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Sample records for alister hardy foundation

  1. The Hardy Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hixon, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The late James C. Hardy completed an extensive investigation of respiratory muscle activity during speech production. The data set that resulted was probably the most comprehensive and instructive that has ever existed. One aspect of the data puzzled Hardy and caused him to question the validity of his findings and withhold his…

  2. Hardiness among Elderly Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagnild, Gail; Young, Heather

    Hardiness has been defined as a mediator in life stress and, within the health/illness context, has been conceptualized as a personality characteristic. This study used a descriptive exploratory design to examine the concept of hardiness among elderly women. The Stress, Appraisal, and Coping model developed by Lazarus and Folkman (1986) was the…

  3. Cold hardiness in molluscs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansart, Armelle; Vernon, Philippe

    2003-05-01

    Molluscs inhabit all types of environments: seawater, intertidal zone, freshwater and land, and of course may have to deal with subzero temperatures. Ectotherm animals survive cold conditions by avoiding it by extensive supercooling (freezing avoidant species) or by bearing the freezing of their extracellular body fluids (freezing tolerant species). Although some studies on cold hardiness are available for intertidal molluscs, they are scarce for freshwater and terrestrial ones. Molluscs often exhibit intermediary levels of cold hardiness, with a moderate or low ability to supercool and a limited survival to the freezing of their tissues. Several factors could be involved: their dependence on water, their ability to enter dormancy, the probability of inoculative freezing in their environment, etc. Size is an important parameter in the development of cold hardiness abilities: it influences supercooling ability in land snails, which are rather freezing avoidant and survival to ice formation in intertidal organisms, which generally tolerate freezing.

  4. Foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    A building will more likely collapse if it does not have any proper foundations. Similarly, the design philosophy of Triadic Game Design (TGD) needs to reside on solid building blocks, otherwise the concept will collapse as well. In this level I will elaborate on these building blocks. First I will explain what the general idea of TGD is. It is a design philosophy, for sure, but one which stresses that an “optimum” needs to be found in a design space constituted by three different worlds: Reality, Meaning, and Play. Additionally, these worlds need to be considered simultaneously and be treated equally. The latter requires balancing the worlds which may result in different tensions, within and between two or three of the worlds. I continue by discussing each of the worlds and showing their perspective on the field of games with a meaningful purpose. From this, we clearly see that it is feasible to think of each world and that the idea makes sense. I substantiate this further by relating the notion of player and similar approaches to this framework. This level is quite a tough pill to swallow yet essential for finishing the other levels. Do not cheat or simply skip this level, but just take a big cup of coffee or tea and start reading it.

  5. [Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in genetic epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Hu, Yonghua

    2010-01-01

    Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test is the base of genetic epidemiology. The new methods for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test involve: X chromosome-linked single nucleotide polymorphism Hardy-Weinberg test, inbreeding coefficient (F) test, an incomplete enumeration algorithm for an exact test of Hardy-Weinberg proportions with multiple alleles, and graphical tests for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium based on the ternary plot. It is necessary to conduct Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test in genetic epidemiology studies and adjust the associations as deviation of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium occurs.

  6. Bound on Hardy's nonlocality from the principle of information causality

    SciTech Connect

    Ahanj, Ali; Kunkri, Samir; Rai, Ashutosh; Rahaman, Ramij; Joag, Pramod S.

    2010-03-15

    Recently, the principle of nonviolation of information causality [Nature 461, 1101 (2009)] has been proposed as one of the foundational properties of nature. We explore the Hardy's nonlocality theorem for two-qubit systems, in the context of generalized probability theory, restricted by the principle of nonviolation of information causality. Applying a sufficient condition for information causality violation, we derive an upper bound on the maximum success probability of Hardy's nonlocality argument. We find that the bound achieved here is higher than that allowed by quantum mechanics but still much less than what the no-signaling condition permits. We also study the Cabello type nonlocality argument (a generalization of Hardy's argument) in this context.

  7. Modified Hardy and Hardy-Littlewood operators and their behaviour in various spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volosivets, Sergei S.

    2011-02-01

    We study the behaviour of modified Hardy and Hardy-Littlewood operators in \\mathbf P-adic Herz and Hölder-Besov spaces and in spaces close to \\mathbf P-adic Hardy spaces and {BMO}. We also establish a Titchmarsh-type equation for distributions and obtain an estimate for the multiplicative Fourier transform in \\mathbf P-adic Hardy spaces.

  8. Seedling phenology and cold hardiness: Moving targets

    Treesearch

    Diane L. Haase

    2011-01-01

    Phenology is the annual cycle of plant development as influenced by seasonal variations. Dormancy and cold hardiness are two aspects of the annual cycle. In temperate plants, the development of cold hardiness results in the ability to withstand subfreezing winter temperatures. Cold hardiness is also a reflection of overall stress resistance. In addition to describing...

  9. Hardy spaces for the strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakan, Andrew; Kaijser, Sten

    2007-09-01

    In this paper we shall study Hardy spaces of analytic functions in a strip . Our main result is on one hand an intrinsic characterization of the spaces and on the second that polynomials are dense. We also present an orthogonal (in ) basis of polynomials.

  10. The Hardy-Weinberg Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurran, Shawnee L.

    2010-01-01

    This module was initially developed for a course in applications of mathematics in biology. The objective of this lesson is to investigate how the allele and genotypic frequencies associated with a particular gene might evolve over successive generations. The lesson will discuss how the Hardy-Weinberg model provides a basis for comparison when…

  11. The Hardy-Weinberg Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurran, Shawnee L.

    2010-01-01

    This module was initially developed for a course in applications of mathematics in biology. The objective of this lesson is to investigate how the allele and genotypic frequencies associated with a particular gene might evolve over successive generations. The lesson will discuss how the Hardy-Weinberg model provides a basis for comparison when…

  12. Understanding the different types of social support offered by audience to A-list diary-like and informative bloggers.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hsiu-Chia; Wang, Li-Ling; Xu, Yi-Ting

    2013-03-01

    Blogs offer audiences a forum through which they can exchange ideas and provide feedback about the everyday lives and experiences of the bloggers. Such interactions and communication between audiences and bloggers could be regarded as a kind of social support. The present study aims to identify and compare the types of social support offered by audiences to continuous popular diary-like and informative bloggers, and to explore the possible benefits that bloggers may obtain from such social support. Content analysis was used to analyze the 485 and 390 comments provided by the audiences to the A-list diary-like and informative blog posts, respectively. Results reveal that validation, compliment, and encouragement are the most common types of social support given by audiences to A-list bloggers. Chi-square test results show that the audiences offer more encouragement-type of social support to diary-like bloggers and more complimentary and informational social support to informative bloggers. Such types of social support may enhance A-list bloggers' self-esteem, boost their confidence, promote their self-understanding, and help them obtain the benefits of social validation, which in turn encourage bloggers to commit continuous self-disclosure.

  13. Understanding the Different Types of Social Support Offered by Audience to A-List Diary-Like and Informative Bloggers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Ling; Xu, Yi-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Blogs offer audiences a forum through which they can exchange ideas and provide feedback about the everyday lives and experiences of the bloggers. Such interactions and communication between audiences and bloggers could be regarded as a kind of social support. The present study aims to identify and compare the types of social support offered by audiences to continuous popular diary-like and informative bloggers, and to explore the possible benefits that bloggers may obtain from such social support. Content analysis was used to analyze the 485 and 390 comments provided by the audiences to the A-list diary-like and informative blog posts, respectively. Results reveal that validation, compliment, and encouragement are the most common types of social support given by audiences to A-list bloggers. Chi-square test results show that the audiences offer more encouragement-type of social support to diary-like bloggers and more complimentary and informational social support to informative bloggers. Such types of social support may enhance A-list bloggers' self-esteem, boost their confidence, promote their self-understanding, and help them obtain the benefits of social validation, which in turn encourage bloggers to commit continuous self-disclosure. PMID:23363225

  14. Hardy's paradox for high-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing-Ling; Cabello, Adán; Xu, Zhen-Peng; Su, Hong-Yi; Wu, Chunfeng; Kwek, L. C.

    2013-12-01

    Hardy's proof is considered the simplest proof of nonlocality. Here we introduce an equally simple proof that (i) has Hardy's as a particular case, (ii) shows that the probability of nonlocal events grows with the dimension of the local systems, and (iii) is always equivalent to the violation of a tight Bell inequality. Our proof has all the features of Hardy's and adds the only ingredient of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen scenario missing in Hardy's proof: It applies to measurements with an arbitrarily large number of outcomes.

  15. Thomas Hardy's Victorian Gothic: Reassessing Hardy's Fiction and His Gothic Sensibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Norma Walrath

    Proposing that Thomas Hardy's fiction exhibits strong Gothic sensibilities which offer insight into his artistic vision and add to the power of his fiction, creating a new form of the Gothic, a Victorian Gothic, this dissertation reassesses the Gothic strains in Hardy's fiction. The dissertation is in eight chapters: (1) Introduction to Hardy's…

  16. The Effects of a Hardiness Educational Intervention on Hardiness and Perceived Stress of Baccalaureate Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, Paula R.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the known benefits of hardiness education, no published research has been found on the effects of hardiness education with nursing students. Thus, the purposes of this study were first to determine if an increase in hardiness and a decrease in perceived stress in baccalaureate nursing students occurred in those who participated in a…

  17. The Effects of a Hardiness Educational Intervention on Hardiness and Perceived Stress of Baccalaureate Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, Paula R.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the known benefits of hardiness education, no published research has been found on the effects of hardiness education with nursing students. Thus, the purposes of this study were first to determine if an increase in hardiness and a decrease in perceived stress in baccalaureate nursing students occurred in those who participated in a…

  18. Hardy's paradox and measurement-disturbance relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Kazuo; Oh, C. H.; Yu, Sixia

    2015-01-01

    We establish a quantitative relation between Hardy's paradox and the breaking of the uncertainty principle in the sense of measurement-disturbance relations in the conditional measurement of noncommuting operators. The analysis of the inconsistency of local realism with entanglement by Hardy is simplified if this breaking of measurement-disturbance relations is taken into account, and a much simplified experimental test of local realism is illustrated in the framework of Hardy's thought experiment. The essence of Hardy's model is identified as a combination of two conditional measurements, which give rise to definite eigenvalues to two noncommuting operators simultaneously in hidden-variables models. Better understanding of the intimate interplay of entanglement and measurement disturbance is crucial in the current discussions of Hardy's paradox using the idea of weak measurement, which is based on a general analysis of measurement-disturbance relations.

  19. Testing departure from Hardy-Weinberg proportions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Shete, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The Hardy-Weinberg principle, one of the most important principles in population genetics, was originally developed for the study of allele frequency changes in a population over generations. It is now, however, widely used in studies of human diseases to detect inbreeding, populations stratification, and genotyping errors. For assessment of deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg proportions in data, the most popular approaches include the asymptotic Pearson's chi-square goodness-of-fit test and the exact test. The Pearson's chi-square goodness-of-fit test is simple and straightforward, but it is very sensitive to small sample size or rare allele frequency. The exact test of Hardy-Weinberg proportions is preferable in these situations. The exact test can be performed through complete enumeration of heterozygote genotypes or on the basis of the Markov chain Monte Carlo procedure. In this chapter, we describe the Hardy-Weinberg principle and the commonly used Hardy-Weinberg proportions tests and their applications, and we demonstrate how the chi-square test and exact test of Hardy-Weinberg proportions can be performed step-by-step using the popular software programs SAS, R, and PLINK, which have been widely used in genetic association studies, along with numerical examples. We also discuss recent approaches for testing Hardy-Weinberg proportions in case-control study designs that are better than traditional approaches for testing Hardy-Weinberg proportions in controls only. Finally, we note that deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg proportions in affected individuals can provide evidence for an association between genetic variants and diseases.

  20. Orwell's Thrush Is a Hardy Bird.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, W. Russell

    1984-01-01

    Explores the linkages between Thomas Hardy's poem "The Darkling Thrush" and the thrush scene in George Orwell's novel "1984." Suggests a variety of enrichment projects for students that deal with aspects of these two works. (RBW)

  1. Teaching the Hardy-Weinberg Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, B. A. C.

    1972-01-01

    Describes an approach to teaching the Hardy-Weinberg Law in high school genetics class. Instructional procedures used help in developing this concept in broad generalization form rather than merely a mathematical model of a gene pool. (PS)

  2. Teaching the Hardy-Weinberg Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, B. A. C.

    1972-01-01

    Describes an approach to teaching the Hardy-Weinberg Law in high school genetics class. Instructional procedures used help in developing this concept in broad generalization form rather than merely a mathematical model of a gene pool. (PS)

  3. Orwell's Thrush Is a Hardy Bird.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, W. Russell

    1984-01-01

    Explores the linkages between Thomas Hardy's poem "The Darkling Thrush" and the thrush scene in George Orwell's novel "1984." Suggests a variety of enrichment projects for students that deal with aspects of these two works. (RBW)

  4. [Hardiness, coping and quality of life of nurses working in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Delmas, P; Duquette, A

    2000-03-01

    The goals of the study are two-folds: on the one hand, to examine the relations between hardiness, coping strategies and quality of life at work of french nurses working in the intensive care units; on the other hand, to examine the mediating effect of coping strategies between hardiness and quality of life at work. Data was collected using a self-administered questionnaire, anonymously filled by 137 nurses which represented 60% participation from the initial sample population. Maddi & Kobasa's theory (1984) of Hardiness is the foundation for the present study and Baron & Kenny's statistical model (1986) was used to determine the mediating effect of the coping strategies. Regression analysis demonstrated that positive reevaluation/problem solving strategies had a mediating effect between a sense of commitment, a sense of mastery and quality of life at work. These results prompted various propositions in order to improve nurses quality of life at work.

  5. FMA Live! at Hardy Middle School

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-16

    Leland Melvin, NASA Associate Administrator for Education and former 2x astronaut, Hardy Middle School Prinipal Patricia Pride, and Tom Buckmaster, President, Honeywell Hometown Solutions introduce "FMA Live!" at Hardy Middle School in Washington on Monday, Sept. 16th, 2013. "FMA Live!" is a program sponsored by NASA and Honeywell that teaches Newton's three laws of motion mixed with dance and music. The program travels across the country and has reached nearly 300,000 students.Photo Credit: (NASA/Jay Westcott)

  6. FMA Live! at Hardy Middle School

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-16

    Two teachers at Hardy Middle School square off in foam suits as "FMA Live!" crew members explain Newton's third law of motion during a performance of "FMA Live!" at Hardy Middle School in Washington on Monday, Sept. 16th, 2013. "FMA Live!" is a program sponsored by NASA and Honeywell that teaches Newton's three laws of motion mixed with dance and music. The program travels across the country and has reached nearly 300,000 students.Photo Credit: (NASA/Jay Westcott)

  7. A reality check on Hardy-Weinberg.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alan E; Seneta, Eugene

    2013-08-01

    G. H. Hardy (1877-1947) and Wilhelm Weinberg (1862-1937) had very different lives, but in the minds of geneticists, the two are inextricably linked through the ownership of an apparently simple law called the Hardy-Weinberg law. We demonstrate that the simplicity is more apparent than real. Hardy derived the well-known trio of frequencies {q 2, 2pq, p 2} with a concise demonstration, whereas for Weinberg it was the prelude to an ingenious examination of the inheritance of twinning in man. Hardy's recourse to an identity relating to the distribution of types among offspring following random mating, rather than an identity relating to the mating matrix, may be the reason why he did not realize that Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium can be reached and sustained with non-random mating. The phrase 'random mating' always comes up in reference to the law. The elusive nature of this phrase is part of the reason for the misunderstandings that occur but also because, as we explain, mathematicians are able to use it in a different way from the man-in-the-street. We question the unthinking appeal to random mating as a model and explanation of the distribution of genotypes even when they are close to Hardy-Weinberg proportions. Such sustained proportions are possible under non-random mating.

  8. Hardy's test for local realism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Quynh; Dregli, Aurelio

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrated the violation of Bell inequality using entangled photons produced by spontaneous parametric down-conversion. The experiment is based on a local realism test originally proposed by Lucien Hardy. Polarized entangled photons is produced in down-conversion through a pair of beta barium borate crystals. Polarization is adjusted by half wave plates and quartz plates. Single photons travel down two separate paths, each pass through a half-wave plate and a broad band polarizing beam splitter. Light from the beam splitter is collected by lens and focused into optic fibers that direct light into a single photon counting module. Coincidence counting is done using time-to-amplitude converter/single-channel-analyzer units. The probabilities in Bell-Clauser-Horne inequality is calculated by the ratio of the measured coincidence counts on the transmitted laser beams to the total number of coincidence. The counting is done by a LabVIEW program. We find the data to violate local realism by 30 standard deviation. The experiment is based on straight forward quantum mechanical calculations and experimental techniques more accessible to undergraduate students than other methods of testing Bell inequalities.

  9. FMA Live! at Hardy Middle School

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-16

    Leland Melvin, NASA Associate Administrator for Education and former 2x astronaut,Hardy Middle School Prinipal Patricia Pride, and Tom Buckmaster, President, Honeywell Hometown Solutions introduce "FMA Live!" at Hardy Middle School in Washington on Monday, Sept. 16th, 2013. "FMA Live!" is a program sponsored by NASA and Honeywell that teaches Newton's three laws of motion mixed with dance and music. The program travels across the country and has reached nearly 300,000 students.Photo Credit: (NASA/Jay Westcott)

  10. Molecular markers associated with cold-hardiness in Camellia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers from expressed sequence tag-polymerase chain reaction (EST-PCR) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were developed with the goal to separate cold hardy camellias from non-cold hardy ones. A total of 28 cold hardy and non-cold h...

  11. One-dimensional differential Hardy inequality.

    PubMed

    Kalybay, Aigerim

    2017-01-01

    We establish necessary and sufficient conditions for the one-dimensional differential Hardy inequality to hold, including the overdetermined case. The solution is given in terms different from those of the known results. Moreover, the least constant for this inequality is estimated.

  12. A magnetic contribution to the Hardy inequality

    SciTech Connect

    Ekholm, T. Portmann, F.

    2014-02-15

    We study the quadratic form associated to the kinetic energy operator in the presence of an external magnetic field in d = 3. We show that if the radial component of the magnetic field does not vanish identically, then the classical lower bound given by Hardy is improved by a non-negative potential term depending on properties of the magnetic field.

  13. Restricting Riesz-Morrey-Hardy potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Xiao, J.

    2017-06-01

    To strengthen the weak restriction principle discovered in both [2, Theorem 5.1] for λ = κ and [32, Lemma 2.1] for λ < κ, this paper shows that the Riesz operator Iα of order α maps the Morrey-Hardy space LH p , κ to the Morrey-Radon space Lμq,λ continuously if and only if

  14. Hardiness as a Stress Resistance Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Carla B.

    One of the most important stress resistance resources emerging from research in adults has been the hardy personality (Kobasa, 1979). Identification of such a personality characteristic in young adults would provide some understanding of how some individuals emerge from a period of instability and change with the skills that help them adapt in a…

  15. Psychological Predictors of Human Hardiness Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeer, Evald F.; Yugova, Elena A.; Karpova, Natalia P.; Trubetskaya, Olga V.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the researched problem is conditioned by the growing social and psychological tension in the ever-changing post-industrial society and psychoemotional disorders affecting the human lifespan, developing on this background. The goal of the article is to disclose and analyse psychological predictors of hardiness formation,…

  16. Genomics of cold hardiness in woody plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The term cold hardiness or freezing tolerance is used to represent in a general sense the ability of plants to adapt to and withstand freezing temperatures. It is a complex, multigenic trait that is too often viewed as a single entity when in fact is composed of many aspects, all of which can be to...

  17. The effects of a hardiness educational intervention on hardiness and perceived stress of junior baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Jameson, Paula R

    2014-04-01

    Baccalaureate nursing education is stressful. The stress encompasses a range of academic, personal, clinical, and social reasons. A hardiness educational program, a tool for stress management, based on theory, research, and practice, exists to enhance the attitudes and coping strategies of hardiness (Maddi, 2007; Maddi et al., 2002). Research has shown that students who completed the hardiness educational program, subsequently improved in grade point average (GPA), college retention rates, and health (Maddi et al., 2002). Little research has been done to explore the effects of hardiness education with junior baccalaureate nursing students. Early identification of hardiness, the need for hardiness education, or stress management in this population may influence persistence in and completion of a nursing program (Hensel and Stoelting-Gettelfinger, 2011). Therefore, the aims were to determine if an increase in hardiness and a decrease in perceived stress in junior baccalaureate nursing students occurred in those who participated in a hardiness intervention. The application of the Hardiness Model and the Roy Adaptation Model established connections and conceptual collaboration among stress, stimuli, adaptation, and hardi-coping. A quasi-experimental non-equivalent control group with pre-test and post-test was used with a convenience sample of full-time junior level baccalaureate nursing students. Data were collected from August 2011 to December 2011. Results of statistical analyses by paired t-tests revealed that the hardiness intervention did not have a statistically significant effect on increasing hardiness scores. The hardiness intervention did have a statistically significant effect on decreasing perceived stress scores. The significant decrease in perceived stress was congruent with the Hardiness Model and the Roy Adaptation Model. Further hardiness research among junior baccalaureate nursing students, utilizing the entire hardiness intervention, was recommended

  18. Hardy's criterion of nonlocality for mixed states

    SciTech Connect

    Ghirardi, GianCarlo; Marinatto, Luca

    2006-03-15

    We generalize Hardy's proof of nonlocality to the case of bipartite mixed statistical operators, and we exhibit a necessary condition which has to be satisfied by any given mixed state {sigma} in order that a local and realistic hidden variable model exists which accounts for the quantum mechanical predictions implied by {sigma}. Failure of this condition will imply both the impossibility of any local explanation of certain joint probability distributions in terms of hidden variables and the nonseparability of the considered mixed statistical operator. Our result can be also used to determine the maximum amount of noise, arising from imperfect experimental implementations of the original Hardy's proof of nonlocality, in presence of which it is still possible to put into evidence the nonlocal features of certain mixed states.

  19. FMA Live! at Hardy Middle School

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-16

    Leland Melvin, NASA Associate Administrator for Education and former 2x astronaut, is interviewed by a news crew before the start of a "FMA Live!" event at Hardy Middle School in Washington on Monday, Sept. 16th, 2013. "FMA Live!" is a program sponsored by NASA and Honeywell that teaches Newton's 3 laws of motion mixed with dance and music. The program travels across the country and has reached nearly 300,000 students. Photo Credit: (NASA/Jay Westcott)

  20. FMA Live! at Hardy Middle School

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-16

    With the help of a student participant, "FMA Live!" crew members explain Newton's first law of motion during a performance of "FMA Live!" at Hardy Middle School in Washington on Monday, Sept. 16th, 2013. "FMA Live!" is a program sponsored by NASA and Honeywell that teaches Newton's three laws of motion mixed with dance and music. The program travels across the country and has reached nearly 300,000 students.Photo Credit: (NASA/Jay Westcott)

  1. FMA Live! at Hardy Middle School

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-16

    With the help of a student participant, "FMA Live!" crew members explain Newton's second law of motion during a performance of "FMA Live!" at Hardy Middle School in Washington on Monday, Sept. 16th, 2013. "FMA Live!" is a program sponsored by NASA and Honeywell that teaches Newton's three laws of motion mixed with dance and music. The program travels across the country and has reached nearly 300,000 students.Photo Credit: (NASA/Jay Westcott)

  2. Are Optimistic Repatriates More Hardy and Resilient?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-05

    buffering effect of hardiness is shown in decreasing mental and physical illness symptoms, whether these be self-reported or more objectively measured...Repatriated Prisoners of War (RPWs). Optimism is associated with increased positive psychological health in those afflicted by extreme trauma or illness ...is associated with increased positive psychological health in those afflicted by extreme trauma or illness (Segovia et. al, 2012). In the follow-up

  3. FMA Live! at Hardy Middle School

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-16

    Tom Buckmaster, President, Honeywell Hometown Solutions and Leland Melvin, NASA Associate Administrator for Education and former 2x astronaut, are interviewed before the start of "FMA Live!" at Hardy Middle School in Washington on Monday, Sept. 16th, 2013. "FMA Live!" is a program sponsored by NASA and Honeywell that teaches Newton's three laws of motion mixed with dance and music. The program travels across the country and has reached nearly 300,000 students.Photo Credit: (NASA/Jay Westcott)

  4. FMA Live! at Hardy Middle School

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-16

    Performers dance and sing during a performance of "FMA Live!" at Hardy Middle School in Washington on Monday, Sept. 16th, 2013. "FMA Live!" is a program sponsored by NASA and Honeywell that teaches Newton's three laws of motion mixed with dance and music. The program travels across the country and has reached nearly 300,000 students.Photo Credit: (NASA/Jay Westcott)

  5. FMA Live! at Hardy Middle School

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-16

    Leland Melvin, NASA Associate Administrator for Education and former 2x astronaut, addresses students before the start of "FMA Live!" at Hardy Middle School in Washington on Monday, Sept. 16th, 2013. "FMA Live!" is a program sponsored by NASA and Honeywell that teaches Newton's three laws of motion mixed with dance and music. The program travels across the country and has reached nearly 300,000 students.Photo Credit: (NASA/Jay Westcott)

  6. FMA Live! at Hardy Middle School

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-16

    A teacher gets dunked with apple sauce during a performance of "FMA Live!" at Hardy Middle School in Washington on Monday, Sept. 16th, 2013. "FMA Live!" is a program sponsored by NASA and Honeywell that teaches Newton's three laws of motion mixed with dance and music. The program travels across the country and has reached nearly 300,000 students.Photo Credit: (NASA/Jay Westcott)

  7. Sobolev and Hardy-Littlewood-Sobolev inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolbeault, Jean; Jankowiak, Gaspard

    2014-09-01

    This paper is devoted to improvements of Sobolev and Onofri inequalities. The additional terms involve the dual counterparts, i.e. Hardy-Littlewood-Sobolev type inequalities. The Onofri inequality is achieved as a limit case of Sobolev type inequalities. Then we focus our attention on the constants in our improved Sobolev inequalities, that can be estimated by completion of the square methods. Our estimates rely on nonlinear flows and spectral problems based on a linearization around optimal Aubin-Talenti functions.

  8. The Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium--Some Helpful Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Mary T.; Taras, Loretta; Stavroulakis, Anthea M.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an approach that provides mathematical tips and helpful suggestions for presenting the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium to predict allele frequencies, phenotypes, and genotypes in populations. (ASK)

  9. Lidar-based fracture characterization: An outcrop-scale study of the Woodford Shale, McAlister Shale Pit, Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanzel, Jason

    The use of lidar (light detection and ranging), a remote sensing tool based on principles of laser optometry, in mapping complex, multi-scale fracture networks had not been rigorously tested prior to this study despite its foreseeable utility in interpreting rock fabric with imprints of complex tectonic evolution. This thesis demonstrates lidar-based characterization of the Woodford Shale where intense fracturing could be due to both tectonism and mineralogy. The study area is the McAlister Shale Pit in south-central Oklahoma where both the upper and middle sections of the Woodford Shale are exposed and can be lidar-mapped. Lidar results are validated using hand-measured strike and dips of fracture planes, thin sections and mineral chemistry of selected samples using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Complexity of the fracture patterns as well as inaccessibility of multiple locations within the shale pit makes hand-measurement prone to errors and biases; lidar provides an opportunity for less biased and more efficient field mapping. Fracture mapping with lidar is a multi-step process. The lidar data are converted from point clouds into a mesh through triangulation. User-defined parameters such as size and orientation of the individual triangular elements are then used to group similar elements into surfaces. The strike and dip attribute of the simulated surfaces are visualized in an equal area lower hemisphere projection stereonet. Three fracture sets were identified in the upper and middle sections with common orientation but substantially different spatial density. Measured surface attributes and spatial density relations from lidar were validated using their hand-measured counterparts. Thin section analysis suggests that high fracture density in the upper Woodford measured by both the lidar and the hand-measured data could be due to high quartz. A significant finding of this study is the reciprocal relation between lidar intensity and gamma-ray (GR), which is generally

  10. Adult Attachment Style, Hardiness, and Mood

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    strange sit- uation” scenario (Ainsworth & Wittig, 1969). By studying how individual children reacted to the same situation, Ains- worth was able to...Solomon (1986) which they called Insecure-Disorganized/Disoriented. Children classified into this attachment category may appear con- fused and dazed in...Separated 72 5.6 Divorced 76 5.9 Widowed 3 0.2 ADULT ATTACHMENT STYLE, HARDINESS, AND MOOD 131 D ow nl oa de d by [ Pa ul T . B ar to ne ] at 1 2: 35

  11. The Role of Hardiness in the Resolution of Grief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Jane; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Investigated relation of personality factor of hardiness to resolution of grief. In anonymous sample of 70 widows, hardiness was significant predictor of grief resolution in addition to general mental health, time since death, and widow's age. Whether death was expected did not relate to course of resolution. (Author/NB)

  12. Hardy type inequalities in [Formula: see text] with sharp remainders.

    PubMed

    Ioku, Norisuke; Ishiwata, Michinori; Ozawa, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    Sharp remainder terms are explicitly given on the standard Hardy inequalities in [Formula: see text] with [Formula: see text]. Those remainder terms provide a direct and exact understanding of Hardy type inequalities in the framework of equalities as well as of the nonexistence of nontrivial extremals.

  13. Hardy-Littlewood-Sobolev inequalities via fast diffusion flows

    PubMed Central

    Carlen, Eric A.; Carrillo, José A.; Loss, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We give a simple proof of the λ = d - 2 cases of the sharp Hardy-Littlewood-Sobolev inequality for d≥3, and the sharp Logarithmic Hardy-Littlewood-Sobolev inequality for d = 2 via a monotone flow governed by the fast diffusion equation. PMID:21041663

  14. The Hardy-Morrey & Hardy-John-Nirenberg inequalities involving distance to the boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippas, Stathis; Psaradakis, Georgios

    2016-09-01

    We strengthen the classical inequality of C.B. Morrey concerning the optimal Hölder continuity of functions in W 1 , p when p > n, by replacing the Lp-modulus of the gradient with the sharp Hardy difference involving distance to the boundary. When p = n we do the same strengthening in the integral form of a well known inequality due to F. John and L. Nirenberg.

  15. Probabilistic ODF Estimation from Reduced HARDI Data with Sparse Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Tristán-Vega, Antonio; Westin, Carl-Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging (HARDI) demands a higher amount of data measurements compared to Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), restricting its use in practice. We propose to represent the probabilistic Orientation Distribution Function (ODF) in the frame of Spherical Wavelets (SW), where it is highly sparse. From a reduced subset of measurements (nearly four times less than the standard for HARDI), we pose the estimation as an inverse problem with sparsity regularization. This allows the fast computation of a positive, unit-mass, probabilistic ODF from 14–16 samples, as we show with both synthetic diffusion signals and real HARDI data with typical parameters. PMID:21995028

  16. Contribution of Hardiness and School Climate to Alienation Experienced by Student Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, William C.; Wendt, Janice C.

    1995-01-01

    This study examined relationships between hardiness and school climate in contributing to student teacher alienation. Survey results from 106 student teachers indicated that hardiness significantly affected alienation. Alienation levels of high-hardy students decreased in more supportive school climates. Low-hardy students increased in alienation…

  17. Hardy's proof of nonlocality in the presence of noise

    SciTech Connect

    Ghirardi, GianCarlo; Marinatto, Luca

    2006-12-15

    We extend the validity of Hardy's nonlocality without inequalities proof to cover the case of special one-parameter classes of nonpure statistical operators. These mixed states are obtained by mixing the Hardy states with a completely chaotic noise or with a colored noise and they represent a realistic description of imperfect preparation processes of (pure) Hardy states in nonlocality experiments. Within such a framework we are able to exhibit a precise range of values of the parameter measuring the noise affecting the nonoptimal preparation of an arbitrary Hardy state, for which it is still possible to put into evidence genuine nonlocal effects. Equivalently, our work exhibits particular classes of bipartite mixed states whose constituents do not admit any local and deterministic hidden variable model reproducing the quantum mechanical predictions.

  18. Weighted Multilinear Hardy Operators on Herz Type Spaces

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bolin

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the bounds of weighted multilinear Hardy operators on the product Herz spaces and the product Morrey-Herz spaces, respectively. We present a sufficient condition on the weight function that guarantees weighted multilinear Hardy operators to be bounded on the product Herz spaces. And the condition is necessary under certain assumptions. Finally, we extend the obtained results to the product Morrey-Herz spaces. PMID:24511285

  19. Semigroups of Operators on Hardy Spaces and Cocycles of Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    has used the correspondence between one-parameter flows on the disk and their infinitesimal generators to prove the subnormality of the Cesaro oper...ator on Hardy spaces of the unit disk. Siskakis [S1] has studied weighted Cesaro operators on Hardy and Bergman spaces. Finally, Berkson and Porta [BP...Subnormality of the Cesaro operator and a semigroup of composition operators, Indiana Univ. Math. J., 33 (1984), 305-318. [CM] C. C. Cowen and B. D

  20. Semigroups of Operators on Hardy Spaces and Cocycles of Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    used the correspondence between one-parameter flows on the disk and their infinitesimal generators to prove the subnormality of the Cesaro op- erator...on Hardy spaces of the unit disk. Siskakis [?] has studied weighted Cesaro operators on Hardy and Bergman spaces. Finally, Berkson and Porta [?], who...Math. Soc. 265 (1981), 69-95. [C2] C. C. Cowen, Subnormality of the Cesaro operator and a semigroup of composition operators, Indiana Univ. Math. J

  1. Defense Horizons. To Build Resilience: Leader Influence on Mental Hardiness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    Influence on Mental Hardiness by Paul T. Bartone, Charles L. Barry, and Robert E. Armstrong A publication of the Center for Technology and National...Afghanistan, Mental Health Problems, and Barriers to Care,” New England Journal of Medicine 351 (July 1, 2004), 13–22. While exposure to combat stressors no...and Hardiness,” in Interventions Following Mass Violence and Disasters: Strategies for Mental Health Practice, ed. E.C. Ritchie, M.J. Friedman, and

  2. Exact tests for Hardy-Weinberg proportions.

    PubMed

    Engels, William R

    2009-12-01

    Exact conditional tests are often required to evaluate statistically whether a sample of diploids comes from a population with Hardy-Weinberg proportions or to confirm the accuracy of genotype assignments. This requirement is especially common when the sample includes multiple alleles and sparse data, thus rendering asymptotic methods, such as the common chi(2)-test, unreliable. Such an exact test can be performed using the likelihood ratio as its test statistic rather than the more commonly used probability test. Conceptual advantages in using the likelihood ratio are discussed. A substantially improved algorithm is described to permit the performance of a full-enumeration exact test on sample sizes that are too large for previous methods. An improved Monte Carlo algorithm is also proposed for samples that preclude full enumeration. These algorithms are about two orders of magnitude faster than those currently in use. Finally, methods are derived to compute the number of possible samples with a given set of allele counts, a useful quantity for evaluating the feasibility of the full enumeration procedure. Software implementing these methods, ExactoHW, is provided.

  3. Geology of Northeastern Hardy County, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, S.L.; Fisher, R.R. . Dept. of Geology); Kulander, B.R. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Lessing, P. ); Kurtz, M.P. . Dept. of Geology and Geography); Orzechowski, M.L. )

    1994-03-01

    The Baker, Needmore and Wolf Gap 7.5-minute quadrangles, are located in the Valley and Ridge province of Hardy County, West Virginia. These quadrangles cover the geology of the Cacapon Mountain anticlinorium on the east and the Broadtop synclinorium on the west. Stratigraphically, the Paleozoic section is exposed from the Upper Ordovician Martinsburg Formation to Lower Mississippian Purslane Sandstone. The Cacapon Mountain structure developed by longitudinal ramping from the Lower Cambrian Waynesboro (i.e. Rome) decollement level to the Upper Ordovician Martinsburg detachment horizon. Longitudinal ramping from the Waynesboro to Martinsburg level under Whip Cove anticline (west) along the western flank of Broadtop synclinorium has resulted in the Broadtop overthrust sheet of Jacobeen and Kanes (1974, 1975), which duplicates the Lower Paleozoic section westward to the Bedford syncline. Anderson Ridge anticline in the Cacapon Mountain anticlinorium complex has been redesignated Trout Run anticlinorium because of recent detailed mapping. Short wave length folds developed in the largely incompetent Silurian and Devonian section in the Cacapon Mountain anticlinorium. Also of significance in this structure are extensive thrust faults and back thrusts on Halfmoon Mountain at the northern plunge-out of Trout run anticlinorium. Early layer-parallel shortening values were obtained from fossil deformation and intergranular strain studies, determined by Rf/[O] and Fry analyses of 42 rock samples from the Chemung Formation in the Broadtop synclinorium. Shortening averaged 13%, assuming constant volume.

  4. Hardiness and its Role in the Stress-Burnout Relationship among Prospective Chinese Teachers in Hong Kong.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, David W.

    2003-01-01

    Assessed hardiness, stress, and burnout among Chinese preservice teachers. Different responses to positively and negatively worded hardiness items suggested positive and negative hardiness stress resilience and stress vulnerability. Stress, positive hardiness, and negative hardiness had main, independent significant impact on emotional exhaustion…

  5. [Cold hardiness of Pinus ponderosa, P. banksian and P. tabulaeformis].

    PubMed

    Gong, Yuehua; Zhou, Yongxue; Fan, Junfeng; Liu, Yingzhou; Pang, Kejia

    2006-08-01

    By the method of artificial freezing, this paper made a comparative study on the cold hardiness of Pinus ponderosa, P. banksiana and P. tabulaeformis, with their inherent mechanisms approached. The results showed that the cold hardiness of these three species was in the sequence of P. banksiana > P. tabulaeformis > P. ponderosa. P. banksiana had high bound water/free water ratio (7.0) and ABA content (164.3 microg x g(-1) FW) but low K+ (2450 microg x g(-1) DW) and soluble sugar (12.0%) , P. tabulaeformis had higher contents of ABA (95.8 microg x g(-1) FW), K+ (4538 microg x g(-1) DW) and soluble sugar (18.68%) but low bound water/free water ratio (2.58), while P. ponderosa had high soluble sugar content (18.05%) but low bound water/free water ratio (2.18) and K+ (2275 microg x g(-1) DW) and ABA (63.3 microg x g(-1) FW) contents. These differences might be the reasons resulting in the different cold hardiness of these three species. Low chlorophyll content and high carotenoid/chlorophyll ratio might also contribute to the cold hardiness of P. banksiana. Therefore, though the test species are all of cold hardiness, their inherent mechanisms may be different.

  6. Local orthogonality provides a tight upper bound for Hardy's nonlocality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Subhadipa; Banik, Manik; Gazi, Md. Rajjak; Rai, Ashutosh; Kunkri, Samir

    2013-12-01

    The amount of nonlocality in quantum theory is limited compared to that allowed in generalized no-signaling theory [S. Popescu and D. Rohrlich, Found. Phys.FNDPA40015-901810.1007/BF02058098 24, 379 (1994)]. This feature, for example, gets manifested in the amount of Bell inequality violation as well as in the degree of success probability of Hardy's (Cabello's) nonlocality argument. Physical principles like information causality and macroscopic locality have been proposed for analyzing restricted nonlocality in quantum mechanics, viz. explaining the Cirel'son bound. However, these principles are not very successful in explaining the maximum success probability of Hardy's as well as Cabello's argument in quantum theory. Here we show that a recently proposed physical principle, namely local orthogonality, does better by providing a tighter upper bound on the success probability for Hardy's nonlocality. This bound is relatively closer to the corresponding quantum value compared to the bounds achieved from other principles.

  7. SPHERE: SPherical Harmonic Elastic REgistration of HARDI data.

    PubMed

    Yap, Pew-Thian; Chen, Yasheng; An, Hongyu; Yang, Yang; Gilmore, John H; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2011-03-15

    In contrast to the more common Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging (HARDI) allows superior delineation of angular microstructures of brain white matter, and makes possible multiple-fiber modeling of each voxel for better characterization of brain connectivity. However, the complex orientation information afforded by HARDI makes registration of HARDI images more complicated than scalar images. In particular, the question of how much orientation information is needed for satisfactory alignment has not been sufficiently addressed. Low order orientation representation is generally more robust than high order representation, although the latter provides more information for correct alignment of fiber pathways. However, high order representation, when naïvely utilized, might not necessarily be conducive to improving registration accuracy since similar structures with significant orientation differences prior to proper alignment might be mistakenly taken as non-matching structures. We present in this paper a HARDI registration algorithm, called SPherical Harmonic Elastic REgistration (SPHERE), which in a principled means hierarchically extracts orientation information from HARDI data for structural alignment. The image volumes are first registered using robust, relatively direction invariant features derived from the Orientation Distribution Function (ODF), and the alignment is then further refined using spherical harmonic (SH) representation with gradually increasing orders. This progression from non-directional, single-directional to multi-directional representation provides a systematic means of extracting directional information given by diffusion-weighted imaging. Coupled with a template-subject-consistent soft-correspondence-matching scheme, this approach allows robust and accurate alignment of HARDI data. Experimental results show marked increase in accuracy over a state-of-the-art DTI registration algorithm. Copyright © 2010

  8. SPHERE: SPherical Harmonic Elastic REgistration of HARDI Data

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Pew-Thian; Chen, Yasheng; An, Hongyu; Yang, Yang; Gilmore, John H.; Lin, Weili

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to the more common Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging (HARDI) allows superior delineation of angular microstructures of brain white matter, and makes possible multiple-fiber modeling of each voxel for better characterization of brain connectivity. However, the complex orientation information afforded by HARDI makes registration of HARDI images more complicated than scalar images. In particular, the question of how much orientation information is needed for satisfactory alignment has not been sufficiently addressed. Low order orientation representation is generally more robust than high order representation, although the latter provides more information for correct alignment of fiber pathways. However, high order representation, when naïvely utilized, might not necessarily be conducive to improving registration accuracy since similar structures with significant orientation differences prior to proper alignment might be mistakenly taken as non-matching structures. We present in this paper a HARDI registration algorithm, called SPherical Harmonic Elastic REgistration (SPHERE), which in a principled means hierarchically extracts orientation information from HARDI data for structural alignment. The image volumes are first registered using robust, relatively direction invariant features derived from the Orientation Distribution Function (ODF), and the alignment is then further refined using spherical harmonic (SH) representation with gradually increasing orders. This progression from non-directional, single-directional to multi-directional representation provides a systematic means of extracting directional information given by diffusion-weighted imaging. Coupled with a template-subject-consistent soft-correspondence-matching scheme, this approach allows robust and accurate alignment of HARDI data. Experimental results show marked increase in accuracy over a state-of-the-art DTI registration algorithm. PMID:21147231

  9. Consequences and applications of the completeness of Hardy's nonlocality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Shane

    2017-02-01

    Logical nonlocality is completely characterized by Hardy's "paradox" in (2 ,2 ,l ) and (2 ,k ,2 ) scenarios. We consider a variety of consequences and applications of this fact. (i) Polynomial algorithms may be given for deciding logical nonlocality in these scenarios. (ii) Bell states are the only entangled two-qubit states which are not logically nonlocal under projective measurements. (iii) It is possible to witness Hardy nonlocality with certainty in a simple tripartite quantum system. (iv) Noncommutativity of observables is necessary and sufficient for enabling logical nonlocality.

  10. The relation between Hardy's non-locality and violation of Bell inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yang

    2011-06-01

    We give an analytic quantitative relation between Hardy's non-locality and Bell operator. We find that Hardy's non-locality is a sufficient condition for the violation of Bell inequality, the upper bound of Hardy's non-locality allowed by information causality just corresponds to Tsirelson bound of Bell inequality and the upper bound of Hardy's non-locality allowed by the principle of no-signaling just corresponds to the algebraic maximum of Bell operator. Then we study the Cabello's argument of Hardy's non-locality (a generalization of Hardy's argument) and find a similar relation between it and violation of Bell inequality. Finally, we give a simple derivation of the bound of Hardy's non-locality under the constraint of information causality with the aid of the above derived relation between Hardy's non-locality and Bell operator.

  11. HSC Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... with unique care challenges in the surrounding Washington, DC area: Health Services for Children with Special Needs, ... and young adults with disabilities in the Washington, DC area through a network of community partners. /foundation/ ...

  12. Marfan Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Marfan Foundation Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are Related Disorders? What are the Signs? ... Click to see what's happening around the country! Marfan syndrome is a life-threatening genetic disorder, and an ...

  13. Vasculitis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you think. More serious than you know. Support. Awareness. Education. Become a member today! Our Mission The ... Foundation supports and empowers our community through education, awareness and research. Contact Us Click here to send ...

  14. Critical Reception of Thomas Hardy's Short Stories: Finding "The Key to the Art."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heber, Janice Stewart

    Thomas Hardy has received great acclaim as a poet and novelist, but his short stories have remained largely ignored with regard to the usual short story "canon." Early reviews of Hardy's stories were mixed, but after his death the tide of critical opinion tended to turn against Hardy's stories. A significant historical factor was the…

  15. Nursery culture impacts cold hardiness in longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) seedlings

    Treesearch

    Anthony S. Davis; Amy L. Ross-Davis; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2011-01-01

    Success in restoring longleaf pine ecosystems depends on outplanting high-quality longleaf pine seedlings. One important and relatively understudied attribute of seedling quality is cold hardiness. A suite of trials was conducted to investigate the influence of common nursery cultural practices on longleaf pine cold hardiness. Cold hardiness was increased with higher...

  16. Enhancing hardiness among health-care workers: the perceptions of senior managers.

    PubMed

    Hague, Ann; Leggat, Sandra G

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to understand 'hardiness' as defined and operationalized by senior health executives, and to explore the options for increasing the hardiness of the health-care workforce. Previous research has shown that hardiness is important in the workplace as a means to reduce or avoid the negative impact of stress, which then has an association with the maintenance of individual health. Hardiness has been thought to play an important role in assisting health-care workers deal with emotional and stressful work environments. In depth interviews were conducted with senior managers in a Victorian health service to explore hardiness and determine whether the senior executives had identified hardiness as a factor related to performance, how they recognized it within their staff and how hardiness might be enhanced within the organization. The senior managers were able to identify hardy members of their staff, whom they largely described as high performers. We argue that there is opportunity to strengthen health-care organizations by identifying and supporting hardy staff members. Our findings suggest that health-care organizations can teach the concept of hardiness, select hardy employees and develop strategies to assist employees to increase their levels of hardiness in the workplace.

  17. Quantitative Trait Loci and Epistasis for Oat Winter Hardiness Component Traits

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Winter hardiness is a complex trait and poor winter hardiness limits commercial production of winter oat (Avena species). The objective of this study was to identify Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) for five winter hardiness component traits in a recombinant inbred line population derived from a cross ...

  18. Geographic trend of bud hardiness response in Vitis riparia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A major goal of grapevine breeding efforts for production outside of Mediterranean climates is the production of varieties that have cold tolerance phenotypes. Typically, grapevine breeders use midwinter bud hardiness measures as the descriptive phenotype for cold tolerance. Historical practices of...

  19. Personality Hardiness as a Predictor of Officer Cadet Leadership Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    References: 1995; Salovey & Mayer , 1990). Bartone, P.T. (1999). Hardiness protects against war- Additional work is needed to evaluate the related...States Military Academy, West Point, New York. Salovey , P. & Mayer , J.D. (1990). Emotional intelligence. Imagination, Cognition and Contrada, R.J

  20. Revisiting the Academic Hardiness Scale: Revision and Revalidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creed, Peter A.; Conlon, Elizabeth G.; Dhaliwal, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    We used two studies to evaluate, modify, and provide initial validation for a revised Academic Hardiness scale. First, 16 experts rated scale items for content validity and identified two problematic questions. Second, confirmatory factor analyses with 300 Grade 10 students (46% boys, age range 14-17) identified a 17-item version to be the best…

  1. Cold hardiness of Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) pupae

    Treesearch

    A.C. Morey; W.D. Hutchison; R.C. Venette; E.C. Burkness

    2012-01-01

    An insect's cold hardiness affects its potential to overwinter and outbreak in different geographic regions. In this study, we characterized the response of Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) pupae to low temperatures by using controlled laboratory measurements of supercooling point (SCP), lower lethal temperature (LT50), and lower...

