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Sample records for aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation

  1. Aerobic microorganism for the degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    1989-01-01

    A chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading microorganism, having American Type Culture Collection accession numbers ATCC 53570 and 53571, in a biologically pure culture aseptically collected from a deep subsurface habitat and enhanced, mineralizes trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene to HCl, H.sub.2 O and Co.sub.2 under aerobic conditions stimulated by methane, acetate, methanol, tryptone-yeast extract, propane and propane-methane.

  2. SELECTIVE ENUMERATION OF AROMATIC AND ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBON DEGRADING BACTERIA BY A MOST-PROBABLE-NUMBER PROCEDURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A most-portable-number (MPN) procedure was developed to separately enumerate aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon degrading bacteria, because most of the currently available methods are unable to distinguish between these two groups. Separate 96-well microtiter plates are used to ...

  3. Complete genome of Zhongshania aliphaticivorans SM-2(T), an aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium isolated from tidal flat sediment.

    PubMed

    Jia, Baolei; Jeong, Hye Im; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Jeon, Che Ok

    2016-05-20

    Zhongshania aliphaticivorans SM-2(T), a degrader of aliphatic hydrocarbons, is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped, flagellated, facultatively aerobic bacterium. Here, we report the genome sequence of strain SM-2(T), which has a size of 4,204,359bp with 44 tRNAs, 9 rRNAs, and 3664 protein-coding genes. In addition, several genes encoding aliphatic hydrocarbon degraders (alkane 1-monooxygenase, haloalkane dehalogenase, and cytochrome P450) were detected in the genome shedding light on the function of pollutants degradation. PMID:27034022

  4. Degradation kinetics of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by methane oxidizers naturally-associated with wetland plant roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. L.; Goltz, M. N.; Agrawal, A.

    2014-12-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) are common groundwater contaminants that can be removed from the environment by natural attenuation processes. CAH biodegradation can occur in wetland environments by reductive dechlorination as well as oxidation pathways. In particular, CAH oxidation may occur in vegetated wetlands, by microorganisms that are naturally associated with the roots of wetland plants. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the cometabolic degradation kinetics of the CAHs, cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cisDCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1TCA), by methane-oxidizing bacteria associated with the roots of a typical wetland plant in soil-free system. Laboratory microcosms with washed live roots investigated aerobic, cometabolic degradation of CAHs by the root-associated methane-oxidizing bacteria at initial aqueous [CH4] ~ 1.9 mg L- 1, and initial aqueous [CAH] ~ 150 μg L- 1; cisDCE and TCE (in the presence of 1,1,1TCA) degraded significantly, with a removal efficiency of approximately 90% and 46%, respectively. 1,1,1TCA degradation was not observed in the presence of active methane oxidizers. The pseudo first-order degradation rate-constants of TCE and cisDCE were 0.12 ± 0.01 and 0.59 ± 0.07 d- 1, respectively, which are comparable to published values. However, their biomass-normalized degradation rate constants obtained in this study were significantly smaller than pure-culture studies, yet they were comparable to values reported for biofilm systems. The study suggests that CAH removal in wetland plant roots may be comparable to processes within biofilms. This has led us to speculate that the active biomass may be on the root surface as a biofilm. The cisDCE and TCE mass losses due to methane oxidizers in this study offer insight into the role of shallow, vegetated wetlands as an environmental sink for such xenobiotic compounds.

  5. Degradation kinetics of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by methane oxidizers naturally-associated with wetland plant roots.

    PubMed

    Powell, C L; Goltz, M N; Agrawal, A

    2014-12-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) are common groundwater contaminants that can be removed from the environment by natural attenuation processes. CAH biodegradation can occur in wetland environments by reductive dechlorination as well as oxidation pathways. In particular, CAH oxidation may occur in vegetated wetlands, by microorganisms that are naturally associated with the roots of wetland plants. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the cometabolic degradation kinetics of the CAHs, cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cisDCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1TCA), by methane-oxidizing bacteria associated with the roots of a typical wetland plant in soil-free system. Laboratory microcosms with washed live roots investigated aerobic, cometabolic degradation of CAHs by the root-associated methane-oxidizing bacteria at initial aqueous [CH4] ~1.9mgL(-1), and initial aqueous [CAH] ~150μgL(-1); cisDCE and TCE (in the presence of 1,1,1TCA) degraded significantly, with a removal efficiency of approximately 90% and 46%, respectively. 1,1,1TCA degradation was not observed in the presence of active methane oxidizers. The pseudo first-order degradation rate-constants of TCE and cisDCE were 0.12±0.01 and 0.59±0.07d(-1), respectively, which are comparable to published values. However, their biomass-normalized degradation rate constants obtained in this study were significantly smaller than pure-culture studies, yet they were comparable to values reported for biofilm systems. The study suggests that CAH removal in wetland plant roots may be comparable to processes within biofilms. This has led us to speculate that the active biomass may be on the root surface as a biofilm. The cisDCE and TCE mass losses due to methane oxidizers in this study offer insight into the role of shallow, vegetated wetlands as an environmental sink for such xenobiotic compounds. PMID:25444117

  6. Degradation of recalcitrant aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons by a dioxin-degrader Rhodococcus sp. strain p52.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-Yan; Jia, Rui-Bao; Chen, Bin; Li, Li

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the ability of Rhodococcus sp. strain p52, a dioxin degrader, to biodegrade petroleum hydrocarbons. Strain p52 can use linear alkanes (tetradecane, tetracosane, and dotriacontane), branched alkane (pristane), and aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene and phenanthrene) as sole carbon and energy sources. Specifically, the strain removes 85.7 % of tetradecane within 48 h at a degradation rate of 3.8 mg h(-1) g(-1) dry cells, and 79.4 % of tetracosane, 66.4 % of dotriacontane, and 63.9 % of pristane within 9-11 days at degradation rates of 20.5, 14.7, and 20.3 mg day(-1) g(-1) dry cells, respectively. Moreover, strain p52 consumes 100 % naphthalene and 55.3 % phenanthrene within 9-11 days at respective degradation rates of 16 and 12.9 mg day(-1) g(-1) dry cells. Metabolites of the petroleum hydrocarbons by strain p52 were analyzed. Genes encoding alkane-hydroxylating enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme (CYP185) and two alkane-1-monooxygenases, were amplified by polymerase chain reaction. The transcriptional activities of these genes in the presence of petroleum hydrocarbons were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The results revealed potential of strain p52 to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons. PMID:24859700

  7. Assessment of degradation potential of aliphatic hydrocarbons by autochthonous filamentous fungi from a historically polluted clay soil.

    PubMed

    Covino, Stefano; D'Annibale, Alessandro; Stazi, Silvia Rita; Cajthaml, Tomas; Čvančarová, Monika; Stella, Tatiana; Petruccioli, Maurizio

    2015-02-01

    The present work was aimed at isolating and identifying the main members of the mycobiota of a clay soil historically contaminated by mid- and long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbons (AH) and to subsequently assess their hydrocarbon-degrading ability. All the isolates were Ascomycetes and, among them, the most interesting was Pseudoallescheria sp. 18A, which displayed both the ability to use AH as the sole carbon source and to profusely colonize a wheat straw:poplar wood chip (70:30, w/w) lignocellulosic mixture (LM) selected as the amendment for subsequent soil remediation microcosms. After a 60 d mycoaugmentation with Pseudoallescheria sp. of the aforementioned soil, mixed with the sterile LM (5:1 mass ratio), a 79.7% AH reduction and a significant detoxification, inferred by a drop in mortality of Folsomia candida from 90 to 24%, were observed. However, similar degradation and detoxification outcomes were found in the non-inoculated incubation control soil that had been amended with the sterile LM. This was due to the biostimulation exerted by the amendment on the resident microbiota, fungi in particular, the activity and density of which were low, instead, in the non-amended incubation control soil. PMID:25461057

  8. Aliphatic hydrocarbons of the fungi.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Review of studies of aliphatic hydrocarbons which have been recently detected in the spores of phytopathogenic fungi, and are found to be structurally very similar to the alkanes of higher plants. It appears that the hydrocarbon components of the few mycelial and yeast forms reported resemble the distribution found in bacteria. The occurence and distribution of these compounds in the fungi is discussed. Suggested functional roles of fungal spore alkanes are presented.

  9. Environmental degradation of polluting aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons: a case study.

    PubMed

    Osuji, Leo C; Ozioma, Achugasim

    2007-03-01

    Oil extracts of Ukpeliede spill samples from Niger Delta (Nigeria) were analyzed by gas chromatography. The amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), especially the lower-molecular-weight naphthene, fluorine, phenathrene, pyrene, and benzo[a]anthracene, decreased within the sampling intervals of 2 months and 5 months. There was a predominance of three-to-six-ring PAHs over the two-ring PAHs. There was marked disappearance of n-C8 to n-C11 hydrocarbon fractions and the acyclic isoprenoids (pristane and phytane). The depletion of these molecules within the two sampling intervals suggests the possible attenuation of hydrocarbons as a result of the environmental modification within the set interval. PMID:17372944

  10. Stable isotope investigations of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons.

    SciTech Connect

    Abrajano, T.; Heraty, L. J.; Holt, B. D.; Huang, L.; Sturchio, N. C.

    1999-06-01

    Stable isotope ratio measurements for carbon (C) and chlorine (Cl) can be used to elucidate the processes affecting transformation and transportation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) in the environment. Methods recently developed in our laboratory for isotopic analysis of CAHs have been applied to laboratory measurements of the kinetic isotope effects associated with aerobic degradation of dichloromethane (DCM) and with both anaerobic and aerobic cometabolic degradation of trichlomethene (TCE) in batch and column microbial cultures. These experimental determinations of fractionation factors are crucial for understanding the behavior of CAHs in complex natural systems, where the extent of biotransformation can be masked by dispersion and volatilization. We have also performed laboratory investigations of kinetic isotope effects accompanying evaporation of CAHs, as well as field investigations of natural attenuation and in situ remediation of CAHs in a number of contaminated shallow aquifers at sites operated by the federal government and the private sector.

  11. Oxygenases for aliphatic hydrocarbons and fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxygenases catalyzing the insertion of oxygen into either aliphatic hydrocarbons or fatty acids have great similarity. There are two classes of oxygenases: monooxygenases and dioxygenases. Dioxygenase inserts both atoms of molecular oxygen into a substrate, whereas monooxygenase incorporates one a...

  12. Oceanobacter-related bacteria are important for the degradation of petroleum aliphatic hydrocarbons in the tropical marine environment.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Maki; Suzuki, Masahito; Okazaki, Fumiyoshi; Hatmanti, Ariani; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2009-10-01

    Petroleum-hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were obtained after enrichment on crude oil (as a 'chocolate mousse') in a continuous supply of Indonesian seawater amended with nitrogen, phosphorus and iron nutrients. They were related to Alcanivorax and Marinobacter strains, which are ubiquitous petroleum-hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in marine environments, and to Oceanobacter kriegii (96.4-96.5 % similarities in almost full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences). The Oceanobacter-related bacteria showed high n-alkane-degrading activity, comparable to that of Alcanivorax borkumensis strain SK2. On the other hand, Alcanivorax strains exhibited high activity for branched-alkane degradation and thus could be key bacteria for branched-alkane biodegradation in tropical seas. Oceanobacter-related bacteria became most dominant in microcosms that simulated a crude oil spill event with Indonesian seawater. The dominance was observed in microcosms that were unamended or amended with fertilizer, suggesting that the Oceanobacter-related strains could become dominant in the natural tropical marine environment after an accidental oil spill, and would continue to dominate in the environment after biostimulation. These results suggest that Oceanobacter-related bacteria could be major degraders of petroleum n-alkanes spilt in the tropical sea. PMID:19541999

  13. Spreading coefficients of aliphatic hydrocarbons on water

    SciTech Connect

    Takii, Taichi; Mori, Y.H. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    Experiments have been performed to determine the equilibrium spreading coefficients of some aliphatic hydrocarbons (C[sub 6]C[sub 10]) on water. The thickness of a discrete lens of each hydrocarbon sample floating on a stagnant water pool was measured interferometrically and used to calculate the spreading coefficient of the hydrocarbon with the aid of Langmuir's capillarity theory. The dependences of the spreading coefficient, thus observed, on temperature (0--50 C) and on the number of carbon atoms in the hydrocarbon molecule are in qualitative agreement with the predictions based on the Lifshitz theory of van der Waals forces.

  14. Biodegradation of aliphatic vs. aromatic hydrocarbons in fertilized arctic soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braddock, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    A study was carried out to test a simple bioremediation treatment strategy in the Arctic and analyze the influence of fertilization the degradation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, e.g., pristine, n-tetradecane, n-pentadecane, 2-methylnaphthalene, naphthalene, and acenaphthalene. The site was a coarse sand pad that once supported fuel storage tanks. Diesel-range organics concentrations were 250-860 mg/kg soil at the beginning of the study. Replicate field plots treated with fertilizer yielded final concentrations of 0, 50, 100, or 200 mg N/kg soil. Soil pH and soil-water potentials decreased due to fertilizer application. The addition of fertilizer considerably increased soil respiration potentials, but not the populations of microorganisms measured. Fertilizer addition also led to ??? 50% loss of measured aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in surface and subsurface soils. For fertilized plots, hydrocarbon loss was not associated with the quantity of fertilizer added. Losses of aliphatic hydrocarbons were ascribed to biotic processes, while losses of aromatic hydrocarbons were due to biotic and abiotic processes.

  15. Aliphatic hydrocarbons of the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, John R.; Pizzarello, Sandra

    1990-01-01

    Hydrocarbon fractions from the Murchison meteorite were prepared using benzene-methanol as the extraction solvent, fractionated on silica gel columns, and analyzed using gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry and IR and NMR techniques. Results indicate that the most abundant aliphatic hydrocarbon components of the Murchison meteorite are C15 to C30 branched-alkyl-substituted mono-, di-, and tricyclic alkanes. It is shown that the n-alkanes, methyl alkanes, and isoprenoid alkanes that are sometimes found in extracts of the Murchison meteorite are terrestrial contaminants.

  16. Isolation and characterization of a Mycobacterium species capable of degrading three- and four-ring aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, S.A.; Harper, J.P.; Churchill, P.F.

    1999-02-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain CH1 was isolated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated freshwater sediments and identified by analysis of 16S rDNA sequences. Strain CH1 was capable of mineralizing three- and four-ring PAHs including phenanthrene, pyrene, and fluoranthene. In addition, strain CH1 could utilize phenanthrene or pyrene as a sole carbon and energy source. A lag phase of at least 3 days was observed during pyrene mineralization. This lag phase decreased to less than 1 day when strain CH1 was grown in the presence of phenanthrene or fluoranthene. Strain CH1 also was capable of using a wide range of alkanes as sole carbon and energy sources. No DNA hybridization was detected with the nahAc gene probe, indicating that enzymes involved in PAH metabolism are not related to the well-characterized naphthalene dioxygenase gene. DNA hybridization was not detected when the alkB gene from Pseudomonas oleovorans was used under high-stringency conditions. However, there was slight but detectable hybridization under low-stringency conditions. This suggests a distant relationship between genes involved in alkane oxidation.

  17. Isolation and Characterization of a Mycobacterium Species Capable of Degrading Three- and Four-Ring Aromatic and Aliphatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Sharon A.; Harper, Jennifer P.; Churchill, Perry F.

    1999-01-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain CH1 was isolated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated freshwater sediments and identified by analysis of 16S rDNA sequences. Strain CH1 was capable of mineralizing three- and four-ring PAHs including phenanthrene, pyrene, and fluoranthene. In addition, strain CH1 could utilize phenanthrene or pyrene as a sole carbon and energy source. A lag phase of at least 3 days was observed during pyrene mineralization. This lag phase decreased to less than 1 day when strain CH1 was grown in the presence of phenanthrene or fluoranthene. Strain CH1 also was capable of using a wide range of alkanes as sole carbon and energy sources. No DNA hybridization was detected with the nahAc gene probe, indicating that enzymes involved in PAH metabolism are not related to the well-characterized naphthalene dioxygenase gene. DNA hybridization was not detected when the alkB gene from Pseudomonas oleovorans was used under high-stringency conditions. However, there was slight but detectable hybridization under low-stringency conditions. This suggests a distant relationship between genes involved in alkane oxidation. PMID:9925581

  18. Aliiglaciecola aliphaticivorans sp. nov., an aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium, isolated from a sea-tidal flat and emended description of the genus Aliiglaciecola Jean et al. 2013.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hyun Mi; Jeong, Hye Im; Jeon, Che Ok

    2015-05-01

    A Gram-stain-negative heterotrophic bacterium, designated GSD6(T), capable of growth on aliphatic hydrocarbons as a sole carbon and energy source, was isolated from sea-tidal flat sediment of the Yellow Sea, South Korea. Cells were facultatively aerobic, catalase- and oxidase-positive, motile rods with a single polar flagellum. Growth of strain GSD6(T) was observed at 4-37 °C (optimum 30 °C), at pH 5.5-9.0 (optimum pH 6.5-7.5) and in the presence of 1-9% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 2%). Strain GSD6(T) contained ubiquinone-8 (Q-8) as the sole isoprenoid quinone and summed feature 3 (comprising C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH), C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω7c, C17  : 0 10-methyl and C17 : 1ω8c as the major fatty acids. Phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol were identified as the major polar lipids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 44.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain GSD6(T) formed a phylogenetic lineage with members of the genus Aliiglaciecola . Strain GSD6(T) was most closely related to Aliiglaciecola lipolytica E3(T) with a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 97.4%, but their DNA-DNA hybridization value was 39.1 ± 7.1%. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and molecular features, strain GSD6(T) represents a novel species of the genus Aliiglaciecola , for which the name Aliiglaciecola aliphaticivorans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GSD6(T) ( =KACC 18129(T) =JCM 30133(T)). An emended description of the genus Aliiglaciecola is also proposed. PMID:25713045

  19. Microbial degradation of aliphatic and aliphatic-aromatic co-polyesters.

    PubMed

    Shah, Aamer Ali; Kato, Satoshi; Shintani, Noboru; Kamini, Numbi Ramudu; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki

    2014-04-01

    Biodegradable plastics (BPs) have attracted much attention since more than a decade because they can easily be degraded by microorganisms in the environment. The development of aliphatic-aromatic co-polyesters has combined excellent mechanical properties with biodegradability and an ideal replacement for the conventional nondegradable thermoplastics. The microorganisms degrading these polyesters are widely distributed in various environments. Although various aliphatic, aromatic, and aliphatic-aromatic co-polyester-degrading microorganisms and their enzymes have been studied and characterized, there are still many groups of microorganisms and enzymes with varying properties awaiting various applications. In this review, we have reported some new microorganisms and their enzymes which could degrade various aliphatic, aromatic, as well as aliphatic-aromatic co-polyesters like poly(butylene succinate) (PBS), poly(butylene succinate)-co-(butylene adipate) (PBSA), poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), poly(ethylene succinate) (PES), poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and poly(3-hydoxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalterate) (PHB/PHBV), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), poly(butylene terephthalate) (PBT), poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate (PBAT), poly(butylene succinate-co-terephthalate) (PBST), and poly(butylene succinate/terephthalate/isophthalate)-co-(lactate) (PBSTIL). The mechanism of degradation of aliphatic as well as aliphatic-aromatic co-polyesters has also been discussed. The degradation ability of microorganisms against various polyesters might be useful for the treatment and recycling of biodegradable wastes or bioremediation of the polyester-contaminated environments. PMID:24522729

  20. Biodegradation of individual and multiple chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by methane-oxidizing cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, H L; Alvarez-Cohen, L

    1996-01-01

    The microbial degradation of chlorinated and nonchlorinated methanes, ethanes, and ethanes by a mixed methane-oxidizing culture grown under chemostat and batch conditions is evaluated and compared with that by two pure methanotrophic strains: CAC1 (isolated from the mixed culture) and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. With the exception of 1,1-dichloroethylene, the transformation capacity (Tc) for each chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon was generally found to be in inverse proportion to its chlorine content within each aliphatic group (i.e., methanes, ethanes, and ethenes), whereas similar trends were not observed for degradation rate constants. Tc trends were similar for all methane-oxidizing cultures tested. None of the cultures were able to degrade the fully chlorinated aliphatics such as perchloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride. Of the four cultures tested, the chemostat-grown mixed culture exhibited the highest Tc for trichloroethylene, cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, tetrachloroethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and 1,2-dichloroethane, whereas the pure batch-grown OB3b culture exhibited the highest Tc for all other compounds tested. The product toxicity of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons in a mixture containing multiple compounds was cumulative and predictable when using parameters measured from the degradation of individual compounds. The Tc for each chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon in a mixture (Tcmix) and the total Tc for the mixture (sigma Tcmix) are functions of the individual Tc, the initial substrate concentration (S0), and the first-order rate constant (k/Ks) of each compound in the mixture, indicating the importance of identifying the properties and compositions of all potentially degradable compounds in a contaminant mixture. PMID:8795228

  1. Determination of aliphatic hydrocarbons in the alga Himanthalia elongata.

    PubMed

    Punín Crespo, M O; Lage Yusty, M A

    2004-02-01

    The algae considered new foods according to Regulation CE 258/97 need a guarantee of their healthfulness before being in the European market. In this work ten samples of the brown alga Himanthalia elongata have been analyzed with the aim of verifying the absence of aliphatic hydrocarbons, due to the ability of the macroalgae to capture lipophilic organic compounds of the marine water coming from accidental or continuous leaks of raw oil and refined products, which happen each year with the growth of the industrialization and the demand of energy. The fat of the samples were Soxhlet extracted using hexane:dichloromethane (1:1) for 7h. The organic fractions were purified using silica microcolumns. The identification and quantification of the aliphatic hydrocarbons have been carried out using gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detector (FID). The total hydrocarbon content was between 14.8 and 40.2 microg g(-1) dry weight. PMID:14759670

  2. Aliphatics hydrocarbon content in surface sediment from Jakarta Bay, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YAzis, M.; Asia, L.; Piram, A.; Doumenq, P.; Syakti, A. D.

    2016-02-01

    Sedimentary aliphatic hydrocarbons content have been studied quantitatively and qualitatively using GC/MS method in eight coastal stations located in the Jakarta Bay, North of Jakarta, Indonesia. The total concentrations n-alkanes have ranged from 480 μg.kg-1to 1,935 μg.kg-1sediment dry weight. Several ratios (e.g. CPI24-32, NAR, TAR, Pr/Phy, n-C17/Pr, n- C18/Phyt,n-C29/n-C17, Ʃn-alkanes/n-C16LMW/HMW, Paq and TMD) were used to evaluate the possible sources of terrestrial-marine inputs of these hydrocarbons in the sediments. The various origins of aliphatic hydrocarbons were generally biogenic, including both terrigenous and marine, with an anthropogenic pyrolytic contribution (petrogenic and biogenic combustion). Two stations (G,H) were thehighest concentration and had potential risk to environment

  3. The effect of aliphatic fuel constituents on the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Gamerdinger, A.P.

    1995-12-01

    In petroleum-derived waste, n-alkanes are often codeposited with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The impact of aliphatic fuel constituents on the biodegradation of the more toxic PAHs is considered. Biodegradation of naphthalene by a Coryneform bacteria was examined in biphasic, slurry systems containing and aliphatic solvent in addition to the aqueous phase. The effect of solvent hydrophobicity was evaluated by varying the solvent treatment; a homologous series of n-alkanes was used. Relative to an aqueous system (no solvent), the extent of naphthalene degradation was enhanced in the presence of decane, dodecane, and hexadecane. Biodegradation was apparent, but decreased in the presence of octane, and was completely absent in the presence of hexane. The impact of aliphatic constituents on PAH biodegradation is a function of solvent hydrophobicity. The results indicate that the presence of multiple chemical constituents in complex systems modifies bioavailability and biodegradation.

  4. Aliphatic hydrocarbons in Great Barrier Reef organisms and environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, M.; Connell, D. W.; Bodero, J.; Miller, G. J.; Back, R.

    1986-07-01

    This investigation was undertaken to assess the chemical nature, occurrence, and possible origin of petroleum hydrocarbons in the Great Barrier Reef ecosystem. Aliphatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments, water, and a suite of seven species from widely separated coral reefs in the Great Barrier Reef area were analysed by gas chromatography, and by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The hydrocarbons found were substantially of biogenic origin. The major components were n-pentadecane, n-heptadecane, pristane and mono-alkenes based on heptadecane, and were believed to originate from benthic algae and phytoplankton. There was no evidence to suggest that lipid content had any influence on hydrocarbon content. Hydrocarbons from the organisms and sediments have characteristic composition patterns which would be altered by the presence of petroleum hydrocarbons. An unresolved complex mixture, usually considered indicative of petroleum contamination, was found in greater than trace amounts only in Holothuria (sea cucumber) and Acropora (coral) from the Capricorn Group, and in some sediment samples from the Capricorn Group and Lizard Island area.

  5. Organic pollutants in the coastal environment off San Diego, California. 2: Petrogenic and biogenic sources of aliphatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, K.; Yu, C.C.; Zeng, E.Y.

    1997-02-01

    The results from the measurements of aliphatic hydrocarbons suggest that hydrocarbons suggest that hydrocarbons in the Point Loma Wastewater Treatment Plant (PLWTP) effluents are mainly petroleum derived; those in the Tijuana River runoff have largely originated from terrestrial plants with visible petroleum contamination; and those in the sea surface microlayer, sediment traps, and sediments at various coastal locations off San Diego have mostly resulted from biogenic contributions with enhanced microbial products in the summer season. Rainfall in the winter season appeared to amplify the inputs from terrestrial higher plants to the coastal areas. The PLWTP discharged approximately 3.85 metric tons of n-alkanes (C{sub 10}-C{sub 35}) in 1994, well below the level (136 metric tons) estimated in 1979. The input of aliphatic hydrocarbons from the Tijuana River was about 0.101 metric tons in 1994. Diffusion, solubilization, evaporation, and microbial degradation seemed partially responsible for the difference in the concentrations and compositions of aliphatic hydrocarbons in different sample media, although the relative importance of each mechanism cannot be readily discerned from the available data. The results from analyses of aliphatic hydrocarbon compositional indices are generally consistent with those of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  6. Volatile hydrocarbons inhibit methanogenic crude oil degradation

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, Angela; Grant, Russell J.; Aitken, Carolyn M.; Jones, D. Martin; Head, Ian M.; Gray, Neil D.

    2014-01-01

    Methanogenic degradation of crude oil in subsurface sediments occurs slowly, but without the need for exogenous electron acceptors, is sustained for long periods and has enormous economic and environmental consequences. Here we show that volatile hydrocarbons are inhibitory to methanogenic oil biodegradation by comparing degradation of an artificially weathered crude oil with volatile hydrocarbons removed, with the same oil that was not weathered. Volatile hydrocarbons (nC5–nC10, methylcyclohexane, benzene, toluene, and xylenes) were quantified in the headspace of microcosms. Aliphatic (n-alkanes nC12–nC34) and aromatic hydrocarbons (4-methylbiphenyl, 3-methylbiphenyl, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene) were quantified in the total hydrocarbon fraction extracted from the microcosms. 16S rRNA genes from key microorganisms known to play an important role in methanogenic alkane degradation (Smithella and Methanomicrobiales) were quantified by quantitative PCR. Methane production from degradation of weathered oil in microcosms was rapid (1.1 ± 0.1 μmol CH4/g sediment/day) with stoichiometric yields consistent with degradation of heavier n-alkanes (nC12–nC34). For non-weathered oil, degradation rates in microcosms were significantly lower (0.4 ± 0.3 μmol CH4/g sediment/day). This indicated that volatile hydrocarbons present in the non-weathered oil inhibit, but do not completely halt, methanogenic alkane biodegradation. These findings are significant with respect to rates of biodegradation of crude oils with abundant volatile hydrocarbons in anoxic, sulphate-depleted subsurface environments, such as contaminated marine sediments which have been entrained below the sulfate-reduction zone, as well as crude oil biodegradation in petroleum reservoirs and contaminated aquifers. PMID:24765087

  7. Aliphatic hydrocarbons in sediment cores from the southern basin of Lake Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Doskey, P.V.; Andren, A.W.

    1991-10-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons in sediments of the southern basin of Lake Michigan have planktonic, terrigenous, and petroleum residue origins. Surficial sediments collected near the eastern shore in 60-80 m of water contained more petroleum residue and planktonic hydrocarbons and exhibited less terrigenous character than sediments collected from the deepest location in the basin. Petroleum residue inputs have increased since 1900 as evidenced by a change in the flux of an unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of hydrocarbons from 6 ng/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}yr to a flux of approximately 100 ng/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}yr in 1980. Sediment profiles of the UCM exhibited subsurface concentration maxima that may be due to reduced inputs of combustion products or feeding by oligochaetes. Profiles of n-C{sub l7} and pristane indicated that planktonic n-alkanes undergo degradation in the aerobic, mixed zone of the sediments.

  8. Kinetics of aerobic cometabolic biodegradation of chlorinated and brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons: A review.

    PubMed

    Jesus, João; Frascari, Dario; Pozdniakova, Tatiana; Danko, Anthony S

    2016-05-15

    This review analyses kinetic studies of aerobic cometabolism (AC) of halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) from 2001-2015 in order to (i) compare the different kinetic models proposed, (ii) analyse the estimated model parameters with a focus on novel HAHs and the identification of general trends, and (iii) identify further research needs. The results of this analysis show that aerobic cometabolism can degrade a wide range of HAHs, including HAHs that were not previously tested such as chlorinated propanes, highly chlorinated ethanes and brominated methanes and ethanes. The degree of chlorine mineralization was very high for the chlorinated HAHs. Bromine mineralization was not determined for studies with brominated aliphatics. The examined research period led to the identification of novel growth substrates of potentially high interest. Decreasing performance of aerobic cometabolism were found with increasing chlorination, indicating the high potential of aerobic cometabolism in the presence of medium- and low-halogenated HAHs. Further research is needed for the AC of brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons, the potential for biofilm aerobic cometabolism processes, HAH-HAH mutual inhibition and the identification of the enzymes responsible for each aerobic cometabolism process. Lastly, some indications for a possible standardization of future kinetic studies of HAH aerobic cometabolism are provided. PMID:26874310

  9. Enzymatic degradation of aliphatic nitriles by Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2, a versatile nitrile-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shumei; An, Xuejiao; Liu, Hongyuan; Cheng, Yi; Hou, Ning; Feng, Lu; Huang, Xinning; Li, Chunyan

    2015-06-01

    Nitriles are common environmental pollutants, and their removal has attracted increasing attention. Microbial degradation is considered to be the most acceptable method for removal. In this work, we investigated the biodegradation of three aliphatic nitriles (acetonitrile, acrylonitrile and crotononitrile) by Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2 and the expression of their corresponding metabolic enzymes. This organism can utilize all three aliphatic nitriles as sole carbon and nitrogen sources, resulting in the complete degradation of these compounds. The degradation kinetics were described using a first-order model. The degradation efficiency was ranked according to t1/2 as follows: acetonitrile>trans-crotononitrile>acrylonitrile>cis-crotononitrile. Only ammonia accumulated following the three nitriles degradation, while amides and carboxylic acids were transient and disappeared by the end of the assay. mRNA expression and enzyme activity indicated that the tested aliphatic nitriles were degraded via both the inducible NHase/amidase and the constitutive nitrilase pathways, with the former most likely preferred. PMID:25746475

  10. ANAEROBIC TRANSFORMATION OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN A SAND AQUIFER BASED ON SPATIAL CHEMICAL DISTRIBUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We estimated the distribution of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) from groundwater samples collected along three transects in a sand aquifer. richloroethylene (TCE) leaked and contaminated the aquifer probably more than a decade before we collected the measurements. he d...

  11. CHEMICAL DISTRIBUTION AND ANAEROBIC TRANSFORMATION OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN A SAND AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    We estimated the distribution of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHS) from groundwater samples collected along three transects in a sand aquifer. richloroethylene (TCE) leaked and contaminated the aquifer probably more than a decade before we collected the measurements. he d...

  12. Anaerobic biotransformation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons: Ugly duckling to beautiful swan

    SciTech Connect

    Parkin, G.F.

    1999-10-01

    For many years anaerobic biological processes were reputed to be more sensitive than aerobic processes to toxic substances such as chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAH) and thus a poor choice for treating water containing these compounds. This was especially true for water containing perchloroethylene (PCE) or trichloroethylene (TCE) because vinyl chloride, a human carcinogen, is produced when these two compounds are degraded anaerobically. Aerobic treatment with organisms containing oxygenase enzyme systems, which could fortuitously degrade a wide variety of chlorinated aliphatics (but not PCE), was favored. Recently, however, several enrichments and organisms have been isolated that will convert PCE and TCE into ethene and ethane, as shown by field data. Because of this evidence, anaerobic processes are now considered a significant alternative treatment for CAH contamination. Recent work at the University of Iowa, Iowa City, has focused on the effect of mixtures of CAHs on biotransformation of individual organic compounds and the potential for a combined methanogen-iron (Fe(0)) system to improve CAH bioremediation. At the concentration ranges tested, the presence of a mixture of CAHs seems to decrease rate of transformation of individual organics. However, there are important exceptions; in some cases a mixture of CAHs seems to facilitate transformation of an individual organic compound. Combination of an active methanogenic population with Fe(0) increases the rate and extent of transformation of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform. Results with PCE and 1,1,1-trichloroethane are less clear.

  13. A statistical approach to the interpretation of aliphatic hydrocarbon distributions in marine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rapp, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    Q-mode factor analysis was used to quantitate the distribution of the major aliphatic hydrocarbon (n-alkanes, pristane, phytane) systems in sediments from a variety of marine environments. The compositions of the pure end members of the systems were obtained from factor scores and the distribution of the systems within each sample was obtained from factor loadings. All the data, from the diverse environments sampled (estuarine (San Francisco Bay), fresh-water (San Francisco Peninsula), polar-marine (Antarctica) and geothermal-marine (Gorda Ridge) sediments), were reduced to three major systems: a terrestrial system (mostly high molecular weight aliphatics with odd-numbered-carbon predominance), a mature system (mostly low molecular weight aliphatics without predominance) and a system containing mostly high molecular weight aliphatics with even-numbered-carbon predominance. With this statistical approach, it is possible to assign the percentage contribution from various sources to the observed distribution of aliphatic hydrocarbons in each sediment sample. ?? 1991.

  14. Aliphatic Hydrocarbons in Surface Sediments of Willapa Bay and Grays Harbor, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rapp, J.B.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Clifton, H.E.

    1982-01-01

    Willapa Bay and Grays Harbor are two adjacent estuaries along the coast of Washington state. Willapa Bay is a recreational area minimally affected by industry; Grays Harbor, on the other hand, is moderately industrialized. Aliphatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments from these two estuaries reflect the differences in human activities. For example, the mean concentration of aliphatic hydrocarbons for seven stations in Willapa Bay is 1,000 ?g/g (relative to organic carbon) while in Grays Harbor this mean concentration for six stations is 1,900 ?g/g. The difference is attributed mainly to the greater urban and industrial pollution in Grays Harbor. The gas chromatographic records of aliphatic hydrocarbons also reflect the extent of hydrocarbon pollution by the presence of a chromatographically unresolved mixture of hydrocarbons. This kind of mixture is more evident in sediments from Grays Harbor, and in both estuaries it is more concentrated in sediments collected nearest to urban centers.

  15. Aliphatic hydrocarbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon geochemistry of twelve major rivers in the Northwest Territories

    SciTech Connect

    Backus, S.; Swyripa, M.; Peddle, J.; Jeffries, D.S.

    1995-12-31

    Suspended sediment and water samples collected from twelve major rivers in the Northwest Territories were analyzed for aliphatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to assess the sources and transport of hydrocarbons entering the Arctic Ocean. Three stations on the Mackenzie River and one station near the mouth of eleven other northern rivers were selected for sampling. Samples were collected on the Mackenzie River on four occasions to characterize spring, summer and fall flow conditions and once on the remaining eleven rivers during high flow conditions. The Mackenzie River is distinctively different then the other eleven rivers. Naturally occurring hydrocarbons predominate in the river. These hydrocarbons include biogenic alkanes, diagenic PAHs, petrogenic alkanes, and PAHs from oil seeps and/or bitumens. Anthropogenic inputs of PAHs are low as indicated by low concentrations of combustion PAHs. Alkyl PAH distributions indicate that a significant component of the lower molecular weight PAH fraction is petrogenic. The majority of the high molecular weight PAHs, together with the petrogenic PAHs have a principal source in the Mackenzie River.

  16. Seasonal distribution of aliphatic hydrocarbons in the Vaza Barris Estuarine System, Sergipe, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, José Carlos S; Santos, Lukas G G V; Sant'Anna, Mércia V S; Souza, Michel R R; Damasceno, Flaviana C; Alexandre, Marcelo R

    2016-03-15

    The seasonal assessment of anthropogenic activities in the Vaza Barris estuarine river system, located in the Sergipe state, northeastern Brazil, was performed using the aliphatic hydrocarbon distribution. The aliphatic hydrocarbon and isoprenoid (Pristane and Phytane) concentrations ranged between 0.19μgg(-1) and 8.5μgg(-1) of dry weight. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test, with significance level set at p<0.05, and no seasonality distribution change was observed. The Carbon Preference Index (CPI), associated with n-alkanes/n-C16, Low Molecular Weight/High Molecular Weight ratio (LMW/HMW) and Terrigenous to Aquatic Ratio (TAR) suggested biogenic input of aliphatic hydrocarbons for most samples, with significant contribution of higher plants. PMID:26837270

  17. Degradation of halogenated aliphatic compounds by Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10.

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, D B; Scheper, A; Dijkhuizen, L; Witholt, B

    1985-01-01

    A bacterium that is able to utilize a number of halogenated short-chain hydrocarbons and halogenated carboxylic acids as sole carbon source for growth was identified as a strain of Xanthobacter autotrophicus. The organism constitutively produces two different dehalogenases. One enzyme is specific for halogenated alkanes, whereas the other, which is more heat stable and has a higher pH optimum, is specific for halogenated carboxylic acids. Haloalkanes were hydrolyzed in cell extracts to produce alcohols and halide ions, and a route for the metabolism of 1,2-dichlorethane is proposed. Both dehalogenases show a broad substrate specificity, allowing the degradation of bromine- and chlorine-substituted organic compounds. The results show that X. autotrophicus may play a role in the degradation of organochlorine compounds and that hydrolytic dehalogenases may be involved in the microbial metabolism of short-chain halogenated hydrocarbons in microorganisms. Images PMID:3994371

  18. Microbiota associated with the migration and transformation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiangyu; Liu, Fei; Xie, Yuxuan; Zhu, Lingling; Han, Bin

    2013-08-01

    Pollution of groundwater with chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) is a serious environmental problem which is threatening human health. Microorganisms are the major participants in degrading these contaminants. Here, groundwater contaminated for a decade with CAHs was investigated. Numerical simulation and field measurements were used to track and forecast the migration and transformation of the pollutants. The diversity, abundance, and possible activity of groundwater microbial communities at CAH-polluted sites were characterized by molecular approaches. The number of microorganisms was between 5.65E+05 and 1.49E+08 16S rRNA gene clone numbers per liter according to quantitative real-time PCR analysis. In 16S rRNA gene clone libraries constructed from samples along the groundwater flow, eight phyla were detected, and Proteobacteria were dominant (72.8 %). The microbial communities varied with the composition and concentration of pollutants. Meanwhile, toluene monooxygenases and methane monooxygenases capable of degradation of PCE and TCE were detected, demonstrating the major mechanism for PCE and TCE degradation and possibility for in situ remediation by addition of oxygen in this study. PMID:23420483

  19. Polymeric membrane and process for separation of aliphatically unsaturated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, W.S.W.

    1991-11-05

    This patent describes a process for separating at least one unsaturated hydrocarbon from a hydrocarbon feed steam containing the unsaturated hydrocarbon. It comprises contacting the feed stream against a first side of a solid, homogeneous membrane comprising a hydrophilic polymer selected from the group consisting of a polyvinylalcohol, polyvinylacetate, sulfonyl-containing polymers, polyvinylpyrrolidone, polyethylene oxide, polyacrylamide, copolymers thereof, and blends thereof a transition metal or transition metal ion capable of reversibly complexing with the unsaturated hydrocarbon, and a hydrophilic salt of a Group I metal; and withdrawing at a second side of the membrane a permeate comprising the unsaturated hydrocarbon in higher concentration than in the feed stream. This patent also describes a solid, homogeneous membrane for separating at least one unsaturated hydrocarbon from a hydrocarbon stream containing the unsaturated hydrocarbon. It comprises a hydrophilic polymer selected from the group consisting of polyvinylalcohol, polyvinylacetate, sulfonyl-containing polymers, polyvinylpyrrolidone, polyethylene oxide, polyacrylamide, copolymers thereof, and blends thereof, a transition metal or transition metal ion capable of reversibly complexing with the unsaturated hydrocarbon, and a hydrophilic salt of a Group I metal.

  20. Polymeric membrane and process for separating aliphatically unsaturated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, W.S.W.

    1991-05-14

    This patent describes a process for separating at least one unsaturated hydrocarbon from a hydrocarbon feed stream containing. It comprises: contacting the feed stream against a first side of a solid, homogeneous membrane consisting essentially of a hydrophilic polymer selected from the group consisting of polyvinylalcohol, polyvinylacetate, sulfonyl containing polymers, polyvinylpyrrolidone, polyethylene oxide, polyacrylamide, copolymers thereof, and blends thereof, and a metal or metal ion capable of reversibly complexing with the unsaturated hydrocarbon, the metal or metal ion is distributed homogeneously in the hydrophilic polymer; and withdrawing at a second side of the membrane a permeate comprising the unsaturated hydrocarbon in higher concentration than in the feed stream; whereby the membrane provides high permeability and selectivity for unsaturated hydrocarbons and substantially increases the rate at which the permeate is withdrawn.

  1. Aliphatic polyester block polymers: renewable, degradable, and sustainable.

    PubMed

    Hillmyer, Marc A; Tolman, William B

    2014-08-19

    Nearly all polymers are derived from nonrenewable fossil resources, and their disposal at their end of use presents significant environmental problems. Nonetheless, polymers are ubiquitous, key components in myriad technologies and are simply indispensible for modern society. An important overarching goal in contemporary polymer research is to develop sustainable alternatives to "petro-polymers" that have competitive performance properties and price, are derived from renewable resources, and may be easily and safely recycled or degraded. Aliphatic polyesters are particularly attractive targets that may be prepared in highly controlled fashion by ring-opening polymerization of bioderived lactones. However, property profiles of polyesters derived from single monomers (homopolymers) can limit their applications, thus demanding alternative strategies. One such strategy is to link distinct polymeric segments in an A-B-A fashion, with A and B chosen to be thermodynamically incompatible so that they can self-organize on a nanometer-length scale and adopt morphologies that endow them with tunable properties. For example, such triblock copolymers can be useful as thermoplastic elastomers, in pressure sensitive adhesive formulations, and as toughening modifiers. Inspired by the tremendous utility of petroleum-derived styrenic triblock copolymers, we aimed to develop syntheses and understand the structure-property profiles of sustainable alternatives, focusing on all renewable and all readily degradable aliphatic polyester triblocks as targets. Building upon oxidation chemistry reported more than a century ago, a constituent of the peppermint plant, (-)-menthol, was converted to the ε-caprolactone derivative menthide. Using a diol initiator and controlled catalysis, menthide was polymerized to yield a low glass transition temperature telechelic polymer (PM) that was then further functionalized using the biomass-derived monomer lactide (LA) to yield fully renewable PLA

  2. A Theoretical Study on the Vibrational Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Molecules with Aliphatic Sidegroups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadjadi, SeyedAbdolreza; Zhang, Yong; Kwok, Sun

    2015-03-01

    The role of aliphatic side groups in the formation of astronomical unidentified infrared emission (UIE) features is investigated by applying the density functional theory to a series of molecules with mixed aliphatic-aromatic structures. The effects of introducing various aliphatic groups to a fixed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) core (ovalene) are studied. Simulated spectra for each molecule are produced by applying a Drude profile at T = 500 K while the molecule is kept at its electronic ground state. The vibrational normal modes are classified using a semi-quantitative method. This allows us to separate the aromatic and aliphatic vibrations, and therefore provides clues to what types of vibrations are responsible for the emissions bands at different wavelengths. We find that many of the UIE bands are not pure aromatic vibrational bands but may represent coupled vibrational modes. The effects of aliphatic groups on the formation of the 8 μm plateau are quantitatively determined. The vibrational motions of methyl (-CH3) and methylene (-CH2 -) groups can cause the merging of the vibrational bands of the parent PAH and the forming of broad features. These results suggest that aliphatic structures can play an important role in the UIE phenomenon.

  3. Source apportionment of urban particulate aliphatic and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using multivariate methods.

    PubMed

    Kavouras, I G; Koutrakis, P; Tsapakis, M; Lagoudaki, E; Stephanou, E G; Von Baer, D; Oyola, P

    2001-06-01

    Samples of organic aerosol were collected in Santiago de Chile. An activated-charcoal diffusion denuder was used to strip out organic vapors prior to particle collection. Both polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and aliphatic hydrocarbons were determined using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Organic particle sources were resolved using both concentration diagnostic ratios and multivariate methods such as hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and factor analysis (FA). Four factors were identified based on the loadings of PAHs and n-alkanes and were attributed to the following sources: (1) high-temperature combustion of fuels; (2) fugitive emissions from oil residues; (3) biogenic sources; and (4) unburned fuels. Multilinear regression (MLR) analysis was used to determine emission profiles and contributions of the sources. The reconstructed concentrations of particle phase aliphatic and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons were in good agreement (R2 > 0.70) with those measured in Santiago de Chile. PMID:11414034

  4. SPITZER'S VIEW ON AROMATIC AND ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBON EMISSION IN HERBIG Ae STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Acke, B.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Bouwman, J.; Juhasz, A.; Henning, Th.; Van den Ancker, M. E.; Meeus, G.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2010-07-20

    The chemistry of astronomical hydrocarbons, responsible for the well-known infrared emission features detected in a wide variety of targets, remains enigmatic. Here we focus on the group of young intermediate-mass Herbig Ae stars. We have analyzed the aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features in the infrared spectra of a sample of 53 Herbig Ae stars, obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. We confirm that the PAH-to-stellar luminosity ratio is higher in targets with a flared dust disk. However, a few sources with a flattened dust disk still show relatively strong PAH emission. Since PAH molecules trace the gas disk, this indicates that gas disks may still be flared, while the dust disk has settled due to grain growth. There are indications that the strength of the 11.3 {mu}m feature also depends on dust disk structure, with flattened disks being less bright in this feature. We confirm that the CC bond features at 6.2 and 7.8 {mu}m shift to redder wavelengths with decreasing stellar effective temperature. Moreover, we show that this redshift is accompanied by a relative increase of aliphatic CH emission and a decrease of the aromatic 8.6 {mu}m CH feature strength. Cool stars in our sample are surrounded by hydrocarbons with a high aliphatic/aromatic CH ratio and a low aromatic CH/CC ratio, and vice versa for the hot stars. We conclude that, while the overall hydrocarbon emission strength depends on the dust disk's geometry, the relative differences seen in the IR emission features in disks around Herbig Ae stars are mainly due to chemical differences of the hydrocarbon molecules induced by the stellar UV field. Strong UV flux reduces the aliphatic component and emphasizes the spectral signature of the aromatic molecules in the IR spectra.

  5. {Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and aliphatic hydrocarbons in gas and particle phases in two sites of Mexico: MILAGRO project}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador-Muñoz, O.; Villalobos-Pietrini, R.; Castro, T.; Gaspariano-Larino, R.

    2009-04-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons are markers of anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources1; meanwhile PAHs are generated by incomplete combustion sources2. The last ones are important compounds due to their carcinogenic and mutagenic properties3,4. The aim of this study was to identify and quantify aliphatic hydrocarbons and PAHs in gas and particles phases of the atmospheric aerosol and to determine the day and night time behavior during the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local Global and Research Observations) campaign. The gas phase was collected on polyurethane foam, while particles less than 2.5 m (PM2.5) were collected on glass fiber filters covered with Teflon (TIGF, pallflex) of 8x10 in. Samplings were carried out with a high volume sampler (Tisch) with a flow of 1.13 m3 min-1 at two sites: Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo (T0) and Tecamac (T1) located at North and Northeast of Mexico City, respectively during day (7:00 am-7:00 pm) and night time (7:00 pm-7:00 am) from 1 to 29 of March, 2006. Ninteen PAHs and 23 aliphatic hydrocarbons from n-C13H28 to n-C35H72 were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in impact mode. The samples were spiked with deuterads PAHs and aliphatics hydrocarbons before ultrasound extraction. Medians comparisons were made with Mann-Whitney U test. PAHs with molecular weight (MW) less than 228 g mol-1 were distributed in the gas phase, in both sites. Higher concentrations of PAHs ≥ 228 g mol-1 in PM2.5, were observed during night period (p

  6. Aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments of the Slovenian coastal area (Gulf of Trieste, northern Adriatic).

    PubMed

    Bajt, Oliver

    2012-12-01

    The distribution and sources of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were determined in sediments at seven sites around the Slovenian coastal area. The potential toxicological significance was also assessed using biological thresholds. The results of the analyses showed higher concentrations of hydrocarbons in the Port of Koper and in the Marina of Portoroz. The influence of pollution was also evident in rather higher concentrations of hydrocarbons in the surrounding area in the Bays of Koper and Piran. Concentrations of hydrocarbons decrease toward the central part of the Gulf of Trieste. The major component of the aliphatic fraction was the unresolved complex mixture. Concentrations of the total resolved aliphatic hydrocarbons were in a range from 689 to 3,164 ng g(-1). Concentrations of the total PAHs were between 330 and 1,173 ng g(-1). Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are primarily of pyrolytic origin with some smaller contributions of the petrogenic, while the aliphatic are mostly of petrogenic origin with significant amounts of biogenic derived compounds of terrestrial and marine origin. Strong evidence of the diagenetic origin of perylene in the investigated area was also found. Quite a good linear relationship between PAH concentration and TOC and between aliphatic hydrocarbon concentrations and TOC was observed. The principal component analysis showed differences between the nearshore and offshore sites. In general, the investigated area is moderately contaminated by hydrocarbons. Concentrations of PAHs, hydrocarbons of high concern, are below the levels (effects range low and the effects range median) associated with adverse biological effects. PMID:22270593

  7. Unique gas and hydrocarbon adsorption in a highly porous metal-organic framework made of extended aliphatic ligands.

    PubMed

    Li, Kunhao; Lee, Jeongyong; Olson, David H; Emge, Thomas J; Bi, Wenhua; Eibling, Matthew J; Li, Jing

    2008-12-14

    High and unique gas and hydrocarbon adsorption in a highly stable guest-free microporous metal-organic framework constructed on rigid aliphatic ligands, H(2)bodc and ted, is reported in this work. PMID:19082093

  8. BIOTRANSFORMATION OF MIXTURES OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS BY AN ACETATE-GROWN METHANOGENIC ENRICHMENT CULTURE. (R825549C053)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotransformation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons under anaerobic conditions has received considerable attention due to the prevalence of these compounds as groundwater contaminants. However, information concerning the impact of mixtures of chlorinated compounds on their...

  9. Forensic investigation of aliphatic hydrocarbons in the sediments from selected mangrove ecosystems in the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Vaezzadeh, Vahab; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Shau-Hwai, Aileen Tan; Ibrahim, Zelina Zaiton; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Abootalebi-Jahromi, Fatemeh; Masood, Najat; Magam, Sami Mohsen; Alkhadher, Sadeq Abdullah Abdo

    2015-11-15

    Peninsular Malaysia has gone through fast development during recent decades resulting in the release of large amounts of petroleum and its products into the environment. Aliphatic hydrocarbons are one of the major components of petroleum. Surface sediment samples were collected from five rivers along the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia and analyzed for aliphatic hydrocarbons. The total concentrations of C10 to C36 n-alkanes ranged from 27,945 to 254,463ng·g(-1)dry weight (dw). Evaluation of various n-alkane indices such as carbon preference index (CPI; 0.35 to 3.10) and average chain length (ACL; 26.74 to 29.23) of C25 to C33 n-alkanes indicated a predominance of petrogenic source n-alkanes in the lower parts of the Rivers, while biogenic origin n-alkanes from vascular plants are more predominant in the upper parts, especially in less polluted areas. Petrogenic sources of n-alkanes are predominantly heavy and degraded oil versus fresh oil inputs. PMID:26323864

  10. Autothermal reforming of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Voecks, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented from a study of the autothermal reforming of paraffins and aromatics over nickel catalysts. The trials were performed to examine the carbon products that appear when steam is passed over hydrocarbon liquids to form H2-rich gases, i.e., the autothermal process (ATR). Attention was given to n-hexane, n-tetradecane, benzene, and benzene solutions of naphthalene with reactant preheat to 1000-1150 F. The carbon-formation limit was sought as a function of the steam-to-carbon and oxygen to carbon molar ratios at constant pressure and the preheat temperatures. The catalyst bed was examined after each trial to identify the locations and types of carbon formed using SEM, thermal gravimetric analysis, and X ray diffraction techniques. The hydrocarbon fuels each had a separate temperature and reaction profile, as well as carbon formation characteristics. No carbon formation was observed in the upper layer of the reactor bed, while both gas phase and surface-grown deposits were present in the lower part. The results are concluded of use in the study of No. 2 fuel oil for ATR feedstock.

  11. Hydrogen addition reactions of aliphatic hydrocarbons in comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hitomi; Watanabe, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Fukushima, T.; Kawakita, H.

    2013-10-01

    Comets are thought as remnants of early solar nebula. Their chemical compositions are precious clue to chemical and physical evolution of the proto-planetary disk. Some hydrocarbons such as C2H6, C2H2 and CH4 in comets have been observed by using near-infrared spectroscopy. Although the compositions of C2H6 were about 1% relative to the water in normal comets, there are few reports on the detection of C2H6 in ISM. Some formation mechanisms of C2H6 in ISM have been proposed, and there are two leading hypotheses; one is the dimerizations of CH3 and another is the hydrogen addition reactions of C2H2 on cold icy grains. To evaluate these formation mechanisms for cometary C2H6 quantitatively, it is important to search the C2H4 in comets, which is the intermediate product of the hydrogen addition reactions toward C2H6. However, it is very difficult to detect the C2H4 in comets in NIR (3 microns) regions because of observing circumstances. The hydrogen addition reactions of C2H2 at low temperature conditions are not well characterized both theoretically and experimentally. For example, there are no reports on the reaction rate coefficients of those reaction system. To determine the production rates of those hydrogen addition reactions, we performed the laboratory experiments of the hydrogenation of C2H2 and C2H4. We used four types of the initial composition of the ices: pure C2H4, pure C2H2, C2H2 on amorphous solid water (ASW) and C2H4 on ASW at three different temperatures of 10, 20, and 30K. We found 1) reactions are more efficient when there are ASW in the initial compositions of the ice; 2) hydrogenation of C2H4 occur more rapid than that of C2H2.

  12. Quantitative separation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons using silver ion--silica solid-phase extraction

    PubMed

    Bennett; Larter

    2000-03-01

    A solid-phase extraction (SPE) method employing silver nitrate impregnated silica has been developed and evaluated for the separation of defined aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons from crude oils. The versatility of the SPE method is demonstrated using a light crude oil from the North Sea and a heavy crude oil from Orcutt field (Monterey, California, U.S.A.). The coefficients of variation for a number of geochemical parameters measured on both aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons were excellent. The separation efficiency of SPE is demonstrated using quantification of monoaromatic steroid hydrocarbons which are notoriously difficult to efficiently sequester into the aromatic hydrocarbon fraction using traditional liquid chromatographic procedure. The selectivity and efficiency of the SPE technique is comparable with that of silica gel TLC. However, losses of volatile compounds such as naphthalene are limited during SPE since the sample remains in solvent. We conclude that solid-phase extraction affords rapid sample turnover suitable for processing large sample numbers with high reproducibility. PMID:10739209

  13. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 101. Alcohols + Hydrocarbons + Water. Part 2. C1-C3 Alcohols + Aliphatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oracz, Paweł; Góral, Marian; Wiśniewska-Gocłowska, Barbara; Shaw, David G.; Mączyński, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    The mutual solubilities and related liquid-liquid equilibria for 37 ternary systems of C1-C3 alcohols with aliphatic hydrocarbons and water are exhaustively and critically reviewed. Reports of experimental determination of solubility that appeared in the primary literature prior to the end of 2012 are compiled. For 14 systems, sufficient data are available (two or more independent determinations) to allow critical evaluation. All data are expressed as mass percent and mole fraction as well as the originally reported units. In addition to the standard evaluation criteria used throughout the Solubility Data Series, an additional criterion was used for each of the evaluated systems. These systems include one binary miscibility gap in the hydrocarbon + water subsystem and another one can be in the methanol + hydrocarbon subsystem. The binary tie lines were compared with the recommended values published previously.

  14. Friction of iron lubricated with aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and halogenated analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of oxygen and various organic molecules on the reduction of the friction of an iron (011) single crystal surface was investigated. A comparison was made between aliphatic and aromatic structures, all of which contained six carbon atoms, and among various halogen atoms. Results of the investigation indicate that hexane and benzene give similar friction coefficients over a range of loads except at very light loads. At light loads, the friction decreased with an increase in the load where the halogens fluorine and chlorine are incorporated into the benzene molecular structure; however, over the same load range when bromine and iodine were present, the friction was relatively unchanged. The aliphatic compound chlorohexane exhibited lower friction coefficients than the aromatic structure chlorobenzene at very light loads. With the brominated benzene structures, however, friction was essentially the same. Oxygen was more effective in reducing friction than were the simple hydrocarbons.

  15. Methyl oleate deoxygenation for production of diesel fuel aliphatic hydrocarbons over Pd/SBA-15 catalysts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Catalytic deoxygenation is a prominent process for production of renewable fuels from vegetable oil. In this work, deoxygenation of technical grade methyl oleate to diesel fuel aliphatic hydrocarbons (C15 – C18) is evaluated with several parameters including temperature, hydrogen pressure and reaction time in a stirred batch reactor over Pd/SBA-15 catalysts. Results Two different SBA-15 morphologies i.e. spherelike and necklacelike structures have been synthesize as supports for Pd active metal. It is found that Pd dispersion on necklacelike SBA-15 is higher than that of spherelike SBA-15. Notably, higher Pd dispersion on necklacelike SBA-15 provides significant deoxygenation efficiency as compared to Pd/SBA-15-spherelike. Results show that H2 pressures greatly determine the total ester conversion and selectivity to C15 – C18 aliphatic hydrocarbons. Total ester conversions with 55< selectivity to n-heptadecane are achieved using Pd/SBA-15-necklacelike at 270°C and 60 bar H2 pressure within 6 h reaction time. Gas phase study reveals that formation of C17 is generated via indirect decarbonylation when the reaction time is prolonged. Conclusions Pd/SBA-15-necklacelike catalyst exhibits good catalytic performance with high selectivity to diesellike aliphatic hydrocarbons (C15 – C18). The physicochemical properties of the Pd supported on different SBA-15 morphologies influence the deoxygenation activity of the catalysts. Furthermore, the reaction pathways are governed by the H2 pressure as well as reaction duration. PMID:24011181

  16. Microbial degradation of hydrocarbons in the environment.

    PubMed Central

    Leahy, J G; Colwell, R R

    1990-01-01

    The ecology of hydrocarbon degradation by microbial populations in the natural environment is reviewed, emphasizing the physical, chemical, and biological factors that contribute to the biodegradation of petroleum and individual hydrocarbons. Rates of biodegradation depend greatly on the composition, state, and concentration of the oil or hydrocarbons, with dispersion and emulsification enhancing rates in aquatic systems and absorption by soil particulates being the key feature of terrestrial ecosystems. Temperature and oxygen and nutrient concentrations are important variables in both types of environments. Salinity and pressure may also affect biodegradation rates in some aquatic environments, and moisture and pH may limit biodegradation in soils. Hydrocarbons are degraded primarily by bacteria and fungi. Adaptation by prior exposure of microbial communities to hydrocarbons increases hydrocarbon degradation rates. Adaptation is brought about by selective enrichment of hydrocarbon-utilizing microorganisms and amplification of the pool of hydrocarbon-catabolizing genes. The latter phenomenon can now be monitored through the use of DNA probes. Increases in plasmid frequency may also be associated with genetic adaptation. Seeding to accelerate rates of biodegradation has been shown to be effective in some cases, particularly when used under controlled conditions, such as in fermentors or chemostats. PMID:2215423

  17. Use of aliphatic hydrocarbons in feed to decrease body burdens of lipophilic toxicants in livestock

    SciTech Connect

    Rozman, K.; Rozman, T.; Griem, H.; Nieman, I.J.; Smith, G.S.

    1982-01-01

    Sheep were contaminated with hexachlorobenzene and then fed a conventional diet with or without 5% mineral oil or hexadecane. Similar to nonruminant species, both treatments enhanced fecal excretion of hexachlorobenzene about 3-fold and reduced levels of hexachlorobenzene stored in adipose tissue. Normal digestive functions of the animals, including fiber digestion by rumen microbes, were not affected by the administration of the aliphatic hydrocarbons. Dietary administration of mineral oil could be an inexpensive way to save livestock contaminated with toxic lipophilic compounds, such as many pesticides and industrial chemicals.

  18. Vertical fluxes of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Deyme, Rémi; Bouloubassi, Ioanna; Taphanel-Valt, Marie-Hélène; Miquel, Juan-Carlos; Lorre, Anne; Marty, Jean-Claude; Méjanelle, Laurence

    2011-12-01

    Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon fluxes were measured in time series sediment trap samples at 200 m and at 1000 m depths in the open Northwestern Mediterranean Sea, from December 2000 to July 2002. Averaged fluxes of n-alkanes, UCM and T-PAH(35) were 2.96 ± 2.60 μg m(-2) d(-1), 64 ± 60 μg m(-2) d(-1) and 0.68 ± 0.59 μg m(-2) d(-1), respectively. Molecular compositions of both hydrocarbon classes showed a contamination in petrogenic hydrocarbons well above the background levels of such an open site, whereas pyrolytic hydrocarbons stand in the range of other open Mediterranean locations. Fluxes displayed ample interannual and seasonal variabilities, mainly related to mass flux variation while concentration evolutions trigger secondary changes in pollutant fluxes. High lithogenic flux events exported particles with a larger pollutant load than biogenic particles formed during the spring bloom and during the summer. Sinking hydrocarbons were efficiently transported from 200 m to 1000 m. PMID:21862192

  19. The early diagenesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons and organic matter in sedimentary particulates from Dabob Bay, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl, Fredrick G.; Bennett, Joseph T.; Carpenter, Roy

    1980-12-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbon compositions were quantitatively characterized in plankton, sediment trap-collected particulate materials and sediments from Dabob Bay using high resolution glass capillary gas chromatography. The average net accumulation of individual hydrocarbons measured in a 1-yr series of sediment traps was compared with the net accumulation of corresponding compounds measured in three depth intervals of 210Pb-dated bottom sediments. Systematic and rapid decreases in the net accumulation of individual hydrocarbons were observed from the sediment traps to the sediments. Most pronounced decreases were measured for planktonically derived hydrocarbon constituents (e.g. pristane and two unsaturated compounds) which are rapidly remineralized at or near the sediment-water interface. Consequently, the amount of each compound measured in deposited sediments is not necessarily a quantitative indication of its initial flux to the sediments. The n-alkanes (C 25,27,29,31). characteristic of terrestrial plant waxes, are the predominant hydrocarbons measured by 4-6 cm depth in these sediments and show reasonably constant net accumulation below this interval. Significant diagenetic alteration of the bulk organic matter contained in the average sediment trap particulate material is also noted through comparison with bottom sediments on the basis of organic C/N and δ 13C measurements. Organic matter elementally similar to marine plankton is preferentially remineralized upon deposition of the sedimentary particulates. The residual organic matter remaining and buried in the bottom sediments closely resembles terrestrial organic matter.

  20. Sources and distribution of aliphatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbons in coastal sediments from the Ushuaia Bay (Tierra del Fuego, Patagonia, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Commendatore, Marta G; Nievas, Marina L; Amin, Oscar; Esteves, José L

    2012-03-01

    The environmental quality of Ushuaia Bay, located at the southernmost tip of South America, is affected by the anthropogenic pressure of Ushuaia city. In this study, levels and sources of hydrocarbons in coastal sediments were assessed. Aliphatic hydrocarbon fractions ranged between 5.5 and 1185.3 μg/g dry weight and PAHs from not detected to 360 ng/g. Aliphatic diagnostic indices, the nalkanes homologous series occurrence, Aliphatic Unresolved Complex Mixtures (AliUCMs), and pristane and phytane isoprenoids indicated a petrogenic input. Some sites showed biogenic features masked by the anthropogenic signature. Particularly in port areas biodegradation processes were evident. PAH ratios showed a mixture of petrogenic and pyrogenic sources. Aliphatic and aromatic UCMs were strongly correlated, reflecting chronic pollution. Three areas were distinguished inside the bay: (1) east, with low hydrocarbons impact; (2) central, where hydrocarbons accumulation was related to source proximity and sediment characteristics; (3) south-west, where sediment characteristics and current circulation favour hydrocarbons accumulation. PMID:22189069

  1. Aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons characterisation of Coimbra and Oporto PM2.5 urban aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, A. C.; Mirante, F.; Gonçalves, C.; Nunes, T.; Alves, C.; Evtyugina, M.; Kowacz, M.; Pio, C.; Rocha, C.; Vasconcelos, T.

    2009-04-01

    The concentration of organic pollutants in urban areas is mostly due to incomplete combustion from vehicles, industries and domestic heating. Some of these compounds, principally the aliphatic (ALIPH) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) promote harmful effects in human health. The determination of the ALIPH and PAHs concentration levels and their possible emission sources are useful for air quality management and source apportionment studies. In order to estimate and compare the ambient concentrations and establish the main sources of these compounds, the fine fraction of the atmospheric particulate matter (PM2.5) was collected simultaneously in Oporto and Coimbra during summer and winter seasons using a high volume sampler. The organic compounds were extracted from the particulate matter, under reflux with dichloromethane and the total organic extract (TOE) was fractionated by flash chromatography using five different eluents with increasing polarity. The hydrocarbon fractions were analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Here we present and discuss the qualitative and quantitative composition of the aliphatic and aromatic fractions present in PM2.5 samples from both cities. The homologous series of C14 to C34 n-alkanes, isoprenoid hydrocarbons (pristane and phytane), PAHs and some petroleum markers have been identified and quantified. With the purpose of identifying the possible sources, various molecular diagnostic ratios were calculated. The global carbon preference index (CPI) closer to the unity, the large concentration of the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) and the presence of PAHs indicate that motor vehicle exhaust was the main emission source of the aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic fractions of Oporto and Coimbra aerosol, especially in the first city. Also, the remarkable presence of petroleum biomarkers such, as hopanes, confirms the previous results. Concentration ratios between PAHs were calculated and used to assign emission

  2. Complete genome sequence of Sphingorhabdus sp. M41, a versatile hydrocarbon degrader, isolated from crude oil-contaminated costal sediment.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hye Im; Jin, Hyun Mi; Jeon, Che Ok

    2016-06-10

    Sphingorhabdus sp. M41, capable of degrading aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, was isolated from crude oil-contaminated costal sediment by an enrichment culture and its complete genome was sequenced. The genome of strain M41 has a chromosome with a size of 3,324,420bp, including 44 tRNAs, 6 rRNAs, and 3118 protein-coding genes. In addition, many potential genes responsible for the biodegradation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons were identified from the genome. This is the first complete genome of the genus Sphingorhabdus, which will provide insights into the bioremediation of crude oil-contaminated costal sediment by strain M41. PMID:27080446

  3. The galactic distribution of aliphatic hydrocarbons in the diffuse interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Allamandola, Louis J.

    1995-01-01

    The infrared absorption feature near 2950(exp -1) (3.4 micron), characteristic of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), is attributed to C-H stretching vibrations of aliphatic hydrocarbons. We show here that the strength of the band does not scale linearly with visual extinction everywhere, but instead increases more rapidly for objects near the center of the Galaxy, a behavior that parallels that of the Si-O stretching band due to silicate materials in the diffuse ISM. This implies that the grains responsible for the diffuse medium aliphatic C-H and silicate Si-O stretching bands are different from those responsible for much of the observed visual extinction. It also suggests that the distribution of the carbonaceous component of the diffuse ISM is not uniform throughout the Galaxy, but instead may increase in density toward the center of the Galaxy. The similar behavior of the C-H and Si-O stretching bands suggests that these two components may be coupled, perhaps in the form of silicate-core, organic-mantle grains. Several possible models of the distribution of this material are presented and it is demonstrated that the inner parts of the Galaxy has a carrier density that is 5 to 35 times higher than in the local ISM. Depending on the model used, the density of aliphatic material in the local ISM is found to be about 1 to 2 -CH3 groups m(exp -3) and about 2 to 5 -CH2- groups m(exp -3). These densities are consistent with the strengths of the 2955 and 2925 cm(exp -1) (3.4 micron) band being described by the relations A(sub nu)/tau(sub 2955 cm(exp -1)) = 270 +/- 40 and A(sub nu)/tau(sub 2925 cm(exp -1)) = 250 +/- 40 in the local diffuse ISM.

  4. The Galactic Distribution of Aliphatic Hydrocarbons in the Diffuse Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Allamandola, Louis J.

    1995-01-01

    The infrared absorption feature near 2950/ cm (3.4 microns), characteristic of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), is attributed to C-H stretching vibrations of aliphatic hydrocarbons. We show here that the strength of the band does not scale linearly with visual extinction everywhere, but instead increases more rapidly for objects near the center of the Galaxy, a behavior that parallels that of the Si-O stretching band due to silicate materials in the diffuse ISM. This implies that the grains responsible for the diffuse medium aliphatic C-H and silicate Si-O stretching bands are different from those responsible for much of the observed visual extinction. It also suggests that the distribution of the carbonaceous component of the diffuse ISM is not uniform throughout the Galaxy, but instead may increase in density toward the center of the Galaxy. The similar behavior of the C-H and Si-O stretching bands suggests that these two components may be coupled, perhaps in the form of silicate-core, organic-mantle grains. Several possible models of the distribution of this material are presented and it is demonstrated that the inner parts of the Galaxy has a carrier density that is 5 to 35 times higher than in the local ISM. Depending on the model used, the density of aliphatic material in the local ISM is found to be about 1 to 2 -CH3 groups /cc and about 2 to 5 -CH2- groups/cc. These densities are consistent with the strengths of the 2955 and 2925/ cm (3.38 and 3.42 microns) subfeatures (due to -CH3 and -CH2- groups, respectively) within the overall 2950/ cm (3.4 microns) band being described by the relations A(sub upsilon)/tau(sub 2925/cm) = 270 +/- 40 and A(sub upsilon)/tau(sub 2925/cm) = 250 +/- 40 in the local diffuse ISM.

  5. Genetic basis of long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbon biosynthesis in bacteria. Final technical report, July 7, 1981-January 6, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Kloos, W.E.

    1983-01-01

    A variety of Micrococcus species, some related Arthrobacter, and Pseudomonas maltophilia are among the few bacteria which produce significant quantities of long chain aliphatic hydrocarbons. It was the purpose of this investigation to initiate studies aimed at understanding the genetic basis of aliphatic hydrocarbon production. Results have shown that some strains of several of the Micrococcus species carry plasmids, but they appear not to be associated with hydrocarbon production. Clearly, plasmids are not required for hydrocarbon biosynthesis, as many plasmidless strains produce large quantities of hydrocarbons with normal species-specific profiles. This is the first report on the occurrence of plasmids in Micrococcus species such as M. roseus, M. varians, M. kristinae, M. agilis, M. nishinomiyaensis, and unnamed, nonhuman primate Micrococcus spp. It is also the first report on aliphatic hydrocarbon production in M. agilis and the above nonhuman primate species. Although hydrocarbon production is not specifically under plasmid control, micrococcal plasmids may be able to serve as vectors for cloned hydrocarbon biosynthesis genes and ultimately used in the genetic engineering of this important group of organisms. For this reason, we initiated studies on the nucleotide sequence relationships, restriction enzyme digestion, and marking of several of the more interesting plasmids. Results have indicated that within species some plasmids share considerable nucleotide sequence homology. It is recommended that future investigations on these organisms should focus on unraveling the hydrocarbon biosynthetic pathway(s), isolating and characterizing the various enzymes involved with hydrocarbon biosynthesis, isolating and cloning the various chromosomal genes controlling these enzymes, and exploring genetic transfer (exchange) systems. Expression of micrococcal hydrocarbon genes in other organisms should also be evaluated.

