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Sample records for alignment control system

  1. Nova laser alignment control system

    SciTech Connect

    Van Arsdall, P.J.; Holloway, F.W.; McGuigan, D.L.; Shelton, R.T.

    1984-03-29

    Alignment of the Nova laser requires control of hundreds of optical components in the ten beam paths. Extensive application of computer technology makes daily alignment practical. The control system is designed in a manner which provides both centralized and local manual operator controls integrated with automatic closed loop alignment. Menudriven operator consoles using high resolution color graphics displays overlaid with transport touch panels allow laser personnel to interact efficiently with the computer system. Automatic alignment is accomplished by using image analysis techniques to determine beam references points from video images acquired along the laser chain. A major goal of the design is to contribute substantially to rapid experimental turnaround and consistent alignment results. This paper describes the computer-based control structure and the software methods developed for aligning this large laser system.

  2. Alignment control optical-electronic system with duplex retroreflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleshchenok, Maksim A.; Anisimov, Andrey G.; Lashmanov, Oleg U.; Timofeev, Alexandr N.; Korotaev, Valery V.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we consider the influence of various factors and interference invariant transformations measuring information on autoreflection schemes alignment control. Theoretical and experimental studies of an error for biprizm scheme. Shown that the main influencing factors are non-linear transformations in optical systems and the impact of the air path. Experimental studies were conducted based on two alignment control opto- electronic systems in which the control element (CE) is configured as one or two corner-cube retroreflectors.

  3. Optical tools and techniques for aligning solar payloads with the SPARCS control system. [Solar Pointing Aerobee Rocket Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, N. L.; Chisel, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The success of a rocket-borne experiment depends not only on the pointing of the attitude control system, but on the alignment of the attitude control system to the payload. To ensure proper alignment, special optical tools and alignment techniques are required. Those that were used in the SPARCS program are described and discussed herein. These tools include theodolites, autocollimators, a 38-cm diameter solar simulator, a high-performance 1-m heliostat to provide a stable solar source during the integration of the rocket payload, a portable 75-cm sun tracker for use at the launch site, and an innovation called the Solar Alignment Prism. Using the real sun as the primary reference under field conditions, the Solar Alignment Prism facilitates the coalignment of the attitude sun sensor with the payload. The alignment techniques were developed to ensure the precise alignment of the solar payloads to the SPARCS attitude sensors during payload integration and to verify the required alignment under field conditions just prior to launch.

  4. Optical tools and techniques for aligning solar payloads with the SPARCS control system. [Solar Pointing Aerobee Rocket Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, N. L.; Chisel, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The success of a rocket-borne experiment depends not only on the pointing of the attitude control system, but on the alignment of the attitude control system to the payload. To ensure proper alignment, special optical tools and alignment techniques are required. Those that were used in the SPARCS program are described and discussed herein. These tools include theodolites, autocollimators, a 38-cm diameter solar simulator, a high-performance 1-m heliostat to provide a stable solar source during the integration of the rocket payload, a portable 75-cm sun tracker for use at the launch site, and an innovation called the Solar Alignment Prism. Using the real sun as the primary reference under field conditions, the Solar Alignment Prism facilitates the coalignment of the attitude sun sensor with the payload. The alignment techniques were developed to ensure the precise alignment of the solar payloads to the SPARCS attitude sensors during payload integration and to verify the required alignment under field conditions just prior to launch.

  5. Active alignment and vibration control system for a large airborne optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienholz, David A.

    2000-04-01

    Airborne optical or electro-optical systems may be too large for all elements to be mounted on a single integrating structure, other than the aircraft fuselage itself. An active system must then be used to maintain the required alignment between elements. However the various smaller integrating structures (benches) must still be isolated from high- frequency airframe disturbances that could excite resonances outside the bandwidth of the alignment control system. The combined active alignment and vibration isolation functions must be performed by flight-weight components, which may have to operate in vacuum. A testbed system developed for the Air Force Airborne Laser program is described. The payload, a full-scale 1650-lb simulated bench, is mounted in six degrees- of-freedom to a vibrating platform by a set of isolator- actuators. The mounts utilize a combination of pneumatics and magnetics to perform the dual functions of low-frequency alignment and high-frequency isolation. Test results are given and future directions for development are described.

  6. Micro-vision servo control of a multi-axis alignment system for optical fiber assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weihai; Yu, Fei; Qu, Jianliang; Chen, Wenjie; Zhang, Jianbin

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes a novel optical fiber assembly system featuring a multi-axis alignment function based on micro-vision feedback control. It consists of an active parallel alignment mechanism, a passive compensation mechanism, a micro-gripper and a micro-vision servo control system. The active parallel alignment part is a parallelogram-based design with remote-center-of-motion (RCM) function to achieve precise rotation without fatal lateral motion. The passive mechanism, with five degrees of freedom (5-DOF), is used to implement passive compensation for multi-axis errors. A specially designed 1-DOF micro-gripper mounted onto the active parallel alignment platform is adopted to grasp and rotate the optical fiber. A micro-vision system equipped with two charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras is introduced to observe the small field of view and obtain multi-axis errors for servo feedback control. The two CCD cameras are installed in an orthogonal arrangement—thus the errors can be easily measured via the captured images. Meanwhile, a series of tracking and measurement algorithms based on specific features of the target objects are developed. Details of the force and displacement sensor information acquisition in the assembly experiment are also provided. An experiment demonstrates the validity of the proposed visual algorithm by achieving the task of eliminating errors and inserting an optical fiber to the U-groove accurately.

  7. Development of a Digital Control for the Phase Contrast Imaging Alignment Feedback System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, M.; Marinoni, A.; Rost, J. C.; Davis, E. M.; Porkolab, M.

    2016-10-01

    The Phase Contrast Imaging diagnostic is an internal reference interferometer that images density fluctuations on a 32-element linear detector array. Since proper operation of the system requires accurate alignment of a CO2 laser beam on a phase plate, beam motion due to vibrations of the DIII-D vessel need to be compensated up to 1 kHz. The feedback network controlling the steering mirrors currently uses a linear analog controller, but a digital controller can provide improved stability performance and flexibility. A prototype was developed using an Arduino Due, a low-cost microcontroller, to assess performance capabilities. Digital control parameters will be developed based on the measured frequency and phase response of the physical components. Finally, testing of the digital feedback system and the required revisions will be done to achieve successful performance. This upgrade to the linear analog controller is expected to be used routinely on similar diagnostics in fusion devices, especially in view of restricted access to the machine hall. Work supported in part by the US Department of Energy under DE-FG02-94ER54235, DE-FC02-04ER54698, and the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI).

  8. Antares beam-alignment-system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Appert, Q.D.; Bender, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    The beam alignment system for the 24-beam-sector Antares CO/sub 2/ fusion laser automatically aligns more than 200 optical elements. A visible-wavelength alignment technique is employed which uses a telescope/TV system to view point-light sources appropriately located down the beamline. The centroids of the light spots are determined by a video tracker, which generates error signals used by the computer control system to move appropriate mirrors in a closed-loop system. Final touch-up alignment is accomplished by projecting a CO/sub 2/ alignment laser beam through the system and sensing its position at the target location. The techniques and control algorithms employed have resulted in alignment accuracies exceeding design requirements. By employing video processing to determine the centroids of diffraction images and by averaging over multiple TV frames, we achieve alignment accuracies better than 0.1 times system diffraction limits in the presence of air turbulence.

  9. Self-propelled in-tube shuttle and control system for automated measurements of magnetic field alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroski, W. N.; Nicol, T. H.; Pidcoe, S. V.; Zink, R. A.

    1990-03-01

    A magnetic field alignment gauge is used to measure the field angle as a function of axial position in each of the magnets for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). Present measurements are made by manually pushing the gauge through the magnet bore tube and stopping at intervals to record field measurements. Gauge location is controlled through graduation marks and alignment pins on the push rods. Field measurements are recorded on a logging multimeter with tape output. Described is a computerized control system being developed to replace the manual procedure for field alignment measurements. The automated system employs a pneumatic walking device to move the measurement gauge through the bore tube. Movement of the device, called the Self-Propelled In-Tube Shuttle (SPITS), is accomplished through an integral, gas driven, double-acting cylinder. The motion of the SPITS is transferred to the bore tube by means of a pair of controlled, retractable support feet. Control of the SPITS is accomplished through an RS-422 interface from an IBM-compatible computer to a series of solenoid-actuated air valves. Direction of SPITS travel is determined by the air-valve sequence, and is managed through the control software. Precise axial position of the gauge within the magnet is returned to the control system through an optically-encoded digital position transducer attached to the shuttle. Discussed is the performance of the transport device and control system during preliminary testing of the first prototype shuttle.

  10. Laser-Beam-Alignment Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasowski, M. J.; Dickens, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    In laser-beam-alignment controller, images from video camera compared to reference patterns by fuzzy-logic pattern comparator. Results processed by fuzzy-logic microcontroller, which sends control signals to motor driver adjusting lens and pinhole in spatial filter.

  11. Alignment issues, correlation techniques and their assessment for a visible light imaging-based 3D printer quality control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    Quality control is critical to manufacturing. Frequently, techniques are used to define object conformity bounds, based on historical quality data. This paper considers techniques for bespoke and small batch jobs that are not statistical model based. These techniques also serve jobs where 100% validation is needed due to the mission or safety critical nature of particular parts. One issue with this type of system is alignment discrepancies between the generated model and the physical part. This paper discusses and evaluates techniques for characterizing and correcting alignment issues between the projected and perceived data sets to prevent errors attributable to misalignment.

  12. Autonomous monitoring of control hardware to predict off-normal conditions using NIF automatic Alignment Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Awwal, A; Wilhelmsen, K; Leach, R; Kamm, V M; Burkhart, S; Lowe-Webb, R; Cohen, S

    2011-07-20

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high power laser system capable of supporting high-energy-density experimentation as a user facility for the next 30 years. In order to maximize the facility availability, preventive maintenance enhancements are being introduced into the system. An example of such an enhancement is a camera-based health monitoring system, integrated into the automated alignment system, which provides an opportunity to monitor trends in measurements such as average beam intensity, size of the beam, and pixel saturation. The monitoring system will generate alerts based on observed trends in measurements to allow scheduled pro-active maintenance before routine off-normal detection stops system operations requiring unscheduled intervention.

  13. Improved docking alignment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, Leo G. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Improved techniques are provided for the alignment of two objects. The present invention is particularly suited for 3-D translation and 3-D rotational alignment of objects in outer space. A camera is affixed to one object, such as a remote manipulator arm of the spacecraft, while the planar reflective surface is affixed to the other object, such as a grapple fixture. A monitor displays in real-time images from the camera such that the monitor displays both the reflected image of the camera and visible marking on the planar reflective surface when the objects are in proper alignment. The monitor may thus be viewed by the operator and the arm manipulated so that the reflective surface is perpendicular to the optical axis of the camera, the roll of the reflective surface is at a selected angle with respect to the camera, and the camera is spaced a pre-selected distance from the reflective surface.

  14. Well-pump alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1998-01-01

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping.

  15. Docking alignment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, Leo G. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Improved techniques are provided for alignment of two objects. The present invention is particularly suited for three-dimensional translation and three-dimensional rotational alignment of objects in outer space. A camera 18 is fixedly mounted to one object, such as a remote manipulator arm 10 of the spacecraft, while the planar reflective surface 30 is fixed to the other object, such as a grapple fixture 20. A monitor 50 displays in real-time images from the camera, such that the monitor displays both the reflected image of the camera and visible markings on the planar reflective surface when the objects are in proper alignment. The monitor may thus be viewed by the operator and the arm 10 manipulated so that the reflective surface is perpendicular to the optical axis of the camera, the roll of the reflective surface is at a selected angle with respect to the camera, and the camera is spaced a pre-selected distance from the reflective surface.

  16. Gauging Item Alignment through Online Systems While Controlling for Rater Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Daniel; Irvin, Shawn; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald A.

    2015-01-01

    The alignment of test items to content standards is critical to the validity of decisions made from standards-based tests. Generally, alignment is determined based on judgments made by a panel of content experts with either ratings averaged or via a consensus reached through discussion. When the pool of items to be reviewed is large, or the…

  17. Gauging Item Alignment through Online Systems While Controlling for Rater Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Daniel; Irvin, Shawn; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald A.

    2015-01-01

    The alignment of test items to content standards is critical to the validity of decisions made from standards-based tests. Generally, alignment is determined based on judgments made by a panel of content experts with either ratings averaged or via a consensus reached through discussion. When the pool of items to be reviewed is large, or the…

  18. Novel 3-axis optical fiber alignment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas-Almaguer, S.; Guajardo-Gonzalez, Candelario; Betancourt-Ibarra, Francisco; Martinez-Hernandez, Carlos; Selvas, Romeo

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a 3-Axis enhanced alignment system for optical fiber. The arrangement uses in one of its axis a vision recognition system which employs Canny edge detector and Phase correlation. The other two-axis are aligned by controlling a couple stepper motors through displacement algorithms. The setup uses a commercial multimodal transmitter and receiver, multimode fiber, a digital microscope, three stepping motors and software. This automatic system takes an alignment time of 20 seconds and up to 70% of coupling power efficiency.

  19. Visual attitude orientation and alignment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beam, R. A.; Morris, D. B.

    1967-01-01

    Active vehicle optical alignment aid and a passive vehicle three-dimensional alignment target ensure proper orientation and alignment plus control of the closure range and rate between two bodies, one in controlled motion and one at rest.

  20. Well-pump alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1998-10-20

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

  1. Mask alignment system for semiconductor processing

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Aaron P.; Carlson, Charles T.; Weaver, William T.; Grant, Christopher N.

    2017-02-14

    A mask alignment system for providing precise and repeatable alignment between ion implantation masks and workpieces. The system includes a mask frame having a plurality of ion implantation masks loosely connected thereto. The mask frame is provided with a plurality of frame alignment cavities, and each mask is provided with a plurality of mask alignment cavities. The system further includes a platen for holding workpieces. The platen may be provided with a plurality of mask alignment pins and frame alignment pins configured to engage the mask alignment cavities and frame alignment cavities, respectively. The mask frame can be lowered onto the platen, with the frame alignment cavities moving into registration with the frame alignment pins to provide rough alignment between the masks and workpieces. The mask alignment cavities are then moved into registration with the mask alignment pins, thereby shifting each individual mask into precise alignment with a respective workpiece.

  2. National Ignition Facility system alignment.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, S C; Bliss, E; Di Nicola, P; Kalantar, D; Lowe-Webb, R; McCarville, T; Nelson, D; Salmon, T; Schindler, T; Villanueva, J; Wilhelmsen, K

    2011-03-10

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest optical instrument, comprising 192 37 cm square beams, each generating up to 9.6 kJ of 351 nm laser light in a 20 ns beam precisely tailored in time and spectrum. The Facility houses a massive (10 m diameter) target chamber within which the beams converge onto an ∼1 cm size target for the purpose of creating the conditions needed for deuterium/tritium nuclear fusion in a laboratory setting. A formidable challenge was building NIF to the precise requirements for beam propagation, commissioning the beam lines, and engineering systems to reliably and safely align 192 beams within the confines of a multihour shot cycle. Designing the facility to minimize drift and vibration, placing the optical components in their design locations, commissioning beam alignment, and performing precise system alignment are the key alignment accomplishments over the decade of work described herein. The design and positioning phases placed more than 3000 large (2.5 m×2 m×1 m) line-replaceable optics assemblies to within ±1 mm of design requirement. The commissioning and alignment phases validated clear apertures (no clipping) for all beam lines, and demonstrated automated laser alignment within 10 min and alignment to target chamber center within 44 min. Pointing validation system shots to flat gold-plated x-ray emitting targets showed NIF met its design requirement of ±50 μm rms beam pointing to target chamber. Finally, this paper describes the major alignment challenges faced by the NIF Project from inception to present, and how these challenges were met and solved by the NIF design and commissioning teams.

  3. Self-Aligning Optical Measurement Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses how to teach a system of neural networks to respond to the alignment clues used by a human operator in performing routine, initial alignments. A paradigm is proposed for automating the alignment of the components of optical measurement systems. The paradigm which was tested on a spatial filter has proved to be successful for optical alignment.

  4. Conception and design of a control and monitoring system for the mirror alignment of the CBM RICH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendarouach, J.

    2016-08-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) complex will investigate the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at high baryon density and moderate temperatures created in A+A collisions. For the SIS100 accelerator, the foreseen beam energy will range up to 11 AGeV for the heaviest nuclei. One of the key detector components required for the CBM physics program is the Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector, which is developed for efficient and clean electron identification and pion suppression. An important aspect to guarantee a stable operation of the RICH detector is the alignment of the mirrors. A qualitative alignment control procedure for the mirror system has been implemented in the CBM RICH prototype detector and tested under real conditions at the CERN PS/T9 beamline. Collected data and results of image processing are reviewed and discussed. In parallel a quantitative method using recorded data has also been employed to compute mirror displacements of the RICH mirrors. Results based on simulated events and the limits of the method are presented and discussed as well. If mirror misalignment is detected, it can be subsequently included and rectified by correction routines. A first correction routine is presented and a comparison between misaligned, corrected and ideal geometries is shown.

  5. Magnetic alignment and the Poisson alignment reference system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, L. V.; Schenz, R. F.; Sommargren, G. E.

    1990-08-01

    Three distinct metrological operations are necessary to align a free-electron laser (FEL): the magnetic axis must be located, a straight line reference (SLR) must be generated, and the magnetic axis must be related to the SLR. This article begins with a review of the motivation for developing an alignment system that will assure better than 100-μm accuracy in the alignment of the magnetic axis throughout an FEL. The 100-μm accuracy is an error circle about an ideal axis for 300 m or more. The article describes techniques for identifying the magnetic axes of solenoids, quadrupoles, and wiggler poles. Propagation of a laser beam is described to the extent of revealing sources of nonlinearity in the beam. Development of a straight-line reference based on the Poisson line, a diffraction effect, is described in detail. Spheres in a large-diameter laser beam create Poisson lines and thus provide a necessary mechanism for gauging between the magnetic axis and the SLR. Procedures for installing FEL components and calibrating alignment fiducials to the magnetic axes of the components are also described. The Poisson alignment reference system should be accurate to 25 μm over 300 m, which is believed to be a factor-of-4 improvement over earlier techniques. An error budget shows that only 25% of the total budgeted tolerance is used for the alignment reference system, so the remaining tolerances should fall within the allowable range for FEL alignment.

  6. Component alignment and clinical outcome following total knee arthroplasty: a randomised controlled trial comparing an intramedullary alignment system with patient-specific instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Huijbregts, H J T A M; Khan, R J K; Fick, D P; Hall, M J; Punwar, S A; Sorensen, E; Reid, M J; Vedove, S Dalle; Haebich, S

    2016-08-01

    We conducted a randomised controlled trial to assess the accuracy of positioning and alignment of the components in total knee arthroplasty (TKA), comparing those undertaken using standard intramedullary cutting jigs and those with patient-specific instruments (PSI). There were 64 TKAs in the standard group and 69 in the PSI group. The post-operative hip-knee-ankle (HKA) angle and positioning was investigated using CT scans. Deviation of > 3° from the planned position was regarded as an outlier. The operating time, Oxford Knee Scores (OKS) and Short Form-12 (SF-12) scores were recorded. There were 14 HKA-angle outliers (22%) in the standard group and nine (13%) in the PSI group (p = 0.251). The mean HKA-angle was 0.5° varus in the standard group and 0.2° varus in the PSI group (p = 0.492). The accuracy of alignment in the coronal and axial planes and the proportion of outliers was not different in the two groups. The femoral component was more flexed (p = 0.035) and there were significantly more tibial slope outliers (29% versus 13%) in the PSI group (p = 0.032). Operating time and the median three-month OKS were similar (p = 0.218 and p = 0.472, respectively). Physical and mental SF-12 scores were not significantly different at three months (p = 0.418 and p = 0.267, respectively) or at one year post-operatively (p = 0.114 and p = 0.569). The median one-year Oxford knee score was two points higher in the PSI group (p = 0.049). Compared with standard intramedullary jigs, the use of PSI did not significantly reduce the number of outliers or the mean operating time, nor did it clinically improve the accuracy of alignment or the median Oxford Knee Scores. Our data do not support the routine use of PSI when undertaking TKA. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1043-9. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  7. Magnetic axis alignment and the Poisson alignment reference system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Lee V.; Schenz, Richard F.; Sommargren, Gary E.

    1989-01-01

    Three distinct metrological operations are necessary to align a free-electron laser (FEL): the magnetic axis must be located, a straight line reference (SLR) must be generated, and the magnetic axis must be related to the SLR. This paper begins with a review of the motivation for developing an alignment system that will assure better than 100 micrometer accuracy in the alignment of the magnetic axis throughout an FEL. The paper describes techniques for identifying the magnetic axis of solenoids, quadrupoles, and wiggler poles. Propagation of a laser beam is described to the extent of revealing sources of nonlinearity in the beam. Development and use of the Poisson line, a diffraction effect, is described in detail. Spheres in a large-diameter laser beam create Poisson lines and thus provide a necessary mechanism for gauging between the magnetic axis and the SLR. Procedures for installing FEL components and calibrating alignment fiducials to the magnetic axes of the components are also described. An error budget shows that the Poisson alignment reference system will make it possible to meet the alignment tolerances for an FEL.

  8. Image Alignment and Correlation System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU Of STANDARDS-1963-A 07- 0r MA4 ETL 237 IMAGE ALIGNMENT AND CORRELATION SYSTEM (J[ Y Samuel E./Craig Alan L./Moyer...respect to the reference image. The images are transparencies mounted on light boxes. iii/ . . . . .. , , I Ii / An x- y plotter and a graphics terminal were...terminal which has a storage cathode- ray tube (CRT) or an x- y recorder for "hard copy." The sensor output is scanned in the spatial frequency domain under

  9. Control rod housing alignment and repair method

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, R.C.; Deaver, G.A.; Punches, J.R.; Singleton, G.E.; Erbes, J.G.; Offer, H.P.

    1992-04-07

    This patent describes a method for underwater welding of a control rod drive housing inserted through a stub tube to maintain requisite alignment and elevation of the top of the control rod drive housing to an overlying and corresponding aperture in a core plate as measured by an alignment device which determines the relative elevation and angularity with respect to the aperture. It comprises providing a welding cylinder dependent from the alignment device such that the elevation of the top of the welding cylinder is in a fixed relationship to the alignment device and is gas-proof; pressurizing the welding cylinder with inert welding gas sufficient to maintain the interior of the welding cylinder dry; lowering the welding cylinder through the aperture in the core plate by depending the cylinder with respect to the alignment device, the lowering including lowering through and adjusting the elevation relationship of the welding cylinder to the alignment device such that when the alignment device is in position to measure the elevation and angularity of the new control rod drive housing, the lower distal end of the welding cylinder extends below the upper periphery of the stub where welding is to occur; inserting a new control rod drive housing through the stub tube and positioning the control rod drive housing to a predetermined relationship to the anticipated final position of the control rod drive housing; providing welding implements transversely rotatably mounted interior of the welding cylinder relative to the alignment device such that the welding implements may be accurately positioned for dispensing weldment around the periphery of the top of the stub tube and at the side of the control rod drive housing; measuring the elevation and angularity of the control rod drive housing; and dispensing weldment along the top of the stub tube and at the side of the control rod drive housing.

  10. Free-space optical communication alignment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariola, M.; Petruccione, F.

    2016-10-01

    Optical communication systems in free space require a coarse and fine alignment system to align the receiver and transmitter. In general a coarse alignment is not entirely accurate to transmit the laser beacon in the exact direction of the visible field of the camera. During this process, some algorithms such as the raster, spiral and raster spiral scan algorithm can be used to find the spot of the laser beacon. Applications that require to transmit data in form of polarization signals, such as quantum cryptography, requires a polarisation bases alignment system to transmit and receive the photons. In this paper we present a fine alignment system using a polarised laser beacon. The system proposed was subdivided into a coarse and fine alignment system. The coarse alignment was implemented by using the GPS to acquire the geographical position of the transmitter, receiver and a reference point. The fine alignment was achieved by using a polarised laser beacon from the receiver to the transmitter and a camera located on the transmitter side. The algorithm presented was capable of excluding the background noise. Furthermore the polarisation of the laser beacon was used to align the polarisation bases of the transmitter and the receiver.

  11. The GEM Detector projective alignment simulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, C.R.; Belser, F.C.; Holdener, F.R.; Roeben, M.D.; Paradiso, J.A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Ostapchuk, A.; Pier-Amory, J.

    1993-07-09

    Precision position knowledge (< 25 microns RMS) of the GEM Detector muon system at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) is an important physics requirement necessary to minimize sagitta error in detecting and tracking high energy muons that are deflected by the magnetic field within the GEM Detector. To validate the concept of the sagitta correction function determined by projective alignment of the muon detectors (Cathode Strip Chambers or CSCs), the basis of the proposed GEM alignment scheme, a facility, called the ``Alignment Test Stand`` (ATS), is being constructed. This system simulates the environment that the CSCs and chamber alignment systems are expected to experience in the GEM Detector, albeit without the 0.8 T magnetic field and radiation environment. The ATS experimental program will allow systematic study and characterization of the projective alignment approach, as well as general mechanical engineering of muon chamber mounting concepts, positioning systems and study of the mechanical behavior of the proposed 6 layer CSCs. The ATS will consist of a stable local coordinate system in which mock-ups of muon chambers (i.e., non-working mechanical analogs, representing the three superlayers of a selected barrel and endcap alignment tower) are implemented, together with a sufficient number of alignment monitors to overdetermine the sagitta correction function, providing a self-consistency check. This paper describes the approach to be used for the alignment of the GEM muon system, the design of the ATS, and the experiments to be conducted using the ATS.

  12. Automated interferometric alignment system for paraboloidal mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, L.C.

    1993-09-28

    A method is described for a systematic method of interpreting interference fringes obtained by using a corner cube retroreflector as an alignment aid when aligning a paraboloid to a spherical wavefront. This is applicable to any general case where such alignment is required, but is specifically applicable in the case of aligning an autocollimating test using a diverging beam wavefront. In addition, the method provides information which can be systematically interpreted such that independent information about pitch, yaw and focus errors can be obtained. Thus, the system lends itself readily to automation. Finally, although the method is developed specifically for paraboloids, it can be seen to be applicable to a variety of other aspheric optics when applied in combination with a wavefront corrector that produces a wavefront which, when reflected from the correctly aligned aspheric surface will produce a collimated wavefront like that obtained from the paraboloid when it is correctly aligned to a spherical wavefront. 14 figures.

  13. Partial Automated Alignment and Integration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Gary Wayne (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is a Partial Automated Alignment and Integration System (PAAIS) used to automate the alignment and integration of space vehicle components. A PAAIS includes ground support apparatuses, a track assembly with a plurality of energy-emitting components and an energy-receiving component containing a plurality of energy-receiving surfaces. Communication components and processors allow communication and feedback through PAAIS.

  14. Beam/seam alignment control for electron beam welding

    DOEpatents

    Burkhardt, Jr., James H.; Henry, J. James; Davenport, Clyde M.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a dynamic beam/seam alignment control system for electron beam welds utilizing video apparatus. The system includes automatic control of workpiece illumination, near infrared illumination of the workpiece to limit the range of illumination and camera sensitivity adjustment, curve fitting of seam position data to obtain an accurate measure of beam/seam alignment, and automatic beam detection and calculation of the threshold beam level from the peak beam level of the preceding video line to locate the beam or seam edges.

  15. High-speed optical beam alignment based on a motion control technique for three-dimensional microelectromechanical systems optical switch modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukami, Masato; Yamaguchi, Joji; Nemoto, Naru

    2011-07-01

    For optical axis alignment when light deflection control of a MEMS mirror is done at high speed, we propose a method based on identifying the quadratic surface shape. The method uses information about the optical power monitored when the mirror is inclined to a small angle. It is shown that the search for maximum optical power is possible by using this method. We also designed a control system with a band-stop filter for resonance frequency to decrease residual vibration generated when the mirror is moved at high speed. We confirm that the searchable level of optical power can be improved.

  16. Automated interferometric alignment system for paraboloidal mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, L. Curtis

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for a systematic method of interpreting interference fringes obtained by using a corner cube retroreflector as an alignment aid when aigning a paraboloid to a spherical wavefront. This is applicable to any general case where such alignment is required, but is specifically applicable in the case of aligning an autocollimating test using a diverging beam wavefront. In addition, the method provides information which can be systematically interpreted such that independent information about pitch, yaw and focus errors can be obtained. Thus, the system lends itself readily to automation. Finally, although the method is developed specifically for paraboloids, it can be seen to be applicable to a variety of other aspheric optics when applied in combination with a wavefront corrector that produces a wavefront which, when reflected from the correctly aligned aspheric surface will produce a collimated wavefront like that obtained from the paraboloid when it is correctly aligned to a spherical wavefront.

  17. Controlled production of aligned-nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrones, M.; Grobert, N.; Olivares, J.; Zhang, J. P.; Terrones, H.; Kordatos, K.; Hsu, W. K.; Hare, J. P.; Townsend, P. D.; Prassides, K.; Cheetham, A. K.; Kroto, H. W.; Walton, D. R. M.

    1997-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes might be usefully employed in nanometre-scale engineering and electronics. Electrical conductivity measurements on the bulk material, on individual multi-walled and single-walled nanotubes and on bundles of single-walled nanotubes have revealed that they may behave as metallic, insulating or semiconducting nanowires, depending on the method of production-which controls the degree of graphitization, the helicity and the diameter. Measurements of Young's modulus show that single nanotubes are stiffer than commercial carbon fibres. Methods commonly used to generate nanotubes-carbon-arc discharge techniques, catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbons and condensed-phase electrolysis-generally suffer from the drawbacks that polyhedral particles are also formed and that the dimensions of the nanotubes are highly variable. Here we describe a method for generating aligned carbon nanotubes by pyrolysis of 2-amino-4,6-dichloro-s-triazine over thin films of a cobalt catalyst patterned on a silica substrate by laser etching. The use of a patterned catalyst apparently encourages the formation of aligned nanotubes. The method offers control over length (up to about 50μm) and fairly uniform diameters (30-50nm), as well as producing nanotubes in high yield, uncontaminated by polyhedral particles.

  18. Pupil Alignment Measuring Technique and Alignment Reference for Instruments or Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John G.

    2010-01-01

    A technique was created to measure the pupil alignment of instruments in situ by measuring calibrated pupil alignment references (PARs) in instruments. The PAR can also be measured using an alignment telescope or an imaging system. PAR allows the verification of the science instrument (SI) pupil alignment at the integrated science instrument module (ISIM) level of assembly at ambient and cryogenic operating temperature. This will allow verification of the ISIM+SI alignment, and provide feedback to realign the SI if necessary.

  19. Controlling band alignments by artificial interface dipoles at perovskite heterointerfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Yajima, Takeaki; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Minohara, Makoto; Bell, Christopher; Mundy, Julia A.; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Muller, David A.; Kumigashira, Hiroshi; Oshima, Masaharu; Hwang, Harold Y.

    2015-04-07

    The concept ‘the interface is the device' is embodied in a wide variety of interfacial electronic phenomena and associated applications in oxide materials, ranging from catalysts and clean energy systems to emerging multifunctional devices. Many device properties are defined by the band alignment, which is often influenced by interface dipoles. On the other hand, the ability to purposefully create and control interface dipoles is a relatively unexplored degree of freedom for perovskite oxides, which should be particularly effective for such ionic materials. Here we demonstrate tuning the band alignment in perovskite metal-semiconductor heterojunctions over a broad range of 1.7 eV. This is achieved by the insertion of positive or negative charges at the interface, and the resultant dipole formed by the induced screening charge. This approach can be broadly used in applications where decoupling the band alignment from the constituent work functions and electron affinities can enhance device functionality.

  20. Active alignment/contact verification system

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, William M.

    2000-01-01

    A system involving an active (i.e. electrical) technique for the verification of: 1) close tolerance mechanical alignment between two component, and 2) electrical contact between mating through an elastomeric interface. For example, the two components may be an alumina carrier and a printed circuit board, two mating parts that are extremely small, high density parts and require alignment within a fraction of a mil, as well as a specified interface point of engagement between the parts. The system comprises pairs of conductive structures defined in the surfaces layers of the alumina carrier and the printed circuit board, for example. The first pair of conductive structures relate to item (1) above and permit alignment verification between mating parts. The second pair of conductive structures relate to item (2) above and permit verification of electrical contact between mating parts.

  1. Automated alignment method for coherence-controlled holographic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostal, Zbynek; Slaby, Tomas; Kvasnica, Lukas; Lostak, Martin; Krizova, Aneta; Chmelik, Radim

    2015-11-01

    A coherence-controlled holographic microscope (CCHM) was developed particularly for quantitative phase imaging and measurement of live cell dynamics, which is the proper subject of digital holographic microscopy (DHM). CCHM in low-coherence mode extends DHM in the study of living cells. However, this advantage is compensated by sensitivity of the system to easily become misaligned, which is a serious hindrance to wanted performance. Therefore, it became clear that introduction of a self-correcting system is inevitable. Accordingly, we had to devise a theory of a suitable control and design an automated alignment system for CCHM. The modulus of the reconstructed holographic signal was identified as a significant variable for guiding the alignment procedures. From this, we derived the original basic realignment three-dimensional algorithm, which encompasses a unique set of procedures for automated alignment that contains processes for initial and advanced alignment as well as long-term maintenance of microscope tuning. All of these procedures were applied to a functioning microscope and the tested processes were successfully validated. Finally, in such a way, CCHM is enabled to substantially contribute to study of biology, particularly of cancer cells in vitro.

  2. Vacuum mechatronic laser alignment system on the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Holliday, M.; Wong, K.; Shelton, R.

    1991-11-01

    The experiments conducted on NOVA are done to investigate inertially confined laser fusion reactions. To this end, the ten beams of the laser are aligned to within 30mm. The target chamber employs a vacuum mechatronic based reticle/target positioning system to accomplish this. It is a five degree-of-freedom chamber resident system, known as the Alignment Aids Positioner or AAP. The AAP aids in beam and diagnostic alignment by accurately positioning a reticle at target chamber center to with 7mm. The AAP system increases target positioning and alignment flexibility and accuracy through the use of a computer controlled multi degree-of-freedom stage assembly. This device uses microstepping DC stepper motors with encoders to achieve closed loop control in a 10{sup {minus}6} torr vacuum. The AAP has two positioning regimes to move the alignment reticle and do beam alignment. One is course positioning in the Y-Z plane that moves a high resolution stage assembly to target chamber center. The other regime is high resolution movement in the X,Y,Z and q directions. 5 refs., 9 figs.

  3. National Ignition Facility sub-system design requirements automatic alignment system SSDR 1.5.5

    SciTech Connect

    VanArsdall, P.; Bliss, E.

    1996-09-01

    This System Design Requirement document establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Automatic Alignment System, which is part of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS).

  4. Implementation of two-state alignment system into CXrL aligner (Poster Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guan-Jye; Bodoh, D.; Wallace, John P.; Anderson, Paul D.; Reilly, Michael T.; Nachman, Ramez; Cerrina, Franco

    1992-07-01

    We describe the implementation of the two-state alignment system into the CXrL aligner, which is developed at our Center for X-ray Lithography. The CXrL aligner is designed to expose sub 0.25 μm feature size integrated circuits. The aligner consists of a three-axes two-state alignment system for alignment error detection and a piezo based precision mechanical stage for alignment error correction. The wafer is held by a precision vacuum chuck, while the mask is held by three vacuum suction cups located around the glass ring. In the prototype, the mask to wafer relative positioning is achieved by 3 motorized stages (for gap setting) and 3 piezo-actuators (for lateral alignment). Since the optical system is designed to be located outside of the synchrotron radiation path, alignment can be performed during exposure. We present the results of the alignment system performance, such as noise equivalent displacement and alignment signal response time. An alignment signal repeatibility of much better than 3σ = 0.07μm is achieved. We also briefly describe the future evaluation of the system, such as overlay measurement of the system using verniers and SEM inspection of some specially designed patterns.

  5. Evryscope Robotilter automated camera / ccd alignment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratzloff, Jeff K.; Law, Nicholas M.; Fors, Octavi; Ser, Daniel d.; Corbett, Henry T.

    2016-08-01

    We have deployed a new class of telescope, the Evryscope, which opens a new parameter space in optical astronomy - the ability to detect short time scale events across the entire sky simultaneously. The system is a gigapixel-scale array camera with an 8000 sq. deg. field of view, 13 arcsec per pixel sampling, and the ability to detect objects brighter than g = 16 in each 2-minute exposure. The Evryscope is designed to find transiting exoplanets around exotic stars, as well as detect nearby supernovae and provide continuous records of distant relativistic explosions like gamma-ray-bursts. The Evryscope uses commercially available CCDs and optics; the machine and assembly tolerances inherent in the mass production of these parts introduce problematic variations in the lens / CCD alignment which degrades image quality. We have built an automated alignment system (Robotilters) to solve this challenge. In this paper we describe the Robotilter system, mechanical and software design, image quality improvement, and current status.

  6. Experience report with the Alignment Diagnostic System

    SciTech Connect

    Gassner, Georg; /SLAC

    2011-03-03

    Since 2009 an Alignment Diagnostic System (ADS) has been operating at the undulator of the new Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The undulator spans a distance of 132 meters and is structured into 33 segments. Each segment is equipped with four hydrostatic leveling sensors and four wire position monitors. This report describes the set up and reflects the experience gained with the ADS.

  7. Study of a module alignment measuring system for UARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    An alignment measurement system (AMS) which precisely determines the boresights pointing directions of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) instruments relative to the UARS attitude control system (ACS) was studied. The technology used in on the MAGSAT mission was considered. The AMS optical, mechanical, thermal and electrical system properties were defined. The AMS is constrained to interface with the UARS instrument module and spacecraft layout.

  8. Portable weighing system with alignment features

    DOEpatents

    Abercrombie, Robert Knox; Richardson, Gregory David; Scudiere, Matthew Bligh; Sheldon, Frederick T.

    2012-11-06

    A system for weighing a load is disclosed. The weighing system includes a pad having at least one transducer for weighing a load disposed on the pad. In some embodiments the pad has a plurality of foot members and the weighing system may include a plate that disposed underneath the pad for receiving the plurality of foot member and for aligning the foot members when the weighing system is installed. The weighing system may include a spacer disposed adjacent the pad and in some embodiments, a spacer anchor operatively secures the spacer to a support surface, such as a plate, a railway bed, or a roadway. In some embodiments the spacer anchor operatively secures both the spacer and the pad to a roadway.

  9. Feedback control of flow alignment in sheared liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Strehober, David A; Schöll, Eckehard; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2013-12-01

    Based on a continuum theory, we investigate the manipulation of the nonequilibrium behavior of a sheared liquid crystal via closed-loop feedback control. Our goal is to stabilize a specific dynamical state, that is, the stationary "flow alignment," under conditions where the uncontrolled system displays oscillatory director dynamics with in-plane symmetry. To this end we employ time-delayed feedback control (TDFC), where the equation of motion for the ith component q(i)(t) of the order parameter tensor is supplemented by a control term involving the difference q(i)(t)-q(i)(t-τ). In this diagonal scheme, τ is the delay time. We demonstrate that the TDFC method successfully stabilizes flow alignment for suitable values of the control strength K and τ; these values are determined by solving an exact eigenvalue equation. Moreover, our results show that only small values of K are needed when the system is sheared from an isotropic equilibrium state, contrary to the case where the equilibrium state is nematic.

  10. Alignment control study for the solar optical telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of the alignment and focus errors than can be tolerated, methods of sensing such errors, and mechanisms to make the necessary corrections were addressed. Alternate approaches and their relative merits were considered. The results of this study indicate that adequate alignment control can be achieved.

  11. Optical alignment of Centaur's inertial guidance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordan, Andrew L.

    1987-01-01

    During Centaur launch operations the launch azimuth of the inertial platform's U-accelerometer input axis must be accurately established and maintained. This is accomplished by using an optically closed loop system with a long-range autotheodolite whose line of sight was established by a first-order survey. A collimated light beam from the autotheodolite intercepts a reflecting Porro prism mounted on the platform azimuth gimbal. Thus, any deviation of the Porro prism from its predetermined heading is optically detected by the autotheodolite. The error signal produced is used to torque the azimuth gimbal back to its required launch azimuth. The heading of the U-accelerometer input axis is therefore maintained automatically. Previously, the autotheodolite system could not distinguish between vehicle sway and rotational motion of the inertial platform unless at least three prisms were used. One prism was mounted on the inertial platform to maintain azimuth alignment, and two prisms were mounted externally on the vehicle to track sway. For example, the automatic azimuth-laying theodolite (AALT-SV-M2) on the Saturn vehilce used three prisms. The results of testing and modifying the AALT-SV-M2 autotheodolite to simultaneously monitor and maintain alignment of the inertial platform and track the sway of the vehicle from a single Porro prism.

  12. Controlling band alignments by artificial interface dipoles at perovskite heterointerfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Yajima, Takeaki; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Minohara, Makoto; ...

    2015-04-07

    The concept ‘the interface is the device' is embodied in a wide variety of interfacial electronic phenomena and associated applications in oxide materials, ranging from catalysts and clean energy systems to emerging multifunctional devices. Many device properties are defined by the band alignment, which is often influenced by interface dipoles. On the other hand, the ability to purposefully create and control interface dipoles is a relatively unexplored degree of freedom for perovskite oxides, which should be particularly effective for such ionic materials. Here we demonstrate tuning the band alignment in perovskite metal-semiconductor heterojunctions over a broad range of 1.7 eV.more » This is achieved by the insertion of positive or negative charges at the interface, and the resultant dipole formed by the induced screening charge. This approach can be broadly used in applications where decoupling the band alignment from the constituent work functions and electron affinities can enhance device functionality.« less

  13. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the . substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carver liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to The CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  14. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Patry, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carrier liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to the CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  15. Automatic spreader-container alignment system using infrared structured lights.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Wang, Yibo; Lv, Jimin; Zhang, Maojun

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a computer-vision system to assist reach stackers to automatically align the spreader with the target container. By analyzing infrared lines on the top of the container, the proposed system is able to calculate the relative position between the spreader and the container. The invisible structured lights are equipped in this system to enable all-weather operation, which can avoid environmental factors such as shadows and differences in climate. Additionally, the lateral inclination of the spreader is taken into consideration to offer a more accurate alignment than other competing systems. Estimation errors are reduced through approaches including power series and linear regression. The accuracy can be controlled within 2 cm or 2 deg, which meets the requirements of reach stackers' operation.

  16. NIF pointing and centering systems and target alignment using a 351 nm laser source

    SciTech Connect

    Boege, S.J.; Bliss, E.S.; Chocol, C.J.; Holdener, F.R.; Miller, J.L.; Toeppen, J.S.; Vann, C.S.; Zacharias, R.A.

    1996-10-01

    The operational requirements of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) place tight constraints upon its alignment system. In general, the alignment system must establish and maintain the correct relationships between beam position, beam angle, laser component clear apertures, and the target. At the target, this includes adjustment of beam focus to obtain the correct spot size. This must be accomplished for all beamlines in a time consistent with planned shot rates and yet, in the front end and main laser, beam control functions cannot be initiated until the amplifiers have sufficiently cooled so as to minimize dynamic thermal distortions during and after alignment and wavefront optimization. The scope of the task dictates an automated system that implements parallel processes. We describe reticle choices and other alignment references, insertion of alignment beams, principles of operation of the Chamber Center Reference System 2048 and Target Alignment Sensor, and the anticipated alignment sequence that will occur between shots.

  17. Alignment and diagnostics on the National Ignition Facility laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, E S; Boege, S J; Boyd, B; Demaret, R D; Feldman, M; Gates, A J; Holdener, F R; Hollis, J; Knopp, C F; McCarville, T J; Miller-Kamm; Rivera, W E; Salmon, J T; Severyn, J R; Thompson, C E; V J; Wang, D Y; Zacharias, R A

    1999-07-01

    The NIF laser system will be capable of delivering 1.8MJ of 351nm energy in 192 beams. Diagnostics instruments must measure beam energy, power vs. time, wavefront quality, and beam intensity profile to characterize laser performance. Alignment and beam diagnostics are also used to set the laser up for the high power shots and to isolate problems when performance is less than expected. Alignment and beam diagnostics are multiplexed to keep the costs under control. At the front-end the beam is aligned and diagnosed in an input sensor package. The output 1053nm beam is sampled by collecting a 0.1% reflection from an output beam sampler and directing it to the output sensor package (OSP). The OSP also gets samples from final focus lens reflection and samples from the transport spatial filter pinhole plane. The output 351nm energy is measured by a calorimeter collecting the signal from an off-axis diffractive beam-sampler. Detailed information on the focused beam in the high-energy target focal plane region is gathered in the precision diagnostics. This paper describes the design of the alignment and diagnostics on the NIF laser system.

  18. Automatic alignment technology in high power laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Dai, Wan-jun; Wang, Yuan-cheng; Lian, Bo; Yang, Ying; Yuan, Qiang; Deng, Xue-wei; Zhao, Jun-pu; Zhou, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The high power solid laser system is becoming larger and higher energy that requires the beam automatic alignment faster and higher precision to ensure safety running of laser system and increase the shooting success rate. This paper take SGIII laser facility for instance, introduce the basic principle of automatic alignment of large laser system. The automatic alignment based on digital image processing technology which use the imaging of seven-classes spatial filter pinholes for feedback to working. Practical application indicates that automatic alignment system of cavity mirror in SGIII facility can finish the work in 210 seconds of four bundles and will not exceed 270 seconds of all six bundles. The alignment precision promoted to 2.5% aperture from 8% aperture. The automatic alignment makes it possible for fast and safety running of lager laser system.

  19. Shear alignment of lamellar mesophase systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaju, S. J.; Kumaran, V.

    2015-11-01

    Mixtures of oil, water and surfactants form different microphases. Some of these phases, e.g. lamellar, hexagonal phases, lead to complex rheological behaviour at macroscale due to inherent anisotropy and irregularities in the microstructures. We present a comprehensive simulation study to examine the structure-rheology relationship in lamellar phase flow. At mesoscale, Reynolds number (Re), Schmidt number (Sc), Ericksen number (Er), extent of segregation between hydrophilic and hydrophobic components (r), ratio of viscosity of the two components (Δμ /μ0), and system size to layer width ratio (L / λ) complete the lamellar phase description. We have used lattice Boltzmann simulations to study a two dimensional lamellar phase system of moderate size. The domains and grain boundaries seen at low Sc are replaced by isolated edge dislocations at high Sc. The alignment mechanism does not change with changes in layer bending moduli (Er), viscosity contrast or r. Increasing segregation, increases disorder; this however does not lead to higher resistance to flow. At high Er, the shear tries homogenise the concentration field and disrupt layer formation. We see significantly higher peak viscosity at low Er at high viscosity contrast and due to defect pinning. The authors would like to thank the Department of Science and Technology, Government of India for financial support, and Supercomputer Education and Research Centre at Indian Institute of Science for the computational resources.

  20. Corrective optics space telescope axial replacement alignment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusher, Robert B.; Satter, Michael J.; Kaplan, Michael L.; Martella, Mark A.; Freymiller, Ed D.; Buzzetta, Victor

    1993-10-01

    To facilitate the accurate placement and alignment of the corrective optics space telescope axial replacement (COSTAR) structure, mechanisms, and optics, the COSTAR Alignment System (CAS) has been designed and assembled. It consists of a 20-foot optical bench, support structures for holding and aligning the COSTAR instrument at various stages of assembly, a focal plane target fixture (FPTF) providing an accurate reference to the as-built Hubble Space Telescope (HST) focal plane, two alignment translation stages with interchangeable alignment telescopes and alignment lasers, and a Zygo Mark IV interferometer with a reference sphere custom designed to allow accurate double-pass operation of the COSTAR correction optics. The system is used to align the fixed optical bench (FOB), the track, the deployable optical bench (DOB), the mechanisms, and the optics to ensure that the correction mirrors are all located in the required positions and orientations on-orbit after deployment. In this paper, the layout of the CAS is presented and the various alignment operations are listed along with the relevant alignment requirements. In addition, calibration of the necessary support structure elements and alignment aids is described, including the two-axis translation stages, the latch positions, the FPTF, and the COSTAR-mounted alignment cubes.

  1. Method and system for aligning fibers during electrospinning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Carnell, Lisa A. (Inventor); Stephens, Ralph M (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Rhim, Caroline (Inventor); Niklason, Laura (Inventor); Clark, Robert L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method and system are provided for aligning fibers in an electrospinning process. A jet of a fiberizable material is directed towards an uncharged collector from a dispensing location that is spaced apart from the collector. While the fiberizable material is directed towards the collector, an elliptical electric field is generated via the electrically charged dispenser and an oppositely-charged control location. The field spans between the dispensing location and the control location that is within line-of-sight of the dispensing location, and impinges upon at least a portion of the collector. Various combinations of numbers and geometries of dispensers, collectors, and electrodes can be used.

  2. Field-Aligned Current Systems at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyner, Daniel; Exner, Willi

    2017-04-01

    Mercury exhibits a very dynamic magnetosphere, which is partially due to strong dayside reconnection and fast magnetospheric convection. It has been shown that dayside reconnection occurs even on low magnetic shear angles across the magnetopause. This drives quasi-steady region 1 field-aligned currents (FAC) that are observable in in-situ MESSENGER data. Here, the structure of the Hermean FAC-system is discussed and compared to the terrestrial counterpart. Due to the lack of a significant ionosphere at Mercury, it has to be examined how much of the poloidal FAC is reflected back to the magnetosphere, closed via toroidal currents in the planetary interior or via Pedersen currents in the tenuous exosphere. This investigation gives insights into the planetary conductivity structure as well as the exospheric plasma densities. Furthermore, it will be examined how much the only partially developed ring current at Mercury produces possible region 2 FAC signatures. We conclude with requirements to simulations that are needed to forecast the FAC structure on the southern hemisphere that will be closely studied with the upcoming BepiColombo mission.

  3. Automatic Alignment System for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhlelmsen, K C; Awwal, A S; Ferguson, S W; Horowitz, B; Miller Kamm, V J; Reynolds, C A

    2007-10-04

    The automatic alignment system for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large-scale parallel system that directs all 192 laser beams along the 300-m optical path to a 50-micron focus at target chamber in less than 30 minutes. The system commands 9,000 stepping motors to adjust mirrors and other optics. Twenty-two control loops per beamline request image processing services running on a LINUX cluster to analyze high-resolution images of the beam and references. Process-leveling assures the computational load is evenly spread on the cluster. Algorithms also estimate measurement accuracy and reject off-normal images. One challenge to achieving rapid alignment of beams in parallel is the efficient coordination of shared laser devices, such as sensors that are configurable to monitor multiple beams. Contention for shared resources is managed by the Component Mediation System, which precludes deadlocks and optimizes device motions using a hierarchical component structure. A reservation service provided by the software framework prevents interference from competing instances of automated controls or from the actions of system operators. The design, architecture and performance of the system will be discussed.

  4. Aligned carbon nanotubes: from controlled synthesis to electronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bilu; Wang, Chuan; Liu, Jia; Che, Yuchi; Zhou, Chongwu

    2013-09-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess superior geometrical, electronic, chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties and are very attractive for applications in electronic devices and circuits. To make this a reality, the nanotube orientation, density, diameter, electronic property, and even chirality should be well controlled. This Feature article focuses on recent achievements researchers have made on the controlled growth of horizontally aligned SWNTs and SWNT arrays on substrates and their electronic applications. Principles and strategies to control the morphology, structure, and properties of SWNTs are reviewed in detail. Furthermore, electrical properties of field-effect transistors fabricated on both individual SWNTs and aligned SWNT arrays are discussed. State-of-the-art electronic devices and circuits based on aligned SWNTs and SWNT arrays are also highlighted.

  5. Surface-controlled patterned vertical alignment mode with reactive mesogen.

    PubMed

    Lee, You-Jin; Kim, Young-Ki; Jo, Soo In; Gwag, Jin Seog; Yu, Chang-Jae; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2009-06-08

    We proposed a patterned vertical alignment (PVA) mode controlled by a modified surface with ultraviolet (UV) curable reactive mesogen (RM) mixed with vertical alignment material for a liquid crystal display (LCD) with fast response time. In the surface-controlled PVA (SC-PVA) mode, the RM monomers in the alignment layer are polymerized along the LC directors by UV exposure under an applied voltage. The polymerized RMs produce a pretilt against the substrate normal depending on the applied field direction in the patterned electrode configuration. In such SC-PVA mode, fast response time was achieved at whole grey levels with the predetermined rotational preference of the LC directors governed by the pretilt direction.

  6. A comparative study of two different clear aligner systems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aims to compare the ‘Nuvola®’ system with ‘Fantasmino®’ system, examine their material properties, and define the indications for use of the aligners. Methods Two groups of patients were selected and were respectively treated with Nuvola® aligner and Fantasmino® system. Results The goal of treatment has been achieved with the two systems. Conclusions The two types of aligners have shown differences during the treatment. Fantasmino® system has elastic properties of high performance, but its size does not encourage compliance throughout the day. Nuvola® system determines good tooth movement and its size facilitates the patient’s collaboration. In both aligner systems, difficulties were found in the correction of torque information and rotations. PMID:24934094

  7. Directed Beam Alignment System Testing Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-04

    4 2.1.1 Handover Based on DBAS Alignment ........... 7 2.2 Conceptoal Implementation of DBAS .... ........... 8 3.0 Breadboard...Sequence Timing Diagrams ........... 70 Figure 29. Level Sensor ...... .................. 72 Figure 30. Recommended DBAS Development Schedule ...... .76...D.B.A.S. Sensor Geometric Measurements ..... .32 Table 6. Summary of DBAS Radiometric Measurements . . .. 34 Table 7. R6 Parking Lot Test Summary

  8. Mask-to-wafer alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Tichenor, Daniel A.; Haney, Steven J.

    2003-11-04

    A modified beam splitter that has a hole pattern that is symmetric in one axis and anti-symmetric in the other can be employed in a mask-to-wafer alignment device. The device is particularly suited for rough alignment using visible light. The modified beam splitter transmits and reflects light from a source of electromagnetic radiation and it includes a substrate that has a first surface facing the source of electromagnetic radiation and second surface that is reflective of said electromagnetic radiation. The substrate defines a hole pattern about a central line of the substrate. In operation, an input beam from a camera is directed toward the modified beam splitter and the light from the camera that passes through the holes illuminates the reticle on the wafer. The light beam from the camera also projects an image of a corresponding reticle pattern that is formed on the mask surface of the that is positioned downstream from the camera. Alignment can be accomplished by detecting the radiation that is reflected from the second surface of the modified beam splitter since the reflected radiation contains both the image of the pattern from the mask and a corresponding pattern on the wafer.

  9. Measuring femoral and rotational alignment: EOS system versus computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Folinais, D; Thelen, P; Delin, C; Radier, C; Catonne, Y; Lazennec, J Y

    2013-09-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is currently the reference standard for measuring femoral and tibial rotational alignment. The EOS System is a new biplanar low-dose radiographic device that allows 3-dimensional lower-limb modelling with automated measurements of femoral and tibial rotational alignment (torsion). Femoral and tibial torsion measurements provided by the EOS System are equivalent to those obtained using CT. In a retrospective analysis of 43 lower limbs in 30 patients, three senior radiologists measured femoral and tibial torsion on both CT and EOS images. Agreement between CT and EOS values was assessed by computing Pearson's correlation coefficient and interobserver reproducibility by computing the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Femoral torsion was 13.4° by EOS vs. 13.7° by CT (P=0.5) and tibial torsion was 30.8° by EOS vs. 30.3° by CT (P=0.4). Strong associations were found between EOS and CT values for both femoral torsion (P=0.93) and tibial torsion (P=0.89). With EOS, the ICC was 0.93 for femoral torsion and 0.86 for tibial torsion; corresponding values with CT were 0.90 and 0.92. The EOS system is a valid alternative to CT for lower-limb torsion measurement. EOS imaging allows a comprehensive evaluation in all three planes while substantially decreasing patient radiation exposure. Level III, case-control. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. [New concepts in aligner therapy with the orthocaps system].