  2. Predicting Eating Disorder Continuum Groups: Hardiness and College Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon-Boyd, Gail D.; Bieschke, Kathleen J.

    This study examined relationships between hardiness, college adjustment (academic adjustment, social adjustment, personal-emotional adjustment, institutional attachment) and eating disorder (ED) continuum categories in 122 female and 20 male college students. Students who exhibited a higher level of personal-emotional adjustment (PEA) to college…

  3. Production of Hardy Garden Mums in WholeTree Substrate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A substrate component (WholeTree) made from loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) was evaluated along with supplemental supplemental fertilizer rates in container-grown hardy garden chrysanthemum. Loblolly pine were harvested at ground level, chipped and further processed through a hammer mill to pass a 0.25 ...

  4. Root cold hardiness and native distribution of subalpine conifers

    Treesearch

    Mark D. Coleman; Thomas M. Hinckley; Geoffrey McNaughton; Barbara A. Smit

    1992-01-01

    Root and needle cold hardiness were compared in seedlings of subalpine conifers to determine if differences existed among species originating from either cold continental climates or mild maritime climates. Abies amabilis (Dougl.) Carr. and Tsuga mertensiana (Bong.) Carr. are exclusively distributed in maritime environments,...

  5. Growth, Flowering and Cold Hardiness of Rockrose in Western Oregon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ninety-three species, cultivars, and hybrid selections of Cistus spp. L., Halimium spp. Spach. (Dunal) and ×Halimiocistus spp. Janch. were evaluated for growth, flowering, and cold hardiness in a landscape trial in Aurora, OR, from 2004 to 2009. Plants were irrigated to aid establishment when plant...

  6. On the best possible remaining term in the Hardy inequality

    PubMed Central

    Ghoussoub, Nassif; Moradifam, Amir

    2008-01-01

    We give a necessary and sufficient condition on a radially symmetric potential V on a bounded domain Ω of ℝn that makes it an admissible candidate for an improved Hardy inequality of the following type. For every ∈ H10(Ω) A characterization of the best possible constant c(V) is also given. This result yields easily the improved Hardy's inequalities of Brezis-Vázquez [Brezis H, Vázquez JL (1997) Blow up solutions of some nonlinear elliptic problems. Revista Mat Univ Complutense Madrid 10:443–469], Adimurthi et al. [Adimurthi, Chaudhuri N, Ramaswamy N (2002) An improved Hardy Sobolev inequality and its applications. Proc Am Math Soc 130:489–505], and Filippas-Tertikas [Filippas S, Tertikas A (2002) Optimizing improved Hardy inequalities. J Funct Anal 192:186–233] as well as the corresponding best constants. Our approach clarifies the issue behind the lack of an optimal improvement while yielding the following sharpening of known integrability criteria: If a positive radial function V satisfies lim infr→oln(r)∫ro,sV(s)ds>−∞,then there exists ρ:=ρ(Ω) > 0 such that the above inequality holds for the scaled potential vρ(x)=v(|x|ρ).On the other hand, if lim r→0 ln(r)∫ro,sV(s)ds=−∞, then there is no ρ > 0 for which the inequality holds for Vρ. PMID:18794534

  7. Hardy's inequalities for the twisted convolution with Laguerre functions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jinsen; He, Jianxun

    2017-01-01

    In this article, two types of Hardy's inequalities for the twisted convolution with Laguerre functions are studied. The proofs are mainly based on an estimate for the Heisenberg left-invariant vectors of the special Hermite functions deduced by the Heisenberg group approach.

  8. Revisiting the Academic Hardiness Scale: Revision and Revalidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creed, Peter A.; Conlon, Elizabeth G.; Dhaliwal, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    We used two studies to evaluate, modify, and provide initial validation for a revised Academic Hardiness scale. First, 16 experts rated scale items for content validity and identified two problematic questions. Second, confirmatory factor analyses with 300 Grade 10 students (46% boys, age range 14-17) identified a 17-item version to be the best…

  9. HARDI DATA DENOISING USING VECTORIAL TOTAL VARIATION AND LOGARITHMIC BARRIER

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yunho; Thompson, Paul M.; Vese, Luminita A.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we wish to denoise HARDI (High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging) data arising in medical brain imaging. Diffusion imaging is a relatively new and powerful method to measure the three-dimensional profile of water diffusion at each point in the brain. These images can be used to reconstruct fiber directions and pathways in the living brain, providing detailed maps of fiber integrity and connectivity. HARDI data is a powerful new extension of diffusion imaging, which goes beyond the diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) model: mathematically, intensity data is given at every voxel and at any direction on the sphere. Unfortunately, HARDI data is usually highly contaminated with noise, depending on the b-value which is a tuning parameter pre-selected to collect the data. Larger b-values help to collect more accurate information in terms of measuring diffusivity, but more noise is generated by many factors as well. So large b-values are preferred, if we can satisfactorily reduce the noise without losing the data structure. Here we propose two variational methods to denoise HARDI data. The first one directly denoises the collected data S, while the second one denoises the so-called sADC (spherical Apparent Diffusion Coefficient), a field of radial functions derived from the data. These two quantities are related by an equation of the form S = SSexp (−b · sADC) (in the noise-free case). By applying these two different models, we will be able to determine which quantity will most accurately preserve data structure after denoising. The theoretical analysis of the proposed models is presented, together with experimental results and comparisons for denoising synthetic and real HARDI data. PMID:20802839

  10. Foundation Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connection: The Journal of the New England Board of Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Nicholas C. Donohue is the new president and CEO of the Quincy, Massachusetts-based Nellie Mae Education Foundation, the largest philanthropy in New England devoted exclusively to education. Donohue has been a classroom teacher, a university trustee, and commissioner of education for the state of New Hampshire. Most recently, he served as special…

  11. Testing Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium: an objective Bayesian analysis.

    PubMed

    Consonni, Guido; Moreno, Elías; Venturini, Sergio

    2011-01-15

    We analyze the general (multiallelic) Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium problem from an objective Bayesian testing standpoint. We argue that for small or moderate sample sizes the answer is rather sensitive to the prior chosen, and this suggests to carry out a sensitivity analysis with respect to the prior. This goal is achieved through the identification of a class of priors specifically designed for this testing problem. In this paper, we consider the class of intrinsic priors under the full model, indexed by a tuning quantity, the training sample size. These priors are objective, satisfy Savage's continuity condition and have proved to behave extremely well for many statistical testing problems. We compute the posterior probability of the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium model for the class of intrinsic priors, assess robustness over the range of plausible answers, as well as stability of the decision in favor of either hypothesis. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Hardy's stargazers and the astronomy of other minds.

    PubMed

    Henchman, A

    2008-01-01

    This essay argues that Thomas Hardy compares the act of observing another person to the scientific practice of observing the stars in order to reveal structural obstacles to accessing other minds. He draws on astronomy and optics to underscore the discrepancy between the full perception one has of one's own consciousness and the lack of such sensory evidence for the consciousness of others. His scenes of stargazing show such obstacles being temporarily overcome; the stargazer turns away from the thick sensory detail of earthly life and uses minimal visual information as a jumping-off point for the imagination. These visual journeys into space are analogous to those Hardy's readers experience as he wrests them out of their bodies into imaginary landscapes and unfamiliar minds.

  13. Uncertainty Visualization in HARDI based on Ensembles of ODFs

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Fangxiang; Phillips, Jeff M.; Gur, Yaniv; Johnson, Chris R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new and accurate technique for uncertainty analysis and uncertainty visualization based on fiber orientation distribution function (ODF) glyphs, associated with high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI). Our visualization applies volume rendering techniques to an ensemble of 3D ODF glyphs, which we call SIP functions of diffusion shapes, to capture their variability due to underlying uncertainty. This rendering elucidates the complex heteroscedastic structural variation in these shapes. Furthermore, we quantify the extent of this variation by measuring the fraction of the volume of these shapes, which is consistent across all noise levels, the certain volume ratio. Our uncertainty analysis and visualization framework is then applied to synthetic data, as well as to HARDI human-brain data, to study the impact of various image acquisition parameters and background noise levels on the diffusion shapes. PMID:24466504

  14. The Protective Value of Hardiness on Military Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    stressful oc- cupations to cognitively appraise stressors more positively , thereby negating some of the detri- mental health effects of stress... health screening outcomes in US Army soldiers. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 70, 1266 –1272. doi:10.4088/JCP .08m04361 Reivich, K. J., Seligman , M. E. P... positively related to PTSD symptoms. Hardiness moderated the effects of time in the military on PTSD symptoms, such that time in the military had no

  15. On the best possible remaining term in the Hardy inequality.

    PubMed

    Ghoussoub, Nassif; Moradifam, Amir

    2008-09-16

    We give a necessary and sufficient condition on a radially symmetric potential V on a bounded domain Omega of (n) that makes it an admissible candidate for an improved Hardy inequality of the following type. For every element in H(1)(0)(Omega) integral(Omega) |vector differential u|2 dx - ((n - 2)/2)2 integral(Omega) |u|2/|x|2 dx > or = c integral(Omega) V(x)|u|2 dx. A characterization of the best possible constant c(V) is also given. This result yields easily the improved Hardy's inequalities of Brezis-Vázquez [Brezis H, Vázquez JL (1997) Blow up solutions of some nonlinear elliptic problems. Revista Mat Univ Complutense Madrid 10:443-469], Adimurthi et al. [Adimurthi, Chaudhuri N, Ramaswamy N (2002) An improved Hardy Sobolev inequality and its applications. Proc Am Math Soc 130:489-505], and Filippas-Tertikas [Filippas S, Tertikas A (2002) Optimizing improved Hardy inequalities. J Funct Anal 192:186-233] as well as the corresponding best constants. Our approach clarifies the issue behind the lack of an optimal improvement while yielding the following sharpening of known integrability criteria: If a positive radial function V satisfies lim inf(r-->o) ln(r) integral(r)(o),sV(s) ds > -infinity, then there exists rho: = rho(Omega) > 0 such that the above inequality holds for the scaled potential v(rho)(x) = v((|x|)(rho)). On the other hand, if lim (r-->0) ln(r) integral(r)(o),sV(s) ds = -infinity, then there is no rho > 0 for which the inequality holds for V(rho).

  16. Distributions of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test statistics.

    PubMed

    Rohlfs, R V; Weir, B S

    2008-11-01

    It is well established that test statistics and P-values derived from discrete data, such as genetic markers, are also discrete. In most genetic applications, the null distribution for a discrete test statistic is approximated with a continuous distribution, but this approximation may not be reasonable. In some cases using the continuous approximation for the expected null distribution may cause truly null test statistics to appear nonnull. We explore the implications of using continuous distributions to approximate the discrete distributions of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test statistics and P-values. We derive exact P-value distributions under the null and alternative hypotheses, enabling a more accurate analysis than is possible with continuous approximations. We apply these methods to biological data and find that using continuous distribution theory with exact tests may underestimate the extent of Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium in a sample. The implications may be most important for the widespread use of whole-genome case-control association studies and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) testing for data quality control.

  17. The personality construct of hardiness, III: Relationships with repression, innovativeness, authoritarianism, and performance.

    PubMed

    Maddi, Salvatore R; Harvey, Richard H; Khoshaba, Deborah M; Lu, John L; Persico, Michele; Brow, Marnie

    2006-04-01

    Previous research has established hardiness as a dispositional factor in preserving and enhancing performance and health despite stressful circumstances. The present four studies continue this construct-validational process by (a) introducing a shortened version of the hardiness measure and (b) testing hypotheses concerning the relationship between hardiness and repressive coping, right-wing authoritarianism, innovative behavior, and billable hours (a measure of consulting effectiveness). Results of these studies suggest the adequate reliability and validity of the Personal Views Survey III-R, which is the shortened, 18-item measure of hardiness. Further, results support the hypothesis that the relationship of hardiness is negative with repressive coping and right-wing authoritarianism and positive with innovative behavior and billable hours. Hardiness also appears unrelated to socially desirable responding.

  18. Problem-solving skills and perceived stress among undergraduate students: The moderating role of hardiness.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, Abbas; Abu Talib, Mansor; Carlbring, Per; Harvey, Richard; Yaacob, Siti Nor; Ismail, Zanariah

    2016-06-26

    This study was designed to examine the relationships between problem-solving skills, hardiness, and perceived stress and to test the moderating role of hardiness in the relationship between problem-solving skills and perceived stress among 500 undergraduates from Malaysian public universities. The analyses showed that undergraduates with poor problem-solving confidence, external personal control of emotion, and approach-avoidance style were more likely to report perceived stress. Hardiness moderated the relationships between problem-solving skills and perceived stress. These findings reinforce the importance of moderating role of hardiness as an influencing factor that explains how problem-solving skills affect perceived stress among undergraduates.

  19. Hardy personality and burnout syndrome among nursing students in three Brazilian universities—an analytic study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nursing students may exhibit the characteristics of resistance to stress, such as hardiness, which can reduce the risk of burnout. However, we found only one published study about these phenomena among nursing students. Thus, we investigated the association between hardiness and burnout in such students. Methods An analytic, cross-sectional study was conducted among 570 nursing students from three Brazilian universities. Data were collected relating to sociodemographic characteristics, hardiness, and burnout, which we analyzed using inferential statistics. Results We observed that 64.04% of nursing students in the sample had a high level of emotional exhaustion, 35.79% had a high level of cynicism, and 87.72% had a low level of professional efficacy: these are dimensions of burnout. We also found that 48.77% had a high level of control, 61.40% a high level of commitment, and 35.44% a high level of challenge: these are dimensions of hardiness. Only 24.74% of the students experienced burnout, and 21.93% met the criteria for a hardy personality. There was a statistically significant difference between the frequency of hardiness and burnout (p = 0.033), with 68.00% of hardy students not exhibiting burnout. Conclusions Although nursing students live with educational stressors, burnout was not preponderant in our sample students; this may be linked to hardiness. Thus, given its benefits to student life and health, we recommend the development of strategies to promote hardiness among nursing students. PMID:24678676

  20. Smoke without fire: a reply to Hardy, Segatore and Edge.

    PubMed

    Stones, M J; Turner, K

    1993-12-01

    Literacy is defined in the Oxford English Dictionary as the ability to read and write, and illiteracy as an inability to read. Hardy, Segatore and Edge (1993) suggest a serious problem of illiteracy among student nurses that endangers patient safety. Their evidence is entirely anecdotal, some of which is misclassified as literacy errors. They provide no substantive or statistical evidence to support their claims. Educators making serious and provocative charges on such flimsy grounds ought either to recant or obtain evidence that is more convincing.

  1. Induction of cold hardiness in an invasive herbivore: The case of hemlock woolly adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae)

    Treesearch

    Joseph S. Elkinton; Jeffrey A. Lombardo; Artemis D. Roehrig; Thomas J. McAvoy; Albert Mayfield; Mark Whitmore

    2017-01-01

    As a measure of cold hardiness, we tested the supercooling points or freezing temperatures of individual hemlock woolly adelgids (Adelges tsugae Annand) collected from 15 locations across the north to south range of the adelgid in eastern North America at different times during two winters. Adelgids from the northern interior locations with USDA hardiness zones of 5B–...

  2. Dynamic thermal-time model of cold hardiness for dormant grapevine buds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Grapevine (Vitis spp.) cold hardiness varies dynamically throughout the dormant season, primarily in response to changes in temperature. We describe development and possible uses of a discrete-dynamic model of bud cold hardiness for three Vitis genotypes. Iterative methods were used to optimize and ...

  3. Using an Algorithm When Solving Hardy-Weinberg Problems in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stencel, John E.

    1991-01-01

    A real world sample of actual data that students can use to see the application of the Hardy-Weinberg law to a real population is provided. The directions for using a six-step algorithmic procedure to determine Hardy-Weinberg percentages on the data given are described. (KR)

  4. A Lab Exercise Explaining Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium and Evolution Effectively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winterer, Juliette

    2001-01-01

    Presents a set of six activities in population genetics for a college-level biology course that helps students understand the Hardy-Weinberg principle. Activities focus on characterizing a population, Hardy-Weinberg proportions, genetic drift, mutation and selection, population size and divergence, and secondary contact. The only materials…

  5. A Lab Exercise Explaining Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium and Evolution Effectively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winterer, Juliette

    2001-01-01

    Presents a set of six activities in population genetics for a college-level biology course that helps students understand the Hardy-Weinberg principle. Activities focus on characterizing a population, Hardy-Weinberg proportions, genetic drift, mutation and selection, population size and divergence, and secondary contact. The only materials…

  6. A study of the impacts of climate change scenarios on the plant hardiness zones of Albania

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Maps of plant hardiness zones are useful tools for determining the extreme limits for the survival of plants. Exploration of projected climate change effects on hardiness zones can help identify areas most affected by climate change. Such studies are important in areas with high risks related to cli...

  7. Hardiness and the Big Five Personality Traits among Chinese University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Li-fang

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the construct of hardiness with the Big Five personality traits among 362 Chinese university students. Participants in the study responded to the Dispositional Hardiness Scale (Bartone, Ursano, Wright, & Ingraham, 1989) and the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (Costa & McCrae, 1992). Results indicate that personality…

  8. Dormancy and cold hardiness transitions in wine grape cultivars Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dormancy and cold hardiness influence grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) susceptibility to cold injury, which is a major cause of economic loss in high latitude growing regions. The objectives of this study were to compare dormancy and cold hardiness transitions in wine grape cultivars considered more (C...

  9. 'Lufkin Red' and 'Lufkin White' winter-hardy hibiscus (Hibiscus x laevis All.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    USDA ARS announces the release of ‘Lufkin Red’ and ‘Lufkin White’ winter-hardy native hibiscuses.Both clones have desirable horticultural traits in combination with demonstrated high levels of field resistance to the leaf spot complex that is problematic on winter-hardy hibiscus clones in areas wit...

  10. Hardiness as a mediator between perceived stress and happiness in nurses.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, A; Abu Talib, M; Yaacob, S N; Ismail, Z

    2014-01-01

    The relevance of the study of happiness and stress in nurses has been emphasized. In this sense, the intelligent use of hardiness is enable nurses to cope better with stress and contribute to being happier. This study aimed to examine the relationship among hardiness, perceived stress, and happiness in nurses. Moreover, we examined the mediator role of hardiness on the relationship between perceived stress and happiness in nurses. Our study revealed that hardi-attitude nurses evaluate situations as less stressful which results in a higher happiness. This study showed hardiness as being a protective factor against perceived stress and a facilitating factor for happiness in nurses. The findings could be important in training future nurses so that hardiness can be imparted, thereby giving them the ability to control their stress. Nursing is a stressful occupation with high levels of stress within the health professions. Given that hardiness is an important construct to enable nurses to cope better with stress and contribute to being happier; therefore, it is necessary we advance our knowledge about the aetiology of happiness, especially the role of hardiness in decreasing stress levels and increasing happiness. The present study sought to investigate the role of hardiness as a mediator between perceived stress and happiness. The participants, comprising 252 nurses from six private hospitals in Tehran, completed the Personal Views Survey, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Oxford Happiness Inventory. Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) was used to analyse the data and answer the research hypotheses. As expected, hardiness partially mediated between perceived stress and happiness among nurses, and nurses with low levels of perceived stress were more likely to report greater hardiness and happiness. In addition, nurses with high levels of hardiness were more likely to report happiness. This study showed hardiness as being a protective factor against perceived stress and

  11. Psychological hardiness and coping style as risk/resilience factors for alcohol abuse.

    PubMed

    Bartone, Paul T; Hystad, Sigurd W; Eid, Jarle; Brevik, John I

    2012-05-01

    Alcohol abuse is a growing problem in the military, and a costly one. The present study evaluates the potential role of psychological hardiness, an individual resilience resource, to stress-related problem drinking in a military population. We assess the association of psychological hardiness and avoidance coping style with alcohol use patterns in a large national sample of Norwegian military defense personnel. Results show that low hardiness and high avoidance coping are significant predictors of alcohol abuse. Also, the challenge facet of hardiness predicts risk of alcohol abuse among respondents with recent deployment experience, and this effect is greater for those with harsh deployment experiences. Older defense workers are also at higher risk, suggesting cumulative occupational stress may take a toll. This research indicates that hardiness and avoidance coping measures may serve as useful adjunct screening tools for alcohol abuse in the military.

  12. Relationships of Hardiness to Physical and Mental Health Status in Military Men: A Test of Mediated Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    associated with PH in military men, and this relationship is mediated by MH. Keywords Hardiness Health Mediated effects Mental health Physical...overarching theoretical model delin- eating complex relationships between hardiness; stress/ strain; mental /physical health ; and associated causal path- ways is...Maddi, 1999), a distinct construct reflecting adverse consequences of cumulative stress. Hardiness, then, associates with aspects of mental health and

  13. Mapping of quantitative trait loci controlling adaptive traits in coastal Douglas-fir.II. Spring and fall cold-hardiness

    Treesearch

    K.D. Jermstad; D.L. Bassoni; N.C. Wheeler; T.S. Anekonda; S.N. Aitken; W.T. Adams; D.B. Neale

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting fall and spring cold-hardiness were identified in a three-generation outbred pedigree of coastal Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga meniziesii (Mirb.) Franco var. menziesii]. Eleven QTLs controlling fall cold-hardiness were detected on four linkage groups, and 15 QTLs controlling spring cold-hardiness were detected on four...

  14. On the Hardy Space Theory of Compensated Compactness Quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, Sauli

    2017-05-01

    We make progress on a problem of Coifman et al. (J Math Pures Appl (9) 72(3): 247-286, 1993) by showing that the Jacobian operator J does not map {W^{1,n}(Rn, Rn) onto the Hardy space H1(Rn) for any {n ≥ 2}. The related question about the surjectivity of {J : dot{W}^{1,n}(Rn,Rn) to H1(Rn) is still open. The second main result and its variants reduce the proof of H1 regularity of a large class of compensated compactness quantities to an integration by parts or easy arithmetic, and applications are presented. Furthermore, we exhibit a class of nonlinear partial differential operators in which weak sequential continuity is a strictly stronger condition than H1 regularity, shedding light on another question of Coifman, Lions, Meyer and Semmes.

  15. Rethinking Hardy-Weinberg and genetic drift in undergraduate biology.

    PubMed

    Masel, Joanna

    2012-08-01

    Population genetics is often taught in introductory biology classes, starting with the Hardy-Weinberg principle (HWP) and genetic drift. Here I argue that teaching these two topics first aligns neither with current expert knowledge, nor with good pedagogy. Student difficulties with mathematics in general, and probability in particular, make population genetics difficult to teach and learn. I recommend an alternative, historically inspired ordering of population genetics topics, based on progressively increasing mathematical difficulty. This progression can facilitate just-in-time math instruction. This alternative ordering includes, but does not privilege, the HWP and genetic drift. Stochastic events whose consequences are felt within a single generation, and the deterministic accumulation of the effects of selection across multiple generations, are both taught before tackling the stochastic accumulation of the effects of accidents of sampling. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Alport Syndrome Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Groups Hear From the Experts Follow us on Facebook! Alport Syndrome Foundation of USA 3 days ago ... by Alport Syndrome Foundation on Flickr! View on Facebook · Share View on Facebook The Alport Syndrome Foundation ...

  17. Proteus Syndrome Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome Foundation The Proteus Syndrome Foundation , a 501c3 ... 1 Trial with ARQ 092 in Proteus Syndrome Proteus Syndrome Patient Registry The Proteus Syndrome Foundation Contact ...

  18. Cesàro operators on Hardy spaces in the unit ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaoqin; Ren, Guangbin

    2008-03-01

    This article establishes the boundedness of the generalized Cesàro operator on holomorphic Hardy spaces in the unit ball. The approach consists in writing the generalized Cesàro operator as a composition of certain integral operators.

  19. Validation of a Newly Developed Instrument Establishing Links Between Motivation and Academic Hardiness.

    PubMed

    Kamtsios, Spiridon; Karagiannopoulou, Evangelia

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish the reliability, the structural and the convergent validity of the "Dimensions of Academic Hardiness Questionnaire" for late elementary school children. A sample of children (N = 1264) aged 10-12 years completed the questionnaire and the "Athens Coping Scale". Multiple fit indices provided support that the 9-factor model had a good fit to the data. Reliability coefficients ranged from .68 to .83. The study provided also preliminary evidence of convergent validity of the "Dimensions of Academic Hardiness" scores with one theoretically related measure, the "Athens Coping Scale". The results enrich the notion of Academic Hardiness in late elementary school children as the role of awareness and the role of children's previous experiences has been distinguished. The relation between the "Dimensions of Academic Hardiness" and achievement goal orientations in children learning is also noted. These findings are discussed in the context of the relevant literature.

  20. Harriet Hardy and the workers of Los Alamos: a campus-community historical investigation.

    PubMed

    Silver, Ken; Bird, Rick; Smith, Alex; Valerio, Daniel; Romero, Hilario

    2014-11-01

    Harriet Hardy, protégé of Alice Hamilton, spent 1948 in the Health Division of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The contemporary campaign for federal legislation to compensate nuclear workers brought to the fore living retirees in whose cases of occupational illness Hardy had a role in diagnosis or case management. A third case is documented in archival records. Methods of participatory action research were used to better document the cases and strategize in light of the evidence, thereby assisting the workers with compensation claims. Medical and neuropsychological exams of the mercury case were conducted. Hardy's diary entries and memoirs were interpreted in light of medicolegal documentation and workers' recollections. Through these participatory research activities, Harriet Hardy's role and influence both inside and outside the atomic weapons complex have been elucidated. An important lesson learned is the ongoing need for a system of protective medical evaluations for nuclear workers with complex chemical exposures.

  1. Cold hardiness increases with age in juvenile Rhododendron populations

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chon-Chong; Krebs, Stephen L.; Arora, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    Winter survival in woody plants is controlled by environmental and genetic factors that affect the plant’s ability to cold acclimate. Because woody perennials are long-lived and often have a prolonged juvenile (pre-flowering) phase, it is conceivable that both chronological and physiological age factors influence adaptive traits such as stress tolerance. This study investigated annual cold hardiness (CH) changes in several hybrid Rhododendron populations based on Tmax, an estimate of the maximum rate of freezing injury (ion leakage) in cold-acclimated leaves from juvenile progeny. Data from F2 and backcross populations derived from R. catawbiense and R. fortunei parents indicated significant annual increases in Tmax ranging from 3.7 to 6.4°C as the seedlings aged from 3 to 5 years old. A similar yearly increase (6.7°C) was observed in comparisons of 1- and 2-year-old F1 progenies from a R. catawbiense × R. dichroanthum cross. In contrast, CH of the mature parent plants (>10 years old) did not change significantly over the same evaluation period. In leaf samples from a natural population of R. maximum, CH evaluations over 2 years resulted in an average Tmax value for juvenile 2- to 3-year-old plants that was 9.2°C lower than the average for mature (~30 years old) plants. A reduction in CH was also observed in three hybrid rhododendron cultivars clonally propagated by rooted cuttings (ramets)—Tmax of 4-year-old ramets was significantly lower than the Tmax estimates for the 30- to 40-year-old source plants (ortets). In both the wild R. maximum population and the hybrid cultivar group, higher accumulation of a cold-acclimation responsive 25 kDa leaf dehydrin was associated with older plants and higher CH. The feasibility of identifying hardy phenotypes at juvenile period and research implications of age-dependent changes in CH are discussed. PMID:25360138

  2. Subject–Motion Correction in HARDI Acquisitions: Choices and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Elhabian, Shireen; Gur, Yaniv; Vachet, Clement; Piven, Joseph; Styner, Martin; Leppert, Ilana R.; Pike, G. Bruce; Gerig, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is known to be prone to artifacts related to motion originating from subject movement, cardiac pulsation, and breathing, but also to mechanical issues such as table vibrations. Given the necessity for rigorous quality control and motion correction, users are often left to use simple heuristics to select correction schemes, which involves simple qualitative viewing of the set of DWI data, or the selection of transformation parameter thresholds for detection of motion outliers. The scientific community offers strong theoretical and experimental work on noise reduction and orientation distribution function (ODF) reconstruction techniques for HARDI data, where post-acquisition motion correction is widely performed, e.g., using the open-source DTIprep software (1), FSL (the FMRIB Software Library) (2), or TORTOISE (3). Nonetheless, effects and consequences of the selection of motion correction schemes on the final analysis, and the eventual risk of introducing confounding factors when comparing populations, are much less known and far beyond simple intuitive guessing. Hence, standard users lack clear guidelines and recommendations in practical settings. This paper reports a comprehensive evaluation framework to systematically assess the outcome of different motion correction choices commonly used by the scientific community on different DWI-derived measures. We make use of human brain HARDI data from a well-controlled motion experiment to simulate various degrees of motion corruption and noise contamination. Choices for correction include exclusion/scrubbing or registration of motion corrupted directions with different choices of interpolation, as well as the option of interpolation of all directions. The comparative evaluation is based on a study of the impact of motion correction using four metrics that quantify (1) similarity of fiber orientation distribution functions (fODFs), (2) deviation of local fiber orientations, (3) global

  3. Images of the Foundations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Kathryn M., Ed.; O'Reilly, Patricia, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This theme issue of the serial "Educational Foundations" contains five articles devoted to the "Images of the Foundations." In "Through the Disarray of Social Foundations: Some Some Notes Toward a New Social Foundations" (Erwin V. Johanningmeier) traces developments in the field and challenges a move beyond the images…

  4. Tolerance to multiple climate stressors: A case study of Douglas-fir drought and cold hardiness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bansal, Sheel; Harrington, Constance A; St. Clair, John Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Summary: 1. Drought and freeze events are two of the most common forms of climate extremes which result in tree damage or death, and the frequency and intensity of both stressors may increase with climate change. Few studies have examined natural covariation in stress tolerance traits to cope with multiple stressors among wild plant populations. 2. We assessed the capacity of coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii), an ecologically and economically important species in the northwestern USA, to tolerate both drought and cold stress on 35 populations grown in common gardens. We used principal components analysis to combine drought and cold hardiness trait data into generalized stress hardiness traits to model geographic variation in hardiness as a function of climate across the Douglas-fir range. 3. Drought and cold hardiness converged among populations along winter temperature gradients and diverged along summer precipitation gradients. Populations originating in regions with cold winters had relatively high tolerance to both drought and cold stress, which is likely due to overlapping adaptations for coping with winter desiccation. Populations from regions with dry summers had increased drought hardiness but reduced cold hardiness, suggesting a trade-off in tolerance mechanisms. 4. Our findings highlight the necessity to look beyond bivariate trait–climate relationships and instead consider multiple traits and climate variables to effectively model and manage for the impacts of climate change on widespread species.

  5. Tolerance to multiple climate stressors: a case study of Douglas-fir drought and cold hardiness.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Sheel; Harrington, Constance A; St Clair, John Bradley

    2016-04-01

    Drought and freeze events are two of the most common forms of climate extremes which result in tree damage or death, and the frequency and intensity of both stressors may increase with climate change. Few studies have examined natural covariation in stress tolerance traits to cope with multiple stressors among wild plant populations.We assessed the capacity of coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii), an ecologically and economically important species in the northwestern USA, to tolerate both drought and cold stress on 35 populations grown in common gardens. We used principal components analysis to combine drought and cold hardiness trait data into generalized stress hardiness traits to model geographic variation in hardiness as a function of climate across the Douglas-fir range.Drought and cold hardiness converged among populations along winter temperature gradients and diverged along summer precipitation gradients. Populations originating in regions with cold winters had relatively high tolerance to both drought and cold stress, which is likely due to overlapping adaptations for coping with winter desiccation. Populations from regions with dry summers had increased drought hardiness but reduced cold hardiness, suggesting a trade-off in tolerance mechanisms.Our findings highlight the necessity to look beyond bivariate trait-climate relationships and instead consider multiple traits and climate variables to effectively model and manage for the impacts of climate change on widespread species.

  6. Frost hardiness of tree species is independent of phenology and macroclimatic niche.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, M; Bruelheide, H

    2015-03-01

    The differences in timing in bud burst between species have been interpreted as an adaptation to late frost events in spring. Thus, it has been suggested that the degree of frost susceptibility of leaves is species-specific and depends on the species' phenology and geographic distribution range. To test for relationships between frost tolerance and phenology as well as between frost tolerance and distribution range across Central European tree species, we studied the frost hardiness of closed buds before bud burst and of freshly opened buds at the time of bud burst. We hypothesized that species with early bud burst and species distributed in eastern and northern areas were more frost tolerant than species with late bud burst and species distributed in western and southern areas. Frost hardiness was estimated by exposing twigs to 11 frost temperatures between -4 °C and -80 °C and by assessing tissue damage by the electrolyte leakage method. In contrast to our hypotheses, neither frost hardiness of closed buds nor frost hardiness of freshly opened buds were related to any variable describing species' macroclimatic niche. Furthermore, frost hardiness of freshly opened buds did not differ among species. Thus, the investigated species with early bud burst take higher risks of frost damage than the species with late bud bursts. These findings indicate that frost hardiness might not play the key role in limiting the geographic distribution ranges previously anticipated.

  7. Character Strengths and Hardiness of Australian Army Special Forces Applicants.

    PubMed

    Gayton, Scott D; Kehoe, E James

    2015-08-01

    Australian Army Special Forces (SF) applicants (N = 95) were asked to rank themselves on 24 character strengths at the start of the selection process. Across all applicants, the character strength of integrity was most frequently assigned a top-four rank (45%), followed by team worker (41%), persistence (36%), and love of learning (25%). Successful applicants assigned a top-four rank to team worker significantly more often than unsuccessful applicants (65% versus 32%). The likelihood of passing when team worker was highly ranked (37.5%) was 2.6 times greater than without team worker listed in the top ranks (14.3%). Self-ratings of hardiness revealed no discernible differences between successful and unsuccessful applicants, either alone or in combination with the team worker rankings. These results were largely consistent with the results of a previous study with a cohort of applicants for a different Australian SF unit. Results are discussed with respect to their implications for enhancing the assessment of SF applicants. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  8. Bayesian methods for examining Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Jon

    2010-03-01

    Testing for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium is ubiquitous and has traditionally been carried out via frequentist approaches. However, the discreteness of the sample space means that uniformity of p-values under the null cannot be assumed, with enumeration of all possible counts, conditional on the minor allele count, offering a computationally expensive way of p-value calibration. In addition, the interpretation of the subsequent p-values, and choice of significance threshold depends critically on sample size, because equilibrium will always be rejected at conventional levels with large sample sizes. We argue for a Bayesian approach using both Bayes factors, and the examination of posterior distributions. We describe simple conjugate approaches, and methods based on importance sampling Monte Carlo. The former are convenient because they yield closed-form expressions for Bayes factors, which allow their application to a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in particular in genome-wide contexts. We also describe straightforward direct sampling methods for examining posterior distributions of parameters of interest. For large numbers of alleles at a locus we resort to Markov chain Monte Carlo. We discuss a number of possibilities for prior specification, and apply the suggested methods to a number of real datasets.

  9. DWI filtering using joint information for DTI and HARDI.

    PubMed

    Tristán-Vega, Antonio; Aja-Fernández, Santiago

    2010-04-01

    The filtering of the Diffusion Weighted Images (DWI) prior to the estimation of the diffusion tensor or other fiber Orientation Distribution Functions (ODF) has been proved to be of paramount importance in the recent literature. More precisely, it has been evidenced that the estimation of the diffusion tensor without a previous filtering stage induces errors which cannot be recovered by further regularization of the tensor field. A number of approaches have been intended to overcome this problem, most of them based on the restoration of each DWI gradient image separately. In this paper we propose a methodology to take advantage of the joint information in the DWI volumes, i.e., the sum of the information given by all DWI channels plus the correlations between them. This way, all the gradient images are filtered together exploiting the first and second order information they share. We adapt this methodology to two filters, namely the Linear Minimum Mean Squared Error (LMMSE) and the Unbiased Non-Local Means (UNLM). These new filters are tested over a wide variety of synthetic and real data showing the convenience of the new approach, especially for High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging (HARDI). Among the techniques presented, the joint LMMSE is proved a very attractive approach, since it shows an accuracy similar to UNLM (or even better in some situations) with a much lighter computational load. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantum Byzantine agreement via Hardy correlations and entanglement swapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, Ramij; Wieśniak, Marcin; Żukowski, Marek

    2015-10-01

    We present a device-independent quantum scheme for the Byzantine generals problem. The protocol is for three parties. Party C is to send two identical one-bit messages to parties A and B . The receivers A and B may exchange two one-bit messages informing the other party on the message received from C . A bit-flipping error in one of the transmissions does not allow the receiving parties to establish what was the message of C . Our quantum protocol is based on Hardy's argument, which uses a set of conditions impossible for classical systems, but satisfied by predictions for a unique two-qubit state. The scheme has the feature that if the messages of the Byzantine protocol are readable (that is give an unambiguous bit value for any of the receivers), then any error by C (cheating by one of the commanding generals) is impossible. A and B do not have to exchange protocol messages to be sure of this.

  11. Reverse altitudinal cline in cold hardiness among Erebia butterflies.

    PubMed

    Vrba, Pavel; Konvicka, Martin; Nedved, Oldrich

    2012-01-01

    There is strong evidence for a shifting of range boundaries by many temperate butterfly species to higher altitudes and latitudes. Climate change represents a potential threat to mountain fauna. Nevertheless, information on ecophysiological limits of individual species is scarce. We studied the lower thermal limits of four species representing the prevailingly mountain Holarctic butterfly genus Erebia. We measured the cold tolerance of hibernating larvae, namely the supercooling point (SCP) and the lower lethal temperature (LLT). Three mountain species were freeze avoiding, with various levels of SCP (-8 to -22 degree C), and LLT close to SCP. The only exception was lowland E. medusa, whose caterpillars were freeze tolerant with LLT (-21 degree C) slightly below its SCP (-17 degree C). Surprisingly, LLT was highest in the alpine E. tyndarus and lowest in E. medusa inhabiting lower altitudes with higher mean winter temperatures. We explain the observed reversed altitudinal cline in cold hardiness by the buffering function of snow cover in the hibernacula of caterpillars that is strong at high mountains but irregular, unpredictable and thus unreliable in lowlands.

  12. Evaluation of IgE binding to proteins of hardy (Actinidia arguta), gold (Actinidia chinensis) and green (Actinidia deliciosa) kiwifruits and processed hardy kiwifruit concentrate, using sera of individuals with food allergies to green kiwifruit.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingyun; Lucas, Jane S; Hourihane, Jonathan O; Lindemann, Julianne; Taylor, Steve L; Goodman, Richard E

    2006-07-01

    Allergy to green kiwifruit has become common since the fruit was introduced in North America and Europe 30 years ago. Gold kiwifruit, more recently introduced commercially, has been shown to bind IgE from some individuals allergic to green kiwifruit. Hardy kiwifruit is a third species that is now cultivated in North America with potential application as a fresh fruit and in processed foods. To compare the IgE binding properties of proteins in hardy kiwifruit extract and processed hardy kiwifruit concentrate to each other and to extracts of green and gold kiwifruits to evaluate the potential for allergic cross-reactions. Sera from kiwifruit-allergic subjects and individuals without allergies to kiwifruit were assayed for IgE binding to soluble proteins in green, gold and hardy kiwifruits and heat-processed concentrate from hardy kiwifruit using immunoblots and direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Marked IgE binding to specific hardy kiwifruit proteins was identified. However, IgE binding to heat-processed hardy kiwifruit concentrate was remarkably lower than to the raw fruit extract. These results suggest that some kiwifruit-allergic individuals may suffer allergic cross-reactions if they consume raw hardy kiwifruit. However, heat processing of the hardy kiwifruit alters allergenic protein structure, dramatically reducing in vitro IgE binding. Processing likely reduces the risk of eliciting an allergic response in those with allergies to raw kiwifruit.

  13. Cold hardiness and deacclimation of overwintering Papilio zelicaon pupae.

    PubMed

    Williams, Caroline M; Nicolai, Annegret; Ferguson, Laura V; Bernards, Mark A; Hellmann, Jessica J; Sinclair, Brent J

    2014-12-01

    Seasonally-acquired cold tolerance can be reversed at warm temperatures, leaving temperate ectotherms vulnerable to cold snaps. However, deacclimation, and its underlying mechanisms, has not been well-explored in insects. Swallowtail butterflies are widely distributed but in some cases their range is limited by low temperature and their cold tolerance is seasonally acquired, implying that they experience mortality resulting from deacclimation. We investigated cold tolerance and hemolymph composition of Anise swallowtail (Papilio zelicaon) pupae during overwintering in the laboratory, and after four days exposure to warm temperatures in spring. Overwintering pupae had supercooling points around -20.5°C and survived brief exposures to -30°C, suggesting partial freeze tolerance. Overwintering pupae had hemolymph osmolality of approximately 920 mOsm, imparted by high concentrations of glycerol, K⁺ and Na⁺. After exposure to spring warming, supercooling points increased to approximately -17°C, and survival of a 1h exposure to -20°C decreased from 100% to 0%. This deacclimation was associated with decreased hemolymph osmolality and reduced glycerol, trehalose, Na⁺ and Ca²⁺ concentrations. We compared cold tolerance of pupae to weather conditions at and beyond the species' northern range boundary. Minimum temperatures at the range boundary approached the lower lethal temperature of pupae, and were colder north of the range, suggesting that cold hardiness may set northern range limits. Minimum temperatures following warm snaps were likely to cause mortality in at least one of the past three years. Cold snaps in the spring are increasing in frequency as a result of global climate change, so are likely to be a significant source of mortality for this species, and other temperate ectotherms.

  14. Involvement of CBF transcription factors in winter hardiness in birch.

    PubMed

    Welling, Annikki; Palva, E Tapio

    2008-07-01

    Cold acclimation of plants involves extensive reprogramming of gene expression. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), three cold-inducible transcriptional activators designated CBF1 to -3/DREB1a to -c have been shown to play an important regulatory role in this acclimation process. Similarly to Arabidopsis, boreal zone trees can increase their freezing tolerance (FT) in response to low temperature during the growing season. However, maximal FT of these trees requires short daylength-induced dormancy development followed by exposure to both low and freezing temperatures. To elucidate the molecular basis of FT in overwintering trees, we characterized the role of birch (Betula pendula) CBF transcription factors in the cold acclimation process. We identified four putative CBF orthologs in a birch expressed sequence tag collection designated BpCBF1 to -4. Ectopic expression of birch CBFs in Arabidopsis resulted in constitutive expression of endogenous CBF target genes and increased FT of nonacclimated transgenic plants. In addition, these plants showed stunted growth and delayed flowering, typical features for CBF-overexpressing plants. Expression analysis in birch showed that BpCBF1 to -4 are low temperature responsive but differentially regulated in dormant and growing plants, the expression being delayed in dormant tissues. Freeze-thaw treatment, simulating wintertime conditions in nature, resulted in strong induction of BpCBF genes during thawing, followed by induction of a CBF target gene, BpLTI36. These results suggest that in addition to their role in cold acclimation during the growing season, birch CBFs appear to contribute to control of winter hardiness in birch.

  15. National Emphysema Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    National Emphysema Foundation (NEF) Skip to content Jump to main navigation and login Nav view search Navigation Search Javascript ... ru - free templates joomla Welcome to the National Emphysema Foundation (NEF) This site is for the benefit ...

  16. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Search How We Work Our Focus Areas About RWJF Search Menu How We Work Grants and Grant ... more For Grantees and Grantseekers The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funds a wide array of programs which ...

  17. Cooley's Anemia Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... role in their lives. Welcome to the Cooley's Anemia Foundation Website The Cooley's Anemia Foundation is dedicated to serving people afflicted with ... major form of this genetic blood disease, Cooley's anemia/thalassemia major. Our mission is advancing the treatment ...

  18. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Search How We Work Our Focus Areas About RWJF Search Menu How We Work Grants and Grant ... message For Grantees and Grantseekers The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funds a wide array of programs which ...

  19. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you insights into your child's treatment. LEARN MORE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation Board Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  20. Foundation for Sarcoidosis Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Clinical Trial Our mission is to stop sarcoidosis — join us. The sarcoidosis community needs your help ... receive periodic emails from the Foundation. Foundation For Sarcoidosis Research 1820 W. Webster Ave., Ste 304 Chicago, ...

  1. Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Better Bones Upcoming Events Online Store What is Osteogenesis Imperfecta? Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a genetic bone disorder ... known as "brittle bone disease." Learn More The Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation The OI Foundation provides medically verified information ...

  2. The Future of Foundations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Lawrence

    1974-01-01

    On account of the Tax Reform Act of 1969 (taxing income of a foundation) foundations have developed more rationale grant-making philosophies, longer term grants, more evaluation of grantees, and greater responsibility on the part of the foundations for grantee survival. (Author/PG)

  3. The Future of Foundations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Lawrence

    1974-01-01

    On account of the Tax Reform Act of 1969 (taxing income of a foundation) foundations have developed more rationale grant-making philosophies, longer term grants, more evaluation of grantees, and greater responsibility on the part of the foundations for grantee survival. (Author/PG)

  4. Induction of Cold Hardiness in an Invasive Herbivore: The Case of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae).

    PubMed

    Elkinton, Joseph S; Lombardo, Jeffrey A; Roehrig, Artemis D; McAvoy, Thomas J; Mayfield, Albert; Whitmore, Mark

    2016-12-19

    As a measure of cold hardiness, we tested the supercooling points or freezing temperatures of individual hemlock woolly adelgids (Adelges tsugae Annand) collected from 15 locations across the north to south range of the adelgid in eastern North America at different times during two winters. Adelgids from the northern interior locations with USDA hardiness zones of 5B-6B had lower supercooling points than adelgids from more southern or more coastal locations (zones 7A and 6B), where minimum winter temperatures were higher. Supercooling points reached a minimum in February in northern but not in southern locations. Laboratory experiments demonstrated that adelgids exposed to colder temperatures (-12 °C) had lower supercooling points after 3 d and adelgids held at 10 °C had higher supercooling points than did adelgids held at 2 °C for the same period. Extending these periods to 7 d produced no further change in supercooling points. Adelgids at northern sites had much lower supercooling points in February 2015 following at least 10 d of much colder weather than adelgids from those same sites in February 2016 following much warmer weather. The induction of cold hardiness produced much year-to-year variation in cold hardiness, especially in northern sites, in addition to concurrently and previously demonstrated genetic differences in cold hardiness between northern and southern adelgid populations. Consequently, the cold temperatures required to kill hemlock woolly adelgids will vary year to year and week to week based on exposure to prior temperatures.

  5. Statistical inference for Hardy-Weinberg proportions in the presence of missing genotype information.

    PubMed

    Graffelman, Jan; Sánchez, Milagros; Cook, Samantha; Moreno, Victor

    2013-01-01

    In genetic association studies, tests for Hardy-Weinberg proportions are often employed as a quality control checking procedure. Missing genotypes are typically discarded prior to testing. In this paper we show that inference for Hardy-Weinberg proportions can be biased when missing values are discarded. We propose to use multiple imputation of missing values in order to improve inference for Hardy-Weinberg proportions. For imputation we employ a multinomial logit model that uses information from allele intensities and/or neighbouring markers. Analysis of an empirical data set of single nucleotide polymorphisms possibly related to colon cancer reveals that missing genotypes are not missing completely at random. Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg proportions is mostly due to a lack of heterozygotes. Inbreeding coefficients estimated by multiple imputation of the missings are typically lowered with respect to inbreeding coefficients estimated by discarding the missings. Accounting for missings by multiple imputation qualitatively changed the results of 10 to 17% of the statistical tests performed. Estimates of inbreeding coefficients obtained by multiple imputation showed high correlation with estimates obtained by single imputation using an external reference panel. Our conclusion is that imputation of missing data leads to improved statistical inference for Hardy-Weinberg proportions.

