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Sample records for alk anaplastic lymphoma

  1. ALK Signaling and Target Therapy in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tabbó, Fabrizio; Barreca, Antonella; Piva, Roberto; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    The discovery by Morris et al. (1994) of the genes contributing to the t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocation has laid the foundation for a molecular based recognition of anaplastic large cell lymphoma and highlighted the need for a further stratification of T-cell neoplasia. Likewise the detection of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) genetic lesions among many human cancers has defined unique subsets of cancer patients, providing new opportunities for innovative therapeutic interventions. The objective of this review is to appraise the molecular mechanisms driving ALK-mediated transformation, and to maintain the neoplastic phenotype. The understanding of these events will allow the design and implementation of novel tailored strategies for a well-defined subset of cancer patients. PMID:22649787

  2. A novel immunohistochemical classifier to distinguish Hodgkin lymphoma from ALK anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Döring, Claudia; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Agostinelli, Claudio; Piccaluga, Pier P; Facchetti, Fabio; Pileri, Stefano; Küppers, Ralf; Newrzela, Sebastian; Hartmann, Sylvia

    2014-10-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma and ALK(-) anaplastic large cell lymphoma share many features like strong CD30 expression and usually loss of B- and T-cell markers. However, their clinical course is dramatically different with curability rates of >90% for classical Hodgkin lymphoma and an unfavorable prognosis for anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Classical Hodgkin lymphoma and ALK(-) anaplastic large cell lymphoma can usually be distinguished by PAX5 expression in the Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma and expression of cytotoxic molecules in tumor cells of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. However, in some cases the differential diagnosis is difficult owing to absence of established markers. To be able to better classify these cases, we reevaluated gene expression data of microdissected tumor cells of both lymphomas for differentially expressed genes. A classifier was established, comprising four genes strongly expressed in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (MDC/CCL22, CD83, STAT3, and TUBB2B). Applying this classifier to a test cohort, Hodgkin lymphoma was successfully distinguished from ALK(-) anaplastic large cell lymphoma with an accuracy of 97% (43/44). MDC/CCL22, CD83, and STAT3 have also been found to be expressed in antigen-presenting cells. Therefore, based on our established classifier, Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells differ from tumor cells of anaplastic large cell lymphoma, which can successfully be applied for practical purposes in histopathologic diagnostics.

  3. Atypical Carcinoid Tumor with Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Rearrangement Successfully Treated by an ALK Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Masayuki; Uchiyama, Naoki; Shigemasa, Rie; Matsumura, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Ryota; Nomura, Akihiro

    This is the first report in which crizotinib, an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, reduced an atypical carcinoid tumor with ALK rearrangement. A 70-year-old man developed a tumor in the left lung and multiple metastases to the lung and brain. The pathology of transbronchial biopsied specimens demonstrated an atypical carcinoid pattern. Combined with immunohistochemical findings, we diagnosed the tumor as atypical carcinoid. ALK gene rearrangement was observed by both immunohistochemical (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization. He was treated with chemotherapy as first-line therapy, however, the tumor did not respond to chemotherapy. Thereafter, he was treated with crizotinib, which successfully reduced the tumors.

  4. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors in the treatment of ALK-driven lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Roskoski, Robert

    2017-03-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase is expressed in two-thirds of the anaplastic large-cell lymphomas as an NPM-ALK fusion protein. Physiological ALK is a receptor protein-tyrosine kinase within the insulin receptor superfamily of proteins that participates in nervous system development. The EML4-ALK fusion protein and four other ALK-fusion proteins play a fundamental role in the development in about 5% of non-small cell lung cancers. The amino-terminal portions of the ALK fusion proteins result in dimerization and subsequent activation of the ALK protein kinase domain that plays a key role in the pathogenesis of various tumors. Downstream signaling from the ALK fusion protein leads to the activation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK1/2 cell proliferation module and the JAK/STAT cell survival pathways. Moreover, nearly two dozen ALK activating mutations are involved in the pathogenesis of childhood neuroblastomas. The occurrence of oncogenic ALK-fusion proteins, particularly in non-small cell lung cancer, has fostered considerable interest in the development of ALK inhibitors. Crizotinib was the first such inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer in 2011. The median time for the emergence of crizotinib drug resistance is 10.5 months after the initiation of therapy. Such resistance prompted the development of second-generation drugs including ceritinib and alectinib, which are approved for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Unlike the single gatekeeper mutation that occurs in drug-resistant epidermal growth factor receptor in lung cancer, nearly a dozen different mutations in the catalytic domain of ALK fusion proteins have been discovered that result in crizotinib resistance. Crizotinib, ceritinib, and alectinib form a complex within the front cleft between the small and large lobes of an inactive ALK protein-kinase domain with a compact activation segment. These drugs are classified as type I½ B

  5. Analysis of nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK)-reactive CD8(+) T cell responses in children with NPM-ALK(+) anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    K Singh, V; Werner, S; Hackstein, H; Lennerz, V; Reiter, A; Wölfel, T; Damm-Welk, C; Woessmann, W

    2016-10-01

    Cellular immune responses against the oncoantigen anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) in patients with ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) have been detected using peptide-based approaches in individuals preselected for human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-A*02:01. In this study, we aimed to evaluate nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in ALCL patients ensuring endogenous peptide processing of ALK antigens and avoiding HLA preselection. We also examined the HLA class I restriction of ALK-specific CD8(+) T cells. Autologous dendritic cells (DCs) transfected with in-vitro-transcribed RNA (IVT-RNA) encoding NPM-ALK were used as antigen-presenting cells for T cell stimulation. Responder T lymphocytes were tested in interferon-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays with NPM-ALK-transfected autologous DCs as well as CV-1 in Origin with SV40 genes (COS-7) cells co-transfected with genes encoding the patients' HLA class I alleles and with NPM-ALK encoding cDNA to verify responses and define the HLA restrictions of specific T cell responses. NPM-ALK-specific CD8(+) T cell responses were detected in three of five ALK-positive ALCL patients tested between 1 and 13 years after diagnosis. The three patients had also maintained anti-ALK antibody responses. No reactivity was detected in samples from five healthy donors. The NPM-ALK-specific CD8(+) T cell responses were restricted by HLA-C-alleles (C*06:02 and C*12:02) in all three cases. This approach allowed for the detection of NPM-ALK-reactive T cells, irrespective of the individual HLA status, up to 9 years after ALCL diagnosis.

  6. ALK Positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Presenting as Extensive Bone Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Gajendra, Smeeta; Lipi, Lipika; Goel, Shalini; Misra, Ruchira

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) represents approximately 2% of all Non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas that commonly involves nodal as well as a wide variety of extra nodal sites, as skin, soft tissue, bones and lungs, although primary or secondary involvement of bone is rare. Herein, we report a case of 14-year-old female child presented as extensive bony involvement with a clinical diagnosis of bone tumour/ small round cell tumour, which was proved to be ALK positive ALCL on histopathological examination. PMID:25738071

  7. Therapeutic strategies and mechanisms of drug resistance in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK)-rearranged lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Ryohei

    2017-02-06

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene encoding the receptor tyrosine kinase ALK is expressed as a fusion gene in a variety of carcinomas. The expression of ALK is nearly undetectable in adults, and its activation is normally regulated by its ligands, FAM150A/B. However, ALK gene rearrangements result in different ALK fusion proteins that are constitutively expressed via the active promoter of fusion partner genes. ALK fusion proteins dimerize in a ligand-independent manner and lead to the dysregulation of cell proliferation via abnormal constitutive activation of ALK tyrosine kinase. Many ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been developed to date, are three of which are currently in clinical use for the treatment of ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ALK TKIs often achieve marked tumor regression in NSCLC patients with ALK rearrangements; however, ALK TKI-resistant tumors inevitably emerge within a few years in most cases. In this review, we summarize diverse ALK TKI resistance mechanisms identified in NSCLC with ALK rearrangements, and review potential therapeutic strategies to overcome ALK TKI resistance in these patients.

  8. A novel Patient Derived Tumorgraft model with TRAF1-ALK Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma translocation

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Francesco; Todaro, Maria; van der Krogt, Jo-Anne; Boi, Michela; Landra, Indira; Machiorlatti, Rodolfo; Tabbo’, Fabrizio; Messana, Katia; Barreca, Antonella; Novero, Domenico; Gaudiano, Marcello; Aliberti, Sabrina; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Tousseyn, Thomas; Lasorsa, Elena; Crescenzo, Ramona; Bessone, Luca; Ficarra, Elisa; Acquaviva, Andrea; Rinaldi, Andrea; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Longo, Dario Livio; Aime, Silvio; Cheng, Mangeng; Ruggeri, Bruce; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Pileri, Stefano; Tiacci, Enrico; Falini, Brunangelo; Pera-Gresely, Benet; Cerchietti, Leandro; Iqbal, Javeed; Chan, Wing C; Shultz, Leonard D.; Kwee, Ivo; Piva, Roberto; Wlodarska, Iwona; Rabadan, Raul; Bertoni, Francesco; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Although Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphomas (ALCL) carrying Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) have a relatively good prognosis, aggressive forms exist. We have identified a novel translocation, causing the fusion of the TRAF1 and ALK genes, in one patient who presented with a leukemic ALK+ ALCL (ALCL-11). To uncover the mechanisms leading to high-grade ALCL, we developed a human Patient Derived Tumorgraft (hPDT) line. Molecular characterization of primary and PDT cells demonstrated the activation of ALK and of NFkB pathways. Genomic studies of ALCL-11 showed the TP53 loss and the in vivo subclonal expansion of lymphoma cells lacking PRDM1/Blimp-1 and with c-MYC gene amplification. The treatment with proteasome inhibitors of TRAF1-ALK cells led to down-regulation of p50/p52 and lymphoma growth inhibition. Moreover a NFkB gene set classifier stratified ALCL in distinct subsets with different clinical outcome. Moreover, a selective ALK inhibitor (CEP28122) resulted in a significant clinical response of hPDT mice, but the disease could not be eradicated. These data indicate that the activation of NFkB signaling contributes to the neoplastic phenotype of TRAF1-ALK ALCL. ALCL hPDTs are invaluable to validate the role of druggable molecules, predict therapeutic responses and are helpful tools for the implementation of patient specific therapies. PMID:25533804

  9. Detection of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement in non-small cell lung cancer and related issues in ALK inhibitor therapy: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Yi, Eunhee S; Chung, Jin-Haeng; Kulig, Kimary; Kerr, Keith M

    2012-06-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, and ALK gene rearrangement (ALK+) is implicated in the oncogenesis of non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs), especially adenocarcinomas. The ALK inhibitor crizotinib was approved in August 2011 by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating late-stage NSCLCs that are ALK+, with a companion fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) test using the Vysis ALK Break Apart FISH Probe Kit. This review covers pertinent issues in ALK testing, including approaches to select target patients for the test, pros and cons of different detection methods, and mechanisms as well as monitoring of acquired crizotinib resistance in ALK+ NSCLCs.

  10. Variant translocation partners of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene in two cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma, identified by inverse cDNA polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Takeoka, Kayo; Okumura, Atsuko; Honjo, Gen; Ohno, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    In anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene is rearranged with diverse partners due to variant translocations/inversions. Case 1 was a 39-year-old man who developed multiple tumors in the mediastinum, psoas muscle, lung, and lymph nodes. A biopsy specimen of the inguinal node was effaced by large tumor cells expressing CD30, epithelial membrane antigen, and cytoplasmic ALK, which led to a diagnosis of ALK(+) ALCL. Case 2 was a 51-year-old man who was initially diagnosed with undifferentiated carcinoma. He developed multiple skin tumors eight years after his initial presentation, and was finally diagnosed with ALK(+) ALCL. He died of therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia. G-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization using an ALK break-apart probe revealed the rearrangement of ALK and suggested variant translocation in both cases. We applied an inverse cDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) strategy to identify the partner of ALK. Nucleotide sequencing of the PCR products and a database search revealed that the sequences of ATIC in case 1 and TRAF1 in case 2 appeared to follow those of ALK. We subsequently confirmed ATIC-ALK and TRAF1-ALK fusions by reverse transcriptase PCR and nucleotide sequencing. We successfully determined the partner gene of ALK in two cases of ALK(+) ALCL. ATIC is the second most common partner of variant ALK rearrangements, while the TRAF1-ALK fusion gene was first reported in 2013, and this is the second reported case of ALK(+) ALCL carrying TRAF1-ALK.

  11. ALK positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma of the Thoracic Spine

    PubMed Central

    Abrego, Gabriela; García, Julio; Gilbert, Bruce; Forseen, Scott; Toscano, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Primary bone lymphoma (PBL) is an uncommon extra nodal disease that represents about 1–3% of lymphoma cases. Imaging findings are variable and non-specific. Computed tomography may demonstrate lytic lesions with sequestra and periosteal reaction. On magnetic resonance imaging, lesions are T1WI hypointense and T2WI hyperintense, related to peritumoral edema or bone marrow replacement. Rarely lesions may have associated fibrosis and show a more hypointense signal pattern on T2WI. After administration of contrast, PBL tends to enhance avidly. We present a case of a 24 years old African American female patient with history of back pain. Initial imaging examinations showed lesions involving the T12 and T11 vertebral bodies with initial negative biopsy results. One month later, the patient returned with worsening back pain, and the follow up studies depicted collapse of the T12 vertebral body. A diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma in T12 was made. A brief review of the literature, imaging and pathological findings, and treatment options are also discussed. PMID:27761194

  12. Alectinib: a novel second generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor for overcoming clinically-acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zilan; Wang, Meining; Zhang, Ao

    2015-01-01

    The development of inhibitors for the tyrosine anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has advanced rapidly, driven by biology and medicinal chemistry. The first generation ALK inhibitor crizotinib was granted US FDA approval with only four years of preclinical and clinical testing. Although this drug offers significant clinical benefit to the ALK-positive patients, resistance has been developed through a variety of mechanisms. In addition to ceritinib, alectinib is another second-generation ALK inhibitor launched in 2014 in Japan. This drug has a unique chemical structure bearing a 5H-benzo[b]carbazol-11(6H)-one structural scaffold with an IC50 value of 1.9 nmol/L, and is highly potent against ALK bearing the gatekeeper mutation L1196M with an IC50 of 1.56 nmol/L. In the clinic, alectinib is highly efficacious in treatment of ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and retains potency to combat crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations L1196M, F1174L, R1275Q and C1156Y. PMID:26579422

  13. Silicone implant and primary breast ALK1-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma, fact or fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiyong; Lee, Andrew K

    2010-01-01

    The safety of silicone-based implant for mammoplasty has been debated for decades. A series of anecdotal case reports and a recent epidemiological case-control study have suggested a possible association between silicone implant and the development of primary breast ALK1-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), a rare type of peripheral T-cell lymphoma. In this report, we describe an additional case of primary breast ALK1-negative ALCL in the fibrous capsule and cystic fluid of silicone breast implant in a 58 year old woman who underwent breast reconstructive surgery after lumpectomy for her infiltrating breast adenocarcinoma. Morphologically and immunohistochemically, the lymphoma cells may be confused with recurrent infiltrating breast adenocarcinoma or other non-hematolymphoid malignancies. Molecular studies were needed to determine T-lineage differentiation of the malignant lymphoma cells. We will also review the case reports and case series published in the English literature and discuss our current understanding of silicone implant in primary breast ALK1-negative ALCL. PMID:19918336

  14. Three Years Sustained Complete Remission Achieved in a Primary Refractory ALK-Positive Anaplastic T Large Cell Lymphoma Treated with Crizotinib

    PubMed Central

    Mahuad, Carolina Valeria; Repáraz, María de los Ángeles Vicente; Zerga, Marta E.; Aizpurua, María Florencia; Casali, Claudia; Garate, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of the primary refractory anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK+) anaplastic T large cell lymphoma is ominous. The identification of molecular targets with potential to drive oncogenesis remains a cornerstone for the designing of new selective cancer therapies. Crizotinib is a selective ATP-competitive inhibitor for ALK, approved for its use in lung cancer with rearrangements on ALK gene. The reported cases describe the use of crizotinib as a bridging strategy prior to allotransplantation; there are no reported prolonged survivals under monotherapy with Crizotinib. We report a case of a primary refractory ALK+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma that sustains complete response after 3 years of crizotinib monotherapy. PMID:27441079

  15. ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma limited to the skin: clinical, histopathological and molecular analysis of 6 pediatric cases. A report from the ALCL99 study.

    PubMed

    Oschlies, Ilske; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Lamant, Laurence; Nakazawa, Atsuko; d'Amore, Emanuele S G; Hansson, Ulrika; Hebeda, Konnie; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Maldyk, Jadwiga; Müllauer, Leonhard; Tinguely, Marianne; Stücker, Markus; Ledeley, Marie-Cecile; Siebert, Reiner; Reiter, Alfred; Brugières, Laurence; Klapper, Wolfram; Woessmann, Wilhelm

    2013-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphomas are peripheral T-cell lymphomas that are characterized by a proliferation of large anaplastic blasts expressing CD30. In children, systemic anaplastic large cell lymphomas often present at advanced clinical stage and harbor translocations involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene leading to the expression of chimeric anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-fusion proteins. Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma is regarded as an ALK-negative variant confined to the skin and is part of the spectrum of primary cutaneous CD30-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Thirty-three of 487 pediatric patients registered within the Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma-99 trial (1999 to 2006) presented with a skin limited CD30-positive lympho-proliferative disorder. In 23 of the 33 patients, material for international histopathological review was available, and the cases were studied for histopathological, immunophenotypical and clinical features as well as for breaks within the ALK gene. Five of 23 cases and one additional case (identified after closure of the trial) expressed ALK-protein. Complete staging excluded any other organ involvement in all children. Expression of ALK proteins was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry in all cases and the presence of breaks of the ALK gene was genetically confirmed in 5 evaluable cases. The histopathological and clinical picture of these skin-restricted ALK-positive lymphomas was indistinguishable from that of cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Five children presented with a single skin lesion that was completely resected in 4 and incompletely resected in one. Three of these patients received no further therapy, 2 additional local radiotherapy, and one chemotherapy. All children remain in complete remission with a median follow up of seven years (range 1-8 years). We present 6 pediatric cases of ALK-positive primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphomas. After thorough

  16. Targeting autophagy enhances the anti-tumoral action of crizotinib in ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Desquesnes, Aurore; Le Gonidec, Sophie; AlSaati, Talal; Beau, Isabelle; Lamant, Laurence; Meggetto, Fabienne; Espinos, Estelle; Codogno, Patrice; Brousset, Pierre; Giuriato, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphomas (ALK+ ALCL) occur predominantly in children and young adults. Their treatment, based on aggressive chemotherapy, is not optimal since ALCL patients can still expect a 30% 2-year relapse rate. Tumor relapses are very aggressive and their underlying mechanisms are unknown. Crizotinib is the most advanced ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor and is already used in clinics to treat ALK-associated cancers. However, crizotinib escape mechanisms have emerged, thus preventing its use in frontline ALCL therapy. The process of autophagy has been proposed as the next target for elimination of the resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In this study, we investigated whether autophagy is activated in ALCL cells submitted to ALK inactivation (using crizotinib or ALK-targeting siRNA). Classical autophagy read-outs such as autophagosome visualization/quantification by electron microscopy and LC3-B marker turn-over assays were used to demonstrate autophagy induction and flux activation upon ALK inactivation. This was demonstrated to have a cytoprotective role on cell viability and clonogenic assays following combined ALK and autophagy inhibition. Altogether, our results suggest that co-treatment with crizotinib and chloroquine (two drugs already used in clinics) could be beneficial for ALK-positive ALCL patients. PMID:26338968

  17. Nucleophosmin/anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM/ALK) oncoprotein induces the T regulatory cell phenotype by activating STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Kasprzycka, Monika; Marzec, Michal; Liu, Xiaobin; Zhang, Qian; Wasik, Mariusz A.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms of malignant cell transformation mediated by the oncogenic, chimeric nucleophosmin/anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM/ALK) tyrosine kinase remain only partially understood. Here we report that the NPM/ALK-carrying T cell lymphoma (ALK+TCL) cells secrete IL-10 and TGF-β and express FoxP3, indicating their T regulatory (Treg) cell phenotype. The secreted IL-10 suppresses proliferation of normal immune, CD3/CD28-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and enhances viability of the ALK+TCL cells. The Treg phenotype of the affected cells is strictly dependent on NPM/ALK expression and function as demonstrated by transfection of the kinase into BaF3 cells and inhibition of its enzymatic activity and expression in ALK+TCL cells. NPM/ALK, in turn, induces the phenotype through activation of its key signal transmitter, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). These findings identify a mechanism of NPM/ALK-mediated oncogenesis based on induction of the Treg phenotype of the transformed CD4+ T cells. These results also provide an additional rationale to therapeutically target the chimeric kinase and/or STAT3 in ALK+TCL. PMID:16766651

  18. An interaction map of small-molecule kinase inhibitors with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) mutants in ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ai, Xinghao; Shen, Shengping; Shen, Lan; Lu, Shun

    2015-05-01

    Human anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has become a well-established target for the treatment of ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here, we have profiled seven small-molecule inhibitors, including 2 that are approved drugs, against a panel of clinically relevant mutations in ALK tyrosine kinase (TK) domain, aiming at a comprehensive understanding of molecular mechanism and biological implication underlying inhibitor response to ALK TK mutation. We find that (i) the gatekeeper mutation L1196M causes crizotinib resistance by simultaneously increasing and decreasing the binding affinities of, respectively, ATP and inhibitor to ALK, whereas the secondary mutation C1156Y, which is located far away from the ATP-binding site of ALK TK domain, causes the resistance by inducing marked allosteric effect on the site, (ii) the 2nd and 3rd generation kinase inhibitors exhibit relatively high sensitivity towards ALK mutants as compared to 1st generation inhibitors, (iii) the pan-kinase inhibitor staurosporine is insensitive for most mutations due to its high structural compatibility, and (iv) ATP affinity to ALK is generally reduced upon most clinically relevant mutations. Furthermore, we also identify six novel mutation-inhibitor pairs that are potentially associated with drug resistance. In addition, the G1202R and C1156Y mutations are expected to generally cause resistance for many existing inhibitors, since they can address significant effect on the geometric shape and physicochemical property of ALK active pocket.

  19. Sensitivity Analysis of the NPM-ALK Signalling Network Reveals Important Pathways for Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Buetti-Dinh, Antoine; O’Hare, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A large subset of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) patients harbour a somatic aberration in which anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is fused to nucleophosmin (NPM) resulting in a constitutively active signalling fusion protein, NPM-ALK. We computationally simulated the signalling network which mediates pathological cell survival and proliferation through NPM-ALK to identify therapeutically targetable nodes through which it may be possible to regain control of the tumourigenic process. The simulations reveal the predominant role of the VAV1-CDC42 (cell division control protein 42) pathway in NPM-ALK-driven cellular proliferation and of the Ras / mitogen-activated ERK kinase (MEK) / extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade in controlling cell survival. Our results also highlight the importance of a group of interleukins together with the Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) / signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signalling in the development of NPM-ALK derived ALCL. Depending on the activity of JAK3 and STAT3, the system may also be sensitive to activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP1), which has an inhibitory effect on cell survival and proliferation. The identification of signalling pathways active in tumourigenic processes is of fundamental importance for effective therapies. The prediction of alternative pathways that circumvent classical therapeutic targets opens the way to preventive approaches for countering the emergence of cancer resistance. PMID:27669408

  20. ALK- anaplastic large-cell lymphoma is clinically and immunophenotypically different from both ALK+ ALCL and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified: report from the International Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Project.

    PubMed

    Savage, Kerry J; Harris, Nancy Lee; Vose, Julie M; Ullrich, Fred; Jaffe, Elaine S; Connors, Joseph M; Rimsza, Lisa; Pileri, Stefano A; Chhanabhai, Mukesh; Gascoyne, Randy D; Armitage, James O; Weisenburger, Dennis D

    2008-06-15

    The International Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Project is a collaborative effort designed to gain better understanding of peripheral T-cell and natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs). A total of 22 institutions in North America, Europe, and Asia submitted clinical and pathologic information on PTCLs diagnosed and treated at their respective centers. Of the 1314 eligible patients, 181 had anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL; 13.8%) on consensus review: One hundred fifty-nine had systemic ALCL (12.1%) and 22 had primary cutaneous ALCL (1.7%). Patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive (ALK(+)) ALCL had a superior outcome compared with those with ALK(-) ALCL (5-year failure-free survival [FFS], 60% vs 36%; P = .015; 5-year overall survival [OS], 70% vs 49%; P = .016). However, contrary to prior reports, the 5-year FFS (36% vs 20%; P = .012) and OS (49% vs 32%; P = .032) were superior for ALK(-) ALCL compared with PTCL, not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS). Patients with primary cutaneous ALCL had a very favorable 5-year OS (90%), but with a propensity to relapse (5-year FFS, 55%). In summary, ALK(-) ALCL should continue to be separated from both ALK(+) ALCL and PTCL-NOS. Although the prognosis of ALK(-) ALCL appears to be better than that for PTCL-NOS, it is still unsatisfactory and better therapies are needed. Primary cutaneous ALCL is associated with an indolent course.

  1. Primary cutaneous CD 30 (+) ALK (−) anaplastic large cell lymphoma with dermoscopic findings: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Uzuncakmak, Tugba K.; Akdeniz, Necmettin; Karadag, Ayse S.; Taskin, Secil; Zemheri, Ebru I.; Argenziano, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Primary cutaneous CD 30 (+) anaplastic large cell lymphoma (PCALCL) is a rare and indolent type of cutaneous T cell lymphoma, which usually presents as an asymptomatic solitary firm nodule that rapidly grows and often ulcerates without any systemic involvement. A 64-year-old female presented to our outpatient clinic with a one-year history of multiple pink nodular lesions on the chest, back and gluteal regions. Dermoscopic examination of the nodular lesions revealed pink-to-yellow structureless areas and arborizing-to-polymorphous vessels. Histopathologic examination was consistent with CD30 (+) anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Systemic involvement was not detected. Local radiotherapy for large nodules and surgical excision for small nodules were performed. The large nodules had totally regressed after 10 sessions of radiotherapy. PMID:28243498

  2. Rearranged Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Gene in Adult-Onset Papillary Thyroid Cancer Amongst Atomic Bomb Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Mayumi; Takahashi, Keiko; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakachi, Kei; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously noted that among atomic bomb survivors (ABS), the relative frequency of cases of adult papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) with chromosomal rearrangements (mainly RET/PTC) was significantly greater in those with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. In contrast, the frequency of PTC cases with point mutations (mainly BRAFV600E) was significantly lower in patients with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. We also found that among ABS, the frequency of PTC cases with no detectable gene alterations in RET, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1 (NTRK1), BRAF, or RAS was significantly higher in patients with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. However, in ABS with PTC, the relationship between the presence of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fused with other gene partners and radiation exposure has received little study. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the relative frequency of rearranged ALK in ABS with PTC, and with no detectable gene alterations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF, or RAS, would be greater in those having relatively higher radiation exposures. Methods The 105 subjects in the study were drawn from the Life Span Study cohort of ABS of Hiroshima and Nagasaki who were diagnosed with PTC between 1956 and 1993. Seventy-nine were exposed (>0 mGy), and 26 were not exposed to A-bomb radiation. In the 25 ABS with PTC, and with no detectable gene alterations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF, or RAS, we examined archival, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded PTC specimens for rearrangement of ALK using reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5′ RACE). Results We found rearranged ALK in 10 of 19 radiation-exposed PTC cases, but none among 6 patients with PTC with no radiation exposure. In addition, solid/trabecular-like architecture in PTC was closely associated with ALK

  3. Primary central nervous system ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaoqin; Li, Jun; Huo, Na; Wang, Yan; Wu, Zhao; Lin, Xiaohong; Zhao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma. It mostly invades lymph nodes with extranodal involvement observed in the soft tissue, bone, and skin. Patient concerns: We report a 34-year-old Chinese male patient who presented with headache, diplopia, and vomit. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis via lumbar puncture showed elevated CSF pressure, elevated CSF protein concentrations, decreased CSF glucose and chloride concentration significantly, and pleocytosis of 68 to 350 × 106/L, in which lymphocytes and monocytes were predominant. These changes could be suggestive of tuberculous (TB) meningitis. Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord delineated multiple enhancing nodules in spinal cord, cauda equina, and cristae membrane, and multiple abnormal enhancing lesions in bilateral lumbar intervertebral foramen. Diagnoses: Spinal dura mater biopsy and paraffin pathology examination revealed anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive ALCL. Interventions: High-dose methotrexate, cytosine arabinoside craniospinal, and radiotherapy. Outcomes: Last follow-up on September 22, 2015 showed no evidence of tumor recurrence and the lower extremity muscle strength recovered to 4/5. Lessons: ALCL of primary central nervous system is an exceedingly rare tumor, which is usually misdiagnosed as meningitis (especially TB meningitis) according to clinical manifestation and laboratory examination. Thus closely monitoring patient's conditions and timely adjusting therapeutic regimen during treatment are necessary. PMID:27930548

  4. ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma with urinary bladder involvement diagnosed in urine cytology: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Lobo, João; Henrique, Rui; Monteiro, Paula; Lobo, Cláudia

    2017-04-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma is an aggressive T-cell neoplasm. It rarely involves the urinary bladder, with just twelve cases reported thus far and only one being ALK-negative. Immunophenotyping (particularly for ALK) is mandatory, both for prognostic and therapeutic reasons. Herein, we report the case of a patient with an ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma involving the bladder which was diagnosed and fully characterized by immunocytochemistry in urine cytology. The patient underwent a cystoscopy and the urine sample disclosed tumor diathesis background and aggregates of atypical cells, with evidence of multinucleation and mitotic figures. Immunocytochemistry revealed strong membrane/Golgi positivity for CD30 and negativity for ALK. The patient was submitted to transurethral resection for therapeutic purposes, which confirmed the diagnosis. To the best of our knowledge, this represents only the third case of anaplastic large cell lymphoma with bladder involvement diagnosed in urine cytology and the very first with diagnostic findings allowing for immunophenotyping of the disease in a bladder wash. The present report reinforces the role of urine cytology as a suitable method for establishing an earlier diagnosis and characterization of the disease, avoiding submitting patients to invasive procedures like transurethral resections. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:354-358. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Brentuximab Vedotin or Crizotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-06

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Positive; CD30-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Stage II Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

  6. Therapeutic efficacy of the bromodomain inhibitor OTX015/MK-8628 in ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma: an alternative modality to overcome resistant phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Vurchio, Valentina; Yang, Shao Ning; Moon, John; Kwee, Ivo; Rinaldi, Andrea; Pan, Heng; Crescenzo, Ramona; Cheng, Mangeng; Cerchietti, Leandro; Elemento, Olivier; Riveiro, Maria E.; Cvitkovic, Esteban; Bertoni, Francesco; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL) represent a peripheral T-cell lymphoma subgroup, stratified based on the presence or absence of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) chimeras. Although ALK-positive ALCLs have a more favorable outcome than ALK-negative ALCL, refractory and/or relapsed forms are common and novel treatments are needed. Here we investigated the therapeutic potential of a novel bromodomain inhibitor, OTX015/MK-8628 in ALK-positive ALCLs. The effects of OTX015 on a panel of ALK+ ALCL cell lines was evaluated in terms of proliferation, cell cycle and downstream signaling, including gene expression profiling analyses. Synergy was tested with combination targeted therapies. Bromodomain inhibition with OTX015 led primarily to ALCL cell cycle arrest in a dose-dependent manner, along with downregulation of MYC and its downstream regulated genes. MYC overexpression did not compensate this OTX015-mediated phenotype. Transcriptomic analysis of OTX015-treated ALCL cells identified a gene signature common to various hematologic malignancies treated with bromodomain inhibitors, notably large cell lymphoma. OTX015-modulated genes included transcription factors (E2F2, NFKBIZ, FOS, JUNB, ID1, HOXA5 and HOXC6), members of multiple signaling pathways (ITK, PRKCH, and MKNK2), and histones (clusters 1-3). Combination of OTX015 with the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor ibrutinib led to cell cycle arrest then cell death, and combination with suboptimal doses of the ALK inhibitor CEP28122 caused cell cycle arrest. When OTX015 was associated with GANT61, a selective GLI1/2 inhibitor, C1156Y-resistant ALK ALCL growth was impaired. These findings support OTX015 clinical trials in refractory ALCL in combination with inhibitors of interleukin-2-inducible kinase or SHH/GLI1. PMID:27793034

  7. Consequences of heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) expression and activity on stress-induced apoptosis in CD30+ NPM-ALK+ anaplastic large-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Bonvini, P; Zorzi, E; Mussolin, L; Pillon, M; Romualdi, C; Peron, M; d'Amore, E S G; Lamant, L; Rosolen, A

    2012-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that control stress-induced apoptosis is critical to explain how tumours respond to treatment, as cancer cells frequently escape drug toxicity by regulating stress response through heat shock protein (HSP) expression. The overexpression of Hsp72, in particular, results in increased incidence of cell transformation, and correlates with poor prognosis in a wide range of cancers. We have shown that Hsp72 assists folding of oncogenic NPM-ALK kinase in anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs), but its role in the maintenance of the malignant phenotype remains uncertain. Therefore, we assessed Hsp72 expression in ALCLs, investigating more in detail the mechanisms that regulate its status and activity. We found that Hsp72 is unique among the HSPs involved in tumourigenesis to be overexpressed in ALK(+) tumours and cell lines and to be induced by stress. Different from other HSPs, Hsp72 prevents cell injury, Bax activation and death by apoptosis in ALK(+) cells, acting both upstream and downstream of mitochondria. Conversely, Hsp72 is underexpressed in ALK(-) ALCL cells, and it is unable to protect cells from apoptosis under stress. Moreover, when Hsp72 expression is reduced following NPM-ALK inhibition, lymphoma cells undergo apoptosis, demonstrating the importance of Hsp72 in regulating ALCL stress response and drug sensitivity.

  8. In contrast to agonist monoclonal antibodies, both C-terminal truncated form and full length form of Pleiotrophin failed to activate vertebrate ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)?

    PubMed

    Mathivet, Thomas; Mazot, Pierre; Vigny, Marc

    2007-12-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase essentially and transiently expressed during development in specific regions of the central and peripheral nervous system. ALK expression persists at a lower level in the adult brain. Thus, it might play an important role in both the normal development and function of the nervous system. The nature of the cognate ligand of this receptor in vertebrates is still a matter of debate. Pleiotrophin and midkine have been proposed as ligands of ALK but several independent studies do not confirm this hypothesis. Interestingly, a recent study proposed that a C-terminal truncated form of Pleiotrophin (Pleiotrophin.15) and not the full length form (Pleiotrophin.18) promotes glioblastoma proliferation in an ALK-dependent fashion. These data were obviously a strong basis to conciliate the conflicting results so far reported in the literature. In the present study, we first purified to homogeneity the two forms of Pleiotrophin secreted by HEK 293 cells. In contrast to agonist monoclonal antibodies, both Pleiotrophin.15 and Pleiotrophin.18 failed to activate ALK in neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells expressing this receptor. Thus, for our point of view, ALK is still an orphan receptor in vertebrates.

  9. Breast implant-associated ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma: a case report and discussion of possible pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    George, Eva V; Pharm, John; Houston, Courtney; Al-Quran, Semar; Brian, Grey; Dong, Huijia; Hai, Wang; Reeves, Westley; Yang, Li-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Breast implant associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL) is a recently recognized clinical entity, with only 39 well-documented cases reported worldwide, including 3 fatalities. Because of its rarity, the clinical and pathologic features of this malignancy have yet to be fully defined. Moreover, the pathogenesis of ALCL in association with textured silicone gel breast implants is poorly understood. Here we report a case of BIA-ALCL arising in a 67-year-old woman with a mastectomy due to breast cancer followed by implantation of textured silicone gel breast prosthesis. The patient presented with breast enlargement and tenderness 8 years following reconstructive surgery. MRI revealed a fluid collection surrounding the affected breast implant. Pathologic examination confirmed the presence of malignant ALCL T cells that were CD30+, CD8+, CD15+, HLA-DR+, CD25+ ALK- and p53. A diagnosis of indolent BIA-ALCL was made since tumor cells were not found outside of the capsule. Interestingly, an extensive mixed lymphocytic infiltrate and ectopic lymphoid tissue (lymphoid neogenesis) adjacent to the fibrous implant capsule were present. The patient was treated with capsulectomy and implantation of new breast prostheses. Six months later, the patient was found to have BIA-ALCL involvement of an axillary lymph node with cytogenetic evolution of the tumor. To our knowledge, this is the sixth reported case of aggressive BIA-ALCL. Unique features of this case include the association with lymphoid neogenesis and the in vivo cytogenetic progression of the tumor. This case provides insight into the potential role of chronic inflammation and genetic instability in the pathogenesis of BIA-ALCL.

  10. Clinicopathological features and relation between anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) mutation and histological subtype of lung adenocarcinoma in Eastern European Caucasian population

    PubMed Central

    Zaric, Bojan; Stojsic, Vladimir; Panjkovic, Milana; Tegeltija, Dragana; Stepanov, Vanesa; Kovacevic, Tomi; Sarcev, Tatjana; Radosavljevic, Davorin; Milovancev, Aleksandar; Adamidis, Vasilis; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Trakada, Georgia; Rapti, Aggeliki; Perin, Branislav

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The incidence of echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) mutation among surgically treated patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung of the Eastern European ethnicity is underreported. The aim of this trial was the determination of EML4-ALK mutation frequency in investigated population, and the evaluation of correlations between lung adenocarcinoma subtype and clinical characteristics with mutation status. Patients and methods: This was a prospective trial which included 195 patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung who underwent surgical treatment. ALK mutation screening was performed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). IHC scores of 2+ and 3+ were regarded as positive. Confirmatory FISH was performed in all IHC positive and in 2:1 ratio in negative patients. Results: Overall ALK mutation rate established by IHC was 6.2%, while FISH confirmed rate of 5.1%. The FISH confirmed ALK positivity in 7.6% Hungarians, 5.5% Serbians, and 6.6% Slovakians. Acinar subtype of adenocarcinoma of the lung was significantly (p=0.02) related to EML4-ALK positive mutation status. Most of the patients were males (56.9%), smokers (50.8%), or former smokers (28.7%) with acinar (55.4%) or solid (35.9%) adenocarcinoma of the lung. Sensitivity and specificity of IHC were 100% and 98.9% respectively. Conclusions: ALK mutation rate in surgically treated patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung was found to be 6.2% by IHC and 5.1% by FISH. Acinar subtype of the adenocarcinoma of the lung was significantly related to ALK positive mutation. PMID:27994656

  11. Fine-needle aspiration cytology yield as a basis for morphological, molecular, and cytogenetic diagnosis in alk-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma with atypical clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Bogdanic, Maja; Ostojic Kolonic, Slobodanka; Kaic, Gordana; Kardum Paro, Mirjana Mariana; Lasan Trcic, Ruzica; Kardum-Skelin, Ika

    2017-01-01

    ALK positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a T-cell lymphoma usually occurring in children and young adults. It frequently involves lymph nodes and extranodal sites and is associated with favorable prognosis. A 20-year old man was admitted for painful mass in the left axilla with overlying skin redness. Clinical presentation and US findings were highly suspicious for sarcoma. Definitive diagnosis was established cytolologically and using ancillary technologies from cytological samples. Fine needle aspiration cytology of tumor mass (lymph node conglomerate and surrounding tissue) show predominance of large, pleomorphic, atypical cells with large nuclei and vacuolised cytoplasm. Atypical cells immunocytochemically were positive for LCA, CD30, CD3, EMA, and ALK; negative for CD15 and CD56. NPM-ALK transcript was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCT). Molecular analysis of TCRß and TCRγ genes demonstrated clonal TCR genes rearrangement. Complex karyotype with multiple numerical and structural changes was found on conventional cytogenetics. These findings excluded sarcoma and corroborated the diagnosis of ALK positive ALCL. Cutaneous involvement in ALCL can clinically mimic sarcoma, especially in cases with localized disease without B symptoms. In those cases, immunostaining, PCR, and conventional cytogenetics are helpful to exclude sarcoma. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:51-54. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. AT13387 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, Mantle Cell Lymphoma, or Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Positive; BCL6 Positive; Recurrent Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  13. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase status in rhabdomyosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akihiko; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Wakai, Susumu; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Tsuta, Koji; Fukayama, Masashi; Makimoto, Atsushi; Furuta, Koh; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2013-06-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare soft tissue sarcoma that typically affects children, adolescents, and young adults. Despite treatment via a multidisciplinary approach, the prognosis of advance-stage rhabdomyosarcomas remains poor, and a new treatment strategy is needed. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is a potential target for specific inhibitors. In this study, we investigated 116 rhabdomyosarcomas using a polymer-based ALK immunostaining method and correlated the results with clinicopathological parameters. In addition, we examined ALK status using dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization, PCR, and sequencing. In immunohistochemical analysis, ALK was detected in 2 (6%) of 33 embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas, 42 (69%) of 61 alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas, and 0 (0%) of 22 other subtypes, including pleomorphic, adult-spindle-cell/sclerosing, and epithelioid variants. Compared with ALK-negative alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas, ALK-positive ones are presented with metastatic spread more frequently and showed a greater extent of myogenin reactivity. Overall survival was not associated with ALK expression. FOXO1 rearrangement was significantly associated with ALK immunoreactivity. The median ALK copy number was greater in ALK-positive tumors than in ALK-negative tumors. Most (93%) cases tested showed no selective increase in the ALK gene dosage. ALK selective amplification and low-level selective gain were noted in one and three cases, respectively. Further, a high-polysomy pattern (≥4 ALK copies in ≥40% of cells) was observed in seven cases. A significant increase in the ALK copy number was exclusive to the ALK-immunopositive cohort, but it was uncommon, accounting for only 30% of the 37 ALK-positive rhabdomyosarcomas. ALK gene rearrangement was not observed in either cohort, while an ALK somatic mutation (I1277T) was found in one ALK-negative embryonal case. Although it remains controversial whether ALK expression without gene rearrangement

  14. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK 1) staining and molecular analysis in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours of the bladder: a preliminary clinicopathological study of nine cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Alex; Geddes, Nicola; Munson, Philippa; Joseph, Jean; Ramani, Pramila; Sandison, Ann; Fisher, Cyril; Parkinson, M Connie

    2004-07-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours (IMFT) may arise at any anatomical site, including lung, soft tissues, retroperitoneum and bladder. Although morphologically similar, these lesions encompass a spectrum of entities with differing aetiology, ranging from reactive/regenerative proliferations to low-grade neoplasms with a risk of local recurrence, but no significant metastatic potential. Vesical IMFT usually presents as a polypoid mass with a pale firm cut surface and can be of considerable size, mimicking a malignant tumour clinically and radiologically. Its good outcome, however, warrants conservative surgical excision, emphasising the importance of identification and distinction from malignant tumours of the bladder that may require more radical surgery and/or adjuvant therapy. We conducted a preliminary retrospective, comparative immunocytochemical study of 20 bladder tumours, including nine IMFTs, five spindle cell (sarcomatoid) carcinomas, two rhabdomyosarcomas, two leiomyosarcomas and two neurofibromas. The results confirmed IMFT positivity for smooth muscle actin, desmin and cytokeratin in 78-89% cases, resulting in potential confusion with sarcomatoid carcinoma or leiomyosarcoma. In contrast, cytoplasmic anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK 1) staining was present in eight IMFT (89%), but was not seen in any other lesion examined. The ALK 1 staining was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation, with translocation of the ALK gene present in 15-60% tumour cells in four of six IMFT examined, but not in four cases of sarcomatoid carcinoma or three of leiomyosarcoma. In conclusion, ALK 1 staining may be of value in the distinction of vesical IMFT from morphologically similar entities, and often reflects ALK gene translocations in these lesions.

  15. Nodal anaplastic large-cell lymphoma ALK-1- with CD30+ cutaneous lymphoproliferation treated with mistletoe: spontaneous remission or treatment response?

    PubMed

    Kameda, G; Kempf, W; Oschlies, I; Michael, K; Seifert, G; Längler, A

    2011-11-01

    A 12-year old girl presented with general weakness and weight loss, a localised cervical lymph node enlargement and cutaneous lesions compatible with lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP). Biopsies from lymph node and skin revealed a histological diagnosis of nodal large cell ALK-1- anaplastic lymphoma (ALCL) with a synchronous CD30+ cutaneous lymphoproliferation consistent with lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP). The girl was treated with mistletoe (MT) as monotherapy. Within 1 week after initiation of MT-treatment the skin lesions and lymph node enlargement improved. Under continuing MT-therapy 30 months after diagnosis the patient is still in complete remission. It is not possible to know whether this was a rare case of spontaneous remission of the nodal and skin-manifestations of this CD30+ T-cell lymphoproliferation or whether the observed effect was a specific therapeutic response to MT-treatment.

  16. The anaplastic lymphoma kinase testing conundrum.

    PubMed

    Conde, Esther; Taniere, Philippe; Lopez-Rios, Fernando

    2015-02-01

    Given the excellent results of the clinical trials with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors, the importance of accurately identifying ALK-positive lung carcinoma patients has never been greater. It brings with it a pressing need for harmonized development of companion diagnostics, for economic, scientific and medical reasons. Therefore, it is crucial that ALK testing assays become more standardized both in performance (analytical phase) and interpretation (post-analytical phase). We find that both methods currently recommended by College of American Pathologists/International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/Association for Molecular Pathology guidelines (FISH and Immunohistochemistry) are reasonable approaches for primary routine ALK testing, if at least 50 tumor cells are scored and protocols are strictly followed. Moreover, due to the high demand to study multiple predictive biomarkers on different assay platforms, quick and reliable approaches to achieve this are essential to guide treatment decisions.

  17. Design, synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of 2-(thiazol-2-amino)-4-arylaminopyrimidines as potent anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiqing; Yue, Xihua; Song, Zilan; Peng, Xia; Guo, Junfeng; Ji, Yinchun; Cheng, Zhen; Ding, Jian; Ai, Jing; Geng, Meiyu; Zhang, Ao

    2014-10-30

    A series of new 2,4-diarylaminopyrimidine analogues (DAAPalogues) was developed by incorporation of a substituted 2-aminothiazole component as the C-2 substituent of the center pyrimidine core. Compound 5i showed highest potency of 12.4 nM against ALK and 24.1 nM against ALK gatekeeper mutation L1196M. Although only having moderate cellular potency in the SUP-M2 cells harboring NPM-ALK, compound 5i showed good kinase selectivity and dose-dependently inhibited phosphorylation of ALK and its down-stream signaling pathways.

  18. Identification of ALK germline mutation (3605delG) in pediatric anaplastic medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Coco, Simona; De Mariano, Marilena; Valdora, Francesca; Servidei, Tiziana; Ridola, Vita; Andolfo, Immacolata; Oberthuer, André; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Longo, Luca

    2012-10-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene has been found either rearranged or mutated in several neoplasms such as anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, non-small-cell lung cancer, neuroblastoma and anaplastic thyroid cancer. Medulloblastoma (MB) is an embryonic pediatric cancer arising from nervous system, a tissue in which ALK is expressed during embryonic development. We performed an ALK mutation screening in 52 MBs and we found a novel heterozygous germline deletion of a single base in exon 23 (3605delG) in a case with marked anaplasia. This G deletion results in a frameshift mutation producing a premature stop codon in exon 25 of ALK tyrosine kinase domain. We also screened three human MB cell lines without finding any mutation of ALK gene. Quantitative expression analysis of 16 out of 52 samples showed overexpression of ALK mRNA in three MBs. In the present study, we report the first mutation of ALK found in MB. Moreover, a deletion of ALK gene producing a stop codon has not been detected in human tumors up to now. Further investigations are now required to elucidate whether the truncated form of ALK may have a role in signal transduction.

  19. Primary gastric anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Chen; Zhang, Yizhuo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Most primary stomach lymphomas are now recognized to originate from B-cell. Primary gastric anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) as shown in this case is very rare. Case report A 59-year-old man presented with a 1-month history of epigastric pain. Computed tomography showed a tumor in the stomach with perigastric lymphadenopathy. Biopsy of the tumor with gastroendoscopy showed ALCL. Bone marrow aspiration and trephine biopsy showed no infiltration. A diagnosis of primary gastric ALK-negative ALCL was made. The patient was first treated with four cycles of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone (CHOP) regimen, but his condition did not show improvement. Then he was treated with two cycles of hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone/methotrexate and cytarabine (Hyper-CVAD/MA) regimen. In spite of these treatments, he still died of disease progression. Conclusion The prognosis of ALK-negative ALCLs is usually worse than ALK-positive ALCLs. In this case, the patient was not responsive to a multidrug chemotherapy with CHOP and Hyper-CVAD/MA. PMID:27695344

  20. Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

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  1. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase: signalling in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Ruth H.; Vernersson, Emma; Grabbe, Caroline; Hallberg, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    RTKs (receptor tyrosine kinases) play important roles in cellular proliferation and differentiation. In addition, RTKs reveal oncogenic potential when their kinase activities are constitutively enhanced by point mutation, amplification or rearrangement of the corresponding genes. The ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) RTK was originally identified as a member of the insulin receptor subfamily of RTKs that acquires transforming capability when truncated and fused to NPM (nucleophosmin) in the t(2;5) chromosomal rearrangement associated with ALCL (anaplastic large cell lymphoma). To date, many chromosomal rearrangements leading to enhanced ALK activity have been described and are implicated in a number of cancer types. Recent reports of the EML4 (echinoderm microtubule-associated protein like 4)–ALK oncoprotein in NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer), together with the identification of activating point mutations in neuroblastoma, have highlighted ALK as a significant player and target for drug development in cancer. In the present review we address the role of ALK in development and disease and discuss implications for the future. PMID:19459784

  2. Design, synthesis, and biological activity of urea derivatives as anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    af Gennäs, Gustav Boije; Mologni, Luca; Ahmed, Shaheen; Rajaratnam, Mohanathas; Marin, Oriano; Lindholm, Niko; Viltadi, Michela; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Scapozza, Leonardo; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari

    2011-09-05

    In anaplastic large-cell lymphomas, chromosomal translocations involving the kinase domain of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), generally fused to the 5' part of the nucleophosmin gene, produce highly oncogenic ALK fusion proteins that deregulate cell cycle, apoptosis, and differentiation in these cells. Other fusion oncoproteins involving ALK, such as echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-ALK, were recently found in patients with non-small-cell lung, breast, and colorectal cancers. Recent research has focused on the development of inhibitors for targeted therapy of these ALK-positive tumors. Because kinase inhibitors that target the inactive conformation are thought to be more specific than ATP-targeted inhibitors, we investigated the possibility of using two known inhibitors, doramapimod and sorafenib, which target inactive kinases, to design new urea derivatives as ALK inhibitors. We generated a homology model of ALK in its inactive conformation complexed with doramapimod or sorafenib in its active site. The results elucidated why doramapimod is a weak inhibitor and why sorafenib does not inhibit ALK. Virtual screening of commercially available compounds using the homology model of ALK yielded candidate inhibitors, which were tested using biochemical assays. Herein we present the design, synthesis, biological activity, and structure-activity relationships of a novel series of urea compounds as potent ALK inhibitors. Some compounds showed inhibition of purified ALK in the high nanomolar range and selective antiproliferative activity on ALK-positive cells.

  3. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase: role in cancer pathogenesis and small-molecule inhibitor development for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Thomas R; Slavish, Jake; George, Rani E; Look, A Thomas; Xue, Liquan; Jiang, Qin; Cui, Xiaoli; Rentrop, Walter B; Morris, Stephan W

    2009-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), a receptor tyrosine kinase in the insulin receptor superfamily, was initially identified in constitutively activated oncogenic fusion forms – the most common being nucleophosmin-ALK – in anaplastic large-cell lymphomas, and subsequent studies have identified ALK fusions in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, systemic histiocytosis, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, esophageal squamous cell carcinomas and non-small-cell lung carcinomas. More recently, genomic DNA amplification and protein overexpression, as well as activating point mutations, of ALK have been described in neuroblastomas. In addition to those cancers for which a causative role for aberrant ALK activity is well validated, more circumstantial links implicate the full-length, normal ALK receptor in the genesis of other malignancies – including glioblastoma and breast cancer – via a mechanism of receptor activation involving autocrine and/or paracrine growth loops with the reported ALK ligands, pleiotrophin and midkine. This review summarizes normal ALK biology, the confirmed and putative roles of ALK in the development of human cancers and efforts to target ALK using small-molecule kinase inhibitors. PMID:19275511

  4. [Endobronchial anaplastic large cell lymphoma in childhood].

    PubMed

    Escobosa Sánchez, O M; Herrero Hernández, A; Acha García, T

    2009-05-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a very rare disease in childhood. The most common location of this lymphoma is lymph node and skin, with endobronchial involvement being extremely rare. We report a case of a 10-year-old boy diagnosed by chance with an endobronchial anaplastic large cell lymphoma, while he was being investigated for a a benign bone disease, due to the initial absence of respiratory symptoms.

  5. Combination therapy with brentuximab vedotin and cisplatin/cytarabine in a patient with primarily refractory anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Simon; Beer, Ambros J; Geissinger, Eva; Rosenwald, Andreas; Peschel, Christian; Ringshausen, Ingo; Keller, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a common subtype of the heterogeneous group of peripheral T-cell lymphomas, which is characterized by large pleomorphic cells with strong expression of CD30. Translocations involving ALK, the anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene, are associated with a favorable clinical outcome. Such ALK-positive ALCLs are usually responsive to a multidrug chemotherapy with CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone). However, there is no general consensus on the optimal therapy for relapsed or refractory ALCL. We report the case of a 24-year-old male suffering from ALK-positive ALCL with an uncommon manifestation of only extranodal disease in the gastric cardia region that showed primary refractoriness to standard CHOP chemotherapy. A combination therapy consisting of the anti-CD30 drug conjugate, brentuximab vedotin, and classical lymphoma salvage regimen DHAP (cisplatin, high-dose cytarabine and dexamethasone) was administered. Following two treatment cycles in 21-day intervals, the lymphoma showed considerable regression based on imaging diagnostics and no evidence of vital lymphoma in a subsequent biopsy. We did not observe any increase in toxicity; in particular, polyneuropathy and febrile neutropenia were not observed. In summary, we report that the antibody-drug conjugate brentuximab vedotin and a classical regimen used for aggressive lymphoma, DHAP, could be combined as salvage therapy in a case of refractory ALK-positive ALCL. Phase I/II studies will be required for safety and efficacy analysis.

  6. Cytological Diagnosis of Bilateral Breast Implant-Associated Lymphoma of the ALK-Negative Anaplastic Large-Cell Type. Clinical Implications of Peri-Implant Breast Seroma Cytological Reporting.

    PubMed

    Granados, Rosario; Lumbreras, Eva M; Delgado, Manuel; Aramburu, José A; Tardío, Juan C

    2016-07-01

    The cytological examination of peri-prosthetic breast effusions allowed the diagnosis of bilateral breast-implant ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BI-ALCL) in the case reported. Ten years after reconstructive surgery with bilateral breast implants, a large unilateral seroma developed and was cytologically analyzed. The presence of CD30 and CD4-positive large-sized atypical lymphoid cells exhibiting horseshoe-shaped nuclei and a brisk mitotic activity rendered the diagnosis of BI-ALCL. Similar cells were seen in the peri-prosthetic fluid intraoperatively collected from the contralateral breast. Although initial histological analysis of the capsulectomy specimens showed unilateral tumor, the cytological findings prompted a more thorough tissue sampling, resulting in the diagnosis of bilateral disease. BI-ALCL usually follows an indolent clinical course; however, there are reported cases with an aggressive behavior. While the presence of bilateral disease is a putative risk factor for a bad prognosis, the small number of cases reported precludes a definitive assessment of this risk. Since most BI-ALCL present with late seromas, cytologic analysis of these effusions in women with breast implants should be mandatory. Cytology is a safe tool for diagnosis and follow-up of patients with breast implant-related late seromas, sometimes proven more sensitive than histological analysis. Complete bilateral capsulectomy and a detailed histological analysis should follow a cytological diagnosis of BI-ALCL in a breast effusion in order to avoid false negative diagnoses. Our case constitutes the first published report of a bilateral BI-ALCL diagnosed by cytology. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:623-627. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Synergistic activity of ALK and mTOR inhibitors for the treatment of NPM-ALK positive lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Redaelli, Sara; Ceccon, Monica; Antolini, Laura; Rigolio, Roberta; Pirola, Alessandra; Peronaci, Marco; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Mologni, Luca

    2016-01-01

    ALK-positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) represents a subset of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma whose treatment benefited from crizotinib development, a dual ALK/MET inhibitor. Crizotinib blocks ALK-triggered pathways such as PI3K/AKT/mTOR, indispensable for survival of ALK-driven tumors. Despite the positive impact of targeted treatment in ALCL, resistant clones are often selected during therapy. Strategies to overcome resistance include the design of second generation drugs and the use of combined therapies that simultaneously target multiple nodes essential for cells survival. We investigated the effects of combined ALK/mTOR inhibition. We observed a specific synergistic effect of combining ALK inhibitors with an mTOR inhibitor (temsirolimus), in ALK+ lymphoma cells. The positive cooperation resulted in an increased inhibition of mTOR effectors, compared to single treatments, a block in G0/G1 phase and induction of apoptosis. The combination was able to prevent the selection of resistant clones, while long-term exposure to single agents led to the establishment of resistant cell lines, with either ALK inhibitor or temsirolimus. In vivo, mice injected with Karpas 299 cells and treated with low dose combination showed complete regression of tumors, while only partial inhibition was obtained in single agents-treated mice. Upon treatment stop the combination was able to significantly delay tumor relapses. Re-challenge of relapsed tumors at a higher dose led to full regression of xenografts in the combination group, but not in mice treated with lorlatinib alone. In conclusion, our data suggest that the combination of ALK and mTOR inhibitors could be a valuable therapeutic option for ALK+ ALCL patients. PMID:27662658

  8. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in Association with Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Basheer, Aneesh; Padhi, Somanath; Nagarajan, Ramesh; Boopathy, Vinoth; Mookkappan, Sudhagar; Iqbal, Nayyar

    2014-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) has a well known association with lymphomas, especially of T cell origin. Prognosis of lymphoma associated HLH is very poor, especially in T cell lymphomas; and, therefore, early diagnosis might alter the outcome. Though association of HLH with systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is known, its occurrence in primary cutaneous ALCL (C-ALCL) is distinctly rare. We aim to describe a case of C-ALCL (anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)−) in an elderly male who succumbed to the complication of associated HLH, which was possibly triggered by coexistent virus infection. We briefly present the literatures on lymphoma associated HLH and discuss the histopathological differentials of cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders. We do suggest that HLH may pose diagnostic challenges in the evaluation of an underlying lymphoma and hence warrants proper evaluation for the underlying etiologies and/or triggering factors. PMID:25405042

  9. Ethanol activates midkine and anaplastic lymphoma kinase signaling in neuroblastoma cells and in the brain.

    PubMed

    He, Donghong; Chen, Hu; Muramatsu, Hisako; Lasek, Amy W

    2015-11-01

    Alcohol engages signaling pathways in the brain. Midkine (MDK) is a neurotrophic factor that is over-expressed in the prefrontal cortex of alcoholics. MDK and one of its receptors, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), also regulate behavioral responses to ethanol in mice. The goal of this study was to determine whether MDK and ALK expression and signaling are activated by ethanol. We found that ethanol treatment of neuroblastoma cells increased MDK and ALK expression. We also assessed activation of ALK by ethanol in cells and found that ALK and ALK-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation increased rapidly with ethanol exposure. Similarly, treatment of cells with recombinant MDK protein increased ALK, ERK and STAT3 phosphorylation, suggesting that ethanol may utilize MDK to activate ALK signaling. In support of this, transfection of cells with MDK siRNAs attenuated ALK signaling in response to ethanol. Ethanol also activates ERK signaling in the brain. We found that inhibition of ALK or knockout of MDK attenuated ethanol-induced ERK phosphorylation in mouse amygdala. These results demonstrate that ethanol engages MDK and ALK signaling, which has important consequences for alcohol-induced neurotoxicity and the regulation of behaviors related to alcohol abuse.

  10. Adult Systemic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma: Recommendations for Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Bennani-Baiti, Nabila; Ansell, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Summary Systemic anaplastic large cell lymphomas (sALCLs) comprise a heterogeneous group of relatively rare T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas characterized by CD30 expression and other unifying pathologic features. ALK fusions are present in about 50% of cases. Pathological diagnosis can be challenging, particularly in ALK-negative cases. Though ALK-positive and ALK-negative sALCL are similar morphologically and immunophenotypically, they are separate entities with different genetics, clinical behavior, and outcomes. Evidence-based data evaluating treatment regimens are limited as randomized controlled trials are lacking and most prospective studies are too small to draw definitive conclusions. However, recent advances in molecular biology are bringing forth much needed knowledge in this field, and are likely to guide further targeted therapeutic development. PMID:26581318

  11. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 negatively regulates anaplastic lymphoma kinase in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Shunpei; Takatori, Atsushi; Ogura, Atsushi; Kohashi, Kenichi; Souzaki, Ryota; Kinoshita, Yoshiaki; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Hossain, Md. Shamim; Ohira, Miki; Nakamura, Yohko; Nakagawara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    In neuroblastoma (NB), one of the most common paediatric solid tumours, activation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is often associated with poor outcomes. Although genetic studies have identified copy number alteration and nonsynonymous mutations of ALK, the regulatory mechanism of ALK signalling at protein levels is largely elusive. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 (NLRR1) is a type 1 transmembrane protein that is highly expressed in unfavourable NB and potentially influences receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Here, we showed that NLRR1 and ALK exhibited a mutually exclusive expression pattern in primary NB tissues by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, dorsal root ganglia of Nlrr1+/+ and Nlrr1−/− mice displayed the opposite expression patterns of Nlrr1 and Alk. Of interest, NLRR1 physically interacted with ALK in vitro through its extracellular region. Notably, the NLRR1 ectodomain impaired ALK phosphorylation and proliferation of ALK-mutated NB cells. A newly identified cleavage of the NLRR1 ectodomain also supported NLRR1-mediated ALK signal regulation in trans. Thus, we conclude that NLRR1 appears to be an extracellular negative regulator of ALK signalling in NB and neuronal development. Our findings may be beneficial to comprehend NB heterogeneity and to develop a novel therapy against unfavourable NB. PMID:27604320

  12. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase aberrations correlate with metastatic features in pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Raffaella; Collini, Paola; Alaggio, Rita; Zin, Angelica; Bonvini, Paolo; Antonescu, Cristina R; Boldrini, Renata; Caserini, Roberto; Moro, Massimo; Centonze, Giovanni; Meazza, Cristina; Massimino, Maura; Bergamaschi, Luca; Luksch, Roberto; Chiaravalli, Stefano; Bisogno, Gianni; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Daidone, MariaGrazia

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most frequent soft tissue tumor in childhood and arises from immature mesenchymal cells committed to skeletal muscle differentiation. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase aberrantly expressed in several cancers. Moreover, ALK full-length receptor protein has been observed in RMS, although its clinical and functional significance is yet controversial. The role of ALK and its clinical relevance were investigated in a selected cohort of 74 FFPE pediatric RMS and a panel of RMS cell lines, evaluating its gene and protein status, utilizing Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH), immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blot approaches. Moreover, to get insight into its possible therapeutic relevance, effects of ALK silencing on cell proliferation, invasion and apoptosis were studied in RMS cells. ALK IHC positivity was significantly correlated with gene copy number gain, the alveolar subtype, PAX3/7-FOXO1 rearrangements, the presence of metastasis at diagnosis and a worse overall outcome. Furthermore, EML4-ALK fusion gene associated with higher protein expression was identified in an embryonal RMS. ALK silencing in RH30 ALK positive cells strongly inhibited invasion capability. Overall, our data suggest a potential role of ALK in pediatric RMS. PMID:27385213

  13. Primary anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma of the breast in a male patient.

    PubMed

    Ko, E S; Seol, H; Shin, J H; Ko, E Y

    2012-04-01

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma is an extremely rare lymphoma subtype. We describe the mammographic and ultrasonographic findings in a 51-year-old male patient who suffered from a palpable lump caused by this rare disease.