    PubMed

    Khan, Wajeeh

    2014-09-01

    Orthodontic tooth movement with aligners poses challenges peculiar to removable appliances. The mechanical limitations of aligners can be overcome, to some extent, by increasing the aligner grip on teeth as well as by choosing elastic materials in their fabrication. Sound planning together with the use of auxiliaries can result in obtaining satisfactory results for the patients who seek an aesthetically pleasing and comfortable alternative to fixed appliance systems. The salient features of the Orthocaps System are the use of elastic thermoplastics, precision scanning, high pressure thermoforming, 3D interactive set-ups for treatment planning and approval, treatment evaluation at regular intervals during treatment and a unique attachment design (friction pads).

  11. A Dynamic Alignment System for the Final Focus Test Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, R.E.; Bressler, V.E.; Fischer, G.; Plouffe, D.; /SLAC

    2005-08-16

    The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) was conceived as a technological stepping stone on the way to the next linear collider. Nowhere is this more evident than with the alignment subsystems. Alignment tolerances for components prior to beam turn are almost an order of magnitude smaller than for previous projects at SLAC. Position monitoring systems which operate independent of the beam are employed to monitor motions of the components locally and globally with unprecedented precision. An overview of the FFTB alignment system is presented herein.

  12. Automated alignment of a reconfigurable optical system using focal-plane sensing and Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Fang, Joyce; Savransky, Dmitry

    2016-08-01

    Automation of alignment tasks can provide improved efficiency and greatly increase the flexibility of an optical system. Current optical systems with automated alignment capabilities are typically designed to include a dedicated wavefront sensor. Here, we demonstrate a self-aligning method for a reconfigurable system using only focal plane images. We define a two lens optical system with 8 degrees of freedom. Images are simulated given misalignment parameters using ZEMAX software. We perform a principal component analysis on the simulated data set to obtain Karhunen-Loève modes, which form the basis set whose weights are the system measurements. A model function, which maps the state to the measurement, is learned using nonlinear least-squares fitting and serves as the measurement function for the nonlinear estimator (extended and unscented Kalman filters) used to calculate control inputs to align the system. We present and discuss simulated and experimental results of the full system in operation.

  13. An industrial quality automatic resonator alignment system for a 20 kW CO 2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akitt, D. R.; Seguin, H. J. J.; Sellathamby, C. V.; Rogozinski, K.

    A limiting feature in high-power laser technology which has surfaced in recent years is alignment instability induced by thermally generated distortions of the optical hardware and phase perturbations of the gain media under elevated power loading. In an effort to ameliorate these problems, a study was initiated to ascertain the feasibility of utilizing a feedback control system both to monitor and align the resonator optics of a multikilowatt laser; thereby actively preserving optimum mode quality. This papers summarizes the results of this project and outlines the basic approach used to construct a controller which accomplishes fully automatic alignment of both mirrors in an unstable resonator for a 20 kW CO 2 machine. A mathematical model of the control system is presented along with a description of the principles of operation. Data are provided to document the major improvement in device performance achievable using this automatic alignment controller concept.

  14. The brass plug monument system for Doubler alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.T.

    1981-09-04

    The system of brass plugs set in the Main Ring tunnel floor for use in radial alignment of Doubler elements is described. Considerations leading to the choice of plug positions and properties are discussed. The quantitative relationship between the plugs and the Doubler orbit is presented in sufficient detail so that they can be used by anybody to align Doubler elements both radially and along the beam. Neither the origin or the accuracy of the system is discussed in detail.

  15. Orthopaedic surgeon-hospital alignment at Geisinger Health System.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Daniel S

    2013-06-01

    There is broad recognition that the healthcare crisis in the United States is going to require a response and change in clinical practice. The management structure of Geisinger Health System is unique, and this has the potential to change the dynamics of surgeon-administration alignment. Our goal is to summarize and clarify the relationship between orthopaedic surgeons and the healthcare system at Geisinger, evaluate the positive and negative aspects, and consider which components may be reproducible. This overview arises from a review of management publications, discussions with orthopaedic attendings and administrators, and personal observations and comparison with my previous 15-year university-based practice. The Geisinger Health System has always been physician-run. The overall efficiency and pragmatic approach found at Geisinger relies heavily on changing surgeon behavior to match what is optimal for the system rather than the individual. This approach appears to bring greater stability and more consistent outcomes, but only by removing what some see as the art of medicine and at the loss of perceived provider autonomy. Despite the rigid demands placed on the surgeon, the system remains adaptable to change and appears to retain faculty at a high rate. The Geisinger System is unique in its ability to control an insurance plan, multiple hospitals, and a large physician group. Through clear protocols and behavioral pressure, it demands surgeon alignment with the system as a whole and in return provides a stable work environment. It is not ideal for all surgeons and it is unclear whether it can be reproduced in a less structured setting.

  16. Self-Aligned Plasmonic Nanopores by Optically Controlled Dielectric Breakdown.

    PubMed

    Pud, Sergii; Verschueren, Daniel; Vukovic, Nikola; Plesa, Calin; Jonsson, Magnus P; Dekker, Cees

    2015-10-14

    We present a novel cost-efficient method for the fabrication of high-quality self-aligned plasmonic nanopores by means of an optically controlled dielectric breakdown. Excitation of a plasmonic bowtie nanoantenna on a dielectric membrane localizes the high-voltage-driven breakdown of the membrane to the hotspot of the enhanced optical field, creating a nanopore that is automatically self-aligned to the plasmonic hotspot of the bowtie. We show that the approach provides precise control over the nanopore size and that these plasmonic nanopores can be used as single molecule DNA sensors with a performance matching that of TEM-drilled nanopores. The principle of optically controlled breakdown can also be used to fabricate nonplasmonic nanopores at a controlled position. Our novel fabrication process guarantees alignment of the nanopore with the optical hotspot of the nanoantenna, thus ensuring that pore-translocating biomolecules interact with the concentrated optical field that can be used for detection and manipulation of analytes.

  17. Chemical control over the energy-level alignment in a two-terminal junction.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li; Franco, Carlos; Crivillers, Núria; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Cao, Liang; Sangeeth, C S Suchand; Rovira, Concepció; Veciana, Jaume; Nijhuis, Christian A

    2016-07-26

    The energy-level alignment of molecular transistors can be controlled by external gating to move molecular orbitals with respect to the Fermi levels of the source and drain electrodes. Two-terminal molecular tunnelling junctions, however, lack a gate electrode and suffer from Fermi-level pinning, making it difficult to control the energy-level alignment of the system. Here we report an enhancement of 2 orders of magnitude of the tunnelling current in a two-terminal junction via chemical molecular orbital control, changing chemically the molecular component between a stable radical and its non-radical form without altering the supramolecular structure of the junction. Our findings demonstrate that the energy-level alignment in self-assembled monolayer-based junctions can be regulated by purely chemical modifications, which seems an attractive alternative to control the electrical properties of two-terminal junctions.

  18. Chemical control over the energy-level alignment in a two-terminal junction

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Li; Franco, Carlos; Crivillers, Núria; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Cao, Liang; Sangeeth, C. S. Suchand; Rovira, Concepció; Veciana, Jaume; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    The energy-level alignment of molecular transistors can be controlled by external gating to move molecular orbitals with respect to the Fermi levels of the source and drain electrodes. Two-terminal molecular tunnelling junctions, however, lack a gate electrode and suffer from Fermi-level pinning, making it difficult to control the energy-level alignment of the system. Here we report an enhancement of 2 orders of magnitude of the tunnelling current in a two-terminal junction via chemical molecular orbital control, changing chemically the molecular component between a stable radical and its non-radical form without altering the supramolecular structure of the junction. Our findings demonstrate that the energy-level alignment in self-assembled monolayer-based junctions can be regulated by purely chemical modifications, which seems an attractive alternative to control the electrical properties of two-terminal junctions. PMID:27456200

  19. Optical alignment and tuning system for the HUST THz-FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xu; Liu, Kaifeng; Qin, Bin; Tan, Ping; Fu, Qiang; Wang, Wei; Pei, Yuanji

    2016-11-01

    A compact FEL oscillator with a radiation wavelength of 30 - 100 μm is proposed by HUST and NSRL. The optical cavity is very sensitive to misalignment errors of the mirror, due to its near-concentric and symmetric structure. The magnetic axis of the undulator, the optical axis of the resonator, and the electron beam propagation axis must all be aligned with high precision for achieving saturated lasing. This paper introduces a high-precision, multi-degree-of-freedom controlled optical alignment system, which has the ability to align in the transverse and longitudinal directions. The alignment tolerances are given by theoretical analysis and numerical simulations with three-dimensional FEL code GENESIS and optical propagation code (OPC). To accomplish optical alignment, two auxiliary HeNe laser systems were introduced. By adjusting the HeNe laser beam spot on the wedge, the optical axis can be aligned to the magnetic axis, and the estimated errors meet the tolerances. Finally, the electron beam will be guided through the hole in the central wedge to complete the transverse alignment. The longitudinal alignment and tuning methods are also described.

  20. Magnetic Control of MOF Crystal Orientation and Alignment.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fei; Marshall, Ellis S; Young, Adam J; Robinson, Peter J; Bouillard, Jean-Sebastien G; Adawi, Ali M; Vermeulen, Nicolaas A; Farha, Omar K; Reithofer, Michael R; Chin, Jia Min

    2017-09-14

    Most MOFs possess anisotropic properties, the full exploitation of which necessitates a general strategy for the controllable orientation of such MOF crystals. Current methods largely rely upon layer-by-layer MOF epitaxy or tuning of MOF crystal growth on appropriate substrates, yielding MOFs with fixed crystal orientations. Here, the dynamic magnetic alignment of different MOF crystals (NH2-MIL-53(Al) and NU-1000) is shown. The MOFs were magnetized by electrostatic adsorption of iron oxide nanoparticles, dispersed in curable polymer resins (Formlabs 1+ clear resin / Sylgard® 184), magnetically oriented and fixed by resin curing. The importance of crystal orientation on MOF functionality was demonstrated whereby magnetically aligned NU-1000/Sylgard® 184 composite was excited with linearly polarized 405 nm light, affording an anisotropic fluorescence response dependent on the polarization angle of the excitation beam relative to NU-1000 crystal orientation. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Controlled growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhaoli

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) is a fascinating material with extraordinary electrical thermal and mechanical properties. Growing vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays on metal substrates is an important step in bringing CNT into practical applications such as thermal interface materials (TIMs) and microelectrodes. However, the growth process is challenging due to the difficulties in preventing catalyst diffusion and controlling catalyst dewetting on metal substrates with physical surface heterogeneity. In this work, the catalyst diffusion mechanism and catalyst dewetting theory were studied for the controlled growth of VACNTs on metal substrates. The diffusion time of the catalyst, the diffusion coefficients for the catalyst in the substrate materials and the number density of catalyst nanoparticles after dewetting are identified as the key parameters, based on which three strategies are developed. Firstly, a fast-heating catalyst pretreatment strategy was used, aiming at preserving the amount of catalyst prior to CNT growth by reducing the catalyst diffusion time. The catalyst lifetime is extended from half an hour to one hour on a patterned Al thin film and a VACNT height of 106 mum, about twenty fold of that reported in the literature, was attained. Secondly, a diffusion barrier layer strategy is employed for a reduction of catalyst diffusion into the substrate materials. Enhancement of VACNT growth on Cu substrates was achieved by adopting a conformal Al2O 3 diffusion barrier layer fabricated by a specially designed atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. Lastly, a novel catalyst glancing angle deposition (GLAD) strategy is performed to manipulate the morphology of a relatively thick catalyst on metal substrates with physical surface heterogeneity, aiming to obtain uniform and dense catalyst nanoparticles after dewetting in the pretreatment process for enhanced VACNT growth. We are able to control the VACNT growth conditions on metal substrates in terms of their

  2. Aligning Task Control with Desire for Control: Implications for Performance

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Alex T.; Etcheverry, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined whether matches between task control and participants' desire for control over their environment lead to better task performance than mismatches. Work control and desire for control were manipulated, and participants engaged in timed tasks. As predicted, performance was higher in cases of match, even when task control and desire for control were low. Task control and desire for control may predict work performance in combination, highlighting the importance of Person-Environment Fit theory for both selection and work design. By manipulating desire for control, our research also explores the potentially state-dependent quality of this individual difference variable. PMID:26045630

  3. Aligning Task Control with Desire for Control: Implications for Performance.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Alex T; Etcheverry, Paul E

    The current study examined whether matches between task control and participants' desire for control over their environment lead to better task performance than mismatches. Work control and desire for control were manipulated, and participants engaged in timed tasks. As predicted, performance was higher in cases of match, even when task control and desire for control were low. Task control and desire for control may predict work performance in combination, highlighting the importance of Person-Environment Fit theory for both selection and work design. By manipulating desire for control, our research also explores the potentially state-dependent quality of this individual difference variable.

  4. 2011 Status of the Automatic Alignment System for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, K; Awwal, A; Burkhart, S; McGuigan, D; Kamm, V M; Leach, R; Lowe-Webb, R; Wilson, R

    2011-07-19

    Automated alignment for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is accomplished using a large-scale parallel control system that directs 192 laser beams along the 300-m optical path. The beams are then focused down to a 50-micron spot in the middle of the target chamber. The entire process is completed in less than 50 minutes. The alignment system commands 9,000 stepping motors for highly accurate adjustment of mirrors and other optics. 41 control loops per beamline perform parallel processing services running on a LINUX cluster to analyze high-resolution images of the beams and their references. This paper describes the status the NIF automatic alignment system and the challenges encountered as NIF development has transitioned from building the laser, to becoming a research project supporting a 24 hour, 7 day laser facility. NIF is now a continuously operated system where performance monitoring is increasingly more critical for operation, maintenance, and commissioning tasks. Equipment wear and the effects of high energy neutrons from fusion experiments are issues which alter alignment efficiency and accuracy. New sensors needing automatic alignment assistance are common. System modifications to improve efficiency and accuracy are prevalent. Handling these evolving alignment and maintenance needs while minimizing the impact on NIF experiment schedule is expected to be an on-going challenge for the planned 30 year operational life of NIF.

  5. Relay telescope for high power laser alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd; Harris, Fritz B.

    2006-09-19

    A laser system includes an optical path having an intracavity relay telescope with a telescope focal point for imaging an output of the gain medium between an image location at or near the gain medium and an image location at or near an output coupler for the laser system. A kinematic mount is provided within a vacuum chamber, and adapted to secure beam baffles near the telescope focal point. An access port on the vacuum chamber is adapted for allowing insertion and removal of the beam baffles. A first baffle formed using an alignment pinhole aperture is used during alignment of the laser system. A second tapered baffle replaces the alignment aperture during operation and acts as a far-field baffle in which off angle beams strike the baffle a grazing angle of incidence, reducing fluence levels at the impact areas.

  6. High resolution Fresnel zone plate laser alignment system

    SciTech Connect

    Bressler, V.E.; Fischer, G.E.; Ruland, R.E.; Wang, T.

    1992-03-01

    The existing Fresnel zone plate laser alignment system is currently being extended and upgraded for the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB). Previously, the resolution of this system has been several tens of micrometers. After the upgrade, the resolution will be a few micrometers. Details of the upgrade as well as simulation and experimental results will be presented.

  7. A simple method to control over-alignment in the MAFFT multiple sequence alignment program.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Kazutaka; Standley, Daron M

    2016-07-01

    We present a new feature of the MAFFT multiple alignment program for suppressing over-alignment (aligning unrelated segments). Conventional MAFFT is highly sensitive in aligning conserved regions in remote homologs, but the risk of over-alignment is recently becoming greater, as low-quality or noisy sequences are increasing in protein sequence databases, due, for example, to sequencing errors and difficulty in gene prediction. The proposed method utilizes a variable scoring matrix for different pairs of sequences (or groups) in a single multiple sequence alignment, based on the global similarity of each pair. This method significantly increases the correctly gapped sites in real examples and in simulations under various conditions. Regarding sensitivity, the effect of the proposed method is slightly negative in real protein-based benchmarks, and mostly neutral in simulation-based benchmarks. This approach is based on natural biological reasoning and should be compatible with many methods based on dynamic programming for multiple sequence alignment. The new feature is available in MAFFT versions 7.263 and higher. http://mafft.cbrc.jp/alignment/software/ katoh@ifrec.osaka-u.ac.jp Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Optical alignment of multiple components to a common coordinate system.

    PubMed

    Appler, R L; Howell, B J

    1968-06-01

    An improved method of optical tooling for the determination of angular alignment of randomly oriented multicomponent systems is described. The method was developed for alignment of the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory. A test object is mounted on a precision rotary table and viewed in autocollimation by a first-order theodolite. Azimuth and elevation readings from subject mirrors and relay mirrors, and azimuth readings from a dihedral mirror reference system are transformed into test object coordinates of roll, pitch, and yaw by a computer program. The program uses matrix optics methods. Errors are discussed.

  9. AXAF Alignment Test System Autocollimating Flat Error Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Timothy S.

    1995-01-01

    The alignment test system for the advanced x ray astrophysics facility (AXAF) high-resolution mirror assembly (HRMA) determines the misalignment of the HRMA by measuring the displacement of a beam of light reflected by the HRMA mirrors and an autocollimating flat (ACF). This report shows how to calibrate the system to compensate for errors introduced by the ACF, using measurements taken with the ACF in different positions. It also shows what information can be obtained from alignment test data regarding errors in the shapes of the HRMA mirrors. Simulated results based on measured ACF surface data are presented.

  10. Flexible polymeric rib waveguide with self-align couplers system

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng-Sheng; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a polymeric based rib waveguide with U shape self-align fiber couplers system using a simple micromolding process with SU8 as a molding material and polydimethysiloxane as a waveguide material. The material is used for its good optical transparency, low surface tension, biocompatibility, and durability. Furthermore, the material is highly formable. This unique fabrication molding technique provides a means of keeping the material and manufacturing costs to a minimum. The self-align fiber couplers system also proves a fast and simple means of light coupling. The flexible nature of the waveguide material makes this process ideal for a potential wearable optical sensor. PMID:22171151

  11. Secure alignment of coordinate systems using quantum correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezazadeh, F.; Mani, A.; Karimipour, V.

    2017-08-01

    We show that two parties far apart can use shared entangled states and classical communication to align their coordinate systems with a very high fidelity. Moreover, compared with previous methods proposed for such a task, i.e., sending parallel or antiparallel pairs or groups of spin states, our method has the extra advantages of using single-qubit measurements and also being secure, so that third parties do not extract any information about the aligned coordinate system established between the two parties. The latter property is important in many other quantum information protocols in which measurements inevitably play a significant role.

  12. Alignment Systems For Subassemblies Of Overmolded Optoeletronic Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Benson; Fortier, Paul F.; Guindon, Francois M.; Johnson, Glen W.; Letourneau, Martial A.; Sherman, John H.; Tetreault, Real

    2003-04-15

    Alignment systems for optoelectronic modules with overmolded chip carriers include drilled or milled substrate corners for engaging dowel pins to precisely align the substrate in a mold for molding an overmold frame on the substrate. The overmold frame includes slot and trilobe holes for receiving retainer posts to precisely align a retainer assembly on the overmold frame. Cooperating standoff pads on the overmold frame and on the retainer assembly stabilize the assembly of these components and provide a precise gap for receiving an adhesive to permanently attach these two components. The retainer assembly carries optoelectronic components that include a flexible circuit, and a distal end portion of this flexible circuit and walls of a receiving cavity in the overmold frame have cooperating features for precisely aligning distal electrical leads of the flexible circuit with an array of electrical pads on the substrate. A permanent shroud on a proximate end portion of the flexible circuit protects and helps align proximate electrical leads with electrical pads on optic dies and their carriers.

  13. Alignment of the Muon System at the CMS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Ryan; Perniè, Luca; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Kamon, Teruki; Safonov, Alexei; Brown, Malachi

    2017-01-01

    The muon detectors of the CMS experiment provide fast trigger decisions, muon identifications and muon track measurements. Alignment of the muon detectors is crucial for accurate reconstruction of events with high pT muons that are present in signatures for many new physics scenarios. The muon detector's relative positions and orientations with respect to the inner silicon tracker may be precisely measured using reconstructed tracks propagating from the interaction point. This track-based alignment procedure is capable of aligning individual muon detectors to within 100 microns along sensitive modes. However, weak (insensitive) modes may not be well measured due to the system's design and cause systematic miss-measurements. In this report, we present a new track-based procedure which enables all 6 alignment parameters - 3 positions and 3 rotations for each individual muon detector. The improved algorithm allows for measurement of weak modes and considerably reduced related systematic uncertainties. We describe results of the alignment procedure obtained with 2016 data.

  14. FY 2005 Quantum Cascade Laser Alignment System Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Cannon, Bret D.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Broocks, Bryan T.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Hatchell, Brian K.

    2006-01-11

    The Alignment Lasers Task of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) Remote Spectroscopy Project (Project PL211I) is a co-funded project between DOE NA-22 and a Classified Client. This project, which began in the second half of FY03, involved building and delivering a Quantum Cascade (QC) Laser Alignment System to be used for testing the pupil alignment of an infrared sensor by measuring the response from four pairs of diametrically opposed QC lasers. PNNL delivered the system in FY04 and provided technical assistance in FY05 culminating into a successful demonstration of the system. This project evolved from the Laser Development Task of PL211I, which is involved in developing novel laser technology to support development of advanced chemical sensors for detecting the proliferation of nuclear weapons. The laser systems are based on quantum cascade (QC) lasers, a new semiconductor source in the infrared. QC lasers can be tailored to emit light throughout the infrared region (3.5 ? 17 ?m) and have high output power and stability. Thus, these lasers provide an infrared source with superb power and spectral stability enabling them to be used for applications such as alignment and calibration in addition to chemical sensing.

  15. Alignment of Two Grading Systems: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohner, Margaret; Tsigaris, Panagiotis

    2010-01-01

    For the past number of years, a Canadian university has been offering its business degree program in universities located in Tianjin and Shanghai, China. This paper examines the alignment of the two grading systems and its implications on the grade distribution of graduates from the programs. An attempt is made to find an exchange rate of the two…

  16. Spacecraft Alignment Determination and Control for Dual Spacecraft Precision Formation Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calhoun, Philip C.; Novo-Gradac, Anne-Marie; Shah, Neerav

    2017-01-01

    Many proposed formation flying missions seek to advance the state of the art in spacecraft science imaging by utilizing precision dual spacecraft formation flying to enable a virtual space telescope. Using precision dual spacecraft alignment, very long focal lengths can be achieved by locating the optics on one spacecraft and the detector on the other. Proposed science missions include astrophysics concepts with spacecraft separations from 1000 km to 25,000 km, such as the Milli-Arc-Second Structure Imager (MASSIM) and the New Worlds Observer, and Heliophysics concepts for solar coronagraphs and X-ray imaging with smaller separations (50m 500m). All of these proposed missions require advances in guidance, navigation, and control (GNC) for precision formation flying. In particular, very precise astrometric alignment control and estimation is required for precise inertial pointing of the virtual space telescope to enable science imaging orders of magnitude better than can be achieved with conventional single spacecraft instruments. This work develops design architectures, algorithms, and performance analysis of proposed GNC systems for precision dual spacecraft astrometric alignment. These systems employ a variety of GNC sensors and actuators, including laser-based alignment and ranging systems, optical imaging sensors (e.g. guide star telescope), inertial measurement units (IMU), as well as micro-thruster and precision stabilized platforms. A comprehensive GNC performance analysis is given for Heliophysics dual spacecraft PFF imaging mission concept.

  17. Spacecraft Alignment Determination and Control for Dual Spacecraft Precision Formation Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calhoun, Philip; Novo-Gradac, Anne-Marie; Shah, Neerav

    2017-01-01

    Many proposed formation flying missions seek to advance the state of the art in spacecraft science imaging by utilizing precision dual spacecraft formation flying to enable a virtual space telescope. Using precision dual spacecraft alignment, very long focal lengths can be achieved by locating the optics on one spacecraft and the detector on the other. Proposed science missions include astrophysics concepts with spacecraft separations from 1000 km to 25,000 km, such as the Milli-Arc-Second Structure Imager (MASSIM) and the New Worlds Observer, and Heliophysics concepts for solar coronagraphs and X-ray imaging with smaller separations (50m-500m). All of these proposed missions require advances in guidance, navigation, and control (GNC) for precision formation flying. In particular, very precise astrometric alignment control and estimation is required for precise inertial pointing of the virtual space telescope to enable science imaging orders of magnitude better than can be achieved with conventional single spacecraft instruments. This work develops design architectures, algorithms, and performance analysis of proposed GNC systems for precision dual spacecraft astrometric alignment. These systems employ a variety of GNC sensors and actuators, including laser-based alignment and ranging systems, optical imaging sensors (e.g. guide star telescope), inertial measurement units (IMU), as well as microthruster and precision stabilized platforms. A comprehensive GNC performance analysis is given for Heliophysics dual spacecraft PFF imaging mission concept.

  18. Panoramic alignment system for optical wireless communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Thomas C.; Drost, Robert J.; Rzasa, John; Sadler, Brian M.; Davis, Christopher C.

    2015-03-01

    Free space optical communication may provide a viable adjunct to radio frequency (RF) technology for mobile communications, especially in "RF-denied" settings in which RF-based communication may be prohibited or impractical. These settings may include military tactical environments or settings which suffer from RF jamming or interference. Unlike many RF communication systems, point-to-point optical communications between mobile nodes typically require establishing and maintaining alignment, which requires each node to have awareness of the locations of neighboring nodes. We propose a method to create this situational awareness between nodes using purely optical means. This method uses a camera that is focused on a hyperboloidal mirror, thus providing a 360-degree view of the surrounding environment. The camera and mirror are used to detect light emitted from the beacon transmitters from neighboring nodes, with the location of the beacon image in the sensor plane of the camera yielding elevation and azimuth information of the beacon. The beacon transmitter itself is modulated, allowing it to be distinguished from the environment. In discussing our experimental realization of this system, we assess its performance.

  19. Alignment method of off-axis RC reflective optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue-min, Zhang; Xing, Song; Zhi-jun, Zhang; Hou, Xiao-hua

    2016-10-01

    Off-axis optical system has a wide application in space optics and remote detective area. The high surface shape accuracy can be ensured with the development of advanced manufacture technique. So the only condition which limits the wide application of off-axis optical system is how to realize the precise alignment of it. Based on a RC reflective optical system whose diameter is 400mm, the alignment method which combines the high resolution initial placement and computer-aided alignment is introduced. By designing a system which can measure the off-axis fabrication and off-axis angle precisely, the high resolution initial placement of off-axis mirror can be ensured with a measurement accuracy of +/-0.05mm and +/-10". The good initial placement can give a good initial state, so the computer-aided model can be converged well. The experiment shows that a system which has a good initial placement could have a good wave aberration of 0.04λ after three times iteration adjustment.

  20. Low cost, high performance, self-aligning miniature optical systems

    PubMed Central

    Kester, Robert T.; Christenson, Todd; Kortum, Rebecca Richards; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2009-01-01

    The most expensive aspects in producing high quality miniature optical systems are the component costs and long assembly process. A new approach for fabricating these systems that reduces both aspects through the implementation of self-aligning LIGA (German acronym for lithographie, galvanoformung, abformung, or x-ray lithography, electroplating, and molding) optomechanics with high volume plastic injection molded and off-the-shelf glass optics is presented. This zero alignment strategy has been incorporated into a miniature high numerical aperture (NA = 1.0W) microscope objective for a fiber confocal reflectance microscope. Tight alignment tolerances of less than 10 μm are maintained for all components that reside inside of a small 9 gauge diameter hypodermic tubing. A prototype system has been tested using the slanted edge modulation transfer function technique and demonstrated to have a Strehl ratio of 0.71. This universal technology is now being developed for smaller, needle-sized imaging systems and other portable point-of-care diagnostic instruments. PMID:19543344

  1. The Poisson alignment reference system implementation at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Feier, I.

    1998-09-21

    The Poisson spot was established using a collimated laser beam from a 3-mW diode laser. It was monitored on a quadrant detector and found to be very sensitive to vibration and air disturbances. Therefore, for future work we strongly recommend a sealed vacuum tube in which the Poisson line may be propagated. A digital single-axis feedback system was employed to generate an straight line reference (SLR) on the X axis. Pointing accuracy was better than 8 {+-} 2 microns at a distance of 5 m. The digital system was found to be quite slow with a maximum bandwidth of 47 {+-} 9 Hz. Slow drifts were easily corrected but any vibration over 5 Hz was not. We recommend an analog proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller for high bandwidth and smooth operation of the kinematic mirror. Although the Poisson alignment system (PAS) at the Advanced Photon Source is still in its infancy, it already shows great promise as a possible alignment system for the low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL). Since components such as wigglers and quadruples will initially be aligned with respect to each other using conventional means and mounted on some kind of rigid rail, the goal would be to align six to ten such rails over a distance of about 30 m. The PAS could be used to align these rails by mounting a sphere at the joint between two rails. These spheres would need to be in a vacuum pipe to eliminate the refractive effects of air. Each sphere would not be attached to either rail but instead to a flange connecting the vacuum pipes of each rail. Thus the whole line would be made up of straight, rigid segments that could be aligned by moving the joints. Each sphere would have its own detector, allowing the operators to actively monitor the position of each joint and therefore the overall alignment of the system.

  2. String-fluid transition in systems with aligned anisotropic interactions.

    PubMed

    Brandt, P C; Ivlev, A V; Morfill, G E

    2010-06-21

    Systems with aligned anisotropic interactions between particles exhibit numerous phase transitions. A remarkable example of the fluid phase transition occurring in such systems is the formation of particle strings--the so-called "string" or "chain" fluids. We employ an approach based on the Ornstein-Zernike (OZ) equation, which allows us to calculate structural properties of fluids with aligned anisotropic interactions. We show that the string-fluid transition can be associated with the bifurcation of the "isotropic" correlation length into two distinct scales which characterize the longitudinal and transverse order in string fluids and, hence, may be used as a fingerprint of this transition. The comparison of the proposed OZ theory with the Monte Carlo simulations reveals fairly good agreement.

  3. A Fuzzy Logic Based Controller for the Automated Alignment of a Laser-beam-smoothing Spatial Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasowski, M. J.; Dickens, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    A fuzzy logic based controller for a laser-beam-smoothing spatial filter is described. It is demonstrated that a human operator's alignment actions can easily be described by a system of fuzzy rules of inference. The final configuration uses inexpensive, off-the-shelf hardware and allows for a compact, readily implemented embedded control system.

  4. Understanding Beam Alignment in a Coherent Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Roychoudhari, Chandrasekhar

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam alignment in a coherent lidar (or ladar) receiver system plays a critical role in optimizing its performance. Optical alignment in a coherent lidar system dictates the wavefront curvature (phase front) and Poynting vector) matching of the local oscillator beam with the incoming receiver beam on a detector. However, this alignment is often not easy to achieve and is rarely perfect. Furthermore, optical fibers are being increasingly used in coherent lidar system receivers for transporting radiation to achieve architectural elegance. Single mode fibers also require stringent mode matching for efficient light coupling. The detector response characteristics vary with the misalignment of the two pointing vectors. Misalignment can lead to increase in DC current. Also, a lens in front of the detector may exasperate phase front and Poynting vector mismatch. Non-Interaction of Waves, or the NIW property indicates the light beams do not interfere by themselves in the absence of detecting dipoles. In this paper, we will analyze the extent of misalignment on the detector specifications using pointing vectors of mixing beams in light of the NIW property.

  5. Note: O-ring stack system for electron gun alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, In-Yong; Cho, Boklae; Han, Cheolsu; Shin, Seungmin; Lee, Dongjun; Ahn, Sang Jung

    2015-01-01

    We present a reliable method for aligning an electron gun which consists of an electron source and lenses by controlling a stack of rubber O-rings in a vacuum condition. The beam direction angle is precisely tilted along two axes by adjusting the height difference of a stack of O-rings. In addition, the source position is shifted in each of three orthogonal directions. We show that the tilting angle and linear shift along the x and y axes as obtained from ten stacked O-rings are ±2.55° and ±2 mm, respectively. This study can easily be adapted to charged particle gun alignment and adjustments of the flange position in a vacuum, ensuring that its results can be useful with regard to electrical insulation between flanges with slight modifications.

  6. Note: O-ring stack system for electron gun alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Park, In-Yong; Cho, Boklae; Han, Cheolsu; Shin, Seungmin; Lee, Dongjun; Ahn, Sang Jung

    2015-01-15

    We present a reliable method for aligning an electron gun which consists of an electron source and lenses by controlling a stack of rubber O-rings in a vacuum condition. The beam direction angle is precisely tilted along two axes by adjusting the height difference of a stack of O-rings. In addition, the source position is shifted in each of three orthogonal directions. We show that the tilting angle and linear shift along the x and y axes as obtained from ten stacked O-rings are ±2.55° and ±2 mm, respectively. This study can easily be adapted to charged particle gun alignment and adjustments of the flange position in a vacuum, ensuring that its results can be useful with regard to electrical insulation between flanges with slight modifications.

  7. Alignment in star-debris disc systems seen by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaves, J. S.; Kennedy, G. M.; Thureau, N.; Eiroa, C.; Marshall, J. P.; Maldonado, J.; Matthews, B. C.; Olofsson, G.; Barlow, M. J.; Moro-Martín, A.; Sibthorpe, B.; Absil, O.; Ardila, D. R.; Booth, M.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Brown, D. J. A.; Cameron, A. Collier; del Burgo, C.; Di Francesco, J.; Eislöffel, J.; Duchêne, G.; Ertel, S.; Holland, W. S.; Horner, J.; Kalas, P.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Lestrade, J.-F.; Vican, L.; Wilner, D. J.; Wolf, S.; Wyatt, M. C.

    2014-02-01

    Many nearby main-sequence stars have been searched for debris using the far-infrared Herschel satellite, within the DEBRIS, DUNES and Guaranteed-Time Key Projects. We discuss here 11 stars of spectral types A-M where the stellar inclination is known and can be compared to that of the spatially resolved dust belts. The discs are found to be well aligned with the stellar equators, as in the case of the Sun's Kuiper belt, and unlike many close-in planets seen in transit surveys. The ensemble of stars here can be fitted with a star-disc tilt of ≲ 10°. These results suggest that proposed mechanisms for tilting the star or disc in fact operate rarely. A few systems also host imaged planets, whose orbits at tens of au are aligned with the debris discs, contrary to what might be expected in models where external perturbers induce tilts.

  8. Vertical Continuity and Alignment of Block Copolymer Domains by Kinetically Controlled Electrospray Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hanqiong; Woo, Youngwoo; Feng, Xunda; Osuji, Chinedum; Osuji Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    We report the fabrication of vertically aligned cylindrical block copolymer (BCP) domains using continuous electrospray deposition (ESD) onto bare wafer surfaces. The out-of-plane orientation of hexagonally packed styrene cylinders was achieved in a ``fast-wet'' deposition regime where rapid evaporation of solvent in droplets of polymer solution drove the vertical alignment of SBS domains. The deposition conditions were optimized such that thermally activated crosslinking of the polybutadiene matrix provided kinetic control of the morphology, locking in the vertical alignment and preventing relaxation of the system to its preferred parallel orientation on the non-treated substrate. Physically continuous and vertically oriented domains is achieved over several microns of film thickness. We describe the effects of flow rate, collection distance and substrate temperature on thin film morphology and demonstrate selective etching capabilities. The ability of ESD to fabricate well-ordered and aligned BCP films on non-treated substrates, the low utilization of material relative to spin-coating and the continuous nature of the deposition may open up new opportunities for BCP thin films. We are exploring ESD as a new platform for sequential deposition of BCPs with different functionalities.

  9. Real-time Optical Alignment and Diagnostic System (ROADS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The ultimate and most frequent usage of ROADS will be the alignment of subassemblies (collector and collimator) prior to their installation in a chamber. The system as designed has inherent associated capabilities well applied to acceptance testing of the No. 4 mirror, prediction of in-chamber performance, generation of a catalog of test results and other data, providing data for the plotting of isointensity lines, and other applications which are discussed. The ROADS system will collect, process, display, analyze, and retain data as required for components, partial subassemblies, complete subassemblies, complete modules, and multimodular arrays.

  10. System and method for 2D workpiece alignment

    DOEpatents

    Weaver, William T.; Carlson, Charles T.; Smith, Scott A.; Beck, Michael A.; Webb, Aaron P.; Strassner, James D.; Gravell, Lawrence R.; Simmons, Michael C.

    2015-07-14

    A carrier capable of holding one or more workpieces is disclosed. The carrier includes movable projections located along the sides of each cell in the carrier. This carrier, in conjunction with a separate alignment apparatus, aligns each workpiece within its respective cell against several alignment pins, using a multiple step alignment process to guarantee proper positioning of the workpiece in the cell. First, the workpieces are moved toward one side of the cell. Once the workpieces have been aligned against this side, the workpieces are then moved toward an adjacent orthogonal side such that the workpieces are aligned to two sides of the cell. Once aligned, the workpiece is held in place by the projections located along each side of each cell. In addition, the alignment pins are also used to align the associated mask, thereby guaranteeing that the mask is properly aligned to the workpiece.

  11. Vacuum level alignment in organic guest-host systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makinen, A. J.; Hill, I. G.; Kafafi, Z. H.

    2002-08-01

    Using a combination of ultraviolet and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, we have studied the relative energy level alignment of two phosphorescent guest molecules, 2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octaethyl-21H,23H-porphine platinum (PtOEP) and tris(2-phenylpyridine)iridium (Ir(ppy)3), doped in an electron transport host, tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato) aluminum (III) (Alq3), and in a hole transport host, 4,4')-bis(carbazol-9-ylbiphenyl. In each of the guest-host systems, we find that the vacuum levels of the guest and the host molecules align, and that the position of the highest occupied molecular orbital of the phosphorescent guest is independent of the guest molecule concentration (0.8%-56% by mass). The vacuum level alignment implies free movement of the Fermi level within the gaps of the guest and the host molecules manifesting the intrinsic nature of these organic semiconductors. These results give insights into the role that the phosphorescent molecules play in trapping and transporting charges within the emissive layer of an organic light-emitting device.

  12. Developing Systems Engineering Graduate Programs Aligned to the Body of Knowledge and Curriculum to Advance Systems Engineering (BKCASE (trademark)) Guidelines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Developing Systems Engineering Graduate Programs Aligned to the Body of Knowledge and Curriculum to Advance Systems Engineering (BKCASETM...Developing Systems Engineering Graduate Programs Aligned to the Body of Knowledge and Curriculum to Advance Systems Engineering (BKCASETM) Guidelines 5a

  13. MACSIMS : multiple alignment of complete sequences information management system

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Julie D; Muller, Arnaud; Waterhouse, Andrew; Procter, Jim; Barton, Geoffrey J; Plewniak, Frédéric; Poch, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    Background In the post-genomic era, systems-level studies are being performed that seek to explain complex biological systems by integrating diverse resources from fields such as genomics, proteomics or transcriptomics. New information management systems are now needed for the collection, validation and analysis of the vast amount of heterogeneous data available. Multiple alignments of complete sequences provide an ideal environment for the integration of this information in the context of the protein family. Results MACSIMS is a multiple alignment-based information management program that combines the advantages of both knowledge-based and ab initio sequence analysis methods. Structural and functional information is retrieved automatically from the public databases. In the multiple alignment, homologous regions are identified and the retrieved data is evaluated and propagated from known to unknown sequences with these reliable regions. In a large-scale evaluation, the specificity of the propagated sequence features is estimated to be >99%, i.e. very few false positive predictions are made. MACSIMS is then used to characterise mutations in a test set of 100 proteins that are known to be involved in human genetic diseases. The number of sequence features associated with these proteins was increased by 60%, compared to the features available in the public databases. An XML format output file allows automatic parsing of the MACSIM results, while a graphical display using the JalView program allows manual analysis. Conclusion MACSIMS is a new information management system that incorporates detailed analyses of protein families at the structural, functional and evolutionary levels. MACSIMS thus provides a unique environment that facilitates knowledge extraction and the presentation of the most pertinent information to the biologist. A web server and the source code are available at . PMID:16792820

  14. Control and alignment of segmented-mirror telescopes: matrices, modes, and error propagation.

    PubMed

    Chanan, Gary; MacMartin, Douglas G; Nelson, Jerry; Mast, Terry

    2004-02-20

    Starting from the successful Keck telescope design, we construct and analyze the control matrix for the active control system of the primary mirror of a generalized segmented-mirror telescope, with up to 1000 segments and including an alternative sensor geometry to the one used at Keck. In particular we examine the noise propagation of the matrix and its consequences for both seeing-limited and diffraction-limited observations. The associated problem of optical alignment of such a primary mirror is also analyzed in terms of the distinct but related matrices that govern this latter problem.

  15. System design and implementation for the glass panel alignment and sealing tool for flat panel displays

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J.D.; Stromberg, P.G.; Kuszmaul, S.S.

    1996-10-16

    This report describes the system designed and fabricated for the National Center for Advanced Information Component Manufacturing (NCAICM) project number 9322-135. The system is a device capable of simultaneously aligning two glass plates and sealing them together with glass frit. The process development was divided into two phases. The first was thermal sealing in an ambient environment. The second was sealing a controlled environment in a vacuum.

  16. Recent advances in automatic alignment system for the National Iginition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, K; Awwal, A; Kalantar, D; Leach, R; Lowe-Webb, R; McGuigan, D; Kamm, V

    2010-12-08

    The automatic alignment system for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large-scale parallel system that directs all 192 laser beams along the 300-m optical path to a 50-micron focus at target chamber in less than 50 minutes. The system automatically commands 9,000 stepping motors to adjust mirrors and other optics based upon images acquired from high-resolution digital cameras viewing beams at various locations. Forty-five control loops per beamline request image processing services running on a LINUX cluster to analyze these images of the beams and references, and automaticallys teer the beams toward the target. This paper discusses the upgrades to the NIF automatic alignment system to handle new alignment needs and evolving requirements as related to various types of experiments performed. As NIF becomes a continuously-operated system and more experiments are performed, performance monitoring is increasingly important for maintenance and commissioning work. Data, collected during operations, is analyzed for tuning of the laser and targeting maintenance work. handling evolving alignment and maintenance needs is expected for the planned 30-year operational life of NIF.

  17. A FAULT MODEL FOR ONTOLOGY MAPPING, ALIGNMENT, AND LINKING SYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    JOHNSON, HELEN L.; COHEN, K. BRETONNEL; HUNTER, LAWRENCE

    2008-01-01

    There has been much work devoted to the mapping, alignment, and linking of ontologies (MALO), but little has been published about how to evaluate systems that do this. A fault model for conducting fine-grained evaluations of MALO systems is proposed, and its application to the system described in Johnson et al. [15] is illustrated. Two judges categorized errors according to the model, and inter-judge agreement was calculated by error category. Overall inter-judge agreement was 98% after dispute resolution, suggesting that the model is consistently applicable. The results of applying the model to the system described in [15] reveal the reason for a puzzling set of results in that paper, and also suggest a number of avenues and techniques for improving the state of the art in MALO, including the development of biomedical domain specific language processing tools, filtering of high frequency matching results, and word sense disambiguation. PMID:17990495

  18. Report on the Power and Detector Stability Measurements for the QC Laser Alignment System

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Cannon, Bret D.; Suarez, Reynold; Stewart, Timothy L.; Hatchell, Brian K.

    2003-12-15

    This report summarizes the preliminary tests that PNNL has performed to date for the Quantum Cascade (QC) Laser Alignment System that is being developed for the Using Client for a classified application. PNNL is designing, fabricating, assembling, and testing the QC Laser Alignment System and has a subcontract with Maxion Technologies, Inc. for development and production of the QC laser devices to be used in this system. The QC lasers furnished by Maxion will be incorporated into the QC Laser Alignment System by PNNL. The QC Laser Alignment System consists of five Alignment Source Assemblies (ASAs) and a computer control system with graphical user interface (GUI). Each ASA has two QC lasers along with a temperature sensor. The system design also includes an optical detector for each QC laser to measure the output power of the rear facet for additional stabilization. The system will monitor the voltage across the QC laser, the temperature, the current, and the signal from the optical detectors to ensure the system is within the tolerances specified in the System Specifications. The System Specifications require that the relative power between lasers on the same ASA be maintained at {+-}1% and among the lasers on different ASAs at {+-}2.5%. For the tests reported here, we attempted to examine the power stability of the QC laser as well as the variability of the optical detectors to ensure the system will adhere to these specifications. These preliminary tests did not incorporate the actual ASA mounting scheme or the QC lasers that are being fabricated by Maxion to operate at the specified temperature of -50 C. Thus, we expect the performance from these results to differ from the actual results that can be achieved in the QC Laser Alignment System. Current limitations with the mounting scheme created problems with the power stability due to thermal cycling. Short-term power stability where thermal cycling was not a problem showed power fluctuations within the 1

  19. An Automated SVD for Alignment and Control of James Webb Space Telescope Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiri, Sharam; Howard, Joseph M.; Aronstein, David L.; Ha, Kong; Smith, J. Scott; Dean, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a three-mirror anastigmatic telescope. The alignment of the segmented primary and secondary mirrors in the wavefront sensing and control process involves a series of actuators to control the six degrees-of-freedom motion on each surface in addition to the radius of curvature. The control matrix developed from the alignment parameters is over-determined and singular value decomposition (SVD) method is used to solve it in the least square sense. An automated SVD scheme has been developed to identify the most contributing modes in a typical alignment process and reduce the impact of error-prone modes from the control process.

  20. Large aperture laser beam alignment system based on far field sampling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. C.; Liu, D. Z.; Ouyang, X. P.; Kang, J.; Xie, X. L.; Zhou, J.; Gong, L.; Zhu, B. Q.

    2016-11-01

    Laser beam alignment is very important for high-power laser facility. Long laser path and large-aperture lens for alignment are generally used, while the proposed alignment system with a wedge by far-field sampling technique reduces both space and cost requirements. General alignment system for large-aperture laser beam is long in distance and large in volum because of taking near-field sampling technique. With the development of laser fusion facilities, the space for alignment system is limited. A new alignment system for large-aperture laser beam is designed to save space and reduce operating costs. The new alignment for large-aperture laser beam with a wedge is based on far-field sampling technique. The wedge is placed behind the spatial filter to reflect some laser beam as signal light for alignment. Therefore, laser beam diameter in alignment system is small, which can save space for the laser facility. Comparing to general alignment system for large-aperture laser beam, large-aperture lenses for near-field and far-field sampling, long distance laser path are unnecessary for proposed alignment system, which saves cost and space greatly. This alignment system for large-aperture laser beam has been demonstrated well on the Muliti-PW Facility which uses the 7th beam of the SG-Ⅱ Facility as pump source. The experimental results indicate that the average near-field alignment error is less than 1% of reference, and the average far-filed alignment error is less than 5% of spatial filter pinhole diameter, which meet the alignment system requirements for laser beam of Multi-PW Facility.

  1. Molecular alignment using coherent resonant excitation: A new proposal for stereodynamic control of chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Nandini

    2009-10-28

    For the mode-selective control of chemical reaction, we present a new approach of molecular alignment using coherent resonant interaction with low intensity midinfrared optical pulses. Under coherent excitation, the alignment of vibrationally excited molecules becomes a function of the optical pulse area. Depending on the type of transition, with certain values of the pulse areas, a narrow group of magnetic substates are selectively excited, which results in aligning the rotational axis of the molecular ensemble. It is shown that for a P-type transition, significant alignment in the excited vibrational state can be realized using a resonant midinfrared pulse of area approximately 2pi. Under the steady state excitation (pulse duration longer than the vibrational relaxation time), the molecular alignment is destroyed due to saturation. We design a polarization spectroscopy experiment to coherently excite and probe the molecular alignment in real time.

  2. Optical development system lab alignment solutions for the ICESat-2 ATLAS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T.

    The ATLAS Instrument for the ICESat-2 mission at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center requires an alignment test-bed to prove out new concepts. The Optical Development System (ODS) lab was created to test prototype models of individual instrument components to simulate how they will act as a system. The main ICESat-2 instrument is the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS). It measures ice elevation by transmitting laser pulses, and collecting the reflection in a telescope. Because the round trip time is used to calculate distance, alignment between the outgoing transmitter beam and the incoming receiver beams are critical. An automated closed loop monitoring control system is currently being tested at the prototype level to prove out implementation for the final spacecraft. To achieve an error of less than 2 micro-radians, an active deformable mirror was used to correct the lab wave front from the collimated “ ground reflection” beam. The lab includes a focal plane assembly set up, a one meter diameter collimator optic, and a 0.8 meter flight spare telescope for alignment. ATLAS prototypes and engineering models of transmitter and receiver optics and sub-systems are brought in to develop and integrate systems as well as write procedures to be used in integration and testing. By having a fully integrated system with prototypes and engineering units, lessons can be learned before flight designs are finalized.

  3. Heat transfer in vertically aligned phase change energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    El-Dessouky, H.T.; Bouhamra, W.S.; Ettouney, H.M.; Akbar, M.

    1999-05-01

    Convection effects on heat transfer are analyzed in low temperature and vertically aligned phase change energy storage systems. This is performed by detailed temperature measurements in the phase change material (PCM) in eighteen locations forming a grid of six radial and three axial positions. The system constitutes a double pipe configuration, where commercial grade paraffin wax is stored in the annular space between the two pipes and water flows inside the inner pipe. Vertical alignment of the system allowed for reverse of the flow direction of the heat transfer fluid (HTF), which is water. Therefore, the PCM is heated from the bottom for HTF flow from bottom to top and from the top as the HTF flow direction is reversed. For the former case, natural convection affects the melting process. Collected data are used to study variations in the transient temperature distribution at axial and radial positions as well as for the two-dimensional temperature field. The data are used to calculate the PCM heat transfer coefficient and to develop correlations for the melting Fourier number. Results indicate that the PCM heat transfer coefficient is higher for the case of PCM heating from bottom to top. Nusselt number correlations are developed as a function of Rayleigh, Stefan, and Fourier numbers for the HTF flow from bottom to top and as a function of Stefan and Fourier numbers for HTF flow from top to bottom. The enhancement ratio for heat transfer caused by natural convection increases and then levels off as the inlet temperature of the HTF is increased.

  4. Study on the key alignment technology of the catadioptric optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chong; Fu, Xing; Fu, Xi-hong; Kang, Xiao-peng; Liu, Kai

    2017-02-01

    Optical system alignment has a great influence on the whole system accuracy. In this paper, the processing of optical system alignment was mainly studied, the processing method of optics on the primary and secondary mirrors, front correction lens group and behind correction lens group with high precision centering lathe and internal focusing telescope. Then using the height indicator complete the system alignment of the primary mirror, secondary mirror, front correction group and behind correction group. Finally, based on the zygo interferometer detect the wavefront information. Using this alignment program for catadioptric optical system, the wavefront aberration of optical system, focal length, modulation transfer function (MTF) and other technical indicators have reached the requirements.

  5. Self-aligning amelogenin nanoribbons in oil-water system.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaodong; Wu, Shenping; Martinez-Avila, Olga; Cheng, Yifan; Habelitz, Stefan

    2011-04-01

    The highly organized microstructure of dental enamel is a result of protein-guided anisotropic growth of apatite nanofibers. It is established that amelogenin proteins, the main constituent of the developing enamel matrix, form nanospheres in vitro, but the amphiphilic nature of the full-length protein conveys the possibility of generating more complex structures as observed with other surfactant-like molecules. This study tested if the use of metastable oil-water emulsions can induce supramolecular assemblies of amelogenin. Recombinant full-length amelogenin, rH174, was mixed into octanol/ethyl acetate preparations of different ratios to form emulsions at pH 4.5 and 7.4. Atomic force and electron microscopy showed the formation of 16.7±1.0nm wide nanoribbons which grew to several micrometer length over a period of days. Nanoribbons formed from reverse micelles by enabling hydrophobic tails of the molecules to interact while preventing the formation of amelogenin nanospheres. Ribbon formation required the presence of calcium and phosphate ions and may be localized at a dark central line along the amelogenin ribbons. The ribbons have a strong tendency to align in parallel maintaining 5-20nm space between each other. The growth rates and number of ribbons were significantly higher at pH 4.5 and related to the metastability of the emulsion. A model for ribbon extension proposes the addition of short segments or amelogenin dimers to the ends of the ribbon. The formation of self-aligning and uniaxially elongating amelogenin structures triggered by the presence of calcium and phosphate may represent a suitable new model for protein controlled mineralization in enamel. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Self-aligning amelogenin nanoribbons in oil-water system

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaodong; Wu, Shenping; Martinez-Avila, Olga; Cheng, Yifan; Habelitz, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    The highly organized microstructure of dental enamel is a result of protein-guided anisotropic growth of apatite nanofibers. It is established that amelogenin proteins, the main constituent of the developing enamel matrix, form nanospheres in vitro, but the amphiphilic nature of the full-length protein conveys the possibility of generating more complex structures as observed with other surfactant-like molecules. This study tested if the use of metastable oil-water emulsions can induce supramolecular assemblies of amelogenin. Recombinant full-length amelogenin, rH174, was mixed into octanol/ethyl acetate preparations of different ratios to form emulsions at pH 4.5 and 7.4. Atomic force and electron microscopy showed the formation of 16.7±1.0 nm wide nanoribbons which grew to several micrometer length over a period of days. Nanoribbons formed from reverse micelles by enabling hydrophobic tails of the molecules to interact while preventing the formation of amelogenin nanospheres. Ribbon formation required the presence of calcium and phosphate ions and may be localized at a dark central line along the amelogenin ribbons. The ribbons have a strong tendency to align in parallel maintaining 5 to 20nm space between each other. The growth rates and number of ribbons were significantly higher at pH 4.5 and related to the metastability of the emulsion. A model for ribbon extension proposes the addition of short segments or amelogenin dimers to the ends of the ribbon. The formation of self-aligning and uniaxially elongating amelogenin structures triggered by the presence of calcium and phosphate may represent a suitable new model for protein controlled mineralization in enamel. PMID:21134461

  7. Centroid Detector Assembly for the AXAF-I Alignment Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, Paul

    1995-01-01

    The High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (imaging) (AXAF-I) consists of four nested paraboloids and four nested hyperboloids, all of meter-class size, and all of which are to be assembled and aligned in a special 15 meter tower at Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, NY. The goals of the alignment are (1) to make the images of the four telescopes coincident; (2) to remove coma from each image individually; and (3) to control and determine the final position of the composite focus. This will be accomplished by the HRMA Aligment Test System (HATS) which is essentially a scanning Hartmann test system. The scanning laser source and the focal plane of the HATS are part of the Centroid Detector Assembly (CDA) which also includes processing electronics and software. In this paper we discuss the design and the measured performance of the CDA.

  8. CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Shannon, R.H.; Williamson, H.E.

    1962-10-30

    A boiling water type nuclear reactor power system having improved means of control is described. These means include provisions for either heating the coolant-moderator prior to entry into the reactor or shunting the coolantmoderator around the heating means in response to the demand from the heat engine. These provisions are in addition to means for withdrawing the control rods from the reactor. (AEC)

  9. Alignment control and softness creation in hair with glycylglycine.

    PubMed

    Breakspear, Steven; Fukuhara, Masaki; Itou, Takashi; Hirano, Yuji; Nojiri, Masayoshi; Kiyomine, Akira; Inoue, Shigeto

    2013-01-01

    Thick and coarse hair, as typically found among the Japanese population, frequently lacks softness that consumers are acutely aware of. Such poor feeling is accentuated by daily grooming, weathering, and chemical treatments, in particular, which can cause changes in the hair shape and the creation of frizzy or irregularly shaped hair. Existing technologies to improve the soft feel of hair, though effective, usually concentrate on the surface of the fiber and often leave the hair feeling either overconditioned or sometimes even sticky from product buildup. Hair softness is said to be governed by a number of factors, but primarily hair diameter and surface condition. In this study, we have also identified hair alignment as playing a critical role in hair softness. In addition, by studying how Japanese women perceive hair softness when touching their hair, we have identified that the strain on the hair fiber associated with these manipulations is far smaller than previously considered. With these factors in mind, we have studied the mechanisms behind a new softening technology containing glycylglycine (GG). It has been found that treatment with GG can give a tangible feeling of hair softness by dramatically improving alignment in unruly hair and by lowering the modulus of the fiber. Moreover, using the atomic force microscope, it has been revealed that the properties of the cell membrane complex of the hair cortex may be modified after GG treatment; the role of this additive in modifying the internal properties of the hair to create softness will thus be discussed.