  6. Problem-solving skills appraisal mediates hardiness and suicidal ideation among malaysian undergraduate students.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, Abbas; Talib, Mansor Abu; Yaacob, Siti Nor; Ismail, Zanariah

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that suicidal ideation is increased among university students, it is essential to increase our knowledge concerning the etiology of suicidal ideation among university students. This study was conducted to examine the relationships between problem-solving skills appraisal, hardiness, and suicidal ideation among university students. In addition, this study was conducted to examine problem-solving skills appraisal (including the three components of problem-solving confidence, approach-avoidance style, and personal control of emotion) as a potential mediator between hardiness and suicidal ideation. The participants consisted of 500 undergraduate students from Malaysian public universities. Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) estimated that undergraduate students with lower hardiness, poor problem-solving confidence, external personal control of emotion, and avoiding style was associated with higher suicidal ideation. Problem-solving skills appraisal (including the three components of problem-solving confidence, approach-avoidance style, and personal control of emotion) partially mediated the relationship between hardiness and suicidal ideation. These findings underline the importance of studying mediating processes that explain how hardiness affects suicidal ideation.

  7. Problem-Solving Skills Appraisal Mediates Hardiness and Suicidal Ideation among Malaysian Undergraduate Students

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahi, Abbas; Talib, Mansor Abu; Yaacob, Siti Nor; Ismail, Zanariah

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Recent evidence suggests that suicidal ideation is increased among university students, it is essential to increase our knowledge concerning the etiology of suicidal ideation among university students. This study was conducted to examine the relationships between problem-solving skills appraisal, hardiness, and suicidal ideation among university students. In addition, this study was conducted to examine problem-solving skills appraisal (including the three components of problem-solving confidence, approach-avoidance style, and personal control of emotion) as a potential mediator between hardiness and suicidal ideation. Methods The participants consisted of 500 undergraduate students from Malaysian public universities. Results Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) estimated that undergraduate students with lower hardiness, poor problem-solving confidence, external personal control of emotion, and avoiding style was associated with higher suicidal ideation. Problem-solving skills appraisal (including the three components of problem-solving confidence, approach-avoidance style, and personal control of emotion) partially mediated the relationship between hardiness and suicidal ideation. Conclusion These findings underline the importance of studying mediating processes that explain how hardiness affects suicidal ideation. PMID:25830229

  8. Decreased frost hardiness of Vaccinium vitis-idaea in reponse to UV-A radiation.

    PubMed

    Taulavuori, Kari; Keränen, Johanna; Suokanerva, Hanne; Lakkala, Kaisa; Huttunen, Satu; Laine, Kari; Taulavuori, Erja

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate plant frost hardiness responses to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, since the few results reported are largely contradictory. It was hypothesized that functional adaptation of life forms could explain these contradictions. Dwarf shrubs and tree seedlings, representing both evergreen and deciduous forms, were tested (Vaccinium vitis-idaea, Vaccinium myrtillus, Pinus sylvestris, Betula pubescens and its red form f. rubra). The research was performed in Sodankylä, Northern Finland (67°N), with enhanced UV-B- and UV-A-radiation treatments between 2002 and 2009. Plant frost hardiness was determined using the freeze-induced electrolyte leakage method in early autumn, during the onset of the frost hardening process. Additional physiological variables (malondialdehyde, glutathione, total phenols, C and N contents) were analyzed in V. vitis-idaea to explain the possible responses. These variables did not respond significantly to UV-radiation treatments, but explained the frost hardiness well (r² = 0.678). The main finding was that frost hardiness decreased in the evergreen shrub V. vitis-idaea, particularly with enhanced UV-A radiation. No significant responses were observed with the other plants. Therefore, this study does not support the idea that enhanced UV radiation could increase plant frost hardiness.

  9. Exact Inference for Hardy-Weinberg Proportions with Missing Genotypes: Single and Multiple Imputation.

    PubMed

    Graffelman, Jan; Nelson, S; Gogarten, S M; Weir, B S

    2015-09-15

    This paper addresses the issue of exact-test based statistical inference for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the presence of missing genotype data. Missing genotypes often are discarded when markers are tested for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, which can lead to bias in the statistical inference about equilibrium. Single and multiple imputation can improve inference on equilibrium. We develop tests for equilibrium in the presence of missingness by using both inbreeding coefficients (or, equivalently, χ(2) statistics) and exact p-values. The analysis of a set of markers with a high missing rate from the GENEVA project on prematurity shows that exact inference on equilibrium can be altered considerably when missingness is taken into account. For markers with a high missing rate (>5%), we found that both single and multiple imputation tend to diminish evidence for Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium. Depending on the imputation method used, 6-13% of the test results changed qualitatively at the 5% level.

  10. Experimental ladder proof of Hardy's nonlocality for high-dimensional quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lixiang; Zhang, Wuhong; Wu, Ziwen; Wang, Jikang; Fickler, Robert; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2017-08-01

    Recent years have witnessed a rapidly growing interest in high-dimensional quantum entanglement for fundamental studies as well as towards novel applications. Therefore, the ability to verify entanglement between physical qudits, d -dimensional quantum systems, is of crucial importance. To show nonclassicality, Hardy's paradox represents "the best version of Bell's theorem" without using inequalities. However, so far it has only been tested experimentally for bidimensional vector spaces. Here, we formulate a theoretical framework to demonstrate the ladder proof of Hardy's paradox for arbitrary high-dimensional systems. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate the ladder proof by taking advantage of the orbital angular momentum of high-dimensionally entangled photon pairs. We perform the ladder proof of Hardy's paradox for dimensions 3 and 4, both with the ladder up to the third step. Our paper paves the way towards a deeper understanding of the nature of high-dimensionally entangled quantum states and may find applications in quantum information science.

  11. Hamilton and Hardy: Mentoring and Friendship in the Service of Occupational Health.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Marianne

    This article explores the mentoring relationship between Alice Hamilton and Harriet Hardy, two female physician-researchers who had a tremendous impact on the development of the field of occupational health in the United States during the 20th century. The article relies on letters the women wrote to each other. Hamilton, the elder, supported and furthered Hardy's career by asking her to coauthor the second edition of a seminal occupational health text. After beginning this intellectual collaboration, Hamilton remained a mentor to Hardy, and a decades-long friendship ensued. The article explores their relationship within the historical, political, and social context in which the women worked and made remarkable contributions to public health.

  12. Life-history correlations with seasonal cold hardiness in maritime pine.

    PubMed

    Prada, Eva; Climent, José; Alía, Ricardo; Díaz, Raquel

    2016-12-01

    Plants have developed mechanisms to withstand stressful environmental conditions, but the high energetic cost of these mechanisms may involve exchanges with other key functions. While trade-offs between cold hardiness and growth rates are a general assumption, we lack information regarding genetically based trade-offs between cold hardiness and other life-history traits. Such information has strong implications for tree conservation and breeding, especially in the context of ongoing climate change. We used a common garden progeny test to examine the relationships between seasonal cold hardiness and life-history traits of growth, reproduction, juvenile ontogeny, and phenology in 75 families of six maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.) populations, three of continental and three of coastal origins. We found a clear differentiation among populations with regard to cold hardiness and life-history traits. Two continental Iberian populations showed high cold tolerance and slower growth, but faster ontogenetic development in relation to both vegetative heteroblastic change in juveniles and the onset of female reproduction. The coastal populations displayed the opposite behavior, while the continental Moroccan population presented a unique combination of traits. We confirmed trade-offs between cold-hardiness and growth at the population level, but not within populations. There were no trade-offs with other life-history traits at either level. Relevant local adaptation syndromes were identified in the relationship between cold hardiness and life-history traits. These should be considered in developing tree management guidelines aimed at increasing productivity or adaptability under the expected conditions of climate change. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  13. Fixed Food Eruption Caused by Actinidia arguta (Hardy Kiwi): A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Kyoung Hee; Kim, Byung Keun; Kim, Ju Young; Song, Woo Jung; Kang, Hye Ryun; Park, Heung Woo; Cho, Sang Heon; Min, Kyung Up

    2017-03-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a common hypersensitivity reaction characterized by recurrent, well-circumscribed, erythematous patches that arise at the same site as a result of systemic drug exposure. However, fixed food eruption (FFE), a lesion triggered by food ingestion, is a rare allergy that was first defined in 1996. Based on their anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties, the fruit and leaves of Actinidia arguta, the hardy kiwi, are widely consumed across Korea, Japan, and China. This report describes the first case of FFE caused by hardy kiwi leaves, known as Daraesun in Korean, confirmed by oral provocation tests and skin biopsy.

  14. On Hardy and Rellich type inequalities for an Engel-type operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabitbek, Bolys

    2017-09-01

    In the paper by Ruzhansky and Suragan it was demonstrated that improved versions of Hardy and Rellich inequalities as well as of uncertainty principles for sums of squares of vector fields on bounded sets of smooth manifolds under certain assumptions on the vector fields, in particular, the obtained results were valid for sums of squares of vector fields on Euclidean spaces and for sub-Laplacians on stratified Lie groups. In this paper we present versions of Hardy and Rellich type inequalities for an Engel-type operator by using properties of the fundamental solution. The obtained results remain unchanged for higher step Engel-type operators.

  15. Frost hardiness of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal Scots pine under two fertilization treatments.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Anna; Lehto, Tarja; Repo, Tapani

    2015-07-01

    Survival and functioning of mycorrhizal associations at low temperatures are not known well. In an earlier study, ectomycorrhizas did not affect the frost hardiness of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) roots, but here we studied whether differential nutrient availability would change the result and additionally, alter frost hardiness aboveground. The aim in this experiment was to compare the frost hardiness of roots and needles of mycorrhizal (Hebeloma sp.) and non-mycorrhizal Scots pine seedlings raised using two fertilization treatments and two cold-hardening regimes. The fertilization treatments were low (LF) and high (HF) application of a complete nutrient solution. Three hundred mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal seedlings were cultivated in growth chambers in four blocks for 16 weeks. For the first 9 weeks, the seedlings grew in long-day and high-temperature (LDHT) with low fertilization and then they were raised for 3 weeks in LDHT with either low or high fertilization. After this, half of the plants in each treatment combination remained in LDHT, and half were transferred to short-day and low-temperature (SDLT) conditions to cold acclimatize. The frost hardiness of the roots and needles was assessed using controlled freezing tests followed by electrolyte leakage tests (REL). Mycorrhizal roots were slightly more frost hardy than non-mycorrhizal roots, but only in the growing-season conditions (LDHT) in low-nutrient treatment. In LDHT and LF, the frost hardiness of the non-mycorrhizal roots was about -9 °C, and that of the non-mycorrhizal HF roots and the mycorrhizal roots in both fertilization levels was about -11 °C. However, no difference was found in the roots within the SDLT regime, and in needles, there was no difference between mycorrhizal and fertilization treatments. The frost hardiness of needles increased by SDLT treatment, being -8.5 and -14.1 °C in LDHT and SDLT, respectively. The dry mass of roots, stems, and needles was lower in LF than in

  16. Fixed Food Eruption Caused by Actinidia arguta (Hardy Kiwi): A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Kyoung-Hee; Kim, Byung-Keun; Kim, Ju-Young; Song, Woo-Jung; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Park, Heung-Woo; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2017-01-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a common hypersensitivity reaction characterized by recurrent, well-circumscribed, erythematous patches that arise at the same site as a result of systemic drug exposure. However, fixed food eruption (FFE), a lesion triggered by food ingestion, is a rare allergy that was first defined in 1996. Based on their anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties, the fruit and leaves of Actinidia arguta, the hardy kiwi, are widely consumed across Korea, Japan, and China. This report describes the first case of FFE caused by hardy kiwi leaves, known as Daraesun in Korean, confirmed by oral provocation tests and skin biopsy. PMID:28102064

  17. Impact of climate change on cold hardiness of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii): Environmental and genetic considerations

    Treesearch

    Sheel Bansal; Bradley J. St. Clair; Constance A. Harrington; Peter J. Gould

    2015-01-01

    The success of conifers over much of the world’s terrestrial surface is largely attributable to their tolerance to cold stress (i.e., cold hardiness). Due to an increase in climate variability, climate change may reduce conifer cold hardiness, which in turn could impact ecosystem functioning and productivity in conifer-dominated forests. The expression of cold...

  18. On S.N. Bernstein’s derivation of Mendel’s Law and ‘rediscovery’ of the Hardy-Weinberg distribution

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Alan; Seneta, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Around 1923 the soon-to-be famous Soviet mathematician and probabilist Sergei N. Bernstein started to construct an axiomatic foundation of a theory of heredity. He began from the premise of stationarity (constancy of type proportions) from the first generation of offspring. This led him to derive the Mendelian coefficients of heredity. It appears that he had no direct influence on the subsequent development of population genetics. A basic assumption of Bernstein was that parents coupled randomly to produce offspring. This paper shows that a simple model of non-random mating, which nevertheless embodies a feature of the Hardy-Weinberg Law, can produce Mendelian coefficients of heredity while maintaining the population distribution. How W. Johannsen’s monograph influenced Bernstein is discussed. PMID:22888285

  19. Foundation Design Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Carmody, John; Mosiman, Garrett; Handeen, Daniel; Huelman, Patrick; Christian, Jeffery

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide information that will enable designers, builders, and homeowners to understand foundation design problems and solutions. The foundation of a house is a somewhat invisible and sometimes ignored component of the building. It is increasingly evident, however, that attention to good foundation design and construction has significant benefits to the homeowner and the builder, and can avoid some serious future problems. Good foundation design and construction practice means not only insulating to save energy, but also providing effective structural design as well as moisture, termite, and radon control techniques where appropriate.

  20. Hardiness as a predictor of mental health and well-being of Australian army reservists on and after stability operations.

    PubMed

    Orme, Geoffrey J; Kehoe, E James

    2014-04-01

    This study tested whether cognitive hardiness moderates the adverse effects of deployment-related stressors on health and well-being of soldiers on short-tour (4-7 months), peacekeeping operations. Australian Army reservists (N = 448) were surveyed at the start, end, and up to 24 months after serving as peacekeepers in Timor-Leste or the Solomon Islands. They retained sound mental health throughout (Kessler 10, Post-Traumatic Checklist-Civilian, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale 42). Ratings of either traumatic or nontraumatic stress were low. Despite range restrictions, scores on the Cognitive Hardiness Scale moderated the relationship between deployment stressors and a composite measure of psychological distress. Scatterplots revealed an asymmetric pattern for hardiness scores and measures of psychological distress. When hardiness scores were low, psychological distress scores were widely dispersed. However, when hardiness scores were higher, psychological distress scores became concentrated at a uniformly low level.

  1. Thomas Hardy's Notion of Impurity in "Far from the Madding Crowd": The Tragic Failure of a Ruined Maid or The Blessed Life of a Fallen Lady

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleh, Nafiseh Salman; Abbasi, Pyeaam

    2014-01-01

    As a prolific nineteenth-century novelist, Thomas Hardy witnessed how women were treated as well as the dreadful conditions in which they lived. Well aware of the nineteenth-century limitations on femininity, Hardy stood for women's downtrodden rights. Henceforth, so as to examine Hardy's personal thoughts and impressions towards the prevailing…

  2. Seeking Foundation Grants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gary, Barbara Stewart

    Institutions seeking supplementary funding should not be afraid of approaching foundations for grants but should be sure that they understand the grant-seeking process so they do not waste time and effort sending inadequate proposals to uninterested foundations. This booklet, a guide to grantsmanship intended primarily for Catholic educators,…

  3. Foundations for Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Trudy; Chun, Marc; Daly, William T.; Harrington, Christine; Tobolowsky, Barbara F.

    2015-01-01

    "Foundations for Critical Thinking" explores the landscape of critical-thinking skill development and pedagogy through foundational chapters and institutional case studies involving a range of students in diverse settings. By establishing a link between active learning and improved critical thinking, this resource encourages all higher…

  4. National Science Foundation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Kent K.

    Established by Congressional Act in 1950, the National Science Foundation (NSF) is charged with a variety of responsibilities in the areas of education, research, applications of research, data gathering, and information dissemination. The foundation is governed by an appointed director and a national board and is primarily funded by the federal…

  5. Establishing a University Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemish, Donald L.

    A handbook on how to establish a university foundation is presented. It presupposes that a foundation will be used as the umbrella organization for receiving all private gifts, restricted and unrestricted, for the benefit of a public college or university; and hence it chiefly addresses readers from public colleges and universities. Information is…

  6. Establishing a University Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemish, Donald L.

    A handbook on how to establish a university foundation is presented. It presupposes that a foundation will be used as the umbrella organization for receiving all private gifts, restricted and unrestricted, for the benefit of a public college or university; and hence it chiefly addresses readers from public colleges and universities. Information is…

  7. Foundations for Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Trudy; Chun, Marc; Daly, William T.; Harrington, Christine; Tobolowsky, Barbara F.

    2015-01-01

    "Foundations for Critical Thinking" explores the landscape of critical-thinking skill development and pedagogy through foundational chapters and institutional case studies involving a range of students in diverse settings. By establishing a link between active learning and improved critical thinking, this resource encourages all higher…

  8. Foundation Development Abstracts, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James M., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This series of brief two-page essays is published quarterly by the Network of California Community College Foundations to address topics related to development activities typically conducted by educational foundations. Volume 1 includes "Your Message is as Clear as Your Mission Statement," by Pat Rasmussen and James M. Anderson, which suggests…

  9. Dallas's Nonprofit Foundation Founders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Dan

    1979-01-01

    Describes the scandals that have destroyed the Foundation for Quality Education, the foundation the Dallas (Texas) school district created to raise money for the schools through real estate management and the marketing of school-system-developed curriculum materials. (Author/IRT)

  10. Impact of Psychological Hardiness and Self-Monitoring on Teacher Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erkutlu, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the moderating effects of psychological hardiness and self-monitoring on the linkage between organizational politics and teacher burnout. Totally 1344 teachers from 112 high schools chosen by random method in Ankara, Istanbul, Adana, Antalya, Samsun, Kahramanmaras, Adiyaman and Gaziantep in 2010-2011…

  11. UTDG -101, a late-maturing orchardgrass germplasm with increased winter hardiness and forage quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is a need to identify novel germplasm that is late-maturing, winter hardy, and nutritious that can be incorporated into current orchardgrass breeding programs. The United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service announces the public release of a late-maturing orchardgr...

  12. A Model of Median Auroral Electron Flux Deduced from Hardy 2008 Model Probability Density Maps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    Statistical hemispheric particle precipitation maps were created for a range of different magnetospheric activity levels defined by the Kp index. The... Magnetospheric Electric Fields, J. Geophys. Res., 86, pp. 768-778. Gussenhoven, M. S., D. A. Hardy, and N. Heinemann, (1983), Systematics of the Equatorward

  13. Hardiness, Perceived Employability, and Career Decision Self-Efficacy among Taiwanese College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Jie-Tsuen

    2015-01-01

    Past empirical evidence has demonstrated that personality traits predict career decision self-efficacy. This study extends previous research by proposing and testing a model that examines the mediating roles of perceived internal and external employability on the relationship between personality hardiness and career decision self-efficacy. Using…

  14. As Luck Would Have It: Thomas Hardy's "Bildungsroman" on Leading a Human Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laverty, Megan Jane

    2014-01-01

    In this essay, I demonstrate the value of the Bildungsroman for philosophy of education on the grounds that these narratives raise and explore educational questions. I focus on a short story in the Bildungsroman tradition, Thomas Hardy's "A Mere Interlude". This story describes the maturation of its heroine by narrating a series of…

  15. Genetic and environmental influences on cold hardiness of native and introduced riparian trees

    Treesearch

    Jonathan M. Friedman; James E. Roelle; Brian S. Cade

    2012-01-01

    To explore latitudinal genetic variation in cold hardiness and leaf phenology, we planted a common garden of paired collections of native and introduced riparian trees sampled along a latitudinal gradient. The garden in Fort Collins, Colorado (latitude 40.6°N), included 681 native plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides subsp. monilifera) and introduced saltcedar (Tamarix...

  16. Characterization of wild north american grapevine cold hardiness using differential thermal analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The cold hardiness of 33 different grapevine genotypes, representing six wild North American grapevine species, one wild Asian grapevine species, and six hybrid grapevines, was evaluated by measuring lethal temperatures for dormant buds using low temperature exotherms. Studies were conducted in thre...

  17. Development of a new USDA plant hardiness zone map for the United States

    Treesearch

    C. Daly; M.P. Widrlechner; M.D. Halbleib; J.I. Smith; W.P. Gibson

    2012-01-01

    In many regions of the world, the extremes of winter cold are a major determinant of the geographic distribution of perennial plant species and of their successful cultivation. In the United States, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Plant Hardiness Zone Map (PHZM) is the primary reference for defining geospatial patterns of extreme winter cold for the...

  18. Registration of WSRC01, WSRC02, and WSRC03 Winter Hardy Safflower Germplasm

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Winter hardy safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) germplasm lines WSRC01, WSRC02, and WSRC03 were developed at the USDA-ARS, Western Regional Plant Introduction Station, Pullman WA. All three lines originated from germplasm introduced from China to the USDA-ARS national safflower germplasm collectio...

  19. Problem-solving skills and hardiness as protective factors against stress in Iranian nurses.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, Abbas; Talib, Mansor Abu; Yaacob, Siti Nor; Ismail, Zanariah

    2014-02-01

    Nursing is a stressful occupation, even when compared with other health professions; therefore, it is necessary to advance our knowledge about the protective factors that can help reduce stress among nurses. The present study sought to investigate the associations among problem-solving skills and hardiness with perceived stress in nurses. The participants, 252 nurses from six private hospitals in Tehran, completed the Personal Views Survey, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Problem-Solving Inventory. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to analyse the data and answer the research hypotheses. As expected, greater hardiness was associated with low levels of perceived stress, and nurses low in perceived stress were more likely to be considered approachable, have a style that relied on their own sense of internal personal control, and demonstrate effective problem-solving confidence. These findings reinforce the importance of hardiness and problem-solving skills as protective factors against perceived stress among nurses, and could be important in training future nurses so that hardiness ability and problem-solving skills can be imparted, allowing nurses to have more ability to control their perceived stress.

  20. As Luck Would Have It: Thomas Hardy's "Bildungsroman" on Leading a Human Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laverty, Megan Jane

    2014-01-01

    In this essay, I demonstrate the value of the Bildungsroman for philosophy of education on the grounds that these narratives raise and explore educational questions. I focus on a short story in the Bildungsroman tradition, Thomas Hardy's "A Mere Interlude". This story describes the maturation of its heroine by narrating a series of…

  1. Relationships between Teacher Organizational Commitment, Psychological Hardiness and Some Demographic Variables in Turkish Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sezgin, Ferudun

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between teachers' organizational commitment perceptions and both their psychological hardiness and some demographic variables in a sample of Turkish primary schools. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 405 randomly selected teachers working at primary schools in Ankara…

  2. The Development of a Questionnaire on Academic Hardiness for Late Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamtsios, Spiridon; Karagiannopoulou, Evangelia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to develop a questionnaire to measure dimensions of academic hardiness in late elementary school children. Questionnaires were distributed to 1474 children. After a set of exploratory factor analyses in studies 1 and 2, the confirmatory factor analysis results provided support for the 9-factor solution which…

  3. Cold hardiness of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis: a new perspective

    Treesearch

    Robert C. Venette; Mark. Abrahamson

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the cold hardiness of emerald ash borer larvae, the overwintering stage of the insect. We began by measuring larval supercooling points, the temperatures at which larvae freeze. We found that larvae collected from naturally infested trees in St. Paul, MN between late October and early December had an average supercooling point of -25...

  4. Appreciation of Hardy's Poem "Neutral Tones" from the Point of View of Functional Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hong-qin

    2008-01-01

    According to the theory of Systemic-Functional Linguistics (SFL), language cannot be disassociated from meaning. Function and semantics, as SFL suggests, are considered as the basis of human language and communicative activity. In order to reveal the inseparability of language and semantic, this paper aims to analyze and appreciate Hardy's poem…

  5. Where Is the Individual? Comments on Nesselroade, Gerstorf, Hardy and Ram

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaie, K. Warner

    2007-01-01

    Nesselroade, Gerstorf, Hardy, and Ram have done a marvelous job in discussing the methodological issues for a meaningful revival of the idiographic versus nomothetic debate that has flared up periodically over the past seven decades. Nesselroade et al. have previously attempted to resolve the paradox that all behavior occurs at the individual…

  6. Chemical control of Phytophthora ramorum causing foliar disease in hardy nursery stock in the United Kingdom

    Treesearch

    Judith Turner; Philip Jennings; Sam McDonough; Debbie Liddell; Jackie Stonehouse

    2006-01-01

    A range of fungicides have been tested for activity against P. ramorum using both in vitro and in vivo tests. All fungicides had proven activity against Phytophthora species and either had full approval for use on hardy ornamental nursery stock in the United Kingdom, or could be used under the Revised Long Term Arrangements for Extension of Use (2002...

  7. An Examination of the Differences between Type A and B Individuals on Hardiness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, James P.; And Others

    This study examined the differences between Type A and B individuals and their hardiness. Although it is thought to be an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease, the role of Type A behavior in other disease processes or general health has not been established. Because Type A has been hypothesized to be a maladaptive coping strategy…

  8. Stress among School-Going Adolescents in Relation to Psychological Hardiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Raminder

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the stress among school-going adolescents in relation to psychological hardiness and also to study the gender and locale-wise differences in various dimensions and components of stress. The study was conducted over a sample of 200 (100 rural and 100 urban) adolescents studying in 10+1 and 10+2 classes…

  9. Hardiness, Perceived Employability, and Career Decision Self-Efficacy among Taiwanese College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Jie-Tsuen

    2015-01-01

    Past empirical evidence has demonstrated that personality traits predict career decision self-efficacy. This study extends previous research by proposing and testing a model that examines the mediating roles of perceived internal and external employability on the relationship between personality hardiness and career decision self-efficacy. Using…

  10. Stress in the Work Environment: An Examination of Social Support and Hardiness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, David E.; Campbell, David E.

    Stress in organizations continues to be of interests to researchers in industrial psychology, organizational behavior, and human resources development. This study examined the effects on stress of an individual's social support and hardiness in a work environment. Subjects were 90 employees of an industrial firm and 50 undergraduate students who…

  11. Relationships between Teacher Organizational Commitment, Psychological Hardiness and Some Demographic Variables in Turkish Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sezgin, Ferudun

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between teachers' organizational commitment perceptions and both their psychological hardiness and some demographic variables in a sample of Turkish primary schools. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 405 randomly selected teachers working at primary schools in Ankara…

  12. Disentangling dormancy and cold-hardiness in wine grape cultivars Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cold-hardiness of bud and cane tissue was monitored throughout para, endo and ecodormancy in field-grown vines using differential thermal analysis to generate lethal temperature exotherms (LTE). Deacclimation and re-acclimation rates were measured during ecodormancy to determine the depth of dorm...

  13. A Hardy's Uncertainty Principle Lemma in Weak Commutation Relations of Heisenberg-Lie Algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaesu, Toshimitsu

    2011-07-01

    In this article we consider linear operators satisfying a generalized commutation relation of a type of the Heisenberg-Lie algebra. It is proven that a generalized inequality of the Hardy's uncertainty principle lemma follows. Its applications to time operators and abstract Dirac operators are also investigated.

  14. Abscisic acid form, concentration, and application timing influence phenology and bud cold hardiness in Merlot grapevines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of abscisic acid (ABA) form, concentration and application timing on bud cold hardiness, phenology and fruiting performance on ‘Merlot’ grapevines (Vitis vinifera) were evaluated in a three year field trial with site locations in British Columbia Canada, Ontario Canada, Washington U.S. ...

  15. Genetics of cold hardiness in a cloned full-sib family of coastal Douglas-fir

    Treesearch

    T.S. Anekonda; W.T. Adams; S.N. Aitken; D.B. Neale; K.D. Jermstad; N.C. Wheeler

    2000-01-01

    Variation in cold-hardiness traits, and their extent of genetic control and interrelationships, were investigated among individuals (clones) within a single large full-sib family of coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) from Oregon. Cold injury to needle, stem, and bud tissues was evaluated...

  16. Hardy-Littlewood-Sobolev inequalities on compact Riemannian manifolds and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yazhou; Zhu, Meijun

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we extend Hardy-Littlewood-Sobolev inequalities on compact Riemannian manifolds for dimension n ≠ 2. As one application, we solve a generalized Yamabe problem on locally conformally flat manifolds via a new designed energy functional and a new variational approach. Even for the classic Yamabe problem on locally conformally flat manifolds, our approach provides a new and relatively simpler solution.

  17. Weighted Hardy-Littlewood Theorems for Conjugate A-Harmonic Tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Haiyu

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we establish some versions of A( φ 1( x), φ 2( x), τ, Ω)-weighted Hardy-Littlewood inequalities for conjugate A-harmonic tensors, the theory of harmonic analysis and A-harmonic differential forms largely pertain to applications in mathematical physics, quantum field theory, elementary particle physics, etc.

  18. Hardiness, avoidance coping, and alcohol consumption in war veterans: A moderated-mediation study.

    PubMed

    Bartone, Paul T; Johnsen, Bjorn H; Eid, Jarle; Hystad, Sigurd W; Laberg, Jon C

    2016-11-24

    Military personnel often engage in excessive alcohol use after returning from deployments. Thus far, research has paid scant attention to personality factors that may increase or diminish the risk for increased alcohol consumption in this population. The present study explores how psychological hardiness, avoidance coping, and stress exposure may interact to influence alcohol consumption patterns in soldiers following deployment. U.S. Army National Guard soldiers (N = 357) were surveyed shortly after returning from combat operations in Afghanistan. Conditional process analysis was used to test for mediation and moderation effects. Mediation effects were further tested in a replication sample of Norwegian Army soldiers (N = 230) deployed to Kosovo. Findings show that hardiness is a significant (negative) predictor of increased alcohol use and that this relation is mediated by avoidance coping. Further, this effect was moderated by combat stress exposure in the U.S. sample, such that the mediation is stronger for those with greater exposure (moderated-mediation). Avoidance coping also mediated the effects of hardiness on alcohol consumption in the Norwegian sample. These findings suggest that avoidance coping and hardiness may be fruitful areas for interventions aimed at reducing risky drinking in high-stress groups like the military.

  19. Impact of Psychological Hardiness and Self-Monitoring on Teacher Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erkutlu, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the moderating effects of psychological hardiness and self-monitoring on the linkage between organizational politics and teacher burnout. Totally 1344 teachers from 112 high schools chosen by random method in Ankara, Istanbul, Adana, Antalya, Samsun, Kahramanmaras, Adiyaman and Gaziantep in 2010-2011…

  20. Hardy's paradox and the entanglementlike structure of forward-scattered waves

    SciTech Connect

    Koniorczyk, Matyas; Szabo, Levente; Adam, Peter

    2011-10-15

    We analyze Hardy's paradox from the point of view of scattering theory. This approach has been useful for the understanding of interaction-free measurement, which is a similar setup. We calculate the forward-scattered waves generated by the beam splitters, which are replaceable in the gedanken experiment. These two-mode waves appear to have an entanglementlike structure.

  1. Woody landscape plant breeding in Minnesota (45°N): It's not all about cold hardiness

    Treesearch

    S.C. ​Hokanson; V.M. Whitaker; J.M. Bradeen; M.C. Long; S.K. Krebs; R.A. Blanchette; J. Juzwik; K. Zuzek; S. McNamara

    2010-01-01

    The Woody Landscape Plant Breeding project at the University of Minnesota has been in existence since 1954. The project was initiated largely to develop an extended palette of cold-hardy woody landscape plants for northern landscapes. Since its inception, it has been responsible for the release of 49 woody plant cultivars including large stature shade trees, small...

  2. [Application of chi-square test and exact test in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium testing].

    PubMed

    Huang, Dai-Xin; Yang, Qing-En

    2004-01-01

    This article review the application of chi-square test of various data handling methods and exact test in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium testing of human genetic marker in population genetics. The importance of HWE-exact test in multiallelic system was emphasized, especially in the study of forensic VNTR and STR typing.

  3. A survey of "mental hardiness" and "mental toughness" in professional male football players.

    PubMed

    Wieser, Rainer; Thiel, Haymo

    2014-01-01

    It is not uncommon for chiropractors to be associated with sports teams for injury prevention, treatment, or performance enhancement. There is increasing acceptance of the importance of sports psychology in the overall management of athletes. Recent findings indicate mental hardiness can be determined reliably using specific self-assessment questionnaires. This study set out to investigate the hardiness scores of professional footballers and examine the correlation between two questionnaires. It also included a mental hardiness rating of players by two coaches, and examined differences in hardiness and mental toughness between national and international players. Two self-assessment questionnaires (modified Sports Mental Toughness Questionnaire [SMTQ-M] and Psychological Performance Inventory [PPI-A]) were completed by 20 male professional footballers. Two coaches, independently rated each player. A percentage score from each questionnaire was awarded each player and an average score was calculated ({SMTQ-M % + PPI-A %} ÷ 2). The PPI-A and SMTQ-M scores obtained for each player were analysed for correlation with Pearson's correlation coefficient. Cohen's kappa inter-reliability coefficient was used to determine agreement between coaches, and between the players' hardiness scores and coaches' ratings. The independent t-test was used to examine differences between national and international players. The players' scores obtained from PPI-A and SMTQ-M correlated well (r = 0.709, p < 0.001). The coaches ratings showed significant, weak to moderate agreement (Cohen's kappa = 0.33). No significant agreement was found between player self-assessments and coaches' ratings. The average ({SMTQ-M % + PPI-A %} ÷ 2) mean score was 77% (SD = 7.98) with international players scoring 7.4% (p = 0.04) higher than non-international players. The questionnaires (SMTQ-M and PPI-A) correlated well in their outcome scores. These findings suggest that coaches moderately agree when assessing

  4. Bound on Hardy's nonlocality from the principle of information causality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahanj, Ali; Kunkri, Samir; Rai, Ashutosh; Rahaman, Ramij; Joag, Pramod S.

    2010-03-01

    Recently, the principle of nonviolation of information causality [Nature 461, 1101 (2009)] has been proposed as one of the foundational properties of nature. We explore the Hardy’s nonlocality theorem for two-qubit systems, in the context of generalized probability theory, restricted by the principle of nonviolation of information causality. Applying a sufficient condition for information causality violation, we derive an upper bound on the maximum success probability of Hardy’s nonlocality argument. We find that the bound achieved here is higher than that allowed by quantum mechanics but still much less than what the no-signaling condition permits. We also study the Cabello type nonlocality argument (a generalization of Hardy’s argument) in this context.

  5. Estimation of the CSA-ODF using Bayesian Compressed Sensing of Multi-shell HARDI

    PubMed Central

    Duarte-Carvajalino, Julio M.; Lenglet, Christophe; Xu, Junqian; Yacoub, Essa; Ugurbil, Kamil; Moeller, Steen; Carin, Lawrence; Sapiro, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Diffusion MRI provides important information about the brain white matter structures and has opened new avenues for neuroscience and translational research. However, acquisition time needed for advanced applications can still be a challenge in clinical settings. There is consequently a need to accelerate diffusion MRI acquisitions. Methods A multi-task Bayesian compressive sensing (MT-BCS) framework is proposed to directly estimate the constant solid angle orientation distribution function (CSA-ODF) from under-sampled (i.e., accelerated image acquisition) multi-shell high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) datasets, and accurately recover HARDI data at higher resolution in q-space. The proposed MT-BCS approach exploits the spatial redundancy of the data by modeling the statistical relationships within groups (clusters) of diffusion signal. This framework also provides uncertainty estimates of the computed CSA-ODF and diffusion signal, directly computed from the compressive measurements. Experiments validating the proposed framework are performed using realistic multi-shell synthetic images and in-vivo multi-shell high angular resolution HARDI datasets. Results Results indicate a practical reduction in the number of required diffusion volumes (q-space samples) by at least a factor of four to estimate the CSA-ODF from multi-shell data. Conclusion This work presents, for the first time, a multi-task Bayesian compressive sensing approach to simultaneously estimate the full posterior of the CSA-ODF and diffusion-weighted volumes from multi-shell HARDI acquisitions. It demonstrates improvement of the quality of acquired datasets via CS de-noising, and accurate estimation of the CSA-ODF, as well as enables a reduction in the acquisition time by a factor of two to four, especially when “staggered” q-space sampling schemes are used. The proposed MT-BCS framework can naturally be combined with parallel MR imaging to further accelerate HARDI acquisitions

  6. Builder's foundation handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Carmody, J. . Underground Space Center); Christian, J. ); Labs, K. )

    1991-05-01

    This handbook contains a worksheet for selecting insulation levels based on specific building construction, climate, HVAC equipment, insulation cost, and other economic considerations. The worksheet permits optimization of foundation insulation levels for new or retrofit applications. Construction details representing good practices for the design and installation of energy efficient basement, crawl space, and slab-n-grade foundations are the focal point of the handbook. The construction details are keyed to lists of critical design information useful for specifying structural integrity; thermal and vapor control; subsurface drainage; waterproofing; and mold, mildew, odor, decay, termite, and radon control strategies. Another useful feature are checklist chapter summaries covering major design considerations for each foundation type--basement, crawl space, and slab-on-grade. These checklist summaries are useful during design and construction inspection. The information in this handbook is drawn heavily from the first foundation handbook from the DOE/ORNL Building Envelope Systems and Materials Program, the Building Foundation Design Handbook (Labs et al., 1988), which is an extensive technical reference manual. This book presents what to do in foundation design'' in an inviting, concise format. This handbook is intended to serve the needs of active home builders; however, the information is pertinent to anyone involved in foundation design and construction decisions including homeowners, architects, and engineers. 17 refs., 49 figs., 18 tabs.

  7. Chaperonin Contributes to Cold Hardiness of the Onion Maggot Delia antiqua through Repression of Depolymerization of Actin at Low Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Kayukawa, Takumi; Ishikawa, Yukio

    2009-01-01

    Winter-diapause and cold-acclimated non-diapause pupae of the onion maggot, Delia antiqua (Diptera: Anthomyiidae), show strong cold hardiness. To obtain insights into the mechanisms involved in the enhancement of cold hardiness, we investigated the expression patterns of genes encoding subunits of chaperonin (CCT) and the morphology of actin, a substrate of CCT, at low temperatures. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed the mRNA levels of CCT subunits in pupal tissues to be highly correlated with the cold hardiness of the pupae. While actin in the Malpighian tubules of non-cold-hardy pupae showed extensive depolymerization after a cold treatment, actin in the same tissue of cold-hardy pupae was not depolymerized. Damage to cell membranes became apparent after the depolymerization of actin. Moreover, administration of Latrunculin B, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, to the larvae markedly decreased the cold hardiness of the pupae obtained. These findings suggest that CCT contributes to the cold hardiness of D. antiqua through the repression of depolymerization of actin at low temperatures. PMID:20011606

  8. National Ataxia Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... in San Antonio! Charity Navigator Awards NAF Four-Star Rating Charity Navigator, America’s premier charity evaluator, has ... Ataxia Foundation received a four out of four star rating. This is the fourth consecutive year NAF ...

  9. Foundation Fighting Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Campaign to End Blindness Other Ways to Fight Blindness Corporate Support Volunteer Take Action Honor a Loved ... taking place nationwide. Join Us We Are Ending Blindness The urgent mission of the Foundation Fighting Blindness ...

  10. Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Percentage Donations Tribute Wall Other Giving/Fundraising Opportunities Bitcoin Donation Form FAQs Mesothelioma Awareness Day: Find out ... Percentage Donations Tribute Wall Other Giving/Fundraising Opportunities Bitcoin Donation Form FAQs © 2017 Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation, ...

  11. National Psoriasis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... 723-9166 | Submit a Question | Learn More National Psoriasis Foundation provides you with the help you need to best manage your psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis, while promoting research to find ...

  12. National Reye's Syndrome Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Packages - Free! Talking to Tweens and Teens About Aspirin and Other Medications Join the Effort to Eradicate ... Foundation's LinkedIn profile Spread Awareness with the Kids & Aspirin Don't Mix car magnet ribbon. Get News & ...

  13. National Osteonecrosis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foundation is made up of a group of patients, physicians and others who want to see the end ... NONF Brochure | Legg Perthes Disease Borchure | Membership Form | Patient Questionnaire | Physician Members Copyright © 2014, National Osteonecrosis Foundaton. All Rights ...

  14. Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Washington, D.C. and help cardiomyopathy related bills get passed into law and protect at-risk children from sudden cardiac death. TAKE ACTION TODAY Disclaimer & Privacy Policy © 2017 Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation. All rights reserved.

  15. National Parkinson Foundation, Inc.

    MedlinePlus

    ... Amantadine (Gocovri™) for Treatment of Dyskinesia August 25, 2017 Statement from the Parkinson’s Foundation Medical Director, Michael ... Investment to Early Career Parkinson’s Scientists August 8, 2017 $1.2 Million Investment to Advance Careers, Support ...

  16. Skin Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Glossary Information on medications and procedures The 2017 Skin Cancer Foundation Journal The latest in skin cancer prevention, detection and treatment 2017 Champions for Change Gala Purchase tickets Research Grants ...

  17. Hepatitis B Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... worldwide 2 Billion People have been infected with Hepatitis B Worldwide The Hepatitis B Foundation is working ... of people living with hepatitis B. Learn About Hepatitis B in 11 Other Languages . Resource Video See ...

  18. Lupus Foundation of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Testing New Treatments Learn More About the Lupus Foundation of America We are devoted to solving ... Spam Control Text: Please leave this field empty Lupus FAQ What is lupus? What are the common ...

  19. National Headache Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Headache Disorders New Perspectives on Caffeine and Headache War Veterans Health Resource Initiative National Headache Foundation Brochures ... Sign up for NHF Updates . CAQ in Headache Medicine In 2015, NHF will be offering a Certificate ...

  20. Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... to issue a television public service announcement (PSA). STARS PERFORM FOR SOLD-OUT AUDIENCE AT BROADWAY BELTS ... Patients The Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation has a four-star rating from Charity Navigator and is a Better ...

  1. Australian Mineral Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowe, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Provides details on the philosophy and operation of the Australian Mineral Foundation, established in 1970 to update professionals in the mining and petroleum industries. Services in continuing education courses and to secondary school teachers and students are described. (CS)

  2. Children's Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... CBTF Justin's Hope Fund Grant Recipients Grants Children’s Brain Tumor Foundation, A non-profit organization, was founded ... and the long term outlook for children with brain and spinal cord tumors through research, support, education, ...

  3. United Leukodystrophy Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... for his ... Read More 26 June 2017 5K & Volleyball The United Leukodystrophy Foundation sends out a great ... Nebraska, the Sinnott Sand Bar ran its annual volleyball tournament, ... Read More 22 June 2017 Michelle Fingeroot ...

  4. Building foundation design handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Labs, K.; Carmody, J.; Sterling, R.; Shen, L.; Huang, Yu Joe; Parker, D.

    1988-05-01

    This design handbook contains a concise set of typical residential foundation construction details and recommends cost-effective insulation levels for a variety of basements, crawl spaces, and slab-on-grade foundations for most US regions. The construction details are accompanied by the critical design information needed for specifying structural integrity; thermal and vapor controls; subsurface drainage; waterproofing; backfilling and compaction; and decay, termite, and radon control measures. 402 refs., 122 figs., 97 tabs.

  5. Impact of Rician adapted Non-Local Means filtering on HARDI.

    PubMed

    Descoteaux, Maxime; Wiest-Daesslé, Nicolas; Prima, Sylvain; Barillot, Christian; Deriche, Rachid

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we study the impact of denoising the raw high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data with the Non-Local Means filter adapted to Rician noise (NLMr). We first show that NLMr filtering improves robustness of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and orientation distribution function (ODF) reconstructions from synthetic HARDI datasets. Our results suggest that the NLMr filtering improve the quality of anisotropy maps computed from ADC and ODF and improve the coherence of q-ball ODFs with the underlying anatomy while not degrading angular resolution. These results are shown on a biological phantom with known ground truth and on a real human brain dataset. Most importantly, we show that multiple measurements of diffusion-weighted (DW) images and averaging these images along each direction can be avoided because NLMr filtering of the individual DW images produces better quality generalized fractional anisotropy maps and more accurate ODF fields than when computed from the averaged DW datasets.

  6. Identification of phenolic compounds in tissues of the novel olive cultivar hardy's mammoth.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Danielle; Antolovich, Michael; Herlt, Tony; Prenzler, Paul D; Lavee, Shimon; Robards, Kevin

    2002-11-06

    A methodological approach to phenolic profiling making extensive use of LC-MS with extracted ion chromatograms was applied to extracts of five different olive tissues: pulp, seed, stone, new-season leaves, and old-season leaves. Tissue extracts of the cultivars Hardy's Mammoth, Corregiola, Verdale, and Manzanillo were analyzed by HPLC with UV and ESI MS detection. Chromatograms of samples of green Hardy's Mammoth drupes, a uniquely Australian olive cultivar, were dominated by a large, broad peak. This peak was not attributable to oleuropein, which is usually the dominant phenolic compound in green olive fruit, but the phenolic compound I. This compound was isolated by semipreparative HPLC and characterized by 1D- and 2D-NMR. Extraction studies showed that the compound was not likely to be an artifact of an enzymatic degradation process. Tritium labeling studies were used to establish a possible relationship between the biosynthesis of I and oleuropein.

  7. Does 5HTTLPR long allele prevent hospitalization? Test of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, Gen; Kung, Simon; Mrazek, David A

    2014-02-01

    Many studies suggest an association of the serotonin transporter gene polymorphism (5HTTLPR) long allele with better antidepressant treatment response than the short allele. However, there is controversy over these findings. We hypothesized that if the long allele is associated with a better outcome, we would find fewer inpatients with the long allele compared with the short allele. Chart review identified 925 depressed inpatients and 201 outpatients genotyped for 5HTTLPR. The sample was primarily White (>90%). We tested potential departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for each sample. We analyzed three independent sets of inpatient samples separately and combined, a White subgroup of 791 patients of the total 925 inpatients, and 201 outpatients. There was no departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium with any of these samples. We also compared 5HTTLPR genotype prevalence between 925 inpatients and 201 outpatients, which showed no statistically significant difference.

  8. COLD HARDINESS AND RANGE OF THE MYRIAPOD Angarozonium amurense (POLYZONIIDAE, DIPLOPODA, ARTHROPODA) IN PERMAFROST ENVIRONMENTS.

    PubMed

    Berman, D I; Meshcheryakova, E N; Mikhaljova, E V

    2015-01-01

    Angarozonium amurense (Gerstfeldt, 1859) is the only one out of more than a hundred diplopod species described in Siberia and the Far East that inhabits regions with solid permafrost. To evaluate the cold hardiness of A. amurense that allows this species to inhabit permafrost regions. The survival temperature thresholds and supercooling points (SCP) were measured. The temperature thresholds for adult animal survival are -8.5 C in summer and -27 C in winter. Average SCP decreases from -7.7 in summer to -16.9 in winter. Water content decreases from 55.7% in summer to 49.4% in winter. The cold hardiness of A. amurense sets the record in this class of animals. It allows it to overwinter in the upper 15 centimeters layer of soil in most biotopes of the coldest permafrost regions in North Asia.

  9. A cross-national analysis of mental toughness and hardiness in elite university rugby league teams.

    PubMed

    Sheard, Michael

    2009-08-01

    The relation between nationality and selected indicators of psychological performance in rugby league football was examined. Mental toughness was assessed using the alternative Psychological Performance Inventory (PPI-A) and hardiness using the Personal Views Survey III-R (PVS III-R). Participants (N = 49, M age = 21.7 yr., SD = 2.3) were male elite-level university rugby league footballers representing Australia and Great Britain. Participants completed the questionnaires in training camp in Sydney, Australia, one week prior to the commencement of an international tournament there in 2006. Multivariate analyses revealed that the Australian Universities players had significantly higher mean scores on Positive Cognition, Visualization, Total Mental Toughness, and Challenge than their opponents from Great Britain. The Australian Universities players were also the tournament winners. The findings concur with previous research indicating superior mental toughness and hardiness are related to successful sport performance. Practical implications focus on the potentiality of ameliorative cultural environments.