  14. Discovery of Brigatinib (AP26113), a Phosphine Oxide-Containing, Potent, Orally Active Inhibitor of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Sheng; Liu, Shuangying; Zou, Dong; Thomas, Mathew; Wang, Yihan; Zhou, Tianjun; Romero, Jan; Kohlmann, Anna; Li, Feng; Qi, Jiwei; Cai, Lisi; Dwight, Timothy A; Xu, Yongjin; Xu, Rongsong; Dodd, Rory; Toms, Angela; Parillon, Lois; Lu, Xiaohui; Anjum, Rana; Zhang, Sen; Wang, Frank; Keats, Jeffrey; Wardwell, Scott D; Ning, Yaoyu; Xu, Qihong; Moran, Lauren E; Mohemmad, Qurish K; Jang, Hyun Gyung; Clackson, Tim; Narasimhan, Narayana I; Rivera, Victor M; Zhu, Xiaotian; Dalgarno, David; Shakespeare, William C

    2016-05-26

    In the treatment of echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive (ALK+) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), secondary mutations within the ALK kinase domain have emerged as a major resistance mechanism to both first- and second-generation ALK inhibitors. This report describes the design and synthesis of a series of 2,4-diarylaminopyrimidine-based potent and selective ALK inhibitors culminating in identification of the investigational clinical candidate brigatinib. A unique structural feature of brigatinib is a phosphine oxide, an overlooked but novel hydrogen-bond acceptor that drives potency and selectivity in addition to favorable ADME properties. Brigatinib displayed low nanomolar IC50s against native ALK and all tested clinically relevant ALK mutants in both enzyme-based biochemical and cell-based viability assays and demonstrated efficacy in multiple ALK+ xenografts in mice, including Karpas-299 (anaplastic large-cell lymphomas [ALCL]) and H3122 (NSCLC). Brigatinib represents the most clinically advanced phosphine oxide-containing drug candidate to date and is currently being evaluated in a global phase 2 registration trial.

  15. Genetic inhibition of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase rescues cognitive impairments in Neurofibromatosis 1 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Joseph B; Weber, Sydney J; Torres, Eileen Ruth S; Marzulla, Tessa; Raber, Jacob

    2017-03-15

    Heterozygous Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) loss of function mutations occur in approximately 90% of patients with neurofibromatosis. A major, disabling phenotypic consequence of reduced NF1 function is cognitive impairment; a possibly related behavioral phenotype is impaired sleep. Recent results in Drosophila have demonstrated a genetic interaction between Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (Alk) and NF1 for both associative learning and sleep. Inhibition of Alk improves associative learning and sleep in heterozygous NF1 mutant flies. The results in Drosophila provide a strong motivation to investigate NF1/Alk genetic interactions in mice. In Drosophila, activation of Alk by its ligand, Jelly belly (Jeb), is the physiologically relevant target of negative regulation by NF1. Therefore, we tested whether genetic inhibition of Alk in heterozygous NF1 mutant mice attenuates or rescues cognitive impairments in mice. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that NF1 functions in mice biochemically to inhibit signaling from Alk through Ras. The cognitive phenotypes observed in heterozygous NF1 mutant mice are rescued or ameliorated by genetic inhibition of Alk activity. In two tests of hippocampus-dependent learning, the Morris water maze and extinction of contextual fear, mutation of one or both alleles of Alk was sufficient to improve performance to wild type or near wild type levels in NF1-/+ mice. In addition, in NF1 mice genetic inhibition of Alk improves circadian activity levels. These data are intriguing in light of the circadian alterations seen in NF1 patients and indicate that inhibition of Alk activity may cognitively benefit patients with Neurofibromatosis 1.

  16. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Rearrangement in Digestive Tract Cancer: Implication for Targeted Therapy in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Guo, Lei; Qiu, Tian; Ling, Yun; Shan, Ling; Zhou, Haitao; Zhao, Dongbing; Wang, Jian; Liang, Jianwei; Zhao, Jianjun; Jiao, Yuchen; Lu, Ning; Zhao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements define a subgroup of lung cancer which is eligible to targeted kinase inhibition. The aim of this study is to observe the incidence rate of ALK fusion in a large cohort of Chinese digestive tract cancer patients. Patients and Methods Tissue microarray (TMA) was constructed from 808 digestive tract cancer cases, including 169 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, 182 gastric cancer and 457 colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. We tested all cases for ALK expression via a fully automated immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay. The IHC-positive cases were subjected to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), target gene enrichment and sequencing for confirmation of ALK gene rearrangement and discovery of novel fusion partner. Results Among the tested cases, 2 (0.44%) CRC cases showed positive both by IHC and FISH. By qRT-PCR, EML4–ALK fusion was found in one IHC-positive CRC case. In another IHC-positive CRC case, target gene enrichment and sequencing revealed ALK was fused to a novel partner, spectrin beta non-erythrocytic 1 (SPTBN1). One gastric cancer case showed partially positive IHC result, but no fusion was found by FISH and gene sequencing. Conclusions The incidence rate of ALK gene fusion in Chinese CRC patients was 0.44%,but not detectable in gastric and esophageal cancers. The novel SPTBN1 -ALK fusion, together with other ALK fusion genes, may become a potential target for anti-ALK therapy. PMID:26678488

  17. Effect of single-chain antibody targeting of the ligand-binding domain in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase receptor

    PubMed Central

    Stylianou, DC; Auf der Maur, A; Kodack, DP; Henke, RT; Hohn, S; Toretsky, JA; Riegel, AT; Wellstein, A

    2013-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase receptor anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and its ligand, the growth factor pleiotrophin (PTN), are highly expressed during the development of the nervous system and have been implicated in the malignant progression of different tumor types. Here, we describe human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies that target the ligand-binding domain (LBD) in ALK and show the effect in vitro and in vivo. The ALK LBD was used as a bait in a yeast two-hybdrid system to select human scFv from a library with randomized complementarity-determining region 3 domains. Surface plasmon resonance showed high-affinity binding of the selected scFv. The anti-ALK scFv competed for binding of PTN to ALK in intact cells and inhibited PTN-dependent signal transduction through endogenous ALK. Invasion of an intact endothelial cell monolayer by U87MG human glioblastoma cells was inhibited by the anti-ALK scFv. In addition, the growth of established tumor xenografts in mice was reversed after the induction of the conditional expression of the anti-ALK scFv. In archival malignant brain tumors expression levels of ALK and PTN were found elevated and appear correlated with poor patient survival. This suggests a rate-limiting function of the PTN/ALK interaction that may be exploited therapeutically. PMID:19633684

  18. P-glycoprotein Mediates Ceritinib Resistance in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-rearranged Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Ryohei; Sakashita, Takuya; Yanagitani, Noriko; Ninomiya, Hironori; Horiike, Atsushi; Friboulet, Luc; Gainor, Justin F.; Motoi, Noriko; Dobashi, Akito; Sakata, Seiji; Tambo, Yuichi; Kitazono, Satoru; Sato, Shigeo; Koike, Sumie; John Iafrate, A.; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Shaw, Alice T.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Takeuchi, Kengo; Nishio, Makoto; Fujita, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion oncogene is observed in 3%–5% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Crizotinib and ceritinib, a next-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) active against crizotinib-refractory patients, are clinically available for the treatment of ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients, and multiple next-generation ALK-TKIs are currently under clinical evaluation. These ALK-TKIs exhibit robust clinical activity in ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients; however, the emergence of ALK-TKI resistance restricts the therapeutic effect. To date, various secondary mutations or bypass pathway activation-mediated resistance have been identified, but large parts of the resistance mechanism are yet to be identified. Here, we report the discovery of p-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1) overexpression as a ceritinib resistance mechanism in ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients. P-gp exported ceritinib and its overexpression conferred ceritinib and crizotinib resistance, but not to PF-06463922 or alectinib, which are next-generation ALK inhibitors. Knockdown of ABCB1 or P-gp inhibitors sensitizes the patient-derived cancer cells to ceritinib, in vitro and in vivo. P-gp overexpression was identified in three out of 11 cases with in ALK-rearranged crizotinib or ceritinib resistant NSCLC patients. Our study suggests that alectinib, PF-06463922, or P-gp inhibitor with ceritinib could overcome the ceritinib or crizotinib resistance mediated by P-gp overexpression. PMID:26870817

  19. CTOP/ITE/MTX Compared With CHOP as the First-line Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Young Patients With T Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-24

    ALK-negative Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Peripherial T Cell Lymphoma,Not Otherwise Specified; Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T Cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T Cell Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis Like T Cell Lymphoma

  20. Combination Chemotherapy and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Peripheral T-cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-30

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Negative; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Positive; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage II Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Stage II Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Stage III Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma

  1. Expression of p63 in anaplastic large cell lymphoma but not in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Immunohistochemical determination of p63 protein is frequently used in the pathologic diagnosis of nonhematological solid tumors. In malignant hematological disease, p63 expression has been reported in 22% of follicular lymphoma, about 35% of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, 23% of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and in some cases of blast crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a rare disease that accounts for less than 5% of all cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. There is little information concerning p63 expression in this specific type of lymphoma. In some cases, the morphological and phenotypic features between anaplastic large cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin's lymphoma are similar, making this differential diagnosis challenging. We studied p63 expression using a tissue microarray approach in 154 cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma, including 38% anaplastic large cell kinase positive and 62% anaplastic large cell kinase negative, and 58 Hodgkin's lymphoma cases. Sixty-eight cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (44%) showed p63 nuclear positivity (41% of anaplastic large cell kinase positive and 47% of anaplastic large cell kinase negative). Of 130 cases of systemic-anaplastic large cell lymphoma, 42% showed p63 positivity. The neoplastic cells expressed p63 in 38% of the cases of CD45-negative/anaplastic large cell kinase–negative null cell–type anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a subgroup that offers the most difficulties in the differential diagnosis with classical Hodgkin's lymphoma. In contrast, none of the cases of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma demonstrated any p63 expression. These results demonstrate that p63 protein expression is frequently expressed in a subset of anaplastic large cell lymphoma cases and may be used as a potential tool in the differential diagnosis between anaplastic large cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:18620733

  2. ALK: a tyrosine kinase target for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Holla, Vijaykumar R.; Elamin, Yasir Y.; Bailey, Ann Marie; Johnson, Amber M.; Litzenburger, Beate C.; Khotskaya, Yekaterina B.; Sanchez, Nora S.; Zeng, Jia; Shufean, Md Abu; Shaw, Kenna R.; Mendelsohn, John; Mills, Gordon B.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Simon, George R.

    2017-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene plays an important physiologic role in the development of the brain and can be oncogenically altered in several malignancies, including non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL). Most prevalent ALK alterations are chromosomal rearrangements resulting in fusion genes, as seen in ALCL and NSCLC. In other tumors, ALK copy-number gains and activating ALK mutations have been described. Dramatic and often prolonged responses are seen in patients with ALK alterations when treated with ALK inhibitors. Three of these—crizotinib, ceritinib, and alectinib—are now FDA approved for the treatment of metastatic NSCLC positive for ALK fusions. However, the emergence of resistance is universal. Newer ALK inhibitors and other targeting strategies are being developed to counteract the newly emergent mechanism(s) of ALK inhibitor resistance. This review outlines the recent developments in our understanding and treatment of tumors with ALK alterations. PMID:28050598

  3. Structure Based Drug Design of Crizotinib (PF-02341066), a Potent and Selective Dual Inhibitor of Mesenchymal-Epithelial Transition Factor (c-MET) Kinase and Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK)

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, J Jean; Tran-Dube,; #769; Michelle,; Shen, Hong; Nambu, Mitchell; Kung, Pei-Pei; Pairish, Mason; Jia, Lei; Meng, Jerry; Funk, Lee; Botrous, Iriny; McTigue, Michele; Grodsky, Neil; Ryan, Kevin; Padrique, Ellen; Alton, Gordon; Timofeevski, Sergei; Yamazaki, Shinji; Li, Qiuhua; Zou, Helen; Christensen, James; Mroczkowski, Barbara; Bender, Steve; Kania, Robert S; Edwards, Martin P

    2011-08-03

    Because of the critical roles of aberrant signaling in cancer, both c-MET and ALK receptor tyrosine kinases are attractive oncology targets for therapeutic intervention. The cocrystal structure of 3 (PHA-665752), bound to c-MET kinase domain, revealed a novel ATP site environment, which served as the target to guide parallel, multiattribute drug design. A novel 2-amino-5-aryl-3-benzyloxypyridine series was created to more effectively make the key interactions achieved with 3. In the novel series, the 2-aminopyridine core allowed a 3-benzyloxy group to reach into the same pocket as the 2,6-dichlorophenyl group of 3 via a more direct vector and thus with a better ligand efficiency (LE). Further optimization of the lead series generated the clinical candidate crizotinib (PF-02341066), which demonstrated potent in vitro and in vivo c-MET kinase and ALK inhibition, effective tumor growth inhibition, and good pharmaceutical properties.

  4. Skin involvement as the first manifestation of breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Alcalá, Rebeca; Llombart, Beatriz; Lavernia, Javier; Traves, Víctor; Guillén, Carlos; Sanmartín, Onofre

    2016-07-01

    Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a newly described clinical and pathologic entity that typically presents as seroma in the fibrous scar around the implant. Less frequently, it presents as a solid peri-implant mass, and there have been no reports to date of cutaneous lesions as the presenting manifestation. We report the case of a 56-year-old woman with a history of bilateral breast reconstruction following breast cancer of the right breast who consulted with several papules on the right breast suggestive of metastasis. Histopathology showed a proliferation of large epithelioid lymphocytes with highly pleomorphic cells and nuclei. The neoplastic cells were CD15 and CD30 positive and ALK-1 negative. The epithelial markers were all negative except for epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), which was weakly positive. Molecular analysis showed monoclonal T-cell receptor γ gene rearrangement, confirming a diagnosis of breast implant-associated ALCL. The non-specific morphology of the skin lesions, the epithelioid nature of the neoplastic cells and the expression of EMA can lead to an erroneous diagnosis of skin metastases from a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the breast. We recommend immunohistochemical staining for CD30 and ALK-1 for patients with breast implants who develop anaplastic lesions.

  5. Study of Bortezomib and Panobinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma or NK/T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-26

    Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma (Not Otherwise Specified); Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma Nasal Type; Enteropathy- Type T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) (ALK-1 Negative); Relapsed ALCL (ALK-1 Positive) Post Autologous Transplant

  6. ANALYSIS OF HUMAN T-CELL LYMPHOTROPIC VIRUS IN CD25-POSITIVE-ANAPLASTIC LARGE CELL LYMPHOMAS IN CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Chioato, Lucimara; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Harrington, William J.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    T-cell lymphomas are rare in children. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is the most common pediatric mature T-cell lymphoma, accounting for about 10-20% of all pediatric non-Hodgkin lymphoma. ALCL is now recognized as two distinct diseases, i.e., ALCL-ALK-positive (ALCL- ALK+) and ALCL-ALK-negative (ALCL- ALK-); ALK-positive ALCL presents at a younger age and has a better prognosis. The human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus that mainly infects helper T lymphocytes and is linked to the development of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). The other type of lymphoma related to this virus family is hairy cell leukemia (HCL). Both of these neoplasms frequently express CD25 (alpha chain-IL-2 receptor). Recently, it was demonstrated that CD25 is significantly expressed in childhood ALCL (75%). In Brazil, HTLV-1 infection is considered endemic, and vertical transmission is responsible for spread to children, and it is important to point out that 90% or more of the HTLV-1 carriers remain asymptomatic. Some cases of HTLV-1-related lymphomas in adults are described as having characteristics of ALCL, but are considered to be CD30-positive subtypes of ATLL based on the virologic findings. No similar cases have been described in children, therefore we analyzed 33 cases of pediatric ALCL, both CD25-positive and CD25-negative, looking for the presence of proviral HTLV-1 DNA, by PCR. All cases corresponded to the common histological type of ALCL and were CD30-positive in virtually all neoplastic cells. ALK expression was observed in all but two cases (93.9%), while CD25 was positive in 27 cases (82%), including one of the ALCL-ALK-. There was a strong positive correlation between ALK and CD25 expression. None of the cases showed proviral HTLV-1-DNA presence. Our study concludes that ALCL in children has no relationship with HTLV-1 and the high frequency of CD25 expression must be explained by a different mechanism than that described in ATLL. PMID:19864230

  7. Epigenetic silencing of the proapoptotic gene BIM in anaplastic large cell lymphoma through an MeCP2/SIN3a deacetylating complex.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Rocco; Magistroni, Vera; Mogavero, Angela; Andreoni, Federica; Ambrogio, Chiara; Chiarle, Roberto; Mologni, Luca; Bachmann, Petra S; Lock, Richard B; Collini, Paola; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2013-05-01

    BIM is a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family. Here, we investigated the epigenetic status of the BIM locus in NPM/ALK+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) cell lines and in lymph node biopsies from NPM/ALK+ ALCL patients. We show that BIM is epigenetically silenced in cell lines and lymph node specimens and that treatment with the deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A restores the histone acetylation, strongly upregulates BIM expression, and induces cell death. BIM silencing occurs through recruitment of MeCP2 and the SIN3a/histone deacetylase 1/2 (HDAC1/2) corepressor complex. This event requires BIM CpG methylation/demethylation with 5-azacytidine that leads to detachment of the MeCP2 corepressor complex and reacetylation of the histone tails. Treatment with the ALK inhibitor PF2341066 or with an inducible shRNA targeting NPM/ALK does not restore BIM locus reacetylation; however, enforced expression of NPM/ALK in an NPM/ALK-negative cell line significantly increases the methylation at the BIM locus. This study demonstrates that BIM is epigenetically silenced in NPM/ALK-positive cells through recruitment of the SIN3a/HDAC1/2 corepressor complex and that NPM/ALK is dispensable to maintain BIM epigenetic silencing but is able to act as an inducer of BIM methylation.

  8. Primary Central Nervous System Anaplastic Large T-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Splavski, Bruno; Muzevic, Dario; Ladenhauser-Palijan, Tatjana; Jr, Brano Splavski

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) of T-cell origin is an exceptionally rare, highly malignant intracranial neoplasm. Although such a tumor typically presents with a focal mass lesion. Case report: Past medical history of a 26-year-old male patient with a PCNS lymphoma of T-cell origin was not suggestive of intracranial pathology or any disorder of other organs and organic systems. To achieve a gross total tumor resection, surgery was performed via osteoplastic craniotomy using the left frontal transcortical transventricular approach. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses of the tissue removed described tumor as anaplastic large cell lymphoma of T-cells (T-ALCL). Postoperative and neurological recovery was complete, while control imaging of the brain showed no signs of residual tumor at a six-month follow-up. The patient, who did not appear immunocompromized, was referred to a hematologist and an oncologist where corticosteroids, the particular chemotherapeutic protocol and irradiation therapy were applied. Conclusion: Since PCNS lymphoma is a potentially curable brain tumor, we believe that proper selection of the management options, including early radical tumor resection for solitary PCNS lymphoma, may be proposed as a major treatment of such a tumor in selected patients, resulting in a satisfactory outcome. PMID:27703297

  9. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-06

    Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; HTLV-1 Infection; NK-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable; Primary Systemic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Negative; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides; Refractory Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Refractory Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mycosis Fungoides; Refractory Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified

  10. Expression of the Chemokine Receptor Gene, CCR8, is Associated with DUSP22 Rearrangements in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xiaoming; Flotte, Thomas J.; Law, Mark E.; Blahnik, Anthony J.; Chng, Wee-Joo; Huang, Gaofeng; Knudson, Ryan A.; Ketterling, Rhett P.; Porcher, Julie C.; Ansell, Stephen M.; Sidhu, Jagmohan; Dogan, Ahmet; Feldman, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is one of the most common T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas and has two main subtypes: an ALK-positive subtype characterized by ALK gene rearrangements and an ALK-negative subtype that is poorly understood. We recently identified recurrent rearrangements of the DUSP22 locus on 6p25.3 in both primary cutaneous and systemic ALK-negative ALCLs. This study aimed to determine the relationship between these rearrangements and expression of the chemokine receptor gene, CCR8. CCR8 has skin-homing properties, and has been suggested to play a role in limiting extracutaneous spread of primary cutaneous ALCLs. However, overexpression of CCR8 also has been reported in systemic ALK-negative ALCLs. As available antibodies for CCR8 have shown lack of specificity, we examined CCR8 expression using quantitative real-time PCR in frozen tissue and RNA in situ hybridization (ISH) in paraffin tissue. Both approaches showed higher CCR8 expression in ALCLs with DUSP22 rearrangements than in non-rearranged cases (PCR: 19.5-fold increase, p=0.01; ISH: 3.3-fold increase, p=0.0008). CCR8 expression was not associated with cutaneous presentation, cutaneous biopsy site, or cutaneous involvement during the disease course. These findings suggest that CCR8 expression in ALCL is more closely related to the presence of DUSP22 rearrangements than to cutaneous involvement, and that the function of CCR8 may extend beyond its skin-homing properties in this disease. This study also underscores the utility of RNA-ISH as a paraffin-based method for investigating gene expression when reliable antibodies for immunohistochemistry are not available. PMID:25390351

  11. U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval: crizotinib for treatment of advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer that is anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive.

    PubMed

    Malik, Shakun M; Maher, Virginia Ellen; Bijwaard, Karen E; Becker, Robert L; Zhang, Lijun; Tang, Shenghui W; Song, Pengfei; Liu, Qi; Marathe, Anshu; Gehrke, Brenda; Helms, Whitney; Hanner, Diane; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2014-04-15

    On August 26, 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved crizotinib (XALKORI Capsules, Pfizer Inc.) for treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that is anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive as detected by an FDA-approved test. The Vysis ALK Break-Apart FISH Probe Kit (Abbott Molecular, Inc.) was approved concurrently. In two multicenter, single-arm trials, patients with locally advanced or metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC previously treated with one or more systemic therapies received crizotinib orally at a dose of 250 mg twice daily. In 119 patients with ALK-positive NSCLC by local trial assay, the objective response rate (ORR) was 61% [95% confidence intervals (CI), 52%-70%] with a median response duration of 48 weeks. In 136 patients with ALK-positive NSCLC by the to-be-marketed test, the ORR was 50% (95% CI, 42%-59%) with a median response duration of 42 weeks. The most common adverse reactions (≥25%) were vision disorder, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, edema, and constipation. Accelerated approval was granted on the basis of the high ORRs and durable responses. On November 20, 2013, crizotinib received full approval based on an improvement in progression-free survival in patients with metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC previously treated with one platinum-based chemotherapy regimen.

  12. Diagnosis of anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement in cytological samples through a fluorescence in situ hybridization-based assay: Cytological smears versus cell blocks.

    PubMed

    Zito Marino, Federica; Rossi, Giulio; Brunelli, Matteo; Malzone, Maria Gabriella; Liguori, Giuseppina; Bogina, Giuseppe; Morabito, Alessandro; Rocco, Gaetano; Franco, Renato; Botti, Gerardo

    2017-02-14

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) status analysis of lung cytological specimens should be successfully encouraged in routine practice because biopsy specimens are not always available. To date, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved both fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) as diagnostic tests for identifying ALK-positive patients eligible for treatment with crizotinib. Although ALK IHC is an optimal diagnostic tool, FISH becomes mandatory in equivocal cases. ALK FISH of paraffin-embedded tissue material is still the gold standard, whereas the cytological specimen assay has not yet been completely standardized. Many controversial data have been reported on the adequacy of cytology cell blocks (CBs) versus conventional smears for FISH testing. This review discusses some critical issues related to ALK FISH of cytological samples, including the triaging of collected specimens to optimize the material, the use of CBs versus conventional smears, and alternative methods for an ALK rearrangement diagnosis. Conventional smears have the advantages of an immediate evaluation, no probe tissue-related artifactual loss, no fixation-related alterations, and usually sufficient material for an analytic preparation. On the other hand, CBs have several advantages, including the appropriate conservation of the tissue architecture, an absence of problems related to cell overlapping, and the ability to evaluate neoplastic cells in a dark field. Cancer Cytopathol 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  13. Array-CGH analysis of cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Szuhai, K; van Doorn, R; Tensen, C P; Van Kester

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes a study in which the pattern of numerical chromosomal alterations in cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (C-ALCL) tumor samples was defined using array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). First, the array-based CGH technique applied is outlined in detail. Next, its application in the analysis of C-ALCL tumor specimens is described. This approach resulted in the identification of highly recurrent chromosomal alterations in C-ALCL that include gain of 7q31 and loss on 6q16-6q21 and 13q34, each affecting 45% of the patients. The pattern characteristic of C-ALCL differs markedly from chromosomal alterations observed in other CTCL such as mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome and yielded several candidate genes with potential relevance in the pathogenesis of C-ALCL.

  14. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma associated with breast implants: a report of 13 cases.

    PubMed

    Aladily, Tariq N; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Amin, Mitual B; Haideri, Nisreen; Ye, Dongjiu; Azevedo, Sergio J; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L; de Peralta-Venturina, Mariza; Mustafa, Eid B; Young, Ken H; You, M James; Fayad, Luis E; Blenc, Ann Marie; Miranda, Roberto N

    2012-07-01

    We report 13 cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) associated with breast implants. Patient age ranged from 39 to 68 years, and the interval from implant to ALCL was 4 to 29 years. All tumors were composed of large, pleomorphic cells that were CD30 and ALK1, and all 7 cases assessed had monoclonal T-cell receptor γ-chain rearrangements. Two patient subgroups were identified. Ten patients presented with effusion surrounded by fibrous capsule without a grossly identifiable tumor mass. Nine patients had stage I and 1 had stage II disease. Eight patients underwent implant removal and capsulectomy. Four patients received chemotherapy and 4 radiation therapy. All patients were alive without disease at last follow-up. A second subgroup of 3 patients had effusion and a distinct mass adjacent to the implant. One patient had stage I and 2 stage II disease. One patient had a 3-year history of lymphomatoid papulosis, and 1 patient had a 1-year history of CD30 T-cell lymphoma adjacent to the breast before the diagnosis of ALCL associated with breast implant. Two patients received chemotherapy and 1 radiation therapy. Two patients died 2 and 12 years after diagnosis, respectively. We conclude that the clinical behavior of ALCL associated with breast implants is heterogeneous. Patients who present with effusion without a distinct mass have an indolent disease course, similar to CD30 lymphoproliferative disorder of skin. In contrast, patients who present with a distinct mass may have advanced stage or possibly systemic disease and have a poorer prognosis.

  15. Synthesis and biological evaluation of benzo[4,5]imidazo[1,2-c]pyrimidine and benzo[4,5]imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazine derivatives as anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tardy, Sébastien; Orsato, Alexandre; Mologni, Luca; Bisson, William H; Donadoni, Carla; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Scapozza, Leonardo; Gueyrard, David; Goekjian, Peter G

    2014-02-15

    Chromosomal translocations involving anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) are the driving mutations for a range of cancers and ALK is thus considered an attractive therapeutic target. We synthesized a series of functionalized benzo[4,5]imidazo[1,2-c]pyrimidines and benzo[4,5]imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazines by an aza-Graebe-Ullman reaction, followed by palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. A sequential regioselective cross-coupling route is reported for the synthesis of unsymmetrically disubstituted benzo[4,5]imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazines. The inhibition of ALK was evaluated and compound 19 in particular showed good activity against both the wild type and crizotinib-resistant L1196M mutant in vitro and in ALK-transfected BaF3 cells.

  16. Occurrence of anaplastic large cell lymphoma following IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis and cholecystitis and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Mitsuaki; Hodohara, Keiko; Yoshida, Keiko; Kagotani, Akiko; Iwai, Muneo; Yoshii, Miyuki; Okuno, Hiroko; Horinouchi, Akiko; Nakanishi, Ryota; Harada, Ayumi; Yoshida, Takashi; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2013-01-01

    IgG4-related sclerosing disease is an established disease entity with characteristic clinicopathological features. Recently, the association between IgG4-related sclerosing disease and the risk of malignancies has been suggested. IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis with pancreatic cancer has been reported. Further, a few cases of extraocular malignant lymphoma in patients with IgG4-related sclerosing disease have also been documented. Herein, we describe the first documented case of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) following IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis and cholecystitis and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). A 61-year-old Japanese male, with a past history of DLBCL, was detected with swelling of the pancreas and tumorous lesions in the gallbladder. Histopathological study of the resected gallbladder specimen revealed diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration with fibrosclerosis in the entire gallbladder wall. Eosinophilic infiltration and obliterative phlebitis were also noted. Immunohistochemically, many IgG4-positive plasma cells had infiltrated into the lesion, and the ratio of IgG4/IgG-positive plasma cells was 71.6%. Accordingly, a diagnosis of IgG4-related cholecystitis was made. Seven months later, he presented with a painful tumor in his left parotid gland. Histopathological study demonstrated diffuse or cohesive sheet-like proliferation of large-sized lymphoid cells with rich slightly eosinophilic cytoplasm and irregular-shaped large nuclei. These lymphoid cells were positive for CD30, CD4, and cytotoxic markers, but negative for CD3 and ALK. Therefore, a diagnosis of ALK-negative ALCL was made. It has been suggested that the incidence of malignant lymphoma may be high in patients with IgG4-related sclerosing disease, therefore, intense medical follow-up is important in patients with this disorder.

  17. Bevacizumab and Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumor, Lymphoma, Intracranial Glioblastoma, Gliosarcoma or Anaplastic Astrocytoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-14

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV

  18. Detection of Echinoderm Microtubule Associated Protein Like 4-Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Fusion Genes in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Clinical Samples by a Real-time Quantitative Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Jin-Yin; Chen, Zhi-Xia; Zhong, Wei; Li, Long-Yun; Liu, Li-Cheng; Hu, Xiao-Xu; Chen, Wei-Jun; Wang, Meng-Zhao

    2016-12-20

    Objective To establish a real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay (qRT-PCR) for the rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of echinoderm microtubule associated protein like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) fusion genes in non-small cell lung cancer. Methods The specific primers for the four variants of EML4-ALK fusion genes (V1, V2, V3a, and V3b) and Taqman fluorescence probes for the detection of the target sequences were carefully designed by the Primer Premier 5.0 software. Then, using pseudovirus containing EML4-ALK fusion genes variants (V1, V2, V3a, and V3b) as the study objects, we further analyzed the lower limit, sensitivity, and specificity of this method. Finally, 50 clinical samples, including 3 ALK-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) positive specimens, were collected and used to detect EML4-ALK fusion genes using this method. Results The lower limit of this method for the detection of EML4-ALK fusion genes was 10 copies/μl if no interference of background RNA existed. Regarding the method's sensitivity, the detection resolution was as high as 1% and 0.5% in the background of 500 and 5000 copies/μl wild-type ALK gene, respectively. Regarding the method's specificity, no non-specific amplification was found when it was used to detect EML4-ALK fusion genes in leukocyte and plasma RNA samples from healthy volunteers. Among the 50 clinical samples, 47 ALK-FISH negative samples were also negative. Among 3 ALK-FISH positive samples, 2 cases were detected positive using this method, but another was not detected because of the failure of RNA extraction. Conclusion The proposed qRT-PCR assay for the detection of EML4-ALK fusion genes is rapid, simple, sensitive, and specific, which is deserved to be validated and widely used in clinical settings.

  19. The long non-coding RNA LINC01013 enhances invasion of human anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chung, I-Hsiao; Lu, Pei-Hsuan; Lin, Yang-Hsiang; Tsai, Ming-Ming; Lin, Yun-Wen; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2017-03-22

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare type of highly malignant, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Currently, only studies on the chimeric oncogene NPM-ALK have reported a link to ALCL progression. However, the specific molecular mechanisms underlying the invasion of ALCL are still unclear. Here, we sought to investigate differentially expressed, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in ALCL and their potential biological function. Our microarray analyses revealed that LINC01013, a novel non-coding RNA gene, was highly expressed in clinical specimens of ALCL and was significantly upregulated in invasive ALCL cell lines. Knockdown of LINC01013 suppressed tumor cell invasion; conversely, its overexpression enhanced tumor cell invasion. LINC01013-induced invasion was mediated by activation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated proteins, snail and fibronectin. Specifically, LINC01013 induced snail, resulting in activation of fibronectin and enhanced ALCL cell invasion. Collectively, these findings support a potential role for LINC01013 in cancer cell invasion through the snail-fibronectin activation cascade and suggest that LINC01013 could potentially be utilized as a metastasis marker in ALCL.

  20. Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma masquerading as large pyogenic granuloma

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Anupama; Vedant, Deepak; Shanker, Vinay; Tegta, G. R.

    2016-01-01

    Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (pcALCL) forms 9% of the cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. It usually presents as solitary reddish brown ulcerating nodule or indurated plaque. Sometimes, it mimics other dermatological diseases such as eczema, pyoderma gangrenosum, pyogenic granuloma, morphea, and squamous cell carcinoma. Our case presented with large pyogenic granuloma like lesion with regional lymphadenopathy. Since pcALCL is rare, one can misdiagnose such cases and therefore high index of suspicion is necessary. PMID:27990392

  1. A Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Neuroblastoma Driven by Mutated ALK and MYCN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0220 TITLE: A Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Neuroblastoma Driven by Mutated ALK and MYCN PRINCIPAL...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Neuroblastoma Driven by Mutated ALK and MYCN 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER... genetic and epigenetic changes that occur during tumorigenesis. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Anaplastic lymphoma kinase, neuroblastoma, ALK, ALKF1174L, MYCN, CDK7

  2. Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma: review of a distinct clinicopathologic entity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Wei, Shi

    2014-06-01

    Primary breast anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is rare but is more commonly seen in patients with implants; fewer than 50 cases of breast implant-associated ALCL have been reported in the English language literature. Breast implant-associated ALCL is not a disease of the breast parenchyma, but instead is a disease of the fibrous capsule surrounding the implant. The patients usually present with an effusion around the implant and, rarely, with a solid mass. Morphologically, the neoplastic cells are large, epithelioid, and pleomorphic, with abundant cytoplasm, vesicular irregular nuclei, and frequent mitoses. Occasional "hallmark" cells may be present. The lesional cells typically show strong and diffuse immunoreactivity for CD30 and often express T-cell markers, cytotoxic-associated antigens, and epithelial membrane antigen. Almost all reported cases are negative for anaplastic lymphoma kinase. Molecular genetic analyses have demonstrated T-cell receptor gene rearrangements. The differential diagnosis essentially includes poorly differentiated carcinoma, other lymphomas, and chronic inflammation. Once a diagnosis of lymphoma is established, it is important to exclude systemic anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative ALCL involving the breast, primary cutaneous ALCL, and other CD30(+) lymphoproliferative disorders. The patients with effusion-associated ALCL often have an indolent course and excellent prognosis, responding well to excision of the fibrous capsule around the implant (capsulectomy) and implant removal. In contrast, patients who present with a distinct mass may have a more aggressive course and poor prognosis, requiring chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy.

  3. CRKL mediates EML4-ALK signaling and is a potential therapeutic target for ALK-rearranged lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Voeller, Donna; Gower, Arjan; Kim, In-Kyu; Zhang, Yu-Wen; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements are oncogenic drivers in a small subset of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The ALK inhibitors are highly effective in NSCLC patients harboring ALK rearrangements; however, most patients acquire resistance to the therapy following an initial response. Mechanisms of acquired resistance are complex. We used LC-MS/MS-based phosphotyrosine-peptide profiling in the EML4-ALK rearranged H3122 and H2228 cells treated with ALK inhibitors, to identify downstream effectors of ALK. We then used Western blot, siRNA experiments, cell proliferation, viability and migration assays to validate our findings. We identified CRKL as a novel downstream effector of ALK signaling. We demonstrated that CRKL tyrosine phosphorylation was repressed by pharmacological inhibition or small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of ALK in the ALK-rearranged cells. More importantly, CRKL knockdown attenuated their cell proliferation, viability, and migration, but it had no effect on ALK phosphorylation and expression in these cells. Furthermore, CRKL tyrosine phosphorylation was inhibited by dasatinib (an inhibitor of ABL and SRC kinases), which in combination with the ALK inhibitor crizotinib displayed a synergistic inhibitory effect in vitro. In conclusion, our study suggests that CRKL is a key downstream effector of ALK, and combined inhibition of ALK and CRKL may represent an effective strategy for treating ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients. PMID:27078848

  4. Targeted therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma and systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma: focus on brentuximab vedotin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xueyan; Soma, Lorinda A; Fromm, Jonathan R

    2014-01-01

    Despite the relative success of chemotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), novel therapeutic agents are needed for refractory or relapsed patients. Targeted immunotherapy has emerged as a novel treatment option for these patients. Although unconjugated anti-cluster of differentiation (CD)30 antibodies showed minimal antitumor activity in early clinical trials, development of antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs) appears promising. Brentuximab vedotin is an ADC composed of an anti-CD30 antibody linked to a potent microtubule-disrupting agent monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE). It has the ability to target CD30-positive tumor cells and, once bound to CD30, brentuximab vedotin is internalized and MMAE is released to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In two Phase II trials, objective response was reported in 75% and 86% of patients with refractory or relapsed HL and systemic ALCL, respectively, with an acceptable toxicity profile. Based on these studies, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted accelerated approval of brentuximab vedotin in August 2011 for the treatment of refractory and relapsed HL and ALCL. We review the key characteristics of brentuximab vedotin, clinical data supporting its therapeutic efficacy, and current ongoing trials to explore its utility in other CD30-positive malignancies. PMID:24379682

  5. Alectinib-Induced Erythema Multiforme and Successful Rechallenge with Alectinib in a Patient with Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Rearranged Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tatsuo; Sowa-Osako, Junko; Nakai, Toshiyuki; Ohyama, Ayako; Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Ohsawa, Masahiko; Hirata, Kazuto

    2016-01-01

    Background Alectinib is an oral drug developed for the treatment of patients with fusion gene encoding echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK)-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here, we present the case of a patient treated with alectinib who developed a hypersensitivity reaction with successful rechallenge treatment. Case Presentation A 39-year-old woman who was a passive smoker was referred to Osaka City University Hospital for the evaluation of a skin event caused by treatment for NSCLC with the fusion gene EML4-ALK. The skin reaction was observed on the anterior chest, upper arms, and ear auricles on day 11 of treatment with oral alectinib. The skin event presented as widely distributed erythematous macules that were confluent, indicating a severe and life-threatening form. The skin lesions started to resolve after the initiation of treatment with 40 mg prednisolone. After regrowth of the tumor, she received a rechallenge program for alectinib for 2 weeks; thereafter, alectinib treatment was successfully reinitiated. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, we present the first case in which alectinib, which binds to the adenosine triphosphate site of EML4-ALK, induced erythema multiforme. Moreover, successful readministration of alectinib through our rechallenge program has not been reported so far. PMID:28101031

  6. Analysis of clinical characteristics and prognosis of patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase‐positive and surgically resected lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hong; Cai, Yiran; Shi, Liang; Tang, Junfang; Liu, Zhidong; Wang, Zitong; Bai, Lianqi

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent research into lung cancer‐related driver genes has identified a distinctive molecular subtype of non‐small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) – anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)‐positive NSCLC. We evaluated the clinical features and survival rates of ALK‐positive lung adenocarcinoma patients who had undergone surgery but had not received ALK inhibitor therapy, along with the characteristics of patients with distant metastases. Methods Clinical data of 40 patients with ALK‐positive, postsurgical lung adenocarcinoma were retrospectively analyzed. Relationships between the patients’ clinical characteristics, distant metastases, and their disease‐free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were assessed. Results Most patients were relatively young, never‐smokers, had peripheral tumors, and the tumors were either moderately or poorly differentiated. The most common organ of distant metastases was the brain. The median time from surgery to brain metastasis was 17.2 months. The median OS following brain metastasis was 9.4 months. DFS in patients with early stage disease, peripheral tumors, no lymph node metastases, and treated with adjuvant therapy was significantly longer than for those with late stage disease (P = 0.015), central tumors (P = 0.000), lymph node metastases (P = 0.026), and not treated with adjuvant therapy (P = 0.000). Patients with early stage disease, peripheral tumors, and treated with adjuvant therapy obtained markedly longer OS than those with late stage disease (P = 0.021), central tumors (P = 0.003), and not treated with adjuvant therapy (P = 0.006). Conclusion Patients with ALK‐positive surgically resected lung adenocarcinoma have distinctive clinical characteristics. The brain is the most common site of extrapulmonary metastasis. Survival is associated with stage, tumor location, and the administration of adjuvant therapy. PMID:27779369

  7. Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Letter, Haley; Rop, Baiywo; Edison, Michele N; Turner, Patricia

    2016-03-26

    Introduction Anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a very rare T-cell lymphoma that has only recently been found to be associated with breast implants. It has been described in the literature mainly in the form of case reports. This article focuses on the imaging characteristics of this rare disease. We hope to increase awareness of breast imagers and referring physicians to improve early detection rates. Case Report We present the case of a 32-year-old female who presented with several weeks of pain and firmness in her right breast. MRI and ultrasound demonstrated a peri-implant fluid collection. Ultrasound-guided aspiration revealed anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The patient was treated with implant removal alone and has now been in remission for 3 years.  Conclusion Anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the breast is a very rare entity that has mainly been described in the literature as case reports. As in the case of our patient, imaging findings can be very non-specific, and it is important for surgeons, breast imagers, and oncologists to be aware of this rare disease to ensure prompt diagnosis.

  8. Reversal of microRNA-150 silencing disadvantages crizotinib-resistant NPM-ALK(+) cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Hoareau-Aveilla, Coralie; Valentin, Thibaud; Daugrois, Camille; Quelen, Cathy; Mitou, Géraldine; Quentin, Samuel; Jia, Jinsong; Spicuglia, Salvatore; Ferrier, Pierre; Ceccon, Monica; Giuriato, Sylvie; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Brousset, Pierre; Lamant, Laurence; Meggetto, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory microRNA miR-150 is involved in the development of hemopathies and is downregulated in T-lymphomas, such as anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) tumors. ALCL is defined by the presence or absence of translocations that activate the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), with nucleophosmin-ALK (NPM-ALK) fusions being the most common. Here, we compared samples of primary NPM-ALK(+) and NPM-ALK(–) ALCL to investigate the role of miR-150 downstream of NPM-ALK. Methylation of the MIR150 gene was substantially elevated in NPM-ALK(+) biopsies and correlated with reduced miR-150 expression. In NPM-ALK(+) cell lines, DNA hypermethylation–mediated miR-150 repression required ALK-dependent pathways, as ALK inhibition restored miR-150 expression. Moreover, epigenetic silencing of miR-150 was due to the activation of STAT3, a major downstream substrate of NPM-ALK, in cooperation with DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). Accordingly, miR-150 repression was turned off following treatment with the DNMT inhibitor, decitabine. In murine NPM-ALK(+) xenograft models, miR-150 upregulation induced antineoplastic activity. Treatment of crizotinib-resistant NPM-ALK(+) KARPAS-299-CR06 cells with decitabine or ectopic miR-150 expression reduced viability and growth. Altogether, our results suggest that hypomethylating drugs, alone or in combination with other agents, may benefit ALK(+) patients harboring tumors resistant to crizotinib and other anti-ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Moreover, these results support further work on miR-150 in these and other ALK(+) malignancies. PMID:26258416

  9. Detection of t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocation by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization in CD30-positive primary cutaneous lymphoma and lymphomatoid papulosis.

    PubMed Central

    Beylot-Barry, M.; Lamant, L.; Vergier, B.; de Muret, A.; Fraitag, S.; Delord, B.; Dubus, P.; Vaillant, L.; Delaunay, M.; MacGrogan, G.; Beylot, C.; de Mascarel, A.; Delsol, G.; Merlio, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    The t(2;5) generates a chimeric NPM-ALK transcript encoded by the nucleophosmin NPM gene fused to the anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene ALK. Using a reverse transcriptase nested polymerase chain reaction assay we have detected NPM-ALK transcripts within CD30+ primary cutaneous lymphoma and lymphomatoid papulosis (LP). The t(2;5) was identified in 4 out of 9 CD30+ anaplastic lymphomas and in 1 out of 4 CD30+ pleomorphic lymphomas. Moreover, the t(2;5) was detected in 3 out of 10 LPs. All NPM-ALK-positive lymphomas and 1 NPM-ALK-positive LP exhibited a clonal rearrangement of the T cell receptor gamma-chain gene. The t(2;5) was detected in 2 cases of LP without other evidence for a clonal lymphoid population. To identify cells carrying the t(2;5) translocation, we used immunohistochemistry to detect the ALK-encoded p80 protein and in situ hybridization for the specific detection of NPM-ALK transcripts. Both p80 protein and NPM-ALK transcripts were expressed by anaplastic or large CD30+ lymphoma cells with positive NPM-ALK amplification. The presence of t(2;5) in a subset of CD30+ cutaneous lymphoma and LP may indicate a common pathogenesis with a subset of anaplastic nodal lymphoma. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8701987

  10. ALK F1174V mutation confers sensitivity while ALK I1171 mutation confers resistance to alectinib. The importance of serial biopsy post progression.

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong; Milliken, Jeffrey C; Azada, Michele C; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M; Klempner, Samuel J

    2016-01-01

    Many acquired resistant mutations to the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene have been identified during treatment of ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with crizotinib, ceritinib, and alectinib. These various acquired resistant ALK mutations confer differential sensitivities to various ALK inhibitors and may provide guidance on how to sequence the use of many of the second generation ALK inhibitors. We described a patient who developed an acquired ALK F1174V resistant mutation on progression from crizotinib that responded to alectinib for 18 months but then developed an acquired ALK I1171S mutation to alectinib. Both tumor samples had essentially the same genomic profile by comprehensive genomic profiling otherwise. This is the first patient report that demonstrates ALK F1174V mutation is sensitive to alectinib and further confirms missense acquired ALK I1171 mutation is resistant to alectinib. Sequential tumor re-biopsy for comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) is important to appreciate the selective pressure during treatment with various ALK inhibitors underpinning the evolution of the disease course of ALK+NSCLC patients while on treatment with the various ALK inhibitors. This approach will likely help inform the optimal sequencing strategy as more ALK inhibitors become available. This case report also validates the importance of developing structurally distinct ALK inhibitors for clinical use to overcome non-cross resistant ALK mutations.

  11. Activity of second-generation ALK inhibitors against crizotinib-resistant mutants in an NPM-ALK model compared to EML4-ALK

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Diletta; Ceccon, Monica; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Mologni, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a tyrosine kinase receptor involved in both solid and hematological tumors. About 80% of ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) cases are characterized by the t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocation, encoding for the aberrant fusion protein nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK, whereas 5% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients carry the inv(2)(p21;p23) rearrangement, encoding for the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK fusion. The ALK/c-MET/ROS inhibitor crizotinib successfully improved the treatment of ALK-driven diseases. However, several cases of resistance appeared in NSCLC patients, and ALK amino acid substitutions were identified as a leading cause of resistance to crizotinib. Second-generation ALK inhibitors have been developed in order to overcome crizotinib resistance. In this work, we profiled in vitro the activity of crizotinib, AP26113, ASP3026, alectinib, and ceritinib against six mutated forms of ALK associated with clinical resistance to crizotinib (C1156Y, L1196M, L1152R, G1202R, G1269A, and S1206Y) and provide a classification of mutants according to their level of sensitivity/resistance to the drugs. Since the biological activity of ALK mutations extends beyond the specific type of fusion, both NPM-ALK- and EML4-ALK-positive cellular models were used. Our data revealed that most mutants may be targeted by using different inhibitors. One relevant exception is represented by the G1202R substitution, which was highly resistant to all drugs (>10-fold increased IC50 compared to wild type) and may represent the most challenging mutation to overcome. These results provide a prediction of cross-resistance of known crizotinib-resistant mutations against all second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) clinically available, and therefore could be a useful tool to help clinicians in the management of crizotinib-resistance cases. PMID:25727400

  12. Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma associated with breast implants: a unique entity within the spectrum of peri-implant effusions.

    PubMed

    Chai, Siaw Ming; Kavangh, Simon; Ooi, Sin Sin; Sterrett, Gregory F; Cull, Gavin; Plunkett, Myfanwy; Spagnolo, Dominic; Amanuel, Benhur; Joske, David; Leslie, Connull; Barham, Tony; Frost, Felicity

    2014-11-01

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare and newly described complication associated with breast implants. Patients often present with a peri-implant effusion, which is amenable to fine-needle aspiration. The laboratory handling of peri-implant effusions for cytology and ancillary studies is as crucial as recognizing the characteristic cytology of ALCL. All cases of peri-implant effusions were retrieved from the PathWest database between January 2003 and May 2013, yielding four cases of breast implant-associated ALCL and six benign samples. The cytological features were evaluated and information from ancillary studies collated. Clinical and follow-up histology was available in all cases. All ALCL cases contained highly atypical lymphoid cells including 'hallmark' cells. In contrast, benign peri-implant effusions showed a mixture of inflammatory cells, being either neutrophil-rich (three cases) or lymphocyte-rich (three cases). A CD30 positive, ALK1 negative immunophenotype was demonstrated in all cases on cell block immunohistochemistry. Flow cytometry and T-cell receptor clonality studies confirmed aberrant T-cell immunophenotype in four of four and clonally rearranged T-cell receptor antigens in three of three cases. ALCL was identified in three of four subsequent capsulectomies. Staging confirmed disease limited to the capsular tissue or peri-implant effusion in all cases. None of the six patients with benign peri-implant effusions developed lymphoma during follow-up. Cases of ALCL accounted for 40% of peri-implant effusions received over a 10-year period, indicating the rarity of these samples and the high likelihood of malignancy. Awareness of this entity and its presentation should allow for appropriate triage of these specimens and definitive diagnosis on effusion specimens.

  13. The Utility of Thyroid Transcription Factor 1 (TTF-1), Napsin A, Excision Repair Cross-Complementing 1 (ERCC1), Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) and the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Expression in Small Biopsy in Prognosis of Patients with Lung Adenocarcinoma – A Retrograde Single-Center Study from Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Burazer, Marina Piljić; Mladinov, Suzana; Ćapkun, Vesna; Kuret, Sendi; Durdov, Merica Glavina

    2017-01-01

    Background The present study was carried out in order to evaluate our institutional experience with small biopsy in diagnosis and molecular testing of lung adenocarcinoma. Few specific and predictive markers have been evaluated and correlated with clinicopathologic characteristics and survival in patients with lung adenocarcinoma who received platinum-based chemotherapy. There have not been such reports from Croatia. Material/Methods A total of 142 cases of lung adenocarcinoma were retrospectively investigated in small biopsies for the immunohistochemical expression of TTF-1, napsin A, ERCC1, ALK, and the EGFR mutation by real-time polymerase chain reaction (rtPCR). Results TTF-1, napsin A, and ERCC1 expression was found in 81%, 78%, and 69% of patients, respectively, and the expressions were not significantly associated with subtype. Expression of ALK was found in 4% and EGFR mutation in 10% of patients. Exon 19 deletions were the most common. Longer survival was significantly associated with TTF-1 positivity (p=0.007) and napsin A positivity (p=0.026). Higher relative risk of death significantly correlated with positive expression of ERCC1 (p=0.041). Conclusions Positive TTF-1 and napsin A expressions in lung adenocarcinoma tissues were useful diagnostic and favorable prognostic parameters. Positive ERCC1 expression was identified as a negative prognostic marker in patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. The percentages of EGFR and ALK mutations corresponded to those in previously published reports for Caucasians. PMID:28128193

  14. Primary central nervous system anaplastic large-cell lymphoma mimicking lymphomatosis cerebri.

    PubMed

    Sugino, Toshiya; Mikami, Takeshi; Akiyama, Yukinori; Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Mikuni, Nobuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is usually diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) rarely occurs in the central nervous system. PCNSL always presents as single or multiple nodular contrast-enhancing mass lesions within T2-hyperintense areas on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Infrequently, diffuse infiltrating change with little contrast enhancement called lymphomatosis cerebri can be seen in PCNSL. In this report, we describe a 75-year-old immunocompetent man who had progressive dementia. On MRI, diffuse white matter lesions with little contrast enhancement were observed to gradually progress, which was clinically consistent with his worsening condition. A biopsy specimen revealed non-destructive, diffusely infiltrating, anaplastic large CD30-positive lymphoma, indicating a diagnosis of ALCL. After the biopsy, he was treated by whole brain irradiation (total 46 Gy) and focal boost irradiation (total 14 Gy). However, his performance status worsened and there was no symptom improvement. The patient died 8 months after symptom onset. The clinical course, diagnostic workup, pathologic correlates, and treatment outcomes are described herein.

  15. Cardiac Tamponade Associated with the Presentation of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma in a 2-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Mira-Perceval Juan, Gema; Alcalá Minagorre, Pedro J.; Huertas Sánchez, Ana M.; Segura Sánchez, Sheila; López Iniesta, Silvia; De León Marrero, Francisco J.; Costa Navarro, Estela; Niveiro de Jaime, María

    2015-01-01

    The anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a rare entity in pediatric patients. We present an unusual case of pericardial involvement, quite uncommon as extranodal presentation of this type of disorder, that provoked a life-risk situation requiring an urgent pericardiocentesis. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a child with pericardial involvement without an associated cardiac mass secondary to anaplastic large cell lymphoma in pediatric age. We report the case of a 21-month-old Caucasian male infant with cardiac tamponade associated with the presentation of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Initially, the child presented with 24-day prolonged fever syndrome, cutaneous lesions associated with hepatomegaly, inguinal adenopathies, and pneumonia. After a 21-day asymptomatic period, polypnea and tachycardia were detected in a clinical check-up. Chest X-ray revealed a remarkable increase of the cardiothoracic index. The anaplastic large cell lymphoma has a high incidence of extranodal involvement but myocardial or pericardial involvements are rare. For this reason, we recommend a close monitoring of patients with a differential diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. PMID:26435869

  16. The enzymatic activity of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/IMP cyclohydrolase is enhanced by NPM-ALK: new insights in ALK-mediated pathogenesis and the treatment of ALCL.

    PubMed

    Boccalatte, Francesco E; Voena, Claudia; Riganti, Chiara; Bosia, Amalia; D'Amico, Lucia; Riera, Ludovica; Cheng, Mangeng; Ruggeri, Bruce; Jensen, Ole N; Goss, Valerie L; Lee, Kimberly; Nardone, Julie; Rush, John; Polakiewicz, Roberto D; Comb, Michael J; Chiarle, Roberto; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2009-03-19

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma represents a subset of neoplasms caused by translocations that juxtapose the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) to dimerization partners. The constitutive activation of ALK fusion proteins leads to cellular transformation through a complex signaling network. To elucidate the ALK pathways sustaining lymphomagenesis and tumor maintenance, we analyzed the tyrosine-kinase protein profiles of ALK-positive cell lines using 2 complementary proteomic-based approaches, taking advantage of a specific ALK RNA interference (RNAi) or cell-permeable inhibitors. A well-defined set of ALK-associated tyrosine phosphopeptides, including metabolic enzymes, kinases, ribosomal and cytoskeletal proteins, was identified. Validation studies confirmed that vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase (ATIC) associated with nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK, and their phosphorylation required ALK activity. ATIC phosphorylation was documented in cell lines and primary tumors carrying ALK proteins and other tyrosine kinases, including TPR-Met and wild type c-Met. Functional analyses revealed that ALK-mediated ATIC phosphorylation enhanced its enzymatic activity, dampening the methotrexate-mediated transformylase activity inhibition. These findings demonstrate that proteomic approaches in well-controlled experimental settings allow the definition of informative proteomic profiles and the discovery of novel ALK downstream players that contribute to the maintenance of the neoplastic phenotype. Prediction of tumor responses to methotrexate may justify specific molecular-based chemotherapy.

  17. Efficiency of Crizotinib on an ALK-Positive Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor of the Central Nervous System: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chennouf, Anas; Arslanian, Elizabeth; Roberge, David; Berthelet, France; Bojanowski, Michel; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Masucci, Laura; Belanger, Karl; Florescu, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMT) of the central nervous system (CNS) are rare entities that have a predilection for local recurrences. Approximately half of the inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors contain translocations that result in the over-expression of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene. We hereby present the case of a patient diagnosed with a left parieto-occipital IMT that recurred after multiple surgeries and radiotherapy. Immuno-histochemical examination of the tumor demonstrated ALK overexpression and the presence of an ALK rearrangement observed in lung cancers. The patient was subsequently started on an ALK inhibitor. A response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) partial response was observed by the seventh month of ALK inhibition and the tumor remained in control for 14 months. The current case reiterates the activity of ALK inhibitors within the CNS and suggests that radiotherapy may potentiate the permeability of ALK inhibitors in CNS tumors addicted to ALK signalling.

  18. Excess of NPM-ALK oncogenic signaling promotes cellular apoptosis and drug dependency

    PubMed Central

    Mologni, Luca; Poggio, Teresa; Varesio, Lydia M.; Menotti, Matteo; Bombelli, Silvia; Rigolio, Roberta; Manazza, Andrea D.; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Ambrogio, Chiara; Giudici, Giovanni; Casati, Cesare; Mastini, Cristina; Compagno, Mara; Turner, Suzanne D.; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Chiarle, Roberto; Voena, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Most of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) cases carry the t(2;5; p23;q35) that produces the fusion protein NPM-ALK. NPM-ALK deregulated kinase activity drives several pathways that support malignant transformation of lymphoma cells. We found that in ALK-rearranged ALCL cell lines NPM-ALK was distributed in equal amounts between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Only the cytoplasmic portion was catalytically active in both cell lines and primary ALCL, whereas the nuclear portion was inactive due to heterodimerization with NPM1. Thus, about 50% of the NPM-ALK is not active and sequestered as NPM-ALK/NPM1 heterodimers in the nucleus. Overexpression or re-localization of NPM-ALK to the cytoplasm by NPM genetic knock-out or knock-down caused ERK1/2 increased phosphorylation and cell death through the engagement of an ATM/Chk2 and γH2AX mediated DNA damage response. Remarkably, human NPM-ALK amplified cell lines resistant to ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) underwent apoptosis upon drug withdrawal as a consequence of ERK1/2 hyperactivation. Altogether, these findings indicate that an excess of NPM-ALK activation and signaling induces apoptosis via oncogenic stress responses. A “drug holiday” where the ALK TKI treatment is suspended could represent a therapeutic option in cells that become resistant by NPM-ALK amplification. PMID:26657151

  19. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma in a reconstructed breast using a silicone implant: a UK case report.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, K; Murphy, J; Lennard, A; Wadehra, V; Menon, G K; Collis, N

    2014-04-01

    We present case of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma discovered as an incidental finding whilst revising an implant based breast reconstruction in a 55 year old woman, whom previously had undergone risk reduction mastectomies and immediate reconstruction. During the procedure a presumed seroma was present but this was macroscopically atypical giving a 'milky' coloured appearance with a pink tinge to it. The atypical fluid was sent for analysis and the diagnosis of ALCL confirmed. Treatment consisted of unilateral capsulectomy on the affected side and bilateral removal of implants with staging scans suggesting the disease being confined to the capsule. She remains in remission 12 months following the original procedure.

  20. Coming of Age: Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma After 18 Years of Investigation.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Mark W; Miranda, Roberto N

    2015-10-01

    Breast implant associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIALCL) is a distinct clinical entity that can present in patients receiving either reconstructive or cosmetic breast implants. Presenting symptoms include onset of a delayed (>1 year after implantation) fluid collection, mass of the capsule, or lymphadenopathy. Treatment has progressed in recent years and most commonly includes implant removal and total resection of the tumor, including capsule, mass, and involved lymph nodes. Further research is warranted to determine potential malignant drivers, disease progression, and optimal treatment strategies in advanced disease.

  1. ALK Gene Copy Number Gain and Immunohistochemical Expression Status Using Three Antibodies in Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Sewha

    2017-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase ( ALK) gene aberrations-such as mutations, amplifications, and copy number gains-represent a major genetic predisposition to neuroblastoma (NB). This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between ALK gene copy number status, ALK protein expression, and clinicopathological parameters. We retrospectively retrieved 30 cases of poorly differentiated NB and constructed tissue microarrays (TMAs). ALK copy number changes were assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays, and ALK immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing was performed using three different antibodies (ALK1, D5F3, and 5A4 clones). ALK amplification and copy number gain were observed in 10% (3/30) and 53.3% (16/30) of the cohort, respectively. There were positive correlations between ALK copy number and IHC-positive rate in ALK1 and 5A4 antibodies ( P < 0.001 and P = 0.019, respectively). ALK1, D5F3, and 5A4 antibodies equally showed 100% sensitivity in detecting ALK amplification. However, the sensitivity for detecting copy number gain differed among the three antibodies, with 75% sensitivity in D5F3 and 0% sensitivity in ALK1. ALK-amplified NBs were correlated with synchronous MYCN amplification and chromosome 1p deletion. ALK IHC positivity was frequently observed in INSS stage IV and high-risk group patients. In conclusion, this study identified that an increase in the ALK copy number is a frequent genetic alteration in poorly differentiated NB. ALK-amplified NBs showed consistent ALK IHC positivity with all kinds of antibodies. In contrast, the detection performance of ALK copy number gain was antibody dependent, with the D5F3 antibody showing the best sensitivity.

  2. Personalized treatment in advanced ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer: from bench to clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Passaro, Antonio; Lazzari, Chiara; Karachaliou, Niki; Spitaleri, Gianluca; Pochesci, Alessia; Catania, Chiara; Rosell, Rafael; de Marinis, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements and the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) that target them have achieved unprecedented success in the management of patients with ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Despite the high efficacy of crizotinib, the first oral ALK TKI approved for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC, almost all patients inevitably develop acquired resistance, showing disease progression in the brain or in other parenchymal sites. Second- or third-generation ALK TKIs have shown to be active in crizotinib-pretreated or crizotinib-naïve ALK-positive patients, even in those with brain metastases. In this review, the current knowledge regarding ALK-positive NSCLC, focusing on the biology of the disease and the available therapeutic options are discussed. PMID:27799783

  3. Acute spontaneous tumor lysis in anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma presenting with hyperuricemic acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiang-Hao; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2004-01-01

    Acute spontaneous tumor lysis (ASTL) syndrome, an extremely rare disease, requires prompt recognition and aggressive management because it is fulminant at its outset, associated with severe metabolic derangement, and potentially reversible. We describe an unusual case in which spontaneous tumor lysis occurred in anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma associated with acute uric acid nephropathy, persistent oliguria, and shock. This case contrasts markedly with previously reported cases of ASTL syndrome, which developed mainly in the pathologic type of Burkitt lymphoma. To our knowledge, this is the first reported occurrence of ASTL syndrome associated with anaplastic large T-cell type lymphoma. This report also chronicles our successful experience with continuous renal replacement therapy in the presence of compromised hemodynamic status.

  4. Implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the breast: Insight into a poorly understood disease.

    PubMed

    Weathers, William M; Wolfswinkel, Erik M; Hatef, Daniel A; Lee, Edward I; Hollier, Larry H; Brown, Rodger H

    2013-01-01

    Implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is the subject of much debate in the field of plastic surgery. Only a few published cases have been reported and the rarity of the disease may make proving causality exceedingly difficult. Despite this, it is of utmost importance that full attention be devoted to this subject to ensure the safety and well-being of patients. The authors report one new case of implant-associated ALCL that recently presented to their institution. Implant-associated ALCL is a poorly understood disease. It should likely be considered its own clinical entity and categorized into two subtypes: one presenting as a seroma and the other as a distinct mass or masses. When reported, only textured implants have been associated with ALCL. The United States Food and Drug Administration and American Society of Plastic Surgeons have initiated a registry and have collected critical data to gain further understanding of this disease.

