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Sample records for alk anaplastic lymphoma

  1. ALK Signaling and Target Therapy in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tabbó, Fabrizio; Barreca, Antonella; Piva, Roberto; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    The discovery by Morris et al. (1994) of the genes contributing to the t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocation has laid the foundation for a molecular based recognition of anaplastic large cell lymphoma and highlighted the need for a further stratification of T-cell neoplasia. Likewise the detection of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) genetic lesions among many human cancers has defined unique subsets of cancer patients, providing new opportunities for innovative therapeutic interventions. The objective of this review is to appraise the molecular mechanisms driving ALK-mediated transformation, and to maintain the neoplastic phenotype. The understanding of these events will allow the design and implementation of novel tailored strategies for a well-defined subset of cancer patients. PMID:22649787

  2. A novel immunohistochemical classifier to distinguish Hodgkin lymphoma from ALK anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Döring, Claudia; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Agostinelli, Claudio; Piccaluga, Pier P; Facchetti, Fabio; Pileri, Stefano; Küppers, Ralf; Newrzela, Sebastian; Hartmann, Sylvia

    2014-10-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma and ALK(-) anaplastic large cell lymphoma share many features like strong CD30 expression and usually loss of B- and T-cell markers. However, their clinical course is dramatically different with curability rates of >90% for classical Hodgkin lymphoma and an unfavorable prognosis for anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Classical Hodgkin lymphoma and ALK(-) anaplastic large cell lymphoma can usually be distinguished by PAX5 expression in the Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma and expression of cytotoxic molecules in tumor cells of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. However, in some cases the differential diagnosis is difficult owing to absence of established markers. To be able to better classify these cases, we reevaluated gene expression data of microdissected tumor cells of both lymphomas for differentially expressed genes. A classifier was established, comprising four genes strongly expressed in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (MDC/CCL22, CD83, STAT3, and TUBB2B). Applying this classifier to a test cohort, Hodgkin lymphoma was successfully distinguished from ALK(-) anaplastic large cell lymphoma with an accuracy of 97% (43/44). MDC/CCL22, CD83, and STAT3 have also been found to be expressed in antigen-presenting cells. Therefore, based on our established classifier, Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells differ from tumor cells of anaplastic large cell lymphoma, which can successfully be applied for practical purposes in histopathologic diagnostics.

  3. Atypical Carcinoid Tumor with Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Rearrangement Successfully Treated by an ALK Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Masayuki; Uchiyama, Naoki; Shigemasa, Rie; Matsumura, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Ryota; Nomura, Akihiro

    This is the first report in which crizotinib, an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, reduced an atypical carcinoid tumor with ALK rearrangement. A 70-year-old man developed a tumor in the left lung and multiple metastases to the lung and brain. The pathology of transbronchial biopsied specimens demonstrated an atypical carcinoid pattern. Combined with immunohistochemical findings, we diagnosed the tumor as atypical carcinoid. ALK gene rearrangement was observed by both immunohistochemical (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization. He was treated with chemotherapy as first-line therapy, however, the tumor did not respond to chemotherapy. Thereafter, he was treated with crizotinib, which successfully reduced the tumors.

  4. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors in the treatment of ALK-driven lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Roskoski, Robert

    2017-03-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase is expressed in two-thirds of the anaplastic large-cell lymphomas as an NPM-ALK fusion protein. Physiological ALK is a receptor protein-tyrosine kinase within the insulin receptor superfamily of proteins that participates in nervous system development. The EML4-ALK fusion protein and four other ALK-fusion proteins play a fundamental role in the development in about 5% of non-small cell lung cancers. The amino-terminal portions of the ALK fusion proteins result in dimerization and subsequent activation of the ALK protein kinase domain that plays a key role in the pathogenesis of various tumors. Downstream signaling from the ALK fusion protein leads to the activation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK1/2 cell proliferation module and the JAK/STAT cell survival pathways. Moreover, nearly two dozen ALK activating mutations are involved in the pathogenesis of childhood neuroblastomas. The occurrence of oncogenic ALK-fusion proteins, particularly in non-small cell lung cancer, has fostered considerable interest in the development of ALK inhibitors. Crizotinib was the first such inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer in 2011. The median time for the emergence of crizotinib drug resistance is 10.5 months after the initiation of therapy. Such resistance prompted the development of second-generation drugs including ceritinib and alectinib, which are approved for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Unlike the single gatekeeper mutation that occurs in drug-resistant epidermal growth factor receptor in lung cancer, nearly a dozen different mutations in the catalytic domain of ALK fusion proteins have been discovered that result in crizotinib resistance. Crizotinib, ceritinib, and alectinib form a complex within the front cleft between the small and large lobes of an inactive ALK protein-kinase domain with a compact activation segment. These drugs are classified as type I½ B

  5. Analysis of nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK)-reactive CD8(+) T cell responses in children with NPM-ALK(+) anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    K Singh, V; Werner, S; Hackstein, H; Lennerz, V; Reiter, A; Wölfel, T; Damm-Welk, C; Woessmann, W