  10. Psychological Hardiness and Coping Style as Risk/Resilience Factors for Alcohol Abuse

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    experience symptoms of mental dissociation following traumatic stress exposure. It is well known that peritraumatic dissociation is associated with PTSD... peritraumatic dissociation a risk factor for PTSD? J Trauma Dissociation 2007; 8: 53–69. 46. Marshall GN, Schell TL: Reappraising the link between peritraumatic ... Dissociation , hardiness, and performance in military cadets participating in survival training. Mil Med 2006; 171: 436–42. 45. Breh DC, Seidler GH: Is

  11. Assessing family resources: validation of the Swedish version of the Family Hardiness Index.

    PubMed

    Persson, Carina; Benzein, Eva; Årestedt, Kristofer

    2016-12-01

    All families face normative transitions. Some are perceived as stressful and calls for family resources to maintain or restore family well-being. In times of illness, families also need to develop strengths and capabilities to enhance family well-being. The way these are developed is related to family hardiness. Family hardiness is thus seen as a family resource, and the Family Hardiness Index (FHI) was developed to measure family stress resistance and adaptation resources. The index was not available in Swedish and no extensive international psychometric evaluation was found. Therefore, the aim was to translate and validate the Swedish version of the FHI. The study was approved by a Regional Ethical Review Board. Data from 174 Swedish participants, family members to persons with cognitive dysfunctions (n = 95) and nursing students (n = 79) were included. Family members were enrolled in outpatient clinics in primary care and rehabilitation, and nursing students at a nursing school. Psychometric properties were evaluated through calculations of missing data, distributions of item and scale scores, item correlations, Cronbach's alpha, confirmatory factor analyses and correlations with theoretically related constructs. Sample scores had acceptable data quality, internal consistency for the FHI total scale was satisfactory (α = 0.86), and construct validity was supported. Our findings cast some doubt on the intended interpretation since confirmatory factor analyses showed that a modified four-subscale version, excluding one subscale, showed best fit. The Control subscale lacked important psychometric properties in terms of homogeneity, internal consistency and construct validity. The sample size was probably sufficiently large for the factor analyses, but the subgroup analyses should be treated with caution. The conclusion is that the Swedish version of the FHI is a promising scale for assessing family hardiness, but more solid evidence for the factor structure in

  12. Resilience and Hardiness in Repatriated Vietnam-Era Prisoners of War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-31

    these skills or otherwise demonstrate these dispositional traits , and are able to apply them in response to stressors or hassles, will predictably have...an easier time “bouncing back” than individuals who are not gifted in those ways. The personality construct of Hardiness, as defined by Maddi and...of law, no person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB

  13. Military Applications of Curved Focal Plane Arrays Developed by the HARDI Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    considered one of the main founders of geometrical optics, modern photography, and cinematography . Among his inventions are the Petzval portrait lens... special frequencies, (b) the variation of intensity as a function of special frequency, (c) the image variation of intensity as a result of an...parameters for the HARDI systems to be designed for various applications. To do this, we needed a toolcomputer codeto study the effects of various

  14. Discrete analogue of generalized Hardy spaces and multiplication operators on homogenous trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukumar, Perumal; Ponnusamy, Saminathan

    2017-09-01

    In this article, we define discrete analogue of generalized Hardy spaces and its separable subspace on a homogenous rooted tree and study some of its properties such as completeness, inclusion relations with other spaces, separability, growth estimate for functions in these spaces and their consequences. Equivalent conditions for multiplication operators to be bounded and compact are also obtained. Furthermore, we discuss about point spectrum, approximate point spectrum and spectrum of multiplication operators and discuss when a multiplication operator is an isometry.

  15. Latitudinal variation in cold hardiness in introduced Tamarix and native Populus

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Jonathan M; Roelle, James E; Gaskin, John F; Pepper, Alan E; Manhart, James R

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the evolution of clinal variation in an invasive plant, we compared cold hardiness in the introduced saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima, Tamarix chinensis, and hybrids) and the native plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides subsp. monilifera). In a shadehouse in Colorado (41°N), we grew plants collected along a latitudinal gradient in the central United States (29–48°N). On 17 occasions between September 2005 and June 2006, we determined killing temperatures using freeze-induced electrolyte leakage and direct observation. In midwinter, cottonwood survived cooling to −70°C, while saltcedar was killed at −33 to −47°C. Frost sensitivity, therefore, may limit northward expansion of saltcedar in North America. Both species demonstrated inherited latitudinal variation in cold hardiness. For example, from September through January killing temperatures for saltcedar from 29.18°N were 5–21°C higher than those for saltcedar from 47.60°N, and on September 26 and October 11, killing temperatures for cottonwood from 33.06°N were >43°C higher than those for cottonwood from 47.60°N. Analysis of nine microsatellite loci showed that southern saltcedars are more closely related to T. chinensis while northern plants are more closely related to T. ramosissima. Hybridization may have introduced the genetic variability necessary for rapid evolution of the cline in saltcedar cold hardiness. PMID:25567800

  16. Temperature control of the development of frost hardiness in two populations of Leptospermum scoparium.

    PubMed

    Greer, D H; Robinson, L A

    1995-06-01

    Seedlings of Leptospermum scoparium J.R. et G. Forst (manuka) originating from seed from a low altitude coastal site (Auckland) and from a high altitude inland site (Desert Road) were grown for 96 days in four controlled environments to compare the relationship between growth temperature and frost hardening. Day/night temperature treatments were 12/6, 12/3, 12/0 and 12/-3 degrees C. Frost hardiness was determined at 14-day intervals by exposing whole seedlings to temperatures ranging from -2 to -8 degrees C. Frost damage differed significantly between the two populations: Desert Road seedlings were less affected than Auckland seedlings. At all growth temperatures, the time courses of frost hardiness of both populations followed curvilinear relationships reaching a maximum hardiness at about Day 50, after which the seedlings spontaneously dehardened. The rate of frost hardening increased linearly with decreasing temperature from 6 to 0 degrees C, but thereafter, no further increase occurred with decreasing temperature to -3 degrees C. The frost hardening process was more sensitive to temperature in the Desert Road seedlings than in the Auckland seedlings, and this difference may account for the intraspecific variation in frost hardening capacity of this species. Comparisons with Pinus radiata D. Don and Lolium perenne L. indicated that interspecific variation in frost hardening capacity can also be accounted for by differences in the sensitivity of the hardening process to temperature.

  17. Genetic and environmental influences on leaf phenology and cold hardiness of native and introduced riparian trees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, J.M.; Roelle, J.E.; Cade, B.S.

    2011-01-01

    To explore the roles of plasticity and genetic variation in the response to spatial and temporal climate variation, we established a common garden consisting of paired collections of native and introduced riparian trees sampled along a latitudinal gradient. The garden in Fort Collins, Colorado (latitude 40.6??N), included 681 native plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides subsp. monilifera) and introduced saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima, T. chinensis and hybrids) collected from 15 sites at 29.2-47.6??N in the central United States. In the common garden both species showed latitudinal variation in fall, but not spring, leaf phenology, suggesting that the latitudinal gradient in fall phenology observed in the field results at least in part from inherited variation in the critical photoperiod, while the latitudinal gradient in spring phenology observed in the field is largely a plastic response to the temperature gradient. Populations from higher latitudes exhibited earlier bud set and leaf senescence. Cold hardiness varied latitudinally in both fall and spring for both species. For cottonwood, cold hardiness began earlier and ended later in northern than in southern populations. For saltcedar northern populations were hardier throughout the cold season than southern populations. Although cottonwood was hardier than saltcedar in midwinter, the reverse was true in late fall and early spring. The latitudinal variation in fall phenology and cold hardiness of saltcedar appears to have developed as a result of multiple introductions of genetically distinct populations, hybridization and natural selection in the 150 years since introduction. ?? 2011 US Government.

  18. A Bayesian test for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium of biallelic X-chromosomal markers.

    PubMed

    Puig, X; Ginebra, J; Graffelman, J

    2017-10-01

    The X chromosome is a relatively large chromosome, harboring a lot of genetic information. Much of the statistical analysis of X-chromosomal information is complicated by the fact that males only have one copy. Recently, frequentist statistical tests for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium have been proposed specifically for dealing with markers on the X chromosome. Bayesian test procedures for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for the autosomes have been described, but Bayesian work on the X chromosome in this context is lacking. This paper gives the first Bayesian approach for testing Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium with biallelic markers at the X chromosome. Marginal and joint posterior distributions for the inbreeding coefficient in females and the male to female allele frequency ratio are computed, and used for statistical inference. The paper gives a detailed account of the proposed Bayesian test, and illustrates it with data from the 1000 Genomes project. In that implementation, a novel approach to tackle multiple testing from a Bayesian perspective through posterior predictive checks is used.

  19. Genetic and environmental influences on leaf phenology and cold hardiness of native and introduced riparian trees.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Jonathan M; Roelle, James E; Cade, Brian S

    2011-11-01

    To explore the roles of plasticity and genetic variation in the response to spatial and temporal climate variation, we established a common garden consisting of paired collections of native and introduced riparian trees sampled along a latitudinal gradient. The garden in Fort Collins, Colorado (latitude 40.6°N), included 681 native plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides subsp. monilifera) and introduced saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima, T. chinensis and hybrids) collected from 15 sites at 29.2-47.6°N in the central United States. In the common garden both species showed latitudinal variation in fall, but not spring, leaf phenology, suggesting that the latitudinal gradient in fall phenology observed in the field results at least in part from inherited variation in the critical photoperiod, while the latitudinal gradient in spring phenology observed in the field is largely a plastic response to the temperature gradient. Populations from higher latitudes exhibited earlier bud set and leaf senescence. Cold hardiness varied latitudinally in both fall and spring for both species. For cottonwood, cold hardiness began earlier and ended later in northern than in southern populations. For saltcedar northern populations were hardier throughout the cold season than southern populations. Although cottonwood was hardier than saltcedar in midwinter, the reverse was true in late fall and early spring. The latitudinal variation in fall phenology and cold hardiness of saltcedar appears to have developed as a result of multiple introductions of genetically distinct populations, hybridization and natural selection in the 150 years since introduction.

  20. Anisotropic Hardy Spaces of Musielak-Orlicz Type with Applications to Boundedness of Sublinear Operators

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baode; Yang, Dachun; Yuan, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Let φ : ℝn × [0, ∞)→[0, ∞) be a Musielak-Orlicz function and A an expansive dilation. In this paper, the authors introduce the anisotropic Hardy space of Musielak-Orlicz type, H A φ(ℝn), via the grand maximal function. The authors then obtain some real-variable characterizations of H A φ(ℝn) in terms of the radial, the nontangential, and the tangential maximal functions, which generalize the known results on the anisotropic Hardy space H A p(ℝn) with p ∈ (0,1] and are new even for its weighted variant. Finally, the authors characterize these spaces by anisotropic atomic decompositions. The authors also obtain the finite atomic decomposition characterization of H A φ(ℝn), and, as an application, the authors prove that, for a given admissible triplet (φ, q, s), if T is a sublinear operator and maps all (φ, q, s)-atoms with q < ∞ (or all continuous (φ, q, s)-atoms with q = ∞) into uniformly bounded elements of some quasi-Banach spaces ℬ, then T uniquely extends to a bounded sublinear operator from H A φ(ℝn) to ℬ. These results are new even for anisotropic Orlicz-Hardy spaces on ℝn. PMID:24757418

  1. Latitudinal variation in cold hardiness in introduced Tamarix and native Populus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, Jonathan M.; Roelle, James E.; Gaskin, John F.; Pepper, Alan E.; Manhart, James R.

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the evolution of clinal variation in an invasive plant, we compared cold hardiness in the introduced saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima, Tamarix chinensis, and hybrids) and the native plains cottonwood (Populus deltoidessubsp. monilifera). In a shadehouse in Colorado (41°N), we grew plants collected along a latitudinal gradient in the central United States (29–48°N). On 17 occasions between September 2005 and June 2006, we determined killing temperatures using freeze-induced electrolyte leakage and direct observation. In midwinter, cottonwood survived cooling to −70°C, while saltcedar was killed at −33 to −47°C. Frost sensitivity, therefore, may limit northward expansion of saltcedar in North America. Both species demonstrated inherited latitudinal variation in cold hardiness. For example, from September through January killing temperatures for saltcedar from 29.18°N were 5–21°C higher than those for saltcedar from 47.60°N, and on September 26 and October 11, killing temperatures for cottonwood from 33.06°N were >43°C higher than those for cottonwood from 47.60°N. Analysis of nine microsatellite loci showed that southern saltcedars are more closely related to T. chinensis while northern plants are more closely related to T. ramosissima. Hybridization may have introduced the genetic variability necessary for rapid evolution of the cline in saltcedar cold hardiness.

  2. The combined influence of hardiness and cohesion on mental health in a military peacekeeping mission: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Ådne G; Hystad, Sigurd W; Johnsen, Bjørn Helge; Johnsen, Grethe E; Laberg, Jon C; Eid, Jarle

    2015-10-01

    A large number of studies have shown that hardiness and cohesion are associated with mental health in a military context. However, most of them are presented without controlling for baseline mental health symptoms, which is their most significant source of error. The present study investigates the combined effect of hardiness and cohesion in a prospective design, controlling for baseline levels of symptoms among Norwegian personnel serving in a peacekeeping operation in Kosovo. Multivariate regression analyses were performed in which self-reported mental health complaints were regressed on our explanatory variables. Our findings suggest that both cohesion and hardiness contributed to increased stress resiliency, as measured by a lower level of reported mental health complaints. Our baseline measure of mental health accounted for a larger proportion of the variance than our other predictors. A significant interaction between cohesion and hardiness suggested a combined effect, over and above the individual contributions of the predictors. For individuals who scored high on hardiness, cohesion levels did not influence levels of mental health complaints. Individuals who scored low on hardiness, on the other hand, reported lower levels of mental health complaints when cohesion levels were high.

  3. Cultivating Foundation Support for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Mary Kay, Ed.

    The process of acquiring financial support from private foundations is discussed in 26 essays, divided into five categories (Targeting the Foundation Market; Getting Started: Tools of the Trade; The Process of Foundation Fund Raising; The Grant Maker's Perspective; and Focused Programs and Foundation Support). A prologue, "Ethics and Foundation…

  4. Cultivating Foundation Support for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Mary Kay, Ed.

    The process of acquiring financial support from private foundations is discussed in 26 essays, divided into five categories (Targeting the Foundation Market; Getting Started: Tools of the Trade; The Process of Foundation Fund Raising; The Grant Maker's Perspective; and Focused Programs and Foundation Support). A prologue, "Ethics and Foundation…

  5. Foundation for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Directorate for Education and Human Resources.

    This document describes some of the many programs sponsored by the National Science Foundation in its efforts to continue to promote systemic science and mathematics education reform. Brief descriptions of the following programs are included: (1) Interactive Math Program Restructures 9-12 Math Education; (2) Algebra I Project Sparks Citywide…

  6. American Liver Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foundation is included in CharityWatch’s 2016 list of Top-Rated Charities and is a Member of the World Hepatitis Alliance. ––––––––––––––––– Begin Code for Siteimprove Analytics –––––––––

  7. Supergravity:. Foundations and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceresole, Anna; Ferrara, Sergio

    2012-12-01

    We briefly discuss the foundations of Supergravity as a gauge theory of supersymmetry, its mathematical structure and the basic lagrangians for N-extended supersymmetry. As applications, we describe the basic elements of the supersymmetry breaking mechanism and various aspects of the physics of extremal black holes.

  8. Foundations of Biomolecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, William L.

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to Martin Kaplus, Michael Levitt, and Arieh Warshel for “Development of Multiscale Models for Complex Chemical Systems”. The honored work from the 1970s has provided a foundation for the widespread activities today in modeling organic and biomolecular systems. PMID:24315087

  9. The Broad Foundations, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broad Foundation, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The mission of the Broad Foundations is to transform K-12 urban public education through better governance, management, labor relations and competition; make significant contributions to advance major scientific and medical research; foster public appreciation of contemporary art by increasing access for audiences worldwide; and lead and…

  10. The Broad Foundations, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broad Foundation, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This 2008 foundation report provides an opportunity to look back and ahead as the organization reviews what has been accomplished and identifies challenges to be tackled in the future in the areas of education, scientific and medical research, and the arts. Grant making from the perspective of grantees is presented in each area. [This document was…

  11. Kessler Foundation Research Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... format >> Map it with Google Maps Our other location 1199 Pleasant Valley Way West Orange, NJ 07052 973.324.3571 click to download directions in PDF format >> Map it with Google Maps email us @ info@kesslerfoundation.org Kessler Foundation 2015 © | accessibility statement | careers | privacy policy | press releases

  12. Autumn frost hardiness in Norway spruce plus tree progeny and trees of the local and transferred provenances in central Sweden.

    PubMed

    Hannerz, Mats; Westin, Johan

    2005-09-01

    Reforestation with provenances from locations remote from the planting site (transferred provenances) or the progeny of trees of local provenances selected for superior form and vigor (plus trees) offer alternative means to increase yield over that obtained by the use of seed from unselected trees of the local provenance. Under Swedish conditions, Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) of certain transferred provenances generally has an advantage in productivity relative to the local provenance comparable to that of progeny of plus trees. The aim of this study was to explore the extent to which productivity gains achieved by provenance transfer or the use of plus tree progeny are associated with reductions in autumn frost hardiness, relative to that of trees of the local provenance. In a field trial with 19-year-old trees in central Sweden, bud hardiness was tested on four occasions during the autumn of 2002. Trees of the local provenance were compared with trees of a south Swedish provenance originating 3 degrees of latitude to the south, a Belarusian provenance and the progeny of plus trees of local origin. The Belarusian provenance was the least hardy and the local provenance the most hardy, with plus tree progeny and the south Swedish provenance being intermediate in hardiness. Both the Belarusian provenance and the plus tree progeny were significantly taller than trees of the other populations. Within provenances, tree height was negatively correlated with autumn frost hardiness. Among the plus tree progeny, however, no such correlation between tree height and autumn frost hardiness was found. It is concluded that although the gain in productivity achieved by provenance transfer from Belarus was comparable to that achieved by using the progeny of plus trees of the local provenance, the use of trees of the Belarus provenance involved an increased risk of autumn frost damage because of later hardening.

  13. Foundations for engineering biology.

    PubMed

    Endy, Drew

    2005-11-24

    Engineered biological systems have been used to manipulate information, construct materials, process chemicals, produce energy, provide food, and help maintain or enhance human health and our environment. Unfortunately, our ability to quickly and reliably engineer biological systems that behave as expected remains quite limited. Foundational technologies that make routine the engineering of biology are needed. Vibrant, open research communities and strategic leadership are necessary to ensure that the development and application of biological technologies remains overwhelmingly constructive.

  14. CONVEYOR FOUNDATIONS CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    S. Romanos

    1995-03-10

    The purpose of these calculations is to design foundations for all conveyor supports for the surface conveyors that transport the muck resulting from the TBM operation, from the belt storage to the muck stockpile. These conveyors consist of: (1) Conveyor W-TO3, from the belt storage, at the starter tunnel, to the transfer tower. (2) Conveyor W-SO1, from the transfer tower to the material stacker, at the muck stockpile.

  15. Wronski's Foundations of Mathematics.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Roi

    2016-09-01

    Argument This paper reconstructs Wronski's philosophical foundations of mathematics. It uses his critique of Lagrange's algebraic analysis as a vignette to introduce the problems that he raised, and argues that these problems have not been properly appreciated by his contemporaries and subsequent commentators. The paper goes on to reconstruct Wronski's mathematical law of creation and his notions of theory and techne, in order to put his objections to Lagrange in their philosophical context. Finally, Wronski's proof of his universal law (the expansion of a given function by any series of functions) is reviewed in terms of the above reconstruction. I argue that Wronski's philosophical approach poses an alternative to the views of his contemporary mainstream mathematicians, which brings up the contingency of their choices, and bridges the foundational concerns of early modernity with those of the twentieth-century foundations crisis. I also argue that Wronski's views may be useful to contemporary philosophy of mathematical practice, if they are read against their metaphysical grain.

  16. Impact of climate change on cold hardiness of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii): environmental and genetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Sheel; St Clair, J Bradley; Harrington, Constance A; Gould, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    The success of conifers over much of the world's terrestrial surface is largely attributable to their tolerance to cold stress (i.e., cold hardiness). Due to an increase in climate variability, climate change may reduce conifer cold hardiness, which in turn could impact ecosystem functioning and productivity in conifer-dominated forests. The expression of cold hardiness is a product of environmental cues (E), genetic differentiation (G), and their interaction (G × E), although few studies have considered all components together. To better understand and manage for the impacts of climate change on conifer cold hardiness, we conducted a common garden experiment replicated in three test environments (cool, moderate, and warm) using 35 populations of coast Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii) to test the hypotheses: (i) cool-temperature cues in fall are necessary to trigger cold hardening, (ii) there is large genetic variation among populations in cold hardiness that can be predicted from seed-source climate variables, (iii) observed differences among populations in cold hardiness in situ are dependent on effective environmental cues, and (iv) movement of seed sources from warmer to cooler climates will increase risk to cold injury. During fall 2012, we visually assessed cold damage of bud, needle, and stem tissues following artificial freeze tests. Cool-temperature cues (e.g., degree hours below 2 °C) at the test sites were associated with cold hardening, which were minimal at the moderate test site owing to mild fall temperatures. Populations differed 3-fold in cold hardiness, with winter minimum temperatures and fall frost dates as strong seed-source climate predictors of cold hardiness, and with summer temperatures and aridity as secondary predictors. Seed-source movement resulted in only modest increases in cold damage. Our findings indicate that increased fall temperatures delay cold hardening, warmer/drier summers confer a degree of cold

  17. Foundation doctors' induction experiences.

    PubMed

    Miles, Susan; Kellett, Joanne; Leinster, Sam J

    2015-07-24

    It is well established that trainee doctors struggle with the transition from medical school to starting work and feel unprepared for many aspects of their new role. There is evidence that suitable induction experiences improve competence and confidence, but available data indicate that trainee doctors on the UK Foundation Programme are commonly not experiencing useful inductions. The aim of the reported research was to explore trainee doctors' experiences with induction during their first year of the Foundation Programme to identify the most useful characteristics. A questionnaire was designed to explore trainee doctors' experiences with induction at two points during their first Foundation year, during the first and third of three rotations, to enable all induction experiences on offer during the year to be surveyed. Data were collected using an anonymous questionnaire distributed during a teaching session, with an online version available for those trainees not present. Questions gathered information about characteristics of the inductions, usefulness of components of the inductions and what gaps exist. 192 Foundation trainee doctors completed the questionnaire during Rotation 1 and 165 during Rotation 3. The findings indicated that induction experiences at the beginning of the year, including the local Preparation for Professional Practice week, were more useful than those received for later rotations. Longer inductions were more useful than shorter. Departmental inductions were generally only moderately helpful and they missed many important characteristics. Gaps in their inductions identified by many trainees matched those aspects judged to be most useful by those trainees who had experienced these characteristics. Many Foundation trainee doctors are experiencing inadequate inductions, notably at the department level. Trainees are starting rotations in new departments without rudimentary knowledge about their role and responsibilities in that department

  18. Changes of cold hardiness, supercooling capacity, and major cryoprotectants in overwintering larvae of Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    PubMed

    Atapour, M; Moharramipour, S

    2009-02-01

    The rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis Walker, which is a key rice pest in northern parts of Iran, overwinters in rice stubble and weeds as mature larvae. Diapause of this pest is initiated between October to November and terminates in March. Seasonal variations in the supercooling point, survival at low temperatures, and sugar contents were studied in field-collected larvae during different phases of diapause. Ambient temperature was lowest in January and February when larvae were at the highest diapause intensity and achieved a high degree of cold hardiness at -10, -15, and -20 degrees C. Glycerol, a major cryoprotectant, reached a peak in January. It appeared that cold hardiness in the larvae is closely associated with the diapause. For the first time, this study suggests that glucose and glycogen are converted to glycerol during cold seasons, but trehalose has no definite role in the interconversion. During the coldest months, supercooling points (SCPs) increased (around -11 degrees C), and larvae could survive below their SCP values, showing that overwintering larvae of C. suppressalis are freeze tolerant in Iran. Our findings suggest that cold hardiness and diapause are essential components for this species. The overwintering larvae have high capacity of cold hardiness and can overcome severe winters. Understanding of cold hardiness and overwintering behavior of this species may help in integrated pest management of the rice stem borer in paddy fields.

  19. A Comparison of Type II Diabetic Patients With Healthy People: Coping Strategies, Hardiness, and Occupational Life Quality

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Safdar; Jaafari, Asghar; Ghamari, Mohammad; Esfandiary, Maryam; Salehi Mazandarani, Foroozan; Daneshvar, Sahar; Ajami, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to the epidemiologic transition and a rise in the prevalence of non-communicable diseases different coping strategies have been studied and developed. These strategies may help the affected people to conduct a normal life style. Objectives This research was conducted in Qazvin, Iran to determine the relationship between coping strategies, hardiness, and occupational life quality in Type II diabetic patients and healthy people. Patients and Methods Questionnaires such as Valton’s on “occupational life quality,” Billings and Moos’ examination of “Coping strategies,” and Kobasa’s investigation of “hardiness” were applied to collect the data needed for the present study. In this regard, 80 people were randomly selected from employees of offices in Qazvin, Iran. Results The results of this research indicated that there is a significant relationship between problem-focused strategies, emotion-focused strategies, hardiness, and occupational life quality in people suffering from Type II diabetes and healthy people (P ≤ 0.05). These results also indicated that hardiness does not predict occupational life quality of people suffering from Type II diabetes. Conclusions The results of the present study give some evidence that allows us to conclude that hardiness and coping strategies affect occupational life quality for both people suffering from Type II diabetes and healthy people. Therefore, it is proposed that people strengthen their hardiness and coping strategies, in order to improve their occupational life quality. PMID:27162758

  20. A Fall fur-hunt from Maine to New Brunswick, Canada: The 1858 journal of Manly Hardy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krohn, W.B.

    2005-01-01

    Ecologists, conservationists, and others increasingly ask questions that require a reliable understanding of natural conditions in the past. For example, when the US Fish and Wildlife Service proposed to list the Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) under the Federal Endangered Species Act, there was a need to know the historical status of this species in the northeastern US. The natural history writings of Manly Hardy, a successful, nineteenth-century businessman and respected amateur naturalist from Brewer, ME, proved useful in assessing the lynx's historical status. Because of the wide array of potential uses of Hardy's writings, the objective of this paper is to make biologists and other scholars aware of Hardy, especially his 15 surviving journals, 1852-1899. Hardy left the most extensive published record of any of the naturalists who wrote about wildlife in Maine from the late 1800s through the early 1900s. His articles and essays covered a wide range of subjects about a variety of bird and mammal species. A recently published biographical sketch of Hardy contains an annotated bibliography of his publications along with the republication of 14 of his mammalian works. In contrast, this article contains an example of his unpublished journal writing with significant wildlife observations.

  1. Lang and Goulet Hardiness Scale: development and testing on bereaved parents following the death of their fetus/infant.

    PubMed

    Lang, Ariella; Goulet, Celine; Amsel, Rhonda

    2003-12-01

    The process of development and testing of the Lang and Goulet Hardiness Scale (LGHS), a self-report instrument designed to measure hardiness in bereaved parents following the death of their fetus/infant, is presented. Hardiness is a personal resource, composed of 3 interdependent components that are characterized by a sense of personal control over the outcome of life events and hardships such as the death of a fetus/infant, an active orientation toward meeting the challenges brought on by the loss, and a belief in the ability to make sense of one's own existence following such a tragedy. The concept of hardiness has been studied by various disciplines and in a multitude of settings to understand its ability to lessen potentially negative effects of life stress. However, it has never been studied within the context of parental bereavement. The LGHS was developed systematically, originating from a concept analysis. A panel of 15 experts was used to establish content validity.A pretest was conducted on 73 bereaved individuals to assess convergent and discriminant validity of the LGHS. Subsequently, a validation study on 220 bereaved parents who had experienced the death of their fetus/infant 2 months previously was conducted including a retest 6 months after the loss with 192 of the remaining participants. Analyses reveal that the LGHS is a valid and reliable instrument for measuring hardiness and that it is sensitive enough to detect changes in the construct over time.

  2. Brief Chilling to Subzero Temperature Increases Cold Hardiness in the Hatchling Painted Turtle (Chrysemys picta).

    PubMed

    Muir, Timothy J; Costanzo, Jon P; Lee, Richard E

    2010-01-01

    Although many studies of ectothermic vertebrates have documented compensatory changes in cold hardiness associated with changes of season, much less attention has been paid to adjustment of physiological functions and survival limits following more acute exposure to cold. We investigated the ability of hatchling painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) to increase cold hardiness in response to brief exposure to a subzero temperature. Winter-acclimated turtles were "cold conditioned" by chilling them in the supercooled (unfrozen) state to -7 degrees C over a few days before returning them to 4 degrees C. These turtles fared no better than control animals in resisting freezing when cooled in the presence or absence of ice and exogenous ice nuclei. Survival following tests of freeze tolerance (freezing for about 70 h; minimum body temperature, -3.75 degrees C) was nominally higher in cold-conditioned turtles than in controls (36% vs. 13%, respectively), although the difference was not statistically significant. Of the survivors, cold-conditioned turtles apparently recovered sooner. Turtles subjected to cold shock (supercooling to -13 degrees C for 24 h, followed by rewarming to 0 degrees C) were strongly affected by cold conditioning: all controls died, but 50% of cold-conditioned turtles survived. We investigated potential mechanisms underlying the response to cold conditioning by measuring changes in levels of putative cryoprotectants. Plasma levels of glucose and lactate, but not urea, were higher in cold-conditioned turtles than in controls, although the combined increase in these solutes was only 23 mmol L(-1). Cold conditioning attenuated cold-shock injury to brain cells, as assessed using a vital-dye assay, suggesting a link between protection of the nervous system and cold hardiness at the organismal level.

  3. The Role of the Foundation Board. Foundation Relations. Board Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simic, Curtis R.

    1998-01-01

    This booklet for trustees of institutions of higher education addresses the role of boards of related non-profit fund-raising foundations. The booklet begins with an explanation of four advantages of such foundations to host institutions, such as separating gift funds from public funds. Suggestions for making foundation boards more effective…

  4. [Hardy personality and psychological capital: the positive personal variables and the processes of exhaustion and vigor].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Jiménez, Bernardo; Garrosa, Eva; Corso, Sandra; Boada, Mar; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Raquel

    2012-02-01

    The research examined the effects of personal variables, psychological capital and Hardy Personality (HP), using exhaustion and vigor as criterion variables, reviewing two studies, one of 427 nurses (Spain) and another of 253 teachers (Perú). The results showed significant direct and moderating effects of personal variables on exhaustion and vigor, with a greater effect on vigor. The commitment variable (HP) is the only one that had significant effects on both samples. The discussion emphasizes the importance of positive personal variables to explain exhaustion and vigor, particularly the latter.

  5. Fonction maximale centrée de Hardy-Littlewood sur les espaces hyperboliques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-Quan; Lohoué, Noël

    2012-10-01

    On montre que la fonction maximale centrée de Hardy-Littlewood, M, sur les espaces hyperboliques réels {H}n = {R}^{{{raise .17exhbox riptstyle +}{raise .17exhbox riptstyle +}{raise .1exhbox riptscriptstyle +}riptscriptstyle +}} × {R}^{n - 1}, satisfait l'inégalité de type faible \\| M f \\|_{L^{1, infty}} ≤ A (n log {n}) \\| f\\|1 pour toute f∈ L 1(ℍ n ), où A>0 est une constante indépendante de la dimension n.

  6. Foundations of isomathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muktibodh, A. S.

    2013-10-01

    Santilli's isomathematics has a strong foundation in the early literature of mathematics surveyed by R.H. Bruck in his land mark book `A Survey of Binary Systems' [1] dating back to 1958. This work aims at exploring the very basics of Isomathematics as suggested by Santilli [7] and [8]. The concept of `Isotopy' plays a vital role in the development of this new age mathematics. Starting with Isotopy of groupoids we develop the study of Isotopy of quasi groups and loops via Partial Planes, Projective planes, 3-nets and multiplicative 3-nets.

  7. Foundation fieldbus economics comparison

    PubMed

    Verhappen

    2000-01-01

    This paper will provide a life cycle cost comparison between installations of three different control system configurations. 1. Conventional analogue instruments. 2. HART protocol instruments with a parallel asset management system. 3. Foundation fieldbus installation. Engineering, procurement, construction, commissioning and ongoing maintenance costs will be included as part of the analysis. Data for the analysis includes equipment from multiple manufacturers so a range of expected expenses will also be provided to indicate the sensitivity of the economic calculations to supplier. All calculations will be based on the median equipment values.

  8. The Lighthouse Foundation.

    PubMed

    Crome, Sarah; Barton, Susan

    2003-04-01

    The Lighthouse Foundation is a not-for-profit organisation, dedicated to empowering young people to take responsibility for their own lives. Lighthouse provides long-term care and support within a family style environment, to young people aged between 15 and 22 years, who may otherwise be homeless. There are currently seven homes operating in Victoria. The Lighthouse model is unique in meeting many of the long-term needs of disadvantaged young people. Emphasis is placed on relationships and community, providing young people with an environment where they are trusted, challenged, and can thrive intellectually, physically, socially, spiritually and emotionally. A sense of being, and belonging, is encouraged.

  9. Students' Perceptions of Foundation Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ooms, A.; Burke, L. M.; Marks-Maran, D. J.; Webb, M.; Cooper, D.

    2012-01-01

    In 2008 there were 87,339 people enrolled on foundation degrees (FDs) in the UK (Foundation Degree Forward, 2009), and educational institutions in the UK offered 1700 different foundation degrees in over 25 subjects, with nearly 900 more in development (Action on Access, 2010). In addition, student views are seen to be of importance, as…

  10. Students' Perceptions of Foundation Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ooms, A.; Burke, L. M.; Marks-Maran, D. J.; Webb, M.; Cooper, D.

    2012-01-01

    In 2008 there were 87,339 people enrolled on foundation degrees (FDs) in the UK (Foundation Degree Forward, 2009), and educational institutions in the UK offered 1700 different foundation degrees in over 25 subjects, with nearly 900 more in development (Action on Access, 2010). In addition, student views are seen to be of importance, as…

  11. Farm Foundation Annual Report, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farm Foundation, Oak Brook, IL.

    The Farm Foundation was established in 1933 as a private agency to help coordinate the work of other public and private groups and agencies to improve agriculture and rural life without taking political positions or supporting specific legislation. An operating rather than a grant-making foundation, the foundation develops national and regional…

  12. Effects of life-event stress and hardiness on peripheral vision in a real-life stress situation.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Tracie J; Alderman, Brandon L; Landers, Daniel M

    2003-01-01

    Previous research has only examined perceptual deficits that are hypothesized in a model of stress and injury under laboratory-induced stress conditions. The generalizability of findings from such induced-stress conditions is limited beyond the laboratory. The current research examined the influence of life-event stress and hardiness on peripheral narrowing in a real-life stress situation. Athletes completed life-stress and hardiness questionnaires, along with measures of state anxiety and peripheral vision. The stress condition was obtained by assessing the athletes within 2 hours of a competition. The real-life stress condition had a larger effect on state anxiety and peripheral narrowing than the laboratory-induced situations used in previous research, with effect sizes twice and three times as large as those reported in the literature. All athletes experienced significant reductions in peripheral vision prior to competition, regardless of life-event stress or hardiness levels.

  13. Mathematical foundations of biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Niederer, Peter F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of biomechanics is the analysis of the structure and function of humans, animals, and plants by means of the methods of mechanics. Its foundations are in particular embedded in mathematics, physics, and informatics. Due to the inherent multidisciplinary character deriving from its aim, biomechanics has numerous connections and overlapping areas with biology, biochemistry, physiology, and pathophysiology, along with clinical medicine, so its range is enormously wide. This treatise is mainly meant to serve as an introduction and overview for readers and students who intend to acquire a basic understanding of the mathematical principles and mechanics that constitute the foundation of biomechanics; accordingly, its contents are limited to basic theoretical principles of general validity and long-range significance. Selected examples are included that are representative for the problems treated in biomechanics. Although ultimate mathematical generality is not in the foreground, an attempt is made to derive the theory from basic principles. A concise and systematic formulation is thereby intended with the aim that the reader is provided with a working knowledge. It is assumed that he or she is familiar with the principles of calculus, vector analysis, and linear algebra.

  14. Colloidal Stability in Asymmetric Electrolytes: Modifications of the Schulze-Hardy Rule.

    PubMed

    Trefalt, Gregor; Szilagyi, Istvan; Téllez, Gabriel; Borkovec, Michal

    2017-02-21

    The Schulze-Hardy rule suggests a strong dependence of the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) on the ionic valence. This rule is addressed theoretically and confronted with recent experimental results. The commonly presented derivation of this rule assumes symmetric electrolytes and highly charged particles. Both assumptions are incorrect. Symmetric electrolytes containing multivalent ions are hardly soluble, and experiments are normally carried out with the well-soluble salts of asymmetric electrolytes containing monovalent and multivalent ions. In this situation, however, the behavior is completely different whether the multivalent ions represent the counterions or co-ions. When these ions represent the counterions, meaning that the multivalent ions have the opposite sign than the charge of the particle, they adsorb strongly to the particles. Thereby, they progressively reduce the magnitude of the surface charge with increasing valence. In fact, this dependence of the charge density on the counterion valence is mainly responsible for the decrease of the CCC with the valence. In the co-ion case, where the multivalent ions have the same sign as the charge of the particle, the multivalent ions are repelled from the particles, and the surfaces remain highly charged. In this case, the inverse Schulze-Hardy rule normally applies, whereby the CCC varies inversely proportional to the co-ion valence.

  15. Cold hardiness of Asian longhorned beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) larvae in different populations.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuqian; Xu, Lili; Tian, Bing; Tao, Jing; Wang, Jinlin; Zong, Shixiang

    2014-10-01

    The Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), is distributed widely in China, where it causes severe damage to forests, and is a quarantine pest in Europe, the United States, and Canada. A. glabripennis overwinters as dormant larvae to avoid adverse environmental conditions. To elucidate the cold hardiness of A. glabripennis larvae, the supercooling point (SCP), freezing point (FP), and cold hardiness-related compounds were examined in overwintering larva from five populations in China (Yili, Yanchi, Wulateqianqi, Beijing, and Dezhou). The results showed that the SCP and FP differed significantly among populations, where the SCP of larvae in the Wulateqianqi population was the lowest and highest in the Beijing population. The water, fat, and glycogen contents also differed significantly among the five populations. The SCPs of larvae from all five populations were proportional to glycogen contents, but had no association with water contents and fat contents. The total contents of seven low-molecular weight compounds (glycerol, galactose, glucose, mannose, sorbitol, inositol, and trehalose) differed significantly among populations. Thus, A. glabripennis larvae from different geographical populations contained different sugars or sugar alcohols (especially glycerol, glucose, sorbitol, and trehalose), which helped them to resist cold temperatures. This study provides basic information about that may facilitate the prediction of distribution range expansions and ensure proper implementation of the integrated management of A. glabripennis populations.

  16. Cold hardiness and supercooling capacity in the overwintering larvae of the codling moth, Cydia pomonella.

    PubMed

    Khani, Abbas; Moharramipour, Saeid

    2010-01-01

    The codling moth, Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), a worldwide apple pest, is classified as a freeze-intolerant organism and one of the most cold-tolerant pests. The objectives of this study were to examine the supercooling point of overwintering and non-diapausing larvae of C. pomonella as an index of its cold hardiness, and to assess larval mortality following 24 h exposure to extreme low temperatures ranging from -5 to -25 degrees C. The mean (+/-SE) supercooling point for feeding larvae (third through fifth instars) was -12.4 +/- 1.1 degrees C. The mean supercooling point for cocooned, non-diapausing larvae (i.e., non-feeding stages) decreased as the days that the arvae were cocooned increased and changed between -15.1 +/- 1.2 degrees C for one to two day cocooned arvae and -19.2 +/- 1.8 degrees C for less than five day cocooned larvae. The mean (+/-SE) supercooling point for other non-feeding stages containing pupae and overwintering larvae were -19.9 +/- 1.0 degrees C and -20.2 +/- 0.2 degrees C, respectively. Mean supercooling points of C. pomonella larvae were significantly lower during the winter months than the summer months, and sex had no effect on the supercooling point of C. pomonella larvae. The mortality of larvae increased significantly after individuals were exposed to temperatures below the mean supercooling point of the population. The supercooling point was a good predictor of cold hardiness.

  17. Principle of maximum Fisher information from Hardy's axioms applied to statistical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieden, B. Roy; Gatenby, Robert A.

    2013-10-01

    Consider a finite-sized, multidimensional system in parameter state a. The system is either at statistical equilibrium or general nonequilibrium, and may obey either classical or quantum physics. L. Hardy's mathematical axioms provide a basis for the physics obeyed by any such system. One axiom is that the number N of distinguishable states a in the system obeys N=max. This assumes that N is known as deterministic prior knowledge. However, most observed systems suffer statistical fluctuations, for which N is therefore only known approximately. Then what happens if the scope of the axiom N=max is extended to include such observed systems? It is found that the state a of the system must obey a principle of maximum Fisher information, I=Imax. This is important because many physical laws have been derived, assuming as a working hypothesis that I=Imax. These derivations include uses of the principle of extreme physical information (EPI). Examples of such derivations were of the De Broglie wave hypothesis, quantum wave equations, Maxwell's equations, new laws of biology (e.g., of Coulomb force-directed cell development and of in situ cancer growth), and new laws of economic fluctuation and investment. That the principle I=Imax itself derives from suitably extended Hardy axioms thereby eliminates its need to be assumed in these derivations. Thus, uses of I=Imax and EPI express physics at its most fundamental level, its axiomatic basis in math.

  18. Estimation of integral curves from high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Owen; Sakhanenko, Lyudmila

    2015-01-01

    We develop statistical methodology for a popular brain imaging technique HARDI based on the high order tensor model by Özarslan and Mareci [10]. We investigate how uncertainty in the imaging procedure propagates through all levels of the model: signals, tensor fields, vector fields, and fibers. We construct asymptotically normal estimators of the integral curves or fibers which allow us to trace the fibers together with confidence ellipsoids. The procedure is computationally intense as it blends linear algebra concepts from high order tensors with asymptotical statistical analysis. The theoretical results are illustrated on simulated and real datasets. This work generalizes the statistical methodology proposed for low angular resolution diffusion tensor imaging by Carmichael and Sakhanenko [3], to several fibers per voxel. It is also a pioneering statistical work on tractography from HARDI data. It avoids all the typical limitations of the deterministic tractography methods and it delivers the same information as probabilistic tractography methods. Our method is computationally cheap and it provides well-founded mathematical and statistical framework where diverse functionals on fibers, directions and tensors can be studied in a systematic and rigorous way. PMID:25937674

  19. Estimation of integral curves from high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Owen; Sakhanenko, Lyudmila

    2015-05-15

    We develop statistical methodology for a popular brain imaging technique HARDI based on the high order tensor model by Özarslan and Mareci [10]. We investigate how uncertainty in the imaging procedure propagates through all levels of the model: signals, tensor fields, vector fields, and fibers. We construct asymptotically normal estimators of the integral curves or fibers which allow us to trace the fibers together with confidence ellipsoids. The procedure is computationally intense as it blends linear algebra concepts from high order tensors with asymptotical statistical analysis. The theoretical results are illustrated on simulated and real datasets. This work generalizes the statistical methodology proposed for low angular resolution diffusion tensor imaging by Carmichael and Sakhanenko [3], to several fibers per voxel. It is also a pioneering statistical work on tractography from HARDI data. It avoids all the typical limitations of the deterministic tractography methods and it delivers the same information as probabilistic tractography methods. Our method is computationally cheap and it provides well-founded mathematical and statistical framework where diverse functionals on fibers, directions and tensors can be studied in a systematic and rigorous way.

  20. Validation of a Newly Developed Instrument Establishing Links Between Motivation and Academic Hardiness

    PubMed Central

    Kamtsios, Spiridon; Karagiannopoulou, Evangelia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish the reliability, the structural and the convergent validity of the “Dimensions of Academic Hardiness Questionnaire” for late elementary school children. A sample of children (N = 1264) aged 10-12 years completed the questionnaire and the “Athens Coping Scale”. Multiple fit indices provided support that the 9-factor model had a good fit to the data. Reliability coefficients ranged from .68 to .83. The study provided also preliminary evidence of convergent validity of the “Dimensions of Academic Hardiness” scores with one theoretically related measure, the “Athens Coping Scale”. The results enrich the notion of Academic Hardiness in late elementary school children as the role of awareness and the role of children’s previous experiences has been distinguished. The relation between the “Dimensions of Academic Hardiness” and achievement goal orientations in children learning is also noted. These findings are discussed in the context of the relevant literature. PMID:27247692

  1. Hörmander multipliers on two-dimensional dyadic Hardy spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, J.; Fridli, S.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we are interested in conditions on the coefficients of a two-dimensional Walsh multiplier operator that imply the operator is bounded on certain of the Hardy type spaces Hp, 0Hardy spaces.

  2. Hardy Bacterium Isolated From Two Geographically Distinct Spacecraft Assembly Cleanroom Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaisham-payan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Earlier studies have confirmed that a tenacious hardy bacterial population manages to persist and survive throughout a spacecraft assembly process. The widespread detection of these organisms underscores the challenges in eliminating them completely. Only comprehensive and repetitive microbial diversity studies of geographically distinct cleanroom facilities will bolster the understanding of planetary protection relevant microbes. Extensive characterizations of the physiological traits demonstrated by cleanroom microbes will aid NASA in gauging the forward contamination risk that hardy bacteria (such as Tersicoccus phoenicis) pose to spacecraft. This study reports on the isolation and identification of two gram-positive, non-motile, non-spore-forming bacterial strains from the spacecraft assembly facilities at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA and Centre Spatial Guyanais, Kourou, French Guiana. DNA-DNA relatedness values between the novel strains indicates that these novel strains were indeed members of a same species. Phylogenetic evidence derived from a 16S ribosomal DNA analysis indicated that both the novel strains are less closely related to all other Arthrobacter species.

  3. The size of the chi-square test for the Hardy-Weinberg law.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seung-Ho; Shin, Dongwan

    2004-01-01

    Many scientific problems can be formulated in terms of a statistical model indexed by parameters, only some of which are of scientific interest and the other parameters, called nuisance parameters, are not of interest in themselves. For testing the Hardy-Weinberg law, a relation among genotype and allele probabilities is of interest and allele probabilities are of no interest and now nuisance parameters. In this paper we investigate how the size (the maximum of the type I error rate over the nuisance parameter space) of the chi-square test for the Hardy-Weinberg law is affected by the nuisance parameters. Whether the size is well controlled or not under the nominal level has been frequently investigated as basic components of statistical tests. The size represents the type I error rate at the worst case. We prove that the size is always greater than the nominal level as the sample size increases. Extensive computations show that the size of the chi-squared test (worst type I error rate over the nuisance parameter space) deviates more upwardly from the nominal level as the sample size gets larger. The value at which the maximum of the type I error rate was found moves closer to the edges of the the nuisance parameter space with increasing sample size. An exact test is recommended as an alternative when the type I error is inflated. 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. On horizontal Hardy, Rellich, Caffarelli-Kohn-Nirenberg and p-sub-Laplacian inequalities on stratified groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzhansky, Michael; Suragan, Durvudkhan

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we present a version of horizontal weighted Hardy-Rellich type and Caffarelli-Kohn-Nirenberg type inequalities on stratified groups and study some of their consequences. Our results reflect on many results previously known in special cases. Moreover, a new simple proof of the Badiale-Tarantello conjecture [2] on the best constant of a Hardy type inequality is provided. We also show a family of Poincaré inequalities as well as inequalities involving the weighted and unweighted p-sub-Laplacians.