  10. Optical pickup adjustment system using a passive alignment method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abiko, Yukihiro; Yabuki, Akihiko; Koezuka, Tetsuo

    2002-03-01

    The optical pickup of a magneto-optical drive is constructed of millimeter-size optical components, including a laser diode (LD), a collimating lens (CL), a polarizing beam splitter, some kinds of prisms, and photo detectors (PD). Each component must be assembled with micrometer-order accuracy. In particular, the astigmatism, which is adjusted by changing the position of the CL, must be within 0.65 micrometers in the optical axis direction. To enable the CL position to be adjusted quantitatively, we developed an adjustment method that uses passive alignment. We estimated the astigmatism by analyzing an image of the LD, which is acquired through the CL by illuminating the LD with the polarized light. We developed an optical-pickup adjustment system using the proposed method and tested its effectiveness experimentally. The results showed that this system can be used to adjust the accuracy to within 0.65 micrometers. Because the image of the LD and the PD are acquired clearly by this system, it should be useful for not only adjusting the optical pickup but also for visually inspecting the LD and PD.

  11. Wavefront alignment research of segmented mirror synthetic aperture optical (SAO) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jian; An, Xiaoqiang; Tian, Hao

    2010-05-01

    Wavefront control technology and imaging experiment are introduced for a segmented mirror SAO system with deformable sub-mirrors. This system is a RC style with 300mm aperture, 4.5 F#, +/-0.4°FOV, 0.45~0.75μm wave band, and diffraction-limit design MTF. The primary mirror is composed by three sub-mirrors, with parabolic shape, and each deformable sub-mirror has 19 actuators to control and keep the surface shape, and 5 actuators to align sub-mirrors location in 5 degree of freedom. Interferometer is used to feed back and control exit wavefront error, and base on measurement and finite element analysis, location and quanitity of actuators are optimized, making the surface shape and misadjustment errors interact and compensate each other, and the synthetic system exit pupil wavefront error is controlled. The integrated exit pupil wavefront errors are gotten by ZYGO interferometer, and central FOV is 0.077λRMS, and edge FOV is 0.093λRMS. At the end, an imaging experiment is executed, and good results are obtained, which proves, the deformable sub-mirrors have the ability to meliorate alignment and the latter can retroact the former, and this relationship iterate make system exit pupil wavefront error convergence and improve segmented mirror SAO system imaging ability.

  12. The HERA-B database services. for detector configuration, calibration, alignment, slow control and data classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, A.; Amaral, Vasco; Marconi, Umberto; Steinbeck, Stefan; Tomé, António; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Wolters, Helmut; HERA-B Collaboration

    2001-10-01

    The database services for the distributed application environment of the HERA-B experiment are presented. Achieving the required 10 6 trigger reduction implies that all reconstruction, including calibration and alignment procedures, must run online, making extensive usage of the database systems. The associations from the events to the database objects are carefully introduced considering efficiency and flexibility. The challenges of managing the slow control information were addressed by introducing data and update objects used in special processing on dedicated servers. The system integrates the DAQ client/server protocols with customized active database servers and relies on a high-performance database support toolkit. For applications that required complex selection mechanisms, as in the data-quality databases, the relevant data is replicated using a relational database management system.

  13. System modeling of the Thirty Meter Telescope alignment and phasing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekens, Frank G.; Seo, Byoung-Joon; Troy, Mitchell

    2014-08-01

    We have developed a system model using the System Modeling Language (SysML) for the Alignment and Phasing System (APS) on the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). APS is a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor that will be used to measure the alignment and phasing of the primary mirror segments, and the alignment of the secondary and tertiary mirrors. The APS system model contains the ow-down of the Level 1 TMT requirements to APS (Level 2) requirements, and from there to the APS sub-systems (Level 3) requirements. The model also contains the operating modes and scenarios for various activities, such as maintenance alignment, post-segment exchange alignment, and calibration activities. The requirements ow-down is captured in SysML requirements diagrams, and we describe the process of maintaining the DOORS database as the single-source-of-truth for requirements, while using the SysML model to capture the logic and notes associated with the ow-down. We also use the system model to capture any needed communications from APS to other TMT systems, and between the APS sub-systems. The operations are modeled using SysML activity diagrams, and will be used to specify the APS interface documents. The modeling tool can simulate the top level activities to produce sequence diagrams, which contain all the communications between the system and subsystem needed for that activity. By adding time estimates for the lowest level APS activities, a robust estimate for the total time on-sky that APS requires to align and phase the telescope can be obtained. This estimate will be used to verify that the time APS requires on-sky meets the Level 1 TMT requirements.

  14. Software Development for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope's Segment Alignment Maintenance System using LABView

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Drew P.; Ly, William; Howard, Richard T.; Weir, John; Rakoczy, John; Roe, Fred (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The software development for an upgrade to the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) was done in LABView. In order to improve the performance of the HET at the McDonald Observatory, a closed-loop system had to be implemented to keep the mirror segments aligned during periods of observation. The control system, called the Segment Alignment Maintenance System (SAMs), utilized inductive sensors to measure the relative motions of the mirror segments. Software was developed in LABView to tie the sensors, operator interface, and mirror-control motors together. Developing the software in LABView allowed the system to be flexible, understandable, and able to be modified by the end users. Since LABView is built using block diagrams, the software naturally followed the designed control system's block and flow diagrams, and individual software blocks could be easily verified. LABView's many built-in display routines allowed easy visualization of diagnostic and health-monitoring data during testing. Also, since LABView is a multi-platform software package, different programmers could develop the code remotely on various types of machines. LABView s ease of use facilitated rapid prototyping and field testing. There were some unanticipated difficulties in the software development, but the use of LABView as the software "language" for the development of SAMs contributed to the overall success of the project.

  15. System-of-Systems Acquisition: Alignment and Collaboration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-30

    behavior such as eBay , Facebook, and the Zerox Eureka system. eBay is an online auction and shopping website in which individuals and businesses buy...mechanism • Cost and/or value functions all had the form of S curves 9 eBay • eBay is an on-line auction and shopping website • Value to the seller is...and sell a wide variety of products and services. eBay was founded in 1995 and experienced very rapid growth. By the second year of operations eBay

  16. AlexSys: a knowledge-based expert system for multiple sequence alignment construction and analysis.

    PubMed

    Aniba, Mohamed Radhouene; Poch, Olivier; Marchler-Bauer, Aron; Thompson, Julie Dawn

    2010-10-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is a cornerstone of modern molecular biology and represents a unique means of investigating the patterns of conservation and diversity in complex biological systems. Many different algorithms have been developed to construct MSAs, but previous studies have shown that no single aligner consistently outperforms the rest. This has led to the development of a number of 'meta-methods' that systematically run several aligners and merge the output into one single solution. Although these methods generally produce more accurate alignments, they are inefficient because all the aligners need to be run first and the choice of the best solution is made a posteriori. Here, we describe the development of a new expert system, AlexSys, for the multiple alignment of protein sequences. AlexSys incorporates an intelligent inference engine to automatically select an appropriate aligner a priori, depending only on the nature of the input sequences. The inference engine was trained on a large set of reference multiple alignments, using a novel machine learning approach. Applying AlexSys to a test set of 178 alignments, we show that the expert system represents a good compromise between alignment quality and running time, making it suitable for high throughput projects. AlexSys is freely available from http://alnitak.u-strasbg.fr/∼aniba/alexsys.

  17. Alignment and structural control of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes by utilizing precursor concentration effect.

    PubMed

    Deng, Weina; Chen, Xiaohua; Chen, Xian; Liu, Zheng; Zeng, Ying; Hu, Aiping; Xiong, Yina; Li, Zhe; Tang, Qunli

    2014-11-28

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) were prepared using a simple ultrasonic spray pyrolysis method. The precursor concentration effect was examined to effectively control alignment, open tip and diameter of the NCNTs by changing xylene/cyclohexylamine ratio. The structure and morphology of the resultant NCNTs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The degree of alignment and the diameter of the NCNTs increased as the xylene/cyclohexylamine precursor mixture was changed from 0 to 35% cyclohexylamine. This precursor composition also caused a large number of open-ended nanotubes to form with graphite layers inside the cavities of the NCNTs. However, further increase cyclohexylamine content in the precursor reduced the degree of alignment and diameter of the NCNTs. We demonstrate control over the NCNT alignment and diameter, along with the formation of open-ended nanotube tips, and propose a growth mechanism to understand how these properties are interlinked.

  18. Alignment of an aspheric mirror subsystem for an advanced infrared catadioptric system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingstad, James S.

    1991-12-01

    With many optical systems the method that is used to align the optical system needs to be an integral portion of the system design and not an afterthought. Once all the pieces are in fabrication it may be too late to implement a cost-effective alignment procedure for both prototype and production designs. This is especially true with catadioptric systems where the mirror alignment tends to be very critical as far as system performance is concerned. This paper describes the design and use of an aspheric null mirror for the alignment of a two mirror subsystem to a lens cell. The optical system to be aligned was a six-in. EFL, F/2 system working in the 3-5 micrometers bandpass. It consisted of two aspheric mirrors, one aspheric lens, and two spherical lenses.

  19. A Concept for Zero-Alignment Micro Optical Systems

    SciTech Connect

    DESCOUR, MICHAEL R.; KOLOLUOMA,TERHO; LEVEY,RAVIV; RANTALA,JUHA T.; SHUL,RANDY J.; WARREN,MIAL E.; WILLISON,CHRISTI LEE

    1999-09-16

    We are developing a method of constructing compact, three-dimensional photonics systems consisting of optical elements, e.g., lenses and mirrors, photo-detectors, and light sources, e.g., VCSELS or circular-grating lasers. These optical components, both active and passive, are mounted on a lithographically prepared silicon substrate. We refer to the substrate as a micro-optical table (MOT) in analogy with the macroscopic version routinely used in optics laboratories. The MOT is a zero-alignment, microscopic optical-system concept. The position of each optical element relative to other optical elements on the MOT is determined in the layout of the MOT photomask. Each optical element fits into a slot etched in the silicon MOT. The slots are etched using a high-aspect-ratio silicon etching (HARSE) process. Additional positioning features in each slot's cross-section and complementary features on each optical element permit accurate placement of that element's aperture relative to the MOT substrate. In this paper we present the results of the first fabrication and micro-assembly experiments of a silicon-wafer based MOT. Based on these experiments, estimates of position accuracy are reported. We also report on progress in fabrication of lens elements in a hybrid sol-gel material (HSGM). Diffractive optical elements have been patterned in a 13-micron thick HSGM layer on a 150-micron thick soda-lime glass substrate. The measured ms surface roughness was 20 nm. Finally, we describe modeling of MOT systems using non-sequential ray tracing (NSRT).

  20. Curvature and Rho activation differentially control the alignment of cells and stress fibers

    PubMed Central

    Bade, Nathan D.; Kamien, Randall D.; Assoian, Richard K.; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    2017-01-01

    In vivo, cells respond to a host of physical cues ranging from substrate stiffness to the organization of micro- and nanoscale fibrous networks. We show that macroscale substrates with radii of curvature from tens to hundreds of micrometers influence cell alignment. In a model system of fibroblasts, isolated cells aligned strongly in the axial direction on cylinders with radii similar to the cell length and more weakly on cylinders of much larger radius. Isolated vascular smooth muscle cells did not align as effectively as fibroblasts. However, both cell types aligned robustly in weak curvature fields when in confluent monolayers. We identified two distinct populations of stress fibers in both cell types: long, apical stress fibers that aligned axially and short, basal stress fibers that aligned circumferentially. Circumferential alignment of the basal stress fibers is in apparent disagreement with a long-standing hypothesis that energetic penalties for bending enforce axial alignment on cylinders. To explore this phenomenon, we manipulated stress fibers by activating Rho, a small guanosine triphosphatase that regulates stress fiber assembly. In response, apical stress fibers disassembled, whereas basal stress fibers thickened and aligned more strongly in the circumferential direction. By activating Rho in confluent monolayers of vascular smooth muscle cells, we recapitulated the circumferential alignment pattern of F-actin within these cells that is observed in cylindrical vessels in vivo. In agreement with recent theory, these results suggest that stress fiber bending penalties are overcome when stress fiber contractility is enhanced and motivate deeper study of the mechanics of these distinct stress fiber populations. PMID:28913421

  1. Curvature and Rho activation differentially control the alignment of cells and stress fibers.

    PubMed

    Bade, Nathan D; Kamien, Randall D; Assoian, Richard K; Stebe, Kathleen J

    2017-09-01

    In vivo, cells respond to a host of physical cues ranging from substrate stiffness to the organization of micro- and nanoscale fibrous networks. We show that macroscale substrates with radii of curvature from tens to hundreds of micrometers influence cell alignment. In a model system of fibroblasts, isolated cells aligned strongly in the axial direction on cylinders with radii similar to the cell length and more weakly on cylinders of much larger radius. Isolated vascular smooth muscle cells did not align as effectively as fibroblasts. However, both cell types aligned robustly in weak curvature fields when in confluent monolayers. We identified two distinct populations of stress fibers in both cell types: long, apical stress fibers that aligned axially and short, basal stress fibers that aligned circumferentially. Circumferential alignment of the basal stress fibers is in apparent disagreement with a long-standing hypothesis that energetic penalties for bending enforce axial alignment on cylinders. To explore this phenomenon, we manipulated stress fibers by activating Rho, a small guanosine triphosphatase that regulates stress fiber assembly. In response, apical stress fibers disassembled, whereas basal stress fibers thickened and aligned more strongly in the circumferential direction. By activating Rho in confluent monolayers of vascular smooth muscle cells, we recapitulated the circumferential alignment pattern of F-actin within these cells that is observed in cylindrical vessels in vivo. In agreement with recent theory, these results suggest that stress fiber bending penalties are overcome when stress fiber contractility is enhanced and motivate deeper study of the mechanics of these distinct stress fiber populations.

  2. Characterization of electrode alignment for optimal droplet charging and actuation in droplet-based microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Myung Mo; Im, Do Jin; Yoo, Byeong Sun; Kang, In Seok

    2015-09-01

    The actuation method using electric force as a driving force is utilized widely in droplet-based microfluidic systems. In this work, the effects of charging electrode alignment on direct charging of a droplet on electrified electrodes and a subsequent electrophoretic control of the droplet are investigated. The charging characteristics of a droplet according to different electrode alignments are quantitatively examined through experiments and systematic numerical simulations with varying distances and angles between the two electrodes. The droplet charge acquired from the electrified electrode is directly proportional to the distance and barely affected by the angle between the two electrodes. This implies that the primary consideration of electrode alignment in microfluidic devices is the distance between electrodes and the insignificant effect of angle provides a great degree of freedom in designing such devices. Not only the droplet charge acquired from the electrode but also the force exerted on the droplet is analyzed. Finally, the implications and design guidance for microfluidic systems are discussed with an electrophoresis of a charged droplet method-based digital microfluidic device. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Synchronization of the mammalian circadian timing system: Light can control peripheral clocks independently of the SCN clock: alternate routes of entrainment optimize the alignment of the body's circadian clock network with external time.

    PubMed

    Husse, Jana; Eichele, Gregor; Oster, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    A vast network of cellular circadian clocks regulates 24-hour rhythms of behavior and physiology in mammals. Complex environments are characterized by multiple, and often conflicting time signals demanding flexible mechanisms of adaptation of endogenous rhythms to external time. Traditionally this process of circadian entrainment has been conceptualized in a hierarchical scheme with a light-reset master pacemaker residing in the hypothalamus that subsequently aligns subordinate peripheral clocks with each other and with external time. Here we review new experiments using conditional mouse genetics suggesting that resetting of the circadian system occurs in a more "federated" and tissue-specific fashion, which allows for increased noise resistance and plasticity of circadian timekeeping under natural conditions.

  4. An Advanced Electrospinning Method of Fabricating Nanofibrous Patterned Architectures with Controlled Deposition and Desired Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasel, Sheikh Md

    We introduce a versatile advanced method of electrospinning for fabricating various kinds of nanofibrous patterns along with desired alignment, controlled amount of deposition and locally variable density into the architectures. In this method, we employed multiple electrodes whose potentials have been altered in milliseconds with the help of microprocessor based control system. Therefore, key success of this method was that the electrical field as well as charge carrying fibers could be switched shortly from one electrode's location to another, as a result, electrospun fibers could be deposited on the designated areas with desired alignment. A wide range of nanofibrous patterned architectures were constructed using proper arrangement of multiple electrodes. By controlling the concurrent activation time of two adjacent electrodes, we demonstrated that amount of fibers going into the pattern can be adjusted and desired alignment in electrospun fibers can be obtained. We also revealed that the deposition density of electrospun fibers in different areas of patterned architectures can be varied. We showed that by controlling the deposition time between two adjacent electrodes, a number of functionally graded patterns can be generated with uniaxial alignment. We also demonstrated that this handy method was capable of producing random, aligned, and multidirectional nanofibrous mats by engaging a number of electrodes and switching them in desired patterns. A comprehensive study using finite element method was carried out to understand the effects of electrical field. Simulation results revealed that electrical field strength alters shortly based on electrode control switch patterns. Nanofibrous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffolds and its composite reinforced with wollastonite and wood flour were fabricated using rotating drum electrospinning technique. Morphological, mechanical, and thermal, properties were characterized on PVA/wollastonite and PVA/wood flour nanocomposites

  5. Neural-network-directed alignment of optical systems using the laser-beam spatial filter as an example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Weiland, Kenneth E.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes an effort at NASA Lewis Research Center to use artificial neural networks to automate the alignment and control of optical measurement systems. Specifically, it addresses the use of commercially available neural network software and hardware to direct alignments of the common laser-beam-smoothing spatial filter. The report presents a general approach for designing alignment records and combining these into training sets to teach optical alignment functions to neural networks and discusses the use of these training sets to train several types of neural networks. Neural network configurations used include the adaptive resonance network, the back-propagation-trained network, and the counter-propagation network. This work shows that neural networks can be used to produce robust sequencers. These sequencers can learn by example to execute the step-by-step procedures of optical alignment and also can learn adaptively to correct for environmentally induced misalignment. The long-range objective is to use neural networks to automate the alignment and operation of optical measurement systems in remote, harsh, or dangerous aerospace environments. This work also shows that when neural networks are trained by a human operator, training sets should be recorded, training should be executed, and testing should be done in a manner that does not depend on intellectual judgments of the human operator.

  6. Fabrication of aligned nanofibers by electric-field-controlled electrospinning: insulating-block method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Wontae; Pang, Changhyun; Chae, Heeyeop

    2016-10-01

    Aligned nanofiber arrays and mats were fabricated with an electrospinning process by manipulating the electric field. The electric field was modified by insulating blocks (IBs) that were installed between the nozzle and the substrate as guiding elements to control the trajectory of the electrospinning jet flow. Simulation results showed that the electric field was deformed near the IBs, resulting in confinement of the electrospinning jet between the blocks. The balance of the electric field in the vertical direction and the repulsive force by space charges in the confined electrified jet stream was attributed to the aligned motion of the jet. Aligned arrays of 200 nm thick polyethylene oxide nanofibers were obtained, exhibiting wave-shaped and cross patterns as well as rectilinear patterns. In addition, 40 μm thick quasi-aligned carbon-nanofiber mats with anisotropic electrical property were also attained by this method.

  7. Fabrication of aligned nanofibers by electric-field-controlled electrospinning: insulating-block method.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Wontae; Pang, Changhyun; Chae, Heeyeop

    2016-10-28

    Aligned nanofiber arrays and mats were fabricated with an electrospinning process by manipulating the electric field. The electric field was modified by insulating blocks (IBs) that were installed between the nozzle and the substrate as guiding elements to control the trajectory of the electrospinning jet flow. Simulation results showed that the electric field was deformed near the IBs, resulting in confinement of the electrospinning jet between the blocks. The balance of the electric field in the vertical direction and the repulsive force by space charges in the confined electrified jet stream was attributed to the aligned motion of the jet. Aligned arrays of 200 nm thick polyethylene oxide nanofibers were obtained, exhibiting wave-shaped and cross patterns as well as rectilinear patterns. In addition, 40 μm thick quasi-aligned carbon-nanofiber mats with anisotropic electrical property were also attained by this method.

  8. An adaptive alignment algorithm for quality-controlled label-free LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Sandin, Marianne; Ali, Ashfaq; Hansson, Karin; Månsson, Olle; Andreasson, Erik; Resjö, Svante; Levander, Fredrik

    2013-05-01

    Label-free quantification using precursor-based intensities is a versatile workflow for large-scale proteomics studies. The method however requires extensive computational analysis and is therefore in need of robust quality control during the data mining stage. We present a new label-free data analysis workflow integrated into a multiuser software platform. A novel adaptive alignment algorithm has been developed to minimize the possible systematic bias introduced into the analysis. Parameters are estimated on the fly from the data at hand, producing a user-friendly analysis suite. Quality metrics are output in every step of the analysis as well as actively incorporated into the parameter estimation. We furthermore show the improvement of this system by comprehensive comparison to classical label-free analysis methodology as well as current state-of-the-art software.

  9. The application of variable universe fuzzy PID controller in computer-aided alignment of lithography projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mei; Zheng, Meng; Li, Yanqiu

    2013-12-01

    A variable universe fuzzy PID algorithm is designed to control the misalignment of the lithography projection optics to meet the requirement of high image quality. This paper first simulates the alignment of Schwarzschild objective designed by us. Secondly, the variable universe fuzzy PID control is introduced to feed back the misalignment of Schwarzschild objective to the control system to drive the stage which holds the objective. So the position can be adjusted automatically. This feedback scheme can adjust the variables' universe self-adaptively by using fuzzy rules so that the concrete function and parameters of the contraction-expansion factor are not necessary. Finally, the proposed approach is demonstrated by simulations. The results show that, variable universe fuzzy PID method exhibits better performance in both improving response speed and decreasing overshoot compared to conventional PID and fuzzy PID control methods. In addition, the interference signal can be effectively restrained. It is concluded that this method can improve the dynamic and static properties of system and meet the requirement of fast response.

  10. The Alignment Test System for AXAF-I's High Resolution Mirror Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldman, Mark

    1995-01-01

    The AXAF-1 High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) consists of four nested mirror pairs of Wolter Type-1 grazing incidence optics. The HRMA assembly and alignment will take place in a vibration-isolated, cleanliness class 100, 18 meter high tower at an Eastman Kodak Company facility in Rochester, NY. Each mirror pair must be aligned such that its image is coma-free, and the four pairs must be aligned such that their images are coincident. In addition, both the HRMA optical axis and focal point must be precisely known with respect to physical references on the HRMA. The alignment of the HRMA mirrors is measured by the HRMA Alignment Test System (HATS), which is an integral part of the tower facility. The HATS is configured as a double-pass, autocollimating Hartmann test where each mirror aperture is scanned to determine the state of alignment. This paper will describe the design and operation of the HATS.

  11. Nanostructured aligned CNT platforms enhance the controlled release of a neurotrophic protein from polypyrrole.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brianna C; Chen, Jun; Moulton, Simon E; Wallace, Gordon G

    2010-04-01

    An aligned CNT array membrane electrode has been used as a nanostructured supporting platform for polypyrrole (PPy) films, exhibiting significant improvement in the controlled release of neurotrophin. In terms of linearity of release, stimulated to unstimulated control of NT-3 release and increased mass and % release of incorporated NT-3, the nanostructured material performed more favourably than the flat PPy film.

  12. Nanostructured aligned CNT platforms enhance the controlled release of a neurotrophic protein from polypyrrole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Brianna C.; Chen, Jun; Moulton, Simon E.; Wallace, Gordon G.

    2010-04-01

    An aligned CNT array membrane electrode has been used as a nanostructured supporting platform for polypyrrole (PPy) films, exhibiting significant improvement in the controlled release of neurotrophin. In terms of linearity of release, stimulated to unstimulated control of NT-3 release and increased mass and % release of incorporated NT-3, the nanostructured material performed more favourably than the flat PPy film.

  13. Systems Alignment for Comprehensive Faculty Development in Liberal Arts Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Vicki L.; Lunsford, Laura G.; Pifer, Meghan J.

    2015-01-01

    Using an alignment framework, the authors explore faculty development initiatives in liberal arts colleges in order to understand the connection between organizational priorities and processes as connected to faculty members' stated needs. The study draws on mixed-methods data from The Initiative for Faculty Development in Liberal Arts Colleges…

  14. Systems Alignment for Comprehensive Faculty Development in Liberal Arts Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Vicki L.; Lunsford, Laura G.; Pifer, Meghan J.

    2015-01-01

    Using an alignment framework, the authors explore faculty development initiatives in liberal arts colleges in order to understand the connection between organizational priorities and processes as connected to faculty members' stated needs. The study draws on mixed-methods data from The Initiative for Faculty Development in Liberal Arts Colleges…

  15. Optical Alignment of the Spherical Antenna Measurement System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-11-01

    theodolite with built-in autocollimation capability, and a unique target mirror assembly with the target viewable from both sides. A hand-held programmable ... calculator is also used to calculate angular positions and distances. Numerous techniques and procedures developed for optical alignment are described

  16. Dynamic interferometer alignment and its utility in UV Fourier transform spectrometer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorval, Rick K.; Engel, James R.; Wyntjes, Geert J.

    1993-01-01

    Dynamic alignment has been demonstrated as a practical approach to alignment maintenance for systems in the infrared region of the spectrum. On the basis of work done by OPTRA, this technique was introduced in commercial Fourier transform spectrometer systems in 1982 and in various forms is now available from a number of manufacturers. This paper reports on work by OPTRA to extend the basic technique to systems operating in the ultraviolet. In addition, this paper reports the preliminary results of the development of an alignment system using a laser diode in place of a gas laser normally found in dynamic alignment systems. A unique optical system and spatial heterodyne technique allows for achievement of a metrology system with characteristics that fully satisfy the requirements of an ultraviolet spectrometer system.

  17. Dynamic interferometer alignment and its utility in UV Fourier transform spectrometer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorval, Rick K.; Engel, James R.; Wyntjes, Geert J.

    1993-01-01

    Dynamic alignment has been demonstrated as a practical approach to alignment maintenance for systems in the infrared region of the spectrum. On the basis of work done by OPTRA, this technique was introduced in commercial Fourier transform spectrometer systems in 1982 and in various forms is now available from a number of manufacturers. This paper reports on work by OPTRA to extend the basic technique to systems operating in the ultraviolet. In addition, this paper reports the preliminary results of the development of an alignment system using a laser diode in place of a gas laser normally found in dynamic alignment systems. A unique optical system and spatial heterodyne technique allows for achievement of a metrology system with characteristics that fully satisfy the requirements of an ultraviolet spectrometer system.

  18. Real-time observation of dynamic floor motion of the KEKB injector linac with a laser-based alignment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwada, T.; Enomoto, Y.; Kakihara, K.; Mikawa, K.; Higo, T.

    2017-03-01

    A new remote-controllable sensing system for a laser-based alignment system is in development to measure slow dynamic displacements of the tunnel floor in real time at the KEKB injector linac. Although the injector linac had initially been aligned with a laser-based alignment system, we have found that, based on recent real-time observations, the transverse displacements of the tunnel floor to the laser axis caused by dynamic ground motion are not negligibly small compared with the required alignment tolerance, in terms of the straightness of the beam line. Based on spatial and temporal cross-correlation analyses performed using displacement vectors from data recorded during a nearly eight-month period, it was found that the tunnel floor moves coherently in space and time domains over the entire length of the linac on average over long periods of time, while the cross-correlation function varies irregularly and complexly over shorter periods of time. This report describes in detail the basic design, experimental results, and present status of the new remote-sensing system for real-time alignment observations at the KEKB injector linac.

  19. State Standards and State Assessment Systems: A Guide to Alignment. Series on Standards and Assessments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Marca, Paul M.; Redfield, Doris; Winter, Phoebe C.

    Alignment of content standards, performance standards, and assessments is crucial. This guide contains information to assist states and districts in aligning their assessment systems to their content and performance standards. It includes a review of current literature, both published and fugitive. The research is woven together with a few basic…

  20. Aligning Evaluation Results and Professional Development: Driving Systemic Human Capital Management Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrstock-Sherratt, Ellen; Jacques, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    This brief provides district and other educational leaders with research-based information on aligning professional development policies with teacher evaluations to drive more comprehensive human capital management. First, this brief describes an aligned evaluation and professional development system. Next, it discusses existing models and…

  1. Controlling Reactive Nitrogen: Attaining Cost Effectiveness and Institutional Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, O.

    2012-12-01

    The fact that reactive nitrogen (Nr) cascades by changing form and moving between air, land and water makes its management and control especially difficult. The cascade means that excess Nr's negative impacts may initially occur, flow through, or linger in air, land or water. The critical question becomes where and how to interdict, not only in terms of technical capacity but also in terms of cost effectiveness and institutional capacity. The nature of Nr also needs to inform the questions that need to be asked to be able to deal with Nr. For much of the world, agriculture is the major contributor to Nr.The stark trade-off often involves excess Nr that is the product of increased food production. As it is often the largest source of excess Nr, agriculture has to be a focus for Nr control and management efforts. This paper will start with the Nr balance sheet for the US and outline some of the trade-offs and opportunities for controlling Nr.The institutional responsibility and capacity to take effective action will be assessed on the basis of US institutions and their history. This will involve illustrating some of the difficulties posed by the cascading nature of Nr as it movesfrom one regulatory jurisdiction to another. Within the US agricultural sector. the history and politics of dealing with such problems will be traced as they relate to the willingness and capacity of the sector to more effectively control or manage problems like Nr. The institutional history of the sector has a strong influence onwhat can be accomplished in a cost effective way - one that is very different from the history and practice in Australia or Europe. The EPA Science Advisory Boards' suggestion that a twenty five percent reduction in excess Nr should be achievable will be traced through for agriculture and allied situations illustrating some of the possibilities and dilemmas. Finally, the issue of metrics will be addressed. As a caution to policy makers, one can obtain very different

  2. Controlling liquid crystal alignment using photocleavable cyanobiphenyl self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Prompinit, Panida; Achalkumar, Ammathnadu S; Bramble, Jonathan P; Bushby, Richard J; Wälti, Christoph; Evans, Stephen D

    2010-12-01

    We report on the development of novel cyano-biphenyl-based thiolate self-assembled monolayers designed to promote homeotropic alignment of calamitic liquid crystals. The molecules developed contain an ortho-nitrobenzyl protected carboxylic acid group that on irradiation by soft UV (365 nm) is cleaved to yield carboxylic acid groups exposed at the surface that promote planar alignment. Using a combination of wetting, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform-infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, and ellipsometry we show that high photolysis yields (>90%) can be achieved and that the patterned SAMs are suitable for the controlled alignment of calamitic liquid crystals. This study further shows that such photo-patterned SAMs can be used to control the formation of focal conic domains (FCDs) in the smectic-A phase in terms of positioning and size confinement on surfaces.

  3. Fabrication and testing of a prototype longwall face alignment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Fabrication and testing of a laser system for instantaneous location of a longwall shearer are summarized. Calculations and measurements for the design of a laser based system for monitoring and controlling the trajectory of the shearing machine as it progresses along the longwall face are reported. An early version was fabricated by employing simple mechanical contrivances and a standard miners lamp. It is concluded that the advantages of the early version is the ability to test the longwall face without approval from the Mine Safety and Health Administration.

  4. Reconfigurable systems for sequence alignment and for general dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Ricardo P; Ayala-Rincón, Mauricio; Carvalho, Luis G A; Llanos, Carlos H; Hartenstein, Reiner W

    2005-09-30

    Reconfigurable systolic arrays can be adapted to efficiently resolve a wide spectrum of computational problems; parallelism is naturally explored in systolic arrays and reconfigurability allows for redefinition of the interconnections and operations even during run time (dynamically). We present a reconfigurable systolic architecture that can be applied for the efficient treatment of several dynamic programming methods for resolving well-known problems, such as global and local sequence alignment, approximate string matching and longest common subsequence. The dynamicity of the reconfigurability was found to be useful for practical applications in the construction of sequence alignments. A VHDL (VHSIC hardware description language) version of this new architecture was implemented on an APEX FPGA (Field programmable gate array). It would be several magnitudes faster than the software algorithm alternatives.

  5. Orientation- and position-controlled alignment of asymmetric silicon microrod on a substrate with asymmetric electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Akihide; Watanabe, Keiji; Sato, Takuya; Kotaki, Hiroshi; Schuele, Paul J.; Crowder, Mark A.; Zhan, Changqing; Hartzell, John W.; Nakatani, Ryoichi

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the orientation-controlled alignment of asymmetric Si microrods on a glass substrate with an asymmetric pair of electrodes. The Si microrods have the shape of a paddle with a blade and a shaft part, and the pair of electrodes consists of a narrow electrode and a wide electrode. By applying AC bias to the electrodes, the Si microrods suspended in a fluid align in such a way to settle across the electrode pair, and over 80% of the aligned Si microrods have an orientation with the blade and the shaft of the paddle on the wide and the narrow electrodes, respectively. When Si microrods have a shell of dielectric film and its thickness on the top face is thicker than that on the bottom face, 97.8% of the Si microrods are aligned with the top face facing upwards. This technique is useful for orientation-controlled alignment of nano- and microsized devices that have polarity or a distinction between the top and bottom faces.

  6. Alignment of multiple-off-axis-beam imaging/interference systems.

    PubMed

    Vadivel, Shruthi K; Leibovici, Matthieu C R; Gaylord, Thomas K

    2016-04-20

    The alignment of components in complex multibeam arrangements is typically prone to errors that limit the performance of the system. A systematic procedure for aligning such systems is presented here. The method facilitates the precision alignment of the optical elements to achieve the accurate projection of multiple on- and off-axis images and the simultaneous interference of the multiple beams. In addition to the multibeam imaging/interference system presented, the procedure can be employed in other multibeam imaging and/or interfering configurations.

  7. Two accurate sequence, structure, and phylogenetic template-based RNA alignment systems.

    PubMed

    Shang, Lei; Gardner, David P; Xu, Weijia; Cannone, Jamie J; Miranker, Daniel P; Ozer, Stuart; Gutell, Robin R

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of RNA sequences, once a small niche field for a small collection of scientists whose primary emphasis was the structure and function of a few RNA molecules, has grown most significantly with the realizations that 1) RNA is implicated in many more functions within the cell, and 2) the analysis of ribosomal RNA sequences is revealing more about the microbial ecology within all biological and environmental systems. The accurate and rapid alignment of these RNA sequences is essential to decipher the maximum amount of information from this data. Two computer systems that utilize the Gutell lab's RNA Comparative Analysis Database (rCAD) were developed to align sequences to an existing template alignment available at the Gutell lab's Comparative RNA Web (CRW) Site. Multiple dimensions of cross-indexed information are contained within the relational database--rCAD, including sequence alignments, the NCBI phylogenetic tree, and comparative secondary structure information for each aligned sequence. The first program, CRWAlign-1 creates a phylogenetic-based sequence profile for each column in the alignment. The second program, CRWAlign-2 creates a profile based on phylogenetic, secondary structure, and sequence information. Both programs utilize their profiles to align new sequences into the template alignment. The accuracies of the two CRWAlign programs were compared with the best template-based rRNA alignment programs and the best de-novo alignment programs. We have compared our programs with a total of eight alternative alignment methods on different sets of 16S rRNA alignments with sequence percent identities ranging from 50% to 100%. Both CRWAlign programs were superior to these other programs in accuracy and speed. Both CRWAlign programs can be used to align the very extensive amount of RNA sequencing that is generated due to the rapid next-generation sequencing technology. This latter technology is augmenting the new paradigm that RNA is intimately

  8. Two accurate sequence, structure, and phylogenetic template-based RNA alignment systems

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The analysis of RNA sequences, once a small niche field for a small collection of scientists whose primary emphasis was the structure and function of a few RNA molecules, has grown most significantly with the realizations that 1) RNA is implicated in many more functions within the cell, and 2) the analysis of ribosomal RNA sequences is revealing more about the microbial ecology within all biological and environmental systems. The accurate and rapid alignment of these RNA sequences is essential to decipher the maximum amount of information from this data. Methods Two computer systems that utilize the Gutell lab's RNA Comparative Analysis Database (rCAD) were developed to align sequences to an existing template alignment available at the Gutell lab's Comparative RNA Web (CRW) Site. Multiple dimensions of cross-indexed information are contained within the relational database - rCAD, including sequence alignments, the NCBI phylogenetic tree, and comparative secondary structure information for each aligned sequence. The first program, CRWAlign-1 creates a phylogenetic-based sequence profile for each column in the alignment. The second program, CRWAlign-2 creates a profile based on phylogenetic, secondary structure, and sequence information. Both programs utilize their profiles to align new sequences into the template alignment. Results The accuracies of the two CRWAlign programs were compared with the best template-based rRNA alignment programs and the best de-novo alignment programs. We have compared our programs with a total of eight alternative alignment methods on different sets of 16S rRNA alignments with sequence percent identities ranging from 50% to 100%. Both CRWAlign programs were superior to these other programs in accuracy and speed. Conclusions Both CRWAlign programs can be used to align the very extensive amount of RNA sequencing that is generated due to the rapid next-generation sequencing technology. This latter technology is augmenting the

  9. Metrology system for inter-alignment of lasers, telescopes, and mechanical datum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharon, Oren; Vishnia, Itai

    2015-10-01

    In modern scientific and industrial laser applications, inter-alignment of multiple optical devices is frequently a basic requirement to meet a certain specification and performance. However, the designed optical system combining mechanical elements, lasers and optical sights in various wavelengths frequently deviates from specified goals due to real life imperfections and effects. These may include mechanical tolerances, optical distortion, heating, laser cavity misalignment, overall instabilities, and non-linear effects. In order to deliver accurately and produce intricate optical systems, a carefully designed method for inter-alignment is required completing and updating the already existing methods. Thus, we designed and upgraded the performance of electronic autocollimator and combined it with innovative mechanical manipulation of optical invariants such as a Lateral Transfer Hollow Periscope to greatly improve and expand inter-alignment procedures. Depending on the combination of optical sights, laser types, and mechanical requirements, an appropriate method will be analyzed. For example, several layouts will be analyzed such as high power CO2 laser cavity alignment and laser delivery system mechanical rollers alignment. By completing the presented gear in this article other instruments such as Align Meter, Lateral Hollow Periscope (LTHPTM), Lateral Hollow Retroreflector ( LTHRTM) are available for applications such as alignment of articulated beam delivery systems.

  10. A distributed system for fast alignment of next-generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Srimani, Jaydeep K; Wu, Po-Yen; Phan, John H; Wang, May D

    2010-12-01

    We developed a scalable distributed computing system using the Berkeley Open Interface for Network Computing (BOINC) to align next-generation sequencing (NGS) data quickly and accurately. NGS technology is emerging as a promising platform for gene expression analysis due to its high sensitivity compared to traditional genomic microarray technology. However, despite the benefits, NGS datasets can be prohibitively large, requiring significant computing resources to obtain sequence alignment results. Moreover, as the data and alignment algorithms become more prevalent, it will become necessary to examine the effect of the multitude of alignment parameters on various NGS systems. We validate the distributed software system by (1) computing simple timing results to show the speed-up gained by using multiple computers, (2) optimizing alignment parameters using simulated NGS data, and (3) computing NGS expression levels for a single biological sample using optimal parameters and comparing these expression levels to that of a microarray sample. Results indicate that the distributed alignment system achieves approximately a linear speed-up and correctly distributes sequence data to and gathers alignment results from multiple compute clients.

  11. In Situ alignment system for phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, Kenneth Alan; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2000-01-01

    A device and method to facilitate the gross alignment of patterned object- and image-plane masks in optical systems such as the phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer are provided. When an array of similar pinholes or discreet mask fields is used, confusion can occur over the alignment of the focused beams within the field. Adding to the mask pattern a circumscribed or inscribed set of symbols that are identifiable in situ facilitates the unambiguous gross alignment of the object- and/or image-plane masks. Alternatively, a system of markings can be encoded directly into the window shape to accomplish this same task.

  12. In-situ temperature-controllable shear flow device for neutron scattering measurement—An example of aligned bicellar mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yan; Li, Ming; Kučerka, Norbert; Li, Shutao; Nieh, Mu-Ping

    2015-02-01

    We have designed and constructed a temperature-controllable shear flow cell for in-situ study on flow alignable systems. The device has been tested in the neutron diffraction and has the potential to be applied in the small angle neutron scattering configuration to characterize the nanostructures of the materials under flow. The required sample amount is as small as 1 ml. The shear rate on the sample is controlled by the flow rate produced by an external pump and can potentially vary from 0.11 to 3.8 × 105 s-1. Both unidirectional and oscillational flows are achievable by the setting of the pump. The instrument is validated by using a lipid bicellar mixture, which yields non-alignable nanodisc-like bicelles at low T and shear-alignable membranes at high T. Using the shear cell, the bicellar membranes can be aligned at 31 °C under the flow with a shear rate of 11.11 s-1. Multiple high-order Bragg peaks are observed and the full width at half maximum of the "rocking curve" around the Bragg's condition is found to be 3.5°-4.1°. It is noteworthy that a portion of the membranes remains aligned even after the flow stops. Detailed and comprehensive intensity correction for the rocking curve has been derived based on the finite rectangular sample geometry and the absorption of the neutrons as a function of sample angle [See supplementary material at http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4908165 for the detailed derivation of the absorption correction]. The device offers a new capability to study the conformational or orientational anisotropy of the solvated macromolecules or aggregates induced by the hydrodynamic interaction in a flow field.

  13. In-situ temperature-controllable shear flow device for neutron scattering measurement—An example of aligned bicellar mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yan; Li, Ming; Kučerka, Norbert; Li, Shutao; Nieh, Mu-Ping

    2015-02-15

    We have designed and constructed a temperature-controllable shear flow cell for in-situ study on flow alignable systems. The device has been tested in the neutron diffraction and has the potential to be applied in the small angle neutron scattering configuration to characterize the nanostructures of the materials under flow. The required sample amount is as small as 1 ml. The shear rate on the sample is controlled by the flow rate produced by an external pump and can potentially vary from 0.11 to 3.8 × 10{sup 5} s{sup −1}. Both unidirectional and oscillational flows are achievable by the setting of the pump. The instrument is validated by using a lipid bicellar mixture, which yields non-alignable nanodisc-like bicelles at low T and shear-alignable membranes at high T. Using the shear cell, the bicellar membranes can be aligned at 31 °C under the flow with a shear rate of 11.11 s{sup −1}. Multiple high-order Bragg peaks are observed and the full width at half maximum of the “rocking curve” around the Bragg’s condition is found to be 3.5°–4.1°. It is noteworthy that a portion of the membranes remains aligned even after the flow stops. Detailed and comprehensive intensity correction for the rocking curve has been derived based on the finite rectangular sample geometry and the absorption of the neutrons as a function of sample angle [See supplementary material at http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4908165 for the detailed derivation of the absorption correction]. The device offers a new capability to study the conformational or orientational anisotropy of the solvated macromolecules or aggregates induced by the hydrodynamic interaction in a flow field.

  14. Controllable positioning and alignment of silver nanowires by tunable hydrodynamic focusing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Chen, Ying; Guo, Qiuquan; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang; Yang, Jun

    2011-03-25

    Assembly and alignment of nanowires or nanotubes are critical steps for integrating functional nanodevices by the bottom-up strategy. However, it is still challenging to manipulate either an array of nanowires or individual nanowires in a controllable manner. Here we present a simple but versatile method of positioning and aligning nanowires by hydrodynamic focusing that functions as 'hydro-tweezers'. By adjusting the flow duration and flow rates of the sheath flows and sample flow, the density, width and position of the nanowire arrays, as building blocks of nanodevices, can be readily tuned in the hydrodynamic focusing process. This approach exhibits great potentials in the assembly of an array of functional nanodevices. With this method, multiple nanowire arrays can be positioned and aligned on predefined locations. Further focusing the sample flow, nanowires flow in single file. Thus single nanowires can also be lined up and located to desired positions.

  15. Controllable growth of vertically aligned graphene on C-face SiC

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Chen, Lianlian; Hilliard, Donovan; Huang, Qing-song; Liu, Fang; Wang, Mao; Böttger, Roman; Hübner, René; N’Diaye, Alpha T.; Arenholz, Elke; Heera, Viton; Skorupa, Wolfgang; Zhou, Shengqiang

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how to control the growth of vertically aligned graphene on C-face SiC by varying the processing conditions. It is found that, the growth rate scales with the annealing temperature and the graphene height is proportional to the annealing time. Temperature gradient and crystalline quality of the SiC substrates influence their vaporization. The partial vapor pressure is crucial as it can interfere with further vaporization. A growth mechanism is proposed in terms of physical vapor transport. The monolayer character of vertically aligned graphene is verified by Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. With the processed samples, d0 magnetism is realized and negative magnetoresistance is observed after Cu implantation. We also prove that multiple carriers exist in vertically aligned graphene. PMID:27708399

  16. Controllable growth of vertically aligned graphene on C-face SiC

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yu; Chen, Lianlian; Hilliard, Donovan; ...

    2016-10-06

    We investigated how to control the growth of vertically aligned graphene on C-face SiC by varying the processing conditions. It is found that, the growth rate scales with the annealing temperature and the graphene height is proportional to the annealing time. Temperature gradient and crystalline quality of the SiC substrates influence their vaporization. The partial vapor pressure is crucial as it can interfere with further vaporization. A growth mechanism is proposed in terms of physical vapor transport. The monolayer character of vertically aligned graphene is verified by Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. With the processed samples, d0 magnetism is realizedmore » and negative magnetoresistance is observed after Cu implantation. We also prove that multiple carriers exist in vertically aligned graphene.« less

  17. Controllable growth of vertically aligned graphene on C-face SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yu; Chen, Lianlian; Hilliard, Donovan; Huang, Qing-song; Liu, Fang; Wang, Mao; Böttger, Roman; Hübner, René; N’Diaye, Alpha T.; Arenholz, Elke; Heera, Viton; Skorupa, Wolfgang; Zhou, Shengqiang

    2016-10-06

    We investigated how to control the growth of vertically aligned graphene on C-face SiC by varying the processing conditions. It is found that, the growth rate scales with the annealing temperature and the graphene height is proportional to the annealing time. Temperature gradient and crystalline quality of the SiC substrates influence their vaporization. The partial vapor pressure is crucial as it can interfere with further vaporization. A growth mechanism is proposed in terms of physical vapor transport. The monolayer character of vertically aligned graphene is verified by Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. With the processed samples, d0 magnetism is realized and negative magnetoresistance is observed after Cu implantation. We also prove that multiple carriers exist in vertically aligned graphene.

  18. Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps in Workforce Development Programs—Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, Lori Ross; Assante, Michael; Tobey, D. H.; Conway, T. J.; Vanderhorst, Jr, T. J.; Januszewski, III, J.; Leo, R.; Perman, K.

    2013-07-01

    This document is a summarization of the report, Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps in Workforce Development Programs, the final report for phase 2 of the SPSP (DOE workforce study) project.

  19. In-flight angular alignment of inertial navigation systems by means of radio aids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, W.

    1972-01-01

    The principles involved in the angular alignment of the inertial reference by nondirectional data from radio aids are developed and compared with conventional methods of alignment such as gyro-compassing and pendulous vertical determination. The specific problem is considered of the space shuttle reentry and a proposed technique for the alignment of the inertial reference system some time before landing. A description is given of the digital simulation of a transponder interrogation system and of its interaction with the inertial navigation system. Data from reentry simulations are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of in-flight inertial system alignment. Concluding remarks refer to other potential applications such as space shuttle orbit insertion and air navigation of conventional aircraft.

  20. Alignment of the measurement scale mark during immersion hydrometer calibration using an image processing system.

    PubMed

    Peña-Perez, Luis Manuel; Pedraza-Ortega, Jesus Carlos; Ramos-Arreguin, Juan Manuel; Arriaga, Saul Tovar; Fernandez, Marco Antonio Aceves; Becerra, Luis Omar; Hurtado, Efren Gorrostieta; Vargas-Soto, Jose Emilio

    2013-10-24

    The present work presents an improved method to align the measurement scale mark in an immersion hydrometer calibration system of CENAM, the National Metrology Institute (NMI) of Mexico, The proposed method uses a vision system to align the scale mark of the hydrometer to the surface of the liquid where it is immersed by implementing image processing algorithms. This approach reduces the variability in the apparent mass determination during the hydrostatic weighing in the calibration process, therefore decreasing the relative uncertainty of calibration.

  1. Controllable-Viewing-Angle Display Using a Hybrid Aligned Nematic Liquid-Crystal Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Masaya

    2008-10-01

    We have developed a “controllable-viewing-angle (CVA)” device consisting of a hybrid aligned nematic (HAN) liquid-crystal (LC) cell and an negative C-plate. The CVA device can control the transmission of light at predetermined azimuth angles and at the polar angles without changing the transmission of light in the normal direction. By arranging the CVA device on top of a LC panel, we have realized a simple controllable-viewing-angle display. In particular, the CVA device using a HAN LC cell realizes a stronger light-shielding effect and better control over a wider range of viewing angles than possible with a homogeneous aligned LC cell.

  2. Study on computer-aided alignment method of reflective zoom systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jide; Chang, Jun; Xie, Guijuan; Zhang, Ke

    2015-08-01

    Computer-aided alignment is an effective method to improve the imaging quality of high-precision, complex, and off-axis optical systems. However, how to determine the misalignment quickly, exactly and constantly is essential to the technology of computer-aided alignment. Owing to the varying optical characteristics of a zoom system, sensitivity matrices are used in the alignment rather than a single matrix. Thus, the processing of sensitivity matrices is important for the computer-aided alignment of the reflective zoom system. So, the total least squares is proposed in order to solve the problems of the numerical instability and the result inaccuracy which result from the solution of the least squares method directly. Finally, the simulant calculation is processed using the numerical analysis model established in the essay. The results demonstrate that the computation method is rational and effective.

  3. A simple method for fabrication of electrospun fibers with controlled degree of alignment having potential for nerve regeneration applications.

    PubMed

    Vimal, Sunil Kumar; Ahamad, Nadim; Katti, Dhirendra S

    2016-06-01

    In peripheral nerve injuries where direct suturing of nerve endings is not feasible, nerve regeneration has been facilitated through the use of artificially aligned fibrous scaffolds that provide directional growth of neurons to bridge the gap. The degree of fiber alignment is crucial and can impact the directionality of cells in a fibrous scaffold. While there have been multiple approaches that have been used for controlling fiber alignment, however, they have been associated with a compromised control on other properties, such as diameter, morphology, curvature, and topology of fibers. Therefore, the present study demonstrates a modified electrospinning set-up, that enabled fabrication of electrospun fibers with controlled degree of alignment from non-aligned (NA), moderately aligned (MA, 75%) to highly aligned (HA, 95%) sub-micron fibers while keeping other physical properties unchanged. The results demonstrate that the aligned fibers (MA and HA) facilitated directional growth of human astrocytoma cells (U373), wherein the aspect ratio of cells was found to increase with an increase in degree of fibers alignment. In contrast to NA and MA fibers, the HA fibers showed improved contact guidance to U373 cells that was demonstrated by a significantly higher cell aspect ratio and nuclear aspect ratio. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated a modified electrospinning setup to fabricate differentially aligned fibrous scaffolds with the HA fibers showing potential for use in neural tissue engineering.

  4. Selective control over fragmentation reactions in polyatomic molecules using impulsive laser alignment.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xinhua; Doblhoff-Dier, Katharina; Xu, Huailiang; Roither, Stefan; Schöffler, Markus S; Kartashov, Daniil; Erattupuzha, Sonia; Rathje, Tim; Paulus, Gerhard G; Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Baltuška, Andrius; Gräfe, Stefanie; Kitzler, Markus

    2014-04-25

    We investigate the possibility of using molecular alignment for controlling the relative probability of individual reaction pathways in polyatomic molecules initiated by electronic processes on the few-femtosecond time scale. Using acetylene as an example, it is shown that aligning the molecular axis with respect to the polarization direction of the ionizing laser pulse does not only allow us to enhance or suppress the overall fragmentation yield of a certain fragmentation channel but, more importantly, to determine the relative probability of individual reaction pathways starting from the same parent molecular ion. We show that the achieved control over dissociation or isomerization pathways along specific nuclear degrees of freedom is based on a controlled population of associated excited dissociative electronic states in the molecular ion due to relatively enhanced ionization contributions from inner valence orbitals.

  5. Proximally placed alignment control strap for ankle varus deformity: a case report.

    PubMed

    Oh-Park, Mooyeon; Park, Geun Young; Hosamane, Sadvi; Kim, Dennis D

    2007-01-01

    Ankle varus is a commonly encountered deformity in patients with neurologic or musculoskeletal disorders. It impedes stability during the stance phase of gait and often causes skin lesions on the lateral ankle area. Plastic or conventional ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) with supplementary features such as a T-strap or increased contact area of the lateral flange have been used for correctable varus deformities. These supplementary modifications, however, have limitations as effective tools for varus control, and ankle varus may persist despite their use. We are revisiting the concept of a proximally placed alignment control strap for ankle varus, which may overcome the limitations of currently available modifications. This alignment control strap is designed to provide a medially directed force on the tibia and fibula against the force of varus deformation of the ankle. This modification can be easily added to various types of existing AFOs with acceptable aesthetic appearance. We describe 2 cases of manually correctable but persistent varus deformities of the ankle that were successfully controlled by utilization of the proximally placed alignment control strap.

  6. Experimental findings on the underwater measurements uncertainty of speed of sound and the alignment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, T. Q.; Alvarenga, A. V.; Oliveira, D. P.; Mayworm, R. C.; Souza, R. M.; Costa-Félix, R. P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Speed of sound is an important quantity to characterize reference materials for ultrasonic applications, for instance. The alignment between the transducer and the test body is an key activity in order to perform reliable and consistent measurement. The aim of this work is to evaluate the influence of the alignment system to the expanded uncertainty of such measurement. A stainless steel cylinder was previously calibrated on an out of water system typically used for calibration of non-destructive blocks. Afterwards, the cylinder was calibrated underwater with two distinct alignment system: fixed and mobile. The values were statistically compared to the out-of-water measurement, considered the golden standard for such application. For both alignment systems, the normalized error was less than 0.8, leading to conclude that the both measurement system (under and out-of-water) do not diverge significantly. The gold standard uncertainty was 2.7 m-s-1, whilst the fixed underwater system resulted in 13 m-s-1, and the mobile alignment system achieved 6.6 m-s-1. After the validation of the underwater system for speed of sound measurement, it will be applied to certify Encapsulated Tissue Mimicking Material as a reference material for biotechnology application.

  7. Drive system alignment calibration of a microgravity drop tower of novel design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trunins, J.; Osborne, B. P.; Augousti, A.

    2013-06-01

    We report here the calibration of the drive system of a new scientific facility for production of microgravity, operating on a novel design of electromagnetically driven platform. The construction achieves the design specification of alignment of the guide rails to better than 0.254mm across the entire guide rail height of 8m, despite a small lean to the right (within tolerance) and it was noted that this alignment is improved by the presence of the trolley that carries the platform.

  8. Controlled growth of aligned carbon nanotube using pulsed glow barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Kimura, Yoshihito; Okazaki, Ken

    2002-10-01

    We first achieved a catalytic growth of aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) using atmospheric pressure pulsed glow barrier discharge combined with DC bias (1000 V). Aligned CNT can grow with the directional electric field, and this is a big challenge in barrier discharges since dielectric barrier does not allow DC bias and forces to use AC voltage to maintain stable plasma conditions. To overcome this, we developed a power source generating Gaussian-shape pulses at 20 kpps with 4% duty, and DC bias was applied to the GND electrode where Ni-, Fe-coated substrate existed. With positive pulse, i.e. substrate was the cathode, random growth of CNT was observed at about 10^9 cm-2. Growth rate significantly reduced when applied negative pulse; Negative glow formation near substrate is essential for sufficient supply of radical species to the catalyst. If -DC was biased, aligned CNT with 20 nm was synthesized because negative bias enhanced negative glow formation. Interestingly, 2 to 3 CNTs stuck each other with +DC bias, resulting in 50-70 nm and non-aligned CNT. Atmospheric pressure glow barrier discharges can be highly controlled and be a potential alternative to vacuum plasmas for CVD, micro-scale, nano-scale fabrication.