    2016-10-01

    Cellular immune responses against the oncoantigen anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) in patients with ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) have been detected using peptide-based approaches in individuals preselected for human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-A*02:01. In this study, we aimed to evaluate nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in ALCL patients ensuring endogenous peptide processing of ALK antigens and avoiding HLA preselection. We also examined the HLA class I restriction of ALK-specific CD8(+) T cells. Autologous dendritic cells (DCs) transfected with in-vitro-transcribed RNA (IVT-RNA) encoding NPM-ALK were used as antigen-presenting cells for T cell stimulation. Responder T lymphocytes were tested in interferon-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays with NPM-ALK-transfected autologous DCs as well as CV-1 in Origin with SV40 genes (COS-7) cells co-transfected with genes encoding the patients' HLA class I alleles and with NPM-ALK encoding cDNA to verify responses and define the HLA restrictions of specific T cell responses. NPM-ALK-specific CD8(+) T cell responses were detected in three of five ALK-positive ALCL patients tested between 1 and 13 years after diagnosis. The three patients had also maintained anti-ALK antibody responses. No reactivity was detected in samples from five healthy donors. The NPM-ALK-specific CD8(+) T cell responses were restricted by HLA-C-alleles (C*06:02 and C*12:02) in all three cases. This approach allowed for the detection of NPM-ALK-reactive T cells, irrespective of the individual HLA status, up to 9 years after ALCL diagnosis.

  6. ALK Positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Presenting as Extensive Bone Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Gajendra, Smeeta; Lipi, Lipika; Goel, Shalini; Misra, Ruchira

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) represents approximately 2% of all Non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas that commonly involves nodal as well as a wide variety of extra nodal sites, as skin, soft tissue, bones and lungs, although primary or secondary involvement of bone is rare. Herein, we report a case of 14-year-old female child presented as extensive bony involvement with a clinical diagnosis of bone tumour/ small round cell tumour, which was proved to be ALK positive ALCL on histopathological examination. PMID:25738071

  7. Therapeutic strategies and mechanisms of drug resistance in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK)-rearranged lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Ryohei

    2017-02-06

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene encoding the receptor tyrosine kinase ALK is expressed as a fusion gene in a variety of carcinomas. The expression of ALK is nearly undetectable in adults, and its activation is normally regulated by its ligands, FAM150A/B. However, ALK gene rearrangements result in different ALK fusion proteins that are constitutively expressed via the active promoter of fusion partner genes. ALK fusion proteins dimerize in a ligand-independent manner and lead to the dysregulation of cell proliferation via abnormal constitutive activation of ALK tyrosine kinase. Many ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been developed to date, are three of which are currently in clinical use for the treatment of ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ALK TKIs often achieve marked tumor regression in NSCLC patients with ALK rearrangements; however, ALK TKI-resistant tumors inevitably emerge within a few years in most cases. In this review, we summarize diverse ALK TKI resistance mechanisms identified in NSCLC with ALK rearrangements, and review potential therapeutic strategies to overcome ALK TKI resistance in these patients.

  8. A novel Patient Derived Tumorgraft model with TRAF1-ALK Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma translocation

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Francesco; Todaro, Maria; van der Krogt, Jo-Anne; Boi, Michela; Landra, Indira; Machiorlatti, Rodolfo; Tabbo’, Fabrizio; Messana, Katia; Barreca, Antonella; Novero, Domenico; Gaudiano, Marcello; Aliberti, Sabrina; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Tousseyn, Thomas; Lasorsa, Elena; Crescenzo, Ramona; Bessone, Luca; Ficarra, Elisa; Acquaviva, Andrea; Rinaldi, Andrea; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Longo, Dario Livio; Aime, Silvio; Cheng, Mangeng; Ruggeri, Bruce; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Pileri, Stefano; Tiacci, Enrico; Falini, Brunangelo; Pera-Gresely, Benet; Cerchietti, Leandro; Iqbal, Javeed; Chan, Wing C; Shultz, Leonard D.; Kwee, Ivo; Piva, Roberto; Wlodarska, Iwona; Rabadan, Raul; Bertoni, Francesco; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Although Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphomas (ALCL) carrying Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) have a relatively good prognosis, aggressive forms exist. We have identified a novel translocation, causing the fusion of the TRAF1 and ALK genes, in one patient who presented with a leukemic ALK+ ALCL (ALCL-11). To uncover the mechanisms leading to high-grade ALCL, we developed a human Patient Derived Tumorgraft (hPDT) line. Molecular characterization of primary and PDT cells demonstrated the activation of ALK and of NFkB pathways. Genomic studies of ALCL-11 showed the TP53 loss and the in vivo subclonal expansion of lymphoma cells lacking PRDM1/Blimp-1 and with c-MYC gene amplification. The treatment with proteasome inhibitors of TRAF1-ALK cells led to down-regulation of p50/p52 and lymphoma growth inhibition. Moreover a NFkB gene set classifier stratified ALCL in distinct subsets with different clinical outcome. Moreover, a selective ALK inhibitor (CEP28122) resulted in a significant clinical response of hPDT mice, but the disease could not be eradicated. These data indicate that the activation of NFkB signaling contributes to the neoplastic phenotype of TRAF1-ALK ALCL. ALCL hPDTs are invaluable to validate the role of druggable molecules, predict therapeutic responses and are helpful tools for the implementation of patient specific therapies. PMID:25533804