  5. Activated Alk triggers prolonged neurogenesis and Ret upregulation providing a therapeutic target in ALK-mutated neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Cazes, Alex; Lopez-Delisle, Lucille; Tsarovina, Konstantina; Pierre-Eugène, Cécile; De Preter, Katleen; Peuchmaur, Michel; Nicolas, André; Provost, Claire; Louis-Brennetot, Caroline; Daveau, Romain; Kumps, Candy; Cascone, Ilaria; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Prignon, Aurélie; Speleman, Frank; Rohrer, Hermann; Delattre, Olivier; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations of the ALK (Anaplastic lymphoma Kinase) gene have been identified in sporadic and familial cases of neuroblastoma, a cancer of early childhood arising from the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). To decipher ALK function in neuroblastoma predisposition and oncogenesis, we have characterized knock-in (KI) mice bearing the two most frequent mutations observed in neuroblastoma patients. A dramatic enlargement of sympathetic ganglia is observed in AlkF1178L mice from embryonic to adult stages associated with an increased proliferation of sympathetic neuroblasts from E14.5 to birth. In a MYCN transgenic context, the F1178L mutation displays a higher oncogenic potential than the R1279Q mutation as evident from a shorter latency of tumor onset. We show that tumors expressing the R1279Q mutation are sensitive to ALK inhibition upon crizotinib treatment. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that activated ALK triggers RET upregulation in mouse sympathetic ganglia at birth as well as in murine and human neuroblastoma. Using vandetanib, we show that RET inhibition strongly impairs tumor growth in vivo in both MYCN/KI AlkR1279Q and MYCN/KI AlkF1178L mice. Altogether, our findings demonstrate the critical role of activated ALK in SNS development and pathogenesis and identify RET as a therapeutic target in ALK mutated neuroblastoma. PMID:24811913

  6. Identification of the transforming STRN-ALK fusion as a potential therapeutic target in the aggressive forms of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Lindsey M.; Barila, Guillermo; Liu, Pengyuan; Evdokimova, Viktoria N.; Trivedi, Sumita; Panebianco, Federica; Gandhi, Manoj; Carty, Sally E.; Hodak, Steven P.; Luo, Jianhua; Dacic, Sanja; Yu, Yan P.; Nikiforova, Marina N.; Ferris, Robert L.; Altschuler, Daniel L.; Nikiforov, Yuri E.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common endocrine malignancy that encompasses well-differentiated as well as dedifferentiated cancer types. The latter tumors have high mortality and lack effective therapies. Using a paired-end RNA-sequencing approach, we report the discovery of rearrangements involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene in thyroid cancer. The most common of these involves a fusion between ALK and the striatin (STRN) gene, which is the result of a complex rearrangement involving the short arm of chromosome 2. STRN-ALK leads to constitutive activation of ALK kinase via dimerization mediated by the coiled-coil domain of STRN and to a kinase-dependent, thyroid-stimulating hormone–independent proliferation of thyroid cells. Moreover, expression of STRN-ALK transforms cells in vitro and induces tumor formation in nude mice. The kinase activity of STRN-ALK and the ALK-induced cell growth can be blocked by the ALK inhibitors crizotinib and TAE684. In addition to well-differentiated papillary cancer, STRN-ALK was found with a higher prevalence in poorly differentiated and anaplastic thyroid cancers, and it did not overlap with other known driver mutations in these tumors. Our data demonstrate that STRN-ALK fusion occurs in a subset of patients with highly aggressive types of thyroid cancer and provide initial evidence suggesting that it may represent a therapeutic target for these patients. PMID:24613930

  7. A causal link from ALK to hexokinase II overexpression and hyperactive glycolysis in EML4-ALK-positive lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yibao; Yu, Chunrong; Mohamed, Esraa M.; Shao, Huanjie; Wang, Li; Sundaresan, Gobalakrishnan; Zweit, Jamal; Idowu, Michael; Fang, Xianjun

    2016-01-01

    A high rate of aerobic glycolysis is a hallmark of malignant transformation. Accumulating evidence suggests that diverse regulatory mechanisms mediate this cancer-associated metabolic change seen in a wide spectrum of cancer. The echinoderm microtubule associated protein-like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) fusion protein is found in approximately 3-7% of non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). Molecular evidence and therapeutic effectiveness of FDA-approved ALK inhibitors indicated that EML4-ALK is a driving factor of lung tumorigenesis. A recent clinical study showed that NSCLC harboring EML4-ALK rearrangements displayed higher glucose metabolism compared to EML4-ALK-negative NSCLC. In the current work, we presented evidence that EML4-ALK is coupled to overexpression of hexokinase II (HK2), one of the rate-limiting enzymes of the glycolytic pathway. The link from EML4-ALK to HK2 upregulation is essential for a high rate of glycolysis and proliferation of EML4-ALK-rearranged NSCLC cells. We identified hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) as a key transcription factor to drive HK2 gene expression in normoxia in these cells. EML4-ALK induced hypoxia-independent but glucose-dependent accumulation of HIF1α protein via both transcriptional activation of HIF1α mRNA and the PI3K-AKT pathway to enhance HIF1α protein synthesis. The EML4-ALK-mediated upregulation of HIF1α, HK2 and glycolytic metabolism was also highly active in vivo as demonstrated by FDG-PET imaging of xenografts grown from EML4-ALK-positive NSCLC cells. Our data reveal a novel EML4-ALK-HIF1α-HK2 cascade to enhance glucose metabolism in EML4-ALK-positive NSCLC. PMID:27132509

  8. Breast Implant Informed Consent Should Include the Risk of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Mark W; Miranda, Roberto N; Butler, Charles E

    2016-04-01

    Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare T-cell lymphoma arising around breast implants. Public awareness has increased following a safety communication warning of the association of breast implant-associated ALCL by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2011. Difficulty with determining an accurate assessment of risk, including diagnosis, or standardized treatment regimen has led surgeons to commonly omit preoperative discussion of this rare and frequently misunderstood cancer. Risk disclosure is a form of respect for patient autonomy, and informed consent has positive practical and moral consequences for the practice of plastic surgery. A model of breast implant-associated ALCL informed consent implementation and health care provider education are reviewed with 1-year process follow-up at a tertiary cancer center. Breast implant-associated ALCL should be included during preoperative counseling on the risks of breast implantation when obtaining informed consent. Pertinent aspects of decision-making include disease awareness, presenting symptoms, and resources for concerned patients. Education of health care professionals and provision of patient-focused materials ensures effectiveness of the informed consent process.

  9. Canadian consensus: inhibition of ALK-positive tumours in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Melosky, B.; Agulnik, J.; Albadine, R.; Banerji, S.; Bebb, D.G.; Bethune, D.; Blais, N.; Butts, C.; Cheema, P.; Cheung, P.; Cohen, V.; Deschenes, J.; Ionescu, D.N.; Juergens, R.; Kamel-Reid, S.; Laurie, S.A.; Liu, G.; Morzycki, W.; Tsao, M.S.; Xu, Z.; Hirsh, V.

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (alk) is an oncogenic driver in non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc). Chromosomal rearrangements involving the ALK gene occur in up to 4% of nonsquamous nsclc patients and lead to constitutive activation of the alk signalling pathway. ALK-positive nsclc is found in relatively young patients, with a median age of 50 years. Patients frequently have brain metastasis. Targeted inhibition of the alk pathway prolongs progression-free survival in patients with ALK-positive advanced nsclc. The results of several recent clinical trials confirm the efficacy and safety benefit of crizotinib and ceritinib in this population. Canadian oncologists support the following consensus statement: All patients with advanced nonsquamous nsclc (excluding pure neuroendocrine carcinoma) should be tested for the presence of an ALK rearrangement. If an ALK rearrangement is present, treatment with a targeted alk inhibitor in the first-line setting is recommended. As patients become resistant to first-generation alk inhibitors, other treatments, including second-generation alk inhibitors can be considered. PMID:27330348

  10. ALK gene expression status in pleural effusion predicts tumor responsiveness to crizotinib in Chinese patients with lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Wu, Xiaonan; Han, Xiaohong; Cheng, Gang; Mu, Xinlin; Zhang, Yuhui; Cui, Di; Liu, Chang; Liu, Dongge; Shi, Yuankai

    2016-01-01

    Objective The relationship between anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) expression in malignant pleural effusion (MPE) samples detected only by Ventana immunohistochemistry (IHC) ALK (D5F3) and the efficacy of ALK-tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy is uncertain. Methods Ventana anti-ALK (D5F3) rabbit monoclonal primary antibody testing was performed on 313 cell blocks of MPE samples from Chinese patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to verify the ALK gene status in Ventana IHC ALK (D5F3)-positive samples. The follow-up clinical data on patients who received crizotinib treatment were recorded. Results Of the 313 MPE samples, 27 (8.6%) were confirmed as ALK expression-positive, and the Ventana IHC ALK (D5F3)-positive rate was 17.3% (27/156) in wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) MPE samples. Twenty-three of the 27 IHC ALK (D5F3)-positive samples were positive by FISH. Of the 11 Ventana IHC ALK (D5F3)-positive patients who received crizotinib therapy, 2 patients had complete response (CR), 5 had partial response (PR) and 3 had stable disease (SD). Conclusions The ALK gene expression status detected by the Ventana IHC ALK (D5F3) platform in MPE samples may predict tumor responsiveness to crizotinib in Chinese patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:28174489

  11. New therapeutic strategies in neuroblastoma: combined targeting of a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor and liposomal siRNAs against ALK

    PubMed Central

    Di Paolo, Daniela; Yang, D.; Pastorino, Fabio; Emionite, Laura; Cilli, Michele; Daga, Antonio; Destefanis, Elisa; Di Fiore, Annarita; Piaggio, Francesca; Brignole, Chiara; Xu, Xiaobao; Liang, Chris; Gibbons, James

    2015-01-01

    Many different aberrations in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) were found to be oncogenic drivers in several cancers including neuroblastoma (NB), therefore ALK is now considered a critical player in NB oncogenesis and a promising therapeutic target. The ALK-inhibitor crizotinib has a limited activity against the various ALK mutations identified in NB patients. We tested: the activity of the novel ALK-inhibitor X-396 administered alone or in combination with Targeted Liposomes carrying ALK-siRNAs (TL[ALK-siRNA]) that are active irrespective of ALK gene mutational status; the pharmacokinetic profiles and the biodistribution of X-396; the efficacy of X-396 versus crizotinib treatment in NB xenografts; whether the combination of X-396 with the TL[ALK-siRNA] could promote long-term survival in NB mouse models. X-396 revealed good bioavailability, moderate half-life, high mean plasma and tumor concentrations. X-396 was more effective than crizotinib in inhibiting in vitro cell proliferation of NB cells and in reducing tumor volume in subcutaneous NB models in a dose-dependent manner. In orthotopic NB xenografts, X-396 significantly increased life span independently of the ALK mutation status. In combination studies, all effects were significantly improved in the mice treated with TL[ALK-siRNA] and X-396 compared to mice receiving the single agents. Our findings provide a rational basis to design innovative molecular-based treatment combinations for clinical application in ALK-driven NB tumors. PMID:26299615

  12. New therapeutic strategies in neuroblastoma: combined targeting of a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor and liposomal siRNAs against ALK.

    PubMed

    Di Paolo, Daniela; Yang, D; Pastorino, Fabio; Emionite, Laura; Cilli, Michele; Daga, Antonio; Destafanis, Elisa; Di Fiore, Annarita; Piaggio, Francesca; Brignole, Chiara; Xu, Xiaobao; Liang, Chris; Gibbons, James; Ponzoni, Mirco; Perri, Patrizia

    2015-10-06

    Many different aberrations in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) were found to be oncogenic drivers in several cancers including neuroblastoma (NB), therefore ALK is now considered a critical player in NB oncogenesis and a promising therapeutic target. The ALK-inhibitor crizotinib has a limited activity against the various ALK mutations identified in NB patients. We tested: the activity of the novel ALK-inhibitor X-396 administered alone or in combination with Targeted Liposomes carrying ALK-siRNAs (TL[ALK-siRNA]) that are active irrespective of ALK gene mutational status; the pharmacokinetic profiles and the biodistribution of X-396; the efficacy of X-396 versus crizotinib treatment in NB xenografts; whether the combination of X-396 with the TL[ALK-siRNA] could promote long-term survival in NB mouse models. X-396 revealed good bioavailability, moderate half-life, high mean plasma and tumor concentrations. X-396 was more effective than crizotinib in inhibiting in vitro cell proliferation of NB cells and in reducing tumor volume in subcutaneous NB models in a dose-dependent manner. In orthotopic NB xenografts, X-396 significantly increased life span independently of the ALK mutation status. In combination studies, all effects were significantly improved in the mice treated with TL[ALK-siRNA] and X-396 compared to mice receiving the single agents. Our findings provide a rational basis to design innovative molecular-based treatment combinations for clinical application in ALK-driven NB tumors.

  13. Achievements and future developments of ALK-TKIs in the management of CNS metastases from ALK-positive NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Cappuzzo, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents the paradigm of personalized treatment of human cancer. Several oncogenic druggable alterations have been so far identified, with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements being one of the newest and most appealing. Presence of ALK fusions is associated with some particular clinical and pathological features, including a preferential seeding into the central nervous system (CNS). In addition, ALK rearrangements are recognized as the strongest predictor for benefit of anti-ALK therapy. Crizotinib, the first ALK inhibitor (ALK-I) licensed in clinical practice, is the standard of care for newly diagnosed patients. Unfortunately, within the first year of treatment the majority of patients become insensitive to crizotinib, with approximately one third of them developing brain metastases (BMs). Optimal management of BMs is one of the major challenges in treating ALK positive NSCLC. Several novel and highly CNS penetrant ALK-Is are currently under investigation and available data clearly indicated their ability in controlling intracranial disease. PMID:28149753

  14. ALK and ROS1 as targeted therapy paradigms and clinical implications to overcome crizotinib resistance.

    PubMed

    Ye, Mingxiang; Zhang, Xinxin; Li, Nan; Zhang, Yong; Jing, Pengyu; Chang, Ning; Wu, Jianxiong; Ren, Xinling; Zhang, Jian

    2016-03-15

    During the past decade, more than 10 targetable oncogenic driver genes have been validated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and ROS1 kinase are two new driver genes implicated in ALK- and ROS1-rearranged NSCLC. Inhibition of ALK and ROS1 by crizotinib has been reported to be highly effective and well tolerated in these patients. However, resistance to crizotinib emerges years after treatment, and increasing efforts have been made to overcome this issue. Here, we review the biology of ALK and ROS1 and their roles in cancer progression. We also summarize the ongoing and completed clinical trials validating ALK and ROS1 as targets for cancer treatment. In the last section of the review, we will discuss the molecular mechanisms of crizotinib resistance and focus approaches to overcome it. This review describes an exciting new area of research and may provide new insights for targeted cancer therapies.

  15. Treatment of Primary Cutaneous CD30+ Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, James B.; McNiff, Jennifer M.; Lund, Molly W.; Wilson, Lynn D.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Primary cutaneous CD30+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (CALCL) is a relatively rare and indolent variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). This report examines the response of localized disease to radiation alone. Methods: The Yale Cancer Center records were examined, and all patients with CTCL from January 1, 2001, to September 1, 2006, evaluated in the Department of Therapeutic Radiology were identified. Only those patients with localized or single CALCL lesions, no clinical evidence or history of lymphomatoid papulosis, no history of other CTCLs, no history of other skin disorders, lack of lymph node involvement, unambiguous pathology reports, and treatment with radiation alone were included. Results: Eight patients were identified. Median age was 67 years, and gender was split evenly. Patients received radiation ranging from 34 to 44 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Most patients (5 of 8) received 40 Gy, using 6 to 9 MeV electrons with 0.5 to 2 cm of bolus. All patients had a complete response. All patients were without evidence of disease at the most recent follow-up (median follow-up, 12 months). Radiation therapy was well tolerated, and the only recorded toxicity was Grade I to II dermatitis. Conclusions: Radiation therapy alone for localized CALCL is very well tolerated and clinical response is excellent. A dose of 40 Gy in 2-Gy fractions seems to be well tolerated and effective in inducing a complete response. Lower doses may be effective in achieving the same result, but data are not available. Longer follow-up is necessary before conclusions regarding durable disease-free survival can be made.

  16. Anaplastic T large cell lymphoma diagnosed by exfoliative cytology in a post renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Treaba, Diana; Assad, Lina; Goldberg, Cathryn; Loew, Jerome; Reddy, Vijaya B; Kluskens, Larry; Gattuso, Paolo

    2002-07-01

    In the last two decades posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) have been recognized as a complication of organ transplantation with immunosuppression. The reported incidence of PTLDs in renal transplant patients ranges between 0.3-3% (Birkeland et al., Transplantation 1999;67:876-881). In contrast to the reported incidence of PTLDs in post bone marrow transplant, it is 1% in HLA-matched recipients and up to 20% in HLA mismatched T-cell depleted bone marrow recipients (Curtis et al., Blood 1996;94:2208-2216). In cardiac transplant recipients the reported incidence of PTLDs is between 1.8-9.8 (Mihalov et al., Clin Transplant 1996;10:248-255). PTLDs are predominately extranodal. They have varied morphologic patterns and clonality, but almost all are associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The vast majority are of B cell lineage; only about 10% are of T-cell origin. We report a T-cell anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) presenting with bilateral pleural effusion and liver involvement in a renal transplant recipient.

  17. Oncogenic kinase NPM/ALK induces through STAT3 expression of immunosuppressive protein CD274 (PD-L1, B7-H1)

    PubMed Central

    Marzec, Michal; Zhang, Qian; Goradia, Ami; Raghunath, Puthiyaveettil N.; Liu, Xiaobin; Paessler, Michele; Wang, Hong Yi; Wysocka, Maria; Cheng, Mangeng; Ruggeri, Bruce A.; Wasik, Mariusz A.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms of malignant cell transformation caused by the oncogenic, chimeric nucleophosmin (NPM)/anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) remain only partially understood, with most of the previous studies focusing mainly on the impact of NPM/ALK on cell survival and proliferation. Here we report that the NPM/ALK-carrying T cell lymphoma (ALK+TCL) cells strongly express the immunosuppressive cell-surface protein CD274 (PD-L1, B7-H1), as determined on the mRNA and protein level. The CD274 expression is strictly dependent on the expression and enzymatic activity of NPM/ALK, as demonstrated by inhibition of the NPM/ALK function in ALK+TCL cells by the small molecule ALK inhibitor CEP-14083 and by documenting CD274 expression in IL-3-depleted BaF3 cells transfected with the wild-type NPM/ALK, but not the kinase-inactive NPM/ALK K210R mutant or empty vector alone. NPM/ALK induces CD274 expression by activating its key signal transmitter, transcription factor STAT3. STAT3 binds to the CD274 gene promoter in vitro and in vivo, as shown in the gel electromobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, and is required for the PD-L1 gene expression, as demonstrated by siRNA-mediated STAT3 depletion. These findings identify an additional cell-transforming property of NPM/ALK and describe a direct link between an oncoprotein and an immunosuppressive cell-surface protein. These results also provide an additional rationale to therapeutically target NPM/ALK and STAT3 in ALK+TCL. Finally, they suggest that future immunotherapeutic protocols for this type of lymphoma may need to include the inhibition of NPM/ALK and STAT3 to achieve optimal clinical efficacy. PMID:19088198

  18. Activation of the orphan receptor tyrosine kinase ALK by zinc.

    PubMed

    Bennasroune, Aline; Mazot, Pierre; Boutterin, Marie-Claude; Vigny, Marc

    2010-08-06

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase essentially and transiently expressed during development of the central and peripheral nervous system. The nature of the cognate ligand of this receptor in Vertebrates is still a matter of debate. During synaptic transmission the release of ionic zinc found in vesicles of certain glutamatergic and gabaergic terminals may act as a neuromodulator by binding to pre- or post-synaptic receptors. Recently, zinc has been shown to activate the receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkB, independently of neurotrophins. This activation occurs via increasing the Src family kinase activity. In the present study, we investigated whether the ALK activity could be modulated by extracellular zinc. We first showed that zinc alone rapidly activates ALK. This activation is dependent of ALK tyrosine kinase activity and dimerization of the receptor but is independent of Src family kinase activity. In contrast, addition of sodium pyrithione, a zinc ionophore, led to a further activation of ALK. This stronger activation is dependent of Src family kinase but independent of ALK activity and dimerization. In conclusion, zinc could constitute an endogenous ligand of ALK in vertebrates.

  19. CD13-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma of T-cell origin--a diagnostic and histogenetic problem.

    PubMed

    Popnikolov, N K; Payne, D A; Hudnall, S D; Hawkins, H K; Kumar, M; Norris, B A; Elghetany, M T

    2000-12-01

    The expression of myelomonocytic-associated antigens in anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCLs), particularly those presenting in extranodal sites, can make their distinction from extramedullary myeloid cell tumors (EMCTs) or histiocytic tumors problematic. Yet, this distinction is clinically significant because of its therapeutic and prognostic implications. Herein, we describe a case of extranodal anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive CD30-positive ALCL of T-cell origin in a 12-year-old boy, which was initially called an EMCT because of the expression of CD13 and HLA-DR detected by flow cytometry and the absence of other T-cell-related surface markers. However, the detection of cytoplasmic CD3 by flow cytometry prompted further studies. The tumor was composed of large cells with abundant slightly eosinophilic vacuolated cytoplasm and ovoid or reniform nuclei with a few small nucleoli. Using immunohistochemistry, the tumor was positive for CD45, CD30, CD45RO, and CD43 with a strong cytoplasmic and nuclear anaplastic lymphoma kinase stain. The tumor cells showed a T-cell clonal genotype. Electron microscopy revealed no ultrastructural features of myelomonocytic or histiocytic origin. The patient responded well to the chemotherapy and was in complete remission for 10 months at the time of submission of this manuscript. Review of the literature showed inconsistencies regarding the diagnosis, nomenclature, and, therefore, treatment and prognosis of these tumors. In addition, the CD13 expression in ALCL raises some histogenetic questions and may indicate origin from a pluripotent stem cell, misprogramming during malignant transformation, or a microenvironmental effect on lymphoid cell expression of surface antigens. Therefore, ALCL should be considered in the differential diagnosis of EMCTs or histiocytic tumors, particularly when surface marker lineage assignment is ambiguous.

  20. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Other Thyroid Cancers: Medullary, Anaplastic, Lymphoma and So Forth

    PubMed Central

    Araz, Mine; Çayır, Derya

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is used in staging, restaging, and evaluation of therapy response in many cancers as well as differentiated thyroid carcinomas especially in non-iodine avid variants. Its potential in less frequent thyroid tumors like medullary, anaplastic thyroid cancers, thyroid lymphoma and metastatic tumors of the thyroid however, is not well established yet. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the recent applications and indications of 18F-FDG PET/CT in these tumors and to focus on the controversies in the clinical setting. PMID:28291004

  1. Bone involvement and abcess formation by neutrophil-rich CD30+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma mimicking skeletal infection in an AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    Mira, José A; Fernández-Alonso, Jorge; Macías, Juan; Sáez, Carmen; Japón, Miguel A; Pereda, Teresa; Pineda, Juan A

    2003-07-01

    Neutrophil-rich CD30+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare pathological entity without distinct clinical behavior. Twelve cases of neutrophil-rich CD30+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) have been reported, three of them were HIV-infected patients. All these reports stressed the presence of neutrophil infiltration as a new morphologic feature of CD30+ ALCL. Only one case of cutaneous involvement presented with microabscess formation. We describe a case of neutrophil-rich CD30+ ALCL in an AIDS patient with a clinical picture determined by the massive neutrophil infiltration of the tumor without necrosis nor local infection, but with the formation of abscesses.

  2. Detection of ALK rearrangements in lung cancer patients using a homebrew PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Chang, JianHua; Liu, Fang; Wang, Qifeng; Lu, YongMing; Zhang, ZhuanXu; Shen, Jiabing; Zhai, Qing; Meng, Xia; Wang, Jialei; Ye, Xun

    2017-01-31

    Lung cancer patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements are candidates for targeted therapeutics. However, patients must be tested with a companion diagnostic assay to realize their ALK rearrangement status. We analyzed the publicly available E-GEOD-31210 microarray dataset and identified a non-coding RNA, sweyjawbu, which is strongly associated with ALK rearrangements. We validated these results using quantitative real-time PCR in an independent cohort consisting of 4 cell lines and 83 clinical samples. We could differentiate between ALK rearrangement-positive and -negative lung cancer samples by comparing sweyjawbu expression. Additionally, ALK rearrangement status was determined by comparing the expression of the 5' and 3' regions of the ALK transcript or by detecting known ALK hybrid subtypes. Thus, using our homebrew PCR assay, we were able to accurately detect ALK rearrangements, which could be used for diagnostic screening of lung cancer patients. The prototype could potentially be transferred to an automatic multiplex PCR platform (FilmArray) to differentiate between ALK rearrangement-positive and -negative patients in point-of-care settings.

  3. Novel CAD-ALK gene rearrangement is drugable by entrectinib in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Amatu, Alessio; Somaschini, Alessio; Cerea, Giulio; Bosotti, Roberta; Valtorta, Emanuele; Buonandi, Pasquale; Marrapese, Giovanna; Veronese, Silvio; Luo, David; Hornby, Zachary; Multani, Pratik; Murphy, Danielle; Shoemaker, Robert; Lauricella, Calogero; Giannetta, Laura; Maiolani, Martina; Vanzulli, Angelo; Ardini, Elena; Galvani, Arturo; Isacchi, Antonella; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Siena, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Background: Activated anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fusions are recurrent events in a small fraction of colorectal cancers (CRCs), although these events have not yet been exploited as in other malignancies. Methods: We detected ALK protein expression by immunohistochemistry and gene rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridisation in the ALKA-372-001 phase I study of the pan-Trk, ROS1, and ALK inhibitor entrectinib. One out of 487 CRCs showed ALK positivity with a peculiar pattern that prompted further characterisation by targeted sequencing using anchored multiplex PCR. Results: A novel ALK fusion with the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamylase, and dihydroorotase (CAD) gene (CAD-ALK fusion gene) was identified. It resulted from inversion within chromosome 2 and the fusion of exons 1–35 of CAD with exons 20–29 of ALK. After failure of previous standard therapies, treatment of this patient with the ALK inhibitor entrectinib resulted in a durable objective tumour response. Conclusions: We describe the novel CAD-ALK rearrangement as an oncogene and provide the first evidence of its drugability as a new molecular target in CRC. PMID:26633560

  4. ALK and ROS1 as a joint target for the treatment of lung cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Puig de la Bellacasa, Raimon; Karachaliou, Niki; Estrada-Tejedor, Roger; Teixidó, Jordi; Costa, Carlota; Borrell, José I

    2013-04-01

    Rearrangements of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have been described in multiple malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ALK fusions have gain of function properties while activating mutations in wild-type ALK can also occur within the tyrosine kinase domain. ALK rearrangements define a new molecular subtype of NSCLC that is exquisitely sensitive to ALK inhibition. Crizotinib, an orally available small molecule ATP-mimetic compound which was originally designed as a MET inhibitor, was recognized to have "off-target" anti-ALK activity and has been approved in the USA for the treatment of patients with ALK-positive NSCLC. Chromosomal rearrangements involving the ROS1 receptor tyrosine kinase have also been recently described in NSCLC, while crizotinib is currently under clinical trial in this molecular subset of NSCLC patients. The basic approaches of any computer aided drug design work in terms of structure and ligand based drug design. Details of each of these approaches should be covered with an emphasis on utilizing both in order to develop multi-targeted small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Such multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors can have antiproliferative activity against both ROS1and ALK rearranged NSCLC. Herein, we highlight the importance of targeting these proteins and the advances in optimizing more potent and selective ALK and ROS1 kinase inhibitors.

  5. ALK and ROS1 as a joint target for the treatment of lung cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Puig de la Bellacasa, Raimon; Karachaliou, Niki; Estrada-Tejedor, Roger; Teixidó, Jordi; Costa, Carlota

    2013-01-01

    Rearrangements of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have been described in multiple malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ALK fusions have gain of function properties while activating mutations in wild-type ALK can also occur within the tyrosine kinase domain. ALK rearrangements define a new molecular subtype of NSCLC that is exquisitely sensitive to ALK inhibition. Crizotinib, an orally available small molecule ATP-mimetic compound which was originally designed as a MET inhibitor, was recognized to have “off-target” anti-ALK activity and has been approved in the USA for the treatment of patients with ALK-positive NSCLC. Chromosomal rearrangements involving the ROS1 receptor tyrosine kinase have also been recently described in NSCLC, while crizotinib is currently under clinical trial in this molecular subset of NSCLC patients. The basic approaches of any computer aided drug design work in terms of structure and ligand based drug design. Details of each of these approaches should be covered with an emphasis on utilizing both in order to develop multi-targeted small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Such multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors can have antiproliferative activity against both ROS1and ALK rearranged NSCLC. Herein, we highlight the importance of targeting these proteins and the advances in optimizing more potent and selective ALK and ROS1 kinase inhibitors. PMID:25806218

  6. Crizotinib for Untreated Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of a NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Philip; Woolacott, Nerys; Biswas, Mousumi; Mebrahtu, Teumzghi; Harden, Melissa; Hodgson, Robert

    2017-03-24

    As part of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) single technology appraisal process, the manufacturer of crizotinib submitted evidence on the clinical and cost effectiveness of crizotinib in untreated anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive (ALK-positive) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Crizotinib has previously been assessed by NICE for patients with previously treated ALK-positive NSCLC (TA 296). It was not approved in this previous appraisal, but had been made available through the cancer drugs fund. As part of this new appraisal, the company included a price discount patient access scheme (PAS). The Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and Centre for Health Economics Technology Appraisal Group at the University of York was commissioned to act as the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG). This article provides a description of the company's submission and the ERG's review and summarises the resulting NICE guidance issued in August 2016. The main clinical-effectiveness data were derived from a multicentre randomised controlled trial-PROFILE 1014-that compared crizotinib with pemetrexed chemotherapy in combination with carboplatin or cisplatin in patients with untreated non-squamous ALK-positive NSCLC. In the trial, crizotinib demonstrated improvements in progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). The company's economic model was a three-state 'area under the curve' Markov model. The base-case incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was estimated to be greater than £50,000 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained (excluding the PAS discount). The ERG assessment of the evidence submitted by the company raised a number of concerns. In terms of the clinical evidence, the OS benefit was highly uncertain due to the cross-over permitted in the trial and the immaturity of the data; only 26% of events had occurred by the data cut-off point. In the economic modelling, the most significant concerns related to the analysis

  7. Oncogenic TPM3-ALK activation requires dimerization through the coiled-coil structure of TPM3

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, Yosuke; Ishikawa, Rie; Sakatani, Toshio; Ichinose, Junji; Sunohara, Mitsuhiro; Watanabe, Kousuke; Kage, Hidenori; Nakajima, Jun; Nagase, Takahide; Ohishi, Nobuya; Takai, Daiya

    2015-02-13

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a mesenchymal tumor that can arise from anywhere in the body. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements, most often resulting in the tropomyosin 3 (TPM3)-ALK fusion gene, are the main causes of IMT. However, the mechanism of malignant transformation in IMT has yet to be elucidated. The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of the TPM3 region in the transformation of IMT via TPM3-ALK. Lentivirus vectors containing a TPM3-ALK fusion gene lacking various lengths of TPM3 were constructed and expressed in HEK293T and NIH3T3 cell lines. Focus formation assay revealed loss of contact inhibition in NIH3T3 cells transfected with full-length TPM3-ALK, but not with ALK alone. Blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) revealed that TPM3-ALK dimerization increased in proportion to the length of TPM3. Western blot showed phosphorylation of ALK, ERK1/2, and STAT3 in HEK293T cells transfected with TPM3-ALK. Thus, the coiled-coil structure of TPM3 contributes to the transforming ability of the TPM3-ALK fusion protein, and longer TPM3 region leads to higher dimer formation. - Highlights: • TPM3-ALK fusion protein dimerizes through the coiled-coil structure of TPM3. • Longer coiled-coil structure of TPM3 leads to higher TPM3-ALK dimer formation. • Presence of TPM3-ALK dimer leads to ALK, STAT3, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. • Presence of TPM3-ALK leads to loss of contact inhibition. • BN-PAGE is a simple technique for visualizing oncogenic dimerization.

  8. A patient previously treated with ALK inhibitors for central nervous system lesions from ALK rearranged lung cancer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kashima, Jumpei; Okuma, Yusuke; Hishima, Tsunekazu

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are now preferentially treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, patients treated with ALK inhibitors end up with acquired resistance. Case presentation We present a patient with recurrent ALK-rearranged NSCLC that developed multiple brain metastases and meningitis carcinomatosa after sequential treatment with several lines of cytotoxic chemotherapy, crizotinib, and alectinib. After the patient underwent retreatment with crizotinib as salvage therapy because of poor performance status, the intracranial metastatic foci and meningeal thickening were shrank within 1 week. Conclusion Our experience with this case suggests that alectinib may restore sensitivity to crizotinib or amplified pathway such as MET which bestowed alectinib resistance was inhibited with crizotinib. PMID:27785052

  9. [Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Delsol, G

    2010-11-01

    Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in lymphomas. They are of diagnostic and prognostic value and are taken into account for the WHO classification of these tumors. They also shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in lymphomas. Overall, four types of molecular abnormalities are involved: mutations, translocations, amplifications and deletions of tumor suppressor genes. Several techniques are available to detect these molecular anomalies: conventional cytogenetic analysis, multicolor FISH, CGH array or gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. In some lymphomas, genetic abnormalities are responsible for the expression of an abnormal protein (e.g. tyrosine-kinase, transcription factor) detectable by immunohistochemistry. In the present review, molecular abnormalities observed in the most frequent B, T or NK cell lymphomas are discussed. In the broad spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas microarray analysis shows mostly two subgroups of tumors, one with gene expression signature corresponding to germinal center B-cell-like (GCB: CD10+, BCL6 [B-Cell Lymphoma 6]+, centerine+, MUM1-) and a subgroup expressing an activated B-cell-like signature (ABC: CD10-, BCL6-, centerine-, MUM1+). Among other B-cell lymphomas with well characterized molecular abnormalies are follicular lymphoma (BCL2 deregulation), MALT lymphoma (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue) [API2-MALT1 (mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue-lymphoma-translocation-gene1) fusion protein or deregulation BCL10, MALT1, FOXP1. MALT1 transcription factors], mantle cell lymphoma (cycline D1 [CCND1] overexpression) and Burkitt lymphoma (c-Myc expression). Except for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, well characterized molecular anomalies are rare in lymphomas developed from T or NK cells. Peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are a heterogeneous group of tumors with frequent but not recurrent molecular abnormalities

  10. Targeting stemness is an effective strategy to control EML4-ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se Jin; Noh, Kyung Hee; Lee, Young-Ho; Hong, Soon-Oh; Song, Kwon-Ho; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Soyeon; Kim, Tae Min; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Seo, Jae Hong; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Tae Woo

    2015-11-24

    The fusion between anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) is a causative factor in a unique subset of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Although the inhibitor crizotinib, as it blocks the kinase activity of the resulting EML4-ALK fusion protein, displays remarkable initial responses, a fraction of NSCLC cases eventually become resistant to crizotinib by acquiring mutations in the ALK domain or activating bypass pathways via EGFR, KIT, or KRAS. Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory provides a plausible explanation for acquisition of tumorigenesis and resistance. However, the question as to whether EML4-ALK-driven tumorigenesis is linked with the stem-like property and whether the stemness is an effective target in controlling EML4-ALK+ NSCLC including crizotinib-resistant NSCLC cells has not been addressed. Here, we report that stem-like properties stem from ALK activity in EML4-ALK+ NSCLC cells. Notably, treatment with rapamycin, a CSC targeting agent, attenuates stem-like phenotypes of the EML4-ALK+ cells, which increased capability of tumor formation and higher expression of stemness-associated molecules such as ALDH, NANOG, and OCT4. Importantly, combinational treatment with rapamycin and crizotinib leads to synergistic anti-tumor effects on EML4-ALK+ NSCLC cells as well as on those resistant to crizotinib. Thus, we provide a proof of principle that targeting stemness would be a novel strategy to control intractable EML4-ALK+ NSCLC.

  11. Non-anaplastic peripheral T cell lymphoma in children and adolescents-an international review of 143 cases.

    PubMed

    Mellgren, K; Attarbaschi, A; Abla, O; Alexander, S; Bomken, S; Bubanska, E; Chiang, A; Csóka, M; Fedorova, A; Kabickova, E; Kapuscinska-Kemblowska, L; Kobayashi, R; Krenova, Z; Meyer-Wentrup, F; Miakova, N; Pillon, M; Plat, G; Uyttebroeck, A; Williams, D; Wróbel, G; Kontny, U

    2016-08-01

    Peripheral T cell lymphomas (PTCL) are rare in children and adolescents, and data about outcome and treatment results are scarce. The present study is a joint, international, retrospective analysis of 143 reported cases of non-anaplastic PTCL in patients <19 years of age, with a focus on treatment and outcome features. One hundred forty-three patients, between 0.3 and 18.7 years old, diagnosed between 2000 and 2015 were included in the study. PTCL not otherwise specified was the largest subgroup, followed by extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, hepatosplenic T cell lymphoma (HS TCL), and subcutaneous panniculitis-like T cell lymphoma (SP TCL). Probability of overall survival (pOS) at 5 years for the whole group was 0.56 ± 0.05, and probability of event-free survival was (pEFS) 0.45 ± 0.05. Patients with SP TCL had a good outcome with 5-year pOS of 0.78 ± 0.1 while patients with HS TCL were reported with 5-year pOS of only 0.13 ± 0.12. Twenty-five percent of the patients were reported to have a pre-existing condition, and this group had a dismal outcome with 5-year pOS of 0.29 ± 0.09. The distribution of non-anaplastic PTCL subtypes in pediatric and adolescent patients differs from what is reported in adult patients. Overall outcome depends on the subtype with some doing better than others. Pre-existing conditions are frequent and associated with poor outcomes. There is a clear need for subtype-based treatment recommendations for children and adolescents with PTCL.

  12. Screening for ALK abnormalities in central nervous system metastases of non-small-cell lung cancer: ALK abnormalities in CNS metastases of NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Nicoś, Marcin; Jarosz, Bożena; Krawczyk, Paweł; Wojas-Krawczyk, Kamila; Kucharczyk, Tomasz; Sawicki, Marek; Pankowski, Juliusz; Trojanowski, Tomasz; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-11-23

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement was reported in 3-7% of primary non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its presence is commonly associated with adenocarcinoma (AD) type and non-smoking history. ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as crizotinib, alectinib and ceritinib showed efficiency in patients with primary NSCLC harboring ALK gene rearrangement. Moreover, response to ALK TKIs was observed in central nervous system (CNS) metastatic lesions of NSCLC. However, there are no reports concerning the frequency of ALK rearrangement in CNS metastases. We assessed the frequency of ALK abnormalities in 145 formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue samples from CNS metastases of NSCLC using immunohistochemical (IHC) automated staining (BenchMark GX, Ventana, USA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique (Abbot Molecular, USA). The studied group was heterogeneous in terms of histopathology and smoking status. ALK abnormalities were detected in 4.8% (7/145) of CNS metastases. ALK abnormalities were observed in six AD (7.5%; 6/80) and in single patients with adenosuqamous lung carcinoma. Analysis of clinical and demographic factors indicated that expression of abnormal ALK was significantly more frequently observed (p=0.0002; χ(2) =16.783) in former-smokers. Comparison of IHC and FISH results showed some discrepancies, which were caused by unspecific staining of macrophages and glial/nerve cells, which constitute the background of CNS tissues. Our results indicate high frequency of ALK gene rearrangement in CNS metastatic sites of NSCLC that are in line with prior studies concerning evaluation of the presence of ALK abnormalities in such patients. However, we showed that assessment of ALK by IHC and FISH methods in CNS tissues require additional standardizations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Transformation of Sézary syndrome into CD30+ anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma after alemtuzumab therapy with evidence of clonal unity.

    PubMed

    Nevet, Mariela Judith; Zuckerman, Tsila; Sahar, Dvora; Bergman, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized mouse antibody targeting the CD52 cell surface, which has been effective in patients with advanced stage mycosis fungoides (MF) including erythrodermic MF and Sézary syndrome. There are a few descriptions of large cell transformation after its administration. A young patient with an acute onset of Sézary syndrome treated initially unsuccessfully with fludarabine and cyclophosphamide and later on successfully with alemtuzumab has been described. Three weeks after the beginning of therapy, however, she developed transformed T-cell lymphoma indistinguishable from CD30 anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. After bone marrow transplantation, the transformed CD30 cutaneous T-cell lymphoma recurred as a transformed CD30 plaque MF. All 3 types of lesions showed the same T-cell receptor clonal gene rearrangement, which supports the notion that Sézary syndrome, CD30 anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, and MF are interrelated.

  14. The pleiotrophin-ALK axis is required for tumorigenicity of glioblastoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Koyama-Nasu, R; Haruta, R; Nasu-Nishimura, Y; Taniue, K; Katou, Y; Shirahige, K; Todo, T; Ino, Y; Mukasa, A; Saito, N; Matsui, M; Takahashi, R; Hoshino-Okubo, A; Sugano, H; Manabe, E; Funato, K; Akiyama, T

    2014-04-24

    Increasing evidence suggests that brain tumors arise from the transformation of neural stem/precursor/progenitor cells. Much current research on human brain tumors is focused on the stem-like properties of glioblastoma. Here we show that anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and its ligand pleiotrophin are required for the self-renewal and tumorigenicity of glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs). Furthermore, we demonstrate that pleiotrophin is transactivated directly by SOX2, a transcription factor essential for the maintenance of both neural stem cells and GSCs. We speculate that the pleiotrophin-ALK axis may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma.

  15. Resensitization to Crizotinib by the Lorlatinib ALK Resistance Mutation L1198F.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Alice T; Friboulet, Luc; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Gainor, Justin F; Bergqvist, Simon; Brooun, Alexei; Burke, Benjamin J; Deng, Ya-Li; Liu, Wei; Dardaei, Leila; Frias, Rosa L; Schultz, Kate R; Logan, Jennifer; James, Leonard P; Smeal, Tod; Timofeevski, Sergei; Katayama, Ryohei; Iafrate, A John; Le, Long; McTigue, Michele; Getz, Gad; Johnson, Ted W; Engelman, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-07

    In a patient who had metastatic anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged lung cancer, resistance to crizotinib developed because of a mutation in the ALK kinase domain. This mutation is predicted to result in a substitution of cysteine by tyrosine at amino acid residue 1156 (C1156Y). Her tumor did not respond to a second-generation ALK inhibitor, but it did respond to lorlatinib (PF-06463922), a third-generation inhibitor. When her tumor relapsed, sequencing of the resistant tumor revealed an ALK L1198F mutation in addition to the C1156Y mutation. The L1198F substitution confers resistance to lorlatinib through steric interference with drug binding. However, L1198F paradoxically enhances binding to crizotinib, negating the effect of C1156Y and resensitizing resistant cancers to crizotinib. The patient received crizotinib again, and her cancer-related symptoms and liver failure resolved. (Funded by Pfizer and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01970865.).

  16. The bHLH transcription factor Hand is regulated by Alk in the Drosophila embryonic gut

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, Gaurav K.; Palmer, Ruth H. . E-mail: Ruth.Palmer@ucmp.umu.se

    2006-12-29

    During embryonic development the midgut visceral muscle is formed by fusion of cells within the visceral mesoderm, a process initiated by the specification of a specialised cell type, the founder cell, within this tissue. Activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk) in the developing visceral muscle of Drosophila melanogaster initiates a signal transduction pathway required for muscle fusion. In this paper, we have investigated downstream components which are regulated by this novel signalling pathway. Here we show that Alk-mediated signal transduction drives the expression of the bHLH transcription factor Hand in vivo. Loss of Alk function results in a complete lack of Hand expression in this tissue, whereas Alk gain of function results in an expansion of Hand expression. Finally, we have investigated the process of muscle fusion in the gut of Hand mutant animals and can find no obvious defects in this process, suggesting that Hand is not critical for visceral muscle fusion per se.

  17. Augmentor α and β (FAM150) are ligands of the receptor tyrosine kinases ALK and LTK: Hierarchy and specificity of ligand–receptor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Andrey V.; Murray, Phillip B.; Shi, Xiarong; Mo, Elizabeth S.; Mohanty, Jyotidarsini; Tome, Francisco; Bai, Hanwen; Gunel, Murat; Lax, Irit; Schlessinger, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are a class of cell surface receptors that, upon ligand binding, stimulate a variety of critical cellular functions. The orphan receptor anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is one of very few RTKs that remain without a firmly established protein ligand. Here we present a novel cytokine, FAM150B, which we propose naming augmentor-α (AUG-α), as a ligand for ALK. AUG-α binds ALK with high affinity and activates ALK in cells with subnanomolar potency. Detailed binding experiments using cells expressing ALK or the related receptor leukocyte tyrosine kinase (LTK) demonstrate that AUG-α binds and robustly activates both ALK and LTK. We show that the previously established LTK ligand FAM150A (AUG-β) is specific for LTK and only weakly binds to ALK. Furthermore, expression of AUG-α stimulates transformation of NIH/3T3 cells expressing ALK, induces IL-3 independent growth of Ba/F3 cells expressing ALK, and is expressed in neuroblastoma, a cancer partly driven by ALK. These experiments reveal the hierarchy and specificity of two cytokines as ligands for ALK and LTK and set the stage for elucidating their roles in development and disease states. PMID:26630010

  18. EML4-ALK induces epithelial–mesenchymal transition consistent with cancer stem cell properties in H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fuchun; Liu, Xiaoke Qing, Qin Sang, Yaxiong Feng, Chengjun Li, Xiaoyu Jiang, Li Su, Pei Wang, Yongsheng

    2015-04-10

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4(EML4) – anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene has been identified as a driver mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the role of EML4-ALK in malignant transformation is not entirely clear. Here, for the first time, we showed that H1299 NSCLC cells stably expressing EML4-ALK acquire EMT phenotype, associated with enhanced invasive migration and increased expression of EMT-inducing transcription factors. H1299-EML4-ALK cells also displayed cancer stem cell-like properties with a concomitant up-regulation of CD133 and enhanced ability of mammospheres formation. Moreover, we found that inhibition of ERK1/2 reversed EMT induced by EML4-ALK in H1299 cells. Taken together, these results suggested that EML4-ALK induced ERK activation is mechanistically associated with EMT phenotype. Thus, inhibition of ERK signaling pathway could be a potential strategy in treatment of NSCLC patients with EML4-ALK translocation. - Highlights: • EML4-ALK induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition in H1299 cells. • Expression of EML4-ALK promotes invasion and migration in vitro. • EML4-ALK enhanced sphere formation and stem cell-like properties in H1299 cells. • Blockage of ERK1/2 reverse Epithelial–Mesenchymal transition induced by EML4-ALK.

  19. Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma: Report of 2 Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Hart, Alexandra M; Lechowicz, Mary Jo; Peters, Kendall K; Holden, Jeannine; Carlson, Grant W

    2014-08-01

    Although primary breast lymphomas are exceedingly rare, cases of breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (iALCL) continue to be reported. The authors describe their experience with 2 patients and review the literature. Both patients presented with periprosthetic fluid collection. Neither had evidence of systemic disease nor received systemic therapy. Both were disease free after bilateral capsulectomies and implant removal without implant replacement, and disease did not recur. During the literature review, 63 cases of iALCL (including our 2 patients) were identified. The median time from implant placement to diagnosis was 9 years. Both saline and silicone implants were associated with iALCL. Of the 26 cases for which implant surface was reported, the surface was textured in 24. Of the 58 patients with an identifiable presentation, 39 had periprosthetic fluid collection, including 7 with an associated mass; 13 had an isolated mass at presentation, including 1 with axillary adenopathy. Forty patients had capsulectomy, 7 of whom underwent implant replacement. Of the 44 patients with known treatment, 33 received chemotherapy and 23 received radiation. Of the 49 patients with known anaplastic large cell lymphoma, 15 had disease recurrence, and 4 patient deaths were reported. Of the 18 patients presenting with a mass, 11 had disease recurrence, including all 4 patients who died. This study represents the largest review of patients with iALCL described to date. Although most cases have an indolent clinical course, the variety of presentations defined as "seroma" vs "capsular involvement" emphasizes the importance of investigating a definitive method of diagnosis, management, and treatment of this disease. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 5.

  20. Insights into brain metastasis in patients with ALK+ lung cancer: is the brain truly a sanctuary?

    PubMed

    Toyokawa, Gouji; Seto, Takashi; Takenoyama, Mitsuhiro; Ichinose, Yukito

    2015-12-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has been identified to exert a potent transforming activity through its rearrangement in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and patients (pts) with ALK rearrangement can be treated more successfully with ALK inhibitors, such as crizotinib, alectinib, and ceritinib, than with chemotherapy. Despite the excellent efficacy of ALK inhibitors, resistance to these drugs is inevitably encountered in most ALK-rearranged pts. Cases of resistance are subtyped into three groups, i.e., systemic, oligo, and central nervous system (CNS) types, with the CNS being used to be considered a sanctuary. With regard to the management of CNS lesions in pts with ALK+ NSCLC, a growing body of evidence has gradually demonstrated the intracranial (IC) efficacy of ALK inhibitor (ALKi) in ALK+ NSCLC pts with brain metastases (BMs). Although the efficacy of crizotinib for the CNS lesions remains controversial, a recent retrospective investigation of ALK+ pts with BM enrolled in PROFILE 1005 and PROFILE 1007 demonstrated that crizotinib is associated with a high disease control rate for BM. However, BM comprises the most common site of progressive disease in pts with or without baseline BMs, which is a serious problem for crizotinib. Furthermore, alectinib can be used to achieve strong and long-lasting inhibitory effects on BM. In addition to alectinib, the IC efficacy of other next-generation ALK inhibitors, such as ceritinib, AP26113 and PF-06463922, has been demonstrated. In this article, we review the latest evidence regarding the BM and IC efficacy of ALK inhibitors in pts with ALK+ NSCLC.

  1. Crizotinib-Resistant Mutants of EML4-ALK Identified Through an Accelerated Mutagenesis Screen

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sen; Wang, Frank; Keats, Jeffrey; Zhu, Xiaotian; Ning, Yaoyu; Wardwell, Scott D; Moran, Lauren; Mohemmad, Qurish K; Anjum, Rana; Wang, Yihan; Narasimhan, Narayana I; Dalgarno, David; Shakespeare, William C; Miret, Juan J; Clackson, Tim; Rivera, Victor M

    2011-01-01

    Activating gene rearrangements of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have been identified as driver mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, and other cancers. Crizotinib, a dual MET/ALK inhibitor, has demonstrated promising clinical activity in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors harboring ALK translocations. Inhibitors of driver kinases often elicit kinase domain mutations that confer resistance, and such mutations have been successfully predicted using in vitro mutagenesis screens. Here, this approach was used to discover an extensive set of ALK mutations that can confer resistance to crizotinib. Mutations at 16 residues were identified, structurally clustered into five regions around the kinase active site, which conferred varying degrees of resistance. The screen successfully predicted the L1196M, C1156Y, and F1174L mutations, recently identified in crizotinib-resistant patients. In separate studies, we demonstrated that crizotinib has relatively modest potency in ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines. A more potent ALK inhibitor, TAE684, maintained substantial activity against mutations that conferred resistance to crizotinib. Our study identifies multiple novel mutations in ALK that may confer clinical resistance to crizotinib, suggests that crizotinib's narrow selectivity window may underlie its susceptibility to such resistance and demonstrates that a more potent ALK inhibitor may be effective at overcoming resistance. PMID:22034911

  2. RANBP2-ALK fusion combined with monosomy 7 in acute myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji-Hun; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Cho, Young-Uk; Lee, Je-Hwan; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Lee, Jin-Ok; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Kim, Jong-Il; Huh, Jooryung; Seo, Eul-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase (ALK) is located on chromosome 2p23; the chromosomal rearrangements of this gene are common genetic alterations, resulting in the creation of multiple fusion genes involved in tumorigenesis. However, the presence of an ALK fusion in myeloid malignancies is extremely rare. We report a case of acute myelomonocytic leukemia in a 31-year-old woman with an unusual rearrangement between RAN-binding protein 2 (RANBP2) and ALK and a karyotype of 45,XX,inv(2)(p23q21),-7[20]. We detected an ALK rearrangement using fluorescence in situ hybridization, identified the ALK fusion partner by using RNA transcriptome sequencing, and demonstrated the RANBP2-ALK fusion transcript by reverse transcriptase--PCR and Sanger sequencing. Immunohistochemistry for ALK showed strong staining of the nuclear membrane in leukemic cells. The patient had an unfavorable clinical course. Our results, together with a literature review, suggest the RANBP2-ALK fusion combined with monosomy 7 may be related to a unique clonal hematologic disorder of childhood and adolescence, characterized by myelomonocytic leukemia and a poor prognosis.

  3. Prospective and clinical validation of ALK immunohistochemistry: results from the phase I/II study of alectinib for ALK-positive lung cancer (AF-001JP study)

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, K.; Togashi, Y.; Kamihara, Y.; Fukuyama, T.; Yoshioka, H.; Inoue, A.; Katsuki, H.; Kiura, K.; Nakagawa, K.; Seto, T.; Maemondo, M.; Hida, T.; Harada, M.; Ohe, Y.; Nogami, N.; Yamamoto, N.; Nishio, M.; Tamura, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusions need to be accurately and efficiently detected for ALK inhibitor therapy. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) remains the reference test. Although increasing data are supporting that ALK immunohistochemistry (IHC) is highly concordant with FISH, IHC screening needed to be clinically and prospectively validated. Patients and methods In the AF-001JP trial for alectinib, 436 patients were screened for ALK fusions through IHC (n = 384) confirmed with FISH (n = 181), multiplex RT-PCR (n = 68), or both (n = 16). IHC results were scored with iScore. Result ALK fusion was positive in 137 patients and negative in 250 patients. Since the presence of cancer cells in the samples for RT-PCR was not confirmed, ALK fusion negativity could not be ascertained in 49 patients. IHC interpreted with iScore showed a 99.4% (173/174) concordance with FISH. All 41 patients who had iScore 3 and were enrolled in phase II showed at least 30% tumor reduction with 92.7% overall response rate. Two IHC-positive patients with an atypical FISH pattern responded to ALK inhibitor therapy. The reduction rate was not correlated with IHC staining intensity. Conclusions Our study showed (i) that when sufficiently sensitive and appropriately interpreted, IHC can be a stand-alone diagnostic for ALK inhibitor therapies; (ii) that when atypical FISH patterns are accompanied by IHC positivity, the patients should be considered as candidates for ALK inhibitor therapies, and (iii) that the expression level of ALK fusion is not related to the level of response to ALK inhibitors and is thus not required for patient selection. Registration number JapicCTI-101264 (This study is registered with the Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center). PMID:26487585

  4. CCL11-CCR3 interactions promote survival of anaplastic large cell lymphoma cells via ERK1/2 activation.

    PubMed

    Miyagaki, Tomomitsu; Sugaya, Makoto; Murakami, Takashi; Asano, Yoshihide; Tada, Yayoi; Kadono, Takafumi; Okochi, Hitoshi; Tamaki, Kunihiko; Sato, Shinichi

    2011-03-15

    CCR3 is a specific marker of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) cells. ALCL cells also express CCL11, a ligand for CCR3, leading to the hypothesis that CCL11 may play an autocrine role in ALCL progression. In this study, we investigated a role of CCL11 in cell survival and growth of human Ki-JK cells, established from an ALCL patient, and murine EL-4 lymphoma cells. Both Ki-JK and EL-4 cells expressed cell surface CCR3. CCL11 increased cell survival rates of Ki-JK cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas it promoted EL-4 cell proliferation. Furthermore, CCL11 induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in both Ki-JK cells and EL-4 cells. Cell survival and tumor proliferation promoted by CCL11 was completely blocked by inhibition of ERK phosphorylation. CCL11 induced expression of antiapoptotic proteins, Bcl-xL and survivin, in Ki-JK cells. CCL11 also enhanced tumor growth of EL-4 and Ki-JK cells in vivo. Consistent with these results, tumor cells of cutaneous ALCL expressed CCR3 and increased levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2, Bcl-xL, and survivin in situ. Thus, our findings prompt a novel therapeutic approach to treat relapses of an aggressive form of lymphoma based on the discovery that a cell surface marker of disease functions as a critical autocrine growth receptor.

  5. For staining of ALK protein, the novel D5F3 antibody demonstrates superior overall performance in terms of intensity and extent of staining in comparison to the currently used ALK1 antibody.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Diana; Zahavi, David J; Del Carmen Rodriguez, Maria; Meliti, Abdelrazak; Rezaee, Neda; Yonescu, Raluca; Ricardo, Bernardo F P; Dolatkhah, Shahaboddin; Ning, Yi; Bishop, Justin A; Netto, George J; Sharma, Rajni

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare neoplasm. Approximately 50 % of IMTs show an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fusion resulting in ALK overexpression on immunohistochemistry (IHC). A novel anti-ALK monoclonal antibody (D5F3) has been suggested to be of superior sensitivity to the ALK1 antibody which is currently used. We compared the performance of D5F3 in detecting ALK protein expression in IMTs from various anatomic sites compared to the currently utilized ALK1. We selected 25 IMTs from our surgical pathology files (2005-2015). The novel rabbit monoclonal anti-human CD246 (clone D5F3) and the currently used mouse monoclonal anti-human CD246 (clone ALK1) were used for immunohistochemical staining (IHC) in an automated slide stainer. The percentage of immunoreactive tumor cells (0, <5 %, 5-50 %, >50 %) and cytoplasmic staining intensity (graded 0-3) were assessed and compared between the two antibodies. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies for ALK gene rearrangement were performed on 11 tumors. D5F3 antibody stained 76 % and ALK1 antibody stained 72 % of IMTs (p = 0.747). Compared to staining with ALK1, D5F3 stained a higher proportion of cases extensively (>50 % cells) (76 vs. 28 %, p < 0.001) and with high intensity (grade 3 76 % vs 0; p < 0.001). FISH and IHC findings (for both antibodies) were concordant in 9/10 (90 %) IMTs, in which results were informative. The novel anti-ALK rabbit monoclonal antibody (D5F3 clone) demonstrates superior overall performance in term of intensity and extent of staining of ALK protein in IMT. We found IHC staining with both antibody clones to correlate equally well with FISH results for detection of ALK rearrangement.

  6. Complete Surgical Excision Is Essential for the Management of Patients With Breast Implant–Associated Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Mark W.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Butler, Charles E.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Fanale, Michelle A.; Horwitz, Steven; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Liu, Jun; Morgan, Elizabeth A.; Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi; Parkash, Vinita; Ning, Jing; Sohani, Aliyah R.; Ferry, Judith A.; Mehta-Shah, Neha; Dogan, Ahmed; Liu, Hui; Thormann, Nora; Di Napoli, Arianna; Lade, Stephen; Piccolini, Jorge; Reyes, Ruben; Williams, Travis; McCarthy, Colleen M.; Hanson, Summer E.; Nastoupil, Loretta J.; Gaur, Rakesh; Oki, Yasuhiro; Young, Ken H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Breast implant–associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (BI-ALCL) is a rare type of T-cell lymphoma that arises around breast implants. The optimal management of this disease has not been established. The goal of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of different therapies used in patients with BI-ALCL to determine an optimal treatment approach. Patients and Methods In this study, we applied strict criteria to pathologic findings, assessed therapies used, and conducted a clinical follow-up of 87 patients with BI-ALCL, including 50 previously reported in the literature and 37 unreported. A Prentice, Williams, and Peterson model was used to assess the rate of events for each therapeutic intervention. Results The median and mean follow-up times were 45 and 30 months, respectively (range, 3 to 217 months). The median overall survival (OS) time after diagnosis of BI-ALCL was 13 years, and the OS rate was 93% and 89% at 3 and 5 years, respectively. Patients with lymphoma confined by the fibrous capsule surrounding the implant had better event-free survival (EFS) and OS than did patients with lymphoma that had spread beyond the capsule (P = .03). Patients who underwent a complete surgical excision that consisted of total capsulectomy with breast implant removal had better OS (P = .022) and EFS (P = .014) than did patients who received partial capsulectomy, systemic chemotherapy, or radiation therapy. Conclusion Surgical management with complete surgical excision is essential to achieve optimal EFS in patients with BI-ALCL. PMID:26628470

  7. Tackling ALK in non-small cell lung cancer: the role of novel inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Facchinetti, Francesco; Di Maio, Massimo; Graziano, Paolo; Bria, Emilio; Rossi, Giulio; Novello, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Crizotinib is an oral inhibitor of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) with remarkable clinical activity in patients suffering from ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), accounting to its superiority compared to chemotherapy. Unfortunately, virtually all ALK-rearranged tumors acquire resistance to crizotinib, frequently within one year since the treatment initiation. To date, therapeutic strategies to overcome crizotinib resistance have focused on the use of more potent and structurally different compounds. Second-generation ALK inhibitors such as ceritinib (LDK378), alectinib (CH5424802/RO5424802) and brigatinib (AP26113) have shown relevant clinical activity, consequently fostering their rapid clinical development and their approval by health agencies. The third-generation inhibitor lorlatinib (PF-06463922), selectively active against ALK and ROS1, harbors impressive biological potency; its efficacy in reversing resistance to crizotinib and to other ALK inhibitors is being proven by early clinical trials. The NTRK1-3 and ROS1 inhibitor entrectinib (RXDX-101) has been reported to act against NSCLC harboring ALK fusion proteins too. Despite the quick development of these novel agents, several issues remain to be discussed in the treatment of patients suffering from ALK-rearranged NSCLC. This position paper will discuss the development, the current evidence and approvals, as long as the future perspectives of new ALK inhibitors beyond crizotinib. Clinical behaviors of ALK-rearranged NSCLC vary significantly among patients and differential molecular events responsible of crizotinib resistance account for the most important quote of this heterogeneity. The precious availability of a wide range of active anti-ALK compounds should be approached in a critical and careful perspective, in order to develop treatment strategies tailored on the disease evolution of every single patient. PMID:27413712

  8. A Unique "Composite" PTLD with Diffuse Large B-Cell and T/Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Components Occurring 17 Years after Transplant.

    PubMed

    La Fortune, Kristin; Zhang, Dahua; Raca, Gordana; Ranheim, Erik A

    2013-01-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) comprises a spectrum ranging from polyclonal hyperplasia to aggressive monoclonal lymphomas. The majority of PTLDs are of B-cell origin while T-cell PTLDs and Hodgkin lymphoma-like PTLDs are uncommon. Here, we report a unique case of a 56-year-old man in whom a lymphoma with two distinct components developed as a duodenal mass seventeen years following a combined kidney-pancreas transplant. This PTLD, which has features not previously reported in the literature, consisted of one component of CD20 positive and EBV negative monomorphic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The other component showed anaplastic morphology, expressed some but not all T-cell markers, failed to express most B-cell markers except for PAX5, and was diffusely EBV positive. Possible etiologies for this peculiar constellation of findings are discussed and the literature reviewed for "composite-like" lymphomas late in the posttransplant setting.

  9. EXTRINSIC APOPTOTIC PATHWAYS: A NEW POTENTIAL “TARGET” FOR MORE SUFFICIENT THERAPY IN A CASE OF CUTANEOUS ANAPLASTIC LARGE CD30+ ALK–T-CELL LYMPHOMA

    PubMed Central

    Georgi, Tchernev; Carlos, Cardoso José; Lubomir, Arseniev; Hiroyuki, Okamoto

    2011-01-01

    The primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) represent a clonal T-lymphocyte proliferation infiltrating the skin. CD30+T-cell lymphomas present clinically as nodules with a diameter between 1 and 15 cm, mostly in elderly patients. The role of the CD30 molecule in patients suffering from T-cell lymphomas is not completely clear yet. The signal transduction pathway which includes CD30 seems to play a key role in tumor progression. In certain forms of T-cellular lymphomas, the interaction between CD30/CD30-ligand is able to provoke apoptosis of the “tumor lymphocytes”. The modern conceptions of the pathogenesis of T-cell lymphomas include disorders in the pathways involved in programmed cellular death and disregulation in the expression of certain of its regulatory molecules. We are presenting an unusual case of a female patient with a primary cutaneous form of CD30+/ALK− anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma. Upon the introduction of systemic PUVA, (psoralen plus ultraviolet light radiation) combined with beam therapy, a complete remission could be noticed. Eight months later, we observed a local recurrence, which was overcome by CHOP chemotherapy (Cyclophosphamide, Hydroxydaunorubicin (Doxorubicin), Vincristin (Oncovin®), Predniso(lo)n). Six months later, new cutaneous lesions had been noticed again. A new therapeutic hope for the patients with anaplastic large CTCL is actually based on the influence of the activity of the different apoptotic pathways. Death ligands, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, CD95L/FasL, and TRAIL, mediate also some important safeguard mechanisms against tumor growth in patients with CD30+ cutaneous anaplastic large T-cell lymphomas and critically contribute to lymphocyte homeostasis. PMID:21572802

  10. [Successful long-term control of recurrent primary central nervous system anaplastic large cell lymphoma after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with concurrent whole brain and spinal cord radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, Yuki; Kaiume, Hiroko; Kirihara, Takehiko; Takeda, Wataru; Kurihara, Taro; Sato, Keijiro; Shimizu, Ikuo; Ueki, Toshimitsu; Sumi, Masahiko; Ueno, Mayumi; Ichikawa, Naoaki; Asano, Naoko; Watanabe, Masahide; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2015-12-01

    A 24-year-old woman was hospitalized with seizures in 2002. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an intraspinal mass and inhomogeneous gadolinium enhancement along the cerebrospinal meninges. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology showed large atypical cells expressing CD2, cytoplasmic CD3, CD7, CD13 and CD30. The patient was finally diagnosed with primary central nervous system anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). She completed 5 courses of methotrexate (MTX)/ procarbazine (PCZ)/ vincristine (VCR) (MPV) chemotherapy, followed by 2 courses of high dose cytarabine (AraC) and achieved a complete remission. In 2003, she suffered from headache. CSF analysis showed atypical lymphoid cells expressing CD 30. First CNS relapse was diagnosed. She then underwent autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (auto-PBSCT) after administration of thiotepa, buslfan, and cyclophosphamide. However, second CNS relapse occurred in 2004. She received 5 courses of MPV chemotherapy followed by 36 Gy of craniospinal irradiation. Although there was no recurrence of the CNS disease, a third relapse was detected in the right breast in 2009. Pathological and immunohistochemistry analysis revealed ALK-1 positive ALCL. She was treated with 6 courses of cyclophosphamide/adriamycin/vincristine/predonine (CHOP) chemotherapy and 30.6 Gy of local radiation therapy. She has remained in remission for 6 years, to date, since the last therapy and has an excellent quality of life.