  5. An Early Cretaceous volcanic arc/marginal basin transition zone, Peninsula hardy, southernmost Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher A.; Barton, Michael; Hanson, Richard E.; Fleming, Thomas H.

    1994-10-01

    The Hardy Formation represents a latest Jurassic-Early Cretaceous volcanic arc that was located along the Pacific margin of southern South America. It was separated from the continent by a marginal basin floored by portions of an ophiolite sequence (the Rocas Verdes ophiolites). The transition between the arc and marginal basin occurs on Peninsula Hardy, southernmost Chile, where there is a lateral facies transition from arc deposits of the Hardy Formation into proximal marginal basin fill of the Yahgan Formation. Interfingering of arc and marginal basin sequences demonstrates that subduction-related arc magmatism was concurrent with marginal basin formation. The lateral facies transition is reflected in the geochemistry of volcanic rocks from the Hardy and Yahgan formations. Basalts, andesites and dacites of the arc sequence follow a calc-alkaline differentiation trend whereas basalts from the marginal basin follow a tholeiitic differentiation trend. Estimates of temperature and oxygen fugacity for crystallization of the arc andesites are similar to values reported for other calc-alkaline andesites. It is suggested that water activity influenced the early or late crystallization of Ti-magnetite and this controlled the style of differentiation of the magmas erupted on Peninsula Hardy. Magmas with high water contents evolved along the calc-alkaline differentiation trend whereas those with low water contents evolved along the tholeiitic differentiation trend. Some rhyolites are differentiated from the calc-alkaline andesites and dacites, but most appear to be the products of crustal anatexis on the basis of trace-element evidence. The arc basalts and some marginal basin basalts show relative enrichment in LILE, relative depletion in HFSE, and enrichment in LREE. Other marginal basin basalts are LREE depleted and show small relative depletions in HFSE. Basalts with both calc-alkaline and tholeiitic affinities can also be recognized in the Rocas Verdes ophiolites

  6. Hardiness and Social Support as Predictors of Stress in Mothers of Typical Children, Children with Autism, and Children with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Mary Jane

    2002-01-01

    One hundred twenty mothers of children with autism, with mental retardation, or typically developing were assessed for effects of social support and hardiness on level of stress. Results indicated significant group differences in ratings of depression, anxiety, somatic complaints and burnout. Both hardiness and social support were predictive of…

  7. The foundation of physicianship.

    PubMed

    Fuks, Abraham; Brawer, James; Boudreau, J Donald

    2012-01-01

    Although the practice of medicine continually changes in response to new biomedical understanding, novel technologies, and evolving cultural contexts, the ethical foundations of the clinical relationship between patient and physician paradoxically remain constant. There are fundamental characteristics with respect to character, behavior, and responsibilities that are descriptive of and necessary to the role of healer and that underpin the notion of physicianship. This article discusses the underlying characteristics or virtues that are necessary to the practice of medicine from the perspectives of three different philosophic traditions: the Aristotelian idea of phronesis as developed in the work of Edmund Pellegrino; the notion of alterity as framed by Emmanuel Levinas; and the attributes necessary to healing as laid out in the kabbala.

  8. Foundations of Geomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Andy

    The study of the magnetic field of the Earth, or geomagnetism, is one of the oldest lines of scientific enquiry. Indeed, it has often been said that William Gilbert's De Magnete, published in 1600 and predating Isaac Newton's Principia by 87 years, can claim to be the first true scientific textbook; his study was essentially the first of academic rather than practical interest.What then, we may ask, has been accomplished in the nearly 400 intervening years up to the publication of Foundations of Geomagnetism? In short, a wealth of observational evidence, considerable physical understanding, and a great deal of mathematical apparatus have accrued, placing the subject on a much surer footing.The latter two categories are described in considerable detail, and with attendant rigor, in this book. The sphericity of the Earth means that a frequent theme in the book is the solution of the partial differential equations of electrodynamics in a spherical geometry.

  9. Fraction Sense: Foundational Understandings.

    PubMed

    Fennell, Francis Skip; Karp, Karen

    2016-08-09

    The intent of this commentary is to identify elements of fraction sense and note how the research studies provided in this special issue, in related but somewhat different ways, validate the importance of such understandings. Proficiency with fractions serves as a prerequisite for student success in higher level mathematics, as well as serving as a gateway to many occupations and varied contexts beyond the mathematics classroom. Fraction sense is developed through instructional opportunities involving fraction equivalence and magnitude, comparing and ordering fractions, using fraction benchmarks, and computational estimation. Such foundations are then extended to operations involving fractions and decimals and applications involving proportional reasoning. These components of fraction sense are all addressed in the studies provided in this issue, with particular consideration devoted to the significant importance of the use of the number line as a central representational tool for conceptually understanding fraction magnitude. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2016.

  10. Foundations of modern cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, John F.; Holcomb, Katherine A.

    2005-07-01

    Recent discoveries in astronomy, especially those made with data collected by satellites such as the Hubble Space Telescope and the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, have revolutionized the science of cosmology. These new observations offer the possibility that some long-standing mysteries in cosmology might be answered, including such fundamental questions as the ultimate fate of the universe. Foundations of modern cosmology provides an accessible, thorough and descriptive introduction to the physical basis for modern cosmological theory, from the big bang to a distant future dominated by dark energy. This second edition includes the latest observational results and provides the detailed background material necessary to understand their implications, with a focus on the specific model supported by these observations, the concordance model. Consistent with the book's title, emphasis is given to the scientific framework for cosmology, particularly the basics concepts of physics that underlie modern theories of relativity and cosmology; the importance of data and observations is stressed throughout. The book sketches the historical background of cosmology, and provides a review of the relevant basic physics and astronomy. After this introduction, both special and general relativity are treated, before proceeding to an in-depth discussion of the big bang theory and physics of the early universe. The book includes current research areas, including dark matter and structure formation, dark energy, the inflationary universe, and quantum cosmology. The authors' website (http://www.astro.virginia.edu/~jh8h/Foundations) offers a wealth of supplemental information, including questions and answers, references to other sources, and updates on the latest discoveries.

  11. Flavor of cold-hardy grapes: impact of berry maturity and environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Pedneault, Karine; Dorais, Martine; Angers, Paul

    2013-11-06

    Since the arrival on the market of high-quality cold-hardy grape varieties, northern winemaking has been developing tremendously in countries traditionally unsuited for grape and wine production. Cold-hardy grapes are mainly interspecific hybrids of Vitis vinifera with Vitis labrusca and Vitis riparia , making their chemical composition distinct from that of V. vinifera varieties traditionally used for winemaking and therefore limiting the use of current knowledge about V. vinifera varieties in the assessment of grape maturity. Consequently, to evaluate the flavor development of cold-hardy grapes in the province of Quebec, Canada, the ripening of Frontenac and Marquette berries in two vineyards located in the southwest (SW) and northeast (NE) areas of the province, starting at the beginning of veraison, was studied. Quality attributes, phenolic compounds, and aroma profiles showed significant changes during maturation. Although full maturity was reached for both Frontenac and Marquette in the SW vineyard (1380 accumulated growing degree days, based on 10 °C), the accumulation of 1035 growing degree days was not sufficient to fully ripen Frontenac and Marquette in the NE vineyard. Principal component analysis showed different ripening patterns for the two studied locations. The longer veraison in the SW vineyard resulted in higher quality attributes and higher flavor development for both Frontenac and Marquette. Under the colder conditions in the NE vineyard, metabolite accumulation was driven primarily by berry growth, and flavor development was limited. Besides growing degree days and technological parameters (total soluble solids, pH, titratable acidity), which provide significant guidelines for maturity assessment in cold climate, phenolic maturity may be followed by the accumulation of hydroxycinnamic esters and flavonoids, although the impact of these compound classes on quality remains to be determined in cold-climate wines. In both Frontenac and Marquette

  12. Pruning time × cultivar effects on flower-bud hardiness in northern highbush and southern highbush blueberry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study was conducted to determine if early-fall pruning of either northern highbush or southern highbush blueberries was detrimental to the development of optimum and levels of mid-winter cold-hardiness. Using a detached-shoot freeze-thaw assay, flower bud LT50 values were determined in early Janua...

  13. Clonal differences in antioxidant activity and bioactive constituents of hardy kiwifruit (Actinidia arguta) and its year-to-year variability.

    PubMed

    Latocha, Piotr; Wołosiak, Rafał; Worobiej, Elwira; Krupa, Tomasz

    2013-04-01

    Hardy kiwifruit (Actinidia arguta) is a new species, commercially grown in recent years. Total phenolics (TPC), vitamin C (TAA) content, antioxidant activity (AA) and their year-to-year variability in seven hardy kiwifruit clones were evaluated. TPC was determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent assay. TAA was estimated by determination of l-ascorbic acid and l-dehydroascorbic acid levels using high-performance liquid chromatography. AA was measured using diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and OH radicals. The highest content of vitamin C, in all seasons, was found in D11 (1447-2181 mg kg(-1) fresh weight) and phenolics for D11 and M1 clones (2583-3312 and 2228-3414 mg gallic acid equivalents kg(-1) fresh weight, respectively). TPC and TAA content showed significant differences between hardy kiwifruit clones and showed significant year-to-year variability. Each year, the level of AA was significantly higher for D11 (DPPH, ABTS). AA was strongly correlated with TPC and TAA content in Actinidia fruit. Hardy kiwifruit are an important source of vitamin C and phenolics, which resulted in their good antioxidant potential. A significantly higher content of these compounds was found in fruit of hybrid origin, which suggests that A. purpurea × A. arguta clones may be useful genetic resources for further interspecific hybridization. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Registration of four winter-hardy faba bean germplasm lines for use in winter pulse and cover crop development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Faba bean (Vicia faba L.) is a versatile crop grown for food, feed, vegetable, or cover crop purposes in many countries. In response to the growing demand for winter annual legumes for cover crop development in the United States, we developed four winter-hardy faba bean germplasm lines, WH-1 (Reg. N...

  15. On a more accurate half-discrete Hardy-Hilbert-type inequality related to the kernel of arc tangent function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Yang, Bicheng

    2016-01-01

    By means of weight functions and Hermite-Hadamard's inequality, and introducing a discrete interval variable, a more accurate half-discrete Hardy-Hilbert-type inequality related to the kernel of arc tangent function and a best possible constant factor is given, which is an extension of a published result. The equivalent forms and the operator expressions are also considered.

  16. Association Genetics of Coastal Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii, Pinaceae). I. Cold-Hardiness Related Traits

    Treesearch

    Andrew J. Eckert; Andrew D. Bower; Jill L. Wegrzyn; Barnaly Pande; Kathleen D. Jermstad; Konstantin V. Krutovsky; J. Bradley St. Clair; David B. Neale

    2009-01-01

    Adaptation to cold is one of the greatest challenges to forest trees. This process is highly synchronized with environmental cues relating to photoperiod and temperature. Here, we use a candidate gene-based approach to search for genetic associations between 384 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers from 117 candidate genes and 21 cold-hardiness related traits....

  17. A Structural Model of Parental Alcoholism, Family Functioning, and Psychological Health: The Mediating Effects of Hardiness and Personal Growth Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robitschek, Christine; Kashubeck, Susan

    1999-01-01

    This study sought to: (a) determine whether personal-growth orientation and hardiness mediated the relations of parental alcoholism and family functioning to psychological well-being and distress; (b) determine whether this model was invariant across men and women; and (c) examine the role of parental alcoholism in a model that included family…

  18. Comment on Nesselroade, Gerstorf, Hardy, & Ram, "Idiographic Filters for Psychological Constructs": Another Kind of Discrepancy to Think about

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loehlin, John C.

    2007-01-01

    In their stimulating article, Nesselroade et al. (Nesselroade, Gerstorf, Hardy, & Ram, this issue) propose "filtering out" idiosyncracy at the measurement level in order to maintain constancy at the construct level. They illustrate their idea using data from a study by Lebo and Nesselroade (1978), in which self-descriptions of individual women…

  19. The Effects of Hardiness, Job-Related Stress, and Life Stress on Health and Absence from Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Thomas Li-Ping; Hammontree, Monty L.

    The emphasis in stress-illness research has begun to shift recently toward the study of resistance resources. Social support has been identified as a potentially important moderator of the stress-illness relationship. In this study, hardiness in a sample of police officers was examined. Subjects (N=60) were police officers from seven suburban…

  20. Taiwanese Students' Science Learning Self-Efficacy and Teacher and Student Science Hardiness: A Multilevel Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ya-Ling; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the factors accounting for science learning self-efficacy (the specific beliefs that people have in their ability to complete tasks in science learning) from both the teacher and the student levels. We thus propose a multilevel model to delineate its relationships with teacher and student science hardiness (i.e.,…

  1. The Wording of a Proof: Hardy's Second "Elegant" Proof--The Pythagorean School's Irrationality of Square Root of 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padula, Janice

    2006-01-01

    One of the most interesting and important proofs in the history of mathematics is the Pythagorean school's proof of the "irrationality" of the square root of 2. After a brief look at G. H. Hardy (1941) thoughts regarding it, two versions of the classic Pythagorean proof are examined and discussed in this article, one written by an American…

  2. Moving Frost Hardy Genes From Wild to Cultivated Potatoes. Use of Precise Screening Tools to Make Real Progress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The common cultivated species Solanum tubrosum is frost sensitive and is killed at temperatures below -2.5°C. It has been estimated that by increasing frost hardiness by 1–2 C one can expect an increase in potato yield by 26 to 40% in the Altiplano (Peru and Bolivia) covering 63,000 ha. of potatoes....

  3. Relationships between cold hardiness, and ice nucleating activity, glycerol and protein contents in the hemolymph of caterpillars, Aporia crataegi L.

    PubMed

    Li, N G

    2012-01-01

    Insects in Siberia must tolerate some of the coldest conditions on earth. The relationship between hemolymph ice nucleating activity, glycerol and total protein concentrations, and cold hardiness was explored in Aporia crataegi L. (Lepidoptera: Pieridae). Cold-hardened overwintering caterpillars were collected at a time of year when temperatures are regularly below -50 degree C, and warm-acclimated at +22 degree C, to see how changes in the physical and chemical properties of the hemolymph influence their cold hardiness potential. Warm acclimation led to a decrease in glycerol and proteins content in the hemolymph, which was associated with the decrease in ice nucleating activity and dramatic loss of cold hardiness potential of the caterpillars. It is suggested that one of the effects of cryoprotection in the freeze tolerant insects, caused by glycerol, might be associated with its ability to form larger aggregates of ice nucleating polypeptides that initiate the ice nucleation at high subzero temperatures. Such ice nucleating structures seem to ensure a high probability of ice nucleation at relatively high temperatures, which may contribute to the extraordinary cold hardiness of A. crataegi caterpillars, which may tolerate temperatures below -85 degree С.

  4. Notice to nurserymen of the naming and release for propagation of lufkin red an american hardy hibiscus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hibiscus laevis ‘Lufkin Red’, a new hardy native ornamental hibiscus is recommended for trial by nurserymen and horticulturists as a summer flowering perennial landscape plant nationwide but is particularly adapted to conditions in the South. ‘Lufkin Red’ was selected for its outstanding red flowe...

  5. Notice to nurserymen of the nameing and release for propagation of lufin white an american hardy hibiscus cultivar

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hibiscus laevis ‘LUFKIN WHITE’, a new hardy native ornamental hibiscus cultivar is recommended for trial by nurserymen and horticulturists as a summer flowering perennial landscape plant nationwide but is particularly adapted to conditions in the South. ‘LUFKIN WHITE’ was selected for its exception...

  6. Testing for homogeneity of Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium using data sampled from several populations.

    PubMed

    Olson, J M; Foley, M

    1996-09-01

    Olson (1993, Annals of Human Genetics 57, 291-295) proposed a large-sample test of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium when genotype data are sampled from several populations with different allele frequencies. The test assumes that a ratio measure of disequilibrium is constant across the populations. In this paper, we consider the problem of testing the assumption of homogeneity of that ratio and propose both a large-sample test and an exact test. The large-sample test is appropriate if sample sizes in all strata are sufficiently large, but is strongly anticonservative if some strata are small. In the latter case, the exact test is preferred and we approximate the P-value of this test using a Markov chain Monte Carlo approach.

  7. Quantitative changes in phenolic content during physiological development of the olive (Olea europaea) cultivar Hardy's Mammoth.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Danielle; Prenzler, Paul D; Lavee, Shimon; Antolovich, Michael; Robards, Kevin

    2003-04-23

    This investigation was designed to characterize phenolic metabolism of the olive cultivar, Hardy's Mammoth, by examining its constitutive tissues. The phenolic profiles of pulp, seed, stone, and new and old season leaves were monitored over two fruiting seasons, to investigate possible relationships between tissues and phenol content and to determine the impact of alternate fruit bearing. No major qualitative differences in phenolic composition were found between the various tissues; however, distinct differences between the tissues with respect to quantifiable phenols were established. Relationships between 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethyl (3E,4E)-4-formyl-3-(2-oxoethyl)hex-4-enoate ester, oleuropein, and hydroxytyrosol in pulp and leaf were identified and found to be related to alternate bearing. Concentrations of 5-caffeoylquinic acid in old season leaves differed dramatically between seasons, confirming earlier studies.

  8. Chemistry of fruit flies: Glandular secretion ofBactrocera (Polistomimetes) visenda (Hardy).

    PubMed

    Krohn, S; Fletcher, M T; Kitching, W; Moore, C J; Drew, R A; Francke, W

    1992-12-01

    The major component (>90% of volatiles) of the male rectal glandular extract of the nonpest speciesBactrocera visenda (Hardy) is 3-methyl2-butenyl acetate, with minor components being the isomeric 3-methyl-3-butenyl acetate, the homologous esters, 3-methyl-2-butenyl propanoate and 3-methyl-2-butenyl formate, along with 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, 3-methyl-2-butenal, and 3-methylbutyl acetate. None of these compounds has been identified previously from aBactrocera species, supporting the view thatBactrocera visenda is taxonomically distant from otherBactrocera species identified from the Australian mainland. This collection of compounds adds to the known types utilized by dipteran species and emphasizes their extensive biosynthetic capability.

  9. Geometric BVPs, Hardy spaces, and the Cauchy integral and transform on regions with corners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loya, Paul

    In this paper we give a new perspective on the Cauchy integral and transform and Hardy spaces for Dirac-type operators on manifolds with corners of codimension two. Instead of considering Banach or Hilbert spaces, we use polyhomogeneous functions on a geometrically "blown-up" version of the manifold called the total boundary blow-up introduced by Mazzeo and Melrose [R.R. Mazzeo, R.B. Melrose, Analytic surgery and the eta invariant, Geom. Funct. Anal. 5 (1) (1995) 14-75]. These polyhomogeneous functions are smooth everywhere on the original manifold except at the corners where they have a "Taylor series" (with possible log terms) in polar coordinates. The main application of our analysis is a complete Fredholm theory for boundary value problems of Dirac operators on manifolds with corners of codimension two.

  10. Foundations of resilience thinking.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Charles G; Parker, Jessica P

    2014-08-01

    Through 3 broad and interconnected streams of thought, resilience thinking has influenced the science of ecology and natural resource management by generating new multidisciplinary approaches to environmental problem solving. Resilience science, adaptive management (AM), and ecological policy design (EPD) contributed to an internationally unified paradigm built around the realization that change is inevitable and that science and management must approach the world with this assumption, rather than one of stability. Resilience thinking treats actions as experiments to be learned from, rather than intellectual propositions to be defended or mistakes to be ignored. It asks what is novel and innovative and strives to capture the overall behavior of a system, rather than seeking static, precise outcomes from discrete action steps. Understanding the foundations of resilience thinking is an important building block for developing more holistic and adaptive approaches to conservation. We conducted a comprehensive review of the history of resilience thinking because resilience thinking provides a working context upon which more effective, synergistic, and systems-based conservation action can be taken in light of rapid and unpredictable change. Together, resilience science, AM, and EPD bridge the gaps between systems analysis, ecology, and resource management to provide an interdisciplinary approach to solving wicked problems. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  11. Ford Foundation Fellowships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Ford Foundation is sponsoring 40 three-year predoctoral fellowships and 10 one-year dissertation fellowships for minorities for 1987. The predoctoral fellowships include an annual stipend of $10,000 and an annual grant of $6000 to the fellow's institution in lieu of tuition and fees. Dissertation Fellows will receive a stipend of $18,000 and no institutional grant.The program is designed to increase the presence of under represented minorities in the nation's college and university faculties. The minority groups to be considered under this program are: American Indians, Alaskan Natives (Eskimo or Aleut), Black Americans, Mexican Americans/Chicanos, Native Pacific Islanders (Polynesians or Micronesians), and Puerto Ricans. The competition is open to any U.S. citizen who is a member of one of these groups, who is a beginning graduate student or is within 1 year of completing the dissertation, and who expects to work toward a Ph.D. or Sc.D. degree. Fellowships will be awarded in the behavioral and social sciences, humanities, engineering, mathematics, physical sciences, and biological sciences. The National Research Council, which is administering the fellowships, can provide more information on which fields of study are and are not eligible for this program.

  12. Creating a Successful Affiliated Foundation. Foundation Relations. Board Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedgepeth, Royster C.

    1999-01-01

    This booklet for trustees of institutions of higher education offers guidelines for the creation of effective affiliated foundations. An introductory section notes the increased use of such foundations by public colleges and universities for institutional fund-raising and management of property and endowments. The booklet finds that successful…

  13. Creating a Successful Affiliated Foundation. Foundation Relations. Board Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedgepeth, Royster C.

    1999-01-01

    This booklet for trustees of institutions of higher education offers guidelines for the creation of effective affiliated foundations. An introductory section notes the increased use of such foundations by public colleges and universities for institutional fund-raising and management of property and endowments. The booklet finds that successful…

  14. [Supercooling capacity and cold hardiness of the Pararcyplera microptera meridionalis (Orthoptera: Acrididae) eggs].

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Zhou, Xiao-Rong; Pang, Bao-Ping

    2014-07-01

    Using the thermocouple method, the supercooling point (SCP) and cold hardiness of Pararcyplera microptera meridionalis eggs were measured in the laboratory. The soil water content significantly affected the water content of pre-diapause eggs, but had no significant effect on the SCP, and the water content of pre-diapause eggs rose with the increasing soil water content. There were highly significant differences among the SCPs, water contents or fat contents in the eggs at different developmental stages. With the egg' s development, the water content decreased from 51.5% at oviposition to 46.8% in 120 days after oviposition, the fat content increased from 10.5% (fresh mass)/19.0% (dry mass) to 14.5% (fresh mass)/28.9% (dry mass), and the SCP declined from -23.5 degrees C to -30.0 degrees C. There was a significant correlation between the SCP and the water content or fat content. The SCPs of deep-diapause eggs were lower than those of pre- and early-diapause eggs. The different low temperatures and treatment durations significantly affected the survival rate of diapause eggs. The lethal low temperature (Ltemp50) for 12 h exposure was -27.3 degrees C and the lethal time (Ltime50) at -25 degrees C was 22.73 days. As the mean SCPs of diapause eggs was much similar to their Ltemp50, the SCP could be considered as a good indicator of cold hardiness for P. m. meridionalis eggs and this species is a freeze-intolerant insect.

  15. Enzyme Activity, Cold Hardiness, and Supercooling Point in Developmental Stages of Acrosternum arabicum (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae).

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Mozhgan; Izadi, Hamzeh

    2016-01-01

    Several species of pentatomid bugs feed on pistachio fruits in Iran. Acrosternum arabicum Wagner (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) is one of the most important pests of pistachio in Rafsanjan, Iran. This study was carried out to investigate the carbohydrase activities, supercooling points, and cold hardiness profiles of different developmental stages of A. arabicum under laboratory conditions. The midgut amylolytic of A. arabicum showed an optimal pH at 7.0. The highest amylolytic activity was found in the female adults (35.41 ± 0.90 nmol/min/gut). The mean amylolytic activity measured in first instar nymph was 6.75 ± 0.54 nmol/min/gut. Midgut α- and β-glucosidase showed an optimal activity at pH 5 and 7, respectively. These activities increased from first (83 ± 5 and 54 ± 5 nmol/min, respectively) to fifth (881 ± 17 and 237 ± 14 nmol/min, respectively) instar nymphs. The enzyme activities increased in the adults. Midgut α- and β-galactosidase showed an optimal activity at pH 5. α- and β-galactosidase activities were low in the first instar nymphs (73 ± 5 and 21 ± 3 nmol/min, respectively). The level of α- and β-galactosidase activities in the female adults (533 ± 18 and 246 ± 6 nmol/min, respectively) was higher than the nymphs. The lowest super cooling points (-19 and -18.2 °C, respectively) and the highest cold hardiness (22 and 18% following 24 h exposure at - 20 °C, respectively) were recorded for the eggs and adult females.

  16. Seasonal changes in physiology and development of cold hardiness in the hatchling painted turtle Chrysemys picta.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, J P; Litzgus, J D; Iverson, J B; Lee, R E

    2000-11-01

    Hatchling painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) commonly hibernate in shallow, natal nests where winter temperatures may fall below -10 degrees C. Although hatchlings are moderately freeze-tolerant, they apparently rely on supercooling to survive exposure to severe cold. We investigated seasonal changes in physiology and in the development of supercooling capacity and resistance to inoculative freezing in hatchling Chrysemys picta exposed in the laboratory to temperatures that decreased from 22 to 4 degrees C over a 5.5 month period. For comparison, we also studied hatchling snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina), a less cold-hardy species that usually overwinters under water. Although Chrysemys picta and Chelydra serpentina differed in some physiological responses, both species lost dry mass, catabolized lipid and tended to gain body water during the acclimation regimen. Recently hatched, 22 degrees C-acclimated Chrysemys picta supercooled only modestly (mean temperature of crystallization -6.3+/-0.2 degrees C; N=6) and were susceptible to inoculation by ice nuclei in a frozen substratum (mean temperature of crystallization -1.1+/-0.1 degrees C; N=6) (means +/- s.e.m.). In contrast, cold-acclimated turtles exhibited pronounced capacities for supercooling and resistance to inoculative freezing. The development of cold hardiness reflected the elimination or deactivation of potent endogenous ice nuclei and an elevation of blood osmolality that was due primarily to the retention of urea, but was not associated with accumulation of the polyols, sugars or amino acids commonly found in the cryoprotection systems of other animals. Also, Chrysemys picta (and Chelydra serpentina) lacked both antifreeze proteins and ice-nucleating proteins, which are used by some animals to promote supercooling and to initiate freezing at the high temperatures conducive to freezing survival, respectively.

  17. Spatial HARDI: Improved Visualization of Complex White Matter Architecture with Bayesian Spatial Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Ashish; Hess, Christopher; Mukherjee, Pratik

    2010-01-01

    Imaging of water diffusion using magnetic resonance imaging has become an important noninvasive method for probing the white matter connectivity of the human brain for scientific and clinical studies. Current methods such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) such as q-ball imaging, and diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI), are limited by low spatial resolution, long scan times, and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). These methods fundamentally perform reconstruction on a voxel-by-voxel level, effectively discarding the natural coherence of the data at different points in space. This paper attempts to overcome these tradeoffs by using spatial information to constrain the reconstruction from raw diffusion MRI data, and thereby improve angular resolution and noise tolerance. Spatial constraints are specified in terms of a prior probability distribution, which is then incorporated in a Bayesian reconstruction formulation. By taking the log of the resulting posterior distribution, optimal Bayesian reconstruction is reduced to a cost minimization problem. The minimization is solved using a new iterative algorithm based on successive least squares quadratic descent. Simulation studies and in vivo results are presented which indicate significant gains in terms of higher angular resolution of diffusion orientation distribution functions, better separation of crossing fibers, and improved reconstruction SNR over the same HARDI method, spherical harmonic q-ball imaging, without spatial regularization. Preliminary data also indicate that the proposed method might be better at maintaining accurate ODFs for smaller numbers of diffusion-weighted acquisition directions (hence faster scans) compared to conventional methods. Possible impacts of this work include improved evaluation of white matter microstructural integrity in regions of crossing fibers and higher spatial and angular resolution for more accurate tractography. PMID:20670684

  18. Temperature studies with the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri: cold hardiness and temperature thresholds for oviposition.

    PubMed

    Hall, David G; Wenninger, Erik J; Hentz, Matthew G

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to obtain information on the cold hardiness of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), in Florida and to assess upper and lower temperature thresholds for oviposition. The psyllid is an important pest in citrus because it transmits the bacterial pathogens responsible for citrus greening disease, Huanglongbing, considered the most serious citrus disease worldwide. D. citri was first found in Florida during 1998, and the disease was discovered during 2005. Little was known regarding cold hardiness of D. citri, but Florida citrus is occasionally subjected to notable freeze events. Temperature and duration were each significant sources of variation in percent mortality of D. citri subjected to freeze events. Relatively large percentages of adults and nymphs survived after being exposed for several hours to temperatures as low as -5 to -6 °C. Relatively large percentages of eggs hatched after being exposed for several hours to temperatures as low as -8 °C. Research results indicated that adult D. citri become cold acclimated during the winter through exposure to cooler winter temperatures. There was no evidence that eggs became cold acclimated during winter. Cold acclimation in nymphs was not investigated. Research with adult D. citri from laboratory and greenhouse colonies revealed that mild to moderate freeze events were usually nonlethal to the D. citri irrespective of whether they were cold acclimated or not. Upper and lower temperature thresholds for oviposition were investigated because such information may be valuable in explaining the geographic distribution and potential spread of the pest from Florida as well as how cooler winter temperatures might limit population growth. The estimated lower and upper thresholds for oviposition were 16.0 and 41.6 °C, respectively; the estimated temperature of peak oviposition over a 48 h period was 29.6 °C.

  19. Temperature Studies with the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri: Cold Hardiness and Temperature Thresholds for Oviposition

    PubMed Central

    Hall, David G.; Wenninger, Erik J.; Hentz, Matthew G.

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to obtain information on the cold hardiness of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), in Florida and to assess upper and lower temperature thresholds for oviposition. The psyllid is an important pest in citrus because it transmits the bacterial pathogens responsible for citrus greening disease, Huanglongbing, considered the most serious citrus disease worldwide. D. citri was first found in Florida during 1998, and the disease was discovered during 2005. Little was known regarding cold hardiness of D. citri, but Florida citrus is occasionally subjected to notable freeze events. Temperature and duration were each significant sources of variation in percent mortality of D. citri subjected to freeze events. Relatively large percentages of adults and nymphs survived after being exposed for several hours to temperatures as low as -5 to -6° C. Relatively large percentages of eggs hatched after being exposed for several hours to temperatures as low as -8° C. Research results indicated that adult D. citri become cold acclimated during the winter through exposure to cooler winter temperatures. There was no evidence that eggs became cold acclimated during winter. Cold acclimation in nymphs was not investigated. Research with adult D. citri from laboratory and greenhouse colonies revealed that mild to moderate freeze events were usually nonlethal to the D. citri irrespective of whether they were cold acclimated or not. Upper and lower temperature thresholds for oviposition were investigated because such information may be valuable in explaining the geographic distribution and potential spread of the pest from Florida as well as how cooler winter temperatures might limit population growth. The estimated lower and upper thresholds for oviposition were 16.0 and 41.6° C, respectively; the estimated temperature of peak oviposition over a 48 h period was 29.6° C. PMID:21870969

  20. Cold Hardiness and Supercooling Capacity in the Overwintering Larvae of the Codling Moth, Cydia pomonella

    PubMed Central

    Khani, Abbas; Moharramipour, Saeid

    2010-01-01

    The codling moth, Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), a worldwide apple pest, is classified as a freeze-intolerant organism and one of the most cold-tolerant pests. The objectives of this study were to examine the supercooling point of overwintering and non-diapausing larvae of C. pomonella as an index of its cold hardiness, and to assess larval mortality following 24 h exposure to extreme low temperatures ranging from -5 to -25°C. The mean (±SE) supercooling point for feeding larvae (third through fifth instars) was -12.4 ± 1.1°C. The mean supercooling point for cocooned, non-diapausing larvae (i.e., non-feeding stages) decreased as the days that the arvae were cocooned increased and changed between -15.1 ± 1.2°C for one to two day cocooned arvae and -19.2 ± 1.8°C for less than five day cocooned larvae. The mean (±SE) supercooling point for other non-feeding stages containing pupae and overwintering larvae were -19.9 ± 1.0°C and -20.2 ± 0.2°C, respectively. Mean supercooling points of C. pomonella larvae were significantly lower during the winter months than the summer months, and sex had no effect on the supercooling point of C. pomonella larvae. The mortality of larvae increased significantly after individuals were exposed to temperatures below the mean supercooling point of the population. The supercooling point was a good predictor of cold hardiness. PMID:20673068

  1. Leveraging EAP-Sparsity for Compressed Sensing of MS-HARDI in (k, q)-Space.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiaqi; Sakhaee, Elham; Entezari, Alireza; Vemuri, Baba C

    2015-01-01

    Compressed Sensing (CS) for the acceleration of MR scans has been widely investigated in the past decade. Lately, considerable progress has been made in achieving similar speed ups in acquiring multi-shell high angular resolution diffusion imaging (MS-HARDI) scans. Existing approaches in this context were primarily concerned with sparse reconstruction of the diffusion MR signal S(q) in the q-space. More recently, methods have been developed to apply the compressed sensing framework to the 6-dimensional joint (k, q)-space, thereby exploiting the redundancy in this 6D space. To guarantee accurate reconstruction from partial MS-HARDI data, the key ingredients of compressed sensing that need to be brought together are: (1) the function to be reconstructed needs to have a sparse representation, and (2) the data for reconstruction ought to be acquired in the dual domain (i.e., incoherent sensing) and (3) the reconstruction process involves a (convex) optimization. In this paper, we present a novel approach that uses partial Fourier sensing in the 6D space of (k, q) for the reconstruction of P(x, r). The distinct feature of our approach is a sparsity model that leverages surfacelets in conjunction with total variation for the joint sparse representation of P(x, r). Thus, our method stands to benefit from the practical guarantees for accurate reconstruction from partial (k, q)-space data. Further, we demonstrate significant savings in acquisition time over diffusion spectral imaging (DSI) which is commonly used as the benchmark for comparisons in reported literature. To demonstrate the benefits of this approach,.we present several synthetic and real data examples.

  2. Leveraging EAP-Sparsity for Compressed Sensing of MS-HARDI in (k, q)-Space

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiaqi; Sakhaee, Elham; Entezari, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Compressed Sensing (CS) for the acceleration of MR scans has been widely investigated in the past decade. Lately, considerable progress has been made in achieving similar speed ups in acquiring multi-shell high angular resolution diffusion imaging (MS-HARDI) scans. Existing approaches in this context were primarily concerned with sparse reconstruction of the diffusion MR signal S(q) in the q-space. More recently, methods have been developed to apply the compressed sensing framework to the 6-dimensional joint (k, q)-space, thereby exploiting the redundancy in this 6D space. To guarantee accurate reconstruction from partial MS-HARDI data, the key ingredients of compressed sensing that need to be brought together are: (1) the function to be reconstructed needs to have a sparse representation, and (2) the data for reconstruction ought to be acquired in the dual domain (i.e., incoherent sensing) and (3) the reconstruction process involves a (convex) optimization. In this paper, we present a novel approach that uses partial Fourier sensing in the 6D space of (k, q) for the reconstruction of P(x, r). The distinct feature of our approach is a sparsity model that leverages surfacelets in conjunction with total variation for the joint sparse representation of P(x, r). Thus, our method stands to benefit from the practical guarantees for accurate reconstruction from partial (k, q)-space data. Further, we demonstrate significant savings in acquisition time over diffusion spectral imaging (DSI) which is commonly used as the benchmark for comparisons in reported literature. To demonstrate the benefits of this approach, we present several synthetic and real data examples. PMID:26221688

  3. The Psychological Foundations of Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suppes, Patrick

    1967-01-01

    This paper outlines problems which are central to the psychological foundations of mathematics. Discussed are the relations that exist between psychological and classical foundations of mathematics. It is shown how the inadequacies of current learning theories which account for complex mathematics learning may be made explicit for appropriate…

  4. Theoretical Foundations of Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonassen, David H., Ed.; Land, Susan M., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    "Theoretical Foundations of Learning Environments" describes the most contemporary psychological and pedagogical theories that are foundations for the conception and design of open-ended learning environments and new applications of educational technologies. In the past decade, the cognitive revolution of the 60s and 70s has been…

  5. Foundation Degrees: A Risky Business?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Foundation degrees, the new proposal for sub-degree vocational education in the UK, are characterised by innovation both in their design (curriculum, teaching, learning and assessment) and in the marketplace for which they are designed. This article argues that the development and delivery of foundation degrees carry a high level of risk,…

  6. Foundation Degrees: A Risky Business?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Foundation degrees, the new proposal for sub-degree vocational education in the UK, are characterised by innovation both in their design (curriculum, teaching, learning and assessment) and in the marketplace for which they are designed. This article argues that the development and delivery of foundation degrees carry a high level of risk,…

  7. NEWS: Solid foundations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    Among the initiatives to be found at UK universities is a vocational award with the title `University Foundation Degree' at Nottingham Trent University. This qualification will be offered in 14 different subjects including four in the Faculty of Science and Mathematics, in the areas of applied biology, applied sciences, chemistry and physics. The courses will be available on a two-year full-time, three-year sandwich or a part-time basis. Set at a higher standard and specification than the Higher National Diplomas which it replaces, the UFD has been devised in consultation with industry and will cover the technical and specialist areas demanded by employers to combat skills shortages. The UFD in applied sciences concentrates on practical applications through laboratory, IT and project work, supported by lectures and seminars. At the end students can enter the employment market or transfer onto the second year of a degree course. Science-based careers including research and development would be the aim of those taking the UFD in physics. The first year develops the fundamentals of modern physics supported by studies in mathematics, IT and computer programming, whilst year 2 is vocational in nature with industrial problem solving and work experience as well as an academic theme associated with environmental aspects of the subject. Those who complete the UFD will be allowed automatic progression to a specified honours degree course and would normally be expected to study for a further two years for this award. However, those demonstrating an outstanding academic performance can transfer to the linked degree programme at the end of the first year via fast-track modules. Back in May the UK's Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) announced new standard benchmarks for degrees. These will be introduced into higher education institutions from 2002 to outline the knowledge, understanding and skills a student should gain from a particular higher education course. These benchmark

  8. Effects of emissions from copper-nickel smelters on the frost hardiness of Finns sylvestris needles in the subarctic region.

    PubMed

    Sutinen, M L; Raitio, H; Nivala, V; Ollikainen, R; Ritari, A

    1996-03-01

    It has been proposed that freezing injuries play an important role in the forest decline phenomenon. In this study, the effect of emissions from the copper-nickel smelters in Monchegorsk and Nikel-Zapolyarnyi in the Kola Peninsula, south-west Russia, on seasonal changes in the frost hardiness of Pinus sylvestris L. needles were studied. The frost hardiness of current-year needles during autumn, winter, spring and early summer in 1991-1993 was estimated by the electrolyte leakage method and by visual estimation of the proportion of damaged needles at nine sites in Finnish Lapland, at five sites in the vicinity of Monchegorsk and at two sites in Norway, in the vicinity of Nikel. The foliar S, Cu, and Ni concentrations also analysed. There were no significant differences at any time of the year between the frost hardiness of pine needles at the sites in Norway and Finnish Lapland. However, in the winter, the degree of visual damage at -45 °C, the temperature close to the lowest recorded temperature in this area, was slightly higher at the sites near to Nikel than at the sites in Finnish Lapland. In the Kola Peninsula the frost hardiness was consistently lower at the sites located 10 km to the south and 36 km to the south-west of Monchegorsk than at the other sites (48-110 km to the south-west). The differences were greatest in early June, 1991, when frost hardiness was -2 °C and -8°C at the sites closest to Monchegorsk. At the same time, the frost hardiness at the other sites was e.-20 °C. There were slight differences between years, but the trends were the same. A clearly increasing gradient in the S, Cu and Ni concentrations was observed on moving towards the emission point source at Monchegorsk. Highly elevated concentrations were found within 40 km of the smelter. The results suggest that air pollutants from the copper-nickel smelter have predisposed the pines to freezing injuries, rhus contributing to forest decline in the Kola Peninsula.

  9. Polish Foundation for Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Polish Foundation for Energy Efficiency (FEWE) was established in Poland at the end of 1990. FEWE, as an independent and non-profit organization, has the following objectives: to strive towards an energy efficient national economy, and to show the way and methods by use of which energy efficiency can be increased. The activity of the Foundation covers the entire territory of Poland through three regional centers: in Warsaw, Katowice and Cracow. FEWE employs well-known and experienced specialists within thermal and power engineering, civil engineering, economy and applied sciences. The organizer of the Foundation has been Battelle Memorial Institute - Pacific Northwest Laboratories from the USA.

  10. Supercooling capacity and cold hardiness of band-winged grasshopper eggs (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Pang, Bao-Ping; Li, Na; Zhou, Xiao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    The band-winged grasshopper, Oedaleus asiaticus Bei-Bienko, is one of the most dominant and economically important grasshopper species in the steppe grasslands and farming-pastoral ecotone in northern China. It is a univoltine species and overwinters as eggs in soil. The cold hardiness of its eggs was examined in the laboratory. Water content in soil significantly affected the supercooling points (SCPs), water content and fat content of prediapause eggs. With the increase of water content in soil, the SCP, and water content of prediapause eggs rose whereas the fat content declined. There was a significant relationship between the SCP and water content or fat content of prediapause eggs. The SCPs of prediapause and diapause eggs varied from -7.6 to -28.4°C and the SCPs of eggs 30 d after oviposition could be divided into two groups. The means of high SCP group (-11.0 to -11.9°C) were much higher than those of low SCP group (-21.8 to -21.9°C), and the majority belonged to the latter (90.48-93.33%). The SCPs of prediapause eggs and early-diapause eggs 30 d after oviposition were significantly higher than those of deep-diapause eggs 60 d after oviposition. The survival rates of diapause eggs were significantly different among different temperature treatments. The survival rate was higher than 88% at greater than -20°C and declined significantly to 57% at -25°C, and suddenly dropped to zero at -30°C. The lower lethal temperature (Ltemp50) for 12 h exposure was -25.3°C and the lower lethal time (Ltime50) at -20°C was 32.8 d. As the mean SCPs of diapause eggs were similar to their Ltemp50, the SCP of eggs can be considered as a good indicator of cold hardiness for O. asiaticus and that this grasshopper is a freeze-intolerant insect.

  11. Automated Retinofugal Visual Pathway Reconstruction with Multi-shell HARDI and FOD-based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kammen, Alexandra; Law, Meng; Tjan, Bosco S.; Toga, Arthur W.; Shi, Yonggang

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion MRI tractography provides a non-invasive modality to examine the human retinofugal projection, which consists of the optic nerves, optic chiasm, optic tracts, the lateral geniculate nuclei (LGN) and the optic radiations. However, the pathway has several anatomic features that make it particularly challenging to study with tractography, including its location near blood vessels and bone-air interface at the base of the cerebrum, crossing fibers at the chiasm, somewhat-tortuous course around the temporal horn via Meyer’s Loop, and multiple closely neighboring fiber bundles. To date, these unique complexities of the visual pathway have impeded the development of a robust and automated reconstruction method using tractography. To overcome these challenges, we develop a novel, fully automated system to reconstruct the retinofugal visual pathway from high-resolution diffusion imaging data. Using multi-shell, high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data, we reconstruct precise fiber orientation distributions (FODs) with high order spherical harmonics (SPHARM) to resolve fiber crossings, which allows the tractography algorithm to successfully navigate the complicated anatomy surrounding the retinofugal pathway. We also develop automated algorithms for the identification of ROIs used for fiber bundle reconstruction. In particular, we develop a novel approach to extract the LGN region of interest (ROI) based on intrinsic shape analysis of a fiber bundle computed from a seed region at the optic chiasm to a target at the primary visual cortex. By combining automatically identified ROIs and FOD-based tractography, we obtain a fully automated system to compute the main components of the retinofugal pathway, including the optic tract and the optic radiation. We apply our method to the multi-shell HARDI data of 215 subjects from the Human Connectome Project (HCP). Through comparisons with post-mortem dissection measurements, we demonstrate the retinotopic

  12. American Foundation for the Blind

    MedlinePlus

    ... worth twice as much It's National Disability Employment Awareness Month! Every year in October, we celebrate the ... and talents. Learn more about National Disability Employment Awareness Month Foundations of Education, Third Edition This highly ...

  13. Asymptotic behavior of the least-energy solutions of a semilinear elliptic equation with the Hardy-Sobolev critical exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Masato

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the existence, the non-existence and the asymptotic behavior of the least-energy solutions of a semilinear elliptic equation with the Hardy-Sobolev critical exponent. In the boundary singularity case, it is known that the mean curvature of the boundary at origin plays a crucial role on the existence of the least-energy solutions. In this paper, we study the relation between the asymptotic behavior of the solutions and the mean curvature at origin.

  14. Predicting the level of job satisfaction based on hardiness and its components among nurses with tension headache.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, A; Nikmanesh, E; AghaeI, M; Kamran, F; Zahra Tavakoli, Z; Khaki Seddigh, F

    2015-01-01

    Nurses are the most significant part of human resources in a sanitary and health system. Job satisfaction results in the enhancement of organizational productivity, employee commitment to the organization and ensuring his/ her physical and mental health. The present research was conducted with the aim of predicting the level of job satisfaction based on hardiness and its components among the nurses with tension headache. The research method was correlational. The population consisted of all the nurses with tension headache who referred to the relevant specialists in Tehran. The sample size consisted of 50 individuals who were chosen by using the convenience sampling method and were measured and investigated by using the research tools of "Job Satisfaction Test" of Davis, Lofkvist and Weiss and "Personal Views Survey" of Kobasa. The data analysis was carried out by using the Pearson Correlation Coefficient and the Regression Analysis. The research findings demonstrated that the correlation coefficient obtained for "hardiness", "job satisfaction" was 0.506, and this coefficient was significant at the 0.01 level. Moreover, it was specified that the sense of commitment and challenge were stronger predictors for job satisfaction of nurses with tension headache among the components of hardiness, and, about 16% of the variance of "job satisfaction" could be explained by the two components (sense of commitment and challenge).

  15. Inhibition of hardy kiwifruit (Actinidia aruguta) ripening by 1-methylcyclopropene during cold storage and anticancer properties of the fruit extract.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sooyeon; Han, Seung Hyun; Kim, Jeongyun; Lee, Han Jun; Lee, Jeong Gu; Lee, Eun Jin

    2016-01-01

    Hardy kiwifruits (Actinidia arguta) were treated with 20 μl/l 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) for 16 h at 10 °C and subsequently stored at 1 ± 0.5 °C. Anticancer properties of the fruit extracts were tested against five different human cancer cells. The hardy kiwifruits, without 1-MCP treatment, showed increases in both respiration and ethylene production rates during fruit storage. The 1-MCP treatment remarkably inhibited fruit ripening by reducing respiration and ethylene production. Fruits with the 1-MCP treatment could be stored for up to 5 weeks by maintaining higher fruit firmness, ascorbic acid and total phenolic contents compared to the control. The hardy kiwifruit extracts showed anti-proliferative effects to Hep3B and HeLa cells but not to HT29, HepG2 and LoVo cells. These results suggest that the application of 1-MCP at harvest effectively delayed the ripening process of the fruits, and the fruit extract had beneficial effects for the prevention of human cancer growth.