  9. Novel TRAF1-ALK fusion identified by deep RNA sequencing of anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Andrew L; Vasmatzis, George; Asmann, Yan W; Davila, Jaime; Middha, Sumit; Eckloff, Bruce W; Johnson, Sarah H; Porcher, Julie C; Ansell, Stephen M; Caride, Ariel

    2013-11-01

    Chromosomal translocations leading to expression of abnormal fusion proteins play a major role in the pathogenesis of various hematologic malignancies. The recent development of high-throughput, "deep" sequencing has allowed discovery of novel translocations leading to a rapid increase in understanding these diseases. Translocations involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene leading to ALK fusion proteins originally were discovered in anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCLs). Among ALCLs, NPM1-ALK fusions are most common and lead to nuclear localization of the fusion protein. Here, we present a 50-year-old male with ALCL demonstrating cytoplasmic ALK immunoreactivity only, suggesting the presence of a non-NPM1 fusion partner. We performed deep RNA sequencing of tumor tissue from this patient and identified a novel transcript fusing Exon 6 of TRAF1 to Exon 20 of ALK. The TRAF1-ALK fusion transcript was confirmed at the mRNA level by Sanger sequencing and the fusion protein was visualized by Western blot. The discovery of this TRAF1-ALK fusion expands the diversity of known ALK fusion partners and highlights the power of deep sequencing for fusion transcript discovery. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Detection of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement in non-small cell lung cancer and related issues in ALK inhibitor therapy: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Yi, Eunhee S; Chung, Jin-Haeng; Kulig, Kimary; Kerr, Keith M

    2012-06-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, and ALK gene rearrangement (ALK+) is implicated in the oncogenesis of non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs), especially adenocarcinomas. The ALK inhibitor crizotinib was approved in August 2011 by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating late-stage NSCLCs that are ALK+, with a companion fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) test using the Vysis ALK Break Apart FISH Probe Kit. This review covers pertinent issues in ALK testing, including approaches to select target patients for the test, pros and cons of different detection methods, and mechanisms as well as monitoring of acquired crizotinib resistance in ALK+ NSCLCs.

  11. Variant translocation partners of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene in two cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma, identified by inverse cDNA polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Takeoka, Kayo; Okumura, Atsuko; Honjo, Gen; Ohno, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    In anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene is rearranged with diverse partners due to variant translocations/inversions. Case 1 was a 39-year-old man who developed multiple tumors in the mediastinum, psoas muscle, lung, and lymph nodes. A biopsy specimen of the inguinal node was effaced by large tumor cells expressing CD30, epithelial membrane antigen, and cytoplasmic ALK, which led to a diagnosis of ALK(+) ALCL. Case 2 was a 51-year-old man who was initially diagnosed with undifferentiated carcinoma. He developed multiple skin tumors eight years after his initial presentation, and was finally diagnosed with ALK(+) ALCL. He died of therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia. G-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization using an ALK break-apart probe revealed the rearrangement of ALK and suggested variant translocation in both cases. We applied an inverse cDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) strategy to identify the partner of ALK. Nucleotide sequencing of the PCR products and a database search revealed that the sequences of ATIC in case 1 and TRAF1 in case 2 appeared to follow those of ALK. We subsequently confirmed ATIC-ALK and TRAF1-ALK fusions by reverse transcriptase PCR and nucleotide sequencing. We successfully determined the partner gene of ALK in two cases of ALK(+) ALCL. ATIC is the second most common partner of variant ALK rearrangements, while the TRAF1-ALK fusion gene was first reported in 2013, and this is the second reported case of ALK(+) ALCL carrying TRAF1-ALK.

  12. ALK positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma of the Thoracic Spine.

    PubMed

    Abrego, Gabriela; García, Julio; Gilbert, Bruce; Forseen, Scott; Toscano, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Primary bone lymphoma (PBL) is an uncommon extra nodal disease that represents about 1-3% of lymphoma cases. Imaging findings are variable and non-specific. Computed tomography may demonstrate lytic lesions with sequestra and periosteal reaction. On magnetic resonance imaging, lesions are T1WI hypointense and T2WI hyperintense, related to peritumoral edema or bone marrow replacement. Rarely lesions may have associated fibrosis and show a more hypointense signal pattern on T2WI. After administration of contrast, PBL tends to enhance avidly. We present a case of a 24 years old African American female patient with history of back pain. Initial imaging examinations showed lesions involving the T12 and T11 vertebral bodies with initial negative biopsy results. One month later, the patient returned with worsening back pain, and the follow up studies depicted collapse of the T12 vertebral body. A diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma in T12 was made. A brief review of the literature, imaging and pathological findings, and treatment options are also discussed.