  9. Optical control of plasmonic heating effects using reversible photo-alignment of nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palermo, Giovanna; Cataldi, Ugo; De Sio, Luciano; Bürgi, Thomas; Tabiryan, Nelson; Umeton, Cesare

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate and characterize an optical control of the plasmonic heat delivered by a monolayer substrate of gold nanoparticles, obtained by modulating the effective refractive index of the neighboring dielectric medium. The effect, which exploits the dependence of the nematic liquid crystal (NLC) refractive index on the molecular director orientation, is realized by using a polarization dependent, light-induced molecular reorientation of a thin film of photo-alignment layer that the NLC is in contact with. For a suitable alignment, plasmonic pumping intensity values ranging from 0.25 W/cm2 to 6.30 W/cm2 can induce up to 17.4 °C temperature variations in time intervals of the order of seconds. The reversibility of the optically induced NLC molecular director orientation enables an active control of the plasmonic photo-induced heat.

  10. Controlled growth and alignment of palladium nanowires prepared by template-assisted electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidin, Nur Ubaidah; Kok, Kuan-Ying; Jumali, Mohammad Hafizuddin Haji; Fuzi, Siti Aishah Ahmad

    2017-05-01

    Palladium nanowires are good candidates for hydrogen sensing due to the many advantages. In this paper, we discuss the controlled growth of palladium nanowires into the nanopores of anodized alumina oxide (AAO) via template-assisted electrodeposition. This technique provides precise control for the dimensional growth of Pd nanowires. The potential range for electrochemical deposition of palladium nanowires was determined by Linear Sweep Voltammetry (LSV). Crystallinity and microstructural studies of the palladium nanowires were carried out using X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as characterization tools. Systematic study on nanowire alignment across 3 µm-gaps between pairs of microfabricated gold electrodes was carried out using a.c. dielectrophoresis technique. Optimized conditions for good nanowire alignment were reported.

  11. Facilitating Constructive Alignment in Power Systems Engineering Education Using Free and Open-Source Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanfretti, L.; Milano, F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes how the use of free and open-source software (FOSS) can facilitate the application of constructive alignment theory in power systems engineering education by enabling the deep learning approach in power system analysis courses. With this aim, this paper describes the authors' approach in using the Power System Analysis Toolbox…

  12. Facilitating Constructive Alignment in Power Systems Engineering Education Using Free and Open-Source Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanfretti, L.; Milano, F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes how the use of free and open-source software (FOSS) can facilitate the application of constructive alignment theory in power systems engineering education by enabling the deep learning approach in power system analysis courses. With this aim, this paper describes the authors' approach in using the Power System Analysis Toolbox…

  13. The Role of System Alignment in Care and Education of Children from Birth to Grade 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xin; Shen, Jianping; Krenn, Huilan Y.; Yuan, Jing; Hu, Shanshan

    2015-01-01

    The emerging concept of system alignment refers to how different systems in care and education of young children can be integrated to work together as a whole system that is more effective, efficient, and equitable to produce excellent outcomes in children. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the existing literature on system…

  14. The Role of System Alignment in Care and Education of Children from Birth to Grade 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xin; Shen, Jianping; Krenn, Huilan Y.; Yuan, Jing; Hu, Shanshan

    2015-01-01

    The emerging concept of system alignment refers to how different systems in care and education of young children can be integrated to work together as a whole system that is more effective, efficient, and equitable to produce excellent outcomes in children. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the existing literature on system…

  15. Tailored Transport through Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofibre Membranes; Controlled Synthesis, Modelling, and Passive Diffusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Fletcher, Benjamin L; Hullander, Eric D; Klein, Kate L; Hensley, Dale K; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Simpson, Michael L; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2005-01-01

    The ability to control the permeability of a synthetic membrane structure formed by a spatially stochastic forest of vertically aligned carbon nanofibres is demonstrated. Control of membrane pore size and morphology was achieved by varying the thickness of a uniform, conformal coating of SiO2 on the nanofibre surfaces. Characterization of passive diffusion using fluorescence microscopy and labelled latex beads confirms the ability to alter membrane permeability. Further, statistically reproducible transport regimes are predicted for the spatially stochastic membrane as a function of the nanofibre diameter by a Monte Carlo simulation technique. Realizing predictable nanoscale behaviour in a microscopically random, statistical structure is essential for applications requiring controlled, species specific transport.

  16. Alignment control and atomically-scaled heteroepitaxial interface study of GaN nanowires.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingyun; Liu, Baodan; Yang, Wenjin; Yang, Bing; Zhang, Xinglai; Labbé, Christophe; Portier, Xavier; An, Vladimir; Jiang, Xin

    2017-04-11

    Well-aligned GaN nanowires are promising candidates for building high-performance optoelectronic nanodevices. In this work, we demonstrate the epitaxial growth of well-aligned GaN nanowires on a [0001]-oriented sapphire substrate in a simple catalyst-assisted chemical vapor deposition process and their alignment control. It is found that the ammonia flux plays a key role in dominating the initial nucleation of GaN nanocrystals and their orientation. Typically, significant improvement of the GaN nanowire alignment can be realized at a low NH3 flow rate. X-ray diffraction and cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy studies further verified the preferential orientation of GaN nanowires along the [0001] direction. The growth mechanism of GaN nanowire arrays is also well studied based on cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) characterization and it is observed that GaN nanowires have good epitaxial growth on the sapphire substrate following the crystallographic relationship between (0001)GaN∥(0001)sapphire and (101[combining macron]0)GaN∥(112[combining macron]0)sapphire. Most importantly, periodic misfit dislocations are also experimentally observed in the interface region due to the large lattice mismatch between the GaN nanowire and the sapphire substrate, and the formation of such dislocations will favor the release of structural strain in GaN nanowires. HRTEM analysis also finds the existence of "type I" stacking faults and voids inside the GaN nanowires. Optical investigation suggests that the GaN nanowire arrays have strong emission in the UV range, suggesting their crystalline nature and chemical purity. The achievement of aligned GaN nanowires will further promote the wide applications of GaN nanostructures toward diverse high-performance optoelectronic nanodevices including nano-LEDs, photovoltaic cells, photodetectors etc.

  17. MEF2C regulates outflow tract alignment and transcriptional control of Tdgf1.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Ralston M; Harris, Ian S; Jaehnig, Eric J; Sauls, Kimberly; Sinha, Tanvi; Rojas, Anabel; Schachterle, William; McCulley, David J; Norris, Russell A; Black, Brian L

    2016-03-01

    Congenital heart defects are the most common birth defects in humans, and those that affect the proper alignment of the outflow tracts and septation of the ventricles are a highly significant cause of morbidity and mortality in infants. A late differentiating population of cardiac progenitors, referred to as the anterior second heart field (AHF), gives rise to the outflow tract and the majority of the right ventricle and provides an embryological context for understanding cardiac outflow tract alignment and membranous ventricular septal defects. However, the transcriptional pathways controlling AHF development and their roles in congenital heart defects remain incompletely elucidated. Here, we inactivated the gene encoding the transcription factor MEF2C in the AHF in mice. Loss of Mef2c function in the AHF results in a spectrum of outflow tract alignment defects ranging from overriding aorta to double-outlet right ventricle and dextro-transposition of the great arteries. We identify Tdgf1, which encodes a Nodal co-receptor (also known as Cripto), as a direct transcriptional target of MEF2C in the outflow tract via an AHF-restricted Tdgf1 enhancer. Importantly, both the MEF2C and TDGF1 genes are associated with congenital heart defects in humans. Thus, these studies establish a direct transcriptional pathway between the core cardiac transcription factor MEF2C and the human congenital heart disease gene TDGF1. Moreover, we found a range of outflow tract alignment defects resulting from a single genetic lesion, supporting the idea that AHF-derived outflow tract alignment defects may constitute an embryological spectrum rather than distinct anomalies.

  18. Alignment validation

    SciTech Connect

    ALICE; ATLAS; CMS; LHCb; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-06

    The four experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb are currently under constructionat CERN. They will study the products of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. All experiments are equipped with sophisticated tracking systems, unprecedented in size and complexity. Full exploitation of both the inner detector andthe muon system requires an accurate alignment of all detector elements. Alignmentinformation is deduced from dedicated hardware alignment systems and the reconstruction of charged particles. However, the system is degenerate which means the data is insufficient to constrain all alignment degrees of freedom, so the techniques are prone to converging on wrong geometries. This deficiency necessitates validation and monitoring of the alignment. An exhaustive discussion of means to validate is subject to this document, including examples and plans from all four LHC experiments, as well as other high energy experiments.

  19. Modal control of structural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, D. F.; Wells, W. R.

    1984-11-01

    There is much interest in the practical control of large space structures such as space transportation systems and large communication satellites. The control task is normally thought of in terms of maintaining specified shape configurations, orientation and alignment, vibration suppression and pointing accuracy, etc. Because of their inherent flexibility, they are generally analyzed as distributed parameter systems which creates difficulties in the design and analysis of controllers for them. Modal control techniques have been developed to bypass problems associated with distributed parameter theory. Modal control is built upon the notion that certain specified system modes can be controlled by appropriate design of the associated closed-loop eigenvalues. This reduces the number of sensors and actuators needed to effect the control of the structure. An undesirable phenomenon, referred to as observation and control spillover, can occur if the number of sensors and actuators used is small. Spillover refers to the phenomenon in which energy intended to go solely into the controlled modes leaks into the uncontrolled modes. This report discusses the control of flexible systems described by a generalized one-dimensional wave equation which relates the structure displacement to the force distribution acting on the structure. Optimal control involving the minimization of a quadratic performance index representing control and modal energy content is considered. Typically this control formulation leads to a state feedback algorithm.

  20. Alignment of the stellar spin with the orbits of a three-planet system.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Winn, Joshua N; Barclay, Thomas; Clarke, Bruce D; Ford, Eric B; Fortney, Jonathan J; Geary, John C; Holman, Matthew J; Howard, Andrew W; Jenkins, Jon M; Koch, David; Lissauer, Jack J; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Mullally, Fergal; Ragozzine, Darin; Seader, Shawn E; Still, Martin; Thompson, Susan E

    2012-07-25

    The Sun's equator and the planets' orbital planes are nearly aligned, which is presumably a consequence of their formation from a single spinning gaseous disk. For exoplanetary systems this well-aligned configuration is not guaranteed: dynamical interactions may tilt planetary orbits, or stars may be misaligned with the protoplanetary disk through chaotic accretion , magnetic interactions or torques from neighbouring stars. Indeed, isolated 'hot Jupiters' are often misaligned and even orbiting retrograde. Here we report an analysis of transits of planets over starspots on the Sun-like star Kepler-30 (ref. 8), and show that the orbits of its three planets are aligned with the stellar equator. Furthermore, the orbits are aligned with one another to within a few degrees. This configuration is similar to that of our Solar System, and contrasts with the isolated hot Jupiters. The orderly alignment seen in the Kepler-30 system suggests that high obliquities are confined to systems that experienced disruptive dynamical interactions. Should this be corroborated by observations of other coplanar multi-planet systems, then star-disk misalignments would be ruled out as the explanation for the high obliquities of hot Jupiters, and dynamical interactions would be implicated as the origin of hot Jupiters.

  1. High accuracy alignment of the RC system coupled with the relay lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Shengbo; Li, Yang; Du, Guojun; Xin, Wei; Zhang, Qingchun

    2016-10-01

    The area array CMOS devices are usually used on the staring imaging space remote sensors on which the wide field angle. Only an RC system cannot match the requirement. So at present, the RC system coupled with a group of relay lens which is always used in the long focal length and wide field angle system can extend the field angle because the aberration of off axis of the RC system can be corrected by the relay lens. In order to reach the high precision alignment of the system, the computer aided alignment technology and the high precision spatial location reconfiguration technology will be introduced. Comparing with the group of relay lens and the secondary mirror both adjusted, this method fixed the group of relay lens. It made the secondary mirror be the only variable. The number of the variable of the alignment was reduced. The efficiency of the alignment was also improved and the period was shortened. The result was that the MTF of all the nine field angles was better than 0.315, which the design result was 0.345. The factor of the alignment was 91 percent.

  2. The Drive towards Sustainable Health Systems Needs an Alignment: Where are the Innovations in Health Systems Planning?

    PubMed

    Murphy, Gail Tomblin; Birch, Stephen; MacKenzie, Adrian; Rigby, Janet; Purkis, Mary Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Clarifying the healthcare innovation agenda is critical in order to advance the impact of system innovations. As part of this agenda-setting it is important to address the four conditions within which innovations can enhance system sustainability: 1) the innovation agenda reflects and is aligned with healthcare objectives and policy; 2) planning methodologies for services, workforce and funding are aligned with healthcare objectives and policy; 3) innovations in services are accommodated in systems through innovations in policy, planning and funding; and 4) innovations are systematically monitored and evaluated. In order to illustrate these conditions, the authors present a case study of an evaluation of one Canadian Health Authority's efforts to transform healthcare delivery. This case study reveals that aligning innovations in policy, planning, funding and health services is critical to transforming health systems and that, in the absence of such alignment, sustainable health systems are difficult to achieve.

  3. Efficacy of clear aligners in controlling orthodontic tooth movement: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Gabriele; Parrini, Simone; Castroflorio, Tommaso; Deregibus, Andrea; Debernardi, Cesare L

    2015-09-01

    To assess the scientific evidence related to the efficacy of clear aligner treatment (CAT) in controlling orthodontic tooth movement. PubMed, PMC, NLM, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials, Web of Knowledge, Scopus, Google Scholar, and LILACs were searched from January 2000 to June 2014 to identify all peer-reviewed articles potentially relevant to the review. Methodological shortcomings were highlighted and the quality of the studies was ranked using the Cochrane Tool for Risk of Bias Assessment. Eleven relevant articles were selected (two Randomized Clinical Trials (RCT), five prospective non-randomized, four retrospective non-randomized), and the risk of bias was moderate for six studies and unclear for the others. The amount of mean intrusion reported was 0.72 mm. Extrusion was the most difficult movement to control (30% of accuracy), followed by rotation. Upper molar distalization revealed the highest predictability (88%) when a bodily movement of at least 1.5 mm was prescribed. A decrease of the Little's Index (mandibular arch: 5 mm; maxillary arch: 4 mm) was observed in aligning arches. CAT aligns and levels the arches; it is effective in controlling anterior intrusion but not anterior extrusion; it is effective in controlling posterior buccolingual inclination but not anterior buccolingual inclination; it is effective in controlling upper molar bodily movements of about 1.5 mm; and it is not effective in controlling rotation of rounded teeth in particular. However, the results of this review should be interpreted with caution because of the number, quality, and heterogeneity of the studies.

  4. Precision alignment and calibration of optical systems using computer generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyle, Laura Elizabeth

    As techniques for manufacturing and metrology advance, optical systems are being designed with more complexity than ever before. Given these prescriptions, alignment and calibration can be a limiting factor in their final performance. Computer generated holograms (CGHs) have several unique properties that make them powerful tools for meeting these demanding tolerances. This work will present three novel methods for alignment and calibration of optical systems using computer generated holograms. Alignment methods using CGHs require that the optical wavefront created by the CGH be related to a mechanical datum to locate it space. An overview of existing methods is provided as background, then two new alignment methods are discussed in detail. In the first method, the CGH contact Ball Alignment Tool (CBAT) is used to align a ball or sphere mounted retroreflector (SMR) to a Fresnel zone plate pattern with micron level accuracy. The ball is bonded directly onto the CGH substrate and provides permanent, accurate registration between the optical wavefront and a mechanical reference to locate the CGH in space. A prototype CBAT was built and used to align and bond an SMR to a CGH. In the second method, CGH references are used to align axi-symmetric optics in four degrees of freedom with low uncertainty and real time feedback. The CGHs create simultaneous 3D optical references where the zero order reflection sets tilt and the first diffracted order sets centration. The flexibility of the CGH design can be used to accommodate a wide variety of optical systems and maximize sensitivity to misalignments. A 2-CGH prototype system was aligned multiplied times and the alignment uncertainty was quantified and compared to an error model. Finally, an enhanced calibration method is presented. It uses multiple perturbed measurements of a master sphere to improve the calibration of CGH-based Fizeau interferometers ultimately measuring aspheric test surfaces. The improvement in the

  5. A Precision Dose Control Circuit for Maskless E-Beam Lithography With Massively Parallel Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Eliza, Sazia A.; Islam, Syed K; Rahman, Touhidur; Bull, Nora D; Blalock, Benjamin; Baylor, Larry R; Ericson, Milton Nance; Gardner, Walter L

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a highly accurate dose control circuit (DCC) for the emission of a desired number of electrons from vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) in a massively parallel maskless e-beam lithography system. The parasitic components within the VACNF device cause a premature termination of the electron emission, resulting in underexposure of the photoresist. In this paper, we compensate for the effects of the parasitic components and noise while reducing the area of the chip and achieving a precise count of emitted electrons from the VACNFs to obtain the optimum dose for the e-beam lithography.

  6. An automated system for the alignment of large area modular solar simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, J. P.; Polak, L. F.; Fisher, P. S.

    1972-01-01

    A real-time optical alignment and diagnostic system is being assembled for installation at the Space Environment Simulation Laboratory. This system will be used to measure and analyze the performance of optical components, assemblies, and full modules. This information, in turn, is used to align assemblies and modules. The system capability includes such functions as the generation and updating of a catalog, which serves as permanent record, in addition to providing the capability to predict in-chamber performance of optics combinations before they are mounted in the chamber.

  7. Active angular alignment of gauge block in system for contactless gauge block calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchta, Zdeněk.; Šarbort, Martin; Řeřucha, Šimon; Hucl, Václav; Čížek, Martin; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a method for active angular alignment of gauge block implemented in a system for automatic contactless calibration of gauge blocks designed at ISI ASCR. The system combines low-coherence interferometry and laser interferometry, where the first identifies the gauge block sides position and the second one measures the gauge block length itself. A crucial part of the system is the algorithm for gauge block alignment to the measuring beam which is able to compensate the gauge block lateral and longitudinal tilt up to 0.141 mrad. The algorithm is also important for the gauge block position monitoring during its length measurement.

  8. Evaluation of mechanical precision and alignment uncertainties for an integrated CT/LINAC system.

    PubMed

    Court, Laurence; Rosen, Isaac; Mohan, Radhe; Dong, Lei

    2003-06-01

    A new integrated CT/LINAC combination, in which the CT scanner is inside the radiation therapy treatment room and the same patient couch is used for CT scanning and treatment (after a 180-degree couch rotation), should allow for accurate correction of interfractional setup errors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sources of uncertainties, and to measure the overall precision of this system. The following sources of uncertainty were identified: (1) the patient couch position on the LINAC side after a rotation, (2) the patient couch position on the CT side after a rotation, (3) the patient couch position as indicated by its digital readout, (4) the difference in couch sag between the CT and LINAC positions, (5) the precision of the CT coordinates, (6) the identification of fiducial markers from CT images, (7) the alignment of contours with structures in the CT images, and (8) the alignment with setup lasers. The largest single uncertainties (one standard deviation or 1 SD) were found in couch position on the CT side after a rotation (0.5 mm in the RL direction) and the alignment of contours with the CT images (0.4 mm in the SI direction). All other sources of uncertainty are less than 0.3 mm (1 SD). The overall precision of two setup protocols was investigated in a controlled phantom study. A protocol that relies heavily on the mechanical integrity of the system, and assumes a fixed relationship between the LINAC isocenter and the CT images, gave a predicted precision (1 SD) of 0.6, 0.7, and 0.6 mm in the SI, RL and AP directions, respectively. The second protocol reduces reliance on the mechanical precision of the total system, particularly the patient couch, by using radio-opaque fiducial markers to transfer the isocenter information from the LINAC side to the CT images. This protocol gave a slightly improved predicted precision of 0.5, 0.4, and 0.4 mm in the SI, RL and AP directions, respectively. The distribution of phantom position after CT

  9. Stability Measurements for Alignment of the NIF Neutron Imaging System Pinhole Array

    SciTech Connect

    Fittinghoff, D N; Bower, D E; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Frank, M; Buckles, R A; Munson, C; Wilde, C H

    2011-03-29

    The alignment system for the National Ignition Facility's neutron imaging system has been commissioned and measurements of the relative stability of the 90-315 DIM, the front and the back of the neutron imaging pinhole array and an exploding pusher target have been made using the 90-135 and the 90-258 opposite port alignment systems. Additionally, a laser beam shot from the neutron-imaging Annex and reflected from a mirror at the back of the pinhole array was used to monitor the pointing of the pinhole. Over a twelve hour period, the relative stability of these parts was found to be within {approx} {+-}18 {micro}m rms even when using manual methods for tracking the position of the objects. For highly visible features, use of basic particle tracking techniques found that the front of the pinhole array was stable relative to the 90-135 opposite port alignment camera to within {+-}3.4 {micro}m rms. Reregistration, however, of the opposite port alignment systems themselves using the target alignment sensor was found to change the expected position of target chamber center by up to 194 {micro}m.

  10. Automated alignment system for optical wireless communication systems using image recognition.

    PubMed

    Brandl, Paul; Weiss, Alexander; Zimmermann, Horst

    2014-07-01

    In this Letter, we describe the realization of a tracked line-of-sight optical wireless communication system for indoor data distribution. We built a laser-based transmitter with adaptive focus and ray steering by a microelectromechanical systems mirror. To execute the alignment procedure, we used a CMOS image sensor at the transmitter side and developed an algorithm for image recognition to localize the receiver's position. The receiver is based on a self-developed optoelectronic integrated chip with low requirements on the receiver optics to make the system economically attractive. With this system, we were able to set up the communication link automatically without any back channel and to perform error-free (bit error rate <10⁻⁹) data transmission over a distance of 3.5 m with a data rate of 3 Gbit/s.

  11. Uneven batch data alignment with application to the control of batch end-product quality.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jian; Marjanovic, Ognjen; Lennox, Barry

    2014-03-01

    Batch processes are commonly characterized by uneven trajectories due to the existence of batch-to-batch variations. The batch end-product quality is usually measured at the end of these uneven trajectories. It is necessary to align the time differences for both the measured trajectories and the batch end-product quality in order to implement statistical process monitoring and control schemes. Apart from synchronizing trajectories with variable lengths using an indicator variable or dynamic time warping, this paper proposes a novel approach to align uneven batch data by identifying short-window PCA&PLS models at first and then applying these identified models to extend shorter trajectories and predict future batch end-product quality. Furthermore, uneven batch data can also be aligned to be a specified batch length using moving window estimation. The proposed approach and its application to the control of batch end-product quality are demonstrated with a simulated example of fed-batch fermentation for penicillin production. Copyright © 2013 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Controlled release of 6-aminonicotinamide from aligned, electrospun fibers alters astrocyte metabolism and dorsal root ganglia neurite outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, Nicholas J.; Gilbert, Ryan J.

    2011-08-01

    Following central nervous system (CNS) injury, activated astrocytes form a glial scar that inhibits the migration of axons ultimately leading to regeneration failure. Biomaterials developed for CNS repair can provide local delivery of therapeutics and/or guidance mechanisms to encourage cell migration into damaged regions of the brain or spinal cord. Electrospun fibers are a promising type of biomaterial for CNS injury since these fibers can direct cellular and axonal migration while slowly delivering therapy to the injury site. In this study, it was hypothesized that inclusion of an anti-metabolite, 6-aminonicotinamide (6AN), within poly-l-lactic acid electrospun fibers could attenuate astrocyte metabolic activity while still directing axonal outgrowth. Electrospinning parameters were varied to produce highly aligned electrospun fibers that contained 10% or 20% (w/w) 6AN. 6AN release from the fiber substrates occurred continuously over 2 weeks. Astrocytes placed onto drug-releasing fibers were less active than those cultured on scaffolds without 6AN. Dorsal root ganglia placed onto control and drug-releasing scaffolds were able to direct neurites along the aligned fibers. However, neurite outgrowth was stunted by fibers that contained 20% 6AN. These results show that 6AN release from aligned, electrospun fibers can decrease astrocyte activity while still directing axonal outgrowth.

  13. Time-varying gyrocompass alignment for fiber-optic-gyro inertial navigation system with large misalignment angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben, Yueyang; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yi; Huo, Liang

    2014-09-01

    Conventional strapdown gyrocompass alignment methods are based on the assumption that the fiber-optic-gyro inertial navigation system has a small azimuth misalignment angle. A large azimuth misalignment angle would lead to an extension of the alignment duration. A time-varying gyrocompass alignment method to solve this problem is provided. An appropriate parameter setting is given for the gyrocompass alignment with a large misalignment angle. Also, a proper protocol for a parametric switch is derived. Simulation and trail results show that the proposed method has better alignment performance than conventional ones, as the system has large misalignment angles.

  14. Structurally controlled and aligned tight gas reservoir compartmentalization in the San Juan and Piceance Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, A.D.; Kuuskraa, V.A.; Klawitter, A.L.

    1995-10-01

    Recurrent basement faulting is the primary controlling mechanism for aligning and compartmentalizing upper Cretaceous aged tight gas reservoirs of the San Juan and Piceance Basins. Northwest trending structural lineaments that formed in conjunction with the Uncompahgre Highlands have profoundly influenced sedimentation trends and created boundaries for gas migration; sealing and compartmentalizing sedimentary packages in both basins. Fractures which formed over the structural lineaments provide permeability pathways which allowing gas recovery from otherwise tight gas reservoirs. Structural alignments and associated reservoir compartments have been accurately targeted by integrating advanced remote sensing imagery, high resolution aeromagnetics, seismic interpretation, stratigraphic mapping and dynamic structural modelling. This unifying methodology is a powerful tool for exploration geologists and is also a systematic approach to tight gas resource assessment in frontier basins.

  15. Anchoring energy enhancement and pretilt angle control of liquid crystal alignment on polymerized surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Libo; Liao, Pei-Chun; Lin, Chen-Chun; Ting, Tien-Lun; Hsu, Wen-Hao; Su, Jenn-Jia; Chien, Liang-Chy

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate enhanced surface anchoring energy and control of pretilt angle in a nematic liquid crystal cell with vertical alignment and polymerized surfaces (PS-VA). The polymerized surfaces are formed by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation-induced phase separation of a minute amount of a reactive monomer in the vertical-aligned nematic liquid crystal. By introducing a bias voltage during UV curing, surface-localized polymer protrusions with a dimension of 100nm and a field-induced pretilt angle are observed. Experimental evidences and theoretical analyses validate that PS-VA has increased surface anchoring strength by two folds and pretilt angle has been changed from 89° to 86° compared to those of a VA cell. The enabling PS-VA cell technique with excel electro-optical properties such as very good dark state, high optical contrast, and fast rise and decay times may lead to development of a wide range of applications.

  16. Anchoring energy enhancement and pretilt angle control of liquid crystal alignment on polymerized surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Libo; Chien, Liang-Chy; Liao, Pei-Chun; Lin, Chen-Chun; Ting, Tien-Lun; Hsu, Wen-Hao; Su, Jenn-Jia

    2015-09-15

    We demonstrate enhanced surface anchoring energy and control of pretilt angle in a nematic liquid crystal cell with vertical alignment and polymerized surfaces (PS-VA). The polymerized surfaces are formed by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation-induced phase separation of a minute amount of a reactive monomer in the vertical-aligned nematic liquid crystal. By introducing a bias voltage during UV curing, surface-localized polymer protrusions with a dimension of 100nm and a field-induced pretilt angle are observed. Experimental evidences and theoretical analyses validate that PS-VA has increased surface anchoring strength by two folds and pretilt angle has been changed from 89° to 86° compared to those of a VA cell. The enabling PS-VA cell technique with excel electro-optical properties such as very good dark state, high optical contrast, and fast rise and decay times may lead to development of a wide range of applications.

  17. Eccentricity Inferences in Multi-planet systems with Transit Timing: Degeneracies and Apsidal Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Van Laerhoven, Christa L.; Ford, Eric B.

    2016-05-01

    Hundreds of multi-transiting systems discovered by the Kepler mission show Transit Timing Variations (TTV). In cases where the TTVs are uniquely attributable to transiting planets, the TTVs enable precise measurements of planetary masses and orbital parameters. Of particular interest are the constraints on eccentricity vectors that can be inferred in systems of low-mass exoplanets.The TTVs in these systems are dominated by a signal caused by near-resonant mean motions. This causes the well-known near-degeneracy between planetary masses and orbital eccentricities. In addition, it causes a degeneracy between the eccentricities of interacting planet pairs.For many systems, the magnitude of individual eccentricities are weakly constrained, yet the data typically provide a tight constraint on the posterior joint distribution for the eccentricity vector components. This permits tight constraints on the relative eccentricity and degree of alignment of interacting planets.For a sample of two and three-planet systems with TTVs, we highlight the effects of these correlations. While the most eccentric orbital solutions for these systems show apsidal alignment, this is often due to the degeneracy that causes correlated constraints on the eccentricity vector components. We compare the likelihood of apsidal alignment for two choices of eccentricity prior: a wide prior using a Rayleigh distribution of scale length 0.1 and a narrower prior with scale length 0.02. In all cases the narrower prior decreased the fraction of samples that exhibited apsidal alignment. However, apsidal alignment persisted in the majority of cases with a narrower eccentricity prior. For a sample of our TTV solutions, we ran simulations of these systems over secular timescales, and decomposed their eccentricity eigenmodes over time, confirming that in most cases, the eccentricities were dominated by parallel eigenmodes which favor apsidal alignment.

  18. Calibration method for lumbosacral dimensions in wearable sensor system of lumbar alignment.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Yoshio; Kusaka, Takashi; Tanaka, Takayuki; Matsuo, Yoshikazu; Oda, Makoto; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Kamishima, Tamotsu; Yamanaka, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Anteflexion of the spine is essential for many physical activities in everyday life. However, this motion places the lumbar disks under heavy load due to changes in the shape of the lumbar spine and can lead to low back pain. With the aim of reducing low back pain, here we developed a wearable sensor system that can estimate lumbosacral alignment and lumbar load by measuring the shape of the lumbar skin when the lumbosacral alignment changes. In addition, we used this system to measure the parameters of anteflexion and studied the change in dimensions of the lumbar spine from changes in posture. By determining the dimensions of the lumbosacral spine on an X-ray image, a lumbosacral dimensions calibration method based on body surface area and height was developed. By using this method, lumbosacral alignment and lumbar load could be accurately estimated using the wearable sensor system.

  19. Alignment and measurement for back-end optical system of quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qi-rui; Fan, Bin

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduced the method of alignment and measurement for back-end optical system of quantum communication ground station. The alignment methods of important components of system such as 20 constriction multiplicator, single photon detector mechanism and so on were introduced at first. The alignment method of the key receiving optical path and the entanglement receiving optical path which were integrated into coaxial multi optical path with other three optical paths were described in detail. Finally the back-end optical system was tested indoors with an optical power meter and a collimator. The results shows that the quantum key signal (@850nm) receiving efficiency is 27.6%, the average polarization contrast is better than 320:1, the receiving efficiency of quantum entanglement signal (@810nm) was 28.6%, and the average polarization contrast is better than 180:1.

  20. The Alignment System for a Medium-Sized Schwarzschild-Couder Telescope Prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Deivid; Humensky, Brian; Nieto, Daniel; V Vassiliev Group in UCLA division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P Kaaret Group at Iowa University Department of Physics and Astronomy, CTA Consortium

    2016-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is an international project for a next-generation ground-based gamma-ray observatory. CTA, conceived as an array of tens of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, comprising small, medium and large-size telescopes, is aiming to improve on the sensitivity of current-generation experiments by an order of magnitude and provide energy coverage from 20 GeV to more than 300 TeV. The Schwarzschild-Couder design is a candidate 9-m diameter medium-sized telescope featuring a novel aplanatic two-mirror optical design capable of a wide field of view with significantly improved imaging resolution as compared to the traditional Davies-Cotton optical design. Achieving this imaging resolution imposes strict mirror alignment requirements that necessitate a sophisticated alignment system. This system uses a collection of position sensors between panels to determine the relative position of adjacent panels; each panel is mounted on a Stewart platform to allow motion control with six degrees of freedom, facilitating the alignment of the optical surface for the segmented primary and secondary mirrors. Alignments of the primary and secondary mirrors and the camera focal plane with respect to each other are performed utilizing a set of CCD cameras which image LEDs placed on the mirror panels to measure relative translation, and custom-built auto-collimators to measure relative tilt between the primary and secondary mirrors along the optical axis of the telescope. In this contribution we present the status of the development of the SC optical alignment system, soon to be materialized in a full-scale prototype SC medium-size telescope (pSCT) at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in southern Arizona.

  1. Second Language Writing Classification System Based on Word-Alignment Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotani, Katsunori; Yoshimi, Takehiko

    2010-01-01

    The present paper introduces an automatic classification system for assisting second language (L2) writing evaluation. This system, which classifies sentences written by L2 learners as either native speaker-like or learner-like sentences, is constructed by machine learning algorithms using word-alignment distributions as classification features…

  2. Microwave systems analysis, solar power satellite. [alignment of the antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Various alternative active approaches to achieving aand maintaining flatness for the microwave power transmission system (MPTS) were studied. A baseline active alignment scheme was developed which includes subarray attachment mechanisms, height and tilting adjustments, service corridors, a rotating laser beam reference system, monopulse pointing techniques, and the design of a beam-centering photoconductive sensor.

  3. Aligning Food Systems Policies to Advance Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Mark; Tagtow, Angie; Roberts, Susan L.; MacDougall, Erin

    2009-01-01

    The involvement of public health professionals in food and agricultural policy provides tremendous opportunities for advancing the public's health. It is particularly challenging, however, for professionals to understand and consider the numerous policy drivers that impact the food system, which range from agricultural commodity policies to local food safety ordinances. Confronted with this complexity in the food system, policy advocates often focus on narrow objectives with disregard for the larger system. This commentary contends that, in order to be most effective, public health professionals need to consider the full range of interdependent policies that affect the system. Food policy councils have proven to be an effective tool, particularly at the local and state level, for developing comprehensive food systems policies that can improve public health. PMID:23144671

  4. Method of alignment error control in free-form surface metrology with the tilted-wave-interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Shen, Hua; Zhu, Rihong

    2016-04-01

    Compared with conventional optical elements, free-form surface optical elements, as a kind of nonrotationally symmetrical shaped component, can provide more freedom in optical design, optimize the structure of the optical system, and improve its performance. However, the difficulties involved in the measurement of free-form elements restrict their manufacture and application. A tilted-wave-interferometer (TWI) can achieve high precision in free-form surface measurement, but it requires higher space attitude error control. We analyze the relation between the alignment error and the measurement error introduced by the misalignment in free-form surface metrology with TWI. The attitude control method in the rotation direction is proposed based on the moire fringe technique. Then, combining it with the five-dimensional space attitude control method of aspherical elements, we put forward an alignment error control process in measuring the free-form surface. An experiment of measuring a free-form surface using TWI shows the effectiveness of our method.

  5. Alignment of the Measurement Scale Mark during Immersion Hydrometer Calibration Using an Image Processing System

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Perez, Luis Manuel; Pedraza-Ortega, Jesus Carlos; Ramos-Arreguin, Juan Manuel; Arriaga, Saul Tovar; Fernandez, Marco Antonio Aceves; Becerra, Luis Omar; Hurtado, Efren Gorrostieta; Vargas-Soto, Jose Emilio

    2013-01-01

    The present work presents an improved method to align the measurement scale mark in an immersion hydrometer calibration system of CENAM, the National Metrology Institute (NMI) of Mexico, The proposed method uses a vision system to align the scale mark of the hydrometer to the surface of the liquid where it is immersed by implementing image processing algorithms. This approach reduces the variability in the apparent mass determination during the hydrostatic weighing in the calibration process, therefore decreasing the relative uncertainty of calibration. PMID:24284770

  6. A closed-loop time-alignment system for baseband combining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feria, Y.

    1994-01-01

    In baseband combining, the key element is the time alignment of the baseband signals. This article describes a closed-loop time-alignment system that estimates and adjusts the relative delay between two baseband signals received from two different antennas for the signals to be coherently combined. This system automatically determines which signal is advanced and delays it accordingly with a resolution of a sample period. The performance of the loop is analyzed, and the analysis is verified through simulation. The variance of the delay estimates and the signal-to-noise ratio degradation in the simulations agree with the theoretical calculations.

  7. The proposed alignment system for the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, R.E.; Fischer, G.E.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes the current state of work in progress with respect to the geometry, alignment requirements, scenarios, and hardware for meeting the tolerances of the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at SLAC. The methods and systems proposed acknowledge that component motion at the micron level, from whatever cause (ground motion, thermal effects, etc.) must be measured on-line and compensated for on relatively short time scales. To provide an integrated alignment/positioning package, some unique designs for reference systems, calibration of effect electric and magnetic centers, and component movers are introduced. 24 refs., 28 figs.

  8. WAVELENGTH AND ALIGNMENT TESTS FOR CONFOCAL SPECTRAL IMAGING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal spectral imaging (CSI) microscope systems now on the market delineate multiple fluorescent proteins, labels, or dyes within biological specimens by performing spectral characterizations. However, we find that some CSI present inconsistent spectral profiles of reference s...

  9. WAVELENGTH AND ALIGNMENT TESTS FOR CONFOCAL SPECTRAL IMAGING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal spectral imaging (CSI) microscope systems now on the market delineate multiple fluorescent proteins, labels, or dyes within biological specimens by performing spectral characterizations. However, we find that some CSI present inconsistent spectral profiles of reference s...

  10. Magnetic prism alignment system for measuring large-angle strabismus.

    PubMed

    Bishop, John Edward

    2014-02-01

    Prismatic measurement of large-angle strabismus requires the simultaneous use of two or more prisms for neutralization. To facilitate the clinical measurement of large-angle strabismus a new prism system was designed utilizing a flat plate and a ferrous metal surface coupled with prisms containing rare earth magnets implanted in their base and bottom surfaces. Copyright © 2014 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Alignment of Department of Defense Manpower, Resources, and Personnel Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    phases of the research were conducted during fiscal year 2004 and briefed to the sponsor in September 2004. This report is being published now for...of Defense for Person- nel and Readiness, or OUSD P &R. It was conducted within the Forces and Resources Policy Center of the RAND Corporation’s...Defense Manpower Data Center’s Forces and Resources Manpower Information System ( FORMIS ) database. Misalign- ments were evident at points in time, but

  12. An Intelligent Dynamic Alignment System for Interferometer of Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kun; Zeng, Libo

    An intelligent dynamic alignment system for a Michelson interferometer which is applied to a Mid-infrared band Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) is presented. Three photodiodes are used to detect the tilt of moving mirror opposite to fixed mirror with the assistance of the interfered signal of a reference He-Ne laser. This technique is based on detecting the phase difference of laser signal between every two diodes in two perpendicular directions. And four magnetic actuators behind the mounting brace of fixed mirror are used to change the pose of fixed mirror. The system is controlled by a digital signal processor (DSP) in real-time. A feedback algorithm is used to tilt fixed mirror following the action of moving mirror so as to keep both mirror planes in perpendicular. Experiment result shows that the relative tilt between two reflecting mirrors can be restricted in a range no more than ±1.5×10-6rad. This system is effective and reliable to be applied to scanning interferometer of Fourier transform spectrometer.

  13. A line-source method for aligning on-board and other pinhole SPECT systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Susu; Bowsher, James; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: In order to achieve functional and molecular imaging as patients are in position for radiation therapy, a robotic multipinhole SPECT system is being developed. Alignment of the SPECT system—to the linear accelerator (LINAC) coordinate frame and to the coordinate frames of other on-board imaging systems such as cone-beam CT (CBCT)—is essential for target localization and image reconstruction. An alignment method that utilizes line sources and one pinhole projection is proposed and investigated to achieve this goal. Potentially, this method could also be applied to the calibration of the other pinhole SPECT systems.Methods: An alignment model consisting of multiple alignment parameters was developed which maps line sources in three-dimensional (3D) space to their two-dimensional (2D) projections on the SPECT detector. In a computer-simulation study, 3D coordinates of line-sources were defined in a reference room coordinate frame, such as the LINAC coordinate frame. Corresponding 2D line-source projections were generated by computer simulation that included SPECT blurring and noise effects. The Radon transform was utilized to detect angles (α) and offsets (ρ) of the line-source projections. Alignment parameters were then estimated by a nonlinear least squares method, based on the α and ρ values and the alignment model. Alignment performance was evaluated as a function of number of line sources, Radon transform accuracy, finite line-source width, intrinsic camera resolution, Poisson noise, and acquisition geometry. Experimental evaluations were performed using a physical line-source phantom and a pinhole-collimated gamma camera attached to a robot.Results: In computer-simulation studies, when there was no error in determining angles (α) and offsets (ρ) of the measured projections, six alignment parameters (three translational and three rotational) were estimated perfectly using three line sources. When angles (α) and offsets (ρ) were provided by

  14. Kondo-correlated transport in single molecule ferromagnetic break junction devices with controllable electrode magnetization alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Gavin; Hu, Ting-Chen

    A quantum dot attached to electrodes with magnetizations that can be switched between parallel and anti-parallel alignment has been proposed as a platform for investigating quantum criticality associated with the destruction of Kondo entanglement. We have fabricated single molecule break junction devices with elliptical ferromagnetic electrodes designed to suit this purpose. Low temperature transport measurements, supported by micromagnetic simulations, were used to investigate the magnetoresistance response on control samples during the magnetization reversal process. We show results of Kondo-correlated transport as the source and drain contacts are switched between parallel and anti-parallel magnetization configurations.

  15. An Improved Alignment Method for the Strapdown Inertial Navigation System (SINS).

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Gao, Yanbin; Li, Guangchun; Guang, Xingxing; Li, Shutong

    2016-04-29

    In this paper, an innovative inertial navigation system (INS) mechanization and the associated Kalman filter (KF) are developed to implement a fine alignment for the strapdown INS (SINS) on stationary base. The improved mechanization is established in the pseudo-geographic frame, which is rebuilt based on the initial position. The new mechanization eliminates the effects of linear movement errors on the heading by decoupling. Compared with the traditional local-level mechanization, it has more advantages. The proposed algorithm requires lower coarse alignment accuracy in both the open-loop and closed-loop KFs and hence can improve the system reliability and decrease the total alignment time. Moreover, for the closed-loop KF, it can decrease oscillation caused by the system errors and improve the closed-loop system stability. In addition, the proposed algorithm can also be applied to polar alignment. The performance of the proposed algorithm is verified by both simulations and experiments and the results exhibit the superior performance of the proposed approach.

  16. Working Together: Aligning State Systems and Policies for Individual and Regional Prosperity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzeo, Christopher; Roberts, Brandon; Spence, Chistopher; Strawn, Julie

    2006-01-01

    This report focuses on six areas in which policymakers can take action to enhance outcomes for students along the educational pipeline and thus increase the supply of knowledge workers. These areas include: (1) Promoting access to education and training and improving the alignment of adult and workforce education systems and postsecondary…

  17. Alignment in Complex Education Systems: Achieving Balance and Coherence. OECD Education Working Papers, Number 64

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looney, Janet W.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of OECD countries now implement one form or another of standards-based assessment and evaluation. The core logic of standards-based systems rests upon the alignment of three key elements: "standards" defining the knowledge and skills--or "competences"--students are expected to have attained at different stages of their education;…

  18. The Caterpillar Game: A SW-PBIS Aligned Classroom Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floress, Margaret T.; Jacoby, Amber L.

    2017-01-01

    The Caterpillar Game is a classroom management system that is aligned with School-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports standards. A single-case, multiple-baseline design was used to evaluate the effects of the Caterpillar Game on disruptive student behavior and teacher praise. Three classrooms were included in the study (preschool,…

  19. An Improved Alignment Method for the Strapdown Inertial Navigation System (SINS)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meng; Gao, Yanbin; Li, Guangchun; Guang, Xingxing; Li, Shutong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an innovative inertial navigation system (INS) mechanization and the associated Kalman filter (KF) are developed to implement a fine alignment for the strapdown INS (SINS) on stationary base. The improved mechanization is established in the pseudo-geographic frame, which is rebuilt based on the initial position. The new mechanization eliminates the effects of linear movement errors on the heading by decoupling. Compared with the traditional local-level mechanization, it has more advantages. The proposed algorithm requires lower coarse alignment accuracy in both the open-loop and closed-loop KFs and hence can improve the system reliability and decrease the total alignment time. Moreover, for the closed-loop KF, it can decrease oscillation caused by the system errors and improve the closed-loop system stability. In addition, the proposed algorithm can also be applied to polar alignment. The performance of the proposed algorithm is verified by both simulations and experiments and the results exhibit the superior performance of the proposed approach. PMID:27136565

  20. Improving Alignment, Advancing Students-Demands and Opportunities for States, Systems, and Campuses. Perspectives, July 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This analysis of secondary-postsecondary alignment issues suggests some clear directions that campus, system, and state policy leaders must take to improve the success of students in the educational pipeline. These efforts will be more successful if they take place as part of broader K-16 initiatives--efforts that include early outreach to high…

  1. The Caterpillar Game: A SW-PBIS Aligned Classroom Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floress, Margaret T.; Jacoby, Amber L.

    2017-01-01

    The Caterpillar Game is a classroom management system that is aligned with School-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports standards. A single-case, multiple-baseline design was used to evaluate the effects of the Caterpillar Game on disruptive student behavior and teacher praise. Three classrooms were included in the study (preschool,…

  2. A Sense of Balance: District Aligns Personalized Learning with School and System Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donsky, Debbie; Witherow, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses the challenge of personalizing learning while also ensuring alignment with system and school improvement plans. Leaders of the York Region District School Board in Ontario knew that what took their high-performing school district from good to great would not take it from great to excellent. The district's early model of…

  3. Controlled electrode magnetization alignment in planar elliptical ferromagnetic break junction devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Gavin D.; Hu, Ting-Chen

    2016-10-01

    Controlling the magnetization reversal process of magnetic elements is important for a wide range of applications that make use of magnetoresistive effects but is difficult to achieve for devices that require adjacent thin film structures capable of contacting an individual molecule or quantum dot. We report on the fabrication and measurement of ferromagnetic break junction devices with planar, elliptical leads, to address the particular challenge of controlling the relative magnetization alignment between neighboring electrodes. Low temperature transport measurements, supported by finite-element micromagnetic simulations, are used to characterize the magnetoresistance response across a range of conductance levels. We demonstrate that an in-plane external field applied parallel to the hard axis of the ellipses may be used to controllably switch the magnetization of the source and drain electrodes between monodomain-like parallel and antiparallel configurations for devices in the tunneling regime.

  4. A non-contacting vertical alignment system for mass properties measuring instruments

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.H. III; Suazo, J.E.; Varga, R.C.

    1993-11-01

    A non-contact system for alignment of objects on mass properties measuring instruments is described. Test parts can be aligned to within the capabilities of the user and the fixture to make the adjustments. The current implementation can align objects to less than .001 inches at two points with final requested adjustments of a few ten-thousands of an inch. The non-contact capability allows the alignment of objects which are too compliant or fragile for traditional contacting measurement methods. Also, this system allows the definition of a reference axis on objects which are not perfectly symmetric. The reference axis is defined at the top of the object by an appropriate marker and defined at the bottom by a best fit circle through the surface at a specified height. A general description of the hardware, procedures, and results are presented for the non-user. Appendices which contain a complete description of the software, usage, and mathematical implementation are provided for the reader who is interested in using or further developing the system.

  5. Control and dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leondes, C.T. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains papers on analysis and control system techniques for electric power systems. Topics include: modeling and control of electric power systems, dynamic state estimation techniques, optimal power flow algorithms, and neural networks in power systems.

  6. Increased dermal collagen bundle alignment in systemic sclerosis is associated with a cell migration signature and role of Arhgdib in directed fibroblast migration on aligned ECMs.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lizhi; Lafyatis, Robert; Burkly, Linda C

    2017-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a devastating disease affecting the skin and internal organs. Dermal fibrosis manifests early and Modified Rodnan Skin Scores (MRSS) correlate with disease progression. Transcriptomics of SSc skin biopsies suggest the role of the in vivo microenvironment in maintaining the pathological myofibroblasts. Therefore, defining the structural changes in dermal collagen in SSc patients could inform our understanding of fibrosis pathogenesis. Here, we report a method for quantitative whole-slide image analysis of dermal collagen from SSc patients, and our findings of more aligned dermal collagen bundles in diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc) patients. Using the bleomycin-induced mouse model of SSc, we identified a distinct high dermal collagen bundle alignment gene signature, characterized by a concerted upregulation in cell migration, adhesion, and guidance pathways, and downregulation of spindle, replication, and cytokinesis pathways. Furthermore, increased bundle alignment induced a cell migration gene signature in fibroblasts in vitro, and these cells demonstrated increased directed migration on aligned ECM fibers that is dependent on expression of Arhgdib (Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 2). Our results indicate that increased cell migration is a cellular response to the increased collagen bundle alignment featured in fibrotic skin. Moreover, many of the cell migration genes identified in our study are shared with human SSc skin and may be new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  7. Nanoporous thin films with controllable nanopores processed from vertically aligned nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Bi, Zhenxing; Anderoglu, Osman; Zhang, Xinghang; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L; Yang, Hao; Jia, Quanxi; Wang, Haiyan

    2010-07-16

    Porous thin films with ordered nanopores have been processed by thermal treatment on vertically aligned nanocomposites (VAN), e.g., (BiFeO(3))(0.5):(Sm(2)O(3))(0.5) VAN thin films. Uniformly distributed nanopores with an average diameter of 60 nm and 150 nm were formed at the bottom and top of the nanoporous films, respectively. Controllable porosity can be achieved by adjusting the microstructure of VAN (BiFeO(3)):(Sm(2)O(3)) thin films and the annealing parameters. In situ heating experiments within a transmission electron microscope (TEM) column at temperatures from 25 to 850 degrees C, provides significant insights into the phase transformation, evaporation and structure reconstruction during the annealing. The in situ experiments also demonstrate the possibility of processing vertically aligned nanopores (VANP) with one phase stable in a columnar structure. These nanoporous thin films with controllable pore size and density could be promising candidates for thin film membranes and catalysis for fuel cell and gas sensor applications.

  8. Site- and alignment-controlled growth of graphene nanoribbons from nickel nanobars.

    PubMed

    Kato, Toshiaki; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2012-10-01

    Graphene nanoribbons combine the unique electronic and spin properties of graphene with a transport gap that arises from quantum confinement and edge effects. This makes them an attractive candidate material for the channels of next-generation transistors. Nanoribbons can be made in a variety of ways, including lithographic, chemical and sonochemical approaches, the unzipping of carbon nanotubes, the thermal decomposition of SiC and organic synthesis. However, the reliable site and alignment control of nanoribbons with high on/off current ratios remains a challenge. Here we control the site and alignment of narrow (∼23 nm) graphene nanoribbons by directly converting a nickel nanobar into a graphene nanoribbon using rapid-heating plasma chemical vapour deposition. The nanoribbons grow directly between the source and drain electrodes of a field-effect transistor without transfer, lithography and other postgrowth treatments, and exhibit a clear transport gap (58.5 meV), a high on/off ratio (>10(4)) and no hysteresis. Complex architectures, including parallel and radial arrays of supported and suspended ribbons, are demonstrated. The process is scalable and completely compatible with existing semiconductor processes, and is expected to allow integration of graphene nanoribbons with silicon technology.

  9. THE BANANA PROJECT. IV. TWO ALIGNED STELLAR ROTATION AXES IN THE YOUNG ECCENTRIC BINARY SYSTEM EP CRUCIS: PRIMORDIAL ORIENTATION AND TIDAL ALIGNMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Simon; Winn, Joshua N.; Setiawan, Johny; Torres, Guillermo; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2013-04-10

    With observations of the EP Cru system, we continue our series of measurements of spin-orbit angles in eclipsing binary star systems, the BANANA project (Binaries Are Not Always Neatly Aligned). We find a close alignment between the sky projections of the rotational and orbital angular momentum vectors for both stars ({beta}{sub p} = -1. Degree-Sign 8 {+-} 1. Degree-Sign 6 and |{beta}{sub s}| < 17 Degree-Sign ). We also derive precise absolute dimensions and stellar ages for this system. The EP Cru and DI Her systems provide an interesting comparison: they have similar stellar types and orbital properties, but DI Her is younger and has major spin-orbit misalignments, raising the question of whether EP Cru also had a large misalignment at an earlier phase of evolution. We show that tidal dissipation is an unlikely explanation for the good alignment observed today, because realignment happens on the same timescale as spin-orbit synchronization, and the stars in EP Cru are far from synchronization (they are spinning nine times too quickly). Therefore it seems that some binaries form with aligned axes, while other superficially similar binaries are formed with misaligned axes.

  10. Control and dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leondes, C.T. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    This volume covers topics pertaining to analysis and control system techniques for electric power systems. Topics include: computer relaying in power systems, power system generation expansion, expert systems for power systems, and power flow algorithms.

  11. An Integrated Support and Alignment System for Large ILC Lattice Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Viola, Robert

    2013-05-15

    The manipulators used to support and position lattice elements are critical components of all particle accelerators. The increased use of large superconducting magnets and accelerator modules places even greater demands on these manipulators. However, the performance of these support systems has not kept pace with the advances made in other areas of accelerator technology. This results in accelerators that are difficult to align and may not be capable of achieving target luminosities. An innovative new type of positioning mechanism tailored to the requirements of the International Linear Collider is proposed. The Tri-Sphere System provides secure support for large lattice elements and precision adjustment in six degrees of freedom. Integrated target sockets allow the support system to be rapidly pre-aligned. The system's kinematic design passively guides lattice elements into their correct location during installation. A complimentary Portable Actuation Unit provides the advantages of automated adjustment and allows these adjustments to be completely decoupled from surveying.

  12. Method for auto-alignment of digital optical phase conjugation systems based on digital propagation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Mooseok; Ruan, Haowen; Zhou, Haojiang; Judkewitz, Benjamin; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    Optical phase conjugation (OPC) has enabled many optical applications such as aberration correction and image transmission through fiber. In recent years, implementation of digital optical phase conjugation (DOPC) has opened up the possibility of its use in biomedical optics (e.g. deep-tissue optical focusing) due to its ability to provide greater-than-unity OPC reflectivity (the power ratio of the phase conjugated beam and input beam to the OPC system) and its flexibility to accommodate additional wavefront manipulations. However, the requirement for precise (pixel-to-pixel matching) alignment of the wavefront sensor and the spatial light modulator (SLM) limits the practical usability of DOPC systems. Here, we report a method for auto-alignment of a DOPC system by which the misalignment between the sensor and the SLM is auto-corrected through digital light propagation. With this method, we were able to accomplish OPC playback with a DOPC system with gross sensor-SLM misalignment by an axial displacement of up to~1.5 cm, rotation and tip/tilt of ~5∘, and in-plane displacement of ~5 mm (dependent on the physical size of the sensor and the SLM). Our auto-alignment method robustly achieved a DOPC playback peak-to-background ratio (PBR) corresponding to more than ~30 % of the theoretical maximum. As an additional advantage, the auto-alignment procedure can be easily performed at will and, as such, allows us to correct for small mechanical drifts within the DOPC systems, thus overcoming a previously major DOPC system vulnerability. We believe that this reported method for implementing robust DOPC systems will broaden the practical utility of DOPC systems. PMID:24977504

  13. Alignment performance comparison between MFR and MDCO for a TMA optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyukmo; Oh, Eunsong; Kim, Sug-Whan

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we performed alignment state estimation simulations and compared the performance of two Computer Aided Alignment (hereafter CAA) algorithms i.e. `Merit Function Regression (MFR)' and `Multiple Design Configuration Optimization (MDCO)' for a TMA optical system. The former minimizes the merit function using multi-field wavefront error measurements from single configuration, while the latter minimizes the merit function using single-field measured wavefront error from multiple configurations. The optical system used is an unobscured three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) optical system of 70mm in diameter, and F/5.0. It is designed for an unmanned aerial vehicle for coastal water remote sensing. The TMA consists of two aspherical mirrors, a spherical mirror and a flat folding mirror. Based on the sensitivity analysis, we set the tilt x, y of tertiary mirror as a compensator, and not considered decenter of tertiary mirror because of its spherical characteristic. For the simulation, we introduced Gaussian distribution of initial misalignment to M3. It has the mean value of zero and standard deviation of 0.5 mrad. The initial simulation result of alignment state estimation shows that both algorithms can meet the alignment requirement, λ/10 RMS WFE at 633nm. However, when we includes measurement noise, the simulation result of MFR shows greater standard deviation in RMS WFE than that of MDCO. As for the measurement, the MDCO requires single on-axis field while the MFR requires multiple fields, we concluded that the MDCO is more practical method to align the off-axis TMA optics than MFR.