  16. Intraspecies differences in cold hardiness, carbohydrate content and β-amylase gene expression of Vaccinium corymbosum during cold acclimation and deacclimation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Hyung; Yu, Duk Jun; Kim, Su Jin; Choi, Doil; Lee, Hee Jae

    2012-12-01

    Changes in cold hardiness, carbohydrate content and β-amylase gene expression were monitored in the shoots of the highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) cultivars 'Sharpblue' and 'Jersey' during cold acclimation (CA) and deacclimation (DA). The seasonal patterns were similar in both cultivars, but the levels of cold hardiness determined by electrolyte leakage analysis were significantly different; 'Jersey' was hardier than 'Sharpblue'. Cold hardiness was closely related to total soluble sugar content (r = -0.98** and -0.99** for 'Sharpblue' and 'Jersey', respectively). In 'Jersey', more soluble sugars accumulated during CA. Of the detected soluble sugars, glucose, fructose and raffinose contents were significantly associated with cold hardiness in both cultivars. Sucrose was abundant in both cultivars, and stachyose content changed significantly during CA and DA. However, they were not associated with cold hardiness. A sharp decrease in starch contents in the middle of CA coincided with β-amylase gene (VcBMY) expression, indicating the conversion of starch into soluble sugars. During CA, VcBMY was expressed up to twofold higher in 'Jersey' than in 'Sharpblue'. These results suggest that intraspecies differences in the cold hardiness of highbush blueberries are associated with total soluble sugar content, which is driven partly by differential expression of VcBMY.

  17. A Hardy Plant Facilitates Nitrogen Removal via Microbial Communities in Subsurface Flow Constructed Wetlands in Winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Penghe; Zhang, Hui; Zuo, Jie; Zhao, Dehua; Zou, Xiangxu; Zhu, Zhengjie; Jeelani, Nasreen; Leng, Xin; An, Shuqing

    2016-09-01

    The plants effect in subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SSF-CWs) is controversial, especially at low temperatures. Consequently, several SSF-CWs planted with Iris pseudacorus (CWI) or Typha orientalis Presl. (CWT) and several unplanted ones (CWC) were set up and fed with secondary effluent of sewage treatment plant during the winter in Eastern China. The 16S rDNA Illumina Miseq sequencing analysis indicated the positive effects of I. pseudacorus on the bacterial community richness and diversity in the substrate. Moreover, the community compositions of the bacteria involved with denitrification presented a significant difference in the three systems. Additionally, higher relative abundances of nitrifying bacteria (0.4140%, 0.2402% and 0.4318% for Nitrosomonas, Nitrosospira and Nitrospira, respectively) were recorded in CWI compared with CWT (0.2074%, 0.0648% and 0.0181%, respectively) and CWC (0.3013%, 0.1107% and 0.1185%, respectively). Meanwhile, the average removal rates of NH4+-N and TN in CWI showed a prominent advantage compared to CWC, but no distinct advantage was found in CWT. The hardy plant I. pseudacorus, which still had active root oxygen release in cold temperatures, positively affected the abundance of nitrifying bacteria in the substrate, and accordingly was supposed to contribute to a comparatively high nitrogen removal efficiency of the system during the winter.

  18. Cold Temperatures Increase Cold Hardiness in the Next Generation Ophraella communa Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhong-Shi; Rasmann, Sergio; Li, Min; Guo, Jian-Ying; Chen, Hong-Song; Wan, Fang-Hao

    2013-01-01

    The leaf beetle, Ophraella communa, has been introduced to control the spread of the common ragweed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, in China. We hypothesized that the beetle, to be able to track host-range expansion into colder climates, can phenotypically adapt to cold temperatures across generations. Therefore, we questioned whether parental experience of colder temperatures increases cold tolerance of the progeny. Specifically, we studied the demography, including development, fecundity, and survival, as well as physiological traits, including supercooling point (SCP), water content, and glycerol content of O. communa progeny whose parents were maintained at different temperature regimes. Overall, the entire immature stage decreased survival of about 0.2%–4.2% when parents experienced cold temperatures compared to control individuals obtained from parents raised at room temperature. However, intrinsic capacity for increase (r), net reproductive rate (R0) and finite rate of increase (λ) of progeny O. communa were maximum when parents experienced cold temperatures. Glycerol contents of both female and male in progeny was significantly higher when maternal and paternal adults were cold acclimated as compared to other treatments. This resulted in the supercooling point of the progeny adults being significantly lower compared to beetles emerging from parents that experienced room temperatures. These results suggest that cold hardiness of O. communa can be promoted by cold acclimation in previous generation, and it might counter-balance reduced survival in the next generation, especially when insects are tracking their host-plants into colder climates. PMID:24098666

  19. Cold temperatures increase cold hardiness in the next generation Ophraella communa beetles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhong-Shi; Rasmann, Sergio; Li, Min; Guo, Jian-Ying; Chen, Hong-Song; Wan, Fang-Hao

    2013-01-01

    The leaf beetle, Ophraella communa, has been introduced to control the spread of the common ragweed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, in China. We hypothesized that the beetle, to be able to track host-range expansion into colder climates, can phenotypically adapt to cold temperatures across generations. Therefore, we questioned whether parental experience of colder temperatures increases cold tolerance of the progeny. Specifically, we studied the demography, including development, fecundity, and survival, as well as physiological traits, including supercooling point (SCP), water content, and glycerol content of O. communa progeny whose parents were maintained at different temperature regimes. Overall, the entire immature stage decreased survival of about 0.2%-4.2% when parents experienced cold temperatures compared to control individuals obtained from parents raised at room temperature. However, intrinsic capacity for increase (r), net reproductive rate (R 0) and finite rate of increase (λ) of progeny O. communa were maximum when parents experienced cold temperatures. Glycerol contents of both female and male in progeny was significantly higher when maternal and paternal adults were cold acclimated as compared to other treatments. This resulted in the supercooling point of the progeny adults being significantly lower compared to beetles emerging from parents that experienced room temperatures. These results suggest that cold hardiness of O. communa can be promoted by cold acclimation in previous generation, and it might counter-balance reduced survival in the next generation, especially when insects are tracking their host-plants into colder climates.

  20. The mid p-value in exact tests for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Graffelman, Jan; Moreno, Victor

    2013-08-01

    Exact tests for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium are widely used in genetic association studies. We evaluate the mid p-value, unknown in the genetics literature, as an alternative for the standard p-value in the exact test. The type 1 error rate and the power of the exact test are calculated for different sample sizes, significance levels, minor allele counts and degrees of deviation from equilibrium. Three different p-value are considered: the standard two-sided p-value, the doubled one-sided p-value and the mid p-value. Practical implications of using the mid p-value are discussed with HapMap datasets and a data set on colon cancer. The mid p-value is shown to have a type 1 error rate that is always closer to the nominal level, and to have better power. Differences between the standard p-value and the mid p-value can be large for insignificant results, and are smaller for significant results. The analysis of empirical databases shows that the mid p-value uncovers more significant markers, and that the equilibrium null distribution is not tenable for both databases. The standard exact p-value is overly conservative, in particular for small minor allele frequencies. The mid p-value ameliorates this problem by bringing the rejection rate closer to the nominal level, at the price of occasionally exceeding the nominal level.

  1. Cold hardiness and postfreeze metabolism in caterpillars of Hypercompe scribonia (Arctiidae: Lepidoptera).

    PubMed

    Layne, Jack R; Leszczynski, Christine F

    2008-10-01

    Insects evolve levels of cold hardiness that are sufficient to meet the severity of thermal conditions in their hibernacula. This study examined freeze tolerance and related features in caterpillars of Hypercompe scribonia, which is the overwintering stage for this species, to compare with existing data for more northerly distributed species in Arctiidae that also overwinter as caterpillars. All specimens were collected from western Pennsylvania during mid-October 2004 and 2006 and eventually acclimated to 3 degrees C for > or = 4 wk. All caterpillars initially survived freezing at -3 degrees C, which converted approximately 45% of their body water into ice, and one third of them developed into moths. In contrast, freezing at -10 degrees C was invariably lethal to caterpillars, even in the short term. Body composition (hemolymph osmolality, hemolymph glycerol, body mass, and water content) of caterpillars was stable between the 2 yr, with glycerol accounting for 3-5% of their solute. Thawed caterpillars showed an initial decline in routine aerobic metabolism that persisted through the first 6 h of the recovery period. H. scribonia caterpillars have a level of freeze tolerance that is adequate for hibernaculum conditions in western Pennsylvania; however, it is limited with respect to the tolerance levels of other arctiid caterpillars whose ranges extend northward well into colder regions of North America.

  2. A Hardy Plant Facilitates Nitrogen Removal via Microbial Communities in Subsurface Flow Constructed Wetlands in Winter

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Penghe; Zhang, Hui; Zuo, Jie; Zhao, Dehua; Zou, Xiangxu; Zhu, Zhengjie; Jeelani, Nasreen; Leng, Xin; An, Shuqing

    2016-01-01

    The plants effect in subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SSF-CWs) is controversial, especially at low temperatures. Consequently, several SSF-CWs planted with Iris pseudacorus (CWI) or Typha orientalis Presl. (CWT) and several unplanted ones (CWC) were set up and fed with secondary effluent of sewage treatment plant during the winter in Eastern China. The 16S rDNA Illumina Miseq sequencing analysis indicated the positive effects of I. pseudacorus on the bacterial community richness and diversity in the substrate. Moreover, the community compositions of the bacteria involved with denitrification presented a significant difference in the three systems. Additionally, higher relative abundances of nitrifying bacteria (0.4140%, 0.2402% and 0.4318% for Nitrosomonas, Nitrosospira and Nitrospira, respectively) were recorded in CWI compared with CWT (0.2074%, 0.0648% and 0.0181%, respectively) and CWC (0.3013%, 0.1107% and 0.1185%, respectively). Meanwhile, the average removal rates of NH4+-N and TN in CWI showed a prominent advantage compared to CWC, but no distinct advantage was found in CWT. The hardy plant I. pseudacorus, which still had active root oxygen release in cold temperatures, positively affected the abundance of nitrifying bacteria in the substrate, and accordingly was supposed to contribute to a comparatively high nitrogen removal efficiency of the system during the winter. PMID:27646687

  3. A Hardy Plant Facilitates Nitrogen Removal via Microbial Communities in Subsurface Flow Constructed Wetlands in Winter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Penghe; Zhang, Hui; Zuo, Jie; Zhao, Dehua; Zou, Xiangxu; Zhu, Zhengjie; Jeelani, Nasreen; Leng, Xin; An, Shuqing

    2016-09-20

    The plants effect in subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SSF-CWs) is controversial, especially at low temperatures. Consequently, several SSF-CWs planted with Iris pseudacorus (CWI) or Typha orientalis Presl. (CWT) and several unplanted ones (CWC) were set up and fed with secondary effluent of sewage treatment plant during the winter in Eastern China. The 16S rDNA Illumina Miseq sequencing analysis indicated the positive effects of I. pseudacorus on the bacterial community richness and diversity in the substrate. Moreover, the community compositions of the bacteria involved with denitrification presented a significant difference in the three systems. Additionally, higher relative abundances of nitrifying bacteria (0.4140%, 0.2402% and 0.4318% for Nitrosomonas, Nitrosospira and Nitrospira, respectively) were recorded in CWI compared with CWT (0.2074%, 0.0648% and 0.0181%, respectively) and CWC (0.3013%, 0.1107% and 0.1185%, respectively). Meanwhile, the average removal rates of NH4(+)-N and TN in CWI showed a prominent advantage compared to CWC, but no distinct advantage was found in CWT. The hardy plant I. pseudacorus, which still had active root oxygen release in cold temperatures, positively affected the abundance of nitrifying bacteria in the substrate, and accordingly was supposed to contribute to a comparatively high nitrogen removal efficiency of the system during the winter.

  4. A behaviorological thanatology: Foundations and implications

    PubMed Central

    Fraley, Lawrence E.

    1998-01-01

    Foundation principles supporting a behaviorological thanatology are reviewed, including concepts of life, person, death, value, right, ethic, and body/person distinctions. These natural science foundations are contrasted with traditional foundations, and their respective implications are speculatively explored. PMID:22478293

  5. Foundation + Collaboration + Inspiration. The Joyce Foundation 2009 Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce Foundation, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Among the great strengths of a policy-oriented foundation like Joyce is the willingness to take a long view, to be patient investors in ideas that take time to have impact, and to take chances on projects that may not work out. But in times of crisis, Joyce team and partners also have an obligation to be responsive to immediate challenges in their…

  6. Disk Evolution: Testing The Foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, Phil

    2016-07-01

    Models for planet formation and observable large-scale structure in protoplanetary disks are built on a foundation of gas-phase physics. In the simplest telling, it is assumed that the disk evolves due to turbulence, and that photoevaporation is the dominant driver of mass loss. How secure is this foundation to our understanding? I will review recent results from magnetohydrodynamic simulations of protoplanetary disks, which suggest a modified picture in which MHD winds and fossil magnetic flux play a critical role. I will discuss what these theoretical results may imply for observations of disks.

  7. Improving Fiber Alignment in HARDI by Combining Contextual PDE Flow with Constrained Spherical Deconvolution

    PubMed Central

    Portegies, J. M.; Fick, R. H. J.; Sanguinetti, G. R.; Meesters, S. P. L.; Girard, G.; Duits, R.

    2015-01-01

    We propose two strategies to improve the quality of tractography results computed from diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) data. Both methods are based on the same PDE framework, defined in the coupled space of positions and orientations, associated with a stochastic process describing the enhancement of elongated structures while preserving crossing structures. In the first method we use the enhancement PDE for contextual regularization of a fiber orientation distribution (FOD) that is obtained on individual voxels from high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data via constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD). Thereby we improve the FOD as input for subsequent tractography. Secondly, we introduce the fiber to bundle coherence (FBC), a measure for quantification of fiber alignment. The FBC is computed from a tractography result using the same PDE framework and provides a criterion for removing the spurious fibers. We validate the proposed combination of CSD and enhancement on phantom data and on human data, acquired with different scanning protocols. On the phantom data we find that PDE enhancements improve both local metrics and global metrics of tractography results, compared to CSD without enhancements. On the human data we show that the enhancements allow for a better reconstruction of crossing fiber bundles and they reduce the variability of the tractography output with respect to the acquisition parameters. Finally, we show that both the enhancement of the FODs and the use of the FBC measure on the tractography improve the stability with respect to different stochastic realizations of probabilistic tractography. This is shown in a clinical application: the reconstruction of the optic radiation for epilepsy surgery planning. PMID:26465600

  8. Involvement of CBF Transcription Factors in Winter Hardiness in Birch1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Welling, Annikki; Palva, E. Tapio

    2008-01-01

    Cold acclimation of plants involves extensive reprogramming of gene expression. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), three cold-inducible transcriptional activators designated CBF1 to -3/DREB1a to -c have been shown to play an important regulatory role in this acclimation process. Similarly to Arabidopsis, boreal zone trees can increase their freezing tolerance (FT) in response to low temperature during the growing season. However, maximal FT of these trees requires short daylength-induced dormancy development followed by exposure to both low and freezing temperatures. To elucidate the molecular basis of FT in overwintering trees, we characterized the role of birch (Betula pendula) CBF transcription factors in the cold acclimation process. We identified four putative CBF orthologs in a birch expressed sequence tag collection designated BpCBF1 to -4. Ectopic expression of birch CBFs in Arabidopsis resulted in constitutive expression of endogenous CBF target genes and increased FT of nonacclimated transgenic plants. In addition, these plants showed stunted growth and delayed flowering, typical features for CBF-overexpressing plants. Expression analysis in birch showed that BpCBF1 to -4 are low temperature responsive but differentially regulated in dormant and growing plants, the expression being delayed in dormant tissues. Freeze-thaw treatment, simulating wintertime conditions in nature, resulted in strong induction of BpCBF genes during thawing, followed by induction of a CBF target gene, BpLTI36. These results suggest that in addition to their role in cold acclimation during the growing season, birch CBFs appear to contribute to control of winter hardiness in birch. PMID:18467468

  9. Transcriptome analysis and identification of induced genes in the response of Harmonia axyridis to cold hardiness.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bin; Liu, Xiao-Jun; Shi, Zuo-Kun; Shen, Qi-Da; Xu, Yan-Xia; Wang, Su; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Shi-Gui

    2017-06-01

    Harmonia axyridis is an important predatory lady beetle that is a natural enemy of agricultural and forestry pests. In this research, the cold hardiness induced genes and their expression changes in H. axyridis were screened and detected by the way of the transcriptome and qualitative real-time PCR under normal and low temperatures, using high-throughput transcriptome and digital gene-expression-tag technologies. We obtained a 10Gb transcriptome and an 8Mb gene expression tag pool using Illumina deep sequencing technology and RNA-Seq analysis (accession number SRX540102). Of the 46,980 non-redundant unigenes identified, 28,037 (59.7%) were matched to known genes in GenBank, 21,604 (46.0%) in Swiss-Prot, 19,482 (41.5%) in Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and 13,193 (28.1%) in Gene Ontology databases. Seventy-five percent of the unigene sequences had top matches with gene sequences from Tribolium castaneum. Results indicated that 60 genes regulated the entire cold-acclimation response, and, of these, seven genes were always up-regulated and five genes always down-regulated. Further screening revealed that six cold-resistant genes, E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase, transketolase, trehalase, serine/arginine repetitive matrix protein 2, glycerol kinase and sugar transporter SWEET1-like, play key roles in the response. Expression from a number of the differentially expressed genes was confirmed with quantitative real-time PCR (HaCS_Trans). The paper attempted to identify cold-resistance response genes, and study the potential mechanism by which cold acclimation enhances the insect's cold endurance. Information on these cold-resistance response genes will improve the development of low-temperature storage technology of natural enemy insects for future use in biological control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Water relations and mucopolysaccharide increases for a winter hardy cactus during acclimation to subzero temperatures.

    PubMed

    Loik, Michael E; Nobel, Park S

    1991-11-01

    Thickness, relative water content (RWC), osmotic pressure, water potential isotherms, and mucopolysaccharide content were measured for the photosynthetic chlorenchyma and the water-storage parenchyma of the winter hardy cactus, Opuntia humifusa, after shifting from day/night air temperatures of 25° C/15° C to 5° C/-5° C. After 14 d at 5° C/-5° C, the average fraction of water contained in the symplast decreased from 0.92 to 0.78, the water potential of saturated (fully hydrated) tissue was essentially unchanged, but the osmotic pressure of saturated tissue decreased (by 0.15 MPa for the chlorenchyma and 0.12 MPa for the water-storage parenchyma). After 7 weeks at 5° C/-5° C, tissue thickness was reduced by 61% for the chlorenchyma and 65% for the water-storage parenchyma, and the RWC decreased by 42% and 68%, respectively; these changes contributed to an osmotic pressure increase of 0.55 MPa for the chlorenchyma and 0.34 MPa for the water-storage parenchyma. During the 7 week acclimation to low temperature, mucopolysaccharide increased by 114% for the chlorenchyma and by 89% for the water-storage parenchyma. The water potential of the extracted mucopolysaccharide was relatively constant for an RWC between 1.00 and 0.30, decreasing abruptly below 0.30. Changes in water relations parameters and in mucopolysaccharide content during low-temperature acclimation may reduce water efflux from the cells, and thus reduce damage due to rapid dehydration during extracellular freezing.

  11. But…What about My Epistemological Foundations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curin, Raquel Isabel Barrera

    2015-01-01

    At one time or another, all researchers in mathematics education must face the rather complex question of their epistemological foundations. Discussing epistemological foundations naturally leads to a conversation about theories. Theories and epistemological foundations work in a circular fashion: theories can have epistemological foundations and…

  12. Raising Money Through an Institutionally Related Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilley, Timothy A., Ed.

    The creation of foundations for fund raising at public colleges and new ideas and techniques for established foundations are discussed in 13 chapters. The relationship of the foundation and the institution is described from the viewpoint of the institution and also that of the foundation. Article titles and authors include: "How the…

  13. Foundations and the Advancement of Postsecondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Libby V.

    2017-01-01

    The author examined the websites of two large foundations, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Lumina Foundation. Each has developed projects and networks, coupled with substantive grants, to improve postsecondary education. These and other foundations have deep and ongoing commitments, not just philosophical but resource-based, to…

  14. Raising Money Through an Institutionally Related Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilley, Timothy A., Ed.

    The creation of foundations for fund raising at public colleges and new ideas and techniques for established foundations are discussed in 13 chapters. The relationship of the foundation and the institution is described from the viewpoint of the institution and also that of the foundation. Article titles and authors include: "How the…

  15. National Niemann-Pick Disease Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foundation NewsLine , Type A , Type B , Type C March 2017 Newsletter Posted by jbeirl in Foundation NewsLine , ... Foundation NewsLine , Type A , Type B , Type C March 2017 Newsletter Posted by jbeirl in Foundation NewsLine , ...

  16. Principles for Foundations of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britt, John

    The significance of the foundations of education approach to teaching is apparent in the ideas of John Henry Newman, Karl Jaspers, Jose Ortega y Gasset, and Mortimer Adler. Newman maintained that there is a circle of knowledge and once this unity is ignored the result is distortion in the learners and in the knowledge. To retain the whole, the…

  17. Epistemological Foundations of School Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izquierdo-Aymerich, Merce; Aduriz-Bravo, Agustin

    2003-01-01

    Presents a theoretical framework that provides foundations for school science and defines some research problems. Begins with what is already known about students' models and cognition in order to construct proposals of didactical intervention. Proposes an analogous model for school science in which experimentation and language play the key roles.…

  18. Building Trades. Block II. Foundations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    Twelve informational lessons and eleven manipulative lessons are provided on foundations as applied to the building trades. Informational lessons cover land measurements; blueprint reading; level instruments; building and site planning; building site preparation; laying out building lines; soil preparation and special evacuation; concrete forms;…

  19. Soils and Foundations: A Syllabus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Melvin J.

    The teaching guide and course outline for a 12-week course in soils and foundations is designed to help student technicians in a two-year associate degree civil engineering technology program to obtain entry level employment as highway engineering aides, soil testing technicians, soil mappers, or construction inspectors. The seven teaching units…

  20. Foundations of Distinctive Feature Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltaxe, Christiane A. M.

    This treatise on the theoretical and historical foundations of distinctive feature theory traces the evolution of the distinctive features concept in the context of related notions current in linguistic theory, discusses the evolution of individual distinctive features, and criticizes certain acoustic and perceptual correlates attributed to these…

  1. Foundation Level Training. Trainer's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Human Services, Oklahoma City. Developmental Disabilities Services Div.

    This trainer's manual was developed to provide a consistent knowledge and skill base (i.e., a "foundation") for all individuals employed in programs funded by Oklahoma's Developmental Disabilities Services Division. They include van drivers, recreation workers, residential staff, administrators, case managers, secretarial/clerical staff,…

  2. Foundations of Distinctive Feature Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltaxe, Christiane A. M.

    This treatise on the theoretical and historical foundations of distinctive feature theory traces the evolution of the distinctive features concept in the context of related notions current in linguistic theory, discusses the evolution of individual distinctive features, and criticizes certain acoustic and perceptual correlates attributed to these…

  3. Sociolinguistic Foundations of Language Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornstein-Galicia, Jacob L.

    An answer to the question of what sociolinguistics has to offer to the art of language assessment is sought in exploration of the following topics: (1) a history of the development of sociolinguistics and an outline of the research on dialectology; (2) a review of basic sociolinguistic foundations and theories about language, society, domains of…

  4. Principles for Foundations of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britt, John

    The significance of the foundations of education approach to teaching is apparent in the ideas of John Henry Newman, Karl Jaspers, Jose Ortega y Gasset, and Mortimer Adler. Newman maintained that there is a circle of knowledge and once this unity is ignored the result is distortion in the learners and in the knowledge. To retain the whole, the…

  5. Obtaining corporate information from NHS foundation trusts.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Valerie; Endacott, Ruth; Sheaff, Rod; Jones, Ray

    Foundation trusts have boards of directors that are responsible for the day-to-day running of the organisation, planning services and developing strategy. Unlike non-foundation trusts and primary care trusts (PCTs), foundation trusts are not obliged to hold directors' board meetings in public. This article describes the online availability and accessibility of the minutes of such meetings in a number of foundation trusts, non-foundation trusts and PCTs. The implications for transparency in the NHS are also discussed.

  6. Effect of Low Temperature and Wheat Winter-Hardiness on Survival of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici under Controlled Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lijie; Qiao, Jiaxing; Kong, Xinyu; Zou, Yiping; Xu, Xiangming; Chen, Xianming; Hu, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    Wheat stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is one of the most important diseases of wheat worldwide. Understanding the survival of Pst during the overwintering period is critical for predicting Pst epidemics in the spring. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) methods quantifying Pst DNA and RNA (cDNA) were developed and compared for the ability to quantify viable Pst in leaf tissues. Both qPCR of DNA and RNA can provide reliable measurement of viable Pst in plant tissues prior to the late sporulation stage for which qPCR of DNA gave a much higher estimate of fungal biomass than qPCR of RNA. The percentage of Pst biomass that was viable in detached and attached leaves under low temperatures decreased over time. Pst survived longer on attached leaves than on detached leaves. The survival of Pst in cultivars with strong winter-hardiness at 0°C and -5°C was greater than those with weak winter-hardiness. However, such differences in Pst survival among cultivars were negligible at -10, -15 and -20°C. Results indicated that Pst mycelia inside green leaves can also be killed by low temperatures rather than through death of green leaves under low temperatures. The relationship of Pst survival in attached leaves with temperature and winter-hardiness was well described by logistic models. Further field evaluation is necessary to assess whether inclusion of other factors such as moisture and snow cover could improve the model performance in predicting Pst overwintering potential, and hence the epidemic in spring. PMID:26083371

  7. Effect of Low Temperature and Wheat Winter-Hardiness on Survival of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici under Controlled Conditions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lijie; Qiao, Jiaxing; Kong, Xinyu; Zou, Yiping; Xu, Xiangming; Chen, Xianming; Hu, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    Wheat stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is one of the most important diseases of wheat worldwide. Understanding the survival of Pst during the overwintering period is critical for predicting Pst epidemics in the spring. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) methods quantifying Pst DNA and RNA (cDNA) were developed and compared for the ability to quantify viable Pst in leaf tissues. Both qPCR of DNA and RNA can provide reliable measurement of viable Pst in plant tissues prior to the late sporulation stage for which qPCR of DNA gave a much higher estimate of fungal biomass than qPCR of RNA. The percentage of Pst biomass that was viable in detached and attached leaves under low temperatures decreased over time. Pst survived longer on attached leaves than on detached leaves. The survival of Pst in cultivars with strong winter-hardiness at 0°C and -5°C was greater than those with weak winter-hardiness. However, such differences in Pst survival among cultivars were negligible at -10, -15 and -20°C. Results indicated that Pst mycelia inside green leaves can also be killed by low temperatures rather than through death of green leaves under low temperatures. The relationship of Pst survival in attached leaves with temperature and winter-hardiness was well described by logistic models. Further field evaluation is necessary to assess whether inclusion of other factors such as moisture and snow cover could improve the model performance in predicting Pst overwintering potential, and hence the epidemic in spring.

  8. Norman Dott, Gerard Guiot, and Jules Hardy: key players in the resurrection and preservation of transsphenoidal surgery.

    PubMed

    Patel, Smruti K; Husain, Qasim; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Couldwell, William T; Liu, James K

    2012-08-01

    Developed over a century ago, the transsphenoidal approach to access lesions of the pituitary gland and sella turcica has transformed the field of neurosurgery, largely due to the work of Oskar Hirsch and Harvey Cushing. Furthermore, its use and modification in the early 1900s was perhaps one of Cushing's greatest legacies to skull base surgery. However, Cushing, who had worked relentlessly to improve the transsphenoidal route to the pituitary region, abandoned the approach by 1929 in his pursuit to master transcranial approaches to the suprasellar region. Hirsch and a few other surgeons continued to perform transsphenoidal operations, but they were unable to maintain the popularity of the approach among their peers. During a time when transsphenoidal surgery was on the brink of extinction, a critical lineage of 3 key surgeons--Norman Dott, Gerard Guiot, and Jules Hardy--would resurrect the art, each working to further improve the procedure. Dott, Cushing's apprentice from 1923 to 1924, brought his experiences with transsphenoidal surgery to Edinburgh, Scotland, and along the way, developed the lighted nasal speculum to provide better illumination in the narrow working area. Guiot, inspired by Dott, adopted his technique and used intraoperative radiofluoroscopic technique for image guidance. Hardy, a fellow of Guiot, from Montreal, Canada, revolutionized transsphenoidal microsurgery with the introduction of the binocular microscope and selective adenomectomy. The teachings of these pioneers have endured over time and are now widely used by neurosurgeons worldwide. In this paper, we review the lineage and contributions of Dott, Guiot, and Hardy who served as crucial players in the preservation of transsphenoidal surgery.

  9. Differences in cold hardiness, carbohydrates, dehydrins and related gene expressions under an experimental deacclimation and reacclimation in Prunus persica.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyunsuk; Oh, Youngjae; Kim, Daeil

    2015-08-01

    To boost our understanding of a recent outbreak of freezing injury, we sought to confirm distinctive features between the shoot tissues of the peach (Prunus persica) cultivars Daewol and Kiraranokiwami by mimicking unseasonable changes of temperatures that occur in the early spring through repeated deacclimation and reacclimation treatments. Patterns of cold hardiness declined dramatically during the deacclimation and rose during the reacclimation in both cultivars. Our results indicated that 'Daewol' possessed higher capacity in response to repeated deacclimation and reacclimation treatments than 'Kiraranokiwami'. 'Daewol' showed more sensitive changes in the carbohydrates in response to warm and low temperatures compared with 'Kiraranokiwami'. 'Daewol' indicated almost similar repeated down- and up-patterns in soluble sugar content in response to repeated deacclimation and reacclimation, whereas it indicated repeated up- and down-patterns in starch content. However, 'Kiraranokiwami' showed a progressive increase in the soluble sugar content and a progressive decrease in starch content. Notably, patterns of accumulation of a 60-kDa dehydrin protein encoded by the PpDhn1 gene were confirmed through western blotting and paralleled fluctuations of cold hardiness in both cultivars. Expression of this dehydrin was weak in both cultivars during deacclimation but its band intensity increased during reacclimation. Changes in related genes (β-amylase, PpDhn1, PpDhn2 and PpDhn3) were positively correlated with changes in cold hardiness throughout the experiment. Our results indicate that recent repeated warm periods may cause premature deacclimation in the early spring, and that more cold-tolerant cultivar may be more resilient to freezing injury caused by unstable temperature conditions. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  10. Frost hardiness in walnut trees (Juglans regia L.): how to link physiology and modelling?

    PubMed

    Charrier, Guillaume; Poirier, Magalie; Bonhomme, Marc; Lacointe, André; Améglio, Thierry

    2013-11-01

    In the literature, frost hardiness (FH) studies in trees have often been restricted to one organ (buds, leaves, needles or twigs). To extend our knowledge and gain a unified view, FH differences between organs and tissues or throughout the life of the tree have to be characterized in relation to physiological changes. In this study, different organs and tissues of young potted and mature orchard walnut trees (Juglans regia L.) were compared for seasonal changes in FH during different years. FH was assessed using the electrolyte leakage method. Physiological parameters were concomitantly monitored focusing on two significant traits: water content (WC) and carbohydrate content (glucose + fructose + sucrose, GFS). No seasonal variation in FH was observed in the root system, but acclimation and deacclimation were observed aboveground. Among organs and tissues, cold sensitivity levels were different in deep winter, with buds most sensitive and bark most resistant, but acclimation/deacclimation dynamics followed similar patterns. Physiological variation was also similar among organs: FH increased when WC decreased and/or soluble carbohydrates increased. Based on these results, relations between soluble carbohydrate content, WC and FH were calculated independently or in interaction. The key results were that: (i) the relationship between FH and physiological parameters (GFS and WC), which had previously been shown for branches only, could be generalized to all aboveground organs; (ii) lower WC increased the cryoprotective effect of GFS, showing a synergic effect of the two factors; (iii) the best fit was a non-linear function of WC and GFS, yielding a predictive model with an root mean square error of 5.07 °C on an independent dataset and 2.59 °C for the most sensitive stages; and (iv) the same parameters used for all organs yielded a unified model of FH depending on physiology, although the variability of GFS or WC was wide. The model should be of value for predicting

  11. Electrodynamics and Spacetime Geometry: Foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Francisco; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2016-11-01

    We explore the intimate connection between spacetime geometry and electrodynamics. This link is already implicit in the constitutive relations between the field strengths and excitations, which are an essential part of the axiomatic structure of electromagnetism, clearly formulated via integration theory and differential forms. We review the foundations of classical electromagnetism based on charge and magnetic flux conservation, the Lorentz force and the constitutive relations. These relations introduce the conformal part of the metric and allow the study of electrodynamics for specific spacetime geometries. At the foundational level, we discuss the possibility of generalizing the vacuum constitutive relations, by relaxing the fixed conditions of homogeneity and isotropy, and by assuming that the symmetry properties of the electro-vacuum follow the spacetime isometries. The implications of this extension are briefly discussed in the context of the intimate connection between electromagnetism and the geometry (and causal structure) of spacetime.

  12. Electrodynamics and Spacetime Geometry: Foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Francisco; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2017-02-01

    We explore the intimate connection between spacetime geometry and electrodynamics. This link is already implicit in the constitutive relations between the field strengths and excitations, which are an essential part of the axiomatic structure of electromagnetism, clearly formulated via integration theory and differential forms. We review the foundations of classical electromagnetism based on charge and magnetic flux conservation, the Lorentz force and the constitutive relations. These relations introduce the conformal part of the metric and allow the study of electrodynamics for specific spacetime geometries. At the foundational level, we discuss the possibility of generalizing the vacuum constitutive relations, by relaxing the fixed conditions of homogeneity and isotropy, and by assuming that the symmetry properties of the electro-vacuum follow the spacetime isometries. The implications of this extension are briefly discussed in the context of the intimate connection between electromagnetism and the geometry (and causal structure) of spacetime.

  13. Cognitive Foundations for Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Noonan, Christine F.; Franklin, Lyndsey

    2011-02-25

    In this report, we provide an overview of scientific/technical literature on information visualization and VA. Topics discussed include an update and overview of the extensive literature search conducted for this study, the nature and purpose of the field, major research thrusts, and scientific foundations. We review methodologies for evaluating and measuring the impact of VA technologies as well as taxonomies that have been proposed for various purposes to support the VA community. A cognitive science perspective underlies each of these discussions.

  14. Design of Foundations in Permafrost.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    conventional consolidometer test methods to develop plots of pressure versus void ratio or pressure versus settlement strain to determine the stress...most widely used method of maintaining the thermal regime of the permafrost is by use of a ventilated foundation. The circulation of cold winter air...11c. b and a are then computed from the slope, and I/st at time I hour. m The above method is a rational approach that could be used, out ,enerally is

  15. Cold affects the transcription of fatty acid desaturases and oil quality in the fruit of Olea europaea L. genotypes with different cold hardiness

    PubMed Central

    Matteucci, M.; D'Angeli, S.; Errico, S.; Lamanna, R.; Perrotta, G.; Altamura, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    The olive tree lacks dormancy and is low temperature sensitive, with differences in cold tolerance and oil quality among genotypes. The oil is produced in the drupe, and the unsaturated fatty acids contribute to its quality. The aim of the present research was to investigate the relationship among development, cold response, expression of fatty acid desaturase (FAD) genes, and unsaturated fatty acid composition in drupes belonging to genotypes differing in leaf cold tolerance, but producing good oil (i.e. the non-hardy Moraiolo, the semi-hardy Frantoio, and the hardy Canino). In all genotypes, cold sensitivity, evaluated by cold-induced transient increases in cytosolic calcium, was high in the epi-mesocarp cells before oil body formation, and decreased during oil biogenesis. However, genotype-dependent differences in cold sensitivity appeared at the end of oil production. Genotype-dependent differences in FAD2.1, FAD2.2, FAD6, and FAD7 expression levels occurred in the epi-mesocarp cells during the oleogenic period. However, FAD2.1 and FAD7 were always the highest in the first part of this period. FAD2.2 and FAD7 increased after cold applications during oleogenesis, independently of the genotype. Unsaturated fatty acids increased in the drupes of the non-hardy genotype, but not in those of the hardy one, after cold exposure at the time of the highest FAD transcription. The results show a direct relationship between FAD expression and lipid desaturation in the drupes of the cold-sensitive genotype, and an inverse relationship in those of the cold-resistant genotype, suggesting that drupe cold acclimation requires a fine FAD post-transcriptional regulation. Hypotheses relating FAD desaturation to storage and membrane lipids, and genotype cold hardiness are discussed. PMID:21357772

  16. Predicting the level of job satisfaction based on hardiness and its components among nurses with tension headache

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, A; Nikmanesh, E; AghaeI, M; Kamran, F; Zahra Tavakoli, Z; Khaki Seddigh, F

    2015-01-01

    Nurses are the most significant part of human resources in a sanitary and health system. Job satisfaction results in the enhancement of organizational productivity, employee commitment to the organization and ensuring his/ her physical and mental health. The present research was conducted with the aim of predicting the level of job satisfaction based on hardiness and its components among the nurses with tension headache. The research method was correlational. The population consisted of all the nurses with tension headache who referred to the relevant specialists in Tehran. The sample size consisted of 50 individuals who were chosen by using the convenience sampling method and were measured and investigated by using the research tools of “Job Satisfaction Test” of Davis, Lofkvist and Weiss and “Personal Views Survey” of Kobasa. The data analysis was carried out by using the Pearson Correlation Coefficient and the Regression Analysis. The research findings demonstrated that the correlation coefficient obtained for “hardiness”, “job satisfaction” was 0.506, and this coefficient was significant at the 0.01 level. Moreover, it was specified that the sense of commitment and challenge were stronger predictors for job satisfaction of nurses with tension headache among the components of hardiness, and, about 16% of the variance of “job satisfaction” could be explained by the two components (sense of commitment and challenge). PMID:28316713

  17. Multilevel Deficiency of White Matter Connectivity Networks in Alzheimer's Disease: A Diffusion MRI Study with DTI and HARDI Models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Shi, Feng; Jin, Yan; Yap, Pew-Thian; Wee, Chong-Yaw; Zhang, Jianye; Yang, Cece; Li, Xia; Xiao, Shifu; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in elderly people. It is an irreversible and progressive brain disease. In this paper, we utilized diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to detect abnormal topological organization of white matter (WM) structural networks. We compared the differences between WM connectivity characteristics at global, regional, and local levels in 26 patients with probable AD and 16 normal control (NC) elderly subjects, using connectivity networks constructed with the diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) model and the high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) model, respectively. At the global level, we found that the WM structural networks of both AD and NC groups had a small-world topology; however, the AD group showed a significant decrease in both global and local efficiency, but an increase in clustering coefficient and the average shortest path length. We further found that the AD patients had significantly decreased nodal efficiency at the regional level, as well as weaker connections in multiple local cortical and subcortical regions, such as precuneus, temporal lobe, hippocampus, and thalamus. The HARDI model was found to be more advantageous than the DTI model, as it was more sensitive to the deficiencies in AD at all of the three levels.

  18. To freeze or not to freeze? An evolutionary perspective on the cold-hardiness strategies of overwintering ectotherms.

    PubMed

    Voituron, Yann; Mouquet, Nicolas; de Mazancourt, Claire; Clobert, Jean

    2002-08-01

    We address the question of whether freeze-tolerance, freeze-avoidance, or mixed strategy represents the best adaptation for overwintering ectotherms to endure severe winter. To this end, we develop an optimization fitness model that takes into account different physiological parameters such as energetic level, the physiological stress associated with each strategy, and climatic variables. The results show that the freeze-tolerance strategy is strongly dependent on a low sensitivity to the number of freezing days and on a capacity to reduce stress associated with freezing. This strategy is also favored when the initial energetic level is low compared to the freeze-avoidance strategy, which is favored by a high initial energetic level, a low stress associated with the supercooling, and a low sensitivity of this strategy to climatic conditions. From a theoretical point of view, the mixed strategy permits survival in harsher environments but requires the optimization of all parameters involved in both cold-hardiness strategies. However, the mixed strategy shows energetic advantages in variable environments allowing animals to resist the harshest periods. From the model results, it appears that the physiological processes developed by ectotherms to reduce these stresses might be a key to understanding the evolution of the cold-hardiness strategies.

  19. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundation parameter study

    SciTech Connect

    Lodde, P.F.

    1980-07-01

    The dynamic failure criterion governing the dimensions of prototype Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundations is treated as a variable parameter. The resulting change in foundation dimensions and costs is examined.

  20. Practitioner Perspectives on Foundational Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Leider, Jonathon P.; Juliano, Chrissie; Castrucci, Brian C.; Beitsch, Leslie M.; Dilley, Abby; Nelson, Rachel; Kaiman, Sherry; Sprague, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Context: National efforts are underway to classify a minimum set of public health services that all jurisdictions throughout the United States should provide regardless of location. Such a set of basic programs would be supported by crosscutting services, known as the “foundational capabilities” (FCs). These FCs are assessment services, preparedness and disaster response, policy development, communications, community partnership, and organizational support activities. Objective: To ascertain familiarity with the term and concept of FCs and gather related perspectives from state and local public health practitioners. Design: In fall 2013, we interviewed 50 leaders from state and local health departments. We asked about familiarity with the term “foundational capabilities,” as well as the broader concept of FCs. We attempted to triangulate the utility of the FC concept by asking respondents about priority programs and services, about perceived unique contributions made by public health, and about prevalence and funding for the FCs. Setting: Telephone-based interviews. Participants: Fifty leaders of state and local health departments. Main Outcome Measures: Practitioner familiarity with and perspectives on the FCs, information about current funding streams for public health, and the likelihood of creating nationwide FCs that would be recognized and accepted by all jurisdictions. Results: Slightly more than half of the leaders interviewed said that they were familiar with the concept of FCs. In most cases, health departments had all of the capabilities to some degree, although operationalization varied. Few indicated that current funding levels were sufficient to support implementing a minimum level of FCs nationally. Conclusions: Respondents were not able to articulate the current or optimal levels of services for the various capabilities, nor the costs associated with them. Further research is needed to understand the role of FCs as part of the foundational

  1. Practitioner perspectives on foundational capabilities.

    PubMed

    Leider, Jonathon P; Juliano, Chrissie; Castrucci, Brian C; Beitsch, Leslie M; Dilley, Abby; Nelson, Rachel; Kaiman, Sherry; Sprague, James B

    2015-01-01

    National efforts are underway to classify a minimum set of public health services that all jurisdictions throughout the United States should provide regardless of location. Such a set of basic programs would be supported by crosscutting services, known as the "foundational capabilities" (FCs). These FCs are assessment services, preparedness and disaster response, policy development, communications, community partnership, and organizational support activities. To ascertain familiarity with the term and concept of FCs and gather related perspectives from state and local public health practitioners. In fall 2013, we interviewed 50 leaders from state and local health departments. We asked about familiarity with the term "foundational capabilities," as well as the broader concept of FCs. We attempted to triangulate the utility of the FC concept by asking respondents about priority programs and services, about perceived unique contributions made by public health, and about prevalence and funding for the FCs. Telephone-based interviews. Fifty leaders of state and local health departments. Practitioner familiarity with and perspectives on the FCs, information about current funding streams for public health, and the likelihood of creating nationwide FCs that would be recognized and accepted by all jurisdictions. Slightly more than half of the leaders interviewed said that they were familiar with the concept of FCs. In most cases, health departments had all of the capabilities to some degree, although operationalization varied. Few indicated that current funding levels were sufficient to support implementing a minimum level of FCs nationally. Respondents were not able to articulate the current or optimal levels of services for the various capabilities, nor the costs associated with them. Further research is needed to understand the role of FCs as part of the foundational public health services.

  2. Foundational issues in evolution education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mike U.; Siegel, Harvey; McInerney, Joseph D.

    1995-01-01

    There is a great need for effective evolution education. This paper reviews some of the evidence that demonstrates that need and analyzes some of the foundational semantic, epistemological, and philosophical issues involved. This analysis is used to provide a functional understanding of the distinction between science and non-science. Special emphasis is placed the scientific meaning of the terms theory, hypothesis, fact, proof, evidence, and truth, focusing on the difference between religious belief and acceptance of a scientific theory. Science is viewed as theologically neutral and as not mutually exclusive from religion. Finally, a number of practical recommendations to the classroom biology teacher are presented.

  3. EVOLUTIONARY FOUNDATIONS FOR MOLECULAR MEDICINE

    PubMed Central

    Nesse, Randolph M.; Ganten, Detlev; Gregory, T. Ryan; Omenn, Gilbert S.

    2015-01-01

    Evolution has long provided a foundation for population genetics, but many major advances in evolutionary biology from the 20th century are only now being applied in molecular medicine. They include the distinction between proximate and evolutionary explanations, kin selection, evolutionary models for cooperation, and new strategies for tracing phylogenies and identifying signals of selection. Recent advances in genomics are further transforming evolutionary biology and creating yet more opportunities for progress at the interface of evolution with genetics, medicine, and public health. This article reviews 15 evolutionary principles and their applications in molecular medicine in hopes that readers will use them and others to speed the development of evolutionary molecular medicine. PMID:22544168

  4. Deontological foundations for medical ethics?

    PubMed

    Gillon, R

    1985-05-04

    Gillon outlines the principles of the deontological, or duty-based, group of moral theories in one of a series of British Medical Journal articles on the philosophical foundations of medical ethics. He differentiates between monistic theories, such as Immanuel Kant's, which rely on a single moral principle, and pluralistic theories, such as that of W.D. Ross, which rely on several principles that potentially could conflict. He summarizes the contributions of Kant and Ross to the development of deontological thought, then concludes his essay with brief paragraphs on other deontological approaches to the resolution of conflicting moral principles.

  5. Epistemological Foundations of School Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo-Aymerich, Mercè; Adúriz-Bravo, Agustín

    Based on a synthesis of contributions from different authors, we present a theoretical framework that provides some foundations for school science, and we define some research problems. We start from what is already known about students' models and cognition in order to construct proposals of didactical intervention. The cognitive model of science, developed in the philosophy of science through studying scientists' activity, has allowed us to propose an analogous model for school science in which experimentation and language play the key roles. We emphasise the relative independence of school science and scientists' science.

  6. The shifting foundations of nursing.

    PubMed

    Law, Kate; Aranda, Kay

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we argue that the concerns generated by the development of Foundation Degrees and the Assistant and Associate Practitioner roles have rekindled some of the unresolved debates regarding the status and identity of nursing and nurses. Through the application of the sociological theories of professionalisation and nostalgia we have identified the shifting and unresolved nature of nursing. We argue that these theories continue to have resonance in the current climate of change and 'upskilling' of the health care workforce and argue, that the shifts illuminated are perhaps so significant as to demonstrate that we have entered a post-nursing era. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Community College Foundation Manual & Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James M., Comp.; Snyder, Tom, Comp.