  13. ALK positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma of the Thoracic Spine

    PubMed Central

    Abrego, Gabriela; García, Julio; Gilbert, Bruce; Forseen, Scott; Toscano, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Primary bone lymphoma (PBL) is an uncommon extra nodal disease that represents about 1–3% of lymphoma cases. Imaging findings are variable and non-specific. Computed tomography may demonstrate lytic lesions with sequestra and periosteal reaction. On magnetic resonance imaging, lesions are T1WI hypointense and T2WI hyperintense, related to peritumoral edema or bone marrow replacement. Rarely lesions may have associated fibrosis and show a more hypointense signal pattern on T2WI. After administration of contrast, PBL tends to enhance avidly. We present a case of a 24 years old African American female patient with history of back pain. Initial imaging examinations showed lesions involving the T12 and T11 vertebral bodies with initial negative biopsy results. One month later, the patient returned with worsening back pain, and the follow up studies depicted collapse of the T12 vertebral body. A diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma in T12 was made. A brief review of the literature, imaging and pathological findings, and treatment options are also discussed. PMID:27761194

  14. Alectinib: a novel second generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor for overcoming clinically-acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zilan; Wang, Meining; Zhang, Ao

    2015-01-01

    The development of inhibitors for the tyrosine anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has advanced rapidly, driven by biology and medicinal chemistry. The first generation ALK inhibitor crizotinib was granted US FDA approval with only four years of preclinical and clinical testing. Although this drug offers significant clinical benefit to the ALK-positive patients, resistance has been developed through a variety of mechanisms. In addition to ceritinib, alectinib is another second-generation ALK inhibitor launched in 2014 in Japan. This drug has a unique chemical structure bearing a 5H-benzo[b]carbazol-11(6H)-one structural scaffold with an IC50 value of 1.9 nmol/L, and is highly potent against ALK bearing the gatekeeper mutation L1196M with an IC50 of 1.56 nmol/L. In the clinic, alectinib is highly efficacious in treatment of ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and retains potency to combat crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations L1196M, F1174L, R1275Q and C1156Y. PMID:26579422

  15. Silicone implant and primary breast ALK1-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma, fact or fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiyong; Lee, Andrew K

    2010-01-01

    The safety of silicone-based implant for mammoplasty has been debated for decades. A series of anecdotal case reports and a recent epidemiological case-control study have suggested a possible association between silicone implant and the development of primary breast ALK1-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), a rare type of peripheral T-cell lymphoma. In this report, we describe an additional case of primary breast ALK1-negative ALCL in the fibrous capsule and cystic fluid of silicone breast implant in a 58 year old woman who underwent breast reconstructive surgery after lumpectomy for her infiltrating breast adenocarcinoma. Morphologically and immunohistochemically, the lymphoma cells may be confused with recurrent infiltrating breast adenocarcinoma or other non-hematolymphoid malignancies. Molecular studies were needed to determine T-lineage differentiation of the malignant lymphoma cells. We will also review the case reports and case series published in the English literature and discuss our current understanding of silicone implant in primary breast ALK1-negative ALCL. PMID:19918336

  16. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene alteration in signet ring cell carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Alese, Olatunji B; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Sica, Gabriel; Zhang, Guojing; Alexis, Dianne; La Rosa, Francisco G; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Chen, Zhengjia; Rossi, Michael R; Adsay, Nazim V; Khuri, Fadlo R; Owonikoko, Taofeek K

    2015-03-01

    ALK-EML4 translocation is an established driver aberration in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with reported predilection for cases with signet ring histology. We assessed the presence of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements in signet ring cancers arising in the stomach and colon. Histologically confirmed cases of signet ring adenocarcinoma of the stomach or the colon were identified. The presence of the classic ALK and EML4 fusion gene was initially determined by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) technique. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed using two previously validated antibodies, ALK1 clone (1:100; DAKO) and 5A4 (Novocastra, Leica Biosystems) along with positive controls of ALK-translocated lung cancer. We employed 42 cases of signet ring carcinoma diagnosed between 2001 and 2011; 25 gastric and 17 colon cancer. Median age 63.3 years; male/female 17/25; race, black 47.5%, white 47.5%, others, 5%; stage I, 21.4%; stage II, 31%; stage III, 26.2%; stage IV, 21.4%. One of 42 cases (2.3%) was positive for ALK translocation by FISH using the standard criteria of at least 15% positive cells for the break-apart signal (50-70 cells enumerated per case). Using a less restrictive cut-off of 10% positive cells, 7 cases (16%) were considered possibly positive. None of the 'possibly positive' cases was found to harbor ALK translocation by another molecular testing approach (IHC). IHC with two previously validated monoclonal antibodies showed 0 of 42 (0%) cases positive. ALK gene rearrangement is very rare in gastrointestinal cancers and enrichment strategy focusing on signet ring cell histology did not significantly improve the detection rate.