  11. French multicentric validation of ALK rearrangement diagnostic in 547 lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Rouquette, Isabelle; Blons, Hélène; Le Stang, Nolwenn; Ilie, Marius; Begueret, Hugues; Grégoire, Valerie; Hofman, Paul; Gros, Audrey; Garcia, Stephane; Monhoven, Nathalie; Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan; Mansuet-Lupo, Audrey; Thivolet, Françoise; Antoine, Martine; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Penault-Llorca, Frederique; Galateau-Sallé, Françoise; McLeer-Florin, Anne

    2015-07-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements in lung adenocarcinoma result in kinase activity targetable by crizotinib. Although fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) is the reference diagnostic technique, immunohistochemistry (IHC) could be useful for pre-screening. Diagnostic yields of ALK IHC, FISH and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR performed in 14 French pathology/molecular genetics platforms were compared. 547 lung adenocarcinoma specimens were analysed using 5A4 and D5F3 antibodies, two break-apart FISH probes and TaqMan kits. Clinicopathological data were recorded. 140 tumours were ALK rearranged (FISH with ≥15% of rearranged cells) and 400 were ALK FISH negative (<15%). FISH was not interpretable for seven cases. ALK patients were young (p=0.003), mostly females (p=0.007) and light/nonsmokers (p<0.0001). 13 cases were IHC negative but FISH ≥15%, including six cases with FISH between 15% and 20%; eight were IHC positive with FISH between 10% and 14%. Sensitivity and specificity for 5A4 and D5F3 were 87% and 92%, and 89% and 76%, respectively. False-negative IHC, observed in 2.4% of cases, dropped to 1.3% for FISH >20%. Variants were undetected in 36% of ALK tumours. Discordances predominated with FISH ranging from 10% to 20% of rearranged cells and were centre dependent. IHC remains a reliable pre-screening method for ALK rearrangement detection.

  12. Oncogenic ALK regulates EMT in non-small cell lung carcinoma through repression of the epithelial splicing regulatory protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Menotti, Matteo; Poggio, Teresa; Panizza, Elena; Wang, Qi; Minero, Valerio G.; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Compagno, Mara; Altruda, Fiorella; Monti, Stefano; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    A subset of Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC) carries chromosomal rearrangements involving the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) gene. ALK-rearranged NSCLC are typically adenocarcinoma characterized by a solid signet-ring cell pattern that is frequently associated with a metastatic phenotype. Recent reports linked the presence of ALK rearrangement to an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype in NSCLC, but the extent and the mechanisms of an ALK-mediated EMT in ALK-rearranged NSCLC are largely unknown. We found that the ALK-rearranged H2228 and DFCI032, but not the H3122, cell lines displayed a mesenchymal phenotype. In these cell lines, oncogenic ALK activity dictated an EMT phenotype by directly suppressing E-cadherin and up-regulating vimentin expression, as well as expression of other genes involved in EMT. We found that the epithelial splicing regulatory protein 1 (ESRP1), a key regulator of the splicing switch during EMT, was repressed by EML4-ALK activity. The treatment of NSCLC cells with ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) led to up-regulation of ESRP1 and E-cadherin, thus reverting the phenotype from mesenchymal to epithelial (MET). Consistently, ESRP1 knock-down impaired E-cadherin up-regulation upon ALK inhibition, whereas enforced expression of ESRP1 was sufficient to increase E-cadherin expression. These findings demonstrate an ALK oncogenic activity in the regulation of an EMT phenotype in a subset of NSCLC with potential implications for the biology of ALK-rearranged NSCLC in terms of metastatic propensity and resistance to therapy. PMID:27119231

  13. Identification of different ALK mutations in a pair of neuroblastoma cell lines established at diagnosis and relapse

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lindi; Humphreys, Angharad; Turnbull, Lisa; Bellini, Angela; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Salwen, Helen; Cohn, Susan L.; Bown, Nick; Tweddle, Deborah A.

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) is a transmembrane receptor kinase that belongs to the insulin receptor superfamily and has previously been shown to play a role in cell proliferation, migration and invasion in neuroblastoma. Activating ALK mutations are reported in both hereditary and sporadic neuroblastoma tumours, and several ALK inhibitors are currently under clinical evaluation as novel treatments for neuroblastoma. Overall, mutations at codons F1174, R1275 and F1245 together account for ∼85% of reported ALK mutations in neuroblastoma. NBLW and NBLW-R are paired cell lines originally derived from an infant with metastatic MYCN amplified Stage IVS (Evans Criteria) neuroblastoma, at diagnosis and relapse, respectively. Using both Sanger and targeted deep sequencing, this study describes the identification of distinct ALK mutations in these paired cell lines, including the rare R1275L mutation, which has not previously been reported in a neuroblastoma cell line. Analysis of the sensitivity of NBLW and NBLW-R cells to a panel of ALK inhibitors (TAE-684, Crizotinib, Alectinib and Lorlatinib) revealed differences between the paired cell lines, and overall NBLW-R cells with the F1174L mutation were more resistant to ALK inhibitor induced apoptosis compared with NBLW cells. This pair of cell lines represents a valuable pre-clinical model of clonal evolution of ALK mutations associated with neuroblastoma progression. PMID:27888620

  14. Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder Manifesting as Intestinal Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma in an Adult Renal Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Börcek, Pelin; Özdemir, B Handan; Özgün, Gonca; Haberal, Mehmet

    2016-11-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder is a relatively common posttransplant malignancy affecting as many as 10% of all solid-organ recipients. Most cases of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder are of B-cell origin, with common Epstein-Barr virus association. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders of T-cell origin are much rarer and less frequently associated with Epstein-Barr virus. Here, we report an unusual case of Epstein-Barr virus-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma causing an intestinal perforation in an adult renal transplant recipient. A 52-year-old male patient with renal allograft developed cryptogenic end-stage liver failure and was accepted as a candidate for liver transplant. Before transplant, he was admitted with severe abdominal pain, which turned out to result from ileal perforation. Pathologic evaluation of the intestinal resection showed diffuse malignant lymphoid infiltration of the ileum, consistent with anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. The tumor was positive for Epstein-Barr virus genome. Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma is a rare form of T-cell posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder that is infrequently associated with Epstein-Barr virus. The occurrence of this extraordinary form of post transplant lymphoproliferative disorder, its late onset, intestinal localization, and Epstein-Barr virus as sociation represent a unique clinical rarity.

  15. Precision medicine in NSCLC and pathology: how does ALK fit in the pathway?

    PubMed

    Kerr, K M; López-Ríos, F

    2016-09-01

    The evolution of personalised medicine in lung cancer has dramatically impacted diagnostic pathology. Current challenges centre on the growing demands placed on small tissue samples by molecular diagnostic techniques. In this review, expert recommendations are provided regarding successful identification of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Steps to correctly process and conserve tumour tissue during diagnostic testing are essential to ensure tissue availability. For example, storing extra tissue sections ready for molecular diagnostic steps allows faster testing and preserves tissue. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) is commonly used to detect ALK rearrangements, with most laboratories favouring screening by immunohistochemistry followed by a confirmatory FISH assay. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction can also identify ALK fusion gene mRNA transcripts but can be limited by the quality of RNA and the risk that rare fusion variants may not be captured. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has recently provided an alternative method for detecting ALK rearrangements. While current experience is limited, NGS is set to become the most efficient approach as an increasing number of genetic abnormalities is required to be tested. Upfront, reflex testing for ALK gene rearrangement should become routine as ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy moves into the first-line setting. Guidelines recommend that EGFR and ALK tests are carried out in parallel on all confirmed and potential adenocarcinomas, and this is more efficient in terms of tissue usage and testing turnaround time for both of these actionable gene alterations. The practice of sequential testing is not recommended. Identification of ALK rearrangements is now essential for the diagnosis of NSCLC, underpinned by the benefits of ALK inhibitors. As scientific understanding and diagnostic technology develops, ALK testing will continue to be an

  16. Molecular Testing for Selection of Patients With Lung Cancer for Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors: American Society of Clinical Oncology Endorsement of the College of American Pathologists/International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/Association for Molecular Pathology Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Leighl, Natasha B.; Rekhtman, Natasha; Biermann, William A.; Huang, James; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; West, Howard; Whitlock, Sara; Somerfield, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The College of American Pathologists (CAP), the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), and the Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP) guideline on molecular testing for the selection of patients with lung cancer for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine kinase inhibitors was considered for endorsement. Methods American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) staff reviewed the CAP/IASLC/AMP guideline for developmental rigor; an ASCO ad hoc review panel of experts reviewed the guideline content. Results The ASCO panel concurred that the recommendations are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence in this content area and present options that will be acceptable to patients. The CAP/IASLC/AMP guideline comprises 37 recommendations (evidence grade A or B), expert consensus opinions, or suggestions that address the following five principal questions: (1) When should molecular testing be performed? (2) How should EGFR testing be performed? (3) How should ALK testing be performed? (4) Should other genes be routinely tested in lung adenocarcinoma? (5) How should molecular testing be implemented and operationalized? Conclusion The ASCO review panel endorses the CAP/IASLC/AMP guideline. This guideline represents an important advance toward standardization of EGFR and ALK testing practices and is of major clinical relevance in advancing the care of patients with lung cancer. In the Discussion section, the ASCO review panel highlights three evolving areas: advances in ALK testing methodology, considerations for selecting appropriate populations for molecular testing, and emergence of other targetable molecular alterations. PMID:25311215

  17. Crizotinib for the Treatment of ALK-Rearranged Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Success Story to Usher in the Second Decade of Molecular Targeted Therapy in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Cynthia Huang; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Cui, Jean; Iafrate, A. John

    2012-01-01

    Crizotinib, an ALK/MET/ROS1 inhibitor, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in August 2011, merely 4 years after the first publication of ALK-rearranged NSCLC. The crizotinib approval was accompanied by the simultaneous approval of an ALK companion diagnostic fluorescent in situ hybridization assay for the detection of ALK-rearranged NSCLC. Crizotinib continued to be developed as an ALK and MET inhibitor in other tumor types driven by alteration in ALK and MET. Crizotinib has recently been shown to be an effective ROS1 inhibitor in ROS1-rearranged NSCLC, with potential future clinical applications in ROS1-rearranged tumors. Here we summarize the heterogeneity within the ALK- and ROS1-rearranged molecular subtypes of NSCLC. We review the past and future clinical development of crizotinib for ALK-rearranged NSCLC and the diagnostic assays to detect ALK-rearranged NSCLC. We highlight how the success of crizotinib has changed the paradigm of future drug development for targeted therapies by targeting a molecular-defined subtype of NSCLC despite its rarity and affected the practice of personalized medicine in oncology, emphasizing close collaboration between clinical oncologists, pathologists, and translational scientists. PMID:22989574

  18. Inactivation of the putative ubiquitin-E3 ligase PDLIM2 in classical Hodgkin and anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Wurster, K D; Hummel, F; Richter, J; Giefing, M; Hartmann, S; Hansmann, M-L; Kreher, S; Köchert, K; Krappmann, D; Klapper, W; Hummel, M; Wenzel, S-S; Lenz, G; Janz, M; Dörken, B; Siebert, R; Mathas, S

    2017-01-01

    Apart from its unique histopathological appearance with rare tumor cells embedded in an inflammatory background of bystander cells, classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) is characterized by an unusual activation of a broad range of signaling pathways involved in cellular activation. This includes constitutive high-level activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT), activator protein-1 (AP-1) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) transcription factors (TFs) that are physiologically only transiently activated. Here, we demonstrate that inactivation of the putative ubiquitin E3-ligase PDLIM2 contributes to this TF activation. PDLIM2 expression is lost at the mRNA and protein levels in the majority of cHL cell lines and Hodgkin and Reed–Sternberg (HRS) cells of nearly all cHL primary samples. This loss is associated with PDLIM2 genomic alterations, promoter methylation and altered splicing. Reconstitution of PDLIM2 in HRS cell lines inhibits proliferation, blocks NF-κB transcriptional activity and contributes to cHL-specific gene expression. In non-Hodgkin B-cell lines, small interfering RNA-mediated PDLIM2 knockdown results in superactivation of TFs NF-κB and AP-1 following phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulation. Furthermore, expression of PDLIM2 is lost in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) that shares key biological aspects with cHL. We conclude that inactivation of PDLIM2 is a recurrent finding in cHL and ALCL, promotes activation of inflammatory signaling pathways and thereby contributes to their pathogenesis. PMID:27538486

  19. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for relapsed or refractory anaplastic large cell lymphoma: a study of children and adolescents in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fukano, Reiji; Mori, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Mitsui, Tetsuo; Fujita, Naoto; Iwasaki, Fuminori; Suzumiya, Junji; Chin, Motoaki; Goto, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Hara, Junichi; Park, Yong-Dong; Inoue, Masami; Koga, Yuhki; Inagaki, Jiro; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Adachi, Souichi; Kawa, Keisei; Kato, Koji; Suzuki, Ritsuro

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in children and adolescents, we reviewed the records of 47 patients who were ≤18 years, had relapsed or refractory anaplastic large cell lymphoma, and received HSCT between 1990 and 2010. At HSCT, complete remission (CR) was less common in allogeneic HSCT recipients (n = 24) than in autologous HSCT recipients (n = 23) (P = 0·01). The autologous and allogeneic HSCT groups differed in terms of 5-year event-free survival (EFS) (38% vs. 50%, P = 0·63), cumulative incidence of progress or relapse (49% vs. 28%, P = 0·25), and treatment-related mortality (12% vs. 25%, P = 0·40). However, these differences were not significant. Patients with non-CR at autologous HSCT had a significantly lower EFS rate (14% vs. 48%, P = 0·03). Conversely, although those with non-CR at allogeneic HSCT had a lower EFS rate, this was not significant (44% vs. 63%, P = 0·26). Reduced-intensity conditioning regimens were used for three of the 16 allogeneic HSCTs received by patients with non-CR. These three patients achieved CR, surviving 32-65 months after HSCT. These results demonstrated that allogeneic HSCT might be a treatment option for patients who do not achieve CR through conventional chemotherapy.

  20. Evaluation of EML4-ALK Fusion Proteins in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Small Molecule Inhibitors12

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongjun; Ye, Xiaofen; Liu, Jinfeng; Zha, Jiping; Pei, Lin

    2011-01-01

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) fusion gene resulting from an inversion within chromosome 2p occurs in approximately 5% of non-small cell lung cancer and is mutually exclusive with Ras and EGFR mutations. In this study, we have used a potent and selective ALK small molecule inhibitor, NPV-TAE684, to assess the oncogenic role of EML4-ALK in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We show here that TAE684 inhibits proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and tumor regression in two NSCLC models that harbor EML4-ALK fusions. TAE684 inhibits EML4-ALK activation and its downstream signaling including ERK, AKT, and STAT3. We used microarray analysis to carry out targeted pathway studies of gene expression changes in H2228 NSCLC xenograft model after TAE684 treatment and identified a gene signature of EML4-ALK inhibition. The gene signature represents 1210 known human genes, and the top biologic processes represented by these genes are cell cycle, DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and cell death. We also compared the effect of TAE684 with PF2341066, a c-Met and ALK small molecule inhibitor currently in clinical trial in cancers harboring ALK fusions, and demonstrated that TAE684 is a much more potent inhibitor of EML4-ALK. Our data demonstrate that EML4-ALK plays an important role in the pathogenesis of a subset of NSCLC and provides insight into the mechanism of EML4-ALK inhibition by a small molecule inhibitor. PMID:21245935

  1. Therapeutic strategies to overcome crizotinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancers harboring the fusion oncogene EML4-ALK

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Ryohei; Khan, Tahsin M.; Benes, Cyril; Lifshits, Eugene; Ebi, Hiromichi; Rivera, Victor M.; Shakespeare, William C.; Iafrate, A. John; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Shaw, Alice T.

    2011-01-01

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion oncogene represents a molecular target in a small subset of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). This fusion leads to constitutive ALK activation with potent transforming activity. In a pivotal phase 1 clinical trial, the ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) crizotinib (PF-02341066) demonstrated impressive antitumor activity in the majority of patients with NSCLC harboring ALK fusions. However, despite these remarkable initial responses, cancers eventually develop resistance to crizotinib, usually within 1 y, thereby limiting the potential clinical benefit. To determine how cancers acquire resistance to ALK inhibitors, we established a model of acquired resistance to crizotinib by exposing a highly sensitive EML4-ALK–positive NSCLC cell line to increasing doses of crizotinib until resistance emerged. We found that cells resistant to intermediate doses of crizotinib developed amplification of the EML4-ALK gene. Cells resistant to higher doses (1 μM) also developed a gatekeeper mutation, L1196M, within the kinase domain, rendering EML4-ALK insensitive to crizotinib. This gatekeeper mutation was readily detected using a unique and highly sensitive allele-specific PCR assay. Although crizotinib was ineffectual against EML4-ALK harboring the gatekeeper mutation, we observed that two structurally different ALK inhibitors, NVP-TAE684 and AP26113, were highly active against the resistant cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, these resistant cells remained highly sensitive to the Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG. Thus, we have developed a model of acquired resistance to ALK inhibitors and have shown that second-generation ALK TKIs or Hsp90 inhibitors are effective in treating crizotinib-resistant tumors harboring secondary gatekeeper mutations. PMID:21502504

  2. Clinical outcomes of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients with EGFR mutation, ALK rearrangement and EGFR/ALK co-alterations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Jun; Zhou, Qing; Yan, Li-Xu; Xie, Zhi; Su, Jian; Chen, Zhi-Hong; Tu, Hai-Yan; Yan, Hong-Hong; Wang, Zhen; Xu, Chong-Rui; Jiang, Ben-Yuan; Wang, Bin-Chao; Bai, Xiao-Yan; Zhong, Wen-Zhao; Wu, Yi-Long; Yang, Jin-Ji

    2016-01-01

    The co-occurrence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements constitutes a rare molecular subtype of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Herein, we assessed the clinical outcomes and incidence of acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in this subtype. So we enrolled 118 advanced NSCLC treated with TKIs. EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangements were detected by DNA sequencing or Scorpion amplification refractory mutation system and fluorescence in situ hybridization respectively. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the activation of associated proteins. We found that nine in ten patients with EGFR/ALK co-alterations had good response with first-line EGFR TKI, and the objective response rate (ORR) of EGFR TKIs was 80% (8/10) for EGFR/ALK co-altered and 65.5% (55/84) for EGFR-mutant (P = 0.57), with a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 11.2 and 13.2 months, (hazard ratio [HR]=0.95, 95% [CI], 0.49-1.84, P= 0.87). ORR of crizotinib was 40% (2/5) for EGFR/ALK co-altered and 73.9% (17/23) for ALK-rearranged (P= 0.29), with a median PFS of 1.9 and 6.9 months (hazard ratio [HR], 0.40; 95% [CI] 0.15-1.10, P = 0.08). The median overall survival (OS) was 21.3, 23.7, and 18.5 months in EGFR-mutant, ALK-rearranged, and EGFR/ALK co-altered (P= 0.06), and there existed a statistically significant difference in OS between ALK-rearranged and EGFR/ALK co-altered (P=0.03). Taken together, the first-line EGFR-TKI might be the reasonable care for advanced NSCLC harbouring EGFR/ALK co-alterations, whether or nor to use sequential crizotinib should be guided by the status of ALK rearrangement and the relative level of phospho-EGFR and phospho-ALK. PMID:27533086

  3. Stereotactic Radiation Therapy can Safely and Durably Control Sites of Extra-Central Nervous System Oligoprogressive Disease in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Positive Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Crizotinib

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Gregory N.; Weickhardt, Andrew J.; Scheier, Benjamin; Doebele, Robert C.; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Camidge, D. Ross

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To analyze the durability and toxicity of radiotherapeutic local ablative therapy (LAT) applied to extra-central nervous system (eCNS) disease progression in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive NSCLC patients receiving crizotinib and manifesting ≤4 discrete sites of eCNS progression were classified as having oligoprogressive disease (OPD). If subsequent progression met OPD criteria, additional courses of LAT were considered. Crizotinib was continued until eCNS progression was beyond OPD criteria or otherwise not suitable for further LAT. Results: Of 38 patients, 33 progressed while taking crizotinib. Of these, 14 had eCNS progression meeting OPD criteria suitable for radiotherapeutic LAT. Patients with eCNS OPD received 1-3 courses of LAT with radiation therapy. The 6- and 12-month actuarial local lesion control rates with radiation therapy were 100% and 86%, respectively. The 12-month local lesion control rate with single-fraction equivalent dose >25 Gy versus ≤25 Gy was 100% versus 60% (P=.01). No acute or late grade >2 radiation therapy-related toxicities were observed. Median overall time taking crizotinib among those treated with LAT versus those who progressed but were not suitable for LAT was 28 versus 10.1 months, respectively. Patients continuing to take crizotinib for >12 months versus ≤12 months had a 2-year overall survival rate of 72% versus 12%, respectively (P<.0001). Conclusions: Local ablative therapy safely and durably eradicated sites of individual lesion progression in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive NSCLC patients receiving crizotinib. A dose–response relationship for local lesion control was observed. The suppression of OPD by LAT in patients taking crizotinib allowed an extended duration of exposure to crizotinib, which was associated with longer overall survival.

  4. Breast Implant–Associated Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma: Long-Term Follow-Up of 60 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Roberto N.; Aladily, Tariq N.; Prince, H. Miles; Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi; de Jong, Daphne; Fayad, Luis E.; Amin, Mitual B.; Haideri, Nisreen; Bhagat, Govind; Brooks, Glen S.; Shifrin, David A.; O'Malley, Dennis P.; Cheah, Chan Y.; Bacchi, Carlos E.; Gualco, Gabriela; Li, Shiyong; Keech, John A.; Hochberg, Ephram P.; Carty, Matthew J.; Hanson, Summer E.; Mustafa, Eid; Sanchez, Steven; Manning, John T.; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y.; Miranda, Alonso R.; Fox, Patricia; Bassett, Roland L.; Castillo, Jorge J.; Beltran, Brady E.; de Boer, Jan Paul; Chakhachiro, Zaher; Ye, Dongjiu; Clark, Douglas; Young, Ken H.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Breast implant–associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a recently described clinicopathologic entity that usually presents as an effusion-associated fibrous capsule surrounding an implant. Less frequently, it presents as a mass. The natural history of this disease and long-term outcomes are unknown. Patients and Methods We reviewed the literature for all published cases of breast implant–associated ALCL from 1997 to December 2012 and contacted corresponding authors to update clinical follow-up. Results The median overall survival (OS) for 60 patients was 12 years (median follow-up, 2 years; range, 0-14 years). Capsulectomy and implant removal was performed on 56 of 60 patients (93%). Therapeutic data were available for 55 patients: 39 patients (78%) received systemic chemotherapy, and of the 16 patients (28%) who did not receive chemotherapy, 12 patients opted for watchful waiting and four patients received radiation therapy alone. Thirty-nine (93%) of 42 patients with disease confined by the fibrous capsule achieved complete remission, compared with complete remission in 13 (72%) of 18 patients with a tumor mass. Patients with a breast mass had worse OS and progression-free survival (PFS; P = .052 and P = .03, respectively). The OS or PFS were similar between patients who received and did not receive chemotherapy (P = .44 and P = .28, respectively). Conclusion Most patients with breast implant–associated ALCL who had disease confined within the fibrous capsule achieved complete remission. Proper management for these patients may be limited to capsulectomy and implant removal. Patients who present with a mass have a more aggressive clinical course that may be fatal, justifying cytotoxic chemotherapy in addition to removal of implants. PMID:24323027

  5. Loss of CD30 Expression in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Following Brentuximab Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nielson, Colton; Fischer, Ryan; Fraga, Garth; Aires, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Monoclonal antibody therapy is a new innovation in cancer therapy. Binding of monoclonal antibodies to tumor cells facilitates their destruction by the immune system. Tumor cells with mutated target antigens may escape detection by monoclonal antibodies and exhibit a selective growth advantage. This phenomenon was first recognized in CD20-negative B-cell lymphomas in patients previously treated with the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab. We report a cutaneous recurrence of systemic ALCL with an anomalous CD30-negative immunophenotype. The patient had been previously treated with the anti-CD30 monoclonal antibody brentuximab. To our knowledge, we present the first reported case of a cutaneous recurrence of systemic ALCL with an anomalous CD30-negative immunophenotype following chronic brentuximab therapy.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(7):894-895.

  6. L1198F Mutation Resensitizes Crizotinib to ALK by Altering the Conformation of Inhibitor and ATP Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Sun, Rong; Wu, Yuehong; Song, Mingzhu; Li, Jia; Yang, Qianye; Chen, Xiaoyi; Bao, Jinku; Zhao, Qi

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment with small molecule inhibitors is greatly challenged by acquired resistance. A recent study reported the newest generation inhibitor resistant mutation L1198F led to the resensitization to crizotinib, which is the first Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drug for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC. It is of great importance to understand how this extremely rare event occurred for the purpose of overcoming the acquired resistance of such inhibitors. In this study, we exploited molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to dissect the molecular mechanisms. Our MD results revealed that L1198F mutation of ALK resulted in the conformational change at the inhibitor site and altered the binding affinity of ALK to crizotinib and lorlatinib. L1198F mutation also affected the autoactivation of ALK as supported by the identification of His1124 and Tyr1278 as critical amino acids involved in ATP binding and phosphorylation. Our findings are valuable for designing more specific and potent inhibitors for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC and other types of cancer. PMID:28245558

  7. Concurrent EGFR Mutation and ALK Translocation in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sachdev; Bank, Bruce; Fishkin, Paul; Mooney, Colin; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements are now routine biomarkers that have been incorporated into the practice of managing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Historically, the two molecular alterations have been viewed as mutually exclusive, but recent identified cases suggest otherwise. In this report, we describe cases of lung cancer with concurrent EGFR mutation and ALK rearrangement and identify their clinical characteristics. Non-small cell lung cancer patients with multiple molecular alterations were retrospectively analyzed from an academic referral center from 2011–2013. An additional review was conducted of reported cases with dual alterations. Four cases of NSCLC with alterations in both EGFR and ALK were identified and evaluated with 16 published cases for a total of 20 cases. The age of patients ranged from 37 to 77 years. Nine patients were never smokers. The disease control rates in patients treated with EGFR inhibitors and ALK inhibitors were 46% (6/13) and 71% (5/7), respectively. This series highlights the importance of comprehensive molecular profiling of newly diagnosed lung cancer, as NSCLC may be driven by concurrent molecular alterations. EGFR- and ALK-targeted therapies appear to have modest activity in patients with tumors possessing both alterations. Dual-altered NSCLC patients may have distinct clinical characteristics warranting further study. Combination targeted therapy or novel multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors may prove important in these patients, though necessary studies remain ongoing. PMID:27026837

  8. A molecular dynamics investigation on the crizotinib resistance mechanism of C1156Y mutation in ALK

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hui-Yong; Ji, Feng-Qin

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study revealed the detailed resistance mechanism of the non-active mutation C1156Y in ALK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C1156Y leads to crizotinib displacement and conformational changes in the binding cavity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The conformations cause a decline in the vdW and electrostatic energy between crizotinib and ALK. -- Abstract: Crizotinib is an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor that has recently been approved in the US for the treatment of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Despite its outstanding safety and efficacy, several resistant mutations against crizotinib have been detected in the treatment of NSCLC. However, in contrast to the widely accepted mechanism of steric hindrance by mutations at the active site, the mechanism by which the C1156Y non-active site mutation confers resistance against crizotinib remains unclear. In the present study, the resistance mechanism of C1156Y in ALK was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The results suggest that despite the non-active site mutation, C1156Y causes the dislocation of crizotinib as well as the indirect conformational changes in the binding cavity, which results in a marked decrease in the van der Waals and electrostatic interactions between crizotinib and ALK. The obtained results provide a detailed explanation of the resistance caused by C1156Y and may give a vital clue for the design of drugs to combat crizotinib resistance.

  9. A malignant inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the hypopharynx harboring the 3a/b variants of the EML4-ALK fusion gene

    PubMed Central

    Muscarella, Lucia Anna; Rossi, Giulio; Trombetta, Domenico; La Torre, Annamaria; Di Candia, Leonarda; Mengoli, Maria Cecilia; Sparaneo, Angelo; Fazio, Vito Michele; Graziano, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMT) in the head and neck region are rare neoplasms that generally mimic benign/low-grade neoplasms. Overexpression of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has been reported in 50% of IMT cases, secondary to ALK activation by structural rearrangements in the ALK gene, which results in a fusion protein with echinoderm microtubule associated protein like 4 (EML4) in ~20% of cases. The present study describes a case of a 74-year-old woman with a malignant IMT in the right posterior hypopharynx harboring a previously unreported chromosomal rearrangement resulting in EML4 and ALK gene fusion. Strong ALK immunoreactivity was observed in neoplastic cells, while fluorescent in situ hybridization combined with fluorescent fragment analysis and direct sequencing identified the first case of the 3a/b variants of the EML4-ALK fusion gene in IMT. The results of the current study highlight the uncommon occurrence of ALK-positive IMT in the head/neck region and demonstrate the importance of integrating different molecular methodologies to identify unequivocal gene fusion characterization. PMID:28356934

  10. EML4-ALK induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition consistent with cancer stem cell properties in H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fuchun; Liu, Xiaoke; Qing, Qin; Sang, Yaxiong; Feng, Chengjun; Li, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Li; Su, Pei; Wang, Yongsheng

    2015-04-10

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4(EML4)--anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene has been identified as a driver mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the role of EML4-ALK in malignant transformation is not entirely clear. Here, for the first time, we showed that H1299 NSCLC cells stably expressing EML4-ALK acquire EMT phenotype, associated with enhanced invasive migration and increased expression of EMT-inducing transcription factors. H1299-EML4-ALK cells also displayed cancer stem cell-like properties with a concomitant up-regulation of CD133 and enhanced ability of mammospheres formation. Moreover, we found that inhibition of ERK1/2 reversed EMT induced by EML4-ALK in H1299 cells. Taken together, these results suggested that EML4-ALK induced ERK activation is mechanistically associated with EMT phenotype. Thus, inhibition of ERK signaling pathway could be a potential strategy in treatment of NSCLC patients with EML4-ALK translocation.

  11. Combination of the human anti-CD30 antibody 5F11 with cytostatic drugs enhances its antitumor activity against Hodgkin and anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Heuck, Friederike; Ellermann, Julia; Borchmann, Peter; Rothe, Achim; Hansen, Hinrich; Engert, Andreas; von Strandmann, Elke Pogge

    2004-01-01

    Due to its selective overexpression on the malignant cells of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and large cell anaplastic lymphoma (ALCL), CD30 is an excellent target for immunotherapy of these diseases. The fully human monoclonal anti-CD30-antibody 5F11 has been shown to be effective against CD30-expressing cell lines both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, 5F11 shows promising antitumor activity in phase 1/2 clinical trials. To extend these promising results, the authors evaluated combinations of 5F11 with conventional cytostatic drugs against a variety of lymphoma cell lines in vitro. Most combinations tested showed at least additive cytotoxic effects on the HL-derived cell lines L428, L540, and L1236 and the ALCL-derived cell line Karpas 299 as measured by proliferation assays (XTT) and the induction of apoptosis (annexin-V FACS analysis). The most impressive results were detected with the combination of 5F11 and gemcitabine or etoposide. The data suggest that the combination of the human antibody 5F11 with conventional chemotherapy might be beneficial in the combined chemo-immunotherapy of CD30-positive lymphomas.

  12. Silicone-induced granuloma of breast implant capsule (SIGBIC): similarities and differences with anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and their differential diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, Eduardo de Faria Castro; Rêgo, Milena Morais; Ramalho, Luciana Costa; Ayres, Veronica Jorge; Seleti, Rodrigo Oliveira; Ferreira, Carlos Alberto Pecci; Roveda, Decio

    2017-01-01

    Primary breast lymphoma is a rare disease and accounts for 0.5% of cases of breast cancer. Most primary breast lymphomas develop from B cells, and the involvement of T cells is rare. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a recently discovered T-cell lymphoma associated with breast implants. Only a few cases have been reported to date. It is believed that the incidence of ALCL is increasing because of the increasing number of breast implants. The clinical presentation is variable and can manifest as a palpable mass in the breast or armpit, breast pain, or capsular contracture. Because of the rarity of the disease and the lack of knowledge to date, clinical diagnosis is often delayed, with consequent delays in treatment. The cause and pathogenesis have not been fully elucidated, and there are no evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, or follow-up of this disease. We present a review of cases of patients with silicone breast implants, including ALCL, a rare type of breast cancer that is still under study, and silicone-induced granuloma of breast implant capsule and its differential diagnosis, and discuss if a silicone-induced granuloma of breast implant capsule could be the precursor of the disease. PMID:28331364

  13. Silicone-induced granuloma of breast implant capsule (SIGBIC): similarities and differences with anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and their differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Eduardo de Faria Castro; Rêgo, Milena Morais; Ramalho, Luciana Costa; Ayres, Veronica Jorge; Seleti, Rodrigo Oliveira; Ferreira, Carlos Alberto Pecci; Roveda, Decio

    2017-01-01

    Primary breast lymphoma is a rare disease and accounts for 0.5% of cases of breast cancer. Most primary breast lymphomas develop from B cells, and the involvement of T cells is rare. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a recently discovered T-cell lymphoma associated with breast implants. Only a few cases have been reported to date. It is believed that the incidence of ALCL is increasing because of the increasing number of breast implants. The clinical presentation is variable and can manifest as a palpable mass in the breast or armpit, breast pain, or capsular contracture. Because of the rarity of the disease and the lack of knowledge to date, clinical diagnosis is often delayed, with consequent delays in treatment. The cause and pathogenesis have not been fully elucidated, and there are no evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, or follow-up of this disease. We present a review of cases of patients with silicone breast implants, including ALCL, a rare type of breast cancer that is still under study, and silicone-induced granuloma of breast implant capsule and its differential diagnosis, and discuss if a silicone-induced granuloma of breast implant capsule could be the precursor of the disease.

  14. Progress in the treatment of mature T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ritsuro

    Treatment outcomes of malignant lymphoma have improved due to the discovery of novel chemotherapeutic and molecular targeted agents as well as advances in their combination uses. However, the prognosis of T-cell lymphoma remains poorer than that of B-cell lymphomas, and progress is slow. The reasons include their chemotherapeutic resistant nature and the absence of effective antibody agents for T-cell lymphomas. The number of T-cell lymphoma subtypes increased from 21 in the WHO classification 2008 to 29 in the WHO classification 2016. This means that T-cell lymphomas are heterogeneous. T-cell lymphomas can be divided to ALK-positive anaplastic lymphoma (ALCL) with a good prognosis and others with poorer prognoses. ALK-positive ALCL can be successfully treated with CHOP, but the others cannot. P-glycoprotein resistant anthracyclines, etoposide, or hematopoietic stem cell transplantations are increasingly applied to improve outcomes, but no standard treatment approach has yet been established. Regarding relapsed/refractory T-cell lymphoma, many novel agents are currently under development. The treatment outcomes of T-cell lymphoma need to be improved by applying innovative strategies including further novel agents.

  15. A large, single-center, real-world study of clinicopathological characteristics and treatment in advanced ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Yaxiong; Yan, Fang; Fang, Wenfeng; Yang, Yunpeng; Hong, Shaodong; Miao, Siyu; Wu, Manli; Huang, Xiaodan; Luo, Youli; Zhou, Cong; Gong, Run; Huang, Yan; Zhou, Ningning; Zhao, Hongyun; Zhang, Li

    2017-04-04

    Crizotinib has achieved astonishing success in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement. However, no real-world studies described the clinicopathological characteristics and treatment of such patients in China. Patients were consecutively collected from Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center. Chi-square test was applied to explore the relationship between ALK fusion status and metastasis sites. Kaplan-Meier methods and multivariable analyses were used to estimate progression-free survival (PFS). A total of 291 advanced NSCLC patients (ALK (+), N = 97; both ALK & epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (-), N = 194) were enrolled. The occurrence of brain metastasis in ALK-positive patients was significantly higher than double-negative ones both at baseline (26.5% vs. 16.5%, P = 0.038) and during treatment (25.8% vs. 11.9%, P = 0.003), but opposite for pleural effusion (6.2% vs. 26.9%, P < 0.001 at baseline; 3.1% vs. 10.3%, P = 0.031 during treatment). ALK-positive patients of 53.6% used crizotinib, whereas others only received chemotherapy (37.1%) or supportive care (9.3%). Usage of crizotinib prolonged PFS compared with chemotherapy in ALK-positive patients (median PFS 17.6 m vs. 4.8 m, P < 0.001). ALK-positive NSCLC had more brain metastasis and less pleural effusion than double-negative ones. Crizotinib showed better PFS than chemotherapy in advanced ALK-positive NSCLC at any line. However, half advanced ALK-positive patients never received crizotinib, which was grim and need improving.

  16. Use of minimal disseminated disease and immunity to NPM-ALK antigen to stratify ALK-positive ALCL patients with different prognosis.

    PubMed

    Mussolin, L; Damm-Welk, C; Pillon, M; Zimmermann, M; Franceschetto, G; Pulford, K; Reiter, A; Rosolen, A; Woessmann, W

    2013-02-01

    We studied the prognostic value of minimal disseminated disease (MDD) and anti-ALK immune response in children with NPM-ALK-positive anaplastic-large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and evaluated their potential for risk stratification. NPM-ALK transcripts were analyzed by RT-PCR in bone marrow/peripheral blood of 128 ALCL patients at diagnosis, whereas ALK antibody titers in plasma were assessed using an immunocytochemical approach. MDD was positive in 59% of patients and 96% showed an anti-ALK response. Using MDD and antibody titer results, patients could be divided into three biological risk groups (bRG) with different prognosis: high risk (bHR): MDD-positive and antibody titer ≤ 1/750, 26/128 (20%); low risk (bLR): MDD negative and antibody titer >1/750, 40/128 (31%); intermediate risk (bIR): all remaining patients, 62/128 (48%). Progression-free survival was 28% (s.e., 9%), 68% (s.e., 6%) and 93% (s.e., 4%) for bHR, bIR and bLR, respectively (P<0.0001). Survival was 71% (s.e., 9%), 83% (s.e., 5%) and 98% (s.e., 2%) for bHR, bIR and bLR (P=0.02). Only bHR and histology other than common type were predictive of higher risk of failure (hazard ratio 4.9 and 2.7, respectively) in multivariate analysis. Stratification of ALCL patients based on MDD and anti-ALK titer should be considered in future ALCL trials to optimize treatment.

  17. Responses to crizotinib in patients with ALK-positive lung adenocarcinoma who tested immunohistochemistry (IHC)-positive and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-negative

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Mu, Xinlin; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Xinming; Li, Junling; Lin, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    Although the Ventana immunohistochemistry (IHC) platform for detecting anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene (ALK) (D5F3) expression was recently approved by the US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is still the “gold-standard” method recommended by the US National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guideline for NSCLC. We evaluated 6 ALK-positive lung adenocarcinoma patients who tested Ventana IHC-positive and FISH-negative and assessed their clinical responses to the ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) crizotinib. Histologic and cytologic specimens from the 6 patients were stained with Ventana anti-ALK(D5F3) rabbit monoclonal primary antibody using the OptiView™ DAB IHC detection kit and OptiView™ amplification kit on a Ventana BenchMark XT processor. In addition, they were also tested by FISH, qRT-PCR, next-generation sequencing (NGS), and RNAscope ISH analysis. All patients received crizotinib treatment and their follow-up clinical data were recorded. The objective response rate achieved with crizotinib therapy was 66.7% (4/6 partial responses and 2/6 stable disease). One patient in whom a new fusion type (EML4->EXOC6B->ALK fusion) was identified obtained a partial response. These findings indicate that patients with ALK-positive lung adenocarcinoma who test Ventana IHC-positive and FISH-negative may still respond to crizotinib therapy. PMID:27418132

  18. Comparison of small biopsy specimens and surgical specimens for the detection of EGFR mutations and EML4-ALK in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, DeSheng; Lu, Can; Zhu, Wei; He, QiuYan; Li, Yong; Fu, ChunYan; Zhou, JianHua; Liu, Shuang; Tao, YongGuang

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion genes represent novel oncogenes that are associated with non–small-cell lung cancers (NSCLC). The feasibility of detecting EGFR mutations and ALK fusion genes in small biopsy specimens or surgical specimens was determined. Of the 721 NSCLC patients, a total of 305 cases were positive for EGFR mutations (42.3%). The rate of EGFR mutations in women was significantly higher than that in men. Histologically, the EGFR mutation rate in adenocarcinomas was significantly higher than that in squamous cell carcinomas. No difference in the EGFR mutation rate was observed between surgical specimens (42.1%) and small biopsy specimens (42.4%), which indicated that the EGFR mutation ratios in surgical specimens and small biopsy specimens were not different. In 385 NSCLC patients, 26 cases were positive for EML4-ALK (6.8%). However, 11.7% of the surgical specimens were EML4-ALK-positive, whereas the positive proportion in the small biopsy specimens was only 4.7%, which indicated that EML4-ALK-positive rate in the surgical specimens was significantly higher than that in the small biopsy specimens. Detection of EGFR gene mutations was feasible in small biopsy specimens, and screening for EML4-ALK expression in small biopsy specimens can be used to guide clinical treatments. PMID:27322143

  19. Alectinib induced CNS radiation necrosis in an ALK+NSCLC patient with a remote (7 years) history of brain radiation.

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Weitz, Michael; Jalas, John R; Kelly, Daniel F; Wong, Vanessa; Azada, Michele C; Quines, Oliver; Klempner, Samuel J

    2016-06-01

    Alectinib is a second generation ALK inhibitor that has significant clinical activity in central nervous system (CNS) metastases in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Pseudoprogression (PsP) due to radiation necrosis during alecitnib treatment of central nervous system (CNS) metastases from ALK-rearranged NSCLC as been reported. Hence, distinguishing radiation-related PsP from alectinib-induced radiographic changes is important to avoid erroneous early trial discontinuation and abandonment of an effective treatment. However, it remains difficult to assess casuality of radiation necrosis is related to recent direct radiation or induced by alectinib treatment or both. It is also unknown how long from previous radiation can alectinib still induce radiation necrosis. Here we reported a crizotinib-refractory ALK-positive NSCLC patient who develop radiation necrosis in one of his metastatic CNS lesions after approximately 12 months of alectinib treatment who otherwise had on-going CNS response on alectinib. His most recent radiation to his CNS metastases was 7 years prior to the start of alectinib. This case illustrates that in the setting of pror CNS radiation, given the significant clinical activity of alectinib in CNS metastases in ALK-positive NSCLC patients the risk of CNS radiation necrosis remains long after previous radiation to the CNS metastases has been completed and can occur after durable response of treatment.

  20. Stimulation of the midkine/ALK axis renders glioma cells resistant to cannabinoid antitumoral action

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, M; Torres, S; Salazar, M; Carracedo, A; Hernández-Tiedra, S; Rodríguez-Fornés, F; García-Taboada, E; Meléndez, B; Mollejo, M; Campos-Martín, Y; Lakatosh, S A; Barcia, J; Guzmán, M; Velasco, G

    2011-01-01

    Identifying the molecular mechanisms responsible for the resistance of gliomas to anticancer treatments is an issue of great therapeutic interest. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major active ingredient of marijuana, and other cannabinoids inhibit tumor growth in animal models of cancer, including glioma, an effect that relies, at least in part, on the stimulation of autophagy-mediated apoptosis in tumor cells. Here, by analyzing the gene expression profile of a large series of human glioma cells with different sensitivity to cannabinoid action, we have identified a subset of genes specifically associated to THC resistance. One of these genes, namely that encoding the growth factor midkine (Mdk), is directly involved in the resistance of glioma cells to cannabinoid treatment. We also show that Mdk mediates its protective effect via the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) receptor and that Mdk signaling through ALK interferes with cannabinoid-induced autophagic cell death. Furthermore, in vivo Mdk silencing or ALK pharmacological inhibition sensitizes cannabinod-resistant tumors to THC antitumoral action. Altogether, our findings identify Mdk as a pivotal factor involved in the resistance of glioma cells to THC pro-autophagic and antitumoral action, and suggest that selective targeting of the Mdk/ALK axis could help to improve the efficacy of antitumoral therapies for gliomas. PMID:21233844

  1. An Unusual Case of Systemic Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor with Successful Treatment with ALK-Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Sanjivini V.; Reith, John D.; Kojima, Angerika Y.; Williams, William D.; Liu, Chen; Vila Duckworth, Lizette

    2014-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is an exceedingly rare entity. A 45-year-old Hispanic female presented with a 6-month history of left-sided thigh pain, low back pain, and generalized weakness. PET/CT scan revealed abnormal activity in the liver, adrenal gland, and pancreas. MRI of the abdomen demonstrated two 6-7 cm masses in the liver. MRI of the lumbar spine demonstrated lesions in the L2 to L4 spinous processes, paraspinal muscles, and subcutaneous tissues, as well as an 8 mm enhancing intradural lesion at T11, all thought to be metastatic disease. A biopsy of the liver showed portal tract expansion by a spindle cell proliferation rich in inflammation. Tumor cells showed immunoreactivity for smooth muscle actin and anaplastic lymphoma kinase 1 (ALK1). Tissue from the L5 vertebra showed a process histologically identical to that seen in the liver. FISH analysis of these lesions demonstrated an ALK (2p23) gene rearrangement. The patient was successfully treated with an ALK-inhibitor, Crizotinib, and is now in complete remission. We present the first reported case, to our knowledge, of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor with systemic manifestations and ALK translocation. This case is a prime example of how personalized medicine has vastly improved patient care through the use of molecular-targeted therapy. PMID:25045570

  2. microRNA classifiers are powerful diagnostic/prognostic tools in ALK-, EGFR-, and KRAS-driven lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Pierluigi; Cascione, Luciano; Landi, Lorenza; Carasi, Stefania; Lovat, Francesca; Tibaldi, Carmelo; Alì, Greta; D'Incecco, Armida; Minuti, Gabriele; Chella, Antonio; Fontanini, Gabriella; Fassan, Matteo; Cappuzzo, Federico; Croce, Carlo M

    2015-12-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) can act as oncosuppressors or oncogenes, induce chemoresistance or chemosensitivity, and are major posttranscriptional gene regulators. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), EGF receptor (EGFR), and V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) are major drivers of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of this study was to assess the miRNA profiles of NSCLCs driven by translocated ALK, mutant EGFR, or mutant KRAS to find driver-specific diagnostic and prognostic miRNA signatures. A total of 85 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples were considered: 67 primary NSCLCs and 18 matched normal lung tissues. Of the 67 primary NSCLCs, 17 were echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-ALK translocated (ALK(+)) lung cancers; the remaining 50 were not (ALK(-)). Of the 50 ALK(-) primary NSCLCs, 24 were EGFR and KRAS mutation-negative (i.e., WT; triple negative); 11 were mutant EGFR (EGFR(+)), and 15 were mutant KRAS (KRAS(+)). We developed a diagnostic classifier that shows how miR-1253, miR-504, and miR-26a-5p expression levels can classify NSCLCs as ALK-translocated, mutant EGFR, or mutant KRAS versus mutation-free. We also generated a prognostic classifier based on miR-769-5p and Let-7d-5p expression levels that can predict overall survival. This classifier showed better performance than the commonly used classifiers based on mutational status. Although it has several limitations, this study shows that miRNA signatures and classifiers have great potential as powerful, cost-effective next-generation tools to improve and complement current genetic tests. Further studies of these miRNAs can help define their roles in NSCLC biology and in identifying best-performing chemotherapy regimens.

  3. Management of crizotinib therapy for ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung carcinoma: an expert consensus.

    PubMed

    Cappuzzo, Federico; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Gautschi, Oliver; Boleti, Ekaterini; Felip, Enriqueta; Groen, Harry J M; Germonpré, Paul; Meldgaard, Peter; Arriola, Edurne; Steele, Nicola; Fox, Jesme; Schnell, Patrick; Engelsberg, Arne; Wolf, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    Within 4 years of the discovery of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the ALK inhibitor crizotinib gained US and European approval for the treatment of advanced ALK-positive NSCLC. This was due to the striking response data observed with crizotinib in phase I and II trials in patients with ALK-positive NSCLC, as well as the favorable tolerability and safety profile observed. Recently published phase III data established crizotinib as a new standard of care for this NSCLC molecular subset. A consequence of such rapid approval, however, is the limited clinical experience and relative paucity of information concerning optimal therapy management. In this review, we discuss the development of crizotinib and the clinical relevance of its safety profile, examining crizotinib-associated adverse events in detail and making specific management recommendations. Crizotinib-associated adverse events were mostly mild to moderate in severity in clinical studies, and appropriate monitoring and supportive therapies are considered effective in avoiding the need for dose interruption or reduction in most cases. Therapy management of patients following disease progression on crizotinib is also discussed. Based on available clinical data, it is evident that patients may have prolonged benefit from crizotinib after Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors-defined disease progression, and crizotinib should be continued for as long as the patient derives benefit.

  4. Ixabepilone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  5. Oral Clofarabine for Relapsed/Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-17

    Follicular Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Low Grade B-cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large-cell Lymphoma

  6. Fatal Haemoptysis Associated with Dramatic Response to Crizotinib in an ALK-Rearranged Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mussat, Elodie; Giraud, Violaine; Julie, Catherine; Chinet, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The presence of an ALK (Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase) rearrangement is a rare molecular feature in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC), and concerns mainly non- or light smokers, young patients, with adenocarcinoma histological type. These tumours are particularly sensitive to Alk-targeted therapies, as crizotinib. Crizotinib is usually well-tolerated. We report a case of fatal haemoptysis associated with dramatic response to crizotinib in a patient with an ALK-rearranged lung adenocarcinoma. The patient presented a mediastinal invasion with tracheal involvement and compression of the right pulmonary artery. The initial evolution under crizotinib was good with tumour response. At 6 weeks of crizotinib the patient presented a massive haemoptysis with a tracheobronchial fistula and pneumomediastinum. She died of acute respiratory failure. Our case is the first to report a fatal effect of crizotinib associated with tumour necrosis and good tumour response on a massive mediastinal infiltration. Precautions are recommended with the use of crizotinib in proximal lung tumours with vascular invasion. PMID:27134984

  7. Uncommon features of surgically resected ALK-positive cavitary lung adenocarcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takamori, Shinkichi; Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Taguchi, Kenichi; Edagawa, Makoto; Shimamatsu, Shinichiro; Toyozawa, Ryo; Nosaki, Kaname; Hirai, Fumihiko; Seto, Takashi; Takenoyama, Mitsuhiro; Ichinose, Yukito

    2017-12-01

    Some features found on chest computed tomography (CT), such as central tumor location, large pleural effusion, and the absence of a pleural tail, and a patient age of less than 60 years, have been suggested to be useful in predicting anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).A 68-year-old female patient with a history of gynecological treatment was found to have a cavitary mass in the right lower lobe on an annual chest roentgenogram. The tumor was located in the peripheral area with a pleural tail showing no pleural effusion. In addition, two pure ground-glass-opacity nodules (p-GGNs) in the right upper lobe of the lung were detected on consecutive chest CT scans. The patient underwent right lower lobectomy, partial resection of the right upper lobe, and hilar mediastinal lymph node dissection for complete resection of each tumor. The pathological diagnosis was invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma with signet-ring cells for the cavitary mass in the right lower lobe and invasive adenocarcinoma for the rest of the p-GGNs; subcarinal lymph node metastasis was also detected. The ALK rearrangement was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization from the cavitary mass. The patient underwent four cycles of cisplatin and vinorelbine chemotherapy as standard adjuvant chemotherapy for pStage III NSCLC. The ALK fusion gene status of NSCLC with atypical CT features should also be investigated.

  8. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the ALK gene in 2,045 non-small cell lung cancer patients from North-Western Spain (Galicia).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ares, María; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José M; Vázquez-Estévez, Sergio; Lázaro-Quintela, Martín; Vázquez-Boquete, Ángel; Afonso-Afonso, Francisco J; Casal-Rubio, Joaquín; González-Piñeiro, Ana L; Rico-Rodríguez, Yolanda; Fírvida-Pérez, José L; Ruíz-Bañobre, Juan; Couso, Elena; Santomé, Lucía; Pérez-Becerra, Raquel; García-Campelo, Rosario; Amenedo, Margarita; Azpitarte-Raposeiras, Cristina; Antúnez, José; Abdulkader, Ihab

    2016-08-01

    Identification of anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements is a standard diagnostic test in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The current study describes the experience of ALK rearrangement detection of a referral center in the public health care system of Galicia in North-Western Spain. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) patterns of the ALK gene and the clinical and pathological features of these patients are reported. This study is also of interest for comparative purposes due to the relative geographical isolation of the area, which could have contributed to particular genetic features. A total of 2,045 tissue samples from NSCLC patients were collected between October 2010 and July 2015 and tested for ALK rearrangements by FISH. Examination of 1,686 paraffin-embedded tissue specimens and 395 cytological samples (306 cell block preparations and 53 cytological smears) was conducted, and any associations between the FISH results and clinicopathological features were assessed. The rate of successful evaluation was marginally higher in tissue samples than in cytological samples (92.9% vs. 84.1%); this difference was not significant. ALK rearrangements were identified in 82 patients(4%): 65 (79.3%) in tissue specimens, 15 (18.3%) in cell block samples and 2 (2.4%) in cytological smears. This genetic translocation appeared to be associated with a non-smoking history, younger age, female gender, stage IV and adenocarcinoma histological type. The findings demonstrate that ALK evaluation by FISH is feasible in tissue and cytological samples. The clinical and pathological features of the ALK-positive series of patients are similar to those previously reported in the literature.

  9. Molecular Testing Guideline for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients for EGFR and ALK Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lindeman, Neal I.; Cagle, Philip T.; Beasley, Mary Beth; Chitale, Dhananjay Arun; Dacic, Sanja; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Jenkins, Robert Brian; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Saldivar, Juan-Sebastian; Squire, Jeremy; Thunnissen, Erik; Ladanyi, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish evidence-based recommendations for the molecular analysis of lung cancers that are that are required to guide EGFR- and ALK-directed therapies, addressing which patients and samples should be tested, and when and how testing should be performed. Participants Three cochairs without conflicts of interest were selected, one from each of the 3 sponsoring professional societies: College of American Pathologists, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, and Association for Molecular Pathology. Writing and advisory panels were constituted from additional experts from these societies. Evidence Three unbiased literature searches of electronic databases were performed to capture articles published published from January 2004 through February 2012, yielding 1533 articles whose abstracts were screened to identify 521 pertinent articles that were then reviewed in detail for their relevance to the recommendations. Evidence was formally graded for each recommendation. Consensus Process Initial recommendations were formulated by the cochairs and panel members at a public meeting. Each guideline section was assigned to at least 2 panelists. Drafts were circulated to the writing panel (version 1), advisory panel (version 2), and the public (version 3) before submission (version 4). Conclusions The 37 guideline items address 14 subjects, including 15 recommendations (evidence grade A/B). The major recommendations are to use testing for EGFR mutations and ALK fusions to guide patient selection for therapy with an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, respectively, in all patients with advanced-stage adenocarcinoma, regardless of sex, race, smoking history, or other clinical risk factors, and to prioritize EGFR and ALK testing over other molecular predictive tests. As scientific discoveries and clinical practice outpace the completion of randomized clinical trials, evidence-based guidelines developed

  10. A novel lead compound CM-118: antitumor activity and new insight into the molecular mechanism and combination therapy strategy in c-Met- and ALK-dependent cancers.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lanfang; Shu, Mengjun; Chen, Yaqing; Yang, Dexiao; He, Qun; Zhao, Hui; Feng, Zhiyong; Liang, Chris; Yu, Ker

    2014-06-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and the c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase play essential roles in the pathogenesis in multiple human cancers and present emerging targets for cancer treatment. Here, we describe CM-118, a novel lead compound displaying low nanomolar biochemical potency against both ALK and c-Met with selectivity over>90 human kinases. CM-118 potently abrogated hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-induced c-Met phosphorylation and cell migration, phosphorylation of ALK, EML4-ALK, and ALK resistance mutants in transfected cells. CM-118 inhibited proliferation and/or induced apoptosis in multiple c-Met- and ALK-addicted cancer lines with dose response profile correlating target blockade. We show that the CM-118-induced apoptosis in c-Met-amplified H1993 NSCLC cells involved a rapid suppression of c-Met activity and c-Met-to-EGFR cross-talk, and was profoundly potentiated by EGFR inhibitors as shown by the increased levels of apoptotic proteins cleaved-PARP and Bim as well as reduction of the survival protein Mcl-1. Bim-knockdown or Mcl-1 overexpression each significantly attenuated apoptosis. We also revealed a key role by mTOR in mediating CM-118 action against the EML4-ALK-dependent NSCLC cells. Abrogation of EML4-ALK in H2228 cells profoundly reduced signaling capacity of the rapamycin-sensitive mTOR pathway leading to G 1 cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial hyperpolarization, a metabolic perturbation linked to mTOR inhibition. Depletion of mTOR or mTORC1 inhibited H2228 cell growth, and mTOR inhibitors potentiated CM-118's antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Oral administration of CM-118 at a wide range of well tolerated dosages diminished c-Met- and ALK phosphorylation in vivo, and caused tumor regression or growth inhibition in multiple c-Met- and ALK-dependent tumor xenografts in mice. CM-118 exhibits favorable pharmacokinetic and drug metabolism properties hence presents a candidate for clinical evaluation.

  11. Decoding Tumor Phenotypes for ALK, ROS1, and RET Fusions in Lung Adenocarcinoma Using a Radiomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Sohn, Insuk; Cho, Jong Ho; Lee, Ho Yun; Kim, Jae-Hun; Choi, Yoon-La; Kim, Hyeseung; Lee, Genehee; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Jhingook

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Quantitative imaging using radiomics can capture distinct phenotypic differences between tumors and may have predictive power for certain phenotypes according to specific genetic mutations. We aimed to identify the clinicoradiologic predictors of tumors with ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase), ROS1 (c-ros oncogene 1), or RET (rearranged during transfection) fusions in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. A total of 539 pathologically confirmed lung adenocarcinomas were included in this retrospective study. The baseline clinicopathologic characteristics were retrieved from the patients’ medical records and the ALK/ROS1/RET fusion status was reviewed. Quantitative computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography imaging characteristics were evaluated using a radiomics approach. Significant features for the fusion-positive tumor prediction model were extracted from all of the clinicoradiologic features, and were used to calculate diagnostic performance for predicting 3 fusions’ positivity. The clinicoradiologic features were compared between ALK versus ROS1/RET fusion-positive tumors to identify the clinicoradiologic similarity between the 2 groups. The fusion-positive tumor prediction model was a combination of younger age, advanced tumor stage, solid tumor on CT, higher values for SUVmax and tumor mass, lower values for kurtosis and inverse variance on 3-voxel distance than those of fusion-negative tumors (sensitivity and specificity, 0.73 and 0.70, respectively). ALK fusion-positive tumors were significantly different in tumor stage, central location, SUVmax, homogeneity on 1-, 2-, and 3-voxel distances, and sum mean on 2-voxel distance compared with ROS1/RET fusion-positive tumors. ALK/ROS1/RET fusion-positive lung adenocarcinomas possess certain clinical and imaging features that enable good discrimination of fusion-positive from fusion-negative lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:26469915

  12. Alectinib's activity against CNS metastases from ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer: a single institution case series.

    PubMed

    Metro, Giulio; Lunardi, Gianluigi; Bennati, Chiara; Chiarini, Pietro; Sperduti, Isabella; Ricciuti, Biagio; Marcomigni, Luca; Costa, Cinzia; Crinò, Lucio; Floridi, Piero; Gori, Stefania; Chiari, Rita

    2016-09-01

    In the present study we assessed the activity of the next-generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (-TKI) alectinib, in patients with ALK-postive, advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and central nervous system (CNS) metastases. NSCLCs with ALK-positive disease, as assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and CNS metastases were treated with alectinib 600 mg BID. Included patients were followed prospectively in order to evaluate the efficacy of the drug, with particular emphasis on activity in the CNS. Eleven consecutive patients were enrolled. The majority of them were pretreated with crizotinib (n = 10, 90.9 %), and cranial radiotherapy (n = 8, 72.7 %). Six of the seven patients with measurable CNS disease experienced a CNS response, including three patients who were naïve for cranial radiation. Median duration of response was 8 months. For the whole population, median CNS-progression-free survival (-PFS), systemic-PFS, overall-PFS, overall survival, and 1-year survival were 8, 11, 8, 13 months, and 31.1 %, respectively. Two patients experiencing a CNS response were assessed for alectinib's concentrations in serum and cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), and showed a CSF-to-serum ratio ranging from 0.001 to 0.003 ng/mL. Alectinib is highly active against CNS metastases from ALK-positive NSCLCs, irrespective of prior treatment(s) with ALK-TKI(s) and/or cranial radiotherapy. The low CSF-to-serum ratio of alectinib suggests that measuring the concentrations of the drug in the CSF may not be a reliable surrogate of its distribution into the CNS.

  13. Decoding Tumor Phenotypes for ALK, ROS1, and RET Fusions in Lung Adenocarcinoma Using a Radiomics Approach.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Sohn, Insuk; Cho, Jong Ho; Lee, Ho Yun; Kim, Jae-Hun; Choi, Yoon-La; Kim, Hyeseung; Lee, Genehee; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Jhingook

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative imaging using radiomics can capture distinct phenotypic differences between tumors and may have predictive power for certain phenotypes according to specific genetic mutations. We aimed to identify the clinicoradiologic predictors of tumors with ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase), ROS1 (c-ros oncogene 1), or RET (rearranged during transfection) fusions in patients with lung adenocarcinoma.A total of 539 pathologically confirmed lung adenocarcinomas were included in this retrospective study. The baseline clinicopathologic characteristics were retrieved from the patients' medical records and the ALK/ROS1/RET fusion status was reviewed. Quantitative computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography imaging characteristics were evaluated using a radiomics approach. Significant features for the fusion-positive tumor prediction model were extracted from all of the clinicoradiologic features, and were used to calculate diagnostic performance for predicting 3 fusions' positivity. The clinicoradiologic features were compared between ALK versus ROS1/RET fusion-positive tumors to identify the clinicoradiologic similarity between the 2 groups.The fusion-positive tumor prediction model was a combination of younger age, advanced tumor stage, solid tumor on CT, higher values for SUV(max) and tumor mass, lower values for kurtosis and inverse variance on 3-voxel distance than those of fusion-negative tumors (sensitivity and specificity, 0.73 and 0.70, respectively). ALK fusion-positive tumors were significantly different in tumor stage, central location, SUV(max), homogeneity on 1-, 2-, and 3-voxel distances, and sum mean on 2-voxel distance compared with ROS1/RET fusion-positive tumors.ALK/ROS1/RET fusion-positive lung adenocarcinomas possess certain clinical and imaging features that enable good discrimination of fusion-positive from fusion-negative lung adenocarcinomas.

  14. Genotype-driven therapies for non-small cell lung cancer: focus on EGFR, KRAS and ALK gene abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gaughan, Elizabeth M; Costa, Daniel B

    2011-05-01

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) are heterogeneous cancers. In 2004, the identification of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) somatic mutations provided the first glimpse of a clinically relevant NSCLC oncogene. Approximately 70% of NSCLCs with EGFR mutations (exon 19 deletions or the exon 21 L858R) attain responses to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib and erlotinib, with improved response rate (RR), progression-free survival (PFS) and in some reports overall survival (OS) when compared with EGFR wildtype (WT) cases. Three randomized trials of gefitinib versus chemotherapy (IPASS, WJTOG3405, NEJ002) in stage IV NSCLC have consistently demonstrated better RR and PFS (hazard ratios of 0.48 [IPASS], 0.49 [WJTOG3405] and 0.30 [NEJ002]) for EGFR-mutated NSCLCs treated with gefitinib. Novel irreversible EGFR TKIs (afatinib, XL647, PF00299804) show similar activity in EGFR-mutated patients. A translocation involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene with EML4, identified in 2007, is the most recent oncogene found in NSCLC. Crizotinib (PF02341066), an ALK TKI, has shown impressive activity against ALK translocated NSCLC in an expanded cohort of a phase I trial (NCT00585195). Over 80 patients have been treated and the RR is ∼60% with the 6-month PFS rate exceeding 70%. A registration phase III trial of crizotinib versus second-line chemotherapy (pemetrexed/docetaxel) is underway (PROFILE 1007, NCT00932893). KRAS, EGFR mutations and ALK translocations are mutually exclusive and few EGFR WT NSCLCs respond to EGFR TKIs. The promising results of EGFR and ALK TKIs in molecular subgroups of NSCLCs herald a new age of drug and clinical trial development for patients with NSCLC.