    This collection of resources and information about community college foundations includes brief articles, selected data, materials from foundations, sample mission statements and articles of incorporation, sample forms and correspondence, relevant educational legislation, and other related materials from specific active foundations at two-year…

  8. Report on Illinois Public Community College Foundations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    At the request of the Illinois Community College Board's (ICCB's) Committee on Foundations, the ICCB surveyed the state's public community college district to determine the purposes, resources, and activities of the colleges' foundations. The study found that all of the community college districts, except one, have foundations to assist them in…

  9. Beyond Dependency: Strategies for Saving Foundations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutz, Aaron; Butin, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The foundations field cannot sustain itself in its present condition. A range of complex forces have combined to marginalize foundations over the past few decades. The decline of this field as a separate discipline in schools of education has been abetted by the fact that foundations is generally a "service provider" to other programs.…

  10. Philanthropy and Private Foundations: Expanding Revenue Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummer, Carlee; Marshburn, Roxann

    2014-01-01

    As community colleges seek new revenue streams, philanthropic organizations, including college foundations and private funders, have already begun to influence both revenues and college programming. This chapter discusses the current role of philanthropy, especially private foundations such as the Lumina Foundation for Education and the Bill and…

  11. A Foundation Manual for California Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James M., Ed.; And Others

    Designed to aid the development and organization of effective college foundations in California, this reference guide reviews the purposes of foundations and the steps in their organization, providing sample documents from existing foundations. The manual is divided into 11 sections, the first of which discusses reasons for establishing…

  12. Philanthropy and Private Foundations: Expanding Revenue Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummer, Carlee; Marshburn, Roxann

    2014-01-01

    As community colleges seek new revenue streams, philanthropic organizations, including college foundations and private funders, have already begun to influence both revenues and college programming. This chapter discusses the current role of philanthropy, especially private foundations such as the Lumina Foundation for Education and the Bill and…

  13. Bernard van Leer Foundation Annual Report, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard Van Leer Foundation, The Hague (Netherlands).

    This annual report details the activities and financial status for 1999 of the Bernard van Leer Foundation, a private institution created in 1949 for broad humanitarian purposes. Following the introduction by the chairman of the Foundation's board of trustees, the report of the executive director details activities during the Foundation's fiftieth…

  14. Foundations for offshore wind turbines.

    PubMed

    Byrne, B W; Houlsby, G T

    2003-12-15

    An important engineering challenge of today, and a vital one for the future, is to develop and harvest alternative sources of energy. This is a firm priority in the UK, with the government setting a target of 10% of electricity from renewable sources by 2010. A component central to this commitment will be to harvest electrical power from the vast energy reserves offshore, through wind turbines or current or wave power generators. The most mature of these technologies is that of wind, as much technology transfer can be gained from onshore experience. Onshore wind farms, although supplying 'green energy', tend to provoke some objections on aesthetic grounds. These objections can be countered by locating the turbines offshore, where it will also be possible to install larger capacity turbines, thus maximizing the potential of each wind farm location. This paper explores some civil-engineering problems encountered for offshore wind turbines. A critical component is the connection of the structure to the ground, and in particular how the load applied to the structure is transferred safely to the surrounding soil. We review previous work on the design of offshore foundations, and then present some simple design calculations for sizing foundations and structures appropriate to the wind-turbine problem. We examine the deficiencies in the current design approaches, and the research currently under way to overcome these deficiencies. Designs must be improved so that these alternative energy sources can compete economically with traditional energy suppliers.

  15. Design of foundations in permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankle, K. R.

    The relatively recent growth in military and scientific facilities in polar regions and the industrial exploitation of Alaska and northern Canada, has necessitated a better understanding of the physical environment of cold regions. With this increased activity and occupation of cold regions also comes the need for better engineered structures. Foundations on permafrost, or perennially frozen ground, present special problems and demands in design and construction. Design of foundations in areas of seasonal frost where the material below the frost line remains unfrozen present certain problems. However, by taking structural loads to depths below the frost line, potential problems from heave and lateral thrust are generally removed. Permafrost itself is actually a fairly good material with high compressive strength. However, it does tend to creep under load, and cyclical freezing and thawing are of particular concern. Freezing and thawing have dramatic effects on the soil properties upon which the stability or a structure depends. The magnitude of these effects depend not only on the type of soil and its water content, but also on environmental factors such as weather, ground cover, snow, and the thermal properties of subsurface materials.

  16. Hardiness and Anxiety as Predictors of Academic Success in First-Year, Full-Time and Part-Time RN Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Tracey J. F.; Goldenberg, Dolly

    1999-01-01

    A personal-views survey and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory were completed by 25 full-time and 16 part-time nursing students. They reported moderately high levels of hardiness and low anxiety, but these characteristics did not correlate with academic achievement. (SK)

  17. A Collision of Vice and Virtue in Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D'Urbervilles: "A Pure Woman Faithfully Presented" or a Fallen Angel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleh, Nafiseh Salman; Abbasi, Pyeaam

    2014-01-01

    Heralded as a sympathizer with the oppressed nineteenth century femininity, Thomas Hardy adopted an aggressive stance towards the institutionalized codes of the time, particularly the ideal of femininity which results in presenting him as one of the promethean forerunners of "New Woman" fiction. His outspoken attitudes are tangible in…

  18. A modified mass selection scheme for creating winter-hardy faba bean (Vicia faba L.) lines with a broad genetic base

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Winter-hardy faba bean (Vicia faba L.) from northern Europe is represented by a rather narrow gene pool. Limited selection gains for overwintering beyond a maximum of -25°C have restricted the adoption of this crop. Therefore, the faba bean collection maintained by the USDA-ARS National Plant Germpl...

  19. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 AND TEMPERATURE ON COLD HARDINESS AND SPRING BUD BURST AND GROWTH IN DOUGLAS-FIR (PSEUDOTSUGA MENZIESII)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on cold hardiness and bud burst of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) seedlings. Two-year-old seedlings were grown for 2.5 years in semi-closed, sunlit chambers at either ambient or elevated (ambient+apprxeq 4deg...

  20. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 AND TEMPERATURE ON COLD HARDINESS AND SPRING BUD BURST AND GROWTH IN DOUGLAS-FIR (PSEUDOTSUGA MENZIESII)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on cold hardiness and bud burst of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) seedlings. Two-year-old seedlings were grown for 2.5 years in semi-closed, sunlit chambers at either ambient or elevated (ambient+apprxeq 4deg...

  1. Construction of a genetic linkage map of an interspecific diploid blueberry population and identification of QTL for chilling requirement and cold hardiness

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A genetic linkage map has been constructed from an interspecific diploid blueberry population [(Vaccinium darrowii Fla4B x V. corymbosum W85-20) F1#10 x V. corymbosum W85-23] designed to segregate for cold hardiness and chilling requirement. The map is comprised of 12 linkage groups (equivalent to t...

  2. Is the strategy for cold hardiness in insects determined by their water balance? A study on two closely related families of beetles: Cerambycidae and Chrysomelidae.

    PubMed

    Zachariassen, K E; Li, N G; Laugsand, A E; Kristiansen, E; Pedersen, S A

    2008-11-01

    The strategy for cold-hardiness and water balance features of two closely related families of Coleoptera, Cerambycidae and Chrysomelidae, were investigated. Cerambycids were freeze-avoiding with low supercooling points, whereas chrysomelids froze at high temperatures and were tolerant to freezing. Hence, the two families have adopted different strategies for cold-hardiness. Due to their low trans-cuticular water permeability, the cerambycids have low rates of evaporative water loss. Chrysomelids have much higher trans-cuticular water permeability, but freezing brings their body fluids in vapour pressure equilibrium with ice and prevents evaporative water loss. The differences in cold-hardiness strategies and rates of water loss are likely to reflect the water content of the diets of the two families. Cerambycids feed on dry wood with low water content, causing a restrictive water balance. Chrysomelids feed on leaves with high water content and may use evaporation through the cuticle as a route of water excretion. Haemolymph ice nucleators help chrysomelids to freeze at a high temperature and thus to maximize the period they spend in the water saving frozen state. The diet-related differences in water balance may be the reason why the two families have developed different strategies for cold-hardiness.

  3. Effect of storage temperature and duration on cold hardiness and dormancy of northern red oak seedlings: use of the electrolyte leakage procedure

    Treesearch

    Barrett C. Wilson; Douglass F. Jacobs

    2005-01-01

    Electrolyte leakage (EL) has successfully predicted cold hardiness of conifer seedlings in both research and commercial settings. EL has also been performed experimentally on European hardwood species. The objective of our study was to determine if further refinement and adjustment of EL methodology to account for the unique characteristics of hardwood seedlings (e.g...

  4. Occupational Role Stressors, Coping, Support, and Hardiness as Predictors of Strain in Academic Faculty: An Emphasis on New and Female Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lease, Suzanne H.

    1999-01-01

    A study of occupational stress and personal-strain levels among new and experienced male and female college faculty found no differences in stress or strain between male and female faculty or between new and experienced faculty. Role overload and avoidant coping were significant predictors of strain, with hardiness and responsibility for…

  5. Improving Freezing Tolerance of Cultivated Potatoes: Moving Frost Hardy Genes From Wild Potatoes and Making Real Progress Using Precise Screening Tools

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The common cultivated species Solanum tubrosum is frost sensitive and is killed at temperatures below -2.5°C. It has been estimated that by increasing frost hardiness by 1–2 C one can expect an increase in potato yield by 26 to 40% in the Altiplano (Peru and Bolivia) covering 63,000 ha. of potatoes....

  6. The foundation of kinship: households.

    PubMed

    Leonetti, Donna L; Chabot-Hanowell, Benjamin

    2011-07-01

    Men's hunting has dominated the discourse on energy capture and flow in the past decade or so. We turn to women's roles as critical to household formation, pair-bonding, and intergenerational bonds. Their pivotal contributions in food processing and distribution likely promoted kinship, both genetic and affinal, and appear to be the foundation from which households evolved. With conscious recognition of household social units, variable cultural constructions of human kinship systems that were sensitive to environmental and technological conditions could emerge. Kinship dramatically altered the organization of resource access for our species, creating what we term "kinship ecologies." We present simple mathematical models to show how hunting leads to dependence on women's contributions, bonds men to women, and bonds generations together. Kinship, as it organized transfers of food and labor energy centered on women, also became integrated with the biological evolution of human reproduction and life history.

  7. Emotional foundations of cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Inzlicht, Michael; Bartholow, Bruce D; Hirsh, Jacob B

    2015-03-01

    Often seen as the paragon of higher cognition, here we suggest that cognitive control is dependent on emotion. Rather than asking whether control is influenced by emotion, we ask whether control itself can be understood as an emotional process. Reviewing converging evidence from cybernetics, animal research, cognitive neuroscience, and social and personality psychology, we suggest that cognitive control is initiated when goal conflicts evoke phasic changes to emotional primitives that both focus attention on the presence of goal conflicts and energize conflict resolution to support goal-directed behavior. Critically, we propose that emotion is not an inert byproduct of conflict but is instrumental in recruiting control. Appreciating the emotional foundations of control leads to testable predictions that can spur future research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The foundation of kinship: Households

    PubMed Central

    Leonetti, Donna L.; Chabot-Hanowell, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Men’s hunting has dominated the discourse on energy capture and flow in the past decade or so. We turn to women’s roles as critical to household formation, pair bonding and intergenerational bonds. Their pivotal contributions in food processing and distribution likely promoted kinship, both genetic and affinal, and appear to be the foundation from which households evolved. With conscious recognition of household social units, variable cultural constructions of human kinship systems could emerge that were sensitive to environmental and technological conditions. Kinship dramatically altered the organization of resource access for our species creating what we term “kinship ecologies.” We present simple mathematical models to show how hunting leads to dependence on women’s contributions, bonds men to women and generations together. Kinship, as it organized transfers of food and labor energy centered on women, also became integrated with the biological evolution of human reproduction and life history. PMID:21799658

  9. Emotional foundations of cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Inzlicht, Michael; Bartholow, Bruce D.; Hirsh, Jacob B.

    2015-01-01

    Often seen as the paragon of higher cognition, here we suggest that cognitive control is dependent on emotion. Rather than asking whether control is influenced by emotion, we ask whether control itself can be understood as an emotional process. Reviewing converging evidence from cybernetics, animal research, cognitive neuroscience, and social and personality psychology, we suggest that cognitive control is initiated when goal conflicts evoke phasic changes to emotional primitives that both focus attention on the presence of goal conflicts and energize conflict resolution to support goal-directed behavior. Critically, we propose that emotion is not an inert byproduct of conflict but is instrumental in recruiting control. Appreciating the emotional foundations of control leads to testable predictions that can spur future research. PMID:25659515

  10. Analyzing the Implications of Climate Data on Plant Hardiness Zones for Green Infrastructure Planning: Case Study of Knoxville, Tennessee and Surrounding Region

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvester, Linda M.; Omitaomu, Olufemi A.; Parish, Esther S.

    2016-07-01

    Downscaled climate data for Knoxville, Tennessee and the surrounding region were used to investigate future changing Plant Hardiness Zones due to climate change. The methodology used is the same as the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), well-known for their creation of the standard Plant Hardiness Zone map used by gardeners and planners. USDA data were calculated from observed daily data for 1976–2005. The modeled climate data for the past is daily data from 1980-2005 and the future data is projected for 2025–2050. The average of all the modeled annual extreme minimums for each time period of interest was calculated. Each 1 km raster cell was placed into zone categories based on temperature, using the same criteria and categories of the USDA. The individual models vary between suggesting little change to the Plant Hardiness Zones to suggesting Knoxville moves into the next two Hardiness Zones. But overall, the models suggest moving into the next warmer Zone. USDA currently has the Knoxville area categorized as Zone 7a. None of the Zones calculated from the climate data models placed Knoxville in Zone 7a for the similar time period. The models placed Knoxville in a cooler Hardiness Zone and projected the area to increase to Zone 7. The modeled temperature data appears to be slightly cooler than the actual temperature data and this may explain the zone discrepancy. However, overall Knoxville is projected to increase to the next warmer Zone. As the modeled data has Knoxville, overall, moving from Zone 6 to Zone 7, it can be inferred that Knoxville, Tennessee may increase from their current Zone 7 to Zone 8.

  11. Bellʼs inequality and extremal non-local box from Hardyʼs test for non-locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sixia

    2014-10-01

    Bell showed 50 years ago that quantum theory is non-local via his celebrated inequalities, turning the issue of quantum non-locality from a matter of taste into a matter of test. Years later, Hardy proposed a test for non-locality without inequality, which is a kind of ‘something-versus-nothing’ argument. Hardy's test for n particles induces an n-partite Bell's inequality with two dichotomic local measurements for each observer, which has been shown to be violated by all entangled pure states. Our first result is to show that the Bell-Hardy inequality arising form Hardy's non-locality test is tight for an arbitrary number of parties, i.e., it defines a facet of the Bell polytope in the given scenario. On the other hand quantum theory is not that non-local since it forbids signaling and even not as non-local as allowed by non-signaling conditions, i.e., quantum mechanical predictions form a strict subset of the so called non-signaling polytope. In the scenario of each observer measuring two dichotomic observables, Fritz established a duality between the Bell polytope and the non-signaling polytope: tight Bell's inequalities, the facets of the Bell polytope, are in a one-to-one correspondence with extremal non-signaling boxes, the vertices of the non-signaling polytope. Our second result is to provide an alternative and more direct formula for this duality. As an example, the tight Bell-Hardy inequality gives rise to an extremal non-signaling box that serves as a natural multipartite generalization of Popescu-Rohrlich box. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘50 years of Bell’s theorem’.

  12. Effects of elevated CO(2) and temperature on cold hardiness and spring bud burst and growth in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii).

    PubMed

    Guak, Sunghee; Olsyzk, David M.; Fuchigami, Leslie H.; Tingey, David T.

    1998-10-01

    We examined effects of elevated CO(2) and temperature on cold hardiness and bud burst of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) seedlings. Two-year-old seedlings were grown for 2.5 years in semi-closed, sunlit chambers at either ambient or elevated (ambient + ~ 4 degrees C) air temperature in the presence of an ambient or elevated (ambient + ~ 200 ppm) CO(2) concentration. The elevated temperature treatment delayed needle cold hardening in the autumn and slowed dehardening in the spring. At maximum hardiness, trees in the elevated temperature treatment were less hardy by about 7 degrees C than trees in the ambient temperature treatment. In general, trees exposed to elevated CO(2) were slightly less hardy during hardening and dehardening than trees exposed to ambient CO(2). For trees in the elevated temperature treatments, date to 30% burst of branch terminal buds was advanced by about 6 and 15 days in the presence of elevated CO(2) and ambient CO(2), respectively. After bud burst started, however, the rate of increase in % bud burst was slower in the elevated temperature treatments than in the ambient temperature treatments. Time of bud burst was more synchronous and bud burst was completed within a shorter period in trees at ambient temperature (with and without elevated CO(2)) than in trees at elevated temperature. Exposure to elevated temperature reduced final % bud burst of both leader and branch terminal buds and reduced growth of the leader shoot. We conclude that climatic warming will influence the physiological processes of dormancy and cold hardiness development in Douglas-fir growing in the relatively mild temperate region of western Oregon, reducing bud burst and shoot growth.

  13. Association Genetics of Coastal Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii, Pinaceae). I. Cold-Hardiness Related Traits

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Andrew J.; Bower, Andrew D.; Wegrzyn, Jill L.; Pande, Barnaly; Jermstad, Kathleen D.; Krutovsky, Konstantin V.; St. Clair, J. Bradley; Neale, David B.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptation to cold is one of the greatest challenges to forest trees. This process is highly synchronized with environmental cues relating to photoperiod and temperature. Here, we use a candidate gene-based approach to search for genetic associations between 384 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers from 117 candidate genes and 21 cold-hardiness related traits. A general linear model approach, including population structure estimates as covariates, was implemented for each marker–trait pair. We discovered 30 highly significant genetic associations [false discovery rate (FDR) Q < 0.10] across 12 candidate genes and 10 of the 21 traits. We also detected a set of 7 markers that had elevated levels of differentiation between sampling sites situated across the Cascade crest in northeastern Washington. Marker effects were small (r2 < 0.05) and within the range of those published previously for forest trees. The derived SNP allele, as measured by a comparison to a recently diverged sister species, typically affected the phenotype in a way consistent with cold hardiness. The majority of markers were characterized as having largely nonadditive modes of gene action, especially underdominance in the case of cold-tolerance related phenotypes. We place these results in the context of trade-offs between the abilities to grow longer and to avoid fall cold damage, as well as putative epigenetic effects. These associations provide insight into the genetic components of complex traits in coastal Douglas fir, as well as highlight the need for landscape genetic approaches to the detection of adaptive genetic diversity. PMID:19487566

  14. Cold hardiness and biochemical response to low temperature of the unfed bush tick Haemaphysalis longicornis (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Jun; Lu, Yu-Lan; Yang, Xiao-Long; Chen, Jie; Wang, Hui; Wang, Duo; Liu, Jing-Ze

    2014-07-26

    The survival of overwintering ticks, is critical for their subsequent population dynamics in the spring, and consequent transmission of tick-borne diseases. Survival is largely influenced by the severity of the winter temperatures and their degree of cold hardiness at the overwintering stage. The bush tick Haemaphysalis longicornis, is widely distributed in China, and can transmit various pathogens that pose serious medical/veterinary problems. In the present study we investigated the effect of low temperature stress to tick survival, super-cooling point and body content of water, glycerol and total protein. After various temperature acclimations, the super-cooling point was measured by Ni/CrNi-thermocouples with a precision temperature recorder. Water content was determined from weight loss of the sample exposed to 60°C for 48 h. Glycerol content was determined using Free Glycerol Reagent as directed by the manufacturer, and total protein was determined using the Bradford assay. The 50% mortality temperatures for the adults and nymphs were -13.7°C and -15.2°C, respectively; and the discriminating temperatures for the adults and nymphs were -16.0°C and -17.0°C, respectively. The super-cooling points of the adults and nymphs were -19.0°C and -22.7°C, respectively. The water content of adult H. longicornis decreased substantially after acclimation at 0°C for 10 d, whereas the nymphs decreased after acclimation at 0°C for 20 d, and the glycerol and proteins of both nymphs and adults were significantly increased (p < 0.01) when stressed at 0°C for 10 d. In H. longicornis, low temperature stress can enhance its cold hardiness and trigger appropriate responses, including reducing water content, and increasing glycerol and total protein content.

  15. In cold-hardy insects, seasonal, temperature, and reversible phosphorylation controls regulate sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA).

    PubMed

    McMullen, David C; Ramnanan, Christopher J; Storey, Kenneth B

    2010-01-01

    Winter cold hardiness of insects typically involves one of two major strategies for survival below 0 degrees C: freeze avoidance and freeze tolerance. The two strategies have some common features, including the accumulation of high concentrations of cryoprotectant polyols and the frequent occurrence of diapause. Entry into the hypometabolic state of diapause requires coordinated suppression of major ATP-consuming metabolic processes, and ion motive ATPases are important targets for regulation. This study documents the suppression of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) activity in the overwintering larvae of two cold-hardy species, the freeze-avoiding gall moth Epiblema scudderiana and the freeze-tolerant gall fly Eurosta solidaginis. Activity was reduced despite a lack of change in SERCA protein levels in E. solidaginis larvae over the winter and a six- to eightfold increase in SERCA protein in E. scudderiana. This implicated posttranslational modification as the mechanism of SERCA suppression, and in vitro incubations indicated that enzyme phosphorylation by protein kinases A, G, or C strongly reduced enzyme activity. A stable reduction in SERCA activity was also seen in cold-acclimated larvae of both species compared with 15 degrees C controls, with significant changes in the kinetic parameters of the E. scudderiana enzyme (e.g., K(m) ATP was 3.2-fold higher in -20 degrees C-acclimated larvae) that were consistent with reduced enzyme function at low temperature. Epiblema scudderiana SERCA was also subject to regulation by differential temperature effects (Arrhenius activation energy increased by approximately threefold below 10 degrees C) and by seasonal changes in the levels of a SERCA inhibitor protein, phospholamban.

  16. GBS-Based Deconvolution of the Surviving North American Collection of Cold-Hardy Kiwifruit (Actinidia spp.) Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Arthur T. O.; Guthrie, Robert S.; Hale, Iago

    2017-01-01

    Plant germplasm collections can be invaluable resources to plant breeders, provided they are well-characterized. After 140 years of acquisition and curation efforts by a wide and largely non-coordinated array of private and institutional actors, the current US collection of cold-hardy kiwifruit (Actinidia spp.) is rife with misclassifications, misnomers, and mix-ups. To facilitate the systematic improvement and resource-efficient curation of these species of long-recognized horticultural potential, we used genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) data to deconvolute this historic collection. Evaluation of a total of 138 accessions (103 A. arguta, 28 A. kolomikta, and 7 A. polygama) with an interspecific set of 1,040 high-quality SNPs resulted in clear resolution of the three species. Intraspecific analysis (2,964 SNPs) within A. arguta revealed a significant level of redundancy (41.7%; only 60 unique genotypes out of 103 analyzed) and a sub-population structure reflecting likely geographic provenance, phenotypic classes, and hybrid pedigree. For A. kolomikta (3,425 SNPs), the level of accession redundancy was even higher (53.6%; 13 unique genotypes out of 28 analyzed); but no sub-structure was detected. Numerous instances were discovered of distinct genotypes sharing a common name, different names assigned to the same genotype, mistaken species assignments, and incorrect gender records, all critical information for both breeders and curators. In terms of method, this study demonstrates the practical and cost-effective use of GBS data to characterize plant genetic resources, despite ploidy differences and the lack of reference genomes. With the recent prohibition on further imports of Actinidia plant material into the country and with the active eradication of historic vines looming, this analysis of the US cold-hardy kiwifruit germplasm collection provides a timely assessment of the genetic resource base of an emerging, high-value specialty crop. PMID:28125645

  17. GBS-Based Deconvolution of the Surviving North American Collection of Cold-Hardy Kiwifruit (Actinidia spp.) Germplasm.

    PubMed

    Melo, Arthur T O; Guthrie, Robert S; Hale, Iago

    2017-01-01

    Plant germplasm collections can be invaluable resources to plant breeders, provided they are well-characterized. After 140 years of acquisition and curation efforts by a wide and largely non-coordinated array of private and institutional actors, the current US collection of cold-hardy kiwifruit (Actinidia spp.) is rife with misclassifications, misnomers, and mix-ups. To facilitate the systematic improvement and resource-efficient curation of these species of long-recognized horticultural potential, we used genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) data to deconvolute this historic collection. Evaluation of a total of 138 accessions (103 A. arguta, 28 A. kolomikta, and 7 A. polygama) with an interspecific set of 1,040 high-quality SNPs resulted in clear resolution of the three species. Intraspecific analysis (2,964 SNPs) within A. arguta revealed a significant level of redundancy (41.7%; only 60 unique genotypes out of 103 analyzed) and a sub-population structure reflecting likely geographic provenance, phenotypic classes, and hybrid pedigree. For A. kolomikta (3,425 SNPs), the level of accession redundancy was even higher (53.6%; 13 unique genotypes out of 28 analyzed); but no sub-structure was detected. Numerous instances were discovered of distinct genotypes sharing a common name, different names assigned to the same genotype, mistaken species assignments, and incorrect gender records, all critical information for both breeders and curators. In terms of method, this study demonstrates the practical and cost-effective use of GBS data to characterize plant genetic resources, despite ploidy differences and the lack of reference genomes. With the recent prohibition on further imports of Actinidia plant material into the country and with the active eradication of historic vines looming, this analysis of the US cold-hardy kiwifruit germplasm collection provides a timely assessment of the genetic resource base of an emerging, high-value specialty crop.

  18. Textural break foundation wall construction modules

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Steven J.

    1990-01-01

    Below-grade, textural-break foundation wall structures are provided for inhibiting diffusion and advection of liquids and gases into and out from a surrounding hydrogeologic environment. The foundation wall structure includes a foundation wall having an interior and exterior surface and a porous medium disposed around a portion of the exterior surface. The structure further includes a modular barrier disposed around a portion of the porous medium. The modular barrier is substantially removable from the hydrogeologic environment.

  19. The Community College Foundation Today: A. History, Characteristics, and Assets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angel, Dan; Gares, Dale

    1989-01-01

    Offers a historical perspective on the community college foundation, reviews 1987 research findings concerning foundation assets, lists 10 steps to establishing a foundation, and identifies key factors in organizational success. Describes the revitalization of the Citrus College Foundation. (DMM)

  20. The Community College Foundation Today: A. History, Characteristics, and Assets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angel, Dan; Gares, Dale

    1989-01-01

    Offers a historical perspective on the community college foundation, reviews 1987 research findings concerning foundation assets, lists 10 steps to establishing a foundation, and identifies key factors in organizational success. Describes the revitalization of the Citrus College Foundation. (DMM)

  1. Influence of foundation design on environmental vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, James T.; Blazier, Warren E., Jr.

    1992-02-01

    Building foundation design is important for controlling structural environmental vibration caused by external transportation and stationary sources, and by internal sources such as mechanical systems. The dynamic response of grade slabs, footings, and pilings are reviewed. A lumped parameter model presented in the literature is described and used to estimate the response of a massive foundation on an elastic half-space with some representative examples. The effect of vibration radiation losses, and foundation bearing area are discussed. Finally, some informal test results are discussed for deep friction piles. These results indicate that pile foundations can be effective in reducing environmental vibration.

  2. The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Anthony F.

    1987-01-01

    The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario is a non-profit volunteer-driven organization that is active in supporting research and education programs with the ultimate goal of reducing death and disability from heart disease and stroke. The Foundation has over 65 chapters across the province, a full-time staff of 130, and over 70,000 volunteers involved in various programs and fund-raising activities. Several of the Foundation's programs offer direct assistance to family physicians and their patients. This review summarizes the major programs of the Foundation and specifies how they relate to the physicians of Ontario. PMID:21263913

  3. Evolutionary foundations for cancer biology

    PubMed Central

    Aktipis, C Athena; Nesse, Randolph M

    2013-01-01

    New applications of evolutionary biology are transforming our understanding of cancer. The articles in this special issue provide many specific examples, such as microorganisms inducing cancers, the significance of within-tumor heterogeneity, and the possibility that lower dose chemotherapy may sometimes promote longer survival. Underlying these specific advances is a large-scale transformation, as cancer research incorporates evolutionary methods into its toolkit, and asks new evolutionary questions about why we are vulnerable to cancer. Evolution explains why cancer exists at all, how neoplasms grow, why cancer is remarkably rare, and why it occurs despite powerful cancer suppression mechanisms. Cancer exists because of somatic selection; mutations in somatic cells result in some dividing faster than others, in some cases generating neoplasms. Neoplasms grow, or do not, in complex cellular ecosystems. Cancer is relatively rare because of natural selection; our genomes were derived disproportionally from individuals with effective mechanisms for suppressing cancer. Cancer occurs nonetheless for the same six evolutionary reasons that explain why we remain vulnerable to other diseases. These four principles—cancers evolve by somatic selection, neoplasms grow in complex ecosystems, natural selection has shaped powerful cancer defenses, and the limitations of those defenses have evolutionary explanations—provide a foundation for understanding, preventing, and treating cancer. PMID:23396885

  4. Neurobehavioral foundation of environmental reactivity.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sarah R; Depue, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    Sensitivity to environmental context has been of interest for many years, but the nature of individual differences in environmental sensitivity has become of particular focus over the past 2 decades. What is particularly uncertain are the neural variables and processes that mediate the effects of environment on developmental outcomes. Accordingly, we provide a neurobehavioral foundation of reactivity to the environment in several steps. First, the different patterns of environmental sensitivity are defined to identify the significant factors involved in the manifestation of these patterns. Second, we focus on neurobiological reactivity as the construct underlying variation in sensitivity to the environment by (a) providing an organizing threshold model of elicitation of neurobiology by environmental context; and (b) integrating the literature on 2 sets of neuromodulators in terms of each modulator's (a) contribution to neural and behavioral reactivity to stimulation, and (b) relation to emotional-motivational systems (dopamine, opiates and oxytocin, corticotropin-releasing hormone) or the general modulation of those systems (serotonin, norepinephrine, and GABA). Discussion concludes with (a) a comprehensive neurobehavioral framework of environmental reactivity based on a combinatorial model of a supertrait, (b) methodological implications of the model, and (c) a developmental perspective on environmental reactivity. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Philosophical foundations of artificial consciousness.

    PubMed

    Chrisley, Ron

    2008-10-01

    Consciousness is often thought to be that aspect of mind that is least amenable to being understood or replicated by artificial intelligence (AI). The first-personal, subjective, what-it-is-like-to-be-something nature of consciousness is thought to be untouchable by the computations, algorithms, processing and functions of AI method. Since AI is the most promising avenue toward artificial consciousness (AC), the conclusion many draw is that AC is even more doomed than AI supposedly is. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the soundness of this inference. The results are achieved by means of conceptual analysis and argumentation. It is shown that pessimism concerning the theoretical possibility of artificial consciousness is unfounded, based as it is on misunderstandings of AI, and a lack of awareness of the possible roles AI might play in accounting for or reproducing consciousness. This is done by making some foundational distinctions relevant to AC, and using them to show that some common reasons given for AC scepticism do not touch some of the (usually neglected) possibilities for AC, such as prosthetic, discriminative, practically necessary, and lagom (necessary-but-not-sufficient) AC. Along the way three strands of the author's work in AC--interactive empiricism, synthetic phenomenology, and ontologically conservative heterophenomenology--are used to illustrate and motivate the distinctions and the defences of AC they make possible.

  6. Evolutionary foundations for cancer biology.

    PubMed

    Aktipis, C Athena; Nesse, Randolph M

    2013-01-01

    New applications of evolutionary biology are transforming our understanding of cancer. The articles in this special issue provide many specific examples, such as microorganisms inducing cancers, the significance of within-tumor heterogeneity, and the possibility that lower dose chemotherapy may sometimes promote longer survival. Underlying these specific advances is a large-scale transformation, as cancer research incorporates evolutionary methods into its toolkit, and asks new evolutionary questions about why we are vulnerable to cancer. Evolution explains why cancer exists at all, how neoplasms grow, why cancer is remarkably rare, and why it occurs despite powerful cancer suppression mechanisms. Cancer exists because of somatic selection; mutations in somatic cells result in some dividing faster than others, in some cases generating neoplasms. Neoplasms grow, or do not, in complex cellular ecosystems. Cancer is relatively rare because of natural selection; our genomes were derived disproportionally from individuals with effective mechanisms for suppressing cancer. Cancer occurs nonetheless for the same six evolutionary reasons that explain why we remain vulnerable to other diseases. These four principles-cancers evolve by somatic selection, neoplasms grow in complex ecosystems, natural selection has shaped powerful cancer defenses, and the limitations of those defenses have evolutionary explanations-provide a foundation for understanding, preventing, and treating cancer.

  7. Foundations of support constraint machines.

    PubMed

    Gnecco, Giorgio; Gori, Marco; Melacci, Stefano; Sanguineti, Marcello

    2015-02-01

    The mathematical foundations of a new theory for the design of intelligent agents are presented. The proposed learning paradigm is centered around the concept of constraint, representing the interactions with the environment, and the parsimony principle. The classical regularization framework of kernel machines is naturally extended to the case in which the agents interact with a richer environment, where abstract granules of knowledge, compactly described by different linguistic formalisms, can be translated into the unified notion of constraint for defining the hypothesis set. Constrained variational calculus is exploited to derive general representation theorems that provide a description of the optimal body of the agent (i.e., the functional structure of the optimal solution to the learning problem), which is the basis for devising new learning algorithms. We show that regardless of the kind of constraints, the optimal body of the agent is a support constraint machine (SCM) based on representer theorems that extend classical results for kernel machines and provide new representations. In a sense, the expressiveness of constraints yields a semantic-based regularization theory, which strongly restricts the hypothesis set of classical regularization. Some guidelines to unify continuous and discrete computational mechanisms are given so as to accommodate in the same framework various kinds of stimuli, for example, supervised examples and logic predicates. The proposed view of learning from constraints incorporates classical learning from examples and extends naturally to the case in which the examples are subsets of the input space, which is related to learning propositional logic clauses.

  8. Foundations Invest In Environmental Health.

    PubMed

    Sessions, Kathryn; Fortunato, Karla; Johnson, Philip R S; Panek, Amy

    2016-11-01

    Nearly one in four deaths globally are due to environmental hazards such as air and water pollution, according to the World Health Organization. However, knowledge about how the environment affects health and health equity outcomes has not been well integrated into decisions that shape the conditions in which people live, work, and play. To address this challenge, US foundations have invested millions of dollars to make it easier to incorporate environmental health information into decisions ranging from family purchases and governmental policy making to business, medical, and other professional practices. This article summarizes grant making aimed at improving environmental conditions to improve health and health equity outcomes. We provide examples of environmental health grants that focus on tools that the public, policy makers, and professionals can use in making decisions. We found that the investment in and attention to environmental factors, including in work addressing social determinants of health, have been insufficient to realize the potential for reducing negative environmental impacts on health and health disparities. We argue that the grant making highlighted here has increased knowledge that could enable more widespread consideration of environmental health in many decisions, with positive effects on health and health equity.

  9. Density functional theory: Foundations reviewed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryachko, Eugene S.; Ludeña, Eduardo V.

    2014-11-01

    Guided by the above motto (quotation), we review a broad range of issues lying at the foundations of Density Functional Theory, DFT, a theory which is currently omnipresent in our everyday computational study of atoms and molecules, solids and nano-materials, and which lies at the heart of modern many-body computational technologies. The key goal is to demonstrate that there are definitely the ways to improve DFT. We start by considering DFT in the larger context provided by reduced density matrix theory (RDMT) and natural orbital functional theory (NOFT), and examine the implications that N-representability conditions on the second-order reduced density matrix (2-RDM) have not only on RDMT and NOFT but, also, by extension, on the functionals of DFT. This examination is timely in view of the fact that necessary and sufficient N-representability conditions on the 2-RDM have recently been attained. In the second place, we review some problems appearing in the original formulation of the first Hohenberg-Kohn theorem which is still a subject of some controversy. In this vein we recall Lieb's comment on this proof and the extension to this proof given by Pino et al. (2009), and in this context examine the conditions that must be met in order that the one-to-one correspondence between ground-state densities and external potentials remains valid for finite subspaces (namely, the subspaces where all Kohn-Sham solutions are obtained in practical applications). We also consider the issue of whether the Kohn-Sham equations can be derived from basic principles or whether they are postulated. We examine this problem in relation to ab initio DFT. The possibility of postulating arbitrary Kohn-Sham-type equations, where the effective potential is by definition some arbitrary mixture of local and non-local terms, is discussed. We also deal with the issue of whether there exists a universal functional, or whether one should advocate instead the construction of problem

  10. Education Interface Guide to Precollege Foundation Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broderick, Barbara, Ed.

    Private philanthropic foundations that fund precollege programs are described in this guidebook that is designed to help the prospective grant applicant. The introduction provides information on the following: how to identify good prospects; five steps in identifying the right foundation; five matchmaking steps; strategies for fund-raising…

  11. Kellogg Foundation Still Investing in People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Alim, Jamaal

    2011-01-01

    When the W.K. Kellogg Foundation first approached a group of tribal college presidents in 1994 with a $23 million grant for a handful of their institutions, the tribal college leaders did not exactly trip over themselves to get the money. They wanted it to be split among all of them, and the foundation honored the tribal college leaders' wish.…

  12. Kellogg Foundation Still Investing in People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Alim, Jamaal

    2011-01-01

    When the W.K. Kellogg Foundation first approached a group of tribal college presidents in 1994 with a $23 million grant for a handful of their institutions, the tribal college leaders did not exactly trip over themselves to get the money. They wanted it to be split among all of them, and the foundation honored the tribal college leaders' wish.…

  13. New River Community College Educational Foundation, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Florine R.

    In September 1981, the Educational Foundation, Inc., at New River Community College (NRCC) initiated a charter member fund drive. By October 1982, the Foundation received $100,000 in gifts and pledges, $130,000 in liquid assets, and $300,000 in gifts other than cash. Among the reasons for the success of the drive was the training received by the…

  14. Foundation Schools and Admissions: The Local Dimension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Christine; Anderson, Lesley; Bush, Tony

    2001-01-01

    In 1988, the Labour Government abolished Grant Maintained schools and introduced three new categories of school: community, voluntary, and foundation. Reports findings of a study that gathered the perceptions of heads, governors, and senior staff about admission issues in 11 foundation schools after their first full term. (26 references)…

  15. Study on foundation's stability of theodolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong-yan, Feng; Yun-guo, Gao

    The foundation's stability of theodolite is very important complication of working precision. Bring forwarda new model of vibration isolation. Through analysis and comparison of several control methods, choose the absolute velocity feedback control method. The results of MATLAB simulation and experiment results indicated that the method can advance the effect of vibration isolation and strengthen the foundation's stability of theodolite.

  16. Creating a stand-alone fundraising foundation.

    PubMed

    Dillingham, Walter J; Weiss, Leigh H; Lawson, John M

    2012-10-01

    When considering a stand-alone fundraising foundation, healthcare organizations should: Review the costs and benefits of starting a separate stand-alone foundation. Perform a competitive analysis to see which hospitals use them. Work with a team of legal, development, and investment advisory experts who can help map out a plan. Review governance requirements. Develop an investment policy statement.

  17. Bernard van Leer Foundation Annual Report, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard Van Leer Foundation, The Hague (Netherlands).

    This annual report for 2000 describes the year's activities, achievements, and financial status of the Bernard van Leer Foundation, a private foundation based in The Netherlands that operates internationally to improve opportunities for young children from birth to age 7 living in circumstances of social and economic disadvantage. Following an…

  18. Bernard van Leer Foundation Annual Report, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard Van Leer Foundation, The Hague (Netherlands).

    This annual report for 2002 describes the year's activities, achievements, and financial status of the Bernard van Leer Foundation, a private foundation based in The Netherlands operating internationally to improve opportunities for young children from birth to age 7 living in circumstances of social and economic disadvantage. Following the…

  19. Foundations and Higher Education: Whose Agenda?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Grant programs that had been relatively open-ended were now tightly drawn, grounded in the foundations' own carefully articulated take on issues and receptive only to proposals that responded appropriately. Initiative and creativity had shifted heavily from prospective grantee to grantor. As foundations embraced this funding-by-agenda, it burdened…

  20. Inter-American Foundation Annual Report 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inter-American Foundation, Rosslyn, VA.

    This annual report from the Inter-American Foundation (IAF), a federal development agency, includes letters from foundation officials describing the IAF-funded work in poverty areas of Latin America and the Caribbean. The report describes IAF's In-Country Support System (ICS), staffed by local professionals who assist grantees and report their…

  1. Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Report for 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, New York, NY.

    This Sloan Foundation report for 1976 discusses foundation activities in the three facets of the General Program--(1) Education for the Public Service, (2) Economics and Management, and (3) Science and Technology--as well as in three Particular Programs--(1) Minority Engineering Education, (2) Technology in Education, and (3) Neuroscience. The…

  2. Corporation and Foundation Giving to Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, G. Jeremiah

    Designed to encourage and inform community college efforts to obtain financial support from corporations and foundations, this report assesses the current status of corporate and foundation giving to two-year colleges and identifies organizations that accept funding proposals from community colleges. After stressing the need to diversify financial…

  3. Liberating Foundations of Art and Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Fern

    2012-01-01

    Research concerning the basic course known as Foundations of Art and Design strengthens the pedagogical approach for K-16 art and design education. The version of Foundations introduced to America by Josef Albers, although hardly changed, is shown to have continued, timeless relevance. Next, a sequential, implicit logic is revealed in linking the…

  4. Foundations Invest Cautiously in Public Education Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewington, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Like many grant-making philanthropies in Canada, the Winnipeg Foundation for years had no history of giving directly to schools, fearing that could let governments off the hook for public education. In 2003, the Winnipeg Foundation invested $3 million over five years in one of the city's most impoverished neighbourhoods, with a local school as the…

  5. Foundation Skills for Scientists: An Evolving Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Teresa; Fedko, Sarah; Johnston, Nancy; Khoo, Elaine; King, Sarah; Mall, Saira; Olaveson, Mary; Patterson, Janice; Persaud, Kamini; Sardone, Frances; Shahbazi, Zohreh; Skene, Allyson; Young, Martha; Hasenkampf, Clare A.

    2010-01-01

    We have undertaken an integrated and collaborative approach to developing foundational skills of students in a first year, Introductory Biology course. The course is a large lecture and laboratory course with enrollments ranging from 800-1000 per year. Teaching and Learning experts were brought into the course as weekly "Foundation Skills for…

  6. Portfolios: Conceptual Foundations and Functional Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luescher, Andreas; Sinn, John W.

    2003-01-01

    In this article the authors address several important areas that combine to illuminate the portfolio as performance, index, and design. They provide an in-depth look at the conceptual foundation and selected functional implications of portfolios. Accordingly, the foundations laid here may serve as a basis for further development and application to…

  7. On the Need to Live Educational Foundations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, William H.

    2013-01-01

    William H. Schubert, retired faculty member at the University of Illinois, Chicago, reflects on his teaching career and the loss of "educational foundations." Schubert states that "Foundations of Education" are being pushed toward the precipice of extinction. He describes a loss of "back-to-basics" education with a…

  8. Liberating Foundations of Art and Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Fern

    2012-01-01

    Research concerning the basic course known as Foundations of Art and Design strengthens the pedagogical approach for K-16 art and design education. The version of Foundations introduced to America by Josef Albers, although hardly changed, is shown to have continued, timeless relevance. Next, a sequential, implicit logic is revealed in linking the…

  9. The scientific foundation of the LANDFIRE Prototype Project [Chapter 3

    Treesearch

    Robert E. Keane; Matthew Rollins

    2006-01-01

    The Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools Prototype Project, or LANDFIRE Prototype Project, originated from a recent mapping project that developed a set of coarse-scale spatial data layers for wildland fire management describing fire hazard and ecological status for the conterminous United States (Hardy and others 2001; Schmidt and others 2002; www. fs...

  10. The Foundation-Institution Partnership: The Role of Institutionally Related Foundations in Public Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, David

    2010-01-01

    Institutionally related foundations have played a vital role in raising and managing private resources in support of public institutions of higher education. Unlike private grant-making foundations, college and university foundations are typically incorporated as public charities under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Although they…

  11. The Foundation-Institution Partnership: The Role of Institutionally Related Foundations in Public Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, David

    2010-01-01

    Institutionally related foundations have played a vital role in raising and managing private resources in support of public institutions of higher education. Unlike private grant-making foundations, college and university foundations are typically incorporated as public charities under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Although they…

  12. Forward the Foundation: Local Education Foundations Offer an Alternative Source for School Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks-Young, Susan

    2007-01-01

    February's column "Going Corporate" discussed ideas for approaching private foundations for funding. Some districts take this idea several steps further by partnering with the community and local businesses to establish a not-for-profit foundation, or local education foundation (LEF). It probably comes as no surprise that the idea of forming a LEF…

  13. Molecular Cloning and Induced Expression of Six Small Heat Shock Proteins Mediating Cold-Hardiness in Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Juan; Shi, Zuo-Kun; Shen, Qi-Da; Xu, Cai-Di; Wang, Bing; Meng, Zhao-Jun; Wang, Shi-Gui; Tang, Bin; Wang, Su

    2017-01-01

    The main function of small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) as molecular chaperones is to protect proteins from denaturation under adverse conditions. Molecular and physiological data were used to examine the sHSPs underlying cold-hardiness in Harmonia axyridis. Complementary DNA sequences were obtained for six H. axyridis sHSPs based on its transcriptome, and the expression of the genes coding for these sHSPs was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) in several developmental stages, under short-term cooling or heating conditions, and in black and yellow females of experimental and overwintering populations under low-temperature storage. In addition, we measured water content and the super cooling and freezing points (SCP and FP, respectively) of H. axyridis individuals from experimental and overwintering populations. The average water content was not significantly different between adults of both populations, but the SCP and FP of the overwintering population were significantly lower than that of the experimental population. Overall, the six sHSPs genes showed different expression patterns among developmental stages. In the short-term cooling treatment, Hsp16.25 and Hsp21.00 expressions first increased and then decreased, while Hsp10.87 and Hsp21.56 expressions increased during the entire process. Under short-term heating, the expressions of Hsp21.00, Hsp21.62, Hsp10.87, and Hsp16.25 showed an increasing trend, whereas Hsp36.77 first decreased and then increased. Under low-temperature storage conditions, the expression of Hsp36.77 decreased, while the expressions of Hsp21.00 and Hsp21.62 were higher than that of the control group in the experimental population. The expression of Hsp36.77 first increased and then decreased, whereas Hsp21.56 expression was always higher than that of the control group in the overwintering population. Thus, differences in sHSPs gene expression were correlated with the H. axyridis forms, suggesting that the mechanism of cold

  14. Molecular Cloning and Induced Expression of Six Small Heat Shock Proteins Mediating Cold-Hardiness in Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui-Juan; Shi, Zuo-Kun; Shen, Qi-Da; Xu, Cai-Di; Wang, Bing; Meng, Zhao-Jun; Wang, Shi-Gui; Tang, Bin; Wang, Su

    2017-01-01

    The main function of small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) as molecular chaperones is to protect proteins from denaturation under adverse conditions. Molecular and physiological data were used to examine the sHSPs underlying cold-hardiness in Harmonia axyridis. Complementary DNA sequences were obtained for six H. axyridis sHSPs based on its transcriptome, and the expression of the genes coding for these sHSPs was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) in several developmental stages, under short-term cooling or heating conditions, and in black and yellow females of experimental and overwintering populations under low-temperature storage. In addition, we measured water content and the super cooling and freezing points (SCP and FP, respectively) of H. axyridis individuals from experimental and overwintering populations. The average water content was not significantly different between adults of both populations, but the SCP and FP of the overwintering population were significantly lower than that of the experimental population. Overall, the six sHSPs genes showed different expression patterns among developmental stages. In the short-term cooling treatment, Hsp16.25 and Hsp21.00 expressions first increased and then decreased, while Hsp10.87 and Hsp21.56 expressions increased during the entire process. Under short-term heating, the expressions of Hsp21.00, Hsp21.62, Hsp10.87, and Hsp16.25 showed an increasing trend, whereas Hsp36.77 first decreased and then increased. Under low-temperature storage conditions, the expression of Hsp36.77 decreased, while the expressions of Hsp21.00 and Hsp21.62 were higher than that of the control group in the experimental population. The expression of Hsp36.77 first increased and then decreased, whereas Hsp21.56 expression was always higher than that of the control group in the overwintering population. Thus, differences in sHSPs gene expression were correlated with the H. axyridis forms, suggesting that the mechanism of cold

  15. The Complete Genome of Propionibacterium freudenreichii CIRM-BIA1T, a Hardy Actinobacterium with Food and Probiotic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Falentin, Hélène; Deutsch, Stéphanie-Marie; Jan, Gwenaël; Loux, Valentin; Thierry, Anne; Parayre, Sandrine; Maillard, Marie-Bernadette; Dherbécourt, Julien; Cousin, Fabien J.; Jardin, Julien; Siguier, Patricia; Couloux, Arnaud; Barbe, Valérie; Vacherie, Benoit; Wincker, Patrick; Gibrat, Jean-François; Gaillardin, Claude; Lortal, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Background Propionibacterium freudenreichii is essential as a ripening culture in Swiss-type cheeses and is also considered for its probiotic use [1]. This species exhibits slow growth, low nutritional requirements, and hardiness in many habitats. It belongs to the taxonomic group of dairy propionibacteria, in contrast to the cutaneous species P. acnes. The genome of the type strain, P. freudenreichii subsp. shermanii CIRM-BIA1 (CIP 103027T), was sequenced with an 11-fold coverage. Methodology/Principal Findings The circular chromosome of 2.7 Mb of the CIRM-BIA1 strain has a GC-content of 67% and contains 22 different insertion sequences (3.5% of the genome in base pairs). Using a proteomic approach, 490 of the 2439 predicted proteins were confirmed. The annotation revealed the genetic basis for the hardiness of P. freudenreichii, as the bacterium possesses a complete enzymatic arsenal for de novo biosynthesis of aminoacids and vitamins (except panthotenate and biotin) as well as sequences involved in metabolism of various carbon sources, immunity against phages, duplicated chaperone genes and, interestingly, genes involved in the management of polyphosphate, glycogen and trehalose storage. The complete biosynthesis pathway for a bifidogenic compound is described, as well as a high number of surface proteins involved in interactions with the host and present in other probiotic bacteria. By comparative genomics, no pathogenicity factors found in P. acnes or in other pathogenic microbial species were identified in P. freudenreichii, which is consistent with the Generally Recognized As Safe and Qualified Presumption of Safety status of P. freudenreichii. Various pathways for formation of cheese flavor compounds were identified: the Wood-Werkman cycle for propionic acid formation, amino acid degradation pathways resulting in the formation of volatile branched chain fatty acids, and esterases involved in the formation of free fatty acids and esters. Conclusions

  16. Neutral and stable equilibria of genetic systems and the hardy-weinberg principle: limitations of the chi-square test and advantages of auto-correlation functions of allele frequencies.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Francisco; Castro, Diogo; Briones, Marcelo R S

    2012-01-01

    Since the foundations of Population Genetics the notion of genetic equilibrium (in close analogy with Classical Mechanics) has been associated with the Hardy-Weinberg (HW) principle and the identification of equilibrium is currently assumed by stating that the HW axioms are valid if appropriate values of χ(2) (p < 0.05) are observed in experiments. Here we show by numerical experiments with the genetic system of one locus/two alleles that considering large ensembles of populations the χ(2)-test is not decisive and may lead to false negatives in random mating populations and false positives in non-random mating populations. This result confirms the logical statement that statistical tests cannot be used to deduce if the genetic population is under the HW conditions. Furthermore, we show that under the HW conditions populations of any size evolve in time according to what can be identified as neutral dynamics to which the very notion of equilibrium is unattainable for any practical purpose. Therefore, under the HW conditions the identification of equilibrium properties needs a different approach and the use of more appropriate concepts. We also show that by relaxing the condition of random mating the dynamics acquires all the characteristics of asymptotic stable equilibrium. As a consequence our results show that the question of equilibrium in genetic systems should be approached in close analogy to non-equilibrium statistical physics and its observability should be focused on dynamical quantities like the typical decay properties of the allelic auto-correlation function in time. In this perspective one should abandon the classical notion of genetic equilibrium and its relation to the HW proportions and open investigations in the direction of searching for unifying general principles of population genetic transformations capable to take in consideration these systems in their full complexity.