  17. Three Years Sustained Complete Remission Achieved in a Primary Refractory ALK-Positive Anaplastic T Large Cell Lymphoma Treated with Crizotinib

    PubMed Central

    Mahuad, Carolina Valeria; Repáraz, María de los Ángeles Vicente; Zerga, Marta E.; Aizpurua, María Florencia; Casali, Claudia; Garate, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of the primary refractory anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK+) anaplastic T large cell lymphoma is ominous. The identification of molecular targets with potential to drive oncogenesis remains a cornerstone for the designing of new selective cancer therapies. Crizotinib is a selective ATP-competitive inhibitor for ALK, approved for its use in lung cancer with rearrangements on ALK gene. The reported cases describe the use of crizotinib as a bridging strategy prior to allotransplantation; there are no reported prolonged survivals under monotherapy with Crizotinib. We report a case of a primary refractory ALK+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma that sustains complete response after 3 years of crizotinib monotherapy. PMID:27441079

  18. ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma presenting as intradural spinal mass: first reported case and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Novello, Mariangela; Lauriola, Libero; Della Pepa, Giuseppe Maria; Giuseppe, La Rocca; Coli, Antonella; Visocchi, Massimiliano

    2013-08-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is characterized by large anaplastic cells of T-cell or null-cell phenotype expressing CD30 (Ki-1 antigen). In most cases this neoplasm expresses the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), a chimeric protein resulting from the t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocation. ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma is most frequent in the first three decades of life and shows a male predominance, involving both nodal and extranodal sites, but rarely the CNS. We report a 21-year-old patient with a previous history of nodal ALK-positive ALCL, lymphohistiocytic subtype, who was admitted for recent occurrence of left-sided anesthesia with pain and progressive motor weakness of both legs. An MRI of the spine documented an intradural extramedullary mass dislocating the thoracic cord, suggesting a meningioma and the patient underwent surgical decompression. Histological examination revealed a lymphoproliferative neoplasm with morphology and immunophenotype of ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma. After surgery, all preoperative symptoms disappeared. To our knowledge, no cases of ALCL presenting as secondary localization with an intradural extramedullary spinal mass have been reported in the literature. © 2012 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  19. A novel patient-derived tumorgraft model with TRAF1-ALK anaplastic large-cell lymphoma translocation.

    PubMed

    Abate, F; Todaro, M; van der Krogt, J-A; Boi, M; Landra, I; Machiorlatti, R; Tabbò, F; Messana, K; Abele, C; Barreca, A; Novero, D; Gaudiano, M; Aliberti, S; Di Giacomo, F; Tousseyn, T; Lasorsa, E; Crescenzo, R; Bessone, L; Ficarra, E; Acquaviva, A; Rinaldi, A; Ponzoni, M; Longo, D L; Aime, S; Cheng, M; Ruggeri, B; Piccaluga, P P; Pileri, S; Tiacci, E; Falini, B; Pera-Gresely, B; Cerchietti, L; Iqbal, J; Chan, W C; Shultz, L D; Kwee, I; Piva, R; Wlodarska, I; Rabadan, R; Bertoni, F; Inghirami, G

    2015-06-01

    Although anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCL) carrying anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have a relatively good prognosis, aggressive forms exist. We have identified a novel translocation, causing the fusion of the TRAF1 and ALK genes, in one patient who presented with a leukemic ALK+ ALCL (ALCL-11). To uncover the mechanisms leading to high-grade ALCL, we developed a human patient-derived tumorgraft (hPDT) line. Molecular characterization of primary and PDT cells demonstrated the activation of ALK and nuclear factor kB (NFkB) pathways. Genomic studies of ALCL-11 showed the TP53 loss and the in vivo subclonal expansion of lymphoma cells, lacking PRDM1/Blimp1 and carrying c-MYC gene amplification. The treatment with proteasome inhibitors of TRAF1-ALK cells led to the downregulation of p50/p52 and lymphoma growth inhibition. Moreover, a NFkB gene set classifier stratified ALCL in distinct subsets with different clinical outcome. Although a selective ALK inhibitor (CEP28122) resulted in a significant clinical response of hPDT mice, nevertheless the disease could not be eradicated. These data indicate that the activation of NFkB signaling contributes to the neoplastic phenotype of TRAF1-ALK ALCL. ALCL hPDTs are invaluable tools to validate the role of druggable molecules, predict therapeutic responses and implement patient specific therapies.

  20. ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma limited to the skin: clinical, histopathological and molecular analysis of 6 pediatric cases. A report from the ALCL99 study.

    PubMed

    Oschlies, Ilske; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Lamant, Laurence; Nakazawa, Atsuko; d'Amore, Emanuele S G; Hansson, Ulrika; Hebeda, Konnie; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Maldyk, Jadwiga; Müllauer, Leonhard; Tinguely, Marianne; Stücker, Markus; Ledeley, Marie-Cecile; Siebert, Reiner; Reiter, Alfred; Brugières, Laurence; Klapper, Wolfram; Woessmann, Wilhelm