  6. Complexes of ruthenium and rhodium with aliphatic amines in the catalysis of hydrogenation of unsaturated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Turisbekova, K.K.; Shuikina, L.P.; Parenago, O.P.; Frolov, V.F.

    1989-02-01

    The authors synthesized new catalysts highly active in the hydrogenations of unsaturated hydrocarbons, based on complexes of ruthenium and rhodium with higher aliphatic amines, which are soluble in aromatic solvents. The complexes acquired catalytic activity in hydrogenation as a result of their treatment with diisobutyl aluminum hydride. Olefins (1-hexene, cyclopentene, cyclohexene) or dienes (isoprene) were used as the unsaturated compounds. For the ruthenium based catalysts, the highest activity was observed during the hydrogenation of 1-hexene. For the rhodium-based catalysts, the activity in the hydrogenation of olefins and dienes was approximately the same. In the case of the rhodium complex catalysts, the hydrogenation of 1-hexene was accompanied by a side-reaction consisting in isomerization into olefins with inner double bonds.

  7. Vapor-liquid critical properties of elements and compounds. 6: Unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsonopoulos, C.; Ambrose, D.

    1996-07-01

    This is part 6 of a series of contributions by the critical properties group of the IUPAC Commission I.2 on Thermodynamics, Subcommittee on Thermodynamic Data. It presents all known experimental data for the critical constants of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons, which have been divided into five families: linear alk-1-enes (10 compounds, C{sub 2} to C{sub 12}); other alkenes (8 compounds, C{sub 4} to C{sub 6}); alkadienes (3 compounds, C{sub 3} to C{sub 6}); terpenes (3 C{sub 10} compounds); and alkynes (3 compounds, C{sub 2} to C{sub 4}). Recommendations are given together with uncertainties. Critical temperatures have been converted to ITS-90.

  8. Frequency of genes in aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbon biodegradation pathways within bacterial populations from Alaskan sediments.

    PubMed

    Sotsky, J B; Greer, C W; Atlas, R M

    1994-11-01

    A significant proportion of the naturally occurring hydrocarbon-degrading populations within Alaskan sediments affected by the Exxon Valdez oil spill had both the xylE and alkB genes and could convert hexadecane and naphthalene to carbon dioxide; a greater proportion of the population had xylE than had alkB, reflecting the composition of the residual oil at the time of sampling; nearly equal populations with xylE alone, alkB alone, and xylE + alkB genes together were found after exposure to fresh crude oil; populations with xylE lacking alkB increased after enrichment on naphthalene. Thus, the genotypes of hydrocarbon-degrading populations reflected the composition of the hydrocarbons to which they were exposed. PMID:7804909

  9. Inhibition of jet fuel aliphatic hydrocarbon induced toxicity in human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Inman, A O; Monteiro-Riviere, N A; Riviere, J E

    2008-05-01

    Jet propellant (JP)-8, the primary jet fuel used by the U.S. military, consists of hydrocarbon-rich kerosene base commercial jet fuel (Jet-A) plus additives DC1-4A, Stadis 450 and diethylene glycol monomethyl ether. Human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK) were exposed to JP-8, aliphatic hydrocarbon (HC) fuel S-8 and aliphatic HC pentadecane (penta), tetradecane (tetra), tridecane (tri) and undecane (un) for 5 min. Additional studies were conducted with signal transduction pathway blockers parthenolide (P; 3.0 microm), isohelenin (I; 3.0 microm), SB 203580 (SB; 13.3 microm), substance P (SP; 3.0 microm) and recombinant human IL-10 (rHIL-10; 10 ng ml(-1)). In the absence of inhibitors, JP-8 and to a lesser extent un and S-8, had the greatest toxic effect on cell viability and inflammation suggesting, as least in vitro, that synthetic S-8 fuel is less irritating than the currently used JP-8. Each inhibitor significantly (P < 0.05) decreased HEK viability. DMSO, the vehicle for P, I and SB, had a minimal effect on viability. Overall, IL-8 production was suppressed at least 30% after treatment with each inhibitor. Normalizing data relative to control indicate which inhibitors suppress HC-mediated IL-8 to control levels. P was the most effective inhibitor of IL-8 release; IL-8 was significantly decreased after exposure to un, tri, tetra and penta but significantly increased after JP-8 exposure compared with controls. Inhibitors were not effective in suppressing IL-8 release in JP-8 exposures to control levels. This study shows that inhibiting NF-kappa B, which appears to play a role in cytokine production in HC-exposed HEK in vitro, may reduce the inflammatory effect of HC in vivo. PMID:17966119

  10. [Storage of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria].

    PubMed

    Bade, G M; Vecchioli, G I; del Panno, M T; Painceira, M T

    1994-01-01

    The storage in the laboratory of hydrocarbon degrading bacteria to be used in the decontamination of polluted sites or in the enhancement of biological treatment of industrial effluents was studied. Storage was carried out at 4 degrees C in nutrient agar and in a medium with selection pressure, liquid mineral medium with hydrocarbons. Storage at 4 degrees C with selection pressure and storage at -20 degrees C of 7 gram negative bacilli were compared. The former was the easiest method for preserving the greatest number of strains viable and active. PMID:7838975

  11. Comparative Genomics of the Ubiquitous, Hydrocarbon-degrading Genus Marinobacter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, E.; Webb, E.; Edwards, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    The genus Marinobacter is amongst the most ubiquitous in the global oceans and strains have been isolated from a wide variety of marine environments, including offshore oil-well heads, coastal thermal springs, Antarctic sea water, saline soils and associations with diatoms and dinoflagellates. Many strains have been recognized to be important hydrocarbon degraders in various marine habitats presenting sometimes extreme pH or salinity conditions. Analysis of the genome of M. aquaeolei revealed enormous adaptation versatility with an assortment of strategies for carbon and energy acquisition, sensation, and defense. In an effort to elucidate the ecological and biogeochemical significance of the Marinobacters, seven Marinobacter strains from diverse environments were included in a comparative genomics study. Genomes were screened for metabolic and adaptation potential to elucidate the strategies responsible for the omnipresence of the Marinobacter genus and their remedial action potential in hydrocarbon-polluted waters. The core genome predominantly encodes for key genes involved in hydrocarbon degradation, biofilm-relevant processes, including utilization of external DNA, halotolerance, as well as defense mechanisms against heavy metals, antibiotics, and toxins. All Marinobacter strains were observed to degrade a wide spectrum of hydrocarbon species, including aliphatic, polycyclic aromatic as well as acyclic isoprenoid compounds. Various genes predicted to facilitate hydrocarbon degradation, e.g. alkane 1-monooxygenase, appear to have originated from lateral gene transfer as they are located on gene clusters of 10-20% lower GC-content compared to genome averages and are flanked by transposases. Top ortholog hits are found in other hydrocarbon degrading organisms, e.g. Alcanivorax borkumensis. Strategies for hydrocarbon uptake encoded by various Marinobacter strains include cell surface hydrophobicity adaptation via capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis and attachment

  12. Impact of carbon, oxygen and sulfur content of microscale zerovalent iron particles on its reactivity towards chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Velimirovic, Milica; Larsson, Per-Olof; Simons, Queenie; Bastiaens, Leen

    2013-11-01

    Zerovalent iron (ZVI) abiotically degrades several chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) via reductive dechlorination, which offers perspectives for in situ groundwater remediation applications. The difference in reactivity between ZVI particles is often linked with their specific surface area. However, other parameters may influence the reactivity as well. Earlier, we reported for a set of microscale zerovalent iron (mZVI) particles the disappearance kinetic of different CAHs which were collected under consistent experimental conditions. In the present study, these kinetic data were correlated with the carbon, oxygen and sulfur content of mZVI particles. It was confirmed that not only the specific surface area affects the disappearance kinetic of CAHs, but also the chemical composition of the mZVI particles. The chemical composition, in addition, influences CAHs removal mechanism inducing sorption onto mZVI particles instead of dechlorination. Generally, high disappearance kinetic of CAHs was observed for particles containing less oxygen. A high carbon content, on the other hand, induced nonreactive sorption of the contaminants on the mZVI particles. To obtain efficient remediation of CAHs by mZVI particles, this study suggested that the carbon and oxygen content should not exceed 0.5% and 1% respectively. Finally, the efficiency of the mZVI particles may be improved to some extent by enriching them with sulfur. However, the impact of sulfur content on the reactivity of mZVI particles is less pronounced than that of the carbon and oxygen content. PMID:23962383

  13. Recent studies in microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    PubMed Central

    Fathepure, Babu Z.

    2014-01-01

    Many hypersaline environments are often contaminated with petroleum compounds. Among these, oil and natural gas production sites all over the world and hundreds of kilometers of coastlines in the more arid regions of Gulf countries are of major concern due to the extent and magnitude of contamination. Because conventional microbiological processes do not function well at elevated salinities, bioremediation of hypersaline environments can only be accomplished using high salt-tolerant microorganisms capable of degrading petroleum compounds. In the last two decades, there have been many reports on the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in moderate to high salinity environments. Numerous microorganisms belonging to the domain Bacteria and Archaea have been isolated and their phylogeny and metabolic capacity to degrade a variety of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in varying salinities have been demonstrated. This article focuses on our growing understanding of bacteria and archaea responsible for the degradation of hydrocarbons under aerobic conditions in moderate to high salinity conditions. Even though organisms belonging to various genera have been shown to degrade hydrocarbons, members of the genera Halomonas Alcanivorax, Marinobacter, Haloferax, Haloarcula, and Halobacterium dominate the published literature. Despite rapid advances in understanding microbial taxa that degrade hydrocarbons under aerobic conditions, not much is known about organisms that carry out similar processes in anaerobic conditions. Also, information on molecular mechanisms and pathways of hydrocarbon degradation in high salinity is scarce and only recently there have been a few reports describing genes, enzymes and breakdown steps for some hydrocarbons. These limited studies have clearly revealed that degradation of oxygenated and non-oxygenated hydrocarbons by halophilic and halotolerant microorganisms occur by pathways similar to those found in non-halophiles. PMID:24795705

  14. Recent studies in microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments.

    PubMed

    Fathepure, Babu Z

    2014-01-01

    Many hypersaline environments are often contaminated with petroleum compounds. Among these, oil and natural gas production sites all over the world and hundreds of kilometers of coastlines in the more arid regions of Gulf countries are of major concern due to the extent and magnitude of contamination. Because conventional microbiological processes do not function well at elevated salinities, bioremediation of hypersaline environments can only be accomplished using high salt-tolerant microorganisms capable of degrading petroleum compounds. In the last two decades, there have been many reports on the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in moderate to high salinity environments. Numerous microorganisms belonging to the domain Bacteria and Archaea have been isolated and their phylogeny and metabolic capacity to degrade a variety of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in varying salinities have been demonstrated. This article focuses on our growing understanding of bacteria and archaea responsible for the degradation of hydrocarbons under aerobic conditions in moderate to high salinity conditions. Even though organisms belonging to various genera have been shown to degrade hydrocarbons, members of the genera Halomonas Alcanivorax, Marinobacter, Haloferax, Haloarcula, and Halobacterium dominate the published literature. Despite rapid advances in understanding microbial taxa that degrade hydrocarbons under aerobic conditions, not much is known about organisms that carry out similar processes in anaerobic conditions. Also, information on molecular mechanisms and pathways of hydrocarbon degradation in high salinity is scarce and only recently there have been a few reports describing genes, enzymes and breakdown steps for some hydrocarbons. These limited studies have clearly revealed that degradation of oxygenated and non-oxygenated hydrocarbons by halophilic and halotolerant microorganisms occur by pathways similar to those found in non-halophiles. PMID:24795705

  15. HYDROCARBON-DEGRADING BACTERIA AND SURFACTANT ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Grazyna A. Plaza, G; jacek Wypych, j

    2006-08-15

    Fate of benzene ethylbenzene toluene xylenes (BTEX) compounds through biodegradation was investigated using two different bacteria, Ralstonia picketti (BP-20) and Alcaligenes piechaudii (CZOR L-1B). These bacteria were isolated from extremely polluted petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils. PCR and Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) were used to identify the isolates. Biodegradation was measured using each organism individually and in combination. Both bacteria were shown to degrade each of the BTEX compounds. Alcaligenes piechaudii biodegraded BTEXs more efficiently while mixed with BP-20 and individually. Biosurfactant production was observed by culture techniques. In addition 3-hydroxy fatty acids, important in biosurfactant production, was observed by FAME analysis. In the all experiments toluene and m+p- xylenes were better growth substrates for both bacteria than the other BTEX compounds. In addition, the test results indicate that the bacteria could contribute to bioremediation of aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX) pollution increase biodegradation through the action by biosurfactants.

  16. Selective redox degradation of chlorinated aliphatic compounds by Fenton reaction in pyrite suspension.

    PubMed

    Che, Hyeongsu; Lee, Woojin

    2011-02-01

    Selective redox degradation of chlorinated aliphatics by Fenton reaction in pyrite suspension was investigated in a closed system. Carbon tetrachloride (CT) was used as a representative target of perchlorinated alkanes and trichloroethylene (TCE) was used as one of highly chlorinated alkenes. Degradation of CT in Fenton reaction was significantly enhanced by pyrite used as an iron source instead of soluble Fe. Pyrite Fenton showed 93% of CT removal in 140 min, while Fenton reaction with soluble Fe(II) showed 52% and that with Fe(III) 15%. Addition of 2-propanol to the pyrite Fenton system significantly inhibited degradation of TCE (99% to 44% of TCE removal), while degradation of CT was slightly improved by the 2-propanol addition (80-91% of CT removal). The result suggests that, unlike oxidative degradation of TCE by hydroxyl radical in pyrite Fenton system, an oxidation by the hydroxyl radical is not a main degradation mechanism for the degradation of CT in pyrite Fenton system but a reductive dechlorination by superoxide can rather be the one for the CT degradation. The degradation kinetics of CT in the pyrite Fenton system was decelerated (0.13-0.03 min(-1)), as initial suspension pH decreased from 3 to 2. The formation of superoxide during the CT degradation in the pyrite Fenton system was observed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The formation at initial pH 3 was greater than that at initial pH 2, which supported that superoxide was a main reductant for degradation of CT in the pyrite Fenton system. PMID:21186044

  17. Iron enhanced abiotic degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.T.

    1995-10-01

    Since the 1970s, several researchers have investigated the ability of certain zero-valent metals or alloys to enhance the degradation of halogenated organic compounds in contaminated water. Iron, zinc, aluminum, brass, copper, and stainless steel have been studied at various times with varying degrees of success. Gillham and O`Hannesin have recently made a literature review and conducted tests on 14 halogenated aliphatic compounds using zero-valent iron as an enhancing agent. The results showed that rapid dehalogenation occurred on all of the compounds tested except dichloromethane. Based on these test results, EnviroMetal Technologies, Inc. proposed to remediate groundwater contaminated with chlorinated organic compounds using this technology. The EPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program has accepted this technology for demonstration. This demonstration project will include two processes, above ground reactor and in situ permeable wall. The demonstration on the above ground reactor is being conducted at a site in Wayne, New Jersey. The main contaminants at this site are tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE). The in situ permeable wall process will be conducted at a site in upstate New York. This site is a shallow sand aquifer containing TCE, dichloroethenes, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane.

  18. Microbial degradation of an aliphatic polyester with a high melting point, poly(tetramethylene succinate).

    PubMed

    Pranamuda, H; Tokiwa, Y; Tanaka, H

    1995-05-01

    The biodegradability of poly(tetramethylene succinate) (PTMS), a synthetic aliphatic polyester with a high melting point, was evaluated. The ecological study showed that the distribution of PTMS-degrading microorganisms in soil environments was quite restricted compared with the distribution of microorganisms that degrade poly((epsilon)-caprolactone) (PCL), a polyester with a low melting point. However, in soil samples in which the formation of a clear zone was observed, PTMS-degrading microorganisms constituted 0.2 to 6.0% of the total number of microorganisms, which is very close to the percentage (0.8 to 8.0%) observed for PCL-degrading microorganisms. Five strains were isolated from colonies which formed distinct clear zones on agar plates with emulsified PTMS. In liquid cultures of the isolates with ground PTMS powder, strain HT-6, an actinomycete, showed the highest PTMS degrading activity. It assimilated about 60% of the ground PTMS powder after 8 days of cultivation. When a PTMS emulsion was used, a higher degradation rate was observed and more than 90% of the PTMS was assimilated in 6 days. PTMS degradation products were analyzed by gas chromatography, and it was found that 1,4-butanediol, 4-hydroxy n-butyrate, and succinic acid accumulated during cultivation. Degradation of PTMS film by the strain occurred in two steps: fragmentation and then the formation of hemispherical holes on the surface of the film. Strain HT-6 was also able to assimilate PCL and poly((beta)-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB). The crude enzyme showed a wide range of substrate specificity, being able to degrade low-molecular-weight PTMS, PCL, PHB, and even high-molecular-weight PTMS. PMID:16535023

  19. Aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons risk assessment in coastal water and sediments of Khark Island, SW Iran.

    PubMed

    Akhbarizadeh, Razegheh; Moore, Farid; Keshavarzi, Behnam; Moeinpour, Alireza

    2016-07-15

    The potential sources and ecotoxicological risks of 26 aliphatic hydrocarbons (AHs), 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) were investigated in coastal water and sediments of Khark Island, SW Iran. The major sources of the contamination were petroleum and petroleum combustion based on the PCA analysis and diagnostic indices of AHs and PAHs, and also ring classification of PAHs. The ecological risk of both individual and multiple PAHs was quite low in sediments compared with screening benchmarks. Likewise, the low concentration of TEQ, MEQ and TEQ(carc) of sediments suggest low toxicity of PAHs in the study area. However, environmental control is recommended to reduce the pollution burden of PAHs in seawater. The human health risk assessment for PAHs through dermal adsorption indicated that the possibility of negative adverse effects of PAHs in sediments is rare but swimming in the vicinity of industrial facilities should be done cautiously. PMID:27207022

  20. 40 CFR Table 2b to Subpart E of... - Reactivity Factors for Aliphatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures 2B Table 2B to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures Bin Averageboiling point * (degrees F) Criteria Reactivityfactor 1 80-205 Alkanes... + Dry Point) / 2 (b) Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvents...

  1. 40 CFR Table 2b to Subpart E of... - Reactivity Factors for Aliphatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures 2B Table 2B to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures Bin Averageboiling point * (degrees F) Criteria Reactivityfactor 1 80-205 Alkanes... + Dry Point) / 2 (b) Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvents...

  2. Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in marine biota and coastal sediments from the Gulf and the Gulf of Oman.

    PubMed

    Tolosa, Imma; de Mora, Stephen J; Fowler, Scott W; Villeneuve, Jean-Pierre; Bartocci, Jean; Cattini, Chantal

    2005-12-01

    The composition and spatial distribution of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated in biota and coastal sediments from four countries surrounding the Gulf (Bahrain, Qatar, United Arab Emirates and Oman). The levels of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), aliphatic unresolved mixture and PAHs in sediments and biota were relatively low compared to world-wide locations reported to be chronically contaminated by oil. Only in the case of the sediments collected near the BAPCO oil refinery in Bahrain, having concentrations of 779 microg g(-1) total petroleum hydrocarbon equivalents and 6.6 microg g(-1) Sigma PAHs, can they be categorized as chronically contaminated. Some evidence of oil contamination was also apparent in sediments and bivalves around Akkah Head and Abu Dhabi in the UAE, and near Mirbat in Oman. Contaminant patterns in sediments and biota indicated that the PAHs were mainly from fossil sources, with the exception of the high PAH concentrations in sediments near the BAPCO refinery that contained substantial concentrations of carcinogenic PAH combustion products. PMID:16038948

  3. Visualization of in vivo degradation of aliphatic polyesters by a fluorescent dendritic star macromolecule.

    PubMed

    Duan, Shun; Ma, Shiqing; Huang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Xu; Yang, Xiaoping; Gao, Ping; Yin, Meizhen; Cai, Qing

    2015-12-01

    In tissue engineering, most polymeric scaffolds should degrade along with the formation of the new tissues. Therefore, it is necessary to look into the in vivo degradation of scaffolds. In this study, a fluorescent perylenediimide-cored (PDI-cored) dendritic star macromolecule bearing multiple amines (d-p48) was incorporated into biodegradable polyester nanofibrous scaffolds by eletrospinning as an indicator. The polyester/d-p48 blend nanofibers could emit strong red fluorescence when they were irradiated under exciting light. Initially, using slowly degradable polyester, poly(L-lactide) (PLLA)/d-p48 nanofibers were soaked in phosphate buffered saline for various lengths of time to determine the possible diffusing release of d-p48 macromolecule from nanofibers. The PLLA/d-p48 nanofibers were then implanted subcutaneously into mice and left for up to 2 weeks. In both cases, no undesirable release of the incorporated d-p48 macromolecule was detected, and the nanofibers were clearly visualized in vivo by fluorescence microscopy. Using a fast degradable polyester, poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)/d-p48 nanofibers were electrospun and implanted subcutaneously to determine the possibility of monitoring in vivo degradation by fluorescence during 12 weeks. The results showed that the location and the contour of PLGA/d-p48 nanofibrous scaffolds could be clearly visualized using an animal fluorescent imaging system. The fluorescent intensities decreased gradually with the degradation of the scaffolds. No side effects on liver and kidney were found during the detection. This study indicates that the fluorescent PDI-cored dendritic star macromolecule can be used as a stable bioimaging indicator for biodegradable aliphatic polyesters in vivo. PMID:26526346

  4. A New, Rapid, Precise and Sensitive Method for Chlorine Stable Isotope Analysis of Chlorinated Aliphatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Acker, M. R.; Shahar, A.; Young, E. D.; Coleman, M. L.

    2005-12-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAH) are recognized common groundwater contaminants. Because of their physico-chemical properties, their lifespan in groundwater is in the order of decades (Pankow and Cherry, 1996). Stable isotopes can play a role in determining the rate and extent of CAH attenuation (Slater, 2003). The use of chlorine has been hampered by the current time consuming and insensitive analytical methods. We present a new analytical procedure to measure chlorine stable isotope values using a gas chromatograph coupled to a multi-collector inductively coupled mass spectrometer (GC-MC-ICP-MS). The GC has a Porapack Q packed column. The carrier gas was helium and the temperature was constant at 160°C. The GC was coupled to the MC-ICP-MS by heated stainless steel tubing. Our high resolution spectra showed that 37Cl is free of its main interference 36Ar-H over a range of 0.004 amu. Two pure CAH, trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE), were used for zero enrichment (sample relative to itself) and standard-sample difference measurements. Integrations and background corrections of transient signals were performed using Microsoft Excel after import of the raw data from the MC-ICPMS acquisition software. Zero enrichment tests with TCE and PCE yielded δ37Cl of -0.04±0.16‰ and -0.03±0.17‰, respectively, results for sample injections of 0.12 to 0.02 microliters. Accuracy was tested by injecting 0.24 microliters of a 50/50 mixture of TCE and PCE of known isotopic compositions as the difference between the two solvents was of paramount interest. The δ37Cl(TCE) value of PCE was -1.99±0.16‰. A highly satisfactory comparison with the conventional method is shown by published values for TCE and PCE, -2.04±0.12‰ and -0.30±0.14‰, respectively (Jendrzejewski et al., 2001), giving a δ37Cl(TCE) value for PCE of -2.34±0.18‰. These tests of the GC-MC-ICP-MS method showed that we can obtain reproducible and accurate Cl isotope values using an

  5. Factors influencing hydrocarbon degradation in three freshwater lakes.

    PubMed

    Cooney, J J; Silver, S A; Beck, E A

    1985-06-01

    The mixed microbial flora of 3 lakes in Ohio with differing histories of hydrocarbon pollution was examined in relation to the ability to use hydrocarbons. Weathered kerosene was spiked with naphthalene, pristane, 1,13-tetradecadiene, andn-hexadecane and added to water-sediment mixtures from the 3 lakes, and utilization of the 4 marker hydrocarbons was measured. Each of the marker hydrocarbons was metabolized; naphthalene was the most readily used and pristane was the most resistant. Values for dissolved oxygen suggest that oxygen did not limit hydrocarbon degradation in the water column at any site examined. Nutrient addition studies indicated that nitrogen and phosphorus limited hydrocarbon degradation at all sites examined. Maximum numbers of heterotrophic bacteria were detected when the water temperature was 10°C or higher. The data indicate that temperature limits hydrocarbon degradation in the winter, except at a site which had been impacted by an oil spill and which received chronic inputs of hydrocarbons and nutrients. In samples from that site, all 4 marker hydrocarbons were degraded at 0°C. Results of temperature and nutrient-addition experiments suggest that different seasonal populations of hydrocarbon users are selected at that site, but not at other lake sites. PMID:24221301

  6. 40 CFR Table 2b to Subpart E of... - Reactivity Factors for Aliphatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures 2B Table 2B to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures Bin Averageboiling point* (degrees F) Criteria Reactivityfactor (g O3/g VOC) 1 80... Point + Dry Point)/2(b) Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvents...

  7. 40 CFR Table 2b to Subpart E of... - Reactivity Factors for Aliphatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures 2B Table 2B to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures Bin Averageboiling point* (degrees F) Criteria Reactivityfactor (g O3/g VOC) 1 80... Point + Dry Point)/2(b) Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvents...

  8. 40 CFR Table 2b to Subpart E of... - Reactivity Factors for Aliphatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures 2B Table 2B to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures Bin Averageboiling point* (degrees F) Criteria Reactivityfactor (g O3/g VOC) 1 80... Point + Dry Point)/2(b) Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvents...

  9. Aliphatic hydrocarbon spectra by helium ionization mass spectrometry (HIMS) on a modified atmospheric-pressure source designed for electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhihua; Attygalle, Athula B

    2011-08-01

    Chemical-ionization techniques that use metastable species to ionize analytes traditionally use a flat pin or a sharp solid needle onto which the high potential needed to generate the discharge plasma is applied. We report here that direct analysis of samples containing volatile and semivolatile compounds, including saturated and unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons, can be achieved on any electrospray-ionization mass spectrometer by passing helium though the sample delivery metal capillary held at a high potential. In the helium plasma ionization source (HPIS) described here, the typical helium flow required (about 20-30 mL/min), was significantly lower than that needed for other helium-ionization sources. By this procedure, positive ions were generated by nominal hydride ion removal from molecules emanating from heated saturated hydrocarbons as large as tetratetracontane (C(44)H(90)), at capillary voltages ranging from 2.0 to 4.0 kV. Unsaturated hydrocarbons, on the other hand, underwent facile protonation under much lower capillary voltages (0.9 to 2.0 kV). Although saturated and monounsaturated hydrocarbons bearing the same number of carbon atoms generate ions of the same m/z ratio, a gas-phase deuterium exchange method is described to ascertain the identity of these isomeric ions originating from either protonation or hydride abstraction mechanisms. Moreover, mass spectrometric results obtained by exposing unsaturated hydrocarbons to D(2)O vapor in an HPIS-MS instrument confirmed that the proton donor for ionization of unsaturated hydrocarbons is protonated water. PMID:21953194

  10. Preliminary chemical analysis and biological testing of materials from the HRI catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process. [Aliphatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Later, D.W.; Wilson, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    Coal-derived materials from experimental runs of Hydrocarbon Research Incorporated's (HRI) catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process were chemically characterized and screened for microbial mutagenicity. This process differs from two-stage coal liquefaction processes in that catalyst is used in both stages. Samples from both the first and second stages were class-fractionated by alumina adsorption chromatography. The fractions were analyzed by capillary column gas chromatography; gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; direct probe, low voltage mass spectrometry; and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Mutagenicity assays were performed with the crude and class fractions in Salmonella typhimurium, TA98. Preliminary results of chemical analyses indicate that >80% CTSL materials from both process stages were aliphatic hydrocarbon and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds. Furthermore, the gross and specific chemical composition of process materials from the first stage were very similar to those of the second stage. In general, the unfractionated materials were only slightly active in the TA98 mutagenicity assay. Like other coal liquefaction materials investigated in this laboratory, the nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic compound (N-PAC) class fractions were responsible for the bulk of the mutagenic activity of the crudes. Finally, it was shown that this activity correlated with the presence of amino-PAH. 20 figures, 9 tables.

  11. In-Situ Heating Decrease Kinetics of Aliphatic Hydrocarbons in Tagish Lake Meteorite by Micro-FTIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kebukawa, Y.; Nakashima, S.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2005-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites are known to contain up to 3wt.% C, the major part of which corresponds to a macromolecular organic fraction. Chondritic organic matter is based on small aromatic units, cross-linked by short aliphatic chains rather than large clusters of polyaromatic structures. Two main characteristic features of those organics measured by FTIR are: (1) an equivalent intensity of the asymmetric stretching mode absorptions for CH3 (2960/cm) and CH2 (2920/cm) and (2) a lack of aromatic CH-stretching mode (3040/cm). Tagish Lake is a new type of water- and carbon-rich type 2 carbonaceous chondrite. Its total carbon content is approx. 5 wt%, of which the organic carbon content reaches approx. 1.3 wt%. Tagish Lake may have never experienced temperatures higher than 120 C after formation of organics based on the disappearance of infrared (IR) organic peaks in step heating experiments. Here we report in-situ kinetic heating experiments of organics in Tagish Lake by micro-FTIR to characterize the nature of aliphatic hydrocarbons and their thermal stabilities.

  12. Aliphatic Hydrocarbons and Fatty Acids of Some Marine and Freshwater Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Oró, J.; Tornabene, T. G.; Nooner, D. W.; Gelpi, E.

    1967-01-01

    Gas chromatography and combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry have been used to study the fatty acids and hydrocarbons of a bacterium from the Pacific Ocean, Vibrio marinus, a freshwater blue-green alga, Anacystis nidulans, and algal mat communities from the Gulf of Mexico. Both types of microorganisms (bacteria and algae) showed relatively simple hydrocarbon and fatty acid patterns, the hydrocarbons predominating in the region of C-17 and the fatty acids in the range of C-14 to C-18. The patterns of V. marinus were more comparable to those of the algal populations than to patterns reported for other bacteria. An incomplete correlation between fatty acids and hydrocarbons in both types of organisms was observed, making it difficult to accept the concept that the biosynthesis of hydrocarbons follows a simple fatty acid decarboxylation process. PMID:6025301

  13. Kinetics of chlorinated hydrocarbon degradation by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b and toxicity of trichloroethylene.

    PubMed Central

    Oldenhuis, R; Oedzes, J Y; van der Waarde, J J; Janssen, D B

    1991-01-01

    The kinetics of the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) and seven other chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b were studied. All experiments were performed with cells grown under copper stress and thus expressing soluble methane monooxygenase. Compounds that were readily degraded included chloroform, trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, and TCE, with Vmax values of 550, 330, and 290 nmol min-1 mg of cells-1, respectively. 1,1-Dichloroethylene was a very poor substrate. TCE was found to be toxic for the cells, and this phenomenon was studied in detail. Addition of activated carbon decreased the acute toxicity of high levels of TCE by adsorption, and slow desorption enabled the cells to partially degrade TCE. TCE was also toxic by inactivating the cells during its conversion. The degree of inactivation was proportional to the amount of TCE degraded; maximum degradation occurred at a concentration of 2 mumol of TCE mg of cells-1. During conversion of [14C]TCE, various proteins became radiolabeled, including the alpha-subunit of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase. This indicated that TCE-mediated inactivation of cells was caused by nonspecific covalent binding of degradation products to cellular proteins. Images PMID:2036023

  14. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aliphatic hydrocarbons, trace elements and monooxygenase activity in birds nesting on the North Platte River, Casper, Wyoming, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Custer, Christine M.; Dickerson, K.; Allen, K.; Melancon, M.J.; Schmidt, L.J.

    2001-01-01

    Tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) and house wren (Troglodytes aedon) eggs and chicks were collected near a refinery site on the North Platte River, Casper, Wyoming, USA and at a reference site 10 km upstream. Total polycylic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in swallow and wren chicks were higher at the refinery site than at the reference site. Polycylic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in sediment and chick dietary samples were consistent with these findings. The general lack of methylated PAHs in sediment, diet, and bird carcasses suggested that the PAHs were derived from combustion and not from petroleum. The predominance of odd numbered aliphatic hydrocarbons and the low ratios (≤ 0.25) of pristane: n-C17 and phytane: n-C18 in chick and diet samples also suggested that swallow and wren chicks were not being chronically exposed to petroleum. Mean ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase and benzyloxyresorufin-O-dealkylase activities in tree swallow livers averaged nine times higher at the refinery site than at the reference site and were probably induced by exposure to PAHs. Trace element concentrations in eggs and livers of swallows and wrens were similar or greater at the reference site than at the refinery site. Selenium, strontium, and boron concentrations were elevated in eggs and livers of swallows and wrens at both the refinery and reference sites.

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aliphatic hydrocarbons, trace elements, and monooxygenase activity in birds nesting on the North Platte River, Casper, Wyoming, USA.

    PubMed

    Custer, T W; Custer, C M; Dickerson, K; Allen, K; Melancon, M J; Schmidt, L J

    2001-03-01

    Tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) and house wren (Troglodytes aedon) eggs and chicks were collected near a refinery site on the North Platte River, Casper. Wyoming, USA and at a reference site 10 km upstream. Total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in swallow and wren chicks were higher at the refinery site than at the reference site. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in sediment and chick dietary samples were consistent with these findings. The general lack of methylated PAHs in sediment, diet, and bird carcasses suggested that the PAHs were derived from combustion and not from petroleum. The predominance of odd-numbered aliphatic hydrocarbons and the low ratios (< or =0.25) of pristane:n-C17 and phytane:n-C18 in chick and diet samples also suggested that swallow and wren chicks were not being chronically exposed to petroleum. Mean ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase and benzyloxyresorufin-O-dealkylase activities in tree swallow livers averaged nine times higher at the refinery site than at the reference site and were probably induced by exposure to PAHs. Trace element concentrations in eggs and livers of swallows and wrens were similar or greater at the reference site than at the refinery site. Selenium, strontium, and boron concentrations were elevated in eggs and livers of swallows and wrens at both the refinery and reference sites. PMID:11349865

  16. A comparison of sedimentary aliphatic hydrocarbon distribution between the southern Okinawa Trough and a nearby river with high sediment discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, Woei-Lih; Huh, Chih-An

    2006-01-01

    Twelve surface sediments from the southern Okinawa Trough (OT) and nine surface sediments from a nearby river, the Lanyang River (LR), with high sediment discharge were analyzed for comparison of their aliphatic hydrocarbon distributions. Performing cluster analysis on all hydrocarbon data of LR and OT sediments showed that the two areas had a similarity level of only 0.15, meaning that they were quite dissimilar. The average ratio of terrigenous to aquatic n-alkanes was 0.99 for LR sediments and 9.64 for OT sediments, indicating that the concentrations of n-alkanes in LR and OT sediments were quite different. Furthermore, the mean pristane/phytane ratios for LR and OT sediments were 1.01 and 2.57, respectively; the difference between them was significant (Student's t test, at the 99% significance level). The carbon preference index (CPI) of C 25-C 33n-alkanes averaged 3.26 (range 2.16-4.59) for LR sediments and 2.92 (range 2.35-5.24) for OT sediments; no significant difference was found between the two CPI averages (Student's t test, at the 99% confidence level). However, higher plant n-alkanes generally maximized at C 29 for LR sediments, but maximized at C 31 for all OT sediments, strongly indicating significant differences in the origins of the hydrocarbons in these two areas. All present results appear to suggest that LR sediments are not a major hydrocarbon source for OT sediments. In addition, there was no positive, linear correlation between diploptene (hop-22(29)-ene) and terrestrial higher plant n-alkanes for LR and OT sediments.

  17. In vitro studies of degradation and bioactivity of aliphatic polyester composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouzouri, Georgia

    In spite of numerous publications on the potential use of combinations of aliphatic polyester composites containing bioactive fillers for bone regeneration, little information exists on the combined in vitro mechanisms involving simultaneously diffusion for polymer degradation and bioactivity through nucleation and growth of apatite in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. The objective of this study is to contribute to the understanding of the fundamentals in designing non-porous, solid materials for bone regeneration, from experimental data along with their engineering interpretation. Bioactivity, in terms of apatite growth, was assessed through several experimental methods such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray-diffraction (XRD) and changes in ion concentration. In the case of the six neat fillers evaluated, the filler shape, form and chemical structure showed significant differences in bioactivity response. Bioglass and calcium silicate fillers showed faster nucleation and growth rates in the screening experiments. Composites at 30% by weight filler were prepared by solution and/or melt mixing. Polycaprolactone (PCL) composites containing five different fillers were evaluated. Solution processed PCL/calcium silicate (CS) samples showed faster bioactivity, as determined by apatite growth, compared to melt mixed samples. The onset time for bioactivity was different for all PCL composites. The limited bioactivity in the PCL composites over longer periods of time could be attributed to the PCL hydrophobicity leading to a slow polymer degradation rate, and also to the lack of SBF replenishment. For both polylactic acid (PLA) composites containing CS and bioglass, significant growth was observed after one week and in the case of CS was still evident after four weeks immersion. However, at prolonged time periods no further bioactivity was observed, although ion release results indicated a faster release rate that would

  18. Distributions and sources of petroleum, aliphatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface sediments from Bohai Bay and its adjacent river, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Wang, Chuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoke; Zhang, Haijiang; He, Shijie; Lv, Shuangyan

    2015-01-15

    Surface sediment samples from Bohai Bay and its adjacent river, China, were analyzed for aliphatic hydrocarbon, PAHs and biomarkers in order to determine the distribution, composition and source of organic matter in a coastal environment. Results suggested that the input of organic matter from anthropogenic activities has a more significant influence on its distribution than that from natural processes. Petroleum contamination, mainly from offshore oil exploration and discharge of pollutants from rivers, was the main source of n-alkanes. PAHs were mostly of pyrogenic origin; while some sites in Yellow River Estuary were derived mainly from the petrogenic sources. The toxic assessment suggested that the PAHs in surface sediments will not cause immediately adverse biological effects in sediments from Bohai Bay and its adjacent river, China. PMID:25499964

  19. Degradation of hydrocarbons under methanogenic conditions in different geosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straaten, Nontje; Jiménez García, Núria; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Krueger, Martin

    2014-05-01

    With increasing energy demand the search for new resources is becoming increasingly important for the future energy supply. Therefore the knowledge about fossil fuels like oil or natural gas and their extraction should be expanded. Biodegraded oil is found in many reservoirs worldwide. Consequently, it is very important to get insight in the microbial communities and metabolic processes involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Due to the lack of alternative electron acceptors in hydrocarbon-rich geosystems, degradation often takes place under methanogenic conditions. The aim of the present study is to identify the microorganisms and mechanisms involved in the degradation of complex hydrocarbons, like BTEX and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, using culture dependent and independent techniques. For this purpose enrichment cultures from marine sediments, shales, coal and oil reservoirs are monitored for their capability to degrade alkanes and aromatic compounds. Moreover the environmental samples of these different geosystems analysed for evidence for the in situ occurrence of methanogenic oil degradation. The gas geochemical data provided in several cases hints for a recent biological origin of the methane present. First results of the microbial community analysis showed in environmental samples and enrichment cultures the existence of Bacteria known to degrade hydrocarbons. Also a diverse community of methanogenic Archaea could be found in the clone libraries. Additionally, in oil and coal reservoir samples the degradation of model hydrocarbons, e.g. methylnaphthalene, hexadecane and BTEX, to CH4 was confirmed by 13C-labeling. To explore the mechanisms involved in biodegradation, the enrichments as well as the original environmental samples are further analysed for the presence of respective functional genes.

  20. Controlled oxidation of aliphatic CH bonds in metallo-monooxygenases: mechanistic insights derived from studies on deuterated and fluorinated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao-Sheng; Luo, Wen-I; Yang, Chung-Ling; Tu, Yi-Jung; Chang, Chun-Wei; Chiang, Chih-Hsiang; Chang, Chi-Yao; Chan, Sunney I; Yu, Steve S-F

    2014-05-01

    The control over the regio- and/or stereo-selective aliphatic CH oxidation by metalloenzymes is of great interest to scientists. Typically, these enzymes invoke host-guest chemistry to sequester the substrates within the protein pockets, exploiting sizes, shapes and specific interactions such as hydrogen-bonding, electrostatic forces and/or van der Waals interactions to control the substrate specificity, regio-specificity and stereo-selectivity. Over the years, we have developed a series of deuterated and fluorinated variants of these hydrocarbon substrates as probes to gain insights into the controlled CH oxidations of hydrocarbons facilitated by these enzymes. In this review, we illustrate the application of these designed probes in the study of three monooxygenases: (i) the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), which oxidizes straight-chain C1-C5 alkanes and alkenes to form their corresponding 2-alcohols and epoxides, respectively; (ii) the recombinant alkane hydroxylase (AlkB) from Pseudomonas putida GPo1, which oxidizes the primary CH bonds of C5-C12 linear alkanes; and (iii) the recombinant cytochrome P450 from Bacillus megaterium, which oxidizes C12-C20 fatty acids at the ω-1, ω-2 or ω-3 CH positions. PMID:24629413

  1. In Situ Hydrocarbon Degradation by Indigenous Nearshore Bacterial Populations

    SciTech Connect

    Cherrier, J.

    2005-05-16

    Potential episodic hydrocarbon inputs associated with oil mining and transportation together with chronic introduction of hydrocarbons via urban runoff into the relatively pristine coastal Florida waters poses a significant threat to Florida's fragile marine environment. It is therefore important to understand the extent to which indigenous bacterial populations are able to degrade hydrocarbon compounds and also determine factors that could potentially control and promote the rate at which these compounds are broken down in situ. Previous controlled laboratory experiments carried out by our research group demonstrated that separately both photo-oxidation and cometabolism stimulate bacterial hydrocarbon degradation by natural bacterial assemblages collected from a chronically petroleum contaminated site in Bayboro Bay, Florida. Additionally, we also demonstrated that stable carbon and radiocarbon abundances of respired CO{sub 2} could be used to trace in situ hydrocarbon degradation by indigenous bacterial populations at this same site. This current proposal had two main objectives: (a) to evaluate the cumulative impact of cometabolism and photo-oxidation on hydrocarbon degradation by natural bacterial assemblages collected the same site in Bayboro Bay, Florida and (b) to determine if in situ hydrocarbon degradation by indigenous bacterial populations this site could be traced using natural radiocarbon and stable carbon abundances of assimilated bacterial carbon. Funds were used for 2 years of full support for one ESI Ph.D. student, April Croxton. To address our first objective a series of closed system bacterial incubations were carried out using photo-oxidized petroleum and pinfish (i.e. cometabolite). Bacterial production of CO{sub 2} was used as the indicator of hydrocarbon degradation and {delta}{sup 13}C analysis of the resultant CO{sub 2} was used to evaluate the source of the respired CO{sub 2} (i.e. petroleum hydrocarbons or the pinfish cometabolite

  2. Hydrocarbon degradation potential of salt marsh plant-microorganisms associations.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Hugo; Mucha, Ana P; Almeida, C Marisa R; Bordalo, Adriano A

    2011-07-01

    Estuaries are often considered sinks for contaminants and the cleanup of salt marshes, sensitive ecosystems with a major ecological role, should be carried out by means of least intrusive approaches, such as bioremediation. This study was designed to evaluate the influence of plant-microorganisms associations on petroleum hydrocarbons fate in salt marshes of a temperate estuary (Lima River, NW Portugal). Sediments un-colonized and colonized (rhizosediments) by different plants (Juncus maritimus, Phragmites australis, Triglochin striata and Spartina patens) were sampled in four sites of the lower and middle estuary for hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms (HD), total cell counts (TCC) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) assessment. In general, TPHs, HD and TCC were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in rhizosediments than in un-colonized sediments. Also recorded were differences on the abundance of hydrocarbon degraders among the rhizosediment of the different plants collected at the same site (J. maritimus < P. australis < T. striata), with statistically significant differences (P < 0.05) between J. maritimus and T. striata. Moreover, strong positive correlations-0.81 and 0.84 (P < 0.05), between biotic (HD) and abiotic (organic matter content) parameters and TPHs concentrations were also found. Our data clearly suggest that salt marsh plants can influence the microbial community, by fostering the development of hydrocarbon-degrading microbial populations in its rhizosphere, an effect observed for all plants. This effect, combined with the plant capability to retain hydrocarbons around the roots, points out that salt marsh plant-microorganisms associations may actively contribute to hydrocarbon removal and degradation in estuarine environments. PMID:21188477

  3. Distribution and fate of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in Antarctic fauna and environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, H. M.; Mackie, P. R.

    1980-03-01

    With the depletion of oil resources in more accessible areas, those of remote regions are being considered or indeed are now being exploited. In many of these regions, especially the polar ones, little is known of the effects such exploitation will have on the environment. But it is known that the ecosystems are often subject to great stress by natural climatic conditions and additional burdens imposed by man may have catastrophic environmental effects. South Georgia, a sub-Antarctic island, has a history of industrial activity mainly concerned with whaling operations that peaked around 1925-1935 but has since declined to virtually nothing. Studies of the ecology of the area provided a unique opportunity to assess the long-term effects that such activities had on the ecosystem. Off the whaling stations a considerable amount of waste material, including fuel oil, was released into the bays and inevitably some of this material was deposited in the sediments. Chemical evidence in the form of both paraffinic and aromatic hydrocarbons still persists in the sediments. The implications of this persistence in relation to the possible influence of the low temperature conditions are discussed. The superficial sediments, marine biota and terrestrial plants, which since 1965 have returned virtually to a pristine state, contain hydrocarbons essentially similar to unpolluted areas around the coast of Britain. Relatively high levels of carcinogenic/mutagenic polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments suggests a world-wide background of abiogenic hydrocarbons probably disseminated by airborne transport. This appears to indicate that contamination reaches even remote parts of the world in relatively undiminished quantities.

  4. 3.4 Micron Emission from Aliphatic Hydrocarbons in Proto-Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrivnak, B. J.; Kwok, S.; Geballe, T. R.

    2002-12-01

    A family of infrared emission features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3 μ m are seen in a variety of objects with strong uv radiation fields. These features are attributed to stretching and bending modes of aromatic compounds. An aliphatic feature has been detected at 3.4 μ m in some of these same objects. Proto-planetary nebulae (PPNs) are in a short-lived stage of evolution between the asymptotic giant branch and planetary nebula (PN) phases. It is observed that in this transitional stage, the strengths of some of these infrared emission features differ from those seen in PNs. In particular, the 3.4 μ m feature, which is usually much weaker than the 3.3 μ m feature, is of comparable strength in some PPNs. To better understand the properties of these features, we carried out medium-resolution (R ~2000) spectroscopy of a sample of PPNs in the 3 μ m region using the NIRSPEC spectrograph on the Keck II telescope. Eight PPNs were observed. These resulted in the first detection of the 3.4 μ m feature in two objects and possible detections in two others and the first detection of the 3.3 μ m feature in two other objects. We will discuss what has been learned from the observations of the 3.4 μ m feature and review the evidence for a correlation of the ratio of the 3.4 to 3.3 μ m features with spectral type. These observations were carried out in the service observing mode as part of a program of limited access to Keck provided to the Gemini Observatory community. This work was funded in part by grants to BJH from the NSF and to SK by NSERC.

  5. Degradation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons by two strains of Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Nwinyi, Obinna C; Ajayi, Oluseyi O; Amund, Olukayode O

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to isolate competent polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons degraders that can utilize polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons of former industrial sites at McDoel Switchyard in Bloomington, Indiana. Using conventional enrichment method based on soil slurry, we isolated, screened and purified two bacterial species strains PB1 and PB2. Applying the ribotyping technique using the 16S rRNA gene analysis, the strains were assigned to the genus Pseudomonas (Pseudomonas plecoglossicida strain PB1 and Pseudomonas sp. PB2). Both isolates showed promising metabolic capacity on pyrene sprayed MS agar plates during the preliminary investigations. Using time course studies in the liquid cultures at calculated concentrations 123, 64, 97 and 94ppm for naphthalene, chrysene, fluroanthene and pyrene, P. plecoglossicida strain PB1 and Pseudomonas sp. PB2 showed partial utilization of the polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Naphthalene was degraded between 26% and 40%, chrysene 14% and 16%, fluroanthene 5% and 7%; pyrene 8% and 13% by P. plecoglossicida strain PB1 and Pseudomonas sp. PB2 respectively. Based on their growth profile, we developed a model R(2)=1 to predict the degradation rate of slow polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon-degraders where all the necessary parameters are constant. From this investigation, we confirm that the former industrial site soil microbial communities may be explored for the biorestoration of the industrial site. PMID:27245129

  6. Methanogenic Hydrocarbon Degradation: Evidence from Field and Laboratory Studies.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Núria; Richnow, Hans H; Vogt, Carsten; Treude, Tina; Krüger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Microbial transformation of hydrocarbons to methane is an environmentally relevant process taking place in a wide variety of electron acceptor-depleted habitats, from oil reservoirs and coal deposits to contaminated groundwater and deep sediments. Methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation is considered to be a major process in reservoir degradation and one of the main processes responsible for the formation of heavy oil deposits and oil sands. In the absence of external electron acceptors such as oxygen, nitrate, sulfate or Fe(III), fermentation and methanogenesis become the dominant microbial metabolisms. The major end product under these conditions is methane, and the only electron acceptor necessary to sustain the intermediate steps in this process is CO2, which is itself a net product of the overall reaction. We are summarizing the state of the art and recent advances in methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation research. Both the key microbial groups involved as well as metabolic pathways are described, and we discuss the novel insights into methanogenic hydrocarbon-degrading populations studied in laboratory as well as environmental systems enabled by novel cultivation-based and molecular approaches. Their possible implications on energy resources, bioremediation of contaminated sites, deep-biosphere research, and consequences for atmospheric composition and ultimately climate change are also addressed. PMID:26959375

  7. Patterns and sources of particle-phase aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban and rural sites of western Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaitzoglou, Maria; Terzi, Eleni; Samara, Constantini

    Particle-bound aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (AHs and PAHs, respectively) were determined in the ambient air of the Eordea basin, in western Greece, where intensive coal burning for power generation takes place. Thirteen PAHs, n-alkanes (C 14-C 35), hopanes, and isoprenoid hydrocarbons (pristane and phytane) were determined in the total suspended particles collected from the atmosphere of four sites within the basin receiving potential impacts from various sources, such as fly ash, coal mining, automobile traffic, domestic heating, and agricultural or refuse burning. The same organic species were also determined in the fly ash generated in power stations, and in particulate emissions from open burning of biomass (dry corn leaves) and refuse burning. Organic particle sources were resolved using concentration diagnostic ratios and factor analysis (FA). A multivariate statistical receptor model (Absolute Principal Component Analysis, APCA) was finally employed to estimate the contribution of identified sources to the measured concentrations of organic pollutants. Four major sources for ambient PAHs and AHs were identified displaying variable contribution in different sites: (a) fossil fuel combustion, (b) biogenic emissions, (c) refuse burning, and (d) oil residues. Fuel combustion was the major source of ambient PAHs and an important source of n-alkanes in the range C 21-C 28. Oil residues were found to be the major source of low molecular weight n-alkanes (particularly the C 14-C 16), and an important source of pristane, phytane and UCM. Biogenic sources were primarily responsible for the high molecular weight n-alkanes explaining almost the entire concentration levels of homologues >C 32. Biomass burning was particularly important for the C 23-C 26n-alkanes. Despite the vicinity of certain sampling sites to power stations, coal fly ash was not identifiable as a source for ambient PAHs and AHs.

  8. Microbial degradation of crude oil hydrocarbons on organoclay minerals.

    PubMed

    Ugochukwu, Uzochukwu C; Manning, David A C; Fialips, Claire I

    2014-11-01

    The role of organoclays in hydrocarbon removal during biodegradation was investigated in aqueous clay/oil microcosm experiments with a hydrocarbon degrading microorganism community. The clays used for this study were Na-montmorillonite and saponite. These two clays were treated with didecyldimethylammonium bromide to produce organoclays which were used in this study. The study indicated that clays with high cation exchange capacity (CEC) such as Na-montmorillonite produced an organomontmorillonite that was inhibitory to biodegradation of the crude oil hydrocarbons. Extensive hydrophobic interaction between the organic phase of the organoclay and the crude oil hydrocarbons is suggested to render the hydrocarbons unavailable for biodegradation. However, untreated Na-montmorillonite was stimulatory to biodegradation of the hydrocarbons and is believed to have done so because of its high surface area for the accumulation of microbes and nutrients making it easy for the microbes to access the nutrients. This study indicates that unlike unmodified montmorillonites, organomontmorillonite may not serve any useful purpose in the bioremediation of crude oil spill sites where hydrocarbon removal by biodegradation is desired within a rapid time period. PMID:24956464

  9. [Consumption of hydrocarbons by psychrotolerant degrader strains].

    PubMed

    Andeeva, I S; Emel'ianova, E K; Ol'kin, S E; Reznikova, I K; Zagrebel'nyĭ, S N; Repin, V E

    2007-01-01

    Oil-oxidizing microorganisms have been sampled in various regions of Siberia and used in strain associations, which degrade n-alkanes of oil from various fields by 64-92% after 6 days of growth in a wide temperature range. These strains are salt-tolerant and psychrotolerant. They are compatible with aboriginal soil microflora. Promising results have been obtained in experiments on growing plants on oil-polluted soil purified with a biodegrader of this series. PMID:17476811

  10. Identifying sources of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons in a residential area in Italy using the integral pumping test method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Luca; Lombi, Silvia; Zanini, Andrea

    2011-09-01

    The results of integral pumping tests (IPTs) performed in the city of Fabriano, Italy, are presented. The IPT methodology was developed by the European Union project INCORE, as a tool for groundwater investigation and source localization in contaminated areas. This methodology consists of a multiple-well pumping test in which the wells are positioned along a control plane downstream of suspected contaminant source zones and perpendicular to the mean groundwater flow direction. During the pumping, concentration time series of target contaminants are measured. In Fabriano, two control planes were realized to identify a chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon plume, to estimate the mass fluxes and draw up a ranked list of the main contamination sources. A numerical flow model was implemented to support the IPT design and to interpret the results. This study revealed low-level trichloroethylene contamination (concentration below 8 μg/l), tetrachloroethylene contamination (mean concentration up to 500 μg/l) and a mass flow rate of about 300 g/day. Through the application of the IPT method, the mean contaminant concentrations, the spatial distribution of concentration values along the control planes, and the total contaminant mass flow rates were evaluated, and the investigation area was reduced for further and deeper investigation activities.

  11. Estimating The Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Bylaska, Eric J.

    2006-08-01

    Many different degradation reactions of chlorinated hydrocarbons are possible in natural ground waters. In order to identify which degradation reactions are important, a large number of possible reaction pathways must be sorted out. Recent advances in ab initio electronic structure methods have the potential to help identify relevant environmental degradation reactions by characterizing the thermodynamic properties of all relevant contaminant species and intermediates for which experimental data is usually not available, as well as provide activation energies for relevant pathways. In this paper, strategies based on ab initio electronic structure methods for estimating thermochemical and kinetic properties of reactions with chlorinated hydrocarbons are presented. Particular emphasis is placed on strategies that are computationally fast and can be used for large organochlorine compounds such as 4,4?-DDT.

  12. Microbial Degradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminants: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nilanjana; Chandran, Preethy

    2011-01-01

    One of the major environmental problems today is hydrocarbon contamination resulting from the activities related to the petrochemical industry. Accidental releases of petroleum products are of particular concern in the environment. Hydrocarbon components have been known to belong to the family of carcinogens and neurotoxic organic pollutants. Currently accepted disposal methods of incineration or burial insecure landfills can become prohibitively expensive when amounts of contaminants are large. Mechanical and chemical methods generally used to remove hydrocarbons from contaminated sites have limited effectiveness and can be expensive. Bioremediation is the promising technology for the treatment of these contaminated sites since it is cost-effective and will lead to complete mineralization. Bioremediation functions basically on biodegradation, which may refer to complete mineralization of organic contaminants into carbon dioxide, water, inorganic compounds, and cell protein or transformation of complex organic contaminants to other simpler organic compounds by biological agents like microorganisms. Many indigenous microorganisms in water and soil are capable of degrading hydrocarbon contaminants. This paper presents an updated overview of petroleum hydrocarbon degradation by microorganisms under different ecosystems. PMID:21350672

  13. Exploring mild enzymatic sustainable routes for the synthesis of bio-degradable aromatic-aliphatic oligoesters.

    PubMed

    Pellis, Alessandro; Guarneri, Alice; Brandauer, Martin; Acero, Enrique Herrero; Peerlings, Henricus; Gardossi, Lucia; Guebitz, Georg M

    2016-05-01

    The application of Candida antarctica lipase B in enzyme-catalyzed synthesis of aromatic-aliphatic oligoesters is here reported. The aim of the present study is to systematically investigate the most favorable conditions for the enzyme catalyzed synthesis of aromatic-aliphatic oligomers using commercially available monomers. Reaction conditions and enzyme selectivity for polymerization of various commercially available monomers were considered using different inactivated/activated aromatic monomers combined with linear polyols ranging from C2 to C12 . The effect of various reaction solvents in enzymatic polymerization was assessed and toluene allowed to achieve the highest conversions for the reaction of dimethyl isophthalate with 1,4-butanediol and with 1,10-decanediol (88 and 87% monomer conversion respectively). Mw as high as 1512 Da was obtained from the reaction of dimethyl isophthalate with 1,10-decanediol. The obtained oligomers have potential applications as raw materials in personal and home care formulations, for the production of aliphatic-aromatic block co-polymers or can be further functionalized with various moieties for a subsequent photo- or radical polymerization. PMID:26762794

  14. Factors limiting aliphatic chlorocarbon degradation by Nitrosomonas europaea: Cometabolic inactivation of ammonia monooxygenase and substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Rasche, M.E.; Hyman, M.R.; Arp, D.J. )

    1991-10-01

    The soil nitrifying bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea is capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) and other halogenated hydrocarbons. TCE cometabolism by N. europaea resulted in an irreversible loss of TCE biodegradative capacity, ammonia-oxidizing activity, and ammonia-dependent O{sub 2} uptake by the cells. Inactivation was not observed in the presence of allylthiourea, a specific inhibitor of enzyme ammonia monooxygenase, or under anaerobic conditions, indicating that the TCE-mediated inactivation required ammonia monooxygenase activity. When N. europaea cells were incubated with ({sup 14}C)TCE under conditions which allowed turnover of ammonia monooxygenase, a number of cellular proteins were covalently labeled with {sup 14}C. Treatment of cells with allylthiourea or acetylene prior to incubation with ({sup 14}C)TCE prevented incorporation of {sup 14}C into proteins. The ammonia-oxidizing activity of cells inactivated in the presence of TCE could be recovered through a process requiring de novo protein synthesis. In addition to TCE, a series of chlorinated methanes, ethanes, and other ethylenes were screened as substrates for ammonia monooxygenase and for their ability to inactivate the ammonia-oxidizing system of N. europaea. The chlorocarbons would be divided into three classes depending on their biodegradability and inactivating potential: (1) compounds which were not biodegradable by N. europaea and which had no toxic effect on the cells (2) compounds which were cooxidized by N. europaea and had little or no toxic effect on the cells; and (3) compounds which were cooxidized and produced a turnover-dependent inactivation of ammonia oxidation by N. europaea.

  15. Hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria enriched by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill identified by cultivation and DNA-SIP

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Tony; Singleton, David R; Berry, David; Yang, Tingting; Aitken, Michael D; Teske, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The massive influx of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico during the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) disaster triggered dramatic microbial community shifts in surface oil slick and deep plume waters. Previous work had shown several taxa, notably DWH Oceanospirillales, Cycloclasticus and Colwellia, were found to be enriched in these waters based on their dominance in conventional clone and pyrosequencing libraries and were thought to have had a significant role in the degradation of the oil. However, this type of community analysis data failed to provide direct evidence on the functional properties, such as hydrocarbon degradation of organisms. Using DNA-based stable-isotope probing with uniformly 13C-labelled hydrocarbons, we identified several aliphatic (Alcanivorax, Marinobacter)- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (Alteromonas, Cycloclasticus, Colwellia)-degrading bacteria. We also isolated several strains (Alcanivorax, Alteromonas, Cycloclasticus, Halomonas, Marinobacter and Pseudoalteromonas) with demonstrable hydrocarbon-degrading qualities from surface slick and plume water samples collected during the active phase of the spill. Some of these organisms accounted for the majority of sequence reads representing their respective taxa in a pyrosequencing data set constructed from the same and additional water column samples. Hitherto, Alcanivorax was not identified in any of the previous water column studies analysing the microbial response to the spill and we discuss its failure to respond to the oil. Collectively, our data provide unequivocal evidence on the hydrocarbon-degrading qualities for some of the dominant taxa enriched in surface and plume waters during the DWH oil spill, and a more complete understanding of their role in the fate of the oil. PMID:23788333

  16. Kinetic modelling of the oxidation of large aliphatic hydrocarbons using an automatic mechanism generation.

    PubMed

    Muharam, Yuswan; Warnatz, Jürgen

    2007-08-21

    A mechanism generator code to automatically generate mechanisms for the oxidation of large hydrocarbons has been successfully modified and considerably expanded in this work. The modification was through (1) improvement of the existing rules such as cyclic-ether reactions and aldehyde reactions, (2) inclusion of some additional rules to the code, such as ketone reactions, hydroperoxy cyclic-ether formations and additional reactions of alkenes, (3) inclusion of small oxygenates, produced by the code but not included in the handwritten C(1)-C(4) sub-mechanism yet, to the handwritten C(1)-C(4) sub-mechanism. In order to evaluate mechanisms generated by the code, simulations of observed results in different experimental environments have been carried out. Experimentally derived and numerically predicted ignition delays of n-heptane-air and n-decane-air mixtures in high-pressure shock tubes in a wide range of temperatures, pressures and equivalence ratios agree very well. Concentration profiles of the main products and intermediates of n-heptane and n-decane oxidation in jet-stirred reactors at a wide range of temperatures and equivalence ratios are generally well reproduced. In addition, the ignition delay times of different normal alkanes was numerically studied. PMID:17687471

  17. Microbial degradation of crude oil and some model hydrocarbons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, Fu-Hsian; Noben, N.N.; Brand, Danny; Hult, Marc F.

    1988-01-01

    Research on microbial degradation of crude oil in the shallow subsurface at a spill site near Bemidji, Minn. (fig. C-l), began in 1983 (Hull, 1984; Chang and Ehrlich, 1984). The rate and extent of crude oil and model hydrocarbon biodegradation by the indigenous microbial community was measured in the laboratory at several concentrations of inorganic nutrients, conditions of oxygen availability, incubation temperatures, and incubation time.

  18. Characterization of the Degradation Mechanisms of Lysine-derived Aliphatic Poly(ester urethane) Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Hafeman, Andrea E.; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna J.; Zachman, Angela L.; Sung, Hak-Joon; Nanney, Lillian B.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of the degradation mechanism of polymeric scaffolds and delivery systems for regenerative medicine is essential to assess their clinical applicability. Key performance criteria include induction of a minimal, transient inflammatory response and controlled degradation to soluble non-cytotoxic breakdown products that are cleared from the body by physiological processes. Scaffolds fabricated from biodegradable poly(ester urethane)s (PEURs) undergo controlled degradation to non-cytotoxic breakdown products and support the ingrowth of new tissue in preclinical models of tissue regeneration. While previous studies have shown that PEUR scaffolds prepared from lysine-derived polyisocyanates degrade faster under in vivo compared to in vitro conditions, the degradation mechanism is not well understood. In this study, we have shown that PEUR scaffolds prepared from lysine triisocyanate (LTI) or a trimer of hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDIt) undergo hydrolytic, esterolytic, and oxidative degradation. Hydrolysis of ester bonds to yield α-hydroxy acids is the dominant mechanism in buffer, and esterolytic media modestly increase the degradation rate. While HDIt scaffolds show a modest (<20%) increase in degradation rate in oxidative medium, LTI scaffolds degrade six times faster in oxidative medium. Furthermore, the in vitro rate of degradation of LTI scaffolds in oxidative medium approximates the in vivo rate in rat excisional wounds, and histological sections show macrophages expressing myeloperoxidase at the material surface. While recent preclinical studies have underscored the potential of injectable PEUR scaffolds and delivery systems for tissue regeneration, this promising class of biomaterials has a limited regulatory history. Elucidation of the macrophage-mediated oxidative mechanism by which LTI scaffolds degrade in vivo provides key insights into the ultimate fate of these materials when injected into the body. PMID:20864156

  19. Characterization of the degradation mechanisms of lysine-derived aliphatic poly(ester urethane) scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hafeman, Andrea E; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna J; Zachman, Angela L; Sung, Hak-Joon; Nanney, Lillian B; Davidson, Jeffrey M; Guelcher, Scott A

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of the degradation mechanism of polymeric scaffolds and delivery systems for regenerative medicine is essential to assess their clinical applicability. Key performance criteria include induction of a minimal, transient inflammatory response and controlled degradation to soluble non-cytotoxic breakdown products that are cleared from the body by physiological processes. Scaffolds fabricated from biodegradable poly(ester urethane)s (PEURs) undergo controlled degradation to non-cytotoxic breakdown products and support the ingrowth of new tissue in preclinical models of tissue regeneration. While previous studies have shown that PEUR scaffolds prepared from lysine-derived polyisocyanates degrade faster under in vivo compared to in vitro conditions, the degradation mechanism is not well understood. In this study, we have shown that PEUR scaffolds prepared from lysine triisocyanate (LTI) or a trimer of hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDIt) undergo hydrolytic, esterolytic, and oxidative degradation. Hydrolysis of ester bonds to yield α-hydroxy acids is the dominant mechanism in buffer, and esterolytic media modestly increase the degradation rate. While HDIt scaffolds show a modest (<20%) increase in degradation rate in oxidative medium, LTI scaffolds degrade six times faster in oxidative medium. Furthermore, the in vitro rate of degradation of LTI scaffolds in oxidative medium approximates the in vivo rate in rat excisional wounds, and histological sections show macrophages expressing myeloperoxidase at the material surface. While recent preclinical studies have underscored the potential of injectable PEUR scaffolds and delivery systems for tissue regeneration, this promising class of biomaterials has a limited regulatory history. Elucidation of the macrophage-mediated oxidative mechanism by which LTI scaffolds degrade in vivo provides key insights into the ultimate fate of these materials when injected into the body. PMID:20864156

  20. Effect of high pressure on hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The blowout of the Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 occurred at a depth of 1500 m, corresponding to a hydrostatic pressure of 15 MPa. Up to now, knowledge about the impact of high pressure on oil-degrading bacteria has been scarce. To investigate how the biodegradation of crude oil and its components is influenced by high pressures, like those in deep-sea environments, hydrocarbon degradation and growth of two model strains were studied in high-pressure reactors. The alkane-degrading strain Rhodococcus qingshengii TUHH-12 grew well on n-hexadecane at 15 MPa at a rate of 0.16 h−1, although slightly slower than at ambient pressure (0.36 h−1). In contrast, the growth of the aromatic hydrocarbon degrading strain Sphingobium yanoikuyae B1 was highly affected by elevated pressures. Pressures of up to 8.8 MPa had little effect on growth of this strain. However, above this pressure growth decreased and at 12 MPa or more no more growth was observed. Nevertheless, S. yanoikuyae continued to convert naphthalene at pressure >12 MPa, although at a lower rate than at 0.1 MPa. This suggests that certain metabolic functions of this bacterium were inhibited by pressure to a greater extent than the enzymes responsible for naphthalene degradation. These results show that high pressure has a strong influence on the biodegradation of crude oil components and that, contrary to previous assumptions, the role of pressure cannot be discounted when estimating the biodegradation and ultimate fate of deep-sea oil releases such as the Deepwater Horizon event. PMID:25401077

  1. Enhanced polyaromatic hydrocarbon degradation by adapted cultures of actinomycete strains.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, Natalia; Isaac, Paula; Alvarez, Héctor; Amoroso, María J; Ferrero, Marcela A

    2014-12-01

    Fifteen actinomycete strains were evaluated for their potential use in removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Their capability to degrade of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene was tested in minimal medium (MM) and MM with glucose as another substrate. Degradation of naphthalene in MM was observed in all isolates at different rates, reaching maximum values near to 76% in some strains of Streptomyces, Rhodococcus sp. 016 and Amycolatopsis tucumanensis DSM 45259. Maximum values of degradation of phenanthrene in MM occurred in cultures of A. tucumanensis DSM 45259 (36.2%) and Streptomyces sp. A12 (20%), while the degradation of pyrene in MM was poor and only significant with Streptomyces sp. A12 (4.3%). Because of the poor performance when growing on phenanthrene and pyrene alone, Rhodococcus sp. 20, Rhodococcus sp. 016, A. tucumanensis DSM 45259, Streptomyces sp. A2, and Streptomyces sp. A12 were challenged to an adaptation schedule of successive cultures on a fresh solid medium supplemented with PAHs, decreasing concentration of glucose in each step. As a result, an enhanced degradation of PAHs by adapted strains was observed in the presence of glucose as co-substrate, without degradation of phenanthrene and pyrene in MM while an increase to up to 50% of degradation was seen with these strains in glucose amended media. An internal fragment of the catA gene, which codes for catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, was amplified from both Rhodococcus strains, showing the potential for degradation of aromatic compounds via salycilate. These results allow us to propose the usefulness of these actinomycete strains for PAH bioremediation in the environment. PMID:25205070

  2. The C–H Stretching Features at 3.2--3.5 μm of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Aliphatic Sidegroups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. J.; Li, Aigen; Glaser, R.; Zhong, J. X.

    2016-07-01

    The so-called “unidentified” infrared emission (UIE) features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 μm are ubiquitously seen in a wide variety of astrophysical regions. The UIE features are characteristic of the stretching and bending vibrations of aromatic hydrocarbon materials, e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. The 3.3 μm aromatic C–H stretching feature is often accompanied by a weaker feature at 3.4 μm. The latter is generally thought to result from the C–H stretch of aliphatic groups attached to the aromatic systems. The ratio of the observed intensity of the 3.3 μm aromatic C–H feature to that of the 3.4 μm aliphatic C–H feature allows one to estimate the aliphatic fraction of the UIE carriers, provided that the intrinsic oscillator strengths of the 3.3 μm aromatic C–H stretch ({A}3.3) and the 3.4 μm aliphatic C–H stretch ({A}3.4) are known. While previous studies on the aliphatic fraction of the UIE carriers were mostly based on the {A}3.4/{A}3.3 ratios derived from the mono-methyl derivatives of small PAH molecules, in this work we employ density functional theory to compute the infrared vibrational spectra of PAH molecules with a wide range of sidegroups including ethyl, propyl, butyl, and several unsaturated alkyl chains, as well as all the isomers of dimethyl-substituted pyrene. We find that, except for PAHs with unsaturated alkyl chains, the corresponding {A}3.4/{A}3.3 ratios are close to that of mono-methyl PAHs. This confirms the predominantly aromatic nature of the UIE carriers previously inferred from the {A}3.4/{A}3.3 ratio derived from mono-methyl PAHs.

  3. Particulate Fluxes of Aliphatic and Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Near-shore Waters to the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea, and the Effect of Continental Runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raoux, C.; Boyona, J. M.; Miquel, J.-C.; Teyssie, J.-L.; Fowler, S. W.; Albaigés, J.

    1999-05-01

    Particulate fluxes of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons were measured with a sediment trap moored at 80m depth offshore Monaco (200m water column) during an 18-month period. The highest fluxes of n -alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) ( c . 300 and 10μg m -2day -1, respectively) were noted following a strong rainfall event (March-April 1989) and were mostly accounted for by continental runoff and river outflows. Fluxes during periods of low precipitation (August 1989-August 1990) were one order of magnitude lower for PAHs (1·51±1·40μg m -2day -1) or two orders of magnitude lower for n -alkanes (4·79±3·3μg m -2day -1) than during the earlier period (March-April 1989). The total PAH and total particle fluxes exhibited a positive linear correlation during the entire sampling period ( r =0·87, N =31, P< 0·05) underscoring the strong affinity of PAHs for particles. Examination of the seasonal variability of fecal pellet content, associated parameters (total organic carbon, total carbon, nitrogen), and individual hydrocarbon content of particles by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed that aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons were clustered in several subgroups in the PCA loading plots according to their origin. n -Alkanes were grouped in two clusters: (i) lower molecular weight ( n -C 16-19) and (ii) the higher molecular weight alkanes ( n -C 20-38) suggesting different pathways into the coastal zone (i.e. runoff vs atmospheric deposition). The distribution of lycopane, pristane and phytane indicated multiple origins. However, the closer location of the two isoprenoids, lycopane and pristane to fecal pellets, suggests a zooplanktonic origin but phytane to fossil fuel source. PAHs exhibited a variety of pyrolytic sources and only fluoranthene and pyrene were not grouped with the remaining PAHs suggesting multiple sources of pollution in these waters.