  14. Controllable deposition distance of aligned pattern via dual-nozzle near-field electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhifeng; Chen, Xindu; Zeng, Jun; Liang, Feng; Wu, Peixuan; Wang, Han

    2017-03-01

    For large area micro/nano pattern printing, multi-nozzle electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing setup is an efficient method to boost productivity in near-field electrospinning (NFES) process. And controlling EHD multi-jet accurate deposition under the interaction of nozzles and other parameters are crucial concerns during the process. The influence and sensitivity of various parameters such as the needle length, needle spacing, electrode-to-collector distance, voltage etc. on the direct-write patterning performance was investigated by orthogonal experiments with dual-nozzle NFES setup, and then the deposition distance estimated based on a novel model was compared with measurement results and proven. More controllable deposition distance and much denser of aligned naofiber can be achieved by rotating the dual-nozzle setup. This study can be greatly contributed to estimate the deposition distance and helpful to guide the multi-nozzle NFES process to accurate direct-write pattern in manufacturing process in future.

  15. Precision digital control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyskub, V. G.; Rozov, B. S.; Savelev, V. I.

    This book is concerned with the characteristics of digital control systems of great accuracy. A classification of such systems is considered along with aspects of stabilization, programmable control applications, digital tracking systems and servomechanisms, and precision systems for the control of a scanning laser beam. Other topics explored are related to systems of proportional control, linear devices and methods for increasing precision, approaches for further decreasing the response time in the case of high-speed operation, possibilities for the implementation of a logical control law, and methods for the study of precision digital control systems. A description is presented of precision automatic control systems which make use of electronic computers, taking into account the existing possibilities for an employment of computers in automatic control systems, approaches and studies required for including a computer in such control systems, and an analysis of the structure of automatic control systems with computers. Attention is also given to functional blocks in the considered systems.

  16. Alignment controlled growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes on quartz substrates.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianliang; Dunham, Simon; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Yongwei; Kocabas, Coskun; Moh, Lionel; Huang, Yonggang; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Lu, Chun; Huang, Wei; Rogers, John A

    2009-12-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess extraordinary electrical properties, with many possible applications in electronics. Dense, horizontally aligned arrays of linearly configured SWNTs represent perhaps the most attractive and scalable way to implement this class of nanomaterial in practical systems. Recent work shows that templated growth of tubes on certain crystalline substrates yields arrays with the necessary levels of perfection, as demonstrated by the formation of devices and full systems on quartz. This paper examines advanced implementations of this process on crystalline quartz substrates with different orientations, to yield strategies for forming diverse, but well-defined horizontal configurations of SWNTs. Combined experimental and theoretical studies indicate that angle-dependent van der Waals interactions can account for nearly all aspects of alignment on quartz with X, Y, Z, and ST cuts, as well as quartz with disordered surface layers. These findings provide important insights into methods for guided growth of SWNTs, and possibly other classes of nanomaterials, for applications in electronics, sensing, photodetection, light emission, and other areas.

  17. OPTIMUM SYSTEMS CONTROL,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Variational calculus and continuous optimal control, (4) The maximum principle and Hamilton Jacobi theory, (5) Optimum systems control examples, (6...Discrete variational calculus and the discrete maximum principle, (7) Optimum control of distributed parameter systems, (8) Optimum state estimation in

  18. Smooth Muscle Cell Alignment and Phenotype Control by Melt Spun Polycaprolactone Fibers for Seeding of Tissue Engineered Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Animesh; Lee, Bae Hoon; Irvine, Scott A.; An, Jia; Bhuthalingam, Ramya; Singh, Vaishali; Low, Kok Yao; Chua, Chee Kai; Venkatraman, Subbu S.

    2015-01-01

    A method has been developed to induce and retain a contractile phenotype for vascular smooth muscle cells, as the first step towards the development of a biomimetic blood vessel construct with minimal compliance mismatch. Melt spun PCL fibers were deposited on a mandrel to form aligned fibers of 10 μm in diameter. The fibers were bonded into aligned arrangement through dip coating in chitosan solution. This formed a surface of parallel grooves, 10 μm deep by 10 μm across, presenting a surface layer of chitosan to promote cell surface interactions. The aligned fiber surface was used to culture cells present in the vascular wall, in particular fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells. This topography induced “surface guidance” over the orientation of the cells, which adopted an elongated spindle-like morphology, whereas cells on the unpatterned control surface did not show such orientation, assuming more rhomboid shapes. The preservation of VSMC contractile phenotype on the aligned scaffold was demonstrated by the retention of α-SMA expression after several days of culture. The effect was assessed on a prototype vascular graft prosthesis fabricated from polylactide caprolactone; VSMCs aligned longitudinally along a fiberless tube, whereas, for the aligned fiber coated tubes, the VSMCs aligned in the required circumferential orientation. PMID:26413093

  19. Minus-end-directed Kinesin-14 motors align antiparallel microtubules to control metaphase spindle length.

    PubMed

    Hepperla, Austin J; Willey, Patrick T; Coombes, Courtney E; Schuster, Breanna M; Gerami-Nejad, Maryam; McClellan, Mark; Mukherjee, Soumya; Fox, Janet; Winey, Mark; Odde, David J; O'Toole, Eileen; Gardner, Melissa K

    2014-10-13

    During cell division, a microtubule-based mitotic spindle mediates the faithful segregation of duplicated chromosomes into daughter cells. Proper length control of the metaphase mitotic spindle is critical to this process and is thought to be achieved through a mechanism in which spindle pole separation forces from plus-end-directed motors are balanced by forces from minus-end-directed motors that pull spindle poles together. However, in contrast to this model, metaphase mitotic spindles with inactive kinesin-14 minus-end-directed motors often have shorter spindle lengths, along with poorly aligned spindle microtubules. A mechanistic explanation for this paradox is unknown. Using computational modeling, in vitro reconstitution, live-cell fluorescence microscopy, and electron microscopy, we now find that the budding yeast kinesin-14 molecular motor Kar3-Cik1 can efficiently align spindle microtubules along the spindle axis. This then allows plus-end-directed kinesin-5 motors to efficiently exert the outward microtubule sliding forces needed for proper spindle bipolarity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Exploring the Potential of Turbulent Flow Control Using Vertically Aligned Nanowire Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Sean; Calhoun, John; Guskey, Christopher; Seigler, Michael; Koka, Aneesh; Sodano, Henry

    2012-11-01

    We present evidence that turbulent flow can be influenced by oscillating nanowires. A substrate coated with vertically aligned nanowires was installed in the boundary wall of fully-developed turbulent channel flow, and the substrate was excited by a piezoceramic actuator to oscillate the nanowires. Because the nanowires are immersed in the viscous sublayer, it was previously unclear whether the small scale flow oscillations imparted into the bulk flow by the nanowires would influence the turbulent flow or be dissipated by the effects of viscosity. Our experiments demonstrated that the nanowires produced perturbations in the flow and contributed energy throughout the depth of the turbulent layer. A parallel investigation using a dynamically scaled surface of vertically aligned wires in laminar flow found that, even at low Reynolds numbers, significant momentum transport can be produced in the flow by the introduction of a travelling wave motion into the surface. These findings reflect the potential for using oscillating nanowires as a novel method of near-wall turbulent flow control. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under FA9550-11-1-0140.

  1. Controlled growth of well-aligned ZnO nanorod arrays by hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailova, I.; Gerbreders, V.; Bulanovs, A.; Tamanis, E.; Sledevskis, E.; Ogurcovs, A.; Sarajevs, P.

    2014-10-01

    The application prospect of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures largely relies on the ability to grow nanoobjects with necessary geometry. In this study well-aligned ZnO nanorod arrays with a high density and uniformity were successfully synthesized on the glass substrates by a hydrothermal method at low-temperature. The aqueous solutions of zinc nitrate hexahydrate and hexamethylenetetramine was used. The effect of seed layer (obtained by electrochemical method and by vacuum deposition method) on the alignment of ZnO nanorods has been investigated. The morphological properties of the ZnO nanorods were also examined in accordance with varying the magnetron sputtering angle for ZnO seeds deposition. It is also shown that the electric field can control the direction of the growth of ZnO nanorods. Morphological, structural and compositional characterizations of obtained films were carried out by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis methods.

  2. Control system design method

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David G [Tijeras, NM; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2012-02-21

    A control system design method and concomitant control system comprising representing a physical apparatus to be controlled as a Hamiltonian system, determining elements of the Hamiltonian system representation which are power generators, power dissipators, and power storage devices, analyzing stability and performance of the Hamiltonian system based on the results of the determining step and determining necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of the Hamiltonian system, creating a stable control system based on the results of the analyzing step, and employing the resulting control system to control the physical apparatus.

  3. Does computer-assisted surgery improve postoperative leg alignment and implant positioning following total knee arthroplasty? A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials?

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tao; Zhao, Song; Peng, Xiaochun; Zhang, Xianlong

    2012-07-01

    Computer-assisted surgery has been proposed as a technique to improve implant alignment during total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, there is still a debate over the accuracy of placing the femoral and tibial components using computer-assisted systems in TKA. The aim of this study is to establish whether computer-assisted surgery leads to superior mechanical leg axis and implant positioning than conventional technique in patients with primary TKA. Major electronic databases were systematically searched to identify relevant studies without language restriction. A meta-analysis of 41 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs was performed in a random effects model. A subgroup analysis was conducted by type of navigation system to explore the clinical heterogeneity between these trials. The following radiographic parameters were used to compare computer-assisted surgery with conventional technique: (1) mechanical leg axis, (2) femoral component coronal alignment, (3) tibial component coronal alignment, (4) femoral component sagittal alignment, and (5) tibial component sagittal alignment. For the mechanical leg axis and coronal positioning of femoral and tibial components, there are statistically significant reductions in the number of patients with malalignment in the CAS group if the outlier cutoff value is ±3 or 2° in the coronal and sagittal planes, respectively. Subgroup analysis demonstrates that CT-free navigation systems provide better alignment than conventional techniques in the coronal and sagittal alignment of femoral components within ±3 and 2°. If the outlier cutoff value for the tibial sagittal alignment is ±2°, the outlier percentages are higher in the CT-free navigation group than in the conventional group. However, there was no significant difference in the tibial sagittal alignment at ±3°. Computer-assisted surgery does improve mechanical leg axis and component orientation in TKAs. However, high-quality RCTs are necessary to

  4. Multivariable Control Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-01-01

    one). Examples abound of systems with numerous controlled variables, and the modern tendency is toward ever greater utilization of systems and plants of this kind. We call them multivariable control systems (MCS).

  5. Optical alignment influenced aberrations in laser beam delivery systems and their correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaggs, Michael; Haas, Gil

    2015-03-01

    Industrial high power laser systems are often evaluated based upon spatial profile of the beam before they are brought to focus for processing materials. It is therefore often assumed that if the raw beam profile is good that the focus is equally as good. The possibility of having good optics and poor alignment or bad optics and good alignment and therefore not achieve a good focal spot is quite high due to the fact that a raw beam spatial profile does not manifest third order aberrations. In such instances the focal spot will contain aberrations when there are slightly misaligned, poor quality, high power optics in the system such as a beam expander or eye piece and objective of a 3-axis galvo. Likewise, if the beam itself is not on axis, the third order aberrations of astigmatism and coma are likely to appear but again not be seen in the unfocused beams spatial profile. The third order aberrations of astigmatism, coma and spherical aberration can significantly alter both the size and spatial profile at the focus resulting in out of spec performance. The impact of beam and zoom expanders and their alignment in beam delivery systems is investigated by measuring both the far field unfocused and the far field focus beams using an all passive beam waist analyzer system.

  6. James Webb Space Telescope optical simulation testbed III: first experimental results with linear-control alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egron, Sylvain; Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Leboulleux, Lucie; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Pueyo, Laurent; Choquet, Élodie; Perrin, Marshall D.; Ygouf, Marie; Michau, Vincent; Bonnefois, Aurélie; Fusco, Thierry; Escolle, Clément; Ferrari, Marc; Hugot, Emmanuel; Soummer, Rémi

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Simulation Testbed (JOST) is a tabletop experiment designed to study wavefront sensing and control for a segmented space telescope, including both commissioning and maintenance activities. JOST is complementary to existing testbeds for JWST (e.g. the Ball Aerospace Testbed Telescope TBT) given its compact scale and flexibility, ease of use, and colocation at the JWST Science and Operations Center. The design of JOST reproduces the physics of JWST's three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) using three custom aspheric lenses. It provides similar quality image as JWST (80% Strehl ratio) over a field equivalent to a NIRCam module, but at 633 nm. An Iris AO segmented mirror stands for the segmented primary mirror of JWST. Actuators allow us to control (1) the 18 segments of the segmented mirror in piston, tip, tilt and (2) the second lens, which stands for the secondary mirror, in tip, tilt and x, y, z positions. We present the full linear control alignment infrastructure developed for JOST, with an emphasis on multi-field wavefront sensing and control. Our implementation of the Wavefront Sensing (WFS) algorithms using phase diversity is experimentally tested. The wavefront control (WFC) algorithms, which rely on a linear model for optical aberrations induced by small misalignments of the three lenses, are tested and validated on simulations.

  7. Alignment and integration of large optical systems based on advanced metrology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliverti, M.; Riva, M.; Moschetti, M.; Pariani, G.; Genoni, M.; Zerbi, F. M.

    Optical alignment is a key activity in opto-mechanical system Integration. Traditional techniques require adjustable mounting, driven by optical references that allows the tuning of the optics position along all 6 Degree of Freedom. Nevertheless, the required flexibility imposes reduced stiffness and consequently less stability of the system. The Observatory of Brera (OAB) started few years ago a research activity focused onto the overcoming of this limits exploiting the high metrology performances of Coordinate Measuring Machines (CMM) with the main objectives of relax the manufacturing tolerances and maximize mounting stiffness. Through the T-REX grants, OAB acquired all the instrumentation needed for that activity furthermore considering the ESPRESSO project training and testing also oriented to large scale instrumentation like the E-ELT one. We will present in this paper the definition of the VLTs convergence point and the feasibility study of large mirrors alignment done by mechanical measurements methods. skip=8pt

  8. Wisdom Appliance Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrick; Jheng, Jyun-Teng; Tsai, Chen-Chai; Liou, Jia-Wei; Wang, Zhi-Hao; Jong, Gwo-Jia

    2017-07-01

    Intelligent appliances wisdom involves security, home care, convenient and energy saving, but the home automation system is still one of the core unit, and also using micro-processing electronics technology to centralized and control the home electrical products and systems, such as: lighting, television, fan, air conditioning, stereo, it composed of front-controller systems and back-controller panels, user using front-controller to control command, and then through the back-controller to powered the device.

  9. Method of Deployment of a Space Tethered System Aligned to the Local Vertical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrzhevskii, A. E.

    2016-09-01

    The object of this research is a space tether of two bodies connected by a flexible massless string. The research objective is the development and theoretical justification of a novel approach to the solution of the problem of deployment of the space tether in a circular orbit with its alignment to the local vertical. The approach is based on use of the theorem on the angular momentum change. It allows developing the open-loop control of the tether length that provides desired change of the angular momentum of the tether under the effect of the gravitational torque to the value, which corresponds to the angular momentum of the deployed tether aligned to the local vertical. The given example of application of the approach to a case of deployment of a tether demonstrates the simplicity of use of the method in practice, and also the method of validation of the mathematical model.

  10. Research on initial alignment and self-calibration of rotary strapdown inertial navigation systems.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Zhang, Ya; Wang, Jianguo

    2015-01-30

    The errors of inertial sensors affect the navigation accuracy of the strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) and are accumulated over time in nature. In order to continuously maintain the high navigation accuracy of vehicles for a long time period, an initial alignment and self-calibration is necessary after the SINS starts. Additionally, the observability analysis is one of the key techniques during the initial alignment and self-calibration process. For marine systems, the observability of inertial sensor errors is extremely low, as their motion states are always slow. Therefore, studying the rotating SINS is urgent. Since traditional analysis methods have their limitations, the global observation analysis method was used in this paper. On the basis of this method, the relationship between the observability and the kinestate of the rotating SINS has been established. After the discussion about the factors that affect the observability in detail, the design principle of the initial alignment and self-calibration rotating scheme, which is appropriate for marine systems, id proposed. With the proposed principle, a novel initial alignment and self-calibration method, named the eight-position rotating scheme, is designed. Simulations and experiments are carried out to verify its performance. The results have shown that compared with other rotating schemes and the static state, the estimated accuracy of the eight-position scheme rotating about axes x and y was the best, and the position error was significantly reduced with this new rotating scheme. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed design principle and the rotating scheme were verified.

  11. Research on Initial Alignment and Self-Calibration of Rotary Strapdown Inertial Navigation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Zhang, Ya; Wang, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    The errors of inertial sensors affect the navigation accuracy of the strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) and are accumulated over time in nature. In order to continuously maintain the high navigation accuracy of vehicles for a long time period, an initial alignment and self-calibration is necessary after the SINS starts. Additionally, the observability analysis is one of the key techniques during the initial alignment and self-calibration process. For marine systems, the observability of inertial sensor errors is extremely low, as their motion states are always slow. Therefore, studying the rotating SINS is urgent. Since traditional analysis methods have their limitations, the global observation analysis method was used in this paper. On the basis of this method, the relationship between the observability and the kinestate of the rotating SINS has been established. After the discussion about the factors that affect the observability in detail, the design principle of the initial alignment and self-calibration rotating scheme, which is appropriate for marine systems, id proposed. With the proposed principle, a novel initial alignment and self-calibration method, named the eight-position rotating scheme, is designed. Simulations and experiments are carried out to verify its performance. The results have shown that compared with other rotating schemes and the static state, the estimated accuracy of the eight-position scheme rotating about axes x and y was the best, and the position error was significantly reduced with this new rotating scheme. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed design principle and the rotating scheme were verified. PMID:25647743

  12. Control and dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leondes, C.T. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    This volume covers topics related to analysis and control system techniques for electric power systems. Topics include: simulation of multimachine power system dynamics, computer simulation in electric distribution systems, transient stability assessment, dynamic stability analysis, and improved power system control techniques.

  13. Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes in Carbon Nanotube Fibers Through Nanoparticles: A Route for Controlling Mechanical and Electrical Properties.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Muhammad Mohsin; Islam, Md Akherul; Shima, Hossain; Hasan, Mudassir; Lee, Moonyong

    2017-02-15

    This is the first study that describes how semiconducting ZnO can act as an alignment agent in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) fibers. Because of the alignment of CNTs through the ZnO nanoparticles linking groups, the CNTs inside the fibers were equally distributed by the attraction of bonding forces into sheetlike bunches, such that any applied mechanical breaking load was equally distributed to each CNT inside the fiber, making them mechanically robust against breaking loads. Although semiconductive ZnO nanoparticles were used here, the electrical conductivity of the aligned CNT fiber was comparable to bare CNT fibers, suggesting that the total electron movement through the CNTs inside the aligned CNT fiber is not disrupted by the insulating behavior of ZnO nanoparticles. A high degree of control over the electrical conductivity was also demonstrated by the ZnO nanoparticles, working as electron movement bridges between CNTs in the longitudinal and crosswise directions. Well-organized surface interface chemistry was also observed, which supports the notion of CNT alignment inside the fibers. This research represents a new area of surface interface chemistry for interfacially linked CNTs and ZnO nanomaterials with improved mechanical properties and electrical conductivity within aligned CNT fibers.

  14. Harnessing cellular-derived forces in self-assembled microtissues to control the synthesis and alignment of ECM.

    PubMed

    Schell, Jacquelyn Y; Wilks, Benjamin T; Patel, Mohak; Franck, Christian; Chalivendra, Vijaya; Cao, Xuan; Shenoy, Vivek B; Morgan, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    The alignment and blend of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins give a tissue its specific mechanical properties as well as its physiological function. Various tissue engineering methods have taken purified ECM proteins and aligned them into gels, sponges and threads. Although, each of these methods has created aligned ECM, they have had many limitations including loss of hierarchal collagen structure and poor mechanical performance. Here, we have developed a new method to control ECM synthesis using self-assembled cells. Cells were seeded into custom designed, scaffold-free, micro-molds with fixed obstacles that harnessed and directed cell-mediated stresses. Cells within the microtissue reacted to self-generated tension by aligning, elongating, and synthesizing an ECM whose organization was dictated by the strain field that was set by our micro-mold design. We have shown that through cell selection, we can create tissues with aligned collagen II or aligned elastin. We have also demonstrated that these self-assembled microtissues have mechanical properties in the range of natural tissues and that mold design can be used to further tailor these mechanical properties.

  15. A surface irregularity compensation alignment method for all-reflective optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lian; Zhang, Ming; Ma, TianMeng

    2016-09-01

    Surface irregularity of optical elements is one of the errors caused in manufacturing process, which has a bad influence on optical system image quality. This image quality deterioration can't be neglected especially in some all-reflective optical systems. A method by rotating the mirrors for compensating the surface irregularity is put forward in the paper. Firstly, the surface irregularity of all the mirrors is analyzed and the most closely matched mirrors are chosen for one set of system alignment. Then, the wavefront characteristic of optical system and the surface irregularity of each mirror represented by Zernike polynomial are studied, and the relationship between them is analyzed. The calculation of the rotate angle is described in detail. A numerical simulation of the method has been performed for two sets of three-mirror optical system to verify the ability and accuracy of the method. The results show that the astigmatism of the optical system caused by the surface irregularity can be decreased and the image quality of both the two systems can be improved effectively. The method is especially suitable for multiple sets of optical systems alignment.

  16. Very high stability systems: LMJ target alignment system and MTG imager test setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compain, Eric; Maquet, Philippe; Kunc, Thierry; Marque, Julien; Lauer-Solelhac, Maxime; Delage, Laurent; Lanternier, Catherine

    2015-09-01

    Most of space instruments and research facilities require test equipment with demanding opto-mechanical stability. In some specific cases, when the stability performance directly drives the final performance of the scientific mission and when feasibility is questionable, specific methods must be implemented for the associated technical risk management. In present paper, we will present our heritage in terms of methodology, design, test and the associated results for two specific systems : the SOPAC-POS and the MOTA, generating new references for future developments. From a performance point of view, we will emphasis on following key parameters : design symmetry, thermal load management, and material and structural choices. From a method point of view the difficulties arise first during design, from the strong coupling between the thermal, mechanical and optical performance models, and then during testing, from the difficulty of conceiving test setup having appropriate performance level. We will present how these limitations have been overcome. SOPAC-POS is the target alignment system of the LMJ, Laser Mega Joule, the French inertial confinement fusion research center. Its stability has been demonstrated by tests in 2014 after 10 years of research and development activities, achieving 1μm stability @ 6m during one hour periods. MOTA is an Optical Ground Support Equipment aiming at qualifying by tests the Flexible Combined Imager (FCI). FCI is an instrument for the meteorological satellite MTG-I, a program of and funded by the European Space Agency and under prime contractorship of Thales Alenia Space. Optimized design will allow to get better than 0.2 μrad stability for one hour periods, as required for MTF measurement.

  17. Control System Damps Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopf, E. H., Jr.; Brown, T. K.; Marsh, E. L.

    1983-01-01

    New control system damps vibrations in rotating equipment with help of phase-locked-loop techniques. Vibrational modes are controlled by applying suitable currents to drive motor. Control signals are derived from sensors mounted on equipment.

  18. Aligning incentives in health care: physician practice and health system partnership.

    PubMed

    Levin, L Scott; Gustave, Lori

    2013-06-01

    The key to successfully aligning hospitals and physicians is financial integration and joint incentives for academic, quality, and clinical productivity. Many physician practices and health systems are moving toward closer integration, but mainly through consolidation and employment strategies. We describe a fully integrated physician and hospital relationship including an overview of an aligned funds flow process that affords the department support for clinical services and teaching, research, and administrative activity. We also describe a physician compensation model that provides incentive not only for increased clinical performance, but also quality and academic objectives. The content of this article was acquired through our own experience in managing the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Pennsylvania Health System including the health system's funds flow process. Based on input from both health system leaders and the faculty, the department's compensation plan was totally redesigned to create a line-of-sight plan that credits clinical performance and academic productivity. Our model is multifactorial and provides sustainable support for the department and a compensation plan that is competitive within the local market and nationally. The health system's funds flow process has enhanced alignment of the faculty and hospitals by providing compensation for nonclinical time and assists the department's growth strategies by providing funding for new faculty and gain-sharing of improved hospital margin. The implementation of the compensation plan increased productivity by 8% in its first year with no additional resources. Academic productivity in that same year was arguably at or above any other year in the department's history in terms of accepted publications, national presentations, and research grants awarded. A model of complete integration between an academic department and a health system is achievable through a systematic process of

  19. Building blocks for actively-aligned micro-optical systems in rapid prototyping and small series production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, Gunnar; Queisser, Marco; Arndt-Staufenbiel, Norbert; Schröder, Henning; Lang, K.-D.

    2015-03-01

    In recent years there has been considerable progress in utilizing fully automated machines for the assembly of microoptical systems. Such systems integrate laser sources, optical elements and detectors into tight packages, and efficiently couple light to free space beams, waveguides in optical backplanes, or optical fibers for longer reach transmission. The required electrical-optical and optical components are placed and aligned actively in more than one respect. For one, all active components are actually operated in the alignment process, and, more importantly, the placing of all components is controlled actively by camera systems and power detectors with live feedback for an optimal coupling efficiency. The total number of optical components typically is in the range of 5 to 50, whereas the number of actors with gripping tools for the actual handling and aligning is limited, with little flexibility in the gripping width. The assembly process therefore is strictly sequential and, given that an automated tool changing has not been established in this class of machines yet, there are either limitations in the geometries of components that may be used, or time-consuming interaction by human operators is needed. As a solution we propose and present lasered glass building blocks with standardized gripping geometries that enclose optical elements of various shapes and functionalities. These are cut as free form geometries with green short pulse and CO2 lasers. What seems to add cost at first rather increases freedom of design and adds an economical flexibility to create very hybrid assemblies of various micro-optical assemblies also in small numbers.

  20. Liquid Crystal Alignment Control Using Polymer Filament and Polymer Layers Coated on Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashige, Takeshi; Fujikake, Hideo; Sato, Hiroto; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Kurita, Taiichiro; Sato, Fumio

    2005-04-01

    We investigated liquid crystal (LC) alignment in LC cells containing an aligned cellulose filament sandwiched by thin polymer layers coated on substrates. Three types of polymer material, namely polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polyimide (PI), were used as polymer layers. LC alignment areas induced on both sides of the filament were large in the order of PS, PVA and PI. In the case of the PS layer, the average LC alignment area reached approximately 100 μm in the direction perpendicular to the polymer filament. The molecular interaction between the LC and the PS layer is thought to be weak and it does not disturb the LC alignment due to the polymer filament. On the other hand, rubbed PS layers were used as polymer layers of the LC cell, where the LC alignment direction induced by the rubbed PS layer was perpendicular to the polymer filament. It was found that the LC alignment near the polymer filament gradually bent in the cell plane. The result suggests that various three-dimensional LC alignments can be realized by the combination of the polymer filament and substrate surface.

  1. Controlled Synthesis and Functionalization of Vertically-Aligned Carbon Nanotubes for Multifunctional Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-07

    1.1 Vertically Aligned BCN Nanotubes with High Capacitance .............................................................. 4 1.2 Carbon Nanomaterials...Structured Carbon Nanotube-Graphene Fibres for Capacitive Energy Storage...NANOTUBES FOR ENERGY APPLICATIONS 1.1 Vertically Aligned BCN Nanotubes with High Capacitance (ACS Nano 2012, 6, 5259.) Using a chemical vapor

  2. Scalable fabrication of coupled NV center - photonic crystal cavity systems by self-aligned N ion implantation

    DOE PAGES

    Schröder, T.; Walsh, M.; Zheng, J.; ...

    2017-04-06

    Towards building large-scale integrated photonic systems for quantum information processing, spatial and spectral alignment of single quantum systems to photonic nanocavities is required. In this paper, we demonstrate spatially targeted implantation of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers into the mode maximum of 2-d diamond photonic crystal cavities with quality factors up to 8000, achieving an average of 1.1 ± 0.2 NVs per cavity. Nearly all NV-cavity systems have significant emission intensity enhancement, reaching a cavity-fed spectrally selective intensity enhancement, Fint, of up to 93. Although spatial NV-cavity overlap is nearly guaranteed within about 40 nm, spectral tuning of the NV’s zero-phonon-linemore » (ZPL) is still necessary after fabrication. To demonstrate spectral control, we temperature tune a cavity into an NV ZPL, yielding FZPLint~5 at cryogenic temperatures.« less

  3. Optimal Parameter Design of Coarse Alignment for Fiber Optic Gyro Inertial Navigation System.

    PubMed

    Lu, Baofeng; Wang, Qiuying; Yu, Chunmei; Gao, Wei

    2015-06-25

    Two different coarse alignment algorithms for Fiber Optic Gyro (FOG) Inertial Navigation System (INS) based on inertial reference frame are discussed in this paper. Both of them are based on gravity vector integration, therefore, the performance of these algorithms is determined by integration time. In previous works, integration time is selected by experience. In order to give a criterion for the selection process, and make the selection of the integration time more accurate, optimal parameter design of these algorithms for FOG INS is performed in this paper. The design process is accomplished based on the analysis of the error characteristics of these two coarse alignment algorithms. Moreover, this analysis and optimal parameter design allow us to make an adequate selection of the most accurate algorithm for FOG INS according to the actual operational conditions. The analysis and simulation results show that the parameter provided by this work is the optimal value, and indicate that in different operational conditions, the coarse alignment algorithms adopted for FOG INS are different in order to achieve better performance. Lastly, the experiment results validate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  4. A robust, alignment-free broadband CARS system based on stimulated processes in heavy water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hong; Gai, Baodong; Liu, Jinbo; Guo, Jingwei; Cai, Xianglong; Xia, Xusheng; Li, Xueyang; Zhang, Baichao; Deng, Liezheng; Jin, Yuqi

    2017-06-01

    We have established a new method for realizing a typical "2-color" collinear CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering) system. The system mainly consists of a laser source, a D2O cell, and a spectrometer. The pump/probe beam and the Stokes beam are provided by SBS (stimulated Brillouin scattering) and BSRS (backward stimulated Raman scattering) of D2O, respectively. The CARS system is statistically stable, and it is also a broadband and alignment-free system. Measurement of N2 signal in air with this system is demonstrated. Detection of N2 in 0.006 bar air is realized with this system. Time-resolved pulse shapes of SBS and BSRS are measured to confirm their generation. Transference of energy from the SBS pulse to the BSRS pulse is realized with a Rhodamine 101 dye cuvette and discussed. This results in a better energy distribution between the pump/probe and Stokes pulses for CARS.

  5. Control and dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leondes, C.T. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    This book covers analysis and control system techniques for electric power systems. Topics include: concurrent processing in power system analysis, power system protection, voltage collapse, reliability techniques in large electric power systems, optimization in hydroelectric systems, and linear programming methods for optimal energy plant operation.

  6. Novel theory for propagation of tilted Gaussian beam through aligned optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Lei; Gao, Yunguo; Han, Xudong

    2017-03-01

    A novel theory for tilted beam propagation is established in this paper. By setting the propagation direction of the tilted beam as the new optical axis, we establish a virtual optical system that is aligned with the new optical axis. Within the first order approximation of the tilt and off-axis, the propagation of the tilted beam is studied in the virtual system instead of the actual system. To achieve more accurate optical field distributions of tilted Gaussian beams, a complete diffraction integral for a misaligned optical system is derived by using the matrix theory with angular momentums. The theory demonstrates that a tilted TEM00 Gaussian beam passing through an aligned optical element transforms into a decentered Gaussian beam along the propagation direction. The deviations between the peak intensity axis of the decentered Gaussian beam and the new optical axis have linear relationships with the misalignments in the virtual system. ZEMAX simulation of a tilted beam through a thick lens exposed to air shows that the errors between the simulation results and theoretical calculations of the position deviations are less than 2‰ when the misalignments εx, εy, εx', εy' are in the range of [-0.5, 0.5] mm and [-0.5, 0.5]°.

  7. CMSA: a heterogeneous CPU/GPU computing system for multiple similar RNA/DNA sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wang, Chen; Tang, Shanjiang; Yu, Ce; Zou, Quan

    2017-06-24

    The multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is a classic and powerful technique for sequence analysis in bioinformatics. With the rapid growth of biological datasets, MSA parallelization becomes necessary to keep its running time in an acceptable level. Although there are a lot of work on MSA problems, their approaches are either insufficient or contain some implicit assumptions that limit the generality of usage. First, the information of users' sequences, including the sizes of datasets and the lengths of sequences, can be of arbitrary values and are generally unknown before submitted, which are unfortunately ignored by previous work. Second, the center star strategy is suited for aligning similar sequences. But its first stage, center sequence selection, is highly time-consuming and requires further optimization. Moreover, given the heterogeneous CPU/GPU platform, prior studies consider the MSA parallelization on GPU devices only, making the CPUs idle during the computation. Co-run computation, however, can maximize the utilization of the computing resources by enabling the workload computation on both CPU and GPU simultaneously. This paper presents CMSA, a robust and efficient MSA system for large-scale datasets on the heterogeneous CPU/GPU platform. It performs and optimizes multiple sequence alignment automatically for users' submitted sequences without any assumptions. CMSA adopts the co-run computation model so that both CPU and GPU devices are fully utilized. Moreover, CMSA proposes an improved center star strategy that reduces the time complexity of its center sequence selection process from O(mn (2)) to O(mn). The experimental results show that CMSA achieves an up to 11× speedup and outperforms the state-of-the-art software. CMSA focuses on the multiple similar RNA/DNA sequence alignment and proposes a novel bitmap based algorithm to improve the center star strategy. We can conclude that harvesting the high performance of modern GPU is a promising approach to

  8. Intelligent flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    The capabilities of flight control systems can be enhanced by designing them to emulate functions of natural intelligence. Intelligent control functions fall in three categories. Declarative actions involve decision-making, providing models for system monitoring, goal planning, and system/scenario identification. Procedural actions concern skilled behavior and have parallels in guidance, navigation, and adaptation. Reflexive actions are spontaneous, inner-loop responses for control and estimation. Intelligent flight control systems learn knowledge of the aircraft and its mission and adapt to changes in the flight environment. Cognitive models form an efficient basis for integrating 'outer-loop/inner-loop' control functions and for developing robust parallel-processing algorithms.

  9. Boiler control systems engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.

    2005-07-01

    The book provides in-depth coverage on how to safely and reliably control the firing of a boiler. Regardless of the capacity or fuel, certain fundamental control systems are required for boiler control. Large utility systems are more complex due to the number of burners and the overall capacity and equipment. This book covers engineering details on control systems and provides specific examples of boiler control including configuration and tuning. References to requirements are based on the 2004 NFPA 85 along with other ISA standards. Detailed chapters cover: Boiler fundamentals including piping and instrument diagrams (P&IDs) and a design basis checklist; Control of boilers, from strategies and bumpless transfer to interlock circuitry and final control elements; Furnace draft; Feedwater; Coal-fired boilers; Fuel and air control; Steam temperature; Burner management systems; Environment; and Control valve sizing. 2 apps.

  10. Digital Optical Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, David H.; Tipton, Charles A.; Christmann, Charles E.; Hochhausler, Nils P.

    1988-09-01

    We describe the digital optical control system (DOGS), a state-of-the-art controller for electrical feedback in an optical system. The need for a versatile optical controller arose from a number of unique experiments being performed by the Air Force Weapons Laboratory. These experiments use similar detectors and actuator-controlled mirrors, but the control requirements vary greatly. The experiments have in common a requirement for parallel control systems. The DOGS satisfies these needs by allowing several control systems to occupy a single chassis with one master controller. The architecture was designed to allow upward compatibility with future configurations. Combinations of off-the-shelf and custom boards are configured to meet the requirements of each experiment. The configuration described here was used to control piston error to X/80 at a wavelength of 0.51 Am. A peak sample rate of 8 kHz, yielding a closed loop bandwidth of 800 Hz, was achieved.

  11. Intermittent Control Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Thomas L.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The technique of intermittent control systems for air quality control as developed and used by the Tennessee Valley Authority is investigated. Although controversial, all Tennessee Valley Authority sulfur dioxide elimination programs are scheduled to be operational this year. Existing or anticipated intermittent control systems are identified. (BT)

  12. Intermittent Control Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Thomas L.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The technique of intermittent control systems for air quality control as developed and used by the Tennessee Valley Authority is investigated. Although controversial, all Tennessee Valley Authority sulfur dioxide elimination programs are scheduled to be operational this year. Existing or anticipated intermittent control systems are identified. (BT)

  13. Closed-loop active optical system control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, T. E.

    1980-01-01

    A control system, based on a real-time lateral shear interferometer has been developed for use in control during thermal tests and static error compensation experiments. The minicomputer which controls the interferometer and provides its service functions also controls the active system, thereby giving flexibility to the algorithm. The minicomputer system contains 288 K bytes of memory and 15 M bytes of disk storage. The interferometer system employed is composed of the measuring head and its support electronics, a video display on which wavefront contour maps are generated, and a DECwriter operator console. The versatility provided by the use of a general purpose interferometer system allows for interactive control of the closed-loop process. Various arithmetic capabilities such as the addition of wavefronts, division by a constant, and fitting of wavefront data with Zernike polynomials, allow for measurements to be averaged and for removal of alignment errors before correction is performed.

  14. Structure determination of aligned systems by solid-state NMR magic angle spinning methods.

    PubMed

    Gross, Benjamin J; Tanski, Joseph M; McDermott, Ann E

    2005-10-01

    Single crystal rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) experiments can be used to determine the three-dimensional orientation of heteronuclear bond vectors in an amino acid, as well as the crystal's orientation relative to the rotor fixed frame (RFF). We also demonstrate that for samples uniaxially aligned along the rotor axis, the polar tilt angle of a bond vector relative to the RFF can be measured by use of an analytical expression that describes the REDOR curve for that system. These bond orientations were verified by X-ray indexing of the single crystal sample, and were shown to be as accurate as +/- 1 degrees .

  15. Structure determination of aligned systems by solid-state NMR magic angle spinning methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Benjamin J.; Tanski, Joseph M.; McDermott, Ann E.

    2005-10-01

    Single crystal rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) experiments can be used to determine the three-dimensional orientation of heteronuclear bond vectors in an amino acid, as well as the crystal's orientation relative to the rotor fixed frame (RFF). We also demonstrate that for samples uniaxially aligned along the rotor axis, the polar tilt angle of a bond vector relative to the RFF can be measured by use of an analytical expression that describes the REDOR curve for that system. These bond orientations were verified by X-ray indexing of the single crystal sample, and were shown to be as accurate as ±1°.

  16. Controllable growth and characterization of highly aligned ZnO nanocolumnar thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuk, Zuhal; Rujisamphan, Nopporn; Murray, Roy; Bah, Mohamed; Tomakin, Murat; Shah, S. Ismat

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the effects of growth conditions during magnetron sputtering on the structural, morphological, and optical properties of nanostructured ZnO thin films. Undoped ZnO thin films are deposited onto p-type Si (100) and corning 7059 glass substrates by RF magnetron sputtering using a ZnO target in combination with various Ar-O2 sputtering gas mixtures at room temperature. The effect of the partial pressure of oxygen on the morphology of ZnO thin film structure and band alignment were investigated. Thickness, and therefore the growth rate of the samples measured from the cross-sectional SEM micrographs, is found to be strongly correlated with the oxygen partial pressure in the sputtering chamber. The optical transmittance spectrometry results show that the absorption edge shifts towards the longer wavelength at higher oxygen partial pressure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) used for determining the surface chemical structure and valence band offsets show that conduction band can be controlled by changing the sputtering atmosphere.

  17. Ergatic dynamic control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlov, V. V. (Editor); Drozdova, T. I. (Editor); Antomonov, Y. G. (Editor); Golego, V. N. (Editor); Ivakhnenko, A. G. (Editor); Meleshev, A. M. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Synthesis and analysis of systems containing a man in their control circuits are considered. The concepts of ergonomics and ergatic systems are defined, and tasks and problems of ergonomics are outlined. The synthesis of the structure of an astronautic ergatic organism is presented, as well as the synthesis of nonstationary ergatic systems. Problems of selecting the criteria for complex systems are considered, and the results are presented from a study of ergatic control systems with any degree of human participation.

  18. Robust Control Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    Controller ................... 38 Sampled-Data Performance Analysis ............. 44 Doyle and Stein Technique in Discrete-Time Systems - 1...48 Doyle and Stein Technique in Discretd-Time System.s - 2 ................................. 50 Enhancing Robustness of... Technique Extended to Sampled-Data Controllers ................ 73 G715 Robustness Enhancement by Directly D"?C TAB E

  19. Fission control system for nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Conley, G.H.; Estes, G.P.

    Control system for nuclear reactor comprises a first set of reactivity modifying rods fixed in a reactor core with their upper ends stepped in height across the core, and a second set of reactivity modifying rods movable vertically within the reactor core and having their lower ends stepped to correspond with the stepped arrangement of the first set of rods, pairs of the rods of the first and second sets being in coaxial alignment.

  20. Wide-Viewing-Angle Hybrid Aligned Nematic Liquid Crystal Cell Controlled by Complex Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seung Ho; Kim, Hyang Yul; Kim, Jae-Hyung; Nam, Sang-Hee; Lee, Myong-Hoon; Lee, Seung Hee

    2002-07-01

    We have developed a hybrid aligned nematic liquid crystal (LC) cell driven by a complex electric field. In the device, the pixel electrode exists on the bottom substrate and the counter electrodes exist on the top and bottom substrates such that with a bias voltage both vertical and horizontal fields are generated. The LC molecules are hybrid aligned with homogeneous alignment on the bottom substrate where the alignment direction is coincident with one of the transmission axes of the crossed polarizers. Therefore, the cell appears to be black in the absence of an electric field. When a voltage is applied to obtain a white state, both vertical and horizontal fields enable the LC molecules to rotate with lowered tilt angles than those in the dark state. The device shows a much wider viewing angle than that of the twisted nematic mode, high light efficiency and low driving voltage in electro-optic characteristics.

  1. A novel flexible field-aligned coordinate system for tokamak edge plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leddy, J.; Dudson, B.; Romanelli, M.; Shanahan, B.; Walkden, N.

    2017-03-01

    Tokamak plasmas are confined by a magnetic field that limits the particle and heat transport perpendicular to the field. Parallel to the field the ionised particles can move freely, so to obtain confinement the field lines are ;closed; (i.e. form closed surfaces of constant poloidal flux) in the core of a tokamak. Towards, the edge, however, the field lines intersect physical surfaces, leading to interaction between neutral and ionised particles, and the potential melting of the material surface. Simulation of this interaction is important for predicting the performance and lifetime of future tokamak devices such as ITER. Field-aligned coordinates are commonly used in the simulation of tokamak plasmas due to the geometry and magnetic topology of the system. However, these coordinates are limited in the geometry they allow in the poloidal plane due to orthogonality requirements. A novel 3D coordinate system is proposed herein that relaxes this constraint so that any arbitrary, smoothly varying geometry can be matched in the poloidal plane while maintaining a field-aligned coordinate. This system is implemented in BOUT++ and tested for accuracy using the method of manufactured solutions. A MAST edge cross-section is simulated using a fluid plasma model and the results show expected behaviour for density, temperature, and velocity. Finally, simulations of an isolated divertor leg are conducted with and without neutrals to demonstrate the ion-neutral interaction near the divertor plate and the corresponding beneficial decrease in plasma temperature.

  2. Control of Nonlinear Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-26

    6-7 C. Minimum Energy Regulators for Commutative Bilinear Systems .................... ........ 8-9 D. Control Law.s for Certain Aerospace...class of nonlinear systems (3,10]. (c) Minimum energy regulators for commutative bilinear systems [3,10]. (D) Control laws for certain aerospace...With Delay in Control," IEEE Trans. on Auto Contr., Vol. AC-20, pp. 702-704, 1975, and [3].) - !. 8 C. Minimum Energy Regulators for Commutative Bilinear

  3. Control Systems & LEED

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperman, Alissa; Dieckmann, John; Brodrick, James

    2012-06-01

    This article discusses the LEED guidelines (2009 v3), and corresponding points, that can only be attained using control systems for lighting, HVAC, and/or the entire building. Integrating and centralizing control systems allows for better building management, energy savings and can potentially award 29 points towards certification across the following categories: Sustainable Sites, Energy & Atmosphere, and Indoor Air Quality. In closing, potential energy savings are highlighted and the overall market potential for control systems are summarized.

  4. The ILC control system.

    SciTech Connect

    Carwardine, J.; Saunders, C.; Arnold, N.; Lenkszus, F.; Rehlich, K.; Simrock, S.; Banerjee, b.; Chase, B.; Gottschalk, E.; Joireman, P.; Kasley, P.; Lackey, S.; McBride, P.; Pavlicek, V.; Patrick, J.; Votava, M.; Wolbers, S.; Furukawa, K.; Michizono, S.; Larson, R.S.; Downing, R.; DESY; FNAL; SLAC

    2007-01-01

    Since the last ICALEPCS, a small multi-region team has developed a reference design model for a control system for the International Linear Collider as part of the ILC Global Design Effort. The scale and performance parameters of the ILC accelerator require new thinking in regards to control system design. Technical challenges include the large number of accelerator systems to be controlled, the large scale of the accelerator facility, the high degree of automation needed during accelerator operations, and control system equipment requiring 'Five Nines' availability. The R&D path for high availability touches the control system hardware, software, and overall architecture, and extends beyond traditional interfaces into the technical systems. Software considerations for HA include fault detection through exhaustive out-of-band monitoring and automatic state migration to redundant systems, while the telecom industry's emerging ATCA standard - conceived, specified, and designed for High Availability - is being evaluated for suitability for ILC front-end electronics.

  5. Neogene-Quaternary Volcanic Alignments in the Transantarctic Mountains and West Antarctic Rift System of Southern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, T. S.; Wilson, T. J.

    2004-12-01

    Neogene-Quaternary volcanism in southern Victoria Land, Antarctica, produced the Erebus Volcanic Province, a suite of alkaline volcanic rocks that extend from the Transantarctic Mountains rift-flank uplift to offshore localities within the West Antarctic rift system. We are mapping volcanic vent patterns in the province to detect alignments indicative of stress/strain patterns during rift evolution. In the southern sector of the Erebus Volcanic Province in the Royal Society Range Block of the Transantarctic Mountains, mapping shows that elliptical scoria cones, fissures, dikes, and linear vent arrays define volcanic alignments that have a dominant NNE trend, with subsidiary WNW trends. Age data for the alignments suggest that this pattern persisted from 14.6 to 0.25 Ma. We are currently completing mapping along an east-west transect crossing the rift margin, and results obtained so far within the rift region indicate a similar pattern of alignments. On the northern flank of Mount Morning, a large volcano just to the east of the Royal Society Range, elliptical scoria cones and linear vent arrays define volcanic alignments that have a dominant NE trend, with a subsidiary NNW trend. Available age data suggest that many of these cone alignments may be of Quaternary age. At Brown Peninsula, further east from the rift flank, cone alignments trend NNE and available ages range from 2 to 3 Ma. To the east of Brown Peninsula, cone alignments trend NW at Black Island, but are of uncertain age; age data on Black Island range from 11 to 3.4 Ma. At White Island, the farthest east into the rift, cone alignments trend NNE and available age data suggest volcanism as young as 0.2 Ma. Although some differences in cone alignment trends are apparent between the rift flank and the rift system across our transect, both regions appear to be dominated by NE trending alignments, which implies a WNW to NW minimum horizontal stress (Shmin) direction. This is oblique to the ENE Shmin Cape

  6. Control and optimization system

    DOEpatents

    Xinsheng, Lou

    2013-02-12

    A system for optimizing a power plant includes a chemical loop having an input for receiving an input parameter (270) and an output for outputting an output parameter (280), a control system operably connected to the chemical loop and having a multiple controller part (230) comprising a model-free controller. The control system receives the output parameter (280), optimizes the input parameter (270) based on the received output parameter (280), and outputs an optimized input parameter (270) to the input of the chemical loop to control a process of the chemical loop in an optimized manner.

  7. Intelligent Control Systems Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loparo, Kenneth A.

    1994-01-01

    Results of a three phase research program into intelligent control systems are presented. The first phase looked at implementing the lowest or direct level of a hierarchical control scheme using a reinforcement learning approach assuming no a priori information about the system under control. The second phase involved the design of an adaptive/optimizing level of the hierarchy and its interaction with the direct control level. The third and final phase of the research was aimed at combining the results of the previous phases with some a priori information about the controlled system.

  8. Integrated blending control system

    SciTech Connect

    Cogbill, R.B.; Dodd, T.J.; Heilman, P.W.; Heronemus, D.L.; Sears, L.R.; Berryman, L.N.; Baker, R.L.; Guffee, L.E.; Prucha, D.A.; Roberts, D.M.

    1989-07-25

    This patent describes a proppant control system. It comprises: storage bin means for storing particulate material; surge bin means for receiving a flow of the particulate material from the storage bin means; first conveyor means for providing a flow of particulate material to the surge bin means from the storage bin means; second conveyor means for transferring a controllable quantity of the particulate material from the surge bin means; and proppant control means. The control means include: first speed control means for remotely controlling the speed of the first conveyor means; and second speed control means for remotely controlling the speed of the second conveyor means.

  9. Integration of microfluidic chip with biomimetic hydrogel for 3D controlling and monitoring of cell alignment and migration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Ho; Lee, Ki Hwa; Lee, Jeonghoon; Choi, Hyuk; Lee, Donghee; Park, Yongdoo; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2014-04-01

    A biomimetic hydrogel was integrated into microfluidic chips to monitor glioma cell alignment and migration. The extracellular matrix-based biomimetic hydrogel was remodeled by matrix metalloprotease (MMP) secreted by glioma cells and the hydrogel could thus be used to assess cellular behavior. Both static and dynamic cell growth conditions (flow rate of 0.1 mL/h) were used. Cell culture medium with and without vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insensitive VEGF and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) were employed to monitor cell behavior. A concentration gradient formed in the hydrogel resulted in differences in cell behavior. Glioma cell viability in the microchannel was 75-85%. Cells in the VEGF-loaded microchannels spread extensively, degrading the MMP-sensitive hydrogel, and achieved cell sizes almost fivefold larger than seen in the control medium. Our integrated system can be used as a model for the study of cellular behavior in a controlled microenvironment generated by fluidic conditions in a biomimetic matrix.

  10. LSST camera control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Stuart; Thaler, Jon; Schalk, Terry; Huffer, Michael

    2006-06-01

    The LSST Camera Control System (CCS) will manage the activities of the various camera subsystems and coordinate those activities with the LSST Observatory Control System (OCS). The CCS comprises a set of modules (nominally implemented in software) which are each responsible for managing one camera subsystem. Generally, a control module will be a long lived "server" process running on an embedded computer in the subsystem. Multiple control modules may run on a single computer or a module may be implemented in "firmware" on a subsystem. In any case control modules must exchange messages and status data with a master control module (MCM). The main features of this approach are: (1) control is distributed to the local subsystem level; (2) the systems follow a "Master/Slave" strategy; (3) coordination will be achieved by the exchange of messages through the interfaces between the CCS and its subsystems. The interface between the camera data acquisition system and its downstream clients is also presented.

  11. Starspots and Spin-orbit Alignment in the WASP-4 Exoplanetary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N.; Holman, Matthew J.; Carter, Joshua A.; Osip, David J.; Fuentes, Cesar I.

    2011-06-01

    We present photometry of four transits of the exoplanet WASP-4b, each with a precision of approximately 500 ppm and a time sampling of 40-60 s. We have used the data to refine the estimates of the system parameters and ephemerides. During two of the transits we observed a short-lived, low-amplitude anomaly that we interpret as the occultation of a starspot by the planet. We also found evidence for a pair of similar anomalies in previously published photometry. The recurrence of these anomalies suggests that the stellar rotation axis is nearly aligned with the orbital axis, or else the starspot would not have remained on the transit chord. By analyzing the timings of the anomalies we find the sky-projected stellar obliquity to be λ = -1+14 - 12 degrees. This result is consistent with (and more constraining than) a recent observation of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. It suggests that the planet migration mechanism preserved the initially low obliquity, or else that tidal evolution has realigned the system. Future applications of this method using data from the CoRoT and Kepler missions will allow spin-orbit alignment to be probed for many other exoplanets. Based on observations with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  12. A peptide-spectrum scoring system based on ion alignment, intensity, and pair probabilities.

    PubMed

    Risk, Brian A; Edwards, Nathan J; Giddings, Morgan C

    2013-09-06

    Peppy, the proteogenomic/proteomic search software, employs a novel method for assessing the match quality between an MS/MS spectrum and a theorized peptide sequence. The scoring system uses three score factors calculated with binomial probabilities: the probability that a fragment ion will randomly align with a peptide ion, the probability that the aligning ions will be selected from subsets of the most intense peaks, and the probability that the intensities of fragment ions identified as y-ions are greater than those of their counterpart b-ions. The scores produced by the method act as global confidence scores, which facilitate the accurate comparison of results and the estimation of false discovery rates. Peppy has been integrated into the meta-search engine PepArML to produce meaningful comparisons with Mascot, MSGF+, OMSSA, X!Tandem, k-Score and s-Score. For two of the four data sets examined with the PepArML analysis, Peppy exceeded the accuracy performance of the other scoring systems. Peppy is available for download at http://geneffects.com/peppy .

  13. STARSPOTS AND SPIN-ORBIT ALIGNMENT IN THE WASP-4 EXOPLANETARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N.; Carter, Joshua A.; Holman, Matthew J.; Fuentes, Cesar I.; Osip, David J.

    2011-06-01

    We present photometry of four transits of the exoplanet WASP-4b, each with a precision of approximately 500 ppm and a time sampling of 40-60 s. We have used the data to refine the estimates of the system parameters and ephemerides. During two of the transits we observed a short-lived, low-amplitude anomaly that we interpret as the occultation of a starspot by the planet. We also found evidence for a pair of similar anomalies in previously published photometry. The recurrence of these anomalies suggests that the stellar rotation axis is nearly aligned with the orbital axis, or else the starspot would not have remained on the transit chord. By analyzing the timings of the anomalies we find the sky-projected stellar obliquity to be {lambda} = -1{sup +14}{sub -12} degrees. This result is consistent with (and more constraining than) a recent observation of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. It suggests that the planet migration mechanism preserved the initially low obliquity, or else that tidal evolution has realigned the system. Future applications of this method using data from the CoRoT and Kepler missions will allow spin-orbit alignment to be probed for many other exoplanets.

  14. Classification systems for causes of stillbirth and neonatal death, 2009-2014: an assessment of alignment with characteristics for an effective global system.