    2013-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphomas are peripheral T-cell lymphomas that are characterized by a proliferation of large anaplastic blasts expressing CD30. In children, systemic anaplastic large cell lymphomas often present at advanced clinical stage and harbor translocations involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene leading to the expression of chimeric anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-fusion proteins. Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma is regarded as an ALK-negative variant confined to the skin and is part of the spectrum of primary cutaneous CD30-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Thirty-three of 487 pediatric patients registered within the Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma-99 trial (1999 to 2006) presented with a skin limited CD30-positive lympho-proliferative disorder. In 23 of the 33 patients, material for international histopathological review was available, and the cases were studied for histopathological, immunophenotypical and clinical features as well as for breaks within the ALK gene. Five of 23 cases and one additional case (identified after closure of the trial) expressed ALK-protein. Complete staging excluded any other organ involvement in all children. Expression of ALK proteins was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry in all cases and the presence of breaks of the ALK gene was genetically confirmed in 5 evaluable cases. The histopathological and clinical picture of these skin-restricted ALK-positive lymphomas was indistinguishable from that of cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Five children presented with a single skin lesion that was completely resected in 4 and incompletely resected in one. Three of these patients received no further therapy, 2 additional local radiotherapy, and one chemotherapy. All children remain in complete remission with a median follow up of seven years (range 1-8 years). We present 6 pediatric cases of ALK-positive primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphomas. After thorough

  1. Targeting autophagy enhances the anti-tumoral action of crizotinib in ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Desquesnes, Aurore; Le Gonidec, Sophie; AlSaati, Talal; Beau, Isabelle; Lamant, Laurence; Meggetto, Fabienne; Espinos, Estelle; Codogno, Patrice; Brousset, Pierre; Giuriato, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphomas (ALK+ ALCL) occur predominantly in children and young adults. Their treatment, based on aggressive chemotherapy, is not optimal since ALCL patients can still expect a 30% 2-year relapse rate. Tumor relapses are very aggressive and their underlying mechanisms are unknown. Crizotinib is the most advanced ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor and is already used in clinics to treat ALK-associated cancers. However, crizotinib escape mechanisms have emerged, thus preventing its use in frontline ALCL therapy. The process of autophagy has been proposed as the next target for elimination of the resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In this study, we investigated whether autophagy is activated in ALCL cells submitted to ALK inactivation (using crizotinib or ALK-targeting siRNA). Classical autophagy read-outs such as autophagosome visualization/quantification by electron microscopy and LC3-B marker turn-over assays were used to demonstrate autophagy induction and flux activation upon ALK inactivation. This was demonstrated to have a cytoprotective role on cell viability and clonogenic assays following combined ALK and autophagy inhibition. Altogether, our results suggest that co-treatment with crizotinib and chloroquine (two drugs already used in clinics) could be beneficial for ALK-positive ALCL patients. PMID:26338968

  2. Detection of novel and potentially actionable anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement in colorectal adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry screening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Kim, Sun Young; Jang, Jiryeon; Kim, Seung Tae; Park, Joon Oh; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Young Suk; Lee, Jiyun; Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Yoon Ah; Huh, Jung Wook; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Do, In-Gu; Kim, Seok Hyung; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Stephens, Philip J.; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Li, Gang Gary; Hornby, Zachary; Ali, Siraj M.; Miller, Vincent A.; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement has been detected in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) using advanced molecular diagnostics tests including exon scanning, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and next generation sequencing (NGS). We investigated if immunohistochemistry (IHC) can be used to detect ALK rearrangement in gastrointestinal malignancies. Experimental designs Tissue microarrays (TMAs) from consecutive gastric carcinoma (GC) and CRC patients who underwent surgical resection at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea were screened by IHC using ALK monoclonal antibody 5A4. IHC positive cases were confirmed by FISH, nCounter assays, and NGS-based comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP). ALK IHC was further applied to CRC patients enrolled in a pathway-directed therapeutic trial. Results Four hundred thirty-two GC and 172 CRC cases were screened by IHC. No GC sample was ALK IHC positive. One CRC (0.6%) was ALK IHC positive (3+) that was confirmed by ALK FISH and a novel CAD-ALK (C35; A20) fusion variant that resulted from a paracentric inversion event inv(2)(p22–21p23) was identified by CGP. One out of 50 CRC patients enrolled in a pathway-directed therapeutic trial was ALK IHC positive (3+) confirmed by ALK FISH and found to harbor the EML4-ALK (E21, A20) fusion variant by CGP. Growth of a tumor cell line derived from this EML4-ALK CRC patient was inhibited by ALK inhibitors crizotinib and entrectinib. Conclusions ALK IHC is a viable screening strategy for identifying ALK rearrangement in CRC. ALK rearrangement is a potential actionable driver mutation in CRC based on survival inhibition of patient tumor-derived cell line by potent ALK inhibitors. PMID:26172300