  15. Three-Year Follow-Up of an Alectinib Phase I/II Study in ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: AF-001JP.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Tomohide; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Seto, Takashi; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Maemondo, Makoto; Inoue, Akira; Hida, Toyoaki; Yoshioka, Hiroshige; Harada, Masao; Ohe, Yuichiro; Nogami, Naoyuki; Murakami, Haruyasu; Kuriki, Hiroshi; Shimada, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Takeuchi, Kengo; Nishio, Makoto

    2017-03-15

    Purpose Alectinib is an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) -specific kinase inhibitor that seems to be effective against non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with a variety of ALK mutations. The primary analysis of AF-001JP reported a promising overall response rate. To assess progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), patients from the phase II part of AF-001JP were followed up for approximately 3 years. Patients and Methods Oral alectinib 300 mg was administered twice per day to patients with ALK inhibitor-naïve, ALK-positive NSCLC who had progressed after one or more regimens of previous chemotherapy. In this long-term follow-up, efficacy (PFS, OS), correlation between tumor shrinkage and PFS, safety of alectinib, and relief of cancer symptoms were evaluated. Results At the updated data cutoff (September 10, 2015; first patient in August 30, 2011, last patient in April 18, 2012), 25 of 46 phase II patients were still receiving alectinib. Disease progression was confirmed in 18 patients (39%); median PFS was not reached (3-year PFS rate, 62%; 95% CI, 45 to 75). Fourteen patients had brain metastases at baseline; of these, 6 remained in the study without CNS and systemic progression. Tumor shrinkage and PFS showed no correlation. The 3-year OS rate was 78% (13 events). The most common treatment-related adverse event (all grades) was increased blood bilirubin (36.2%). Most cancer symptoms were relieved early, and medication for symptoms was dramatically decreased during alectinib therapy. Conclusion Alectinib was effective in this 3-year follow-up with a favorable safety profile over a long administration period in ALK-positive NSCLC without previous ALK inhibitor treatment.

  16. Durable brain response with pulse-dose crizotinib and ceritinib in ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer compared with brain radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dudnik, Elizabeth; Siegal, Tali; Zach, Leor; Allen, Aaron M; Flex, Dov; Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Limon, Dror; Hirsch, Fred R; Peled, Nir

    2016-04-01

    Crizotinib achieves excellent systemic control in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-rearranged (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); however, central nervous system (CNS) metastases frequently occur as an early event. Whole brain irradiation, the standard treatment, results in neurocognitive impairment. We present a case series of three ALK+ NSCLC patients with progressing CNS metastases who were treated with pulse-dose crizotinib followed by ceritinib. Three ALK+ NSCLC patients treated between 2011 and 2014 (two males, two never smokers, age range 20-54years, all echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4/ALK rearrangement), were diagnosed with progressing cerebral disease while receiving crizotinib. Clinico-pathological characteristics, treatments, and outcomes were analyzed. In two patients the progression was limited to the CNS, and radiological evidence of leptomeningeal spread was present in one patient. Sequential use of crizotinib 500mg administered once daily (pulse-dose) followed by ceritinib on progression achieved control of the disease in the CNS for over 18 months and over 7 months in Patient 1 and Patient 2, respectively. This strategy provided durable CNS control after whole-brain radiotherapy failure in Patient 1, and allowed the whole-brain radiotherapy to be deferred in Patient 2. Limited CNS progression was documented in Patient 3 while he was on standard-dose/pulse-dose crizotinib for 15months; durable (over 7 months) complete remission was achieved with stereotactic radiotherapy and ceritinib. Manipulating the crizotinib schedule in ALK+ NSCLC patients with CNS metastases and using a novel ALK-inhibitor at the time of further progression may provide durable CNS control and allow brain radiotherapy to be deferred.

  17. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation and Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Gene Fusion: Detection in Malignant Pleural Effusion by RNA or PNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Lin; Lee, Chung-Ta; Lu, Cheng-Chan; Yang, Shu-Ching; Chen, Wan-Li; Lee, Yang-Cheng; Yang, Chung-Hsien; Peng, Shu-Ling; Su, Wu-Chou; Chow, Nan-Haw; Ho, Chung-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing EGFR mutations and detecting ALK gene fusion are indispensable when planning to treat pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is a devastating complication of lung cancer and sometimes the only source for mutation analysis. The percentage of tumor cells in the pleural effusion may be low; therefore, mutant enrichment is required for a successful analysis. The EGFR mutation status in MPE was determined using three methods: (1) PCR sequencing of genomic DNA (direct sequencing), (2) mutant-enriched PCR sequencing of genomic DNA using peptide nucleic acid (PNA-sequencing), and (3) PCR sequencing of cDNA after reverse transcription for cellular RNA (RNA-sequencing). RT-PCR was also used to test cases for ALK gene fusion. PNA-sequencing and RNA-sequencing had similar analytical sensitivities (< 1%), which indicates similar enrichment capabilities. The clinical sensitivity in 133 cases when detecting the common EGFR exon 19 and exon 21 mutations was 56.4% (75/133) for direct sequencing, 63.2% (84/133) for PNA-sequencing, and 65.4% (87/133) for RNA-sequencing. RT-PCR and sequencing showed 5 cases (3.8%) with ALK gene fusion. All had wild-type EGFR. For EGFR analysis of MPE, RNA-sequencing is at least as sensitive as PNA-sequencing but not limited to specific mutations. Detecting ALK fusion can be incorporated in the same RNA workflow. Therefore, RNA is a better source for comprehensive molecular diagnoses in MPE. PMID:27352172

  18. Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, arising in association with saline breast implant: expanding the spectrum of breast implant-associated lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Aladily, Tariq N; Nathwani, Bharat N; Miranda, Roberto N; Kansal, Rina; Yin, C Cameron; Protzel, Richard; Takowsky, Gary S; Medeiros, L Jeffrey

    2012-11-01

    Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, is a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is most common in Asia and is driven by Epstein-Barr virus infection. These tumors usually arise in the nasal region; in rare cases they can involve extranasal sites, most often skin, with involvement of the breast being rare. Lymphomas arising adjacent to breast implants are rare, and most cases reported to date have been anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Here we report a 41-year-old white woman with bilateral saline breast implants placed for cosmetic reasons who almost 9 years later developed painful swelling at the right-breast implant site. Excisional biopsy revealed lymphoma composed of monomorphic large cells associated with necrosis and angioinvasion. Immunohistochemical analysis showed an aberrant, NK/T-cell immunophenotype with the lymphoma cells being CD2+, CD3+, CD56+, partial CD30+, granzyme B, TIA-1+, CD4+, CD5+, CD7+, and CD8+. In situ hybridization analysis showed Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA within the neoplastic cells. Polymerase chain reaction analysis showed monoclonal T-cell receptor-γ chain gene rearrangement. These findings support the diagnosis of extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type. On the basis of our review of the literature, this case is unique. In addition, we believe this case is important to report, because it expands the spectrum of T-cell lymphomas that can be associated with breast implants and may be a forerunner of additional cases to follow.

  19. Anaplastic thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000352.htm Anaplastic thyroid cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... of cancer of the thyroid gland. Causes Anaplastic thyroid cancer is an invasive type of thyroid cancer that ...

  20. Treatment patterns and survival in patients with ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer: a Canadian retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Kayaniyil, S.; Hurry, M.; Wilson, J.; Wheatley-Price, P.; Melosky, B.; Rothenstein, J.; Cohen, V.; Koch, C.; Zhang, J.; Osenenko, K.; Liu, G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Crizotinib was the first agent approved for the treatment of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)–positive (+) non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc), followed by ceritinib. However, patients eventually progress or develop resistance to crizotinib. With limited real-world data available, the objective of the present work was to evaluate treatment patterns and survival after crizotinib in patients with locally advanced or metastatic ALK+ nsclc in Canada. Methods In this retrospective study at 6 oncology centres across Canada, medical records of patients with locally advanced or metastatic ALK+ nsclc were reviewed. Demographic and clinical characteristics, treatments, and outcomes data were abstracted. Analyses focused on patients who discontinued crizotinib treatment. Results Of the 97 patients included, 9 were crizotinib-naïve, and 39 were still receiving crizotinib at study end. The 49 patients who discontinued crizotinib treatment were included in the analysis. Of those 49 patients, 43% received ceritinib at any time, 20% subsequently received systemic chemotherapy only (but never ceritinib), and 37% received no further treatment or died before receiving additional treatment. Median overall survival from crizotinib discontinuation was shorter in patients who did not receive ceritinib than in those who received ceritinib (1.7 months vs. 20.4 months, p < 0.001). In a multivariable analysis, factors associated with poorer survival included lack of additional therapies (particularly ceritinib), male sex, and younger age, but not smoking status; patients of Asian ethnicity showed a nonsignificant trend toward improved survival. Conclusions A substantial proportion of patients with ALK+ nsclc received no further treatment or died before receiving additional treatment after crizotinib. Treatment with systemic agents was associated with improved survival, with ceritinib use being associated with the longest survival. PMID:28050149

  1. Amphiregulin triggered epidermal growth factor receptor activation confers in vivo crizotinib-resistance of EML4-ALK lung cancer and circumvention by epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Takeuchi, Shinji; Fukuda, Koji; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Arai, Sachiko; Nanjo, Shigeki; Yamada, Tadaaki; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Mukae, Hiroshi; Yano, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Crizotinib, a first-generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, is known to be effective against echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancers. Nonetheless, the tumors subsequently become resistant to crizotinib and recur in almost every case. The mechanism of the acquired resistance needs to be deciphered. In this study, we established crizotinib-resistant cells (A925LPE3-CR) via long-term administration of crizotinib to a mouse model of pleural carcinomatous effusions; this model involved implantation of the A925LPE3 cell line, which harbors the EML4-ALK gene rearrangement. The resistant cells did not have the secondary ALK mutations frequently occurring in crizotinib-resistant cells, and these cells were cross-resistant to alectinib and ceritinib as well. In cell clone #2, which is one of the clones of A925LPE3-CR, crizotinib sensitivity was restored via the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by means of an EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitor (erlotinib) or an anti-EGFR antibody (cetuximab) in vitro and in the murine xenograft model. Cell clone #2 did not have an EGFR mutation, but the expression of amphiregulin (AREG), one of EGFR ligands, was significantly increased. A knockdown of AREG with small interfering RNAs restored the sensitivity to crizotinib. These data suggest that overexpression of EGFR ligands such as AREG can cause resistance to crizotinib, and that inhibition of EGFR signaling may be a promising strategy to overcome crizotinib resistance in EML4-ALK lung cancer.

  2. Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... don't know why a person gets non-Hodgkin lymphoma. You are at increased risk if you have ... system or have certain types of infections. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can cause many symptoms, such as Swollen, painless ...

  3. [Gene expression profiling by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH): a example for its application to the study of lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Villalva, C; Trempat, P; Zenou, R C; Delsol, G; Brousset, P

    2001-03-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to isolate genes that were differentially expressed in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive and ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma. In addition, this approach was applied to Hodgkin's disease cases with different clinical outcomes. SSH combines a normalization step that equalizes the abundance of cDNAs within the sequences to be tested and a subtraction step that excludes the common sequences between the target and the control. In a model system, the SSH technique enriches for rare sequences up to 5,000-fold in one round. We have isolated several genes whose expression varied significantly with regard to the tumour subtypes. There were different genes with known or unknown functions. We aim to compare the results of the SSH approach with those obtained with high density filters. In a near future, we would like to design DNA chips specific of each pathology that could be used for clinical purposes (evaluation of prognosis and therapeutic response).

  4. Smac mimetic LCL161 supports neuroblastoma chemotherapy in a drug class-dependent manner and synergistically interacts with ALK inhibitor TAE684 in cells with ALK mutation F1174L

    PubMed Central

    Najem, Safiullah; Langemann, Doerte; Appl, Birgit; Trochimiuk, Magdalena; Hundsdoerfer, Patrick; Reinshagen, Konrad; Eschenburg, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor during infancy and childhood. Outcome of high-risk and late-stage disease remains poor despite intensive treatment regimens. Suppressing inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) using Smac mimetics (SM) significantly sensitizes neuroblastoma (NB) cells for chemotherapy, however strongly dependent on the cytotoxic drug combined with SM. Therefore, a systematic analysis of the impact of SM in combination with different classes of chemotherapeutics was of crucial importance. Treatment of NB cell lines with SM LCL161 and vinca alkaloids revealed a strong synergistic inhibition of proliferation and significant induction of apoptosis in virtually all established and de novo NB cell lines (n=8). In contrast, combination of anthracyclines or topoisomerase inhibitors with LCL161 showed a synergism for single drugs and/or cell lines only. Furthermore, we could show that insensibility to LCL161-mediated sensitization for chemotherapeutics is associated with aberrant activation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) by common mutation F1174L. Inhibition of ALK using TAE684 is able to overcome this resistance in a synergistic fashion, a finding that could be highly relevant for improvement of neuroblastoma therapy. PMID:27655666

  5. Smac mimetic LCL161 supports neuroblastoma chemotherapy in a drug class-dependent manner and synergistically interacts with ALK inhibitor TAE684 in cells with ALK mutation F1174L.

    PubMed

    Najem, Safiullah; Langemann, Doerte; Appl, Birgit; Trochimiuk, Magdalena; Hundsdoerfer, Patrick; Reinshagen, Konrad; Eschenburg, Georg

    2016-11-08

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor during infancy and childhood.Outcome of high-risk and late-stage disease remains poor despite intensive treatment regimens.Suppressing inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) using Smac mimetics (SM) significantly sensitizes neuroblastoma (NB) cells for chemotherapy, however strongly dependent on the cytotoxic drug combined with SM.Therefore, a systematic analysis of the impact of SM in combination with different classes of chemotherapeutics was of crucial importance. Treatment of NB cell lines with SM LCL161 and vinca alkaloids revealed a strong synergistic inhibition of proliferation and significant induction of apoptosis in virtually all established and de novo NB cell lines (n=8).In contrast, combination of anthracyclines or topoisomerase inhibitors with LCL161 showed a synergism for single drugs and/or cell lines only.Furthermore, we could show that insensibility to LCL161-mediated sensitization for chemotherapeutics is associated with aberrant activation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) by common mutation F1174L. Inhibition of ALK using TAE684 is able to overcome this resistance in a synergistic fashion, a finding that could be highly relevant for improvement of neuroblastoma therapy.

  6. Panobinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-21

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  7. Plasma Cell-Free DNA in Paediatric Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Mussolin, Lara; Burnelli, Roberta; Pillon, Marta; Carraro, Elisa; Farruggia, Piero; Todesco, Alessandra; Mascarin, Maurizio; Rosolen, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Extracellular circulating DNA (cfDNA) can be found in small amounts in plasma of healthy individuals. Increased levels of cfDNA have been reported in patients with cancer of breast, cervix, colon, liver and it was shown that cfDNA can originate from both tumour and non-tumour cells. Objectives: Levels of cfDNA of a large series of children with lymphoma were evaluated and analyzed in relation with clinical characteristics. Methods: plasma cfDNA levels obtained at diagnosis in 201 paediatric lymphoma patients [43 Hodgkin lymphomas (HL), 45 anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL), 88 Burkitt lymphomas (BL), 17 lymphoblastic (LBL), 8 diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL)] and 15 healthy individuals were determined using a quantitative PCR assay for POLR2 gene and, in addition, for NPM-ALK fusion gene in ALCL patients. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare plasma levels among different patient subgroups and controls and to analyze relationship between levels of cfDNA and clinical characteristics. Results: Levels of cfDNA in lymphoma patients were significantly higher compared with controls (p<0.0001). CfDNA was associated with median age (p=0.01) in HL, and with stage in ALCL (p=0.01). In HL patients high cfDNA levels were correlated with poor prognosis (p=0.03). In ALCL we found that most of the cfDNA (77%) was non-tumor DNA. Conclusion: level of plasma cfDNA might constitute an important non-invasive tool at diagnosis in lymphoma patients' management; in particular in patients with HL, cfDNA seems to be a promising prognostic biomarker. PMID:23678368

  8. The expression of SALL4 is significantly associated with EGFR, but not KRAS or EML4-ALK mutations in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiangbo; Qian, Rulin; Zhang, Binbin

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide; unfortunately, its prognosis is still very poor. Therefore, developing the target molecular is very important for lung cancer diagnosis and treatment, especially in the early stage. With this in view, spalt-like transcription factor 4 (SALL4) is considered a potential biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis in cancers, including lung cancer. Methods In order to better investigate the association between the expression of SALL4 and driver genes mutation, 450 histopathologically diagnosed patients with lung cancer and 11 non-cancer patients were enrolled to test the expression of SALL4 and the status of driver genes mutation. This investigation included epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), and a fusion gene of the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) and the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). Results The results of the study showed that females harbored more EGFR mutation in adenocarcinoma (ADC). The mutation rate of KRAS and EML4-ALK was about 5%, and the double mutations of EGFR/EML4-ALK were higher than EGFR/KRAS. In the expression analysis, the expression of SALL4 was much higher in cancer tissues than normally expected, especially in tissues that carried EGFR mutation (P<0.05), however, there were no significant differences between different mutation types. Likewise, there were no significant differences between expression of SALL4 and KRAS and EML4-ALK mutations. Conclusions SALL4 is up regulated in lung cancer specimens and harbors EGFR mutation; this finding indicates that SALL4 expression may be relevant with EGFR, which could provide a new insight to lung cancer therapy. The mechanism needs further investigation and analysis. PMID:27867542

  9. Alisertib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  10. Everolimus and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-21

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  11. MORAb-004 in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  12. Panobinostat and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Multiple Myeloma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  13. Lenalidomide Therapy for Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory, Peripheral T-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-04-18

    Peripheral T-cell Lymphomas; Adult T-cell Leukemia; Adult T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma Unspecified; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; T/Null Cell Systemic Type; Cutaneous t-Cell Lymphoma With Nodal/Visceral Disease

  14. Controversies on Hodgkin's disease and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Hematopathology Study Group of the Società Italiana di Anatomia Patologica.

    PubMed

    Pileri, S

    1994-01-01

    Just one year ago the Italian Society of Pathology (S.I.A.P.) created a Study Group which included members of the most active Italian hematopathology teams. Prof. Pasquale Calapso was asked to chair the Group and Prof. Stefano Pileri to take care of secretarial duties. The aim of the Group is to spread hematopathologic knowledge among young pathologists and to promote activities that can contribute to updating Italian pathologists on topics of both speculative and diagnostic interest. The first Workshop of the S.I.A.P. Hematopathology Group was held at the Palazzo dei Congressi in Bologna, November 20, 1993. About 150 pathologists from all over Italy took part in the meeting, which consisted of two sections devoted to: a) discussion of the boundaries between Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, and b) a case seminar illustrating the impact of immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of bone-marrow biopsy. The first section included 5 presentations and a Round Table chaired by Prof. Luciano Fiore-Donati. Below, the contributors to this section summarize the content of their presentations, which were aimed at answering specific questions the Organizers had put to them.

  15. Salvia Hispanica Seed in Reducing Risk of Disease Recurrence in Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-26

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; B Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Burkitt Leukemia; Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Mycosis Fungoides; Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis-Like T-Cell Lymphoma; Systemic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Transformed Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  16. CPI-613 and Bendamustine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  17. Effects of adenovirus-mediated expression of p27Kip1, p21Waf1 and p16INK4A in cell lines derived from t(2;5) anaplastic large cell lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Turturro, Franceso; Arnold, Marilyn D; Frist, Audrey Y; Seth, Prem

    2002-06-01

    We investigated the response of SUDHL-1 and L428 cells, derived from t(2;5)-anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and Hodgkin's disease (HD), respectively, to recombinant adenoviruses expressing cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs) p27Kip1 (Adp27), p21Waf1 (Adp21) and p16INK4A (Adp16). Cell cycle analysis of SUDHL-1 cells after 24 h of infection with 200 multiplicity of infection (MOI) of Adp27, Adp21, and Adp16, showed very high levels of cell debris in the subG1 area. The magnitude of cell debris-events was Adp27/Adp21 > Adp16. Cell cycle analysis of L428 cells revealed absence of cell debris and increased G2 phase in all the groups of cells tested as compared to the controls (mock and AdNull). A minimal increase in G1 phase was also evident in cells infected with Adp27 (52%) compared to uninfected cells (43%), AdNull (45%) and to cells infected with Adp21 (37%) and Adp16 (31%). The presence of significant levels of Coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) on the cell surface of L428 cells excluded the cell membrane-barrier as responsible for the differences in cell observed in response to the recombinant adenovirus-mediated CDKIs expression as compared to SUDHL-1. We also showed that the recombinant adenovirus-mediated cytotoxicity measured as apoptosis was MOI- and vector-dependent in SUDHL-1 cells at lower MOI (100). In conclusion, the therapeutic effect induced by recombinant adenoviruses expressing p27Kip1, p21Waf1 and p16INK4A is cell-dependent in cells derived from selected lymphoid malignancies. Biochemical cellular differences more than cell surface barriers seem to be responsible for differences in response to recombinant adenovirus-mediated expression of cytotoxic genes. Moreover, the cytotoxicity of recombinant adenoviruses expressing p27Kip1, p21Waf1 and p16INK4A may be further explored as a tool for gene therapy of t(2;5)-derived ALCL.

  18. Targeting Neuroblastoma Cell Surface Proteins: Recommendations for Homology Modeling of hNET, ALK, and TrkB

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Yazan; Heger, Zbyněk; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-01-01

    Targeted therapy is a promising approach for treatment of neuroblastoma as evident from the large number of targeting agents employed in clinical practice today. In the absence of known crystal structures, researchers rely on homology modeling to construct template-based theoretical structures for drug design and testing. Here, we discuss three candidate cell surface proteins that are suitable for homology modeling: human norepinephrine transporter (hNET), anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 2 (NTRK2 or TrkB). When choosing templates, both sequence identity and structure quality are important for homology modeling and pose the first of many challenges in the modeling process. Homology modeling of hNET can be improved using template models of dopamine and serotonin transporters instead of the leucine transporter (LeuT). The extracellular domains of ALK and TrkB are yet to be exploited by homology modeling. There are several idiosyncrasies that require direct attention throughout the process of model construction, evaluation and refinement. Shifts/gaps in the alignment between the template and target, backbone outliers and side-chain rotamer outliers are among the main sources of physical errors in the structures. Low-conserved regions can be refined with loop modeling method. Residue hydrophobicity, accessibility to bound metals or glycosylation can aid in model refinement. We recommend resolving these idiosyncrasies as part of “good modeling practice” to obtain highest quality model. Decreasing physical errors in protein structures plays major role in the development of targeting agents and understanding of chemical interactions at the molecular level. PMID:28163672

  19. Iodine I 131 Tositumomab, Etoposide and Cyclophosphamide Followed by Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-02

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  20. Pathologic and clinical features of 77 Hodgkin's lymphoma patients treated in a lymphoma protocol (LNH87): a GELA study.

    PubMed

    Cazals-Hatem, D; André, M; Mounier, N; Copin, M C; Divine, M; Berger, F; Bosly, A; Kerneis, Y; Brière, J; Quesnel, B; Diebold, J; Gaulard, P

    2001-03-01

    Between 1987 and 1993, 77 of 2855 lymphomas included in the LNH87 protocol of the GELA as non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and reviewed by a panel of pathologists had a diagnosis changed to Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Some of these lymphomas had been initially interpreted as anaplastic large-cell lymphoma Hodgkin-like (ALCL-HL subtype). The purpose of this study was to analyze the histologic pitfalls initially encountered, to define more clearly the diagnostic criteria of lymphomas placed in the gray zone around HL, and to follow the survival of these 77 patients affected with HL and initially treated with NHL regimens. The 77 cases of HL were reviewed by three hematopathologists and immunostained with a large panel of antibodies, including CD30, CD15, CD3, CD20, CD45, CD43, LMP-1, EMA, BNH-9, TiA1, and ALK1. Each case was classified according to the Lukes-Rye system and the British National Lymphoma Investigation (BNLI) grading. The initial clinical presentation of patients was analyzed, and the overall and event-free survival rates of the 77 patients were estimated. Among the 77 HLs, 46 were misinterpreted as NHL by primary individual pathologists (12 as ALCL, 8 as ALCL-HL, 12 as peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), 6 as B-cell lymphoma, and 8 as unclassifiable NHL). The other 31 cases had been first considered by the panel as consistent with ALCL-HL (n = 18) or with PTCL (n = 13) and were changed later in view of an immunophenotype concordant with HL. Fifty-five percent of the patients completed the full NHL treatment. The 5-year event-free and overall survival rates were 54% and 77%, respectively. The current results indicate that lymphomas initially called ALCL-HL should not be regarded as a variant of ALCL, but as HL. The clinical consequences of misdiagnoses seem to be a lower event-free survival rate compared with that of classical HL, probably because of more relapses of initially inappropriately treated HL.

  1. Bortezomib and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  2. Vorinostat, Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Previously Untreated T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  3. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Multiple Myeloma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. Bendamustine Hydrochloride, Etoposide, Dexamethasone, and Filgrastim For Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Mobilization in Treating Patients With Refractory or Recurrent Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-08

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  5. Cilengitide (EMD 121974) in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2

  6. Genetically Modified Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-06

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage II AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  7. 506U78 in Treating Patients With Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  8. Central nervous system involvement in T-cell lymphoma: A single center experience.

    PubMed

    Gurion, Ronit; Mehta, Neha; Migliacci, Jocelyn C; Zelenetz, Andrew; Moskowitz, Alison; Lunning, Matthew; Moskowitz, Craig; Hamlin, Paul; Horwitz, Steven

    2016-05-01

    Background We characterized the incidence of central nervous system (CNS) involvement, risk factors and outcome in a large single institution dataset of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). Methods Retrospective review of the PTCL database at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. We identified 231 patients with any subtype of PTCL between 1994-2011 with a minimum six months of follow-up or an event defined as relapse or death. Results Histologies included peripheral T-cell lymphoma-not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS) (31.6%), angioimmunoblastic (16.9%), anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), ALK- (12.1%), ALCL, ALK + (6.1%), extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma (7.4%), adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) (7.4%), and transformed mycosis fungoides (8.7%). Seventeen patients had CNS disease (7%). Fifteen had CNS involvement with PTCL and two had diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and glioblastoma. Median time to CNS involvement was 3.44 months (0.16-103.1). CNS prophylaxis was given to 24 patients (primarily intrathecal methotrexate). Rates of CNS involvement were not different in patients who received prophylaxis. Univariate analysis identified stage III-IV, bone marrow involvement, >1 extranodal site and ATLL as risk factors for CNS disease. On multivariate analysis, >1 extranodal site and international prognostic index (IPI) ≥ 3 were predictive for CNS involvement. The median survival of patients with CNS involvement was 2.63 months (0.10-75). Conclusions Despite high relapse rates, PTCL, except ATLL, carries a low risk of CNS involvement. Prognosis with CNS involvement is poor and risk factors include: >1 extra nodal site and IPI ≥3.

  9. Treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation or ALK gene rearrangement: results of an international expert panel meeting of the Italian Association of Thoracic Oncology.

    PubMed

    Gridelli, Cesare; de Marinis, Filippo; Cappuzzo, Federico; Di Maio, Massimo; Hirsch, Fred R; Mok, Tony; Morgillo, Floriana; Rosell, Rafael; Spigel, David R; Yang, James Chih-Hsin; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2014-05-01

    The availability of targeted drugs has made the assessment of the EGFR mutation and ALK rearrangement critical in choosing the optimal treatment for patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In May 2013, the Italian Association of Thoracic Oncology (AIOT) organized an International Experts Panel Meeting to review strengths and limitations of the available evidence for the diagnosis and treatment of advanced NSCLC with EGFR or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) alterations and to discuss implications for clinical practice and future clinical research. All patients with advanced NSCLC, with the exclusion of pure squamous cell carcinoma in former or current smokers, should be tested for EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangements before decisions are made on first-line treatment. First-line treatment of EGFR-mutated cases should be with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). Any available agent (gefitinib, erlotinib, or afatinib) can be used, until further data from comparative studies may better guide TKI selection. As general rule, and when clinically feasible, results of EGFR mutational status should be awaited before starting first-line treatment. Panelists agreed that the use of crizotinib is justified in any line of treatment. Although solid evidence supporting the continuation of EGFR TKIs or crizotinib beyond progression is lacking, in some cases (minimal, asymptomatic progression, or oligoprogression manageable by local therapy), treatment continuation beyond progression could be justified. Experimental strategies to target tumor heterogeneity and to treat patients after failure of EGFR TKIs or crizotinib are considered high-priority areas of research. A number of relevant research priorities were identified to optimize available treatment options.

  10. Proactive management strategies for potential gastrointestinal adverse reactions with ceritinib in patients with advanced ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Eric S; Baik, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fusions occur in 3%–7% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. Ceritinib, a once-daily, oral ALK inhibitor, has activity against crizotinib-resistant and crizotinib-naïve NSCLC, including brain metastases. Ceritinib (Zykadia™) was granted accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2014 for treating crizotinib-resistant ALK-positive NSCLC. Adverse events (AEs), particularly gastrointestinal (GI) AEs, are commonly experienced at the recommended dose of 750 mg/d and ∼38% of patients require dose interruption or reduction for GI AEs. This case study details our experience with the use of proactive GI AE management regimens in patients treated with ceritinib (750 mg/d) across two study sites. Proactive Regimens A and B were implemented in patients with metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC treated with ceritinib to manage drug-related GI AEs. Regimen A comprised ondansetron and diphenoxylate/atropine or loperamide, taken 30 minutes prior to ceritinib dose. Regimen B included dicyclomine (taken with the first ceritinib dose), ondansetron (taken 30 minutes prior to ceritinib dose for the first seven doses), and loperamide (taken as needed with the onset of diarrhea). The proactive medications were tapered off depending on patient tolerability to ceritinib. Nine patient cases are presented. Starting Regimens A or B before the first dose of ceritinib, or as soon as GI symptoms were encountered, prevented the need for dose reduction due to GI toxicity in eight of the nine patients. Using these regimens, 78% of patients were able to remain on 750 mg/d fasting. Two patients received 23 months and 16 months of therapy and remain on ceritinib 750 mg/d and 600 mg/d, respectively. Although not currently recommended or implemented in clinical studies, based on the patients evaluated here, upfront or proactive treatment plans that address AEs early on can allow the majority of patients to remain on the approved 750 mg

  11. Alisertib in Combination With Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma, B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-26

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  12. VSV-hIFNbeta-NIS in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-10

    Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Refractory Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mycosis Fungoides; Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  13. Vorinostat and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-12-08

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  14. Dose Monitoring of Busulfan and Combination Chemotherapy in Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-12

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult

  15. 17-DMAG in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenstr

  16. FAU in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-06

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell

  17. Integrating in silico prediction methods, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics simulation to predict the impact of ALK missense mutations in structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Doss, C George Priya; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Chen, Luonan; Zhu, Hailong

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, advancements in next generation sequencing technology have placed personalized genomic medicine upon horizon. Understanding the likelihood of disease causing mutations in complex diseases as pathogenic or neutral remains as a major task and even impossible in the structural context because of its time consuming and expensive experiments. Among the various diseases causing mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) play a vital role in defining individual's susceptibility to disease and drug response. Understanding the genotype-phenotype relationship through SNPs is the first and most important step in drug research and development. Detailed understanding of the effect of SNPs on patient drug response is a key factor in the establishment of personalized medicine. In this paper, we represent a computational pipeline in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) for SNP-centred study by the application of in silico prediction methods, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics simulation approaches. Combination of computational methods provides a way in understanding the impact of deleterious mutations in altering the protein drug targets and eventually leading to variable patient's drug response. We hope this rapid and cost effective pipeline will also serve as a bridge to connect the clinicians and in silico resources in tailoring treatments to the patients' specific genotype.

  18. Oxaliplatin, Ifosfamide and Etoposide in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  19. Pediatric lymphomas in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Klumb, Claudete E; Barber, Glen N; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study provides the clinical pathological characteristics of 1301 cases of pediatric/adolescent lymphomas in patients from different geographic regions of Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective analyses of diagnosed pediatric lymphoma cases in a 10‐year period was performed. We believe that it represents the largest series of pediatric lymphomas presented from Brazil. RESULTS: Non‐Hodgkin lymphomas represented 68% of the cases, including those of precursor (36%) and mature (64%) cell origin. Mature cell lymphomas comprised 81% of the B‐cell phenotype and 19% of the T‐cell phenotype. Hodgkin lymphomas represented 32% of all cases, including 87% of the classical type and 13% of nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The geographic distribution showed 38.4% of the cases in the Southeast region, 28.7% in the Northeast, 16.1% in the South, 8.8% in the North, and 8% in the Central‐west region. The distribution by age groups was 15–18 years old, 33%; 11–14 years old, 26%; 6–10 years old, 24%; and 6 years old or younger, 17%. Among mature B‐cell lymphomas, most of the cases were Burkitt lymphomas (65%), followed by diffuse large B‐cell lymphomas (24%). In the mature T‐cell group, anaplastic large cell lymphoma, ALK‐positive was the most prevalent (57%), followed by peripheral T‐cell lymphoma, then not otherwise specified (25%). In the group of classic Hodgkin lymphomas, the main histological subtype was nodular sclerosis (76%). Nodular lymphocyte predominance occurred more frequently than in other series. CONCLUSION: Some of the results found in this study may reflect the heterogeneous socioeconomical status and environmental factors of the Brazilian population in different regions. PMID:21340214

  20. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphoma and Liver Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage

  1. MS-275 and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  2. Novel ALK fusion partners in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Iyevleva, Aglaya G; Raskin, Grigory A; Tiurin, Vladislav I; Sokolenko, Anna P; Mitiushkina, Natalia V; Aleksakhina, Svetlana N; Garifullina, Aigul R; Strelkova, Tatiana N; Merkulov, Valery O; Ivantsov, Alexandr O; Kuligina, Ekatherina Sh; Pozharisski, Kazimir M; Togo, Alexandr V; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2015-06-28

    Detection of ALK rearrangements in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) presents a significant technical challenge due to the existence of multiple translocation partners and break-points. To improve the performance of PCR-based tests, we utilized the combination of 2 assays, i.e. the variant-specific PCR for the 5 most common ALK rearrangements and the test for unbalanced 5'/3'-end ALK expression. Overall, convincing evidence for the presence of ALK translocation was obtained for 34/400 (8.5%) cases, including 14 EML4ex13/ALKex20, 12 EML4ex6/ALKex20, 3 EML4ex18/ALKex20, 2 EML4ex20/ALKex20 variants and 3 tumors with novel translocation partners. 386 (96.5%) out of 400 EGFR mutation-negative NSCLCs were concordant for both tests, being either positive (n = 26) or negative (n = 360) for ALK translocation; 49 of these samples (6 ALK+, 43 ALK-) were further evaluated by FISH, and there were no instances of disagreement. Among the 14 (3.5%) "discordant" tumors, 5 demonstrated ALK translocation by the first but not by the second PCR assay, and 9 had unbalanced ALK expression in the absence of known ALK fusion variants. 5 samples from the latter group were subjected to FISH, and the presence of translocation was confirmed in 2 cases. Next generation sequencing analysis of these 2 samples identified novel translocation partners, DCTN1 and SQSTM1; furthermore, the DCTN1/ALK fusion was also found in another NSCLC sample with unbalanced 5'/3'-end ALK expression, indicating a recurrent nature of this translocation. We conclude that the combination of 2 different PCR tests is a viable approach for the diagnostics of ALK rearrangements. Systematic typing of ALK fusions is likely to reveal new NSCLC-specific ALK partners.

  3. Genetic Testing Plus Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic

  4. AR-42 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Relapsed Multiple Myeloma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-21

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large

  5. Blood Sample Markers of Reproductive Hormones in Assessing Ovarian Reserve in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-20

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone

  6. 3-AP and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T

  7. T-cell lymphomas, a challenging disease: types, treatments, and future.

    PubMed

    Ma, Helen; Abdul-Hay, Maher

    2017-02-01

    T-cell lymphomas are rare and aggressive malignancies associated with poor outcome, often because of the development of resistance in the lymphoma against chemotherapy as well as intolerance in patients to the established and toxic chemotherapy regimens. In this review article, we discuss the epidemiology, pathophysiology, current standard of care, and future treatments of common types of T-cell lymphomas, including adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, aggressive NK/T-cell lymphoma, and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

  8. PXD101 and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin

  9. 17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Patients With Advanced Epithelial Cancer, Malignant Lymphoma, or Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-06

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Chondrosarcoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small

  10. Obatoclax Mesylate, Vincristine Sulfate, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Dexrazoxane Hydrochloride in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-30

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  11. Doxorubicin has a synergistic cytotoxicity with cucurbitacin B in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si Hyoung; Kang, Jun Goo; Kim, Chul Sik; Ihm, Sung-Hee; Choi, Moon Gi; Yoo, Hyung Joon; Lee, Seong Jin

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the combined effect of doxorubicin with cucurbitacin B on survival of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells was evaluated. For experiments, 8505C and CAL62 human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells were used. Cell viability, the percentage of viable cells, and cytotoxic activity were measured using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, multiplexed cytotoxicity assay, and cytotoxicity assay, respectively. Reactive oxygen species production was measured. In experiments, doxorubicin and cucurbitacin B reduced cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Cotreatment of doxorubicin and cucurbitacin B, compared with treatment of doxorubicin alone, decreased the percentage of viable cells and increased cytotoxic activity. All of the combination index values were lower than 1.0, suggesting the synergism between doxorubicin and cucurbitacin B in induction of cytotoxicity. In cells treated with both doxorubicin and cucurbitacin B, compared with doxorubicin alone, the protein levels of cleaved poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase and cyclooxygenase 2 and reactive oxygen species production were enhanced. In contrast, the protein levels of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma 2 and survivin and B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma 2/B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma 2-associated x protein ratio were diminished. The protein levels of Janus kinase 2 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 were reduced, while phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 protein levels were elevated without change in total extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 protein levels. These results suggest that doxorubicin synergizes with cucurbitacin B in induction of cytotoxicity in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells. Moreover, synergistic cytotoxicity of doxorubicin with cucurbitacin B is mediated by B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma 2 family proteins, survivin, and reactive oxygen

  12. Lenalidomide With or Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Progressive or Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Prolymphocytic Leukemia, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  13. Veliparib, Bendamustine Hydrochloride, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, or Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-14

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  14. CD30-positive cutaneous lymphoma: report of four cases with an emphasis on clinicopathological correlations*

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Thiago Jeunon de Sousa; Jorge, Samira Barroso; Gonzaga, Yung Bruno de Mello

    2017-01-01

    The classification of cutaneous lymphomas is multidisciplinary and requires the correlation between clinical, histopathological, immunohistochemical, and molecular diagnostic elements. In this article, we present four different cases of CD30-positive T-cell lymphoma with cutaneous manifestations. We compare cases with definitive diagnosis of papulosis lymphomatoid type C, primary cutaneous anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma, systemic anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma with secondary skin involvement, and mycosis fungoides with large cell transformation, highlighting the importance of clinicopathological correlation to classify these cases. PMID:28225962

  15. Tanespimycin and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous

  16. Ipilimumab and Local Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Melanoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Colon, or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-12

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  17. Etoposide, Filgrastim, and Plerixafor in Improving Stem Cell Mobilization in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-06

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  18. Nivolumab With or Without Varlilumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive B-cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Activated B-Cell-Like Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; ALK-Positive Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Atypical Burkitt/Burkitt-Like Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Associated With Chronic Inflammation; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Epstein-Barr Virus Positive Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Elderly; Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive Mucocutaneous Ulcer; Germinal Center B-Cell-Like Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; High-Grade B-Cell Lymphoma With MYC and BCL2 and/or BCL6 Rearrangements; Human Herpesvirus-8-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma; MYC-Negative B-Cell Lymphoma With 11q Aberration Resembling Burkitt Lymphoma; Plasmablastic Lymphoma; Primary Cutaneous Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Primary Cutaneous Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Leg Type; Primary Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Central Nervous System; Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Skin Ulcer; Small Intestinal B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; T-Cell/Histiocyte-Rich Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  19. PXD101 and 17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-15

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV

  20. ALK oncoproteins in atypical inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours: novel RRBP1-ALK fusions in epithelioid inflammatory myofibroblastic sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jen-Chieh; Li, Chien-Feng; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Zhu, Mei-Jun; Mariño-Enríquez, Adrián; Lee, Chung-Ta; Ou, Wen-Bin; Hornick, Jason L; Fletcher, Jonathan A

    2017-02-01

    ALK oncogenic activation mechanisms were characterized in four conventional spindle-cell inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours (IMT) and five atypical IMT, each of which had ALK genomic perturbations. Constitutively activated ALK oncoproteins were purified by ALK immunoprecipitation and electrophoresis, and were characterized by mass spectrometry. The four conventional IMT had TPM3/4-ALK fusions (two cases) or DCTN1-ALK fusions (two cases), whereas two atypical spindle-cell IMT had TFG-ALK and TPM3-ALK fusion in one case each, and three epithelioid inflammatory myofibroblastic sarcomas had RANBP2-ALK fusions in two cases, and a novel RRBP1-ALK fusion in one case. The epithelioid inflammatory myofibroblastic sarcoma with RRBP1-ALK fusion had cytoplasmic ALK expression with perinuclear accentuation, different from the nuclear membranous ALK localization in epithelioid inflammatory myofibroblastic sarcomas with RANBP2-ALK fusions. Evaluation of three additional uncharacterized epithelioid inflammatory myofibroblastic sarcomas with ALK cytoplasmic/perinuclear- accentuation expression demonstrated RRBP1-ALK fusion in two cases. These studies show that atypical spindle-cell IMT can utilize the same ALK fusion mechanisms described previously in conventional IMT, whereas in clinically aggressive epithelioid inflammatory myofibroblastic sarcoma we identify a novel recurrent ALK oncogenic mechanism, resulting from fusion with the RRBP1 gene. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Thyroid metastasis from lung adenocarcinoma with EML4-ALK rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Hironori; Kaneko, Yugo; Ryu, Kai; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid metastases from lung cancer are very rare. A woman aged 42 years with a tumour in the lower lobe of the right lung was diagnosed as having lung adenocarcinoma positive for echinoderm microtubule-associated proteinlike 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase. Positron emission tomography demonstrated fluorodeoxyglucose accumulation in the lower lobe of the right lung, the right thyroid lobe and both adrenal glands. We performed fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) and used reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) to diagnose the patient as having metastatic lung adenocarcinoma to the thyroid gland. We believe that FNAB combined with RT-PCR can be an effective method for diagnosing metastatic lung adenocarcinoma to the thyroid gland. PMID:27872133

  2. [Surgical seeding of an anaplastic ependymoma].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masayuki; Sato, Taku; Kuromi, Yosuke; Matsumoto, Yuka; Oda, Keiko; Kishida, Yugo; Tamura, Takamitsu; Ichikawa, Masahiro; Sakuma, Jun; Saito, Kiyoshi

    2013-12-01

    Ependymomas can relapse at the primary site and disseminate to the spinal cord. Furthermore, extraneural metastases are rare. We present a case of anaplastic ependymoma with extraneural metastasis, possibly caused by surgical seeding. An 18-year-old female was referred to us after experiencing frequent convulsive attacks. At age 9 years, she underwent partial resection of a left frontal anaplastic ependymoma, followed by 45 Gy radiation. At age 15 years, a recurrent tumor was totally removed. Three years later, magnetic resonance images revealed a left frontal recurrent tumor and a new parietal lesion. Our preoperative diagnosis of the parietal tumor was a radiation-induced meningioma. However, intraoperative pathological examinations revealed the lesion to be an anaplastic ependymoma. The tumor, which was located in the epidural space and had invaded extensively into the cranial bone, was gross totally removed. Although extremely rare, surgical seeding of anaplastic ependymomas should be considered as a differential diagnosis for recurrent tumors in the surgical field.

  3. Anaplastic glioma: current treatment and management.

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, Emilie; Taillibert, Sophie; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2015-06-01

    Anaplastic glioma (AG) is divided into three morphology-based groups (anaplastic astrocytoma, anaplastic oligodendroglioma, anaplastic oligoastrocytoma) as well as three molecular groups (glioma-CpG island methylation phenotype [G-CIMP] negative, G-CIMP positive non-1p19q codeleted tumors and G-CIMP positive codeleted tumors). The RTOG 9402 and EORTC 26951 trials established radiotherapy plus (procarbazine, lomustine, vincristine) chemotherapy as the standard of care in 1p/19q codeleted AG. Uni- or non-codeleted AG are currently best treated with radiotherapy only or alkylator-based chemotherapy only as determined by the NOA-04 trial. Maturation of NOA-04 and results of the currently accruing studies, CODEL (for codeleted AG) and CATNON (for uni or non-codeleted AG), will likely refine current up-front treatment recommendations for AG.

  4. EML4-ALK fusion gene and efficacy of an ALK kinase inhibitor in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koivunen, Jussi P.; Mermel, Craig; Zejnullahu, Kreshnik; Murphy, Carly; Lifshits, Eugene; Holmes, Alison J.; Choi, Hwan Geun; Kim, Jhingook; Chiang, Derek; Thomas, Roman; Lee, Jinseon; Richards, William G.; Sugarbaker, David J.; Ducko, Christopher; Lindeman, Neal; Marcoux, J. Paul; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Gray, Nathanael S.; Lee, Charles; Meyerson, Matthew; Jänne, Pasi A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The EML4-ALK fusion gene has been detected in ~7% of Japanese non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). We determined the frequency of EML4-ALK in Caucasian NSCLCs and in NSCLC cell lines. We also determined whether TAE684, a specific ALK kinase inhibitor, would inhibit the growth of EML4-ALK containing cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design We screened 305 primary NSCLCs (both US (n=138) and Korean (n=167) patients) and 83 NSCLC cell lines using RT-PCR and by exon array analyses. We evaluated the efficacy of TAE684 against NSCLC cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Results We detected 4 different variants, including two novel variants, of EML4-ALK using RT-PCR in 8/305 tumors (3%) and in 3/83 (3.6%) NSCLC cell lines. All EML4-ALK containing tumors and cell lines were adenocarcinomas. EML4-ALK was detected more frequently in NSCLC patients who were never or light (< 10 pack years) cigarette smokers compared to current/former smokers (6% vs. 1%; p=0.049). TAE684 inhibited the growth of 1 of 3 (H3122) EML4-ALK containing cell lines in vitro and in vivo, inhibited Akt phosphorylation and caused apoptosis. In another EML4-ALK cell line, DFCI032, TAE684 was ineffective due to co-activation of EGFR and ERBB2. The combination of TAE684 and CL-387,785 (EGFR/ERBB2 kinase inhibitor), inhibited growth and Akt phosphorylation and led to apoptosis in the DFCI032 cell line. Conclusions EML4-ALK is found in the minority of NSCLCs. ALK kinase inhibitors alone or in combination may nevertheless be clinically effective treatments for NSCLC patients whose tumors contain EML4-ALK. PMID:18594010

  5. Hodgkin lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    Lymphoma - Hodgkin; Hodgkin disease; Cancer - Hodgkin lymphoma ... of Hodgkin lymphoma (there are different forms of Hodgkin lymphoma) The stage (where the disease has spread) Whether the tumor is more than ...

  6. Primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Steven T; Querfeld, Christiane

    2006-01-01

    Primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) encompass a clinically and biologically heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) defined by clonal proliferation of skin-homing malignant T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. They account for up to 75% to 80% of all cutaneous lymphomas. The current WHO-EORTC classification of cutaneous lymphomas with primary cutaneous manifestations lists 13 entities. The most common subtypes-mycosis fungoides, Sézary syndrome, primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma, and lymphomatoid papulosis-which represent approximately 95% of CTCLs, will be discussed in the following review. Each entity has unique biological characteristics and clinical course. Topical and/or systemic therapies are employed based on the stage of the disease and the tempo of progression.

  7. Low-Dose Total Body Irradiation and Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  8. Primary and Secondary T-cell Lymphomas of the Breast: Clinico-pathologic Features of 11 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Chioato, Lucimara; Harrington, William J.; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    Breast involvement by non-Hodgkin lymphomas is rare, and exceptional for T-cell lymphomas; we studied the morphologic, immunophenotypic, and clinical features of 11 patients with T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas involving the breast. Four cases fulfilled the definition criteria for primary breast lymphomas, 3 females and 1 male, with a median age of 51 years. One primary breast lymphomas was T-cell lymphoma unspecified, other was subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma, and 2 cases were anaplastic large cell lymphomas. One of the anaplastic large cell lymphoma cases was found surrounding a silicone breast implant and presented as clinically as mastitis; whereas the other case occurred in a man. T-cell lymphoma secondarily involved the breast in 7 patients, all women and 1 bilateral, with a median age of 29 years. These secondary breast lymphomas occurred as part of widespread nodal or leukemic disease. Three patients had adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, including the patient with bilateral lesions, 3 others had precursor T-lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia, and the other presented with a peripheral-T-cell lymphoma nonotherwise specified type. Breast T-cell lymphomas are very infrequent and are morphologically and clinically heterogeneous. PMID:19318917

  9. Anaplastic giant cell thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wallin, G; Lundell, G; Tennvall, J

    2004-01-01

    Anaplastic (giant cell) thyroid carcinoma (ATC), is one of the most aggressive malignancies in humans with a median survival time after diagnosis of 3-6 months. Death from ATC was earlier seen because of local growth and suffocation. ATC is uncommon, accounting for less than 5 % of all thyroid carcinomas. The diagnosis can be established by means of multiple fine needle aspiration biopsies, which are neither harmful nor troublesome for the patient. The cytological diagnosis of this high-grade malignant tumour is usually not difficult for a well trained cytologist. The intention to treat patients with ATC is cure, although only few of them survive. The majority of the patients are older than 60 years and treatment must be influenced by their high age. We have by using a combined modality regimen succeeded in achieving local control in most patients. Every effort should be made to control the primary tumour and thereby improve the quality of remaining life and it is important for patients, relatives and the personnel to know that cure is not impossible. Different treatment combinations have been used since 30 years including radiotherapy, cytostatic drugs and surgery, when feasible. In our latest combined regimen, 22 patients were treated with hyper fractionated radiotherapy 1.6Gy x 2 to a total target dose of 46 Gy given preoperatively, 20 mg doxorubicin was administered intravenously once weekly and surgery was carried out 2-3 weeks after the radiotherapy. 17 of these 22 patients were operated upon and none of these 17 patients got a local recurrence. In the future we are awaiting the development of new therapeutic approaches to this aggressive type of carcinoma. Inhibitors of angiogenesis might be useful. Combretastatin has displayed cytotoxicity against ATC cell lines and has had a positive effect on ATC in a patient. Sodium iodide symporter (NIS) genetherapy is also being currently considered for dedifferentiated thyroid carcinomas with the ultimate aim of

  10. Romidepsin and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-03

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  11. Brentuximab Vedotin + Rituximab as Frontline Therapy for Pts w/ CD30+ and/or EBV+ Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-28

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Epstein-Barr Virus Infection; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis

  12. Anaplastic extramedullary cervical ependymoma with leptomeningeal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Pomeraniec, I J; Dallapiazza, R F; Sumner, H M; Lopes, M B; Shaffrey, C I; Smith, J S

    2015-12-01

    We present a rare extramedullary ependymoma with diffuse spinal metastatic disease, and review the previous reports of extramedullary spinal ependymomas. Ependymomas are the most common intramedullary spinal cord tumor in adults. These tumors rarely present as extramedullary masses. We treated a 23-year-old man with a history of progressive neck, shoulder and arm pain, with sensory and motor symptoms in the C7 dermatome. MRI of the cervical spine demonstrated a ventral contrast-enhancing lesion with evidence of enhancement along the dura and spinal cord of the upper cervical spine, thoracic spine, and cauda equina. He underwent a tumor debulking procedure without complications. Following surgery, he received craniospinal radiation to treat the remaining tumor and diffuse leptomeningeal disease. The final pathology of the tumor revealed that is was a World Health Organization Grade III anaplastic ependymoma. At the 1 year follow-up, the patient had stable imaging and had returned to his preoperative functional status. Of the 19 reported patients with primary intradural, extramedullary spinal ependymomas, two had extradural components and seven had anaplastic grades. Only one tumor with an anaplastic grade resulted in metastatic disease, but without spinal recurrence. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an intradural, extramedullary spinal ependymoma with an anaplastic grade, presenting with concomitant diffuse, nodular leptomeningeal metastasis involving the upper cervical spine, thoracic spine, conus medullaris, and cauda equina. Similar to the treatment of intramedullary ependymomas with metastasis, this patient underwent an aggressive debulking procedure followed by radiation therapy to the entire neuroaxis.

  13. Supratentorial extraventricular anaplastic ependymoma with extracranial metastasis.

    PubMed

    Pachella, Laura A; Kamiya-Matsuoka, Carlos; Lee, Eva Lu T; Olar, Adriana; Yung, W K Alfred

    2015-03-01

    Ependymoma is a relatively rare malignancy accounting for 2.0% of all primary central nervous system tumors in adults. Extracranial metastasis is a very uncommon complication of gliomas, especially of anaplastic ependymomas. The objective of this paper is to show that ependymomas can metastasize to soft tissue and lymph nodes as well as to share our approach to this challenge. We report a male patient with anaplastic ependymoma that recurred, metastasizing to the neck and lymph nodes. Metastatic disease was diagnosed based on clinical presentation of a palpable nodule on the right neck and diffuse cervical lymphadenopathies. A biopsy was obtained and pathology revealed anaplastic ependymoma. Whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scan showed metastatic disease in the right mastoid region with diffuse uptake in the cervical lymph nodes. Clinical and radiologic response was achieved after three chemotherapy cycles of etoposide, cisplatin, vincristine, and cyclophosphamide. This case highlights extracranial metastasis to the soft tissue as an atypical presentation of recurrent anaplastic ependymoma. Other reported instances of extracranial metastatic ependymoma with this presentation are discussed. The possible metastatic pathways of intracranial disease are discussed. It also illustrates how extracranial disease remains stable with systemic chemotherapy.

  14. A Study Of Oral PF-02341066, A C-Met/Hepatocyte Growth Factor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor, In Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (ALK-positive); Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (c-Met Dependent); Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (ROS Marker Positive); Systemic Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma; Advanced Malignancies (Except Leukemia)

  15. Clinical Applications of the Genomic Landscape of Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, Andrea B; Dave, Sandeep S

    2017-03-20

    In this review, we examine the genomic landscapes of lymphomas that arise from B, T, and natural killer cells. Lymphomas represent a striking spectrum of clinical behaviors. Although some lymphomas are curable with standard therapy, the majority of the affected patients succumb to their disease. Here, the genetic underpinnings of these heterogeneous entities are reviewed. We consider B-cell lymphomas, including Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma. We also examine T-cell lymphomas, including anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, and other peripheral T-cell lymphomas. Together, these malignancies make up most lymphomas diagnosed around the world. Genomic technologies, including microarrays and next-generation sequencing, have enabled a better understanding of the molecular underpinnings of these cancers. We describe the broad genomics findings that characterize these lymphoma types and discuss new therapeutic opportunities that arise from these findings.

  16. Expression level of CRKL and AXL combined with exon 19 deletion in EGFR and ALK status confer differential prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yi-Ran; Dong, Yu-Jie; Wu, Hong-Bo; Yu, Da-Ping; Zhou, Li-Juan; Su, Dan; Zhang, Li; Chen, Xue-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a lethal cancer-related disease in population. Adenocarcinoma (AC) is subclassified into several subtypes based on the new classification by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society in 2011. Correlation between original expression of Crk-like (CRKL) and anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase in diverse histological components of AC and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or ALK status was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and sequencing in present study. A total of 106 cases, including 83 patients (78.3%) with mixed-type ACs, were assessed in the present study using eligible follow-up data. The ACs consisted of 32 acinar, 12 papillary, 5 mucinous, 11 micropapillary and 46 solid-predominant ACs. In total, 69.8% samples were composed of 2 or 3 histological components, with different expression levels of CRKL and AXL. ACs with EGFR mutation had a higher level of AXL expression compared with ACs without mutation (P=0.019). Multivariate survival analysis showed that AC subtypes and EGFR mutation subtypes were significantly associated with the progression-free survival (PFS) time. Acinar AC was the subtype with the most notable PFS time (30.6 months), which was significantly different from the PFS time of papillary, mucinous, micropapillary and solid-predominant ACs (hazard ratio, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.21–0.75; P=0.005). Among the ACs with exon 19 mutation, the median PFS time (28.8 months) of patients with a lower level of AXL protein expression was increased compared with the PFS time of patients with the L858R mutation and wild-type EGFR (9.1 months and 11 months, respectively; P=0.03), whereas no significant difference in ACs with an increased level of AXL expression. However, AC patients with higher level of CRKL expression had better PFS (28.8 months) than patients with the L858R mutation and wild-type EGFR (9.1 months and 11.3 months

  17. Efficacy of ALK5 inhibition in myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wanke; Ho, Wanting Tina; Han, Ying; Murdun, Cem; Mailloux, Adam W.; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Xuefeng; Budhathoki, Anjali; Pradhan, Kith; Rapaport, Franck; Wang, Huaquan; Shao, Zonghong; Ren, Xiubao; Steidl, Ulrich; Levine, Ross L.; Zhao, Zhizhuang Joe; Verma, Amit; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K.

    2017-01-01

    Myelofibrosis (MF) is a bone marrow disorder characterized by clonal myeloproliferation, aberrant cytokine production, extramedullary hematopoiesis, and bone marrow fibrosis. Although somatic mutations in JAK2, MPL, and CALR have been identified in the pathogenesis of these diseases, inhibitors of the Jak2 pathway have not demonstrated efficacy in ameliorating MF in patients. TGF-β family members are profibrotic cytokines and we observed significant TGF-β1 isoform overexpression in a large cohort of primary MF patient samples. Significant overexpression of TGF-β1 was also observed in murine clonal MPLW515L megakaryocytic cells. TGF-β1 stimulated the deposition of excessive collagen by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) by activating the TGF-β receptor I kinase (ALK5)/Smad3 pathway. MSCs derived from MPLW515L mice demonstrated sustained overproduction of both collagen I and collagen III, effects that were abrogated by ALK5 inhibition in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, use of galunisertib, a clinically active ALK5 inhibitor, significantly improved MF in both MPLW515L and JAK2V617F mouse models. These data demonstrate the role of malignant hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)/TGF-β/MSC axis in the pathogenesis of MF, and provide a preclinical rationale for ALK5 blockade as a therapeutic strategy in MF.

  18. Alk1 and Alk2 are two new cell cycle-regulated haspin-like proteins in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Nespoli, Alessandro; Vercillo, Raffaella; di Nola, Lisa; Diani, Laura; Giannattasio, Michele; Plevani, Paolo; Muzi-Falconi, Marco

    2006-07-01

    Haspin is a protein kinase identified in mouse and human cells, and genes coding for haspin-like proteins are present in virtually all eukaryotic genomes sequenced so far. Two haspin homologues, called Alk1 and Alk2, are present in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both Alk1 and Alk2 exhibit a weak auto-kinase activity in vitro, are phosphoproteins in vivo and are hyperphosphorylated in response to DNA damage. The amount and modification of the two proteins is greatly regulated during the cell cycle. In fact, Alk1 and Alk2 levels peak in mitosis and late-S/G2, respectively, and phosphorylation of both proteins is maximal in mitosis. Control of protein stability plays a major role in Alk2 regulation. The half-life of Alk2 is particularly short in G1; mutagenesis and genetic analysis indicate that its degradation is controlled by the APC pathway. Overexpression of ALK2, but not of ALK1, causes a mitotic arrest, which is correlated to the kinase activity of the protein. This finding, together with its cell cycle regulation, suggests a role for Alk2 in the control of mitosis.

  19. Basket Study of Entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the Treatment of Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring NTRK 1/2/3 (Trk A/B/C), ROS1, or ALK Gene Rearrangements (Fusions)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Breast Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma; Colorectal Cancer; Head and Neck Neoplasms; Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic; Melanoma; Neuroendocrine Tumors; Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Primary Brain Tumors; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Sarcomas; Salivary Gland Cancers; Adult Solid Tumor

  20. Anaplastic ependymoma with ependymoblastic multilayered rosettes.

    PubMed

    Nobusawa, Sumihito; Suzuki, Aya; Nagaishi, Masaya; Isoda, Koji; Ikota, Hayato; Yokoo, Hideaki; Hirato, Junko; Nakazato, Yoichi

    2013-11-01

    Anaplastic ependymoma, World Health Organization grade III, is a malignant glioma with ependymal differentiation characterized by high mitotic activity often accompanied by microvascular proliferation and necrosis, where, generally, much fewer ependymal rosettes are found than in ependymoma, World Health Organization grade II. Ependymal rosettes, forming a single layer of tumor cells, differ from ependymoblastic multilayered rosettes, which are characteristic histologic features of ependymoblastoma, a variant of central nervous system primitive neuroectodermal tumor. Here, we report an autopsy case involving a 24-year-old woman with a frontal lobe tumor, which showed the aggregation of true rosettes with multilayering of tumor cells resembling the ependymoblastoma histology. Molecular and cytogenetic analyses revealed the absence of 19q13.42 amplification, a specific molecular hallmark of ependymoblastoma and embryonal tumor with abundant neuropil and true rosettes, supporting the diagnosis of anaplastic ependymoma.

  1. Poorly differentiated (anaplastic) seminoma of the testis.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, A G; Vugrin, D; Batata, M; Hajdu, S; Whitmore, W F

    1984-05-01

    Anaplastic seminoma constitutes approximately 17% of total experience with seminoma at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Among 25 previously untreated patients, 11 (44%) were clinical Stage I, and 14 (56%) were clinical Stage II or III. Treatment of these 25 patients with the same regimens employed for classical seminoma yielded an overall 80% 5-year apparent cure rate. Survival rates were poor in eight previously treated patients referred with recurrence.

  2. The ALK inhibitor PF-06463922 is effective as a single agent in neuroblastoma driven by expression of ALK and MYCN

    PubMed Central

    Guan, J.; Tucker, E. R.; Wan, H.; Chand, D.; Danielson, L. S.; Ruuth, K.; El Wakil, A.; Witek, B.; Jamin, Y.; Umapathy, G.; Robinson, S. P.; Johnson, T. W.; Smeal, T.; Martinsson, T.; Chesler, L.; Palmer, R. H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The first-in-class inhibitor of ALK, c-MET and ROS1, crizotinib (Xalkori), has shown remarkable clinical efficacy in treatment of ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer. However, in neuroblastoma, activating mutations in the ALK kinase domain are typically refractory to crizotinib treatment, highlighting the need for more potent inhibitors. The next-generation ALK inhibitor PF-06463922 is predicted to exhibit increased affinity for ALK mutants prevalent in neuroblastoma. We examined PF-06463922 activity in ALK-driven neuroblastoma models in vitro and in vivo. In vitro kinase assays and cell-based experiments examining ALK mutations of increasing potency show that PF-06463922 is an effective inhibitor of ALK with greater activity towards ALK neuroblastoma mutants. In contrast to crizotinib, single agent administration of PF-06463922 caused dramatic tumor inhibition in both subcutaneous and orthotopic xenografts as well as a mouse model of high-risk neuroblastoma driven by Th-ALKF1174L/MYCN. Taken together, our results suggest PF-06463922 is a potent inhibitor of crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations, and highlights an important new treatment option for neuroblastoma patients. PMID:27483357

  3. Interleukin-2 receptor-directed therapies for cutaneous lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Foss, Francine M; Waldmann, Thomas A

    2003-12-01

    Our emerging understanding of the IL-2/IL-2R system opens the possibility for more specific immunotherapy of CTCL. This understanding, taken in conjunction with the ability to produce humanized antibodies to the IL-2R subunit by genetic engineering; to arm these antibodies, as well as IL-2 itself with toxins or with alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides; and to modulate IL-2R subunits to optimize targeting of these agents provides a rational therapeutic strategy for the treatment of IL-2R-expressing CTCL. Although most of these studies were conducted in HTLV-1-associated T-cell lymphomas or CTCL, it is likely that these agents may be applicable to other T-cell lymphomas, including the anaplastic large cell lymphomas, peripheral T-cell lymphomas, and the natural killer lymphomas, because these cells express the IL-2 receptor.

  4. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas in childhood: how to move on?

    PubMed

    Dokmanović, Lidija; Rodić, Predrag; Krstovski, Nada; Lazić, Jelena; Dragana, Janić

    2014-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphomas of childhood represent a diverse group of neoplasms with different clinical, pathological, immunophenotypical and genetic features. A vast majority of childhood non-Hodgkin lymphomas could be classified into one of the three major histological subgroups: mature B-cell neoplasms, lymphoblastic lymphomas or anaplastic large cell lymphomas. Modern therapeutic strategies lead to cure in more than 80% of patients. Conversely, refractory diseases, as well as disease relapse convey a dismal prognosis. This fact requires much better stratification based on prognostic markers which would ideally recognize distinct groups of patients requiring different therapeutic regimens. Defining novel diagnostic and prognostic markers should improve diagnosis and prognosis as well as patient follow-up. It should also allow introduction of individually tailored treatment regimens in selected groups of patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas, with the main goal of improving treatment results and decreasing short- and long-term complications.