    PubMed

    Leisher, Susannah Hopkins; Teoh, Zheyi; Reinebrant, Hanna; Allanson, Emma; Blencowe, Hannah; Erwich, Jan Jaap; Frøen, J Frederik; Gardosi, Jason; Gordijn, Sanne; Gülmezoglu, A Metin; Heazell, Alexander E P; Korteweg, Fleurisca; Lawn, Joy; McClure, Elizabeth M; Pattinson, Robert; Smith, Gordon C S; Tunçalp, Ӧzge; Wojcieszek, Aleena M; Flenady, Vicki

    2016-09-15

    To reduce the burden of 5.3 million stillbirths and neonatal deaths annually, an understanding of causes of deaths is critical. A systematic review identified 81 systems for classification of causes of stillbirth (SB) and neonatal death (NND) between 2009 and 2014. The large number of systems hampers efforts to understand and prevent these deaths. This study aimed to assess the alignment of current classification systems with expert-identified characteristics for a globally effective classification system. Eighty-one classification systems were assessed for alignment with 17 characteristics previously identified through expert consensus as necessary for an effective global system. Data were extracted independently by two authors. Systems were assessed against each characteristic and weighted and unweighted scores assigned to each. Subgroup analyses were undertaken by system use, setting, type of death included and type of characteristic. None of the 81 systems were aligned with more than 9 of the 17 characteristics; most (82 %) were aligned with four or fewer. On average, systems were aligned with 19 % of characteristics. The most aligned system (Frøen 2009-Codac) still had an unweighted score of only 9/17. Alignment with individual characteristics ranged from 0 to 49 %. Alignment was somewhat higher for widely used as compared to less used systems (22 % v 17 %), systems used only in high income countries as compared to only in low and middle income countries (20 % vs 16 %), and systems including both SB and NND (23 %) as compared to NND-only (15 %) and SB-only systems (13 %). Alignment was higher with characteristics assessing structure (23 %) than function (15 %). There is an unmet need for a system exhibiting all the characteristics of a globally effective system as defined by experts in the use of systems, as none of the 81 contemporary classification systems assessed was highly aligned with these characteristics. A particular concern in terms of

  15. How does lower leg alignment differ between soccer players, other athletes, and non-athletic controls?

    PubMed

    Colyn, William; Agricola, Rintje; Arnout, Nele; Verhaar, Jan A N; Bellemans, Johan

    2016-11-01

    The influence of type and intensity of sports during growth on knee alignment was investigated. The second aim was to ascertain whether the distal femur or proximal tibia contribute most to knee alignment. Also, the influence of field position and leg dominancy on knee alignment in soccer players was audited. Standardized full-leg standing digital radiographs were obtained from 100 males and 100 females on which 8 different alignment parameters were measured. Participants were questioned on their sports activities during different stages of growth. Sports activities were graded according to the Tegner score. The mean (±SD) hip-knee-ankle angle (HKA) was significantly lower (p < 0.001) in high-activity male athletes (-2.8° ± 2.4°) than in low-activity male athletes (-0.9° ± 1.9°). No differences in HKA were observed between different activity levels in females. Males who practiced soccer between 10-12 years and 15-17 years had, in turn, a lower HKA than athletes practicing other high-activity sports in these age categories (mean difference ≥1.2°, p ≤ 0.046). The most contributing factor for the varus alignment in male soccer players was a lower medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA). High-activity sports participation during youth is associated with varus alignment at the end of growth in males. The most pronounced bowlegs were observed in male soccer players, and this was primarily determined by the proximal tibia. Adjustments in loads applied to the knees during skeletal growth in males might prevent the development of varus alignment and associated pathology, but further studies are required. Diagnostic study, Level III.

  16. Control system design guide

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, David; Friedman, Hannah; Haasl, Tudi; Bourassa, Norman; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-05-01

    The ''Control System Design Guide'' (Design Guide) provides methods and recommendations for the control system design process and control point selection and installation. Control systems are often the most problematic system in a building. A good design process that takes into account maintenance, operation, and commissioning can lead to a smoothly operating and efficient building. To this end, the Design Guide provides a toolbox of templates for improving control system design and specification. HVAC designers are the primary audience for the Design Guide. The control design process it presents will help produce well-designed control systems that achieve efficient and robust operation. The spreadsheet examples for control valve schedules, damper schedules, and points lists can streamline the use of the control system design concepts set forth in the Design Guide by providing convenient starting points from which designers can build. Although each reader brings their own unique questions to the text, the Design Guide contains information that designers, commissioning providers, operators, and owners will find useful.

  17. Dual annular rotating "windowed" nuclear reflector reactor control system

    DOEpatents

    Jacox, Michael G.; Drexler, Robert L.; Hunt, Robert N. M.; Lake, James A.

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core.

  18. Fixture for aligning motor assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Shervington, Roger M.; Vaghani, Vallabh V.; Vanek, Laurence D.; Christensen, Scott A.

    2009-12-08

    An alignment fixture includes a rotor fixture, a stator fixture and a sensor system which measures a rotational displacement therebetween. The fixture precisely measures rotation of a generator stator assembly away from a NULL position referenced by a unique reference spline on the rotor shaft. By providing an adjustable location of the stator assembly within the housing, the magnetic axes within each generator shall be aligned to a predetermined and controlled tolerance between the generator interface mounting pin and the reference spline on the rotor shaft. Once magnetically aligned, each generator is essentially a line replaceable unit which may be readily mounted to any input of a multi-generator gearbox assembly with the assurance that the magnetic alignment will be within a predetermined tolerance.

  19. Novel microsatellite control system

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.R.; Frigo, J.R.; Tilden, M.W.

    1996-12-31

    The authors are developing extremely simple yet quite capable analog pulse-coded neural networks for smaller-faster-cheaper spacecraft attitude and control systems. They will demonstrate a prototype microsatellite that uses the novel control system to autonomously stabilize itself in the ambient magnetic field and point itself at the brightest available light source.

  20. Systems Modelling and Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kershenbaum, L. S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes aims, objectives content, and instructional strategies of a course in systems modelling and control at Imperial College, England. Major problem areas include multivariable control system design, estimation and filtering, and the design and use of adaptive "self-tuning" regulators. (Author/JN)

  1. Innovative scatterometry approach for self-aligned quadruple patterning (SAQP) process control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunay-Demirkol, Anil; Altamirano Sanchez, Efrain; Heraud, Stephane; Godny, Stephane; Charley, Anne-Laure; Leray, Philippe; Urenski, Ronen; Cohen, Oded; Turovets, Igor; Wolfling, Shay

    2016-03-01

    In this work, capabilities of scatterometry at various steps of the self-aligned quadruple patterning (SAQP) process flow for 7nm (N7) technology node are demonstrated including the pitch walk measurement on the final fin etch step. The scatterometry solutions for each step are verified using reference metrology and the capability to follow the planned process design-of-experiment (DOE) and the sensitivity to catch the small process variations are demonstrated. Pitch walk, which is pitch variation in the four line/space (L/S) populations, is one of the main process challenges for SAQP. Scatterometry, which is a versatile optical technique for critical dimensions (CD) and shape metrology, can find the direct measurement of pitch walk challenging because it is a very weak parameter. In this work, the pitch walk measurement is managed via scatterometry using an advanced technique of parallel interpretation of scatterometry pads with varying pitches. The three populations of trenches could be clearly distinguished with the scatterometry and the consistency with the reference data and with the process DOE are presented. In addition, the root cause of the within-wafer non-uniformity of fin CD is determined. The measurements were done on-site at IMEC as a part of the process development and control of the IMEC SAQP processes [1]. All in all, in this work it is demonstrated that scatterometry is capable of monitoring each process step of FEOL SAQP and it can measure three different space populations separately and extract pitch walk information at the final fin etch step.

  2. Analyzing Feedback Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Interactive controls analysis (INCA) program developed to provide user-friendly environment for design and analysis of linear control systems, primarily feedback control. Designed for use with both small- and large-order systems. Using interactive-graphics capability, INCA user quickly plots root locus, frequency response, or time response of either continuous-time system or sampled-data system. Configuration and parameters easily changed, allowing user to design compensation networks and perform sensitivity analyses in very convenient manner. Written in Pascal and FORTRAN.

  3. Analyzing Feedback Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Interactive controls analysis (INCA) program developed to provide user-friendly environment for design and analysis of linear control systems, primarily feedback control. Designed for use with both small- and large-order systems. Using interactive-graphics capability, INCA user quickly plots root locus, frequency response, or time response of either continuous-time system or sampled-data system. Configuration and parameters easily changed, allowing user to design compensation networks and perform sensitivity analyses in very convenient manner. Written in Pascal and FORTRAN.

  4. Cockpit control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesnewski, David; Snow, Russ M.; Paufler, Dave; Schnieder, George; Athousake, Roxanne; Combs, Lisa

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide a detail design for the cockpit control system of the Viper PFT. The statement of work for this project requires provisions for control of the ailerons, elevator, rudder, and elevator trim. The system should provide adjustment for pilot stature, rigging, and maintenance. MIL-STD-1472 is used as a model for human factors criterion. The system is designed to the pilot limit loading outlined in FAR part 23.397. The general philosophy behind this design is to provide a simple, reliable control system which will withstand the daily abuse that is experienced in the training environment without excessive cost or weight penalties.

  5. Control system testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittler, W. H.; Collart, R. E.

    1984-08-01

    A three stage process of ground testing of the Space Telescope Pointing Control System is used for verification prior to on-orbit operation. First, development tests are conducted in a laboratory environment using flight/engineering model control sensor and actuators configured with an engineering model of the flight computer and data management system breadboards. These development tests validate the results of computer simulations predicting control system performance. Integration tests bring together flight system elements and software interfaced to a software simulation of vehicle dynamics to confirm closed loop performance. The final ground test phase, flight systems testing, is conducted on the fully assembled Space Telescope, verifies interfaces with the Fine Guidance Sensors and includes a thermal vacuum testing period. During the final test phase, the Point Control System is exercised with the dynamics simulator running in real time.

  6. Starspots And Spin-orbit Alignment In the Wasp-4 Exoplanetary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchis Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, J. N.; Holman, M. J.; Carter, J. A.; Osip, D. J.; Fuentes, C. I.

    2011-05-01

    We present photometry of 4 transits of the exoplanet WASP-4b, each with a precision of approximately 500 ppm and a time sampling of 40-60s. During two of the transits we observed a short-lived, low-amplitude anomaly that we interpret as the occultation of a starspot by the planet. We also find evidence for a pair of similar anomalies in previously published photometry. The recurrence of these anomalies suggests that the stellar rotation axis is nearly aligned with the orbital axis, or else the star spot would not have remained on the transit chord. By analyzing the timings of the anomalies we find the sky-projected stellar obliquity to be 1^{+12}_{-14} degrees. This result is consistent with (and more constraining than) a recent observation of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. It suggests that the planet migration mechanism preserved the initially low obliquity, or else that tidal evolution has realigned the system. We discuss future applications of this method using data from the Kepler satellite, which will allow spin-orbit alignment to be probed for many other exoplanets.

  7. MSAProbs-MPI: parallel multiple sequence aligner for distributed-memory systems.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Jorge; Liu, Yongchao; Touriño, Juan; Schmidt, Bertil

    2016-12-15

    MSAProbs is a state-of-the-art protein multiple sequence alignment tool based on hidden Markov models. It can achieve high alignment accuracy at the expense of relatively long runtimes for large-scale input datasets. In this work we present MSAProbs-MPI, a distributed-memory parallel version of the multithreaded MSAProbs tool that is able to reduce runtimes by exploiting the compute capabilities of common multicore CPU clusters. Our performance evaluation on a cluster with 32 nodes (each containing two Intel Haswell processors) shows reductions in execution time of over one order of magnitude for typical input datasets. Furthermore, MSAProbs-MPI using eight nodes is faster than the GPU-accelerated QuickProbs running on a Tesla K20. Another strong point is that MSAProbs-MPI can deal with large datasets for which MSAProbs and QuickProbs might fail due to time and memory constraints, respectively. Source code in C ++ and MPI running on Linux systems as well as a reference manual are available at http://msaprobs.sourceforge.net CONTACT: jgonzalezd@udc.esSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Environmental constraints shaping constituent order in emerging communication systems: Structural iconicity, interactive alignment and conventionalization.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Peer; Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Where does linguistic structure come from? Recent gesture elicitation studies have indicated that constituent order (corresponding to for instance subject-verb-object, or SVO in English) may be heavily influenced by human cognitive biases constraining gesture production and transmission. Here we explore the alternative hypothesis that syntactic patterns are motivated by multiple environmental and social-interactional constraints that are external to the cognitive domain. In three experiments, we systematically investigate different motivations for structure in the gestural communication of simple transitive events. The first experiment indicates that, if participants communicate about different types of events, manipulation events (e.g. someone throwing a cake) and construction events (e.g. someone baking a cake), they spontaneously and systematically produce different constituent orders, SOV and SVO respectively, thus following the principle of structural iconicity. The second experiment shows that participants' choice of constituent order is also reliably influenced by social-interactional forces of interactive alignment, that is, the tendency to re-use an interlocutor's previous choice of constituent order, thus potentially overriding affordances for iconicity. Lastly, the third experiment finds that the relative frequency distribution of referent event types motivates the stabilization and conventionalization of a single constituent order for the communication of different types of events. Together, our results demonstrate that constituent order in emerging gestural communication systems is shaped and stabilized in response to multiple external environmental and social factors: structural iconicity, interactive alignment and distributional frequency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Method to determine and adjust the alignment of the transmitter and receiver fields of view of a LIDAR system

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, Randal L.; Henson, Tammy D.; Krumel, Leslie J.; Hargis, Jr., Philip J.

    2006-06-20

    A method to determine the alignment of the transmitter and receiver fields of view of a light detection and ranging (LIDAR) system. This method can be employed to determine the far-field intensity distribution of the transmitter beam, as well as the variations in transmitted laser beam pointing as a function of time, temperature, or other environmental variables that may affect the co-alignment of the LIDAR system components. In order to achieve proper alignment of the transmitter and receiver optical systems when a LIDAR system is being used in the field, this method employs a laser-beam-position-sensing detector as an integral part of the receiver optics of the LIDAR system.

  10. PRESSURE SYSTEM CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Esselman, W.H.; Kaplan, G.M.

    1961-06-20

    The control of pressure in pressurized liquid systems, especially a pressurized liquid reactor system, may be achieved by providing a bias circuit or loop across a closed loop having a flow restriction means in the form of an orifice, a storage tank, and a pump connected in series. The subject invention is advantageously utilized where control of a reactor can be achieved by response to the temperature and pressure of the primary cooling system.

  11. Drone Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Drones, subscale vehicles like the Firebees, and full scale retired military aircraft are used to test air defense missile systems. The DFCS (Drone Formation Control System) computer, developed by IBM (International Business Machines) Federal Systems Division, can track ten drones at once. A program called ORACLS is used to generate software to track and control Drones. It was originally developed by Langley and supplied by COSMIC (Computer Software Management and Information Center). The program saved the company both time and money.

  12. Terminator field-aligned current system: A new finding from model-assimilated data set (MADS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Schunk, R. W.; Scherliess, L.; Sojka, J. J.; Gardner, L. C.; Eccles, J. V.; Rice, D.

    2013-12-01

    Physics-based data assimilation models have been recognized by the space science community as the most accurate approach to specify and forecast the space weather of the solar-terrestrial environment. The model-assimilated data sets (MADS) produced by these models constitute an internally consistent time series of global three-dimensional fields whose accuracy can be estimated. Because of its internal consistency of physics and completeness of descriptions on the status of global systems, the MADS has also been a powerful tool to identify the systematic errors in measurements, reveal the missing physics in physical models, and discover the important dynamical physical processes that are inadequately observed or missed by measurements due to observational limitations. In the past years, we developed a data assimilation model for the high-latitude ionospheric plasma dynamics and electrodynamics. With a set of physical models, an ensemble Kalman filter, and the ingestion of data from multiple observations, the data assimilation model can produce a self-consistent time-series of the complete descriptions of the global high-latitude ionosphere, which includes the convection electric field, horizontal and field-aligned currents, conductivity, as well as 3-D plasma densities and temperatures, In this presentation, we will show a new field-aligned current system discovered from the analysis of the MADS produced by our data assimilation model. This new current system appears and develops near the ionospheric terminator. The dynamical features of this current system will be described and its connection to the active role of the ionosphere in the M-I coupling will be discussed.

  13. Spin-Orbit Alignment of Exoplanet Systems: Ensemble Analysis Using Asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campante, T. L.; Lund, M. N.; Kuszlewicz, J. S.; Davies, G. R.; Chaplin, W. J.; Albrecht, S.; Winn, J. N.; Bedding, T. R.; Benomar, O.; Bossini, D.; Handberg, R.; Santos, A. R. G.; Van Eylen, V.; Basu, S.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Hekker, S.; Hirano, T.; Huber, D.; Karoff, C.; Kjeldsen, H.; Lundkvist, M. S.; North, T. S. H.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Stello, D.; White, T. R.

    2016-03-01

    The angle ψ between a planet’s orbital axis and the spin axis of its parent star is an important diagnostic of planet formation, migration, and tidal evolution. We seek empirical constraints on ψ by measuring the stellar inclination is via asteroseismology for an ensemble of 25 solar-type hosts observed with NASA’s Kepler satellite. Our results for is are consistent with alignment at the 2σ level for all stars in the sample, meaning that the system surrounding the red-giant star Kepler-56 remains as the only unambiguous misaligned multiple-planet system detected to date. The availability of a measurement of the projected spin-orbit angle λ for two of the systems allows us to estimate ψ. We find that the orbit of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-7b is likely to be retrograde (\\psi =116\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} {4}-14.7+30.2), whereas that of Kepler-25c seems to be well aligned with the stellar spin axis (\\psi =12\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} {6}-11.0+6.7). While the latter result is in apparent contradiction with a statement made previously in the literature that the multi-transiting system Kepler-25 is misaligned, we show that the results are consistent, given the large associated uncertainties. Finally, we perform a hierarchical Bayesian analysis based on the asteroseismic sample in order to recover the underlying distribution of ψ. The ensemble analysis suggests that the directions of the stellar spin and planetary orbital axes are correlated, as conveyed by a tendency of the host stars to display large values of inclination.

  14. Genetic algorithm based fast alignment method for strap-down inertial navigation system with large azimuth misalignment.

    PubMed

    He, Hongyang; Xu, Jiangning; Qin, Fangjun; Li, Feng

    2015-11-01

    In order to shorten the alignment time and eliminate the small initial misalignment limit for compass alignment of strap-down inertial navigation system (SINS), which is sometimes not easy to satisfy when the ship is moored or anchored, an optimal model based time-varying parameter compass alignment algorithm is proposed in this paper. The contributions of the work presented here are twofold. First, the optimization of compass alignment parameters, which involves a lot of trial-and-error traditionally, is achieved based on genetic algorithm. On this basis, second, the optimal parameter varying model is established by least-square polynomial fitting. Experiments are performed with a navigational grade fiber optical gyroscope SINS, which validate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  15. Power Systems Control Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    James Davidson

    2005-01-01

    A diagram provided in the report depicts the complexity of the power systems control architecture used by the national power structure. It shows the structural hierarchy and the relationship of the each system to those other systems interconnected to it. Each of these levels provides a different focus for vulnerability testing and has its own weaknesses. In evaluating each level, of prime concern is what vulnerabilities exist that provide a path into the system, either to cause the system to malfunction or to take control of a field device. An additional vulnerability to consider is can the system be compromised in such a manner that the attacker can obtain critical information about the system and the portion of the national power structure that it controls.

  16. ANALYSIS OF SPIN-ORBIT ALIGNMENT IN THE WASP-32, WASP-38, AND HAT-P-27/WASP-40 SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D. J. A.; Collier Cameron, A.; Enoch, B.; Miller, G. R. M.; Diaz, R. F.; Doyle, A. P.; Smalley, B.; Anderson, D. R.; Hellier, C.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Gillon, M.; Lendl, M.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Queloz, D.; Pollacco, D.; Boisse, I.; Hebrard, G.

    2012-12-01

    We present measurements of the spin-orbit alignment angle, {lambda}, for the hot Jupiter systems WASP-32, WASP-38, and HAT-P-27/WASP-40, based on data obtained using the HARPS spectrograph. We analyze the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for all three systems and also carry out Doppler tomography for WASP-32 and WASP-38. We find that WASP-32 (T {sub eff} = 6140{sup +90} {sub -100} K) is aligned, with an alignment angle of {lambda} = 10.{sup 0}5{sup +6.4} {sub -6.5} obtained through tomography, and that WASP-38 (T {sub eff} = 6180{sup +40} {sub -60} K) is also aligned, with tomographic analysis yielding {lambda} = 7.{sup 0}5{sup +4.7} {sub -6.1}. The latter result provides an order-of-magnitude improvement in the uncertainty in {lambda} compared to the previous analysis of Simpson et al. We are only able to loosely constrain the angle for HAT-P-27/WASP-40 (T{sub eff} = 5190{sup +160} {sub -170} K) to {lambda} = 24.{sup 0}2{sup +76.0}{sub -44.5}, owing to the poor signal-to-noise ratio of our data. We consider this result a non-detection under a slightly updated version of the alignment test of Brown et al. We place our results in the context of the full sample of spin-orbit alignment measurements, finding that they provide further support for previously established trends.

  17. Digital flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caglayan, A. K.; Vanlandingham, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    The design of stable feedback control laws for sampled-data systems with variable rate sampling was investigated. These types of sampled-data systems arise naturally in digital flight control systems which use digital actuators where it is desirable to decrease the number of control computer output commands in order to save wear and tear of the associated equipment. The design of aircraft control systems which are optimally tolerant of sensor and actuator failures was also studied. Detection of the failed sensor or actuator must be resolved and if the estimate of the state is used in the control law, then it is also desirable to have an estimator which will give the optimal state estimate even under the failed conditions.

  18. Desiccant humidity control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amazeen, J. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    A regenerable sorbent system was investigated for controlling the humidity and carbon dioxide concentration of the space shuttle cabin atmosphere. The sorbents considered for water and carbon dioxide removal were silica gel and molecular sieves. Bed optimization and preliminary system design are discussed along with system optimization studies and weight penalites.

  19. Control Oriented System Identification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    The research goals for this grant were to obtain algorithms for control oriented system identification is to construct dynamical models of systems...and measured information. Algorithms for this type of nonlinear system identification have been given that produce models suitable for gain scheduled

  20. Developing Systems Engineering Graduate Programs Aligned to the Body of Knowledge and Curriculum to Advance Systems Engineering (BKCASE(TM)) Guidelines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    AND SUBTITLE Developing Systems Engineering Graduate Programs Aligned to the Body of Knowledge and Curriculum to Advance Systems Engineering (BKCASETM...Engineering Graduate Programs Aligned to the Body of Knowledge and Curriculum to Advance Systems Engineering (BKCASETM) Guidelines Abstract The Body...develop new systems engineering graduate programs . One method is to develop the program within an existing department by combining new curriculum into a

  1. Load Control System Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Trudnowski, Daniel

    2015-04-03

    This report summarizes the results of the Load Control System Reliability project (DOE Award DE-FC26-06NT42750). The original grant was awarded to Montana Tech April 2006. Follow-on DOE awards and expansions to the project scope occurred August 2007, January 2009, April 2011, and April 2013. In addition to the DOE monies, the project also consisted of matching funds from the states of Montana and Wyoming. Project participants included Montana Tech; the University of Wyoming; Montana State University; NorthWestern Energy, Inc., and MSE. Research focused on two areas: real-time power-system load control methodologies; and, power-system measurement-based stability-assessment operation and control tools. The majority of effort was focused on area 2. Results from the research includes: development of fundamental power-system dynamic concepts, control schemes, and signal-processing algorithms; many papers (including two prize papers) in leading journals and conferences and leadership of IEEE activities; one patent; participation in major actual-system testing in the western North American power system; prototype power-system operation and control software installed and tested at three major North American control centers; and, the incubation of a new commercial-grade operation and control software tool. Work under this grant certainly supported the DOE-OE goals in the area of “Real Time Grid Reliability Management.”

  2. IGISOL control system modernization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koponen, J.; Hakala, J.

    2016-06-01

    Since 2010, the IGISOL research facility at the Accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä has gone through major changes. Comparing the new IGISOL4 facility to the former IGISOL3 setup, the size of the facility has more than doubled, the length of the ion transport line has grown to about 50 m with several measurement setups and extension capabilities, and the accelerated ions can be fed to the facility from two different cyclotrons. The facility has evolved to a system comprising hundreds of manual, pneumatic and electronic devices. These changes have prompted the need to modernize also the facility control system taking care of monitoring and transporting the ion beams. In addition, the control system is also used for some scientific data acquisition tasks. Basic guidelines for the IGISOL control system update have been remote control, safety, usability, reliability and maintainability. Legacy components have had a major significance in the control system hardware and for the renewed control system software the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) has been chosen as the architectural backbone.

  3. Optical alignments of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampler, Henry P.

    1990-01-01

    The angular alignments and stabilities of multiple components in a single coordinate system were determined using various alignment tooling techniques. These techniques use autocollimation measurements with a first order theodolite and transformation of coordinates to determine the relative alignment between various components with respect to a common set of COBE spacecraft coordinate axes. Optical-mechanical alignment techniques were also used to integrate the flight COBE observatory attitude control system module that consists of gyros, reaction wheels, and a momentum wheel. Particular attention is given to the techniques for alignments and stabilities of the earth scanners, sun sensors, far IR absolute spectrophotometer, Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment, and differential microwave radiometer antenna horn boresights.

  4. SSRF Beamline Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L. F.; Liu, P.; Zhang, Z. H.; Hu, C.; Mi, Q. R.; Wu, Y. F.; Gong, P. R.; Zhu, Z. X.; Li, Z.

    2010-06-23

    There are seven beamlines in the Phase-I of SSRF. Five of them are equipped with Insertion Devices, while two with Bending Magnets. The beamline control system is based on the standard hardware and software architecture. The VME(PowerPC) with VxWorks is used for motion control, while the personal computers with Scientific Linux are the front end controllers of equipment protection and personnel safety systems. The control software is developed under EPICS which makes various experimental programs of Blu-Ice, LabView, VC and SPEC conveniently access Monochromators, mirror chambers and other optical components.

  5. What is system control?

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, E.; Kirby, B.

    1999-11-01

    Just as the aviation industry needs air-traffic controllers to manage the movement of airplanes for safety and commerce, so too, the electricity industry requires system operators. The electrical-system-control functions encompass a range of activities that support commercial transactions and maintain bulk-power reliability. As part of a project for the Edison Electric Institute, the authors examined the functions and costs of system control and the issues that need to be resolved in a restructured electricity industry (Hirst and Kirby 1998).

  6. Controlled growth of well-aligned ZnO nanowire arrays using the improved hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhitao, Han; Sisi, Li; Jinkui, Chu; Yong, Chen

    2013-06-01

    Well-aligned ZnO nanowires were hydrothermally synthesized based on a facile method for preparing the ZnO seed layer which was derived from the combination of a sol—gel process and the spin-coating technique. The effect of the contents of growth solution and the growth duration on the morphology of ZnO nanowires has been investigated. The results indicated that long and vertically aligned ZnO nanowires could be obtained by adjusting the contents of ammonia and polyethyleneimine (PEI) in the growth solution. Under the optimized condition, the length of ZnO nanowires increased fast and almost linearly with the growth duration. After 10 h incubation, ZnO nanowires more than 25 μm in length were obtained. By combining the conventional photolithographic method with this hydrothermal approach, long and well-aligned ZnO nanowire arrays were selectively grown on the substrate. In addition, the bottom fusion at the foot of the nanowires has been obviously improved. The results demonstrated that the improved hydrothermal process is favorable to synthesize long and well-aligned ZnO nanowires, and possesses good process compatibility with the conventional photolithographic technique for preparing ZnO nanowire arrays. So it has great potential in applications such as display and field emission devices.

  7. Hummock alignment in Japanese volcanic debris avalanches controlled by pre-avalanche slope of depositional area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hidetsugu

    2014-10-01

    This paper investigates the relationship of hummock orientation to the flow dynamics of volcanic debris avalanches. There are opposing views on whether hummocks are systematically aligned along debris avalanche paths, or not. To investigate this geomorphologically fundamental question, I investigated hummock orientation for six Japanese debris avalanches of two simple styles: four "freely spreading" debris avalanches, and two "valley-filling" debris avalanches. Quantitative GIS-based data analysis revealed that hummock orientation along the avalanche flow path alternated between dominantly parallel to and dominantly perpendicular to the flow direction. These changes of alignment reflect dynamic changes of the local stress field within the avalanche, alternating between extensional and compressional in response to changes of the slope of the pre-avalanche ground surface. Changes of hummock alignment from perpendicular to parallel indicate that the local stress regime has changed from compressional to extensional. Conversely, changes of hummock alignment from parallel to perpendicular indicate that the local stress regime has changed from extensional to compressional. Thus, this research demonstrated a clear relationship between hummock orientation and dynamic changes of stress regime within avalanches that are related to changes of the slope of the pre-avalanche ground surface.

  8. System for maintaining the alignment of mandrels in filament winding operations

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Samuel C.; Dodge, William G.; Pollard, Roy E.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a system for sensing and correcting the alignment of a mandrel being wound with filamentary material with respect to the filamentary material winding mechanism. A positioned reference pin attached to the mandrel is positioned in a beam of collimated light emanating from a laser so as to bisect the light beam and create a shadow therebetween. A pair of photocells are positioned to receive the bisected light beam with the shadow uniformly located between the photocells when the pin is in a selected position. The mandrel is supported in the selected position for the winding of a filamentary material by a position adjustable roller mechanism which is coupled by a screw drive to a reversible motor. Changes in the pin position such as caused by winding growth are sensed by the photocells to provide the displacement of the roller mechanism in the direction necessary to return the mandrel to the selected position.

  9. Transducer-actuator systems and methods for performing on-machine measurements and automatic part alignment

    DOEpatents

    Barkman, William E.; Dow, Thomas A.; Garrard, Kenneth P.; Marston, Zachary

    2016-07-12

    Systems and methods for performing on-machine measurements and automatic part alignment, including: a measurement component operable for determining the position of a part on a machine; and an actuation component operable for adjusting the position of the part by contacting the part with a predetermined force responsive to the determined position of the part. The measurement component consists of a transducer. The actuation component consists of a linear actuator. Optionally, the measurement component and the actuation component consist of a single linear actuator operable for contacting the part with a first lighter force for determining the position of the part and with a second harder force for adjusting the position of the part. The actuation component is utilized in a substantially horizontal configuration and the effects of gravitational drop of the part are accounted for in the force applied and the timing of the contact.

  10. Mechanical stability of the CMS strip tracker measured with a laser alignment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

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H.; Barney, D.; Blanchot, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonnaud, J.; Botta, C.; Camporesi, T.; Caratelli, A.; Castello, R.; Cepeda, M.; Ceresa, D.; Cerminara, G.; Chen, Y.; Cichy, K.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; De Gruttola, M.; De Roeck, A.; Detraz, S.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dondelewski, O.; Dorney, B.; du Pree, T.; Duggan, D.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Everaerts, P.; Faccio, F.; Fartoukh, S.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gadek, T.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Gulhan, D.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Jara Casas, L. M.; Kaplon, J.; Kieseler, J.; Kirschenmann, H.; Knünz, V.; Kornmayer, A.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krammer, M.; Lange, C.; Lecoq, P.; Lenoir, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Marconi, S.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Martina, S.; Meijers, F.; Merlin, J. A.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Michelis, S.; Milenovic, P.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Pavis, S.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rose, P.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Sauvan, J. B.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Tosi, M.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veckalns, V.; Veres, G. I.; Verlaat, B.; Verweij, M.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Zwalinski, L.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Berger, P.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meinhard, M. T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, G.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Zhu, D.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Bösiger, K.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; De Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Maier, R.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Salerno, D.; Seitz, C.; Yang, Y.; Zucchetta, A.; Candelise, V.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Fiori, F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Paganis, E.; Psallidas, A.; Tsai, J. f.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Cerci, S.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kara, O.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Kiminsu, U.; Oglakci, M.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Turkcapar, S.; Zorbakir, I. S.; Zorbilmez, C.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Burns, D.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Di Maria, R.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Haddad, Y.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; James, T.; Lane, R.; Laner, C.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Penning, B.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Scott, E.; Seez, C.; Summers, S.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wright, J.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Morton, A.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Bartek, R.; Dominguez, A.; Buccilli, A.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; West, C.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Benelli, G.; Cutts, D.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Hogan, J. M.; Jesus, O.; Kwok, K. H. M.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Nelson, J.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Spencer, E.; Swanson, J.; Syarif, R.; Tersegno, D.; Watson-Daniels, J.; Breedon, R.; Burns, D.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Flores, C.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mclean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Shalhout, S.; Shi, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tos, K.; Tripathi, M.; Bachtis, M.; Bravo, C.; Cousins, R.; Dasgupta, A.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Mccoll, N.; Saltzberg, D.; Schnaible, C.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Bouvier, E.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Ghiasi Shirazi, S. M. A.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Shrinivas, A.; Si, W.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Derdzinski, M.; Gerosa, R.; Holzner, A.; Klein, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Amin, N.; Bhandari, R.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Sevilla, M. Franco; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Heller, R.; Incandela, J.; Mullin, S. D.; Ovcharova, A.; Qu, H.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Bendavid, J.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Duarte, J.; Lawhorn, J. M.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Weinberg, M.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Leontsinis, S.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Mcdermott, K.; Mirman, N.; Kaufman, G. Nicolas; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Tan, S. M.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Wittich, P.; Zientek, M.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Canepa, A.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Chramowicz, J.; Christian, D.; Cihangir, S.; Cremonesi, M.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gingu, C.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hoff, J.; Hrycyk, M.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kahlid, F.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, M.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Magini, N.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; Matulik, M.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Ristori, L.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Shenai, A.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strait, J.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Wu, Y.; Zimmerman, T.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Low, J. F.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Shchutska, L.; Sperka, D.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Santra, A.; Yohay, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Ennesser, L.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Jung, K.; Makauda, S.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Varelas, N.; Wang, H.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Al-bataineh, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Boren, S.; Bowen, J.; Castle, J.; Forthomme, L.; Kenny, R. P., III; Khalil, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Wang, Q.; Wilson, G.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Jeng, G. Y.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Abercrombie, D.; Allen, B.; Apyan, A.; Azzolini, V.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; D'Alfonso, M.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krajczar, K.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Maier, B.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Tatar, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Evans, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Claes, D. R.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Kravchenko, I.; Malta Rodrigues, A.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Nguyen, D.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Charaf, O.; Hahn, K. A.; Kumar, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Rupprecht, N.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Lange, D.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mei, K.; Ojalvo, I.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Tully, C.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Folgueras, S.; Gutay, L.; Hinton, N.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Khatiwada, A.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Schulte, J. F.; Shi, X.; Sun, J.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Kilpatrick, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Nussbaum, T.; Padley, B. P.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. t.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Agapitos, A.; Chou, J. P.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Park, M.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Delannoy, A. G.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Juska, E.; Kamon, T.; Mueller, R.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; De Guio, F.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Gurpinar, E.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Peltola, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Buchanan, J.; Caillol, C.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2017-04-01

    The CMS tracker consists of 206 m2 of silicon strip sensors assembled on carbon fibre composite structures and is designed for operation in the temperature range from -25 to +25°C. The mechanical stability of tracker components during physics operation was monitored with a few μm resolution using a dedicated laser alignment system as well as particle tracks from cosmic rays and hadron-hadron collisions. During the LHC operational period of 2011-2013 at stable temperatures, the components of the tracker were observed to experience relative movements of less than 30μm. In addition, temperature variations were found to cause displacements of tracker structures of about 2μm°C, which largely revert to their initial positions when the temperature is restored to its original value.

  11. System for maintaining the alignment of mandrels in filament winding operations

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, S.C.; Dodge, W.G.; Pollard, R.E.

    1983-10-12

    The present invention is directed to a system for sensing and correcting the alignment of a mandrel being wound with filamentary material with respect to the filamentary material winding mechanism. A positioned reference pin attached to the mandrel is positioned in a beam of collimated light emanating from a laser so as to bisect the light beam and create a shadow therebetween. A pair of photocells are positioned to receive the bisected light beam with the shadow uniformly located between the photocells when the pin is in a selected position. The mandrel is supported in the selected position for the winding of a filamentary material by a position adjustable roller mechanism which is coupled by a screw drive to a reversible motor. Changes in the pin position such as caused by winding growth are sensed by the photocells to provide the displacement of the roller mechanism in the direction necessary to return the mandrel to the selected position.

  12. Alignment System for Full-Shell Replicated X-Ray Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Arnold, William; Ramsey, Brian

    2009-01-01

    We are developing grazing-incidence x-ray optics for high-energy astrophysical applications using the electroformnickel replication process. For space-based applications these optics must be light-weight yet stable, which dictates the use of very-thin-walled full-shell mirrors. Such shells have been fabricated with resolution as good as 11 arcsec for hard x-rays, and technology enhancements under development at MSFC are aimed at producing mirrors with resolution better than 10 arcsec. The challenge, however, is to preserve this resolution during mounting and assembly. We present here a status report on a mounting and alignment system currently under development at Marshall Space Flight Center designed to meet this challenge.

  13. Mechanical stability of the CMS strip tracker measured with a laser alignment system

    DOE PAGES

    Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; ...

    2017-04-21

    Here, the CMS tracker consists of 206 m2 of silicon strip sensors assembled on carbon fibre composite structures and is designed for operation in the temperature range from –25 to +25°C. The mechanical stability of tracker components during physics operation was monitored with a few μm resolution using a dedicated laser alignment system as well as particle tracks from cosmic rays and hadron-hadron collisions. During the LHC operational period of 2011–2013 at stable temperatures, the components of the tracker were observed to experience relative movements of less than 30μm. In addition, temperature variations were found to cause displacements of trackermore » structures of about 2μm°C, which largely revert to their initial positions when the temperature is restored to its original value.« less

  14. System and method for aligning heliostats of a solar power tower

    DOEpatents

    Convery, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar power tower heliostat alignment system and method that includes a solar power tower with a focal area, a plurality of heliostats that each reflect sunlight towards the focal area of the solar power tower, an off-focal area location substantially close to the focal area of the solar power tower, a communication link between the off-focal area location and a misaligned heliostat, and a processor that interprets the communication between the off-focal area location and the misaligned heliostat to identify the misaligned heliostat from the plurality of heliostats and that determines a correction for the identified misaligned heliostat to realign the misaligned heliostat to reflect sunlight towards the focal area of the solar power tower.

  15. Remotely controllable mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, R. R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to a remotely controllable mixing system in which a plurality of mixing assemblies are arranged in an annular configuration, and wherein each assembly employs a central chamber and two outer, upper and lower chambers. Valves are positioned between chambers, and these valves for a given mixing assembly are operated by upper and lower control rotors, which in turn are driven by upper and lower drive rotors. Additionally, a hoop is compressed around upper control rotors and a hoop is compressed around lower control rotors to thus insure constant frictional engagement between all control rotors and drive rotors. The drive rollers are driven by a motor.

  16. Girder Alignment Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zackary; Ruland, Robert; LeCocq, Catherine; Lundahl, Eric; Levashov, Yurii; Reese, Ed; Rago, Carl; Poling, Ben; Schafer, Donald; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Wienands, Uli; /SLAC

    2010-11-18

    The girders for the LCLS undulator system contain components which must be aligned with high accuracy relative to each other. The alignment is one of the last steps before the girders go into the tunnel, so the alignment must be done efficiently, on a tight schedule. This note documents the alignment plan which includes efficiency and high accuracy. The motivation for girder alignment involves the following considerations. Using beam based alignment, the girder position will be adjusted until the beam goes through the center of the quadrupole and beam finder wire. For the machine to work properly, the undulator axis must be on this line and the center of the undulator beam pipe must be on this line. The physics reasons for the undulator axis and undulator beam pipe axis to be centered on the beam are different, but the alignment tolerance for both are similar. In addition, the beam position monitor must be centered on the beam to preserve its calibration. Thus, the undulator, undulator beam pipe, quadrupole, beam finder wire, and beam position monitor axes must all be aligned to a common line. All relative alignments are equally important, not just, for example, between quadrupole and undulator. We begin by making the common axis the nominal beam axis in the girder coordinate system. All components will be initially aligned to this axis. A more accurate alignment will then position the components relative to each other, without incorporating the girder itself.

  17. Automatic alignment method for calibration of hydrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. J.; Chang, K. H.; Chon, J. C.; Oh, C. Y.

    2004-04-01

    This paper presents a new method to automatically align specific scale-marks for the calibration of hydrometers. A hydrometer calibration system adopting the new method consists of a vision system, a stepping motor, and software to control the system. The vision system is composed of a CCD camera and a frame grabber, and is used to acquire images. The stepping motor moves the camera, which is attached to the vessel containing a reference liquid, along the hydrometer. The operating program has two main functions: to process images from the camera to find the position of the horizontal plane and to control the stepping motor for the alignment of the horizontal plane with a particular scale-mark. Any system adopting this automatic alignment method is a convenient and precise means of calibrating a hydrometer. The performance of the proposed method is illustrated by comparing the calibration results using the automatic alignment method with those obtained using the manual method.

  18. Some aspects of SR beamline alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaponov, Yu. A.; Cerenius, Y.; Nygaard, J.; Ursby, T.; Larsson, K.

    2011-09-01

    Based on the Synchrotron Radiation (SR) beamline optical element-by-element alignment with analysis of the alignment results an optimized beamline alignment algorithm has been designed and developed. The alignment procedures have been designed and developed for the MAX-lab I911-4 fixed energy beamline. It has been shown that the intermediate information received during the monochromator alignment stage can be used for the correction of both monochromator and mirror without the next stages of alignment of mirror, slits, sample holder, etc. Such an optimization of the beamline alignment procedures decreases the time necessary for the alignment and becomes useful and helpful in the case of any instability of the beamline optical elements, storage ring electron orbit or the wiggler insertion device, which could result in the instability of angular and positional parameters of the SR beam. A general purpose software package for manual, semi-automatic and automatic SR beamline alignment has been designed and developed using the developed algorithm. The TANGO control system is used as the middle-ware between the stand-alone beamline control applications BLTools, BPMonitor and the beamline equipment.

  19. Computer controlled antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raumann, N. A.

    1972-01-01

    Digital techniques are discussed for application to the servo and control systems of large antennas. The tracking loop for an antenna at a STADAN tracking site is illustrated. The augmentation mode is also considered.

  20. Linear Hereditary Control Systems,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Relationships between external and internal models for systems with time lags are discussed. The use of various canonical forms for the models in solving optimal control problems is considered. (Author)

  1. Flight control actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  2. Flight control actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  3. Comparing the Zeiss Callisto Eye and the Alcon Verion Image Guided System Toric Lens Alignment Technologies.

    PubMed

    Hura, Arjan S; Osher, Robert H

    2017-07-01

    To compare the alignment meridian generated by the Zeiss Callisto Eye (Carl Zeiss AG, Dublin, CA) and the Alcon Verion Image Guided System (Alcon Laboratories, Inc., Fort Worth, TX). In this retrospective comparative evaluation of technology, intraoperative images were captured at different steps in the same surgery, allowing the comparison of the guidance lines generated by the Verion system to the parallel guidance lines generated by the Callisto Eye system. Measurements of each hemi-meridian were quantified using Adobe Photoshop 2015 CC software (Adobe Systems, San Jose, CA). The numbers of degrees separating these alignment meridians were calculated, entered into a database, and analyzed. The authors found that of 98 captured images of 16 eyes, the two technologies were identical in 0 eyes (θ1 = θ2 = 0), similar by 3° in 52 (53%) captured images (θ1 ≠ θ2 ≠ 0), and different by at least 3° in 46 (47%) captured images (θ1 ≠ θ2 ≠ 0). The target meridians were superimposed, the target lines were minimally separated, and the target lines were dissimilar. It was noted that some intraoperative variation occurred from measurement to measurement. Within the small group of 16 cases of routine toric lens implantation in this study, the absolute average number of degrees of misalignment between the Verion and Callisto Eye systems was 3.355 for θ1 and 3.838 for θ2. On average, the intraoperative variation termed "drift" was noted to be 3.963° for θ1, and 4.557° for θ2. The authors found that small deviations were frequent when comparing two sophisticated technologies. Although deviations greater than 3° occurred in less than 47% of captured images from 16 eyes, smaller but significant variations of less than 3° occurred in 53% of captured images from 16 eyes. It was rare to identify a large deviation. However, the authors identified "drift" in the same eye when measurements were taken at different times. The results indicate that the two systems are

  4. Practical alignment method for X-ray spectral measurement in micro-CT system based on 3D printing technology

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Zheng, Bin; Chen, Yong; Yang, Kai; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a practical alignment method for X-ray spectral measurement in a rotating gantry based micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) system using three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. In order to facilitate the spectrometer placement inside the gantry, supporting structures including a cover and a stand were dedicatedly designed and printed using a 3D printer. According to the relative position between the spectrometer and the stand, the upright projection of the spectrometer collimator onto the stand was determined and then marked by a tungsten pinhole. Thus, a visible alignment indicator of the X-ray central beam and the spectrometer collimator represented by the pinhole was established in the micro-CT live mode. Then, a rough alignment could be achieved through repeatedly adjusting and imaging the stand until the pinhole was located at the center of the acquired projection image. With the spectrometer being positioned back onto the stand, the precise alignment was completed by slightly translating the spectrometer-stand assembly around the rough location, until finding a “sweet spot” with the highest photon rate and proper distribution of the X-ray photons in the resultant spectrum. The spectra were acquired under precise alignment and misalignment of approximately 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0mm away from the precise alignment position, and then were compared in qualitative and quantitative analyses. Qualitative analysis results show that, with slight misalignment, the photon rate is reduced from 1302 to 1098, 1031, and 416 photons/second (p/s), respectively, and the characteristic peaks in the acquired spectra are gradually deteriorated. Quantitative analysis indicates that the energy resolutions for characteristic peak of Kα1 were calculated as 1.56% for precise alignment, while were 1.84% and 2.40% for slight misalignment of 0.2mm and 0.5mm. The mean energies were reduced from 43.93keV under precise alignment condition to 40.97, 39.63 and 37.78ke

  5. Transplantable living scaffolds comprised of micro-tissue engineered aligned astrocyte networks to facilitate central nervous system regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Carla C.; Katiyar, Kritika S.; Hernandez, Nicole S.; Song, Yeri J.; Struzyna, Laura A.; Harris, James P.; Cullen, D. Kacy

    2017-01-01

    Neurotrauma, stroke, and neurodegenerative disease may result in widespread loss of neural cells as well as the complex interconnectivity necessary for proper central nervous system function, generally resulting in permanent functional deficits. Potential regenerative strategies involve the recruitment of endogenous neural stem cells and/or directed axonal regeneration through the use of tissue engineered “living scaffolds” built to mimic features of three-dimensional (3-D) in vivo migratory or guidance pathways. Accordingly, we devised a novel biomaterial encasement scheme using tubular hydrogel-collagen micro-columns that facilitated the self-assembly of seeded astrocytes into 3-D living scaffolds consisting of long, cable-like aligned astrocytic networks. Here, robust astrocyte alignment was achieved within a micro-column inner diameter (ID) of 180 μm or 300–350 μm but not 1.0 mm, suggesting that radius of curvature dictated the extent of alignment. Moreover, within small ID micro-columns, >70% of the astrocytes assumed a bi-polar morphology, versus ~10% in larger micro-columns or planar surfaces. Cell–cell interactions also influenced the aligned architecture, as extensive astrocyte-collagen contraction was achieved at high (9–12 × 105 cells/mL) but not lower (2–6 × 105 cells/mL) seeding densities. This high density micro-column seeding led to the formation of ultra-dense 3-D “bundles” of aligned bi-polar astrocytes within collagen measuring up to 150 μm in diameter yet extending to a remarkable length of over 2.5 cm. Importantly, co-seeded neurons extended neurites directly along the aligned astrocytic bundles, demonstrating permissive cues for neurite extension. These transplantable cable-like astrocytic networks structurally mimic the glial tube that guides neuronal progenitor migration in vivo along the rostral migratory stream, and therefore may be useful to guide progenitor cells to repopulate sites of widespread neurodegeneration

  6. Practical alignment method for X-ray spectral measurement in micro-CT system based on 3D printing technology.

    PubMed

    Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Zheng, Bin; Chen, Yong; Yang, Kai; Liu, Hong

    2016-06-01

    This study presents a practical alignment method for X-ray spectral measurement in a rotating gantry based micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) system using three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. In order to facilitate the spectrometer placement inside the gantry, supporting structures including a cover and a stand were dedicatedly designed and printed using a 3D printer. According to the relative position between the spectrometer and the stand, the upright projection of the spectrometer collimator onto the stand was determined and then marked by a tungsten pinhole. Thus, a visible alignment indicator of the X-ray central beam and the spectrometer collimator represented by the pinhole was established in the micro-CT live mode. Then, a rough alignment could be achieved through repeatedly adjusting and imaging the stand until the pinhole was located at the center of the acquired projection image. With the spectrometer being positioned back onto the stand, the precise alignment was completed by slightly translating the spectrometer-stand assembly around the rough location, until finding a "sweet spot" with the highest photon rate and proper distribution of the X-ray photons in the resultant spectrum. The spectra were acquired under precise alignment and misalignment of approximately 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0mm away from the precise alignment position, and then were compared in qualitative and quantitative analyses. Qualitative analysis results show that, with slight misalignment, the photon rate is reduced from 1302 to 1098, 1031, and 416 photons/second (p/s), respectively, and the characteristic peaks in the acquired spectra are gradually deteriorated. Quantitative analysis indicates that the energy resolutions for characteristic peak of Kα1 were calculated as 1.56% for precise alignment, while were 1.84% and 2.40% for slight misalignment of 0.2mm and 0.5mm. The mean energies were reduced from 43.93keV under precise alignment condition to 40.97, 39.63 and 37.78keV when

  7. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-11-01

    A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

  8. Liquid Level Control System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A system for controlling liquid flow from an inlet into a tank comprising a normally closed poppet valve controlled by dual pressure chambers each...containing a diaphragm movable by the pressure of the liquid in the inlet to cause the valve to close. Pressure against the diaphragms is relieved by

  9. Choke and kill control system

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, R.E.

    1988-08-02

    A control system is described for a choke and kill safety valve for use in a well conduit, in which the valve indicates a housing having a bore therethrough, a sleeve telescopically movable in the housing about the bore, a valve closure member positioned in the housing and connected to the sleeve and movable between open and closed positions in the bore, a flow tube longitudinally movable in the housing for controlling the movement of the valve closure member, means between the sleeve and the flow tube for biasing the flow tube in a direction for causing the valve closure member to move the closed position, releasable latch means between the sleeve and the flow tube initially holding the flow tube in position holding the valve closure member in the open position, a biased piston and cylinder assembly initially engaging the releasable latch and holding the latch engaged, the assembly being exposed on one side to pressure in the housing, and the housing and the sleeve including openings which when aligned by movement of the sleeve by well pressure allows fluid to be inserted into the bore from the outside of the housing.

  10. Rotor control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Michael P. (Inventor); Maciolek, Joseph R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A helicopter rotor control system (13) including a stop azimuth controller (32) for establishing the value of a deceleration command (15') to a deceleration controller (23), a transition azimuth predictor (41) and a position reference generator (55), which are effective during the last revolution of said rotor (14) to establish a correction indication (38) to adjust the deceleration command (15') to ensure that one of the rotor blades (27) stops at a predetermined angular position.

  11. Computer controlled antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raumann, N. A.

    1972-01-01

    The application of small computers using digital techniques for operating the servo and control system of large antennas is discussed. The advantages of the system are described. The techniques were evaluated with a forty foot antenna and the Sigma V computer. Programs have been completed which drive the antenna directly without the need for a servo amplifier, antenna position programmer or a scan generator.

  12. ACCESS Pointing Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Alexander, James; Trauger, John; Moody, Dwight; Egerman, Robert; Vallone, Phillip; Elias, Jason; Hejal, Reem; Camelo, Vanessa; Bronowicki, Allen; O'Connor, David; Partrick, Richard; Orzechowski, Pawel; Spitter, Connie; Lillie, Chuck

    2010-01-01

    ACCESS (Actively-Corrected Coronograph for Exoplanet System Studies) was one of four medium-class exoplanet concepts selected for the NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study (ASMCS) program in 2008/2009. The ACCESS study evaluated four major coronograph concepts under a common space observatory. This paper describes the high precision pointing control system (PCS) baselined for this observatory.

  13. ACCESS Pointing Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Alexander, James; Trauger, John; Moody, Dwight; Egerman, Robert; Vallone, Phillip; Elias, Jason; Hejal, Reem; Camelo, Vanessa; Bronowicki, Allen; hide

    2010-01-01

    ACCESS (Actively-Corrected Coronograph for Exoplanet System Studies) was one of four medium-class exoplanet concepts selected for the NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study (ASMCS) program in 2008/2009. The ACCESS study evaluated four major coronograph concepts under a common space observatory. This paper describes the high precision pointing control system (PCS) baselined for this observatory.

  14. Transfer alignment from a personal locator system to a handheld or head-mounted instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda, Lauro; Borenstein, Johann

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a method for computing position and attitude of an instrument attached to the human body such as a handheld or head-mounted video camera. The system uses two Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs). One IMU is part of our earlier-developed Personal Dead-Reckoning (PDR) system, which tracks the position and heading of a walking person relative to a known starting position. The other IMU is rigidly attached to the handheld or head-mounted instrument. Our existing PDR system is substantially more accurate than conventional IMU-based systems because the IMU is mounted on the foot of the user where error correction techniques can be applied that are unavailable for IMUs mounted anywhere else on the body. However, if the walker is waving a handheld or head-mounted instrument, the position and attitude of the instrument is not known. Equipping the instrument with an additional IMU is by itself an unsatisfactory solution because that IMU is subject to accelerometer and gyro drift, which, unlike in the case of the foot-mounted IMU, cannot be corrected and cause unbounded position and heading errors. Our approach uses transfer alignment techniques and takes advantage of the fact that the handheld IMU moves with the walker. This constraint is used to bound and correct errors by a Kalman filter. The paper explains our method and presents extensive experimental results. The results show up to a five-fold reduction in heading errors for the handheld IMU.

  15. Organic semiconductor density of states controls the energy level alignment at electrode interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Oehzelt, Martin; Koch, Norbert; Heimel, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Minimizing charge carrier injection barriers and extraction losses at interfaces between organic semiconductors and metallic electrodes is critical for optimizing the performance of organic (opto-) electronic devices. Here, we implement a detailed electrostatic model, capable of reproducing the alignment between the electrode Fermi energy and the transport states in the organic semiconductor both qualitatively and quantitatively. Covering the full phenomenological range of interfacial energy level alignment regimes within a single, consistent framework and continuously connecting the limiting cases described by previously proposed models allows us to resolve conflicting views in the literature. Our results highlight the density of states in the organic semiconductor as a key factor. Its shape and, in particular, the energy distribution of electronic states tailing into the fundamental gap is found to determine both the minimum value of practically achievable injection barriers as well as their spatial profile, ranging from abrupt interface dipoles to extended band-bending regions. PMID:24938867

  16. CNEOST Control Software System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Zhao, H. B.; Xia, Y.; Lu, H.; Li, B.

    2015-03-01

    In 2013, CNEOST (China Near Earth Object Survey Telescope) adapted its hardware system for the new CCD camera. Based on the new system architecture, the control software is re-designed and implemented. The software system adopts the message passing mechanism via WebSocket protocol, and improves its flexibility, expansibility, and scalability. The user interface with responsive web design realizes the remote operating under both desktop and mobile devices. The stable operating of software system has greatly enhanced the operation efficiency while reducing the complexity, and has also made a successful attempt for the future system design of telescope and telescope cloud.

  17. Information Survivability Control Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    interfaces with higher-level (e.g., Federal Reserve ) and lower-level (e.g., branch) control systems. A hierarchical structure is natural to support...level hierarchical banking system with branch banks at the leaves, money-center banks in the middle, and the Federal Reserve system at the root...center in question, then the check deposit request is routed there. If not, then the check must be routed through the Federal Reserve . Checks for small

  18. Climatology of the inter-hemispheric field-aligned currents system over the Nigeria ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolaji, O. S.; Rabiu, A. B.; Oyeyemi, E. O.; Yumoto, K.