  4. Complete degradation of polychlorinated hydrocarbons by a two-stage biofilm reactor.

    PubMed Central

    Fathepure, B Z; Vogel, T M

    1991-01-01

    A two-stage anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactor successfully degraded a mixture of chlorinated organic compounds to water-soluble metabolic intermediates and carbon dioxide. Reductive dechlorination of hexachlorobenzene (HCB), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and chloroform (CF) occurred on all tested primary carbon sources such as glucose, methanol, and acetate. However, the extent of dechlorination was maximum when the anaerobic biofilm column was fed acetate as a primary carbon source. HCB, PCE, and CF were dechlorinated to the levels of tri- and dichlorinated products (99, 80, and 32%, respectively) with acetate in the feed. This is important, since these less-chlorinated compounds can be metabolized by the aerobic biofilm. The effluent from the anaerobic biofilm column was fed directly into the aerobic column. After both columns, the total amount transformed into nonvolatile intermediates and carbon dioxide was 94, 96, and 83% for [14C]HCB, [14C]trichloroethylene, and [14C]CF, respectively. This research shows the potential application of this novel two-stage bioreactor system for treating groundwaters and industrial effluents composed of highly chlorinated aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:1785918

  5. Diversity of metabolic capacities among strains degrading polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchez, M.; Besnaienou, B.; Blanchet, D.; Vandecasteele, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    Strains of Pseudomonas and Rhodococcus genera were isolated for their capacity to use, as a sole carbon and energy source, one of the following polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): naphthalene (NAP), fluorene (FLU), phenanthrene (PHE), anthracene (ANT), fluoranthene (FLT), and pyrene (PYR). The range of PAHs supporting growth of these pure strains was usually restricted, but several other hydrocarbons were used by Rhodococcus sp. All strains could grow on simple organic acids. Maximal specific growth rates ({mu}{sub max}) of all strains on their PAH growth substrates were determined by respirometry. No clear relationships between {mu}{sub max} values and the molecular weight or water solubility of PAHs were apparent, but Pseudomonas sp. exhibited the highest {mu}{sub max} values. Carbon balances for PAH biodegradation were established. Differences between strains were observed, but high mineralization rates and low production of soluble metabolites were obtained for all PAHs. Bacterial biomass represented 16% to 35% of the carbon consumed. Strain diversity was also apparent in the interactions observed in the degradation of a mixture of two PAHs by individual strains, which often involved inhibition of PAH substrate degradation, with or without cometabolization of the second PAH.

  6. Fate and degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in stormwater bioretention cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeFevre, Gregory Hallett

    This dissertation describes the investigation of the fate of hydrocarbons in stormwater bioretention areas and those mechanisms that affect hydrocarbon fate in such systems. Seventy-five samples from 58 bioretention areas were collected and analyzed to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) residual and biodegradation functional genes. TPH residual in bioretention areas was greater than background sites but low overall (<3 µg/kg), and well below either the TPH concentration of concern or the expected concentration, assuming no losses. Bioretention areas with deep-root vegetation contained significantly greater quantites of bacterial 16S rRNA genes and two functional genes involved in hydrocarbon biodegradation. Field soils were capable of mineralizing naphthalene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) when incubated in the laboratory. In an additional laboratory investigation, a column study was initiated to comprehensively determine naphthalene fate in a simulated bioretention cell using a 14C-labeled tracer. Sorption to soil was the greatest sink of naphthalene in the columns, although biodegradation and vegetative uptake were also important loss mechanisms. Little leaching occurred following the first flush, and volatilization was insignificant. Significant enrichment of naphthalene degrading bacteria occurred over the course of the experiment as a result of naphthalene exposure. This was evident from enhanced naphthalene biodegradation kinetics (measured via batch tests), significant increases in naphthalene dioxygenase gene quantities, and a significant correlation observed between naphthalene residual and biodegradation functional genes. Vegetated columns outperformed the unplanted control column in terms of total naphthalene removal and biodegradation kinetics. As a result of these experiments, a final study focused on why planted systems outperform unplanted systems was conducted. Plant root exudates were harvested from hydroponic setups for three

  7. Assessing the hydrocarbon degrading potential of indigenous bacteria isolated from crude oil tank bottom sludge and hydrocarbon-contaminated soil of Azzawiya oil refinery, Libya.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Abdulatif A; Adetutu, Eric M; Kadali, Krishna K; Morrison, Paul D; Nurulita, Yuana; Ball, Andrew S

    2014-09-01

    The disposal of hazardous crude oil tank bottom sludge (COTBS) represents a significant waste management burden for South Mediterranean countries. Currently, the application of biological systems (bioremediation) for the treatment of COTBS is not widely practiced in these countries. Therefore, this study aims to develop the potential for bioremediation in this region through assessment of the abilities of indigenous hydrocarbonoclastic microorganisms from Libyan Hamada COTBS for the biotreatment of Libyan COTBS-contaminated environments. Bacteria were isolated from COTBS, COTBS-contaminated soil, treated COTBS-contaminated soil, and uncontaminated soil using Bushnell Hass medium amended with Hamada crude oil (1 %) as the main carbon source. Overall, 49 bacterial phenotypes were detected, and their individual abilities to degrade Hamada crude and selected COBTS fractions (naphthalene, phenanthrene, eicosane, octadecane and hexane) were evaluated using MT2 Biolog plates. Analyses using average well colour development showed that ~90 % of bacterial isolates were capable of utilizing representative aromatic fractions compared to 51 % utilization of representative aliphatics. Interestingly, more hydrocarbonoclastic isolates were obtained from treated contaminated soils (42.9 %) than from COTBS (26.5 %) or COTBS-contaminated (30.6 %) and control (0 %) soils. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) separated the isolates into two clusters with microorganisms in cluster 2 being 1.7- to 5-fold better at hydrocarbon degradation than those in cluster 1. Cluster 2 isolates belonged to the putative hydrocarbon-degrading genera; Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Arthrobacter and Brevundimonas with 57 % of these isolates being obtained from treated COTBS-contaminated soil. Overall, this study demonstrates that the potential for PAH degradation exists for the bioremediation of Hamada COTBS-contaminated environments in Libya. This represents the first report on the isolation of

  8. Limitations of microbial hydrocarbon degradation at the Amon Mud Volcano (Nile Deep Sea Fan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felden, J.; Lichtschlag, A.; Wenzhöfer, F.; de Beer, D.; Feseker, T.; Pop Ristova, P.; de Lange, G.; Boetius, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Amon mud volcano (MV), located at 1250 m water depth on the Nile Deep Sea Fan, is known for its active emission of methane and non-methane hydrocarbons into the hydrosphere. Previous investigations showed a low efficiency of hydrocarbon-degrading anaerobic microbial communities inhabiting the Amon MV center in the presence of sulphate and hydrocarbons in the seeping subsurface fluids. By comparing spatial and temporal patterns of in situ biogeochemical fluxes, temperature gradients, pore water composition and microbial activities over three years, we investigated why the activity of anaerobic hydrocarbon degraders can be low despite high energy supplies. We found that the central dome of the Amon MV, as well as a lateral mud flow at its base, showed signs of recent exposure of hot subsurface muds lacking active hydrocarbon degrading communities. In these highly disturbed areas, anaerobic degradation of methane was less than 2% of the methane flux. Rather high oxygen consumption rates compared to low sulphide production suggest a faster development of more rapidly growing aerobic hydrocarbon degraders in highly disturbed areas. In contrast, the more stabilized muds surrounding the central gas and fluid conduits hosted active anaerobic hydrocarbon-degrading microbial communities. Furthermore, within three years, cell numbers and hydrocarbon degrading activity increased at the gas-seeping sites. The low microbial activity in the hydrocarbon-vented areas of Amon mud volcano is thus a consequence of kinetic limitations by heat and mud expulsion, whereas most of the outer mud volcano area is limited by hydrocarbon transport.

  9. Pseudomonads Rule Degradation of Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons in Aerated Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Jiri; Hroudova, Miluse; Jansa, Jan; Vrchotova, Blanka; Macek, Tomas; Uhlik, Ondrej

    2015-01-01

    Given that the degradation of aromatic pollutants in anaerobic environments such as sediment is generally very slow, aeration could be an efficient bioremediation option. Using stable isotope probing (SIP) coupled with pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA genes, we identified naphthalene-utilizing populations in aerated polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-polluted sediment. The results showed that naphthalene was metabolized at both 10 and 20°C following oxygen delivery, with increased degradation at 20°C as compared to 10°C—a temperature more similar to that found in situ. Naphthalene-derived 13C was primarily assimilated by pseudomonads. Additionally, Stenotrophomonas, Acidovorax, Comamonas, and other minor taxa were determined to incorporate 13C throughout the measured time course. The majority of SIP-detected bacteria were also isolated in pure cultures, which facilitated more reliable identification of naphthalene-utilizing populations as well as proper differentiation between primary consumers and cross-feeders. The pseudomonads acquiring the majority of carbon were identified as Pseudomonas veronii and Pseudomonas gessardii. Stenotrophomonads and Acidovorax defluvii, however, were identified as cross-feeders unable to directly utilize naphthalene as a growth substrate. PAH degradation assays with the isolated bacteria revealed that all pseudomonads as well as Comamonas testosteroni degraded acenaphthene, fluorene, and phenanthrene in addition to naphthalene. Furthermore, P. veronii and C. testosteroni were capable of transforming anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene. Screening of isolates for naphthalene dioxygenase genes using a set of in-house designed primers for Gram-negative bacteria revealed the presence of such genes in pseudomonads and C. testosteroni. Overall, our results indicated an apparent dominance of pseudomonads in the sequestration of carbon from naphthalene and potential degradation of other PAHs upon aeration of the sediment at both 20 and

  10. Microbial diversity and hydrocarbon degrading gene capacity of a crude oil field soil as determined by metagenomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Abbasian, Firouz; Palanisami, Thavamani; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi; Lockington, Robin; Ramadass, Kavitha

    2016-05-01

    Soils contaminated with crude oil are rich sources of enzymes suitable for both degradation of hydrocarbons through bioremediation processes and improvement of crude oil during its refining steps. Due to the long term selection, crude oil fields are unique environments for the identification of microorganisms with the ability to produce these enzymes. In this metagenomic study, based on Hiseq Illumina sequencing of samples obtained from a crude oil field and analysis of data on MG-RAST, Actinomycetales (9.8%) were found to be the dominant microorganisms, followed by Rhizobiales (3.3%). Furthermore, several functional genes were found in this study, mostly belong to Actinobacteria (12.35%), which have a role in the metabolism of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons (2.51%), desulfurization (0.03%), element shortage (5.6%), and resistance to heavy metals (1.1%). This information will be useful for assisting in the application of microorganisms in the removal of hydrocarbon contamination and/or for improving the quality of crude oil. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:638-648, 2016. PMID:26914145

  11. [Isolation and identification of a low temperature hydrocarbon-degrading strain and its degradation characteristics].

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Li, Dan; Sun, Dan; Xie, Yu-juan; Ma, Ting; Liang, Feng-lai; Liu, Ru-lin

    2007-09-01

    A low-temperature hydrocarbon-degrading strain T7-2 was isolated from sea-mud of Bohai polluted area and identified as Rhodococcus erythropolis, which could use diesel oil as carbon source. The optimal temperature and pH for the strain utilizing ethanol was 15 degrees C and 7.8, and the optimal concentration of ethanol and the seed culture was 0.5% and 10(8) CFU/mL, respectively. Inoculated to artificial seawater which was added (NH4)2SO5 2.64 g/L, Na2HPO4 2.5 g/L and yeast extract 0.015 g/L after 7 days of culture at the temperature of 15 degrees C, the rate of degradation was 73.2%. The strain could degrade a large range of n-alkane from C12 to C36. PMID:17990565

  12. Degradation of mix hydrocarbons by immobilized cells of mix culture using a trickle fluidized bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chapatwala, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    The microorganisms, capable of degrading mix hydrocarbons were isolated from the soil samples collected from the hydrocarbon contaminated sites. The mix cultures were immobilized in calcium alginate solution in the form of beads. A trickle fluidized bed air-uplift-type reactor designed to study the degradation of mix hydrocarbons was filled with 0.85% normal saline containing the immobilized cells of mix culture. The immobilized beads were aerated with CO[sub 2]-free air at 200 ml/min. The degradation of different concentrations of hydrocarbons in the presence/absence of commercially available fertilizers by the immobilized cells of mix culture is now in progress.

  13. Reconstructing metabolic pathways of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Nina; Donaho, John A; Gutierrez, Tony; Seitz, Kiley W; Teske, Andreas P; Baker, Brett J

    2016-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, one of the largest marine oil spills(1), changed bacterial communities in the water column and sediment as they responded to complex hydrocarbon mixtures(2-4). Shifts in community composition have been correlated to the microbial degradation and use of hydrocarbons(2,5,6), but the full genetic potential and taxon-specific metabolisms of bacterial hydrocarbon degraders remain unresolved. Here, we have reconstructed draft genomes of marine bacteria enriched from sea surface and deep plume waters of the spill that assimilate alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during stable-isotope probing experiments, and we identify genes of hydrocarbon degradation pathways. Alkane degradation genes were ubiquitous in the assembled genomes. Marinobacter was enriched with n-hexadecane, and uncultured Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria populations were enriched in the polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbon-degrading communities and contained a broad gene set for degrading phenanthrene and naphthalene. The repertoire of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon use varied among different bacterial taxa and the combined capabilities of the microbial community exceeded those of its individual components, indicating that the degradation of complex hydrocarbon mixtures requires the non-redundant capabilities of a complex oil-degrading community. PMID:27572965

  14. Preferences in removal of aliphatic and aromatic gasoline components by biofiltration under varied loading.

    PubMed

    Halecky, Martin; Paca, Jan; Kozliak, Evguenii I

    2012-01-01

    Removal of gasoline vapors from waste air was investigated in a bench-scale perlite biofilter for three aromatic-to-aliphatic mass ratios (62/38, 92/8 and 44/56) under different loads, varied by changing both the substrate inlet concentration and air flow rate. The measurement of concentration profiles along the bed height allowed for an assessment of interactions between the aromatic and aliphatic fractions of gasoline. Variations in both the inlet concentrations and empty bed residence time significantly influenced the removal of aliphatic gasoline components. Except for the lowest organic loads, the whole biofilter bed was required for achieving an acceptable removal efficiency of aliphatic hydrocarbons. The presence of large amounts of aromatics negatively impacted the removal of aliphatics. By contrast, the aromatic gasoline components were near-completely removed from any mixtures; the bulk of them were degraded in the first (out of three) biofilter section, even at high concentrations of aliphatic hydrocarbons. The observed effect was shown to be due to competitive interactions of aliphatic and aromatic components, which is consistent with the biological steps being rate limiting. Mass transfer, particularly for aliphatic components due to their high Henry's law constants, was shown to be rate-limiting under extreme scenarios, such as low loading rates and EBRT. PMID:22486669

  15. Identification and biotransformation of aliphatic hydrocarbons during co-composting of sewage sludge-Date Palm waste using Pyrolysis-GC/MS technique.

    PubMed

    El Fels, Loubna; Lemee, Laurent; Ambles, André; Hafidi, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    The behavior of aliphatic hydrocarbons during co-composting of sewage sludge activated with palm tree waste was studied for 6 months using Py-GC/MS. The main aliphatic compounds represented as doublet alkenes/alkanes can be classified into three groups. The first group consists of 11 alkenes (undecene, tridecene, pentadecene, hexadecene, heptadecene, octadecene, nonadecene, eicosene, uncosene, docosene, tricosene) and 15 alkanes (heptane, octane, nonane, decane, undecane, dodecane, tetradecane, pentadecane, heptadecane, octadecane, nonadecane, eicosane, uncosane, docosane, and tricosane), which remain stable during the co-composting process. The stability of these compounds is related to their recalcitrance behavior. The second group consists of five alkenes (heptene, octene, nonene, decene, dodecene) and tridecane as a single alkane that decreases during co-composting. The decrease in these compounds is the combined result of their metabolism and their conversion into other compounds. The third group is constituted with tetradecene and hexadecane that increase during composting, which could be explained by accumulation of these compounds, which are released by the partial breakdown of the substrate. As a result, these molecules are incorporated or adsorbed in the structure of humic substances. PMID:27197656

  16. Effects of co-occurring aromatic hydrocarbons on degradation of individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in marine sediment slurries.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, J E; Capone, D G

    1988-01-01

    Rates of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation and mineralization were influenced by preexposure to alternate PAHs and a monoaromatic hydrocarbon at relatively high (100 ppm) concentrations in organic-rich aerobic marine sediments. Prior exposure to three PAHs and benzene resulted in enhanced [14C]naphthalene mineralization, while [14C]anthracene mineralization was stimulated only by benzene and anthracene preexposure. Preexposure of sediment slurries to phenanthrene stimulated the initial degradation of anthracene. Prior exposure to naphthalene stimulated the initial degradation of phenanthrene but had no effect on either the initial degradation or mineralization of anthracene. For those compounds which stimulated [14C]anthracene or [14C]naphthalene mineralization, longer preexposures (2 weeks) to alternative aromatic hydrocarbons resulted in an even greater stimulation response. Enrichment with individual PAHs followed by subsequent incubation with one or two PAHs showed no alteration in degradation patterns due to the simultaneous presence of PAHs. The evidence suggests that exposure of marine sediments to a particular PAH or benzene results in the enhanced ability of these sediments to subsequently degrade that PAH as well as certain other PAHs. The enhanced degradation of a particular PAH after sediments have been exposed to it may result from the selection and proliferation of specific microbial populations capable of degrading it. The enhanced degradation of other PAHs after exposure to a single PAH suggests that the populations selected have either broad specificity for PAHs, common pathways of PAH degradation, or both. PMID:3415231

  17. Limitations of microbial hydrocarbon degradation at the Amon mud volcano (Nile deep-sea fan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felden, J.; Lichtschlag, A.; Wenzhöfer, F.; de Beer, D.; Feseker, T.; Pop Ristova, P.; de Lange, G.; Boetius, A.

    2013-05-01

    The Amon mud volcano (MV), located at 1250 m water depth on the Nile deep-sea fan, is known for its active emission of methane and non-methane hydrocarbons into the hydrosphere. Previous investigations showed a low efficiency of hydrocarbon-degrading anaerobic microbial communities inhabiting the Amon MV center in the presence of sulfate and hydrocarbons in the seeping subsurface fluids. By comparing spatial and temporal patterns of in situ biogeochemical fluxes, temperature gradients, pore water composition, and microbial activities over 3 yr, we investigated why the activity of anaerobic hydrocarbon degraders can be low despite high energy supplies. We found that the central dome of the Amon MV, as well as a lateral mud flow at its base, showed signs of recent exposure of hot subsurface muds lacking active hydrocarbon degrading communities. In these highly disturbed areas, anaerobic degradation of methane was less than 2% of the methane flux. Rather high oxygen consumption rates compared to low sulfide production suggest a faster development of more rapidly growing aerobic hydrocarbon degraders in highly disturbed areas. In contrast, the more stabilized muds surrounding the central gas and fluid conduits hosted active anaerobic hydrocarbon-degrading microbial communities. The low microbial activity in the hydrocarbon-vented areas of Amon MV is thus a consequence of kinetic limitations by heat and mud expulsion, whereas most of the outer MV area is limited by hydrocarbon transport.

  18. Polycyclic aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons in Chukchi Sea biota and sediments and their toxicological response in the Arctic cod, Boreogadus saida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, H. Rodger; Taylor, Karen A.; Pie, Hannah V.; Mitchelmore, Carys L.

    2014-04-01

    As part of the Chukchi Sea Offshore Monitoring in Drilling Area-Chemical and Benthos (COMIDA CAB) project, we determined the distribution and concentrations of aliphatic n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface sediments (0-1 cm) among 52 sites across the Chukchi Sea and in muscle tissues of the benthic Northern whelk, Neptunea heros, collected opportunistically. In addition, downcore profiles of contaminants were determined at three targeted sites to establish historic patterns. Baseline responses of PAH exposure and its potential toxicological effects were examined in the common Arctic cod, Boreogadus saida, through measures of cytochrome P4501A/ ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (CYP1A/EROD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in liver tissue. The total concentration of PAHs in surface sediments throughout the study area, including parent and alkyl-homologs, were very low (<1600 ng g-1 dry wt) except for a single station, where values were 2-20-fold greater than at other baseline sites (2956 ng g-1 dry wt). Alkyl-substituted PAHs were the dominant form in all surface (54-93%) and subsurface sediments (50-81% of the total), with a general decrease in total PAH concentrations observed downcore. In biota, larger Neptunea showed lower total concentrations of PAHs in foot muscles (4.5-10.7 ng g-1 wet wt) compared to smaller animals; yet aliphatic n-alkane (C19-C33) concentrations (0.655-5.20 μg g-1 wet wt) increased in larger organisms with distributions dominated by long-chain (C23-C33) hydrocarbons. In B. saida, CYP1A1, GST, and SOD enzyme levels were comparable to baseline levels previously reported in other pristine systems. Of the three assays, only SOD had a significant correlation between gene expression and enzyme activity.

  19. Approach to estimation of absorption of aliphatic hydrocarbons diffusing from interior materials in an automobile cabin by inhalation toxicokinetic analysis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Toshiaki

    2010-01-01

    The interior air of an automobile cabin has been demonstrated in our previous studies to be contaminated by high concentrations of a large variety of aliphatic hydrocarbons diffusing from the interior materials. In the present study, the amounts of seven selected aliphatic hydrocarbons absorbed by the car driver were estimated by evaluating their inhalation toxicokinetics in rats. Measured amounts of the substances were injected into a closed chamber system in which a rat had been placed, and the concentration changes in the chamber were examined. The toxicokinetics of the substances were evaluated based on concentration-time courses using a nonlinear compartment model. Their absorption amounts in humans at the levels of actual concentrations in the cabins without ventilation were extrapolated from the results found with the rats. The absorption amounts estimated for a driver during a 2 h drive were as follows: 6 microg/60 kg of human body weight for methylcyclopentane (interior concentration 23 microg/m(3) as median value in previous study), 5 microg for 2-methylpentane (36 microg/m(3)), 13 microg for n-hexane (65 microg/m(3)), 51 microg for n-heptane (150 microg/m(3)), 26 microg for 2,4-dimethylheptane (97 microg/m(3)), 17 microg for n-nonane (25 microg/m(3)) and 49 microg for n-decane (68 microg/m(3)). An inverse relationship was found between the exposure and absorption among the substances (e.g. between n-decane and 2,4-dimethylheptane). These findings suggest that not only the exposure concentrations but also the absorption amounts should be taken into account to evaluate the health effects of exposure to low concentrations of volatile compounds as environmental contaminants. PMID:19743389

  20. Isolation, identification, and crude oil degradation characteristics of a high-temperature, hydrocarbon-degrading strain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boqun; Ju, Meiting; Liu, Jinpeng; Wu, Wentao; Li, Xiaojing

    2016-05-15

    In this work, a hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium Y-1 isolated from petroleum contaminated soil in the Dagang Oilfield was investigated for its potential effect in biodegradation of crude oil. According to the analysis of 16S rRNA sequences, strain Y-1 was identified as Bacillus licheniformis. The growth parameters such as pH, temperature, and salinity were optimised and 60.2% degradation of crude oil removal was observed in 5days. The strain Y-1 showed strong tolerance to high salinity, alkalinity, and temperature. Emplastic produced by strain Y-1 at high temperatures could be applied as biosurfactant. Gas chromatography analysis demonstrated that the strain Y-1 efficiently degraded different alkanes from crude oil, and the emplastic produced by strain Y-1 promoted the degradation rates of long-chain alkanes when the temperature increased to 55°C. Therefore, strain Y-1 would play an important role in the area of crude oil contaminant bioremediation even in some extreme conditions. PMID:26994837

  1. Electron beam degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prager, L.; Langguth, H.; Rummel, S.; Mehnert, R.

    1995-09-01

    Using a low-energy electron accelerator (180 keV, 3 kW) synthetic air polluted with chlorinated hydrocarbons such as cis-dichloro-, trichloro- and perchloroethene was irradiated in a flow system. Already at doses of 2.5 kGy, more than 90 vol% of the initial pollutant concentration (2-50 ppm) could be removed. As main products HCl, CO, chloromethanes, chloroacetyl chlorides and phosgene were identified. After hydrolysis of phosgene and chloroacteyl chlorides in a wet scrubbing system, the chlorine balance shows nearly complete mineralization of the pollutants to HCl, CO and CO2. Less than 5 vol% of chloromethanes and about 0.1 vol% chloroacetic acids were detected after irradiation and hydrolysis. An attempt is made to describe the degradation mechanism as OH radical induced chain reaction. The OH radical adds to the ethene double bond. The resulting adduct releases a chlorine radical. In presence of oxygen a chain reaction is initiated by this radical, which leads to decomposition of the chloroethenes.

  2. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Degradation of Phytoplankton-Associated Arenibacter spp. and Description of Arenibacter algicola sp. nov., an Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Glenn; Mishamandani, Sara; Berry, David; Whitman, William B.; Nichols, Peter D.; Semple, Kirk T.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Pyrosequencing of the bacterial community associated with a cosmopolitan marine diatom during enrichment with crude oil revealed several Arenibacter phylotypes, of which one (OTU-202) had become significantly enriched by the oil. Since members of the genus Arenibacter have not been previously shown to degrade hydrocarbons, we attempted to isolate a representative strain of this genus in order to directly investigate its hydrocarbon-degrading potential. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, one isolate (designated strain TG409T) exhibited >99% sequence identity to three type strains of this genus. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain TG409T represents a novel species in the genus Arenibacter, for which the name Arenibacter algicola sp. nov. is proposed. We reveal for the first time that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation is a shared phenotype among members of this genus, indicating that it could be used as a taxonomic marker for this genus. Kinetic data for PAH mineralization rates showed that naphthalene was preferred to phenanthrene, and its mineralization was significantly enhanced in the presence of glass wool (a surrogate for diatom cell surfaces). During enrichment on hydrocarbons, strain TG409T emulsified n-tetradecane and crude oil, and cells were found to be preferentially attached to oil droplets, indicating an ability by the strain to express cell surface amphiphilic substances (biosurfactants or bioemulsifiers) as a possible strategy to increase the bioavailability of hydrocarbons. This work adds to our growing knowledge on the diversity of bacterial genera in the ocean contributing to the degradation of oil contaminants and of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria found living in association with marine eukaryotic phytoplankton. PMID:24212584

  3. Transport and degradation of semivolatile hydrocarbons in a petroleum-contaminated aquifer, Bemidji, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, E.T.

    1996-12-31

    Hydrophobic semivolatile organic compounds are unlikely to be transported substantial distances in ground water because of rapid partitioning onto aquifer material. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) has been identified as a potential medium for transporting hydrophobic semivolatile organic compounds by cosolvation. In this study, the role of oil-derived DOC, formed in situ, is assessed to determine its effect on the transport of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAM) in ground water. The site of this study is a petroleum-contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minn.

  4. Enrichment of aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic acids by oil-degrading bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of plants growing in oil-contaminated soil from Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Mikolasch, Annett; Omirbekova, Anel; Schumann, Peter; Reinhard, Anne; Sheikhany, Halah; Berzhanova, Ramza; Mukasheva, Togzhan; Schauer, Frieder

    2015-05-01

    Three microbial strains were isolated from the rhizosphere of alfalfa (Medicago sativa), grass mixture (Festuca rubra, 75 %; Lolium perenne, 20 %; Poa pratensis, 10 %), and rape (Brassica napus) on the basis of their high capacity to use crude oil as the sole carbon and energy source. These isolates used an unusually wide spectrum of hydrocarbons as substrates (more than 80), including n-alkanes with chain lengths ranging from C12 to C32, monomethyl- and monoethyl-substituted alkanes (C12-C23), n-alkylcyclo alkanes with alkyl chain lengths from 4 to 18 carbon atoms, as well as substituted monoaromatic and diaromatic hydrocarbons. These three strains were identified as Gordonia rubripertincta and Rhodococcus sp. SBUG 1968. During their transformation of this wide range of hydrocarbon substrates, a very large number of aliphatic, alicyclic, and aromatic acids was detected, 44 of them were identified by GC/MS analyses, and 4 of them are described as metabolites for the first time. Inoculation of plant seeds with these highly potent bacteria had a beneficial effect on shoot and root development of plants which were grown on oil-contaminated sand. PMID:25592733

  5. Zinc oxide/polypyrrole nanocomposite as a novel solid phase microextraction coating for extraction of aliphatic hydrocarbons from water and soil samples.

    PubMed

    Amanzadeh, Hatam; Yamini, Yadollah; Moradi, Morteza

    2015-07-16

    In this work, ZnO/PPy nanocomposite coating was fabricated on stainless steel and evaluated as a novel headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) fiber coating for extraction of ultra-trace amounts of environmental pollutants; namely, aliphatic hydrocarbons in water and soil samples. The ZnO/PPy nanocomposite were prepared by a two-step process including the electrochemical deposition of PPy on the surface of stainless steel in the first step, and the synthesis of ZnO nanorods by hydrothermal process in the pores of PPy matrix in the second step. Porous structure together with ZnO nanorods with the average diameter of 70 nm were observed on the surface by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effective parameters on HS-SPME of hydrocarbons (i.e., extraction temperature, extraction time, desorption temperature, desorption time, salt concentration, and stirring rate) were investigated and optimized by one-variable-at-a-time method. Under optimized conditions (extraction temperature, 65±1°C; extraction time, 15 min; desorption temperature, 250°C; desorption time, 3 min; salt concentration, 10% w/v; and stirring rate, 1200 rpm), the limits of detection (LODs) were found in the range of 0.08-0.5 μg L(-1), whereas the repeatability and fiber-to-fiber reproducibility were in the range 5.4-7.6% and 8.6-10.4%, respectively. Also, the accuracies obtained for the spiked n-alkanes were in the range of 85-108%; indicating the absence of matrix effects in the proposed HS-SPME method. The results obtained in this work suggest that ZnO/PPy can be promising coating materials for future applications of SPME and related sample preparation techniques. PMID:26073809

  6. Halotolerance and effect of salt on hydrophobicity in hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Longang, Adégilns; Buck, Chris; Kirkwood, Kathlyn M

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbon-contaminated environments often also experience co-contamination with elevated levels of salt. This paper investigates the occurrence of halotolerance among several hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, as an initial assessment of the importance of salt contamination to bioremediation strategies. Halotolerance was common, but not ubiquitous, among the 12 hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria tested, with many strains growing at up to 75 or 100 g NaCl L(-1) in rich medium. Greater sensitivity to elevated salt concentrations was observed among aromatics degraders compared to saturates degraders, and in defined medium compared to rich medium. Observed effects of high salt concentrations included increased lag times and decreased maximum growth. Many strains exhibited flocculation at elevated salt concentrations, but this did not correlate to any patterns in cell surface hydrophobicity, measured using the Bacterial Adhesion to Hydrocarbon assay. The occurrence of halotolerance in hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria suggests the potential for native microorganisms to contribute to the bioremediation of oil and salt co-contaminated sites, and indicates the need for a better understanding of the relationship between halotolerance and hydrocarbon biodegradation capabilities. PMID:26915518

  7. Enumeration and phylogenetic analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacteria from Puget Sound sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Geiselbrecht, A.D.; Herwig, R.P.; Deming, J.W.; Staley, J.T.

    1996-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are primarily released into the environment through anthropomorphic sources. PAH degradation has been known to occur in marine sediments. This paper describes the enumeration, isolation, and preliminary characterization of PAH-degrading strains from Puget Sound sediments. 38 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Effects of oxygen on hydrocarbon degradation studies in vitro in surficial sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mille, G.; Mulyono, M.; El Jammal, T.; Bertrand, J.-C.

    1988-09-01

    The degradation of selected hydrocarbons ( nC 19, nC 20, pristane and phenanthrene), no. 1 fuel oil and endogenous hydrocarbons in heavily polluted sediments has been investigated as a function of dissolved oxygen concentration in the overlying water. Continuous flow-through systems have been used in order to maintain or control physicochemical parameters. In such conditions the role of oxygen on the percentages of biodegradation has been determined. Hydrocarbon degradation occurred markedly in sediments where the dissolved oxygen concentration in the overlying seawater was 8 ppm and the redox potential was around + 150 mV. The degradation was slower (2 to 3 times less) when the dissolved oxygen concentration (2-3 ppm) and the redox potential (+ 30 mV) decreased. Under suboxic conditions (dissolved oxygen 0·2-0·3 ppm and redox potential between -180 and -200 mV) no degradation was detected.

  9. Comparative analysis of metagenomes from three methanogenic hydrocarbon-degrading enrichment cultures with 41 environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Tan, Boonfei; Fowler, S Jane; Abu Laban, Nidal; Dong, Xiaoli; Sensen, Christoph W; Foght, Julia; Gieg, Lisa M

    2015-09-01

    Methanogenic hydrocarbon metabolism is a key process in subsurface oil reservoirs and hydrocarbon-contaminated environments and thus warrants greater understanding to improve current technologies for fossil fuel extraction and bioremediation. In this study, three hydrocarbon-degrading methanogenic cultures established from two geographically distinct environments and incubated with different hydrocarbon substrates (added as single hydrocarbons or as mixtures) were subjected to metagenomic and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to test whether these differences affect the genetic potential and composition of the communities. Enrichment of different putative hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in each culture appeared to be substrate dependent, though all cultures contained both acetate- and H2-utilizing methanogens. Despite differing hydrocarbon substrates and inoculum sources, all three cultures harbored genes for hydrocarbon activation by fumarate addition (bssA, assA, nmsA) and carboxylation (abcA, ancA), along with those for associated downstream pathways (bbs, bcr, bam), though the cultures incubated with hydrocarbon mixtures contained a broader diversity of fumarate addition genes. A comparative metagenomic analysis of the three cultures showed that they were functionally redundant despite their enrichment backgrounds, sharing multiple features associated with syntrophic hydrocarbon conversion to methane. In addition, a comparative analysis of the culture metagenomes with those of 41 environmental samples (containing varying proportions of methanogens) showed that the three cultures were functionally most similar to each other but distinct from other environments, including hydrocarbon-impacted environments (for example, oil sands tailings ponds and oil-affected marine sediments). This study provides a basis for understanding key functions and environmental selection in methanogenic hydrocarbon-associated communities. PMID:25734684

  10. Comparative analysis of metagenomes from three methanogenic hydrocarbon-degrading enrichment cultures with 41 environmental samples

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Boonfei; Jane Fowler, S; Laban, Nidal Abu; Dong, Xiaoli; Sensen, Christoph W; Foght, Julia; Gieg, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Methanogenic hydrocarbon metabolism is a key process in subsurface oil reservoirs and hydrocarbon-contaminated environments and thus warrants greater understanding to improve current technologies for fossil fuel extraction and bioremediation. In this study, three hydrocarbon-degrading methanogenic cultures established from two geographically distinct environments and incubated with different hydrocarbon substrates (added as single hydrocarbons or as mixtures) were subjected to metagenomic and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to test whether these differences affect the genetic potential and composition of the communities. Enrichment of different putative hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in each culture appeared to be substrate dependent, though all cultures contained both acetate- and H2-utilizing methanogens. Despite differing hydrocarbon substrates and inoculum sources, all three cultures harbored genes for hydrocarbon activation by fumarate addition (bssA, assA, nmsA) and carboxylation (abcA, ancA), along with those for associated downstream pathways (bbs, bcr, bam), though the cultures incubated with hydrocarbon mixtures contained a broader diversity of fumarate addition genes. A comparative metagenomic analysis of the three cultures showed that they were functionally redundant despite their enrichment backgrounds, sharing multiple features associated with syntrophic hydrocarbon conversion to methane. In addition, a comparative analysis of the culture metagenomes with those of 41 environmental samples (containing varying proportions of methanogens) showed that the three cultures were functionally most similar to each other but distinct from other environments, including hydrocarbon-impacted environments (for example, oil sands tailings ponds and oil-affected marine sediments). This study provides a basis for understanding key functions and environmental selection in methanogenic hydrocarbon-associated communities. PMID:25734684

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Yeast Strains from Petroleum Contaminated Industrial Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, Boutheina; Mhiri, Najla; Karray, Fatma; Aloui, Fathi; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Two yeast strains are enriched and isolated from industrial refinery wastewater. These strains were observed for their ability to utilize several classes of petroleum hydrocarbons substrates, such as n-alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons as a sole carbon source. Phylogenetic analysis based on the D1/D2 variable domain and the ITS-region sequences indicated that strains HC1 and HC4 were members of the genera Candida and Trichosporon, respectively. The mechanism of hydrocarbon uptaking by yeast, Candida, and Trichosporon has been studied by means of the kinetic analysis of hydrocarbons-degrading yeasts growth and substrate assimilation. Biodegradation capacity and biomass quantity were daily measured during twelve days by gravimetric analysis and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry techniques. Removal of n-alkanes indicated a strong ability of hydrocarbon biodegradation by the isolated yeast strains. These two strains grew on long-chain n-alkane, diesel oil, and crude oil but failed to grow on short-chain n-alkane and aromatic hydrocarbons. Growth measurement attributes of the isolates, using n-hexadecane, diesel oil, and crude oil as substrates, showed that strain HC1 had better degradation for hydrocarbon substrates than strain HC4. In conclusion, these yeast strains can be useful for the bioremediation process and decreasing petroleum pollution in wastewater contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. PMID:26339653

  12. Isolation and Characterization of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Yeast Strains from Petroleum Contaminated Industrial Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Gargouri, Boutheina; Mhiri, Najla; Karray, Fatma; Aloui, Fathi; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Two yeast strains are enriched and isolated from industrial refinery wastewater. These strains were observed for their ability to utilize several classes of petroleum hydrocarbons substrates, such as n-alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons as a sole carbon source. Phylogenetic analysis based on the D1/D2 variable domain and the ITS-region sequences indicated that strains HC1 and HC4 were members of the genera Candida and Trichosporon, respectively. The mechanism of hydrocarbon uptaking by yeast, Candida, and Trichosporon has been studied by means of the kinetic analysis of hydrocarbons-degrading yeasts growth and substrate assimilation. Biodegradation capacity and biomass quantity were daily measured during twelve days by gravimetric analysis and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry techniques. Removal of n-alkanes indicated a strong ability of hydrocarbon biodegradation by the isolated yeast strains. These two strains grew on long-chain n-alkane, diesel oil, and crude oil but failed to grow on short-chain n-alkane and aromatic hydrocarbons. Growth measurement attributes of the isolates, using n-hexadecane, diesel oil, and crude oil as substrates, showed that strain HC1 had better degradation for hydrocarbon substrates than strain HC4. In conclusion, these yeast strains can be useful for the bioremediation process and decreasing petroleum pollution in wastewater contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. PMID:26339653

  13. Use of the Complex Conductivity Method to Monitor Hydrocarbon Degradation in Brackish Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Beaver, C. L.; Kimak, C.; Slater, L. D.; Atekwana, E. A.; Rossbach, S.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination of the subsurface is a global environmental problem. The size, location and recurrence rate of contamination very often inhibits active remediation strategies. When there is no direct threat to humans, and direct/invasive remediation methods are prohibited, monitored natural attenuation is often the remediation method of choice. Consequently, long-term monitoring of hydrocarbon degradation is needed to validate remediation. Geophysical methods, frequently utilized to characterize subsurface contamination, have the potential to be adopted for long term monitoring of contaminant degradation. Over the last decade, the complex conductivity method has shown promise as a method for monitoring hydrocarbon degradation processes in freshwater environments. We investigated the sensitivity of complex conductivity to natural attenuation of oil in a brackish setting, being more representative of the conditions where most oil spills occur such as in coastal environments. We performed a series of laboratory hydrocarbon biodegradation experiments whilst continuously monitoring complex conductivity. Sediments from a beach impacted by the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill were used to provide the hydrocarbon degraders, while fluids with three different salinities, ranging from fresh water to brackish water, were used as the supporting media. All experimental columns, including two abiotic controls, were run in duplicate. Early results show a dependence of the complex conductivity parameters (both electrolytic and interfacial) on biodegradation processes. Despite the small signals relative to freshwater conditions, the imaginary part of the complex conductivity appears to be sensitive to biodegradation processes. The columns with highest salinity fluids - similar to the salinites for the site where the sediments were collected - showed distinctive complex conductivity responses similar to microbial growth curves. Geochemical monitoring confirmed elevated rates

  14. Methanogenic degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in subsurface environments remediation, heavy oil formation, and energy recovery.

    PubMed

    Gray, N D; Sherry, A; Hubert, C; Dolfing, J; Head, I M

    2010-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are common constituents of surface, shallow, and deep-subsurface environments. Under anaerobic conditions, hydrocarbons can be degraded to methane by methanogenic microbial consortia. This degradation process is widespread in the geosphere. In comparison with other anaerobic processes, methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation is more sustainable over geological time scales because replenishment of an exogenous electron acceptor is not required. As a consequence, this process has been responsible for the formation of the world's vast deposits of heavy oil, which far exceed conventional oil assets such as those found in the Middle East. Methanogenic degradation is also a potentially important component of attenuation in hydrocarbon contamination plumes. Studies of the organisms, syntrophic partnerships, mechanisms, and geochemical signatures associated with methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation have identified common themes and diagnostic markers for this process in the subsurface. These studies have also identified the potential to engineer methanogenic processes to enhance the recovery of energy assets as biogenic methane from residual oils stranded in petroleum systems. PMID:20602990

  15. Hydrocarbons in Washington coastal sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl, Fredrick G.; Carpenter, Roy

    1984-06-01

    The sources and distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and aliphatic hydrocarbons are characterized in seventeen sediments from a highly river-influenced sedimentary environment off the southwestern coast of Washington. The major hydrocarbons are land-derived, introduced as preformed compounds and display long-term stability in sediment cores. A series of PAH of anthropogenic origin and two naturally derived compounds, retene and perylene, dominate the PAH composition in these sediments. Plantwax n-alkanes are the major aliphatic hydrocarbon constituents. Aliphatic hydrocarbons of marine origin, pristane and a series of four acyclic, multibranched C 25 polyolefins, are also observed in many sediments. The concentrations of these marine-derived hydrocarbons decrease to negligible levels rapidly with sediment depth from the sea-sediment interface, suggesting degradation. In general, the major land-derived hydrocarbons are concentrated in the midshelf silt deposit which extends northwestward along the continental shelf from the Columbia River mouth. A quantitatively more minor, natural series of phenanthrene homologs, also of terrestrial origin, is preferentially advected further offshore and deposited in continental slope sediments. These distributions are consistent with recognized particle associations for these compounds and sediment dispersal processes in this coastal environment. Sediment core records suggest the present pattern of dispersal has persisted for at least the past century and possibly since the Late Pleistocene.

  16. Abundance and diversity of n-alkane-degrading bacteria in a forest soil co-contaminated with hydrocarbons and metals: a molecular study on alkB homologous genes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-de-Mora, Alfredo; Engel, Marion; Schloter, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Unraveling functional genes related to biodegradation of organic compounds has profoundly improved our understanding of biological remediation processes, yet the ecology of such genes is only poorly understood. We used a culture-independent approach to assess the abundance and diversity of bacteria catalyzing the degradation of n-alkanes with a chain length between C(5) and C(16) at a forest site co-contaminated with mineral oil hydrocarbons and metals for nearly 60 years. The alkB gene coding for a rubredoxin-dependent alkane monooxygenase enzyme involved in the initial activation step of aerobic aliphatic hydrocarbon metabolism was used as biomarker. Within the area of study, four different zones were evaluated: one highly contaminated, two intermediately contaminated, and a noncontaminated zone. Contaminant concentrations, hydrocarbon profiles, and soil microbial respiration and biomass were studied. Abundance of n-alkane-degrading bacteria was quantified via real-time PCR of alkB, whereas genetic diversity was examined using molecular fingerprints (T-RFLP) and clone libraries. Along the contamination plume, hydrocarbon profiles and increased respiration rates suggested on-going natural attenuation at the site. Gene copy numbers of alkB were similar in contaminated and control areas. However, T-RFLP-based fingerprints suggested lower diversity and evenness of the n-alkane-degrading bacterial community in the highly contaminated zone compared to the other areas; both diversity and evenness were negatively correlated with metal and hydrocarbon concentrations. Phylogenetic analysis of alkB denoted a shift of the hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial community from Gram-positive bacteria in the control zone (most similar to Mycobacterium and Nocardia types) to Gram-negative genotypes in the contaminated zones (Acinetobacter and alkB sequences with little similarity to those of known bacteria). Our results underscore a qualitative rather than a quantitative response of

  17. Variability of biological degradation of phenolic hydrocarbons in an aerobic aquifer determined by laboratory batch experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Per H.; Christensen, Thomas H.

    1994-11-01

    The biological aerobic degradation of 7 phenolic hydrocarbons (phenol, o-cresol, o-nitrophenol, p-nitrophenol, 2,6-dichlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 4,6- o-dichlorocresol) and 1 aromatic hydrocarbon (nitrobenzene) was studied for 149 days in replicate laboratory batch microcosms with sediment and groundwater from 8 localities representing a 15 m × 30 m section of an aerobic aquifer. Three patterns of variation were found: (1) phenol, o-cresol and in most cases p-nitrophenol showed very fast degradation with no or only short lag phases and with very little variation among localities; (2) 2,4-dichlorophenol was degraded in all localities and showed large variability among localities with respect to lag phases (0-50 days) and some variation with respect to degradation periods (20-40 days); and (3) nitrobenzene, o-nitrophenol, 2,6-dichlorophenol and 4,6- o-dichlorocresol showed very large variability among localities ranging from no degradation within 149 days in some localities to degradation within 2 days in other localities. The degradation patterns were highly sequential, indicating a general sequence, for those compounds degradable, valid in all localities. The results are of importance in designing experimental determination of degradation rates and in assigning degradation parameters for use in solute transport models.

  18. Abundance and diversity of soil petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading microbial communities in oil exploring areas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuyin; Wang, Jie; Liao, Jingqiu; Xie, Shuguang; Huang, Yi

    2015-02-01

    Alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the commonly detected petroleum hydrocarbon contaminants in soils in oil exploring areas. Hydrocarbon-degrading genes are useful biomarks for estimation of the bioremediation potential of contaminated sites. However, the links between environmental factors and the distribution of alkane and PAH metabolic genes still remain largely unclear. The present study investigated the abundances and diversities of soil n-alkane and PAH-degrading bacterial communities targeting both alkB and nah genes in two oil exploring areas at different geographic regions. A large variation in the abundances and diversities of alkB and nah genes occurred in the studied soil samples. Various environmental variables regulated the spatial distribution of soil alkane and PAH metabolic genes, dependent on geographic location. The soil alkane-degrading bacterial communities in oil exploring areas mainly consisted of Pedobacter, Mycobacterium, and unknown alkB-harboring microorganisms. Moreover, the novel PAH-degraders predominated in nah gene clone libraries from soils of the two oil exploring areas. This work could provide some new insights towards the distribution of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms and their biodegradation potential in soil ecosystems. PMID:25236802

  19. Aliphatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediments collected from the 110 mile hole and along a transect from 58 degrees 58.32'N 1 degree 10.38'W to the inner Moray Firth, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Webster, Lynda; Twigg, Marsailidh; Megginson, Colin; Walsham, Pam; Packer, Gill; Moffat, Colin

    2003-06-01

    Sediments were collected from the 110 mile hole and along a transect from 58 degrees 58.32' N 1 degree 10.38' W to the UK National Marine Monitoring (NMMP) site in the inner Moray Firth, for determination of hydrocarbon concentration and composition. Total PAH concentrations (2- to 6-ring PAHs, parent and branched) were highest at NMMP site 95 and at the associated end of the transect in the inner Moray Firth. PAHs in this area were of predominately pyrolytic origin and could be attributed to urban and industrial activities. The majority of sediments collected in the middle section of the transect had low total PAH concentrations (< 100 ng g(-1) dry weight). The high proportion of naphthalenes and alkylated PAHs in this area suggested a predominately petrogenic input. The GC-FID aliphatic hydrocarbon profiles showed that the majority of sediments, including those in the inner Firth, had a limited petrogenic input. This was supported by the geochemical biomarker profiles, which contained triterpanes typical of Middle Eastern crude oil. Principal component analysis was used to investigate spatial trends in the PAH distributions and demonstrated that there were differences between areas. The NMMP site 95 and transect start and middle sediments were well separated. PCA further confirmed that sediments from the NMMP site 95, the 110 mile hole and the inner Moray Firth (south west) end of the transect contained PAHs from predominately pyrolytic sources, whereas sediments from the north east end (start) and the middle of the transect were typified by a greater petrogenic component. PMID:12833981

  20. DNA-based stable isotope probing coupled with cultivation methods implicates Methylophaga in hydrocarbon degradation

    PubMed Central

    Mishamandani, Sara; Gutierrez, Tony; Aitken, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria perform a fundamental role in the oxidation and ultimate removal of crude oil and its petrochemical derivatives in coastal and open ocean environments. Those with an almost exclusive ability to utilize hydrocarbons as a sole carbon and energy source have been found confined to just a few genera. Here we used stable isotope probing (SIP), a valuable tool to link the phylogeny and function of targeted microbial groups, to investigate hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in coastal North Carolina sea water (Beaufort Inlet, USA) with uniformly labeled [13C]n-hexadecane. The dominant sequences in clone libraries constructed from 13C-enriched bacterial DNA (from n-hexadecane enrichments) were identified to belong to the genus Alcanivorax, with ≤98% sequence identity to the closest type strain—thus representing a putative novel phylogenetic taxon within this genus. Unexpectedly, we also identified 13C-enriched sequences in heavy DNA fractions that were affiliated to the genus Methylophaga. This is a contentious group since, though some of its members have been proposed to degrade hydrocarbons, substantive evidence has not previously confirmed this. We used quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of the SIP-identified Alcanivorax and Methylophaga to determine their abundance in incubations amended with unlabeled n-hexadecane. Both showed substantial increases in gene copy number during the experiments. Subsequently, we isolated a strain representing the SIP-identified Methylophaga sequences (99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity) and used it to show, for the first time, direct evidence of hydrocarbon degradation by a cultured Methylophaga sp. This study demonstrates the value of coupling SIP with cultivation methods to identify and expand on the known diversity of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the marine environment. PMID:24578702

  1. Anaerobic Microbial Degradation of Hydrocarbons: From Enzymatic Reactions to the Environment.

    PubMed

    Rabus, Ralf; Boll, Matthias; Heider, Johann; Meckenstock, Rainer U; Buckel, Wolfgang; Einsle, Oliver; Ermler, Ulrich; Golding, Bernard T; Gunsalus, Robert P; Kroneck, Peter M H; Krüger, Martin; Lueders, Tillmann; Martins, Berta M; Musat, Florin; Richnow, Hans H; Schink, Bernhard; Seifert, Jana; Szaleniec, Maciej; Treude, Tina; Ullmann, G Matthias; Vogt, Carsten; von Bergen, Martin; Wilkes, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are abundant in anoxic environments and pose biochemical challenges to their anaerobic degradation by microorganisms. Within the framework of the Priority Program 1319, investigations funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft on the anaerobic microbial degradation of hydrocarbons ranged from isolation and enrichment of hitherto unknown hydrocarbon-degrading anaerobic microorganisms, discovery of novel reactions, detailed studies of enzyme mechanisms and structures to process-oriented in situ studies. Selected highlights from this program are collected in this synopsis, with more detailed information provided by theme-focused reviews of the special topic issue on 'Anaerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons' [this issue, pp. 1-244]. The interdisciplinary character of the program, involving microbiologists, biochemists, organic chemists and environmental scientists, is best exemplified by the studies on alkyl-/arylalkylsuccinate synthases. Here, research topics ranged from in-depth mechanistic studies of archetypical toluene-activating benzylsuccinate synthase, substrate-specific phylogenetic clustering of alkyl-/arylalkylsuccinate synthases (toluene plus xylenes, p-cymene, p-cresol, 2-methylnaphthalene, n-alkanes), stereochemical and co-metabolic insights into n-alkane-activating (methylalkyl)succinate synthases to the discovery of bacterial groups previously unknown to possess alkyl-/arylalkylsuccinate synthases by means of functional gene markers and in situ field studies enabled by state-of-the-art stable isotope probing and fractionation approaches. Other topics are Mo-cofactor-dependent dehydrogenases performing O2-independent hydroxylation of hydrocarbons and alkyl side chains (ethylbenzene, p-cymene, cholesterol, n-hexadecane), degradation of p-alkylated benzoates and toluenes, glycyl radical-bearing 4-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase, novel types of carboxylation reactions (for acetophenone, acetone, and potentially also benzene and

  2. Photolysis degradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on surface sandy soil.

    PubMed

    El-Saeid, Mohamed H; Al-Turki, Ali M; Nadeem, Mahmoud E A; Hassanin, Ashraf S; Al-Wabel, Mohamed I

    2015-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are potent environmental pollutants, and some of them have been identified as carcinogenic and mutagenic. To advance the knowledge of the environmental fate of PAHs, we systematically investigated the influence of different UV wavelengths irradiation on photolysis of PAHs on sandy soil under tow wavelengths (254 and 306 nm) UV irradiation for six PAHs. In addition, kinetic model and influence of several parameters on PAHs photolysis have been studied. The results obtained indicated that UV radiation with a wavelength of 306 nm was more efficient in the photolysis of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Our results showed that fluoranthene (Flt) was the fastest in decomposition, has the greatest value for the coefficient of photolysis (7.4 × 10(-3) h(-1)), and has less half-life, reaching 94 h when using a wavelength of 254 nm. The results indicated that the pyrene (Pyr) was more resistant to photolysis in comparison with indeno(1,2,3-cd) pyrene (IP) and fluoranthene (Flt). The results indicate that photolysis is a successful way to remediate the six studied PAHs compounds. PMID:25586619

  3. Draft Genome of Cladophialophora immunda, a Black Yeast and Efficient Degrader of Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Sterflinger, Katja; Lopandic, Ksenija; Blasi, Barbara; Poynter, Caroline; de Hoog, Sybren; Tafer, Hakim

    2015-01-01

    The fungal genus Cladophialophora comprises many species which cause severe and even fatal infections in humans as well as environmental strains able to degrade polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The draft genome of Cladophialophora immunda presented here is the first whole-genome sequence within this important genus. PMID:25635024

  4. DEGRADATION OF POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS UNDER BENCH-SCALE COMPOST CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between biomass growth and degradation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil, and subsequent toxicity reduction, was evaluated in 10 in-vessel, bench-scale compost units. Field soil was aquired from the Reilly Tar and Chemical Company Superfund site...

  5. Polycyclovorans algicola gen. nov., sp. nov., an aromatic-hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacterium found associated with laboratory cultures of marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Green, David H; Nichols, Peter D; Whitman, William B; Semple, Kirk T; Aitken, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    A strictly aerobic, halotolerant, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain TG408, was isolated from a laboratory culture of the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum (CCAP1077/1C) by enrichment with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the sole carbon source. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis placed this organism within the order Xanthomonadales of the class Gammaproteobacteria. Its closest relatives included representatives of the Hydrocarboniphaga-Nevskia-Sinobacter clade (<92% sequence similarity) in the family Sinobacteraceae. The strain exhibited a narrow nutritional spectrum, preferring to utilize aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon compounds and small organic acids. Notably, it displayed versatility in degrading two- and three-ring PAHs. Moreover, catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity was detected in lysates, indicating that this strain utilizes the meta-cleavage pathway for aromatic compound degradation. Cells produced surface blebs and contained a single polar flagellum. The predominant isoprenoid quinone of strain TG408 was Q-8, and the dominant fatty acids were C(16:0), C(16:1) ω7c, and C(18:1) ω7c. The G+C content of the isolate's DNA was 64.3 mol% ± 0.34 mol%. On the basis of distinct phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain TG408 represents a novel genus and species in the class Gammaproteobacteria for which the name Polycyclovorans algicola gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed. Quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of this strain were developed and used to show that this organism is found associated with other species of marine phytoplankton. Phytoplankton may be a natural biotope in the ocean where new species of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria await discovery and which contribute significantly to natural remediation processes. PMID:23087039

  6. Polycyclovorans algicola gen. nov., sp. nov., an Aromatic-Hydrocarbon-Degrading Marine Bacterium Found Associated with Laboratory Cultures of Marine Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Green, David H.; Nichols, Peter D.; Whitman, William B.; Semple, Kirk T.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    A strictly aerobic, halotolerant, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain TG408, was isolated from a laboratory culture of the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum (CCAP1077/1C) by enrichment with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the sole carbon source. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis placed this organism within the order Xanthomonadales of the class Gammaproteobacteria. Its closest relatives included representatives of the Hydrocarboniphaga-Nevskia-Sinobacter clade (<92% sequence similarity) in the family Sinobacteraceae. The strain exhibited a narrow nutritional spectrum, preferring to utilize aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon compounds and small organic acids. Notably, it displayed versatility in degrading two- and three-ring PAHs. Moreover, catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity was detected in lysates, indicating that this strain utilizes the meta-cleavage pathway for aromatic compound degradation. Cells produced surface blebs and contained a single polar flagellum. The predominant isoprenoid quinone of strain TG408 was Q-8, and the dominant fatty acids were C16:0, C16:1 ω7c, and C18:1 ω7c. The G+C content of the isolate's DNA was 64.3 mol% ± 0.34 mol%. On the basis of distinct phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain TG408 represents a novel genus and species in the class Gammaproteobacteria for which the name Polycyclovorans algicola gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed. Quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of this strain were developed and used to show that this organism is found associated with other species of marine phytoplankton. Phytoplankton may be a natural biotope in the ocean where new species of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria await discovery and which contribute significantly to natural remediation processes. PMID:23087039

  7. Evaluation of EpiDerm full thickness-300 (EFT-300) as an in vitro model for skin irritation: Studies on aliphatic hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Mallampati, Ramya; Patlolla, Ram R.; Agarwal, Saurab; Babu, R. Jayachandra; Hayden, Patrick; Klausner, Mitchell; Singh, Mandip S.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the skin irritation effects of saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons (HCs), C9–C16, found jet fuels using in vitro 3-dimensional EpiDerm full thickness-300 (EFT-300) skin cultures. The EFT-300 cultures were treated with 2.5 µl of HCs and the culture medium and skin samples were collected at 24 and 48 h to measure the release of various inflammatory biomarkers (IL-1α, IL-6 and IL-8). To validate the in vitro results, in vivo skin irritation studies were carried out in hairless rats by measuring trans epidermal water loss (TEWL) and erythema following un-occlusive dermal exposure of HCs for 72 h. The MTT tissue viability assay results with the EFT-300 tissue show that 2.5 µl/tissue (≈4.1 µl/cm2) of the HCs did not induce any significant changes in the tissue viability for exposure times up to 48 h of exposure. Microscopic observation of the EFT-300 cross-sections indicated that there were no obvious changes in the tissue morphology of the samples at 24 h, but after 48 h of exposure, tridecane, tetradecane and hexadecane produced a slight thickening and disruption of stratum corneum. Dermal exposures of C12–C16 HCs for 24 h significantly increased the expression of IL-1α in the skin as well as in the culture medium. Similarly, dermal exposure of all HCs for 24 h significantly increased the expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 in the skin as well as in the culture medium in proportion to the HC chain length. As the exposure time increased to 48 h, IL-6 concentrations increased 2-fold compared to the IL-6 values at 24 h. The in vivo skin irritation data also showed that both TEWL and erythema scores increased with increased HCs chain length (C9–C16). In conclusion, the EFT-300 showed that the skin irritation profile of HCs was in the order of C9 ≤ C10 ≤ C11 ≤ C12 < C13 ≈ C14 ≈ C16 and that the tissue was an excellent in vitro model to predict in vivo irritation and to understand the structural activity

  8. Proteogenomic Characterization of Monocyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Degradation Pathways in the Aniline-Degrading Bacterium Burkholderia sp. K24

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sung Ho; Choi, Chi-Won; Yi, Yoon-Sun; Kim, Jonghyun; Chung, Young-Ho; Park, Edmond Changkyun; Kim, Seung Il

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. K24, formerly known as Acinetobacter lwoffii K24, is a soil bacterium capable of utilizing aniline as its sole carbon and nitrogen source. Genomic sequence analysis revealed that this bacterium possesses putative gene clusters for biodegradation of various monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs), including benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX), as well as aniline. We verified the proposed MAH biodegradation pathways by dioxygenase activity assays, RT-PCR, and LC/MS-based quantitative proteomic analyses. This proteogenomic approach revealed four independent degradation pathways, all converging into the citric acid cycle. Aniline and p-hydroxybenzoate degradation pathways converged into the β-ketoadipate pathway. Benzoate and toluene were degraded through the benzoyl-CoA degradation pathway. The xylene isomers, i.e., o-, m-, and p-xylene, were degraded via the extradiol cleavage pathways. Salicylate was degraded through the gentisate degradation pathway. Our results show that Burkholderia sp. K24 possesses versatile biodegradation pathways, which may be employed for efficient bioremediation of aniline and BTX. PMID:27124467

  9. Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacteria Exhibit a Species-Specific Response to Dispersed Oil while Moderating Ecotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Overholt, Will A.; Marks, Kala P.; Romero, Isabel C.; Hollander, David J.; Snell, Terry W.

    2015-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon blowout in April 2010 represented the largest accidental marine oil spill and the largest release of chemical dispersants into the environment to date. While dispersant application may provide numerous benefits to oil spill response efforts, the impacts of dispersants and potential synergistic effects with crude oil on individual hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria are poorly understood. In this study, two environmentally relevant species of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were utilized to quantify the response to Macondo crude oil and Corexit 9500A-dispersed oil in terms of bacterial growth and oil degradation potential. In addition, specific hydrocarbon compounds were quantified in the dissolved phase of the medium and linked to ecotoxicity using a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-approved rotifer assay. Bacterial treatment significantly and drastically reduced the toxicity associated with dispersed oil (increasing the 50% lethal concentration [LC50] by 215%). The growth and crude oil degradation potential of Acinetobacter were inhibited by Corexit by 34% and 40%, respectively; conversely, Corexit significantly enhanced the growth of Alcanivorax by 10% relative to that in undispersed oil. Furthermore, both bacterial strains were shown to grow with Corexit as the sole carbon and energy source. Hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial species demonstrate a unique response to dispersed oil compared to their response to crude oil, with potentially opposing effects on toxicity. While some species have the potential to enhance the toxicity of crude oil by producing biosurfactants, the same bacteria may reduce the toxicity associated with dispersed oil through degradation or sequestration. PMID:26546426

  10. Characterization of the transcriptome of Achromobacter sp. HZ01 with the outstanding hydrocarbon-degrading ability.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yue-Hui; Deng, Mao-Cheng; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Wu, Chou-Fei; Xiao, Xi; Zhu, Qing; Sun, Xian-Xian; Zhou, Qian-Zhi; Peng, Juan; Yuan, Jian-Ping; Wang, Jiang-Hai

    2016-06-15

    Microbial remediation has become one of the most important strategies for eliminating petroleum pollutants. Revealing the transcript maps of microorganisms with the hydrocarbon-degrading ability contributes to enhance the degradation of hydrocarbons and further improve the effectiveness of bioremediation. In this study, we characterized the transcriptome of hydrocarbon-degrading Achromobacter sp. HZ01 after petroleum treatment for 16h. A total of 38,706,280 and 38,954,413 clean reads were obtained by RNA-seq for the petroleum-treated group and control, respectively. By an effective de novo assembly, 3597 unigenes were obtained, including 3485 annotated transcripts. Petroleum treatment had significantly influenced the transcriptional profile of strain HZ01, involving 742 differentially expressed genes. A part of genes were activated to exert specific physiological functions, whereas more genes were down-regulated including specific genes related to cell motility, genes associated with glycometabolism, and genes coding for ribosomal proteins. Identification of genes related to petroleum degradation revealed that the fatty acid metabolic pathway and a part of monooxygenases and dehydrogenases were activated, whereas the TCA cycle was inactive. Additionally, terminal oxidation might be a major aerobic pathway for the degradation of n-alkanes in strain HZ01. The newly obtained data contribute to better understand the gene expression profiles of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms after petroleum treatment, to further investigate the genetic characteristics of strain HZ01 and other related species and to develop cost-effective and eco-friendly strategies for remediation of crude oil-polluted environments. PMID:26915487

  11. Effects of illuminance and nutrients on bacterial photo-physiology of hydrocarbon degradation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Aqib Hassan Ali; Anees, Mariam; Arshad, Muhammad; Muhammad, Yousaf Shad; Iqbal, Mazhar; Yousaf, Sohail

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial photophysiology was previously limited to photoautotrophs. The discovery of bacteriophytochromes in non-photoautotrophs raised a question whether these non-photoautotrophs are affected by the presence or absence of light? In this research work for the first time, bacterial hydrocarbon degradation and biomass production was studied under the influence of nutrients, illuminance (light flux) and time. An experimental model was designed, with six isolated bacterial strains (Pseudomonas poae BA1, Pseudomonas rhizosphaerae BP3, Bacillus thuringiensis BG3, Acinetobacter bouvetii BP18, Pseudomonas proteolytica BG31 and Stenotrophomonas rhizophila BG32) under four different conditions of nutrient media and illuminance at three time intervals of 15, 30, and 45days without shaking. All strains showed statistically higher hydrocarbon degradation under nutrient rich, dark conditions. Highest biodegradation (80.8, 79.4, and 78.7mg) was observed in BG31, BG17 and BG3 respectively. Nutrient rich media along with dark conditions improved the biomass production, and when media was nutrient deprived, higher biomass was produced in the presence of light. This work proved that light and nutrients significantly affect bacterial populations and hydrocarbon degradation. The optimal use of these parameters could facilitate to achieve the goal of remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated sites. PMID:27039061

  12. Evaluation of solid polymeric organic materials for use in bioreactive sediment capping to stimulate the degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Atashgahi, Siavash; Maphosa, Farai; De Vrieze, Jo; Haest, Pieter Jan; Boon, Nico; Smidt, Hauke; Springael, Dirk; Dejonghe, Winnie

    2014-03-01

    In situ bioreactive capping is a promising technology for mitigation of surface water contamination by discharging polluted groundwater. Organohalide respiration (OHR) of chlorinated ethenes in bioreactive caps can be stimulated through incorporation of solid polymeric organic materials (SPOMs) that provide a sustainable electron source for organohalide respiring bacteria. In this study, wood chips, hay, straw, tree bark and shrimp waste, were assessed for their long term applicability as an electron donor for OHR of cis-dichloroethene (cDCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) in sediment microcosms. The initial release of fermentation products, such as acetate, propionate and butyrate led to the onset of extensive methane production especially in microcosms amended with shrimp waste, straw and hay, while no considerable stimulation of VC dechlorination was obtained in any of the SPOM amended microcosms. However, in the longer term, short chain fatty acids accumulation decreased as well as methanogenesis, whereas high dechlorination rates of VC and cDCE were established with concomitant increase of Dehalococcoides mccartyi and vcrA and bvcA gene numbers both in the sediment and on the SPOMs. A numeric simulation indicated that a capping layer of 40 cm with hay, straw, tree bark or shrimp waste is suffice to reduce the groundwater VC concentration below the threshold level of 5 μg/l before discharging into the Zenne River, Belgium. Of all SPOMs, the persistent colonization of tree bark by D. mccartyi combined with the lowest stimulation of methanogenesis singled out tree bark as a long-term electron donor for OHR of cDCE/VC in bioreactive caps. PMID:23955471

  13. Marine coastal sediments microbial hydrocarbon degradation processes: contribution of experimental ecology in the omics’era

    PubMed Central

    Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Duran, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Coastal marine sediments, where important biological processes take place, supply essential ecosystem services. By their location, such ecosystems are particularly exposed to human activities as evidenced by the recent Deepwater Horizon disaster. This catastrophe revealed the importance to better understand the microbial processes involved on hydrocarbon degradation in marine sediments raising strong interests of the scientific community. During the last decade, several studies have shown the key role played by microorganisms in determining the fate of hydrocarbons in oil-polluted sediments but only few have taken into consideration the whole sediment’s complexity. Marine coastal sediment ecosystems are characterized by remarkable heterogeneity, owning high biodiversity and are subjected to fluctuations in environmental conditions, especially to important oxygen oscillations due to tides. Thus, for understanding the fate of hydrocarbons in such environments, it is crucial to study microbial activities, taking into account sediment characteristics, physical-chemical factors (electron acceptors, temperature), nutrients, co-metabolites availability as well as sediment’s reworking due to bioturbation activities. Key information could be collected from in situ studies, which provide an overview of microbial processes, but it is difficult to integrate all parameters involved. Microcosm experiments allow to dissect in-depth some mechanisms involved in hydrocarbon degradation but exclude environmental complexity. To overcome these lacks, strategies have been developed, by creating experiments as close as possible to environmental conditions, for studying natural microbial communities subjected to oil pollution. We present here a review of these approaches, their results and limitation, as well as the promising future of applying “omics” approaches to characterize in-depth microbial communities and metabolic networks involved in hydrocarbon degradation. In addition

  14. Influence of different salt marsh plants on hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms abundance throughout a phenological cycle.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Hugo; Almeida, C Marisa R; Mucha, Ana Paula; Bordalo, Adriano A

    2013-01-01

    The influence of Juncus maritimus, Phragmites australis, and Triglochin striata on hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms (HD) in Lima River estuary (NW Portugal) was investigated through a year-long plant life cycle. Sediments un-colonized and colonized (rhizosediments) by those salt marsh plants were sampled for HD, total cell counts (TCC), and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) assessment. Generally, TCC seemed to be markedly thriving by the presence of roots, but without significant (p > 0.05) differences among rhizosediments. Nevertheless, plants seemed to have a distinct influence on HD abundance, particularly during the flowering season, with higher HD abundance in the rhizosediments of the fibrous roots plants (J. maritimus < P. australis < T. striata). Our data suggest that different plants have distinct influence on the dynamics of HD populations within its own rhizosphere, particularly during the flowering season, suggesting a period of higher rhizoremediation activity. Additionally, during the vegetative period, plants with fibrous and dense root system tend to retain hydrocarbons around their belowground tissues more efficiently than plants with adventitious root system. Overall results indicate that fibrous root plants have a higher potential to promote hydrocarbons degradation, and that seasonality should be taken into account when designing long-term rhizoremediation strategies in estuarine areas. PMID:23819270

  15. Isolation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-degrading Mycobacterium spp. and the degradation in soil.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jun; Lin, Xiangui; Zhang, Jing; Li, Xuanzhen

    2010-11-15

    The goal of this study was to isolate PAHs degraders that can utilize PAHs associated with soil particulates and investigate the biodegradation of PAHs on agar plate, in liquid culture and soil. Two Mycobacterium strains (NJS-1 and NJS-P) were isolated from PAHs-contaminated farmland soil using enrichment based on soil slurry. The isolates could degrade five test PAHs including pyrene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, anthracene and benzo[a]pyrene on plate, but showed different effects in liquid culture, especially for fluoranthene. Isolate NJS-1 was capable of utilizing benzo[a]pyrene as a sole carbon and energy source, and an enhanced degradation was observed when pyrene was supplied as cometabolic substrate. Reintroduction of the isolates into sterile contaminated soil resulted in a significant removal of aged pyrene and fluoranthene (over 40%) in 2-months incubation. In pyrene-spiked soil, the degradation of pyrene and fluoranthene increased to 90% and 50%, respectively. Comparing PAHs degradation on plate, in liquid culture and soil, we can conclude that there was corresponding degradation in different test systems. In addition, the degradation of aged PAHs in soil suggested the potential application of two isolates in further bioremediation. PMID:20724073

  16. Comparison of aliphatic hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenylethers, and organochlorine pesticides in Pacific sanddab (Citharichthys sordidus) from offshore oil platforms and natural reefs along the California coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gale, Robert W.; Tanner, Michael J.; Love, Milton S.; Nishimoto, Mary M.; Schroeder, Donna M.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the relative exposure of Pacific sanddab (Citharichthys sordidus) to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at oil-production platforms was reported, indicating negligible exposure to PAHs and no discernible differences between exposures at platforms and nearby natural areas sites. In this report, the potential for chronic PAH exposure in fish is reported, by measurement of recalcitrant, higher molecular weight PAHs in tissues of fish previously investigated for PAH metabolites in bile. A total of 34 PAHs (20 PAHs, 11 alkylated PAHs, and 3 polycyclic aromatic thiophenes) were targeted. In addition, legacy contaminants—polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs),—and current contaminants, polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) linked to endocrine disruption, were measured by gas chromatography with electron-capture or mass spectrometric detection, to form a more complete picture of the contaminant-related status of fishes at oil production platforms in the Southern California Bight. No hydrocarbon profiles or unresolved complex hydrocarbon background were found in fish from platforms and from natural areas, and concentrations of aliphatics were low less than 100 nanograms per gram (ng/g) per component]. Total-PAH concentrations in fish ranged from 15 to 37 ng/g at natural areas and from 8.7 to 22 ng/g at platforms. Profiles of PAHs were similar at all natural and platform sites, consisting mainly of naphthalene and methylnaphthalenes, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene. Total-PCB concentrations (excluding non-ortho-chloro-substituted congeners) in fish were low, ranging from 7 to 22 ng/g at natural areas and from 10 to 35 ng/g at platforms. About 50 percent of the total-PCBs at all sites consisted of 11 congeners: 153 > 138/163/164 > 110 > 118 > 15 > 99 > 187 > 149 > 180. Most OCPs, except dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT)-related compounds, were not detectable or were at concentrations of less than 1 ng/g in fish. p

  17. New hydrocarbon degradation pathways in the microbial metagenome from Brazilian petroleum reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Sierra-García, Isabel Natalia; Correa Alvarez, Javier; de Vasconcellos, Suzan Pantaroto; Pereira de Souza, Anete; dos Santos Neto, Eugenio Vaz; de Oliveira, Valéria Maia

    2014-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial diversity and metabolic pathways involved in hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum reservoirs is still limited, mostly due to the difficulty in recovering the complex community from such an extreme environment. Metagenomics is a valuable tool to investigate the genetic and functional diversity of previously uncultured microorganisms in natural environments. Using a function-driven metagenomic approach, we investigated the metabolic abilities of microbial communities in oil reservoirs. Here, we describe novel functional metabolic pathways involved in the biodegradation of aromatic compounds in a metagenomic library obtained from an oil reservoir. Although many of the deduced proteins shared homology with known enzymes of different well-described aerobic and anaerobic catabolic pathways, the metagenomic fragments did not contain the complete clusters known to be involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Instead, the metagenomic fragments comprised genes belonging to different pathways, showing novel gene arrangements. These results reinforce the potential of the metagenomic approach for the identification and elucidation of new genes and pathways in poorly studied environments and contribute to a broader perspective on the hydrocarbon degradation processes in petroleum reservoirs. PMID:24587220

  18. Salinity and Conductivity Amendment of Soil Enhanced the Bioelectrochemical Degradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yueyong; Zhao, Qian; Yu, Binbin; Li, Yongtao; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-01-01

    The extreme salinity and high internal resistance of saline-alkali soil contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons were two key limitations for using the bioelectrochemical remediation. In order to solve two problems, we simply rinsed soil, added carbon fiber to polluted soil. The charge output was enhanced by 110% with increase of the maximum current densities from 81 to 304 mA·m(-2) while hydrocarbons degradation rate enhanced by 484%, especially the high molecular weight fractions (C28-C36 of n-alkanes and 4-6 rings of PAHs). These effects were possibly due to the selective enrichment of species belonged to δ-Proteobacteria (Proteobacteria), Flavobacteriia (Bacteroidetes) or Clostridia (Firmicutes), the activities of biological electron transfer and enzymes. As we know, oxygenase gene that directly decided the process of degradation, was surveyed for the first time in soil bioelectrochemical remediation system. The results confirmed that the bio-current stimulated the activities of naphthalene dioxygenase and xylene monooxygenase and thus the hydrocarbons degradation and the electricity generation. Given that electricity generation and the remediation performance are governed by multiple factors, understanding of microbial community and enzyme gene is crucial to promote the power yield and the bioelectrochemical remediation applicability. PMID:27597387

  19. Salinity and Conductivity Amendment of Soil Enhanced the Bioelectrochemical Degradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yueyong; Zhao, Qian; Yu, Binbin; Li, Yongtao; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-01-01

    The extreme salinity and high internal resistance of saline-alkali soil contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons were two key limitations for using the bioelectrochemical remediation. In order to solve two problems, we simply rinsed soil, added carbon fiber to polluted soil. The charge output was enhanced by 110% with increase of the maximum current densities from 81 to 304 mA·m−2 while hydrocarbons degradation rate enhanced by 484%, especially the high molecular weight fractions (C28–C36 of n-alkanes and 4–6 rings of PAHs). These effects were possibly due to the selective enrichment of species belonged to δ-Proteobacteria (Proteobacteria), Flavobacteriia (Bacteroidetes) or Clostridia (Firmicutes), the activities of biological electron transfer and enzymes. As we know, oxygenase gene that directly decided the process of degradation, was surveyed for the first time in soil bioelectrochemical remediation system. The results confirmed that the bio-current stimulated the activities of naphthalene dioxygenase and xylene monooxygenase and thus the hydrocarbons degradation and the electricity generation. Given that electricity generation and the remediation performance are governed by multiple factors, understanding of microbial community and enzyme gene is crucial to promote the power yield and the bioelectrochemical remediation applicability. PMID:27597387

  20. New Hydrocarbon Degradation Pathways in the Microbial Metagenome from Brazilian Petroleum Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Sierra-García, Isabel Natalia; Correa Alvarez, Javier; Pantaroto de Vasconcellos, Suzan; Pereira de Souza, Anete; dos Santos Neto, Eugenio Vaz; de Oliveira, Valéria Maia

    2014-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial diversity and metabolic pathways involved in hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum reservoirs is still limited, mostly due to the difficulty in recovering the complex community from such an extreme environment. Metagenomics is a valuable tool to investigate the genetic and functional diversity of previously uncultured microorganisms in natural environments. Using a function-driven metagenomic approach, we investigated the metabolic abilities of microbial communities in oil reservoirs. Here, we describe novel functional metabolic pathways involved in the biodegradation of aromatic compounds in a metagenomic library obtained from an oil reservoir. Although many of the deduced proteins shared homology with known enzymes of different well-described aerobic and anaerobic catabolic pathways, the metagenomic fragments did not contain the complete clusters known to be involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Instead, the metagenomic fragments comprised genes belonging to different pathways, showing novel gene arrangements. These results reinforce the potential of the metagenomic approach for the identification and elucidation of new genes and pathways in poorly studied environments and contribute to a broader perspective on the hydrocarbon degradation processes in petroleum reservoirs. PMID:24587220

  1. In situ determination of the rate of unassisted degradation of saturated-zone hydrocarbon contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Kerfoot, H.B.