  3. Nucleophosmin/anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM/ALK) oncoprotein induces the T regulatory cell phenotype by activating STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Kasprzycka, Monika; Marzec, Michal; Liu, Xiaobin; Zhang, Qian; Wasik, Mariusz A.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms of malignant cell transformation mediated by the oncogenic, chimeric nucleophosmin/anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM/ALK) tyrosine kinase remain only partially understood. Here we report that the NPM/ALK-carrying T cell lymphoma (ALK+TCL) cells secrete IL-10 and TGF-β and express FoxP3, indicating their T regulatory (Treg) cell phenotype. The secreted IL-10 suppresses proliferation of normal immune, CD3/CD28-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and enhances viability of the ALK+TCL cells. The Treg phenotype of the affected cells is strictly dependent on NPM/ALK expression and function as demonstrated by transfection of the kinase into BaF3 cells and inhibition of its enzymatic activity and expression in ALK+TCL cells. NPM/ALK, in turn, induces the phenotype through activation of its key signal transmitter, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). These findings identify a mechanism of NPM/ALK-mediated oncogenesis based on induction of the Treg phenotype of the transformed CD4+ T cells. These results also provide an additional rationale to therapeutically target the chimeric kinase and/or STAT3 in ALK+TCL. PMID:16766651

  4. An interaction map of small-molecule kinase inhibitors with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) mutants in ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ai, Xinghao; Shen, Shengping; Shen, Lan; Lu, Shun

    2015-05-01

    Human anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has become a well-established target for the treatment of ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here, we have profiled seven small-molecule inhibitors, including 2 that are approved drugs, against a panel of clinically relevant mutations in ALK tyrosine kinase (TK) domain, aiming at a comprehensive understanding of molecular mechanism and biological implication underlying inhibitor response to ALK TK mutation. We find that (i) the gatekeeper mutation L1196M causes crizotinib resistance by simultaneously increasing and decreasing the binding affinities of, respectively, ATP and inhibitor to ALK, whereas the secondary mutation C1156Y, which is located far away from the ATP-binding site of ALK TK domain, causes the resistance by inducing marked allosteric effect on the site, (ii) the 2nd and 3rd generation kinase inhibitors exhibit relatively high sensitivity towards ALK mutants as compared to 1st generation inhibitors, (iii) the pan-kinase inhibitor staurosporine is insensitive for most mutations due to its high structural compatibility, and (iv) ATP affinity to ALK is generally reduced upon most clinically relevant mutations. Furthermore, we also identify six novel mutation-inhibitor pairs that are potentially associated with drug resistance. In addition, the G1202R and C1156Y mutations are expected to generally cause resistance for many existing inhibitors, since they can address significant effect on the geometric shape and physicochemical property of ALK active pocket.

  5. Sensitivity Analysis of the NPM-ALK Signalling Network Reveals Important Pathways for Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Buetti-Dinh, Antoine; O’Hare, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A large subset of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) patients harbour a somatic aberration in which anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is fused to nucleophosmin (NPM) resulting in a constitutively active signalling fusion protein, NPM-ALK. We computationally simulated the signalling network which mediates pathological cell survival and proliferation through NPM-ALK to identify therapeutically targetable nodes through which it may be possible to regain control of the tumourigenic process. The simulations reveal the predominant role of the VAV1-CDC42 (cell division control protein 42) pathway in NPM-ALK-driven cellular proliferation and of the Ras / mitogen-activated ERK kinase (MEK) / extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade in controlling cell survival. Our results also highlight the importance of a group of interleukins together with the Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) / signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signalling in the development of NPM-ALK derived ALCL. Depending on the activity of JAK3 and STAT3, the system may also be sensitive to activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP1), which has an inhibitory effect on cell survival and proliferation. The identification of signalling pathways active in tumourigenic processes is of fundamental importance for effective therapies. The prediction of alternative pathways that circumvent classical therapeutic targets opens the way to preventive approaches for countering the emergence of cancer resistance. PMID:27669408

  6. ALK- anaplastic large-cell lymphoma is clinically and immunophenotypically different from both ALK+ ALCL and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified: report from the International Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Project.

    PubMed

    Savage, Kerry J; Harris, Nancy Lee; Vose, Julie M; Ullrich, Fred; Jaffe, Elaine S; Connors, Joseph M; Rimsza, Lisa; Pileri, Stefano A; Chhanabhai, Mukesh; Gascoyne, Randy D; Armitage, James O; Weisenburger, Dennis D

    2008-06-15

    The International Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Project is a collaborative effort designed to gain better understanding of peripheral T-cell and natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs). A total of 22 institutions in North America, Europe, and Asia submitted clinical and pathologic information on PTCLs diagnosed and treated at their respective centers. Of the 1314 eligible patients, 181 had anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL; 13.8%) on consensus review: One hundred fifty-nine had systemic ALCL (12.1%) and 22 had primary cutaneous ALCL (1.7%). Patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive (ALK(+)) ALCL had a superior outcome compared with those with ALK(-) ALCL (5-year failure-free survival [FFS], 60% vs 36%; P = .015; 5-year overall survival [OS], 70% vs 49%; P = .016). However, contrary to prior reports, the 5-year FFS (36% vs 20%; P = .012) and OS (49% vs 32%; P = .032) were superior for ALK(-) ALCL compared with PTCL, not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS). Patients with primary cutaneous ALCL had a very favorable 5-year OS (90%), but with a propensity to relapse (5-year FFS, 55%). In summary, ALK(-) ALCL should continue to be separated from both ALK(+) ALCL and PTCL-NOS. Although the prognosis of ALK(-) ALCL appears to be better than that for PTCL-NOS, it is still unsatisfactory and better therapies are needed. Primary cutaneous ALCL is associated with an indolent course.