  5. Third annual forum on T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tobinai, Kensei

    2011-05-01

    The Third Annual T-cell Lymphoma Forum, held on 27-29 January 2011 in San Francisco (CA, USA), continued in the spirit of the two earlier conferences and provided a collegial venue for clinicians and scientists to discuss advances in the science and treatment of T-cell lymphomas. More than 40 experts from around the world presented updates on classification, epidemiology and prognosis; rare and T-cell lymphomas of unspecified origin, CD30(+) T-cell lymphomas; new treatment strategies; new agents and rational combinations; and transplantation. Of particular interest this year was a discussion on the link between breast implants and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, which coincided with the US FDA announcement of this rare but noteworthy relationship. Submitted abstracts and poster presentations rounded off each of the sessions.

  6. Challenging perspectives on the cellular origins of lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, Tim I. M.; Hodson, Daniel J.; Macintyre, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Both B and T lymphocytes have signature traits that set them apart from other cell types. They actively and repeatedly rearrange their DNA in order to produce a unique and functional antigen receptor, they have potential for massive clonal expansion upon encountering antigen via this receptor or its precursor, and they have the capacity to be extremely long lived as ‘memory’ cells. All three of these traits are fundamental to their ability to function as the adaptive immune response to infectious agents, but concurrently render these cells vulnerable to transformation. Thus, it is classically considered that lymphomas arise at a relatively late stage in a lymphocyte's development during the process of modifying diversity within antigen receptors, and when the cell is capable of responding to stimulus via its receptor. Attempts to understand the aetiology of lymphoma have reinforced this notion, as the most notable advances to date have shown chronic stimulation of the antigen receptor by infectious agents or self-antigens to be key drivers of these diseases. Despite this, there is still uncertainty about the cell of origin in some lymphomas, and increasing evidence that a subset arises in a more immature cell. Specifically, a recent study indicates that T-cell lymphoma, in particular nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase-driven anaplastic large cell lymphoma, may originate in T-cell progenitors in the thymus. PMID:27683157

  7. Development of potent ALK inhibitor and its molecular inhibitory mechanism against NSCLC harboring EML4-ALK proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Chung Hyo; Yun, Jeong In; Lee, Kwangho; Lee, Chong Ock; Lee, Heung Kyoung; Yun, Chang-Soo; Hwang, Jong Yeon; Cho, Sung Yun; Jung, Heejung; Kim, Pilho; Ha, Jae Du; Jeon, Jeong Hee; Choi, Sang Un; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Kim, Hyoung Rae; Park, Chi Hoon

    2015-08-28

    Here, we show the newly synthesized and potent ALK inhibitor having similar scaffold to KRCA-0008, which was reported previously, and its molecular mechanism against cancer cells harboring EML4-ALK fusion protein. Through ALK wild type enzyme assay, we selected two compounds, KRCA-0080 and KRCA-0087, which have trifluoromethyl instead of chloride in R2 position. We characterized these newly synthesized compounds by in vitro and in vivo assays. Enzyme assay shows that KRCA-0080 is more potent against various ALK mutants, including L1196M, G1202R, T1151-L1152insT, and C1156Y, which are seen in crizotinib-resistant patients, than KRCA-0008 is. Cell based assays demonstrate our compounds downregulate the cellular signaling, such as Akt and Erk, by suppressing ALK activity to inhibit the proliferation of the cells harboring EML4-ALK. Interestingly, our compounds induced strong G1/S arrest in H3122 cells leading to the apoptosis, which is proved by PARP-1 cleavage. In vivo H3122 xenograft assay, we found that KRCA-0080 shows significant reduction in tumor size compared to crizotinib and KRCA-0008 by 15–20%. Conclusively, we report a potent ALK inhibitor which shows significant in vivo efficacy as well as excellent inhibitory activity against various ALK mutants. - Highlights: • We synthesized KRCA-0008 derivatives having trifluoromethyl instead of chloride. • KRCA-0080 shows superior activity against several ALK mutants to KRCA-0008. • Cellular assays show our ALK inhibitors suppress only EML4-ALK positive cells. • Our ALK inhibitors induce G1/S arrest to lead apoptosis in H3122 cells. • KRCA-0080 has superior in vivo efficacy to crizotinib and KRCA-0008 by 15–20%.

  8. Insertion element analysis and mapping of the Pseudomonas plasmid alk regulon.

    PubMed Central

    Fennewald, M; Benson, S; Oppici, M; Shapiro, J

    1979-01-01

    We characterized and mapped new mutations of the alk (alkane utilization) genes found on Pseudomonas plasmids of the Inc P-2 group. These mutations were isolated after (i) nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis, (ii) transposition of the Tn7 trimethoprim and streptomycin resistance determinant, and (iii) reversion of polarity effects of alk::Tn7 insertion mutations. Our results indicate the existence of two alk loci not previously described--alkD, whose product is required for synthesis of membrane alkane-oxidizing activities, and alkE, whose product is required for synthesis of inducible membrane alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Polarity of alk::Tn7 insertion mutations indicates the existence of an alkBAE operon. Mapping of alk loci by transduction in P. aeruginosa shows that there are at least three alk clusters in the CAM-OCT plasmid--alkRD, containing regulatory genes; alkBAE, containing genes for specific biochemical activities; and alkC, containing one or more genes needed for normal synthesis of membrane alcohol dehydrogenase. The alkRD and alkBAE clusters are linked but separated by about 42 kilobases. The alkC cluster is not linked to either of the other two alk regions. Altogether, these results indicate a complex genetic control of the alkane utilization phenotype in P. putida and P. aeruginosa involving at least six separate genes. Images PMID:479111

  9. Alk1 and Alk5 inhibition by Nrp1 controls vascular sprouting downstream of Notch

    PubMed Central

    Aspalter, Irene Maria; Gordon, Emma; Dubrac, Alexandre; Ragab, Anan; Narloch, Jarek; Vizán, Pedro; Geudens, Ilse; Collins, Russell Thomas; Franco, Claudio Areias; Abrahams, Cristina Luna; Thurston, Gavin; Fruttiger, Marcus; Rosewell, Ian; Eichmann, Anne; Gerhardt, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Sprouting angiogenesis drives blood vessel growth in healthy and diseased tissues. Vegf and Dll4/Notch signalling cooperate in a negative feedback loop that specifies endothelial tip and stalk cells to ensure adequate vessel branching and function. Current concepts posit that endothelial cells default to the tip-cell phenotype when Notch is inactive. Here we identify instead that the stalk-cell phenotype needs to be actively repressed to allow tip-cell formation. We show this is a key endothelial function of neuropilin-1 (Nrp1), which suppresses the stalk-cell phenotype by limiting Smad2/3 activation through Alk1 and Alk5. Notch downregulates Nrp1, thus relieving the inhibition of Alk1 and Alk5, thereby driving stalk-cell behaviour. Conceptually, our work shows that the heterogeneity between neighbouring endothelial cells established by the lateral feedback loop of Dll4/Notch utilizes Nrp1 levels as the pivot, which in turn establishes differential responsiveness to TGF-β/BMP signalling. PMID:26081042

  10. Occipital Falcine Anaplastic Hemangiopericytoma Mimicking Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Kanesen, Davendran; Kandasamy, Regunath; Idris, Zamzuri

    2016-01-01

    The rarity of hemangiopericytoma (HPC) and its controversial histological classification result in its frequent misdiagnosis and thus make the treatment quite challenging. It is often difficult to distinguish these tumors from meningiomas based on clinical features and radiological findings. This is a case report of a man, diagnosed clinically and radiologically as meningioma, which turned out to be anaplastic HPC on histological examination. A 30-year-old man presented with 3 months of progressively worsening of headache and blurring of vision. Clinical examination revealed the right homonymous hemianopia with reduced visual acuity and papilledema bilaterally. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a multilobulated and heterogenous extraaxial lesion attached to the occipital falx. It measured 9.0 cm (AP) × 5.5 cm (W) × 5.8 cm (CC) and expands bilaterally with major bulk on the left. An occipital craniotomy followed by a subtotal tumor excision was only achieved due to profuse bleeding intraoperatively. Histopathology confirmed an anaplastic HPC (WHO Grade 3). The importance of differentiation between HPCs and meningiomas cannot be overemphasized. A preoperative correct diagnosis is difficult, but it is important that it should be made. Multilobulated (mushroom appearance), prominent internal signal voids, relatively narrow dural attachment, and lytic destruction without calcifications are useful findings to distinguish HPCs from meningiomas. PMID:28163517

  11. Occipital Falcine Anaplastic Hemangiopericytoma Mimicking Meningioma.

    PubMed

    Kanesen, Davendran; Kandasamy, Regunath; Idris, Zamzuri

    2016-12-01

    The rarity of hemangiopericytoma (HPC) and its controversial histological classification result in its frequent misdiagnosis and thus make the treatment quite challenging. It is often difficult to distinguish these tumors from meningiomas based on clinical features and radiological findings. This is a case report of a man, diagnosed clinically and radiologically as meningioma, which turned out to be anaplastic HPC on histological examination. A 30-year-old man presented with 3 months of progressively worsening of headache and blurring of vision. Clinical examination revealed the right homonymous hemianopia with reduced visual acuity and papilledema bilaterally. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a multilobulated and heterogenous extraaxial lesion attached to the occipital falx. It measured 9.0 cm (AP) × 5.5 cm (W) × 5.8 cm (CC) and expands bilaterally with major bulk on the left. An occipital craniotomy followed by a subtotal tumor excision was only achieved due to profuse bleeding intraoperatively. Histopathology confirmed an anaplastic HPC (WHO Grade 3). The importance of differentiation between HPCs and meningiomas cannot be overemphasized. A preoperative correct diagnosis is difficult, but it is important that it should be made. Multilobulated (mushroom appearance), prominent internal signal voids, relatively narrow dural attachment, and lytic destruction without calcifications are useful findings to distinguish HPCs from meningiomas.

  12. Clinical roundtable monograph: CD30 in lymphoma: its role in biology, diagnostic testing, and targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Sotomayor, Eduardo M; Young, Ken H; Younes, Anas

    2014-04-01

    CD30, a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, is a transmembrane glycoprotein receptor consisting of an extracellular domain, a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular domain. CD30 has emerged as an important molecule in the field of targeted therapy because its expression is generally restricted to specific disease types and states. The major cancers with elevated CD30 expression include Hodgkin lymphoma and anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma, and CD30 expression is considered essential to the differential diagnosis of these malignancies. Most commonly, CD30 expression is detected and performed by immunohistochemical staining of biopsy samples. Alternatively, flow cytometry analysis has also been developed for fresh tissue and cell aspiration specimens, including peripheral blood and bone marrow aspirate. Over the past several years, several therapeutic agents were developed to target CD30, with varying success in clinical trials. A major advance in the targeting of CD30 was seen with the development of the antibody-drug conjugate brentuximab vedotin, which consists of the naked anti-CD30 antibody SGN-30 conjugated to the synthetic antitubulin agent monomethyl auristatin E. In 2011, brentuximab vedotin was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in Hodgkin lymphoma and anaplastic large cell lymphoma based on clinical trial data showing high response rates in these indications. Ongoing trials are examining brentuximab vedotin after autologous stem cell transplantation, as part of chemotherapy combination regimens, and in other CD30-expressing malignancies, including primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphomas, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, lymphoma positive for Epstein-Barr virus, peripheral T-cell lymphoma not otherwise specified, and cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

  13. Chidamide in the treatment of peripheral T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Thomas S; Tse, Eric; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2017-01-01

    Mature T-cell lymphomas are aggressive malignancies. Treatment outcome is poor with conventional chemotherapy. They are about twice as common in Asia as compared with other non-Asian countries. Histone proteins form the basic structure of chromatin, and their acetylation at lysine residues relaxes chromatin structure, facilitating gene transcription. Conversely, histone deacetylation, catalyzed by histone deacetylases, compacts chromatin and represses gene transcription. Histone deacetylase inhibitors are an important class of antineoplastic agents. Chidamide is a novel orally active benzamide-type histone deacetylase inhibitor that has shown in vitro activities against a wide array of neoplasms. In Phase I trials, chidamide showed preferential efficacy in mature T-cell lymphomas. In a pivotal Phase II trial of chidamide in 79 patients with relapsed or refractory mature T-cell lymphomas, an overall response rate of 28% (complete remission/complete remission unconfirmed: 14%) was achieved, with most responses occurring within the first 6 weeks of treatment. The median duration of response (DOR) was 9.9 (1.1–40.8) months. Of 22 responders, 19 patients (86%) had a DOR of ≥3 months and eight patients (36%) had a DOR of >12 months. Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma and anaplastic large cell lymphoma (anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative) showed better response rates, with the most durable responses observed in angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma patients. Safety profile was favorable, with very few cases of grade 3/4 toxicities observed. Chidamide is approved by the China Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsed and refractory peripheral T-cell lymphomas. PMID:28138258

  14. Novel Approaches in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Kun-Tai; Yu, Xiao-Min; Audhya, Anjon W.; Jaume, Juan C.; Lloyd, Ricardo V.; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Prolla, Tomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), accounting for less than 2% of all thyroid cancer, is responsible for the majority of death from all thyroid malignancies and has a median survival of 6 months. The resistance of ATC to conventional thyroid cancer therapies, including radioiodine and thyroid-stimulating hormone suppression, contributes to the very poor prognosis of this malignancy. This review will cover several cellular signaling pathways and mechanisms, including RET/PTC, RAS, BRAF, Notch, p53, and histone deacetylase, which are identified to play roles in the transformation and dedifferentiation process, and therapies that target these pathways. Lastly, novel approaches and agents involving the Notch1 pathway, nuclear factor κB, Trk-fused gene, cancer stem-like cells, mitochondrial mutation, and tumor immune microenvironment are discussed. With a better understanding of the biological process and treatment modality, the hope is to improve ATC outcome in the future. PMID:25260367

  15. Pleiotrophin is a driver of vascular abnormalization in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Dimberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    In a recent report by Zhang et al., pleiotrophin (PTN) was demonstrated to enhance glioma growth by promoting vascular abnormalization. PTN stimulates glioma vessels through anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk)-mediated perivascular deposition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Targeting of Alk or VEGF signaling normalizes tumor vessels in PTN-expressing tumors.

  16. Anaplastic Carcinoma Possibly Arising from a Heterotopic Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yasushi; Mita, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Hideaki; Akino, Kimishige; Kikuchi, Takefumi; Ishii, Yoshifumi; Endo, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic carcinoma is a rare pancreatic cancer, and the malignant transformation of a heterotopic pancreas is also rare. We herein report a case of an elderly woman with a mass of unknown origin in the abdominal cavity. Computed tomography identified the extent of the tumor but not the organ of origin. The abdominal tumor eventually metastasized to the liver and lung. An autopsy and immunohistochemical examination revealed an anaplastic carcinoma possibly originating in an ectopic pancreas.

  17. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant AlkB enzyme

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-11-13

    AlkB from Pseudomonas putida was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small chain alkanes. Mutant AlkB-BMO1 hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. Mutant AlkB-BMO2 similarly hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. These biocatalysts are highly active for small chain alkane substrates and their regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  18. CSF1R Protein Expression in Reactive Lymphoid Tissues and Lymphoma: Its Relevance in Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Maestre, Lorena; Mata, Elena; Jiménez, Scherezade; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Reyes-García, Ana I.; Rubio, Carmen; Tomás, José F.; Estévez, Mónica; Pulford, Karen; Piris, Miguel A.; García, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) have been associated with survival in classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) and other lymphoma types. The maturation and differentiation of tissue macrophages depends upon interactions between colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) and its ligands. There remains, however, a lack of consistent information on CSF1R expression in TAMs. A new monoclonal antibody, FER216, was generated to investigate CSF1R protein distribution in formalin fixed tissue samples from 24 reactive lymphoid tissues and 187 different lymphoma types. We also analysed the distribution of CSF1R+, CD68+ and CD163+ macrophages by double immunostaining, and studied the relationship between CSF1R expression and survival in an independent series of 249 cHL patients. CSF1R+ TAMs were less frequent in B-cell lymphocytic leukaemia and lymphoblastic B-cell lymphoma than in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma and cHL. HRS cells in cHL and, with the exception of three cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma, the neoplastic cells in NHLs, lacked detectable CSF1R protein. A CSF1R+ enriched microenvironment in cHL was associated with shorter survival in an independent series of 249 cHL patients. CSF1R pathway activation was evident in the cHL and inactivation of this pathway could be a potential therapeutic target in cHL cases. PMID:26066800

  19. CSF1R Protein Expression in Reactive Lymphoid Tissues and Lymphoma: Its Relevance in Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Martín-Moreno, Ana M; Roncador, Giovanna; Maestre, Lorena; Mata, Elena; Jiménez, Scherezade; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L; Reyes-García, Ana I; Rubio, Carmen; Tomás, José F; Estévez, Mónica; Pulford, Karen; Piris, Miguel A; García, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) have been associated with survival in classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) and other lymphoma types. The maturation and differentiation of tissue macrophages depends upon interactions between colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) and its ligands. There remains, however, a lack of consistent information on CSF1R expression in TAMs. A new monoclonal antibody, FER216, was generated to investigate CSF1R protein distribution in formalin fixed tissue samples from 24 reactive lymphoid tissues and 187 different lymphoma types. We also analysed the distribution of CSF1R+, CD68+ and CD163+ macrophages by double immunostaining, and studied the relationship between CSF1R expression and survival in an independent series of 249 cHL patients. CSF1R+ TAMs were less frequent in B-cell lymphocytic leukaemia and lymphoblastic B-cell lymphoma than in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma and cHL. HRS cells in cHL and, with the exception of three cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma, the neoplastic cells in NHLs, lacked detectable CSF1R protein. A CSF1R+ enriched microenvironment in cHL was associated with shorter survival in an independent series of 249 cHL patients. CSF1R pathway activation was evident in the cHL and inactivation of this pathway could be a potential therapeutic target in cHL cases.

  20. Conformational features and binding affinities to Cripto, ALK7 and ALK4 of Nodal synthetic fragments.

    PubMed

    Calvanese, Luisa; Sandomenico, Annamaria; Caporale, Andrea; Focà, Annalia; Focà, Giuseppina; D'Auria, Gabriella; Falcigno, Lucia; Ruvo, Menotti

    2015-04-01

    Nodal, a member of the TGF-β superfamily, is a potent embryonic morphogen also implicated in tumor progression. As for other TGF-βs, it triggers the signaling functions through the interaction with the extracellular domains of type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors and with the co-receptor Cripto. Recently, we reported the molecular models of Nodal in complex with its type I receptors (ALK4 and ALK7) as well as with Cripto, as obtained by homology modeling and docking simulations. From such models, potential binding epitopes have been identified. To validate such hypotheses, a series of mutated Nodal fragments have been synthesized. These peptide analogs encompass residues 44-67 of the Nodal protein, corresponding to the pre-helix loop and the H3 helix, and reproduce the wild-type sequence or bear some modifications to evaluate the hot-spot role of modified residues in the receptor binding. Here, we show the structural characterization in solution by CD and NMR of the Nodal peptides and the measurement of binding affinity toward Cripto by surface plasmon resonance. Data collected by both conformational analyses and binding measurements suggest a role for Y58 of Nodal in the recognition with Cripto and confirm that previously reported for E49 and E50. Surface plasmon resonance binding assays with recombinant proteins show that Nodal interacts in vitro also with ALK7 and ALK4 and preliminary data, generated using the Nodal synthetic fragments, suggest that Y58 of Nodal may also be involved in the recognition with these protein partners.

  1. Anaplastic ependymoma simulating glioblastoma in the cerebrum of an adult.

    PubMed

    Shintaku, Masayuki; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    A case of anaplastic ependymoma of the cerebral hemisphere in which the histopathological features closely simulated those of glioblastoma is reported. The patient was a 72-year-old woman with a large, well-demarcated tumor in the left temporal lobe. The tumor was totally extirpated, but recurred 18 months later, and the patient died after 4 months. The extirpated tumor was well circumscribed from the surrounding brain tissue and consisted of a sheet-like, dense proliferation of atypical, short spindle or polygonal cells. Extensive geographic necrosis with nuclear pseudopalisading was seen. Although perivascular pseudorosettes were observed in many areas, true ependymal rosettes were absent. Immunohistochemistry for glial fibrillary acidic protein and epithelial membrane antigen and ultrastructural study confirmed the ependymal nature of tumor cells. The histopathological spectrum of anaplastic ependymoma is very wide and reflects the basically dual characteristics of ependymal cells: epithelial and glial phenotypes. The present case indicates that some anaplastic ependymomas strongly express the glial phenotype and also show remarkable anaplastic cytological features, thus closely simulating glioblastoma. The diagnostic criteria for anaplastic ependymoma, and the nosological position of highly anaplastic ependymoma and its possible clinical implications, are briefly discussed.

  2. Alk1 controls arterial endothelial cell migration in lumenized vessels.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Elizabeth R; Menon, Prahlad G; Roman, Beth L

    2016-07-15

    Heterozygous loss of the arterial-specific TGFβ type I receptor, activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1; ACVRL1), causes hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). HHT is characterized by development of fragile, direct connections between arteries and veins, or arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). However, how decreased ALK1 signaling leads to AVMs is unknown. To understand the cellular mis-steps that cause AVMs, we assessed endothelial cell behavior in alk1-deficient zebrafish embryos, which develop cranial AVMs. Our data demonstrate that alk1 loss has no effect on arterial endothelial cell proliferation but alters arterial endothelial cell migration within lumenized vessels. In wild-type embryos, alk1-positive cranial arterial endothelial cells generally migrate towards the heart, against the direction of blood flow, with some cells incorporating into endocardium. In alk1-deficient embryos, migration against flow is dampened and migration in the direction of flow is enhanced. Altered migration results in decreased endothelial cell number in arterial segments proximal to the heart and increased endothelial cell number in arterial segments distal to the heart. We speculate that the consequent increase in distal arterial caliber and hemodynamic load precipitates the flow-dependent development of downstream AVMs.

  3. [Gastric lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Ruskoné-Fourmestraux, A

    1997-04-15

    The stomach is the most common site involved in primary gastrointestinal lymphoma. Gastric lymphoma originates from the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue so called MALT. It comprises a group of distinctive clinicopathological entities which are important to take in account for clinical behavior. In recent years, new diagnostic tools and modern modes of treatment have improved their overall prognosis. One of the most exciting recent discoveries is the hypothesis that an infection by a bacterium. Helicobacter pylori has a decisive role in gastric lymphoma.

  4. Enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zettl, Andreas; deLeeuw, Ron; Haralambieva, Eugenia; Mueller-Hermelink, Hans-Konrad

    2007-05-01

    Session 7 of the Society for Hematopathology/European Association for Haematopathology Workshop was devoted to case presentations and discussion of enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma (ETL) and other T-cell lymphomas involving the gastrointestinal tract. ETL is a rare type of T-cell lymphoma, often associated with a history of celiac disease, that usually arises in the jejunum but can involve other gastrointestinal tract sites (eg, stomach and colon). As the cases submitted illustrate, there are 2 histologic groups of ETL that correlate with clinical and immunophenotypic features. Pleomorphic-anaplastic ETL is usually associated with a history of celiac disease and histologic evidence of enteropathy and is most often CD56-. Monomorphic ETL often occurs without a history of celiac disease, has variable histologic evidence of enteropathy, and is usually CD56+. Comparative genomic hybridization has shown recurrent chromosomal gains and losses that are characteristic of ETL and uncommon in other T-cell lymphomas, providing useful ancillary data for the diagnosis of ETL.

  5. Canine lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Madewell, B R

    1985-07-01

    This article presents an overview of the literature regarding canine malignant lymphoma. It includes a discussion of etiology, classification, systemic manifestations of disease, therapy, and supportive care for patient management.

  6. Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... as Hodgkin's disease — is a cancer of the lymphatic system, which is part of your immune system. In Hodgkin's lymphoma, cells in the lymphatic system grow abnormally and may spread beyond the lymphatic ...

  7. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    MedlinePlus

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. People with a weakened immune system are at high risk for primary lymphoma of the brain. ...

  8. PF-06463922, an ALK/ROS1 inhibitor, overcomes resistance to 1st and 2nd generation ALK inhibitors in pre-clinical models

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Helen Y.; Friboulet, Luc; Kodack, David P.; Engstrom, Lars D.; Li, Qiuhua; West, Melissa; Tang, Ruth W.; Wang, Hui; Tsaparikos, Konstantinos; Wang, Jinwei; Timofeevski, Sergei; Katayama, Ryohei; Dinh, Dac M.; Lam, Hieu; Lam, Justine L.; Yamazaki, Shinji; Hu, Wenyue; Patel, Bhushankumar; Bezwada, Divya; Frias, Rosa L.; Lifshits, Eugene; Mahmood, Sidra; Gainor, Justin F.; Affolter, Timothy; Lappin, Patrick B.; Gukasyan, Hovhannes; Lee, Nathan; Deng, Shibing; Jain, Rakesh K; Johnson, Ted W.; Shaw, Alice T.; Fantin, Valeria R.; Smeal, Tod

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY We report the preclinical evaluation of PF-06463922, a potent and brain penetrant ALK/ROS1 inhibitor. Compared to other clinically available ALK inhibitors, PF-06463922 displayed superior potency against all known clinically acquired ALK mutations, including the highly resistant G1202R mutant. Furthermore, PF-06463922 treatment led to regression of EML4-ALK driven brain metastases, leading to prolonged mouse survival, in a superior manner. Finally, PF-06463922 demonstrated high selectivity and safety margins in a variety of preclinical studies. These results suggest that PF-06463922 will be highly effective for the treatment of patients with ALK-driven lung cancers, including those who relapsed on clinically available ALK inhibitors due to secondary ALK kinase domain mutations and/or due to the failed control of brain metastases. PMID:26144315

  9. Anaplastic carcinoma following well-differentiated thyroid cancer: etiological considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Kapp, D. S.; LiVolsi, V. A.; Sanders, M. M.

    1982-01-01

    Most cases of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma can be pathologically and often historically associated with the presence of low-grade (differentiated) cancer in the thyroid. That radiation therapy to the differentiated tumor plays an etiologic role in the transformation of a differentiated to an undifferentiated tumor has been suggested. If such therapy can be implicated, is there a difference in risk between external radiotherapy or radioactive iodine? Review of the literature discloses that more anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid develop in patients without a history of prior radiation than in individuals who have received radiation. We report our recent experience with two patients who demonstrated the sequence of well-differentiated followed by anaplastic thyroid cancer subsequent to radiation and review the question. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:7183024

  10. Uterine ALK3 is essential during the window of implantation

    PubMed Central

    Monsivais, Diana; Clementi, Caterina; Peng, Jia; Titus, Mary M.; Barrish, James P.; Creighton, Chad J.; Lydon, John P.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2016-01-01

    The window of implantation is defined by the inhibition of uterine epithelial proliferation, structural epithelial cell remodeling, and attenuated estrogen (E2) response. These changes occur via paracrine signaling between the uterine epithelium and stroma. Because implantation defects are a major cause of infertility in women, identifying these signaling pathways will improve infertility interventions. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are TGF-β family members that regulate the postimplantation and midgestation stages of pregnancy. In this study, we discovered that signaling via activin-like kinase 3 (ALK3/BMPR1A), a BMP type 1 receptor, is necessary for blastocyst attachment. Conditional knockout (cKO) of ALK3 in the uterus was obtained by producing Alk3flox/flox-Pgr-cre–positive females. Alk3 cKO mice are sterile and have defects in the luminal uterine epithelium, including increased microvilli density and maintenance of apical cell polarity. Moreover, Alk3 cKO mice exhibit an elevated uterine E2 response and unopposed epithelial cell proliferation during the window of implantation. We determined that dual transcriptional regulation of Kruppel-like factor 15 (Klf15), by both the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) transcription factor SMAD family member 4 (SMAD4) and progesterone receptor (PR), is necessary to inhibit uterine epithelial cell proliferation, a key step for embryo implantation. Our findings present a convergence of BMP and steroid hormone signaling pathways in the regulation of uterine receptivity. PMID:26721398

  11. Lumican Peptides: Rational Design Targeting ALK5/TGFBRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesteira, Tarsis Ferreira; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J.; Yuan, Yong; Zhang, Jianhua; Nader, Helena B.; Kao, Winston W.-Y.

    2017-02-01

    Lumican, a small leucine rich proteoglycan (SLRP), is a component of extracellular matrix which also functions as a matrikine regulating multiple cell activities. In the cornea, lumican maintains corneal transparency by regulating collagen fibrillogenesis, promoting corneal epithelial wound healing, regulating gene expression and maintaining corneal homeostasis. We have recently shown that a peptide designed from the 13 C-terminal amino acids of lumican (LumC13) binds to ALK5/TGFBR1 (type1 receptor of TGFβ) to promote wound healing. Herein we evaluate the mechanism by which this synthetic C-terminal amphiphilic peptide (LumC13), binds to ALK5. These studies clearly reveal that LumC13-ALK5 form a stable complex. In order to determine the minimal amino acids required for the formation of a stable lumican/ALK5 complex derivatives of LumC13 were designed and their binding to ALK5 investigated in silico. These LumC13 derivatives were tested both in vitro and in vivo to evaluate their ability to promote corneal epithelial cell migration and corneal wound healing, respectively. These validations add to the therapeutic value of LumC13 (Lumikine) and aid its clinical relevance of promoting the healing of corneal epithelium debridement. Moreover, our data validates the efficacy of our computational approach to design active peptides based on interactions of receptor and chemokine/ligand.

  12. Lumican Peptides: Rational Design Targeting ALK5/TGFBRI

    PubMed Central

    Gesteira, Tarsis Ferreira; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J.; Yuan, Yong; Zhang, Jianhua; Nader, Helena B.; Kao, Winston W.-Y.

    2017-01-01

    Lumican, a small leucine rich proteoglycan (SLRP), is a component of extracellular matrix which also functions as a matrikine regulating multiple cell activities. In the cornea, lumican maintains corneal transparency by regulating collagen fibrillogenesis, promoting corneal epithelial wound healing, regulating gene expression and maintaining corneal homeostasis. We have recently shown that a peptide designed from the 13 C-terminal amino acids of lumican (LumC13) binds to ALK5/TGFBR1 (type1 receptor of TGFβ) to promote wound healing. Herein we evaluate the mechanism by which this synthetic C-terminal amphiphilic peptide (LumC13), binds to ALK5. These studies clearly reveal that LumC13-ALK5 form a stable complex. In order to determine the minimal amino acids required for the formation of a stable lumican/ALK5 complex derivatives of LumC13 were designed and their binding to ALK5 investigated in silico. These LumC13 derivatives were tested both in vitro and in vivo to evaluate their ability to promote corneal epithelial cell migration and corneal wound healing, respectively. These validations add to the therapeutic value of LumC13 (Lumikine) and aid its clinical relevance of promoting the healing of corneal epithelium debridement. Moreover, our data validates the efficacy of our computational approach to design active peptides based on interactions of receptor and chemokine/ligand. PMID:28181591

  13. Inhibition of Axl improves the targeted therapy against ALK-mutated neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Fei; Li, Hongling; Sun, Yong

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • First reported Axl is co-expressed with ALK in neuroblastoma tissues and cell lines. • Axl activation promotes cell growth and impairs the efficiency of ALK inhibitor. • Further found silence of Axl leads to increased sensitivity to ALK inhibitors. • Axl inhibitor promotes the efficiency of targeted therapy in vitro and in vivo. • Axl activation should be considered in the clinical application of ALK inhibitors. - Abstract: Neuroblastoma (NB) patients harboring mutated ALK can be expected to potentially benefit from targeted therapy based on ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), such as crizotinib and ceritinib. However, the effect of the treatment varies with different individuals, although with the same genic changes. Axl receptor tyrosine kinase is expressed in a variety of human cancers, but little data are reported in NB, particularly in which carrying mutated ALK. In this study, we focus on the roles of Axl in ALK-mutated NB for investigating rational therapeutic strategy. We found that Axl is expressed in ALK-positive NB tissues and cell lines, and could be effectively activated by its ligand GAS6. Ligand-dependent Axl activation obviously rescued crizotinib-mediated suppression of cell proliferation in ALK-mutated NB cells. Genetic inhibition of Axl with specific small interfering RNA markedly increased the sensitivity of cells to ALK-TKIs. Furthermore, a small-molecule inhibitor of Axl significantly enhanced ALK-targeted therapy, as an increased frequency of apoptosis was observed in NB cells co-expressing ALK and Axl. Taken together, our results demonstrated that activation of Axl could lead to insensitivity to ALK inhibitors, and dual inhibition of ALK and Axl might be a potential therapeutic strategy against ALK-mutated NB.

  14. Canine lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    Canine lymphoma has served as the ''workhorse'' for the development of veterinary oncology and as an important animal model for human non-Hodgkins lymphomas. Significant advances have been achieved in understanding the biological behavior of the disease and in its treatment. Although it is unlikely that a cure for lymphoma will be achieved, owners should be encouraged to treat their pets, provided they understand that only prolonged remissions and survivals are likely to result. Cooperative studies, employing large numbers of dogs, are needed to optimize and refine the classification scheme to provide a system with diagnostic and prognostic correlates and derive maximum benefit from therapeutic regimens. Such studies need to be prospective in nature, with a solid statistical base incorporated into their design. Rather than being content with what we have accomplished to date in treatment of canine lymphoma, the opportunity exists for the veterinary profession to make further significant contributions to the understanding and treatment of lymphoma in the dog. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  15. Phosphoproteomics reveals ALK promote cell progress via RAS/JNK pathway in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guofeng; Zhang, Min; Wu, Yeming; Wu, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests receptor tyrosine kinase ALK as a promising therapeutic target in neuroblastoma. However, clinical trials reveal that a limited proportion of ALK-positive neuroblastoma patients experience clinical benefits from Crizotinib, a clinically approved specific inhibitor of ALK. The precise molecular mechanisms of aberrant ALK activity in neuroblastoma remain elusive, limiting the clinical application of ALK as a therapeutic target in neuroblastoma. Here, we describe a deep quantitative phosphoproteomic approach in which Crizotinib-treated neuroblastoma cell lines bearing aberrant ALK are used to investigate downstream regulated phosphoproteins. We identified more than 19,500—and quantitatively analyzed approximately 10,000—phosphorylation sites from each cell line, ultimately detecting 450–790 significantly-regulated phosphorylation sites. Multiple layers of bioinformatic analysis of the significantly-regulated phosphoproteins identified RAS/JNK as a downstream signaling pathway of ALK, independent of the ALK variant present. Further experiments demonstrated that ALK/JNK signaling could be inactivated by either ALK- or JNK-specific inhibitors, resulting in cell growth inhibition by induction of cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis. Our study broadly defines the phosphoproteome in response to ALK inhibition and provides a resource for further clinical investigation of ALK as therapeutic target for the treatment of neuroblastoma. PMID:27732954

  16. [Plasmablastic lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Álvarez, Rubén; Sancho, Juan-Manuel; Ribera, Josep-María

    2016-11-04

    Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare and aggressive subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that commonly occurs in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals, and affects oral sites. Occasionally, it has been described in HIV-negative patients and involving non-oral sites. Pathologically, PBL is a high-grade B-cell lymphoma that displays the immunophenotype of a terminally differentiated B-lymphocyte with loss of B-cell markers (CD20) and expression of plasma-cell antigens. Epstein-Barr virus infection and MYC rearrangements are frequently observed. Treatment of PBL is challenging because of the lack of established treatment and poor outcomes, with median survival times shorter than one year. In this review, we discuss the clinical and epidemiologic spectrum of PBL as well as its distinct pathological features. Finally, we summarize the currently available approaches for the treatment of patients with PBL.

  17. [Anaplastic glioma. Neuropathology, molecular diagnostics and current study concepts].

    PubMed

    Wick, W; Weller, M

    2010-08-01

    According to the current WHO classification anaplastic gliomas comprise pure astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas and mixed tumors. This review summarizes findings, discusses problems and defines new questions from the phase III trials on anaplastic gliomas. The molecular subgroup analyses of the NOA-04 trial identified three molecular parameters, which predict longer progression-free and overall survival independent from the mode of therapy, radiotherapy or alkylating chemotherapy-. These are 1p/19q codeletion, methylation of the promoter of the O(6)-methylguanyl methyltransferase (MGMT) gene and hot-spot mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene. The prognostic relevance of these markers is not lower than that of histopathological subclassification but determination is potentially more robust. Therefore, marker profiles should be included into the next WHO brain tumor classification. The current standard of care for first-line treatment in anaplastic gliomas is radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The next steps, e.g. within the international CATNON trial, are to define the role and optimal sequencing of combined modality treatment focusing on radiotherapy and temozolomide. Inclusion in this trial is already based on the WHO grade and the 1p/19q status and not on the histopathological subtype. Furthermore, anaplastic gliomas are an important group of brain tumors for developing future molecular targeted therapies and should therefore be in the main focus of academic and industrial drug development, which aims at improved efficacy and avoiding long-term side-effects.

  18. Breast metastasis of anaplastic oligodendroglioma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Alacacioglu, Ahmet; Unal, Serkan; Canpolat, Selin; Yurt, Alaattin; Oztekin, Ozgur; Coskun, Ali; Karatas, Ayse; Postaci, Hakan; Sop, Gulten

    2012-11-01

    Extracranial metastasis of primary brain tumors is rarely observed. Of all brain malignancies, glioblastomas, medulloblastomas and astrocytomas metastasize most frequently. Metastasis of oligondendroglioma is rare. We present a case of breast metastasis in a 58-year-old man with an anaplastic oligodendroglioma.

  19. Talimogene Laherparepvec and Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Refractory Lymphomas or Advanced or Refractory Non-melanoma Skin Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Adnexal Carcinoma; Apocrine Carcinoma; Eccrine Porocarcinoma; Extraocular Cutaneous Sebaceous Carcinoma; Hidradenocarcinoma; Keratoacanthoma; Malignant Sweat Gland Neoplasm; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Microcystic Adnexal Carcinoma; NK-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable; Non-Melanomatous Lesion; Paget Disease; Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Primary Cutaneous Mucinous Carcinoma; Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mycosis Fungoides; Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Sezary Syndrome; Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma; Skin Basal Cell Carcinoma; Skin Basosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Skin Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Spiradenocarcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Origin; Stage III Skin Cancer; Stage IV Skin Cancer; Sweat Gland Carcinoma; Trichilemmocarcinoma; Vulvar Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  20. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lymphoma? A lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system , which is a part of the body's immune ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma, cancer cells form in the lymphatic system and start to grow. Most of the time, ...

  1. The use of cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA) to study Crizotinib resistance in ALK-expressing human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Alshareef, Abdulraheem; Zhang, Hai-Feng; Huang, Yung-Hsing; Wu, Chengsheng; Zhang, Jing Dong; Wang, Peng; El-Sehemy, Ahmed; Fares, Mohamed; Lai, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Various forms of oncogenic ALK proteins have been identified in various types of human cancers. While Crizotinib, an ALK inhibitor, has been found to be therapeutically useful against a subset of ALK+ tumours, clinical resistance to this drug has been well recognized and the mechanism of this phenomenon is incompletely understood. Using the cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA), we measured the Crizotinib—ALK binding in a panel of ALK+ cell lines, and correlated the findings with the ALK structure and its interactions with specific binding proteins. The Crizotinib IC50 significantly correlated with Crizotinib—ALK binding. The suboptimal Crizotinib—ALK binding in Crizotinib-resistant cells is not due to the cell-specific environment, since transfection of NPM-ALK into these cells revealed substantial Crizotinib—NPM-ALK binding. Interestingly, we found that the resistant cells expressed higher protein level of β-catenin and siRNA knockdown restored Crizotinib—ALK binding (correlated with a significant lowering of IC50). Computational analysis of the crystal structures suggests that β-catenin exerts steric hindrance to the Crizotinib—ALK binding. In conclusion, the Crizotinib—ALK binding measurable by CETSA is useful in predicting Crizotinib sensitivity, and Crizotinib—ALK binding is in turn dictated by the structure of ALK and some of its binding partners. PMID:27641368

  2. The histological and biological spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in the World Health Organization classification.

    PubMed

    Menon, Madhu P; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) are aggressive B-cell lymphomas that are clinically, pathologically, and genetically diverse, in part reflecting the functional diversity of the B-cell system. The focus in recent years has been toward incorporation of clinical features, morphology, immunohistochemistry, and ever evolving genetic data into the classification scheme. The 2008 World Health Organization classification reflects this complexity with the addition of several new entities and variants. The discovery of distinct subtypes by gene expression profiling heralded a new era with a focus on pathways of transformation as well as a promise of more targeted therapies, directed at specific pathways. Some DLBCLs exhibit unique clinical characteristics with a predilection for specific anatomic sites; the anatomic site often reflects underlying biological distinctions. Recently, the spectrum of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven B-cell proliferations in patients without iatrogenic or congenital immunosuppression has been better characterized; most of these occur in patients of advanced age and include Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly. Human herpesvirus 8 is involved in the pathogenesis of primary effusion lymphoma, which can present as a "solid variant." Two borderline categories were created; one deals with tumors at the interface between classic Hodgkin lymphoma and DLBCL. The second confronts the interface between Burkitt lymphoma and DLBCL, so-called "B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between DLBCL and Burkitt lymphoma" in the 2008 classification. Most cases harbor both MYC and BCL2 translocations and are highly aggressive. Another interesting entity is anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive DLBCL, which renders itself potentially targetable by anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors. Ongoing investigations at the genomic level, with both exome and whole-genome sequencing, are sure to reveal new pathways

  3. Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor of the Lung: Two Progressing Pulmonary Nodules in a 25-Year-Old Adult With a Moraxella catharalis Infection.

    PubMed

    Schweckendiek, Daniel; Inci, Ilhan; Schneiter, Didier; Weder, Walter

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the lung is a rare pulmonary lesion of intermediate biologic potential. Approximately half of all inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors show a rearrangement of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene locus with potentially aberrant kinase expression. We present a 25-year-old man with recurrent exertional hemoptysis and two progressing pulmonary nodules in the right lung shown by computed tomography. After an anterolateral thoracotomy, pathologic studies revealed an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor with rearrangement in the ALK gene, although aberrant expression of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase was not detected. In preoperative bronchial washings Moraxella catharalis was found.

  4. Renal Clear Cell Sarcoma - Anaplastic Variant: A Rare Entity.

    PubMed

    Walke, Vaishali Atmaram; Shende, Nitin Y; Kumbhalkar, D T

    2017-01-01

    Clear Cell Sarcoma of Kidney (CCSK) is known for its morphologic diversity, aggressive behaviour, tendency to recur and metastasis to bone. Amongst the various morphologic subtypes, anaplastic CCSK is associated with worse prognosis. Here, we report a case of this rare variant of CCSK. A five-year-old boy presented with history of lump and pain in abdomen since one week. The Computed Tomography (CT) scan revealed a large mass occupying the middle and inferior pole of right kidney. The clinical impression was Wilms tumour. Nephrectomy specimen was received and the diagnosis of CCSK anaplastic variant was offered only after excluding the differentials and after performing ancillary tests such as Immunohistochemistry (IHC). Thus, this case emphasizes the diagnostic challenges on morphology and the essential role of IHC in arriving at a definitive diagnosis, because failure to do so may deprive the child from optimal treatment.

  5. Renal Clear Cell Sarcoma - Anaplastic Variant: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Shende, Nitin Y; Kumbhalkar, D T

    2017-01-01

    Clear Cell Sarcoma of Kidney (CCSK) is known for its morphologic diversity, aggressive behaviour, tendency to recur and metastasis to bone. Amongst the various morphologic subtypes, anaplastic CCSK is associated with worse prognosis. Here, we report a case of this rare variant of CCSK. A five-year-old boy presented with history of lump and pain in abdomen since one week. The Computed Tomography (CT) scan revealed a large mass occupying the middle and inferior pole of right kidney. The clinical impression was Wilms tumour. Nephrectomy specimen was received and the diagnosis of CCSK anaplastic variant was offered only after excluding the differentials and after performing ancillary tests such as Immunohistochemistry (IHC). Thus, this case emphasizes the diagnostic challenges on morphology and the essential role of IHC in arriving at a definitive diagnosis, because failure to do so may deprive the child from optimal treatment. PMID:28273978

  6. Brentuximab vedotin in refractory CD30+ lymphomas: a bridge to allogeneic transplantation in approximately one quarter of patients treated on a Named Patient Programme at a single UK center

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, Adam; Jones, Craig; Bloor, Adrian; Kulkarni, Samar; Illidge, Tim; Linton, Kim; Radford, John

    2013-01-01

    The CD30-targeted agent brentuximab vedotin has shown impressive activity in relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma and anaplastic large cell lymphoma in phase II studies. We have treated 24 patients with relapsed/refratory disease enrolled onto a Named Patient Programme during 2010-11 at a single UK center. Overall response rate across all histologies was 67% (Hodgkin 72%; anaplastic large cell 60%), complete response rate 25% (Hodgkin 17%; anaplastic large cell 60%), median progression-free survival 5.1 months, and toxicity mild to moderate in the majority of cases. Six patients proceeded to allogeneic transplantation and one patient awaits this procedure. These results are similar to phase II data and show that brentuximab vedotin provides a bridge to allogeneic transplantation in approximately one quarter of patients refractory to conventional salvage therapies. Best response was seen after four doses, so consideration of allogeneic transplantation should be made early and scheduled following the first assessment indicating response. PMID:23065511

  7. Activin Receptor-Like Kinase Receptors ALK5 and ALK1 Are Both Required for TGFβ-Induced Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Kroon, Laurie M. G.; Narcisi, Roberto; Blaney Davidson, Esmeralda N.; Cleary, Mairéad A.; van Beuningen, Henk M.; Koevoet, Wendy J. L. M.; van Osch, Gerjo J. V. M.; van der Kraan, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are promising for cartilage regeneration because BMSCs can differentiate into cartilage tissue-producing chondrocytes. Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβ) is crucial for inducing chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs and is known to signal via Activin receptor-Like Kinase (ALK) receptors ALK5 and ALK1. Since the specific role of these two TGFβ receptors in chondrogenesis is unknown, we investigated whether ALK5 and ALK1 are expressed in BMSCs and whether both receptors are required for chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs. Materials & Methods ALK5 and ALK1 gene expression in human BMSCs was determined with RT-qPCR. To induce chondrogenesis, human BMSCs were pellet-cultured in serum-free chondrogenic medium containing TGFβ1. Chondrogenesis was evaluated by aggrecan and collagen type IIα1 RT-qPCR analysis, and histological stainings of proteoglycans and collagen type II. To overexpress constitutively active (ca) receptors, BMSCs were transduced either with caALK5 or caALK1. Expression of ALK5 and ALK1 was downregulated by transducing BMSCs with shRNA against ALK5 or ALK1. Results ALK5 and ALK1 were expressed in in vitro-expanded as well as in pellet-cultured BMSCs from five donors, but mRNA levels of both TGFβ receptors did not clearly associate with chondrogenic induction. TGFβ increased ALK5 and decreased ALK1 gene expression in chondrogenically differentiating BMSC pellets. Neither caALK5 nor caALK1 overexpression induced cartilage matrix formation as efficient as that induced by TGFβ. Moreover, short hairpin-mediated downregulation of either ALK5 or ALK1 resulted in a strong inhibition of TGFβ-induced chondrogenesis. Conclusion ALK5 as well as ALK1 are required for TGFβ-induced chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs, and TGFβ not only directly induces chondrogenesis, but also modulates ALK5 and ALK1 receptor signaling in BMSCs. These results imply that optimizing cartilage formation by

  8. Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... zone lymphomas are a group of indolent (slow-growing) NHL B-cell lymphomas, which account for approximately 12 percent of all B-cell lymphomas. The median age for diagnosis is 65 years old. There are three types of marginal zone lymphoma: ...

  9. Treatment modalities for advanced ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Ivana; Planchard, David

    2016-04-01

    The ALK gene plays a key role in the pathogenesis of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with NSCLC harboring an ALK-rearrangement represent the second oncogene addiction to be identified in this disease. Crizotinib was the first ALK inhibitor showing pronounced clinical activity, and is now a reference treatment for ALK-positive NSCLC disease. However, despite initial impressive responses to crizotinib, acquired resistance almost invariably develops within 12 months. The pressing need for effective second-line agents has prompted the rapid development of next-generation ALK inhibitors. These agents, notably ceritinib and alectinib as the most developed, have a higher potency against ALK than crizotinib, along with activity against tumors harboring crizotinib-resistant mutations and potentially improved CNS penetration.

  10. Targeting brain metastases in ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Isabella; Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Palmer, Joshua D; Mehra, Ranee; Lu, Bo

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of brain metastases has increased as a result of improved systemic control and advances in imaging. However, development of novel therapeutics with CNS activity has not advanced at the same rate. Research on molecular markers has revealed many potential targets for antineoplastic agents, and a particularly important aberration is translocation in the ALK gene, identified in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ALK inhibitors have shown systemic efficacy against ALK-rearranged NSCLC in many clinical trials, but the effectiveness of crizotinib in CNS disease is limited by poor blood-brain barrier penetration and acquired drug resistance. In this Review, we discuss potential pathways to target ALK-rearranged brain metastases, including next generation ALK inhibitors with greater CNS penetration and mechanisms to overcome resistance. Other important mechanisms to control CNS disease include targeting pathways downstream of ALK phosphorylation, increasing the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, modifying the tumour microenvironment, and adding concurrent radiotherapy.

  11. Alk7 Depleted Mice Exhibit Prolonged Cardiac Repolarization and Are Predisposed to Ventricular Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Shaozhen; Cao, Hong; Hu, He; Wang, Xin; Tang, Yanhong; Huang, Congxin

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the role of activin receptor-like kinase (ALK7) in regulating cardiac electrophysiology. Here, we showed that Alk7-/- mice exhibited prolonged QT intervals in telemetry ECG recordings. Furthermore, Langendorff-perfused Alk7-/- hearts had significantly longer action potential duration (APD) and greater incidence of ventricular arrhythmia (AV) induced by burst pacing. Using whole-cell patch clamp, we found that the densities of repolarizing K+ currents Ito and IK1 were profoundly reduced in Alk7-/- ventricular cardiomyocytes. Mechanistically, the expression of Kv4.2 (a major subunit of Ito carrying channel) and KCHIP2 (a key accessory subunit of Ito carrying channel), was markedly decreased in Alk7-/- hearts. These findings suggest that endogenous expression of ALK7 is necessary to maintain repolarizing K+ currents in ventricular cardiomyocytes, and finally prevent action potential prolongation and ventricular arrhythmia. PMID:26882027

  12. RecA stimulates AlkB-mediated direct repair of DNA adducts

    PubMed Central

    Shivange, Gururaj; Monisha, Mohan; Nigam, Richa; Kodipelli, Naveena; Anindya, Roy

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli AlkB protein is a 2-oxoglutarate/Fe(II)-dependent demethylase that repairs alkylated single stranded and double stranded DNA. Immunoaffinity chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry identified RecA, a key factor in homologous recombination, as an AlkB-associated protein. The interaction between AlkB and RecA was validated by yeast two-hybrid assay; size-exclusion chromatography and standard pull down experiment and was shown to be direct and mediated by the N-terminal domain of RecA. RecA binding results AlkB–RecA heterodimer formation and RecA–AlkB repairs alkylated DNA with higher efficiency than AlkB alone. PMID:27378775

  13. High-Dose Busulfan and High-Dose Cyclophosphamide Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Multiple Myeloma, or Recurrent Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-08-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent

  14. A Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Neuroblastoma Driven by Mutated ALK and MYCN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0220 TITLE: A Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Neuroblastoma ...CONTRACT NUMBER A Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Neuroblastoma Driven by Mutated ALK and MYCN 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0220 5c...common ALK mutations in neuroblastoma , F1174L and R1275Q. We have determined that in tumors cells expressing mutated ALK, different downstream

  15. Vorinostat and Bortezomib in Treating Young Patients With Refractory or Recurrent Solid Tumors, Including Central Nervous System Tumors and Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Choriocarcinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Germinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Teratoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Yolk Sac Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Medulloepithelioma; Childhood Meningioma; Childhood Mixed Glioma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Pineoblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  16. Aberrant expression of the dendritic cell marker TNFAIP2 by the malignant cells of Hodgkin lymphoma and primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma distinguishes these tumor types from morphologically and phenotypically similar lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Kondratiev, Svetlana; Duraisamy, Sekhar; Unitt, Christine L; Green, Michael R; Pinkus, Geraldine S; Shipp, Margaret A; Kutok, Jeffery L; Drapkin, Ronny I; Rodig, Scott J

    2011-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α-inducible protein-2 (TNFAIP2) is a protein upregulated in cultured cells treated with tumor necrosis factor α (TNF), but its expression in normal and neoplastic tissues remains largely unknown. Here, we use standard immunohistochemical techniques to demonstrate that TNFAIP2 is normally expressed by follicular dendritic cells, interdigitating dendritic cells, and macrophages but not by lymphoid cells in secondary lymphoid tissues. Consistent with this expression pattern, we found strong TNFAIP2 staining of tumor cells in 4 of 4 cases (100%) of follicular dendritic cell sarcoma and in 3 of 3 cases (100%) of histiocytic sarcoma. Although TNFAIP2 is not expressed by the small and intermediate-sized neoplastic B cells comprising follicular lymphoma, small lymphocytic lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, or marginal zone lymphoma, we observed strong TNFAIP2 staining of the large, neoplastic cells in 31 of 31 cases (100%) of classical Hodgkin lymphoma, in 12 of 12 cases (100%) of nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma, and in 27 of 31 cases (87%) of primary mediastinal (thymic) large B-cell lymphoma. In contrast, TNFAIP2 was expressed by malignant cells in only 2 of 45 cases (4%) of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, in 2 of 18 cases (11%) of Burkitt lymphoma, and in 1 of 19 cases (5%) of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Further analysis indicates that TNFAIP2, as a single diagnostic marker, is more sensitive (sensitivity=87%) and specific (specificity=96%) than TRAF1, nuclear cRel, or CD23 for distinguishing the malignant B cells of primary mediastinal (thymic) large B-cell lymphoma from those of its morphologic and immunophenotypic mimic, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified. Thus, TNFAIP2 may serve as a useful new marker of dendritic and histiocytic sarcomas, the aberrant expression of which in the malignant cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma and primary mediastinal (thymic) large B-cell lymphoma

  17. Intraoperative rapid diagnosis of primary central nervous system lymphomas: advantages and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Yasuo; Terasaki, Mizuhiko; Nakashima, Shinji; Ohshima, Koichi; Morioka, Motohiro; Abe, Hideyuki

    2014-10-01

    To study the advantages and pitfalls of intraoperative rapid diagnosis (IRD) of primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSL), pathology reports and frozen sections in our institution were reviewed. We examined 27 cases of PCNSL, one case of anaplastic glioma, and one case of metastatic brain tumor that were diagnosed on neuroimaging. Fifteen cases of intraoperative cytological preparations were also reviewed in a correlative manner. Among the 27 cases initially diagnosed as PCNSL, 18 were also diagnosed as PCNSL by IRD. However, IRD identified four of the 27 cases as gliosis, two as demyelination, one as atypical epithelial cells, one as malignant glioma and anaplastic astrocytoma. In addition, the case identified as metastatic brain tumor on neuroimaging was corrected to a diagnosis of PCNSL based on IRD. The final accuracy of IRD in the present study was 89.6% (26/29). After postoperative definitive diagnosis, two cases of anaplastic astrocytoma and one case of PCNSL by IRD were corrected to PCNSL, anaplastic oligodendroglioma and demyelination, respectively. PCNSL were sometimes histologically indistinguishable from malignant gliomas or demyelinating diseases in the present study, particularly in frozen sections. Notably, all cases for which both intraoperative cytology and frozen section were performed concomitantly were correctly diagnosed in the present study. In particular, lymphoglandular bodies were highly characteristic cytological findings of PCNSL. Both intraoperative cytology and frozen sections should therefore be performed concomitantly when PCNSL are suspected.

  18. The Escherichia coli AlkB protein protects human cells against alkylation-induced toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, B J; Carroll, P; Samson, L

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli can ameliorate the toxic effects of alkylating agents either by preventing DNA alkylation or by repairing DNA alkylation damage. The alkylation-sensitive phenotype of E. coli alkB mutants marks the alkB pathway as an extremely effective defense mechanism against the cytotoxic effects of the SN2, but not the SN1, alkylating agents. Although it is clear that AlkB helps cells to better handle alkylated DNA, no DNA alkylation repair function could be assigned to the purified AlkB protein, suggesting that AlkB either acts as part of a complex or acts to regulate the expression of other genes whose products are directly responsible for alkylation resistance. However, here we present evidence that the provision of alkylation resistance is an intrinsic function of the AlkB protein per se. We expressed the E. coli AlkB protein in two human cell lines and found that it confers the same characteristic alkylation-resistant phenotype in this foreign environment as it does in E. coli. AlkB expression rendered human cells extremely resistant to cell killing by the SN2 but not the SN1 alkylating agents but did not affect the ability of dimethyl sulfate (an SN2 agent) to alkylate the genome. We infer that SN2 agents produce a class of DNA damage that is not efficiently produced by SN1 agents and that AlkB somehow prevents this damage from killing the cell. Images PMID:7928996

  19. Targeted Disruption of ALK Reveals a Potential Role in Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Nord, Christoffer; Ahlgren, Ulf; Eriksson, Maria; Vernersson-Lindahl, Emma; Helland, Åslaug; Alexeyev, Oleg A.; Hallberg, Bengt; Palmer, Ruth H.

    2015-01-01

    Mice lacking ALK activity have previously been reported to exhibit subtle behavioral phenotypes. In this study of ALK of loss of function mice we present data supporting a role for ALK in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in male mice. We observed lower level of serum testosterone at P40 in ALK knock-out males, accompanied by mild disorganization of seminiferous tubules exhibiting decreased numbers of GATA4 expressing cells. These observations highlight a role for ALK in testis function and are further supported by experiments in which chemical inhibition of ALK activity with the ALK TKI crizotinib was employed. Oral administration of crizotinib resulted in a decrease of serum testosterone levels in adult wild type male mice, which reverted to normal levels after cessation of treatment. Analysis of GnRH expression in neurons of the hypothalamus revealed a significant decrease in the number of GnRH positive neurons in ALK knock-out mice at P40 when compared with control littermates. Thus, ALK appears to be involved in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism by regulating the timing of pubertal onset and testis function at the upper levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis. PMID:25955180

  20. The Use of a Combination of alkB Primers to Better Characterize the Distribution of Alkane-Degrading Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jurelevicius, Diogo; Alvarez, Vanessa Marques; Peixoto, Raquel; Rosado, Alexandre S; Seldin, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    The alkane monooxygenase AlkB, which is encoded by the alkB gene, is a key enzyme involved in bacterial alkane degradation. To study the alkB gene within bacterial communities, researchers need to be aware of the variations in alkB nucleotide sequences; a failure to consider the sequence variations results in the low representation of the diversity and richness of alkane-degrading bacteria. To minimize this shortcoming, the use of a combination of three alkB-targeting primers to enhance the detection of the alkB gene in previously isolated alkane-degrading bacteria was proposed. Using this approach, alkB-related PCR products were detected in 79% of the strains tested. Furthermore, the chosen set of primers was used to study alkB richness and diversity in different soils sampled in Carmópolis, Brazil and King George Island, Antarctica. The DNA extracted from the different soils was PCR amplified with each set of alkB-targeting primers, and clone libraries were constructed, sequenced and analyzed. A total of 255 alkB phylotypes were detected. Venn diagram analyses revealed that only low numbers of alkB phylotypes were shared among the different libraries derived from each primer pair. Therefore, the combination of three alkB-targeting primers enhanced the richness of alkB phylotypes detected in the different soils by 45% to 139%, when compared to the use of a single alkB-targeting primer. In addition, a dendrogram analysis and beta diversity comparison of the alkB composition showed that each of the sampling sites studied had a particular set of alkane-degrading bacteria. The use of a combination of alkB primers was an efficient strategy for enhancing the detection of the alkB gene in cultivable bacteria and for better characterizing the distribution of alkane-degrading bacteria in different soil environments.

  1. The Use of a Combination of alkB Primers to Better Characterize the Distribution of Alkane-Degrading Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Jurelevicius, Diogo; Alvarez, Vanessa Marques; Peixoto, Raquel; Rosado, Alexandre S.; Seldin, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    The alkane monooxygenase AlkB, which is encoded by the alkB gene, is a key enzyme involved in bacterial alkane degradation. To study the alkB gene within bacterial communities, researchers need to be aware of the variations in alkB nucleotide sequences; a failure to consider the sequence variations results in the low representation of the diversity and richness of alkane-degrading bacteria. To minimize this shortcoming, the use of a combination of three alkB-targeting primers to enhance the detection of the alkB gene in previously isolated alkane-degrading bacteria was proposed. Using this approach, alkB-related PCR products were detected in 79% of the strains tested. Furthermore, the chosen set of primers was used to study alkB richness and diversity in different soils sampled in Carmópolis, Brazil and King George Island, Antarctica. The DNA extracted from the different soils was PCR amplified with each set of alkB-targeting primers, and clone libraries were constructed, sequenced and analyzed. A total of 255 alkB phylotypes were detected. Venn diagram analyses revealed that only low numbers of alkB phylotypes were shared among the different libraries derived from each primer pair. Therefore, the combination of three alkB-targeting primers enhanced the richness of alkB phylotypes detected in the different soils by 45% to 139%, when compared to the use of a single alkB-targeting primer. In addition, a dendrogram analysis and beta diversity comparison of the alkB composition showed that each of the sampling sites studied had a particular set of alkane-degrading bacteria. The use of a combination of alkB primers was an efficient strategy for enhancing the detection of the alkB gene in cultivable bacteria and for better characterizing the distribution of alkane-degrading bacteria in different soil environments. PMID:23825163

  2. The effect of low level laser on anaplastic thyroid cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Yun-Hee; Moon, Jeon-Hwan; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang

    2015-02-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a non-thermal phototherapy used in several medical applications, including wound healing, reduction of pain and amelioration of oral mucositis. Nevertheless, the effects of LLLT upon cancer or dysplastic cells have been so far poorly studied. Here we report that the effects of laser irradiation on anaplastic thyroid cancer cells leads to hyperplasia. 650nm of laser diode was performed with a different time interval (0, 15, 30, 60J/cm2 , 25mW) on anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line FRO in vivo. FRO was orthotopically injected into the thyroid gland of nude mice and the irradiation was performed with the same method described previously. After irradiation, the xenograft evaluation was followed for one month. The thyroid tissues from sacrificed mice were undergone to H&E staining and immunohistochemical staining with HIF-1α, Akt, TGF-β1. We found the aggressive proliferation of FRO on thyroid gland with dose dependent. In case of 60 J/ cm2 of energy density, the necrotic bodies were found in a center of the thyroid. The phosphorylation of HIF-1α and Akt was detected in the thyroid gland, which explained the survival signaling of anaplastic cancer cell was turned on the thyroid gland. Furthermore, TGF-β1 expression was decreased after irradiation. In this study, we demonstrated that insufficient energy density irradiation occurred the decreasing of TGF-β1 which corresponding to the phosphorylation of Akt/ HIF-1α. This aggressive proliferation resulted to the hypoxic condition of tissue for angiogenesis. We suggest that LLLT may influence to cancer aggressiveness associated with a decrease in TGF-β1 and increase in Akt/HIF-1α.

  3. Mitochondrial Metabolism as a Treatment Target in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jennifer M; Lai, Stephen Y.; Cotzia, Paolo; Cognetti, David; Luginbuhl, Adam; Pribitkin, Edmund A.; Zhan, Tingting; Mollaee, Mehri; Domingo-Vidal, Marina; Chen, Yunyun; Campling, Barbara; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Birbe, Ruth; Tuluc, Madalina; Outschoorn, Ubaldo Martinez; Curry, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Aims Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human cancers. Key signal transduction pathways that regulate mitochondrial metabolism are frequently altered in ATC. Our goal was to determine the mitochondrial metabolic phenotype of ATC by studying markers of mitochondrial metabolism, specifically Monocarboxylate Transporter 1 (MCT1) and Translocase of the Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Member 20 (TOMM20). Methods Staining patterns of MCT1 and TOMM20 in 35 human thyroid samples (15 ATC, 12 papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), and 8 non-cancerous thyroid) and 9 ATC mouse orthotopic xenografts were assessed by visual and Aperio digital scoring. Staining patterns of areas involved with cancer versus areas with no evidence of cancer were evaluated independently where available. Results MCT1 is highly expressed in human anaplastic thyroid cancer when compared to both non-cancerous thyroid tissues and papillary thyroid cancers (p<0.001 for both). TOMM20 is also highly expressed in both ATC and PTC compared to non-cancerous thyroid tissue (p<0.01 for both). High MCT1 and TOMM20 expression is also found in ATC mouse xenograft tumors compared to non-cancerous thyroid tissue (p<0.001). These xenograft tumors have high 13C- pyruvate uptake. Conclusions Anaplastic thyroid cancer has metabolic features that distinguish it from PTC and non-cancerous thyroid tissue, including high expression of MCT1 and TOMM20. PTC has low expression of MCT1 and non-cancerous thyroid tissue has low expression of both MCT1 and TOMM20. This work suggests that MCT1 blockade may specifically target ATC cells presenting an opportunity for a new drug target. PMID:26615136

  4. Connective tissue growth factor is expressed in malignant cells of Hodgkin lymphoma but not in other mature B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Birgersdotter, Anna; Baumforth, Karl R N; Wei, Wenbin; Murray, Paul G; Sjöberg, Jan; Björkholm, Magnus; Porwit, Anna; Ernberg, Ingemar

    2010-02-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has a major role in development of fibrosis and in the wound-healing process. Microarray analysis of 44 classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) samples showed higher CTGF messenger RNA expression in the nodular sclerosis (NS) than in the mixed cellularity (MC) subtype. When analyzed by immunohistochemical analysis, Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg (H-RS) cells and macrophages in 23 cHLs and "popcorn" cells in 2 nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphomas showed expression of CTGF protein correlating with the extent of fibrosis. In NS, CTGF was also expressed in fibroblasts and occasional lymphocytes. Malignant cells in 32 samples of various non-Hodgkin lymphomas were negative for CTGF. A staining pattern of stromal cells similar to that of NS cHL was seen in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Macrophages stained positively in Burkitt lymphomas and in some mantle cell lymphomas. The high occurrence of fibrosis in cHL may be related to CTGF expression by malignant H-RS cells.