    1994-07-01

    A method to measure the in situ degradation rate of dissolved hydrocarbon contamination has been developed and applied at two locations at a field site. The method uses the rates of downward diffusion of oxygen and upward diffusion of carbon dioxide through the unsaturated zone, as calculated from vertical soil-gas concentration gradients, combined with stoichiometry to obtain two degradation rates in hydrocarbon mass per water table surface area per time. Values of 0.385 gram per m{sup 2} per day and 0.52 gram per m{sup 2} per day (based upon oxygen data) and 0.056 gram per m{sup 2} per day and 0.12 gram per m{sup 2} per day (based upon carbon dioxide data) were calculated at a field site with dissolved fuel contamination. This result of lower values from ground-air carbon dioxide concentrations is consistent with a significant fraction of the carbon dioxide produced being lost to the aqueous phase. Based upon a single-stage equilibrium phase-transfer model, gas/water volume ratios of 0.02 and 0.2 for the capillary fringe were calculated. Groundwater carbon dioxide fugacities and soil-gas carbon dioxide concentrations were used at the two locations and a third to determine whether the source of elevated soil carbon dioxide concentrations were unsaturated-zone hydrocarbon degradation or a saturated-zone process. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Photocatalytic degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[a]pyrene by iron oxides and identification of degradation products.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Himanshu; Gupta, Bina

    2015-11-01

    Photocatalytic decay profiles of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) have been investigated on various synthesized iron oxides and on soil surfaces under a set of diverse conditions. Samples were analysed using the developed HPLC procedure. Results of the present study demonstrate fastest photodisintegration of B[a]P on goethite followed by haematite, magnetite, akaganeite and maghemite, respectively. The effect of soil pH, irradiation wavelength and iron oxide and oxalic acid dose on the degradation of B[a]P was evaluated. The studies revealed enhancement in photodegradation in the presence of oxalic acid due to the occurrence of fenton like reaction. The results showed faster B[a]P degradation under short wavelength UV radiation. Rate constants in acidic, neutral and alkaline soils under optimum dissipation conditions were 1.11×10(-2), 7.69×10(-3) and 9.97×10(-3) h(-1), respectively. The study indicates that iron oxides along with oxalic acid are effective photocatalyst for the remediation of benzo[a]pyrene contaminated soil surfaces. The degradation products of B[a]P in the soils of different pH in presence of goethite were identified and degradation pathways proposed. Peaks due to toxic metabolites such as diones, diols and epoxides disappear after 120 h in all the three soils. PMID:25576129

  3. Impact of hydrocarbons, PCBs and heavy metals on bacterial communities in Lerma River, Salamanca, Mexico: Investigation of hydrocarbon degradation potential.

    PubMed

    Brito, Elcia M S; De la Cruz Barrón, Magali; Caretta, César A; Goñi-Urriza, Marisol; Andrade, Leandro H; Cuevas-Rodríguez, Germán; Malm, Olaf; Torres, João P M; Simon, Maryse; Guyoneaud, Remy

    2015-07-15

    Freshwater contamination usually comes from runoff water or direct wastewater discharges to the environment. This paper presents a case study which reveals the impact of these types of contamination on the sediment bacterial population. A small stretch of Lerma River Basin, heavily impacted by industrial activities and urban wastewater release, was studied. Due to industrial inputs, the sediments are characterized by strong hydrocarbon concentrations, ranging from 2 935 to 28 430μg·kg(-1) of total polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These sediments are also impacted by heavy metals (e.g., 9.6μg·kg(-1) of Cd and 246μg·kg(-1) of Cu, about 8 times the maximum recommended values for environmental samples) and polychlorinated biphenyls (ranging from 54 to 123μg·kg(-1) of total PCBs). The bacterial diversity on 6 sediment samples, taken from upstream to downstream of the main industrial and urban contamination sources, was assessed through TRFLP. Even though the high PAH concentrations are hazardous to aquatic life, they are not the only factor driving bacterial community composition in this ecosystem. Urban discharges, leading to hypoxia and low pH, also strongly influenced bacterial community structure. The bacterial bioprospection of these samples, using PAH as unique carbon source, yielded 8 hydrocarbonoclastic strains. By sequencing the 16S rDNA gene, these were identified as similar to Mycobacterium goodii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas lundensis or Aeromonas veronii. These strains showed high capacity to degrade naphthalene (between 92 and 100% at 200mg·L(-1)), pyrene (up to 72% at 100mg·L(-1)) and/or fluoranthene (52% at 50mg·L(-1)) as their only carbon source on in vitro experiments. These hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria were detected even in the samples upstream of the city of Salamanca, suggesting chronical contamination, already in place longer before. Such microorganisms are clearly potential candidates for hydrocarbon degradation in the

  4. Effect of physical sediments reworking on hydrocarbon degradation and bacterial community structure in marine coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Duran, Robert; Bonin, Patricia; Jezequel, Ronan; Dubosc, Karine; Gassie, Claire; Terrisse, Fanny; Abella, Justine; Cagnon, Christine; Militon, Cecile; Michotey, Valérie; Gilbert, Franck; Cuny, Philippe; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana

    2015-10-01

    The present study aimed to examine whether the physical reworking of sediments by harrowing would be suitable for favouring the hydrocarbon degradation in coastal marine sediments. Mudflat sediments were maintained in mesocosms under conditions as closer as possible to those prevailing in natural environments with tidal cycles. Sediments were contaminated with Ural blend crude oil, and in half of them, harrowing treatment was applied in order to mimic physical reworking of surface sediments. Hydrocarbon distribution within the sediment and its removal was followed during 286 days. The harrowing treatment allowed hydrocarbon compounds to penetrate the first 6 cm of the sediments, and biodegradation indexes (such as n-C18/phytane) indicated that biodegradation started 90 days before that observed in untreated control mesocosms. However, the harrowing treatment had a severe impact on benthic organisms reducing drastically the macrofaunal abundance and diversity. In the harrowing-treated mesocosms, the bacterial abundance, determined by 16S rRNA gene Q-PCR, was slightly increased; and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses of 16S rRNA genes showed distinct and specific bacterial community structure. Co-occurrence network and canonical correspondence analyses (CCA) based on T-RFLP data indicated the main correlations between bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) as well as the associations between OTUs and hydrocarbon compound contents further supported by clustered correlation (ClusCor) analysis. The analyses highlighted the OTUs constituting the network structural bases involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Negative correlations indicated the possible shifts in bacterial communities that occurred during the ecological succession. PMID:25847440

  5. Degradation and utilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by indigenous soil bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Stetzenbach, L.D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The persistence of industrially derived polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the subsurface may be significantly affected by the metabolism of soil bacteria. This study was conducted to determine the ability of indigenous soil bacteria to decrease the concentration of four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene, fluorene, anthracene, and pyrene) and to utilize the compounds as a substrate for growth. Soil cores from petroleum contaminated and noncontaminated sites contained 10/sup 5/-10/sup 7/ viable microorganisms per gram dryweight of soil. Gram negative rod-shaped bacteria predominated. Decreases in the concentration of the four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were observed during incubation with bacterial isolates in aqueous suspension by the use of high performance liquid chromatography. Corresponding increases in bacterial numbers indicated utilization of the compounds as a carbon source. Soil samples from the contaminated sites contained greater numbers of bacteria utilizing anthracene and pyrene than soil samples from uncontaminated sites. Degradation rates of the four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were related to the compound, its concentration, and the bacterium. Biodegradation of pyrene was positively correlated with the presence of oxygen. Pyrene was biodegraded by an Acinetobacter sp. under aerobic conditions but not under anaerobic or microaerophilic conditions. Studies with radiolabeled /sup 14/C-anthracene demonstrated utilization of the labeled carbon as a source of carbon by viable bacterial cells in aqueous suspension. Incorporation of /sup 14/C into cellular biomass however was not observed during incubation of /sup 14/C-anthracene in soil.

  6. Isolation and characterization of heavy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria adapted to electrokinetic conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengmei; Guo, Shuhai; Hartog, Niels; Yuan, Ye; Yang, Xuelian

    2016-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria capable of growing under electrokinetic conditions were isolated using an adjusted acclimation and enrichment procedure based on soil contaminated with heavy PAHs in the presence of an electric field. Their ability to degrade heavy PAHs under an electric field was individually investigated in artificially contaminated soils. The results showed that strains PB4 (Pseudomonas fluorescens) and FB6 (Kocuria sp.) were the most efficient heavy PAH degraders under electrokinetic conditions. They were re-inoculated into a polluted soil from an industrial site with a PAH concentration of 184.95 mg kg(-1). Compared to the experiments without an electric field, the degradation capability of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Kocuria sp. was enhanced in the industrially polluted soil under electrokinetic conditions. The degradation extents of total PAHs were increased by 15.4 and 14.0% in the electrokinetic PB4 and FB6 experiments (PB4 + EK and FB6 + EK) relative to the PB4 and FB6 experiments without electrokinetic conditions (PB4 and FB6), respectively. These results indicated that P. fluorescens and Kocuria sp. could efficiently degrade heavy PAHs under electrokinetic conditions and have the potential to be used for the electro-bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soil, especially if the soil is contaminated with heavy PAHs. PMID:26615425

  7. Identification of Anthraquinone-Degrading Bacteria in Soil Contaminated with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers-Vieira, Elyse A.; Zhang, Zhenfa; Adrion, Alden C.; Gold, Avram

    2015-01-01

    Quinones and other oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAHs) are toxic and/or genotoxic compounds observed to be cocontaminants at PAH-contaminated sites, but their formation and fate in contaminated environmental systems have not been well studied. Anthracene-9,10-dione (anthraquinone) has been found in most PAH-contaminated soils and sediments that have been analyzed for oxy-PAHs. However, little is known about the biodegradation of oxy-PAHs, and no bacterial isolates have been described that are capable of growing on or degrading anthraquinone. PAH-degrading Mycobacterium spp. are the only organisms that have been investigated to date for metabolism of a PAH quinone, 4,5-pyrenequinone. We utilized DNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP) with [U-13C]anthraquinone to identify bacteria associated with anthraquinone degradation in PAH-contaminated soil from a former manufactured-gas plant site both before and after treatment in a laboratory-scale bioreactor. SIP with [U-13C]anthracene was also performed to assess whether bacteria capable of growing on anthracene are the same as those identified to grow on anthraquinone. Organisms closely related to Sphingomonas were the most predominant among the organisms associated with anthraquinone degradation in bioreactor-treated soil, while organisms in the genus Phenylobacterium comprised the majority of anthraquinone degraders in the untreated soil. Bacteria associated with anthracene degradation differed from those responsible for anthraquinone degradation. These results suggest that Sphingomonas and Phenylobacterium species are associated with anthraquinone degradation and that anthracene-degrading organisms may not possess mechanisms to grow on anthraquinone. PMID:25819957

  8. Cultivation of a bacterial consortium with the potential to degrade total petroleum hydrocarbon using waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, S; Song, Y C; Kim, S H; Jang, S H

    2015-11-01

    Waste activated sludge was aerobically treated to demonstrate multiple uses such as cultivating an oil degrading bacterial consortium; studying the influence of a bulking agent (peat moss) and total petroleum hydrocarbon concentration on bacterial growth and producing a soil conditioner using waste activated sludge. After 30 days of incubation, the concentration of oil-degrading bacteria was 4.3 x 10(8) CFU g(-1) and 4.5 x 10(8) CFU g(-1) for 5 and 10 g of total petroleum hydrocarbon, respectively, in a mixture of waste activated sludge (1 kg) and peat moss (0.1 kg). This accounts for approximately 88.4 and 91.1%, respectively, of the total heterotrophic bacteria (total-HB). The addition of bulking agent enhanced total-HB population and total petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial population. Over 90% of total petroleum hydrocarbon degradation was achieved by the mixture of waste activated sludge, bulking agent and total petroleum hydrocarbon. The results of physico-chemical parameters of the compost (waste activated sludge with and without added peat moss compost) and a substantial reduction in E. coli showed that the use of this final product did not exhibit risk when used as soil conditioner. Finally, the present study demonstrated that cultivation of total petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial consortium and production of compost from waste activated sludge by aerobic treatment was feasible. PMID:26688976

  9. Occurrence of aliphatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Mytillus galloprovincialis from the traditional market in Marseille, France, by Gas Chromatography triplequadropole tandem Mass Spectrometry (GC-QQQ/MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azis, M. Y.; Yelmiza; Asia, L.; Piram, A.; Bucharil, B.; Doumenq, P.; Syakti, A. D.

    2016-02-01

    Mediterranean mussel, Mytillusgalloprovincialis collected from the traditional market in Marseille, France,have been analysed using GC-QQQ/MS for their hydrocarbons (n-alkanes and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)) extentwith two different solvent extraction, such as heptane:dichloromethane (HEP:DCM;1:1) and heptane:acetone (HEP:ACE; 1:1). The results showed hydrocarbons yielded from heptane:acetone extractionwere 28335 μg.kg- 1mussels dw (Ʃ n-alkanes C15-34) and 202 μg.kg-1mussels dw(ƩPAHs) while the yield from heptane:DCM extract was lower ca. 27026 μg.kg-1musselsdw and 133 μg.kg-1 mussels dw respectively from the Ʃn-alkanesC15-34and ƩPAHs. High hydrocarbon levels can be affected by the presence of lipids or other metabolites in mussels that have the same polarity with hydrocarbon compounds which has interferred the measurement. Several ratio parameter of n- alcanes and PAHs source in the mussels were evaluated to asses the origins of their hydrocarbons in mussels from which we suggested origins of hydrocarbons were pyrolytic and biogenic rather than petrogenic.

  10. Isolation and screening of black fungi as degraders of volatile aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Isola, Daniela; Selbmann, Laura; de Hoog, G Sybren; Fenice, Massimiliano; Onofri, Silvano; Prenafeta-Boldú, Francesc X; Zucconi, Laura

    2013-06-01

    Black fungi reported as degraders of volatile aromatic compounds were isolated from hydrocarbon-polluted sites and indoor environments. Several of the species encountered are known opportunistic pathogens or are closely related to pathogenic species causing severe mycoses, among which are neurological infections in immunocompetent individuals. Given the scale of the problem of environmental pollution and the phylogenetic relation of aromate-degrading black fungi with pathogenic siblings, it is of great interest to select strains able to mineralize these substrates efficiently without any risk for public health. Fifty-six black strains were obtained from human-made environments rich in hydrocarbons (gasoline car tanks, washing machine soap dispensers) after enrichment with some phenolic intermediates of toluene and styrene fungal metabolism. Based on ITS sequencing identification, the majority of the obtained isolates were members of the genus Exophiala. Exophiala xenobiotica was found to be the dominant black yeast present in the car gasoline tanks. A higher biodiversity, with three Exophiala species, was found in soap dispensers of washing machines. Strains obtained were screened using a 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol (DCPIP) assay, optimized for black fungi, to assess their potential ability to degrade toluene. Seven out of twenty strains tested were able to use toluene as carbon source. PMID:23475324

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Aquamicrobium defluvii Strain W13Z1, a Psychrotolerant Halotolerant Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Decai; Zhou, Lisha; Zhang, Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    Aquamicrobium defluvii W13Z1 was isolated from petroleum-contaminated drill cuttings from the Bohai Sea and could degrade petroleum hydrocarbon with 5% NaCl at 15°C. Here, we present the 4.8-Mb draft genome sequence of this strain, which may provide useful information about the mechanism of petroleum degradation in drill cuttings. PMID:26316640

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Pannonibacter phragmitetus Strain CGMCC9175, a Halotolerant Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Decai; Zhou, Lisha; Zhang, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    Pannonibacter phragmitetus CGMCC9175 is a halotolerant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacterium isolated from PAH-contaminated intertidal zone sediment. Here, we report the 5.7-Mb draft genome sequence of this strain, which will provide insights into the diversity of Pannonibacter and the mechanism of PAH degradation in sediments. PMID:26823598

  13. Microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and cyanide in soils from manufactured gas plant sites

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, YiFong.

    1993-01-01

    The microbial clean-up of cyanide and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) in soils from manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites is the subject of this study. Cyanide was examined for its inhibition on microbial PAH degradation by an MGP-soil isolate identified as a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by classical differential methods as well as 16S rRNA oligonucleotide probes. A strong cyanide-degrading Bacillus pumilus (ATCC No. 7061) strain was used for facilitating cyanide degradation thereby enhancing PAH biodegradation in this soil. This research has validated cyanide interference with the PAH degrader and shown that adding Bacillus pumilus accomplishes the removal of cyanide which subsequently allows Pseudomonas aeruginosa to metabolize PAHs. In addition to the biodegradation of cyanide and lower ring numbered PAHs, the microbial degradation of 4-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by using a mixed culture obtained from another former coal tar contaminated site was also studied. The rate of biotransformation and the abiotic loss due to volatilization were monitored. The 3-ring PAH used in this project was phenanthrene and the 4-ring PAHs used were fluoranthene and pyrene. The results showed that volatilization loss of naphthalene in the control system was substantial while volatilization of higher molecular weight PAH compounds (fluoranthene and pyrene) was negligible. The biodegradation rates of phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene are 6.56, 1.59 and 0.82 mg/L/day, respectively or 65.6, 15.9, 8.2 mg/gram of cells/day assuming 100 mg cells/L in the system. This study indicates that biodegradation of 3- and 4-ring PAHs by mixed cultures obtained from PAH contaminated sites is very promising. These studies will contribute to the understanding of PAH and cyanide removal from MGP and provide information for the design of a bioremediation project to reclaim unusable land that was contaminated through the previous coal gasification process.

  14. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria from aviation fuel spill site at Ibeno, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    John, R C; Essien, J P; Akpan, S B; Okpokwasili, G C

    2012-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria were isolated from aviation fuel contaminated soil at Inua Eyet Ikot in Ibeno, Nigeria. PAH-degrading bacteria in the contaminated soil were isolated by enrichment culture technique. Isolates with high PAH degrading potential characterized by their extensive growth on PAH-supplemented minimal salt medium were screened for their naphthalene, phenanthrene and chrysene degradability. The screening medium which contained selected PAHs as the sole source of carbon and energy showed that Micrococcus varians AFS-2, Pseudomonas putida AFS-3 and Alcaligenes faecalis AFS-5 exhibited a concentration-dependent growth in all the PAH-compounds tested. There were visible changes in the color of growth medium suggesting the production of different metabolites. Their acclimation to different PAH substrates was also evident as A. faecalis AFS-5 isolated from chrysene grew well on other less complex aromatic compounds. The isolate exhibited best growth (0.44 OD(600)) when exposed to 10 ppm of chrysene for 5 days and could utilize up to 90 ppm of chrysene. This isolate and others with strong PAH-degrading potentials are recommended for bioremediation of PAHs in aviation fuel-contaminated sites in the tropics. PMID:22456728

  15. Degradation of petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons using TiO2 nanopowder film.

    PubMed

    Fard, Mohammad Alizadeh; Aminzadeh, Behnoush; Vahidi, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    The performance of a photo-reactor packed with titanium dioxide (TiO2) immobilized on glass beads, initiated by irradiation with natural and artificial ultraviolet (UV) sources, was evaluated in terms of the degradation efficiency of petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons. The effects of parameters such as pH, reaction time, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration and some ions were investigated. Additionally, the degradation of total organic carbon (TOC) and the formation of byproducts were studied. Photodegradation rates ofbenzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) by processes of UV/TiO2 and UV/TiO2/H2O2 were found to obey pseudo first-order kinetic models. Results indicated that the effect of pH value was negligible at the pH range of 5.5 to 8.5. TOC removal improved with addition of H2O2 demonstrating that a lack of hydrogen peroxide leads to incomplete mineralization. The effect of cations and anions on the photodegradation efficiencies of BTEX revealed that Mg2+ and Ca2+ caused the most deterioration in BTEX degradation efficiency. However S4O(2-) and CO3(2-) had the most salient inhibitory effects compared with other tested anions. The degradation efficiencies of both systems were investigated for the treatment of real polluted groundwater collected from the city of Tehran. Results showed that the degradation efficiencies of BTEX declined in the presence of inorganic and organic competitor species. PMID:24191451

  16. Reconstruction of metabolic networks in a fluoranthene-degrading enrichments from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian-Kang; Li, Xiao-Ming; Ai, Guo-Min; Deng, Ye; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Jiang, Cheng-Ying

    2016-11-15

    Microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is the primary process of removing PAHs from environments. The metabolic pathway of PAHs in pure cultures has been intensively studied, but cooperative metabolisms at community-level remained to be explored. In this study, we determined the dynamic composition of a microbial community and its metabolic intermediates during fluoranthene degradation using high-throughput metagenomics and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), respectively. Subsequently, a cooperative metabolic network for fluoranthene degradation was constructed. The network shows that Mycobacterium contributed the majority of ring-hydroxylating and -cleavage dioxygenases, while Diaphorobacter contributed most of the dehydrogenases. Hyphomicrobium, Agrobacterium, and Sphingopyxis contributed to genes encoding enzymes involved in downstream reactions of fluoranthene degradation. The contributions of various microbial groups were calculated with the PICRUSt program. The contributions of Hyphomicrobium to alcohol dehydrogenases were 62.4% in stage 1 (i.e., when fluoranthene was rapidly removed) and 76.8% in stage 3 (i.e., when fluoranthene was not detectable), respectively; the contribution of Pseudomonas were 6.6% in stage 1 and decreased to 1.2% in subsequent stages. To the best of the author's knowledge, this report describes the first cooperative metabolic network to predict the contributions of various microbial groups during PAH-degradation at community-level. PMID:27415596

  17. Anaerobic degradation of cyclohexane by sulfate-reducing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated marine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Jaekel, Ulrike; Zedelius, Johannes; Wilkes, Heinz; Musat, Florin

    2015-01-01

    The fate of cyclohexane, often used as a model compound for the biodegradation of cyclic alkanes due to its abundance in crude oils, in anoxic marine sediments has been poorly investigated. In the present study, we obtained an enrichment culture of cyclohexane-degrading sulfate-reducing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated intertidal marine sediments. Microscopic analyses showed an apparent dominance by oval cells of 1.5 × 0.8 μm. Analysis of a 16S rRNA gene library, followed by whole-cell hybridization with group- and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes showed that these cells belonged to a single phylotype, and were accounting for more than 80% of the total cell number. The dominant phylotype, affiliated with the Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus cluster of the Deltaproteobacteria, is proposed to be responsible for the degradation of cyclohexane. Quantitative growth experiments showed that cyclohexane degradation was coupled with the stoichiometric reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Substrate response tests corroborated with hybridization with a sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe suggested that the dominant phylotype apparently was able to degrade other cyclic and n-alkanes, including the gaseous alkane n-butane. Based on GC-MS analyses of culture extracts cyclohexylsuccinate was identified as a metabolite, indicating an activation of cyclohexane by addition to fumarate. Other metabolites detected were 3-cyclohexylpropionate and cyclohexanecarboxylate providing evidence that the overall degradation pathway of cyclohexane under anoxic conditions is analogous to that of n-alkanes. PMID:25806023

  18. Synergistic degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons with microorganisms and zero valent iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöftner, Philipp; Summer, Dorothea; Leitner, Simon; Watzinger, Andrea; Wimmer, Bernhard; Reichenauer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Sites contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHC) are located mainly within build-up regions. Therefore in most cases only in-situ technologies without excavation of soil material can be used for remediation. This project examines a novel in-situ remediation method, in which the biotic degradation via bacteria is combined with abiotic degradation via zero-valent iron particles (ZVI). ZVI particles are injected into the aquifer where CHC-molecules are reductively dechlorinated. However Fe0 is also oxidized by reaction with water leading to generation of H2 without any CHC degradation. To achieve biotic degradation often strictly anaerobic strains of the bacteria Dehalococcoides are used. These bacteria can dechlorinate CHC by utilizing H2. By combining these processes the H2, produced during the anaerobic corrosion of Fe0, could be used by bacteria for further CHC degradation. Therefore the amount of used Fe0 and as a consequence also remediation costs could be reduced. Additionally the continuous supply of H2 could make the bacterial degradation more controllable. Different Fe0 particles (nano- and micro-scale) were tested for their perchloroethene (PCE) degradation rate and H2 production rate in microcosms. PCE-degradation rate by different bacterial cultures was investigated in the same microcosm system. In course of these experiments the 13C enrichment factors of the PCE degradation of the different particles and cultures were determined to enable the differentiation of biotic and abiotic degradation. Preliminary results showed, that the nano-scale particles reacted faster with PCE and water than their micro-scaled counterparts. The PCE degradation via micro-scaled particles lead to 13C enrichment factors in the range of -3,6 ‰ ± 0,6 to -9,5 ‰ ± 0,2. With one of the examined bacterial cultures a fast reduction of PCE to ethene was observed. Although PCE and TCE were completely degraded by this culture the metabolites DCE and VC could still be detected

  19. Mass culture strategy for bacterial yeast co-culture for degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in marine environment.

    PubMed

    Priya, Anchal; Mandal, Ajoy K; Ball, Andrew S; Manefield, Mike; Lal, Banwari; Sarma, Priyangshu M

    2015-11-15

    In the present study a metabolically versatile co-culture with two Bacilli and one yeast strain was developed using enrichment culture techniques. The developed co-culture had affinity to degrade both aliphatic and aromatic fractions of petroleum crude oil. Degradation kinetics was established for designing the fermentation protocol of the co-culture. The developed mass culture strategy led to achieve the reduction in surface tension (26dynescm(-1) from 69 dynescm(-1)) and degradation of 67% in bench scale experiments. The total crude oil degradation of 96% was achieved in 4000l of natural seawater after 28days without adding any nutrients. The survival of the augmented co-culture was maintained (10(9)cellsml(-1)) in contaminated marine environment. The mass culture protocol devised for the bioaugmentation was a key breakthrough that was subsequently used for pilot scale studies with 100l and 4000l of natural seawater for potential application in marine oil spills. PMID:26384865

  20. Use of Advanced Oxidation and Aerobic Degradation for Remediation of Various Hydrocarbon Contaminates

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-03-06

    Western Research Institute in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., Tetra Tech, Inc., and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory and field studies to test different approaches to enhance degradation of hydrocarbons and associated contaminants. WRI in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., conducted a laboratory and field study for using ozone to treat a site contaminated with MTBE and other hydrocarbons. Results from this study demonstrate that a TOD test can be used to resolve the O{sub 3} dosage problem by establishing a site-specific benchmark dosage for field ozone applications. The follow-up testing of the laboratory samples provided indications that intrinsic biodegradation could be stimulated by adding oxygen. Laboratory studies also suggests that O3 dosage in the full-scale field implementation could be dialed lower than stoichiometrically designed to eliminate the formation of Cr(VI). WRI conducted a study involving a series of different ISCO oxidant applications to diesel-contaminated soil and determined the effects on enhancing biodegradation to degrade the residual hydrocarbons. Soils treated with permanganate followed by nutrients and with persulfate followed by nutrients resulted in the largest decrease in TPH. The possible intermediates and conditions formed from NOM and TPH oxidation by permanganate and activated persulfate favors microbial TPH degrading activity. A 'passive-oxidation' method using microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology was conducted by WRI in conjunction with Tetra Tech, Inc., to degrade MTBE in groundwater. These experiments have demonstrated that a working MFC (i.e., one generating power) could be established in the laboratory using contaminated site water or buffered media inoculated with site water and spiked with MTBE, benzene, or toluene. Electrochemical methods were studied by WRI with goal of utilizing low voltage and amperage electrical sources for 'geo-oxidation' of organic contaminants. The

  1. Decrease of aliphatic CHs from diatoms by in situ heating infrared microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, Leila; Nakashima, Satoru

    2016-04-01

    In situ heating IR microspectroscopy at 260-300°C under air and N2 conditions has been conducted on diatom frustules to examine aliphatic CH losses during heating, simulating their changes with burial-diagenesis. Assuming a reaction model made up of two first-order kinetic relations, reaction rate constants k1 and k2 and activation energies (Ea) were evaluated for aliphatic CHs. The rate constants for loss of aliphatic CHs of diatom frustules under air and N2 flow are much larger, with much smaller activation energies (57-109 kJ/mol: air; 14-44 kJ/mol: N2), than those for conventional hydrocarbon generation reactions from kerogens (170-370 kJ/mol) studied at higher temperatures (350-450°C). The CH decrease rates are somewhat different from the amide I decrease (protein degradation) rates. The obtained results suggest that organic transformation reactions including degradation of aliphatic CHs inside the diatom silica frustules might be quite different from those of kerogens separated from the biological structures.

  2. A Mycobacterium Strain with Extended Capacities for Degradation of Gasoline Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Solano-Serena, Floriane; Marchal, Rémy; Casarégola, Serge; Vasnier, Christelle; Lebeault, Jean-Michel; Vandecasteele, Jean-Paul

    2000-01-01

    A bacterial strain (strain IFP 2173) was selected from a gasoline-polluted aquifer on the basis of its capacity to use 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (isooctane) as a sole carbon and energy source. This isolate, the first isolate with this capacity to be characterized, was identified by 16S ribosomal DNA analysis, and 100% sequence identity with a reference strain of Mycobacterium austroafricanum was found. Mycobacterium sp. strain IFP 2173 used an unusually wide spectrum of hydrocarbons as growth substrates, including n-alkanes and multimethyl-substituted isoalkanes with chains ranging from 5 to 16 carbon atoms long, as well as substituted monoaromatic hydrocarbons. It also attacked ethers, such as methyl t-butyl ether. During growth on gasoline, it degraded 86% of the substrate. Our results indicated that strain IFP 2173 was capable of degrading 3-methyl groups, possibly by a carboxylation and deacetylation mechanism. Evidence that it attacked the quaternary carbon atom structure by an as-yet-undefined mechanism during growth on 2,2,4-trimethylpentane and 2,2-dimethylpentane was also obtained. PMID:10831416

  3. Hydrocarbon degrading microbial communities in bench scale aerobic biobarriers for gasoline contaminated groundwater treatment.

    PubMed

    Daghio, Matteo; Tatangelo, Valeria; Franzetti, Andrea; Gandolfi, Isabella; Papacchini, Maddalena; Careghini, Alessandro; Sezenna, Elena; Saponaro, Sabrina; Bestetti, Giuseppina

    2015-07-01

    BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes) and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) are some of the main constituents of gasoline and can be accidentally released in the environment. In this work the effect of bioaugmentation on the microbial communities in a bench scale aerobic biobarrier for gasoline contaminated water treatment was studied by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Catabolic genes (tmoA and xylM) were quantified by qPCR, in order to estimate the biodegradation potential, and the abundance of total bacteria was estimated by the quantification of the number of copies of the 16S rRNA gene. Hydrocarbon concentration was monitored over time and no difference in the removal efficiency for the tested conditions was observed, either with or without the microbial inoculum. In the column without the inoculum the most abundant genera were Acidovorax, Bdellovibrio, Hydrogenophaga, Pseudoxanthomonas and Serpens at the beginning of the column, while at the end of the column Thauera became dominant. In the inoculated test the microbial inoculum, composed by Rhodococcus sp. CE461, Rhodococcus sp. CT451 and Methylibium petroleiphilum LMG 22953, was outcompeted. Quantitative PCR results showed an increasing in xylM copy number, indicating that hydrocarbon degrading bacteria were selected during the treatment, although only a low increase of the total biomass was observed. However, the bioaugmentation did not lead to an increase in the degradative potential of the microbial communities. PMID:25747304

  4. Functional microbial diversity dynamics in common effluent treatment plants of South Gujarat and hydrocarbon degradation.

    PubMed

    Zaveri, Purvi; Munshi, Nasreen; Vaidya, Alok; Jha, Sanjay; Kumar, G Naresh

    2015-06-01

    Common effluent treatment plants (CETPs) of South Gujarat region, India, process wastewater generated by more than 2500 industries because of the nonfeasibility of processing at the individual industrial unit. This study assessed functional microbial diversity in wastewater samples of CETPs over a geological belt using Ecoplate®, isolation of the most abundant bacteria, and screening for hydrocarbon degradation. The high evenness (EPielou) values (0.9) in almost all samples indicated a highly even community structure. Principal component analysis of carbon source utilization showed a cluster of all inlet samples except E1 and another cluster of all outlet samples; aeration tank community samples were dispersed. In spite of the high richness found in microbial communities, 60 morphologically similar organisms were observed and isolated; 46 out of them were subjected to amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis with MboI, HaeIII, and TaqI enzyme, followed by UPGMA clustering. In screening the most abundant bacteria from each cluster, one of the cultures showed a high potential for hydrocarbon degradation and was identified as Pseudomonas citronellolis by 16S rDNA sequencing. Because of its highly adapted inherent nature, this bacterium may help augment the conventional procedure in wastewater treatment and efficiently decrease the organic load. PMID:25925663

  5. Current State of Knowledge in Microbial Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs): A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Shreya; Dutta, Tapan K.; Ahn, Youngho

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) include a group of organic priority pollutants of critical environmental and public health concern due to their toxic, genotoxic, mutagenic and/or carcinogenic properties and their ubiquitous occurrence as well as recalcitrance. The increased awareness of their various adverse effects on ecosystem and human health has led to a dramatic increase in research aimed toward removing PAHs from the environment. PAHs may undergo adsorption, volatilization, photolysis, and chemical oxidation, although transformation by microorganisms is the major neutralization process of PAH-contaminated sites in an ecologically accepted manner. Microbial degradation of PAHs depends on various environmental conditions, such as nutrients, number and kind of the microorganisms, nature as well as chemical property of the PAH being degraded. A wide variety of bacterial, fungal and algal species have the potential to degrade/transform PAHs, among which bacteria and fungi mediated degradation has been studied most extensively. In last few decades microbial community analysis, biochemical pathway for PAHs degradation, gene organization, enzyme system, genetic regulation for PAH degradation have been explored in great detail. Although, xenobiotic-degrading microorganisms have incredible potential to restore contaminated environments inexpensively yet effectively, but new advancements are required to make such microbes effective and more powerful in removing those compounds, which were once thought to be recalcitrant. Recent analytical chemistry and genetic engineering tools might help to improve the efficiency of degradation of PAHs by microorganisms, and minimize uncertainties of successful bioremediation. However, appropriate implementation of the potential of naturally occurring microorganisms for field bioremediation could be considerably enhanced by optimizing certain factors such as bioavailability, adsorption and mass transfer of PAHs. The main

  6. Succession of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the aftermath of the deepwater horizon oil spill in the gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Dubinsky, Eric A; Conrad, Mark E; Chakraborty, Romy; Bill, Markus; Borglin, Sharon E; Hollibaugh, James T; Mason, Olivia U; M Piceno, Yvette; Reid, Francine C; Stringfellow, William T; Tom, Lauren M; Hazen, Terry C; Andersen, Gary L

    2013-10-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill produced large subsurface plumes of dispersed oil and gas in the Gulf of Mexico that stimulated growth of psychrophilic, hydrocarbon degrading bacteria. We tracked succession of plume bacteria before, during and after the 83-day spill to determine the microbial response and biodegradation potential throughout the incident. Dominant bacteria shifted substantially over time and were dependent on relative quantities of different hydrocarbon fractions. Unmitigated flow from the wellhead early in the spill resulted in the highest proportions of n-alkanes and cycloalkanes at depth and corresponded with dominance by Oceanospirillaceae and Pseudomonas. Once partial capture of oil and gas began 43 days into the spill, petroleum hydrocarbons decreased, the fraction of aromatic hydrocarbons increased, and Colwellia, Cycloclasticus, and Pseudoalteromonas increased in dominance. Enrichment of Methylomonas coincided with positive shifts in the δ(13)C values of methane in the plume and indicated significant methane oxidation occurred earlier than previously reported. Anomalous oxygen depressions persisted at plume depths for over six weeks after well shut-in and were likely caused by common marine heterotrophs associated with degradation of high-molecular-weight organic matter, including Methylophaga. Multiple hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria operated simultaneously throughout the spill, but their relative importance was controlled by changes in hydrocarbon supply. PMID:23937111

  7. Microbial diversity and anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation potential in an oil-contaminated mangrove sediment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mangrove forests are coastal wetlands that provide vital ecosystem services and serve as barriers against natural disasters like tsunamis, hurricanes and tropical storms. Mangroves harbour a large diversity of organisms, including microorganisms with important roles in nutrient cycling and availability. Due to tidal influence, mangroves are sites where crude oil from spills farther away can accumulate. The relationship between mangrove bacterial diversity and oil degradation in mangrove sediments remains poorly understood. Results Mangrove sediment was sampled from 0–5, 15–20 and 35–40 cm depth intervals from the Suruí River mangrove (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), which has a history of oil contamination. DGGE fingerprinting for bamA, dsr and 16S rRNA encoding fragment genes, and qPCR analysis using dsr and 16S rRNA gene fragment revealed differences with sediment depth. Conclusions Analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversity revealed changes with depth. DGGE for bamA and dsr genes shows that the anaerobic hydrocarbon-degrading community profile also changed between 5 and 15 cm depth, and is similar in the two deeper sediments, indicating that below 15 cm the anaerobic hydrocarbon-degrading community appears to be well established and homogeneous in this mangrove sediment. qPCR analysis revealed differences with sediment depth, with general bacterial abundance in the top layer (0–5 cm) being greater than in both deeper sediment layers (15–20 and 35–40 cm), which were similar to each other. PMID:22935169

  8. Numerical and genetic analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hak; Engesser, Karl-H; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2005-07-01

    Ability to degrade high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been found in diverse species of fast-growing mycobacteria. This study included several PAH-degrading mycobacteria from heavily contaminated sites and an uncontaminated humus soil in the Natural Park, Schwäbische Alb, Germany. The numerical analysis with a total of 131 tests showed that isolates from humus soil and contaminated sites had similar substrate utilization patterns for primary alcohols from ethanol to pentanol, 1,4-butanediol, benzyl alcohol, hexadecane, ethyl acetate, fluoranthene, phenanthrene, and pyrene as the sole carbon and energy (C/E) sources. Significant differences between the two subgroups isolated from humus soil and contaminated sites were observed in the utilization of polyalcoholic sugars, including adonitol, D: -arabitol, L: -arabitol, erythritol, inositol, rhamnose, sorbitol, and xylitol. Among isolates from humus soil, strain PYR100 showed high similarity in 16S rDNA sequence with M. vanbaalenii strain PYR-1 (=DSM 7251, 100%) and M. austroafricanum ATCC 33464 (99.9%). In addition to the numerical analysis, the 16S-23S intergenic spacer sequence was useful for discriminating between the closely related strains PYR100 and PYR-1 (98% similarity). The patterns of the variable V2 and V3 regions in the ribosomal RNA gene corresponding to Escherichia coli positions 179 to 197 and 1006 to 1023, respectively, were useful for dividing fast-growing and thermosensitive PAH-degrading mycobacteria into ten subgroups consistent with the phylogenetic positions. PMID:16132428

  9. ULSD and B20 Hydrocarbon Impacts on EGR Cooler Performance and Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Sluder, Scott; Storey, John Morse; Youngquist, Adam D

    2009-01-01

    Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler fouling has emerged as an important issue in diesel engine development. Uncertainty about the level of impact that fuel chemistry may have upon this issue has resulted in a need to investigate the cooler fouling process with emerging non-traditional fuel sources to gage their impact on the process. This study reports experiments using both ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and 20% biodiesel (B20) at elevated exhaust hydrocarbon conditions to investigate the EGR cooler fouling process. The results show that there is little difference between the degradation in cooler effectiveness for ULSD and B20 at identical conditions. At lower coolant temperatures, B20 exhibits elevated organic fractions in the deposits compared with ULSD, but this does not appear to lead to incremental performance degradation under the conditions studied. Comparisons with a previous study conducted at low HC levels shows that the presence of increased volatiles in the deposit does not impact the degradation in effectiveness significantly. Moreover, the effectiveness loss divided by the deposit mass gain for both low- and high-HC conditions seems to indicate that the HC fraction in the deposit does not significantly alter the overall thermal properties of the deposit layer.

  10. Direct immunofluorescence and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for evaluating chlorinated hydrocarbon degrading bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.L.; Franck, M.M.; Brey, J.; Fliermans, C.B.; Scott, D.; Lanclos, K.

    1997-06-01

    Immunological procedures were developed to enumerate chlorinated hydrocarbon degrading bacteria. Polyclonal antibodies (Pabs) were produced by immunizing New Zealand white rabbits against 18 contaminant-degrading bacteria. These included methanotrophic and chlorobenzene (CB) degrading species. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to test for specificity and sensitivity of the Pabs. Direct fluorescent antibodies (DFAs) were developed with these Pabs against select methanotrophic bacteria isolated from a trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and cultures from the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). Analysis of cross reactivity testing data showed some of the Pabs to be group specific while others were species specific. The threshold of sensitivity for the ELISA is 105 bacteria cells/ml. The DFA can detect as few as one bacterium per ml after concentration. Results from the DFA and ELISA techniques for enumeration of methanotrophic bacteria in groundwater were higher but not significantly different (P < 0.05) compared to indirect microbiological techniques such as MPN. These methods provide useful information on in situ community structure and function for bioremediation applications within 1--4 hours of sampling.

  11. Ligand independent aryl hydrocarbon receptor inhibits lung cancer cell invasion by degradation of Smad4.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Chen; Yang, Wen-Hao; Li, Ching-Hao; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Tsai, Chi-Hao; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2016-07-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent-activated transcriptional factor that regulates the metabolism of xenobiotic and endogenous compounds. Although AhR plays a crucial role in air toxicant-induced carcinogenesis, AhR expression was shown to negatively regulate tumorigenesis. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effect of AhR without ligand treatment on cancer invasion in lung cancer cell lines. Lung cancer cells expressing lower levels of AhR showed higher invasion ability (H1299 cells) compared with cells expressing higher levels of AhR (A549 cells). Overexpression of AhR in H1299 cells inhibited the invasion ability. We found that vimentin expression was inhibited in AhR-overexpressing H1299 cells. Additionally, the expression of EMT-related transcriptional factors Snail and ID-1 decreased. Interestingly, we found that Smad4 degradation was induced in AhR-overexpressing H1299 cells. Our data showed that AhR could interact with Jun-activation domain binding protein (Jab1) and Smad4, which may cause degradation of Smad4 by the proteasome. Our data suggest that AhR affects the transforming growth factor-β signaling pathway by inducing Smad4 degradation by the proteasome and suppressing tumor metastasis via epithelial to mesenchymal transition reduction in lung cancer cells. PMID:27060206

  12. Role of nutrients and illuminance in predicting the fate of fungal mediated petroleum hydrocarbon degradation and biomass production.

    PubMed

    Ali Khan, Aqib Hassan; Tanveer, Sundus; Anees, Mariam; Muhammad, Yousaf Shad; Iqbal, Mazhar; Yousaf, Sohail

    2016-07-01

    Biodegradation and biomass production are affected by numerous environmental factors including pH, oxygen availability and presence of pollutants. The present study, for the first time, elucidated the effects of nutrients and light on mycodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in diesel oil. Seven fungal strains (Aspergillus terreus FA3, Aspergillus niger FA5, Aspergillus terreus FA6, Penicillium chrysogenum FP4, Aspergillus terreus FP6, Aspergillus flavus FP10, and Candida sp. FG1) were used for hydrocarbon degradation under static conditions, in four combinations of nutrient media and illuminance for 45 days. Highest degradation was achieved by Aspergillus terreus FA6 and Candida sp. FG1 under both conditions of light and dark, with nutrient deprived HAF (Hydrocarbon adopted fungi) broth. Under HAF/Dark diesel oil degradation by FA6 and FG1 was 87.3% and 84.3% respectively, while under HAF/Light both FA6 and FG1 performed 84.3% biodegradation. The highest biomass was produced by Aspergillus flavus FP10 in PDB (Potato dextrose broth)/Dark (109.3 mg). Fungal degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons was negatively affected by the presence of other simpler-to-degrade carbon sources in the medium. The biomass production was enhanced by improved nutrient availability and diminished by illuminance. PMID:27039364

  13. Nitrogen incorporation in saturated aliphatic C6-C8 hydrocarbons and ethanol in low-pressure nitrogen plasma generated by a hollow cathode discharge ion source.

    PubMed

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek T; Chen, Lee Chuin; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Wada, Hiroshi; Nonami, Hiroshi; Yamabe, Shinichi

    2016-06-01

    Ion/molecule reactions of saturated hydrocarbons (n-hexane, cyclohexane, n-heptane, n-octane and isooctane) in 28-Torr N2 plasma generated by a hollow cathode discharge ion source were investigated using an Orbitrap mass spectrometer. It was found that the ions with [M+14](+) were observed as the major ions (M: sample molecule). The exact mass analysis revealed that the ions are nitrogenated molecules, [M+N](+) formed by the reactions of N3 (+) with M. The reaction, N3 (+) + M → [M+N](+) + N2 , were examined by the density functional theory calculations. It was found that N3 (+) abstracts the H atom from hydrocarbon molecules leading to the formation of protonated imines in the forms of R'R″CNH2 (+) (i.e. C-H bond nitrogenation). This result is in accord with the fact that elimination of NH3 is the major channel for MS/MS of [M+N](+) . That is, nitrogen is incorporated in the C-H bonds of saturated hydrocarbons. No nitrogenation was observed for benzene and acetone, which was ascribed to the formation of stable charge-transfer complexes benzene⋅⋅⋅⋅N3 (+) and acetone⋅⋅⋅⋅N3 (+) revealed by density functional theory calculations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27270868

  14. Substrate-bound structures of benzylsuccinate synthase reveal how toluene is activated in anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation.

    PubMed

    Funk, Michael A; Marsh, E Neil G; Drennan, Catherine L

    2015-09-11

    Various bacteria perform anaerobic degradation of small hydrocarbons as a source of energy and cellular carbon. To activate non-reactive hydrocarbons such as toluene, enzymes conjugate these molecules to fumarate in a radical-catalyzed, C-C bond-forming reaction. We have determined x-ray crystal structures of the glycyl radical enzyme that catalyzes the addition of toluene to fumarate, benzylsuccinate synthase (BSS), in two oligomeric states with fumarate alone or with both substrates. We find that fumarate is secured at the bottom of a long active site cavity with toluene bound directly above it. The two substrates adopt orientations that appear ideal for radical-mediated C-C bond formation; the methyl group of toluene is positioned between fumarate and a cysteine that forms a thiyl radical during catalysis, which is in turn adjacent to the glycine that serves as a radical storage residue. Toluene is held in place by fumarate on one face and tight packing by hydrophobic residues on the other face and sides. These hydrophobic residues appear to become ordered, thus encapsulating toluene, only in the presence of BSSβ, a small protein subunit that forms a tight complex with BSSα, the catalytic subunit. Enzymes related to BSS are able to metabolize a wide range of hydrocarbons through attachment to fumarate. Using our structures as a guide, we have constructed homology models of several of these "X-succinate synthases" and determined conservation patterns that will be useful in understanding the basis for catalysis and specificity in this family of enzymes. PMID:26224635

  15. Engineering of a silica encapsulation platform for hydrocarbon degradation using Pseudomonas sp. NCIB 9816-4.

    PubMed

    Sakkos, Jonathan K; Kieffer, Daniel P; Mutlu, Baris R; Wackett, Lawrence P; Aksan, Alptekin

    2016-03-01

    Industrial application of encapsulated bacteria for biodegradation of hydrocarbons in water requires mechanically stable materials. A silica gel encapsulation method was optimized for Pseudomonas sp. NCIB 9816-4, a bacterium that degrades more than 100 aromatic hydrocarbons. The design process focused on three aspects: (i) mechanical property enhancement; (ii) gel cytocompatibility; and (iii) reduction of the diffusion barrier in the gel. Mechanical testing indicated that the compressive strength at failure (σf ) and elastic modulus (E) changed linearly with the amount of silicon alkoxide used in the gel composition. Measurement of naphthalene biodegradation by encapsulated cells indicated that the gel maintained cytocompatibility at lower levels of alkoxide. However, significant loss in activity was observed due to methanol formation during hydrolysis at high alkoxide concentrations, as measured by FTIR spectroscopy. The silica gel with the highest amount of alkoxide (without toxicity from methanol) had a biodegradation rate of 285 ± 42 nmol/L-s, σf  = 652 ± 88 kPa, and E = 15.8 ± 2.0 MPa. Biodegradation was sustained for 1 month before it dropped below 20% of the initial rate. In order to improve the diffusion through the gel, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) was used as a porogen and resulted in a 48 ± 19% enhancement in biodegradation, but it impacted the mechanical properties negatively. This is the first report studying how the silica composition affects biodegradation of naphthalene by Pseudomonas sp. NCIB 9816-4 and establishes a foundation for future studies of aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation for industrial application. PMID:26332745

  16. Application of Fenton's reagent as a pretreatment step in biological degradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, R.L.; Gauger, W.K.; Srivastava, V.J.

    1990-01-01

    Fenton's reagent (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Fe{sup ++}) has been used for chemical oxidation of numerous organic compounds in water treatment schemes. In this study, the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) applied Fenton's treatment to polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and PAH-contaminated soils. Fenton's treatment was very reactive with PAHs, causing rapid modification of the parental compounds to oxidized products and complete degradation to CO{sub 2}. This treatment was more effective on chemically reactive PAHs, such as benzo(a)pyrene and phenanthrene. Important parameters and conditions for Fenton's treatment of PAHs in solution and soil matrices have been identified. As much as 99% of the PAHs on soil matrices can be removed by treatment with Fenton's reagent. 28 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  17. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation potential of Gulf of Mexico native coastal microbial communities after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    PubMed

    Kappell, Anthony D; Wei, Yin; Newton, Ryan J; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Jizhong; McLellan, Sandra L; Hristova, Krassimira R

    2014-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout resulted in oil transport, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the Gulf of Mexico shoreline. The microbial communities of these shorelines are thought to be responsible for the intrinsic degradation of PAHs. To investigate the Gulf Coast beach microbial community response to hydrocarbon exposure, we examined the functional gene diversity, bacterial community composition, and PAH degradation capacity of a heavily oiled and non-oiled beach following the oil exposure. With a non-expression functional gene microarray targeting 539 gene families, we detected 28,748 coding sequences. Of these sequences, 10% were uniquely associated with the severely oil-contaminated beach and 6.0% with the non-oiled beach. There was little variation in the functional genes detected between the two beaches; however the relative abundance of functional genes involved in oil degradation pathways, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were greater in the oiled beach. The microbial PAH degradation potentials of both beaches, were tested in mesocosms. Mesocosms were constructed in glass columns using sands with native microbial communities, circulated with artificial sea water and challenged with a mixture of PAHs. The low-molecular weight PAHs, fluorene and naphthalene, showed rapid depletion in all mesocosms while the high-molecular weight benzo[α]pyrene was not degraded by either microbial community. Both the heavily oiled and the non-impacted coastal communities showed little variation in their biodegradation ability for low molecular weight PAHs. Massively-parallel sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from mesocosm DNA showed that known PAH degraders and genera frequently associated with oil hydrocarbon degradation represented a major portion of the bacterial community. The observed similar response by microbial communities from beaches with a different recent history of oil exposure suggests that Gulf Coast beach communities are

  18. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation potential of Gulf of Mexico native coastal microbial communities after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    PubMed Central

    Kappell, Anthony D.; Wei, Yin; Newton, Ryan J.; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong; McLellan, Sandra L.; Hristova, Krassimira R.

    2014-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout resulted in oil transport, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the Gulf of Mexico shoreline. The microbial communities of these shorelines are thought to be responsible for the intrinsic degradation of PAHs. To investigate the Gulf Coast beach microbial community response to hydrocarbon exposure, we examined the functional gene diversity, bacterial community composition, and PAH degradation capacity of a heavily oiled and non-oiled beach following the oil exposure. With a non-expression functional gene microarray targeting 539 gene families, we detected 28,748 coding sequences. Of these sequences, 10% were uniquely associated with the severely oil-contaminated beach and 6.0% with the non-oiled beach. There was little variation in the functional genes detected between the two beaches; however the relative abundance of functional genes involved in oil degradation pathways, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were greater in the oiled beach. The microbial PAH degradation potentials of both beaches, were tested in mesocosms. Mesocosms were constructed in glass columns using sands with native microbial communities, circulated with artificial sea water and challenged with a mixture of PAHs. The low-molecular weight PAHs, fluorene and naphthalene, showed rapid depletion in all mesocosms while the high-molecular weight benzo[α]pyrene was not degraded by either microbial community. Both the heavily oiled and the non-impacted coastal communities showed little variation in their biodegradation ability for low molecular weight PAHs. Massively-parallel sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from mesocosm DNA showed that known PAH degraders and genera frequently associated with oil hydrocarbon degradation represented a major portion of the bacterial community. The observed similar response by microbial communities from beaches with a different recent history of oil exposure suggests that Gulf Coast beach communities are

  19. Highly Active and Stable Large Catalase Isolated from a Hydrocarbon Degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324

    PubMed Central

    Vatsyayan, Preety; Goswami, Pranab

    2016-01-01

    A hydrocarbon degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324 produces a high level of extremely active and stable cellular large catalase (CAT) during growth on n-hexadecane to combat the oxidative stress caused by the hydrocarbon degrading metabolic machinery inside the cell. A 160-fold purification with specific activity of around 66 × 105 U mg−1 protein was achieved. The native protein molecular mass was 368 ± 5 kDa with subunit molecular mass of nearly 90 kDa, which indicates that the native CAT protein is a homotetramer. The isoelectric pH (pI) of the purified CAT was 4.2. BLAST aligned peptide mass fragments of CAT protein showed its highest similarity with the catalase B protein from other fungal sources. CAT was active in a broad range of pH 4 to 12 and temperature 25°C to 90°C. The catalytic efficiency (Kcat/Km) of 4.7 × 108 M−1 s−1 within the studied substrate range and alkaline pH stability (half-life, t1/2 at pH 12~15 months) of CAT are considerably higher than most of the extensively studied catalases from different sources. The storage stability (t1/2) of CAT at physiological pH 7.5 and 4°C was nearly 30 months. The haem was identified as haem b by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS/MS). PMID:27057351

  20. Highly Active and Stable Large Catalase Isolated from a Hydrocarbon Degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324.

    PubMed

    Vatsyayan, Preety; Goswami, Pranab

    2016-01-01

    A hydrocarbon degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324 produces a high level of extremely active and stable cellular large catalase (CAT) during growth on n-hexadecane to combat the oxidative stress caused by the hydrocarbon degrading metabolic machinery inside the cell. A 160-fold purification with specific activity of around 66 × 10(5) U mg(-1) protein was achieved. The native protein molecular mass was 368 ± 5 kDa with subunit molecular mass of nearly 90 kDa, which indicates that the native CAT protein is a homotetramer. The isoelectric pH (pI) of the purified CAT was 4.2. BLAST aligned peptide mass fragments of CAT protein showed its highest similarity with the catalase B protein from other fungal sources. CAT was active in a broad range of pH 4 to 12 and temperature 25°C to 90°C. The catalytic efficiency (K cat/K m ) of 4.7 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) within the studied substrate range and alkaline pH stability (half-life, t 1/2 at pH 12~15 months) of CAT are considerably higher than most of the extensively studied catalases from different sources. The storage stability (t 1/2) of CAT at physiological pH 7.5 and 4°C was nearly 30 months. The haem was identified as haem b by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS/MS). PMID:27057351

  1. Predictable bacterial composition and hydrocarbon degradation in Arctic soils following diesel and nutrient disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Terrence H; Yergeau, Etienne; Maynard, Christine; Juck, David; Whyte, Lyle G; Greer, Charles W

    2013-01-01

    Increased exploration and exploitation of resources in the Arctic is leading to a higher risk of petroleum contamination. A number of Arctic microorganisms can use petroleum for growth-supporting carbon and energy, but traditional approaches for stimulating these microorganisms (for example, nutrient addition) have varied in effectiveness between sites. Consistent environmental controls on microbial community response to disturbance from petroleum contaminants and nutrient amendments across Arctic soils have not been identified, nor is it known whether specific taxa are universally associated with efficient bioremediation. In this study, we contaminated 18 Arctic soils with diesel and treated subsamples of each with monoammonium phosphate (MAP), which has successfully stimulated degradation in some contaminated Arctic soils. Bacterial community composition of uncontaminated, diesel-contaminated and diesel+MAP soils was assessed through multiplexed 16S (ribosomal RNA) rRNA gene sequencing on an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine, while hydrocarbon degradation was measured by gas chromatography analysis. Diversity of 16S rRNA gene sequences was reduced by diesel, and more so by the combination of diesel and MAP. Actinobacteria dominated uncontaminated soils with <10% organic matter, while Proteobacteria dominated higher-organic matter soils, and this pattern was exaggerated following disturbance. Degradation with and without MAP was predictable by initial bacterial diversity and the abundance of specific assemblages of Betaproteobacteria, respectively. High Betaproteobacteria abundance was positively correlated with high diesel degradation in MAP-treated soils, suggesting this may be an important group to stimulate. The predictability with which bacterial communities respond to these disturbances suggests that costly and time-consuming contaminated site assessments may not be necessary in the future. PMID:23389106

  2. Degradation of mix hydrocarbons by immobilized cells of mix culture using a trickle fluidized bed reactor. Annual progress report, June 1992--May 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chapatwala, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    The microorganisms, capable of degrading mix hydrocarbons were isolated from the soil samples collected from the hydrocarbon contaminated sites. The mix cultures were immobilized in calcium alginate solution in the form of beads. A trickle fluidized bed air-uplift-type reactor designed to study the degradation of mix hydrocarbons was filled with 0.85% normal saline containing the immobilized cells of mix culture. The immobilized beads were aerated with CO{sub 2}-free air at 200 ml/min. The degradation of different concentrations of hydrocarbons in the presence/absence of commercially available fertilizers by the immobilized cells of mix culture is now in progress.

  3. Anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum-contaminated harbor sediments under sulfate-reducing and artificially imposed iron-reducing conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, J.D.; Anderson, R.T.; Woodward, J.C.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Lovley, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The potential use of iron(III) oxide to stimulate in-situ hydrocarbon degradation in anaerobic petroleum-contaminated harbor sediments was investigated. Previous studies have indicated that Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) can oxidize some electron donors more effectively than sulfate- reducing bacteria (SRB). In contrast to previous results in freshwater sediments, the addition of Fe(III) to marine sediments from San Diego Bay, CA did not switch the terminal electron-accepting process (TEAP) from sulfate reduction to Fe-(III) reduction. Addition of Fe(III) also did not stimulate anaerobic hydrocarbon oxidation. Exposure of the sediment to air [to reoxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III)] followed by anaerobic incubation of the sediments, resulted in Fe-(III) reduction as the TEAP, but contaminant degradation was not stimulated and in some instances was inhibited. The difference in the ability of FeRB to compete with the SRB in the different sediment treatments was related to relative population sizes. Although the addition of Fe(III) did not stimulate hydrocarbon degradation, the results presented here as well as other recent studies demonstrate that there may be significant anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation under sulfate-reducing conditions in harbor sediments.

  4. Characteristics of Newly Isolated Geobacillus sp. ZY-10 Degrading Hydrocarbons in Crude Oil.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yumei; Ning, Zhanguo; Yang, Fan; Li, Xianzhen

    2015-01-01

    An obligately thermophilic strain ZY-10 was isolated from the crude oil in a high-temperature oilfield, which was capable of degrading heavy crude oil. Phenotypic and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the isolate should be grouped in the genus Geobacillus, which shared thd highest similarity (99%) of the 16S rDNA sequence to Geobacillus stearothermophilus. However, the major cellular fatty acid iso-15:0 (28.55%), iso-16:0 (24.93%), iso-17:0 (23.53%) and the characteristics including indole production, tolerance to NaN3 and carbohydrate fermentation showed some difference from the recognized species in the genus Geobacillus. The isolate could use tridecane, hexadecane, octacosane and hexatridecane as sole carbon source for cell growth, and the digesting rate of long-chain alkane was lower than that of short-chain alkane. When the isolate was cultured in the heavy crude oil supplement with inorganic salts and trace yeast extract, the concentration of short-chain alkane was significantly increased and the content of long-chain alkane was decreased, suggesting that the larger hydrocarbon components in crude oil were degraded into shorter-chain alkane. Strain ZY-10 would be useful for improving the mobility of crude oil and upgrading heavy crude oil in situ. PMID:26638533

  5. Degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by free and nanoclay-immobilized manganese peroxidase from Anthracophyllum discolor.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, F; Pizzul, L; Castillo, M Dp; González, M E; Cea, M; Gianfreda, L; Diez, M C

    2010-06-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) produced by Anthracophyllum discolor, a Chilean white rot fungus, was immobilized on nanoclay obtained from volcanic soil and its ability to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) compared with the free enzyme was evaluated. At the same time, nanoclay characterization was performed. Nanoclay characterization by transmission electronic microscopy showed a particle average size smaller than 100 nm. The isoelectric points (IEP) of nanoclay and MnP from A. discolor were 7.0 and 3.7, respectively, as determined by micro electrophoresis migration and preparative isoelectric focusing. Results indicated that 75% of the enzyme was immobilized on the nanoclay through physical adsorption. As compared to the free enzyme, immobilized MnP from A. discolor achieved an improved stability to temperature and pH. The activation energy (Ea) value for immobilized MnP (51.9 kJ mol(-1)) was higher than that of the free MnP (34.4 kJ mol(-1)). The immobilized enzyme was able to degrade pyrene (>86%), anthracene (>65%), alone or in mixture, and to a less extent fluoranthene (<15.2%) and phenanthrene (<8.6%). Compared to free MnP from A. discolor, the enzyme immobilized on nanoclay enhanced the enzymatic transformation of anthracene in soil. Overall results indicate that nanoclay, a carrier of natural origin, is a suitable support material for MnP immobilization. In addition, immobilized MnP shows an increased stability to high temperature, pH and time storage, as well as an enhanced PAHs degradation efficiency in soil. All these characteristics may suggest the possible use of nanoclay-immobilized MnP from A. discolor as a valuable option for in situ bioremediation purposes. PMID:20435332

  6. Effect of concentration gradients on biodegradation in bench-scale sand columns with HYDRUS modeling of hydrocarbon transport and degradation.

    PubMed

    Horel, Agota; Schiewer, Silke; Misra, Debasmita

    2015-09-01

    The present research investigated to what extent results obtained in small microcosm experiments can be extrapolated to larger settings with non-uniform concentrations. Microbial hydrocarbon degradation in sandy sediments was compared for column experiments versus homogenized microcosms with varying concentrations of diesel, Syntroleum, and fish biodiesel as contaminants. Syntroleum and fish biodiesel had higher degradation rates than diesel fuel. Microcosms showed significantly higher overall hydrocarbon mineralization percentages (p < 0.006) than columns. Oxygen levels and moisture content were likely not responsible for that difference, which could, however, be explained by a strong gradient of fuel and nutrient concentrations through the column. The mineralization percentage in the columns was similar to small-scale microcosms at high fuel concentrations. While absolute hydrocarbon degradation increased, mineralization percentages decreased with increasing fuel concentration which was corroborated by saturation kinetics; the absolute CO2 production reached a steady plateau value at high substrate concentrations. Numerical modeling using HYDRUS 2D/3D simulated the transport and degradation of the investigated fuels in vadose zone conditions similar to those in laboratory column experiments. The numerical model was used to evaluate the impact of different degradation rate constants from microcosm versus column experiments. PMID:25940478

  7. Quantification of Degradation of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Saturated Low Permeability Sediments Using Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Philipp; Parker, Beth L; Chapman, Steven W; Aravena, Ramon; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    This field and modeling study aims to reveal if degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in low permeability sediments can be quantified using compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA). For that purpose, the well-characterized Borden research site was selected, where an aquifer-aquitard system was artificially contaminated by a three component chlorinated solvent mixture (tetrachloroethene (PCE) 45 vol %, trichloroethene (TCE) 45 vol %, and chloroform (TCM) 10 vol %). Nearly 15 years after the contaminant release, several high-resolution concentration and CSIA profiles were determined for the chlorinated hydrocarbons that had diffused into the clayey aquitard. The CSIA profiles showed large shifts of carbon isotope ratios with depth (up to 24‰) suggesting that degradation occurs in the aquitard despite the small pore sizes. Simulated scenarios without or with uniform degradation failed to reproduce the isotope data, while a scenario with decreasing degradation with depth fit the data well. This suggests that nutrients had diffused into the aquitard favoring stronger degradation close to the aquifer-aquitard interface than with increasing depth. Moreover, the different simulation scenarios showed that CSIA profiles are more sensitive to different degradation conditions compared to concentration profiles highlighting the power of CSIA to constrain degradation activities in aquitards. PMID:27153381

  8. Microplate MPN-enumeration of monocyclic- and dicyclic-aromatic hydrocarbon degraders via substrate phase-partitioning.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Anders R; Henriksen, Sidsel

    2009-07-01

    The high aqueous solubility of monoaromatic and some diaromatic oil components may hinder classical growth-based MPN enumeration of bacterial mono- and di-aromatics degraders because these aromatics are toxic in high concentrations. We developed a microplate MPN method for the enumeration of toluene-, xylene-, naphthalene-, biphenyl- and benzothiophene-degraders on the basis of phase-partitioning of substrate between a biologically inert organic phase and an aqueous mineral salt medium. This way, it was possible to maintain non-toxic, aqueous concentrations in the microplate wells. Depletion of aqueous aromatics by growth of the degraders was prevented by the continuous solubilization of aromatics from the silicone phase. The method was validated by MPN enumerating degrader cultures both with phase-partitioned aromatics and with tryptic soy broth as carbon sources. The applicability of the method was demonstrated by MPN-enumerating mono- and di-aromatic degraders in soils of varying hydrocarbon pre-exposure. PMID:19043785

  9. Effect of enhanced reactive nitrogen availability on plant-sediment mediated degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated mangrove sediment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Lu, Haoliang; Zhang, Qiong; Liu, JingChun; Yan, Chongling

    2016-02-15

    As land-ocean interaction zones, mangrove systems receive substantial polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage and combustion of fossil fuel. In this study, we investigated the relationship between dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) availability and degradation rate of phenanthrene, a typical PAH compound, in mangrove plant-sediment systems, using Avicennia marina as a model plant. After 50day incubation, phenanthrene removal ratios in sediments ranged from 53.8% to 97.2%. In non-rhizosphere sediment, increasing DIN accessibility increased microbial biomass and total microbial activity, while enhancements in population size of phenanthrene degradation bacteria (PDB) and phenanthrene degradation rates were insignificant. In contrast, the presence of excessive DIN in rhizosphere sediment resulted in a significantly large number of PDB, leading to a rapid dissipation rate of phenanthrene. The differences in degradation rates and abundances of degrader in sediment may be explained by the enhanced root activity due to the elevation in DIN accessibility. PMID:26749225

  10. LABORATORY AND FIELD RESULTS LINKING HIGH CONDUCTIVITIES TO THE MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of a field and laboratory investigation of unconsolidated sediments contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons and undergoing natural biodegradation are presented. Fundamental to geophysical investigations of hydrocarbon impacted sediments is the assessment of how microbi...