    2012-11-01

    Records of the declination (D) magnetic field data for the year 2009 from the Magnetic Data Acquisition System (MAGDAS) facilities at University of Ilorin were employed for this work. From the minutes value of the D-component, the deduced hourly values of the D-component (Sq(QD)) were used to estimate its diurnal (Sq(D)) values with the most five quietest days identified. The monthly mean (MSq(D)) of the most five quietest days and their seasonal (SSq(D)) variabilities were investigated. The inter-hemispheric field aligned currents (IHFACs) exhibit downward and upward inter-hemispheric field-aligned sheet current that appears as a pair at all local times of the Sq(D), MSq(D), and SSq(D) variations. From these variabilities, the IHFACs were observed to flow from the winter to summer hemisphere during noon and dusk sector and flowing in opposite direction during the dawn sector. The Sq(D) variability patterns that were observed in May, June, August September are gentle compared to the disturbed variabilities in January, February, March and November. The highest positive (˜1.7 arc-min) and negative (˜-2.7 arc min) MSq(D) maxima values were observed in August during the dawn and noon sectors respectively. These values indicated that the IHFACs flow in August is strongly southbound (positive) and northbound (negative) in the dawn and noon sectors respectively. Dusk-side IHFACs as can be observed by MAGDAS are weakly northbound in all the seasons. The direction of IHFACs does not flip at the equinoxes but in June and November and does not become largest at solstices but in August. The IHFACs was observed to exhibit longitudinal variability, which indicated that larger amplitude of winter-to-summer IHFACs is observed to be greater in June solstice (northbound/negative IHFACs) than in the December solstice (southbound/positive IHFACs) during the noon sector.

  19. The ISOLDE control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloose, I.; Pace, A.

    1994-12-01

    The two CERN isotope separators named ISOLDE have been running on the new Personal Computer (PC) based control system since April 1992. The new architecture that makes heavy use of the commercial software and hardware of the PC market has been implemented on the 1700 geographically distributed control channels of the two separators and their experimental area. Eleven MSDOS Intel-based PCs with approximately 80 acquisition and control boards are used to access the equipment and are controlled from three PCs running Microsoft Windows used as consoles through a Novell Local Area Network. This paper describes the interesting solutions found and discusses the reduced programming workload and costs that have been obtained.

  20. Development of controlled solid-state alignment for alnico permanent magnets in near-final shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Iver E.; Kassen, Aaron G.; White, Emma M. H.; Palasyuk, Andriy; Zhou, Lin; Tang, Wei; Kramer, Matthew J.

    2017-05-01

    The 2011 price shock in the rare earth (RE) permanent magnet (PM) marketplace precipitated realization of extremely poor RE supply diversity and drove renewed research in RE-free permanent magnets such as "alnico." Essentially, alnico is an Al-Ni-Co-Fe alloy with high magnetic saturation and TC, but low coercivity. It also was last researched extensively in the 1970's. Currently alnico "9" magnets with the highest energy product (10MGOe) are manufactured by directional solidification to make highly aligned anisotropic magnets. This work developed novel powder processing techniques to improve on unaligned anisotropic alnico "8H" with elevated coercivity. Gas atomization was used to produce pre-alloyed powder for binder-assisted compression molding of near-final shape magnets that were vacuum sintered to full density (<1% porosity). Biased grain growth with resulting grain alignment was achieved during a second solution annealing step, during which a uni-axial stress was applied along the axis parallel to the magnetization direction. Evaluation of heavily stressed samples (>250g) showed reduced overall loop squareness compared to unaligned (equiaxed) 8H due to grain rotation-induced misalignment, while low stresses improved squareness and greatly improved alignment compared to equiaxed magnets, with squareness approaching 0.30 and remanence ratio as high as 0.79.

  1. Development of controlled solid-state alignment for alnico permanent magnets in near-final shape

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson, Iver E.; Kassen, Aaron G.; White, Emma M. H.; ...

    2017-01-09

    The 2011 price shock in the rare earth (RE) permanent magnet (PM) marketplace precipitated realization of extremely poor RE supply diversity and drove renewed research in RE-free permanent magnets such as “alnico.” Essentially, alnico is an Al-Ni-Co-Fe alloy with high magnetic saturation and TC, but low coercivity. It also was last researched extensively in the 1970’s. Currently alnico “9” magnets with the highest energy product (10MGOe) are manufactured by directional solidification to make highly aligned anisotropic magnets. This work developed novel powder processing techniques to improve on unaligned anisotropic alnico “8H” with elevated coercivity. Gas atomization was used to producemore » pre-alloyed powder for binder-assisted compression molding of near-final shape magnets that were vacuum sintered to full density (<1% porosity). Biased grain growth with resulting grain alignment was achieved during a second solution annealing step, during which a uni-axial stress was applied along the axis parallel to the magnetization direction. Lastly, evaluation of heavily stressed samples (>250g) showed reduced overall loop squareness compared to unaligned (equiaxed) 8H due to grain rotation-induced misalignment, while low stresses improved squareness and greatly improved alignment compared to equiaxed magnets, with squareness approaching 0.30 and remanence ratio as high as 0.79.« less

  2. Seleno groups control the energy-level alignment between conjugated organic molecules and metals

    SciTech Connect

    Niederhausen, Jens; Heimel, Georg; Wilke, Andreas; Rabe, Jürgen P.; Duhm, Steffen; Bürker, Christoph; Schreiber, Frank; Xin, Qian; Vollmer, Antje; Kera, Satoshi; Ueno, Nobuo; Koch, Norbert

    2014-01-07

    The charge injection from metallic electrodes into hole transporting layers of organic devices often suffers from deviations from vacuum-level alignment at the interface. Even for weakly interacting cases, Pauli repulsion causes an interface dipole between the metal and conjugated organic molecules (COMs) (so called “push-back” or “cushion” effect), which leads notoriously to an increase of the hole injection barrier. On the other hand, for chalcogenol self assembled monolayers (SAMs) on metal surfaces, chemisorption via the formation of chalcogen-metal bonds is commonly observed. In these cases, the energy-level alignment is governed by chalcogen-derived interface states in the vicinity of the metal Fermi-level. In this work, we present X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy data that demonstrate that the interfacial energy-level alignment mechanism found for chalcogenol SAMs also applies to seleno-functionalized COMs. This can be exploited to mitigate the push-back effect at metal contacts, notably also when COMs with low ionization energies are employed, permitting exceedingly low hole injection barriers, as shown here for the interfaces of tetraseleno-tetracene with Au(111), Ag(111), and Cu(111)

  3. Vertical Alignment: Ensuring Opportunity to Learn in a Standards-Based System. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In response to requirements in the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), state policymakers have made concerted efforts to align state standards with state accountability assessments. When strongly aligned and articulated, state standards and assessments can provide a clear and coherent set of expectations for students and educators. How do districts…

  4. Innovative Aspects of the SDL Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, W.S.; Feng, S.K.; Pearson, P.S.; Smith, J.D.

    1997-12-31

    The Source Development Lab at BNL consists of a 230 MeV electron linac and 10m long wiggler for short wavelength FEL development. The control system is based on that in use at the NSLS. Two new extensions of the control system using VXI equipment are described. The first extension is the replacement of patch panels and lab oscilloscopes to monitor RF equipment. Instead, the RF waveforms are fed through a multiplexor into VXI digitizers. The waveforms can then be monitored remotely on any control console. The second extension is the replacement of the analog RF hardware needed to process beam position monitor signals. A digital system based on very fast (sub-nanosecond) VXI waveform digitizers is under development. The difficult operations requiring precise time alignment are then done in software.

  5. LSST control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Germán; Warner, Michael; Krabbendam, Victor

    2006-06-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be a large, wide-field ground-based telescope designed to obtain sequential images of the entire visible sky every few nights. The LSST, in spite of its large field of view and short 15 second exposures, requires a very accurate pointing and tracking performance. The high efficiency specified for the whole system implies that observations will be acquired in blind pointing mode and tracking demands calculated from blind pointing as well. This paper will provide a high level overview of the LSST Control System (LCS) and details of the Telescope Control System (TCS), explaining the characteristics of the system components and the interactions among them. The LCS and TCS will be designed around a distributed architecture to maximize the control efficiency and to support the highly robotic nature of the LSST System. In addition to its control functions, the LCS will capture, organize and store system wide state information, to make it available for monitoring, evaluation and calibration processes. An evaluation of the potential communications middleware software to be utilized for data transport, is also included.

  6. Neural Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundy-Burlet, Karen

    2003-01-01

    The Neural Flight Control System (NFCS) was developed to address the need for control systems that can be produced and tested at lower cost, easily adapted to prototype vehicles and for flight systems that can accommodate damaged control surfaces or changes to aircraft stability and control characteristics resulting from failures or accidents. NFCS utilizes on a neural network-based flight control algorithm which automatically compensates for a broad spectrum of unanticipated damage or failures of an aircraft in flight. Pilot stick and rudder pedal inputs are fed into a reference model which produces pitch, roll and yaw rate commands. The reference model frequencies and gains can be set to provide handling quality characteristics suitable for the aircraft of interest. The rate commands are used in conjunction with estimates of the aircraft s stability and control (S&C) derivatives by a simplified Dynamic Inverse controller to produce virtual elevator, aileron and rudder commands. These virtual surface deflection commands are optimally distributed across the aircraft s available control surfaces using linear programming theory. Sensor data is compared with the reference model rate commands to produce an error signal. A Proportional/Integral (PI) error controller "winds up" on the error signal and adds an augmented command to the reference model output with the effect of zeroing the error signal. In order to provide more consistent handling qualities for the pilot, neural networks learn the behavior of the error controller and add in the augmented command before the integrator winds up. In the case of damage sufficient to affect the handling qualities of the aircraft, an Adaptive Critic is utilized to reduce the reference model frequencies and gains to stay within a flyable envelope of the aircraft.

  7. Neural Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundy-Burlet, Karen

    2003-01-01

    The Neural Flight Control System (NFCS) was developed to address the need for control systems that can be produced and tested at lower cost, easily adapted to prototype vehicles and for flight systems that can accommodate damaged control surfaces or changes to aircraft stability and control characteristics resulting from failures or accidents. NFCS utilizes on a neural network-based flight control algorithm which automatically compensates for a broad spectrum of unanticipated damage or failures of an aircraft in flight. Pilot stick and rudder pedal inputs are fed into a reference model which produces pitch, roll and yaw rate commands. The reference model frequencies and gains can be set to provide handling quality characteristics suitable for the aircraft of interest. The rate commands are used in conjunction with estimates of the aircraft s stability and control (S&C) derivatives by a simplified Dynamic Inverse controller to produce virtual elevator, aileron and rudder commands. These virtual surface deflection commands are optimally distributed across the aircraft s available control surfaces using linear programming theory. Sensor data is compared with the reference model rate commands to produce an error signal. A Proportional/Integral (PI) error controller "winds up" on the error signal and adds an augmented command to the reference model output with the effect of zeroing the error signal. In order to provide more consistent handling qualities for the pilot, neural networks learn the behavior of the error controller and add in the augmented command before the integrator winds up. In the case of damage sufficient to affect the handling qualities of the aircraft, an Adaptive Critic is utilized to reduce the reference model frequencies and gains to stay within a flyable envelope of the aircraft.

  8. SERVOMOTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    MacNeille, S.M.

    1958-12-01

    Control systems for automatic positioning of an electric motor operated vapor valve are described which is operable under the severe conditions existing in apparatus for electro-magnetlcally separating isotopes. In general, the system includes a rotor for turning the valve comprising two colls mounted mutually perpendicular to each other and also perpendicular to the magnetic field of the isotope separating apparatus. The coils are furnished with both a-c and d- c current by assoclate control circuitry and a position control is provided for varying the ratlo of the a-c currents in the coils and at the same time, but in an inverse manner, the ratio between the d-c currents in the coils is varied. With the present system the magnitude of the motor torque is constant for all valves of the rotor orientatlon angle.

  9. REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    MacNeill, J.H.; Estabrook, J.Y.

    1960-05-10

    A reactor control system including a continuous tape passing through a first coolant passageway, over idler rollers, back through another parallel passageway, and over motor-driven rollers is described. Discrete portions of fuel or poison are carried on two opposed active sections of the tape. Driving the tape in forward or reverse directions causes both active sections to be simultaneously inserted or withdrawn uniformly, tending to maintain a more uniform flux within the reactor. The system is particularly useful in mobile reactors, where reduced inertial resistance to control rod movement is important.

  10. Celsius Control system.

    PubMed

    Badjatia, Neeraj

    2004-01-01

    The Celsius Control system (Innercool Therapies, Inc.) is an intravascular cooling catheter system consisting of the Celsius Control catheter,circulating set, and the Celsius Control console. Based on clinical studies, the system has recently received Food and Drug Administration approval for use as a device to induce, maintain, and reverse mild hypothermia in neurosurgical patients in surgery and recovery/intensive care, and is currently being marketed in the 10.7 Fr and 14 Fr catheter sizes. It works to regulate temperature by circulating sterile saline through the Celsius Control console, which contains an integrated assembly comprising a temperature and pressure sensing block,supply and return lines, and a 20-{m} filter with connective tubing and an independent heat exchanger and pump. The system relies on digital core temperature readings from either esophageal or bladder temperature probes. After the system is turned on, approximately 150 mL of sterile saline solution is pumped through the console and is cooled to achieve the preset temperature. This cooled saline subsequently circulates from the console through the catheter in a closed-loop manner. The distal portion of the catheter incorporates a flexible distal metallic heat transfer element that is designed to allow for direct exchange of thermal energy with blood circulating around the catheter.

  11. Optical controlled keyboard system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzyński, Łukasz; Długosz, Dariusz; Niewiarowski, Bartosz; Zajkowski, Maciej

    2011-06-01

    Control systems of our computers are common devices, based on the manipulation of keys or a moving ball. Completely healthy people have no problems with the operation of such devices. Human disability makes everyday activities become a challenge and create trouble. When a man can not move his hands, the work becomes difficult or often impossible. Controlled optical keyboard is a modern device that allows to bypass the limitations of disability limbs. The use of wireless optical transmission allows to control computer using a laser beam, which cooperates with the photodetectors. The article presents the construction and operation of non-contact optical keyboard for people with disabilities.

  12. High-precision optical systems with inexpensive hardware: a unified alignment and structural design approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winrow, Edward G.; Chavez, Victor H.

    2011-09-01

    High-precision opto-mechanical structures have historically been plagued by high costs for both hardware and the associated alignment and assembly process. This problem is especially true for space applications where only a few production units are produced. A methodology for optical alignment and optical structure design is presented which shifts the mechanism of maintaining precision from tightly toleranced, machined flight hardware to reusable, modular tooling. Using the proposed methodology, optical alignment error sources are reduced by the direct alignment of optics through their surface retroreflections (pips) as seen through a theodolite. Optical alignment adjustments are actualized through motorized, sub-micron precision actuators in 5 degrees of freedom. Optical structure hardware costs are reduced through the use of simple shapes (tubes, plates) and repeated components. This approach produces significantly cheaper hardware and more efficient assembly without sacrificing alignment precision or optical structure stability. The design, alignment plan and assembly of a 4" aperture, carbon fiber composite, Schmidt-Cassegrain concept telescope is presented.

  13. Modern tandem control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, J. R.; Marsaudon, J. C.

    1993-04-01

    Nowadays, tandem electrostatic accelerators can benefit greatly from the growing possibilities provided by modern control facilities. Controlling an electrostatic accelerator first requires the solution of technological problems raised by the necessity of fitting inside the tank equipment which is highly stressed by the physical environment. Then, these controls can take advantage of new techniques which appear on the market. Present computer technology provides cheap powerful workstations for efficient operator interfacing, and new modular and distributed control concepts have been developed for general use in experimental physics, in data acquisition and in control systems. The general trend towards standardization is now accepted for both hardware and software and this brings benefits to the designer and the user.

  14. Shock absorber control system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Y.; Ohira, M.; Ushida, M.; Miyagawa, T.; Shimodaira, T.

    1987-01-13

    A shock absorber control system is described for controlling a dampening force of a shock absorber of a vehicle comprising: setting means for setting a desired dampening force changeable within a predetermined range; drive means for driving the shock absorber to change the dampening force of the shock absorber linearly; control means for controlling the drive means in accordance with the desired dampening force when the setting of the desired dampening force has been changed; detecting means for detecting an actual dampening force of the shock absorber; and correcting means for correcting the dampening force of the shock absorber by controlling the drive means in accordance with a difference between the desired dampening force and the detected actual dampening force.

  15. Engine speed control system

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, K.

    1983-02-01

    An idle control system for an automobile internal combustion engine includes an idle control unit for controlling the operation of an electromagnetically operated actuator. While the engine has a combustible mixture intake passage leading to the engine and a throttle valve operatively positioned inside the mixture intake passage for controlling the flow of a combustible air-fuel mixture towards the engine, the actuator is utilized to adjust either the effective cross sectional area of a bypass air passage leading from the air source to the mixture intake passage at a position downstream of the throttle valve or the opening of the throttle valve, to control the engine speed during idling to a predetermined value.

  16. Remotely controllable mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A remotely controllable mixing system (210) in which a plurality of mixing assemblies (10a-10e) are arranged in an annular configuration, and wherein each assembly (10) employs a central chamber (16) and two outer, upper and lower, chambers (12, 14). Valves (18, 20) are positioned between chambers, and these valves (18, 20) for a given mixing assembly (10) are operated by upper and lower control rotors (29), which in turn are driven by upper and lower drive rotors (270, 270b). Additionally, a hoop (278) is compressed around upper control rotors (29) and a hoop (278b) is compressed around lower control rotors (29) to thus insure constant frictional engagement between all control rotors (29) and drive rotors (270, 270b). The drive rollers (270, 270b) are driven by a motor (213).

  17. RHIC control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, D. S.; Binello, S.; Buxton, W.; Clifford, T.; D'Ottavio, T.; Hartmann, H.; Hoff, L. T.; Katz, R.; Kennell, S.; Kerner, T.; Laster, J.; Lee, R. C.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B. R.; Olsen, R.; Piacentino, J.; Skelly, J. F.

    2003-03-01

    The RHIC control system architecture is hierarchical and consists of two physical layers with a fiber-optic network connection. The Front-End Level systems consist of VME chassis with processors running a real-time operating system and both VME I/O modules and remote bus interfaces. Accelerator device software interfaces are implemented as objects in C++. The network implementation uses high speed, switched Ethernet technology. Specialized hardware modules were built for waveform control of power supplies, multiplexed signal acquisition, and timing services. The Console Level systems are Unix workstations. A strong emphasis has been given to developing highly reusable, standard software tools for use in building physics and diagnostic application software.

  18. When a single hole aligns several spins: Double exchange in organic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Trinquier, Georges; Chilkuri, Vijay Gopal; Malrieu, Jean-Paul

    2014-05-28

    The double exchange is a well-known and technically important phenomenon in solid state physics. Ionizing a system composed of two antiferromagnetically coupled high-spin units, the ground state of which is a singlet state, may actually produce a high-spin ground state. This work illustrates the possible occurrence of such a phenomenon in organic chemistry. The here-considered high-spin units are triangulenes, the ground state of which is a triplet. Bridging two of them through a benzene ring produces a molecular architecture of singlet ground state. A careful exploitation of a series of unrestricted density functional calculations enables one to avoid spin contamination in the treatment of the doublet states and shows that under ionization the system becomes of quartet multiplicity in its ground state. The possibility to align more than three spins from conjugated hydrocarbon polyradicals is explored, considering partially hydrogenated triangulenes. A dramatic example shows that ionization of a singlet ground state molecule may generate a decuplet.

  19. Control for stabilizing the alignment position of the rotor of the synchronous motor

    DOEpatents

    Donley, L.I.

    1985-03-12

    A method and apparatus is described for damping oscillations in the rotor load angle of a synchronous motor to provide stable rotational alignment in high precision applications. The damping method includes sensing the angular position of the rotor and utilizing the position signal to generate an error signal in response to changes in the period of rotation of the rotor. The error signal is coupled to phase shift amplifiers which shift the phase of the motor drive signal in a direction to damp out the oscillations in the rotor load angle.

  20. Control for stabilizing the alignment position of the rotor of a synchronous motor

    DOEpatents

    Donley, Lawrence I.

    1988-01-01

    A method and apparatus for damping oscillations in the rotor load angle of a synchronous motor to provide stable rotational alignment in high precision applications. The damping method includes sensing the angular position of the rotor and utilizing the position signal to generate an error signal in response to changes in the period of rotation of the rotor. The error signal is coupled to phase shift amplifiers which shift the phase of the motor drive signal in a direction to damp out the oscillations in the rotor load angle.

  1. Controlled synthesis of vertically aligned hematite on conducting substrate for photoelectrochemical cells: nanorods versus nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Aiming; Shin, Kahee; Kim, Jung Kyu; Wang, Dong Hwan; Han, Gui Young; Park, Jong Hyeok

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes two different processes to synthesize vertically aligned hematite nanorod and nanotube arrays, respectively, on a conductive substrate by the electrochemical deposition method with the help of an anodized aluminum oxide nanotemplate. The two types of nanostructured hematite were used as the photoanode for photoelectrochemical cells. The hematite nanotubes exhibited much higher photoelectrochemical activity than the hematite nanorods, including an improved photocurrent density, more negative onset potential, better photon harvesting, and better charge carrier transfer ability. The observed behavior may offer new information to enhance the photocatalytic ability of hematite, which is considered to be one of the best photoanode materials in the research field of photoelectrochemical cells.

  2. An improved self-alignment method for strapdown inertial navigation system based on gravitational apparent motion and dual-vector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xixiang; Zhao, Yu; Liu, Xianjun; Yang, Yan; Song, Qing; Liu, Zhipeng

    2014-12-01

    Analysis and simulation results indicate that two problems should be solved when the self-alignment method based on gravitational apparent motion and dual-vector can be used for Strapdown Inertial Navigation System. The first one is how to identify the apparent motion from accelerometer measurement containing random noise and the second is how to avoid the collinear problem between two vectors used in alignment solution. In this paper, a parameter identification and reconstruction algorithm is proposed to solve the first problem and simulation results indicate that proposed algorithm can identify apparent motion from accelerometer measurements effectively; and reconstruction algorithm based on current identified parameters for dual-vector is designed in detail to solve the second problem which can make full use of newest identification and avoid collinear problem completely. Simulation and turntable results show that the proposed alignment method can fulfill self-alignment in a swinging condition and the alignment accuracy can reach the theoretical values determined by the sensor precision.

  3. A Toolbox of Metrology-Based Techniques for Optical System Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, Phillip; Ohl, Raymond G.; Blake, Peter N.; Bos, Brent J.; Casto, Gordon V.; Eichhorn, William L.; Gum, Jeffrey S.; Hadjimichael, Theodore J.; Hagopian, John G.; Hayden, Joseph E.; Hicks, Samantha L.; Kubalak, Dave; Mclean, Kyle F.; McMann, Joseph; Redman, Kevin; Wenzel, Greg; Young, Jerrod

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and its partners have broad experience in the alignment of flight optical instruments and spacecraft structures. Over decades, GSFC developed alignment capabilities and techniques for a variety of optical and aerospace applications. In this paper, we provide an overview of a subset of the capabilities and techniques used on several recent projects in a toolbox format. We discuss a range of applications, from small-scale optical alignment of sensors to mirror and bench examples that make use of various large-volume metrology techniques. We also discuss instruments and analytical tools.

  4. A Toolbox of Metrology-Based Techniques for Optical System Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, Phillip; Ohl, Raymond G.; Blake, Peter N.; Bos, Brent J.; Eichhorn, William L.; Gum, Jeffrey S.; Hadjimichael, Theodore J.; Hagopian, John G.; Hayden, Joseph E.; Hetherington, Samuel E.; Kubalak, David A.; McLean, Kyle F.; McMann, Joseph; Redman, Kevin W.; Sampler, Henry P.; Wenzel, Greg W.; Young, Jerrod L.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and its partners have broad experience in the alignment of flight optical instruments and spacecraft structures. Over decades, GSFC developed alignment capabilities and techniques for a variety of optical and aerospace applications. In this paper, we provide an overview of a subset of the capabilities and techniques used on several recent projects in a "toolbox" format. We discuss a range of applications, from small-scale optical alignment of sensors to mirror and bench examples that make use of various large-volume metrology techniques. We also discuss instruments and analytical tools.

  5. Consensus-Based Course Design and Implementation of Constructive Alignment Theory in a Power System Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanfretti, Luigi; Farrokhabadi, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the implementation of the constructive alignment theory (CAT) in a power system analysis course through a consensus-based course design process. The consensus-based design process involves both the instructor and graduate-level students and it aims to develop the CAT framework in a holistic manner with the goal of including…

  6. Aligning P-12 and Postsecondary Education toward a Seamless P-16 Education System. A College Readiness Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TERi (The Education Resources Institute, Inc), 2007

    2007-01-01

    Surveys show that the overwhelming majority of youngsters in this country--regardless of race, income, or ethnic background--want to go to college. As rewarding 21st century jobs increasingly require postsecondary education, these ambitions have never been more important. Everyone must align the nation's divergent educational systems so that…

  7. Consensus-Based Course Design and Implementation of Constructive Alignment Theory in a Power System Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanfretti, Luigi; Farrokhabadi, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the implementation of the constructive alignment theory (CAT) in a power system analysis course through a consensus-based course design process. The consensus-based design process involves both the instructor and graduate-level students and it aims to develop the CAT framework in a holistic manner with the goal of including…

  8. Active control system trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yore, E. E.; Gunderson, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    The active control concepts which achieve the benefit of improved mission performance and lower cost and generate system trends towards improved dynamic performance, more integration, and digital fly by wire mechanization are described. Analytical issues and implementation requirements and tools and approaches developed to address the analytical and implementation issues are briefly discussed.

  9. Timing control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, Gordon A. (Inventor); Wells, Jr., George H. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A timing control system is disclosed which is particularly useful in connection with simulated mortar shells. Special circuitry is provided to assure that the shell does not overshoot, but rather detonates early in case of an improper condition; this ensures that ground personnel will not be harmed by a delayed detonation. The system responds to an externally applied frequency control code which is configured to avoid any confusion between different control modes. A premature detonation routine is entered in case an improper time-setting signal is entered, or if the shell is launched before completion of the time-setting sequence. Special provisions are also made for very early launch situations and improper detonator connections. An alternate abort mode is provided to discharge the internal power supply without a detonation in a manner that can be externally monitored, thereby providing a mechanism for non-destructive testing. The abort mode also accelerates the timing function for rapid testing.

  10. Electric turbocompound control system

    DOEpatents

    Algrain, Marcelo C.

    2007-02-13

    Turbocompound systems can be used to affect engine operation using the energy in exhaust gas that is driving the available turbocharger. A first electrical device acts as a generator in response to turbocharger rotation. A second electrical device acts as a motor to put mechanical power into the engine, typically at the crankshaft. Apparatus, systems, steps, and methods are described to control the generator and motor operations to control the amount of power being recovered. This can control engine operation closer to desirable parameters for given engine-related operating conditions compared to actual. The electrical devices can also operate in "reverse," going between motor and generator functions. This permits the electrical device associated with the crankshaft to drive the electrical device associated with the turbocharger as a motor, overcoming deficient engine operating conditions such as associated with turbocharger lag.

  11. Timing control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiker, Gordon A.; Wells, George H., Jr.

    1987-09-01

    A timing control system is disclosed which is particularly useful in connection with simulated mortar shells. Special circuitry is provided to assure that the shell does not over shoot, but rather detonates early in case of an improper condition; this ensures that ground personnel will not be harmed by a delayed detonation. The system responds to an externally applied frequency control code which is configured to avoid any confusion between different control modes. A premature detonation routine is entered in case an improper time-setting signal is entered, or if the shell is launched before completion of the time-setting sequence. Special provisions are also made for very early launch situations and improper detonator connections. An alternate abort mode is provided to discharge the internal power supply without a detonation in a manner that can be externally monitored, thereby providing a mechanism for non-destructive testing. The abort mode also accelerates the timing function for rapid testing.

  12. Timing Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, Gordon A. (Inventor); Wells, George H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A timing control system is disclosed which is particularly useful in connection with simulated mortar shells. Special circuitry is provided to assure that the shell does not over shoot, but rather detonates early in case of an improper condition; this ensures that ground personnel will not be harmed by a delayed detonation. The system responds to an externally applied frequency control code which is configured to avoid any confusion between different control modes. A premature detonation routine is entered in case an improper time-setting signal is entered, or if the shell is launched before completion of the time-setting sequence. Special provisions are also made for very early launch situations and improper detonator connections. An alternate abort mode is provided to discharge the internal power supply without a detonation in a manner that can be externally monitored, thereby providing a mechanism for non-destructive testing. The abort mode also accelerates the timing function for rapid testing.

  13. Control-display alignment determines the prevalent compatibility effect in two-dimensional stimulus-response tasks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Samuel; Miles, James D; Vu, Kim-Phuong L

    2016-04-01

    Responses are faster and more accurate when they are spatially compatible with a stimulus than when they are incompatible (the stimulus-response compatibility (SRC) effect). In studies using two-dimensional (2-D) stimulus and response sets in which stimuli and responses have both vertical (top-bottom) and horizontal (right-left) spatial relations, SRC effects are generally larger along the horizontal dimension, an effect called right-left prevalence. Several accounts have been posited to explain this asymmetry, including frames of reference to the body and spatio-anatomical constraints. We propose a new account of the right-left prevalence effect in which prevalence effects are largely determined by the spatial alignment between elements on the stimulus display and response locations on the control panel--the control-display alignment (CDA). For example, when responses are aligned below a display, 2-D stimulus and response sets share a common vertical midline that emphasizes a right-left distinction. When responses are to the right or left of the display, the shared midline is horizontal, emphasizing the top-bottom distinction and should instead lead to top-bottom prevalence effects. Participants completed two-choice, 2-D SRC tasks in four control-display configurations with a response panel centered above, below, left, and right of a projected display. As hypothesized, right-left prevalence was elicited using vertical CDA and top-bottom prevalence was elicited using horizontal CDA. The findings demonstrate that CDA largely determines prevalence effects and should be taken into account when using multidimensional stimulus and response sets.

  14. Telerobot control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul G. (Inventor); Tso, Kam S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    This invention relates to an operator interface for controlling a telerobot to perform tasks in a poorly modeled environment and/or within unplanned scenarios. The telerobot control system includes a remote robot manipulator linked to an operator interface. The operator interface includes a setup terminal, simulation terminal, and execution terminal for the control of the graphics simulator and local robot actuator as well as the remote robot actuator. These terminals may be combined in a single terminal. Complex tasks are developed from sequential combinations of parameterized task primitives and recorded teleoperations, and are tested by execution on a graphics simulator and/or local robot actuator, together with adjustable time delays. The novel features of this invention include the shared and supervisory control of the remote robot manipulator via operator interface by pretested complex tasks sequences based on sequences of parameterized task primitives combined with further teleoperation and run-time binding of parameters based on task context.

  15. Cryogenic Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Goloborod'ko, S.; /Fermilab

    1989-02-27

    The control system (CS) for the cryogenic arrangement of the DO Liquid Argon Calorimeter consists of a Texas instruments 560/565 Programmable Logical Controller (PLC), two remote bases with Remote Base Controllers and a corresponding set of input/output (I/O) modules, and a PC AST Premium 286 (IBM AT Compatible). The PLC scans a set of inputs and provides a set of outputs based on a ladder logic program and PID control loops. The inputs are logic or analog (current, voltage) signals from equipment status switches or transducers. The outputs are logic or analog (current or voltage) signals for switching solenoids and positioning pneumatic actuators. Programming of the PLC is preformed by using the TISOFT2/560/565 package, which is installed in the PC. The PC communicates to the PLC through a serial RS232 port and provides operator interface to the cryogenic process using Xpresslink software.

  16. Advanced topographic laser altimeter system (ATLAS) receiver telescope assembly (RTA) and transmitter alignment and test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagopian, John; Bolcar, Matthew; Chambers, John; Crane, Allen; Eegholm, Bente; Evans, Tyler; Hetherington, Samuel; Mentzell, Eric; Thompson, Patrick L.; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Vaughnn, David

    2016-09-01

    The sole instrument on NASA's ICESat-2 spacecraft shown in Figure 1 will be the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS)1. The ATLAS is a Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) instrument; it measures the time of flight of the six transmitted laser beams to the Earth and back to determine altitude for geospatial mapping of global ice. The ATLAS laser beam is split into 6 main beams by a Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) that are reflected off of the earth and imaged by an 800 mm diameter Receiver Telescope Assembly (RTA). The RTA is composed of a 2-mirror telescope and Aft Optics Assembly (AOA) that collects and focuses the light from the 6 probe beams into 6 science fibers. Each fiber optic has a field of view on the earth that subtends 83 micro Radians. The light collected by each fiber is detected by a photomultiplier and timing related to a master clock to determine time of flight and therefore distance. The collection of the light from the 6 laser spots projected to the ground allows for dense cross track sampling to provide for slope measurements of ice fields. NASA LIDAR instruments typically utilize telescopes that are not diffraction limited since they function as a light collector rather than imaging function. The more challenging requirements of the ATLAS instrument require better performance of the telescope at the ¼ wave level to provide for improved sampling and signal to noise. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) contracted the build of the telescope to General Dynamics (GD). GD fabricated and tested the flight and flight spare telescope and then integrated the government supplied AOA for testing of the RTA before and after vibration qualification. The RTA was then delivered to GSFC for independent verification and testing over expected thermal vacuum conditions. The testing at GSFC included a measurement of the RTA wavefront error and encircled energy in several orientations to determine the expected zero gravity figure, encircled

  17. LEON-BIS: multiple alignment evaluation of sequence neighbours using a Bayesian inference system.

    PubMed

    Vanhoutreve, Renaud; Kress, Arnaud; Legrand, Baptiste; Gass, Hélène; Poch, Olivier; Thompson, Julie D

    2016-07-07

    A standard procedure in many areas of bioinformatics is to use a multiple sequence alignment (MSA) as the basis for various types of homology-based inference. Applications include 3D structure modelling, protein functional annotation, prediction of molecular interactions, etc. These applications, however sophisticated, are generally highly sensitive to the alignment used, and neglecting non-homologous or uncertain regions in the alignment can lead to significant bias in the subsequent inferences. Here, we present a new method, LEON-BIS, which uses a robust Bayesian framework to estimate the homologous relations between sequences in a protein multiple alignment. Sequences are clustered into sub-families and relations are predicted at different levels, including 'core blocks', 'regions' and full-length proteins. The accuracy and reliability of the predictions are demonstrated in large-scale comparisons using well annotated alignment databases, where the homologous sequence segments are detected with very high sensitivity and specificity. LEON-BIS uses robust Bayesian statistics to distinguish the portions of multiple sequence alignments that are conserved either across the whole family or within subfamilies. LEON-BIS should thus be useful for automatic, high-throughput genome annotations, 2D/3D structure predictions, protein-protein interaction predictions etc.

  18. Microprocessor control for standardized power control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, D. G.; Perry, E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of microcomputers in space-oriented power systems as a replacement for existing inflexible analog type controllers has been proposed. This study examines multiprocessor systems, various modularity concepts and presents a conceptualized power system incorporating a multiprocessor controller as well as preliminary results from a breadboard model of the proposed system.

  19. Four large-scale field-aligned current systems in the dayside high-latitude region

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtani, S.; Potemra, T.A.; Newell, P.T.

    1995-01-01

    A system of four current sheets of large-scale field-aligned currents (FACs) was discovered in the data set of simultaneous Viking and DMSP-F7 crossings of the dayside high-latitude region. This paper reports four examples of this system that were observed in the prenoon sector. The flow polarities of FACs are upward, downward, upward, and downward, from equatorward to poleward. The lowest-latitude upward current is flowing mostly in the CPS precipitation region, often overlapping with the BPS at its poleward edge, and is interpreted as a region 2 current. The pair of downward and upward FACs in the middle of the structure are collocated with structured electron precipitation. The precipitation of high-energy (>1 keV) electrons is more intense in the lower-latitude downward current sheet. The highest-latitude downward flowing current sheet is located in a weak, low-energy particle precipitation region, suggesting that this current is flowing on open field lines. Simultaneous observations in the postnoon local time sector reveal the standard three-sheet structure of FACs, sometimes described as region 2, region 1, and mantle (referred to the midday region 0) currents. A high correlation was found between the occurrence of the four FAC sheet structure and negative interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B{sub Y}. The authors discuss the FAC structure in terms of three types of convection cells: the merging, viscous, and lobe cells. During strongly negative IMF B{sub Y}, two convection reversals exist in the prenoon sector; one is inside the viscous cell, and the other is between the viscous cell and the lobe cell. This structure of convection flow is supported by the Viking electric field and auroral UV image data. Based on the convection pattern, the four FAC sheet structure is interpreted as the latitudinal overlap of midday and morning FAC systems. 47 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Management control system description

    SciTech Connect

    Bence, P. J.

    1990-10-01

    This Management Control System (MCS) description describes the processes used to manage the cost and schedule of work performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), Richland, Washington. Westinghouse Hanford will maintain and use formal cost and schedule management control systems, as presented in this document, in performing work for the DOE-RL. This MCS description is a controlled document and will be modified or updated as required. This document must be approved by the DOE-RL; thereafter, any significant change will require DOE-RL concurrence. Westinghouse Hanford is the DOE-RL operations and engineering contractor at the Hanford Site. Activities associated with this contract (DE-AC06-87RL10930) include operating existing plant facilities, managing defined projects and programs, and planning future enhancements. This document is designed to comply with Section I-13 of the contract by providing a description of Westinghouse Hanford's cost and schedule control systems used in managing the above activities. 5 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Dynamitron control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisanti, Thomas F.

    2005-12-01

    The Dynamitron control system utilizes the latest personal computer technology in control circuitry and components. Both the DPC-2000 and newer Millennium series of control systems make use of their modular architecture in both software and hardware to keep up with customer and engineering demands. This also allows the main structure of the software to remain constant for the user while software drivers are easily changed as hardware demands are modified and improved. The system is presented as four units; the Remote I/O (Input/Output), Local Analog and Digital I/O, Operator Interface and the Main Computer. The operator is provided with a selection of many informative screen displays. The control program handles all graphic screen displays and the updating of these screens directly; it does not communicate to a display terminal. This adds to the quick response and excellent operator feedback received while operating the accelerator. The CPU also has the ability to store and record all process variable setpoints for each product that will be treated. All process parameters are printed to a report at regular intervals during a process run for record keeping.

  2. Comparing HARPS and Kepler surveys. The alignment of multiple-planet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, P.; Marmier, M.; Boué, G.; Lovis, C.; Santos, N. C.; Montalto, M.; Udry, S.; Pepe, F.; Mayor, M.

    2012-05-01

    Context. The recent results of the HARPS and Kepler surveys provided us with a bounty of extrasolar systems. While the two teams extensively analyzed each of their data-sets, little work has been done comparing the two. Aims: We study a subset of the planetary population whose characterization is simultaneously within reach of both instruments. We compare the statistical properties of planets in systems with msini > 5-10 M⊕ and R > 2 R⊕, as inferred from the HARPS and Kepler surveys, respectively. If we assume that the underlying population has the same characteristics, the different detection sensitivity to the orbital inclination relative to the line of sight allows us to probe the planets' mutual inclination. Methods: We considered the frequency of systems with one, two, and three planets as dictated by HARPS data. We used Kepler's planetary period and host mass and radius distributions (corrected from detection bias) to model planetary systems in a simple, yet physically plausible way. We then varied the mutual inclination between planets in a system according to different prescriptions (completely aligned, Rayleigh distributions, and isotropic) and compared the transit frequencies with one, two, or three planets with those measured by Kepler. Results: The results show that the two datasets are compatible, a remarkable result especially because there are no tunable knobs other than the assumed inclination distribution. For msini cutoffs of 7-10 M⊕, which are those expected to correspond to the radius cutoff of 2 R⊕, we conclude that the results are better described by a Rayleigh distribution with a mode of 1° or smaller. We show that the best-fit scenario only becomes a Rayleigh distribution with a mode of 5° if we assume a quite extreme mass-radius relationship for the planetary population. Conclusions: These results have important consequences for our understanding of the role of several proposed formation and evolution mechanisms. They confirm that

  3. Solar energy control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, J. R.

    1981-12-01

    A solar energy control system for a hot air type solar energy heating system wherein thermocouples are arranged to sense the temperature of a solar collector, a space to be heated, and a top and bottom of a heat storage unit is disclosed. Pertinent thermocouples are differentially connected together, and these are employed to effect the operation of dampers, a fan, and an auxiliary heat source. In accomplishing this, the differential outputs from the thermocouples are amplified by a single amplifier by multiplexing techniques. Additionally, the amplifier is corrected as to offset by including as one multiplex channel a common reference signal.

  4. Opposed port alignment system (OPAS): a commercial astronomical telescope modified for viewing the interior of the NIF target chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, Anastacia M.; McCarville, Tom J.; Seppala, Lynn G.; Klingmann, Jeff L.; Kalantar, Daniel H.

    2012-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires high resolution live images of regions inside the target chamber in order to align diagnostic instruments to fusion targets and to monitor target stability. To view the interior of the target chamber, we modified a commercial 11-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to develop the Opposed Port Alignment System (OPAS). There are two OPAS systems installed on the target chamber ports directly opposite the diagnostics. This paper describes the optical design, highlighting the two key modifications of the telescope. The first key modification was to reposition the Schmidt corrector plate and to uniquely mount the secondary mirror to a precision translation stage to adjust focus from 5.5 m to infinity. The stage is carefully aligned to ensure that the telescope's optical axis lies on a straight line during focus adjustments. The second key modification was a custom three element lens that flattens the field, corrects residual aberrations of the Schmidt-Cassegrain and, with a commercial 1:1 relay lens, projects the final image plane onto a large format 50 mega-pixel camera. The OPAS modifications greatly extend the Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope's field of view, producing nearly diffraction-limited images over a flat field covering +/-0.4 degrees. Also discussed in the paper are the alignment procedure and the hardware layout of the telescope.

  5. The UMC control system

    SciTech Connect

    Dallard, K.E.; Adams, R.J.

    1983-05-01

    The control system for the Central Cormorant Underwater Manifold Centre (UMC) is an important step forward in developing the technology of subsea production. It provides reliable, fast operation of over 250 UMC valves and sensors at a distance of 7 kilometres. Included in the paper is an overview of the complete control system with selected components described in more detail. Principal guidelines which shaped the final design configuration are also discussed and problems encountered during design and manufacture are highlighted. The paper stresses the thorough testing that was an essential requirement prior to installation. Finally, general conclusions are drawn about the approach taken which would be of benefit to similar projects in the future.

  6. Sequential energy and electron transfer in a three-component system aligned on a clay nanosheet.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Takuya; Ramasamy, Elamparuthi; Ishida, Yohei; Shimada, Tetsuya; Takagi, Shinsuke; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan

    2016-02-21

    To achieve the goal of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer across three molecules, a phenomenon often utilized in artificial light harvesting systems, we have assembled a light absorber (that also serves as an energy donor), an energy acceptor (that also serves as an electron donor) and an electron acceptor on the surface of an anionic clay nanosheet. Since neutral organic molecules have no tendency to adsorb onto the anionic surface of clay, a positively charged water-soluble organic capsule was used to hold neutral light absorbers on the above surface. A three-component assembly was prepared by the co-adsorption of a cationic bipyridinium derivative, cationic zinc porphyrin and cationic octaamine encapsulated 2-acetylanthracene on an exfoliated anionic clay surface in water. Energy and electron transfer phenomena were monitored by steady state fluorescence and picosecond time resolved fluorescence decay. The excitation of 2-acetylanthracene in the three-component system resulted in energy transfer from 2-acetylanthracene to zinc porphyrin with 71% efficiency. Very little loss due to electron transfer from 2-acetylanthracene in the cavitand to the bipyridinium derivative was noticed. Energy transfer was followed by electron transfer from the zinc porphyrin to the cationic bipyridinium derivative with 81% efficiency. Analyses of fluorescence decay profiles confirmed the occurrence of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer. Merging the concepts of supramolecular chemistry and surface chemistry we realized sequential energy and electron transfer between three hydrophobic molecules in water. Exfoliated transparent saponite clay served as a matrix to align the three photoactive molecules at a close distance in aqueous solutions.

  7. A Case Study of the Alignment between Curriculum and Assessment in the New York State Earth Science Standards-Based System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contino, Julie

    2013-01-01

    In a standards-based system, it is important for all components of the system to align in order to achieve the intended goals. No Child Left Behind law mandates that assessments be fully aligned with state standards, be valid, reliable and fair, be reported to all stakeholders, and provide evidence that all students in the state are meeting the…

  8. A Case Study of the Alignment between Curriculum and Assessment in the New York State Earth Science Standards-Based System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contino, Julie

    2013-01-01

    In a standards-based system, it is important for all components of the system to align in order to achieve the intended goals. No Child Left Behind law mandates that assessments be fully aligned with state standards, be valid, reliable and fair, be reported to all stakeholders, and provide evidence that all students in the state are meeting the…

  9. Controlled growth of periodically aligned copper-silicide nanocrystal arrays on silicon directed by laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nürnberger, Philipp; Reinhardt, Hendrik M.; Rhinow, Daniel; Riedel, René; Werner, Simon; Hampp, Norbert A.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we introduce a versatile tool for the controlled growth and alignment of copper-silicide nanocrystals. The method takes advantage of a unique self-organization phenomenon denoted as laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS). Copper films (3 ± 0.2 nm) are sputter-deposited onto single crystal silicon (100) substrates with a thin oxide layer (4 ± 0.2 nm), and subsequently exposed to linearly polarized nanosecond laser pulses (τ ≈ 6 ns) at a central wavelength of 532 nm. The irradiation triggers dewetting of the Cu film and simultaneous formation of periodic Cu nanowires (LIPSS), which partially penetrate the oxide layer to the Si substrate. These LIPSS act as nucleation centers for the growth of Cu-Si crystals during thermal processing at 500 °C under forming gas 95/5 atmosphere. Exemplified by our model system Cu/SiO2/Si, LIPSS are demonstrated to facilitate the diffusion reaction between Cu and underlying Si. Moreover, adjustment of the laser polarization allows us to precisely control the nanocrystal alignment with respect to the LIPSS orientation. Potential applications and conceivable alternatives of this process are discussed.

  10. An 8-week thoracic spine stabilization exercise program improves postural back pain, spine alignment, postural sway, and core endurance in university students:a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Toprak Çelenay, Şeyda; Özer Kaya, Derya

    2017-04-18

    To investigate the effects of an 8-week thoracic stabilization exercise program on back pain, spinal alignment, postural sway, and core endurance in university students. University students were randomly allocated into exercise (n: 28) and control (n: 25) groups. The exercise program was carried out 3 days a week for 8 weeks. Postural pain, spinal alignment, postural sway, and core endurance were assessed via visual analogue scale, Spinal Mouse, Biodex Balance System, and McGill's trunk muscle endurance tests at the baseline and after 8 weeks of training. Differences were observed for postural pain, thoracic and lumbar curvature, dynamic stability index (eyes closed), and core endurance scores in the exercise group between baseline and week 8 (P < 0.05) and all the parameters were significantly different when compared to those of the control group (P < 0.05). The program decreased postural pain, spinal curvatures, and postural sway, and increased core endurance in university students. The program can be effective in postural pain and misalignment of spine problems related to core weakness and balance disorders.

  11. OAJ control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón, J. L.; Yanes-Díaz, A.; Rueda-Teruel, S.; Luis-Simoes, R.; Chueca, S.; Lasso-Cabrera, N. M.; Bello, R.; Jiménez, D.; Suárez, O.; Guillén, L.; López-Alegre, G.; Rodríguez, M. A.; de Castro, S.; Nevot, C.; Sánchez-Artigot, J.; Moles, M.; Cenarro, A. J.; Marín-Franch, A.; Ederoclite, A.; Varela, J.; Valdivielso, L.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; López-Sainz, A.; Hernández-Fuertes, J.; Díaz-Martín, M. C.; Iglesias-Marzoa, R.; Abril, J.; Lamadrid, J. L.; Maicas, N.; Rodríguez, S.; Tilve, V.; Civera, T.; Muniesa, D. J.

    2015-05-01

    The Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre (OAJ) is a new astronomical facility located at the Sierra de Javalambre (Teruel, Spain) whose primary role will be to conduct all-sky astronomical surveys leveraging two unprecedented telescopes with unusually large fields of view: the JST/T250, a 2.55 m telescope with a 3 deg field of view, and the JAST/T80, an 83 cm telescope with a 2 deg field of view. The immediate objective of these telescopes for the next years is carrying out two unique photometric surveys covering several thousands square degrees: J-PAS and J-PLUS, each of them with a wide range of scientific applications, like e.g. large structure cosmology and Dark Energy, galaxy evolution, supernovae, Milky Way structure and exoplanets. JST and JAST will be equipped with panoramic cameras being developed within the J-PAS collaboration, JPCam and T80Cam respectively, which make use of large format (˜10{k}×10{k}) CCDs covering the entire focal plane. CEFCA engineering team has been designing the OAJ control system as a global concept to manage, monitor, control and service the observatory systems, not only astronomical but also infrastructure and other facilities. We will give an overview of OAJ's control system from an engineering point of view.

  12. Coupled process of plastics pyrolysis and chemical vapor deposition for controllable synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhou; Zhang, Qiang; Luo, Guohua; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Wei, Fei

    2010-08-01

    Efficient conversion of waste plastics into advanced materials is of conspicuous environmental, social and economic benefits. A coupled process of plastic pyrolysis and chemical vapor deposition for vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) array growth was proposed. Various kinds of plastics, such as polypropylene, polyethylene, and polyvinyl chloride, were used as carbon sources for the controllable growth of CNT arrays. The relationship between the length of CNT arrays and the growth time was investigated. It was found that the length of aligned CNTs increased with prolonged growth time. CNT arrays with a length of 500 μm were obtained for a 40-min growth and the average growth rate was estimated to be 12 μm/min. The diameter of CNTs in the arrays can be modulated by controlling the growth temperature and the feeding rate of ferrocene. In addition, substrates with larger specific surface area such as ceramic spheres, quartz fibers, and quartz particles, were adopted to support the growth of CNT arrays. Those results provide strong evidence for the feasibility of conversion from waste plastics into CNT arrays via this reported sustainable materials processing.

  13. Fiber optics welder having movable aligning mirror

    DOEpatents

    Higgins, Robert W.; Robichaud, Roger E.

    1981-01-01

    A system for welding fiber optic waveguides together. The ends of the two fibers to be joined together are accurately, collinearly aligned in a vertical orientation and subjected to a controlled, diffuse arc to effect welding and thermal conditioning. A front-surfaced mirror mounted at a 45.degree. angle to the optical axis of a stereomicroscope mounted for viewing the junction of the ends provides two orthogonal views of the interface during the alignment operation.

  14. Lobe cell convection and field-aligned currents poleward of the region 1 current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Bonnell, J. W.; Blomberg, L. G.; Ergun, R. E.; Marklund, G. T.; Carlson, C. W.

    2002-08-01

    We present a case and statistical study of plasma convection in the Northern Hemisphere during summer conditions using electric field, magnetic field, and particle data taken during dawn-dusk directed orbits of the FAST satellite. To our knowledge, this set provides the most comprehensive combination of data as yet presented in support of lobe cell convection from an ionospheric perspective this far from the noon sector. In particular, we study the current systems and convection patterns for all passes in July 1997 that show evidence for six large-scale field-aligned currents (FACs) rather than the usual system of four FACs associated with the region 1/region 2 current systems. A total of 71 passes out of 232 in the study had the extra pair of FACs. The extra pair of FACs in 30 of the 71 cases lies either on the dawnside or on the duskside of the noon-midnight meridian, and their position is strongly correlated with the polarity of the IMF By (negative and positive, respectively). This is consistent with the IMF dependence of a three-cell convection pattern of coexisting merging, viscous, and lobe-type convection cells. The occurrence of the asymmetric FAC pair was also strongly linked to conditions of IMF |By/Bz| > 1. The extra pair of FACs in these cases was clearly associated with the lobe cell of the three-cell convection system. The remaining 41 cases had the pair of FACs straddling the noon-midnight meridian. The extra pair of FACs was often (20 cases out of 30) observed at magnetic local times more than three hours away from noon, rather than being confined to regions near noon and the typical location of the cusp. Such a current system consisting of a pair of FACs poleward of the nearest region 1 current is consistent with the IMF By-dependent global MHD model developed by Ogino et al. [1986] for southward IMF conditions, as well as with other magnetospheric and ionospheric convection models that include the effects of merging occuring simultaneously at

  15. Controlled battery charging system

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, D.B.

    1991-07-02

    This patent describes a controlled battery charging system for charging a battery having terminals. It comprises: a transformer having a primary coil connected to a source of alternating current, and a secondary coil having output leads and a center tap, full wave rectifier means connected to the output leads to the secondary coil, the rectifier means including a pair of gate controlled rectifiers having direct current output leads, a battery charging circuit connected to the output leads to the rectifiers and having output means electrically contacting the terminals of a battery to be charged, a unijunction relaxation oscillator circuit connected to the rectifiers to trigger the gate controlled rectifiers into conduction to produce a DC charging current in the charging circuit, an electronic current limiting control circuit comprising a current limiting amplifier having a positive input, a negative input, and an output, a resistive line connected to center tap, a negative input lead connecting the center tap to the negative input of the current limiting amplifier, voltage input means connected to the positive input for supplying a voltage to the current limiting amplifier more positive than a voltage supplied to the negative input, voltage supply means connecting the current limiting amplifier to the battery charging circuit, and control means connecting the output of the current limiting amplifier to the unijunction relaxation oscillator circuit operative to turn off the DC charging circuit when the charging current exceeds a predetermined current value.

  16. Chip electrochromatographic systems: Novel vertically aligned carbon nanotube and silica monoliths based separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Shubhodeep

    2009-12-01

    Miniaturized chemical analysis systems, also know as 'lab-on-a-chip' devices have been rapidly developing over the last decade. Capillary electrochromatography (CEC), a multidimensional separation technique combining capillary electrophoresis (CE) and liquid chromatography (LC) has been of great interest for chip based applications. Preliminary work has been undertaken to develop vertically aligned carbon nanotubes and photopolymerizable silica solgel as novel stationary phase materials for 'chip CEC' separations. Patterned growth of CNTs in a specific location of the channel has been carried out using a solid phase Fe-Al catalyst as well as a vapor deposited ferrocene catalyst. Characterization of the CNT "forests" was achieved using optical microscopy, secondary electron microscopy, high resolution tunneling electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Proof-of-concept applications were demonstrated using reversed phase CEC separations as well as solid phase extraction of a glycosylated protein using concanavilin A immobilized onto the CNT bed. Photopolymerizable silica solgel materials were developed as stationary phase for microfluidic electrochromatographic separations in disposable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chip devices. Effect on morphology and pore size of gels were studied as function of UV and solgel polymerization conditions, porogen, salt additives, geometry and hydrolyzable methoxy-ies. Structural morphologies were studied with Secondary Electron Microscopy (SEM). Pore size and pore volumes were characterized by thermal porometry, nitrogen BET adsorptions and differential scanning calorimetry. Computational fluid dynamics and confocal microscopy tools were employed to study the transport of fluids and model analytes. These investigations were directed towards evolving improved strategies for rinsing of uncrosslinked monomers to form porous monoliths as well as to effect a desired separation under a set of electrochromatograhic conditions

  17. Integrated crystal mounting and alignment system for high-throughput biological crystallography

    DOEpatents

    Nordmeyer, Robert A.; Snell, Gyorgy P.; Cornell, Earl W.; Kolbe, William; Yegian, Derek; Earnest, Thomas N.; Jaklevic, Joseph M.; Cork, Carl W.; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2005-07-19

    A method and apparatus for the transportation, remote and unattended mounting, and visual alignment and monitoring of protein crystals for synchrotron generated x-ray diffraction analysis. The protein samples are maintained at liquid nitrogen temperatures at all times: during shipment, before mounting, mounting, alignment, data acquisition and following removal. The samples must additionally be stably aligned to within a few microns at a point in space. The ability to accurately perform these tasks remotely and automatically leads to a significant increase in sample throughput and reliability for high-volume protein characterization efforts. Since the protein samples are placed in a shipping-compatible layered stack of sample cassettes each holding many samples, a large number of samples can be shipped in a single cryogenic shipping container.