  17. Cold Acclimation in Genetically Related (Sibling) Deciduous and Evergreen Peach (Prunus persica [L.] Batsch): I. Seasonal Changes in Cold Hardiness and Polypeptides of Bark and Xylem Tissues.

    PubMed

    Arora, R; Wisniewski, M E; Scorza, R

    1992-08-01

    Seasonal patterns of proteins and of cold hardiness were characterized in bark and xylem tissues of genetically related (sibling) deciduous and evergreen peach (Prunus persica [L.] Batsch). In contrast with deciduous trees, which entered endodormancy and abscised leaves in the fall, evergreen trees retained their leaves and exhibited shoot elongation under favorable environmental conditions. A successive increase in the cold hardiness of bark and xylem was observed during the fall in both genotypes. This was followed by a subsequent decrease from midwinter to spring. Xylem tissue in both genotypes exhibited deep supercooling and a significant correlation (r = 0.99) between the midpoint of the low-temperature exotherm and the subzero temperature at which 50% injury occurred (assessed by electrolyte leakage) was noted. The maximum hardiness level attained in deciduous trees was more than twofold that of evergreens. Seasonal pattern of proteins from bark and xylem of the sibling genotypes was characterized by one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Among other qualitative and quantitative changes, accumulation of a 19-kilodalton polypeptide in the bark of both genotypes was observed during fall followed by a decrease in spring. This polypeptide accumulated to higher levels in the deciduous peach compared with the evergreen. Additionally, a 16-kilodalton protein exhibited the same pattern in deciduous trees but not in the evergreen trees. Both the 19- and a 16-kilodalton bark proteins conform to the criteria of a bark storage protein. The relationship of seasonal changes in protein to cold hardiness and dormancy in these genetically related peach genotypes is discussed.

  18. Cross-generation plasticity in cold hardiness is associated with diapause, but not the non-diapause developmental pathway, in the blow fly Calliphora vicina.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Paul C; Bale, Jeffrey S; Hayward, Scott A L

    2014-05-01

    Predicting insect responses to global climate change involves understanding cross-generation effects of temperature. The majority of temperate insects overwinter in a state of diapause, a pre-emptive response to winter conditions associated with increased cold hardiness. Diapause is often induced following maternal adult detection of an environmental cue signifying the onset of winter, whilst diapause is initiated in a subsequent life stage and/or generation. Continued global warming will expose adults to higher late-autumn temperatures, whilst diapause life stages will still experience prolonged winter cold. The cross-generation effect of temperature was investigated by acclimating adult Calliphora vicina to present-day (15°C) and future (20°C) late-autumn conditions and assessing cold-hardiness in diapause (D15 and D20) and non-diapause (ND15 and ND20) progeny. A cross-generation plasticity in cold hardiness was associated with D but not ND larvae. D15 larvae exhibited an enhanced ability to suppress internal freezing (supercooling point=-18.9±0.9°C) compared with D20 (-15.3±0.8°C), and displayed a greater tolerance of prolonged exposure to -4°C (LT50=26.0±1.0 and 11.4±1.1 days, respectively) and -8°C (5.1±1.1 and 3.0±1.1 days, respectively). These changes were associated with a reduced glucose content in D15 (2.4±0.3 g mg(-1)) compared with D20 (3.0±0.3 g mg(-1)) larvae. In conclusion, C. vicina adults exposed to warmer autumn conditions during diapause induction will produce larvae with a reduced cold hardiness capacity, which could negatively impact winter survival. Given that maternal regulation of diapause is common among temperate insects, this could be a widespread phenomenon.

  19. The Effectiveness of Group Training of CBT-Based Stress Management on Anxiety, Psychological Hardiness and General Self-Efficacy Among University Students.

    PubMed

    Molla Jafar, Hamdam; Salabifard, Seddigheh; Mousavi, Seyedeh Maryam; Sobhani, Zahra

    2015-09-28

    Admission to university is a very sensitive period of life for efficient, active, and young workforces in any country, and it is mostly associated with many changes in social and human relationships. These changes lead to anxiety in students. Moreover, humans need certain functions in order to adaptively deal with different life situations and challenges. By training stress management, these functions can help human acquire the required abilities. The present study was aimed at investigating the effectiveness of stress management training in anxiety, psychological hardiness, and general self-efficacy among university students. The study was a quasi-experimental intervention (pretest-posttest-follow-up) including a control group, it was a fundamental applied study. The statistical population consisted of all students of Islamic Azad University, Karaj, Iran. Convenient sampling was employed to select 30 students who were divided into an experimental group (n=15) and a control group (n=15). Before stress management training, both groups filled out Beck Anxiety Inventory, Long and Goulet scale of psychological hardiness, and General Self-efficacy Scale (GSE-10). Afterwards, the experimental group was provided with stress management training. And after the experiment, the abovementioned questionnaires and scales were responded by the two groups. Finally the collected data were analyzed and compared using one-way MANOVA. The results of MANOVA indicated that there was a significant difference between the two groups in terms of anxiety, hardiness, and general self-efficacy (p<0.001). According to the results of the present study and those of previous investigations that are in agreement with those of the present study, it can be concluded that stress management among university students cause anxiety to drop; moreover, it enhances their psychological hardiness and self-efficacy. In regard with the role and importance of stress management, training this skill should be

  20. The Effectiveness of Group Training of CBT-Based Stress Management on Anxiety, Psychological Hardiness and General Self-Efficacy among University Students

    PubMed Central

    Jafar, Hamdam Molla; Salabifard, Seddigheh; Mousavi, Seyedeh Maryam; Sobhani, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Admission to university is a very sensitive period of life for efficient, active, and young workforces in any country, and it is mostly associated with many changes in social and human relationships. These changes lead to anxiety in students. Moreover, humans need certain functions in order to adaptively deal with different life situations and challenges. By training stress management, these functions can help human acquire the required abilities. Objective: The present study was aimed at investigating the effectiveness of stress management training in anxiety, psychological hardiness, and general self-efficacy among university students. Method: The study was a quasi-experimental intervention (pretest-posttest-follow-up) including a control group, it was a fundamental applied study. The statistical population consisted of all students of Islamic Azad University, Karaj, Iran. Convenient sampling was employed to select 30 students who were divided into an experimental group (n=15) and a control group (n=15). Before stress management training, both groups filled out Beck Anxiety Inventory, Long and Goulet scale of psychological hardiness, and General Self-efficacy Scale (GSE-10). Afterwards, the experimental group was provided with stress management training. And after the experiment, the abovementioned questionnaires and scales were responded by the two groups. Finally the collected data were analyzed and compared using one-way MANOVA. Results: The results of MANOVA indicated that there was a significant difference between the two groups in terms of anxiety, hardiness, and general self-efficacy (p<0.001). Conclusion: According to the results of the present study and those of previous investigations that are in agreement with those of the present study, it can be concluded that stress management among university students cause anxiety to drop; moreover, it enhances their psychological hardiness and self-efficacy. In regard with the role and importance of

  1. Is the OJIP Test a Reliable Indicator of Winter Hardiness and Freezing Tolerance of Common Wheat and Triticale under Variable Winter Environments?

    PubMed Central

    Rapacz, Marcin; Sasal, Monika; Kalaji, Hazem M.; Kościelniak, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    OJIP analysis, which explores changes in photosystem II (PSII) photochemical performance, has been used as a measure of plant susceptibility to stress. However, in the case of freezing tolerance and winter hardiness, which are highly environmentally variable, the use of this method can give ambiguous results depending on the species as well as the sampling year and time. To clarify this issue, we performed chlorophyll fluorescence measurements over three subsequent winters (2010/11, 2011/12 and 2012/13) on 220 accessions of common winter wheat and 139 accessions of winter triticale. After freezing, leaves were collected from cold-acclimated plants in the laboratory and field-grown plants. Observations of field survival in seven locations across Poland and measurements of freezing tolerance of the studied plants were also recorded. Our results confirm that the OJIP test is a reliable indicator of winter hardiness and freezing tolerance of common wheat and triticale under unstable winter environments. Regardless of species, the testing conditions giving the most reliable results were identical, and the reliability of the test could be easily checked by analysis of some relationships between OJIP-test parameters. We also found that triticale is more winter hardy and freezing tolerant than wheat. In addition, the two species were characterized by different patterns of photosynthetic apparatus acclimation to cold. PMID:26230839

  2. Overexpression of HARDY, an AP2/ERF gene from Arabidopsis, improves drought and salt tolerance by reducing transpiration and sodium uptake in transgenic Trifolium alexandrinum L.

    PubMed

    Abogadallah, Gaber M; Nada, Reham M; Malinowski, Robert; Quick, Paul

    2011-06-01

    Trifolium alexandrinum L. was transformed with the Arabidopsis HARDY gene that belongs to the stress-related AP2/ERF (APETALA2/ethylene responsive element binding factors) superfamily of transcription factors. The fresh weights of the transgenic lines L2 and L3 were improved by 42 and 55% under drought stress and by 38 and 95% under salt stress compared to the wild type, respectively. The dry weights were similarly improved. Overexpression of HARDY improved the instantaneous water use efficiency (WUE) under drought stress by reducing transpiration (E) and under salt stress by improving photosynthesis (A), through reducing Na+ accumulation in leaves, and reducing E. However, HARDY improved the growth of drought-stressed transgenic plants as compared to the wild type by delaying water depletion from soil and preventing rapid decline in A. L2 and L3 had thicker stems and in case of L3, more xylem rows per vascular bundle, which may have made L3 more resistant to lodging in the field. Field performance of L2 and L3 under combined drought and salt stress was significantly better than that of the wild type in terms of fresh and dry weights (40%, 46% and 31%, 40%, respectively). The results provide further evidence for the efficiency of overexpression of a single gene in improving tolerance to abiotic stress under field conditions.

  3. EcoTILLING in Beta vulgaris reveals polymorphisms in the FLC-like gene BvFL1 that are associated with annuality and winter hardiness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris L.) is an important crop for sugar and biomass production in temperate climate regions. Currently sugar beets are sown in spring and harvested in autumn. Autumn-sown sugar beets that are grown for a full year have been regarded as a cropping system to increase the productivity of sugar beet cultivation. However, for the development of these “winter beets” sufficient winter hardiness and a system for bolting control is needed. Both require a thorough understanding of the underlying genetics and its natural variation. Results We screened a diversity panel of 268 B. vulgaris accessions for three flowering time genes via EcoTILLING. This panel had been tested in the field for bolting behaviour and winter hardiness. EcoTILLING identified 20 silent SNPs and one non-synonymous SNP within the genes BTC1, BvFL1 and BvFT1, resulting in 55 haplotypes. Further, we detected associations of nucleotide polymorphisms in BvFL1 with bolting before winter as well as winter hardiness. Conclusions These data provide the first genetic indication for the function of the FLC homolog BvFL1 in beet. Further, it demonstrates for the first time that EcoTILLING is a powerful method for exploring genetic diversity and allele mining in B. vulgaris. PMID:23531083

  4. EcoTILLING in Beta vulgaris reveals polymorphisms in the FLC-like gene BvFL1 that are associated with annuality and winter hardiness.

    PubMed

    Frerichmann, Sebastian L M; Kirchhoff, Martin; Müller, Andreas E; Scheidig, Axel J; Jung, Christian; Kopisch-Obuch, Friedrich J

    2013-03-25

    Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris L.) is an important crop for sugar and biomass production in temperate climate regions. Currently sugar beets are sown in spring and harvested in autumn. Autumn-sown sugar beets that are grown for a full year have been regarded as a cropping system to increase the productivity of sugar beet cultivation. However, for the development of these "winter beets" sufficient winter hardiness and a system for bolting control is needed. Both require a thorough understanding of the underlying genetics and its natural variation. We screened a diversity panel of 268 B. vulgaris accessions for three flowering time genes via EcoTILLING. This panel had been tested in the field for bolting behaviour and winter hardiness. EcoTILLING identified 20 silent SNPs and one non-synonymous SNP within the genes BTC1, BvFL1 and BvFT1, resulting in 55 haplotypes. Further, we detected associations of nucleotide polymorphisms in BvFL1 with bolting before winter as well as winter hardiness. These data provide the first genetic indication for the function of the FLC homolog BvFL1 in beet. Further, it demonstrates for the first time that EcoTILLING is a powerful method for exploring genetic diversity and allele mining in B. vulgaris.

  5. Seismic isolation of two dimensional periodic foundations

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Y.; Mo, Y. L.; Laskar, A.; Cheng, Z.; Shi, Z.; Menq, F.; Tang, Y.

    2014-07-28

    Phononic crystal is now used to control acoustic waves. When the crystal goes to a larger scale, it is called periodic structure. The band gaps of the periodic structure can be reduced to range from 0.5 Hz to 50 Hz. Therefore, the periodic structure has potential applications in seismic wave reflection. In civil engineering, the periodic structure can be served as the foundation of upper structure. This type of foundation consisting of periodic structure is called periodic foundation. When the frequency of seismic waves falls into the band gaps of the periodic foundation, the seismic wave can be blocked. Field experiments of a scaled two dimensional (2D) periodic foundation with an upper structure were conducted to verify the band gap effects. Test results showed the 2D periodic foundation can effectively reduce the response of the upper structure for excitations with frequencies within the frequency band gaps. When the experimental and the finite element analysis results are compared, they agree well with each other, indicating that 2D periodic foundation is a feasible way of reducing seismic vibrations.

  6. Complete set of invariants of a 4th order tensor: the 12 tasks of HARDI from ternary quartics.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulo, Théo; Ghosh, Aurobrata; Deriche, Rachid

    2014-01-01

    Invariants play a crucial role in Diffusion MRI. In DTI (2nd order tensors), invariant scalars (FA, MD) have been successfully used in clinical applications. But DTI has limitations and HARDI models (e.g. 4th order tensors) have been proposed instead. These, however, lack invariant features and computing them systematically is challenging. We present a simple and systematic method to compute a functionally complete set of invariants of a non-negative 3D 4th order tensor with respect to SO3. Intuitively, this transforms the tensor's non-unique ternary quartic (TQ) decomposition (from Hilbert's theorem) to a unique canonical representation independent of orientation - the invariants. The method consists of two steps. In the first, we reduce the 18 degrees-of-freedom (DOF) of a TQ representation by 3-DOFs via an orthogonal transformation. This transformation is designed to enhance a rotation-invariant property of choice of the 3D 4th order tensor. In the second, we further reduce 3-DOFs via a 3D rotation transformation of coordinates to arrive at a canonical set of invariants to SO3 of the tensor. The resulting invariants are, by construction, (i) functionally complete, (ii) functionally irreducible (if desired), (iii) computationally efficient and (iv) reversible (mappable to the TQ coefficients or shape); which is the novelty of our contribution in comparison to prior work. Results from synthetic and real data experiments validate the method and indicate its importance.

  7. Photoperiodic and thermal regulation of development and cold hardiness in larvae of the clover leaf weevil, Hypera punctata.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M

    2000-06-01

    Effects of photoperiod and temperature on the development and cold hardiness were investigated in larvae of Hypera punctata. At a relatively low temperature (15 degrees C), the larvae fed less and developed more slowly under a 12L:12D (SD) photoperiod than under a 16L:8D photoperiod (LD). SD larvae had lower gut weight against the whole body weight and lower supercooling point (SCP) than the LD counterparts for the same instar and same body weight. This was because the larval SCP is markedly affected by the quantity of the gut content. Laboratory experiments indicated that the low temperature mortality of this larvae occurred mainly due to freezing irrespective of the photoperiod and temperature, suggesting that the lower lethal temperature (LLT) depends on the supercooling ability of larvae. The SD larvae tended to have a lower SCP and hence a lower LLT than the LD counterparts at 15 or 10 degrees C, unlike at 20 degrees C. Thus, the slower larval development under SD conditions at relatively low temperatures may prevent larvae from reaching the later instar, which have a higher SCP and thus less cold tolerance, during the coldest season. The suppressed feeding activity under SD conditions would lower the SCP, thereby reducing the possibility of lethal tissue freezing. Such a photoperiodic and thermal regulation of the larval development and the supercooling ability appear to represent adaptive mechanisms for winter survival in this beetle.

  8. Improvement of water use efficiency in rice by expression of HARDY, an Arabidopsis drought and salt tolerance gene

    PubMed Central

    Karaba, Aarati; Dixit, Shital; Greco, Raffaella; Aharoni, Asaph; Trijatmiko, Kurniawan R.; Marsch-Martinez, Nayelli; Krishnan, Arjun; Nataraja, Karaba N.; Udayakumar, Makarla; Pereira, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Freshwater is a limited and dwindling global resource; therefore, efficient water use is required for food crops that have high water demands, such as rice, or for the production of sustainable energy biomass. We show here that expression of the Arabidopsis HARDY (HRD) gene in rice improves water use efficiency, the ratio of biomass produced to the water used, by enhancing photosynthetic assimilation and reducing transpiration. These drought-tolerant, low-water-consuming rice plants exhibit increased shoot biomass under well irrigated conditions and an adaptive increase in root biomass under drought stress. The HRD gene, an AP2/ERF-like transcription factor, identified by a gain-of-function Arabidopsis mutant hrd-D having roots with enhanced strength, branching, and cortical cells, exhibits drought resistance and salt tolerance, accompanied by an enhancement in the expression of abiotic stress associated genes. HRD overexpression in Arabidopsis produces thicker leaves with more chloroplast-bearing mesophyll cells, and in rice, there is an increase in leaf biomass and bundle sheath cells that probably contributes to the enhanced photosynthesis assimilation and efficiency. The results exemplify application of a gene identified from the model plant Arabidopsis for the improvement of water use efficiency coincident with drought resistance in the crop plant rice. PMID:17881564

  9. Efficient Designs of Gene-Environment Interaction Studies: Implications of Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium and Gene-Environment Independence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinbo; Kang, Guolian; VanderWeele, Tyler; Zhang, Cuilin; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY It is important to investigate whether genetic susceptible variants exercise the same effects in populations that are differentially exposed to environmental risk factors. Here, we assess the power of four two-phase case-control design strategies for assessing multiplicative gene-environment (G-E) interactions or for assessing genetic or environmental effects in the presence of G-E interactions. With a di-allelic SNP and a binary E, we obtained closed-form maximum likelihood estimates of both main effect and interaction odds ratio parameters under the constraints of G-E independence and Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium, and used the Wald statistic for all tests. We concluded that i) for testing G-E interactions or genetic effects in the presence of G-E interactions when data for E is fully available, it is preferable to ascertain data for G in a subsample of cases with similar numbers of exposed and unexposed and a random subsample of controls; and ii) for testing G-E interactions or environmental effects in the presence of G-E interactions when data for G is fully available, it is preferable to ascertain data for E in a subsample of cases that has similar numbers for each genotype and a random subsample of controls. In addition, supplementing external control data to an existing casecontrol sample leads to improved power for assessing effects of G or E in the presence of G-E interactions. PMID:22362617

  10. Drilling, completion, stimulation, and testing of Hardy HW{number_sign}1 well, Putnam County, West Virginia. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses the detailed field operations in drilling, logging, casing, completing, stimulating and testing the Hardy HW No. l well located in Union District, Putnam County, West Virginia. The project was designed and managed by BDM in cooperation with Cabot Oil and Gas Corporation. The well was spudded on November 29, 1989 and was completed at a total measured depth of 6406 feet on December 29, 1989. The well was drilled on an average azimuth of 335 degrees with a total horizontal displacement of 2618 feet. Approximately 1035 feet of the well had an inclination higher than 86 degrees, while 2212 feet of the well had an inclination greater than 62 degrees. The well was partitioned into five zones for stimulation purposes. Four zones were stimulated during three stimulation operations (Zones 3 and 4 were stimulated together). Zone 1 stimulation was a successful foam frac while the stimulations on Zones 2, 3-4 were Partially successful. Initial gas production rates were 4.5 times greater than the natural production rate. After 21 months, gas produced from the BDM/Cabot well has declined at a rate about one-half that of a conventional vertical well in the area. This horizontal well is projected to produce 475 million cubic feet of gas over a 30-year period.

  11. Drilling, completion, stimulation, and testing of Hardy HW[number sign]1 well, Putnam County, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses the detailed field operations in drilling, logging, casing, completing, stimulating and testing the Hardy HW No. l well located in Union District, Putnam County, West Virginia. The project was designed and managed by BDM in cooperation with Cabot Oil and Gas Corporation. The well was spudded on November 29, 1989 and was completed at a total measured depth of 6406 feet on December 29, 1989. The well was drilled on an average azimuth of 335 degrees with a total horizontal displacement of 2618 feet. Approximately 1035 feet of the well had an inclination higher than 86 degrees, while 2212 feet of the well had an inclination greater than 62 degrees. The well was partitioned into five zones for stimulation purposes. Four zones were stimulated during three stimulation operations (Zones 3 and 4 were stimulated together). Zone 1 stimulation was a successful foam frac while the stimulations on Zones 2, 3-4 were Partially successful. Initial gas production rates were 4.5 times greater than the natural production rate. After 21 months, gas produced from the BDM/Cabot well has declined at a rate about one-half that of a conventional vertical well in the area. This horizontal well is projected to produce 475 million cubic feet of gas over a 30-year period.

  12. Bioactivity and nutritional properties of hardy kiwi fruit Actinidia arguta in comparison with Actinidia deliciosa 'Hayward' and Actinidia eriantha 'Bidan'.

    PubMed

    Leontowicz, Hanna; Leontowicz, Maria; Latocha, Piotr; Jesion, Iwona; Park, Yong-Seo; Katrich, Elena; Barasch, Dinorah; Nemirovski, Alina; Gorinstein, Shela

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this research is to identify and compare the bioactive compounds, antioxidant capacities and binding potentials to human protein in different varieties of hardy kiwi (Actinidia (A.) arguta), 'Hayward' (Actinidia deliciosa) and less - known 'Bidan' (Actinidia eriantha). Polyphenols, flavonoids, flavanols, tannins, vitamin C, lutein, zeaxanthin and dietary fibers were significantly higher in cultivar 'M1' among the A. arguta than in 'Hayward'. The binding properties of studied kiwi fruits were determined by interaction of polyphenols with human serum albumin (HSA). An internal standard FTIR technique allowed the quantitative comparison of specific IR absorption bands (Amides I, II, III) of different kiwi fruit samples after interaction with HSA. It was shown that the antioxidant and binding capacities and FTIR quantitative estimations of A. arguta fruits were significantly higher than in 'Hayward', but lower than the 'Bidan'. In MS spectra were found some slight differences in A. arguta kiwis in comparison with 'Hayward' and 'Bidan'. Two A. arguta cultivars were similar to 'Bidan'. The interaction of polyphenols with HSA, evaluated by fluorometry/FTIR, made it possible to compare the bioactivity of different cultivars and families. In conclusion, for the first time fruits A. arguta, cultivated in Poland, were compared with widely consumed kiwi fruits, using advanced analytical methods. The high bioactivity and nutritional value of A. arguta fruits from Polish ecological plantation enables us to recommend them for marketing and consumption.

  13. Effect of exposure of sturgeon roe to low-intensity laser radiation on the hardiness of juvenile sturgeon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavskiia, V. Yu.; Barulin, N. V.

    2008-03-01

    We present data on the effect of polarized laser radiation in the near IR region of the spectrum with wavelength 808 nm on the resistance of juvenile sturgeon to oxygen deficiency in the habitat when the fertilized roe are briefly exposed to radiation in the organogenesis stage. The magnitude of the stimulating effect depends on the exposure time (t) and power density (P) of the radiation and also on its modulation frequency (F). For optimal irradiation parameters (cw mode, P = 2.9 mW/cm2, t = 60 sec), the hardiness of the juveniles increases by a factor of ˜1.5 compared with the control group. The maximum differences in the sensitivity of embryos to cw and pulsed radiation are observed for F = 1 Hz; as the modulation frequency increases up to F = 50 Hz, the magnitude of the photobiological effect approaches a level typical for cw exposure. We show that the duration of the dark period (pause time) between pulses is the critical parameter determining the dependence of the stimulating effect on the modulation frequency. We discuss questions concerning use of the indicated physical factor in the technology for raising sturgeon under industrial fish farming conditions.

  14. Test Report: Cost Effective Foundation Insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey M. Lacy; T. E. Rahl; G. A. Twitchell; R. G. Kobbe

    2003-06-01

    A field experiment was conducted to demonstrate and quantify the thermal effectiveness of rigid insulation board when installed on the exterior of a buried concrete foundation wall. A heated, insulated box was constructed along one wall of an existing, unheated building to simulate the living space of a home. The crawl space beneath the living space was divided into two sections. One featured external foundation insulation, while the other side had none. 36 temperature and heat flux sensors were installed at predetermined locations to measure the temperature profile and heat flow out of the living space. The temperature profile through the foundation was then used to calculate the total heat flow out of the foundation for both cases. This experiment showed that a significant energy savings is available with exterior foundation insulation. Over the course of 3 months, the heat-loss differential between the insulated and non-insulated foundations was 4.95 kilowatt-hours per lineal foot of foundation wall, for a ratio of 3:1. For a 2200 sq. ft home with a foundation perimeter 200 ft. long, this would amount to a savings of 990 kW-hrs in just 3 months, or 330 kW-hrs per month. Extrapolating to an 8-month heating year, we would expect to save over 2640 kW-hrs per year for such a home. The savings for a basement foundation, rather than a crawlspace, would be approach twice that amount, nearing 5280 kW-hr per year. Because these data were not collected during the coldest months of the year, they are conservative, and greater savings may be expected during colder periods.

  15. Research on simulation of soft foundation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Zhao, Yan

    2017-06-01

    Engineering field is in a closed area, big surcharge ratio of precipitation preloading method is the first time be proposed to apply to soft foundation treatment, and successfully applied in the artificial island foundation treatment, its advantages of efficient and fast were fully played in practice. This paper discusses process of the overload preloading method to apply to soft foundation treatment, include all key technologies of designing, monitoring and evaluated the reinforcement effect. this project can provide reference for future similar engineering construction or modification of the value of limited of specification.

  16. Foundations for a theory of gravitation theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, K. S.; Lee, D. L.; Lightman, A. P.

    1972-01-01

    A foundation is laid for future analyses of gravitation theories. This foundation is applicable to any theory formulated in terms of geometric objects defined on a 4-dimensional spacetime manifold. The foundation consists of (1) a glossary of fundamental concepts; (2) a theorem that delineates the overlap between Lagrangian-based theories and metric theories; (3) a conjecture (due to Schiff) that the Weak Equivalence Principle implies the Einstein Equivalence Principle; and (4) a plausibility argument supporting this conjecture for the special case of relativistic, Lagrangian-based theories.

  17. Relativistic Navigation: A Theoretical Foundation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turyshev, Slava G.

    1996-01-01

    We present a theoretical foundation for relativistic astronomical measurements in curved space-time. In particular, we discuss a new iterative approach for describing the dynamics of an isolated astronomical N-body system in metric theories of gravity. To do this, we generalize the Fock-Chandrasekhar method of the weak-field and slow-motion approximation (WFSMA) and develop a theory of relativistic reference frames (RF's) for a gravitationally bounded many-extended-body problem. In any proper RF constructed in the immediate vicinity of an arbitrary body, the N-body solutions of the gravitational field equations are formally presented as a sum of the Riemann-flat inertial space-time, the gravitational field generated by the body itself, the unperturbed solutions for each body in the system transformed to the coordinates of this proper RF, and the gravitational interaction term. We develop the basic concept of a general WFSMA theory of the celestial RF's applicable to a wide class of metric theories of gravity and an arbitrary model of matter distribution. We apply the proposed method to general relativity. Celestial bodies are described using a perfect fluid model; as such, they possess any number of internal mass and current multipole moments that explicitly characterize their internal structures. The obtained relativistic corrections to the geodetic equations of motion arise because of a coupling of the bodies' multiple moments to the surrounding gravitational field. The resulting relativistic transformations between the different RF's extend the Poincare group to the motion of deformable self-gravitating bodies. Within the present accuracy of astronomical measurements we discuss the properties of the Fermi-normal-like proper RF that is defined in the immediate vicinity of the extended compact bodies. We further generalize the proposed approximation method and include two Eddington parameters (gamma, Beta). This generalized approach was used to derive the

  18. [Ethical foundations of institutional psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Cano, N

    2006-01-01

    The idea behind this work is to have an ethical examination of the institutional psychotherapy movement which has long influenced French public psychiatry and which has progressively, since the 80s, been subject to growing doubts. In the first part, institutional psychotherapy is presented. It is a model for theoretical development and practice in psychiatric care. It came into being just following the end of the Second World War at the same time as modern medical ethics. Its principles come on the one hand, from recognition of asylums' pathogenic effects--which led to the crushing of the patient's being--and on the other, through recognition of the uniqueness of each person and the subjectivity of mental suffering. These elements gave rise to creativity within the world of medicine and, in the sector, generated the science of psychiatry which advocated for continuity in care (both inpatient and outpatient) and preventive work directed at the population. This movement called for the use of the institution in its dynamic aspect which promotes exchanges and allows patients to situate or resituate themselves in historic and symbolic dimensions. It privileges a high level of transversality, maximum communication, favouring speaking out loud and responsibility. It requires a permanent analysis of the institutional counter transference (emotional reactions of the caregivers involved, their interrelations and the social and material organization of the institution) which determines the therapeutic action itself. THEORICAL BASIS: In a second part, its theoretical foundations and its practice shall be investigated in light of the guiding concepts of medical ethics (justice, autonomy, beneficence, non-malfeasance). Institutional psychotherapy responds to the need for justice by considering the patient as a whole and by conceiving each patient as being like oneself despite the differences (associated with the mode of hospitalization, the social or diagnostic category). The

  19. NCI collaborates with Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) announced a collaboration with the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF) to incorporate MMRF's wealth of genomic and clinical data on the disease into the NCI Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a publicly available datab

  20. Sartre: A Possible Foundation for Educational Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstow, Bonnie

    1983-01-01

    The claim by Khemais Benhamida and others that Jean-Paul Sartre's philosophy is too hostile and restrictive to serve as the foundation of progressive educational theory is based on an incomplete understanding of the philosopher's work. (IS)

  1. Sudden Arrhythmia Death Syndromes (SADS) Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Seminar 04/29/17 Update on Inherited Arrhythmias: Recent Advancements in Therapies and Diagnosis--From 8: ... Legal Notice Privacy Policy COPYRIGHT ©2011-2016 Sudden Arrhythmia Death Syndromes Foundation 4527 South 2300 East, Suite ...

  2. Foundations for Effective School Library Media Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Ken, Ed.

    This collection of 38 articles, reprinted from "Emergency Librarian," addresses critical elements of school library media program development and implementation, organized by seven areas: foundations; the school context; role clarification; information literacy; collaborative program planning and teaching; program development; and…

  3. Foundations of Education: Toward A Generative Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernier, Normand R.; McClelland, Averile E.

    1982-01-01

    Three historical and developmental dimensions of teacher education foundations of education are discussed: (1) academic dimension; (2) professional dimension; and (3) client dimension. A fourth dimension, research, is also described. (CJ)

  4. Foundation for Ichthyosis & Related Skin Types

    MedlinePlus

    ... Who is FIRST? Discover all the benefits of connecting with the Foundation for Ichthyosis and Related Skin Types (FIRST). Listen to what affected families, individual patients, and the medical community have to ...

  5. Values-based medicine and modest foundationalism.

    PubMed

    Little, Miles; Lipworth, Wendy; Gordon, Jill; Markham, Pippa; Kerridge, Ian

    2012-10-01

    Philosophically, values refer to the basic commitments that justify judgements, beliefs and practices, both at the community and personal levels. The study of these kinds of values is axiology. We suggest that all people subscribe to three foundational values - survival, security and flourishing - and that these foundational values are expressed by way of concepts, systems, principles and practices that may differ substantially from culture to culture. Values can stand on their own as foundational justifications for health care and medicine. Many ethical quandaries can be better understood, even though they may remain unsolved, by reference to the foundational values that people can agree upon. This version of values-based health care has strong claims to prior logical status as a justification for the whole enterprise of health care, and values-based medicine is a part of this larger domain. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Funding announcements from federal government, Gates Foundation.

    PubMed

    Garmaise, David

    2007-05-01

    In two separate announcements, in December 2006 and February 2007, the federal government allocated new funding for HIV/AIDS. The latter announcement was accompanied by a pledge from the Gates Foundation.

  7. Sartre: A Possible Foundation for Educational Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstow, Bonnie

    1983-01-01

    The claim by Khemais Benhamida and others that Jean-Paul Sartre's philosophy is too hostile and restrictive to serve as the foundation of progressive educational theory is based on an incomplete understanding of the philosopher's work. (IS)

  8. Foundation of a Communicator Style Construct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Robert W.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the foundation of a communicator style construct which is stipulated to include communication variables which reflect the "way one verbally and paraverbally interacts to signal how literal meaning should be taken, interpreted, filtered, or understood." (MH)

  9. Foundations for Effective School Library Media Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Ken, Ed.

    This collection of 38 articles, reprinted from "Emergency Librarian," addresses critical elements of school library media program development and implementation, organized by seven areas: foundations; the school context; role clarification; information literacy; collaborative program planning and teaching; program development; and…

  10. Veatch's new foundation for medical ethics.

    PubMed

    Kultgen, J

    1985-11-01

    Robert M. Veatch proposes a "triple contract theory" as a new foundation for medical ethics. His criticisms of unilateral "physician ethics" are sound, but uncertainty as to whether he is proposing merely imaginary or real contracts vitiates his constructive arguments. If the former, he is recommending a minor heuristic device for thinking about ethics, not a foundation. If the latter, his proposal is utterly impractical and a medical covenant will have to be developed another way.

  11. Birth of the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation.

    PubMed

    Beck, Ivan T

    2004-01-01

    The Canadian Digestive Disease Foundation, renamed the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation--Fondation canadienne pour la promotion de la santé digestive--in December 2001, is the culmination of ongoing efforts by the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology to establish an independent charitable organization. In February 2001, it was officially endorsed as the Foundation for the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology. The initial efforts to establish this Foundation, led by Dr Richard McKenna in 1963, were unsuccessful. In 1991, Glaxo Canada (now GlaxoSmithKline) became a founding donor, and with the four founding physicians--Drs Ivan T Beck, Richard H Hunt, Suzanne E Lemire and Alan BR Thomson--the expenses to establish the Foundation were met. A charitable number was obtained in 1995 (0997427-11). The second founding donor was Janssen Canada (now Janssen-Ortho), and public education support came from Astra Canada (now AstraZeneca Canada). The Foundation initially relied on corporate donors, but now approaches physicians, patients and the general public. The objectives of the Foundation are to advance the science of gastroenterology and to provide knowledge of digestive diseases and nutrition to the general public, to enhance the quality of life of persons who are afflicted with these disorders. The major achievements of the Foundation are the provision of one-year operating grants to new investigators, which have allowed them to accumulate early data and subsequently obtain support from other major granting organizations. It also provides Fellowships and studentship support grants, in conjunction with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the pharmaceutical industry. The education committee found that there was little research support in this field, considering the large economic burden of digestive disease and the amount of outstanding work done by Canadian researchers. A bilingual Web site, a web-based specialist's discussion program and bilingual

  12. The moral foundations of illusory correlation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ferreiro, Javier; Barberia, Itxaso

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has studied the relationship between political ideology and cognitive biases, such as the tendency of conservatives to form stronger illusory correlations between negative infrequent behaviors and minority groups. We further explored these findings by studying the relation between illusory correlation and moral values. According to the moral foundations theory, liberals and conservatives differ in the relevance they concede to different moral dimensions: Care, Fairness, Loyalty, Authority, and Purity. Whereas liberals consistently endorse the Care and Fairness foundations more than the Loyalty, Authority and Purity foundations, conservatives tend to adhere to the five foundations alike. In the present study, a group of participants took part in a standard illusory correlation task in which they were presented with randomly ordered descriptions of either desirable or undesirable behaviors attributed to individuals belonging to numerically different majority and minority groups. Although the proportion of desirable and undesirable behaviors was the same in the two groups, participants attributed a higher frequency of undesirable behaviors to the minority group, thus showing the expected illusory correlation effect. Moreover, this effect was specifically associated to our participants' scores in the Loyalty subscale of the Moral Foundations Questionnaire. These results emphasize the role of the Loyalty moral foundation in the formation of attitudes towards minorities among conservatives. Our study points out the moral system as a useful fine-grained framework to explore the complex interaction between basic cognitive processes and ideology.

  13. The foundation of self-esteem.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Joseph A.

    2003-01-01

    Self-esteem is a simplistic term for varied and complex mental states pertaining to how one views oneself. It takes but little research in the voluminous literature to see the vagueness and inconsistencies in its various definitions. Even more problematic is the uncertainty concerning its foundational components. The importance of having a solid definition and specific ideas about the foundational components of self-esteem is that both pave the way to recognizing its causes; to predicting effects from those causes; and to organizing the trouble-shooting process for locating those philosophical flaws or psychological scars which lead to low self-esteem. The purpose of this paper is to offer a common ground for thinking about self-esteem at its most basic level. In order to distinguish the "basic level" from the rest of the components of self-esteem, let us liken it to a skyscraper building. Here, the focus is on the building's "underground foundation" and the base upon which that foundation rests. The base is a definition that allows for the assessment of the foundation. The underground foundation itself consists of the mental building blocks called self-meaning, self-identity, self-image, and self-concepts. To help illustrate their interactions, a few of the "masks" and "faces" of self-esteem will be mentioned. What is not being addressed is the "above ground structure"--those theories and manifestations dealt with by most mental health specialists. PMID:12793795

  14. Health legacy foundations: a new census.

    PubMed

    Niggel, Sabrina Jones; Brandon, William P

    2014-01-01

    Health care merger and acquisition activity has increased since enactment of the Affordable Care Act in 2010. Proceeds from transactions involving nonprofit hospitals, health systems, and health plans will endow philanthropic foundations, collectively known as health legacy foundations. Building on work by Grantmakers In Health, we undertook a systematic search for these foundations and generated a newly updated, comprehensive database. We found 306 organizations in forty-three states that have been endowed with proceeds from the sale, merger, lease, joint venture, or other restructuring of nonprofit health care assets. These health legacy foundations had $26.2 billion in assets in 2010. Concentrated in the southern United States, foundations originating from hospitals and specialty care facilities (86.6 percent) held mean assets of $64.7 million per funder and typically restricted grants to local communities. Foundations formed from health plans (13.4 percent) held higher mean assets ($222 million), usually served larger areas, and were more likely to engage in health care advocacy. Recent transactions involving smaller and stand-alone nonprofit hospitals will infuse many more communities with unprecedented charitable wealth.

  15. The foundation of self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Joseph A

    2003-05-01

    Self-esteem is a simplistic term for varied and complex mental states pertaining to how one views oneself. It takes but little research in the voluminous literature to see the vagueness and inconsistencies in its various definitions. Even more problematic is the uncertainty concerning its foundational components. The importance of having a solid definition and specific ideas about the foundational components of self-esteem is that both pave the way to recognizing its causes; to predicting effects from those causes; and to organizing the trouble-shooting process for locating those philosophical flaws or psychological scars which lead to low self-esteem. The purpose of this paper is to offer a common ground for thinking about self-esteem at its most basic level. In order to distinguish the "basic level" from the rest of the components of self-esteem, let us liken it to a skyscraper building. Here, the focus is on the building's "underground foundation" and the base upon which that foundation rests. The base is a definition that allows for the assessment of the foundation. The underground foundation itself consists of the mental building blocks called self-meaning, self-identity, self-image, and self-concepts. To help illustrate their interactions, a few of the "masks" and "faces" of self-esteem will be mentioned. What is not being addressed is the "above ground structure"--those theories and manifestations dealt with by most mental health specialists.

  16. 75 FR 45600 - African Development Foundation, Board of Directors Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ...; ] AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION African Development Foundation, Board of Directors Meeting Time: Tuesday, August 17, 2010, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Place: African Development Foundation, Conference Room, 1400...

  17. 75 FR 14418 - African Development Foundation, Board of Directors Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ...; ] AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION African Development Foundation, Board of Directors Meeting Time: Tuesday, April 13, 2010, 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Place: African Development Foundation, Conference Room, 1400 I...

  18. 75 FR 2844 - African Development Foundation, Board of Directors Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ...; ] AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION African Development Foundation, Board of Directors Meeting Time: Tuesday, January 26, 2010, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Place: African Development Foundation, Conference Room, 1400 I...

  19. Identifying preoperative language tracts and predicting postoperative functional recovery using HARDI q-ball fiber tractography in patients with gliomas.

    PubMed

    Caverzasi, Eduardo; Hervey-Jumper, Shawn L; Jordan, Kesshi M; Lobach, Iryna V; Li, Jing; Panara, Valentina; Racine, Caroline A; Sankaranarayanan, Vanitha; Amirbekian, Bagrat; Papinutto, Nico; Berger, Mitchel S; Henry, Roland G

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT Diffusion MRI has uniquely enabled in vivo delineation of white matter tracts, which has been applied to the segmentation of eloquent pathways for intraoperative mapping. The last decade has also seen the development from earlier diffusion tensor models to higher-order models, which take advantage of high angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging (HARDI) techniques. However, these advanced methods have not been widely implemented for routine preoperative and intraoperative mapping. The authors report on the application of residual bootstrap q-ball fiber tracking for routine mapping of potentially functional language pathways, the development of a system for rating tract injury to evaluate the impact on clinically assessed language function, and initial results predicting long-term language deficits following glioma resection. METHODS The authors have developed methods for the segmentation of 8 putative language pathways including dorsal phonological pathways and ventral semantic streams using residual bootstrap q-ball fiber tracking. Furthermore, they have implemented clinically feasible preoperative acquisition and processing of HARDI data to delineate these pathways for neurosurgical application. They have also developed a rating scale based on the altered fiber tract density to estimate the degree of pathway injury, applying these ratings to a subset of 35 patients with pre- and postoperative fiber tracking. The relationships between specific pathways and clinical language deficits were assessed to determine which pathways are predictive of long-term language deficits following surgery. RESULTS This tracking methodology has been routinely implemented for preoperative mapping in patients with brain gliomas who have undergone awake brain tumor resection at the University of California, San Francisco (more than 300 patients to date). In this particular study the authors investigated the white matter structure status and language correlation in a

  20. A cold-responsive wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) gene wcor14 identified in a winter-hardy cultivar 'Mironovska 808'.

    PubMed

    Tsvetanov, S; Ohno, R; Tsuda, K; Takumi, S; Mori, N; Atanassov, A; Nakamura, C

    2000-02-01

    A cDNA library was constructed from a cold-acclimated winter-hardy common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivar 'Mironovska 808'. Using this library and a cold- and light-responsive barley cDNA clone cor14b as a probe, cDNAs of a homologous wheat gene wcor14 were isolated. Two identical cDNAs designated as wcor14a had an open reading frame encoding an acidic (pI = 4.71) and hydrophobic polypeptide with 140 amino acids (MW = 13.5 kDa). The deduced WCOR14a polypeptide showed 70% identity with the barley chloroplast-imported COR14b and had a nearly identical N-terminal, putative chloroplast transit peptide of 51 amino acid residues. Another cDNA clone wcor14b was assumed to encode a polypeptide WCORb which had 5 substitutions and a frame shift in the C-terminal region as compared with WCOR14a. RACE PCR, genomic PCR and Southern blot analyses suggested that wcor14 and its related sequences constitute a small multigene family with and without an intron in the hexaploid wheat genome. Northern blot analysis showed that transcripts of wcor14 accumulated within 3-6 hours of cold acclimation at 4 degrees C and the level reached a maximum at day 3. The transcripts became non-detectable within 3 hours after de-acclimation at room temperature. Contrary to the barley cor14b, a similar level of wcor14 transcripts was detected under the continuous darkness. Neither treatment with NaCl, ABA nor dehydration induced its expression. Based on these results we conclude that wcor14 is a wheat orthologue of the barley cor14b and specifically induced by low temperature.