  11. Anaerobic degradation of propane and butane by sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from marine hydrocarbon cold seeps

    PubMed Central

    Jaekel, Ulrike; Musat, Niculina; Adam, Birgit; Kuypers, Marcel; Grundmann, Olav; Musat, Florin

    2013-01-01

    The short-chain, non-methane hydrocarbons propane and butane can contribute significantly to the carbon and sulfur cycles in marine environments affected by oil or natural gas seepage. In the present study, we enriched and identified novel propane and butane-degrading sulfate reducers from marine oil and gas cold seeps in the Gulf of Mexico and Hydrate Ridge. The enrichment cultures obtained were able to degrade simultaneously propane and butane, but not other gaseous alkanes. They were cold-adapted, showing highest sulfate-reduction rates between 16 and 20 °C. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries, followed by whole-cell hybridizations with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes showed that each enrichment culture was dominated by a unique phylotype affiliated with the Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus cluster within the Deltaproteobacteria. These phylotypes formed a distinct phylogenetic cluster of propane and butane degraders, including sequences from environments associated with hydrocarbon seeps. Incubations with 13C-labeled substrates, hybridizations with sequence-specific probes and nanoSIMS analyses showed that cells of the dominant phylotypes were the first to become enriched in 13C, demonstrating that they were directly involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Furthermore, using the nanoSIMS data, carbon assimilation rates were calculated for the dominant cells in each enrichment culture. PMID:23254512

  12. Characterization of oily sludge from a refinery and biodegradability assessment using various hydrocarbon degrading strains and reconstituted consortia.

    PubMed

    Jasmine, Jublee; Mukherji, Suparna

    2015-02-01

    Oily sludge obtained from a refinery in India contained 10-11% oil associated with fine particulates. Along with Fe, Ca and Mg various toxic elements were associated with the sludge solids (Pb, Mn, Cu, Zn, As, Bi, Cd, Cr, Co, Ni and V). The oil contained 41-56% asphaltenes and the maltenes comprised of 49 ± 4%, 42 ± 2% and 4 ± 2%, aliphatic, aromatic and polar fractions, respectively. Biodegradation studies with the maltene fraction of oil provided as sole substrate revealed higher degradation by various 3-5 membered reconstituted consortia compared to pure bacterial strains and up to 42 ± 8% degradation could be achieved over 30 days. In contrast, over the same period up to 71.5 ± 2% oil degradation could be achieved using dried oily sludge (15% w/v) as sole substrate. Significant biodegradation observed in the un-inoculated controls indicated the presence of indigenous microorganisms in oily sludge. However, large variability in oil degradation was observed in the un-inoculated controls. Greater biodegradation of the maltene fraction led to significant enrichment of asphaltenes in residual oil associated with the sludge. PMID:25463577

  13. Pyrostegia venusta heptane extract containing saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons induces apoptosis on B16F10-Nex2 melanoma cells and displays antitumor activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Carlos R.; Matsuo, Alisson L.; Pereira, Felipe V.; Rabaça, Aline N.; Farias, Camyla F.; Girola, Nátalia; Massaoka, Mariana H.; Azevedo, Ricardo A.; Scutti, Jorge A.B.; Arruda, Denise C.; Silva, Luciana P.; Rodrigues, Elaine G.; Lago, João Henrique G.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Silva, Regildo M.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pyrostegia venusta (Ker. Gawl.) Miers (Bignoniacea) is a medicinal plant from the Brazilian Cerrado used to treat leucoderma and common diseases of the respiratory system. Objective: To investigate the antitumor activity of P.venusta extracts against melanoma. Materials and Methods: The cytotoxic activity and tumor induced cell death of heptane extract (HE) from P. venusta flowers was evaluated against murine melanoma B16F10-Nex2 cells in vitro and in a syngeneic model in vivo. Results: We found that HE induced apoptosis in melanoma cells by disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, induction of reactive oxygen species and late apoptosis evidenced by plasma membrane blebbing, cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation, exposure of phosphatidylserine on the cell surface and activation of caspase-2,-3,-8,-9. HE was also protective against singeneyc subcutaneous melanoma HE compounds were also able to induce cell cycle arrest at G2/M phases on tumor cells. On fractionation of HE in silica gel we isolated a cytotoxic fraction that contained a mixture of saturated hydrocarbons identified by 1H NMR and GC-MS analyses. Predominant species were octacosane (C28H58-36%) and triacontane (C30H62-13%), which individually showed significant cytotoxic activity against murine melanoma B16F10-Nex2 cells in vitro and a very promising antitumor protection against subcutaneous melanoma in vivo. Conclusion: The results suggest that the components of the heptane extract, mainly octasane and triacontane, which showed antitumor properties in experimental melanoma upon regional administration, might also be therapeutic in human cancer, such as in the mostly epidermal and slowly invasive melanomas, such as acral lentiginous melanoma, as an adjuvant treatment to surgical excision. PMID:24991116

  14. Degradation and Mineralization of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Anthracene and Naphthalene in Intertidal Marine Sediments †

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, James E.; Capone, Douglas G.

    1985-01-01

    The degradation of the polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) anthracene and naphthalene by the microbiota of intertidal sediments was investigated in laboratory studies. No mineralization of either PAH was observed in the absence of oxygen. Both rates and total amounts of PAH mineralization were strongly controlled by oxygen content and temperature of the incubations. Inorganic nitrogen and glucose amendments had minimal effects on PAH mineralization. The rates and total amounts of PAH mineralized were directly related to compound concentration, pre-exposure time, and concentration. Maximum mineralization was observed at the higher concentrations (5 to 100 μg/g [ppm]) of both PAHs. Optimal acclimation to anthracene and naphthalene (through pre-exposures to the compounds) occurred at the highest acclimation concentration (1,000 ppm). However, acclimation to a single concentration (100 ppm) resulted in initial relative mineralization rates over a range of re-exposure concentrations (1 to 1,000 ppm) being nearly identical. Maximum mineralization of both PAHs occurred after intermediate periods (1 to 2 weeks) of pre-exposure. The fraction of the total heterotrophic population capable of utilizing anthracene or naphthalene as sole carbon source was also greatest after 2 weeks. PMID:16346843

  15. Effects of alkylphosphates and nitrous oxide on microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Bogan, B W; Lahner, L M; Trbovic, V; Szajkovics, A M; Paterek, J R

    2001-05-01

    We conducted a series of liquid-culture experiments to begin to evaluate the abilities of gaseous sources of nitrogen and phosphorus to support biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Nutrients examined included nitrous oxide, as well as triethylphosphate (TEP) and tributylphosphate (TBP). Cultures were established using the indigenous microbial populations from one manufactured gas plant (MGP) site and one crude oil-contaminated drilling field site. Mineralization of phenanthrene was measured under alternative nutrient regimes and was compared to that seen with ammoniacal nitrogen and PO(4). Parallel cultures were used to assess removal of a suite of three- to five-ring PAHs. In summary, the abilities of the different communities to degrade PAH when supplemented with N(2)O, TEP, and TBP were highly variable. For example, in the MGP soil, organic P sources, especially TBP, supported a considerably higher degree of removal of low-molecular-weight PAHs than did PO(4); however, loss of high-molecular-weight compounds was impaired under these conditions. The disappearance of most PAHs was significantly less in the oil field soil when organophosphates were used. These results indicate that the utility of gaseous nutrients for PAH bioremediation in situ may be limited and will very likely have to be assessed on a case-by-case basis. PMID:11319093

  16. Effect of in vivo jet fuel exposure on subsequent in vitro dermal absorption of individual aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbon fuel constituents.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, F; Monteiro-Riviere, N A; Baynes, R E; Riviere, J E

    2005-05-14

    The percutaneous absorption of topically applied jet fuel hydrocarbons (HC) through skin previously exposed to jet fuel has not been investigated, although this exposure scenario is the occupational norm. Pigs were exposed to JP-8 jet fuel-soaked cotton fabrics for 1 and 4 d with repeated daily exposures. Preexposed and unexposed skin was then dermatomed and placed in flow-through in vitro diffusion cells. Five cells with exposed skin and four cells with unexposed skin were dosed with a mixture of 14 different HC consisting of nonane, decane, undecane, dodecane, tridecane, tetradecane, pentadecane, hexadecane, ethyl benzene, o-xylene, trimethyl benzene (TMB), cyclohexyl benzene (CHB), naphthalene, and dimethyl naphthalene (DMN) in water + ethanol (50:50) as diluent. Another five cells containing only JP-8-exposed skin were dosed solely with diluent in order to determine the skin retention of jet fuel HC. The absorption parameters of flux, diffusivity, and permeability were calculated for the studied HC. The data indicated that there was a two-fold and four-fold increase in absorption of specific aromatic HC like ethyl benzene, o-xylene, and TMB through 1- and 4-dJP-8 preexposed skin, respectively. Similarly, dodecane and tridecane were absorbed more in 4-d than 1-dJP-8 preexposed skin experiments. The absorption of naphthalene and DMN was 1.5 times greater than the controls in both 1- and 4-d preexposures. CHB, naphthalene, and DMN had significant persistent skin retention in 4-d preexposures as compared to 1-d exposures that might leave skin capable of further absorption several days postexposure. The possible mechanism of an increase in HC absorption in fuel preexposed skin may be via lipid extraction from the stratum corneum as indicated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. This study suggests that the preexposure of skin to jet fuel enhances the subsequent in vitro percutaneous absorption of HC, so single-dose absorption data for jet fuel HC from

  17. Inhibition of free DNA degradation by the deformation of DNA exposed to trace polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminants.

    PubMed

    Kang, Fuxing; Gao, Yanzheng; Wang, Qian

    2010-12-01

    A rapid inhibitory effect of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on DNA degradation was examined by conventional spectral analysis and microtitration. The purpose was to determine whether PAHs inhibited free DNA degradation by the enzyme DNase I. The results showed that model PAHs phenanthrene and pyrene combined with free DNA to decelerate DNA degradation by DNase I. Phenanthrene-induced inhibition was stronger than that of pyrene. Trace level of PAHs did not induce DNase I deactivation. The DNase I enzyme exhibited only slight shifts in IR absorption bands related to amide II and III upon PAH exposure, and no change was observed with other bands. The decelerating degradation of DNA is attributed to the changes in structure, backbone composition, and guanine constituents of DNA induced by PAHs inserted into double strands, and to the imidazole-like derivates from the combination of imidazole rings with pyrene. PMID:21053946

  18. Cultivation-dependent and cultivation-independent characterization of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in Guaymas Basin sediments.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Biddle, Jennifer F; Teske, Andreas; Aitken, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria perform a fundamental role in the biodegradation of crude oil and its petrochemical derivatives in coastal and open ocean environments. However, there is a paucity of knowledge on the diversity and function of these organisms in deep-sea sediment. Here we used stable-isotope probing (SIP), a valuable tool to link the phylogeny and function of targeted microbial groups, to investigate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria under aerobic conditions in sediments from Guaymas Basin with uniformly labeled [(13)C]-phenanthrene (PHE). The dominant sequences in clone libraries constructed from (13)C-enriched bacterial DNA (from PHE enrichments) were identified to belong to the genus Cycloclasticus. We used quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of the SIP-identified Cycloclasticus to determine their abundance in sediment incubations amended with unlabeled PHE and showed substantial increases in gene abundance during the experiments. We also isolated a strain, BG-2, representing the SIP-identified Cycloclasticus sequence (99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity), and used this strain to provide direct evidence of PHE degradation and mineralization. In addition, we isolated Halomonas, Thalassospira, and Lutibacterium sp. with demonstrable PHE-degrading capacity from Guaymas Basin sediment. This study demonstrates the value of coupling SIP with cultivation methods to identify and expand on the known diversity of PAH-degrading bacteria in the deep-sea. PMID:26217326

  19. Cultivation-dependent and cultivation-independent characterization of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in Guaymas Basin sediments

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Tony; Biddle, Jennifer F.; Teske, Andreas; Aitken, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria perform a fundamental role in the biodegradation of crude oil and its petrochemical derivatives in coastal and open ocean environments. However, there is a paucity of knowledge on the diversity and function of these organisms in deep-sea sediment. Here we used stable-isotope probing (SIP), a valuable tool to link the phylogeny and function of targeted microbial groups, to investigate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria under aerobic conditions in sediments from Guaymas Basin with uniformly labeled [13C]-phenanthrene (PHE). The dominant sequences in clone libraries constructed from 13C-enriched bacterial DNA (from PHE enrichments) were identified to belong to the genus Cycloclasticus. We used quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of the SIP-identified Cycloclasticus to determine their abundance in sediment incubations amended with unlabeled PHE and showed substantial increases in gene abundance during the experiments. We also isolated a strain, BG-2, representing the SIP-identified Cycloclasticus sequence (99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity), and used this strain to provide direct evidence of PHE degradation and mineralization. In addition, we isolated Halomonas, Thalassospira, and Lutibacterium sp. with demonstrable PHE-degrading capacity from Guaymas Basin sediment. This study demonstrates the value of coupling SIP with cultivation methods to identify and expand on the known diversity of PAH-degrading bacteria in the deep-sea. PMID:26217326

  20. ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC TREATMENT OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biological degradation of 12 chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CACs) was assessed in bench-top reactors and in serum bottle tests. Three continuously mixed daily batch-fed reactor systems were evaluated: anaerobic, aerobic, and sequential-anaerobic-aerobic (sequential). Glucose,...

  1. Repeated batch cultivation of the hydrocarbon-degrading, micro-algal strain Prototheca zopfii RND16 immobilized in polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Ryohei; Wada, Shun; Urano, Naoto

    2008-01-01

    This study reports on the stability of the cells of a heterotrophic green micro-algal strain Prototheca zopfii RND16 immobilized in polyurethane foam (PUF) cubes during degradation of mixed hydrocarbon substrate, which was composed of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), in 5 successive cycles of repeated batch cultivation at 30 degrees C. Both RND16 cells and mixed hydrocarbon substrate components had been entrapped in PUF cubes through cultivation. PUF-immobilized RND16 degraded n-alkanes almost completely, whereas the strain hardly degraded PAHs in PUFs, rather they accumulated in the matrices. It is noteworthy that this result is strikingly different from that of the free-living cell culture, where RND16 reduced concentrations of both n-alkanes and PAHs. However, PAHs accumulation in the PUFs did not impair the performance of the immobilized alga to utilize n-alkanes. These results suggest that the PUFs harboring RND16 cells could be used repeatedly for selective retrieval of PAHs from oil-polluted waters after preferential biodegradation of n-alkanes by algae. PMID:18388973

  2. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon degradation by heterogeneous reactions with N 2O 5 on atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamens, Richard M.; Guo, Jiazhen; Guo, Zhishi; McDow, Stephen R.

    The degradation of particulate polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) on atmospheric soot particles in the presence of gas phase dinitrogen pentoxide (N 2O 5) was explored. Dilute diesel and wood soot particles containing PAH were reacted with˜10ppm of N 2O 5 in a 200 ℓ continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). To provide a stable source of particles for reaction in the CSTR, diesel or wood soot particles were injected at night into a 25 m 3 Teflon outdoor chamber. The large chamber served as a reservoir for the feed aerosol, and the aerosol could then be introduced at a constant flow rate into the CSTR. PAH-N 2O 5 heterogeneous rate constants for wood soot at 15°C ranged from2 × 10 -18to5 × 10 -18 cm 3 molecules -1 s -1. For diesel soot the rate constants at 16°C were higher and ranged from5 × 10 -18to30 × 10 -18 cm 3 molecules -1 s -1. Comparisons with other studies suggest that sunlight is the most important factor which influences PAH decay. This is followed by ozone, NO 2, N 2O 5 and nitric acid. The rate constants of nitro-PAH formation from a parent PAH and N 2O 5 were of the order of1 × 10 -19-1 × 10 -18 molecules -1s -1. The uncertainty associated with all of these rate constants is± a factor of 3. Given, however, the small magnitude of the rate constants and the low levels of N 2O 5 present in the atmosphere, we concluded that PAH heterogeneous reactions with gas phase N 2O 5 degrade particle-bound PAH or to form nitro-PAH from PAH are not very important. (Direct application of the specific rate constants derived in this study to ambient atmospheres should not be undertaken unless the ambient particle size distributions and chemical composition of the particles are similar to the ones reported in this study.)

  3. Photocatalytic degradation of oil industry hydrocarbons models at laboratory and at pilot-plant scale

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Ronald; Nunez, Oswaldo

    2010-02-15

    Photodegradation/mineralization (TiO{sub 2}/UV Light) of the hydrocarbons: p-nitrophenol (PNP), naphthalene (NP) and dibenzothiophene (DBT) at three different reactors: batch bench reactor (BBR), tubular bench reactor (TBR) and tubular pilot-plant (TPP) were kinetically monitored at pH = 3, 6 and 10, and the results compared using normalized UV light exposition times. The results fit the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) model; therefore, LH adsorption equilibrium constants (K) and apparent rate constants (k) are reported as well as the apparent pseudo-first-order rate constants, k{sub obs}{sup '} = kK/(1 + Kc{sub r}). The batch bench reactor is the most selective reactor toward compound and pH changes in which the reactivity order is: NP > DBT > PNP, however, the catalyst adsorption (K) order is: DBT > NP > PNP at the three pH used but NP has the highest k values. The tubular pilot-plant (TPP) is the most efficient of the three reactors tested. Compound and pH photodegradation/mineralization selectivity is partially lost at the pilot plant where DBT and NP reaches ca. 90% mineralization at the pH used, meanwhile, PNP reaches only 40%. The real time, in which these mineralization occur are: 180 min for PNP and 60 min for NP and DBT. The mineralization results at the TPP indicate that for the three compounds, the rate limiting step is the same as the degradation one. So that, there is not any stable intermediate that may accumulate during the photocatalytic treatment. (author)

  4. Celeribacter persicus sp. nov., a polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium isolated from mangrove soil.

    PubMed

    Jami, Mansooreh; Lai, Qiliang; Ghanbari, Mahdi; Moghadam, Mohsen Shahriari; Kneifel, Wolfgang; Domig, Konrad J

    2016-04-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, mesophilic bacterial strain, designated SBU1T, which degrades polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was isolated from the sediments of the mangrove forests of Nayband Bay in the Iranian Persian Gulf during a bioremediation experiment. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain SBU1T exhibited highest similarities with Celeribacter indicus P73T (98.52 %) and Celeribacter neptunius H 14T (97.05 %). Phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, demonstrated that strain SBU1T fell within a cluster consisting of the type strains of species of the genus Celeribacter and formed a stable clade with C. indicus P73T in trees generated with three algorithms. The fatty acid profile of strain SBU1T consisted of the major fatty acids C18 : 1ω7c/ω6c and C18 : 1ω7c 11-methyl. The major compounds in the polar lipid profile were one phosphatidylglycerol and four unidentified phospholipids. The quinone system exclusively comprised ubiquinone (Q-10). The DNA G+C content was 60.4 mol%. A combination of phylogenetic analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization estimation, average nucleotide identity results and differential phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics demonstrated that strain SBU1T could be distinguished from its close relatives. Therefore, strain SBU1T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Celeribacter for which the name Celeribacter persicus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SBU1T ( = MCCC 1A00672T = DSM 100434T). PMID:26867899

  5. Degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in crumb tyre rubber catalysed by rutile TiO2 under UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Huang, Linyue; Lou, Lan-Lan; Chang, Yue; Dong, Yanling; Wang, Huan; Liu, Shuangxi

    2015-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in crumb tyre rubber were firstly degraded under UV irradiation in the presence of rutile TiO2 and hydrogen peroxide. The effects of light intensity, catalyst amount, oxidant amount, initial pH value, co-solvent content, and reaction time on degradation efficiency of typical PAHs in crumb tyre rubber were studied. The results indicated that UV irradiation, rutile TiO2, and hydrogen peroxide were beneficial to the degradation of PAHs and co-solvent could accelerate the desorption of PAHs from crumb tyre rubber. Up to 90% degradation efficiency of total 16 PAHs could be obtained in the presence of rutile TiO2 (1 wt%) and hydrogen peroxide (1.0 mL) under 1800 µW cm(-2) UV irradiation for 48 h. The high molecular weight PAHs (such as benz(a)pyrene) were more difficult to be degraded than low molecular weight PAHs (such as phenanthrene, chrysene). Moreover, through the characterization of reaction solution and degradation products via GC-MS, it was proved that the PAHs in crumb tyre rubber were successfully degraded. PMID:25323028

  6. Genome Sequence of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Cronobacter sp. Strain DJ34 Isolated from Crude Oil-Containing Sludge from the Duliajan Oil Fields, Assam, India.

    PubMed

    Pal, Siddhartha; Das Banerjee, Tirtha; Roy, Ajoy; Sar, Pinaki; Kazy, Sufia K

    2015-01-01

    We report here the 4,856,096-bp draft genome sequence of hydrocarbon-degrading Cronobacter sp. strain DJ34 isolated from crude oil-containing sludge from the Duliajan oil fields, India. DJ34 contains genes that mediate hydrocarbon degradation, metal resistance, and biosurfactant production. This is the first report of the genome sequence of Cronobacter sp. inhabiting an oil-contaminated environment. PMID:26564043

  7. Genome Sequence of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Cronobacter sp. Strain DJ34 Isolated from Crude Oil-Containing Sludge from the Duliajan Oil Fields, Assam, India

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Siddhartha; Das Banerjee, Tirtha; Roy, Ajoy; Sar, Pinaki

    2015-01-01

    We report here the 4,856,096-bp draft genome sequence of hydrocarbon-degrading Cronobacter sp. strain DJ34 isolated from crude oil-containing sludge from the Duliajan oil fields, India. DJ34 contains genes that mediate hydrocarbon degradation, metal resistance, and biosurfactant production. This is the first report of the genome sequence of Cronobacter sp. inhabiting an oil-contaminated environment. PMID:26564043

  8. In Vitro Microbial Degradation of Bituminous Hydrocarbons and In Situ Colonization of Bitumen Surfaces Within the Athabasca Oil Sands Deposit

    PubMed Central

    Wyndham, R. C.; Costerton, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Bituminous hydrocarbons extracted from the Athabasca oil sands of north-eastern Alberta were adsorbed onto filter supports and placed at sites in the Athabasca River and its tributaries where these rivers come in contact with the oil sands formation. Colonization of the hydrocarbon surfaces at summer and winter ambient temperatures was examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy as well as by epifluorescence microscopy of acridine orange-stained cross sections. Ruthenium red and alkaline bismuth stains visualized an association of bacteria with the hydrocarbon surface which was mediated by bacterial polysaccharides. Bacteria apparently lacking a glycocalyx were also found closely associated with the surface of the hydrophobic substrate and in channels within the substrate. A solvent precipitation and column chromatographic fractionation of the bitumen was followed by cross-tests for growth on the fractions by various isolated sediment microorganisms, as determined by epifluorescence count. All fractions except the asphaltenes supported the growth of at least two of the isolates, although fractionation of degraded bitumen revealed that the saturate, aromatic, and first polar fractions were preferentially degraded. Images PMID:16345738

  9. Generalist hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial communities in the oil-polluted water column of the North Sea

    PubMed Central

    Chronopoulou, Panagiota-Myrsini; Sanni, Gbemisola O; Silas-Olu, Daniel I; van der Meer, Jan Roelof; Timmis, Kenneth N; Brussaard, Corina P D; McGenity, Terry J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the effect of light crude oil on bacterial communities during an experimental oil spill in the North Sea and in mesocosms (simulating a heavy, enclosed oil spill), and to isolate and characterize hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria from the water column. No oil-induced changes in bacterial community (3 m below the sea surface) were observed 32 h after the experimental spill at sea. In contrast, there was a decrease in the dominant SAR11 phylotype and an increase in Pseudoalteromonas spp. in the oiled mesocosms (investigated by 16S rRNA gene analysis using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis), as a consequence of the longer incubation, closer proximity of the samples to oil, and the lack of replenishment with seawater. A total of 216 strains were isolated from hydrocarbon enrichment cultures, predominantly belonging to the genus Pseudoaltero monas; most strains grew on PAHs, branched and straight-chain alkanes, as well as many other carbon sources. No obligate hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria were isolated or detected, highlighting the potential importance of cosmopolitan marine generalists like Pseudoalteromonas spp. in degrading hydrocarbons in the water column beneath an oil slick, and revealing the susceptibility to oil pollution of SAR11, the most abundant bacterial clade in the surface ocean. PMID:25251384

  10. In situ biostimulation of petroleum hydrocarbon degradation by nitrate and phosphate injection using a dipole well configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsin, Violaine; Coulomb, Bruno; Guelorget, Yves; Maier, Joachim; Höhener, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    The main aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of source zone bioremediation by nitrate and nutrient injection in a crude-oil contaminated aquifer using a recirculating well dipole. Groundwater pumped from a downgradient well at a rate of 2.5 m3 h- 1 was enriched with bromide (tracer), nitrate and ammonium phosphate and injected in a well 40 m upgradient. The test was run for 49 days with solute injection, followed by 65 days of dipole operation without solute addition. The resulting bromide breakthrough curve allowed quantifying a first-order leakage coefficient of 0.017 day- 1 from the dipole, whereas from the nitrate data a first-order nitrate consumption rate of 0.075 day- 1 was determined. Dissolved hydrocarbon concentrations including benzene decreased to non-detect in 84 days but experienced important rebounds after ending circulation. Nitrite accumulated temporarily but was consumed entirely when solute injection stopped. The mass balance calculations revealed that about 83% of the nitrate was used for hydrocarbon degradation, with the remaining being used for oxidation of reduced sulfur. A reactive transport model was used for the delineation of the treated zone. This model suggested that denitrification influenced flow and transport in the dipole. It is concluded that successful promotion of denitrifying hydrocarbon degradation is easily obtained in this aquifer and enables to abate dissolved concentrations, and that dipole configuration is a good option.

  11. Use of dissolved and vapor-phase gases to investigate methanogenic degradation of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in the subsurface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amos, R.T.; Mayer, K.U.; Bekins, B.A.; Delin, G.N.; Williams, R.L.

    2005-01-01

    [1] At many sites contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, methanogenesis is a significant degradation pathway. Techniques to estimate CH4 production, consumption, and transport processes are needed to understand the geochemical system, provide a complete carbon mass balance, and quantify the hydrocarbon degradation rate. Dissolved and vapor-phase gas data collected at a petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated site near Bemidji, Minnesota, demonstrate that naturally occurring nonreactive or relatively inert gases such as Ar and N2 can be effectively used to better understand and quantify physical and chemical processes related to methanogenic activity in the subsurface. In the vadose zone, regions of Ar and N2 depletion and enrichment are indicative of methanogenic and methanotrophic zones, and concentration gradients between the regions suggest that reaction-induced advection can be an important gas transport process. In the saturated zone, dissolved Ar and N2 concentrations are used to quantify degassing driven by methanogenesis and also suggest that attenuation of methane along the flow path, into the downgradient aquifer, is largely controlled by physical processes. Slight but discernable preferential depletion of N2 over Ar, in both the saturated and unsaturated zones near the free-phase oil, suggests reactivity of N2 and is consistent with other evidence indicating that nitrogen fixation by microbial activity is taking place at this site. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. In situ biostimulation of petroleum hydrocarbon degradation by nitrate and phosphate injection using a dipole well configuration.

    PubMed

    Ponsin, Violaine; Coulomb, Bruno; Guelorget, Yves; Maier, Joachim; Höhener, Patrick

    2014-12-15

    The main aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of source zone bioremediation by nitrate and nutrient injection in a crude-oil contaminated aquifer using a recirculating well dipole. Groundwater pumped from a downgradient well at a rate of 2.5m(3)h(-1) was enriched with bromide (tracer), nitrate and ammonium phosphate and injected in a well 40 m upgradient. The test was run for 49 days with solute injection, followed by 65 days of dipole operation without solute addition. The resulting bromide breakthrough curve allowed quantifying a first-order leakage coefficient of 0.017 day(-1) from the dipole, whereas from the nitrate data a first-order nitrate consumption rate of 0.075 day(-1) was determined. Dissolved hydrocarbon concentrations including benzene decreased to non-detect in 84days but experienced important rebounds after ending circulation. Nitrite accumulated temporarily but was consumed entirely when solute injection stopped. The mass balance calculations revealed that about 83% of the nitrate was used for hydrocarbon degradation, with the remaining being used for oxidation of reduced sulfur. A reactive transport model was used for the delineation of the treated zone. This model suggested that denitrification influenced flow and transport in the dipole. It is concluded that successful promotion of denitrifying hydrocarbon degradation is easily obtained in this aquifer and enables to abate dissolved concentrations, and that dipole configuration is a good option. PMID:25461884

  13. Effect of reduced iron on the degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in contaminated soil and ground water: A review of publications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.

    2014-02-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons are among the most hazardous organic pollutants. The traditional remediation technologies, i.e., pumping of contaminated soil- and groundwater and its purification appear to be costly and not very efficient as applied to these pollutants. In the last years, a cheaper method of destroying chlorine-replaced hydrocarbons has been used based on the construction of an artificial permeable barrier, where the process develops with the participation of in situ bacteria activated by zerovalent iron. The forced significant decrease in the redox potential (Eh) down to -750 mV provides the concentration of electrons necessary for the reduction of chlorinated hydrocarbons. A rise in the pH drastically accelerates the dechlorination process. In addition to chlorine-organic compounds, ground water is often contaminated with heavy metals. The influence of the latter on the effect of zerovalent iron may be different: both accelerating its degradation (Cu) and inhibiting it (Cr). Most of the products of zerovalent iron corrosion, i.e., green rust, magnetite, ferrihydrite, hematite, and goethite, weaken the efficiency of the Fe0 barrier by mitigating the dechlorination and complicating the water filtration. However, pyrrhotite FeS, on the contrary, accelerates the dechlorination of chlorine hydrocarbons.

  14. A quantitative PCR approach for quantification of functional genes involved in the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Aburto-Medina, Arturo; Taha, Mohamed; Ball, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are major pollutants globally and due to their carcinogenic and mutagenic properties their clean-up is paramount. Bioremediation or using PAH degrading microorganisms (mainly bacteria) to degrade the pollutants represents cheap, effective methods. These PAH degraders harbor functional genes which help microorganisms use PAHs as source of food and energy. Most probable number (MPN) and plate counting methods are widely used for counting PAHs degraders; however, as culture based methods only count a small fraction (<1%) of microorganisms capable of carrying out PAH degradation, the use of culture-independent methodologies is desirable.•This protocol presents a robust, rapid and sensitive qPCR method for the quantification of the functional genes involved in the degradation of PAHs in soil samples.•This protocol enables us to screen a vast number of PAH contaminated soil samples in few hours.•This protocol provides valuable information about the natural attenuation potential of contaminated soil and can be used to monitor the bioremediation process. PMID:27054096

  15. A quantitative PCR approach for quantification of functional genes involved in the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated soils

    PubMed Central

    Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Aburto-Medina, Arturo; Taha, Mohamed; Ball, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are major pollutants globally and due to their carcinogenic and mutagenic properties their clean-up is paramount. Bioremediation or using PAH degrading microorganisms (mainly bacteria) to degrade the pollutants represents cheap, effective methods. These PAH degraders harbor functional genes which help microorganisms use PAHs as source of food and energy. Most probable number (MPN) and plate counting methods are widely used for counting PAHs degraders; however, as culture based methods only count a small fraction (<1%) of microorganisms capable of carrying out PAH degradation, the use of culture-independent methodologies is desirable.•This protocol presents a robust, rapid and sensitive qPCR method for the quantification of the functional genes involved in the degradation of PAHs in soil samples.•This protocol enables us to screen a vast number of PAH contaminated soil samples in few hours.•This protocol provides valuable information about the natural attenuation potential of contaminated soil and can be used to monitor the bioremediation process. PMID:27054096

  16. ALIPHATIC HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS PRODUCE VOLATILE 'SALMONELLA' MUTAGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Production of volatile mutagenic metabolites from 5 halogenated promutagens was examined by a simple modification of the conventional Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay. This method incorporates the taping together of 2 agar plates face to face during the initial portion of ...

  17. Erythrobacter atlanticus sp. nov., a bacterium from ocean sediment able to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Lingping; Liu, Yang; Wang, Lin; Wang, Wanpeng; Shao, Zongze

    2015-10-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, motile, rod-shaped, orange-pigmented bacterium able to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was isolated from deep-sea sediment of the Atlantic Ocean and subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. The strain, designated s21-N3T, could grow at 4–37 °C (optimum 28 °C), at pH 5–10 (optimum pH 7–8) and with 1–7 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 2–3 %). Strain s21-N3T was positive for nitrate reduction, denitrification, aesculin hydrolysis, oxidase and catalase, but negative for indole production and urease. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain s21-N3T formed a distinct branch within the genus Erythrobacter, sharing high similarities with three closely related strains, Erythrobacter marinus HWDM-33T (98.67 %), ‘Erythrobacter luteus’ KA37 (97.80 %) and Erythrobacter gangjinensis K7-2T (97.59 %). The similarities between strain s21-N3T and other type strains of recognized species within the genus Erythrobacter ranged from 95.00 to 96.47 %. The digital DNA–DNA hybridization values and average nucleotide identity (ANI) values between strain s21-N3T and the three closely related strains Erythrobacter marinus HWDM-33T, ‘Erythrobacter luteus’ KA37 and Erythrobacter gangjinensis K7-2T were 18.60, 18.00 and 18.50 % and 74.24, 72.49 and 72.54 %, respectively. The principal fatty acids were summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c/ω6c) and summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c/ω6c). The respiratory lipoquinone was identified as Q-10. The major polar lipids comprised sphingoglycolipid, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and diphosphatidylglycerol. The G+C content of the chromosomal DNA was determined to be 58.18 mol%. The combined genotypic and phenotypic distinctiveness demonstrated that strain s21-N3T represents a novel species of the genus Erythrobacter, for which the name Erythrobacter atlanticus sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain s21-N3T (

  18. CHLORINATED HYDROCARBON DEGRADATION IN PLANTS: MECHANISMS AND ENHANCEMENT OF PHYTOREMEDIATION OF GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several varieties of transgenic poplar containing cytochrome P-450 2E1 have been constructed and are undergoing tests. Strategies for improving public acceptance and safety of transgenic poplar for chlorinated hydrocarbon phytoremediation are being developed. We have discovered a...

  19. Assessing the correlation between anaerobic toluene degradation activity and bssA concentrations in hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer material.

    PubMed

    Kazy, Sufia K; Monier, Amy L; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2010-09-01

    The assessment of biodegradation activity in contaminated aquifers is critical to demonstrate the performance of bioremediation and natural attenuation and to parameterize models of contaminant plume dynamics. Real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to target the catabolic bssA gene (coding for benzylsuccinate synthase) and a 16S rDNA phylogenetic gene (for total Bacteria) as potential biomarkers to infer on anaerobic toluene degradation rates. A significant correlation (P = 0.0003) was found over a wide range of initial toluene concentrations (1-100 mg/l) between toluene degradation rates and bssA concentrations in anaerobic microcosms prepared with aquifer material from a hydrocarbon contaminated site. In contrast, the correlation between toluene degradation activity and total Bacteria concentrations was not significant (P = 0.1125). This suggests that qPCR targeting of functional genes might offer a simple approach to estimate in situ biodegradation activity, which would enhance site investigation and modeling of natural attenuation at hydrocarbon-contaminated sites. PMID:20204467

  20. Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus sp. nov., an aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium identified in laboratory cultures of marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Nichols, Peter D; Whitman, William B; Aitken, Michael D

    2012-02-01

    A marine bacterium, designated strain MCTG13d, was isolated from a laboratory culture of the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum CCAP1121/2 by enrichment with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the sole carbon source. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons, the strain was most closely related to Porticoccus litoralis IMCC2115(T) (96.5%) and to members of the genera Microbulbifer (91.4 to 93.7%) and Marinimicrobium (90.4 to 92.0%). Phylogenetic trees showed that the strain clustered in a distinct phyletic line in the class Gammaproteobacteria for which P. litoralis is presently the sole cultured representative. The strain was strictly aerobic, rod shaped, Gram negative, and halophilic. Notably, it was able to utilize hydrocarbons as sole sources of carbon and energy, whereas sugars did not serve as growth substrates. The predominant isoprenoid quinone of strain MCTG13d was Q-8, and the dominant fatty acids were C(16:1ω7c), C(18:1ω7c), and C(16:0). DNA G+C content for the isolate was 54.9 ± 0.42 mol%. Quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of this strain showed that this organism was common in other laboratory cultures of marine phytoplankton. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain MCTG13d represents a novel species of Porticoccus, for which the name Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus sp. nov. is proposed. The discovery of this highly specialized hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium living in association with marine phytoplankton suggests that phytoplankton represent a previously unrecognized biotope of novel bacterial taxa that degrade hydrocarbons in the ocean. PMID:22139001

  1. Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus sp. nov., an Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Identified in Laboratory Cultures of Marine Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Peter D.; Whitman, William B.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    A marine bacterium, designated strain MCTG13d, was isolated from a laboratory culture of the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum CCAP1121/2 by enrichment with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the sole carbon source. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons, the strain was most closely related to Porticoccus litoralis IMCC2115T (96.5%) and to members of the genera Microbulbifer (91.4 to 93.7%) and Marinimicrobium (90.4 to 92.0%). Phylogenetic trees showed that the strain clustered in a distinct phyletic line in the class Gammaproteobacteria for which P. litoralis is presently the sole cultured representative. The strain was strictly aerobic, rod shaped, Gram negative, and halophilic. Notably, it was able to utilize hydrocarbons as sole sources of carbon and energy, whereas sugars did not serve as growth substrates. The predominant isoprenoid quinone of strain MCTG13d was Q-8, and the dominant fatty acids were C16:1ω7c, C18:1ω7c, and C16:0. DNA G+C content for the isolate was 54.9 ± 0.42 mol%. Quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of this strain showed that this organism was common in other laboratory cultures of marine phytoplankton. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain MCTG13d represents a novel species of Porticoccus, for which the name Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus sp. nov. is proposed. The discovery of this highly specialized hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium living in association with marine phytoplankton suggests that phytoplankton represent a previously unrecognized biotope of novel bacterial taxa that degrade hydrocarbons in the ocean. PMID:22139001

  2. Sorption and degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylphenols, bisphenol A and phthalates in landfill leachate using sand, activated carbon and peat filters.

    PubMed

    Kalmykova, Yuliya; Moona, Nashita; Strömvall, Ann-Margret; Björklund, Karin

    2014-06-01

    Landfill leachates are repeatedly found contaminated with organic pollutants, such as alkylphenols (APs), phthalates and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at levels exceeding water quality standards. It has been shown that these pollutants may be present in the colloidal and truly dissolved phase in contaminated water, making particle separation an inefficient removal method. The aim of this study was to investigate sorption and degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs), selected APs, bisphenol A (BPA), phthalates and PAHs from landfill leachate using sand, granulated activated carbon (GAC) and peat moss filters. A pilot plant was installed at an inactive landfill with mixed industrial and household waste and samples were collected before and after each filter during two years. Leachate pre-treated in oil separator and sedimentation pond failed to meet water quality standards in most samples and little improvement was seen after the sand filter. These techniques are based on particle removal, whereas the analysed pollutants are found, to varying degrees, bound to colloids or dissolved. However, even highly hydrophobic compounds expected to be particle-bound, such as the PHCs and high-molecular weight PAHs, were poorly removed in the sand filter. The APs and BPA were completely removed by the GAC filter, while mass balance calculations indicate that 50-80% of the investigated phenols were removed in the peat filter. Results suggest possible AP degradation in peat filters. No evidence of phthalate degradation in the landfill, pond or the filters was found. The PHCs were completely removed in 50% and 35% of the measured occasions in the GAC and peat filters, respectively. The opposite trend was seen for removal of PAHs in GAC (50%) and peat (63%). Oxygenated PAHs with high toxicity were found in the leachates but not in the pond sediment. These compounds are likely formed in the pond water, which is alarming because sedimentation ponds are commonly used

  3. A real-time polymerase chain reaction method for monitoring anaerobic, hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria based on a catabolic gene.

    PubMed

    Beller, Harry R; Kane, Staci R; Legler, Tina C; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2002-09-15

    We have developed a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method that can quantify hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in sediment samples based on a catabolic gene associated with the first step of anaerobic toluene and xylene degradation. The target gene, bssA, codes for the alpha-subunit of benzylsuccinate synthase. The primer-probe set for real-time PCR was based on consensus regions of bssA from four denitrifying bacterial strains; bssA sequences for two of these strains were determined during this study. The method proved to be sensitive (detection limit ca. 5 gene copies) and had a linear range of >7 orders of magnitude. We used the method to investigate how gasohol releases from leaking underground storage tanks could affect indigenous toluene-degrading bacteria. Microcosms inoculated with aquifer sediments from four different sites were incubated anaerobically with BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) and nitrate in the presence and absence of ethanol. Overall, population trends were consistent with observed toluene degradation activity: the microcosms with the most rapid toluene degradation also had the largest numbers of bssA copies. In the microcosms with the most rapid toluene degradation, numbers of bssA copies increased 100-to 1000-fold over the first 4 days of incubation, during which time most of the toluene had been consumed. These results were supported by slot blot analyses with unamplified DNA and by cloning and sequencing of putative bssA amplicons, which confirmed the real-time PCR method's specificity for bssA. Use of a companion real-time PCR method for estimating total eubacterial populations (based on 16S rDNA) indicated that, in some cases, ethanol disproportionately supported the growth of bacteria that did not contain bssA. The real-time PCR method for bssA could be a powerful tool for monitored natural attenuation of BTEX in fuel-contaminated groundwater. To our knowledge, this is the first reported molecular method that

  4. Microbial metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Isolation and characterization of a pyrene-degrading bacterium. [Mycobacterium sp

    SciTech Connect

    Heitkamp, M.A.; Franklin, W.; Cerniglia, C.E. )

    1988-10-01

    Microbiological analyses of sediments located near a point source for petrogenic chemicals resulted in the isolation of a pyrene-mineralizing bacterium. This isolate was identified as a Mycobacterium sp. on the basis of its cellular and colony morphology, gram-positive and strong acid-fast reactions, diagnostic biochemical tests, 66.6% G+C content of the DNA, and high-molecular-weight mycolic acids (C{sub 58} to C{sub 64}). The mycobacterium mineralized pyrene when grown in a mineral salts medium supplemented with nutrients but was unable to utilize pyrene as a sole source of carbon and energy. The mycobacterium grew well at 24 and 30{degree}C and minimally at 35{degree}C. No growth was observed at 5 or 42{degree}C. The mycobacterium grew well at salt concentrations up to 4%. Pyrene-induced Mycobacterium cultures mineralized 5% of the pyrene after 6 h and reached a maximum of 48% mineralization within 72 h. Treatment of induced and noninduced cultures with chloramphenicol showed that pyrene-degrading enzymes were inducible in this Mycobacterium sp. This bacterium could also mineralize other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and alkyl- and nitro-substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons including naphthalene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, 3-methylcholanthrene, 1-nitropyrene, and 6-nitrochrysene. This is the first report of a bacterium able to extensively mineralize pyrene and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons containing four aromatic rings.

  5. LABORATORY AND FIELD RESULTS LINKING HIGH CONDUCTIVITIES TO THE MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of a l6-month field and l6-month meso-scale laboratory investigation of unconsolidated sandy environments contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons that are undergoing natural biodegradation is presented. The purpose was to understand the processes responsible for causin...

  6. Isolation and characterization of different bacterial strains for bioremediation of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Guermouche M'rassi, A; Bensalah, F; Gury, J; Duran, R

    2015-10-01

    Crude oil is a common environmental pollutant composed of a large number of both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Biodegradation is carried out by microbial communities that are important in determining the fate of pollutants in the environment. The intrinsic biodegradability of the hydrocarbons and the distribution in the environment of competent degrading microorganisms are crucial information for the implementation of bioremediation processes. In the present study, the biodegradation capacities of various bacteria toward aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons were determined. The purpose of the study was to isolate and characterize hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria from contaminated soil of a refinery in Arzew, Algeria. A collection of 150 bacterial strains was obtained; the bacterial isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and their ability to degrade hydrocarbon compounds characterized. The isolated strains were mainly affiliated to the Gamma-Proteobacteria class. Among them, Pseudomonas spp. had the ability to metabolize high molecular weight hydrocarbon compounds such as pristane (C19) at 35.11 % by strain LGM22 and benzo[a] pyrene (C20) at 33.93 % by strain LGM11. Some strains were able to grow on all the hydrocarbons tested including octadecane, squalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene. Some strains were specialized degrading only few substrates. In contrast, the strain LGM2 designated as Pseudomonas sp. was found able to degrade both linear and branched alkanes as well as low and high poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The alkB gene involved in alkane degradation was detected in LGM2 and other Pseudomonas-related isolates. The capabilities of the isolated bacterial strains to degrade alkanes and PAHs should be of great practical significance in bioremediation of oil-contaminated environments. PMID:25813636

  7. Enrichment, Isolation, and Phylogenetic Identification of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacteria from Elizabeth River Sediments▿ † §

    PubMed Central

    Hilyard, Edward J.; Jones-Meehan, Joanne M.; Spargo, Barry J.; Hill, Russell T.

    2008-01-01

    The diversity of indigenous bacteria in sediments from several sites in the Elizabeth River (Virginia) able to degrade multiple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was investigated by the use of classical selective enrichment and molecular analyses. Enrichment cultures containing naphthalene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, or pyrene as a sole carbon and energy source were monitored by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to detect changes in the bacterial-community profile during enrichment and to determine whether the representative strains present were successfully cultured. The DGGE profiles of the final enrichments grown solely on naphthalene and pyrene showed no clear relationship with the site from which the inoculum was obtained. The enrichments grown solely on pyrene for two sample sites had >80% similarity, which suggests that common pyrene-degrading strains may be present in these sediments. The final enrichments grown on fluoranthene and phenanthrene remained diverse by site, suggesting that these strains may be influenced by environmental conditions. One hundred and one isolates were obtained, comprising representatives of the actinomycetes and alpha-, beta-, and gammaproteobacteria, including seven novel isolates with 16S rRNA gene sequences less than 98% similar to known strains. The ability to degrade multiple PAHs was demonstrated by mineralization of 14C-labeled substrate and growth in pure culture. This supports our hypothesis that a high diversity of bacterial strains with the ability to degrade multiple PAHs can be confirmed by the combined use of classical selective enrichment and molecular analyses. This large collection of diverse PAH-degrading strains provides a valuable resource for studies on mechanisms of PAH degradation and bioremediation. PMID:18156326

  8. Diesel and kerosene degradation by Pseudomonas desmolyticum NCIM 2112 and Nocardia hydrocarbonoxydans NCIM 2386.

    PubMed

    Kalme, Satish; Parshetti, Ganesh; Gomare, Sushma; Govindwar, Sanjay

    2008-06-01

    Pseudomonas desmolyticum NCIM 2112 (Pd 2112) and Nocardia hydrocarbonoxydans NCIM 2386 (Nh 2386) demonstrated an ability to degrade diesel and kerosene. Triton X-100 had enhanced the diesel degradation process by reducing the time required for the maximum utilization of total petroleum hydrocarbon. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectrum of degraded diesel indicates the presence of aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes, C=C aromatic nuclei, and substituted benzenes. Surface tension reduction and stable emulsification was increased using consortium when compared to individual strains. Triton X-100 showed increase in microbial attachment to hydrocarbon among the various chemical surfactants tested. For generating a rapid assay to screen microorganisms capable of degrading kerosene, the acetaldehyde produced in the degradation process could be used as an indicator of degradation. These results indicate diesel and kerosene degradation ability of both of the strains. PMID:18330635

  9. Effect of humic deposit (leonardite) on degradation of semi-volatile and heavy hydrocarbons and soil quality in crude-oil-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Turgay, Oguz Can; Erdogan, Esin Eraydın; Karaca, Ayten

    2010-11-01

    In order to investigate the bioremedial potential of humic deposit (leonardite), the effects of the treatments of leonardite and a commercial bioaugmentation agent on the degradation of a variety of petroleum hydrocarbons (C13-C31) and soil enzyme activities (urease acid-alkaline phosphatase and dehydrogenase) were tested within a soil incubation experiment lasting 120 days. Experimentally crude-oil-contaminated soil (2.5%) was regulated to a C:N:P ratio (100:15:1; Oilcon), amended with 5% of leonardite and regulated to the same C:N:P ratio (Oilcon-L) or mixed with a commercial bioaugmentation product (Oilcon-B), respectively. In the short period of incubation (60 days), Oilcon and Oilcon-B treatments showed higher hydrocarbon degradations, whereas Oilcon-L showed higher hydrocarbon degradation over Oilcon and Oilcon-B treatments in the long-term (120 days). Applying contaminated soil with leonardite increased urease (LSD, 4.978, *P<0.05) and dehydrogenase (LSD, 0.660, *P<0.05) activities. However, acid and alkaline phosphatase activities showed no certain inclination between different treatments. Dehydrogenase seemed to be more related to hydrocarbon degradation process. Overall results showed that leonardite enhanced biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons and also stimulated soil ecological quality measured as soil enzyme activities. PMID:19888662

  10. Complete genome of Martelella sp. AD-3, a moderately halophilic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Cui, Changzheng; Li, Zhijie; Qian, Jiangchao; Shi, Jie; Huang, Ling; Tang, Hongzhi; Chen, Xin; Lin, Kuangfei; Xu, Ping; Liu, Yongdi

    2016-05-10

    Martelella sp. strain AD-3, a moderate halophilic bacterium, was isolated from a petroleum-contaminated soil with high salinity in China. Here, we report the complete genome of strain AD-3, which contains one circular chromosome and two circular plasmids. An array of genes related to metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and halophilic mechanism in this bacterium was identified by the whole genome analysis. PMID:26988395

  11. Stable-isotope probing of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial guild in a contaminated soil

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Maiysha D.; Crandell, Douglas W.; Singleton, David R.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The bacteria responsible for the degradation of naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene, fluoranthene, or benz[a]anthracene in a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil were investigated by DNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP). Clone libraries of 16S rRNA genes were generated from the 13C-enriched (“heavy”) DNA recovered from each SIP experiment, and quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene were developed to measure the abundances of many of the SIP-identified sequences. Clone libraries from the SIP experiments with naphthalene, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene primarily contained sequences related to bacteria previously associated with the degradation of those compounds. However, Pigmentiphaga-related sequences were newly associated with naphthalene and phenanthrene degradation, and sequences from a group of uncultivated γ-Proteobacteria known as Pyrene Group 2 were newly associated with fluoranthene and benz[a]anthracene degradation. Pyrene Group 2-related sequences were the only sequences recovered from the clone library generated from SIP with pyrene, and they were 82% of the sequences recovered from the clone library generated from SIP with benz[a]anthracene. In time-course experiments with each substrate in unlabeled form, the abundance of each of the measured groups increased in response to the corresponding substrate. These results provide a comprehensive description of the microbial ecology of a PAH-contaminated soil as it relates to the biodegradation of PAHs from two to four rings, and they underscore that bacteria in Pyrene Group 2 are well-suited for the degradation of four-ring PAHs. PMID:21564459

  12. Degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in used motor oil and implications for urban runoff quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, M.; Stenstrom, M. K.; Lau, S.

    2013-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are common organic pollutants of urban stormwater runoff due to atmospheric deposition, vehicle-related discharges, and coal tar pavement sealants. The US EPA lists sixteen PAHs as priority pollutants and seven of those are potential carcinogenic compounds. Due to their molecular structure, PAHs tend to attach to particles that will subsequently be deposited as sediments in waterways. This study focuses on the degradation of PAHs present in used motor oil. Four experimental setups were used to simulate volatilization and photooxidation in the degradation of sixteen PAHs as observed for up to 54 days. The volatilization-only experiment showed substantial reduction only in the concentration of Napthalene (Nap). However, photooxidation-only was more efficient in degrading PAHs. In this process, substantial reduction in the concentrations of Nap, Acenapthene (Anthe), Anthracene (ANT), Fluoranthene (FLT), Pyrene (PYR), Benz[a]anthracene (BaA), Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), Indeno[1,2,3,cd]pyrene (INP), and Benz[g,h,i]perylene (BghiP) were observed as early as five days. The two volatilization-photooxidation experiments exhibited substantial reduction in the concentrations of Fluorene (FLU), Chrysene (CHR) and Benzo[b]fluoranthene (BbF), in addition to the PAHs reduced by photooxidation-only. Phenanthrene (PHE), Fluoranthene (FLT), and Benzo[b]fluoranthene (BbF) only exhibited substantial decreased concentrations after 20 days in the volatilization-photooxidation experiment. One PAH, acenapthylene (Anthy), was not detected in the original sample of used motor oil. The highest degradations were observed in the combined volatilization-photooxidation experiment. In regions with infrequent rainfall, such as Southern California, molecules of PAHs attached to highway particles will have time to undergo degradation prior to transport. Therefore, PAHs may be present in lower concentrations in highway runoff in dry climates than in rainy climates

  13. Genome sequencing reveals mechanisms for heavy metal resistance and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation in Delftia lacustris strain LZ-C.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenyang; Huang, Haiying; Ling, Zhenmin; Yu, Zhengsheng; Jiang, Yiming; Liu, Pu; Li, Xiangkai

    2016-01-01

    Strain LZ-C, isolated from a petrochemical wastewater discharge site, was found to be resistant to heavy metals and to degrade various aromatic compounds, including naphenol, naphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene and toluene. Data obtained from 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that this strain was closely related to Delftia lacustris. The 5,889,360 bp genome of strain LZ-C was assembled into 239 contigs and 197 scaffolds containing 5855 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Among these predicted ORFs, 464 were different from the type strain of Delftia. The minimal inhibitory concentrations were 4 mM, 30 µM, 2 mM and 1 mM for Cr(VI), Hg(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II), respectively. Both genome sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR data revealed that genes related to Chr, Czc and Mer family genes play important roles in heavy metal resistance in strain LZ-C. In addition, the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter NhaA is important for adaptation to high salinity resistance (2.5 M NaCl). The complete pathways of benzene and benzoate degradation were identified through KEGG analysis. Interestingly, strain LZ-C also degrades naphthalene but lacks the key naphthalene degradation gene NahA. Thus, we propose that strain LZ-C exhibits a novel protein with a function similar to NahA. This study is the first to reveal the mechanisms of heavy metal resistance and salinity tolerance in D. lacustris and to identify a potential 2-methylnaphthalene degradation protein in this strain. Through whole-genome sequencing analysis, strain LZ-C might be a good candidate for the bioremediation of heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:26589947

  14. Marine Oil-Degrading Microorganisms and Biodegradation Process of Petroleum Hydrocarbon in Marine Environments: A Review.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jianliang; Yu, Yang; Bai, Yu; Wang, Liping; Wu, Yanan

    2015-08-01

    Due to the toxicity of petroleum compounds, the increasing accidents of marine oil spills/leakages have had a significant impact on our environment. Recently, different remedial techniques for the treatment of marine petroleum pollution have been proposed, such as bioremediation, controlled burning, skimming, and solidifying. (Hedlund and Staley in Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 51:61-66, 2001). This review introduces an important remedial method for marine oil pollution treatment-bioremediation technique-which is considered as a reliable, efficient, cost-effective, and eco-friendly method. First, the necessity of bioremediation for marine oil pollution was discussed. Second, this paper discussed the species of oil-degrading microorganisms, degradation pathways and mechanisms, the degradation rate and reaction model, and the factors affecting the degradation. Last, several suggestions for the further research in the field of marine oil spill bioremediation were proposed. PMID:25917503

  15. Insights into the biodegradation of weathered hydrocarbons in contaminated soils by bioaugmentation and nutrient stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Brassington, Kirsty J; Prpich, George; Paton, Graeme I; Semple, Kirk T; Pollard, Simon J T; Coulon, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    The potential for biotransformation of weathered hydrocarbon residues in soils collected from two commercial oil refinery sites (Soil A and B) was studied in microcosm experiments. Soil A has previously been subjected to on-site bioremediation and it was believed that no further degradation was possible while soil B has not been subjected to any treatment. A number of amendment strategies including bioaugmentation with hydrocarbon degrader, biostimulation with nutrients and soil grinding, were applied to the microcosms as putative biodegradation improvement strategies. The hydrocarbon concentrations in each amendment group were monitored throughout 112 days incubation. Microcosms treated with biostimulation (BS) and biostimulation/bioaugmentation (BS + BA) showed the most significant reductions in the aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions. However, soil grinding was shown to reduce the effectiveness of a nutrient treatment on the extent of biotransformation by up to 25% and 20% for the aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions, respectively. This is likely due to the disruption to the indigenous microbial community in the soil caused by grinding. Further, ecotoxicological responses (mustard seed germination and Microtox assays) showed that a reduction of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentration in soil was not directly correlable to reduction in toxicity; thus monitoring TPH alone is not sufficient for assessing the environmental risk of a contaminated site after remediation. PMID:27441989

  16. Involvement of the Ligninolytic System of White-Rot and Litter-Decomposing Fungi in the Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Pozdnyakova, Natalia N.

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are natural and anthropogenic aromatic hydrocarbons with two or more fused benzene rings. Because of their ubiquitous occurrence, recalcitrance, bioaccumulation potential and carcinogenic activity, PAHs are a significant environmental concern. Ligninolytic fungi, such as Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Bjerkandera adusta, and Pleurotus ostreatus, have the capacity of PAH degradation. The enzymes involved in the degradation of PAHs are ligninolytic and include lignin peroxidase, versatile peroxidase, Mn-peroxidase, and laccase. This paper summarizes the data available on PAH degradation by fungi belonging to different ecophysiological groups (white-rot and litter-decomposing fungi) under submerged cultivation and during mycoremediation of PAH-contaminated soils. The role of the ligninolytic enzymes of these fungi in PAH degradation is discussed. PMID:22830035

  17. [Degradation of hydrocarbons and their derivatives by a microbial association based on Canadian pondweed].

    PubMed

    Tumaĭkina, Iu A; Turkovskaia, O V; Ignatov, V V

    2008-01-01

    The degrading action of an aquatic plant-microbial association on the base of Canadian pondweed (Elodea canadensis) and its components (sterilized plant and two periphytonic strains, Pseudomonas fluorescens E1-2.1 and Brevundimonas diminuta E1-3.1) on crude oil, the water-soluble crude oil fraction, and individual test compounds (phenol, toluene, benzene, decalin, and naphthalene) was studied. It was found that the native association had a wider range and higher degree of degrading activity than individual species. Bacterial strains were significantly more active only towards naphthalene. The ability of the sterilized plant to degrade crude oil and phenol was no less than that of microorganisms and much more for toluene. Enzymatic activity towards the pollutants studied was found in E. canadensis exudates and buffer extracts of its cells. PMID:18924409

  18. Metagenome reveals potential microbial degradation of hydrocarbon coupled with sulfate reduction in an oil-immersed chimney from Guaymas Basin

    PubMed Central

    He, Ying; Xiao, Xiang; Wang, Fengping

    2013-01-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimneys contain a high diversity of microorganisms, yet the metabolic activity and the ecological functions of the microbial communities remain largely unexplored. In this study, a metagenomic approach was applied to characterize the metabolic potential in a Guaymas hydrothermal vent chimney and to conduct comparative genomic analysis among a variety of environments with sequenced metagenomes. Complete clustering of functional gene categories with a comparative metagenomic approach showed that this Guaymas chimney metagenome was clustered most closely with a chimney metagenome from Juan de Fuca. All chimney samples were enriched with genes involved in recombination and repair, chemotaxis and flagellar assembly, highlighting their roles in coping with the fluctuating extreme deep-sea environments. A high proportion of transposases was observed in all the metagenomes from deep-sea chimneys, supporting the previous hypothesis that horizontal gene transfer may be common in the deep-sea vent chimney biosphere. In the Guaymas chimney metagenome, thermophilic sulfate reducing microorganisms including bacteria and archaea were found predominant, and genes coding for the degradation of refractory organic compounds such as cellulose, lipid, pullullan, as well as a few hydrocarbons including toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene were identified. Therefore, this oil-immersed chimney supported a thermophilic microbial community capable of oxidizing a range of hydrocarbons that served as electron donors for sulphate reduction under anaerobic conditions. PMID:23785357

  19. Biosurfactant production from marine hydrocarbon-degrading consortia and pure bacterial strains using crude oil as carbon source

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Eleftheria; Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Korkakaki, Emmanouela; Kalogerakis, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Biosurfactants (BSs) are “green” amphiphilic molecules produced by microorganisms during biodegradation, increasing the bioavailability of organic pollutants. In this work, the BS production yield of marine hydrocarbon degraders isolated from Elefsina bay in Eastern Mediterranean Sea has been investigated. The drop collapse test was used as a preliminary screening test to confirm BS producing strains or mixed consortia. The community structure of the best consortia based on the drop collapse test was determined by 16S-rDNA pyrotag screening. Subsequently, the effect of incubation time, temperature, substrate and supplementation with inorganic nutrients, on BS production, was examined. Two types of BS – lipid mixtures were extracted from the culture broth; the low molecular weight BS Rhamnolipids and Sophorolipids. Crude extracts were purified by silica gel column chromatography and then identified by thin layer chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results indicate that BS production yield remains constant and low while it is independent of the total culture biomass, carbon source, and temperature. A constant BS concentration in a culture broth with continuous degradation of crude oil (CO) implies that the BS producing microbes generate no more than the required amount of BSs that enables biodegradation of the CO. Isolated pure strains were found to have higher specific production yields than the complex microbial marine community-consortia. The heavy oil fraction of CO has emerged as a promising substrate for BS production (by marine BS producers) with fewer impurities in the final product. Furthermore, a particular strain isolated from sediments, Paracoccus marcusii, may be an optimal choice for bioremediation purposes as its biomass remains trapped in the hydrocarbon phase, not suffering from potential dilution effects by sea currents. PMID:25904907

  20. Microorganisms and methods for degrading plant cell walls and complex hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Polne-Fuller, M.

    1991-09-24

    This patent describes a biologically pure multinucleated marine amoeba having the identifying characteristics of ATCC 40319. The amoeba being capable of digesting algal cell walls and having the further capacity to degrade paraffin, wax, polyethylene, polypropylene, polyvinyl chloride polyvinylidene di-chloride and mixtures thereof.

  1. Evolution of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Microbial Communities in the Aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Well Blowout in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, G.; Dubinsky, E. A.; Chakraborty, R.; Hollibaugh, J. T.; Hazen, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill created large plumes of dispersed oil and gas that remained deep in the water column and stimulated growth of several deep-sea bacteria that can degrade hydrocarbons at cold temperatures. We tracked microbial community composition before, during and after the 83-day spill to determine relationships between microbial dynamics, and hydrocarbon and dissolved-oxygen concentrations. Dominant bacteria in plumes shifted drastically over time and were dependent on the concentration of hydrocarbons, and the relative quantities of insoluble and soluble oil fractions. Unmitigated flow from the wellhead early in the spill resulted in the highest concentrations of oil and relatively more n-alkanes suspended in the plume as small oil droplets. These conditions resulted in near complete dominance by alkane-degrading Oceanospirillales, Pseudomonas and Shewanella. Six-weeks into the spill overall hydrocarbon concentrations in the plume decreased and were almost entirely composed of BTEX after management actions reduced emissions into the water column. These conditions corresponded with the emergence of Colwellia, Pseudoalteromonas, Cycloclasticus and Halomonas that are capable of degrading aromatic compounds. After the well was contained dominant plume bacteria disappeared within two weeks after the spill and transitioned to an entirely different set of bacteria dominated by Flavobacteria, Methylophaga, Alteromonas and Rhodobacteraceae that were found in anomalous oxygen depressions throughout August and are prominent degraders of both high molecular weight organic matter as well as hydrocarbons. Bio-Sep beads amended with volatile hydrocarbons from MC-252 oil were used from August through September to create hydrocarbon-amended traps for attracting oil-degrading microbes in situ. Traps were placed at multiple depths on a drilling rig about 600-m from the original MC-252 oil spill site. Microbes were isolated on media using MC-252 oil as the sole

  2. ACCUMULATION OF POLY-B-HYDROXYBUTYRATE IN A METHANE- ENRICHED, HALOGENATED, HYDROCARBON-DEGRADING SOIL COLUMN: IMPLICATIONS FOR MICROBIAL COMMUNITY STRUCTURE AND NUTRITIONAL STATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The prokarotic, endogenous storage polymer poly--hydroxybutyrate (PHB) accumulated in soil from a methane-enriched, halogenated hydrocarbon-degrading soil column. Based on phospholipid ester-linked fatty acid (PLFA) profiles, this mocrocosm has been previously reported to be sign...

  3. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of Sphingobium sp. 22B, a Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium from Semiarid Patagonia, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Madueño, L; Macchi, M; Morelli, I S; Coppotelli, B M

    2016-01-01

    Sphingobium sp. 22B is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading strain isolated from Patagonia, Argentina, with capabilities to withstand the environmental factors of that semiarid region. The draft genome shows the presence of genes related with responses to carbon starvation and drying environmental conditions. PMID:27257204

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Marinomonas sp. Strain D104, a Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium from the Deep-Sea Sediment of the Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chunming; Bai, Xiuhua; Lai, Qiliang; Xie, Yanrong; Chen, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Marinomonas sp. strain D104 was isolated from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading consortium enriched from deep-sea sediment from the Arctic Ocean. The draft genome sequence of D104 (approximately 3.83 Mbp) contains 62 contigs and 3,576 protein-encoding genes, with a G+C content of 44.8%. PMID:24459272

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of the Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Alcanivorax dieselolei KS-293 Isolated from Surface Seawater in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea

    PubMed Central

    Barbato, Marta; Mapelli, Francesca; Chouaia, Bessem; Crotti, Elena; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Alcanivorax dieselolei KS-293, a hydrocarbonoclastic bacterium isolated from the Mediterranean Sea, by supplying diesel oil as the sole carbon source. This strain contains multiple putative genes associated with hydrocarbon degradation pathways and that are highly similar to those described in A. dieselolei type strain B5. PMID:26659675

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of a Versatile Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium, Rhodococcus pyridinivorans Strain KG-16, Collected from Oil Fields in India

    PubMed Central

    Dawar, Chhavi; Phanindranath, R.; Mutnuri, Lakshmi; Dayal, Anurodh M.

    2016-01-01

    We describe here a 5.8-Mb draft genome sequence of Rhodococcus pyridinivorans strain KG-16, which was obtained from the soil samples collected from the oilfields of Krishna-Godavari basin in India. This genomic resource can provide insights into the pathways and mechanisms of hydrocarbon degradation and potentially aid in bioremediation applications. PMID:26868394

  7. ACCUMULATION OF POLY-B-HYDROXYBUTYRATE IN A METHANE-ENRICHED, HALOGENATED HYDROCARBON-DEGRADING SOIL COLUMN: IMPLICATIONS FOR MICROBIAL COMMUNITY STRUCTURE AND NUTRITIONAL STATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The prokarotic, endogenous storage polymer poly-B-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) accumulated in soil from a methane-enriched, halogenated hydrocarbon-degrading soil column. ased on phospholipid ester-linked fatty acid (PLFA) profiles, this mocrocosm has been previously reported to be sign...

  8. Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation in Plants: Mechanisms and Enhancement of Phytoremediation of Groundwater Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Strand, Stuart E.

    2002-06-01

    Several varieties of transgenic poplar containing cytochrome P-450 2E1 have been constructed and are undergoing tests. Strategies for improving public acceptance and safety of transgenic poplar for chlorinated hydrocarbon phytoremediation are being developed. We have discovered a unique rhizobium species that lives within the stems of poplar and we are investigating whether this bacterium contributes nitrogen fixed from the air to the plant and whether this endophyte could be used to introduce genes into poplar. Studies of the production of chloride ion from TCE have shown that our present P-450 constructs did not produce chloride more rapidly than wild type plants. Follow-up studies will determine if there are other rate limiting downstream steps in TCE metabolism in plants. Studies of the metabolism of carbon tetrachloride in poplar cells have provided evidence that the native plant metabolism is due to the activity of oxidative enzymes similar to the mammalian cytochrome P-450 2E1.

  9. Heterologous Expression of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Ring-Hydroxylating Dioxygenase Genes from a Novel Pyrene-Degrading Betaproteobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Aitken, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    A betaproteobacterium within the family Rhodocyclaceae previously identified as a pyrene degrader via stable-isotope probing (SIP) of contaminated soil (designated pyrene group 1 or PG1) was cultivated as the dominant member of a mixed bacterial culture. A metagenomic library was constructed, and the largest contigs were analyzed for genes associated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolism. Eight pairs of genes with similarity to the α- and β-subunits of ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases (RHDs) associated with aerobic bacterial PAH degradation were identified and linked to PG1 through PCR analyses of a simplified enrichment culture. In tandem with a ferredoxin and reductase found in close proximity to one pair of RHD genes, six of the RHDs were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Each cloned RHD was tested for activity against nine PAHs ranging in size from two to five rings. Despite differences in their predicted protein sequences, each of the six RHDs was capable of transforming phenanthrene and pyrene. Three RHDs could additionally transform naphthalene and fluorene, and these genotypes were also associated with the ability of the E. coli constructs to convert indole to indigo. Only one of the six cloned RHDs was capable of transforming anthracene and benz[a]anthracene. None of the tested RHDs were capable of significantly transforming fluoranthene, chrysene, or benzo[a]pyrene. PMID:22427500

  10. Aerobic degradation of phenolics and aromatic hydrocarbons in presence of cyanide.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Naresh K; Philip, Ligy; Murty Bhallamudi, S

    2012-10-01

    Present study focused on the degradation of a mixture of phenol, cresol, xylenol, quinoline, and indole along with cyanide, commonly found in coke oven wastewater, using aerobic mixed culture. It was found that xylenol and indole were difficult to degrade, when the concentrations were above 250 mg/L. It was observed that free cyanide (2.5mg/L and above) has the potency to holdup the oxidation of organics (250 mg/L) until the cyanide concentration drops to a minimum level. Final TOC in the mixed pollutant system was less than 4 mg/L, indicating the absence of other organic byproducts. Experimental results highlight effect of free cyanide on removal of organics and the combined toxic influence of cyanide and organics on the microbes treating coking wastewater. The proposed mathematical model was able to predict the biodegradation of mixed pollutant system satisfactorily. PMID:22858495

  11. Genome Sequence of the Petroleum Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Alcanivorax sp. Strain 97CO-5

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Xiao; Gao, Wei; Li, Qian; Yin, Xiaofei; Zheng, Li

    2014-01-01

    Alcanivorax sp. strain 97CO-5 was isolated from a crude-oil-degrading consortium, enriched from Yellow Sea sediment of China. Here, we present the draft genome of strain 97CO-5, which comprises 3,251,558 bp with a G+C content of 54.54% and contains 2,962 protein-coding genes and 42 tRNAs. PMID:25502673

  12. Strong Impact on the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH)-Degrading Community of a PAH-Polluted Soil but Marginal Effect on PAH Degradation when Priming with Bioremediated Soil Dominated by Mycobacteria▿

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Anders R.; Schmidt, Stine; Hybholt, Trine K.; Henriksen, Sidsel; Jacobsen, Carsten S.; Andersen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Bioaugmentation of soil polluted with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is often disappointing because of the low survival rate and low activity of the introduced degrader bacteria. We therefore investigated the possibility of priming PAH degradation in soil by adding 2% of bioremediated soil with a high capacity for PAH degradation. The culturable PAH-degrading community of the bioremediated primer soil was dominated by Mycobacterium spp. A microcosm containing pristine soil artificially polluted with PAHs and primed with bioremediated soil showed a fast, 100- to 1,000-fold increase in numbers of culturable phenanthrene-, pyrene-, and fluoranthene degraders and a 160-fold increase in copy numbers of the mycobacterial PAH dioxygenase gene pdo1. A nonpolluted microcosm primed with bioremediated soil showed a high rate of survival of the introduced degrader community during the 112 days of incubation. A nonprimed control microcosm containing pristine soil artificially polluted with PAHs showed only small increases in the numbers of culturable PAH degraders and no pdo1 genes. Initial PAH degradation rates were highest in the primed microcosm, but later, the degradation rates were comparable in primed and nonprimed soil. Thus, the proliferation and persistence of the introduced, soil-adapted degraders had only a marginal effect on PAH degradation. Given the small effect of priming with bioremediated soil and the likely presence of PAH degraders in almost all PAH-contaminated soils, it seems questionable to prime PAH-contaminated soil with bioremediated soil as a means of large-scale soil bioremediation. PMID:17209064

  13. Microbial degradation of phenols and aromatic hydrocarbons in creosote-contaminated groundwater under nitrate-reducing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flyvbjerg, John; Arvin, Erik; Jensen, Bjørn K.; Olsen, Susan K.