  18. Integrated crystal mounting and alignment system for high-throughput biological crystallography

    DOEpatents

    Nordmeyer, Robert A.; Snell, Gyorgy P.; Cornell, Earl W.; Kolbe, William F.; Yegian, Derek T.; Earnest, Thomas N.; Jaklevich, Joseph M.; Cork, Carl W.; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2007-09-25

    A method and apparatus for the transportation, remote and unattended mounting, and visual alignment and monitoring of protein crystals for synchrotron generated x-ray diffraction analysis. The protein samples are maintained at liquid nitrogen temperatures at all times: during shipment, before mounting, mounting, alignment, data acquisition and following removal. The samples must additionally be stably aligned to within a few microns at a point in space. The ability to accurately perform these tasks remotely and automatically leads to a significant increase in sample throughput and reliability for high-volume protein characterization efforts. Since the protein samples are placed in a shipping-compatible layered stack of sample cassettes each holding many samples, a large number of samples can be shipped in a single cryogenic shipping container.

  19. Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control for Improved Yaw Alignment with the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Scholbrock, A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.; Slinger, C.; Medley, J.; Harris, M.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes field tests of a light detection and ranging (lidar) device placed forward looking on the nacelle of a wind turbine and used as a wind direction measurement to directly control the yaw position of a wind turbine. Conventionally, a wind turbine controls its yaw direction using a nacelle-mounted wind vane. If there is a bias in the measurement from the nacelle-mounted wind vane, a reduction in power production will be observed. This bias could be caused by a number of issues such as: poor calibration, electromagnetic interference, rotor wake, or other effects. With a lidar mounted on the nacelle, a measurement of the wind could be made upstream of the wind turbine where the wind is not being influenced by the rotor's wake or induction zone. Field tests were conducted with the lidar measured yaw system and the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system. Results show that a lidar can be used to effectively measure the yaw error of the wind turbine, and for this experiment, they also showed an improvement in power capture because of reduced yaw misalignment when compared to the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system.

  20. MIRADAS control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosich Minguell, Josefina; Garzón Lopez, Francisco

    2012-09-01

    The Mid-resolution InfRAreD Astronomical Spectrograph (MIRADAS, a near-infrared multi-object echelle spectrograph operating at spectral resolution R=20,000 over the 1-2.5μm bandpass) was selected in 2010 by the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) partnership as the next-generation near-infrared spectrograph for the world's largest optical/infrared telescope, and is being developed by an international consortium. The MIRADAS consortium includes the University of Florida, Universidad de Barcelona, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Institut de Física d'Altes Energies, Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya and Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. This paper shows an overview of the MIRADAS control software, which follows the standards defined by the telescope to permit the integration of this software on the GTC Control System (GCS). The MIRADAS Control System is based on a distributed architecture according to a component model where every subsystem is selfcontained. The GCS is a distributed environment written in object oriented C++, which runs components in different computers, using CORBA middleware for communications. Each MIRADAS observing mode, including engineering, monitoring and calibration modes, will have its own predefined sequence, which are executed in the GCS Sequencer. These sequences will have the ability of communicating with other telescope subsystems.

  1. Crawling the Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore Larrieu

    2009-10-01

    Information about accelerator operations and the control system resides in various formats in a variety of places on the lab network. There are operating procedures, technical notes, engineering drawings, and other formal controlled documents. There are programmer references and API documentation generated by tools such as doxygen and javadoc. There are the thousands of electronic records generated by and stored in databases and applications such as electronic logbooks, training materials, wikis, and bulletin boards and the contents of text-based configuration files and log files that can also be valuable sources of information. The obvious way to aggregate all these sources is to index them with a search engine that users can then query from a web browser. Toward this end, the Google "mini" search appliance was selected and implemented because of its low cost and its simple web-based configuration and management. In addition to crawling and indexing electronic documents, the appliance provides an API that has been used to supplement search results with live control system data such as current values of EPICS process variables and graphs of recent data from the archiver.

  2. Gas turbine engine control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idelchik, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A control system and method of controlling a gas turbine engine. The control system receives an error signal and processes the error signal to form a primary fuel control signal. The control system also receives at least one anticipatory demand signal and processes the signal to form an anticipatory fuel control signal. The control system adjusts the value of the anticipatory fuel control signal based on the value of the error signal to form an adjusted anticipatory signal and then the adjusted anticipatory fuel control signal and the primary fuel control signal are combined to form a fuel command signal.

  3. PROMUSE: a system for multi-media data presentation of protein structural alignments.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M D; Charp, E; Lodha, S; Meads, D; Pang, A

    1999-01-01

    We present and evaluate PROMUSE: an integrated visualization/sonification system for analyzing pairwise protein structural alignments (superpositions of two protein structures in three-dimensional space). We also explore how the use of sound can enhance the perception and recognition of specific aspects of the local environment at given positions in the represented molecular structure. Sonification presents several opportunities to researchers. For those with visual impairment, data sonification can be a useful alternative to visualization. Sonification can further serve to improve understanding of information in several ways. One use for data sonification is in tasks such as background monitoring, in which case sounds can be used to indicate thresholding events. With PROMUSE, data represented visually may be enhanced or disambiguated by adding sound to the presentation. This aspect of data representation is particularly important for showing features that are difficult to represent visually, due to occlusion or other factors. Another feature of our system is that by representing some variables through sound and others visually, the amount of information that may be represented simultaneously is extended. Our tool aims to augment the power of data visualization rather than replace it. To maximize the utility of our sonifications to represent data, we employed musical voices and melodic components with unique characteristics. We also used sound effects such as panning a voice to the left or right speaker and changing its volume to maximize the individuality of the sonification elements. By making the sonification parameters distinct, we allow the user to focus on those portions of the sonification necessary to resolve possible ambiguities in the visual display. Sonifications of low level data such as raw protein or DNA sequences tend to sound random, and not very musical. We chose instead to sonify an analysis of data features, and thereby present a higher level

  4. Controlling dispersion and electric-field-assisted alignment of carbon nanotubes and nanofibers for multi-functional epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ambuj

    The objective of this investigation is to enhance the elastic modulus and tailor the electrical conductivity of nanoreinforced epoxy composites. The resin employed in this investigation is a bisphenol F epoxide with an aromatic diamine curative, extensively used for high performance composites. The nanofillers are unfunctionalized and functionalized carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The objectives are achieved by controlling the dispersion and alignment of unfunctionalized and functionalized CNFs and CNTs. The process of ultrasonic agitation was used to disperse nanofillers in epoxy resin. The dispersed nanofillers were aligned using alternating current electric field (AC). Continuous use of ultrasonic agitation reduced the lengths, and increased the degree of dispersion of CNFs and CNTs. The parameters of the ultrasonic agitation process were optimized to minimize the reduction in CNF and CNT lengths while achieving good dispersion of CNFs and CNTs in the resin. The composites manufactured with well dispersed CNFs and CNTs increased the elastic modulus as expected based on the theory of short fiber reinforced composites. The alignment and chaining of CNFs and CNTs dispersed in resin were investigated by experiments and modeling. The assembly of chains was found to depend on the frequency of AC electric field used. The mechanism of CNF/CNT chain assembly and growth in a low viscosity epoxy was investigated by developing a finite element model of a chain attached to an electrode. The model includes the combined effects of electrostatic and electro-hydrodynamic forces on chain morphology. The electro-hydrodynamic forces are modeled using the theory of AC electroosmosis. Predictions of the model are compared to experimental results. The experiments were conducted on a CNF/epoxide/curative mixture by applying an AC field at frequencies ranging from 100 -- 100,000 Hz. Predictions of the model qualitatively capture the variations of

  5. Reliable Alignment in Total Knee Arthroplasty by the Use of an iPod-Based Navigation System.

    PubMed

    Koenen, Paola; Schneider, Marco M; Fröhlich, Matthias; Driessen, Arne; Bouillon, Bertil; Bäthis, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Axial alignment is one of the main objectives in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Computer-assisted surgery (CAS) is more accurate regarding limb alignment reconstruction compared to the conventional technique. The aim of this study was to analyse the precision of the innovative navigation system DASH® by Brainlab and to evaluate the reliability of intraoperatively acquired data. A retrospective analysis of 40 patients was performed, who underwent CAS TKA using the iPod-based navigation system DASH. Pre- and postoperative axial alignment were measured on standardized radiographs by two independent observers. These data were compared with the navigation data. Furthermore, interobserver reliability was measured. The duration of surgery was monitored. The mean difference between the preoperative mechanical axis by X-ray and the first intraoperatively measured limb axis by the navigation system was 2.4°. The postoperative X-rays showed a mean difference of 1.3° compared to the final navigation measurement. According to radiographic measurements, 88% of arthroplasties had a postoperative limb axis within ±3°. The mean additional time needed for navigation was 5 minutes. We could prove very good precision for the DASH system, which is comparable to established navigation devices with only negligible expenditure of time compared to conventional TKA.

  6. Reliable Alignment in Total Knee Arthroplasty by the Use of an iPod-Based Navigation System

    PubMed Central

    Koenen, Paola; Schneider, Marco M.; Fröhlich, Matthias; Driessen, Arne; Bouillon, Bertil; Bäthis, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Axial alignment is one of the main objectives in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Computer-assisted surgery (CAS) is more accurate regarding limb alignment reconstruction compared to the conventional technique. The aim of this study was to analyse the precision of the innovative navigation system DASH® by Brainlab and to evaluate the reliability of intraoperatively acquired data. A retrospective analysis of 40 patients was performed, who underwent CAS TKA using the iPod-based navigation system DASH. Pre- and postoperative axial alignment were measured on standardized radiographs by two independent observers. These data were compared with the navigation data. Furthermore, interobserver reliability was measured. The duration of surgery was monitored. The mean difference between the preoperative mechanical axis by X-ray and the first intraoperatively measured limb axis by the navigation system was 2.4°. The postoperative X-rays showed a mean difference of 1.3° compared to the final navigation measurement. According to radiographic measurements, 88% of arthroplasties had a postoperative limb axis within ±3°. The mean additional time needed for navigation was 5 minutes. We could prove very good precision for the DASH system, which is comparable to established navigation devices with only negligible expenditure of time compared to conventional TKA. PMID:27313898

  7. BLTC control system software

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, J.B., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-10

    This is a direct revision to Rev. 0 of the BLTC Control System Software. The entire document is being revised and released as HNF-SD-FF-CSWD-025, Rev 1. The changes incorporated by this revision include addition of a feature to automate the sodium drain when removing assemblies from sodium wetted facilities. Other changes eliminate locked in alarms during cold operation and improve the function of the Oxygen Analyzer. See FCN-620498 for further details regarding these changes. Note the change in the document number prefix, in accordance with HNF-MD-003.

  8. Smog control system

    SciTech Connect

    Eichhorn, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    A smog control system is designed comprised of fans or blowers which are located to introduce air into a smog particle destruction chamber operated with laser energy. The smog particles are broken down and the air is passed into a filtering chamber which may adopt the form of a liquid charcoal chamber. The air may be bubbled through the liquid charcoal and the effluent may then be passed into a freshening agent chamber. The air may then pass as an effluent from the freshening agent chamber. A liquid charcoal supply may be connected to the liquid charcoal chamber and the recovered liquid charcoal which has been spent may be reused for other purposes.

  9. Minus-End Directed Kinesin-14 Motors Align Anti-Parallel Microtubules to Control Metaphase Spindle Length

    PubMed Central

    Hepperla, Austin J.; Willey, Patrick T.; Coombes, Courtney E.; Schuster, Breanna M.; Gerami-Nejad, Maryam; McClellan, Mark; Mukherjee, Soumya; Fox, Janet; Winey, Mark; Odde, David J.; O’Toole, Eileen; Gardner, Melissa K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary During cell division, a microtubule-based mitotic spindle mediates the faithful segregation of duplicated chromosomes into daughter cells. Proper length control of the metaphase mitotic spindle is critical to this process, and is thought to be achieved through a mechanism in which spindle pole separation forces from plus-end directed motors are balanced by forces from minus-end directed motors that pull spindle poles together. However, in contrast to this model, metaphase mitotic spindles with inactive Kinesin-14 minusend directed motors often have shorter spindle lengths, along with poorly aligned spindle microtubules. A mechanistic explanation for this paradox is unknown. Using computational modeling, in vitro reconstitution, live-cell fluorescence microscopy, and electron microscopy, we now find that the budding yeast Kinesin-14 molecular motor Kar3-Cik1 can efficiently align spindle microtubules along the spindle axis. This then allows plus-end directed Kinesin-5 motors to efficiently exert the outward microtubule sliding forces needed for proper spindle bipolarity. PMID:25313961

  10. Airflow control system

    DOEpatents

    Motszko, Sean Ronald; McEnaney, Ryan Patrick; Brush, Jeffrey Alan; Zimmermann, Daniel E.

    2007-03-13

    A dual airflow control system for an environment having a first air zone and a second air zone. The system includes a first input device operable to generate a first input signal indicative of a desired airflow to the first zone and a second input device operable to generate a second input signal indicative of a desired airflow to the second zone. First and second flow regulators are configured to regulate airflow to the first and second zones, respectively, such that the first and second regulators selectively provide the airflow to each of the first and second zones based on the first and second input signals. A single actuator is associated with the first and second flow regulators. The actuator is operable to simultaneously actuate the first and second flow regulators based on an input from the first and second input devices to allow the desired airflows to the first and the second zones.

  11. Complementary characterization data in support of uniaxially aligned electrospun nanocomposites based on a model PVOH-epoxy system.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Samaneh; Staiger, Mark P; Buunk, Neil; Fessard, Alison; Tucker, Nick

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents complementary data corresponding to characterization tests done for our research article entitled "Uniaxially aligned electrospun fibers for advanced nanocomposites based on a model PVOH-epoxy system" (Karimi et al., 2016) [1]. Poly(vinyl alcohol) and epoxy resin were selected as a model system and the effect of electrospun fiber loading on polymer properties was examined in conjunction with two manufacturing methods. A novel electrospinning technology for production of uniaxially aligned nanofiber arrays was used. A conventional wet lay-up fabrication method is compared against a novel, hybrid electrospinning-electrospraying approach. The structure and thermomechanical properties of resulting composite materials were examined using scanning electron microscopy, dynamic mechanical analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and tensile testing. For discussion of obtained results please refer to the research paper (Karimi et al., 2016) [1].

  12. System and method for detecting components of a mixture including tooth elements for alignment

    DOEpatents

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2016-11-22

    Examples are described including assay platforms having tooth elements. An impinging element may sequentially engage tooth elements on the assay platform to sequentially align corresponding detection regions with a detection unit. In this manner, multiple measurements may be made of detection regions on the assay platform without necessarily requiring the starting and stopping of a motor.

  13. CONTROL ROOM WITH SPRINKLER SYSTEM CONTROLS, INCLUDING MANUAL CONTROL BOXES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTROL ROOM WITH SPRINKLER SYSTEM CONTROLS, INCLUDING MANUAL CONTROL BOXES FOR THE VENTILATION SYSTEM AND A PLC SWITCH FOR AUTOMATIC CO (CARBON MONOXIDE) SYSTEM. THE AIR TESTING SYSTEM IS FREE STANDING AND THE FANS ARE COMPUTER-OPERATED. - Alaskan Way Viaduct and Battery Street Tunnel, Seattle, King County, WA

  14. Energy Partitioning and Impulse Dispersion in the Decorated, Tapered, Strongly Nonlinear Granular Alignment: A System with Many Potential Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    finally discuss some preliminary experimental results using systems with chrome spheres and small Nitinol interstitial grains to present the... Nitinol interstitial grains to present the underlying nonlinear dynamics of this so-called decorated tapered granular alignment. We are specifically...second was the DTC setup. In this case, small Nitinol 2.38 mm diameter particles were in- troduced between the main STC particles so that NDTC=9. 53 The

  15. Orbit IMU alignment: Error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive accuracy analysis of orbit inertial measurement unit (IMU) alignments using the shuttle star trackers was completed and the results are presented. Monte Carlo techniques were used in a computer simulation of the IMU alignment hardware and software systems to: (1) determine the expected Space Transportation System 1 Flight (STS-1) manual mode IMU alignment accuracy; (2) investigate the accuracy of alignments in later shuttle flights when the automatic mode of star acquisition may be used; and (3) verify that an analytical model previously used for estimating the alignment error is a valid model. The analysis results do not differ significantly from expectations. The standard deviation in the IMU alignment error for STS-1 alignments was determined to the 68 arc seconds per axis. This corresponds to a 99.7% probability that the magnitude of the total alignment error is less than 258 arc seconds.

  16. Reducing beam shaper alignment complexity: diagnostic techniques for alignment and tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd E.

    2011-10-01

    Safe and efficient optical alignment is a critical requirement for industrial laser systems used in a high volume manufacturing environment. Of specific interest is the development of techniques to align beam shaping optics within a beam line; having the ability to instantly verify by a qualitative means that each element is in its proper position as the beam shaper module is being aligned. There is a need to reduce these types of alignment techniques down to a level where even a newbie to optical alignment will be able to complete the task. Couple this alignment need with the fact that most laser system manufacturers ship their products worldwide and the introduction of a new set of variables including cultural and language barriers, makes this a top priority for manufacturers. Tools and methodologies for alignment of complex optical systems need to be able to cross these barriers to ensure the highest degree of up time and reduce the cost of maintenance on the production floor. Customers worldwide, who purchase production laser equipment, understand that the majority of costs to a manufacturing facility is spent on system maintenance and is typically the largest single controllable expenditure in a production plant. This desire to reduce costs is driving the trend these days towards predictive and proactive, not reactive maintenance of laser based optical beam delivery systems [10]. With proper diagnostic tools, laser system developers can develop proactive approaches to reduce system down time, safe guard operational performance and reduce premature or catastrophic optics failures. Obviously analytical data will provide quantifiable performance standards which are more precise than qualitative standards, but each have a role in determining overall optical system performance [10]. This paper will discuss the use of film and fluorescent mirror devices as diagnostic tools for beam shaper module alignment off line or in-situ. The paper will also provide an overview

  17. Thrust-Vector-Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Jonathan

    1992-01-01

    Control gains computed via matrix Riccati equation. Software-based system controlling aim of gimbaled rocket motor on spacecraft adaptive and optimal in sense it adjusts control gains in response to feedback, according to optimizing algorithm based on cost function. Underlying control concept also applicable, with modifications, to thrust-vector control on vertical-takeoff-and-landing airplanes, control of orientations of scientific instruments, and robotic control systems.

  18. Neural nets for aligning optical components in harsh environments: Beam smoothing spatial filter as an example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Krasowski, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    The goal is to develop an approach to automating the alignment and adjustment of optical measurement, visualization, inspection, and control systems. Classical controls, expert systems, and neural networks are three approaches to automating the alignment of an optical system. Neural networks were chosen for this project and the judgements that led to this decision are presented. Neural networks were used to automate the alignment of the ubiquitous laser-beam-smoothing spatial filter. The results and future plans of the project are presented.

  19. Pollution control system

    SciTech Connect

    Voliva, B.H.; Bernstein, I.B.

    1984-09-25

    A pollution control system is disclosed wherein condensable pollutants are removed from a high-temperature gas stream by counterflow contact in a vertical tower with downwardly flowing, relatively cool absorbent oil. The absorbent is at a sufficiently low temperature so as to rapidly condense a portion of the pollutants in order to form a fog of fine droplets of pollutant entrained by the gas stream, which fog is incapable of being absorbed by the absorbent. The remainder of the condensable pollutants is removed by downwardly flowing absorbent oil, and the gas and entrained fog are directed from the tower to gas/droplet separation means, such as an electrostatic precipitator. The fog is thereby separated from the gas and substantially pollutant-free gas is discharged to the atmosphere.

  20. Optically controlled welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system wherein a welding torch having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features include an actively cooled electrode holder which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm, and a weld pool contour detector comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom, being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  1. Basic control systems engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, P.H.; Yang, C.

    1997-12-31

    This book is one of the latest at the basic or introductory level, which is addressed to undergraduate juniors and seniors across several engineering disciplines such as mechanical, chemical, aerospace, and electrical. In fact, the background of the authors include electrical and aerospace engineering, respectively. The book contains the standard material presented at the undergraduate level. However, there appears to have been a serious attempt by the authors to address several practical implementation issues such as actuator saturation and other nonlinearities, bandwidth limitations, etc. In addition, there is an elementary consideration of the control of discrete event dynamical systems, a subject that has not traditionally been considered in elementary texts, but which nevertheless is increasingly important in industrial applications.

  2. Optically controlled welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system (10) wherein a welding torch (12) having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter (56) to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder (15) to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features includes an actively cooled electrode holder (26) which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm (28) and a weld pool contour detector (14) comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  3. Complementary characterization data in support of uniaxially aligned electrospun nanocomposites based on a model PVOH-epoxy system

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Samaneh; Staiger, Mark P.; Buunk, Neil; Fessard, Alison; Tucker, Nick

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents complementary data corresponding to characterization tests done for our research article entitled “Uniaxially aligned electrospun fibers for advanced nanocomposites based on a model PVOH-epoxy system” (Karimi et al., 2016) [1]. Poly(vinyl alcohol) and epoxy resin were selected as a model system and the effect of electrospun fiber loading on polymer properties was examined in conjunction with two manufacturing methods. A novel electrospinning technology for production of uniaxially aligned nanofiber arrays was used. A conventional wet lay-up fabrication method is compared against a novel, hybrid electrospinning–electrospraying approach. The structure and thermomechanical properties of resulting composite materials were examined using scanning electron microscopy, dynamic mechanical analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and tensile testing. For discussion of obtained results please refer to the research paper (Karimi et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:26977430

  4. Highly ordered and highly aligned two-dimensional binary superlattice of a SWNT/cylindrical-micellar system.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung-Hwan; Jang, Hyung-Sik; Ha, Jae-Min; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kwasniewski, Pawel; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Choi, Sung-Min

    2014-11-10

    We report a highly ordered intercalated hexagonal binary superlattice of hydrophilically functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (p-SWNTs) and surfactant (C12 E5 ) cylindrical micelles. When p-SWNTs (with a diameter slightly larger than that of the C12 E5 cylinders) were added to the hexagonally packed C12 E5 cylindrical-micellar system, p-SWNTs positioned themselves in such a way that the free-volume entropies for both p-SWNTs and C12 E5 cylinders were maximized, thus resulting in the intercalated hexagonal binary superlattice. In this binary superlattice, a hexagonal array of p-SWNTs is embedded in a honeycomb lattice of C12 E5 cylinders. The intercalated hexagonal binary superlattice can be highly aligned in one direction by an oscillatory shear field and remains aligned after the shear is removed.

  5. Counselee participation in follow-up breast cancer genetic counselling visits and associations with achievement of the preferred role, cognitive outcomes, risk perception alignment and perceived personal control.

    PubMed

    Albada, Akke; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the counselee participation in the follow-up visits, compared to the first visits, for breast cancer genetic counselling and to explore associations with counselees' achievement of their preferred role in decision making, information recall, knowledge, risk perception alignment and perceived personal control. First and follow-up visits for breast cancer genetic counselling of 96 counselees of a Dutch genetics center were videotaped (2008-2010). Counselees completed questionnaires before counselling (T1), after the follow-up visit (T2) and one year after the follow-up visit (T3). Consultations were rated with the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). Counselee participation was measured as the percentage of counselee utterances, the percentage of counselee questions and the interactivity (number of turns per minute). Follow-up visits had higher levels of counselee participation than first visits as assessed by the percentage of counselee talk, the interactivity and counselee questions. More counselee talk in the follow-up visit was related to higher achievement of the preferred role (T2) and higher perceived personal control (T3). Higher interactivity in the follow-up visit was related to lower achievement of the preferred role in decision making and lower information recall (T2). There were no significant associations with the percentage of questions asked and none of the participation measures was related to knowledge, risk perception alignment and perceived personal control (T2). In line with the interviewing admonishment 'talk less and listen more', the only assessment of counselee participation associated to better outcomes is the percentage of counselee talk. High interactivity might be associated with lower recall in breast cancer genetic counselees who are generally highly educated. However, this study was limited by a small sample size and a heterogeneous group of counselees. Research is needed on the interactions

  6. Turbocharger control system

    SciTech Connect

    Kawabata, Y.

    1987-02-17

    This patent describes a turbocharger control system utilized in an internal combustion engine having a turbocharger turbine with a downstream passage, a combustion chamber, an exhaust treatment device, an actuator, a link mechanism connected to the actuator, a compressor, and a throttle valve. The engine also has an engine intake manifold, air flow passage means leading from the compressor to the throttle valve and an exhaust passage leading from the combustion chamber. The system comprises: bypass passage means connecting the exhaust passage leading from the combustion chamber to the turbocharger turbine with the downstream passage of the turbine so as to connect the combustion chamber directly to the exhaust treatment device around the turbine; a waste gate valve connected to the actuator by means of the link mechanism so as to close the bypass passage wherein the actuator comprises a first chamber continuously communicating with atmospheric pressure, a second chamber connected to the air flow passage means leading from the compressor to the throttle valve, and a third chamber connected to the engine intake manifold; first spring means interposed in the first chamber for biasing the waste gate valve toward a closed position; and second spring means interposed in the third chamber and having a stronger spring load characteristic than the first spring means for biasing the waste gate valve towards an opened position.

  7. An effortless procedure to align the local frame of an inertial measurement unit to the local frame of another motion capture system.

    PubMed

    Chardonnens, Julien; Favre, Julien; Aminian, Kamiar

    2012-08-31

    Inertial measurement units (IMUs) offer great opportunities to analyze segmental and joints kinematics. When combined with another motion capture system (MCS), for example, to validate new IMU-based applications or to develop mixed systems, it is necessary to align the local frame of the IMU sensors to the local frame of the MCS. Currently, all alignment methods use landmarks on the IMU's casing. Therefore, they can only be used with well-documented IMUs and they are prone to error when the IMU's casing is small. This study proposes an effortless procedure to align the local frame of any IMU to the local frame of any other MCS able to measure the orientation of its local frame. The general concept of this method is to derive the gyroscopic angles for both devices during an alignment movement, and then to use an optimization algorithm to calculate the alignment matrix between both local frames. The alignment movement consists of rotations around three more or less orthogonal axes and it can easily be performed by hands. To test the alignment procedure, an IMU and a magnetic marker were attached to a plate, and 20 alignment movements were recorded. The maximum errors of alignment (accuracy±precision) were 1.02°±0.32° and simulations showed that the method was robust against noise that typically affect IMUs. In conclusion, this study describes an efficient alignment procedure that is quick and easy to perform, and that does not require any alignment device or any knowledge about the IMU casing.

  8. Environment control system

    DOEpatents

    Sammarone, Dino G.

    1978-01-01

    A system for controlling the environment of an enclosed area in nuclear reactor installations. The system permits the changing of the environment from nitrogen to air, or from air to nitrogen, without the release of any radioactivity or process gas to the outside atmosphere. In changing from a nitrogen to an air environment, oxygen is inserted into the enclosed area at the same rate which the nitrogen-oxygen gas mixture is removed from the enclosed area. The nitrogen-oxygen gas mixture removed from the enclosed area is mixed with hydrogen, the hydrogen recombining with the oxygen present in the gas to form water. The water is then removed from the system and, if it contains any radioactive products, can be utilized to form concrete, which can then be transferred to a licensed burial site. The process gas is purified further by stripping it of carbon dioxide and then distilling it to remove any xenon, krypton, and other fission or non-condensable gases. The pure nitrogen is stored as either a cryogenic liquid or a gas. In changing from an air to nitrogen environment, the gas is removed from the enclosed area, mixed with hydrogen to remove the oxygen present, dried, passed through adsorption beds to remove any fission gases, and reinserted into the enclosed area. Additionally, the nitrogen stored during the nitrogen to air change, is inserted into the enclosed area, the nitrogen from both sources being inserted into the enclosed area at the same rate as the removal of the gas from the containment area. As designed, the amount of nitrogen stored during the nitrogen to air change substantially equals that required to replace oxygen removed during an air to nitrogen change.

  9. En route to controlled catalytic CVD synthesis of densely packed and vertically aligned nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube arrays

    PubMed Central

    Pattinson, Sebastian W; Geiser, Valérie; Shaffer, Milo S P

    2014-01-01

    Summary The catalytic chemical vapour deposition (c-CVD) technique was applied in the synthesis of vertically aligned arrays of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs). A mixture of toluene (main carbon source), pyrazine (1,4-diazine, nitrogen source) and ferrocene (catalyst precursor) was used as the injection feedstock. To optimize conditions for growing the most dense and aligned N-CNT arrays, we investigated the influence of key parameters, i.e., growth temperature (660, 760 and 860 °C), composition of the feedstock and time of growth, on morphology and properties of N-CNTs. The presence of nitrogen species in the hot zone of the quartz reactor decreased the growth rate of N-CNTs down to about one twentieth compared to the growth rate of multi-wall CNTs (MWCNTs). As revealed by electron microscopy studies (SEM, TEM), the individual N-CNTs (half as thick as MWCNTs) grown under the optimal conditions were characterized by a superior straightness of the outer walls, which translated into a high alignment of dense nanotube arrays, i.e., 5 × 108 nanotubes per mm2 (100 times more than for MWCNTs grown in the absence of nitrogen precursor). In turn, the internal crystallographic order of the N-CNTs was found to be of a ‘bamboo’-like or ‘membrane’-like (multi-compartmental structure) morphology. The nitrogen content in the nanotube products, which ranged from 0.0 to 3.0 wt %, was controlled through the concentration of pyrazine in the feedstock. Moreover, as revealed by Raman/FT-IR spectroscopy, the incorporation of nitrogen atoms into the nanotube walls was found to be proportional to the number of deviations from the sp2-hybridisation of graphene C-atoms. As studied by XRD, the temperature and the [pyrazine]/[ferrocene] ratio in the feedstock affected the composition of the catalyst particles, and hence changed the growth mechanism of individual N-CNTs into a ‘mixed base-and-tip’ (primarily of the base-type) type as compared to the purely

  10. Study and Control of Flow Past Disk, and Circular and Rectangular Cylinders Aligned in the Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higuchi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Methodology similar to that used for our closed-loop control of Separation over NACA 0012 Airfoil (Pinier et al, AIAA Journal 2007) Synthetic Jet Actuators, Miniature Pressure Transducers Split POD with and without Actuations Flow state estimation from Pressure signature

  11. Thermal control system technology discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Wilbert E.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on thermal control systems technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: heat rejection; heat acquisition and transport; monitoring and control; passive thermal control; and analysis and test verification.

  12. NSLS control system upgrade status

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Tang, Y.; Flannigan, J.; Sathe, S.; Keane, J.; Krinsky, S.

    1993-07-01

    The NSLS control system initially installed in 1978 has undergone several modifications but the basic system architecture remained relatively unchanged. The need for faster response, increased reliability and better diagnostics made the control system upgrade a priority. Since the NSLS runs continuously, major changes to the control system are difficult. The upgrade plan had to allow continuous incremental changes to the control system without having any detrimental effect on operations. The plan had to provide for immediate improvement in a few key areas, such as data access rates, and be complete in a short time. At present, most accelerator operations utilize the upgraded control system.

  13. Large-scale horizontally aligned ZnO microrod arrays with controlled orientation, periodic distribution as building blocks for chip-in piezo-phototronic LEDs.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhen; Li, Haiwen; Zhou, Lianqun; Zhao, Dongxu; Wu, Yihui; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Chuanyu; Yao, Jia

    2015-01-27

    A novel method of fabricating large-scale horizontally aligned ZnO microrod arrays with controlled orientation and periodic distribution via combing technology is introduced. Horizontally aligned ZnO microrod arrays with uniform orientation and periodic distribution can be realized based on the conventional bottom-up method prepared vertically aligned ZnO microrod matrix via the combing method. When the combing parameters are changed, the orientation of horizontally aligned ZnO microrod arrays can be adjusted (θ = 90° or 45°) in a plane and a misalignment angle of the microrods (0.3° to 2.3°) with low-growth density can be obtained. To explore the potential applications based on the vertically and horizontally aligned ZnO microrods on p-GaN layer, piezo-phototronic devices such as heterojunction LEDs are built. Electroluminescence (EL) emission patterns can be adjusted for the vertically and horizontally aligned ZnO microrods/p-GaN heterojunction LEDs by applying forward bias. Moreover, the emission color from UV-blue to yellow-green can be tuned by investigating the piezoelectric properties of the materials. The EL emission mechanisms of the LEDs are discussed in terms of band diagrams of the heterojunctions and carrier recombination processes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Direct-Write, Self-Aligned Electrospinning on Paper for Controllable Fabrication of Three-Dimensional Structures.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guoxi; Teh, Kwok Siong; Liu, Yumeng; Zang, Xining; Wen, Zhiyu; Lin, Liwei

    2015-12-23

    Electrospinning, a process that converts a solution or melt droplet into an ejected jet under a high electric field, is a well-established technique to produce one-dimensional (1D) fibers or two-dimensional (2D) randomly arranged fibrous meshes. Nevertheless, the direct electrospinning of fibers into controllable three-dimensional (3D) architectures is still a nascent technology. Here, we apply near-field electrospinning (NFES) to directly write arbitrarily shaped 3D structures through consistent and spatially controlled fiber-by-fiber stacking of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) fibers. An element central to the success of this 3D electrospinning is the use of a printing paper placed on the grounded conductive plate and acting as a fiber collector. Once deposited on the paper, residual solvents from near-field electrospun fibers can infiltrate the paper substrate, enhancing the charge transfer between the deposited fibers and the ground plate via the fibrous network within the paper. Such charge transfer grounds the deposited fibers and turns them into locally fabricated electrical poles, which attract subsequent in-flight fibers to deposit in a self-aligned manner on top of each other. This process enables the design and controlled fabrication of electrospun 3D structures such as grids, walls, hollow cylinders, and other 3D logos. As such, this technique has the potential to advance the existing electrospinning technologies in constructing 3D structures for biomedical, microelectronics, and MEMS/NMES applications.

  15. By-controlled convection and field-aligned currents near midnight auroral oval for northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taguchi, S.; Sugiura, M.; Iyemori, T.; Winningham, J. D.; Slavin, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Using the Dynamics Explorer (DE) 2 magnetic and electric field and plasma data, B(sub y)- controlled convection and field-aligned currents in the midnight sector for northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) are examined. The results of an analysis of the electric field data show that when IMF is stable and when its magnitude is large, a coherent B(sub y)-controlled convection exists near the midnight auroral oval in the ionosphere having adequate conductivities. When B(sub y) is negative, the convection consists of a westward (eastward) plasma flow at the lower latitudes and an eastward (westward) plasma flow at the higher latitudes in the midnight sector in the northern (southern) ionosphere. When B(sub y) is positive, the flow directions are reversed. The distribution of the field-aligned currents associated with the B(sub y)-controlled convection, in most cases, shows a three-sheet structure. In accordance with the convection the directions of the three sheets are dependent on the sign of B(sub y). The location of disappearance of the precipitating intense electrons having energies of a few keV is close to the convection reversal surface. However, the more detailed relationship between the electron precipitation boundary and the convection reversal surface depends on the case. In some cases the precipitating electrons extend beyond the convection reversal surface, and in others the poleward boundary terminates at a latitude lower than the reversal surface. Previous studies suggest that the poleward boundary of the electrons having energies of a few keV is not necessarily coincident with an open/closed bounary. Thus the open/closed boundary may be at a latitude higher than the poleward boundary of the electron precipitation, or it may be at a latitude lower than the poleward boundary of the electron precipitation. We discuss relationships between the open/closed boundary and the convection reversal surface. When as a possible choice we adopt a view that the

  16. Networked control of microgrid system of systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Magdi S.; Rahman, Mohamed Saif Ur; AL-Sunni, Fouad M.

    2016-08-01

    The microgrid has made its mark in distributed generation and has attracted widespread research. However, microgrid is a complex system which needs to be viewed from an intelligent system of systems perspective. In this paper, a network control system of systems is designed for the islanded microgrid system consisting of three distributed generation units as three subsystems supplying a load. The controller stabilises the microgrid system in the presence of communication infractions such as packet dropouts and delays. Simulation results are included to elucidate the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy.

  17. A method to align the coordinate system of accelerometers to the axes of a human body: The depitch algorithm.

    PubMed

    Gietzelt, Matthias; Schnabel, Stephan; Wolf, Klaus-Hendrik; Büsching, Felix; Song, Bianying; Rust, Stefan; Marschollek, Michael

    2012-05-01

    One of the key problems in accelerometry based gait analyses is that it may not be possible to attach an accelerometer to the lower trunk so that its axes are perfectly aligned to the axes of the subject. In this paper we will present an algorithm that was designed to virtually align the axes of the accelerometer to the axes of the subject during walking sections. This algorithm is based on a physically reasonable approach and built for measurements in unsupervised settings, where the test persons are applying the sensors by themselves. For evaluation purposes we conducted a study with 6 healthy subjects and measured their gait with a manually aligned and a skewed accelerometer attached to the subject's lower trunk. After applying the algorithm the intra-axis correlation of both sensors was on average 0.89±0.1 with a mean absolute error of 0.05g. We concluded that the algorithm was able to adjust the skewed sensor node virtually to the coordinate system of the subject.

  18. Aircraft control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Greg T. (Inventor); Morgan, Walter R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A span-loaded, highly flexible flying wing, having horizontal control surfaces mounted aft of the wing on extended beams to form local pitch-control devices. Each of five spanwise wing segments of the wing has one or more motors and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other wing segments, to minimize inter-segment loads. Wing dihedral is controlled by separately controlling the local pitch-control devices consisting of a control surface on a boom, such that inboard and outboard wing segment pitch changes relative to each other, and thus relative inboard and outboard lift is varied.

  19. Self-aligned colloidal lithography for controllable and tuneable plasmonic nanogaps.

    PubMed

    Ding, Tao; Herrmann, Lars O; de Nijs, Bart; Benz, Felix; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2015-05-13

    Au nanoparticles (NPs) deposited on a substrate function as ring shaped colloidal shadow masks. Using e-beam evaporation of gold, nanometer sized gaps are formed as a result. The size of these gaps can be accurately tuned by controlling the thickness of the gold deposition, thereby tuning the plasmonic coupling of the NPs with the substrate. The clean cavity produced between the Au NPs and the Au film provides an excellent SERS platform for trace molecule detection. © 2014 The Authors. Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Automation of the targeting and reflective alignment concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redfield, Robin C.

    1992-01-01

    The automated alignment system, described herein, employs a reflective, passive (requiring no power) target and includes a PC-based imaging system and one camera mounted on a six degree of freedom robot manipulator. The system detects and corrects for manipulator misalignment in three translational and three rotational directions by employing the Targeting and Reflective Alignment Concept (TRAC), which simplifies alignment by decoupling translational and rotational alignment control. The concept uses information on the camera and the target's relative position based on video feedback from the camera. These relative positions are converted into alignment errors and minimized by motions of the robot. The system is robust to exogenous lighting by virtue of a subtraction algorithm which enables the camera to only see the target. These capabilities are realized with relatively minimal complexity and expense.

  1. SRS control system upgrade requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.F.

    1998-08-04

    This document defines requirements for an upgrade of the Sodium Removal System (SRS) control system. The upgrade is being performed to solve a number of maintainability and operability issues. The upgraded system will provide the same functions, controls and interlocks as the present system, and in addition provide enhanced functionality in areas discussed in this document.

  2. Vertically aligned crystalline silicon nanowires with controlled diameters for energy conversion applications: Experimental and theoretical insights

    SciTech Connect

    Razek, Sara Abdel; Swillam, Mohamed A.; Allam, Nageh K.

    2014-05-21

    Vertically orientated single crystalline silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays with controlled diameters are fabricated via a metal-assisted chemical etching method. The diameter of the fabricated nanowires is controlled by simply varying the etching time in HF/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} electrolytes. The fabricated SiNWs have diameters ranging from 117 to 650 nm and lengths from 8 to 18 μm. The optical measurements showed a significant difference in the reflectance/absorption of the SiNWs with different diameters, where the reflectance increases with increasing the diameter of the SiNWs. The SiNWs showed significant photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra with peaks lying between 380 and 670 nm. The PL intensity increases as the diameter increases and shows red shift for peaks at ∼670 nm. The increase or decrease of reflectivity is coincident with PL intensity at wavelength ∼660 nm. The x-ray diffraction patterns confirm the high crystallinity of the fabricated SiNWs. In addition, the Raman spectra showed a shift in the first order transverse band toward lower frequencies compared to that usually seen for c-Si. Finite difference time domain simulations have been performed to confirm the effect of change of diameter on the optical properties of the nanowires. The simulation results showed good agreement with the experimental results for the SiNWs of different diameters.

  3. System for controlling apnea

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F

    2015-05-05

    An implanted stimulation device or air control device are activated by an external radar-like sensor for controlling apnea. The radar-like sensor senses the closure of the air flow cavity, and associated control circuitry signals (1) a stimulator to cause muscles to open the air passage way that is closing or closed or (2) an air control device to open the air passage way that is closing or closed.

  4. Upgrade of the HET segment control system, utilizing state-of-the-art, decentralized and embedded system controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häuser, Marco; Richter, Josef; Kriel, Herman; Turbyfill, Amanda; Buetow, Brent; Ward, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Together with the ongoing major instrument upgrade of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) we present the planned upgrade of the HET Segment Control System (SCS) to SCS2. Because HET's primary mirror is segmented into 91 individual 1-meter hexagonal mirrors, the SCS is essential to maintain the mirror alignment throughout an entire night of observations. SCS2 will complete tip, tilt and piston corrections of each mirror segment at a significantly higher rate than the original SCS. The new motion control hardware will further increase the system's reliability. The initial optical measurements of this array are performed by the Mirror Alignment Recovery System (MARS) and the HET Extra Focal Instrument (HEFI). Once the segments are optically aligned, the inductive edge sensors give sub-micron precise feedback of each segment's positions relative to its adjacent segments. These sensors are part of the Segment Alignment Maintenance System (SAMS) and are responsible for providing information about positional changes due to external influences, such as steep temperature changes and mechanical stress, and for making compensatory calculations while tracking the telescope on sky. SCS2 will use the optical alignment systems and SAMS inputs to command corrections of every segment in a closed loop. The correction period will be roughly 30 seconds, mostly due to the measurement and averaging process of the SAMS algorithm. The segment actuators will be controlled by the custom developed HET Segment MOtion COntroller (SMOCO). It is a direct descendant of University Observatory Munich's embedded, CAN-based system and instrument control tool-kit. To preserve the existing HET hardware layout, each SMOCO will control two adjacent mirror segments. Unlike the original SCS motor controllers, SMOCO is able to drive all six axes of its two segments at the same time. SCS2 will continue to allow for sub-arcsecond precision in tip and tilt as well as sub-micro meter precision in piston. These

  5. Distributed systems status and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreidler, David; Vickers, David

    1990-01-01

    Concepts are investigated for an automated status and control system for a distributed processing environment. System characteristics, data requirements for health assessment, data acquisition methods, system diagnosis methods and control methods were investigated in an attempt to determine the high-level requirements for a system which can be used to assess the health of a distributed processing system and implement control procedures to maintain an accepted level of health for the system. A potential concept for automated status and control includes the use of expert system techniques to assess the health of the system, detect and diagnose faults, and initiate or recommend actions to correct the faults. Therefore, this research included the investigation of methods by which expert systems were developed for real-time environments and distributed systems. The focus is on the features required by real-time expert systems and the tools available to develop real-time expert systems.

  6. Managing the inventory control system.

    PubMed

    Daniels, C E

    1985-02-01

    The four functions of management--planning, organizing, directing, and controlling--are described in relation to the hospital pharmacy inventory control system. Planning includes the development of inventory system objectives and identification of the resources needed to complete them. Organizing requires the manager to decide on the best method of grouping system activities and resources to complete the objectives in order of priority. Directing is a continual activity that involves obtaining optimal performance from the inventory system resources available. Controlling consists of regulation and verification of inventory system activities. The effective inventory system manager integrates planning, organizing, directing, and controlling in a continuous cycle.

  7. Electrospinning of polycrystalline barium titanate nanofibers with controllable morphology and alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Jesse T.; Chen, Jennifer I. L.; Li, Dan; Ye, Zuo-Guang; Xia, Younan

    2006-06-01

    We report the fabrication of BaTiO 3 nanofibers with controllable aspect ratio by electrospinning. Polycrystalline ribbon-like nanofibers ˜200 nm in width and ˜75 nm in thickness with grain sizes <30 nm were prepared by electrospinning a solution that contained barium-titanium alkoxide and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone). Varying the concentration of alkoxide precursor resulted in the formation of BaTiO 3 fibrils <50 nm in diameter and fibers with ribbon-like morphology. Analysis by XRD and Raman scattering showed that amorphous BaTiO 3 without residual polymer could be generated by calcination at 500 °C, while for fibers calcined at 700 °C, the polarized ferroelectric tetragonal phase was obtained.

  8. Shear controlled alignment of short carbon fibers in copper matrix composite green samples produced by powder injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi, Irfan; Ahmad, Faiz; Raza, M. Rafi; Muhsan, Ali. S.; Aslam, M.

    2015-07-01

    The tensile properties of short fiber reinforced composites are enhanced if fiber alignment in the load direction is achieved. Powder injection molding provides partial alignment of fibers in molded parts and shows a skin-core effect. The objective of this study was to align fibers completely in flow direction and reducing skin-core effect in green samples. This objective was achieved by changing the type of flow during molding by changing sprue geometry in a way that diverging flow is developed in it. This diverging flow was converted to converging flow when feedstock entered mold cavity and generated shear to align fibers. This sprue modification was helpful in aligning short fibers in flow direction and eliminating skin-core effect.

  9. The RHIC cryogenic control system

    SciTech Connect

    Farah, Y.; Sondericker, J.

    1993-08-01

    A cryogenic process control system for the RHIC Project is discussed. It is independent of the main RHIC Control System, consisting of an upgrade of the existing 24.8 Kw helium refrigerator control section with the addition of a ring control section that regulates and monitors all cryogenic signals in the RHIC tunnel. The system is fully automated, which can run without the continuous presence of operators.

  10. Space Shuttle flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinar, W. J.; Kubiak, E. T.; Peters, W. H.; Saldana, R. L.; Smith, E. E., Jr.; Stegall, H. W.

    1975-01-01

    The Space Shuttle is a control stabilized vehicle with control provided by an all digital, fly-by-wire flight control system. This paper gives a description of the several modes of flight control which correspond to the Shuttle mission phases. These modes are ascent flight control (including open loop first stage steering, the use of four computers operating in parallel and inertial guidance sensors), on-orbit flight control (with a discussion of reaction control, phase plane switching logic, jet selection logic, state estimator logic and OMS thrust vector control), entry flight control and TAEM (terminal area energy management to landing). Also discussed are redundancy management and backup flight control.

  11. Transparent, well-aligned TiO(2) nanotube arrays with controllable dimensions on glass substrates for photocatalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lee Kheng; Kumar, Manippady K; An, Wen Wen; Gao, Han

    2010-02-01

    Transparent, well-aligned TiO(2) nanotube arrays (NTAs) with controllable dimensions are grown on glass substrates via atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiO(2) onto free-standing porous anodic alumina (PAA) templates. Photodegradation of aqueous methylene blue (MB) solution and solid stearic acid (SA) film using TiO(2) NTAs of various wall thicknesses are investigated. The Pd functionalized TiO(2) NTAs, with a wall thickness of 15 nm and height of 200 nm, has the highest photodegradation efficiency at 76% after 4 h of UV irradiation. These functionalized NTAs are able to photodegrade MB molecules completely as no obvious demethylated byproducts are observed during the process. It also demonstrates excellent photocatalytic activity for solid contaminants such as SA film. By using the ALD technique, the nanotube wall thickness can be precisely controlled so that it is sufficiently thin to be transparent while sufficiently thick for excellent photocatalytic performances. The transparent TiO(2) NTAs on glass substrates with excellent photocatalytic properties might have potential applications in self-cleaning coating, transparent electronics, and solar cells.

  12. Pharmacophore alignment search tool: influence of scoring systems on text-based similarity searching.

    PubMed

    Hähnke, Volker; Schneider, Gisbert

    2011-06-01

    The text-based similarity searching method Pharmacophore Alignment Search Tool is grounded on pairwise comparisons of potential pharmacophoric points between a query and screening compounds. The underlying scoring matrix is of critical importance for successful virtual screening and hit retrieval from large compound libraries. Here, we compare three conceptually different computational methods for systematic deduction of scoring matrices: assignment-based, alignment-based, and stochastic optimization. All three methods resulted in optimized pharmacophore scoring matrices with significantly superior retrospective performance in comparison with simplistic scoring schemes. Computer-generated similarity matrices of pharmacophoric features turned out to agree well with a manually constructed matrix. We introduce the concept of position-specific scoring to text-based similarity searching so that knowledge about specific ligand-receptor binding patterns can be included and demonstrate its benefit for hit retrieval. The approach was also used for automated pharmacophore elucidation in agonists of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma, successfully identifying key interactions for receptor activation.

  13. Thermodynamics of feedback controlled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, F. J.; Feito, M.

    2009-04-01

    We compute the entropy reduction in feedback controlled systems due to the repeated operation of the controller. This was the lacking ingredient to establish the thermodynamics of these systems, and in particular of Maxwell’s demons. We illustrate some of the consequences of our general results by deriving the maximum work that can be extracted from isothermal feedback controlled systems. As a case example, we finally study a simple system that performs an isothermal information-fueled particle pumping.

  14. All sky pointing attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorell, K. R.; Murphy, J. P. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    In a strapped-down gyroscope space vehicle attitude control system, a method and apparatus are provided for gyro drift and input axis misalignment error compensation employing a sun and a star tracker and preselected vehicle calibration maneuvers. The outputs of two-axis strapped-down gyroscopes nominally aligned with the optical axis of the sun and star trackers are measured to provide gyro drift calibration, roll, pitch and yaw axis scale factors and values corresponding to the degree of nonorthogonality between the roll axis and the pitch and yaw gyro input axes and the nonorthogonality of the roll and pitch axes relative to the yaw axis. The vehicle is then rolled and yawed through precomputed angles as modified by the calibrated data stored in a digital computer, and acquires a target without recourse to external references.

  15. Supervisory control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, T. B.

    1974-01-01

    The various functions of a computer are considered that serve in connecting the man, with his displays and controls, to an external environment, manipulator activators and the interoceptors that are in the actuators, and to the interosensors and the motors or the actuators to drive the sensors. Projected is an improved exoskeleton mechanism with computer control and some supervisory control that may give a quadriplegic the ability to walk and run around.

  16. Supervisory control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, T. B.

    1974-01-01

    The various functions of a computer are considered that serve in connecting the man, with his displays and controls, to an external environment, manipulator activators and the interoceptors that are in the actuators, and to the interosensors and the motors or the actuators to drive the sensors. Projected is an improved exoskeleton mechanism with computer control and some supervisory control that may give a quadriplegic the ability to walk and run around.

  17. Alignment fixture

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Grover C.; Gibson, O. Theodore

    1980-01-01

    A part alignment fixture is provided which may be used for precise variable lateral and tilt alignment relative to the fixture base of various shaped parts. The fixture may be used as a part holder for machining or inspection of parts or alignment of parts during assembly and the like. The fixture includes a precisely machined diameter disc-shaped hub adapted to receive the part to be aligned. The hub is nested in a guide plate which is adapted to carry two oppositely disposed pairs of positioning wedges so that the wedges may be reciprocatively positioned by means of respective micrometer screws. The sloping faces of the wedges contact the hub at respective quadrants of the hub periphery. The lateral position of the hub relative to the guide plate is adjusted by positioning the wedges with the associated micrometer screws. The tilt of the part is adjusted relative to a base plate, to which the guide plate is pivotally connected by means of a holding plate. Two pairs of oppositely disposed wedges are mounted for reciprocative lateral positioning by means of separate micrometer screws between flanges of the guide plate and the base plate. Once the wedges are positioned to achieve the proper tilt of the part or hub on which the part is mounted relative to the base plate, the fixture may be bolted to a machining, inspection, or assembly device.

  18. D0 Cryo System Control System Autodialer

    SciTech Connect

    Urbin, J.; /Fermilab

    1990-04-17

    The DO cryogenic system is controlled by a TI565-PLC based control system. This allows the system to be unmanned when in steady state operation. System experts will need to be contacted when system parameters exceed normal operating points and reach alarm setpoints. The labwide FIRUS system provides one alarm monitor and communication link. An autodialer provides a second and more flexible alarm monitor and communication link. The autodialer monitors contact points in the control system and after receiving indication of an alarm accesses a list of experts which it calls until it receives an acknowledgement. There are several manufacturers and distributors of autodialer systems. This EN explains the search process the DO cryo group used to fmd an autodialer system that fit the cryo system's needs and includes information and specs for the unit we chose.

  19. Facile and controlled synthesis of aligned WO3 nanorods and nanosheets as an efficient photocatalyst material.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Bilal; Kumar, Sumeet; Ojha, Animesh K; Donfack, P; Materny, A

    2017-03-15

    In this work, we have performed a facile and controlled synthesis of WO3 nanorods and sheets in different crystal phases (triclinic, orthorhombic and monoclinic) of WO3 using the sol-gel method. The detailed structures of the synthesized materials were examined by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The shapes and crystal phases of the WO3 nanostructures were found to be highly dependent on the calcination temperature. The variation in crystalline phases and shapes is modified the electronic structure of the samples, which causes a variation in the value of optical band gap. The value of the Raman line intensity ratio I264/I320 has been successfully used to identify the structural transition from the triclinic to the orthorhombic phase of WO3. The PL spectra of the synthesized products excited at wavelengths 380, 400, and 420nm exhibit intense emission peaks that cover the complete visible range (blue-green-red). The emission peaks at ~460 and ~486nm were caused by the near band-edge and band to band transition, respectively. The peaks in spectral range 500-600nm might be originated from the presence of oxygen vacancies lying within the energy band gap. The synthesized WO3 nanostructures showed improved photocatalytic activity for the photodegradation of MB dye. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of WO3 nanosheets compared to WO3 nanorods for photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) dye could be due to the shape of the nanostructured WO3. The sheet type of structure provides more active surface for the interaction of dye molecules compared to the rods, which results in a more efficient degradation of the dye molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Facile and controlled synthesis of aligned WO3 nanorods and nanosheets as an efficient photocatalyst material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Bilal; Kumar, Sumeet; Ojha, Animesh K.; Donfack, P.; Materny, A.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we have performed a facile and controlled synthesis of WO3 nanorods and sheets in different crystal phases (triclinic, orthorhombic and monoclinic) of WO3 using the sol-gel method. The detailed structures of the synthesized materials were examined by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The shapes and crystal phases of the WO3 nanostructures were found to be highly dependent on the calcination temperature. The variation in crystalline phases and shapes is modified the electronic structure of the samples, which causes a variation in the value of optical band gap. The value of the Raman line intensity ratio I264/I320 has been successfully used to identify the structural transition from the triclinic to the orthorhombic phase of WO3. The PL spectra of the synthesized products excited at wavelengths 380, 400, and 420 nm exhibit intense emission peaks that cover the complete visible range (blue-green-red). The emission peaks at 460 and 486 nm were caused by the near band-edge and band to band transition, respectively. The peaks in spectral range 500-600 nm might be originated from the presence of oxygen vacancies lying within the energy band gap. The synthesized WO3 nanostructures showed improved photocatalytic activity for the photodegradation of MB dye. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of WO3 nanosheets compared to WO3 nanorods for photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) dye could be due to the shape of the nanostructured WO3. The sheet type of structure provides more active surface for the interaction of dye molecules compared to the rods, which results in a more efficient degradation of the dye molecules.