  5. Anaplastic mandibular carcinoma in a meerkat (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Dadone, Liza I; Garner, Michael M; Klaphake, Eric; Johnston, Matthew S; Han, Sushan

    2014-06-01

    An 8-yr-old female slender-tailed meerkat (Suricata suricatta) presented with a necrotic sublingual mass and osteolysis of the mandible. After 1 mo of palliative care, the meerkat was euthanized. The mass was diagnosed histologically as an anaplastic carcinoma with extensive rostral mandibular destruction. Immunohistochemistry for vimentin and cytokeratin was validated in this nontypical species and showed that neoplastic cells expressed both mesenchymal and epithelial characteristics, suggestive of a primitive and poorly differentiated tumor. A review of 150 adult slender-tailed meerkat histopathology reports showed a 2% prevalence of orofacial neoplasia, suggesting that oral neoplasms are uncommon in meerkats.

  6. Prophylactic irradiation in bronchogenic small cell anaplastic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, H.H.; Dombernowsky, P.; Hirsch, F.R.; Hansen, M.; Rygard, J.

    1980-07-15

    A total of 114 patients with bronchogenic small cell anaplastic carcinoma and staged as having regional disease all underwent combination chemotherapy consisting of CCNU, cyclophosphamide, and methotrexate. They were randomized to receive either radiotherapy to the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes (4000 rad) or extensive radiotherapy, which included the brain, adrenals, and upper retroperitoneal lymph nodes. Fifteen patients were free of disease after 18 months of chemotherapy and the treatment was discontinued. Only 3 patients subsequently relapsed. No difference was observed between the two groups of patients in median survival time, response rate, duration of response, or relapse pattern, including the frequency of brain metastasis.

  7. Lymphomas-Part 2.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Lara A; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-11-01

    There are 2 types of central nervous system lymphoma: primary and secondary. Both have variable imaging features making them diagnostic challenges. Furthermore, a patient's immune status significantly alters the imaging findings. Familiarity with typical appearances, variations, and common mimics aids radiologists in appropriately considering lymphoma in the differential diagnosis. Moreover, special types of lymphoma, such as lymphomatosis cerebri, intravascular lymphoma, and lymphomatoid granulomatosis, also are found. This article discusses uncommon types of lymphoma and the differential diagnosis for focal, multifocal, meningeal, and infiltrative lymphomas.

  8. Shear induced collateral artery growth modulated by endoglin but not by ALK1

    PubMed Central

    Seghers, Leonard; de Vries, Margreet R; Pardali, Evangelia; Hoefer, Imo E; Hierck, Beerend P; ten Dijke, Peter ten; Goumans, Marie Jose; Quax, Paul HA

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) stimulates both ischaemia induced angiogenesis and shear stress induced arteriogenesis by signalling through different receptors. How these receptors are involved in both these processes of blood flow recovery is not entirely clear. In this study the role of TGF-β receptors 1 and endoglin is assessed in neovascularization in mice. Unilateral femoral artery ligation was performed in mice heterozygous for either endoglin or ALK1 and in littermate controls. Compared with littermate controls, blood flow recovery, monitored by laser Doppler perfusion imaging, was significantly hampered by maximal 40% in endoglin heterozygous mice and by maximal 49% in ALK1 heterozygous mice. Collateral artery size was significantly reduced in endoglin heterozygous mice compared with controls but not in ALK1 heterozygous mice. Capillary density in ischaemic calf muscles was unaffected, but capillaries from endoglin and ALK1 heterozygous mice were significantly larger when compared with controls. To provide mechanistic evidence for the differential role of endoglin and ALK1 in shear induced or ischaemia induced neovascularization, murine endothelial cells were exposed to shear stress in vitro. This induced increased levels of endoglin mRNA but not ALK1. In this study it is demonstrated that both endoglin and ALK1 facilitate blood flow recovery. Importantly, endoglin contributes to both shear induced collateral artery growth and to ischaemia induced angiogenesis, whereas ALK1 is only involved in ischaemia induced angiogenesis. PMID:22436015

  9. T-Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... are extremely rare. T-cell lymphomas can be aggressive (fast-growing) or indolent (slow-growing). Lymphomas are ... also be involved. This group of PTCLs is aggressive and requires combination chemotherapy upon diagnosis. For more ...

  10. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  11. Hodgkin Lymphoma (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Taking Care of Your Ears Taking ... Getting an X-ray Hodgkin Lymphoma KidsHealth > For Kids > Hodgkin Lymphoma Print A A A What's in ...

  12. Lymphoma Research Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... options and patient support topics. Read More LYMPHOMA RESEARCH Featured Researchers – 2017 LRF Scholars The LCRMP is ... and junior faculty who intend to focus their research and clinical careers in lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic ...

  13. Pathology of Extranodal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Heckendorn, Emily; Auerbach, Aaron

    2016-07-01

    An overview of the pathology of extranodal lymphoma is presented. The emphasis of this presentation is on the classification system of extranodal lymphomas, including both B-cell and T-cell lymphomas, based on their morphology, phenotype, and molecular alterations.

  14. Plasmablastic lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiao; Duan, Minghui; Hu, Lixing; Zhou, Daobin; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a B-cell malignancy associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). PBL could also influence the HIV-negative patients. The study aimed to identify prognostic factors for survival among Chinese PBL patients. Materials and methods: Eligible patients from literature and Peking Union Medical College Hospital (PUMCH) were included in this study. Clinical characteristics and immunophenotypic data were extracted. Kaplan–Meier curve was used to describe the survival status. Cox regression was used for multivariate analysis. Results: A total of 60 Chinese PBL patients were included, including 54 patients from 36 published articles and 6 new patients that have not been reported. The median overall survival was 7 months (95% confidence interval 3.853–10.147 months). An overwhelming majority (79.31%) of the included cases were Ann Arbor stage IV patients. All the Chinese PBL patients were HIV-negative; 46.81% were Epstein-Barr virus-positive. CD38, CD138, or MUM1 was positively expressed in more than 80% of patients; CD20 expression was also found in 22.03% of cases. Kaplan–Meier curve revealed obvious differences in patient survival between patients in primary stages and advanced stages, as well as between patients with kidney involvement and those without kidney involvement. Cox regression analysis indicated that stage and age were 2 prognostic factors for patient survival. Conclusions: Advanced stage might be associated with poor prognosis among PBL HIV-negative patients in Chinese. PMID:28248855

  15. Involvement of Cot activity in the proliferation of ALCL lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Margarita; Manso, Rebeca; Bernaldez, Flavia; Lopez, Pilar; Martin-Duce, Antonio; Alemany, Susana

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} We show here that ALCL lymphoma cell lines present high levels of Cot (MAP3K8). {yields} We show that Cot mediates the constitutive Erk1/2 activation in SUDHL-1 cells. {yields} Inhibition of Cot activity reduces the number of cell divisions in SUDHL-1 cells. {yields} Cot controls the activation state of p70 S6K and JunB expression in SUDHL-1 cells. -- Abstract: Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) cells overexpress CD30 on their cell surface, show increased levels of activated Erk1/2 and of JunB; participating JunB in the proliferative capacity of these lymphomas. Here, we show that ALCL lymphoma cells also present high expression levels of the proto-oncogenic Cot (MAP3K8). Using pharmacological drugs as well as the RNA interference technique we show that Cot protein is responsible for the constitutive Erk1/2 activation in the ALCL lymphoma cells, SUDHL-1. Besides, inhibition of Cot activity reduces the number of cell divisions which is achieved, at least in part, by the control that Cot exercises on the activation state of p70 S6K and on the expression levels of JunB. Since Cot represents an alternative mode, independently of RAF, to activate Erk1/2, all these data strongly suggest that molecular targeting of Cot may be a potential new specific strategy for ALCL lymphomas therapy, without the fully disturbance of the Erk1/2 function.

  16. Pegfilgrastim and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Untreated, Relapsed, or Refractory Follicular Lymphoma, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-02

    Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  17. Profile of Ventana ALK (D5F3) companion diagnostic assay for non-small-cell lung carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Conde, Esther; Hernandez, Susana; Prieto, Mario; Martinez, Rebeca; Lopez-Rios, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    The development of several ALK inhibitors means that the importance of accurately identifying ALK-positive lung cancer has never been greater. Therefore, it is crucial that ALK testing assays become more standardized. The aim of this review is to comment on the recently FDA-approved VENTANA ALK (D5F3) Companion Diagnostic (CDx) Assay. This kit provides high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of ALK rearrangements and seamless integration into the laboratory workflow, with a fully automated analytical phase and fast interpretation. The use of controls increases the sensitivity and specificity and a dichotomous scoring approach enhances reproducibility.

  18. Temozolomide Treatment for Pediatric Refractory Anaplastic Ependymoma with Low MGMT Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Komori, Kazutoshi; Yanagisawa, Ryu; Miyairi, Yosuke; Sakashita, Kazuo; Shiohara, Masaaki; Fujihara, Ikuko; Morita, Daisuke; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Ogiso, Yoshifumi; Sano, Kenji; Shirahata, Mitsuaki; Fukuoka, Kohei; Ichimura, Koichi; Shigeta, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    The benefit of postoperative chemotherapy for anaplastic ependymoma remains unknown. We report two pediatric patients with refractory anaplastic ependymoma treated with temozolomide (TMZ). We did not detect O(6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation in tumor samples; however, MGMT protein expression was low. With TMZ treatment, one patient had a 7-month complete remission; the other, stable disease for 15 months. Three other patients did not respond to TMZ; two had high and one low MGMT expression, and two showed no MGMT promoter methylation. These findings suggest that TMZ may be effective for pediatric refractory anaplastic ependymoma with low MGMT protein expression.

  19. pleiotrophin — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Pleiotrophin, or PTN, is a secreted growth factor found in osteoblasts and brain tissue. PTN induces neurite outgrowth and is mitogenic for fibroblasts, epithelial, and endothelial cells. It binds anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) which induces MAPK pathway activation, an important step in the anti-apoptotic signaling of PTN and regulation of cell proliferation.

  20. Application of AlkBGT and AlkL from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 for Selective Alkyl Ester ω-Oxyfunctionalization in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, Gerrit; Weusthuis, Ruud A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The enzyme system AlkBGT from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 can efficiently ω-functionalize fatty acid methyl esters. Outer membrane protein AlkL boosts this ω-functionalization. In this report, it is shown that whole cells of Escherichia coli expressing the AlkBGT system can also ω-oxidize ethyl nonanoate (NAEE). Coexpression of AlkBGT and AlkL resulted in 1.7-fold-higher ω-oxidation activity on NAEE. With this strain, initial activity on NAEE was 70 U/g (dry weight) of cells (gcdw), 67% of the initial activity on methyl nonanoate. In time-lapse conversions with 5 mM NAEE the main product was 9-hydroxy NAEE (3.6 mM), but also 9-oxo NAEE (0.1 mM) and 9-carboxy NAEE (0.6 mM) were formed. AlkBGT also ω-oxidized ethyl, propyl, and butyl esters of fatty acids ranging from C6 to C10. Increasing the length of the alkyl chain improved the ω-oxidation activity of AlkBGT on esters of C6 and C7 fatty acids. From these esters, application of butyl hexanoate resulted in the highest ω-oxidation activity, 82 U/gcdw. Coexpression of AlkL only had a positive effect on ω-functionalization of substrates with a total length of C11 or longer. These findings indicate that AlkBGT(L) can be applied as a biocatalyst for ω-functionalization of ethyl, propyl, and butyl esters of medium-chain fatty acids. IMPORTANCE Fatty acid esters are promising renewable starting materials for the production of ω-hydroxy fatty acid esters (ω-HFAEs). ω-HFAEs can be used to produce sustainable polymers. Chemical conversion of the fatty acid esters to ω-HFAEs is challenging, as it generates by-products and needs harsh reaction conditions. Biocatalytic production is a promising alternative. In this study, biocatalytic conversion of fatty acid esters toward ω-HFAEs was investigated using whole cells. This was achieved with recombinant Escherichia coli cells that produce the AlkBGT enzymes. These enzymes can produce ω-HFAEs from a wide variety of fatty acid esters. Medium-chain-length acids (C

  1. Automation of ALK gene rearrangement testing with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH): a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Zwaenepoel, Karen; Merkle, Dennis; Cabillic, Florian; Berg, Erica; Belaud-Rotureau, Marc-Antoine; Grazioli, Vittorio; Herelle, Olga; Hummel, Michael; Le Calve, Michele; Lenze, Dido; Mende, Stefanie; Pauwels, Patrick; Quilichini, Benoit; Repetti, Elena

    2015-02-01

    In the past several years we have observed a significant increase in our understanding of molecular mechanisms that drive lung cancer. Specifically in the non-small cell lung cancer sub-types, ALK gene rearrangements represent a sub-group of tumors that are targetable by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor Crizotinib, resulting in significant reductions in tumor burden. Phase II and III clinical trials were performed using an ALK break-apart FISH probe kit, making FISH the gold standard for identifying ALK rearrangements in patients. FISH is often considered a labor and cost intensive molecular technique, and in this study we aimed to demonstrate feasibility for automation of ALK FISH testing, to improve laboratory workflow and ease of testing. This involved automation of the pre-treatment steps of the ALK assay using various protocols on the VP 2000 instrument, and facilitating automated scanning of the fluorescent FISH specimens for simplified enumeration on various backend scanning and analysis systems. The results indicated that ALK FISH can be automated. Significantly, both the Ikoniscope and BioView system of automated FISH scanning and analysis systems provided a robust analysis algorithm to define ALK rearrangements. In addition, the BioView system facilitated consultation of difficult cases via the internet.

  2. Rhein Inhibits AlkB Repair Enzymes and Sensitizes Cells to Methylated DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Huang, Yue; Liu, Xichun; Gan, Jianhua; Chen, Hao; Yang, Cai-Guang

    2016-05-20

    The AlkB repair enzymes, including Escherichia coli AlkB and two human homologues, ALKBH2 and ALKBH3, are iron(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases that efficiently repair N(1)-methyladenine and N(3)-methylcytosine methylated DNA damages. The development of small molecule inhibitors of these enzymes has seen less success. Here we have characterized a previously discovered natural product rhein and tested its ability to inhibit AlkB repair enzymes in vitro and to sensitize cells to methyl methane sulfonate that mainly produces N(1)-methyladenine and N(3)-methylcytosine lesions. Our investigation of the mechanism of rhein inhibition reveals that rhein binds to AlkB repair enzymes in vitro and promotes thermal stability in vivo In addition, we have determined a new structural complex of rhein bound to AlkB, which shows that rhein binds to a different part of the active site in AlkB than it binds to in fat mass and obesity-associated protein (FTO). With the support of these observations, we put forth the hypothesis that AlkB repair enzymes would be effective pharmacological targets for cancer treatment.

  3. Racial disparities in anaplastic oligodendroglioma: An analysis on 1643 patients.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jacob Y; Yoon, Ja Kyoung; Diaz, Aidnag Z

    2017-03-01

    The objective of our study is to determine the influence of race on overall survival (OS) for anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO). Data were extracted from the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). Chi-square test, Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression models were employed in SPSS 22.0 (Armonk, NY: IBM Corp.) for data analyses. 1643 patients with AO were identified. 1386 (84.3%) were White, 83 (5.0%) Black, 133 (8.1%) Hispanic, and 41 (2.5%) were Asian. White and Black patients were significantly older than Hispanic and Asian patients (49.3% vs. 49.4% vs. 33.1% vs. 39.0%, p=0.003). Black patients were significantly less likely to be insured than White patients (12.8 vs. 7.2%, p<0.001) and significantly more likely to have lower income than other races (p<0.001). A trend towards higher comorbidity burden and lower rate of gross total resection was seen in Black patients. Black patients had significantly worse five-year OS compared to White, Hispanic, and Asian patients (40.3% vs. 52.3% vs. 67.8% vs. 67.7%, p=0.028). Of those who received adjuvant chemoRT, Black patients still had significantly worse OS compared to White patients (p=0.021). On multivariate analysis, Black race, older age at diagnosis, and not receiving adjuvant chemoradiotherapy were independent prognostic factors for worse OS in anaplastic oligodendroglioma. Future studies are warranted to help determine predictors for unfavorable molecular status, ways to optimize management of comorbidities, and interventions to help ensure adequate access to medical care for all patients to better care for those who may be at more risk for poorer outcome.

  4. Mitochondrial Metabolism as a Treatment Target in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer M; Lai, Stephen Y; Cotzia, Paolo; Cognetti, David; Luginbuhl, Adam; Pribitkin, Edmund A; Zhan, Tingting; Mollaee, Mehri; Domingo-Vidal, Marina; Chen, Yunyun; Campling, Barbara; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Birbe, Ruth; Tuluc, Madalina; Martinez Outschoorn, Ubaldo; Curry, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human cancers. Key signal transduction pathways that regulate mitochondrial metabolism are frequently altered in ATC. Our goal was to determine the mitochondrial metabolic phenotype of ATC by studying markers of mitochondrial metabolism, specifically monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) and translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane member 20 (TOMM20). Staining patterns of MCT1 and TOMM20 in 35 human thyroid samples (15 ATC, 12 papillary thyroid cancer [PTC], and eight non-cancerous thyroid) and nine ATC mouse orthotopic xenografts were assessed by visual and Aperio digital scoring. Staining patterns of areas involved with cancer versus areas with no evidence of cancer were evaluated independently where available. MCT1 is highly expressed in human anaplastic thyroid cancer when compared to both non-cancerous thyroid tissues and papillary thyroid cancers (P<.001 for both). TOMM20 is also highly expressed in both ATC and PTC compared to non-cancerous thyroid tissue (P<.01 for both). High MCT1 and TOMM20 expression is also found in ATC mouse xenograft tumors compared to non-cancerous thyroid tissue (P<.001). These xenograft tumors have high (13)C- pyruvate uptake. ATC has metabolic features that distinguish it from PTC and non-cancerous thyroid tissue, including high expression of MCT1 and TOMM20. PTC has low expression of MCT1 and non-cancerous thyroid tissue has low expression of both MCT1 and TOMM20. This work suggests that MCT1 blockade may specifically target ATC cells presenting an opportunity for a new drug target.

  5. A case of composite classical and nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma with progression to diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: Diagnostic difficulty in fine-needle aspiration cytology.

    PubMed

    Das, Dilip K; Sheikh, Zafar A; Al-Shama'a, Mariam H; John, Bency; Alawi, Abdulla M S; Junaid, Thamradeen A

    2017-03-01

    A small percentage of nodular lymphocytic predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) progresses to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). There have also been rare reports of gray zone lymphoma with features intermediate between classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) and DLBCL. We report a very rare case of composite lymphoma (CHL and NLPHL) progressing to DLBCL, and highlight the diagnostic difficulty faced during its fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology diagnosis. A 65-year-old woman presented with a right axillary swelling which was subjected to FNA cytology. The routine FNA cytology diagnosis was anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) but immunocytochemistry did not support this diagnosis completely. The histopathological diagnosis of the excised lymph node was NLPHL with progression to DLBCL in our hospital but in a hospital abroad where the patient was treated, the reviewed diagnosis was CHL. The patient had a rapid downhill course with development of terminal pleural effusion and died approximately one year from initial diagnosis.The review of the cyto-histologic material along with additional immunocyto/histochemical studies and the clinical course of the disease support the diagnosis of a composite lymphoma (CHL and NLPHL) with progression to DLBCL. It is suggested that all the three lesions were clonally related. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:262-266. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. NeuroD1 promotes neuroblastoma cell growth by inducing the expression of ALK.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fangjin; Kishida, Satoshi; Mu, Ping; Huang, Peng; Cao, Dongliang; Tsubota, Shoma; Kadomatsu, Kenji

    2015-04-01

    Neuroblastoma is derived from the sympathetic neuronal lineage of neural crest cells, and is the most frequently observed of the extracranial pediatric solid tumors. The neuronal differentiation factor, NeuroD1, has previously been shown to promote cell motility in neuroblastoma by suppressing the expression of Slit2. Here we report that NeuroD1 is also involved in the proliferation of neuroblastoma cells, including human cell lines and primary tumorspheres cultured from the tumor tissues of model mice. Interestingly, the growth inhibition of neuroblastoma cells induced by knockdown of NeuroD1 was accompanied by a reduction of ALK expression. ALK is known to be one of the important predisposition genes for neuroblastoma. The phenotype resulting from knockdown of NeuroD1 was suppressed by forced expression of ALK and, therefore, NeuroD1 appears to act mainly through ALK to promote the proliferation of neuroblastoma cells. Furthermore, we showed that NeuroD1 directly bound to the promoter region of ALK gene. In addition, the particular E-box in the promoter was responsible for NeuroD1-mediated ALK expression. These results indicate that ALK should be a direct target gene of NeuroD1. Finally, the expressions of NeuroD1 and ALK in the early tumor lesions of neuroblastoma model mice coincided in vivo. We conclude that the novel mechanism would regulate the expression of ALK in neuroblastoma and that NeuroD1 should be significantly involved in neuroblastoma tumorigenesis.

  7. Burkitt lymphoma is molecularly distinct from other lymphomas

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have uncovered a number of molecular signatures in Burkitt lymphoma, including unique genetic alterations that promote cell survival, that are not found in other lymphomas. These findings provide the first genetic evidence that Burkitt lymphoma

  8. Apatinib as post second-line therapy in EGFR wild-type and ALK-negative advanced lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Shen-Cun; Zhang, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Xie, Wei-Ping

    2017-01-01

    In the absence of a driver mutation, chemotherapy is the standard treatment option as first- and second-line therapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Though a large number of patients are suitable for post second-line therapies, the quality and quantity of the available drugs in this setting is poor. Apatinib, a small molecule vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is a first-generation oral antiangiogenesis drug approved in the People’s Republic of China for use as a subsequent line of treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Herein, we report three cases of advanced NSCLC with epidermal growth factor receptor wild-type and anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative status, wherein the patients showed partial response to apatinib. Moreover, the three patients have achieved a progression-free survival of 2.8, 5.8, and 6 months, respectively. The main toxicities were hypertension, proteinuria, and hand–foot syndrome. Apatinib may provide an additional option for the treatment of advanced NSCLC, especially for advanced lung adenocarcinoma without a driver mutation. PMID:28176910

  9. Primary Intraocular Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Faia, Lisa J.; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2009-01-01

    Primary intraocular lymphoma, recently suggested to be renamed primary retinal lymphoma, is a subset of primary central nervous system lymphoma and is usually an aggressive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Between 56% and 85% of patients who initially present with primary intraocular lymphoma alone will develop cerebral lesions. Patients typically complain of decreased vision and floaters, most likely secondary to the chronic vitritis and subretinal lesions. The diagnosis of primary intraocular lymphoma can be difficult to make and requires tissue for diagnosis. The atypical lymphoid cells are large and display a high nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio, prominent nucleoli, and basophilic cytoplasm. Flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, cytokine analysis, and gene rearrangements also aid in the diagnosis. Local and systemic treatments, such as chemotherapy and radiation, are employed, although the relapse rate remains high. PMID:19653715

  10. The analysis of ALK gene rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization in non-small cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Paweł Adam; Ramlau, Rodryg Adam; Szumiło, Justyna; Kozielski, Jerzy; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Bryl, Maciej; Knopik-Dąbrowicz, Alina; Spychalski, Łukasz; Szczęsna, Aleksandra; Rydzik, Ewelina; Milanowski, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction ALK gene rearrangement is observed in a small subset (3–7%) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. The efficacy of crizotinib was shown in lung cancer patients harbouring ALK rearrangement. Nowadays, the analysis of ALK gene rearrangement is added to molecular examination of predictive factors. Aim of the study The frequency of ALK gene rearrangement as well as the type of its irregularity was analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) in tissue samples from NSCLC patients. Material and methods The ALK gene rearrangement was analysed in 71 samples including 53 histological and 18 cytological samples. The analysis could be performed in 56 cases (78.87%), significantly more frequently in histological than in cytological materials. The encountered problem with ALK rearrangement diagnosis resulted from the scarcity of tumour cells in cytological samples, high background fluorescence noises and fragmentation of cell nuclei. Results The normal ALK copy number without gene rearrangement was observed in 26 (36.62%) patients ALK gene polysomy without gene rearrangement was observed in 25 (35.21%) samples while in 3 (4.23%) samples ALK gene amplification was found. ALK gene rearrangement was observed in 2 (2.82%) samples from males, while in the first case the rearrangement coexisted with ALK amplification. In the second case, signet-ring tumour cells were found during histopathological examination and this patient was successfully treated with crizotinib with partial remission lasting 16 months. Conclusions FISH is a useful technique for ALK gene rearrangement analysis which allows us to specify the type of gene irregularities. ALK gene examination could be performed in histological as well as cytological (cellblocks) samples, but obtaining a reliable result in cytological samples depends on the cellularity of examined materials. PMID:24592134

  11. Intracellular TCR-signaling pathway: novel markers for lymphoma diagnosis and potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Agostinelli, Claudio; Rizvi, Hasan; Paterson, Jennifer; Shende, Vishvesh; Akarca, Ayse U; Agostini, Elena; Fuligni, Fabio; Righi, Simona; Spagnolo, Sebastiano; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Clark, Edward A; Pileri, Stefano A; Marafioti, Teresa

    2014-10-01

    Despite the immunologic functions of T-cell receptor signaling molecules being extensively investigated, their potential as immunohistochemical markers has been poorly explored. With this background, we evaluated the expression of 5 intracellular proteins-GADS, DOK2, SKAP55, ITK, and PKCα-involved in T-cell receptor signaling in normal and neoplastic hematologic tissue samples, using antibodies raised against fixation-resistant epitopes of the 5 molecules. All 5 antibodies were associated with normal T-cell differentiation. GADS, DOK2, SKAP55, and ITK turned out to be T-cell lineage-specific markers in the setting of lymphoid and myeloid precursor neoplasms but showed differential expression in peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) subtypes, being detected in PTCL/not otherwise specified (NOS) and angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma but negative in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). Peripheral B-cell lymphomas were consistently negative for ITK, with occasional cases showing expression of DOK2 and SKAP55, and a proportion (47%) of hairy cell leukemias were GADS. Notably, PKCα highlighted a defective antigen in both PTCL/NOS (6%) and angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (10%), mostly negative in ALCL, and was aberrantly expressed in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (65%), Burkitt lymphoma (48%), and plasma cell myeloma (48%). In conclusion, all five molecules evaluated play a role in T-cell differentiation in normal and neoplastic tissues. They can be applied confidently to routine sections contributing primarily to assignment of T-lineage differentiation in the setting of hematopoietic precursor neoplasms (GADS/DOK2/SKAP55/ITK) and for the differential diagnosis between ALCL and PTCL/NOS (GADS/DOK2/SKAP55/ITK) or classical Hodgkin lymphoma (PKCα). Finally, association with specific tumor subtypes may have therapeutic potential.

  12. Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... and support programs: • Lymphoma Helpline • Clinical Trials Information Service • Lymphoma Support Network • Publications • Teleconferences • Webcasts & podcasts • In-person conferences Medical ...

  13. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Prasanna; Wu, Guang-Yao; Zhu, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tract is the most common extranodal site involved by lymphoma with the majority being non-Hodgkin type. Although lymphoma can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract, the most frequent sites in order of its occurrence are the stomach followed by small intestine and ileocecal region. Gastrointestinal tract lymphoma is usually secondary to the widespread nodal diseases and primary gastrointestinal tract lymphoma is relatively rare. Gastrointestinal lymphomas are usually not clinically specific and indistinguishable from other benign and malignant conditions. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common pathological type of gastrointestinal lymphoma in essentially all sites of the gastrointestinal tract, although recently the frequency of other forms has also increased in certain regions of the world. Although some radiological features such as bulky lymph nodes and maintenance of fat plane are more suggestive of lymphoma, they are not specific, thus mandating histopathological analysis for its definitive diagnosis. There has been a tremendous leap in the diagnosis, staging and management of gastrointestinal lymphoma in the last two decades attributed to a better insight into its etiology and molecular aspect as well as the knowledge about its critical signaling pathways. PMID:21390139

  14. Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... consists of a group of rare and usually aggressive (fast-growing) NHLs that develop from mature T- ... also be involved. This group of PTCLs is aggressive and requires combination chemotherapy upon diagnosis. Anaplastic Large ...

  15. Effects of Pharmacologic and Genetic Inhibition of Alk on Cognitive Impairments in NF1 Mutant Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    neuroblastoma 12-15. Orally active small molecule inhibitors have shown notable effectiveness in the treatment of lung cancer and are actively being...tested for the treatment of neuroblastoma 16-18. The normal function of Alk in humans is less clear though its expression in both the developing and...Y. P. et al. Identification of ALK as a major familial neuroblastoma predisposition gene. Nature 455, 930-935 (2008). 13 Janoueix-Lerosey, I. et

  16. ALK1 heterozygosity increases extracellular matrix protein expression, proliferation and migration in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Félix, José M; Perretta-Tejedor, Nuria; Eleno, Nélida; López-Novoa, José M; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2014-06-01

    Fibrosis is a pathological situation in which excessive amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM) are deposited in the tissue. Myofibroblasts play a crucial role in the development and progress of fibrosis as they actively synthesize ECM components such as collagen I, fibronectin and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and cause organ fibrosis. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) plays a major role in tissue fibrosis. Activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1) is a type I receptor of TGF-β1 with an important role in angiogenesis whose function in cellular biology and TGF-β signaling is well known in endothelial cells, but its role in fibroblast biology and its contribution to fibrosis is poorly studied. We have recently demonstrated that ALK1 regulates ECM protein expression in a mouse model of obstructive nephropathy. Our aim was to evaluate the role of ALK1 in several processes involved in fibrosis such as ECM protein expression, proliferation and migration in ALK1(+/+) and ALK1(+/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) after TGF-β1 stimulations and inhibitors. ALK1 heterozygous MEFs show increased expression of ECM proteins (collagen I, fibronectin and CTGF/CCN2), cell proliferation and migration due to an alteration of TGF-β/Smad signaling. ALK1 heterozygous disruption shows an increase of Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation that explains the increases in CTGF/CCN2, fibronectin and collagen I, proliferation and cell motility observed in these cells. Therefore, we suggest that ALK1 plays an important role in the regulation of ECM protein expression, proliferation and migration.

  17. Arteriovenous malformations in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: looking beyond ALK1-NOTCH interactions.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Hanna M; Caolo, Vincenza; Jones, Elizabeth A V

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is characterized by the development of arteriovenous malformations--enlarged shunts allowing arterial flow to bypass capillaries and enter directly into veins. HHT is caused by mutations in ALK1 or Endoglin; however, the majority of arteriovenous malformations are idiopathic and arise spontaneously. Idiopathic arteriovenous malformations differ from those due to loss of ALK1 in terms of both location and disease progression. Furthermore, while arteriovenous malformations in HHT and Alk1 knockout models have decreased NOTCH signalling, some idiopathic arteriovenous malformations have increased NOTCH signalling. The pathogenesis of these lesions also differs, with loss of ALK1 causing expansion of the shunt through proliferation, and NOTCH gain of function inducing initial shunt enlargement by cellular hypertrophy. Hence, we propose that idiopathic arteriovenous malformations are distinct from those of HHT. In this review, we explore the role of ALK1-NOTCH interactions in the development of arteriovenous malformations and examine a possible role of two signalling pathways downstream of ALK1, TMEM100 and IDs, in the development of arteriovenous malformations in HHT. A nuanced understanding of the precise molecular mechanisms underlying idiopathic and HHT-associated arteriovenous malformations will allow for development of targeted treatments for these lesions.

  18. ALK gene rearranged lung adenocarcinomas: molecular genetics and morphology in cohort of patients from North India.

    PubMed

    Bal, Amanjit; Singh, Navneet; Agarwal, Parimal; Das, Ashim; Behera, Digambar

    2016-10-01

    ALK gene rearrangement in the lung adenocarcinomas is the second most common (1.6-11.7% of NSCLC) targetable genomic change after EGFR mutations. However, the prevalence and clinicopathological features of ALK-rearranged lung adenocarcinomas from North India are lacking. A total of 240 cases of lung adenocarcinoma were screened for EGFR mutations and for ALK expression. Smoking status, TNM stage, and treatment response were recorded in all cases. Out of 240 cases screened, 37 cases were positive for EGFR mutations and 17 cases (7.08%) showed ALK positivity with immunohistochemistry and break-apart FISH. On excluding 37 EGFR mutation-positive cases, the incidence of ALK-positive adenocarcinoma appears to be higher (17/203 cases, 8.03%). Eight were men and nine were women with mean age of 51.7 years. Majority (62.5%) were non-smokers and had unresectable disease (70.6% stage IV, 17.6% IIIB). The morphological patterns noted were solid (12 cases), papillary (four cases), and micropapillary (one case). Signet ring (two cases) and clear cell change (one cases) were noted. Out of five patients who received crizotinib, three had partial response and two had stable disease. ALK-rearranged lung adenocarcinomas account for a minor proportion of NSCLC with prevalence similar to that reported in literature. However, as contrast to published data in our series, patients were in older age group and had solid and papillary pattern on morphology with an aggressive course.

  19. Distribution of alkB genes within n-alkane-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vomberg, A; Klinner, U

    2000-08-01

    Fifty-four bacterial strains belonging to 37 species were tested for their ability to assimilate short chain and/or medium chain liquid n-alkanes. A gene probe derived from the alkB gene of Pseudomonas oleovorans ATCC 29347 was utilized in hybridization experiments. Results of Southern hybridization of PCR-amplificates were compared with those of colony hybridization and dot blot hybridization. Strongest signals were received only from Gram-negative bacteria growing solely with short n-alkanes (C10). Hybridization results with soil isolates growing with n-alkanes of different chain lengths suggested as well that alkB genes seem to be widespread only in solely short-chain n-alkane-degrading pseudomonads. PCR products of Rhodococcus sp., Nocardioides sp., Gordona sp. and Sphingomonas sp. growing additionally or solely with medium-chain n-alkane as hexadecane had only few sequence identity with alkB though hybridizing with the gene probe. The derived amino acid sequence of the alkB-amplificate of Pseudomonas aureofaciens showed high homology (95%) with AlkB from Ps. oleovorans. alkB gene disruptants were not able to grow with decane.

  20. O-GlcNAcylation enhances anaplastic thyroid carcinoma malignancy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y U; Li, Honglun; Li, Jianlin; Li, Jisheng; Gao, Yan; Liu, Baodong

    2016-07-01

    O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) glycosylation (O-GlcNAcylation), a dynamic post-translational modification of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins, may have a critical role in the regulation of biological cell processes and human cancer. O-GlcNAcylation is dynamically regulated by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAc hydrolase (OGA). Accumulating evidence suggests that O-GlcNAcylation is involved in a variety of types of human cancer. However, the exact role of O-GlcNAcylation in tumor pathogenesis or progression remains to be established. Computed tomography scans of patients with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) reveal a rapid growth rate and invasion. The present study demonstrated that O-GlcNAcylation accelerates the progression of ATC. The global O-GlcNAc level of intracellular proteins was increased by overexpression of OGT or downregulation of OGA activity with the specific inhibitor Thiamet-G. By contrast, the global O-GlcNAc level was decreased by silencing of OGT. MTT assay indicated that O-GlcNAcylation significantly promotes cell proliferation. Furthermore, O-GlcNAcylation enhanced cellular biological functions, such as colony formation ability, migration and invasion, of ATC cells in vitro. The findings of the present study suggest that O-GlcNAcylation is associated with malignant properties of thyroid cancer, and may be a potential target for the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid cancer.

  1. Carfilzomib potentiates CUDC-101-induced apoptosis in anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lisa; Boufraqech, Myriem; Lake, Ross; Kebebew, Electron

    2016-03-29

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, with no effective treatment currently available. Previously, we identified agents active against ATC cells, both in vitro and in vivo, using quantitative high-throughput screening of 3282 clinically approved drugs and small molecules. Here, we report that combining two of these active agents, carfilzomib, a second-generation proteasome inhibitor, and CUDC-101, a histone deacetylase and multi-kinase inhibitor, results in increased, synergistic activity in ATC cells. The combination of carfilzomib and CUDC-101 synergistically inhibited cellular proliferation and caused cell death in multiple ATC cell lines harboring various driver mutations observed in human ATC tumors. This increased anti-ATC effect was associated with a synergistically enhanced G2/M cell cycle arrest and increased caspase 3/7 activity induced by the drug combination. Mechanistically, treatment with carfilzomib and CUDC-101 increased p21 expression and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase protein cleavage. Our results suggest that combining carfilzomib and CUDC-101 would offer an effective therapeutic strategy to treat ATC.

  2. Carfilzomib is an effective anticancer agent in anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Amit; Zhang, Lisa; Boufraqech, Myriem; Zhang, Yaqin; Patel, Dhaval; Shen, Min; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-06-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human malignancies. Currently, there is no standard or effective therapy for ATC. Drug repurposing for cancer treatment is an emerging approach for identifying compounds that may have antineoplastic effects. The aim of this study was to use high-throughput drug library screening to identify and subsequently validate novel therapeutic agents with anticancer effects in ATC. We performed quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) in ATC cell lines (SW-1736, 8505C, and C-643), using a compound library of 3282 drugs. qHTS identified 100 compounds that were active in all three ATC cell lines. Proteasome inhibitors were one of the most active drug categories according to enrichment analysis. Of the three proteasome inhibitors screened, a second-generation proteasome inhibitor, carfilzomib, was the most active. Treatment of ATC cells with carfilzomib significantly inhibited cellular proliferation and induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Mechanistically, carfilzomib increased expression of p27 (CDKN1B) and decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein ATF4. Pretreatment with carfilzomib reduced in vivo metastases (lung, bone, liver, and kidney) and disease progression, and decreased N-cadherin expression. Carfilzomib treatment of mice with established, widely metastatic disease significantly increased their survival, without significant toxicity. Our findings support the use or clinical study of carfilzomib as a therapeutic option in patients with advanced and metastatic ATC.

  3. Anaplastic thyroid cancer: molecular pathogenesis and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Smallridge, Robert C; Marlow, Laura A; Copland, John A

    2010-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is a rare malignancy. While external beam radiation therapy has improved locoregional control, the median survival of ∼ 4 months has not changed in more than half a century due to uncontrolled systemic metastases. The objective of this study was to review the literature in order to identify potential new strategies for treating this highly lethal cancer. PubMed searches were the principal source of articles reviewed. The molecular pathogenesis of ATC includes mutations in BRAF, RAS, catenin (cadherin-associated protein), beta 1, PIK3CA, TP53, AXIN1, PTEN, and APC genes, and chromosomal abnormalities are common. Several microarray studies have identified genes and pathways preferentially affected, and dysregulated microRNA profiles differ from differentiated thyroid cancers. Numerous proteins involving transcription factors, signaling pathways, mitosis, proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, adhesion, migration, epigenetics, and protein degradation are affected. A variety of agents have been successful in controlling ATC cell growth both in vitro and in nude mice xenografts. While many of these new compounds are in cancer clinical trials, there are few studies being conducted in ATC. With the recent increased knowledge of the many critical genes and proteins affected in ATC, and the extensive array of targeted therapies being developed for cancer patients, there are new opportunities to design clinical trials based upon tumor molecular profiling and preclinical studies of potentially synergistic combinatorial novel therapies. PMID:18987168

  4. A New Aurora in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, Enke; D'Armiento, Massimino

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancers (ATC) are among the most aggressive human neoplasms with a dire prognosis and a median survival time of few months from the diagnosis. The complete absence of effective therapies for ATC renders the identification of novel therapeutic approaches sorely needed. Chromosomal instability, a feature of all human cancers, is thought to represent a major driving force in thyroid cancer progression and a number of mitotic kinases showing a deregulated expression in malignant thyroid tissues are now held responsible for thyroid tumor aneuploidy. These include the three members of the Aurora family (Aurora-A, Aurora-B, and Aurora-C), serine/threonine kinases that regulate multiple aspects of chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Over the last few years, several small molecule inhibitors targeting Aurora kinases were developed, which showed promising antitumor effects against a variety of human cancers, including ATC, in preclinical studies. Several of these molecules are now being evaluated in phase I/II clinical trials against advanced solid and hematological malignancies. In the present review we will describe the structure, expression, and mitotic functions of the Aurora kinases, their implications in human cancer progression, with particular regard to ATC, and the effects of their functional inhibition on malignant cell proliferation. PMID:25097550

  5. Pediatric primary gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Harris, G J; Laszewski, M J

    1992-04-01

    Primary gastric lymphoma in the pediatric population is rare. We have described a case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Burkitt's type) manifested as a gastric mass. Despite its rarity in children, this tumor should be treated aggressively, since long-term survival has been reported.

  6. Biomarkers for lymphoma

    DOEpatents

    Zangar, Richard C.; Varnum, Susan M.

    2014-09-02

    A biomarker, method, test kit, and diagnostic system for detecting the presence of lymphoma in a person are disclosed. The lymphoma may be Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The person may be a high-risk subject. In one embodiment, a plasma sample from a person is obtained. The level of at least one protein listed in Table S3 in the plasma sample is measured. The level of at least one protein in the plasma sample is compared with the level in a normal or healthy subject. The lymphoma is diagnosed based upon the level of the at least one protein in the plasma sample in comparison to the normal or healthy level.

  7. The type I BMP receptor Alk3 is required for the induction of hepatic hepcidin gene expression by interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Mayeur, Claire; Lohmeyer, Lisa K; Leyton, Patricio; Kao, Sonya M; Pappas, Alexandra E; Kolodziej, Starsha A; Spagnolli, Ester; Yu, Binglan; Galdos, Rita L; Yu, Paul B; Peterson, Randall T; Bloch, Donald B; Bloch, Kenneth D; Steinbicker, Andrea U

    2014-04-03

    Increased IL-6 production induces, via STAT3 phosphorylation, hepatic transcription of the gene encoding the iron-regulatory hormone, hepcidin, leading to development of anemia of chronic disease (ACD). Inhibition of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling prevents the induction of hepcidin gene expression by IL-6 and ameliorates ACD. Using mice with hepatocyte-specific deficiency of Alk2 or Alk3, we sought to identify the BMP type I receptor that participates in IL-6-mediated induction of hepcidin gene expression. Mice were injected with adenovirus specifying IL-6 (Ad.IL-6) or control adenovirus. Seventy-two hours later, serum iron concentrations and hepatic levels of STAT3 phosphorylation and hepcidin messenger RNA were measured. Additional mice were injected with recombinant murine IL-6 (mIL-6) or vehicle, and hepatic hepcidin gene expression was measured 4 hours later. Deficiency of Alk2 or Alk3 did not alter the ability of Ad.IL-6 injection to induce hepatic STAT3 phosphorylation. Ad.IL-6 increased hepatic hepcidin messenger RNA levels and decreased serum iron concentrations in Alk2- but not Alk3-deficient mice. Similarly, administration of mIL-6 induced hepatic hepcidin gene expression in Alk2- but not Alk3-deficient mice. These results demonstrate that the ability of IL-6 to induce hepatic hepcidin gene expression and reduce serum iron concentrations is dependent on the BMP type I receptor Alk3.

  8. Radiation combined with temozolomide contraindicated for young adults diagnosed with anaplastic glioma

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jinquan; You, Gan; Wang, Yinyan; Qiu, Xiaoguang; Li, Shouwei; Wu, Chenxing; Yao, Kun; Li, Wenbin; Peng, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Age is a major prognostic factor for malignant gliomas. However, few studies have investigated the management of gliomas in young adults. We determined the role of survival and treatment in young adults with advanced gliomas in a large population from the Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA). Methods This study included 726 adults (age ≥ 18) with histologically proven anaplastic glioma or glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The overall and progression-free survival was determined in young (age < 50) and older groups (age ≥ 50). Results The study included an older group (OP) of 264 patients and a younger group (YP) of 462patients. In the OP group with GBM and anaplastic glioma, patients treated with RT combined with temozolomide (TMZ) manifested significantly longer OS and PFS compared with patients assigned to RT alone (P < 0.05). In contrast, the YP group diagnosed with anaplastic glioma failed to show any survival advantage with RT plus TMZ compared with RT alone. Conclusions We observed no survival benefit in young adults (age < 50) with anaplastic glioma when treated with TMZ combined with RT. Our findings warrant further investigation of younger patients diagnosed with anaplastic glioma treated with radiotherapy plus TMZ chemotherapy. PMID:27590514

  9. A Clinicopathological Analysis of Primary Cutaneous Lymphomas: A 6-year Observational Study at a Tertiary Care Center of South India

    PubMed Central

    Khader, Anza; Manakkad, Shiny Padinjarayil; Shaan, Mohammed; Pillai, Sarita Sasidharan; Riyaz, Najeeba; Manikoth, P Binitha; Kunnummel, Muhammed; Balakrishnan, Sunitha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Little data are available concerning clinical and pathological patterns of cutaneous lymphomas in India. Aim: To analyze the clinical and histopathological characteristics of cutaneous lymphomas in Indian patients Materials and Methods: This is a single-center, prospective, observational study carried out from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2015. The patients underwent clinical examination, human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1) screening, skin biopsy with hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemistry staining. Results: Among 35 cases, 33 (94.3%) were T-cell, and 2 (5.7%) were B-cell lymphomas. The mean age was 52.66, and the male to female ratio was 2.5:1. The most common types of T-cell lymphomas included mycosis fungoides (MF) (57.1%) followed by adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia (ATL) (17.1%). Primary cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphoma not otherwise specified was diagnosed in 17.1% and anaplastic large cell lymphoma in 2.9%. The morphological types of MF included polymorphic, poikilodermatous, folliculotropic, hypopigmented, hyperpigmented, mixed, and purpuric. Skin manifestations of ATL included ulcerated plaques and erythroderma. Epidermotropism was very marked in ATL (83.3%) than in MF (70%). Larger Pautrier's microabscess was noted in ATL compared to smaller ones in MF. Markedly dense, diffuse infiltrate of atypical cells was noted in ATL in contrast to mild to moderate nodular or perivascular infiltrate in MF. ATL had an extremely poor prognosis. Limitations: Identification of DNA integration of HTLV-1 by Southern blot could not be analyzed, and the number of cases studied is limited. Conclusions: The study showed unique patterns of subtypes of cutaneous lymphomas in our country. Variations in the clinical pattern and histopathological analysis will help to differentiate T-cell lymphoma types which have prognostic implications. PMID:27904177

  10. The role of AP-1 and epigenetics in ALCL.

    PubMed

    Schiefer, Ana-Iris; Vesely, Paul; Hassler, Melanie R; Egger, Gerda; Kenner, Lukas

    2015-06-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is an aggressive, highly proliferative, T-cell lymphoma with increasing incidence worldwide. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) fusions occur in about 50% of all cases. Most ALK positive cases of ALCL harbor the t(2;5) translocation that leads to expression of Nucleophosmin-Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (NPM-ALK). NPM-ALK induces a variety of oncogenic signaling pathways that lead to malignant transformation of T-cells via Activator Protein-1 (AP-1), STAT3 and other (transcription) factors. In addition to the commonly known AP-1 activators Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs), there are other signaling pathways, such as PI3K/mTOR/AKT, which are implicated in AP-1 activation/expression in ALCL. The AP-1 factor JUNB was shown to drive ALCL proliferation and the expression of the characteristic ALCL Ki-1 antigen, CD30. cJUN and JUNB target PDGFRB, thereby leading to tumor progression and dissemination. Furthermore, aberrant gene expression in ALCL is frequently accompanied by changes in epigenetic regulatory mechanisms, such as DNA methylation patterns. Here, we discuss the role of AP-1 in the pathogenesis of ALCL and provide an overview of pathological epigenetic changes in ALCL cells.

  11. High expression of the CC chemokine TARC in Reed-Sternberg cells. A possible explanation for the characteristic T-cell infiltratein Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, A; Visser, L; Poppema, S

    1999-06-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is characterized by the combination of Reed-Sternberg (R-S) cells and a prominent inflammatory cell infiltrate. One of the intriguing questions regarding this disease is what is causing the influx of T lymphocytes into the involved tissues. We applied the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) technique on the Hodgkin's lymphoma-derived cell line L428 and on an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid B-cell line. A frequently expressed tag in L428 corresponded to the T-cell-directed CC chemokine TARC. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses demonstrated expression of TARC in nodular sclerosis (NS) and mixed cellularity (MC) classical Hodgkin's lymphomas but not in NLP Hodgkin's lymphoma, anaplastic large-cell lymphomas, and large-B-cell lymphomas with CD30 positivity. Two of five cases of T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma (TCRBCL) were TARC positive. RNA in situ hybridization (ISH) showed a strong signal for TARC in the cytoplasm of R-S cells, and immunohistochemical staining confirmed the presence of the TARC protein in the R-S cells of NS and MC Hodgkin's lymphomas. The lymphocytic and histiocytic (L&H)-type cells of nodular lymphocyte predominance Hodgkin's lymphoma and the neoplastic cells of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with the exception of two cases of TCRBCL did not stain for TARC. TARC is known to bind to the CCR4 receptor, which is expressed on activated Th2 lymphocytes. The immunophenotype of lymphocytes surrounding R-S cells is indeed Th2-like, and by RNA ISH these lymphocytes showed a positive signal for the chemokine receptor CCR4. The findings suggest that production of TARC by the R-S cells may explain the characteristic T-cell infiltrate in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  12. Current standards of care and future directions for "high-risk" pediatric renal tumors: Anaplastic Wilms tumor and Rhabdoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Geller, James I

    2016-01-01

    'High risk' renal tumors of childhood generally includes anaplastic Wilms tumor, rhabdoid tumor, and metastatic renal sarcomas and carcinomas. In this review, the epidemiology, biology, treatment and prognosis of anaplastic Wilms tumor and rhabdoid tumor are presented. Future directions related to management of such cancers are discussed, with insights provided into possible clinical trials in development that consider integration of novel targeted therapies.

  13. Genetic Susceptibility to Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Skibola, Christine F.; Curry, John D.; Nieters, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genetic susceptibility studies of lymphoma may serve to identify at risk populations and to elucidate important disease mechanisms. METHODS This review considered all studies published through October 2006 on the contribution of genetic polymorphisms in the risk of lymphoma. RESULTS Numerous studies implicate the role of genetic variants that promote B-cell survival and growth with increased risk of lymphoma. Several reports including a large pooled study by InterLymph, an international consortium of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) case-control studies, found positive associations between variant alleles in TNF -308G>A and IL10 -3575T>A genes and risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Four studies reported positive associations between a GSTT1 deletion and risk of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Genetic studies of folate-metabolizing genes implicate folate in NHL risk, but further studies that include folate and alcohol assessments are needed. Links between NHL and genes involved in energy regulation and hormone production and metabolism may provide insights into novel mechanisms implicating neuro- and endocrine-immune cross-talk with lymphomagenesis, but will need replication in larger populations. CONCLUSIONS Numerous studies suggest that common genetic variants with low penetrance influence lymphoma risk, though replication studies will be needed to eliminate false positive associations. PMID:17606447

  14. Malignant progression to anaplastic meningioma: Neuropathology, molecular pathology, and experimental models.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Patrick J

    2015-10-01

    Meningioma is a common adult intracranial tumor, and while several cases are considered benign, a subset is malignant with biologically aggressive behavior and is refractory to current treatment strategies of combined surgery and radiotherapy. Anaplastic meningiomas are quite aggressive and correspond to a World Health Organization (WHO) Grade III tumor. This highly aggressive phenotype mandates the need for more efficacious therapies. Designing rational therapies for treatment will have its foundation in the biologic understanding of involved genes and molecular pathways in these types of tumors. Anaplastic meningiomas (WHO Grade III) can arise from malignant transformation of lower grade (WHO Grade I/II) tumors, however there is an incomplete understanding of specific genetic drivers of malignant transformation in these tumors. Here, the current understanding of anaplastic meningiomas is reviewed in the context of human neuropathologic specimens and small animal models.

  15. Supratentorial extraventricular anaplastic ependymoma in an adult with repeated intratumoral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Naotaka; Murai, Yasuo; Yamamoto, Yoichiro; Adachi, Koji; Teramoto, Akira

    2014-04-01

    We report the case of a 61-year-old man with supratentorial extraventricular anaplastic ependymoma who presented with repeated intratumoral hemorrhage. The patient was admitted with headache. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed an enhancing mass with intratumoral hemorrhage in the right temporal lobe. Gross total resection was performed. The tumor was well demarcated from the brain tissue, and showed no continuity with the ventricular system. Histopathological examination revealed the features of anaplastic ependymoma. Therefore, additional radiation therapy and adjuvant chemotherapy were administered. Ten months later, the tumor recurred with hemorrhage in the spinal canal. This case showed rapid malignant progression and repeated intratumoral hemorrhage within a short period of time, both of which are characteristics of anaplastic ependymomas. Close observation of the central nervous system and adjuvant radiotherapy are mandatory, even if the ependymoma presents with repeated intratumoral hemorrhage.

  16. Incidentally Detected Kaposi Sarcoma of Adrenal Gland with Anaplastic Features in an HIV Negative Patient

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Murat; Sen, Erdem; Cebeci, Hakan; Ata, Ozlem; Yavas, Cagdas

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS), a vascular tumor caused by infection with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8), is a systemic disease that can present with cutaneous lesions with or without visceral involvement. Very few cases of KS, most of which were associated with AIDS, have been reported in the adrenal gland. Anaplastic transformation of KS is a rare clinical presentation known as an aggressive disease with local recurrence and metastatic potential. We report here a 47-year-old HIV negative male presented with extra-adrenal symptoms and had an incidentally detected anaplastic adrenal KS exhibited aggressive clinical course. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of anaplastic primary adrenal KS without mucocutaneous involvement but subsequently developed other side adrenal metastases in an HIV negative patient. PMID:27747121

  17. Internalization and Down-Regulation of the ALK Receptor in Neuroblastoma Cell Lines upon Monoclonal Antibodies Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mazot, Pierre; Cazes, Alex; Dingli, Florent; Degoutin, Joffrey; Irinopoulou, Théano; Boutterin, Marie-Claude; Lombard, Bérangère; Loew, Damarys; Hallberg, Bengt; Palmer, Ruth Helen; Delattre, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Recently, activating mutations of the full length ALK receptor, with two hot spots at positions F1174 and R1275, have been characterized in sporadic cases of neuroblastoma. Here, we report similar basal patterns of ALK phosphorylation between the neuroblastoma IMR-32 cell line, which expresses only the wild-type receptor (ALKWT), and the SH-SY5Y cell line, which exhibits a heterozygous ALK F1174L mutation and expresses both ALKWT and ALKF1174L receptors. We demonstrate that this lack of detectable increased phosphorylation in SH-SY5Y cells is a result of intracellular retention and proteasomal degradation of the mutated receptor. As a consequence, in SH-SY5Y cells, plasma membrane appears strongly enriched for ALKWT whereas both ALKWT and ALKF1174L were present in intracellular compartments. We further explored ALK receptor trafficking by investigating the effect of agonist and antagonist mAb (monoclonal antibodies) on ALK internalization and down-regulation, either in SH-SY5Y cells or in cells expressing only ALKWT. We observe that treatment with agonist mAbs resulted in ALK internalization and lysosomal targeting for receptor degradation. In contrast, antagonist mAb induced ALK internalization and recycling to the plasma membrane. Importantly, we correlate this differential trafficking of ALK in response to mAb with the recruitment of the ubiquitin ligase Cbl and ALK ubiquitylation only after agonist stimulation. This study provides novel insights into the mechanisms regulating ALK trafficking and degradation, showing that various ALK receptor pools are regulated by proteasome or lysosome pathways according to their intracellular localization. PMID:22479414

  18. Specificity and Structure of a High Affinity Activin Receptor-like Kinase 1 (ALK1) Signaling Complex

    PubMed Central

    Townson, Sharon A.; Martinez-Hackert, Erik; Greppi, Chloe; Lowden, Patricia; Sako, Dianne; Liu, June; Ucran, Jeffrey A.; Liharska, Katia; Underwood, Kathryn W.; Seehra, Jasbir; Kumar, Ravindra; Grinberg, Asya V.

    2012-01-01

    Activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1), an endothelial cell-specific type I receptor of the TGF-β superfamily, is an important regulator of normal blood vessel development as well as pathological tumor angiogenesis. As such, ALK1 is an important therapeutic target. Thus, several ALK1-directed agents are currently in clinical trials as anti-angiogenic cancer therapeutics. Given the biological and clinical importance of the ALK1 signaling pathway, we sought to elucidate the biophysical and structural basis underlying ALK1 signaling. The TGF-β family ligands BMP9 and BMP10 as well as the three type II TGF-β family receptors ActRIIA, ActRIIB, and BMPRII have been implicated in ALK1 signaling. Here, we provide a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of BMP9 and BMP10 interactions with ALK1 and type II receptors. Our data show that BMP9 displays a significant discrimination in type II receptor binding, whereas BMP10 does not. We also report the crystal structure of a fully assembled ternary complex of BMP9 with the extracellular domains of ALK1 and ActRIIB. The structure reveals that the high specificity of ALK1 for BMP9/10 is determined by a novel orientation of ALK1 with respect to BMP9, which leads to a unique set of receptor-ligand interactions. In addition, the structure explains how BMP9 discriminates between low and high affinity type II receptors. Taken together, our findings provide structural and mechanistic insights into ALK1 signaling that could serve as a basis for novel anti-angiogenic therapies. PMID:22718755

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of extraventricular anaplastic ependymoma: A report of 11 cases

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Xi; Tan, Xin; Zhang, Chi; Lin, Huan; Qiu, Shijun

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic ependymomas are rare malignant tumors of the central nervous system. Few studies are available regarding their neuroradiological characteristics. The present study aimed to retrospectively review a series of patients with extraventricular anaplastic ependymoma and to analyze the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics to distinguish anaplastic ependymoma from other intracranial tumors. The clinical and pathological images of 11 patients who presented with histologically proven anaplastic ependymoma at Nanfang Hospital (Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China) between September 2004 and March 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. MRI scans were obtained in all 11 cases. Computed tomography scans were obtained in only 3 cases. In total, 8 tumors were located at the supratentorial parenchyma, and 3 tumors were derived from the cerebellar hemisphere. Images displayed quasi-circular (4/11), irregularly-lobulated (7/11) variable-intensity masses. The masses presented with cysts or necrosis (8/11), hemorrhage (7/11), marked (9/11) or mild (2/11) enhancement, and moderate (4/11), mild (3/11) or absent (4/11) peritumoral edema. The tumors were also frequently closely associated with the lateral ventricle (6/11). Tumors appeared isointense to hypointense on T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and heterogeneously hyperintense or hypointense on T2WI, demonstrating wreath-like and ring-like characteristics, with intratumoral nodules (3/11) or marked flake-like inhomogeneous (6/11) enhancement on post-contrast MRI. Only 2 solid lesions showed mild enhancement (2/11). Although the MRI features of the extraventricular anaplastic ependymomas varied and were non-specific, these characteristic MRI findings, combined with the locations of the lesions, the age of onset and the short disease course, could be useful in differentiating anaplastic ependymomas from other intracranial neoplasms in the future. PMID:27602137

  20. BMP9/ALK1 inhibits neovascularization in mouse models of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ntumba, Kalonji; Akla, Naoufal; Oh, S. Paul; Eichmann, Anne; Larrivée, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in aging populations of industrialized countries. The drawbacks of inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFs) currently used for the treatment of AMD, which include resistance and potential serious side-effects, require the identification of new therapeutic targets to modulate angiogenesis. BMP9 signaling through the endothelial Alk1 serine-threonine kinase receptor modulates the response of endothelial cells to VEGF and promotes vessel quiescence and maturation during development. Here, we show that BMP9/Alk1 signaling inhibits neovessel formation in mouse models of pathological ocular angiogenesis relevant to AMD. Activating Alk1 signaling in laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) inhibited neovascularization and reduced the volume of vascular lesions. Alk1 signaling was also found to interfere with VEGF signaling in endothelial cells whereas BMP9 potentiated the inhibitory effects of VEGFR2 signaling blockade, both in OIR and laser-induced CNV. Together, our data show that targeting BMP9/Alk1 efficiently prevents the growth of neovessels in AMD models and introduce a new approach to improve conventional anti-VEGF therapies. PMID:27517154

  1. Spectrum of EGFR gene mutations and ALK rearrangements in lung cancer patients in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sag, Sebnem Ozemri; Gorukmez, Ozlem; Ture, Mehmet; Gorukmez, Orhan; Deligonul, Adem; Sahinturk, Serdar; Topak, Ali; Gulten, Tuna; Kurt, Ender; Yakut, Tahsin

    2016-01-01

    The EGFR gene and ALK rearrangements are two genetic drivers of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The frequency of EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangement varies according to not only ethnicity but also gender, smoking status and the histological type of NSCLC. In the present study, we demonstrated the distribution of EGFR mutations in 132 NSCLC patients by using a pyrosequencing technique and the distribution of ALK rearrangements in 51 NSCLC patients by using fluorescent in situ hybridization technique in Turkey. Additionally, we compared the clinicopathological data of NSCLC patients with the mutation status of EGFR in their cancerous tissues. Both EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangements were identified in 19 (14.39 %) and 1 (1.96 %) patients, respectively. We found EGFR mutations in codon 861, 719 and 858 with the ratios of 10.52 % (2/19), 10.52 % (2/19) and 31.58 % (6/19), respectively, and deletion of exon 19 in 47.37 % (9/19) of the patients. We found the frequency of EGFR mutations to be significantly higher in female patients and nonsmokers (p = 0.043, p = 0.027, respectively). Consequently, we found EGFR mutations to be more frequent in female patients and nonsmokers. Future studies on larger patient groups would provide more accurate data to exhibit the relationship between EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangements and the clinicopathological status.

  2. Anaplastic pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma with spinal leptomeningeal spread at the time of diagnosis in an adult.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Carolina; Faustin, Arline; Snuderl, Matija; Pacione, Donato

    2015-08-01

    We describe the first patient, to our knowledge, with anaplastic pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) with spinal leptomeningeal spread at the time of diagnosis and present a review of the literature. PXA is a tumor that typically has an indolent course but occasionally, when anaplastic features are present, behaves in a more aggressive manner. We found that PXA with spinal leptomeningeal spread at the time of diagnosis confers a worse prognosis. Craniospinal imaging should be obtained at time of diagnosis of PXA and the presence of leptomeningeal spread may be indicative of a more aggressive disease process.

  3. Upregulation of PD-L1 by EML4-ALK fusion protein mediates the immune escape in ALK positive NSCLC: Implication for optional anti-PD-1/PD-L1 immune therapy for ALK-TKIs sensitive and resistant NSCLC patients.