    1993-02-01

    Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the biodegradation of phenols and aromatic hydrocarbons under anaerobic, nitrate-reducing conditions in groundwater from a creosote-contaminated site at Fredensborg, Denmark. The bacteria in the creosote-contaminated groundwater degraded a mixture of toluene, phenol, the cresols ( o-, m- and p-cresol) and the dimethylphenols 2,4-DMP and 3,4-DMP at both 10° and 20°C. Benzene, the xylenes, napthalene, 2,3-DMP, 2,5-DMP, 2,6-DMP and 3,5-DMP were resistant to biodegradation during 7-12 months of incubation. It was demonstrated that the degradation of toluene, 2,4-DMP, 3,4-DMP and p-cresol depended on nitrate or nitrite as electron acceptors. 40-80% of the nitrate consumed during degradation of the aromatic compounds was recovered as nitrite, and the consumption of nitrate was accompanied by a production of ATP. Stoichiometric calculations indicated that in addition to the phenols are toluene other carbon sources present in the groundwater contributed to the consumption of nitrate. If the groundwater was incubated under anaerobic conditions without nitrate, sulphate-reducing conditions evolved after ˜ 1 month at 20°C and ˜2 months at 10°C. In the sulphate-reducing batches disappearance of toluene, phenol, o-cresol and o-cresol was observed, whereas no removal of benzene, the xylenes, naphthalane, 2,3-DMP, 2,4-DMP, 2,5-DMP and 3,5-DMP was detected during 7 months of incubation.

  14. Isolation, identification and diesel-oil biodegradation capacities of indigenous hydrocarbon-degrading strains of Cellulosimicrobium cellulans and Acinetobacter baumannii from tarball at Terengganu beach, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Nkem, Bruno Martins; Halimoon, Normala; Yusoff, Fatimah Md; Johari, Wan Lufti Wan; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Medipally, Srikanth Reddy; Kannan, Narayanan

    2016-06-15

    In this study, we isolated two indigenous hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria from tarball found in Rhu Sepuluh beach, Terengganu, Malaysia. These bacteria were identified based on their physiological characteristic and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, and they showed 99% similarity with Cellulosimicrobium cellulans DSM 43879 and Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606 respectively. Their hydrocarbon-degrading capabilities were tested using diesel-oil as sole carbon source. Results analysed using GC-MS, showed diesel-oil alkanes were degraded an average 64.4% by C. cellulans and 58.1% by A. baumannii with medium optical density reaching 0.967 (C. cellulans) and 1.515 (A. baumannii) in minimal salt media at 32°C for 10days. Individual diesel-oil alkanes were degraded between 10%-95.4% by C. cellulans and 0.2%-95.9% by A. baumannii. Both strains utilized diesel-oil for growth. The study suggests both strains are part of indigenous hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in tarball with potential for bioremediation of oil-polluted marine environment. PMID:27085593

  15. Total petroleum hydrocarbon degradation by hybrid electrobiochemical reactor in oilfield produced water.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Ibrahim E

    2016-08-15

    The crude oil drilling and extraction operations are aimed to maximize the production may be counterbalanced by the huge production of contaminated produced water (PW). PW is conventionally treated through different physical, chemical, and biological technologies. The efficiency of suggested hybrid electrobiochemical (EBC) methods for the simultaneous removal of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) and sulfate from PW generated by petroleum industry is studied. Also, the factors that affect the stability of PW quality are investigated. The results indicated that the effect of biological treatment is very important to keep control of the electrochemical by-products and more TPH removal in the EBC system. The maximum TPH and sulfate removal efficiency was achieved 75% and 25.3%, respectively when the detention time was about 5.1min and the energy consumption was 32.6mA/cm(2). However, a slight increasing in total bacterial count was observed when the EBC compact unit worked at a flow rate of average 20L/h. Pseudo steady state was achieved after 30min of current application in the solution. Also, the results of the study indicate that when the current intensity was increased above optimum level, no significant results occurred due to the release of gases. PMID:27236229

  16. Mechanistic insights into ozone-initiated oxidative degradation of saturated hydrocarbons and polymers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Richmond; Coote, Michelle L

    2016-09-21

    Accurate quantum chemical calculations were employed to investigate the mechanism of ozone-initiated oxidation of C-H bonds of saturated hydrocarbons and polymers. Step wise hydrogen atom abstraction generates the first resting state the trihydroxide -COOOH, which undergoes decomposition to produce the free radical species alkoxyl -CO˙ and peroxyl ˙OOH thereby setting off a complex chain of radical processes. The H transfer from peroxyl radical to alkoxyl allows formation of inactive alcohol and the singlet excited dioxygen. Other competitive processes include the self fragmentation or β-scission of the alkoxyl -CO˙ to give rise to a carbonyl (ketone or aldehyde) and a C-centred free radical species. Tertiary C-H bonds are most susceptible to O3 oxidation followed by secondary and primary. Among the polymers studied, poly(styrene) is the least resistant to C-H bond ozonation, followed by poly(propylene), poly(methacrylate), poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly(vinyl chloride). Calculations also reveal catalytic effects of water in promoting the C-H bond oxidation process in polymer systems without competing H-bond donor groups. PMID:27545312

  17. Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation in Plants: Mechanisms and Enhancement of Phytoremediation of Groundwater Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Strand

    2004-09-27

    The research objectives for this report are: (1) Transform poplar and other tree species to extend and optimize chlorinated hydrocarbon (CHC) oxidative activities. (2) Determine the mechanisms of CHC oxidation in plants. (3) Isolate the genes responsible for CHC oxidation in plants. We have made significant progress toward an understanding of the biochemical mechanism of CHC transformation native to wild-type poplar. We have identified chloral, trichloroethanol, trichloroacetic acid, and dichloroacetic acid as products of TCE metabolism in poplar plants and in tissue cultures of poplar cells.(Newman et al. 1997; Newman et al. 1999) Use of radioactively labeled TCE showed that once taken up and transformed, most of the TCE was incorporated into plant tissue as a non-volatile, unextractable residue.(Shang et al. 2001; Shang and Gordon 2002) An assay for this transformation was developed and validated using TCE transformation by poplar suspension cells. Using this assay, it was shown that two different activities contribute to the fixation of TCE by poplar cells: one associated with cell walls and insoluble residues, the other associated with a high molecular weight, heat labile fraction of the cell extract, a fixation that was apparently catalyzed by plant enzymes.

  18. Assessing toxic levels of hydrocarbons on microbial degrader communities in vadose zone fill soils

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenberg, T.H.; Long, S.C.

    1995-12-31

    Authentic fill samples were collected from the vadose zone at a highway travel plaza. The contamination at the site is a combination of gasoline, diesel, and waste oil resulting from leaking underground storage tanks. Microbial assessments including plate counts and specific-degrader enumerations were performed to establish the presence of degrader microbial communities, and thus bioremediation potential. Contaminant levels were estimated in samples by quantifying headspace VOCs in collection jars. Physical soil characteristics including soil grain size distribution and moisture content were measured to evaluate the potential ecological variables that would affect implementation of a bioremediation technology. Toxicity screening using the Microtox{trademark} acute toxicity assay was used to compare the level of toxicity present among samples. These analyses were used to assess the potential for using in situ bioventing remediation to clean-up the leaking underground storage tank spill study site. High contaminant levels appear to have exerted a toxic effect and resulted in smaller total microbial community sizes in highly contaminated areas (thousands of ppmv) of the site. Microtox{trademark} EC50 results generally corroborated with the trends of the enumeration experiments. Microbial characterization results indicate that in situ bioremediation would be possible at the study site. Soil heterogeneity appears to pose the greatest challenges to the design and implementation of bioremediation at this site.

  19. Interaction between Carbon Nanotubes and Aromatic Hydrocarbon-degrading Microbes and its Effect on Carbon Nanotubes Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Y.; Wang, L.; Poulson, S.; Wang, X.; Xing, B.; Yang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Due to their unique electrical, optical and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been substantially produced and widely applied during the past decades, leading to their increased probability of entering the environment. Some estimation suggests that CNTs are accumulated in agricultural systems with their soil concentration increasing by 0.4-157 ng/kg/year. This has raised concerns about environmental impacts of these emerging contaminants including their ecotoxicity. Meanwhile, transformation of CNTs in the environment can significantly affect their transport, bioavailability and thereby ecotoxicity. So far, environmental biodegradation of CNTs remains obscure. Given the high diversity of soil microorganisms and their metabolic potentials, it is important to investigate microbial biodegradation of CNTs under various environmental conditions. This study focuses on an aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium, Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1, as a model microorganism capable of ring cleavage. We hypothesize that bacterial activities could transform CNTs to more hydrophilic forms, increasing their aqueous stability and environmental reactivity. We incubated M. vanbaalenii PYR-1 with 13C-labeded multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for 30 days, monitored δ13C in the system, characterized MWCNTs before and after the reaction, and compared the results with culture-negative controls. To investigate effects of various environmental conditions, including the presence of extracellular oxidative enzymes from white-rot fungi, additional experiments will be conducted and results compared will be compared among different setups. Moreover, we will measure adverse impacts of CNTs on the metabolic activities of M. vanbaalenii PYR-1, particularly its biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  20. Electrochemical degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in creosote solution using ruthenium oxide on titanium expanded mesh anode.

    PubMed

    Tran, Lan-Huong; Drogui, Patrick; Mercier, Guy; Blais, Jean-François

    2009-05-30

    In this study, expanded titanium (Ti) covered with ruthenium oxide (RuO(2)) electrode was used to anodically oxidize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in creosote solution. Synthetic creosote-oily solution (COS) was prepared with distilled water and a commercial creosote solution in the presence of an amphoteric surfactant; Cocamidopropylhydroxysultaine (CAS). Electrolysis was carried out using a parallelepipedic electrolytic 1.5-L cell containing five anodes (Ti/RuO(2)) and five cathodes (stainless steel, 316 L) alternated in the electrode pack. The effects of initial pH, temperature, retention time, supporting electrolyte, current density and initial PAH concentration on the process performance were examined. Experimental results revealed that a current density of 9.23 mA cm(-2) was beneficial for PAH oxidation. The sum of PAH concentrations for 16 PAHs could be optimally diminished up to 80-82% while imposing a residence time in the electrolysis cell of 90 min. There was not a significant effect of the electrolyte (Na(2)SO(4)) concentration on oxidation efficiency in the investigated range of 500-4000 mg/L. However, an addition of 500 mg Na(2)SO(4)L(-1) was required to reduce the energy consumption and the treatment cost. Besides, there was no effect of initial PAH concentration on oxidation efficiency in the investigated range of 270-540 mg PAHL(-1). Alkaline media was not favourable for PAH oxidation, whereas high performance of PAH degradation could be recorded without initial pH adjustment (original pH around 6.0). Likewise, under optimal conditions, 84% of petroleum hydrocarbon (C(10)-C(50)) was removed, whereas removal yields of 69% and 62% have been measured for O&G and COD, respectively. Microtox and Daphnia biotests showed that electrochemical oxidation using Ti/RuO(2) could be efficiently used to reduce more than 90% of the COS toxicity. PMID:18926633

  1. Isolation of hydrocarbon-degrading and biosurfactant-producing bacteria and assessment their plant growth-promoting traits.

    PubMed

    Pacwa-Płociniczak, Magdalena; Płociniczak, Tomasz; Iwan, Joanna; Żarska, Monika; Chorążewski, Mirosław; Dzida, Marzena; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2016-03-01

    Forty-two hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial strains were isolated from the soil heavily contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. Forty-one strains were identified based on their whole-cell fatty acid profiles using the MIDI-MIS method. Thirty-three of them belong to species Rhodococcus erythropolis, while the others to the genera Rahnella (4), Serratia (3) and Proteus (1). Isolates were screened for their ability to produce biosurfactants/bioemulsifiers. For all of them the activity of several mechanisms characteristic for plant growth-promoting bacteria was also determined. In order to investigate surface active and emulsifying abilities of isolates following methods: oil-spreading, blood agar, methylene blue agar and determination of emulsification index, were used. Among studied bacteria 12 strains (CD 112, CD 126, CD 131, CD 132, CD 135, CD 147, CD 154, CD 155, CD 158, CD 161, CD 166 and CD 167) have been chosen as promising candidates for the production of biosurfactants and/or bioemulsifiers. Among them 2 strains (R. erythropolis CD 126 and Rahnella aquatilis CD 132) had the highest potential to be used in the bioaugmentation of PH-contaminated soil. Moreover, 15 of tested strains (CD 105, CD 106, CD 108, CD 111, CD 116, CD 120, CD 124, CD 125, CD 130, CD 132, CD 134, CD 154, CD 156, CD 161 and CD 170) showed the activity of four mechanisms (ACC deaminase activity, IAA and siderophore production, phosphate solubilization) considered to be characteristic for plant growth-promoting bacteria. Two of them (R. erythropolis CD 106 and R. erythropolis CD 111) showed the highest activity of above-mentioned mechanisms and thus are considered as promising agents in microbe assisted phytoremediation. PMID:26708648

  2. Isolation and Characterization of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacteria Associated with the Rhizosphere of Salt Marsh Plants

    PubMed Central

    Daane, L. L.; Harjono, I.; Zylstra, G. J.; Häggblom, M. M.

    2001-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria were isolated from contaminated estuarine sediment and salt marsh rhizosphere by enrichment using either naphthalene, phenanthrene, or biphenyl as the sole source of carbon and energy. Pasteurization of samples prior to enrichment resulted in isolation of gram-positive, spore-forming bacteria. The isolates were characterized using a variety of phenotypic, morphologic, and molecular properties. Identification of the isolates based on their fatty acid profiles and partial 16S rRNA gene sequences assigned them to three main bacterial groups: gram-negative pseudomonads; gram-positive, non-spore-forming nocardioforms; and the gram-positive, spore-forming group, Paenibacillus. Genomic digest patterns of all isolates were used to determine unique isolates, and representatives from each bacterial group were chosen for further investigation. Southern hybridization was performed using genes for PAH degradation from Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9816-4, Comamonas testosteroni GZ42, Sphingomonas yanoikuyae B1, and Mycobacterium sp. strain PY01. None of the isolates from the three groups showed homology to the B1 genes, only two nocardioform isolates showed homology to the PY01 genes, and only members of the pseudomonad group showed homology to the NCIB 9816-4 or GZ42 probes. The Paenibacillus isolates showed no homology to any of the tested gene probes, indicating the possibility of novel genes for PAH degradation. Pure culture substrate utilization experiments using several selected isolates from each of the three groups showed that the phenanthrene-enriched isolates are able to utilize a greater number of PAHs than are the naphthalene-enriched isolates. Inoculating two of the gram-positive isolates to a marine sediment slurry spiked with a mixture of PAHs (naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, and pyrene) and biphenyl resulted in rapid transformation of pyrene, in addition to the two- and three-ringed PAHs and biphenyl. This

  3. Degradation and Mineralization of High-Molecular-Weight Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Defined Fungal-Bacterial Cocultures

    PubMed Central

    Boonchan, Sudarat; Britz, Margaret L.; Stanley, Grant A.

    2000-01-01

    This study investigated the biodegradation of high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in liquid media and soil by bacteria (Stenotrophomonas maltophilia VUN 10,010 and bacterial consortium VUN 10,009) and a fungus (Penicillium janthinellum VUO 10,201) that were isolated from separate creosote- and manufactured-gas plant-contaminated soils. The bacteria could use pyrene as their sole carbon and energy source in a basal salts medium (BSM) and mineralized significant amounts of benzo[a]pyrene cometabolically when pyrene was also present in BSM. P. janthinellum VUO 10,201 could not utilize any high-molecular-weight PAH as sole carbon and energy source but could partially degrade these if cultured in a nutrient broth. Although small amounts of chrysene, benz[a]anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene, and dibenz[a,h]anthracene were degraded by axenic cultures of these isolates in BSM containing a single PAH, such conditions did not support significant microbial growth or PAH mineralization. However, significant degradation of, and microbial growth on, pyrene, chrysene, benz[a]anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene, and dibenz[a,h]anthracene, each as a single PAH in BSM, occurred when P. janthinellum VUO 10,201 and either bacterial consortium VUN 10,009 or S. maltophilia VUN 10,010 were combined in the one culture, i.e., fungal-bacterial cocultures: 25% of the benzo[a]pyrene was mineralized to CO2 by these cocultures over 49 days, accompanied by transient accumulation and disappearance of intermediates detected by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Inoculation of fungal-bacterial cocultures into PAH-contaminated soil resulted in significantly improved degradation of high-molecular-weight PAHs, benzo[a]pyrene mineralization (53% of added [14C]benzo[a]pyrene was recovered as 14CO2 in 100 days), and reduction in the mutagenicity of organic soil extracts, compared with the indigenous microbes and soil amended with only axenic inocula. PMID:10698765

  4. Degradation of mix hydrocarbons by immobilized cells of mix culture using a trickle fluidized bed reactor. Final report: June 1992--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chapatwala, K.D.

    1994-12-01

    The microorganisms capable of degrading mix hydrocarbons were isolated from the soil samples collected from the hydrocarbon contaminated sites. The mix cultures were identified as Pseudomonas acidovorans, Flavobacterium indoltheticum and Phyllobacterium rubiaceum. The bacterial cells of mix cultures were immobilized in calcium-alginate solution in the form of beads. A trickle fluidized bed air-uplift-type reactor designed to study the degradation of mix hydrocarbons was filled with 0.85% normal saline containing the immobilized cells of mix culture. The immobilized beads were aerated with different amounts of CO{sub 2}-free air. The normal saline saturated with BTXs was circulated in the bioreactors at the rate of 2--4 ml/min. The biodegradation of BTXs by the immobilized beads of mix culture was monitored by determining the concentrations of the BTXs and the metabolites formed during their degradation in the samples at regular intervals using GC. The peaks obtained through the degradation of BTXs were not identified and quantified in this study.

  5. Salix purpurea Stimulates the Expression of Specific Bacterial Xenobiotic Degradation Genes in a Soil Contaminated with Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Pagé, Antoine P.; Yergeau, Étienne; Greer, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to uncover Salix purpurea-microbe xenobiotic degradation systems that could be harnessed in rhizoremediation, and to identify microorganisms that are likely involved in these partnerships. To do so, we tested S. purpurea‘s ability to stimulate the expression of 10 marker microbial oxygenase genes in a soil contaminated with hydrocarbons. In what appeared to be a detoxification rhizosphere effect, transcripts encoding for alkane 1-monooxygenases, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, laccase/polyphenol oxidases, and biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase small subunits were significantly more abundant in the vicinity of the plant's roots than in bulk soil. This gene expression induction is consistent with willows' known rhizoremediation capabilities, and suggests the existence of S. purpurea-microbe systems that target many organic contaminants of interest (i.e. C4-C16 alkanes, fluoranthene, anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene, biphenyl, polychlorinated biphenyls). An enhanced expression of the 4 genes was also observed within the bacterial orders Actinomycetales, Rhodospirillales, Burkholderiales, Alteromonadales, Solirubrobacterales, Caulobacterales, and Rhizobiales, which suggest that members of these taxa are active participants in the exposed partnerships. Although the expression of the other 6 marker genes did not appear to be stimulated by the plant at the community level, signs of additional systems that rest on their expression by members of the orders Solirubrobacterales, Sphingomonadales, Actinomycetales, and Sphingobacteriales were observed. Our study presents the first transcriptomics-based identification of microbes whose xenobiotic degradation activity in soil appears stimulated by a plant. It paints a portrait that contrasts with the current views on these consortia's composition, and opens the door for the development of laboratory test models geared towards the identification of root exudate characteristics that limit the efficiency of

  6. Salix purpurea Stimulates the Expression of Specific Bacterial Xenobiotic Degradation Genes in a Soil Contaminated with Hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Pagé, Antoine P; Yergeau, Étienne; Greer, Charles W

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to uncover Salix purpurea-microbe xenobiotic degradation systems that could be harnessed in rhizoremediation, and to identify microorganisms that are likely involved in these partnerships. To do so, we tested S. purpurea's ability to stimulate the expression of 10 marker microbial oxygenase genes in a soil contaminated with hydrocarbons. In what appeared to be a detoxification rhizosphere effect, transcripts encoding for alkane 1-monooxygenases, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, laccase/polyphenol oxidases, and biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase small subunits were significantly more abundant in the vicinity of the plant's roots than in bulk soil. This gene expression induction is consistent with willows' known rhizoremediation capabilities, and suggests the existence of S. purpurea-microbe systems that target many organic contaminants of interest (i.e. C4-C16 alkanes, fluoranthene, anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene, biphenyl, polychlorinated biphenyls). An enhanced expression of the 4 genes was also observed within the bacterial orders Actinomycetales, Rhodospirillales, Burkholderiales, Alteromonadales, Solirubrobacterales, Caulobacterales, and Rhizobiales, which suggest that members of these taxa are active participants in the exposed partnerships. Although the expression of the other 6 marker genes did not appear to be stimulated by the plant at the community level, signs of additional systems that rest on their expression by members of the orders Solirubrobacterales, Sphingomonadales, Actinomycetales, and Sphingobacteriales were observed. Our study presents the first transcriptomics-based identification of microbes whose xenobiotic degradation activity in soil appears stimulated by a plant. It paints a portrait that contrasts with the current views on these consortia's composition, and opens the door for the development of laboratory test models geared towards the identification of root exudate characteristics that limit the efficiency of current

  7. Phytoremediation of abandoned crude oil contaminated drill sites of Assam with the aid of a hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial formulation.

    PubMed

    Yenn, R; Borah, M; Boruah, H P Deka; Roy, A Sarma; Baruah, R; Saikia, N; Sahu, O P; Tamuli, A K

    2014-01-01

    Environmental deterioration due to crude oil contamination and abandoned drill sites is an ecological concern in Assam. To revive such contaminated sites, afield study was conducted to phytoremediate four crude oil abandoned drill sites of Assam (Gelakey, Amguri, Lakwa, and Borholla) with the aid of two hydrocarbon-degrading Pseudomonas strains designated N3 and N4. All the drill sites were contaminated with 15.1 to 32.8% crude oil, and the soil was alkaline in nature (pH8.0-8.7) with low moisture content, low soil conductivity and low activities of the soil enzymes phosphatase, dehydrogenase and urease. In addition, N, P, K, and C contents were below threshold limits, and the soil contained high levels of heavy metals. Bio-augmentation was achieved by applying Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains N3 and N4 followed by the introduction of screened plant species Tectona grandis, Gmelina arborea, Azadirachta indica, and Michelia champaca. The findings established the feasibility of the phytoremediation of abandoned crude oil-contaminated drill sites in Assam using microbes and native plants. PMID:24933892

  8. Salicylate stimulates the degradation of high-molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by Pseudomonas saccharophila P15

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.H.; Aitken, M.D.

    1999-02-01

    Pseudomonas saccharophila P15 was isolated from soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and previously was reported to degrade a variety of low- and high-molecular weight PAH. Strain P15 grows on phenanthrene by a known pathway in which salicylate is an intermediate. Preincubation with phenanthrene and downstream intermediates through salicylate stimulated PAH dioxygenase activity and initial rates of phenanthrene removal, suggesting that salicylate is the inducer of these activities. Salicylate also greatly enhanced initial rates of removal of fluoranthene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, chrysene, and benzo[a]pyrene, high-molecular weight substrates that strain P15 does not use for growth.The specific rate of removal of benzo[a]pyrene was at least 2 orders of magnitude lower than that of the four-ring compounds and nearly 5 orders of magnitude lower than that of phenanthrene. The mineralization of phenanthrene, benz[a]anthracene, chrysene, and benzo[a]pyrene was stimulated by preincubation with phenanthrene or salicylate, although significant mineralization of phenanthrene, benz[a]anthracene, and chrysene occurred in uninduced cultures. Further experiments with chrysene indicated that chrysene does not appear to induce its own mineralization. The results suggest that P. saccharophila P15 expresses a low level of constitutive PAH metabolism which is inducible to much higher levels and that high-molecular weight PAH metabolism by this organism is induced by the low-molecular weight substrate phenanthrene and by salicylate.

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degradation and microbial community shifts during co-composting of creosote-treated wood.

    PubMed

    Covino, Stefano; Fabianová, Tereza; Křesinová, Zdena; Čvančarová, Monika; Burianová, Eva; Filipová, Alena; Vořísková, Jana; Baldrian, Petr; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2016-01-15

    The feasibility of decontaminating creosote-treated wood (CTW) by co-composting with agricultural wastes was investigated using two bulking agents, grass cuttings (GC) and broiler litter (BL), each employed at a 1:1 ratio with the matrix. The initial concentration of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in CTW (26,500 mg kg(-1)) was reduced to 3 and 19% after 240 d in GC and BL compost, respectively. PAH degradation exceeded the predicted bioaccesible threshold, estimated through sequential supercritical CO2 extraction, together with significant detoxification, assessed by contact tests using Vibrio fisheri and Hordeum vulgare. GC composting was characterized by high microbial biomass growth in the early phases, as suggested by phospholipid fatty acid analyses. Based on the 454-pyrosequencing results, fungi (mostly Saccharomycetales) constituted an important portion of the microbial community, and bacteria were characterized by rapid shifts (from Firmicutes (Bacilli) and Actinobacteria to Proteobacteria). However, during BL composting, larger amounts of prokaryotic and eukaryotic PLFA markers were observed during the cooling and maturation phases, which were dominated by Proteobacteria and fungi belonging to the Ascomycota and those putatively related to the Glomeromycota. This work reports the first in-depth analysis of the chemical and microbiological processes that occur during the co-composting of a PAH-contaminated matrix. PMID:26342147

  10. Functional genes to assess nitrogen cycling and aromatic hydrocarbon degradation: primers and processing matter

    PubMed Central

    Penton, C. Ryan; Johnson, Timothy A.; Quensen, John F.; Iwai, Shoko; Cole, James R.; Tiedje, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Targeting sequencing to genes involved in key environmental processes, i.e., ecofunctional genes, provides an opportunity to sample nature's gene guilds to greater depth and help link community structure to process-level outcomes. Vastly different approaches have been implemented for sequence processing and, ultimately, for taxonomic placement of these gene reads. The overall quality of next generation sequence analysis of functional genes is dependent on multiple steps and assumptions of unknown diversity. To illustrate current issues surrounding amplicon read processing we provide examples for three ecofunctional gene groups. A combination of in silico, environmental and cultured strain sequences was used to test new primers targeting the dioxin and dibenzofuran degrading genes dxnA1, dbfA1, and carAa. The majority of obtained environmental sequences were classified into novel sequence clusters, illustrating the discovery value of the approach. For the nitrite reductase step in denitrification, the well-known nirK primers exhibited deficiencies in reference database coverage, illustrating the need to refine primer-binding sites and/or to design multiple primers, while nirS primers exhibited bias against five phyla. Amino acid-based OTU clustering of these two N-cycle genes from soil samples yielded only 114 unique nirK and 45 unique nirS genus-level groupings, likely a reflection of constricted primer coverage. Finally, supervised and non-supervised OTU analysis methods were compared using the nifH gene of nitrogen fixation, with generally similar outcomes, but the clustering (non-supervised) method yielded higher diversity estimates and stronger site-based differences. High throughput amplicon sequencing can provide inexpensive and rapid access to nature's related sequences by circumventing the culturing barrier, but each unique gene requires individual considerations in terms of primer design and sequence processing and classification. PMID:24062736

  11. Degradation of some representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by the water-soluble protein extracts from Zea mays L. cv PR32-B10.

    PubMed

    Barone, Roberto; de Biasi, Margherita-Gabriella; Piccialli, Vincenzo; de Napoli, Lorenzo; Oliviero, Giorgia; Borbone, Nicola; Piccialli, Gennaro

    2016-10-01

    The ability of the water-soluble protein extracts from Zea mais L. cv. PR32-B10 to degrade some representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), has been evaluated. Surface sterilized seeds of corn (Zea mais L. Pioneer cv. PR32-B10) were hydroponically cultivated in a growth chamber under no-stressful conditions. The water-soluble protein extracts isolated from maize tissues showed peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase and catalase activities. Incubation of the extracts with naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene and pyrene, led to formation of oxidized and/or degradation products. GC-MS and TLC monitoring of the processes showed that naphthalene, phenanthrene, fluorene and pyrene underwent 100%, 78%, 92% and 65% oxidative degradation, respectively, after 120 min. The chemical structure of the degradation products were determined by (1)H NMR and ESI-MS spectrometry. PMID:27391049

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Staphylococcus saprophyticus Strain CNV2, Isolated from Crude Oil-Contaminated Soil from the Noonmati Oil Refinery, Guwahati, Assam, India

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Arghya; Chettri, Bobby; Langpoklakpam, James S.; Singh, Arvind K.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the 2.6 Mb draft genome sequence of hydrocarbon-degrading Staphylococcus saprophyticus strain CNV2, isolated from oil-contaminated soil in Guwahati, India. CNV2 contains 2,545 coding sequences and has a G+C content of 33.2%. This is the first report of the genome sequence of an S. saprophyticus adapted to an oil-contaminated environment. PMID:27174281

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Staphylococcus saprophyticus Strain CNV2, Isolated from Crude Oil-Contaminated Soil from the Noonmati Oil Refinery, Guwahati, Assam, India.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Arghya; Chettri, Bobby; Langpoklakpam, James S; Singh, Arvind K; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the 2.6 Mb draft genome sequence of hydrocarbon-degrading Staphylococcus saprophyticus strain CNV2, isolated from oil-contaminated soil in Guwahati, India. CNV2 contains 2,545 coding sequences and has a G+C content of 33.2%. This is the first report of the genome sequence of an S. saprophyticus adapted to an oil-contaminated environment. PMID:27174281

  14. Metagenomic analysis of an anaerobic alkane-degrading microbial culture: potential hydrocarbon-activating pathways and inferred roles of community members.

    PubMed

    Tan, Boonfei; Dong, Xiaoli; Sensen, Christoph W; Foght, Julia

    2013-10-01

    A microbial community (short-chain alkane-degrading culture, SCADC) enriched from an oil sands tailings pond was shown to degrade C6-C10 alkanes under methanogenic conditions. Total genomic DNA from SCADC was subjected to 454 pyrosequencing, Illumina paired-end sequencing, and 16S rRNA amplicon pyrotag sequencing; the latter revealed 320 operational taxonomic units at 5% distance. Metagenomic sequences were subjected to in-house quality control and co-assembly, yielding 984 086 contigs, and annotation using MG-Rast and IMG. Substantial nucleotide and protein recruitment to Methanosaeta concilii, Syntrophus aciditrophicus, and Desulfobulbus propionicus reference genomes suggested the presence of closely related strains in SCADC; other genomes were not well mapped, reflecting the paucity of suitable reference sequences for such communities. Nonetheless, we detected numerous homologues of putative hydrocarbon succinate synthase genes (e.g., assA, bssA, and nmsA) implicated in anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation, suggesting the ability of the SCADC microbial community to initiate methanogenic alkane degradation by addition to fumarate. Annotation of a large contig revealed analogues of the ass operon 1 in the alkane-degrading sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfatibacillum alkenivorans AK-01. Despite being enriched under methanogenic-fermentative conditions, additional metabolic functions inferred by COG profiling indicated multiple CO(2) fixation pathways, organic acid utilization, hydrogenase activity, and sulphate reduction. PMID:24237341

  15. Hydrocarbon degradation and plant colonization of selected bacterial strains isolated from the rhizsophere and plant interior of Italian ryegrass and Birdsfoot trefoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohail, Y.; Andria, V.; Reichenauer, T. G.; Sessitsch, A.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrocarbon-degrading strains were isolated from the rhizosphere, root and shoot interior of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum var. Taurus), Birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus var. Leo) grown in a soil contaminated with petroleum oil. Strains were tested regarding their phylogeny and their degradation efficiency. The most efficient strains were tested regarding their suitability to be applied for phytoremediation of diesel oils. Sterilized and non-sterilized agricultural soil, with and with out compost, were spiked with diesel and used for planting Italian ryegrass and birdsfoot trefoil. Four selected strains with high degradation activities, derived from the rhizosphere and plant interior, were selected for individual inoculation. Plants were harvested at flowering stage and plant biomass and hydrocarbon degradation was determined. Furthermore, it was investigated to which extent the inoculant strains were able to survive and colonize plants. Microbial community structures were analysed by 16S rRNA and alkB gene analysis. Results showed efficient colonization by the inoculant strains and improved degradation by the application of compost combined with inoculation as well as on microbial community structures will be presented.

  16. Polyimide nanofoams from aliphatic polyester based copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, J.L.; Carter, K.R.; Richter, R.; Russell, T.P.

    1996-10-01

    High temperature polymer foams were prepared using microphase separated block copolymers where the major component is thermally stable block and the minor component is thermally labile. Upon thermal treatment, the dispersed minor component undergoes thermolysis leaving pores the size and shape of which are dictated by the initial copolymer morphology. The driving force behind the survey of aliphatic polyesters as possible labile blocks stems from their quantitative degradation into low boiling, polar degradation products via a backbiting process. Block copolymers were prepared using either a monofunctional caprolactone or a valerolactone oligomer and a high T. polyimide. Microphase morphologies were observed in each case. Thermal decomposition of the polyester blocks was accomplished by a thermal treatment at 370{degrees}C for 5 h. Significant density reductions were measured, and the resulting foams showed pore sizes in the 60-70 {Angstrom} range.

  17. Re-evaluation of dioxygenase gene phylogeny for the development and validation of a quantitative assay for environmental aromatic hydrocarbon degraders

    PubMed Central

    Meynet, Paola; Head, Ian M.; Werner, David; Davenport, Russell J.

    2015-01-01

    Rieske non-heme iron oxygenases enzymes have been widely studied, as they catalyse essential reactions initiating the bacterial degradation of organic compounds, for instance aromatic hydrocarbons. The genes encoding these enzymes offer a potential target for studying aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading organisms in the environment. However, previously reported primer sets that target dioxygenase gene sequences or the common conserved Rieske centre of aromatics dioxygenases have limited specificity and/or target non-dioxygenase genes. In this work, an extensive database of dioxygenase α-subunit gene sequences was constructed, and primer sets targeting the conserved Rieske centre were developed. The high specificity of the primers was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction analysis, agarose gel electrophoresis and sequencing. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays were also developed and optimized, following MIQE guidelines (Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments). Comparison of the qPCR quantification of dioxygenases in spiked sediment samples and in pure cultures demonstrated an underestimation of the Ct value, and the requirement for a correction factor at gene abundances below 108 gene copies per g of sediment. Externally validated qPCR provides a valuable tool to monitor aromatic hydrocarbon degrader population abundances at contaminated sites. PMID:25944871

  18. Anthropogenic and biogenic hydrocarbons in soils and vegetation from the South Shetland Islands (Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Cabrerizo, Ana; Tejedo, Pablo; Dachs, Jordi; Benayas, Javier

    2016-11-01

    Two Antarctic expeditions (in 2009 and 2011) were carried out to assess the local and remote anthropogenic sources of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, as well as potential biogenic hydrocarbons. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), n-alkanes, biomarkers such as phytane (Ph) and pristane (Pr), and the aliphatic unresolved complex mixture (UCM), were analysed in soil and vegetation samples collected at Deception, Livingston, Barrientos and Penguin Islands (South Shetland Islands, Antarctica). Overall, the patterns of n-alkanes in lichens, mosses and grass were dominated by odd-over-even carbon number alkanes. Mosses and vascular plants showed high abundances of n-C21 to n-C35, while lichens also showed high abundances of n-C17 and n-C19. The lipid content was an important factor controlling the concentrations of n-alkanes in Antarctic vegetation (r(2)=0.28-0.53, p-level<0.05). n-C12 to n-C35 n-alkanes were analysed in soils with a predominance of odd C number n-alkanes (n-C25, n-C27, n-C29, and n-C31), especially in the background soils not influenced by anthropogenic sources. The large values for the carbon predominance index (CPI) and the correlations between odd alkanes and some PAHs suggest the potential biogenic sources of these hydrocarbons in Antarctica. Unresolved complex mixture and CPI values ~1 detected at soils collected at intertidal areas and within the perimeter of Juan Carlos research station, further supported the evidence that even a small settlement (20 persons during the austral summer) can affect the loading of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in nearby soils. Nevertheless, the assessment of Pr/n-C17 and Ph/n-C18 ratios showed that hydrocarbon degradation is occurring in these soils. PMID:27450242

  19. Application of a magnesium/co-solvent system for the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their oxygenated derivatives in a spiked soil.

    PubMed

    Elie, Marc R; Williamson, Robert E; Clausen, Christian A; Yestrebsky, Cherie L

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluates the capability, efficacy and practicality of a combined approach based on solvent extraction and chemical reduction to simultaneously degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their oxygenated derivatives (OPAHs) in spiked soil. The spiked soil was washed using a composite organic solvent consisting of ethanol and ethyl lactate (1:1, v/v) and then degradation of the extracted contaminants using zero-valent magnesium. The extraction conditions were optimized at 25 °C with solvent-soil ratio of 2:1 (v/w) and the ensuing degradation efficiency ranged from 79% to 88% for the OPAHs, and 66% to 87% for the PAHs after 24 h of reaction at pH of 6.1. The reductive degradation of the spiked contaminants followed pseudo-first-order kinetics; however, comparing the kinetic results of this study to soil-free studies, the degradation rates are significantly reduced. It can be inferred that extracted organic or inorganic components from the soil medium hinder the degradation process, possibly by reducing the reactivity of the activated metal. Furthermore, to our understanding, this study is the first report on the simultaneous degradation of these priority pollutants and their oxygenated derivatives. The experimental results encourage the application of this magnesium/co-solvent system for future pilot-scale remediation studies. PMID:25461950

  20. New insight on aliphatic linkages in the macromolecular organic fraction of Orgueil and Murchison meteorites through ruthenium tetroxide oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remusat, Laurent; Derenne, Sylvie; Robert, François

    2005-09-01

    Ruthenium tetroxide oxidation was used to examine the macromolecular insoluble organic matter (IOM) from the Orgueil and Murchison meteorites and especially to characterize the aliphatic linkages. Already applied to various terrestrial samples, ruthenium tetroxide is a selective oxidant which destroys aromatic units, converting them into CO 2, and yields aliphatic and aromatic acids. In our experiment on chondritic IOM, it produces mainly short aliphatic diacids and polycarboxylic aromatic acids. Some short hydroxyacids are also detected. Aliphatic diacids are interpreted as aliphatic bridges between aromatic units in the chemical structure, and polycarboxylic aromatic acids are the result of the fusion of polyaromatic units. The product distribution shows that aliphatic links are short with numerous substitutions. No indigenous monocarboxylic acid was detected, showing that free aliphatic chains must be very short (less than three carbon atoms). The hydroxyacids are related to the occurrence of ester and ether functional groups within the aliphatic bridges between the aromatic units. This technique thus allows us to characterize in detail the aliphatic linkages of the IOMs, and the derived conclusions are in agreement with spectroscopic, pyrolytic, and degradative results previously reported. Compared to terrestrial samples, the aliphatic part of chondritic IOM is shorter and highly substituted. Aromatic units are smaller and more cross-linked than in coals, as already proposed from NMR data. Orgueil and Murchison IOM exhibit some tiny differences, especially in the length of aliphatic chains.

  1. The geochemical evolution of low-molecular-weight organic acids derived from the degradation of petroleum contaminants in groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, I.M.; Baedecker, M.J.; Eganhouse, R.P.; Goerlitz, D.F.

    1994-01-01

    The geochemical evolution of low-molecular-weight organic acids in groundwater downgradient from a crude-oil spill near Bemidji, Minnesota, was studied over a five year period (1986-1990). The organic acids are metabolic intermediates of the degradation of components of the crude oil and are structurally related to hydrocarbon precursors. The concentrations of organic acids, particularly aliphatic acids, increase as the microbial alteration of hydrocarbons progresses. The organic-acid pool changes in composition and concentration over time and in space as the degradation processes shift from Fe(III) reduction to methanogenesis. Over time, the aquifer system evolves into one in which the groundwater contains more oxidized products of hydrocarbon degradation and the reduced forms of iron, manganese, and nitrogen. Laboratory microcosm experiments with aquifer material support the hypothesis that organic acids observed in the groundwater originate from the microbial degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons under anoxic conditions. The geochemistry of two other shallow aquifers in coastal plain sediments, one contaminated with creosote waste and the other with gasoline, were compared to the Bemidji site. The geochemical evolution of the low-molecular-weight organic acid pool in these systems is controlled, in part, by the presence of electron acceptors available for microbially mediated electron-transfer reactions. The depletion of electron acceptors in aquifers leads to the accumulation of aliphatic organic acids in anoxic groundwater. ?? 1994.

  2. The geochemical evolution of low-molecular-weight organic acids derived from the degradation of petroleum contaminants in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzarelli, I.M.; Baedecker, M.J.; Eganhouse, R.P. ); Goerlitz, D.F. )

    1994-01-01

    The geochemical evolution of low-molecular-weight organic acids in groundwater downgradient from a crude-oil spill near Bemidji, Minnesota, was studied over a five year period (1986-90). The organic acids are metabolic intermediates of the degradation of components of the crude oil and are structurally related to hydrocarbon precursors. The concentrations of organic acids, particularly aliphatic acids, increase as the microbial alteration of hydrocarbons progresses. The organic-acid pool changes in composition and concentration over time and in space as the degradation processes shift from Fe(III) reduction to methanogenesis. Over time, the aquifer system evolves into one in which the groundwater contains more oxidized products of hydrocarbon degradation and the reduced forms of iron, manganese, and nitrogen. Laboratory microcosm experiments with aquifer material support the hypothesis that organic acids observed in the groundwater originate from the microbial degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons under anoxic conditions. The geochemistry of two other shallow aquifers in coastal plain sediments, one contaminated with creosote waste and the other with gasoline, were compared to the Bemidji site. The geochemical evolution of the low-molecular-weight organic acid pool in these systems is controlled, in part, by the presence of electron acceptors available for microbially mediated electron-transfer reactions. The depletion of electron acceptors in aquifers leads to the accumulation of aliphatic organic acids in anoxic groundwater.

  3. Coupling spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques for evaluation of the depositional history of hydrocarbons in a subtropical estuary.

    PubMed

    Martins, César C; Doumer, Marta E; Gallice, Wellington C; Dauner, Ana Lúcia L; Cabral, Ana Caroline; Cardoso, Fernanda D; Dolci, Natiely N; Camargo, Luana M; Ferreira, Paulo A L; Figueira, Rubens C L; Mangrich, Antonio S

    2015-10-01

    Spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques can be used together to evaluate hydrocarbon inputs to coastal environments such as the Paranaguá estuarine system (PES), located in the SW Atlantic, Brazil. Historical inputs of aliphatic hydrocarbons (AHs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed using two sediment cores from the PES. The AHs were related to the presence of biogenic organic matter and degraded oil residues. The PAHs were associated with mixed sources. The highest hydrocarbon concentrations were related to oil spills, while relatively low levels could be attributed to the decrease in oil usage during the global oil crisis. The results of electron paramagnetic resonance were in agreement with the absolute AHs and PAHs concentrations measured by chromatographic techniques, while near-infrared spectroscopy results were consistent with unresolved complex mixture (UCM)/total n-alkanes ratios. These findings suggest that the use of a combination of techniques can increase the accuracy of assessment of contamination in sediments. PMID:26210796

  4. Molecular application for identification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degrading bacteria (PAHD) species isolated from oil polluted soil in Dammam, Saud Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohamed M.; Al-Turki, Ameena; Al-Sewedi, Dona; Arif, Ibrahim A.; El-Gaaly, Gehan A.

    2015-01-01

    Soil contamination with petroleum hydrocarbon products such as diesel and engine oil is becoming one of the major environmental problems. This study describes hydrocarbons degrading bacteria (PHAD) isolated from long-standing petrol polluted soil from the eastern region, Dammam, Saudi Arabia. The isolated strains were firstly categorized by accessible shape detection, physiological and biochemistry tests. Thereafter, a technique established on the sequence analysis of a 16S rDNA gene was used. Isolation of DNA from the bacterial strains was performed, on which the PCR reaction was carried out. Strains were identified based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis, As follows amplified samples were spontaneously sequenced automatically and the attained results were matched to open databases. Among the isolated bacterial strains, S1 was identified as Staphylococcus aureus and strain S1 as Corynebacterium amycolatum. PMID:26288572

  5. Molecular application for identification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degrading bacteria (PAHD) species isolated from oil polluted soil in Dammam, Saud Arabia.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Al-Turki, Ameena; Al-Sewedi, Dona; Arif, Ibrahim A; El-Gaaly, Gehan A

    2015-09-01

    Soil contamination with petroleum hydrocarbon products such as diesel and engine oil is becoming one of the major environmental problems. This study describes hydrocarbons degrading bacteria (PHAD) isolated from long-standing petrol polluted soil from the eastern region, Dammam, Saudi Arabia. The isolated strains were firstly categorized by accessible shape detection, physiological and biochemistry tests. Thereafter, a technique established on the sequence analysis of a 16S rDNA gene was used. Isolation of DNA from the bacterial strains was performed, on which the PCR reaction was carried out. Strains were identified based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis, As follows amplified samples were spontaneously sequenced automatically and the attained results were matched to open databases. Among the isolated bacterial strains, S1 was identified as Staphylococcus aureus and strain S1 as Corynebacterium amycolatum. PMID:26288572

  6. Degradation problems with the solvent extraction organic at Roessing uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Munyungano, Brodrick; Feather, Angus; Virnig, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Roessing Uranium Ltd recovers uranium from a low-grade ore in Namibia. Uranium is recovered and purified from an ion-exchange eluate in a solvent-extraction plant. The solvent-extraction plant uses Alamine 336 as the extractant for uranium, with isodecanol used as a phase modifier in Sasol SSX 210, an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent. Since the plant started in the mid 1970's, there have been a few episodes where the tertiary amine has been quickly and severely degraded when the plant was operated outside certain operating parameters. The Rossing experience is discussed in more detail in this paper. (authors)

  7. Isolation and characterization of a novel hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium Achromobacter sp. HZ01 from the crude oil-contaminated seawater at the Daya Bay, southern China.

    PubMed

    Deng, Mao-Cheng; Li, Jing; Liang, Fu-Rui; Yi, Meisheng; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Yuan, Jian-Ping; Peng, Juan; Wu, Chou-Fei; Wang, Jiang-Hai

    2014-06-15

    Microorganisms play an important role in the biodegradation of petroleum contaminants, which have attracted great concern due to their persistent toxicity and difficult biodegradation. In this paper, a novel hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium HZ01 was isolated from the crude oil-contaminated seawater at the Daya Bay, South China Sea, and identified as Achromobacter sp. Under the conditions of pH 7.0, NaCl 3% (w/v), temperature 28 °C and rotary speed 150 rpm, its degradability of the total n-alkanes reached up to 96.6% after 10 days of incubation for the evaporated diesel oil. Furthermore, Achromobacter sp. HZ01 could effectively utilize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as its sole carbon source, and could remove anthracene, phenanthrene and pyrence about 29.8%, 50.6% and 38.4% respectively after 30 days of incubation. Therefore, Achromobacter sp. HZ01 may employed as an excellent degrader to develop one cost-effective and eco-friendly method for the bioremediation of marine environments polluted by crude oil. PMID:24775066

  8. 40 CFR 721.3364 - Aliphatic ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aliphatic ether. 721.3364 Section 721... Aliphatic ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an aliphatic ether (PMN P-93-1381) is subject to reporting under...

  9. 40 CFR 721.3364 - Aliphatic ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aliphatic ether. 721.3364 Section 721... Aliphatic ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an aliphatic ether (PMN P-93-1381) is subject to reporting under...

  10. Development of an Efficient Bacterial Consortium for the Potential Remediation of Hydrocarbons from Contaminated Sites

    PubMed Central

    Patowary, Kaustuvmani; Patowary, Rupshikha; Kalita, Mohan C.; Deka, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic biodegradability of hydrocarbons and the distribution of proficient degrading microorganisms in the environment are very crucial for the implementation of bioremediation practices. Among others, one of the most favorable methods that can enhance the effectiveness of bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated environment is the application of biosurfactant producing microbes. In the present study, the biodegradation capacities of native bacterial consortia toward total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) with special emphasis to poly aromatic hydrocarbons were determined. The purpose of the study was to isolate TPH degrading bacterial strains from various petroleum contaminated soil of Assam, India and develop a robust bacterial consortium for bioremediation of crude oil of this native land. From a total of 23 bacterial isolates obtained from three different hydrocarbons contaminated samples five isolates, namely KS2, PG1, PG5, R1, and R2 were selected as efficient crude oil degraders with respect to their growth on crude oil enriched samples. Isolates KS2, PG1, and R2 are biosurfactant producers and PG5, R1 are non-producers. Fourteen different consortia were designed involving both biosurfactant producing and non-producing isolates. Consortium 10, which comprises two Bacillus strains namely, Bacillus pumilus KS2 and B. cereus R2 (identified by 16s rRNA sequencing) has shown the best result in the desired degradation of crude oil. The consortium showed degradation up to 84.15% of TPH after 5 weeks of incubation, as revealed from gravimetric analysis. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) and GCMS (Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer) analyses were correlated with gravimetric data which reveals that the consortium has removed a wide range of petroleum hydrocarbons in comparison with abiotic control including different aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:27471499

  11. Development of an Efficient Bacterial Consortium for the Potential Remediation of Hydrocarbons from Contaminated Sites.

    PubMed

    Patowary, Kaustuvmani; Patowary, Rupshikha; Kalita, Mohan C; Deka, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic biodegradability of hydrocarbons and the distribution of proficient degrading microorganisms in the environment are very crucial for the implementation of bioremediation practices. Among others, one of the most favorable methods that can enhance the effectiveness of bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated environment is the application of biosurfactant producing microbes. In the present study, the biodegradation capacities of native bacterial consortia toward total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) with special emphasis to poly aromatic hydrocarbons were determined. The purpose of the study was to isolate TPH degrading bacterial strains from various petroleum contaminated soil of Assam, India and develop a robust bacterial consortium for bioremediation of crude oil of this native land. From a total of 23 bacterial isolates obtained from three different hydrocarbons contaminated samples five isolates, namely KS2, PG1, PG5, R1, and R2 were selected as efficient crude oil degraders with respect to their growth on crude oil enriched samples. Isolates KS2, PG1, and R2 are biosurfactant producers and PG5, R1 are non-producers. Fourteen different consortia were designed involving both biosurfactant producing and non-producing isolates. Consortium 10, which comprises two Bacillus strains namely, Bacillus pumilus KS2 and B. cereus R2 (identified by 16s rRNA sequencing) has shown the best result in the desired degradation of crude oil. The consortium showed degradation up to 84.15% of TPH after 5 weeks of incubation, as revealed from gravimetric analysis. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) and GCMS (Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer) analyses were correlated with gravimetric data which reveals that the consortium has removed a wide range of petroleum hydrocarbons in comparison with abiotic control including different aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:27471499

  12. Degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in textile dyeing sludge with ultrasound and Fenton processes: Effect of system parameters and synergistic effect study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meiqing; Ning, Xun-an; An, Taicheng; Zhang, Jianhao; Chen, Changmin; Ke, Yaowei; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Yaping; Sun, Jian; Liu, Jingyong

    2016-04-15

    To establish an efficient oxidation process for the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in textile dyeing sludge, the effects of various operating parameters were optimized during the ultrasound process, Fenton process and the combined ultrasound-Fenton process. The results showed that the ultrasonic density of 1.80w/cm(3), both H2O2 and Fe(2+) dosages of 140mmol/L and pH 3 were favorable conditions for the degradation of PAHs. The degradation efficiency of high molecular weight PAHs was close to or even higher than that of light molecular weight PAHs. The highest degradation efficiencies of Σ16 PAHs were obtained within 30min in the order of: Fenton (83.5%) >ultrasound-Fenton (75.5%) >ultrasound (45.5%), then the efficiencies were decreased in the other of: ultrasound-Fenton (73.0%) >Fenton (70.3%) >ultrasound (41.4%) in 60min. The extra PAHs were released from the intracellular substances and the cavities of sludge due to the disruption of sludge during the oxidation process. Also, the degradation of PAHs could be inhibited by the other organic matter in the sludge. The combined ultrasound-Fenton process showed more efficient than both ultrasound process and Fenton process not only in the surface of sludge but also in the sludge interior. PMID:26795704

  13. Bioremediation of coastal areas 5 years after the Nakhodka oil spill in the Sea of Japan: isolation and characterization of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chaerun, S Khodijah; Tazaki, Kazue; Asada, Ryuji; Kogure, Kazuhiro

    2004-09-01

    Five years after the 1997 Nakhodka oil spill in the Sea of Japan, seven bacterial strains capable of utilizing the heavy oil spilled from the Nakhodka Russian oil tanker were isolated from three coastal areas (namely Katano Seashore of Fukui Prefecture, Osawa and Atake seashores of Ishikawa Prefecture) and the Nakhodka Russian oil tanker after a 5-year bioremediation process. All bacterial strains isolated could utilize long-chain-length alkanes efficiently, but not aromatic, and all of them were able to grow well on heavy oil. Using 16S rDNA sequencing, most of the strains were affiliated to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Comparing between the year 1997 (at the beginning of bioremediation process) and the year 2001 (after 5 years of bioremediation), there was no significant change in morphology and size of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria during the 5-year bioremediation. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic observations revealed that a large number of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria still existed in the sites consisting of a variety of morphological forms of bacteria, such as coccus (Streptococcus and Staphylococcus) and bacillus (Streptobacillus). On the application of bioremediation processes on the laboratory-scale, laboratory microcosm experiments (containing seawater, beach sand, and heavy oil) under aerobic condition by two different treatments (i.e., placed the inside building and the outside building) were established for bioremediation of heavy oil to investigate the significance of the role of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria on them. There was no significant bacterial activity differentiation in the two treatments, and removal of heavy oil by hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the outside building was slightly greater than that in the inside building. The values of pH, Eh, EC, and dissolved oxygen (DO) in two treatments indicated that the bioremediation process took place under aerobic conditions (DO: 1-6 mg/l; Eh: 12-300 mV) and neutral

  14. Potential of fungal co-culturing for accelerated biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil.

    PubMed

    Yanto, Dede Heri Yuli; Tachibana, Sanro

    2014-08-15

    The potential of fungal co-culture of the filamentous Pestalotiopsis sp. NG007 with four different basidiomycetes--Trametes versicolor U97, Pleurotus ostreatus PL1, Cerena sp. F0607, and Polyporus sp. S133--for accelerating biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) was studied using three different physicochemical characteristic PHCs in soil. All the combinations showed a mutual intermingling mycelial interaction on the agar plates. However, only NG007/S133 (50/50) exhibited an optimum growth rate and enzymatic activities that supported the degradation of asphalt in soil. The co-culture also degraded all fractions at even higher concentrations of the different PHCs. In addition, asphaltene, which is a difficult fraction for a single microorganism to degrade, was markedly degraded by the co-culture, which indicated that the simultaneous biodegradation of aliphatic, aromatic, resin, and asphaltene fractions had occurred in the co-culture. An examination of in-vitro degradation by the crude enzymes and the retrieval fungal culture from the soil after the experiment confirmed the accelerated biodegradation due to enhanced enzyme activities in the co-culture. The addition of piperonyl butoxide or AgNO3 inhibited biodegradation by 81-99%, which demonstrated the important role of P450 monooxygenases and/or dioxygenases in the initial degradation of the aliphatic and aromatic fractions in PHCs. PMID:24997261

  15. Importance of Rhodococcus strains in a bacterial consortium degrading a mixture of hydrocarbons, gasoline, and diesel oil additives revealed by metatranscriptomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Auffret, Marc D; Yergeau, Etienne; Labbé, Diane; Fayolle-Guichard, Françoise; Greer, Charles W

    2015-03-01

    A bacterial consortium (Mix3) composed of microorganisms originating from different environments (soils and wastewater) was obtained after enrichment in the presence of a mixture of 16 hydrocarbons, gasoline, and diesel oil additives. After addition of the mixture, the development of the microbial composition of Mix3 was monitored at three different times (35, 113, and 222 days) using fingerprinting method and dominant bacterial species were identified. In parallel, 14 bacteria were isolated after 113 days and identified. Degradation capacities for Mix3 and the isolated bacterial strains were characterized and compared. At day 113, we induced the expression of catabolic genes in Mix3 by adding the substrate mixture to resting cells and the metatranscriptome was analyzed. After addition of the substrate mixture, the relative abundance of Actinobacteria increased at day 222 while a shift between Rhodococcus and Mycobacterium was observed after 113 days. Mix3 was able to degrade 13 compounds completely, with partial degradation of isooctane and 2-ethylhexyl nitrate, but tert-butyl alcohol was not degraded. Rhodococcus wratislaviensis strain IFP 2016 isolated from Mix3 showed almost the same degradation capacities as Mix3: these results were not observed with the other isolated strains. Transcriptomic results revealed that Actinobacteria and in particular, Rhodococcus species, were major contributors in terms of total and catabolic gene transcripts while other species were involved in cyclohexane degradation. Not all the microorganisms identified at day 113 were active except R. wratislaviensis IFP 2016 that appeared to be a major player in the degradation activity observed in Mix3. PMID:25343979

  16. Draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium rufum JS14(T), a polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium from petroleum-contaminated soil in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Yunyoung; Li, Qing X; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium rufum JS14(T) (=ATCC BAA-1377(T), CIP 109273(T), JCM 16372(T), DSM 45406(T)), a type strain of the species Mycobacterium rufum sp. . belonging to the family Mycobacteriaceae, was isolated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil in Hilo (HI, USA) because it harbors the capability of degrading PAH. Here, we describe the first genome sequence of strain JS14(T), with brief phenotypic characteristics. The genome is composed of 6,176,413 bp with 69.25 % G + C content and contains 5810 protein-coding genes with 54 RNA genes. The genome information on M. rufum JS14(T) will provide a better understanding of the complexity of bacterial catabolic pathways for degradation of specific chemicals. PMID:27486485

  17. Guided desaturation of unactivated aliphatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voica, Ana-Florina; Mendoza, Abraham; Gutekunst, Will R.; Fraga, Jorge Otero; Baran, Phil S.

    2012-08-01

    The excision of hydrogen from an aliphatic carbon chain to produce an isolated olefin (desaturation) without overoxidation is one of the most impressive and powerful biosynthetic transformations for which there are no simple and mild laboratory substitutes. The versatility of olefins and the range of reactions they undergo are unsurpassed in functional group space. Thus, the conversion of a relatively inert aliphatic system into its unsaturated counterpart could open new possibilities in retrosynthesis. In this article, the invention of a directing group to achieve such a transformation under mild, operationally simple, metal-free conditions is outlined. This ‘portable desaturase’ (TzoCl) is a bench-stable, commercial entity (Aldrich, catalogue number L510092) that is facile to install on alcohol and amine functionalities to ultimately effect remote desaturation, while leaving behind a synthetically useful tosyl group.

  18. The marine bacterium Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus SP17 degrades a wide range of lipids and hydrocarbons through the formation of oleolytic biofilms with distinct gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Mounier, Julie; Camus, Arantxa; Mitteau, Isabelle; Vaysse, Pierre-Joseph; Goulas, Philippe; Grimaud, Régis; Sivadon, Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Hydrophobic organic compounds (mainly lipids and hydrocarbons) represent a significant part of the organic matter in marine waters, and their degradation has an important impact in the carbon fluxes within oceans. However, because they are nearly insoluble in the water phase, their degradation by microorganisms occurs at the interface with water and thus requires specific adaptations such as biofilm formation. We show that Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus SP17 develops biofilms, referred to as oleolytic biofilms, on a large variety of hydrophobic substrates, including hydrocarbons, fatty alcohols, fatty acids, triglycerides, and wax esters. Microarray analysis revealed that biofilm growth on n-hexadecane or triolein involved distinct genetic responses, together with a core of common genes that might concern general mechanisms of biofilm formation. Biofilm growth on triolein modulated the expression of hundreds of genes in comparison with n-hexadecane. The processes related to primary metabolism and genetic information processing were downregulated. Most of the genes that were overexpressed on triolein had unknown functions. Surprisingly, their genome localization was restricted to a few regions identified as putative genomic islands or mobile elements. These results are discussed with regard to the adaptive responses triggered by M. hydrocarbonoclasticus SP17 to occupy a specific niche in marine ecosystems. PMID:25318592

  19. Influence of Cadmium and Mercury on Activities of Ligninolytic Enzymes and Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Pleurotus ostreatus in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Baldrian, Petr; in der Wiesche, Carsten; Gabriel, Jiří; Nerud, František; Zadražil, František

    2000-01-01

    The white-rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus was able to degrade the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) benzo[a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, dibenzo[a,h]anthracene, and benzo[ghi]perylene in nonsterile soil both in the presence and in the absence of cadmium and mercury. During 15 weeks of incubation, recovery of individual compounds was 16 to 69% in soil without additional metal. While soil microflora contributed mostly to degradation of pyrene (82%) and benzo[a]anthracene (41%), the fungus enhanced the disappearance of less-soluble polycyclic aromatic compounds containing five or six aromatic rings. Although the heavy metals in the soil affected the activity of ligninolytic enzymes produced by the fungus (laccase and Mn-dependent peroxidase), no decrease in PAH degradation was found in soil containing Cd or Hg at 10 to 100 ppm. In the presence of cadmium at 500 ppm in soil, degradation of PAHs by soil microflora was not affected whereas the contribution of fungus was negligible, probably due to the absence of Mn-dependent peroxidase activity. In the presence of Hg at 50 to 100 ppm or Cd at 100 to 500 ppm, the extent of soil colonization by the fungus was limited. PMID:10831426

  20. Diversity of benzyl- and alkylsuccinate synthase genes in hydrocarbon-impacted environments and enrichment cultures.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Amy V; Davidova, Irene A; Savage-Ashlock, Kristen; Parisi, Victoria A; Gieg, Lisa M; Suflita, Joseph M; Kukor, Jerome J; Wawrik, Boris

    2010-10-01

    Hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms play an important role in the natural attenuation of spilled petroleum in a variety of anoxic environments. The role of benzylsuccinate synthase (BSS) in aromatic hydrocarbon degradation and its use as a biomarker for field investigations are well documented. The recent discovery of alkylsuccinate synthase (ASS) allows the opportunity to test whether its encoding gene, assA, can serve as a comparable biomarker of anaerobic alkane degradation. Degenerate assA- and bssA-targeted PCR primers were designed in order to survey the diversity of genes associated with aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in petroleum-impacted environments and enrichment cultures. DNA was extracted from an anaerobic alkane-degrading isolate (Desulfoglaeba alkenexedens ALDC), hydrocarbon-contaminated river and aquifer sediments, a paraffin-degrading enrichment, and a propane-utilizing mixed culture. Partial assA and bssA genes were PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced, yielding several novel clades of assA genes. These data expand the range of alkane-degrading conditions for which relevant gene sequences are available and indicate that considerable diversity of assA genes can be found in hydrocarbon-impacted environments. The detection of genes associated with anaerobic alkane degradation in conjunction with the in situ detection of alkylsuccinate metabolites was also demonstrated. Comparable molecular signals of assA/bssA were not found when environmental metagenome databases of uncontaminated sites were searched. These data confirm that the assA gene is a useful biomarker for anaerobic alkane metabolism. PMID:20504044

  1. Combinatorics of aliphatic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Grützmann, Konrad; Böcker, Sebastian; Schuster, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    This study combines biology and mathematics, showing that a relatively simple question from molecular biology can lead to complicated mathematics. The question is how to calculate the number of theoretically possible aliphatic amino acids as a function of the number of carbon atoms in the side chain. The presented calculation is based on earlier results from theoretical chemistry concerning alkyl compounds. Mathematical properties of this number series are highlighted. We discuss which of the theoretically possible structures really occur in living organisms, such as leucine and isoleucine with a chain length of four. This is done both for a strict definition of aliphatic amino acids only involving carbon and hydrogen atoms in their side chain and for a less strict definition allowing sulphur, nitrogen and oxygen atoms. While the main focus is on proteinogenic amino acids, we also give several examples of non-proteinogenic aliphatic amino acids, playing a role, for instance, in signalling. The results are in agreement with a general phenomenon found in biology: Usually, only a small number of molecules are chosen as building blocks to assemble an inconceivable number of different macromolecules as proteins. Thus, natural biological complexity arises from the multifarious combination of building blocks. PMID:21120449

  2. Genome Sequence of Arenibacter algicola Strain TG409, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Associated with Marine Eukaryotic Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Whitman, William B.; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N.; Woyke, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Arenibacter algicola strain TG409 was isolated from Skeletonema costatum and exhibits the ability to utilize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as sole sources of carbon and energy. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 5,550,230 bp with 4,722 genes and an average G+C content of 39.7%. PMID:27491994

  3. Genome Sequence of Arenibacter algicola Strain TG409, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Associated with Marine Eukaryotic Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Whitman, William B; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N; Woyke, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Arenibacter algicola strain TG409 was isolated from Skeletonema costatum and exhibits the ability to utilize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as sole sources of carbon and energy. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 5,550,230 bp with 4,722 genes and an average G+C content of 39.7%. PMID:27491994

  4. Oil-removal enhancement in media with keratinous or chitinous wastes by hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria isolated from oil-polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-González, E; Rojas-Avelizapa, N G; Cruz-Camarillo, R; García-Mena, J; Rojas-Avelizapa, L I

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this work was to isolate oil-degrading bacteria that use chitin or keratin as carbon sources from oil contaminated soils; and additionally to study if oil removal by these bacteria is enhanced when a chitinous or a keratinous waste is added to the culture media. To isolate the above-mentioned bacteria, 12 soil samples were collected close to an oil-well. Such soils showed unsuitable nutrients content, but their counts of heterotrophic bacteria ranged within 10(5)-10(8) CFU g(-1) soil, of which 0.1-77% corresponded to oil hydrocarbon-degrading ones. By sampling on plates, 109 oil-degrading bacterial isolates were obtained. Their keratinase and chitinase activities were then screened by plate assays and spectrophotometric methods, resulting in 13 isolates that were used to integrate two mixed cultures, one keratinolytic and the other chitinolytic. These mixed cultures were grown in media with oil, or oil supplemented with chicken-feathers or shrimp wastes. The oil-hydrocarbon removal was measured by gas chromatography. Results showed that keratinolytic bacteria were better enzyme producers than the chitinolytic ones, and that oil removal in the presence of chicken-feathers was 3.8 times greater than with shrimp wastes, and almost twice, in comparison with oil-only added cultures. Identification of microorganisms from the mixed cultures by 16S rDNA, indicated the presence of seven different bacterial genera; Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas, Brevibacillus, Bacillus, Micrococcus, Lysobacter and Nocardiodes. These findings suggest that the isolated microorganisms and the chicken-feather wastes could be applied to the cleaning of oil-contaminated environments, whether in soil or water. PMID:18613616

  5. Enzymatic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbon intermediates using a recombinant dioxygenase immobilized onto surfactant-activated carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Suma, Yanasinee; Lim, Heejun; Kwean, Oh Sung; Cho, Suyeon; Yang, Junwon; Kim, Yohan; Kang, Christina S; Kim, Han S

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the enzymatic decomposition of aromatic hydrocarbon intermediates (catechol, 4-chlorocatechol, and 3-methylcatechol) using a dioxygenase immobilized onto single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT). The surfaces of SWCNTs were activated with surfactants. The dioxygenase was obtained by recombinant technique: the corresponding gene was cloned from Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6, and the enzyme was overexpressed and purified subsequently. The enzyme immobilization yield was 62%, and the high level of enzyme activity was preserved (60-79%) after enzyme immobilization. Kinetic analyses showed that the substrate utilization rates and the catalytic efficiencies of the immobilized enzyme for all substrates (target aromatic hydrocarbon intermediates) tested were similar to those of the free enzyme, indicating that the loss of enzyme activity was minimal during enzyme immobilization. The immobilized enzyme was more stable than the free enzyme against abrupt changes in pH, temperature, and ionic strength. Moreover, it retained high enzyme activity even after repetitive use. PMID:26810145

  6. Genome Sequence of Halomonas sp. Strain MCTG39a, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading and Exopolymeric Substance-Producing Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Whitman, William B; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Halomonas sp. strain MCTG39a was isolated from coastal sea surface water based on its ability to utilize n-hexadecane. During growth in marine medium the strain produces an amphiphilic exopolymeric substance (EPS) amended with glucose, which emulsifies a variety of oil hydrocarbon substrates. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 4,979,193 bp with 4,614 genes and an average G+C content of 55.0%. PMID:26184945

  7. Fatty acid and hydroxy acid adaptation in three gram-negative hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in relation to carbon source.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Mohamed; Metzger, Pierre; Largeau, Claude

    2005-12-01

    The lipids of three gram-negative bacteria, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Marinobacter aquaeolei, and Pseudomonas oleovorans grown on mineral media supplemented with ammonium acetate or hydrocarbons, were isolated, purified, and their structures determined. Three pools of lipids were isolated according to a sequential procedure: unbound lipids extracted with organic solvents, comprising metabolic lipids and the main part of membrane lipids, OH--labile lipids (mainly ester-bound in the lipopolysaccharides, LPS) and H+-labile lipids (mainly amide-bound in the LPS). Unsaturated FA composition gave evidence for an aerobic desaturation pathway for the synthesis of these acids in A. calcoaceticus and M. aquaeolei, a nonclassic route in gram-negative bacteria. Surprisingly, both aerobic and anaerobic pathways are operating in the studied strain of P. oleovorans. The increase of the proportion of saturated FA observed for the strain of P. oleovorans grown on light hydrocarbons would increase the temperature transition of the lipids for maintaining the inner membrane fluidity. An opposite phenomenon occurs in A. calcoaceticus and M. aquaeolei grown on solid or highly viscous C19 hydrocarbons. The increases of FA < C18 when the bacteria were grown on n-nonadecane, or of iso-FA in cultures on isononadecane would decrease the transition temperature of the lipids, to maintain the fluidity of the inner membranes. Moreover, P. oleovorans grown on hydrocarbons greatly decreases the proportion of P-hydroxy acids of LPS, thus likely maintaining the physical properties of the outer membrane. By contrast, no dramatic change in hydroxy acid composition occurred in the other two bacteria. PMID:16477811

  8. THE CARRIERS OF THE INTERSTELLAR UNIDENTIFIED INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES: AROMATIC OR ALIPHATIC?

    SciTech Connect

    Li Aigen; Draine, B. T. E-mail: draine@astro.princeton.edu

    2012-12-01

    The unidentified infrared emission (UIE) features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 {mu}m, commonly attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, have been recently ascribed to coal- or kerogen-like organic nanoparticles with a mixed aromatic-aliphatic structure. However, we show in this Letter that this hypothesis is inconsistent with observations. We estimate the aliphatic fraction of the UIE carriers based on the observed intensities of the 3.4 {mu}m and 6.85 {mu}m emission features by attributing them exclusively to aliphatic C-H stretch and aliphatic C-H deformation vibrational modes, respectively. We derive the fraction of carbon atoms in aliphatic form to be <15%. We conclude that the UIE emitters are predominantly aromatic, with aliphatic material at most a minor part of the UIE carriers. The PAH model is consistent with astronomical observations and PAHs dominate the strong UIE bands.

  9. Microbial diversity in methanogenic hydrocarbon-degrading enrichment cultures isolated from a water-flooded oil reservoir (Dagang oil field, China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Núria; Cai, Minmin; Straaten, Nontje; Yao, Jun; Richnow, Hans H.; Krüger, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Microbial transformation of oil to methane is one of the main degradation processes taking place in oil reservoirs, and it has important consequences as it negatively affects the quality and economic value of the oil. Nevertheless, methane could constitute a recovery method of carbon from exhausted reservoirs. Previous studies combining geochemical and isotopic analysis with molecular methods showed evidence for in situ methanogenic oil degradation in the Dagang oil field, China (Jiménez et al., 2012). However, the main key microbial players and the underlying mechanisms are still relatively unknown. In order to better characterize these processes and identify the main microorganisms involved, laboratory biodegradation experiments under methanogenic conditions were performed. Microcosms were inoculated with production and injection waters from the reservoir, and oil or 13C-labelled single hydrocarbons (e.g. n-hexadecane or 2-methylnaphthalene) were added as sole substrates. Indigenous microbiota were able to extensively degrade oil within months, depleting most of the n-alkanes in 200 days, and producing methane at a rate of 76 ± 6 µmol day-1 g-1 oil added. They could also produce heavy methane from 13C-labeled 2-methylnaphthalene, suggesting that further methanogenesis may occur from the aromatic and polyaromatic fractions of Dagang reservoir fluids. Microbial communities from oil and 2-methyl-naphthalene enrichment cultures were slightly different. Although, in both cases Deltaproteobacteria, mainly belonging to Syntrophobacterales (e.g. Syntrophobacter, Smithella or Syntrophus) and Clostridia, mostly Clostridiales, were among the most represented taxa, Gammaproteobacteria could be only identified in oil-degrading cultures. The proportion of Chloroflexi, exclusively belonging to Anaerolineales (e.g. Leptolinea, Bellilinea) was considerably higher in 2-methyl-naphthalene degrading cultures. Archaeal communities consisted almost exclusively of representatives of

  10. [Influence of Mirabilis jalapa Linn. Growth on the Microbial Community and Petroleum Hydrocarbon Degradation in Petroleum Contaminated Saline-alkali Soil].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Hai-hua; Cui, Bing-jian; Wu, Shang-hua; Bai, Zhi-hui; Huang, Zhan-bin

    2015-09-01

    In order to explore the effect of Mirabilis jalapa Linn. growth on the structure characteristics of the microbial community and the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) in the petroleum-contaminated saline-alkali soil, Microbial biomass and species in the rhizosphere soils of Mirabilis jalapa Linn. in the contaminated saline soil were studied with the technology of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) analysis. The results showed that comparing to CK soils without Mirabilis jalapa Linn., the ratio of PLFAs species varied were 71. 4%, 69. 2% and 33. 3% in the spring, summer and autumn season, respectively. In addition, there was distinct difference of the biomasses of the microbial community between the CK and rhizosphere soils and among the difference seasons of growth of Mirabilis jalapa Linn.. Compare to CK soil, the degradation rates of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) was increased by 47. 6%, 28. 3%, and 18. 9% in spring, summer, and autumn rhizosphere soils, respectively. Correlation analysis was used to determine the correlation between TPH degradation and the soil microbial community. 77. 8% of the total soil microbial PLFAs species showed positive correlation to the TPH degradation (the correlation coefficient r > 0), among which, 55. 6% of PLFAs species showed high positive correlation(the correlation coefficient was r≥0. 8). In addition, the relative content of SAT and MONO had high correlation with TPH degradation in the CK sample soils, the corelation coefficient were 0. 92 and 0. 60 respectively; However, the percent of positive correlation was 42. 1% in the rhizosphere soils with 21. 1% of them had high positive correlation. The relative content of TBSAT, MONO and CYCLO had moderate or low correlation in rhizosphere soils, and the correlation coefficient were 0. 56, 0. 50, and 0. 07 respectively. Our study showed that the growth of mirabilis Mirabilis jalapa Linn. had a higher influence on the species and biomass of microbial community in the

  11. Biodegradation of Trihalomethanes and Other Halogenated Aliphatic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. B.

    1996-01-01

    The biological dehalogenation of common water pollutants such as trichloromethane (chloroform) and other halogenated aliphatic compounds was the subject of this project. Samples from diverse water environments such as from groundwater contaminated with halogenated compounds and wastewaters from regional treatment plants were studied to identify conditions that favor certain dehalogenation reactions over others. Gene probe analyses of DNA extracted from the dichlormethane-degrading wastewater indicated the presence of the gene coding for dichloromethane dehalogenase, indicating the genetic basis for the dechlorination activity observed. These studies indicate that methanogenic bacteria are the organisms responsible for the chloroform dechlorination. Dechlorination of a common chlorofluorocarbon (CFC-11) was identified in samples taken from a regional aquifer contaminated with halogenated aliphatic compounds.

  12. Exposure to Solute Stress Affects Genome-Wide Expression but Not the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Activity of Sphingomonas sp. Strain LH128 in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Fida, Tekle Tafese; Breugelmans, Philip; Lavigne, Rob; Coronado, Edith; Johnson, David R.; van der Meer, Jan Roelof; Mayer, Antonia P.; Heipieper, Hermann J.; Hofkens, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Members of the genus Sphingomonas are important catalysts for removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil, but their activity can be affected by various stress factors. This study examines the physiological and genome-wide transcription response of the phenanthrene-degrading Sphingomonas sp. strain LH128 in biofilms to solute stress (invoked by 450 mM NaCl solution), either as an acute (4-h) or a chronic (3-day) exposure. The degree of membrane fatty acid saturation was increased as a response to chronic stress. Oxygen consumption in the biofilms and phenanthrene mineralization activities of biofilm cells were, however, not significantly affected after imposing either acute or chronic stress. This finding was in agreement with the transcriptomic data, since genes involved in PAH degradation were not differentially expressed in stressed conditions compared to nonstressed conditions. The transcriptomic data suggest that LH128 adapts to NaCl stress by (i) increasing the expression of genes coping with osmolytic and ionic stress such as biosynthesis of compatible solutes and regulation of ion homeostasis, (ii) increasing the expression of genes involved in general stress response, (iii) changing the expression of general and specific regulatory functions, and (iv) decreasing the expression of protein synthesis such as proteins involved in motility. Differences in gene expression between cells under acute and chronic stress suggest that LH128 goes through changes in genome-wide expression to fully adapt to NaCl stress, without significantly changing phenanthrene degrading activity. PMID:23001650

  13. Fate and transport of petroleum hydrocarbons in engineered biopiles in polar regions.

    PubMed

    Whelan, M J; Coulon, F; Hince, G; Rayner, J; McWatters, R; Spedding, T; Snape, I

    2015-07-01

    A dynamic multi-media model that includes temperature-dependency for partitioning and degradation was developed to predict the behaviour of petroleum hydrocarbons during biopiling at low temperature. The activation energy (Ea) for degradation was derived by fitting the Arrhenius equation to hydrocarbon concentrations from temperature-controlled soil mesocosms contaminated with crude oil and diesel. The model was then applied to field-scale biopiles containing soil contaminated with diesel and kerosene at Casey Station, Antarctica. Temporal changes of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) concentrations were very well described and predictions for individual hydrocarbon fractions were generally acceptable (disparity between measured and predicted concentrations was less than a factor two for most fractions). Biodegradation was predicted to be the dominant loss mechanism for all but the lightest aliphatic fractions, for which volatilisation was most important. Summertime losses were significant, resulting in TPH concentrations which were about 25% of initial concentrations just 1 year after the start of treatment. This contrasts with the slow rates often reported for hydrocarbons in situ and suggests that relatively simple remediation techniques can be effective even in Antarctica. PMID:25563162

  14. Using a Bayesian approach to improve and calibrate a dynamic model of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degradation in an industrial contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Brimo, Khaled; Garnier, Patricia; Sun, Siao; Bertrand-Krajewski, Jean-Luc; Cébron, Aurélie; Ouvrard, Stéphanie

    2016-08-01

    A novel kinetics model that describes the dynamics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soils is presented. The model includes two typical biodegradation pathways: the co-metabolic pathway using pseudo first order kinetics and the specific biodegradation pathway modeled using Monod kinetics. The sorption of PAHs to the solid soil occurs through bi-phasic fist order kinetics, and two types of non-extractible bounded residues are considered: the biogenic and the physically sequestrated into soil matrix. The PAH model was developed in Matlab, parameterized and tested successfully on batch experimental data using a Bayesian approach (DREAM). Preliminary results led to significant model simplifications. They also highlighted that the specific biodegradation pathway was the most efficient at explaining experimental data, as would be expected for an old industrial contaminated soil. Global analysis of sensitivity showed that the amount of PAHs ultimately degraded was mostly governed by physicochemical interactions rather than by biological activity. PMID:27176762

  15. Combined application of stable carbon isotope analysis and specific metabolites determination for assessing in situ degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in a tar oil-contaminated aquifer.

    PubMed

    Griebler, Christian; Safinowski, Michael; Vieth, Andrea; Richnow, Hans H; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2004-01-15

    To evaluate the intrinsic bioremediation potential in an anoxic tar oil-contaminated aquifer at a former gasworks site, groundwater samples were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed by compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) and signature metabolites analysis (SMA). 13C/12C fractionation data revealed conclusive evidence for in situ biodegradation of benzene, toluene, o-xylene, m/p-xylene, naphthalene, and 1-methylnaphthalene. In laboratory growth studies, 13C/12C isotope enrichment factors for anaerobic degradation of naphthalene (epsilon = -1.1 +/- 0.4) and 2-methylnaphthalene (epsilon = -0.9 +/- 0.1) were determined with the sulfate-reducing enrichment culture N47, which was isolated from the investigated test site. On the basis of these and other laboratory-derived enrichment factors from the literature, in situ biodegradation could be quantified for toluene, o-xylene, m/p-xylene, and naphthalene. Stable carbon isotope fractionation in the field was also observed for ethylbenzene, 2-methylnaphthalene, and benzothiophene but without providing conclusive results. Further evidence for the in situ turnover of individual BTEX compounds was provided by the presence of acetophenone, o-toluic acid, and p-toluic acid, three intermediates in the anaerobic degradation of ethylbenzene, o-xylene, and p-xylene, respectively. A number of groundwater samples also contained naphthyl-2-methylsuccinic acid, a metabolite that is highly specific for the anaerobic degradation of 2-methylnaphthalene. Additional metabolites that provided evidence on the anaerobic in situ degradation of naphthalenes were 1-naphthoic acid, 2-naphthoic acid, 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthoic acid, and 5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthoic acid. 2-Carboxybenzothiophene, 5-carboxybenzothiophene, a putative further carboxybenzothiophene isomer, and the reduced derivative dihydrocarboxybenzothiophene indicated the anaerobic conversion of the heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzothiophene. The combined application

  16. Hydrocarbon and chlorinated hydrocarbon-soluble magnesium dialkoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Kamienski, C.W.

    1988-05-31

    This patent describes a process for the preparation of hydrocarbon or chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent solutions of magnesium dialkoxides, which comprises reacting a suspension of magnesium metal or magnesium amide, or a solution of a dialkyimagnesium compound, in a volatile hydrocarbon or chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent with an alcohol selected from the group of (a) aliphatic, cycloaliphatic and acyclic C/sub 5/-C/sub 18/ beta- and gamma-alkyl-substituted secondary and tertiary monohydric alcohols; or (b) mixtures of the (a) alcohols with C/sub 3/-C/sub 18/ aliphatic or cycloaliphatic beta- and gamma-alkyl-unsubstituted secondary or tertiary alcohols; or (c) mixtures of the (a) alcohols with C/sub 1/-C/sub 18/ aliphatic primary unsubstituted and 2-alkyl-substituted alcohols; the mole ratios of the (a) to the (b), and the (a) to the (c), alcohols being 1 of the (a) alcohols to 0.1 to 2 of the (b) and/or the (c) alcohols.

  17. Application of fluorescent antibody and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for TCE and PAH degrading bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.L.; Franck, M.; Brey, J.; Scott, D.; Lanclos, K.; Fliermans, C.

    1996-07-01

    Historically, methods used to identify methanotrophic and polyaromatic hydrocarbon-degrading (PAH) bacteria in environmental samples have been inadequate because isolation and identification procedures are time-consuming and often fail to separate specific bacteria from other environmental microorganisms. Methanotrophic bacteria have been isolated and characterized from TCE-contaminated soils (Bowman et al. 1993; Fliermans et al., 1988). Fliermans et al., (1988) and others demonstrated that cultures enriched with methane and propane could cometabolically degrade a wide variety of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons including ethylene; 1,2-cisdichloroethylene (c-DCE); 1,2-trans-dichloroethylene (t-DCE); vinyl chloride (VC); toluene; phenol and cresol. Characterization of select microorganisms in the natural setting is important for the evaluation of bioremediation potential and its effectiveness. This realization has necessitated techniques that are selective, sensitive and easily applicable to soils, sediments, and groundwater (Fliermans, et al., 1994). Additionally these techniques can identify and quantify microbial types in situ in real time

  18. On the effects of the dispersant Corexit 9500© during the degradation process of n-alkanes and PAHs in marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Macías-Zamora, J V; Meléndez-Sánchez, A L; Ramírez-Álvarez, N; Gutiérrez-Galindo, E A; Orozco-Borbón, M V

    2014-02-01

    In many coastal countries, oil spill contingency plans include several alternatives for removal of the spilled oil from the ocean. Frequently, these plans include dispersants. Because this process applies chemical substances that may add toxicity to oil that already contains toxic compounds, it is, at times, a controversial method to fight oil pollution. Additionally, local conditions may result in particular complications. We investigated the possible effects of the dispersant Corexit 9500© under conditions similar to those of subtropical oceans. We used fuel oil #6+ diesel as the test mixture. Under certain conditions, at least part of the dispersed oil may reach the sediment, particularly if the dispersant is applied in coastal waters. Nine experimental units were used in this experiment. Similar conditions of water temperature, salinity, air fluxes into the experimental units, and hydrocarbon concentrations in sediments were used. Two treatments and one control, each one with three replicates, were carried out. We concentrated our investigation on sediment, although measurements of water were also taken. Our results suggest that once the oil has penetrated the sediment, no significant differences exist between oil that contains dispersant and oil without dispersant. Noticeable degradation of aliphatic hydrocarbons occurred mainly in the low molecular weight aliphatic hydrocarbons and not in the others. Apparently, degradation of aromatics was easier than that of alkanes. However, some differences were noticed for the degradation of PAHs in the sediment, suggesting a faster degradation under particular conditions in aerobic environments such as under this experiment. PMID:24162369

  19. Analysis of defence systems and a conjugative IncP-1 plasmid in the marine polyaromatic hydrocarbons-degrading bacterium Cycloclasticus sp. 78-ME.

    PubMed

    Yakimov, Michail M; Crisafi, Francesca; Messina, Enzo; Smedile, Francesco; Lopatina, Anna; Denaro, Renata; Pieper, Dietmar H; Golyshin, Peter N; Giuliano, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Marine prokaryotes have evolved a broad repertoire of defence systems to protect their genomes from lateral gene transfer including innate or acquired immune systems and infection-induced programmed cell suicide and dormancy. Here we report on the analysis of multiple defence systems present in the genome of the strain Cycloclasticus sp. 78-ME isolated from petroleum deposits of the tanker 'Amoco Milford Haven'. Cycloclasticus are ubiquitous bacteria globally important in polyaromatic hydrocarbons degradation in marine environments. Two 'defence islands' were identified in 78-ME genome: the first harbouring CRISPR-Cas with toxin-antitoxin system, while the second was composed by an array of genes for toxin-antitoxin and restriction-modification proteins. Among all identified spacers of CRISPR-Cas system only seven spacers match sequences of phages and plasmids. Furthermore, a conjugative plasmid p7ME01, which belongs to a new IncP-1θ ancestral archetype without any accessory mobile elements was found in 78-ME. Our results provide the context to the co-occurrence of diverse defence mechanisms in the genome of Cycloclasticus sp. 78-ME, which protect the genome of this highly specialized PAH-degrader. This study contributes to the further understanding of complex networks established in petroleum-based microbial communities. PMID:27345842

  20. Total Phosphate Influences the Rate of Hydrocarbon Degradation but Phosphate Mineralogy Shapes Microbial Community Composition in Cold-Region Calcareous Soils.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Steven D; Chen, Tingting; Phillips, Courtney; Hamilton, Jordan; Hilger, David; Chartrand, Blaine; Grosskleg, Jay; Bradshaw, Kris; Carlson, Trevor; Peak, Derek

    2016-05-17

    Managing phosphorus bioaccessibility is critical for the bioremediation of hydrocarbons in calcareous soils. This paper explores how soil mineralogy interacts with a novel biostimulatory solution to both control phosphorus bioavailability and influence bioremediation. Two large bore infiltrators (1 m diameter) were installed at a PHC contaminated site and continuously supplied with a solution containing nutrients and an electron acceptor. Soils from eight contaminated sites were prepared and pretreated, analyzed pretrial, spiked with diesel, placed into nylon bags into the infiltrators, and removed after 3 months. From XAS, we learned that three principal phosphate phases had formed: adsorbed phosphate, brushite, and newberyite. All measures of biodegradation in the samples (in situ degradation estimates, mineralization assays, culturable bacteria, catabolic genes) varied depending upon the soil's phosphate speciation. Notably, adsorbed phosphate increased anaerobic phenanthrene degradation and bzdN catabolic gene prevalence. The dominant mineralogical constraints on community composition were the relative amounts of adsorbed phosphate, brushite, and newberyite. Overall, this study finds that total phosphate influences microbial community phenotypes whereas relative percentages of phosphate minerals influences microbial community genotype composition. PMID:27082646

  1. Whole-Genome Sequences of Five Oyster-Associated Bacteria Show Potential for Crude Oil Hydrocarbon Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Green, Stefan; Pathak, Ashish; Thomas, Jesse; Venkatramanan, Raghavee

    2013-01-01

    Draft genome sequences of oyster-associated Pseudomonas stutzeri strain MF28, P. alcaligenes strain OT69, P. aeruginosa strain WC55, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain MF89, and Microbacterium maritypicum strain MF109 are reported. Genome-wide surveys of these isolates suggest that the oyster microbiome, which remains largely understudied, has a strong potential to degrade crude oil. PMID:24092793

  2. Raman spectroscopic study of amorphous and crystalline hydrocarbons from soils, peats and lignite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehlička, Jan; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Villar, Susana E. J.; Pokorný, Jan

    2005-08-01

    FT-Raman spectra were obtained from the natural hydrocarbon mixtures ozokerite and hatchettite as well as from the terpenoid minerals fichtelite (norabietane) and hartite (α-phyllocladane). Some of these hydrocarbons occur in soil and peat environments of Holocene age. However, hartite occurs in lignite, in fossilised Glyptostrobus ( Taxodiaceae) trees and in pelosiderites of the Bílina Miocene series (about 20 Ma); it represents the accumulated and crystallised product of diagenetic transformation of precursor biogenic terpenoids. Raman spectra of earth waxes investigated confirm their dominantly aliphatic character and oxidative degradation (related to weathering and/or subaerial alteration in museum cabinets). Vibrational assignments are proposed and differences in Raman spectra of fichtelite and hartite discussed. Some of the individual features can be used for discrimination (e.g., hartite bands at 1480, 1310, 1287, 1041, 729 and 693 cm -1 and fichtelite bands at 1302, 836, 717 and 533 cm -1).

  3. Bioremediation of multi-polluted soil by spent mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) substrate: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degradation and Pb availability.

    PubMed

    García-Delgado, Carlos; Yunta, Felipe; Eymar, Enrique

    2015-12-30

    This study investigates the effect of three spent Agaricus bisporus substrate (SAS) application methods on bioremediation of soil multi-polluted with Pb and PAH from close to a shooting range with respect natural attenuation (SM). The remediation treatments involve (i) use of sterilized SAS to biostimulate the inherent soil microbiota (SSAS) and two bioaugmentation possibilities (ii) its use without previous treatment to inoculate A. bisporus and inherent microbiota (SAS) or (iii) SAS sterilization and further A. bisporus re-inoculation (Abisp). The efficiency of each bioremediation microcosm was evaluated by: fungal activity, heterotrophic and PAH-degrading bacterial population, PAH removal, Pb mobility and soil eco-toxicity. Biostimulation of the native soil microbiology (SSAS) achieved similar levels of PAH biodegradation as SM and poor soil detoxification. Bioaugmented microcosms produced higher PAH removal and eco-toxicity reduction via different routes. SAS increased the PAH-degrading bacterial population, but lowered fungal activity. Abisp was a good inoculum carrier for A. bisporus exhibiting high levels of ligninolytic activity, the total and PAH-degrading bacteria population increased with incubation time. The three SAS applications produced slight Pb mobilization (<0.3%). SAS sterilization and further A. bisporus re-inoculation (Abisp) proved the best application method to remove PAH, mainly BaP, and detoxify the multi-polluted soil. PMID:26188871

  4. Foaming of mixtures of pure hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. V.; Woods, W. W.

    1950-01-01

    Mixtures of pure liquid hydrocarbons are capable of foaming. Nine hydrocarbons were mixed in pairs, in all possible combinations, and four proportions of each combination. These mixtures were sealed in glass tubes, and the foaming was tested by shaking. Mixtures of aliphatic with other aliphatic hydrocarbons, or of alkyl benzenes with other alkyl benzenes, did not foam. Mixtures of aliphatic hydrocarbons with alkyl benzenes did foam. The proportions of the mixtures greatly affected the foaming, the maximum foaming of 12 of 20 pairs being at the composition 20 percent aliphatic hydrocarbon, 80 percent alkyl benzene. Six seconds was the maximum foam lifetime of any of these mixtures. Aeroshell 120 lubricating oil was fractionated into 52 fractions and a residue by extraction with acetone in a fractionating extractor. The index of refraction, foam lifetime, color, and viscosity of these fractions were measured. Low viscosity and high index fractions were extracted first. The viscosity of the fractions extracted rose and the index decreased as fractionation proceeded. Foam lifetimes and color were lowest in the middle fractions. Significance is attached to the observation that none of the foam lifetimes of the fractions or residue is as high as the foam lifetime of the original Aeroshell, indicating that the foaming is not due to a particular foaming constituent, but rather to the entire mixture.

  5. Transformations of 1- and 2-carbon halogenated aliphatic organic compounds under methanogenic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Bouwer, E J; McCarty, P L

    1983-01-01

    Several 1- and 2-carbon halogenated aliphatic organic compounds present at low concentrations (less than 100 micrograms/liter) were degraded under methanogenic conditions in batch bacterial cultures and in a continuous-flow methanogenic fixed-film laboratory-scale column. Greater than 90% degradation was observed within a 2-day detention time under continuous-flow methanogenic conditions with acetate as a primary substrate. Carbon-14 measurements indicated that chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, and 1,2-dichloroethane were almost completely oxidized to carbon dioxide, confirming removal by biooxidation. The initial step in the transformations of tetrachloroethylene and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane to nonchlorinated end products appeared to be reductive dechlorination to trichloroethylene and 1,1,2-trichloroethane, respectively. Transformations of the brominated aliphatic compounds appear to be the result of both biological and chemical processes. The data suggest that transformations of halogenated aliphatic compounds can occur under methanogenic conditions in the environment. PMID:6859849

  6. Dielectric relaxations in aliphatic polyesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Sudeepto

    2001-07-01

    The dielectric technique was used to study the relaxation processes of five linear aliphatic polyesters. The polyesters studied were poly (ethylene succinate/adipate) or PESA, poly (trimethylene succinate/adipate) or PTSA, poly (butylene succinate/adipate) or PBSA, poly (ethylene succinate) or PES, and poly (ethylene adipate) or PEA. Three of the polyesters were copolymers (PESA, PTSA, and PBSA), and the remaining two (PES and PEA) were homopolymers. Two of the five were amorphous (PESA and PTSA), and the remaining three (PBSA, PES, and PEA) were semicrystalline. All the five polyesters were synthesized in the laboratory using a poly-condensation reaction between a series of aliphatic diols and diesters. The succinic and adipic groups in the copolymers are in equimolar amounts. The polymers were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and density measurements. Elemental analysis done on the polymers confirmed that their compositions matched theoretical estimates. The relaxation processes were studied dielectrically using an IMASS time domain dielectric spectrometer (TDS) and an HP 4284A LCR meter. Together they allowed a frequency range from 0.001 Hz to 1 MHz. Typically in the subglass region, good data were obtained between 0.01 Hz and 100 kHz. In the glass transition region, good data were occasionally available over the entire range. Two relaxation processes were detected in the subglass temperature region for all the polymers, and in the case of the copolymers PTSA and PBSA, they were also well resolved. Both the processes showed Arrhenius behavior with modest activation energies characteristic of subglass processes in general. They also progressively merged with increasing temperature, which implies a lower activation energy for the faster process which is consistent with the current understanding of relaxation phenomena. The glass transition region of all the polymers also showed a merging of the dominant alpha relaxation with the subglass

  7. Methanogenic Oil Degradation in the Dagang Oil Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Núria; Cai, Minmin; Straaten, Nontje; Yao, Jun; Richnow, Hans Hermann; Krüger, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Anaerobic biodegradation is one of the main in situ oil transformation processes in subsurface oil reservoirs. Recent studies have provided evidence of biodegradation of residual oil constituents under methanogenic conditions. Methane, like other biogenic gases, may contribute to reduce the viscosity of oil and enhance its flow characteristics (making it more available) but it can also be used as a energy source. So the aim of the present study was to provide reliable information on in situ biotransformation of oil under methanogenic conditions, and to assess the feasibility of implementing a MEOR strategy at this site. For this reason, chemical and isotopic analyses of injection and production fluids of the Dagang oil field (Hebei province, China) were performed. Microbial abundances were assessed by qPCR, and clone libraries were performed to study the diversity. In addition, microcosms with either oil or 13C-labelled hydrocarbons were inoculated with injection or production waters to characterize microbial processes in vitro. Geochemical and isotopic data were consistent with in situ biogenic methane production linked to aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon degradation: GC-MS profiles of petroleum samples were nearly devoid of n-alkanes, linear alkylbenzenes, and alkyltoluenes, and light PAH, confirming that Dagang oil is mostly highly weathered. In addition, carbon and hydrogen isotopic signatures of methane (δ13CCH4 and δDCH4, respectively), and the bulk isotopic discrimination (Δδ13C) between methane and CO2 (between 32 and 65 ) were in accordance with previously reported values for methane formation during hydrocarbon degradation. Furthermore, methane-producing Archaea and hydrocarbon-degrading Bacteria were abundant in produced oil-water samples. On the other hand, our laboratory degradation experiments revealed that autochthonous microbiota are capable of significantly degrade oil within several months, with biodegradation patterns resembling those

  8. Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons at Low Temperature under Aerobic and Nitrate-Reducing Conditions in Enrichment Cultures from Northern Soils

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Mikael; Sodersten, Erik; Yu, Zhongtang; Dalhammar, Gunnel; Mohn, William W.

    2003-01-01

    The potential for biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at low temperature and under anaerobic conditions is not well understood, but such biodegradation would be very useful for remediation of polluted sites. Biodegradation of a mixture of 11 different PAHs with two to five aromatic rings, each at a concentration of 10 μg/ml, was studied in enrichment cultures inoculated with samples of four northern soils. Under aerobic conditions, low temperature severely limited PAH biodegradation. After 90 days, aerobic cultures at 20°C removed 52 to 88% of the PAHs. The most extensive PAH degradation under aerobic conditions at 7°C, 53% removal, occurred in a culture from creosote-contaminated soil. Low temperature did not substantially limit PAH biodegradation under nitrate-reducing conditions. Under nitrate-reducing conditions, naphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, fluorene, and phenanthrene were degraded. The most extensive PAH degradation under nitrate-reducing conditions at 7°C, 39% removal, occurred in a culture from fuel-contaminated Arctic soil. In separate transfer cultures from the above Arctic soil, incubated anaerobically at 7°C, removal of 2-methylnaphthalene and fluorene was stoichiometrically coupled to nitrate removal. Ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis suggested that enrichment resulted in a few predominant bacterial populations, including members of the genera Acidovorax, Bordetella, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, and Variovorax. Predominant populations from different soils often included phylotypes with nearly identical partial 16S rRNA gene sequences (i.e., same genus) but never included phylotypes with identical ribosomal intergenic spacers (i.e., different species or subspecies). The composition of the enriched communities appeared to be more affected by presence of oxygen, than by temperature or source of the inoculum. PMID:12514005

  9. Bacterial Community Dynamics and Hydrocarbon Degradation during a Field-Scale Evaluation of Bioremediation on a Mudflat Beach Contaminated with Buried Oil

    PubMed Central

    Röling, Wilfred F. M.; Milner, Michael G.; Jones, D. Martin; Fratepietro, Francesco; Swannell, Richard P. J.; Daniel, Fabien; Head, Ian M.

    2004-01-01

    A field-scale experiment with a complete randomized block design was performed to study the degradation of buried oil on a shoreline over a period of almost 1 year. The following four treatments were examined in three replicate blocks: two levels of fertilizer treatment of oil-treated plots, one receiving a weekly application of liquid fertilizer and the other treated with a slow-release fertilizer; and two controls, one not treated with oil and the other treated with oil but not with fertilizer. Oil degradation was monitored by measuring carbon dioxide evolution and by chemical analysis of the oil. Buried oil was degraded to a significantly greater extent in fertilized plots, but no differences in oil chemistry were observed between the two different fertilizer treatments, although carbon dioxide production was significantly higher in the oil-treated plots that were treated with slow-release fertilizer during the first 14 days of the experiment. Bacterial communities present in the beach sediments were profiled by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments and 16S rRNA amplified by reverse transcriptase PCR. Similarities between the DGGE profiles were calculated, and similarity matrices were subjected to statistical analysis. These analyses showed that although significant hydrocarbon degradation occurred both in plots treated with oil alone and in the plots treated with oil and liquid fertilizer, the bacterial community structure in these plots was, in general, not significantly different from that in the control plots that were not treated with oil and did not change over time. In contrast, the bacterial community structure in the plots treated with oil and slow-release fertilizer changed rapidly, and there were significant differences over time, as well as between blocks and even within plots. The differences were probably related to the higher concentrations of nutrients measured in interstitial water from

  10. Mantle hydrocarbons: Abiotic or biotic?

    SciTech Connect

    Sugisaki, Ryuichi; Mimura, Koichi

    1994-06-01

    Analyses of 227 rocks from fifty localities throughout the world showed that mantle derived rocks such as tectonized peridotites in ophiolite sequences (tectonites) and peridotite xenoliths in alkali basalts contain heavier hydrocarbons (n-alkanes), whereas igneous rocks produced by magmas such as gabbro and granite lack them. The occurrence of hydrocarbons indicates that they were not derived either from laboratory contamination or from field contamination; these compounds found in the mantle-derived rocks are called here {open_quotes}mantle hydrocarbons.{close_quotes} The existence of hydrocarbons correlates with petrogenesis. For example, peridotite cumulates produced by magmatic differentiation lack hydrocarbons whereas peridotite xenoliths derived from the mantle contain them. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric records of the mantle hydrocarbons resemble those of aliphatics in meteorites and in petroleum. Features of the hydrocarbons are that (a) the mantle hydrocarbons reside mainly along grain boundaries and in fluid inclusions of minerals; (b) heavier isoprenoids such as pristane and phytane are present; and (c) {delta}{sup 13}C of the mantle hydrocarbons is uniform (about {minus}27{per_thousand}). Possible origins for the mantle hydrocarbons are as follows. (1) They were inorganically synthesized by Fischer-Tropsch type reaction in the mantle. (2) They were delivered by meteorites and comets to the early Earth. (3) They were recycled by subduction. The mantle hydrocarbons in the cases of (1) and (2) are abiogenic and those in (3) are mainly biogenic. It appears that hydrocarbons may survive high pressures and temperatures in the mantle, but they are decomposed into lighter hydrocarbon gases such as CH{sub 4} at lower pressures when magmas intrude into the crust; consequently, peridotite cumulates do not contain heavier hydrocarbons but possess hydrocarbon gases up to C{sub 4}H{sub 10}. 76 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Mantle hydrocarbons: abiotic or biotic?

    PubMed

    Sugisaki, R; Mimura, K

    1994-06-01

    Analyses of 227 rocks from fifty localities throughout the world showed that mantle derived rocks such as tectonized peridotites in ophiolite sequences (tectonites) arid peridotite xenoliths in alkali basalts contain heavier hydrocarbons (n-alkanes), whereas igneous rocks produced by magmas such as gabbro arid granite lack them. The occurrence of hydrocarbons indicates that they were not derived either from laboratory contamination or from held contamination; these compounds found in the mantle-derived rocks are called here "mantle hydrocarbons." The existence of hydrocarbons correlates with petrogenesis. For example, peridotite cumulates produced by magmatic differentiation lack hydrocarbons whereas peridotite xenoliths derived from the mantle contain them. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric records of the mantle hydrocarbons resemble those of aliphatics in meteorites and in petroleum. Features of the hydrocarbons are that (a) the mantle hydrocarbons reside mainly along grain boundaries and in fluid inclusions of minerals; (b) heavier isoprenoids such as pristane and phytane are present; and (c) delta 13C of the mantle hydrocarbons is uniform (about -27%). Possible origins for the mantle hydrocarbons are as follows. (1) They were in organically synthesized by Fischer-Tropsch type reaction in the mantle. (2) They were delivered by meteorites and comets to the early Earth. (3) They were recycled by subduction. The mantle hydrocarbons in the cases of (1) and (2) are abiogenic and those in (3) are mainly biogenic. It appears that hydrocarbons may survive high pressures and temperatures in the mantle, but they are decomposed into lighter hydrocarbon gases such as CH4 at lower pressures when magmas intrude into the crust; consequently, peridotite cumulates do not contain heavier hydrocarbons but possess hydrocarbon gases up to C4H10. PMID:11541663

  12. Mantle hydrocarbons: Abiotic or biotic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugisaki, Ryuichi; Mimura, Koichi

    1994-06-01

    Analyses of 227 rocks from fifty localities throughout the world showed that mantle derived rocks such as tectonized peridotites in ophiolite sequences (tectonites) and peridotite xenoliths in alkali basalts contain heavier hydrocarbons ( n-alkanes), whereas igneous rocks produced by magmas such as gabbro and granite lack them. The occurrence of hydrocarbons indicates that they were not derived either from laboratory contamination or from field contamination; these compounds found in the mantle-derived rocks are called here "mantle hydrocarbons." The existence of hydrocarbons correlates with petrogenesis. For example, peridotite cumulates produced by magmatic differentiation lack hydrocarbons whereas peridotite xenoliths derived from the mantle contain them. Gas Chromatographic—mass spectrometric records of the mantle hydrocarbons resemble those of aliphatics in meteorites and in petroleum. Features of the hydrocarbons are that (a) the mantle hydrocarbons reside mainly along grain boundaries and in fluid inclusions of minerals (b) heavier isoprenoids such as pristane and phytane are present (c) δ13C of the mantle hydrocarbons is uniform (about -27%.). Possible origins for the mantle hydrocarbons are as follows. (1) They were inorganically synthesized by Fischer-Tropsch type reaction in the mantle. (2) They were delivered by meteorites and comets to the early Earth. (3) They were recycled by subduction. The mantle hydrocarbons in the cases of (1) and (2) are abiogenic and those in (3) are mainly biogenic. It appears that hydrocarbons may survive high pressures and temperatures in the mantle, but they are decomposed into lighter hydrocarbon gases such as CH 4 at lower pressures when magmas intrude into the crust; consequently, peridotite cumulates do not contain heavier hydrocarbons but possess hydrocarbon gases up to C 4H 10.

  13. A marine oligobacterium harboring genes known to be part of aromatic hydrocarbon degradation pathways of soil pseudomonads.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Lau, P C; Button, D K

    1996-01-01

    The far-ranging distribution of genes for aromatic hydrocarbon catabolism, predominantly studied in soil pseudomonads, is extended to a marine oligobacterium by finding five homologous sequences in a 5.7-kb chromosomal DNA from a new isolate, Cycloclasticus oligotrophus RB1. RB1 is capable of growth in unamended seawater or mineral salts media supplemented with a variety of aromatic compounds, including toluene, o-, m-, or p-xylenes, as sole carbon sources. The five open reading frames, designated xylM, K, G, C1, and C2, are 57% A+T-rich. XylM is predicted to be an integral membrane protein; XylK and XylG possess glutathione S-transferase (GST) and 2-hydroxy-5methyl-6-oxohexa2,4-dienoate dehydrogenase activities, respectively; XylC1C2 are homologs of the large and small subunits of the iron sulfur protein component of the biphenyl dioxygenase (e.g., BphA1A2). PMID:8787414

  14. Transcriptional profiling of genes involved in n-hexadecane compounds assimilation in the hydrocarbon degrading Dietzia cinnamea P4 strain

    PubMed Central

    Procópio, Luciano; de Cassia Pereira e Silva, Michele; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Seldin, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    The petroleum-derived degrading Dietzia cinnamea strain P4 recently had its genome sequenced and annotated. This allowed employing the data on genes that are involved in the degradation of n-alkanes. To examine the physiological behavior of strain P4 in the presence of n-alkanes, the strain was grown under varying conditions of pH and temperature. D. cinnamea P4 was able to grow at pH 7.0–9.0 and at temperatures ranging from 35 ºC to 45 ºC. Experiments of gene expression by real-time quantitative RT-PCR throughout the complete growth cycle clearly indicated the induction of the regulatory gene alkU (TetR family) during early growth. During the logarithmic phase, a large increase in transcriptional levels of a lipid transporter gene was noted. Also, the expression of a gene that encodes the protein fused rubredoxin-alkane monooxygenase was enhanced. Both genes are probably under the influence of the AlkU regulator. PMID:24294263

  15. ELECTROCHEMICAL DEGRADATION OF CHLORINATED CONTAMINANTS IN SEDIMENTS AND GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorinated aliphatic and aromatic compounds account for much of the contamination found at sediments sites. Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons such as trichloroethylene (TCE) occur as serious contaminants at 358 major hazardous waste sites in the USA. TCE is widely used as a sol...

  16. Electrodeposited nickel(3) aluminide base intermetallic coatings and their resistance to high temperature degradation in hydrocarbon cracking environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haifeng

    This research was aimed at developing novel Ni-A1 base intermetallic coatings to protect commercial Fe-Ni-Cr tube alloys from severe corrosive degradation at high temperatures. These alloys are widely used in petrochemical, chemical, and energy conversion industries. The coating process and coating evaluation were the two main aspects of this investigation. A two-step coating processing has been successfully developed to in situ apply pure and CeO2-modified Ni3Al intermetallic coatings onto Fe-Ni-Cr substrates. The process consists of the electrodeposition of Ni-Al and Ni-Al-CeO2 composite coatings from a Watt's nickel bath containing Al and CeO2 particles via a cost-effective electroplating technique and an annealing treatment of the as-plated coatings. It was found that the deposition of Al particles obeyed a Guglielmi model, and that REO particles interfered significantly with the deposition of Al particles. The long-term resistance of pure and CeO2-modified Ni 3A1 coatings to cyclic oxidation, carburization, coke formation, and metal dusting was evaluated in flowing dry air, 2 % CH4-H 2, and CO-H2-H2O respectively. Due to the high porosity, pure and CeO2-dispersed Ni3Al coatings exhibited poor resistance to cyclic oxidation at 850°C. CeO2 improved the spallation resistance of the Ni3Al base coatings during cyclic oxidation at 1050°C. CeO2-dispersed Ni3Al coatings showed better carburization resistance, particularly at 1050°C. Ni 3A1-based coatings. Those CeO2-dispersed were susceptible to coke formation and metal dusting at 650°C. Pre-oxidation improved the resistance of Ni3Al-based coatings to coke formation and metal dusting at 650°C, but the effectiveness depended on the integrity of the induced alumina scale. Special attention was paid to several aspects of coating degradation. These aspects included microstructure changes, degradation mechanisms, coating/substrate interdiffusion, effect of corrosive atmosphere, and effect of CeO2 on coating

  17. Sphingobium barthaii sp. nov., a high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium isolated from cattle pasture soil.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Allyn H; Kunihiro, Marie; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Nogi, Yuichi; Kanaly, Robert A

    2015-09-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, yellow, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain KK22(T), was isolated from a microbial consortium that grew on diesel fuel originally recovered from cattle pasture soil. Strain KK22(T) has been studied for its ability to biotransform high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogeny, strain KK22(T) was affiliated with the genus Sphingobium in the phylum Proteobacteria and was most closely related to Sphingobium fuliginis TKP(T) (99.8%) and less closely related to Sphingobium quisquiliarum P25(T) (97.5%). Results of DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) revealed relatedness values between strain KK22(T) and strain TKP(T) and between strain KK22(T) and strain P25(T) of 21 ± 4% (reciprocal hybridization, 27 ± 2%) and 15 ± 2% (reciprocal hybridization, 17 ± 1%), respectively. Chemotaxonomic analyses of strain KK22(T) showed that the major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone Q-10, that the polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidyl-N-methylethylethanolamine and sphingoglycolipid, and that C18 : 1ω7c and C14 : 0 2-OH were the main fatty acid and hydroxylated fatty acids, respectively. This strain was unable to reduce nitrate and the genomic DNA G+C content was 64.7 mol%. Based upon the results of the DDH analyses, the fact that strain KK22(T) was motile, and its biochemical and physiological characteristics, strain KK22(T) could be separated from recognized species of the genus Sphingobium. We conclude that strain KK22(T) represents a novel species of this genus for which the name Sphingobium barthaii sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is KK22(T) ( = DSM 29313(T) = JCM 30309(T)). PMID:26012583

  18. Coefficients of caffeine distribution in aliphatic alcohol-ammonium sulfate-water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenman, Ya. I.; Krivosheeva, O. A.; Mokshina, N. Ya.

    2012-11-01

    The extraction of caffeine with aliphatic alcohols C3-C9 from aqueous solutions in the presence of a salting-out agent (ammonium sulfate) is studied. Quantitative characteristics of extraction are calculated: the distribution coefficients ( D) and the degree of recovery ( R, %). Relations are found between log D of caffeine and the length of the hydrocarbon radical in the alcohol molecule, along with certain physicochemical properties of the extragents.

  19. Anaerobic digestion of aliphatic polyesters.

    PubMed

    Šmejkalová, Pavla; Kužníková, Veronika; Merna, Jan; Hermanová, Soňa

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic processes for the treatment of plastic materials waste represent versatile and effective approach in environmental protection and solid waste management. In this work, anaerobic biodegradability of model aliphatic polyesters, poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), in the form of powder and melt-pressed films with varying molar mass, was studied. Biogas production was explored in batch laboratory trials at 55 ± 1°C under a nitrogen atmosphere. The inoculum used was thermophilic digested sludge (total solids concentration of 2.9%) from operating digesters at the Central Waste Water Treatment Plant in Prague, Czech Republic. Methanogenic biodegradation of PCLs typically yielded from 54 to 60% of the theoretical biogas yield. The biodegradability of PLAs achieved from 56 to 84% of the theoretical value. High biogas yield (up to 677 mL/g TS) with high methane content (more than 60%), comparable with conventionally processed materials, confirmed the potential of polyester samples for anaerobic treatment in the case of their exploitation in agriculture or as a packaging material in the food industry. PMID:27191559

  20. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of intact polar lipids reveal complex carbon flow patterns among hydrocarbon degrading microbial communities at the Chapopote asphalt volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubotz, Florence; Lipp, Julius S.; Elvert, Marcus; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2011-08-01

    Seepage of asphalt forms the basis of a cold seep system at 3000 m water depth at the Chapopote Knoll in the southern Gulf of Mexico. Anaerobic microbial communities are stimulated in the oil-impregnated sediments as evidenced by the presence of intact polar membrane lipids (IPLs) derived from archaea and Bacteria at depths up to 7 m below the seafloor. Detailed investigation of stable carbon isotope composition (δ 13C) of alkyl and acyl moieties derived from a range of IPL precursors with distinct polar head groups resolved the complexity of carbon metabolisms and utilization of diverse carbon sources by uncultured microbial communities. In surface sediments most of the polar lipid-derived fatty acids with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG) head groups could be tentatively assigned to autotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria, with a relatively small proportion involved in the anaerobic oxidation of methane. Derivatives of phosphatidyl-( N)-methylethanolamine (PME) were abundant and could be predominantly assigned to heterotrophic oil-degrading bacteria. Archaeal IPLs with phosphate-based hydroxyarchaeols and diglycosidic glyceroldibiphytanylglyceroltetraethers (GDGTs) were assigned to methanotrophic archaea of the ANME-2 and ANME-1 cluster, respectively, whereas δ 13C values of phosphate-based archaeols and mixed phosphate-based and diglycosidic GDGTs point to methanogenic archaea. At a 7 m deep sulfate-methane transition zone that is linked to the upward movement of gas-laden petroleum, a distinct increase in abundance of archaeal IPLs such as phosphate-based hydroxyarchaeols and diglycosidic archaeol and GDGTs is observed; their δ 13C values are consistent with their origin from both methanotrophic and methanogenic archaea. This study reveals previously hidden, highly complex patterns in the carbon-flow of versatile microbial communities involved in the degradation of heavy oil including hydrocarbon gases

  1. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  2. Investigation of hydrocarbon oil transformation by gliding arc discharge: comparison of batch and recirculated configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, J. Christopher; Prantsidou, Maria

    2016-04-01

    The degradation of liquid dodecane was studied in a gliding arc discharge (GAD) of humid argon or nitrogen. A batch or recirculating configuration was used. The products in the gaseous and liquid phase were analysed by infrared and chromatography and optical emission spectroscopy was used to identify the excited species in the discharge. The best degradation performance comes from the use of humid N2 but a GAD of humid argon produces fewer gas-phase products but more liquid-phase end-products. A wide range of products such as heavier saturated or unsaturated hydrocarbons both aliphatic and aromatic, and oxidation products mainly alcohols, but also aldehydes, ketones and esters are produced in the liquid-phase. The recirculating treatment mode is more effective than the batch mode increasing the reactivity and changing the product selectivities. Overall, the study shows promising results for the organic liquid waste treatment, especially in the recirculating mode.

  3. Measurement of hydrocarbon transport in bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the hydrophobic, volatility, and relatively low aqueous solubility of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, transport of these chemicals by bacteria has not been extensively studied. These issues make transport assays difficult to carry out, and as a result, strong evidence for the active tran...

  4. Extracting hydrocarbons from water using a centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, A. Yu.; Ilyina, A. A.; Chuikin, A. V.; Velikov, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    An original method for the solid-phase microextraction of hydrocarbons from water using a centrifuge is proposed. Comparative results from the chromatographic elution of substances after liquid-phase and solid-phase microextraction are presented. The percentage of the extraction of substances from aqueous solutions and the minimum detection limit for aromatic and aliphatic compounds are calculated.

  5. 16S rDNA-based probes for two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading soil Mycobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Govindaswami, M.; Feldhake, D.J.; Loper, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    PAHs are a class of widespread pollutants, some of which have been shown to be genotoxic, hence the fate of these compounds in the environment is of considerable interest. Research on the biodegradation of 4 and 5 ring PAHs has been limited by the general lack of microbial isolates or consortia which can completely degrade these toxicants. Heitkamp and Cerniglia have described an oxidative soil Mycobacterium-strain PYR-1 that metabolizes pyrene and fluoranthene more rapidly than the 2 and 3 ring naphthalene and phenanthrene; although some metabolites of benzo-(a)-pyrene (BaP) were detected, no mineralization of BaP was observed. In 1991 Grosser et al. reported the isolation of a Mycobacterium sp. which mineralizes pyrene and also causing some mineralization of BaP. Their study describes a comparative analysis of these two strains, which show very similar colony morphology, growth rate and yellow-orange pigmentation. Genetic differences were shown by DNA amplification fingerprinting (DAF) using two arbitrary GC-rich octanucleotide primers, and by sequence comparison of PCR amplified 16S rDNA, although both strains show similarity closest to that of the genus Mycobacteria. These 16S rDNA sequences are in use for the construction of strain-specific DNA probes to monitor the presence, survival and growth of these isolates in PAH-contaminated soils in studies of biodegradation.

  6. Kinetics of bacterial growth on chlorinated aliphatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wijngaard, A.J. van den; Wind, R.E.; Janssen, D.B. )

    1993-07-01

    Halogenated aliphatic compounds are frequent constituents of industrial waste gases. Because of the environmental and biological toxic effects of these compounds, there is a growing interest in technologies for their removal. Biological waste gas purification is an option if specialized bacterial strains that use halogenated aliphatics as sole carbon and energy sources can be used. Elimination efficiency of the compounds depends not only on the process technology but on the degradation properties of the bacterial strains. Important aspects of bacterial growth are the Monod half-saturation constant and the maximum growth rate. In this study the kinetic properties of the organisms (Ancylobacter aquaticus AD20 and AD25, Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10, Pseudomonas sp. strain AD1) weree measured during growth in continuous cultures and wer compared with the kinetic properties of the first catabolic enzyme involved in the degradation of the growth substrate. The results indicate that the growth of the strains examined followed Monod kinetics. Stains AD20 and GJ10 showed growth rates on DCE somewhat higher than predicted from the amount of haloalkane dehalogenase present in the cells, while strain AD25 was much lower. 33 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Mass spectrometry study of the sublimation of aliphatic dipeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badelin, V. G.; Tyunina, E. Yu.; Krasnov, A. V.; Tyunina, V. V.; Giricheva, N. I.; Girichev, A. V.

    2012-03-01

    The sublimation of glycyl-L-α-alanine (Gly-Ala), L-α-alanyl-L-α-alanine (Ala-Ala), and DL-α-alanyl-DL-α-valine (Ala-Val) aliphatic dipeptides is studied by electron ionization mass spectrometry in combination with Knudsen effusion. The temperature range in which substances sublime as monomer molecular forms is determined. Enthalpies of sublimation Δs H°( T) are determined for Gly-Ala, Ala-Ala, and Ala-Val. It is shown that the enthalpy of sublimation of dipeptides increases with an increase in the side hydrocarbon radical. The unknown Δs H°(298) values for 17 amino acids and nine dipeptides are estimated using the proposed "structure-property" correlation model, in which the geometry and electron characteristics of molecules are used as structural descriptors.

  8. The Genome of Polaromonas sp. Strain JS666: Insights into the Evolution of a Hydrocarbon- and Xenobiotic-Degrading Bacterium, and Features of Relevance to Biotechnology▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Mattes, Timothy E.; Alexander, Anne K.; Richardson, Paul M.; Munk, A. Christine; Han, Cliff S.; Stothard, Paul; Coleman, Nicholas V.

    2008-01-01

    Polaromonas sp. strain JS666 can grow on cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE) as a sole carbon and energy source and may be useful for bioremediation of chlorinated solvent-contaminated sites. Analysis of the genome sequence of JS666 (5.9 Mb) shows a bacterium well adapted to pollution that carries many genes likely to be involved in hydrocarbon and xenobiotic catabolism and metal resistance. Clusters of genes coding for haloalkane, haloalkanoate, n-alkane, alicyclic acid, cyclic alcohol, and aromatic catabolism were analyzed in detail, and growth on acetate, catechol, chloroacetate, cyclohexane carboxylate, cyclohexanol, ferulate, heptane, 3-hydroxybenzoate, hydroxyquinol, gentisate, octane, protocatechuate, and salicylate was confirmed experimentally. Strain JS666 also harbors diverse putative mobile genetic elements, including retrons, inteins, a miniature inverted-repeat transposable element, insertion sequence transposases from 14 families, eight genomic islands, a Mu family bacteriophage, and two large (338- and 360-kb) plasmids. Both plasmids are likely to be self-transferable and carry genes for alkane, alcohol, aromatic, and haloacid metabolism. Overall, the JS666 genome sequence provides insights into the evolution of pollutant-degrading bacteria and provides a toolbox of catabolic genes with utility for biotechnology. PMID:18723656

  9. Gallaecimonas pentaromativorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a bacterium carrying 16S rRNA gene heterogeneity and able to degrade high-molecular-mass polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Blanco, Arturo; Vetion, Gilles; Escande, Marie-Line; Delille, Daniel; Ghiglione, Jean-François

    2010-03-01

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, halotolerant bacterium, designated strain CEE_131(T), which degraded high-molecular-mass polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of four and five rings, was isolated from intertidal sediment of Corcubion Ria in Cee, A Coruña, Spain. Direct sequencing showed ambiguities and suggested heterogeneity. Cloned 16S rRNA gene sequence PCR products yielded five different sequences varying at five positions. Strain CEE_131(T) showed rather distant relationships to its phylogenetically closest neighbours, including the genera Rheinheimera and Serratia , exhibiting 91 % sequence similarity with Rheinheimera perlucida BA131(T) and Serratia proteamaculans subsp. quinovora DSM 4597(T). The major fatty acids were C(16 : 1 )omega7c, C(16 : 0) and C(18 : 1)omega7c. The DNA G+C content was 41.7 mol%. On the basis of these distinct phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain CEE_131(T) is considered to represent a novel species in a new genus in the class Gammaproteobacteria, for which the name Gallaecimonas pentaromativorans gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CEE_131(T) (=DSM 21945(T)=CECT 7479(T)). PMID:19654338

  10. Isotopic and molecular analyses of hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids of the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, R. V.; Epstein, S.; Cronin, John R.; Pizzarello, Sandra; Yuen, George U.

    1992-01-01

    The monocarboxylic acids and hydrocarbons of the Murchison meteorite (CM2) were isolated for isotropic analysis. The nonvolatile hydrocarbons were analyzed as crude methanol and benzene-methanol extracts and also after separation by silica gel chromatography into predominantly aliphatic, aromatic, and polar hydrocarbon fractions. The volatile hydrocarbons were obtained after progressive decomposition of the meteorite matrix by freeze-thaw, hot water, and acid treatment. Molecular analyses of the aromatic hydrocarbons showed them to comprise a complex suite of compounds in which pyrene, fluoranthene, phenanthrene, and acenaphthene were the most abundant components, a result similar to earlier analyses. The polar hydrocarbons also comprise a very complex mixture in which aromatic ketones, nitrogen, and sulfur heterocycles were identified. The monocarboxylic acids, aliphatic, aromatic, and polar hydrocarbons, and the indigenous volatile hydrocarbons were found to be D-rich. The deuterium enrichment observed in these compounds is suggestive. In two separate analyses, the delta-D values of the nonvolatile hydrocarbons were observed to increase in the following order: aliphatic-aromatic-polar. This finding is consistent with an early solar system or parent body conversion of aromatic to aliphatic compounds as well as the suggestion of pyrolytic formation of aromatic from aliphatic compounds.

  11. DESTRUCTION OF HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS WITH SOLVATED ELECTRONS IN THE PRESENCE OF WATER. (R826180)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Model halogenated aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons and halogenated phenols were dehalogenated in seconds by solvated electrons generated from sodium in both anhydrous liquid ammonia and ammonia/water solutions. The minimum sodium required to completely dehalogenate these mo...

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Enterobacter cloacae Strain S1:CND1, Isolated from Crude Oil-Contaminated Soil from the Noonmati Oil Refinery, Guwahati, Assam, India

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Arghya; Chettri, Bobby; Langpoklakpam, James S.; Singh, Arvind K.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the 4.57-Mb draft genome sequence of hydrocarbon-degrading Enterobacter cloacae strain S1:CND1 isolated from oil-contaminated soil in Guwahati, India. S1:CND1 contains 4,205 coding sequences and has a G+C content of 57.45%. This is the first report of the genome sequence of an E. cloacae adapted to an oil-contaminated environment. PMID:27174279

  13. Microcosm experiments of oil degradation by microbial mats.

    PubMed

    de Oteyza, Tirso García; Grimalt, Joan O; Llirós, Marc; Esteve, Isabel

    2006-03-15

    Several microcosm experiments were run in parallel to evaluate the efficiency of microbial mats for crude oil degradation as compared with physico-chemical weathering. The oils used in the experiments constituted representative examples of those currently used for commercial purposes. One was aliphatic and of low viscosity (33.4 American Petroleum Institute degrees, degrees API) and the other was predominantly aromatic, with high sulphur content (ca. 2.7%) and viscosity (16.6 degrees API). After crude oil introduction, the microcosms were kept under cyclic changes in water level to mimic coastal tidal movements. The transformations observed showed that water weathering leads to more effective and rapid elimination of low molecular weight hydrocarbons than microbial mat metabolism, e.g. n-alkanes with chain length shorter than n-pentadecane or n-heptadecane, regular isoprenoid hydrocarbons with chain length lower than C16 or C18 or lower molecular weight naphthalenes. Microbial mats preserved these hydrocarbons from volatilization and water washing. However, hydrocarbons of lower volatility such as the C24-C30 n-alkanes or containing nitrogen atoms, e.g. carbazoles, were eliminated in higher proportion by microbial mats than by water weathering. The strong differences in composition between the two oils used for the experiments were also reflected in significant differences between water weathering and microbial mat biodegradation. Higher oil viscosity seemed to hinder the former but not the later. PMID:15935450

  14. Processes affecting the fate of monoaromatic hydrocarbons in an aquifer contaminated by crude oil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eganhouse, R.P.; Dorsey, T.F.; Phinney, C.S.; Westcott, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Crude oil spilled from a subsurface pipeline in north-central Minnesota has dissolved in the groundwater, resulting in the formation of a plume of aliphatic, aromatic, and alicyclic hydrocarbons. Comparison of paired oil and groundwater samples collected along the central axis of the residual oil body shows that the trailing edge of the oil is depleted in the more soluble aromatic hydrocarbons (e.g., benzene, toluene, etc.) when compared with the leading edge. At the same time, concentrations of monoaromatic hydrocarbons in groundwater beneath the oil increase as the water moves toward the leading edge of the oil. Immediately downgradient from the leading edge of the oil body, certain aromatic hydrocarbons (e.g., benzene) are found at concentrations near those expected of a system at equilibrium, and the concentrations exhibit little variation over time (???8-20%). Other compounds (e.g., toluene) appear to be undersaturated, and their concentrations show considerably more temporal variation (???20-130%). The former are persistent within the anoxic zone downgradient from the oil, whereas concentrations of the latter decrease rapidly. Together, these observations suggest that the volatile hydrocarbon composition of the anoxic groundwater near the oil body is controlled by a balance between dissolution and removal rates with only the most persistent compounds reaching saturation. Examination of the distributions of homologous series and isomeric assemblages of alkylbenzenes reveals that microbial degradation is the dominant process controlling the fate of these compounds once groundwater moves away from the oil. For all but the most persistent compounds, the distal boundary of the plume at the water table extends no more than 10-15 m down-gradient from the oxic/anoxic transition zone. Thus, transport of the monoaromatic hydrocarbons is limited by redox conditions that are tightly coupled to biological degradation processes.

  15. FUNGI AND HYDROCARBONS IN THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrocarbons from various sources--anthropogenic pollution, marine seeps, marine algae, atmospheric fallout and terrestrial runoff--enter the ocean daily. These complex hydrocarbon mixtures are dispersed and degraded by abiotic and biogenic processes. Most commonly, bacteria are ...

  16. Influence of vegetation on the in situ bacterial community and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degraders in aged PAH-contaminated or thermal-desorption-treated soil.

    PubMed

    Cébron, Aurélie; Beguiristain, Thierry; Faure, Pierre; Norini, Marie-Paule; Masfaraud, Jean-François; Leyval, Corinne

    2009-10-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination, bacterial community, and PAH-degrading bacteria were monitored in aged PAH-contaminated soil (Neuves-Maisons [NM] soil; with a mean of 1,915 mg of 16 PAHs.kg(-1) of soil dry weight) and in the same soil previously treated by thermal desorption (TD soil; with a mean of 106 mg of 16 PAHs.kg(-1) of soil dry weight). This study was conducted in situ for 2 years using experimental plots of the two soils. NM soil was colonized by spontaneous vegetation (NM-SV), planted with Medicago sativa (NM-Ms), or left as bare soil (NM-BS), and the TD soil was planted with Medicago sativa (TD-Ms). The bacterial community density, structure, and diversity were estimated by real-time PCR quantification of the 16S rRNA gene copy number, temporal thermal gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting, and band sequencing, respectively. The density of the bacterial community increased the first year during stabilization of the system and stayed constant in the NM soil, while it continued to increase in the TD soil during the second year. The bacterial community structure diverged among all the plot types after 2 years on site. In the NM-BS plots, the bacterial community was represented mainly by Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. The presence of vegetation (NM-SV and NM-Ms) in the NM soil favored the development of a wider range of bacterial phyla (Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Chloroflexi) that, for the most part, were not closely related to known bacterial representatives. Moreover, under the influence of the same plant, the bacterial community that developed in the TD-Ms was represented by different bacterial species (Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Actinobacteria) than that in the NM-Ms. During the 2 years of monitoring, the PAH concentration did not evolve significantly. The abundance of gram-negative (GN

  17. Influence of Vegetation on the In Situ Bacterial Community and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Degraders in Aged PAH-Contaminated or Thermal-Desorption-Treated Soil▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cébron, Aurélie; Beguiristain, Thierry; Faure, Pierre; Norini, Marie-Paule; Masfaraud, Jean-François; Leyval, Corinne

    2009-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination, bacterial community, and PAH-degrading bacteria were monitored in aged PAH-contaminated soil (Neuves-Maisons [NM] soil; with a mean of 1,915 mg of 16 PAHs·kg−1 of soil dry weight) and in the same soil previously treated by thermal desorption (TD soil; with a mean of 106 mg of 16 PAHs·kg−1 of soil dry weight). This study was conducted in situ for 2 years using experimental plots of the two soils. NM soil was colonized by spontaneous vegetation (NM-SV), planted with Medicago sativa (NM-Ms), or left as bare soil (NM-BS), and the TD soil was planted with Medicago sativa (TD-Ms). The bacterial community density, structure, and diversity were estimated by real-time PCR quantification of the 16S rRNA gene copy number, temporal thermal gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting, and band sequencing, respectively. The density of the bacterial community increased the first year during stabilization of the system and stayed constant in the NM soil, while it continued to increase in the TD soil during the second year. The bacterial community structure diverged among all the plot types after 2 years on site. In the NM-BS plots, the bacterial community was represented mainly by Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. The presence of vegetation (NM-SV and NM-Ms) in the NM soil favored the development of a wider range of bacterial phyla (Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Chloroflexi) that, for the most part, were not closely related to known bacterial representatives. Moreover, under the influence of the same plant, the bacterial community that developed in the TD-Ms was represented by different bacterial species (Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Actinobacteria) than that in the NM-Ms. During the 2 years of monitoring, the PAH concentration did not evolve significantly. The abundance of gram-negative (GN

  18. Croceicoccus naphthovorans sp. nov., a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-degrading and acylhomoserine-lactone-producing bacterium isolated from marine biofilm, and emended description of the genus Croceicoccus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yili; Zeng, Yanhua; Feng, Hao; Wu, Yuehong; Xu, Xuewei

    2015-05-01

    A polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-degrading and acylhomoserine-lactone-producing marine bacterium, designated strain PQ-2(T), was isolated from marine biofilm collected from a boat shell at a harbour of Zhoushan island in Zhejiang Province, PR China. Strain PQ-2(T) is Gram-stain-negative, yellow-pigmented, non-motile and short rod-shaped. Optimal growth of strain PQ-2(T) was observed at 32 °C, at pH 7.0 and in 2% (w/v) NaCl. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain PQ-2(T) showed highest similarity to Croceicoccus marinus E4A9(T) (96.3%) followed by Novosphingobium malaysiense MUSC 273(T) (95.6%) and Altererythrobacter marinus H32(T) (95.6%). Phylogenetic analysis with all species of the family Erythrobacteraceae with validly published names revealed that strain PQ-2(T) formed a phyletic line with Croceicoccus marinus E4A9(T) that was distinct from other members of the family Erythrobacteraceae . The sole respiratory quinone was ubiquinone 10 (Q-10). The predominant fatty acids were C18 : 1ω7c, C17 : 1ω6c and summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH). The genomic DNA G+C content was 61.7 mol%. In the polar lipid profile, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, one unidentified phospholipid and one sphingoglycolipid were the major compounds; and another sphingoglycolipid was present in a minor amount. Based on the genotypic and phenotypic data, strain PQ-2(T) represents a novel species of the genus Croceicoccus , for which the name Croceicoccus naphthovorans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PQ-2(T) ( =CGMCC 1.12805(T) =NBRC 110381(T)). In addition, emended descriptions for the genus Croceicoccus and the species C. marinus are given. PMID:25713040

  19. Aliphatic polyamines in physiology and diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramani, D; De Bandt, J P; Cynober, L

    2014-02-01

    Aliphatic polyamines are a family of polycationic molecules derived from decarboxylation of the amino acid ornithine that classically comprise three molecules: putrescine, spermidine and spermine. In-cell polyamine homeostasis is tightly controlled at key steps of cell metabolism. Polyamines are involved in an array of cellular functions from DNA stabilization, and regulation of gene expression to ion channel function and, particularly, cell proliferation. As such, aliphatic polyamines play an essential role in rapidly dividing cells such as in the immune system and digestive tract. Because of their role in cell proliferation, polyamines are also involved in carcinogenesis, prompting intensive research into polyamine metabolism as a target in cancer therapy. More recently, another aliphatic polyamine, agmatine, the decarboxylated derivative of arginine, has been identified as a neurotransmitter in mammals, and investigations have focused on its effects in the CNS, notably as a neuroprotector in brain injury. PMID:24144912

  20. Aliphatic amines in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jungclaus, G.; Cronin, J. R.; Moore, C. B.; Yuen, G. U.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reports on the determination of aliphatic amines in water extracts of the Murchison meteorite. The amines were analyzed by gas chromatography both as the free amines and as 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP) derivatives. The results give evidence for the presence of all of the possible primary aliphatic monoamines (eight) with fewer than five carbon atoms. Two of the seven possible secondary or tertiary aliphatic monoamines were identified. The identified primary amines total 80 nmol per g meteorite, and seem to be chemically or physically trapped in the meteorite. Similarities between the water-extractable amines and amino acids suggest that (1) a simple carbon compound, methane, for example, is the precursor of meteorite amines and amino acids, and (2) both amines and amino acids are extracted from the meteorite both as such and in the form of acid-hydrolyzable derivative or precursor species.

  1. Carbon isotope systematics of individual hydrocarbons in hydrothermal petroleum from Escanaba Trough, Northeastern Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoneit, B.R.T.; Schoell, M.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    We submitted individual aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in samples of hydrothermal petroleum from Escanaba trough to compound specific isotope analysis to trace their origins. The carbon isotope compositions of the alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (means -27.5 and -24.7%, respectively) reflect a primarily terrestrial organic matter source.We submitted individual aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in samples of hydrothermal petroleum from Escanaba Trough to compound specific isotope analysis to trace their origins. The carbon isotope compositions of the alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (means -27.5 and -24.7 per mill, respectively) reflect a primarily terrestrial organic matter source.

  2. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments.

    PubMed

    Martins, Luiz Fernando; Peixoto, Raquel Silva

    2012-07-01

    Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review. PMID:24031900

  3. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Luiz Fernando; Peixoto, Raquel Silva

    2012-01-01

    Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review. PMID:24031900

  4. Chlorinated aliphatic and aromatic VOC decomposition in air mixture by using electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, A. G.; Sun, Yong-Xia; Bułka, S.; Zimek, Z.

    2004-09-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, which are emitted from coal power station and waste incinerators, are very harmful to the environment and human health. Recent studies show that chlorinated aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons are suspected to be the precursors of dioxin's formation. Dioxin's emission into atmosphere will cause severe environmental problems by ecology contamination. l,4-dichlorobenzene(l,4-DCB) and cis-dichloroethylene( cis-DCE) were chosen as representative chlorinated aromatic and aliphatic compounds, respectively. Their decomposition was investigated by electron beam irradiation. The experiments were carried out "in batch" system. It is found that over 97% cis-DCE is decomposed having an initial concentration of 661 ppm. G-values of cis-DCE decomposition vary from 10 to 28 (molecules/100 eV) for initial concentration of 270-1530 ppm cis-DCE. The decomposition is mainly caused by secondary electron attachment and Cl addition reactions. Comparing with cis-DCE, 1,4-DCB decomposition needs higher absorbed dose. G-value of 1,4-DCB is below 4 molecules/100 eV.

  5. MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The responses to Prudhoe Bay oil of the microbial populations present in water column, beach and sediment samples representative of the diverse marine shoreline environments found in the northern Puget Sound and Juan de Fuca areas were investigated under laboratory conditions. Al...

  6. Harboring oil-degrading bacteria: a potential mechanism of adaptation and survival in corals inhabiting oil-contaminated reefs.

    PubMed

    Al-Dahash, Lulwa M; Mahmoud, Huda M

    2013-07-30

    Certain coral reef systems north of the Arabian Gulf are characterized by corals with a unique ability to thrive and flourish despite the presence of crude oil continuously seeping from natural cracks in the seabed. Harboring oil-degrading bacteria as a part of the holobiont has been investigated as a potential mechanism of adaptation and survival for corals in such systems. The use of conventional and molecular techniques verified a predominance of bacteria affiliated with Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes in the mucus and tissues of Acropora clathrata and Porites compressa. These bacteria were capable of degrading a wide range of aliphatic (C9-C28) aromatic hydrocarbons (Phenanthrene, Biphenyl, Naphthalene) and crude oil. In addition, microcosms supplied with coral samples and various concentrations of crude oil shifted their bacterial population toward the more advantageous types of oil degraders as oil concentrations increased. PMID:23014479

  7. Quantification of sequential chlorinated ethene degradation by use of a reactive transport model incorporating isotope fractionation.

    PubMed

    Van Breukelen, Boris M; Hunkeler, Daniel; Volkering, Frank

    2005-06-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) enables quantification of biodegradation by use of the Rayleigh equation. The Rayleigh equation fails, however, to describe the sequential degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) involving various intermediates that are controlled by simultaneous degradation and production. This paper shows how isotope fractionation during sequential degradation can be simulated in a 1D reactive transport code (PHREEQC-2). 12C and 13C isotopes of each CAH were simulated as separate species, and the ratio of the rate constants of the heavy to light isotope equaled the kinetic isotope fractionation factor for each degradation step. The developed multistep isotope fractionation reactive transport model (IF-RTM) adequately simulated reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene (PCE) to ethene in a microcosm experiment. Transport scenarios were performed to evaluate the effect of sorption and of different degradation rate constant ratios among CAH species on the downgradient isotope evolution. The power of the model to quantify degradation is illustrated for situations where mixed sources degrade and for situations where daughter products are removed by oxidative processes. Finally, the model was used to interpret the occurrence of reductive dechlorination at a field site. The developed methodology can easily be incorporated in 3D solute transport models to enable quantification of sequential CAH degradation in the field by CSIA. PMID:15984799

  8. Hydrocarbon components in carbonaceous meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissin, Y. V.

    2003-05-01

    Currently, the presence of free n-alkanes and isoprenoid alkanes in carbonaceous meteorites is usually explained either by microbial contamination during the period between the meteorite fall and collection or by contamination from the environment of analytical laboratories and museums. The goal of this research was to repeat analysis of hydrocarbon components in meteorites and to investigate possible meteorite contamination routes discussed in the literature. Experimental analysis of free organic constituents in five carbonaceous meteorites by infrared spectroscopy (IR) and gas chromatographic (GC) methods confirmed the presence of extractable aliphatic components, n-alkanes in the C 15H 32-C 27H 56 range and isoprenoid alkanes (phytane, pristane, and norpristane), in some of these meteorites. The contents of these compounds vary depending on the source. Insoluble organic components of two meteorites (meteorite kerogens) were isolated, and their composition was analyzed by IR and cracking/GC methods. Comparison with the data on several terrestrial contamination sources proposed in the literature shows that the presence of free saturated hydrocarbons in meteorites and the composition of the meteorite kerogen could not be explained either by microbial contamination or by contamination from the laboratory environment. The types of the hydrocarbons in meteorites resemble those typical of ancient terrestrial deposits of organic-rich sediments, except for the absence of lighter hydrocarbons, which apparently slowly evaporated in space, and multi-ring naphthenic compounds of the biologic origin, steranes, terpanes, etc. The prevailing current explanation for the presence of free linear saturated hydrocarbons in carbonaceous meteorites, apart from contamination, is the abiotic route from hydrogen and carbon monoxide. However, the data on the structure of meteorite kerogens require a search for different routes that initially produce complex polymeric structures containing

  9. Fate of microbial metabolites of hydrocarbons in a coastal plain aquifer: The role of electron acceptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, I.M.; Herman, J.S.; Baedecker, M. Jo

    1995-01-01

    A combined field and laboratory study was undertaken to understand the distribution and geochemical conditions that influence the prevalence of low molecular weight organic acids in groundwater of a shallow aquifer contaminated with gasoline. Aromatic hydrocarbons from gasoline were degraded by microbially mediated oxidation-reduction reactions, including reduction of nitrate, sulfate, and Fe(III). The biogeochemical reactions changed overtime in response to changes in the hydrogeochemical conditions in the aquifer. Aliphatic and aromatic organic acids were associated with hydrocarbon degradation in anoxic zones of the aquifer. Laboratory microcosms demonstrated that the biogeochemical fate of specific organic acids observed in groundwater varied with the structure of the acid and the availability of electron acceptors. Benzoic and phenylacetic acid were degraded by indigenous aquifer microorganisms when nitrate was supplied as an electron acceptor. Aromatic acids with two or more methyl substituants on the benzene ring persisted under nitrate-reducing conditions. Although iron reduction and sulfate reduction were important processes in situ and occurred in the microcosms, these reactions were not coupled to the biological oxidation of aromatic organic acids that were added to the microcosms as electron donors. ?? 1995 American Chemical Society.