    PubMed

    Hong, Shaodong; Chen, Nan; Fang, Wenfeng; Zhan, Jianhua; Liu, Qing; Kang, Shiyang; He, Xiaobo; Liu, Lin; Zhou, Ting; Huang, Jiaxing; Chen, Ying; Qin, Tao; Zhang, Yaxiong; Ma, Yuxiang; Yang, Yunpeng; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Li

    2016-03-01

    Driver mutations were reported to upregulate programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression. However, how PD-L1 expression and immune function was affected by ALK-TKIs and anti-PD-1/PD-L1 treatment in ALK positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains poorly understood. In the present study, western-blot, real-time PCR, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence were employed to explore how PD-L1 was regulated by ALK fusion protein. ALK-TKIs and relevant inhibitors were used to identify the downstream signaling pathways involved in PD-L1 regulation. Cell apoptosis, viability and Elisa test were used to study the immune suppression by ALK activation and immune reactivation by ALK-TKIs and/or PD-1 blocking in tumor cells and DC-CIK cells co-culture system. We found that PD-L1 expression was associated with EGFR mutations and ALK fusion genes in NSCLC cell lines. Over-expression of ALK fusion protein increased PD-L1 expression. PD-L1 mediated by ALK fusion protein increased the apoptosis of T cells in tumor cells and DC-CIK cells co-culture system. Inhibiting ALK by sensitive TKIs could enhance the production of IFNγ. Anti-PD-1 antibody was effective in both crizotinib sensitive and resistant NSCLC cells. Synergistic tumor killing effects were not observed with ALK-TKIs and anti-PD-1 antibody combination in co-culture system. ALK-TKIs not only directly inhibited tumor viability but also indirectly enhanced the antitumor immunity via the downregulation of PD-L1. Anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies could be an optional therapy for crizotinib sensitive, especially crizotinib resistant NSCLC patients with ALK fusion gene. Combination of ALK-TKIs and anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies treatment for ALK positive NSCLC warrants more data before moving into clinical practice.

  4. Primary bony non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the cervical spine: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Non-Hodgkin lymphoma primarily originating from the bone is exceedingly rare. To our knowledge, this is the first report of primary bone lymphoma presenting with progressive cord compression from an origin in the cervical spine. Herein, we discuss the unusual location in this case, the presenting symptoms, and the management of this disease. Case presentation We report on a 23-year-old Caucasian-American man who presented with two months of night sweats, fatigue, parasthesias, and progressive weakness that had progressed to near quadriplegia. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated significant cord compression seen primarily at C7. Surgical management, with corpectomy and dorsal segmental fusion, in combination with adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy, halted the progression of the primary disease and preserved neurological function. Histological analysis demonstrated an aggressive anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Conclusion Isolated primary bony lymphoma of the spine is exceedingly rare. As in our case, the initial symptoms may be the result of progressive cervical cord compression. Anterior corpectomy with posterolateral decompression and fusion succeeded in preventing progressive neurologic decline and maintaining quality of life. The reader should be aware of the unique presentation of this disease and that surgical management is a successful treatment strategy. PMID:20205845

  5. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... January 26, 2015. cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/child-non-hodgkins/HealthProfessional . Accessed March 17, 2016. National Comprehensive Cancer Network. NCCN clinical practice guidelines in oncology: non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Version 2.2016. www.nccn. ...

  6. Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hodgkin lymphoma, is cancer that originates in your lymphatic system, the disease-fighting network spread throughout your body. ... can also spread to other parts of your lymphatic system. These include the lymphatic vessels, tonsils, adenoids, spleen, ...

  7. Hodgkin Lymphoma (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lymphoma , which is a cancer of the lymphatic system. The lymphatic system helps the body's immune system to filter out bacteria, viruses, and other unwanted substances. The lymphatic system includes the lymph nodes (which are sometimes called ...

  8. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Aledavood, Amir; Nasiri, Mohammad Reza Ghavam; Memar, Bahram; Shahidsales, Soodabeh; Raziee, Hamid Reza; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Mohtashami, Samira

    2012-01-01

    Background: Extranodal lymphoma may arise anywhere outside lymph nodes mostly in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract as non-Hodgkin's disease. We reviewed the clinicopathological features and treatment results of patients with primary GI lymphoma. Materials and Methods: A total number of 30 cases with primary GI lymphoma were included in this study. Patients referred to the Radiation Oncology Department of Omid Hospital (Mashhad, Iran) during a 5-year period (2006-11). Clinical, paraclinical, and radiological data was collected from medical records of the patients. Results: Out of the 30 patients with primary GI lymphoma in the study, 12 were female (40%) and 18 were male (60%) (male to female ratio: 3/2). B symptoms were present in 27 patients (90%). Antidiuretic hormone (LDH) levels were elevated in 9 patients (32.1%). The most common primary site was stomach in 14 cases (46.7%). Other common sites included small intestine and colon each in 8 patients (26.7%). All patients had histopathologically proven non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The most common histologic subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBL) in 16 patients (53.3%). In addition, 28 patients (93.3%) received chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, prednisolone (CHOP regimen). The median course of chemotherapy was 6 cources. Moreover, 8 patients (26.7%) received radiotherapy with cobalt 60. The median follow-up time was 26 months. The overall 5-year survival rate was 53% and the median survival time was 60 months. Conclusion: Primary GI lymphoma is commonly seen in stomach and small intestine and mostly is DLBCL or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. PMID:23626617

  9. Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mulay, Kaustubh; Narula, Ritesh; Honavar, Santosh G

    2015-01-01

    Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma (PVRL) is an uncommon, but potentially fatal intraocular malignancy, which may occur with or without primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Considered to be a subset of PCNSL, it is mostly of diffuse large B-cell type. The diagnosis of PVRL poses a challenge not only to the clinician, but also to the pathologist. Despite aggressive treatment with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, relapses or CNS involvement are common. PMID:25971162

  10. Alk5 inhibition increases delivery of macromolecular and protein-bound contrast agents to tumors

    PubMed Central

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E.; Mohanty, Suchismita; Ansari, Celina; Ito, Ken; Hong, Su Hyun; Hoffmann, Matthias; Pisani, Laura; Boudreau, Nancy; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Limited transendothelial permeability across tumor microvessels represents a significant bottleneck in the development of tumor-specific diagnostic agents and theranostic drugs. Here, we show an approach to increase transendothelial permeability of macromolecular and nanoparticle-based contrast agents via inhibition of the type I TGF-β receptor, activin-like kinase 5 (Alk5), in tumors. Alk5 inhibition significantly increased tumor contrast agent delivery and enhancement on imaging studies, while healthy organs remained relatively unaffected. Imaging data correlated with significantly decreased tumor interstitial fluid pressure, while tumor vascular density remained unchanged. This immediately clinically translatable concept involving Alk5 inhibitor pretreatment prior to an imaging study could be leveraged for improved tumor delivery of macromolecular and nanoparticle-based imaging probes and, thereby, facilitate development of more sensitive imaging tests for cancer diagnosis, enhanced tumor characterization, and personalized, image-guided therapies. PMID:27182558

  11. Activin A Stimulates Aromatase via the ALK4-Smad Pathway in Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Juan; Qu, Juan; Lu, Pinhong; Mao, Yundong; Qi, Xiaochen; Ji, Hui; Liu, Jiayin

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent disease. We previously found that the expression of Activin A was upregulated in the peritoneal fluid of patients with endometriosis. The results of the present study indicated that Activin A induced estradiol secretion and P450arom expression in endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) derived from endometriosis patients. The mechanism of estrogenic synthesis was regulated by the Activin-Smad pathway in endometrial lesions. The data showed that the effect of Activin A on ESCs was partially abrogated by pretreatment with an inhibitor of ALK4 (the type I receptor, ActRIB) and Smad4-siRNA. Cumulatively, these data suggest that Activin A promotes the secretion of estradiol from ESCs by increasing the expression of P450arom via the ALK4-Smad pathway. These findings indicate the ALK4-Smad pathway may promote ectopic lesion survival and development. PMID:27833918

  12. Occurrence of diverse alkane hydroxylase alkB genes in indigenous oil-degrading bacteria of Baltic Sea surface water.

    PubMed

    Viggor, Signe; Jõesaar, Merike; Vedler, Eve; Kiiker, Riinu; Pärnpuu, Liis; Heinaru, Ain

    2015-12-30

    Formation of specific oil degrading bacterial communities in diesel fuel, crude oil, heptane and hexadecane supplemented microcosms of the Baltic Sea surface water samples was revealed. The 475 sequences from constructed alkane hydroxylase alkB gene clone libraries were grouped into 30 OPFs. The two largest groups were most similar to Pedobacter sp. (245 from 475) and Limnobacter sp. (112 from 475) alkB gene sequences. From 56 alkane-degrading bacterial strains 41 belonged to the Pseudomonas spp. and 8 to the Rhodococcus spp. having redundant alkB genes. Together 68 alkB gene sequences were identified. These genes grouped into 20 OPFs, half of them being specific only to the isolated strains. Altogether 543 diverse alkB genes were characterized in the brackish Baltic Sea water; some of them representing novel lineages having very low sequence identities with corresponding genes of the reference strains.

  13. The AlkB Family of Fe(II)/α-Ketoglutarate-dependent Dioxygenases: Repairing Nucleic Acid Alkylation Damage and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Fedeles, Bogdan I; Singh, Vipender; Delaney, James C; Li, Deyu; Essigmann, John M

    2015-08-21

    The AlkB family of Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases is a class of ubiquitous direct reversal DNA repair enzymes that remove alkyl adducts from nucleobases by oxidative dealkylation. The prototypical and homonymous family member is an Escherichia coli "adaptive response" protein that protects the bacterial genome against alkylation damage. AlkB has a wide variety of substrates, including monoalkyl and exocyclic bridged adducts. Nine mammalian AlkB homologs exist (ALKBH1-8, FTO), but only a subset functions as DNA/RNA repair enzymes. This minireview presents an overview of the AlkB proteins including recent data on homologs, structural features, substrate specificities, and experimental strategies for studying DNA repair by AlkB family proteins.

  14. The AlkB Family of Fe(II)/α-Ketoglutarate-dependent Dioxygenases: Repairing Nucleic Acid Alkylation Damage and Beyond*

    PubMed Central

    Fedeles, Bogdan I.; Singh, Vipender; Delaney, James C.; Li, Deyu; Essigmann, John M.

    2015-01-01

    The AlkB family of Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases is a class of ubiquitous direct reversal DNA repair enzymes that remove alkyl adducts from nucleobases by oxidative dealkylation. The prototypical and homonymous family member is an Escherichia coli “adaptive response” protein that protects the bacterial genome against alkylation damage. AlkB has a wide variety of substrates, including monoalkyl and exocyclic bridged adducts. Nine mammalian AlkB homologs exist (ALKBH1–8, FTO), but only a subset functions as DNA/RNA repair enzymes. This minireview presents an overview of the AlkB proteins including recent data on homologs, structural features, substrate specificities, and experimental strategies for studying DNA repair by AlkB family proteins. PMID:26152727

  15. In silico studies on the interaction between bioactive ligands and ALK5, a biological target related to the cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Michell O; Trossini, Gustavo H G; Maltarollo, Vinícius G; Silva, Danielle da C; Honorio, Kathia M

    2016-09-01

    Studies have showed that there are many biological targets related to the cancer treatment, for example, TGF type I receptor (TGF-βRI or ALK5). The ALK5 inhibition is a strategy to treat some types of cancer, such as breast, lung, and pancreas. Here, we performed CoMFA and CoMSIA studies for 70 ligands with ALK5 inhibition. The internal validation for both models (q(2)LOO = 0.887 and 0.822, respectively) showed their robustness, while the external validations showed their predictive power (CoMFA: r(2)test = 0.998; CoMSIA: r(2)test = 0.975). After all validations, CoMFA and CoMSIA maps indicated physicochemical evidences on the main factors involved in the interaction between bioactive ligands and ALK5. Therefore, these results suggest molecular modifications to design new ALK5 inhibitors.

  16. Differential repair of etheno-DNA adducts by bacterial and human AlkB proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zdżalik, Daria; Domańska, Anna; Prorok, Paulina; Kosicki, Konrad; van den Born, Erwin; Falnes, Pål Ø.; Rizzo, Carmelo J.; Guengerich, F. Peter; Tudek, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    AlkB proteins are evolutionary conserved Fe(II)/2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases, which remove alkyl and highly promutagenic etheno (ε)-DNA adducts, but their substrate specificity has not been fully determined. We developed a novel assay for the repair of ε-adducts by AlkB enzymes using oligodeoxynucleotides with a single lesion and specific DNA glycosylases and AP-endonuclease for identification of the repair products. We compared the repair of three ε-adducts, 1,N6-ethenoadenine (εA), 3,N4-ethenocytosine (εC) and 1,N2-ethenoguanine (1,N2-εG) by nine bacterial and two human AlkBs, representing four different structural groups defined on the basis of conserved amino acids in the nucleotide recognition lid, engaged in the enzyme binding to the substrate. Two bacterial AlkB proteins, MT-2B (from Mycobacterium tuberculosis) and SC-2B (Streptomyces coelicolor) did not repair these lesions in either double-stranded (ds) or single-stranded (ss) DNA. Three proteins, RE-2A (Rhizobium etli), SA-2B (Streptomyces avermitilis), and XC-2B (Xanthomonas campestris) efficiently removed all three lesions from the DNA substrates. Interestingly, XC-2B and RE-2A are the first AlkB proteins shown to be specialized for ε-adducts, since they do not repair methylated bases. Three other proteins, EcAlkB (Escherichia coli), SA-1A, and XC-1B removed εA and εC from ds and ssDNA but were inactive toward 1,N2-εG. SC-1A repaired only εA with the preference for dsDNA. The human enzyme ALKBH2 repaired all three ε-adducts in dsDNA, while only εA and εC in ssDNA and repair was less efficient in ssDNA. ALKBH3 repaired only εC in ssDNA Altogether, we have shown for the first time that some AlkB proteins, namely ALKBH2, RE-2A, SA-2B and XC-2B can repair 1,N2-εG and that ALKBH3 removes only εC from ssDNA. Our results also suggest that the nucleotide recognition lid is not the sole determinant of the substrate specificity of AlkB proteins. PMID:25797601

  17. Racial Patterns of Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Incidence and Survival in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Scott V.; Newcomb, Polly A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare incidence and survival of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) subtypes among US racial/ethnic groups. Methods Patients with PTCL (age ≥ 15 years; 2000 to 2012) were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries. Race/ethnicity was categorized as non-Hispanic white, black, Asian/Pacific Islander, Hispanic white, or American Indian/Alaskan native. Age-standardized annual incidence rates and incidence rate ratios were estimated with 95% CIs, and case-case odds ratios were estimated by race/ethnicity using polytomous regression. Survival was estimated from SEER follow-up data with Cox regression. Results Thirteen thousand one hundred seven patients with PTCL were identified. Annual PTCL incidence was highest in blacks and lowest in Native Americans. Compared with non-Hispanic whites, blacks had a higher incidence of PTCL not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS), anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and a lower incidence of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL); Asians/Pacific Islanders had a higher incidence of AITL, extranodal nasal-type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma and NK-cell leukemia (ENKCL), and ATLL and a lower incidence of anaplastic large-cell lymphoma; Hispanics had a higher incidence of AITL and ENKCL; and Native Americans had a lower incidence of PTCL-NOS (all P < .05). The ratio of ENKCL to PCTL-NOS among Native Americans, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic whites was approximately three- to four-fold the same ratio among non-Hispanic whites. Survival varied significantly by race/ethnicity (P < .001), with blacks in particular experiencing shorter survival for most subtypes. Conclusion Striking variation in incidence, proportions of PTCL subtypes, and survival was observed. Aspects of these PTCL subtype patterns, such as for ENKCL and ATLL, were similar to corresponding global populations. Despite the small population size and limited number of Native American

  18. Canine tumour suppressor gene p53 mutation in a case of anaplastic carcinoma of the intestine.

    PubMed

    Mayr, B; Reifinger, M

    2002-01-01

    Tumours localised in the large bowel of dogs were subjected to molecular genetic studies. Highly conserved regions of the tumour suppressor gene p53, including typical tumour hot spots (codons 175, 245, 248, 249, 273 and 282), were analysed. A mutation CGG-->TGG (arginine-->tryptophan) was present in codon 249 in an anaplastic carcinoma in the caecum.

  19. Metastatic anaplastic adenocarcinoma suspected to be of mammary origin in an intact male rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    PubMed Central

    Summa, Noémie M.; Eshar, David; Snyman, Heindrich N.; Lillie, Brandon N.

    2014-01-01

    A 7-year-old, intact male, pet dwarf rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) was presented for a ventral abdominal subcutaneous mass. Histolopathology of the resected mass was suggestive of a mammary adenocarcinoma. Six months later, the rabbit died from severe dyspnea. Necropsy showed recurrence of the original mass with hepatic and pulmonary metastasis of the anaplastic adenocarcinoma, suspected to be of mammary origin. PMID:24790235

  20. 506U78 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  1. Anaplastic Transformation in Mandibular Metastases of Follicular Variant of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ambelil, Manju; Sultana, Sadia; Roy, Suvra; Gonzalez, Maria M

    2016-09-01

    Anaplastic transformation of well-differentiated thyroid carcinomas at distant metastatic sites is a rare condition. Most cases described in the literature have occurred in the thyroid or regional lymph nodes. We report a case of anaplastic transformation of the follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma in mandibular metastases. A 76-year-old female presented with a painful and enlarging mandibular mass. She had been treated in the past for the follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma. A palliative hemi-mandibulectomy was performed. Histology revealed a metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma, follicular variant, with an unusual finding of solid pleomorphic epithelioid and spindle cell areas, consistent with anaplastic transformation.

  2. Combined Modality Treatment for PET-Positive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: Favorable Outcomes of Combined Modality Treatment for Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma and Positive Interim or Postchemotherapy FDG-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Halasz, Lia M.; Jacene, Heather A.; Catalano, Paul J.; Van den Abbeele, Annick D.; LaCasce, Ann; Mauch, Peter M.; Ng, Andrea K.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcomes of patients treated for aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) with combined modality therapy based on [{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-2-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) response. Methods and Materials: We studied 59 patients with aggressive NHL, who received chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) from 2001 to 2008. Among them, 83% of patients had stage I/II disease. Patients with B-cell lymphoma received R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone)-based chemotherapy, and 1 patient with anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative anaplastic T-cell lymphoma received CHOP therapy. Interim and postchemotherapy FDG-PET or FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT) scans were performed for restaging. All patients received consolidated involved-field RT. Median RT dose was 36 Gy (range, 28.8-50 Gy). Progression-free survival (PFS) and local control (LC) rates were calculated with and without a negative interim or postchemotherapy FDG-PET scan. Results: Median follow-up was 46.5 months. Thirty-nine patients had negative FDG-PET results by the end of chemotherapy, including 12 patients who had a negative interim FDG-PET scan and no postchemotherapy PET. Twenty patients were FDG-PET-positive, including 7 patients with positive interim FDG-PET and no postchemotherapy FDG-PET scans. The 3-year actuarial PFS rates for patients with negative versus positive FDG-PET scans were 97% and 90%, respectively. The 3-year actuarial LC rates for patients with negative versus positive FDG-PET scans were 100% and 90%, respectively. Conclusions: Patients who had a positive interim or postchemotherapy FDG-PET had a PFS rate of 90% at 3 years after combined modality treatment, suggesting that a large proportion of these patients can be cured with consolidated RT.

  3. Management of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: ICMR Consensus Document.

    PubMed

    Thacker, Nirav; Bakhshi, Sameer; Chinnaswamy, Girish; Vora, Tushar; Prasad, Maya; Bansal, Deepak; Agarwala, Sandeep; Kapoor, Gauri; Radhakrishnan, Venkatraman; Laskar, Siddharth; Kaur, Tanvir; Rath, G K; Dhaliwal, Rupinder Singh; Arora, Brijesh

    2017-04-05

    infrastructure and/or no methotrexate levels; modified MCP-841 with cytarabine, modified BFM-90 protocol with reduced-dose methotrexate or I-BFM 2009 protocol using Capizzi methotrexate may be considered. For ALCL (Anaplastic large cell lymphoma), in centres with good infrastructure and methotrexate levels, ALCL-99 protocol may be considered. In centres with limited infrastructure and/or no methotrexate levels; CHOP (limited-stage only), modified MCP-842 protocol or APO (Adriamycin-prednisolone-oncovin) regimen may be used.

  4. Primary gastric lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Akwaa, Ahmad M; Siddiqui, Neelam; Al-Mofleh, Ibrahim A

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this review is to describe the various aspects of primary gastric lymphoma and the treatment options currently available. METHODS: After a systematic search of Pubmed, Medscape and MDconsult, we reviewed and retrieved literature regarding gastric lymphoma. RESULTS: Primary gastric lymphoma is rare however, the incidence of this malignancy is increasing. Chronic gastritis secondary to Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection has been considered a major predisposing factor for MALT lymphoma. Immune histochemical marker studies and molecular biology utilizing polymerase chain reaction have facilitated appropriate diagnosis and abolished the need for diagnostic surgical resection. Advances in imaging techniques including Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Endoscopic Ultrasonography (EUS) have helped evaluation of tumor extension and invasion. The clinical course and prognosis of this disease is dependent on histopathological sub-type and stage at the time of diagnosis. Controversy remains regarding the best treatment for early stages of this disease. Chemotherapy, surgery and combination have been studied and shared almost comparable results with survival rate of 70%-90%. However, chemotherapy possesses the advantage of preserving gastric anatomy. Radiotherapy alone has been tried and showed good results. Stage IIIE, IVE disease treatment is solely by chemotherapy and surgical resection has been a remote consideration. CONCLUSION: We conclude that methods of diagnosis and staging of the primary gastric lymphoma have dramatically improved. The modalities of treatment are many and probably chemotherapy is superior because of high success rate, preservation of stomach and tolerable complications. PMID:14695759

  5. [Hodgkin's lymphoma and radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Datsenko, P V; Panshin, G A

    2015-01-01

    After a median observation time of 4,5 years, 440 patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma stage I-IV to the Ann Arbor classification were treated with radiotherapy (2200 lymph areas) and ABVD (n=204) or BEACOPP (n=117) or CEA/ABVD (lomustine, etoposide, adriamycine, bleomycine, vinblastine and dacarbacine; n=119) regimens in 1995-2012. Correct allocation of groups with "CR or PR ≥80%" and "PR: 0-79%", after first-line chemotherapy, is extremely important for following RT planning. Adaptation of patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma can take place only after successful treatment, the probability of relapse and fear of repeated courses strongly interfere with this process, especially in the first years after its closure. Duration of remission period, especially in young people, is no less important than the criteria for overall survival. It is impossible to build recommendations for treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma, based only on long-term survival rates. Importance of radiotherapy in reducing the number of relapses is undeniable, so the idea that the development of the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of the ray method Hodgkin's lymphoma gradually becomes secondary is in serious doubt. Our findings suggest the importance of both maintaining a high disease-free survival and reducing long-term complications in designing treatments of Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  6. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Adult Favorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Unfavorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  7. Expression of the brain transcription factor OTX1 occurs in a subset of normal germinal-center B cells and in aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Omodei, Daniela; Acampora, Dario; Russo, Filippo; De Filippi, Rosaria; Severino, Valeria; Di Francia, Raffaele; Frigeri, Ferdinando; Mancuso, Pietro; De Chiara, Anna; Pinto, Antonio; Casola, Stefano; Simeone, Antonio

    2009-12-01

    The roles in brain development. Previous studies have shown the association between OTX2 and OTX1 with anaplastic and desmoplastic medulloblastomas, respectively. Here, we investigated OTX1 and OTX2 expression in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) and multiple myeloma. A combination of semiquantitative RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemical analyses was used to measure OTX1 and OTX2 levels in normal lymphoid tissues and in 184 tumor specimens representative of various forms of NHL and multiple myeloma. OTX1 expression was activated in 94% of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, in all Burkitt lymphomas, and in 90% of high-grade follicular lymphomas. OTX1 was undetectable in precursor-B lymphoblastic lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and in most marginal zone and mantle cell lymphomas and multiple myeloma. OTX2 was undetectable in all analyzed malignancies. Analysis of OTX1 expression in normal lymphoid tissues identified a subset of resting germinal center (GC) B cells lacking PAX5 and BCL6 and expressing cytoplasmic IgG and syndecan. About 50% of OTX1(+) GC B cells co-expressed CD10 and CD20. This study identifies OTX1 as a molecular marker for high-grade GC-derived NHL and suggests an involvement of this transcription factor in B-cell lymphomagenesis. Furthermore, OTX1 expression in a subset of normal GC B cells carrying plasma cell markers suggests its possible contribution to terminal B-cell differentiation.

  8. Expression of the Brain Transcription Factor OTX1 Occurs in a Subset of Normal Germinal-Center B Cells and in Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Omodei, Daniela; Acampora, Dario; Russo, Filippo; De Filippi, Rosaria; Severino, Valeria; Di Francia, Raffaele; Frigeri, Ferdinando; Mancuso, Pietro; De Chiara, Anna; Pinto, Antonio; Casola, Stefano; Simeone, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The roles in brain development. Previous studies have shown the association between OTX2 and OTX1 with anaplastic and desmoplastic medulloblastomas, respectively. Here, we investigated OTX1 and OTX2 expression in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) and multiple myeloma. A combination of semiquantitative RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemical analyses was used to measure OTX1 and OTX2 levels in normal lymphoid tissues and in 184 tumor specimens representative of various forms of NHL and multiple myeloma. OTX1 expression was activated in 94% of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, in all Burkitt lymphomas, and in 90% of high-grade follicular lymphomas. OTX1 was undetectable in precursor-B lymphoblastic lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and in most marginal zone and mantle cell lymphomas and multiple myeloma. OTX2 was undetectable in all analyzed malignancies. Analysis of OTX1 expression in normal lymphoid tissues identified a subset of resting germinal center (GC) B cells lacking PAX5 and BCL6 and expressing cytoplasmic IgG and syndecan. About 50% of OTX1+ GC B cells co-expressed CD10 and CD20. This study identifies OTX1 as a molecular marker for high-grade GC-derived NHL and suggests an involvement of this transcription factor in B-cell lymphomagenesis. Furthermore, OTX1 expression in a subset of normal GC B cells carrying plasma cell markers suggests its possible contribution to terminal B-cell differentiation. PMID:19893048

  9. ClogP(alk): a method for predicting alkane/water partition coefficient.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Peter W; Montanari, Carlos A; Prokopczyk, Igor M

    2013-05-01

    Alkane/water partition coefficients (P(alk)) are less familiar to the molecular design community than their 1-octanol/water equivalents and access to both data and prediction tools is much more limited. A method for predicting alkane/water partition coefficient from molecular structure is introduced. The basis for the ClogP(alk) model is the strong (R² = 0.987) relationship between alkane/water partition coefficient and molecular surface area (MSA) that was observed for saturated hydrocarbons. The model treats a molecule as a perturbation of a saturated hydrocarbon molecule with the same MSA and uses increments defined for functional groups to quantify the extent to which logP(alk) is perturbed by the introduction each functional group. Interactions between functional groups, such as intramolecular hydrogen bonds are also parameterized within a perturbation framework. The functional groups and interactions between them are specified substructurally in a transparent and reproducible manner using SMARTS notation. The ClogP(alk) model was parameterized using data measured for structurally prototypical compounds that dominate the literature on alkane/water partition coefficients and then validated using an external test set of 100 alkane/water logP measurements, the majority of which were for drugs.

  10. Economic Analysis of Alternative Strategies for Detection of ALK Rearrangements in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Shivang; Ray, David; Stein, Karen; Zhang, Jie; Koduru, Prasad; Fogt, Franz; Wellman, Axel; Wat, Ricky; Mathews, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Identification of alterations in ALK gene and development of ALK-directed therapies have increased the need for accurate and efficient detection methodologies. To date, research has focused on the concordance between the two most commonly used technologies, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). However, inter-test concordance reflects only one, albeit important, aspect of the diagnostic process; laboratories, hospitals, and payors must understand the cost and workflow of ALK rearrangement detection strategies. Through literature review combined with interviews of pathologists and laboratory directors in the U.S. and Europe, a cost-impact model was developed that compared four alternative testing strategies—IHC only, FISH only, IHC pre-screen followed by FISH confirmation, and parallel testing by both IHC and FISH. Interviews were focused on costs of reagents, consumables, equipment, and personnel. The resulting model showed that testing by IHC alone cost less ($90.07 in the U.S., $68.69 in Europe) than either independent or parallel testing by both FISH and IHC ($441.85 in the U.S. and $279.46 in Europe). The strategies differed in cost of execution, turnaround time, reimbursement, and number of positive results detected, suggesting that laboratories must weigh the costs and the clinical benefit of available ALK testing strategies. PMID:26838801

  11. Genome-wide RNAi screen reveals ALK1 mediates LDL uptake and transcytosis in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kraehling, Jan R.; Chidlow, John H.; Rajagopal, Chitra; Sugiyama, Michael G.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Lee, Monica Y.; Zhang, Xinbo; Ramírez, Cristina M.; Park, Eon Joo; Tao, Bo; Chen, Keyang; Kuruvilla, Leena; Larriveé, Bruno; Folta-Stogniew, Ewa; Ola, Roxana; Rotllan, Noemi; Zhou, Wenping; Nagle, Michael W.; Herz, Joachim; Williams, Kevin Jon; Eichmann, Anne; Lee, Warren L.; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos; Sessa, William C.

    2016-01-01

    In humans and animals lacking functional LDL receptor (LDLR), LDL from plasma still readily traverses the endothelium. To identify the pathways of LDL uptake, a genome-wide RNAi screen was performed in endothelial cells and cross-referenced with GWAS-data sets. Here we show that the activin-like kinase 1 (ALK1) mediates LDL uptake into endothelial cells. ALK1 binds LDL with lower affinity than LDLR and saturates only at hypercholesterolemic concentrations. ALK1 mediates uptake of LDL into endothelial cells via an unusual endocytic pathway that diverts the ligand from lysosomal degradation and promotes LDL transcytosis. The endothelium-specific genetic ablation of Alk1 in Ldlr-KO animals leads to less LDL uptake into the aortic endothelium, showing its physiological role in endothelial lipoprotein metabolism. In summary, identification of pathways mediating LDLR-independent uptake of LDL may provide unique opportunities to block the initiation of LDL accumulation in the vessel wall or augment hepatic LDLR-dependent clearance of LDL. PMID:27869117

  12. ALK1 signalling analysis identifies angiogenesis related genes and reveals disparity between TGF-β and constitutively active receptor induced gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Lux, Andreas; Salway, Fiona; Dressman, Holly K; Kröner-Lux, Gabriele; Hafner, Mathias; Day, Philip JR; Marchuk, Douglas A; Garland, John

    2006-01-01

    Background TGF-β1 is an important angiogenic factor involved in the different aspects of angiogenesis and vessel maintenance. TGF-β signalling is mediated by the TβRII/ALK5 receptor complex activating the Smad2/Smad3 pathway. In endothelial cells TGF-β utilizes a second type I receptor, ALK1, activating the Smad1/Smad5 pathway. Consequently, a perturbance of ALK1, ALK5 or TβRII activity leads to vascular defects. Mutations in ALK1 cause the vascular disorder hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Methods The identification of ALK1 and not ALK5 regulated genes in endothelial cells, might help to better understand the development of HHT. Therefore, the human microvascular endothelial cell line HMEC-1 was infected with a recombinant constitutively active ALK1 adenovirus, and gene expression was studied by using gene arrays and quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Results After 24 hours, 34 genes were identified to be up-regulated by ALK1 signalling. Analysing ALK1 regulated gene expression after 4 hours revealed 13 genes to be up- and 2 to be down-regulated. Several of these genes, including IL-8, ET-1, ID1, HPTPη and TEAD4 are reported to be involved in angiogenesis. Evaluation of ALK1 regulated gene expression in different human endothelial cell types was not in complete agreement. Further on, disparity between constitutively active ALK1 and TGF-β1 induced gene expression in HMEC-1 cells and primary HUVECs was observed. Conclusion Gene array analysis identified 49 genes to be regulated by ALK1 signalling and at least 14 genes are reported to be involved in angiogenesis. There was substantial agreement between the gene array and quantitative real-time PCR data. The angiogenesis related genes might be potential HHT modifier genes. In addition, the results suggest endothelial cell type specific ALK1 and TGF-β signalling. PMID:16594992

  13. Primary gastric mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Petranovic, Duska; Pilcic, Gorazd; Peitl, Milena; Cubranic, Aleksandar; Valkovic, Toni; Nacinovic, Antica Duletic; Lucin, Ksenija; Jonjic, Nives

    2012-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma represents 2.5–7% all of non Hodgkin's lymphomas. Stomach is the most common site of extranodal lymphoma. However, that is not the case with mantle cell lymphoma, which is extremely rare. We present a case of 71-year-old woman admitted to the Internal Clinic of the University Clinical Hospital Center Rijeka, because of stomach discomfort and melena. Endoscopy and computed tomography revealed a polyp in gastric antrum. Histopathologic, immunohistochemic and genetic methods were also performed and the results were consistent with primary gastric mantle cell lymphoma without periepigastric and/or local or distant abdominal lymph node involvement. PMID:22567215

  14. Lymphoma of the Cervix

    PubMed Central

    Parnis, Juanita; Camilleri, David J.; Babic, Darko; DeGaetano, James; Savona-Ventura, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Primary non-Hodgkins lymphoma of the uterine cervix is a very rare diagnosis. A 54-year-old woman presented with a 3-month history of postmenopausal bleeding per vaginum. On examination, a friable, fungating lesion was seen on the cervix. Histology revealed a CD 20 positive high-grade non-Hodgkin's diffuse large B cell lymphoma from cervical biopsies and endometrial curettage. She was diagnosed as stage IE after workup and subsequently treated with six cycles of R-CHOP chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy of the involved field. PMID:23091747

  15. Lymphomas-Part 1.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Lara A; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-11-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphomas are aggressive, high-cell-density tumors. There is recent increase in their incidence in immunocompetent patients. Knowledge of imaging findings on computed tomography and conventional MR imaging is important to suggest the diagnosis. Moreover, information obtained from advanced MR imaging techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, MR spectroscopy, perfusion-weighted imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced studies, increases diagnostic confidence and helps distinguish them from other aggressive intracranial tumors. This article discusses typical imaging findings of primary and secondary central nervous system lymphomas on computed tomography and conventional MR imaging, advanced MR imaging techniques, and changes related to steroid therapy.

  16. Alkane hydroxylase gene (alkB) phylotype composition and diversity in northern Gulf of Mexico bacterioplankton

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Conor B.; Tolar, Bradley B.; Hollibaugh, James T.; King, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    Natural and anthropogenic activities introduce alkanes into marine systems where they are degraded by alkane hydroxylases expressed by phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Partial sequences for alkB, one of the structural genes of alkane hydroxylase, have been used to assess the composition of alkane-degrading communities, and to determine their responses to hydrocarbon inputs. We present here the first spatially extensive analysis of alkB in bacterioplankton of the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGoM), a region that experiences numerous hydrocarbon inputs. We have analyzed 401 partial alkB gene sequences amplified from genomic extracts collected during March 2010 from 17 water column samples that included surface waters and bathypelagic depths. Previous analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences for these and related samples have shown that nGoM bacterial community composition and structure stratify strongly with depth, with distinctly different communities above and below 100 m. Although we hypothesized that alkB gene sequences would exhibit a similar pattern, PCA analyses of operational protein units (OPU) indicated that community composition did not vary consistently with depth or other major physical-chemical variables. We observed 22 distinct OPUs, one of which was ubiquitous and accounted for 57% of all sequences. This OPU clustered with AlkB sequences from known hydrocarbon oxidizers (e.g., Alcanivorax and Marinobacter). Some OPUs could not be associated with known alkane degraders, however, and perhaps represent novel hydrocarbon-oxidizing populations or genes. These results indicate that the capacity for alkane hydrolysis occurs widely in the nGoM, but that alkane degrader diversity varies substantially among sites and responds differently than bulk communities to physical-chemical variables. PMID:24376439

  17. Radiation therapy for orbital lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Ping . E-mail: pzhou@partners.org; Ng, Andrea K.; Silver, Barbara; Li Sigui; Hua Ling; Mauch, Peter M.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To describe radiation techniques and evaluate outcomes for orbital lymphoma. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients (and 62 eyes) with orbital lymphoma treated with radiotherapy between 1987 and 2003 were included. The majority had mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (48%) or follicular (30%) lymphoma. Seventeen patients had prior lymphoma at other sites, and 29 had primary orbital lymphoma. Median follow-up was 46 months. Results: The median dose was 30.6 Gy; one-third received <30 Gy. Electrons were used in 9 eyes with disease confined to the conjunctiva or eyelid, and photons in 53 eyes with involvement of intraorbital tissues to cover entire orbit. Local control rate was 98% for all patients and 100% for those with indolent lymphoma. Three of the 26 patients with localized primary lymphoma failed distantly, resulting in a 5-year freedom-from-distant-relapse rate of 89%. The 5-year disease-specific and overall survival rates were 95% and 88%, respectively. Late toxicity was mainly cataract formation in patients who received radiation without lens block. Conclusions A dose of 30 Gy is sufficient for indolent orbital lymphoma. Distant relapse rate in patients with localized orbital lymphoma was lower than that reported for low-grade lymphoma presenting in other sites. Orbital radiotherapy can be used for salvage of recurrent indolent lymphoma.

  18. Coexpression of EpCAM, CD44 Variant Isoforms and Claudin-7 in Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Toshihiro; Nakamura, Teruo; Watanabe, Takayuki; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Ashida, Atsuko; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Ito, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Background Anaplastic thyroid cancer is considered to be one of the most aggressive human malignancies, and the mean survival time after diagnosis is approximately six months, regardless of treatments. This study aimed to examine how EpCAM and its related molecules are involved in the characteristics of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Methodology/Principal Findings Two differentiated thyroid cancer cell lines (TPC-1 and FTC-133), and two anaplastic thyroid cancer cell lines (FRO, ACT-1) were analyzed for expression of CD44 standard isoform (CD44s), CD44 variant isoforms, and EpCAM, and human aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 (ALDH1) enzymatic activity using flow cytometry. CD44s expression was higher in TPC-1 and FTC-133 than in the FRO and ACT-1, whereas ALDH1 activities were higher in FRO and ACT-1 than in TPC-1 and FTC-133. An inverse correlation between CD44s expression and ALDH1 activity was observed in all thyroid cancer cell lines. As for the expressions of CD44 variant isoforms, ACT-1 showed higher and FRO showed moderate CD44v6 expressions, whereas either TPC-1 or FTC-133 showed negative CD44v6 expression. EpCAM expressions in FRO and ACT-1 were higher than those in TPC-1 and FTC-133, and EpCAM expressions inversely correlated with those of CD44s. A positive correlation was observed between EpCAM expression and ALDH1 activity in thyroid cancer cell lines. In the RT-PCR analysis, the expression levels of EpCAM, caludin-7 and ALDH1 in FRO and ATC-1 cells were significantly higher than those in TPC-1 and FTC-133 cells. In clinical specimens of thyroid cancers, nuclear expression of EpCAM and high expression of CD44v6 were detected significantly more frequently in anaplastic carcinomas. Conclusions/Significance Our study suggests the possibility that EpCAM, together with CD44v6 and claudin-7 as well as ALDH1, may be involved in the development of the aggressive phenotype of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Our findings may suggest a novel therapeutic strategy for treatment

  19. Intrasinusoidal bone marrow infiltration and splenic marginal zone lymphoma: a quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Pich, Achille; Fraire, Flavio; Fornari, Alessandro; Bonino, Laura Davico; Godio, Laura; Bortolin, Paola; Chiusa, Luigi; Palestro, Giorgio

    2006-05-01

    Intrasinusoidal infiltration (ISI) is a pattern of invasion that is rarely found on bone marrow (BM) biopsies, and is considered as a hallmark of splenic marginal zone cell lymphoma (SMZL). We analysed BM biopsies showing intrasinusoidal infiltration from 54 consecutive patients with different types of lymphoma to verify if ISI quantity was a diagnostic criterion for SMZL. There were 35 primary splenic lymphoma (PSL) and 19 non-PSL; 28 SMZL, three non-splenic MZL, six mantle cell, six small lymphocytic, four follicular, four diffuse large B cell, one peripheral T cell, one lymphoplasmacytic and one anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. The quantity of BM infiltrate was assessed on CD45, CD20 and CD3 stained sections. The mean percentage of total (TI) and intrasinusoidal (ISI) lymphocytes was calculated in 10 areas for each case. TI quantity was 21.57 in PSL and 35.05 in non-PSL (P = 0.04). ISI quantity was 5.23 in PSL and 7.62 in non-PSL (P = 0.08), 5.83 in SMZL and 2.83 in other types of PSL (P = 0.12), 4.46 in non-splenic MZL and 8.21 in other types of non-PSL (P = 0.28). No difference in ISI quantity was found among the lymphoma subtypes, either in PSL (P = 0.74) or non-PSL (P = 0.3). The data demonstrate that ISI quantity in BM biopsies is not a reliable diagnostic parameter for SMZL.

  20. Immunohistochemical evaluation of FLI-1 in acute lymphoblastic lymphoma (ALL): a potential diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Lin, Oscar; Filippa, Daniel A; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie

    2009-10-01

    Cases of CD45-negative acute lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia (ALL) immunoreactive for CD99 and Friend Leukemia Integration-1 (FLI-1) can occur and may lead to a misdiagnosis of Ewing sarcoma/peripheral neuroectodermal tumor with critical clinical treatment management implications. The objective of this study was to evaluate a panel of antibodies that would allow greater diagnostic accuracy of ALL and evaluate the frequency of FLI-1 immunoreactivity in a series of ALL cases and an expanded series of T-cell lymphoma subtypes. Immunoreactivity for CD3 was seen in 12/20 (60%), CD20 in 5/20 (25%), CD43 in 19/20(95%), CD45 in 15/20(75%), CD99 in 15/20 (75%), FLI-1, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) in 17/20 (85%) cases. Two cases negative for leukocyte common antigen (LCA), CD20, and CD3 were positive for FLI-1, CD99, TdT, and CD43. Two other LCA-negative cases were positive for CD99 but negative for FLI-1. The majority of cases showed immunoreactivity for CD43 and/or TdT. Therefore, CD43 and/or TdT should be included in the immunohistochemical evaluation of small round blue cell tumors. Absence of immunoreactivity for LCA does not exclude ALL and immunoreactivity of FLI-1 is not restricted to Ewing sarcoma/peripheral neuroectodermal tumor. We also report FLI-1 expression in an expanded series of 75 cases of T-cell lymphoma and found high expression in anaplastic large cell lymphoma and angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.

  1. Centrofacial angiocentric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Peral-Cagigal, Beatriz; Galdeano-Arenas, María; Crespo-Pinilla, Juan Ignacio; García-Cantera, José Miguel; Sánchez-Cuéllar, Luis Antonio; Verrier-Hernández, Alberto

    2005-01-01

    The centrofacial angiocentric lymphoma is a rare lymphoid neoplasm, with an often-difficult diagnosis due to the non-specific clinical picture. On many occasions it is necessary to perform various biopsies to reach the correct diagnosis. This lymphoma is an aggressive Non-Hodgkin's (NHL) type, which is normally found in the upper respiratory tract (predominantly in the nasal cavity), and has an ominous prognosis, as the average survival rate is between 12 and 18 months (1). It is predominantly found in subjects of oriental and South American extraction, who are between the ages of 50 and 60 years and with a slight tendency towards males (2:1). This is the case study of a female Ecuadorian patient who was referred to our department with a hemifacial edema, chocolate- like rhinorrhea and nasal respiratory obstruction, which had been treated with antibiotics and anti-inflammatories for a month without success. After performing a number of diagnostic tests, it was found histologically that the patient had an extranodal T-cell lymphoma of the nasal type (also known as T-cell angiocentric lymphoma).

  2. In vivo imaging models of bone and brain metastases and pleural carcinomatosis with a novel human EML4-ALK lung cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Nanjo, Shigeki; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Kita, Kenji; Fukuda, Koji; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Uehara, Hisanori; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Hara, Eiji; Uramoto, Hidetaka; Tanaka, Fumihiro; Yano, Seiji

    2015-03-01

    EML4-ALK lung cancer accounts for approximately 3-7% of non-small-cell lung cancer cases. To investigate the molecular mechanism underlying tumor progression and targeted drug sensitivity/resistance in EML4-ALK lung cancer, clinically relevant animal models are indispensable. In this study, we found that the lung adenocarcinoma cell line A925L expresses an EML4-ALK gene fusion (variant 5a, E2:A20) and is sensitive to the ALK inhibitors crizotinib and alectinib. We further established highly tumorigenic A925LPE3 cells, which also have the EML4-ALK gene fusion (variant 5a) and are sensitive to ALK inhibitors. By using A925LPE3 cells with luciferase gene transfection, we established in vivo imaging models for pleural carcinomatosis, bone metastasis, and brain metastasis, all of which are significant clinical concerns of advanced EML4-ALK lung cancer. Interestingly, crizotinib caused tumors to shrink in the pleural carcinomatosis model, but not in bone and brain metastasis models, whereas alectinib showed remarkable efficacy in all three models, indicative of the clinical efficacy of these ALK inhibitors. Our in vivo imaging models of multiple organ sites may provide useful resources to analyze further the pathogenesis of EML4-ALK lung cancer and its response and resistance to ALK inhibitors in various organ microenvironments.

  3. Four Lymphomas in 1 Patient: A Unique Case of Triple Composite Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Followed by Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tennese, Alysa; Skrabek, Pamela J; Nasr, Michel R; Sekiguchi, Debora R; Morales, Carmen; Brown, Theresa C; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Perry, Anamarija M

    2016-09-29

    Composite lymphomas consist of 2 or more distinct lymphomas occurring in a single anatomical site or simultaneously in different sites and can be composed of any combination of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), T-cell NHL, or Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Cases of composite lymphomas with more than 2 lymphomas are extremely rare, with only 4 reports in the literature. We report the case of a 49-year-old man with a triple composite lymphoma in a single lymph node, consisting of small lymphocytic lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, and mantle cell lymphoma in situ. The patient received multiple courses of chemotherapy and an autologous stem cell transplant, which resulted in complete remission. Then, 6 years after the stem cell transplant, he developed classical HL. This unique case is, to our knowledge, the first report of a patient with triple composite lymphoma consisting of 3 small mature B-cell NHLs, who subsequently developed a fourth lymphoma.

  4. [The problems of immunological diagnosis of childhood acute leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Pituch-Noworolska, Anna

    2003-01-01

    The immunophenotyping of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cells is based on staining the cells with monoclonal antibodies against surface and cytoplasmic determinants followed with flow cytometry analysis. The problems of immuno-phenotyping are associated with technical difficulties, changes in expression of determinants and the rare types of leukaemia and haematological disorders typical for newborns and infants. The lack of blast cells within cell suspension obtained for test may be the result of bone marrow disorder (aplastic anaemia, preleukaemic cytopenia) or technical pitfall. The changed expression of determinants on blastic cells observed as weak expression or overexpression or atypical combination of determinants requires a careful interpretation. In the diagnosis of rare types of acute leukaemia (e.g. erythroleukaemia, megakaryoblastic leukaemia, mixed lineage or undifferentiated leukaemia) the additional monoclonal antibodies beyond routine set are needed. A special concern is necessary in diagnosis of newborns and infants leukaemia or bone marrow disorders like myelodisplastic syndrome particularly in children with other systemic diseases e.g. congenital immunological deficiencies, Down's syndrome. The problems of immunophenotyping in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma are frequently associated with obtaining a representative material e.g. surgical tumour biopsy, lymph node. In some case the differential diagnosis including small round cell tumours and anaplastic type of lymphoma is necessary what requires an additional set of monoclonal antibodies. Despite of modern technology, morphology, immunophenotyping and histopathology remain the standard of complex diagnosis of lymphoproliferative diseases and haematopoietic disorders in children.

  5. Ectopic cortical anaplastic ependymoma: an unusual case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Sai, Ke; Wang, Jian; Chen, Yin Shen; Yan, Shu-Mei; Chen, Zhong-Ping

    2014-09-01

    Ependymona occasionally occurs outside the ventricular structures, which is called ectopic ependymona (EE), while pure cortex location is uncommon. However, cortical anaplastic ependymoma (CE) is rare, especially in children. There were only four primary CEs, which is located in the superficial cortex, were reported the age of the patient under 12 years old. The present case is a 20-month-old boy presenting with simple partial seizure was treated in our department. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a fronto-parietal lobe mass of more than 50mm in diameter with mixed signal intensity. Total removal of the mass lesion was performed without any neurological deficit. Pathological examination of the excised tumor were consistent with anaplastic ependymoma (AE). The patient had a good recovery after his surgical resection. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy were not taken into account in view of his age, the favorable site and the complete resection. The management of this unusual tumor is summarized in this paper.

  6. Spermatocytic seminoma: review of the literature and description of a new case of the anaplastic variant.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Mariano; Valli, Mirca; Brisigotti, Massimo; Rosai, Juan

    2011-02-01

    The aims of this paper were to review the literature of Spermatocytic Seminoma (SS) updating its clinico-pathological features and to present a new case of the exceptionally rare variant of this tumor known as anaplastic which only five cases have been reported. Many studies have confirmed that SS is a distinct neoplasm both clinically and pathologically from classical Seminoma and it differs from the latter especially in regard to behavior, characterized by an almost complete inability to metastasize with only very few convincing examples described with metastatic behavior. There is general agreement that orchidectomy is sufficient therapy for SS and that surveillance following surgery is the preferred management option. Surprisingly, the presence of an anaplastic component does not seem to impact on this excellent prognosis. Very different is the case of sarcomatous transformation, for which further therapy after orchiectomy is advisable.

  7. Autopsy of anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas producing granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Haruna; Eguchi, Noriaki; Sumimoto, Kyoku; Matsumoto, Kenta; Azakami, Takahiro; Sumida, Tomonori; Tamura, Tadamasa; Sumii, Masaharu; Uraoka, Naohiro; Shimamoto, Fumio

    2016-08-01

    A 50-year-old man presented to a nearby hospital with high fever and anorexia. An abdominal tumor was detected, and he was referred to our hospital. A pancreatic tumor was detected by computed tomography and abdominal ultrasonography. He had high fever, leukocytosis, and high serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We performed a tumor biopsy and histological examination revealed anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas. Based on the diagnosis, we initiated chemotherapy using gemcitabine plus S-1. However, the tumor rapidly progressed and he deteriorated and died 123 days after admission. As immunohistochemical study showed positive staining for G-CSF in the tumor cell, we diagnosed the tumor producing G-CSF during autopsy. Anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas producing G-CSF is very rare, with 10 cases, including ours, reported in the literature.

  8. THE MANAGEMENT OF AN ORAL ANAPLASTIC SARCOMA IN A PYGMY HIPPOPOTAMUS (CHOEROPSIS LIBERIENSIS) USING INTRALESIONAL CHEMOTHERAPY.

    PubMed

    Franklinos, Lydia H V; Masters, Nicholas; Feltrer, Yedra; Pocknell, Ann; Bolt, David M; Dakin, Stephanie; Berry, Karla; Molenaar, Fieke M

    2017-03-01

    An adult female captive pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis) was diagnosed with an oral anaplastic sarcoma. The tumor was surgically debulked and intralesional chemotherapy with mitomycin C (0.4 mg/cm(3) of tumor) and cisplatin (1 mg/cm(3) of tumor) was administered. Chemotherapeutic treatment proved difficult due to the risks of repeated anesthetics and unknown drug efficacies. Marked proliferation of the mass was observed during estrus, and chemotherapy was repeated as an experimental treatment to slow tumor progression in order for the animal to remain in the species breeding program. Tumor proliferation was detected during the first trimester of pregnancy; however, in the lactation period, the mass became quiescent. No adverse reactions to chemotherapeutic drugs were observed and the animal continues to be monitored for tumor progression. This is the first report of an anaplastic sarcoma and of chemotherapy use in a pygmy hippopotamus and it highlights logistical considerations for treating neoplasia in this species.

  9. Entospletinib and Obinutuzumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-24

    Anemia; B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Fatigue; Fever; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3a Follicular Lymphoma; Hairy Cell Leukemia; Lymphadenopathy; Lymphocytosis; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Night Sweats; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Richter Syndrome; Splenomegaly; Thrombocytopenia; Weight Loss

  10. Kinetic mechanism for the excision of hypoxanthine by Escherichia coli AlkA and evidence for binding to DNA ends.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Boyang; O'Brien, Patrick J

    2011-05-24

    The Escherichia coli 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II protein (AlkA) recognizes a broad range of oxidized and alkylated base lesions and catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond to initiate the base excision repair pathway. Although the enzyme was one of the first DNA repair glycosylases to be discovered more than 25 years ago and there are multiple crystal structures, the mechanism is poorly understood. Therefore, we have characterized the kinetic mechanism for the AlkA-catalyzed excision of the deaminated purine, hypoxanthine. The multiple-turnover glycosylase assays are consistent with Michaelis-Menten kinetics. However, under single-turnover conditions that are commonly employed for studying other DNA glycosylases, we observe an unusual biphasic protein saturation curve. Initially, the observed rate constant for excision increases with an increasing level of AlkA protein, but at higher protein concentrations, the rate constant decreases. This behavior can be most easily explained by tight binding to DNA ends and by crowding of multiple AlkA protamers on the DNA. Consistent with this model, crystal structures have shown the preferential binding of AlkA to DNA ends. By varying the position of the lesion, we identified an asymmetric substrate that does not show inhibition at higher concentrations of AlkA, and we performed pre-steady state and steady state kinetic analysis. Unlike the situation in other glycosylases, release of the abasic product is faster than N-glycosidic bond cleavage. Nevertheless, AlkA exhibits significant product inhibition under multiple-turnover conditions, and it binds approximately 10-fold more tightly to an abasic site than to a hypoxanthine lesion site. This tight binding could help protect abasic sites when the adaptive response to DNA alkylation is activated and very high levels of AlkA protein are present.

  11. Novel alkane hydroxylase gene (alkB) diversity in sediments associated with hydrocarbon seeps in the Timor Sea, Australia.

    PubMed

    Wasmund, Kenneth; Burns, Kathryn A; Kurtböke, D Ipek; Bourne, David G

    2009-12-01

    Hydrocarbon seeps provide inputs of petroleum hydrocarbons to widespread areas of the Timor Sea. Alkanes constitute the largest proportion of chemical components found in crude oils, and therefore genes involved in the biodegradation of these compounds may act as bioindicators for this ecosystem's response to seepage. To assess alkane biodegradation potential, the diversity and distribution of alkane hydroxylase (alkB) genes in sediments of the Timor Sea were studied. Deduced AlkB protein sequences derived from clone libraries identified sequences only distantly related to previously identified AlkB sequences, suggesting that the Timor Sea maybe a rich reservoir for novel alkane hydroxylase enzymes. Most sequences clustered with AlkB sequences previously identified from marine Gammaproteobacteria though protein sequence identities averaged only 73% (with a range of 60% to 94% sequence identities). AlkB sequence diversity was lower in deep water (>400 m) samples off the continental slope than in shallow water (<100 m) samples on the continental shelf but not significantly different in response to levels of alkanes. Real-time PCR assays targeting Timor Sea alkB genes were designed and used to quantify alkB gene targets. No correlation was found between gene copy numbers and levels of hydrocarbons measured in sediments using sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques, probably due to the very low levels of hydrocarbons found in most sediment samples. Interestingly, however, copy numbers of alkB genes increased substantially in sediments exposed directly to active seepage even though only low or undetectable concentrations of hydrocarbons were measured in these sediments in complementary geochemical analyses due to efficient biodegradation.

  12. Increased expression of the immune modulatory molecule PD-L1 (CD274) in anaplastic meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ziming; Abedalthagafi, Malak; Aizer, Ayal A.; McHenry, Allison R.; Sun, Heather H.; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Viramontes, Omar; Machaidze, Revaz; Brastianos, Priscilla K.; Reardon, David A.; Dunn, Ian F.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Ligon, Keith L.; Carpenter, Anne E.; Alexander, Brian M.; Agar, Nathalie Y.; Rodig, Scott J.; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M.; Santagata, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    There are no effective medical treatments for WHO grade III (anaplastic) meningioma. Patients with this high-grade malignancy have a median survival of less than two years. Therapeutics that modulate the mechanisms that inhibit local immune responses in the tumor microenvironment are showing significant and durable clinical responses in patients with treatment refractory high-grade tumors. We examined the immune infiltrate of 291 meningiomas including WHO grade I-III meningiomas using immunohistochemistry and we examined the expression of PD-L1 mRNA by RNAscope in situ hybridization and PD-L1 protein by immunohistochemistry. In meningioma, the tumor infiltrating lymphocytes are predominantly T cells. In anaplastic meningioma, there is a sharp decrease in the number of T cells, including the numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and cells expressing PD-1 and there is also an increase in the number of FOXP3 expressing immunoregulatory (Treg) cells. PD-L1 expression is increased in anaplastic meningioma – both mRNA and protein. Using patient derived meningioma cell, we confirm that PD-L1 is expressed in meningioma cells themselves, and not solely in infiltrating immune cells. This work indicates that high-grade meningioma harbor an immunosuppressive tumor microenviroment and that increased Treg cells and elevated PD-L1 may contribute to the aggressive phenotype of these tumors. PMID:25609200

  13. Treatment Option Overview (AIDS Related-Lymphoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Childhood NHL Treatment Research AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  14. Stages of AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Childhood NHL Treatment Research AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  15. Treatment Options for AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Childhood NHL Treatment Research AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  16. General Information about AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Childhood NHL Treatment Research AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  17. Identification of a novel common proviral integration site, flit-1, in feline leukemia virus induced thymic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Yasuhito; Liao, Chun-Peng; Zhao, Yan Shi; Pan, Judong; Mathes, Lawrence E; Hayes, Kathleen A; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Roy-Burman, Pradip

    2009-03-30

    A new proviral integration site for feline leukemia virus (FeLV), termed flit-1, was identified from feline thymic lymphoma. Among 35 FeLV-related tumors examined, 5 of 25 thymic lymphomas demonstrated proviral insertion within flit-1 locus whereas none of four alimentary and five multicentric lymphomas and one T-lymphoid leukemia examined had rearrangement in this region. Extensive sequence analysis has shown that flit-1, which is noncoding, is conserved on human chromosome 12 and mouse chromosome 15. The human and murine homologs of flit-1 are positioned approximately 30-kb upstream to activin-A receptor type II-like 1 (ACVRL1/ALK1) gene. Expression of ACVRL1 mRNA was examined in two of five lymphomas with flit-1 rearrangement and detected in both of the two whereas normal thymuses and seven lymphoid tumors without flit-1 rearrangement had no detectable expression. Therefore, flit-1 appears to represent a novel FeLV proviral common integration domain that may influence lymphomagenesis as insertional mutagenesis.

  18. Primary hepatic Epstein-Barr virus-associated CD30-positive peripheral T-cell lymphoma of cytotoxic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yue; Cai, Junchao; Yue, Changjun; Qing, Xin

    2016-02-01

    Primary hepatic peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) is exceedingly rare. We encountered such a case in a 58-year-old Hispanic female with a history of chronic sinusitis and hypothyroidism who presented with 4weeks of fever and weight loss. Laboratory studies showed altered liver function and mild pancytopenia. Hepatitis and HIV infection were excluded by negative serological tests. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed innumerable small low-density lesions throughout the liver without splenomegaly or lymphadenopathy. CT-guided liver core biopsy showed scattered small lymphoid aggregates located mainly in the portal tracts and periportal regions. Within the lymphoid aggregates, scattered large pleomorphic lymphoma cells were seen, admixed with smaller lymphoid cells and histiocytes. By immunohistochemistry, the lymphoma cells expressed CD2, CD3, CD8, CD30, CD43, CD45, granzyme B, TIA-1, and negative for CD4, CD5, CD7, CD56, βF1, ALK-1, and B-cell markers. In situ hybridization for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA (EBER) was positive in some lymphoma cells. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of primary hepatic Epstein-Barr virus-associated PTCL with CD30 expression.

  19. SGN-30 and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-10

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  20. Anaplasic lymphoma kinase positive inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour with renal pelvic calculus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Elfatemi, Hinde; Laila, Chbani; Znati, Kaoutar; Tazi, Mohamed Fadl; Ahallal, Youness; Tazi, Elmehdi; Farih, Moulay Hassan; Amarti, Afaf

    2009-08-21

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour is a distinctive mesenchymal neoplasm, composed of a variable admixture of myofibroblastic spindle-shaped and inflammatory cells which were originally described in the lung, as a nonneoplastic lesion and designated as an inflammatory pseudotumour. The lack of certainty of the IMTs pathogenesis is reflected in the large number of terms which have been attributed to this lesion. Recent genetic and molecular studies of IMTs have showed chromosomal abnormalities of 2p23 resulting in a rearrangement of the anaplasic lymphoma kinase gene and have also provided evidence for a monoclonal, noeplastic origin for IMT.Occurrence of IMT in the kidney is very rare, and to our knowledge, only 30 such cases have been described in the literature.This report describes an original case of an ALK positive IMT of the kidney associated with renal pelvic calculus which we believe has never been reported. The differential diagnosis of IMTs will also be discussed.

  1. Anaplasic lymphoma kinase positive inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour with renal pelvic calculus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Elfatemi, Hinde; Laila, Chbani; Znati, Kaoutar; Tazi, Mohamed Fadl; Tazi, Elmehdi; Farih, Moulay Hassan; Amarti, Afaf

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour is a distinctive mesenchymal neoplasm, composed of a variable admixture of myofibroblastic spindle-shaped and inflammatory cells which were originally described in the lung, as a nonneoplastic lesion and designated as an inflammatory pseudotumour. The lack of certainty of the IMTs pathogenesis is reflected in the large number of terms which have been attributed to this lesion. Recent genetic and molecular studies of IMTs have showed chromosomal abnormalities of 2p23 resulting in a rearrangement of the anaplasic lymphoma kinase gene and have also provided evidence for a monoclonal, noeplastic origin for IMT.Occurrence of IMT in the kidney is very rare, and to our knowledge, only 30 such cases have been described in the literature.This report describes an original case of an ALK positive IMT of the kidney associated with renal pelvic calculus which we believe has never been reported. The differential diagnosis of IMTs will also be discussed. PMID:19918581

  2. Clinical analysis of 670 cases in two trials of the European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Lymphoma Cooperative Group subtyped according to the Revised European-American Classification of Lymphoid Neoplasms: a comparison with the Working Formulation.

    PubMed

    Pittaluga, S; Bijnens, L; Teodorovic, I; Hagenbeek, A; Meerwaldt, J H; Somers, R; Thomas, J; Noordijk, E M; De Wolf-Peeters, C

    1996-05-15

    In the Working Formulation (WF), non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) are grouped according to their clinical behavior. These disorders are listed as entities defined by morphology, phenotype, and cytogenetics in the proposed Revised European-American Classification of Lymphoid Neoplasms (REAL), the clinical relevance of which is still debated. We analyzed 670 NHL cases included in two randomized clinical trials (EORTC 20855 WF-intermediate/high-grade and 20856 WF-low-grade malignancy) with histologic material available for review. Based on hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections, 77% of cases could be subtyped. Immunophenotyping was considered to be mandatory only in diagnosing T-cell lymphoma and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. Of 522 cases subtyped, 11% were mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), 5% were marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (MZBCL), 46% were follicle center lymphoma, and 32% were diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Statistical analysis and comparisons between classifications were made only within each trial and treatment group. MCL and MZBCL were characterized by a shorter median survival (3.4 and 4.1 years, respectively) in comparison with low- and intermediate-grade WF groups (> 9.3 and 5.8 years, respectively). In terms of progression-free survival, MCL showed a behavior similar to the low-grade group, with frequent relapses. Follicle center cell lymphomas behaved as low-grade lymphomas as defined by the WF and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas as the WF-intermediate grade group. Because several NHL entities have a clinical behavior of their own, their recognition by the REAL classification offers clinicians additional information that is not obtained when the WF is used.

  3. ALK5 inhibition blocks TGFβ-induced CCN1 expression in human foreskin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Katherine; Murphy-Marshman, Hannah; Leask, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    The potent profibrotic cytokine TGFβ induces connective tissue growth factor (CCN2/CTGF) is induced in fibroblasts in a fashion sensitive to SB-431542, a specific pharmacological inhibitor of TGFβ type I receptor (ALK5). In several cell types, TGFβ induces CCN1 but suppresses CCN3, which opposes CCN1/CCN2 activities. However, whether SB-431542 alters TGFβ-induced CCN1 or CCN3 in human foreskin fibroblasts in unclear. Here we show that TGFβ induces CCN1 but suppresses CCN3 expression in human foreskin fibroblasts in a SB-431542-sensitive fashion. These results emphasize that CCN1/CCN2 and CCN3 are reciprocally regulated and support the notion that blocking ALK5 or addition of CCN3 may be useful anti-fibrotic approaches.

  4. SMARCE1 suppresses EGFR expression and controls responses to MET and ALK inhibitors in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Andreas I; Sun, Chong; Knijnenburg, Theo A; Xue, Yibo; Grernrum, Wipawadee; Hölzel, Michael; Nijkamp, Wouter; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Beijersbergen, Roderick L; Bernards, Rene; Huang, Sidong

    2015-04-01

    Recurrent inactivating mutations in components of SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes have been identified across cancer types, supporting their roles as tumor suppressors in modulating oncogenic signaling pathways. We report here that SMARCE1 loss induces EGFR expression and confers resistance to MET and ALK inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). We found that SMARCE1 binds to regulatory regions of the EGFR locus and suppresses EGFR transcription in part through regulating expression of Polycomb Re