  10. 40 CFR 721.10534 - Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10534 Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... aliphatic alcohol (PMN P-12-260) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10534 - Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10534 Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... aliphatic alcohol (PMN P-12-260) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  12. 40 CFR 721.3520 - Aliphatic polyglycidyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aliphatic polyglycidyl ether. 721.3520... Substances § 721.3520 Aliphatic polyglycidyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance aliphatic polyglycidyl ether (PMN P-89-1036) is subject...

  13. 40 CFR 721.3520 - Aliphatic polyglycidyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aliphatic polyglycidyl ether. 721.3520... Substances § 721.3520 Aliphatic polyglycidyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance aliphatic polyglycidyl ether (PMN P-89-1036) is subject...

  14. 40 CFR 721.2270 - Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt. 721... Substances § 721.2270 Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aliphatic dicarboxylic...

  15. 40 CFR 721.2270 - Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt. 721... Substances § 721.2270 Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aliphatic dicarboxylic...

  16. 40 CFR 721.2270 - Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt. 721... Substances § 721.2270 Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aliphatic dicarboxylic...

  17. 40 CFR 721.2270 - Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt. 721... Substances § 721.2270 Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aliphatic dicarboxylic...

  18. 40 CFR 721.6140 - Dialkyldithiophosphoric acid, aliphatic amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., aliphatic amine salt. 721.6140 Section 721.6140 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6140 Dialkyldithiophosphoric acid, aliphatic amine salt. (a) Chemical... as a dialkyldithiophosphoric acid, aliphatic amine salt (P-90-1839) is subject to reporting...

  19. 40 CFR 721.6140 - Dialkyldithiophosphoric acid, aliphatic amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., aliphatic amine salt. 721.6140 Section 721.6140 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6140 Dialkyldithiophosphoric acid, aliphatic amine salt. (a) Chemical... as a dialkyldithiophosphoric acid, aliphatic amine salt (P-90-1839) is subject to reporting...

  20. 40 CFR 721.6140 - Dialkyldithiophosphoric acid, aliphatic amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., aliphatic amine salt. 721.6140 Section 721.6140 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6140 Dialkyldithiophosphoric acid, aliphatic amine salt. (a) Chemical... as a dialkyldithiophosphoric acid, aliphatic amine salt (P-90-1839) is subject to reporting...

  1. 40 CFR 721.6140 - Dialkyldithiophosphoric acid, aliphatic amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., aliphatic amine salt. 721.6140 Section 721.6140 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6140 Dialkyldithiophosphoric acid, aliphatic amine salt. (a) Chemical... as a dialkyldithiophosphoric acid, aliphatic amine salt (P-90-1839) is subject to reporting...

  2. 40 CFR 721.6140 - Dialkyldithiophosphoric acid, aliphatic amine salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., aliphatic amine salt. 721.6140 Section 721.6140 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6140 Dialkyldithiophosphoric acid, aliphatic amine salt. (a) Chemical... as a dialkyldithiophosphoric acid, aliphatic amine salt (P-90-1839) is subject to reporting...

  3. Celeribacter indicus sp. nov., a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium from deep-sea sediment and reclassification of Huaishuia halophila as Celeribacter halophilus comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Lai, Qiliang; Cao, Junwei; Yuan, Jun; Li, Fuying; Shao, Zongze

    2014-12-01

    A taxonomic study was carried out on strain P73(T), which was isolated from deep-sea sediment of the Indian Ocean by enrichment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The strain was able to degrade biphenyl, naphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene, acenaphthene, anthracene, phenanthrene, dibenzothiophene, dibenzofuran, fluorene, 4-methyldibenzothiophene and fluoranthene, but not pyrene or chrysene. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain P73(T) formed a clade with the genera Celeribacter and Huaishuia within the family Rhodobacteraceae, with highest sequence similarity of 96.98 % to Celeribacter neptunius H 14(T), followed by Huaishuia halophila ZXM137(T) (96.42 %). The bacterium was Gram-stain-negative, oxidase- and catalase-positive, rod-shaped and non-motile. Growth was observed at salinities from 0.5 to 12 % and at temperatures from 10 to 41 °C. The principal fatty acids (>10 %) of strain P73(T) were summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c/ω6c) and C19 : 0ω8c cyclo. The sole respiratory quinone was Q-10. The major lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, one unknown aminolipid, one unknown phospholipid and one unknown lipid; a second unknown phospholipid and one unknown glycolipid were present as minor components. The G+C content of the chromosomal DNA was 66.0 mol%. The combined genotypic and phenotypic data show that strain P73(T) represents a novel species of the genus Celeribacter, for which the name Celeribacter indicus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is P73(T) ( = MCCC 1A01112(T) = LMG 27600(T) = DSM 27257(T)). Phylogenetic study and existing phenotypic information also show that Huaishuia halophila should be transferred to the genus Celeribacter as Celeribacter halophilus comb. nov. (type strain ZXM137(T) = MCCC 1A06432(T) = CGMCC 1.8891(T) = LMG 24854(T)). PMID:25256706

  4. In-situ micro-FTIR Study of Thermal Changes of Organics in Tagish Lake Meteorite: Behavior of Aliphatic Oxygenated Functions and Effects of Minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kebukawa, Yoko; Nakashima, Satoru; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    Systematic in-situ FTIR heating experiments of Tagish Lake meteorite grains have been performed in order to study thermal stability of chondritic organics. Some aliphatic model organic substances have also been used to elucidate effects of hydrous phyllosilicate minerals on the thermal stability of organics. The experimental results indicated that organic matter in the Tagish Lake meteorite might contain oxygenated aliphatic hydrocarbons which are thermally stable carbonyls such as ester and/or C=O in ring compounds. The presence of hydrous phyllosilicate minerals has a pronounced effect on the increase of the thermal stability of aliphatic and oxygenated functions. These oxygenated aliphatic organics in Tagish Lake can be formed during the aqueous alteration in the parent body and the formation temperature condition might be less than 200 C, based especially on the thermal stability of C-O components. The hydrous phyllosilicates might provide sites for organic globule formation and protected some organic decomposition

  5. Remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated sites by DNA diagnosis-based bioslurping technology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungjin; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa; Kim, Jong-Oh; Chung, Jinwook

    2014-11-01

    The application of effective remediation technologies can benefit from adequate preliminary testing, such as in lab-scale and Pilot-scale systems. Bioremediation technologies have demonstrated tremendous potential with regards to cost, but they cannot be used for all contaminated sites due to limitations in biological activity. The purpose of this study was to develop a DNA diagnostic method that reduces the time to select contaminated sites that are good candidates for bioremediation. We applied an oligonucleotide microarray method to detect and monitor genes that lead to aliphatic and aromatic degradation. Further, the bioremediation of a contaminated site, selected based on the results of the genetic diagnostic method, was achieved successfully by applying bioslurping in field tests. This gene-based diagnostic technique is a powerful tool to evaluate the potential for bioremediation in petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil. PMID:25129160

  6. Renaissance of Aliphatic Polycarbonates: New Techniques and Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianwen; Feng, Ellva; Song, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Aliphatic polycarbonates were discovered a long time ago, with their conventional applications mostly limited to low molecular weight oligomeric intermediates for copolymerization with other polymers. Recent developments in polymerization techniques have overcome the difficulty in preparing high molecular weight aliphatic polycarbonates. These in turn, along with new functional monomers, have enabled the preparation of a wide range of aliphatic polycarbonates with diverse chemical compositions and structures. This review summarizes the latest polymerization techniques for preparing well-defined functional aliphatic polycarbonates, as well as the new applications of those aliphatic polycarbonates, esecially in the biomedical field. PMID:24994939

  7. Photolysis of aryl chlorides with aliphatic amines

    SciTech Connect

    Bunce, N.J.

    1982-05-07

    Kinetic arguments show that the aliphatic amine assisted photodechlorinations of chlorides of the benzene, naphthalene, and biphenyl series take place mainly from the triplet excited state. Deuterium labeling studies have been used to determine the origin of the hydrogen atom which replaces chlorine when 4-chlorobiphenyl is photoreduced. Three pathways are inferred: hydrogen abstraction from the solvent and protonation both within the exciplex (or radical ion pair) and by external proton donors.

  8. Individual biotransformation rates in chlorinated aliphatic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, J.B.; Parkin, G.F.

    1996-02-01

    Anaerobic biotransformation of chlorinated aliphatics has been widely studied over the past decade, and anaerobic bioremediation is considered a promising technique for restoration of contaminated aquifers. Studies using batch cultures and continuously fed attached-growth systems investigated the effect of mixtures of chlorinated aliphatics on the anaerobic biotransformation rates of individual components of the mixture. Dichloromethane (DCM), chloroform (CF), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) were selected for study because of their frequent detection in groundwater. Biotransformation of CF and TCA occurred in all systems. When CF and TCA were fed together, transformation rates for both aliphatics were lower than when fed individually. DCM generally had minor to negligible effects on the transformation of CF and TCA, but in one case, it caused a slight but statistically significant decrease in TCA transformation (p = 0.05). DCM transformation was not observed when fed individually or in mixtures to batch resting cultures, so the effect of CF and TCA on DCM transformation could not be determined.

  9. A study of hydrocarbons associated with brines from DOE geopressured wells

    SciTech Connect

    Keeley, D.F.

    1993-01-01

    Accomplishments are summarized on the following tasks: distribution coefficients and solubilities, DOE design well sampling, analysis of well samples, review of theoretical models of geopressured reservoir hydrocarbons, monitor for aliphatic hydrocarbons, development of a ph meter probe, DOE design well scrubber analysis, removal and disposition of gas scrubber equipment at Pleasant Bayou Well, and disposition of archived brines.

  10. Amine neutralized alkenylsuccinic anhydride propylene glycol adducts as corrosion inhibitors for hydrocarbon fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, G.R.

    1989-10-17

    This patent describes a corrosion inhibitor composition for hydrocarbon fuels from the group consisting of gasolines and diesel fuel oils. It comprises: a C{sub 10}-C{sub 24} alkenyl succinic anhydride esterified with between 0.5-1.5 moles of a water-soluble glycol and then neutralized with an aliphatic hydrocarbon amine.

  11. A study of hydrocarbons associated with brines from DOE geopressured wells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Keeley, D.F.

    1993-07-01

    Accomplishments are summarized on the following tasks: distribution coefficients and solubilities, DOE design well sampling, analysis of well samples, review of theoretical models of geopressured reservoir hydrocarbons, monitor for aliphatic hydrocarbons, development of a ph meter probe, DOE design well scrubber analysis, removal and disposition of gas scrubber equipment at Pleasant Bayou Well, and disposition of archived brines.

  12. Carbon isotope systematics of individual hydrocarbons in hydrothermal petroleum from Escanaba Trough, northeastern Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Simoneit, B R; Schoell, M; Kvenvolden, K A

    1997-01-01

    We submitted individual aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in samples of hydrothermal petroleum from Escanaba Trough to compound specific isotope analysis to trace their origins. The carbon isotope compositions of the alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (means -27.5 and -24.7%, respectively) reflect a primarily terrestrial organic matter source. PMID:11541391

  13. PRODUCTION OF FLUORINE-CONTAINING HYDROCARBON

    DOEpatents

    Sarsfield, N.F.

    1949-08-01

    This patent relates to improvements in the production of fluorine- containing hydrocarbon derivatives. The process for increasing the degree of fluorination of a fluorochlorohydrocarbon comprises subjecting a highly fluorinated fluorochlorohydrocarbon to the action of a dehydrochlorinating agent, and treating the resulting unsaturated body with fluorine, cobalt trifluoride, or silver difluoride. A number of reagents are known as dehydrochlorinaling agents, including, for example, the caustic alkalies, either in an anhydrous condition or dissolved in water or a lower aliphatic alcohol.

  14. Encephalopathy and vestibulopathy following short-term hydrocarbon exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, M.J.; Furman, J.; Ryan, C.; Durrant, J.; Kern, E.

    1989-01-01

    Dizziness, headaches, and weakness occurred among three men after short-term hydrocarbon exposure during improper welding procedures in a closed container. Symptoms were related to objective evidence of vestibular and cognitive dysfunction. Symptoms and abnormal test results persisted for 6 to 18 months. Simulation of the accident failed to demonstrate likely exposures except aliphatic hydrocarbons, well within the permissible exposure levels. Short-term exposures to neurotoxins may lead to long-term central nervous system abnormalities.

  15. Enhancement of hydrocarbon waste biodegradation by addition of a biosurfactant from Bacillus subtilis O9.

    PubMed

    Morán, A C; Olivera, N; Commendatore, M; Esteves, J L; Siñeriz, F

    2000-01-01

    A non-sterile biosurfactant preparation (surfactin) was obtained from a 24-h culture of Bacillus subtilis O9 grown on sucrose and used to study its effect on the biodegradation of hydrocarbon wastes by an indigenous microbial community at the Erlenmeyer-flask scale. Crude biosurfactant was added to the cultures to obtain concentrations above and below the critical micelle concentration (CMC). Lower concentration affected neither biodegradation nor microbial growth. Higher concentration gave higher cell concentrations. Biodegradation of aliphatic hydrocarbons increased from 20.9 to 35.5% and in the case of aromatic hydrocarbons from nil to 41%, compared to the culture without biosurfactant. The enhancement effect of biosurfactant addition was more noticeable in the case of long chain alkanes. Pristane and phytane isoprenoids were degraded to the same extent as n-C17 and n-C18 alkanes and, consequently, no decrease in the ratios n-C17/pri and n-C18/phy was observed. Rapid production of surfactin crude preparation could make it practical for bioremediation of ship bilge wastes. PMID:11194975

  16. BIOTIGER, A NATURAL MICROBIAL PRODUCT FOR ENHANCED HYDROCARBON RECOVERY FROM OIL SANDS.

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Whitney Jones, W; Charles Milliken, C

    2008-05-27

    BioTiger{trademark} is a unique microbial consortia that resulted from over 8 years of extensive microbiology screening and characterization of samples collected from a century-old Polish waste lagoon. BioTiger{trademark} shows rapid and complete degradation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, produces novel surfactants, is tolerant of both chemical and metal toxicity and shows good activity at temperature and pH extremes. Although originally developed and used by the U.S. Department of Energy for bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils, recent efforts have proven that BioTiger{trademark} can also be used to increase hydrocarbon recovery from oil sands. This enhanced ex situ oil recovery process utilizes BioTiger{trademark} to optimize bitumen separation. A floatation test protocol with oil sands from Ft. McMurray, Canada was used for the BioTiger{trademark} evaluation. A comparison of hot water extraction/floatation test of the oil sands performed with BioTiger{trademark} demonstrated a 50% improvement in separation as measured by gravimetric analysis in 4 h and a five-fold increase at 25 hr. Since BioTiger{trademark} performs well at high temperatures and process engineering can enhance and sustain metabolic activity, it can be applied to enhance recovery of hydrocarbons from oil sands or other complex recalcitrant matrices.

  17. Hydrocarbon soluble polymer complexes useful as viscosifiers in fracturing operations

    SciTech Connect

    Sedillo, L.P.; Newlove, J.C.; Peiffer, D.G.; Lundberg, R.D.

    1986-10-07

    A process is described for fracturing a subterranean formation surrounding a gas or oil well which comprises injecting into the subterranean formation under hydraulic pressure a fluid comprising about 0.01 to about 25 weight percent of a water insoluble polymer complex dissolved in a solvent system comprising a nonpolar organic liquid. The polymer complex comprises the interaction product of a metal neutralized sulfonated polymer and an amine containing polymer. The sulfonate content of the sulfonated polymer is about 4 meq. per 100 grams of polymer to about 100 meq. per 100 gram of polymer and the basic nitrogen content of the amine containing polymer is about 4 meq. per 100 gram of polymer to about 500 meq. per 100 gram of polymer. The organic liquid is selected from the group consisting of paraffinic hydrocarbons, naphthenic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, ketones, chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons, cyclic aliphatic ethers, aliphatic ethers and organic aliphatic esters and mixtures thereof. The amine containing polymer is a copolymer of vinyl-pyridine with other vinyl monomers which are selected from the group consisting of acrylates, methacrylates, alkyl acrylates, alkyl methacrylates, N-alkylacrylamide and N-alkylmethacrylamides and mixtures thereof, the acrylates or methacrylates, etc. having from about 6 to about 26 carbon atoms.

  18. PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS IN SEDIMENTS OF SAGINAW BAY, LAKE HURON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The history of petroleum contamination of Saginaw Bay is given by a 60 cm core recording sediment accumulation over the last two centuries. Aliphatic hydrocarbon concentrations average 385 micrograms/gm in modern sediments and progressively decrease from 10 cm to 40 cm in the cor...

  19. Hydrocarbons on Phoebe, Iapetus, and Hyperion: Quantitative Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; MoreauDalleOre, Cristina; Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Clark, Roger Nelson

    2012-01-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of the hydrocarbon spectral bands measured on three of Saturn's satellites, Phoebe, Iaperus, and Hyperion. These bands, measured with the Cassini Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on close fly-by's of these satellites, are the C-H stretching modes of aromatic hydrocarbons at approximately 3.28 micrometers (approximately 3050 per centimeter), and the are four blended bands of aliphatic -CH2- and -CH3 in the range approximately 3.36-3.52 micrometers (approximately 2980- 2840 per centimeter) bably indicating the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), is unusually strong in comparison to the aliphatic bands, resulting in a unique signarure among Solar System bodies measured so far, and as such offers a means of comparison among the three satellites. The ratio of the C-H bands in aromatic molecules to those in aliphatic molecules in the surface materials of Phoebe, NAro:NAliph approximately 24; for Hyperion the value is approximately 12, while laperus shows an intermediate value. In view of the trend of the evolution (dehydrogenation by heat and radiation) of aliphatic complexes toward more compact molecules and eventually to aromatics, the relative abundances of aliphatic -CH2- and -CH3- is an indication of the lengths of the molecular chain structures, hence the degree of modification of the original material. We derive CH2:CH3 approximately 2.2 in the spectrum of low-albedo material on laperus; this value is the same within measurement errors to the ratio in the diffuse interstellar medium. The similarity in the spectral signatures of the three satellites, plus the apparent weak trend of aromatic/aliphatic abundance from Phoebe to Hyperion, is consistent with, and effectively confirms that the source of the hydrocarbon-bearing material is Phoebe, and that the appearance of that material on the other two satellites arises from the deposition of the inward-spiraling dust that populates the Phoebe ring.

  20. Hydrocarbons preserved in a ~2.7 Ga outcrop sample from the Fortescue Group, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Y; Flannery, D T; Walter, M R; George, S C

    2015-03-01

    The hydrocarbons preserved in an Archean rock were extracted, and their composition and distribution in consecutive slices from the outside to the inside of the rock were examined. The 2.7 Ga rock was collected from the Fortescue Group in the Pilbara region, Western Australia. The bitumen I (solvent-extracted rock) and bitumen II (solvent-extracted hydrochloric acid-treated rock) fractions have different hydrocarbon compositions. Bitumen I contains only trace amounts of aliphatic hydrocarbons and virtually no aromatic hydrocarbons. In contrast, bitumen II contains abundant aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. The difference seems to reflect the weathering history and preservational environment of the investigated rock. Aliphatic hydrocarbons in bitumen I are considered to be mainly from later hydrocarbon inputs, after initial deposition and burial, and are therefore not indigenous. The lack of aromatic hydrocarbons in bitumen I suggests a severe weathering environment since uplift and exposure of the rock at the Earth's surface in the Cenozoic. On the other hand, the high abundance of aromatic hydrocarbons in bitumen II suggests that bitumen II hydrocarbons have been physically isolated from removal by their encapsulation within carbonate minerals. The richness of aromatic hydrocarbons and the relative scarcity of aliphatic hydrocarbons may reflect the original compositions of organic materials biosynthesised in ancient organisms in the Archean era, or the high thermal maturity of the rock. Cyanobacterial biomarkers were observed in the surficial slices of the rock, which may indicate that endolithic cyanobacteria inhabited the surface outcrop. The distribution of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons implies a high thermal maturity, which is consistent with the lack of any specific biomarkers, such as hopanes and steranes, and the prehnite-pumpellyite facies metamorphic grade. PMID:25393450

  1. Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process for in situ destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbon and fuel hydrocarbon contaminants in water and soil

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Copenhaver, Sally C.; Aines, Roger D.

    2000-01-01

    In situ hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process is useful for in situ degradation of hydrocarbon water and soil contaminants. Fuel hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum distillates and other organic contaminants present in the soil and water are degraded by the process involving hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation into non-toxic products of the degradation. The process uses heat which is distributed through soils and water, optionally combined with oxygen and/or hydrocarbon degradation catalysts, and is particularly useful for remediation of solvent, fuel or other industrially contaminated sites.

  2. Biodegradation rate enhancement of hydrocarbons by an oleophilic fertilizer and a rhamnolipid biosurfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, S.A.; Griffin, R.A.; Jones, L.P.; Churchill, P.F.

    1995-01-01

    The oleophilic fertilizer Inipol EAP 22 and a microbial biosurfactant (rhamnotipid) were investigated for their ability to increase the rate of biodegradation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons by pure bacterial cultures. Both Inipol EAP 22 and rhamnolipid were found to lower the surface tension of a phosphate buffered solution to 32 mN m{sup -1}. Each surfactant dramatically increased the apparent aqueous solubility of solid 2-methylnaphthalene, and were capable of emulsifying liquid hydrocarbons. Biodegradation experiments were carried out with the TOL plasmid-containing strain, Pseudomonas putida (ATCC30015); the OCT plasmid-containing strain, P. oleovorans (ATCC29347); and an unknown naphthalene-degrading strain (ATCC15075). Cells were grown under conditions where biodegradative enzymes were induced before their utilization. Model studies were conducted to investigate the ability of Inipol EAP 22 and rhamnolipid to enhance the rate of transport and uptake of hydrocarbons into bacterial cells, and to assess the impact that increasing the apparent aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons has on their rate of biodegradation. The extent of rate enhancement of compound mineralization resulting from surfactant addition was significantly greater for the sparingly soluble alkanes, hexadecane and octadecane, than for the more soluble aromatics, toluene and 2-methylnaphthalene. The results suggest that increasing the bioavailability of hydrocarbons to bacteria may be a useful method to accelerate the rate of biodegradation at contaminated sites. Lastly, the data supports the hypothesis that surface-active components present in the oleophilic fertilizer formulation, Inipol EAP 22, may have significantly contributed to the positive results reported in tests of remedial agent impact on bioremediation, which was used as a supplemental cleanup technology on Exxon Valdez crude oil contaminated Alaskan beaches. 27 ref., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Genome Sequence of Polycyclovorans algicola Strain TG408, an Obligate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Associated with Marine Eukaryotic Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Thompson, Haydn F; Angelova, Angelina; Whitman, William B; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclovorans algicola strain TG408 is a recently discovered bacterium associated with marine eukaryotic phytoplankton and exhibits the ability to utilize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) almost exclusively as sole sources of carbon and energy. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 3,653,213 bp, with 3,477 genes and an average G+C content of 63.8%. PMID:25814607

  4. Genome Sequence of Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus Strain MCTG13d, an Obligate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Associated with Marine Eukaryotic Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Whitman, William B; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus strain MCTG13d is a recently discovered bacterium that is associated with marine eukaryotic phytoplankton and that almost exclusively utilizes polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the sole source of carbon and energy. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 2,474,654 bp with 2,385 genes and has an average G+C content of 53.1%. PMID:26089431

  5. Genome Sequence of Polycyclovorans algicola Strain TG408, an Obligate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Associated with Marine Eukaryotic Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Haydn F.; Angelova, Angelina; Whitman, William B.; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N.; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclovorans algicola strain TG408 is a recently discovered bacterium associated with marine eukaryotic phytoplankton and exhibits the ability to utilize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) almost exclusively as sole sources of carbon and energy. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 3,653,213 bp, with 3,477 genes and an average G+C content of 63.8%. PMID:25814607

  6. Biodegradation of Aliphatic-Aromatic Copolyesters by Thermomonospora fusca and Other Thermophilic Compost Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Kleeberg, Ilona; Hetz, Claudia; Kroppenstedt, Reiner Michael; Müller, Rolf-Joachim; Deckwer, Wolf-Dieter

    1998-01-01

    Random aliphatic-aromatic copolyesters synthesized from 1,4-butanediol, adipic acid, and terephthalic acid (BTA) have excellent thermal and mechanical properties and are biodegradable by mixed cultures (e.g., in compost). Over 20 BTA-degrading strains were isolated by using compost as a microbial source. Among these microorganisms, thermophilic actinomycetes obviously play an outstanding role and appear to dominate the initial degradation step. Two actinomycete strains exhibited about 20-fold higher BTA degradation rates than usually observed in a common compost test. These isolates were identified as Thermomonospora fusca strains. They appeared to be particularly suitable for establishment of rapid degradation tests and were used in comparative studies on the biodegradation of various polyesters. PMID:9572944

  7. Mixed aromatic-aliphatic organic nanoparticles as carriers of unidentified infrared emission features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Sun; Zhang, Yong

    2011-11-01

    Unidentified infrared emission bands at wavelengths of 3-20 micrometres are widely observed in a range of environments in our Galaxy and in others. Some features have been identified as the stretching and bending modes of aromatic compounds, and are commonly attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules. The central argument supporting this attribution is that single-photon excitation of the molecule can account for the unidentified infrared emission features observed in `cirrus' clouds in the diffuse interstellar medium. Of the more than 160 molecules identified in the circumstellar and interstellar environments, however, not one is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecule. The detections of discrete and broad aliphatic spectral features suggest that the carrier of the unidentified infrared emission features cannot be a pure aromatic compound. Here we report an analysis of archival spectroscopic observations and demonstrate that the data are most consistent with the carriers being amorphous organic solids with a mixed aromatic-aliphatic structure. This structure is similar to that of the organic materials found in meteorites, as would be expected if the Solar System had inherited these organic materials from interstellar sources.

  8. Mixed aromatic-aliphatic organic nanoparticles as carriers of unidentified infrared emission features.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Sun; Zhang, Yong

    2011-11-01

    Unidentified infrared emission bands at wavelengths of 3-20 micrometres are widely observed in a range of environments in our Galaxy and in others. Some features have been identified as the stretching and bending modes of aromatic compounds, and are commonly attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules. The central argument supporting this attribution is that single-photon excitation of the molecule can account for the unidentified infrared emission features observed in 'cirrus' clouds in the diffuse interstellar medium. Of the more than 160 molecules identified in the circumstellar and interstellar environments, however, not one is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecule. The detections of discrete and broad aliphatic spectral features suggest that the carrier of the unidentified infrared emission features cannot be a pure aromatic compound. Here we report an analysis of archival spectroscopic observations and demonstrate that the data are most consistent with the carriers being amorphous organic solids with a mixed aromatic-aliphatic structure. This structure is similar to that of the organic materials found in meteorites, as would be expected if the Solar System had inherited these organic materials from interstellar sources. PMID:22031328

  9. Identification of a Novel Metabolite in the Degradation of Pyrene by Mycobacterium sp. Strain AP1: Actions of the Isolate on Two- and Three-Ring Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Joaquim; López, Zaira; Sabaté, Jordi; Minguillón, Cristina; Solanas, Anna M.; Grifoll, Magdalena

    2001-01-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain AP1 grew with pyrene as a sole source of carbon and energy. The identification of metabolites accumulating during growth suggests that this strain initiates its attack on pyrene by either monooxygenation or dioxygenation at its C-4, C-5 positions to give trans- or cis-4,5-dihydroxy-4,5-dihydropyrene, respectively. Dehydrogenation of the latter, ortho cleavage of the resulting diol to form phenanthrene 4,5-dicarboxylic acid, and subsequent decarboxylation to phenanthrene 4-carboxylic acid lead to degradation of the phenanthrene 4-carboxylic acid via phthalate. A novel metabolite identified as 6,6′-dihydroxy-2,2′-biphenyl dicarboxylic acid demonstrates a new branch in the pathway that involves the cleavage of both central rings of pyrene. In addition to pyrene, strain AP1 utilized hexadecane, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene for growth. Pyrene-grown cells oxidized the methylenic groups of fluorene and acenaphthene and catalyzed the dihydroxylation and ortho cleavage of one of the rings of naphthalene and phenanthrene to give 2-carboxycinnamic and diphenic acids, respectively. The catabolic versatility of strain AP1 and its use of ortho cleavage mechanisms during the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) give new insight into the role that pyrene-degrading bacterial strains may play in the environmental fate of PAH mixtures. PMID:11722898

  10. Biodegradation Ability and Catabolic Genes of Petroleum-Degrading Sphingomonas koreensis Strain ASU-06 Isolated from Egyptian Oily Soil

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, Yasser M.; Shoreit, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are serious pollutants and health hazards. In this study, 15 PAHs-degrading bacteria were isolated from Egyptian oily soil. Among them, one Gram-negative strain (ASU-06) was selected and biodegradation ability and initial catabolic genes of petroleum compounds were investigated. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain ASU-06 to published sequences in GenBank database as well as phylogenetic analysis identified ASU-06 as Sphingomonas koreensis. Strain ASU-06 degraded 100, 99, 98, and 92.7% of 100 mg/L naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, and pyrene within 15 days, respectively. When these PAHs present in a mixed form, the enhancement phenomenon appeared, particularly in the degradation of pyrene, whereas the degradation rate was 98.6% within the period. This is the first report showing the degradation of different PAHs by this species. PCR experiments with specific primers for catabolic genes alkB, alkB1, nahAc, C12O, and C23O suggested that ASU-06 might possess genes for aliphatic and PAHs degradation, while PAH-RHDαGP gene was not detected. Production of biosurfactants and increasing cell-surface hydrophobicity were investigated. GC/MS analysis of intermediate metabolites of studied PAHs concluded that this strain utilized these compounds via two main pathways, and phthalate was the major constant product that appeared in each day of the degradation period. PMID:25177681

  11. Fungal degradation of coal as a pretreatment for methane production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haider, Rizwan; Ghauri, Muhammad A.; SanFilipo, John R.; Jones, Elizabeth J.; Orem, William H.; Tatu, Calin A.; Akhtar, Kalsoom; Akhtar, Nasrin

    2013-01-01

    Coal conversion technologies can help in taking advantage of huge low rank coal reserves by converting those into alternative fuels like methane. In this regard, fungal degradation of coal can serve as a pretreatment step in order to make coal a suitable substrate for biological beneficiation. A fungal isolate MW1, identified as Penicillium chrysogenum on the basis of fungal ITS sequences, was isolated from a core sample of coal, taken from a well drilled by the US. Geological Survey in Montana, USA. The low rank coal samples, from major coal fields of Pakistan, were treated with MW1 for 7 days in the presence of 0.1% ammonium sulfate as nitrogen source and 0.1% glucose as a supplemental carbon source. Liquid extracts were analyzed through Excitation–Emission Matrix Spectroscopy (EEMS) to obtain qualitative estimates of solubilized coal; these analyses indicated the release of complex organic functionalities. In addition, GC–MS analysis of these extracts confirmed the presence of single ring aromatics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aromatic nitrogen compounds and aliphatics. Subsequently, the released organics were subjected to a bioassay for the generation of methane which conferred the potential application of fungal degradation as pretreatment. Additionally, fungal-mediated degradation was also prospected for extracting some other chemical entities like humic acids from brown coals with high huminite content especially from Thar, the largest lignite reserve of Pakistan.

  12. Multifunctional aliphatic polyester nanofibers for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jianan; Singh, Anirudha; Zhang, Zhe; Huang, Ling; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2012-01-01

    Electrospun fibers based on aliphatic polyesters, such as poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), have been widely used in regenerative medicine and drug delivery applications due to their biocompatibility, low cost and ease of fabrication. However, these aliphatic polyester fibers are hydrophobic in nature, resulting in poor wettability, and they lack functional groups for decorating the scaffold with chemical and biological cues. Current strategies employed to overcome these challenges include coating and blending the fibers with bioactive components or chemically modifying the fibers with plasma treatment and reactants. In the present study, we report on designing multifunctional electrospun nanofibers based on the inclusion complex of PCL-α-cyclodextrin (PCL-α-CD), which provides both structural support and multiple functionalities for further conjugation of bioactive components. This strategy is independent of any chemical modification of the PCL main chain, and electrospinning of PCL-α-CD is as easy as electrospinning PCL. Here, we describe synthesis of the PCL-α-CD electrospun nanofibers, elucidate composition and structure, and demonstrate the utility of functional groups on the fibers by conjugating a fluorescent small molecule and a polymeric-nanobead to the nanofibers. Furthermore, we demonstrate the application of PCL-α-CD nanofibers for promoting osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs), which induced a higher level of expression of osteogenic markers and enhanced production of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins or molecules compared with control PCL fibers. PMID:23507886

  13. Isolation of an extremely halophilic arhaeon Natrialba sp. C21 able to degrade aromatic compounds and to produce stable biosurfactant at high salinity.

    PubMed

    Khemili-Talbi, Souad; Kebbouche-Gana, Salima; Akmoussi-Toumi, Siham; Angar, Yassmina; Gana, Mohamed Lamine

    2015-11-01

    Natrialba sp. strain C21 was isolated from oil contaminated saline water in Ain Salah (Algeria) and has exhibited a good potential for degrading phenol (3% v/v), naphthalene (3% v/v), and pyrene (3% v/v) at high salinity with high growth, enzymatic activity and biosurfactant production. Successful metabolism of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds of the strain Natrialba sp. C21 appears to require the ortho-cleavage pathway. Indeed, assays of the key enzymes involved in the ring cleavage of catechol 1, 2-dioxygenase indicated that degradation of the phenol, naphthalene and pyrene by strain Natrialba sp. C21 was via the ortho-cleavage pathway. Cells grown on aromatic hydrocarbons displayed greater ortho-activities mainly towards catechol, while the meta-activity was very low. Besides, biosurfactants derived from the strain C21 were capable of effectively emulsifying both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons and seem to be particularly promising since they have particular adaptations like the increased stability at high temperature and salinity conditions. This study clearly demonstrates for the first time that strain belonging to the genera Natrialba is able to grow at 25% (w/v) NaCl, utilizing phenol, naphthalene, and pyrene as the sole carbon sources. The results suggest that the isolated halophilic archaeon could be a good candidate for the remediation process in extreme environments polluted by aromatic hydrocarbons. Moreover, the produced biosurfactant offers a multitude of interesting potential applications in various fields of biotechnology. PMID:26334644

  14. 40 CFR 721.2270 - Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt. 721... Substances § 721.2270 Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... salt (PMN P-92-1352) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  15. 40 CFR 721.4497 - Aliphatic polyisocyanates (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aliphatic polyisocyanates (generic name). 721.4497 Section 721.4497 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4497 Aliphatic polyisocyanates (generic name). (a) Chemical...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4497 - Aliphatic polyisocyanates (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aliphatic polyisocyanates (generic name). 721.4497 Section 721.4497 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4497 Aliphatic polyisocyanates (generic name). (a) Chemical...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4497 - Aliphatic polyisocyanates (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aliphatic polyisocyanates (generic name). 721.4497 Section 721.4497 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4497 Aliphatic polyisocyanates (generic name). (a) Chemical...

  18. 40 CFR 721.4497 - Aliphatic polyisocyanates (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aliphatic polyisocyanates (generic name). 721.4497 Section 721.4497 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4497 Aliphatic polyisocyanates (generic name). (a) Chemical...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4497 - Aliphatic polyisocyanates (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aliphatic polyisocyanates (generic name). 721.4497 Section 721.4497 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4497 Aliphatic polyisocyanates (generic name). (a) Chemical...

  20. Monitoring biodegradation of hydrocarbons by stable isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorer, Conrad; Fischer, Anko; Herrmann, Steffi; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Vogt, Carsten

    2010-05-01

    nitrate, sulfate or ferric iron as electron acceptor or using light as energy source [3,4,5]. Significantly different lambda values were also observed for the anaerobic degradation of xylenes initiated by the BSS [5]. The different lambda values obtained for the anaerobic degradation of toluene and xylenes might be caused by slightly different reaction mechanisms of BSS isoenzymes. In comparison, lambda and/or ɛbulk values for the methyl monohydroxylation of toluene with oxygen as co-substrate were significantly different for two tested strains each containing a different toluene attacking enzyme, indicating that specific enzymes for aerobic methyl group oxidation reactions can be detected by CSIA and 2D-CSIA. Our results show that the combined carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation approach has great potential to elucidate biodegradation pathways of monoaromatic hydrocarbons in microcosm and field studies. Current work focus on (i) 2D-CSIA of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons in degradation experiments using whole cells, and (ii) 2D-CSIA of aromatic hydrocarbons in in vitro experiments using cell extracts. [1] Fischer et al. (2008) Environ. Sci. Technol. 42, 4356-4363 [2] Mancini et al. (2008) Environ. Sci. Technol. 42, 8290-8296 [3] Vogt et al. (2008) Environ. Sci. Technol. 42, 7793-7800 [4] Tobler et al. (2008) Environ. Sci. Technol. 42, 7786-7792 [5] Herrmann et al. (2009) Environ. Microbiol. Reports 1, 535-544

  1. Attenuation of landfill leachate by UK Triassic sandstone aquifer materials. 2. Sorption and degradation of organic pollutants in laboratory columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Steven F.; Bright, Mildred I.; Lerner, David N.; Tellam, John H.

    2000-05-01

    The sorption and degradation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and 13 organic micropollutants (BTEX, aromatic hydrocarbons, chloro-aromatic and -aliphatic compounds, and pesticides) in acetogenic and methanogenic landfill leachate was studied in laboratory columns containing Triassic sandstone aquifer materials from the English Midlands. Solute sorption and degradation relationships were evaluated using a simple transport model. Relative to predictions, micropollutant sorption was decreased up to eightfold in acetogenic leachate, but increased up to sixfold in methanogenic leachate. This behaviour reflects a combination of interactions between the micropollutants, leachate DOM and aquifer mineral fraction. Sorption of DOM was not significant. Degradation of organic fractions occurred under Mn-reducing and SO 4-reducing conditions. Degradation of some micropollutants occurred exclusively under Mn-reducing conditions. DOM and benzene were not significantly degraded under the conditions and time span (up to 280 days) of the experiments. Most micropollutants were degraded immediately or after a lag phase (32-115 days). Micropollutant degradation rates varied considerably (half-lives of 8 to >2000 days) for the same compounds (e.g., TeCE) in different experiments, and for compounds (e.g., naphthalene, DCB and TeCA) within the same experiment. Degradation of many micropollutants was both simultaneous and sequential, and inhibited by the utilisation of different substrates. This mechanism, in combination with lag phases, controls micropollutant degradation potential in these systems more than the degradation rate. These aquifer materials have a potentially large capacity for in situ bioremediation of organic pollutants in landfill leachate and significant degradation may occur in the Mn-reducing zones of leachate plumes. However, degradation of organic pollutants in acetogenic leachate may be limited in aquifers with low pH buffering capacity and reducible Mn oxides

  2. Validation of Alternatives to Aliphatic Isocyanate Polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Jerome

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Headquarters chartered the Acquisition Pollution Prevention (AP2) Office to coordinate agency activities affecting pollution prevention issues identified during system and component acquisition and sustainment processes. The primary objective of this effort is to demonstrate and validate alternatives to aliphatic isocyanate polyurethane coatings. Successful completion of this project will result in one or more isocyanate-free coating systems qualified for use at Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) and NASA centers participating in this study. The objective of this project is to qualify the candidates under the specifications for the standard system. This project will compare coating performance of the proposed alternatives to existing coating systems or standards.

  3. Use of a sub-gasket and soft gas diffusion layer to mitigate mechanical degradation of a hydrocarbon membrane for polymer electrolyte fuel cells in wet-dry cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Teramoto, Takeshi; Ueyama, Yasuhiro; Sugawara, Yasushi; Sakiyama, Yoko; Kusakabe, Masato; Miyatake, Kenji; Uchida, Makoto

    2016-09-01

    The mechanical durability of hydrocarbon (HC) membranes, used for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), was evaluated by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) stress protocol involving wet-dry cycling, and the degradation mechanism is discussed. The HC membrane ruptured in the edge region of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) after 300 cycles due to a concentration of the mechanical stress. Post-test analysis of stress-strain measurements revealed that the membrane mechanical strain decreased more than 80% in the edge region of the MEA and about 50% in the electrode region, compared with the pristine condition. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) indicated that the average molecular weight of the HC polymer increased slightly, indicating some cross-linking, while the IEC decreased slightly, indicating ionomer degradation. As a result of two types of modifications, a sub-gasket (SG) and a soft gas diffusion layer (GDL) in the MEA edge region, the mechanical stress decreased, and the durability increased, the membrane lasting more than 30,000 cycles without mechanical failure.

  4. Composites of vinyl polystyrylpyridine/bismaleimide-aliphatic ether copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimbuch, Alvin H.; Rosser, Robert W.; Hsu, Ming-Ta S.

    1989-01-01

    An aliphatic ether bismaleimide was prepared and coreacted with a polyvinylstyrylpyridine (VPSP) oligomer. Studies showed that a controlled ratio of aliphatic to aromatic units in the polymer backbone improved both processibility and interlaminar shear properties for the carbon-fiber composite system. This modified resin was readily soluble in tetrahydrofuran, allowing for better fiber impregnation and thus enhancing adhesive properties and reproducibility. DSC studies have shown a lower cure temperature for the copolymer than for the neat aliphatic bismaleimide, and a glass transition temperature of 260 C, which is more than adequate for most applications. Limited measurements indicated an improvement in toughness (impact resistance).

  5. Degradation of hydrocarbons by members of the genus Candida 3. Oxidative intermediates from 1-hexadecene and 1-heptadecene by Candida lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Klug, M J; Markovetz, A J

    1968-10-01

    Candida lipolytica (Phaff) was grown in a mineral-salts medium amended with either 1-hexadecene or 1-heptadecene as substrate. Intermediates of the same chain length as the substrate were isolated and identified by various analytical procedures. The following intermediates of 16 and 17 carbon atoms were identified: omega-unsaturated acids, omega-unsaturated primary and secondary alcohols, 1,2-epoxides, 1,2-diols, and 2-hydroxy acids. Based on the chemical structure of these compounds, three oxidative mechanisms are proposed for the degradation of long-chain 1-alkenes by this yeast: (i) methyl-group oxidation, (ii) double-bond oxidation, and (iii) subterminal oxidation. PMID:5685991

  6. BIOREMEDIATED SOIL VENTING OF LIGHT HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effectiveness and feasibility of bioremediated soil venting of light hydrocarbons in the unsaturated zone was investigated. Degradation mechanics were considered as a one dimensional balance of storage, linear sorption, vertical advection, and Michaelis-Menton kinetics. he re...

  7. Biodegradation of polycyclic hydrocarbons by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are present in anthracene oil (a distillation product obtained from coal tar) was demonstrated. Analysis by capillary gas chromatography and high-performance li...

  8. Deuterated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doney, K. D.; Candian, A.; Mori, T.; Onaka, T.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2016-02-01

    Aims: The amount of deuterium locked up in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has to date been an uncertain value. We present a near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic survey of Hii regions in the Milky Way, Large Magellanic Cloud, and Small Magellanic Cloud obtained with AKARI, which aims to search for features indicative of deuterated PAHs (PAD or Dn-PAH) to better constrain the D/H ratio of PAHs. Methods: Fifty-three Hii regions were observed in the NIR (2.5-5 μm), using the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board the AKARI satellite. Through comparison of the observed spectra with a theoretical model of deuterated PAH vibrational modes, the aromatic and (a)symmetric aliphatic C-D stretch modes were identified. Results: We see emission features between 4.4-4.8 μm, which could be unambiguously attributed to deuterated PAHs in only six of the observed sources, all of which are located in the Milky Way. In all cases, the aromatic C-D stretching feature is weaker than the aliphatic C-D stretching feature, and, in the case of M17b, this feature is not observed at all. Based on the weak or absent PAD features in most of the observed spectra, it is suggested that the mechanism for PAH deuteration in the ISM is uncommon.

  9. Microbial activity and soil organic matter decay in roadside soils polluted with petroleum hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mykhailova, Larysa; Fischer, Thomas; Iurchenko, Valentina

    2015-04-01

    It has been demonstrated previously that hydrocarbon addition to soil provokes soil organic matter priming (Zyakun et al., 2011). It has further been shown that petroleum hydrocarbons deposit to roadside soils bound to fine mineral particles and together with vehicle spray (Mykhailova et al., 2014), and that hydrocarbon concentrations decrease to safe levels within the first 15 m from the road, reaching background concentrations at 60-100 m distance (Mykhailova et al., 2013). It was the aim of this study to (I) identify the bioavailability of different petroleum hydrocarbon fractions to degradation and to (II) identify the native (i.e. pedogenic) C fraction affected by hydrocarbon-mediated soil organic matter priming during decay. To address this aim, we collected soil samples at distances from 1 to 100 m (sampling depth 15 cm) near the Traktorostroiteley avenue and the Pushkinskaya street in Kharkov, as well as near the country road M18 near Kharkov, Ukraine. The roads have been under exploitation for several decades, so microbial adaptation to enhanced hydrocarbon levels and full expression of effects could be assumed. The following C fractions were quantified using 13C-CP/MAS-NMR: Carbohydrates, Proteins, Lignin, Aliphates, Carbonyl/Carboxyl as well as black carbon according to Nelson and Baldock (2005). Petroleum hydrocarbons were determind after hexane extraction using GC-MS and divided into a light fraction (chain-length C27, Mykhailova et al., 2013). Potential soil respiration was determined every 48 h by trapping of CO2 evolving from 20 g soil in NaOH at 20 ° C and at 60% of the maximum water holding capacity and titration after a total incubation period of 4 weeks in the lab. It was found that soil respiration positively correlated with the ratio of the light fraction to the sum of medium and heavy fractions of petroleum hydrocarbons, which indicates higher biodegradation primarily of the light petroleum hydrocarbon fraction. Further, soil respiration was

  10. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of synthetic aliphatic and aromatic monoacylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Batovska, Daniela; Todorova, Iva; Parushev, Stoyan; Tsvetkova, Iva; Najdenski, Hristo; Ubukata, Makoto

    2008-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of synthetic aliphatic and aromatic monoacylglycerols (MAGs) was studied against two human pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The active compounds inhibited selectively S. aureus. The most active compounds amongst them were those with medium size aliphatic chain and aromatic MAGs with electron withdrawing substituents at the aryl ring. The introduction of one or two-carbon spacer between the aryl ring and the carboxylic function did not influence antibacterial effectiveness. PMID:19004249

  11. Process for producing peracids from aliphatic hydroxy carboxylic acids

    DOEpatents

    Chum, H.L.; Palasz, P.D.; Ratcliff, M.A.

    1984-12-20

    A process is described for producing peracids from lactic acid-containing solutions derived from biomass processing systems. It consists of adjusting the pH of the solution to about 8 to 9 and removing alkaline residue fractions therefrom to form a solution comprised substantially of lower aliphatic hydroxy acids. The solution is oxidized to produce volatile lower aliphatic aldehydes. The aldehydes are removed as they are generated and converted to peracids.

  12. Process for producing peracids from aliphatic hydroxy carboxylic acids

    DOEpatents

    Chum, Helena L.; Ratcliff, Matthew A.; Palasz, Peter D.

    1986-01-01

    A process for producing peracids from lactic acid-containing solutions derived from biomass processing systems comprising: adjusting the pH of the solution to about 8-9 and removing alkaline residue fractions therefrom to form a solution comprised substantially of lower aliphatic hydroxy acids; oxidizing the solution to produce volatile lower aliphatic aldehydes; removing said aldehydes as they are generated; and converting said aldehydes to peracids.

  13. Reductive Degradation: Versatile, Low Cost.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Water and Sewage Works, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This article discusses the use of reductive degradation as an economical and effective treatment of chlorinated hydrocarbons. Comparisons with activated carbon treatment show lower capital equipment and treatment costs. (CS)

  14. Atmospheric chemistry of toxic contaminants. 3. Unsaturated aliphatics: Acrolein, acrylonitrile, maleic anhydride

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D. )

    1990-12-01

    Detailed mechanisms are outlined for the chemical reactions that contribute to in-situ formation and atmospheric removal of the unsaturated aliphatic contaminants acrolein, acrylonitrile, and maleic anhydride. In-situ formation of small amounts of acrolein and maleic anhydride may involve the reaction of OH (and O{sub 3}) with 1,3-dienes and the reaction of OH with aromatic hydrocarbons, respectively. There is no known pathway for in-situ formation of acrylonitrile. Rapid removal of acrolein (half-life = less than one day) and of maleic anhydride (half-life = several hours) is expected from their rapid reactions with OH (major), O{sub 3}, and NO{sub 3}. These reactions lead to formaldehyde and glyoxal from acrolein and to dicarbonyls from maleic anhydride. Acrylonitrile is removed at a slower rate (half-life = 2-7 days) by reaction with OH, leading to formaldehyde and formyl cyanide.

  15. Atmospheric chemistry of toxic contaminants 4. Saturated halogenated aliphatics: Methyl bromide, epichlorhydrin, phosgene

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D. )

    1991-01-01

    Mechanisms are outlined for the reactions that contribute to in-situ formation and atmospheric removal of the saturated halogenated aliphatic contaminants methyl bromide, epichlorhydrin, and phosgene. In-situ formation is important only for phosgene and involves the reaction of OH with chloroethenes and other chlorinated hydrocarbons. A ranking of these phosgene precursors is given using data for precursor ambient concentrations and chemical reactivity. The three toxic compounds studied are long-lived in the atmosphere, where removal of phosgene and methyl bromide by chemical reactions is negligibly slow. Epichlorhydrin is removed slowly by reaction with OH, leading to formaldehyde, chloroacetaldehyde, and the chlorinated peroxyacyl nitrate CH{sub 2}ClC(O)OONO{sub 2}.

  16. Investigation of the toxicokinetics of petroleum hydrocarbon distillates with the earthworm Eisenia andrei.

    PubMed

    Cermak, Janet; Stephenson, Gladys; Birkholz, Detlef; Dixon, D George

    2013-04-01

    The Canada-wide standards for petroleum hydrocarbons in soils regulate petroleum hydrocarbons based on four distillate ranges: F1 (C6-C10), F2 (>C10-C16), F3 (>C16-C34), and F4 (>C34). Previous toxicity tests with earthworms and F2, as well as two subfractions of F3, F3a (>C16-C23) and F3a (>C23-C34), indicate that test durations might not be sufficiently long to reach threshold effect concentrations, likely because of the differing toxicokinetics for each distillate. A study was conducted to determine the toxicokinetics of both aliphatic and aromatic fractions of F2, F3a, and F3b with the earthworm Eisenia andrei. Peak accumulation curves were observed for F2 aliphatics and aromatics and F3a aromatics, likely as a result of changes in exposure concentration over the test duration via loss or a decrease in the bioavailable fraction. Biota-soil accumulation factors were >1 for total F2 aliphatics and aromatics and F3a aromatics as well as for several individual polyaromatic hydrocarbons for each distillate. Aromatics were disproportionately accumulated over aliphatics and were the main contributors to toxicity; therefore, aromatics and aliphatics should be regulated separately. The toxicokinetics were used to interpret previous toxicity data. Higher molecular weight distillates need longer-than-standard test durations to determine toxicity, so toxicity test results from fixed, standard-duration tests are not strictly comparable for these petroleum distillates. PMID:23364619

  17. Identification of opsA, a gene involved in solute stress mitigation and survival in soil, in the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium Novosphingobium sp. strain LH128.

    PubMed

    Fida, Tekle Tafese; Breugelmans, Philip; Lavigne, Rob; van der Meer, Jan Roelof; De Mot, René; Vaysse, Pierre-Joseph; Springael, Dirk

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify genes involved in solute and matric stress mitigation in the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading Novosphingobium sp. strain LH128. The genes were identified using plasposon mutagenesis and by selection of mutants that showed impaired growth in a medium containing 450 mM NaCl as a solute stress or 10% (wt/vol) polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000 as a matric stress. Eleven and 14 mutants showed growth impairment when exposed to solute and matric stresses, respectively. The disrupted sequences were mapped on a draft genome sequence of strain LH128, and the corresponding gene functions were predicted. None of them were shared between solute and matric stress-impacted mutants. One NaCl-affected mutant (i.e., NA7E1) with a disruption in a gene encoding a putative outer membrane protein (OpsA) was susceptible to lower NaCl concentrations than the other mutants. The growth of NA7E1 was impacted by other ions and nonionic solutes and by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), suggesting that opsA is involved in osmotic stress mitigation and/or outer membrane stability in strain LH128. NA7E1 was also the only mutant that showed reduced growth and less-efficient phenanthrene degradation in soil compared to the wild type. Moreover, the survival of NA7E1 in soil decreased significantly when the moisture content was decreased but was unaffected when soluble solutes from sandy soil were removed by washing. opsA appears to be important for the survival of strain LH128 in soil, especially in the case of reduced moisture content, probably by mitigating the effects of solute stress and retaining membrane stability. PMID:24657861

  18. Identification of opsA, a Gene Involved in Solute Stress Mitigation and Survival in Soil, in the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Novosphingobium sp. Strain LH128

    PubMed Central

    Fida, Tekle Tafese; Breugelmans, Philip; Lavigne, Rob; van der Meer, Jan Roelof; De Mot, René; Vaysse, Pierre-Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify genes involved in solute and matric stress mitigation in the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading Novosphingobium sp. strain LH128. The genes were identified using plasposon mutagenesis and by selection of mutants that showed impaired growth in a medium containing 450 mM NaCl as a solute stress or 10% (wt/vol) polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000 as a matric stress. Eleven and 14 mutants showed growth impairment when exposed to solute and matric stresses, respectively. The disrupted sequences were mapped on a draft genome sequence of strain LH128, and the corresponding gene functions were predicted. None of them were shared between solute and matric stress-impacted mutants. One NaCl-affected mutant (i.e., NA7E1) with a disruption in a gene encoding a putative outer membrane protein (OpsA) was susceptible to lower NaCl concentrations than the other mutants. The growth of NA7E1 was impacted by other ions and nonionic solutes and by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), suggesting that opsA is involved in osmotic stress mitigation and/or outer membrane stability in strain LH128. NA7E1 was also the only mutant that showed reduced growth and less-efficient phenanthrene degradation in soil compared to the wild type. Moreover, the survival of NA7E1 in soil decreased significantly when the moisture content was decreased but was unaffected when soluble solutes from sandy soil were removed by washing. opsA appears to be important for the survival of strain LH128 in soil, especially in the case of reduced moisture content, probably by mitigating the effects of solute stress and retaining membrane stability. PMID:24657861

  19. Endotoxin-Induced Tryptophan Degradation along the Kynurenine Pathway: The Role of Indolamine 2,3-Dioxygenase and Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Mediated Immunosuppressive Effects in Endotoxin Tolerance and Cancer and Its Implications for Immunoparalysis

    PubMed Central

    Wirthgen, Elisa; Hoeflich, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of tryptophan (TRP) along the kynurenine pathway plays a crucial role as a neuro- and immunomodulatory mechanism in response to inflammatory stimuli, such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS). In endotoxemia or sepsis, an enhanced activation of the rate-limiting enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is associated with a higher mortality risk. It is assumed that IDO induced immunosuppressive effects provoke the development of a protracted compensatory hypoinflammatory phase up to a complete paralysis of the immune system, which is characterized by an endotoxin tolerance. However, the role of IDO activation in the development of life-threatening immunoparalysis is still poorly understood. Recent reports described the impact of inflammatory IDO activation and aryl hydrocarbon receptor- (AhR-) mediated pathways on the development of LPS tolerance and immune escape of cancer cells. These immunosuppressive mechanisms offer new insights for a better understanding of the development of cellular dysfunctions in immunoparalysis. This review provides a comprehensive update of significant biological functions of TRP metabolites along the kynurenine pathway and the complex regulation of LPS-induced IDO activation. In addition, the review focuses on the role of IDO-AhR-mediated immunosuppressive pathways in endotoxin tolerance and carcinogenesis revealing the significance of enhanced IDO activity for the establishment of life-threatening immunoparalysis in sepsis. PMID:26881062

  20. Distribution of aliphatic compounds in bivalve mollusks from Galicia after the Prestige oil spill: spatial and temporal trends.

    PubMed

    Carro, N; Cobas, J; Maneiro, J

    2006-03-01

    The content and distribution of n-alkane (C8-C35) and isoprenoid (pristane and phytane) hydrocarbons were investigated in two species of bivalve mollusk, mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and cockle (Cerastoderma edule), collected at different points of the Galicia littoral zone during the period from December 2002 to February 2003 (after the Prestige oil spill). Samples were analyzed by high-resolution gas chromatography equipped with a flame ionization detector. The highest levels were found in mussels and cockles coming from two estuarine bays, Rías de Arousa and Vigo. Hydrocarbons with carbon chain length > 30 were detected and determined in all samples. The abundance of these hydrocarbons in biota could be interpreted with regard to the feeding and living habits. Chemometric techniques have been employed to analyze data and determine the potential source of hydrocarbon contamination. Differences between mussels and cockles were observed in relation to aliphatic content. According to the data analysis, the main source of hydrocarbon contamination of investigated samples seems to be more related to the intense traffic of vessels in these estuarine bays than to the Prestige oil spill. PMID:16253223

  1. Vaporization and gasification of hydrocarbon feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, H.S.; Garstang, J.H.; Timmins, C.

    1983-08-23

    Heavy hydrocarbon feedstocks, e.g. gas oils, are vaporized and subsequently gasified at high temperatures without pyrolytic degradation by first admixing the hydrocarbon with a hot gaseous reactant, e.g. product gas or steam, to bring the temperature of the mixture above that of the dew point of the hydrocarbon and thereafter raising the temperature of the mixture to above that at which pyrolysis of the hydrocarbon begins to be significant by admixture with further quantities of the reactant which are superheated thereby to bring the temperature of the resultant mixture to that required for effecting a catalytic gasification reaction.

  2. Hydrocarbon biological markers in Carboniferous coals of different maturities from the Ruhr area (northwest Germany)

    SciTech Connect

    ten Haven, H.L.; Littke, R.; Rullkoetter, J. , Juelich )

    1989-03-01

    A great variety of biological markers has been found in Carboniferous coal samples. Changes in the paleo-depositional environment are reflected by the distribution of bacterial derived hydrocarbons. These biological markers contribute to a significant extent to the aliphatic hydrocarbon fraction of low-maturity coal samples; their absolute contribution to total organic matter has yet not been estimated. Biological markers for gymnosperm were observed, which is in accordance with the phylogenetic evolution of the plant kingdom during the Carboniferous.

  3. Hydrocarbon geochemistry of cold seeps in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenson, T.D.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Hostettler, F.D.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Orange, D.L.; Martin, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    Samples from four geographically and tectonically discrete cold seeps named Clam Flat, Clamfield, Horseshoe Scarp South, and Tubeworm City, within the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary were analyzed for their hydrocarbon content. The sediment contains gaseous hydrocarbons and CO2, as well as high molecular weight aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons with various combinations of thermogenic and biogenic contributions from petroleum, marine, and terrigenous sources. Of particular interest is the cold seep site at Clamfield which is characterized by the presence of thermogenic hydrocarbons including oil that can likely be correlated with oil-saturated strata at Majors Creek near Davenport, CA, USA. At Clam Flat, the evidence for thermogenic hydrocarbons is equivocal. At Horseshoe Scarp South and Tubeworm City, hydrocarbon gases, mainly methane, are likely microbial in origin. These varied sources of hydrocarbon gases highlight the diverse chemical systems that appear at cold seep communities. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Composition and sources of aliphatic lipids and sterols in sediments of a tropical island, southern South China Sea: preliminary assessment.

    PubMed

    Mohd Tahir, N; Pang, S Y; Abdullah, N A; Suratman, S

    2013-12-01

    Near-shore surface sediment was collected from five stations off Redang Island located on the eastern coast of Peninsular Malaysia. Freeze-dried sediments were Soxhlet extracted and then fractionated using column chromatography into aliphatic and polar fractions. Determination of these fractions was carried out using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The concentration of total resolved aliphatic hydrocarbons in sediments ranged from 157 to 308 ng/g. The distribution of aliphatic fraction showed the presence of n-alkanes ranging from nC15 to nC33 with a minor odd-to-even predominance exhibiting carbon maximum, depending on station, at nC17, nC26, nC29 or nC31. Calculation of Carbon Preference Index (CPI) for CPI(15-33) gave values ranging from 1.09 to 1.46. n-Alkanol in all sediment exhibits even-to-odd carbon predominance ranging from nC16 to nC28 and maximising at nC22. n-Fatty acids distribution ranged from nC14 to nC24 with a dominant maximum at nC16 and exhibiting high values of short chain fatty acids (≤nC20) to long chain fatty acids (>nC20) ratios. Unsaturated fatty acids, particularly nC16:1 and nC18:1 is also ubiquitous in all samples. Cholesterol is the most abundant compound amongst the sterol group ranging from 42.8 to 62.6% of the total sterols. β-Sitosterol, brassicasterol and stigmasterol, are also present but of relatively lower amount. These observations suggest that the aliphatic lipids and sterols in the study area originate, mainly, from biogenic sources of marine microbial with minor contribution from epiticular waxes of terrestrial plants. PMID:23856812

  5. Carbon-rich dust past the asymptotic giant branch: Aliphatics, aromatics, and fullerenes in the Magellanic Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, G. C.; Lagadec, E.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Kraemer, K. E.; Weis, A. P.; Matsuura, M.; Volk, K.; Peeters, E.; Cami, J.; Duley, W. W.; Bernard-Salas, J.; Kemper, F.

    2014-08-10

    Infrared spectra of carbon-rich objects that have evolved off the asymptotic giant branch reveal a range of dust properties, including fullerenes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aliphatic hydrocarbons, and several unidentified features, including the 21 μm emission feature. To test for the presence of fullerenes, we used the position and width of the feature at 18.7-18.9 μm and examined other features at 17.4 and 6-9 μm. This method adds three new fullerene sources to the known sample, but it also calls into question three previous identifications. We confirm that the strong 11 μm features seen in some sources arise primarily from SiC, which may exist as a coating around carbonaceous cores and result from photo-processing. Spectra showing the 21 μm feature usually show the newly defined Class D PAH profile at 7-9 μm. These spectra exhibit unusual PAH profiles at 11-14 μm, with weak contributions at 12.7 μm, which we define as Class D1, or show features shifted to ∼11.4, 12.4, and 13.2 μm, which we define as Class D2. Alkyne hydrocarbons match the 15.8 μm feature associated with 21 μm emission. Sources showing fullerene emission but no PAHs have blue colors in the optical, suggesting a clear line of sight to the central source. Spectra with 21 μm features and Class D2 PAH emission also show photometric evidence for a relatively clear line of sight to the central source. The multiple associations of the 21 μm feature with aliphatic hydrocarbons suggest that the carrier is related to this material in some way.

  6. Carbon-rich Dust Past the Asymptotic Giant Branch: Aliphatics, Aromatics, and Fullerenes in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, G. C.; Lagadec, E.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Kraemer, K. E.; Weis, A. P.; Matsuura, M.; Volk, K.; Peeters, E.; Duley, W. W.; Cami, J.; Bernard-Salas, J.; Kemper, F.; Sahai, R.

    2014-08-01

    Infrared spectra of carbon-rich objects that have evolved off the asymptotic giant branch reveal a range of dust properties, including fullerenes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aliphatic hydrocarbons, and several unidentified features, including the 21 μm emission feature. To test for the presence of fullerenes, we used the position and width of the feature at 18.7-18.9 μm and examined other features at 17.4 and 6-9 μm. This method adds three new fullerene sources to the known sample, but it also calls into question three previous identifications. We confirm that the strong 11 μm features seen in some sources arise primarily from SiC, which may exist as a coating around carbonaceous cores and result from photo-processing. Spectra showing the 21 μm feature usually show the newly defined Class D PAH profile at 7-9 μm. These spectra exhibit unusual PAH profiles at 11-14 μm, with weak contributions at 12.7 μm, which we define as Class D1, or show features shifted to ~11.4, 12.4, and 13.2 μm, which we define as Class D2. Alkyne hydrocarbons match the 15.8 μm feature associated with 21 μm emission. Sources showing fullerene emission but no PAHs have blue colors in the optical, suggesting a clear line of sight to the central source. Spectra with 21 μm features and Class D2 PAH emission also show photometric evidence for a relatively clear line of sight to the central source. The multiple associations of the 21 μm feature with aliphatic hydrocarbons suggest that the carrier is related to this material in some way.

  7. Compounds in airborne particulates - Salts and hydrocarbons. [at Cleveland, OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Antoine, A. C.; Fordyce, J. S.; Neustadter, H. E.; Leibecki, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    Concentrations of 10 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), the aliphatics as a group, sulfate, nitrate, fluoride, acidity, and carbon in the airborne particulate matter were measured at 16 sites in Cleveland, OH over a 1-year period during 1971 and 1972. Analytical methods used included gas chromatography, colorimetry, and combustion techniques. Uncertainties in the concentrations associated with the sampling procedures, and the analytical methods are evaluated. The data are discussed relative to other studies and source origins. High concentrations downwind of coke ovens for 3,4 benzopyrene are discussed. Hydrocarbon correlation studies indicated no significant relations among compounds studied.

  8. Screening of extremotolerant fungi for the bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyntner, Caroline; Blasi, Barbara; Prenafeta, Francesc; Sterflinger, Katja

    2015-04-01

    Bioremediation can be used to treat contaminated sites, by taking advantage of microorganisms which have the potential to degrade a wide range of contaminants. While research has been focused mainly on bacteria, the knowledge on other microorganisms, especially fungal communities, is still limited. However, the use of fungi may have advantages compared to bacteria. Extremophile fungi like the black yeasts can withstand high levels of environmental stress (e.g. range of pH, water availability and temperature, presence of toxic chemicals). Therefore they might be applicable in situations, where bacterial communities show limited performance. In order to identify fungi which are good candidates for bioremediation application, a selection of 163 fungal strains, mostly from the group of the black yeasts, was tested for their capability to degrade three different pollutants: hexadecane, toluene, and polychlorinated biphenyl 126, which were used as model compounds for aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls. These chemicals are frequently found in sites contaminated by oil, gas and coal. The screening was based on a two-step selection approach. As a first step, a high throughput method was developed to screen the relatively large amount of fungal strains regarding their tolerance to the contaminants. A microtiter plate based method was developed for monitoring fungal growth in the presence of the selected contaminants photometrically with a Tecan reader. Twenty five strains out of 163, being species of the genera Cladophilaophora, Scedosporium and Exophiala, showed the ability to grow on at least 2 hydrocarbons, and are therefore the most promising candidates for further tests. In a second step, degradation of the contaminants was investigated in more detail for a subset of the screened fungi. This was done by closing the carbon balance in sealed liquid cultures in which the selected pollutant was introduce as the sole source of carbon

  9. Differential effects of indole and aliphatic glucosinolates on lepidopteran herbivores.

    PubMed

    Müller, René; de Vos, Martin; Sun, Joel Y; Sønderby, Ida E; Halkier, Barbara A; Wittstock, Ute; Jander, Georg

    2010-08-01

    Glucosinolates are a diverse group of defensive secondary metabolites that is characteristic of the Brassicales. Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (Brassicaceae) lines with mutations that greatly reduce abundance of indole glucosinolates (cyp79B2 cyp79B3), aliphatic glucosinolates (myb28 myb29), or both (cyp79B2 cyp79B3 myb28 myb29) make it possible to test the in vivo defensive function of these two major glucosinolate classes. In experiments with Lepidoptera that are not crucifer-feeding specialists, aliphatic and indole glucosinolates had an additive effect on Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larval growth, whereas Trichoplusia ni (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Manduca sexta (L.) (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae) were affected only by the absence of aliphatic glucosinolates. In the case of two crucifer-feeding specialists, Pieris rapae (L.) (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) and Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), there were no major changes in larval performance due to decreased aliphatic and/or indole glucosinolate content. Nevertheless, choice tests show that aliphatic and indole glucosinolates act in an additive manner to promote larval feeding of both species and P. rapae oviposition. Together, these results support the hypothesis that a diversity of glucosinolates is required to limit the growth of multiple insect herbivores. PMID:20617455

  10. THE STRUCTURE, ORIGIN, AND EVOLUTION OF INTERSTELLAR HYDROCARBON GRAINS

    SciTech Connect

    Chiar, J. E.; Ricca, A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Adamson, A. J. E-mail: Alessandra.Ricca@1.nasa.gov E-mail: aadamson@gemini.edu

    2013-06-10

    Many materials have been considered for the carrier of the hydrocarbon absorption bands observed in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). In order to refine the model for ISM hydrocarbon grains, we analyze the observed aromatic (3.28, 6.2 {mu}m) and aliphatic (3.4 {mu}m) hydrocarbon absorption features in the diffuse ISM along the line of sight toward the Galactic center Quintuplet Cluster. Observationally, sp {sup 2} bonds can be measured in astronomical spectra using the 6.2 {mu}m CC aromatic stretch feature, whereas the 3.4 {mu}m aliphatic feature can be used to quantify the fraction of sp {sup 3} bonds. The fractional abundance of these components allows us to place the Galactic diffuse ISM hydrocarbons on a ternary phase diagram. We conclude that the Galactic hydrocarbon dust has, on average, a low H/C ratio and sp {sup 3} content and is highly aromatic. We have placed the results of our analysis within the context of the evolution of carbon dust in the ISM. We argue that interstellar carbon dust consists of a large core of aromatic carbon surrounded by a thin mantle of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H), a structure that is a natural consequence of the processing of stardust grains in the ISM.

  11. Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2013-03-19

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  12. Catalytic Asymmetric Hydroamination of Unactivated Internal Olefins to Aliphatic Amines

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Shi, Shi-Liang; Niu, Dawen; Liu, Peng; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic assembly of enantiopure aliphatic amines from abundant and readily available precursors has long been recognized as a paramount challenge in synthetic chemistry. Herein, we describe a mild and general copper-catalyzed hydroamination that effectively converts unactivated internal olefins, an important yet unexploited class of abundant feedstock chemicals, into highly enantioenriched α-branched amines (≥ 96% enantiomeric excess) featuring two minimally differentiated aliphatic substituents. This method provides a powerful means to access a broad range of advanced, highly functionalized enantioenriched amines of interest in pharmaceutical research and other areas. PMID:26138973

  13. Contribution of cyanobacterial alkane production to the ocean hydrocarbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Lea-Smith, David J; Biller, Steven J; Davey, Matthew P; Cotton, Charles A R; Perez Sepulveda, Blanca M; Turchyn, Alexandra V; Scanlan, David J; Smith, Alison G; Chisholm, Sallie W; Howe, Christopher J

    2015-11-01

    Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the ocean, where alkanes such as pentadecane and heptadecane can be found even in waters minimally polluted with crude oil. Populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, which are responsible for the turnover of these compounds, are also found throughout marine systems, including in unpolluted waters. These observations suggest the existence of an unknown and widespread source of hydrocarbons in the oceans. Here, we report that strains of the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, produce and accumulate hydrocarbons, predominantly C15 and C17 alkanes, between 0.022 and 0.368% of dry cell weight. Based on global population sizes and turnover rates, we estimate that these species have the capacity to produce 2-540 pg alkanes per mL per day, which translates into a global ocean yield of ∼ 308-771 million tons of hydrocarbons annually. We also demonstrate that both obligate and facultative marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria can consume cyanobacterial alkanes, which likely prevents these hydrocarbons from accumulating in the environment. Our findings implicate cyanobacteria and hydrocarbon degraders as key players in a notable internal hydrocarbon cycle within the upper ocean, where alkanes are continually produced and subsequently consumed within days. Furthermore