  7. Targeting ALK With Crizotinib in Pediatric Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma and Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor: A Children's Oncology Group Study.

    PubMed

    Mossé, Yael P; Voss, Stephan D; Lim, Megan S; Rolland, Delphine; Minard, Charles G; Fox, Elizabeth; Adamson, Peter; Wilner, Keith; Blaney, Susan M; Weigel, Brenda J

    2017-10-01

    Purpose Fusions involving the ALK gene are the predominant genetic lesion underlying pediatric anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL) and inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMTs). We assessed the activity of the ALK inhibitor crizotinib in patients who had no known curative treatment options at diagnosis or with relapsed/recurrent disease. Methods In this study, 26 patients with relapsed/refractory ALK-positive ALCL and 14 patients with metastatic or inoperable ALK-positive IMT received crizotinib orally twice daily. Study objectives were measurement of efficacy and safety. Correlative studies evaluated the serial detection of NPM-ALK fusion transcripts in patients with ALCL. Results The overall response rates for patients with ALCL treated at doses of 165 (ALCL165) and 280 (ALCL280) mg/m(2) were 83% and 90%, respectively. The overall response rate for patients with IMT (treated at 100, 165, and 280 mg/m(2)/dose) was 86%. A complete response was observed in 83% (five of six) of ALCL165, 80% (16 of 20) of ALCL280, and 36% (five of 14) of patients with IMT. Partial response rates were 0% (none of six), 10% (two of 20), and 50% (seven of 14), respectively. The median duration of therapy was 2.79, 0.4, and 1.63 years, respectively, with 12 patients ceasing protocol therapy to proceed to transplantation. The most common drug-related adverse event was decrease in neutrophil count in 33% and 70% of the ALCL165 and ALCL280 groups, respectively, and in 43% of patients with IMT. Levels of NPM-ALK decreased during therapy in most patients with ALCL. Conclusion The robust and sustained clinical responses to crizotinib therapy in patients with relapsed ALCL and metastatic or unresectable IMT highlight the importance of the ALK pathway in these diseases.

  8. Primary cutaneous CD 30 (+) ALK (−) anaplastic large cell lymphoma with dermoscopic findings: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Uzuncakmak, Tugba K.; Akdeniz, Necmettin; Karadag, Ayse S.; Taskin, Secil; Zemheri, Ebru I.; Argenziano, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Primary cutaneous CD 30 (+) anaplastic large cell lymphoma (PCALCL) is a rare and indolent type of cutaneous T cell lymphoma, which usually presents as an asymptomatic solitary firm nodule that rapidly grows and often ulcerates without any systemic involvement. A 64-year-old female presented to our outpatient clinic with a one-year history of multiple pink nodular lesions on the chest, back and gluteal regions. Dermoscopic examination of the nodular lesions revealed pink-to-yellow structureless areas and arborizing-to-polymorphous vessels. Histopathologic examination was consistent with CD30 (+) anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Systemic involvement was not detected. Local radiotherapy for large nodules and surgical excision for small nodules were performed. The large nodules had totally regressed after 10 sessions of radiotherapy. PMID:28243498

  9. Rearranged Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Gene in Adult-Onset Papillary Thyroid Cancer Amongst Atomic Bomb Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Mayumi; Takahashi, Keiko; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakachi, Kei; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously noted that among atomic bomb survivors (ABS), the relative frequency of cases of adult papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) with chromosomal rearrangements (mainly RET/PTC) was significantly greater in those with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. In contrast, the frequency of PTC cases with point mutations (mainly BRAFV600E) was significantly lower in patients with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. We also found that among ABS, the frequency of PTC cases with no detectable gene alterations in RET, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1 (NTRK1), BRAF, or RAS was significantly higher in patients with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. However, in ABS with PTC, the relationship between the presence of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fused with other gene partners and radiation exposure has received little study. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the relative frequency of rearranged ALK in ABS with PTC, and with no detectable gene alterations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF, or RAS, would be greater in those having relatively higher radiation exposures. Methods The 105 subjects in the study were drawn from the Life Span Study cohort of ABS of Hiroshima and Nagasaki who were diagnosed with PTC between 1956 and 1993. Seventy-nine were exposed (>0 mGy), and 26 were not exposed to A-bomb radiation. In the 25 ABS with PTC, and with no detectable gene alterations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF, or RAS, we examined archival, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded PTC specimens for rearrangement of ALK using reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5′ RACE). Results We found rearranged ALK in 10 of 19 radiation-exposed PTC cases, but none among 6 patients with PTC with no radiation exposure. In addition, solid/trabecular-like architecture in PTC was closely associated with ALK

  10. Rearranged anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene in adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer amongst atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Hamatani, Kiyohiro; Mukai, Mayumi; Takahashi, Keiko; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakachi, Kei; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2012-11-01

    We previously noted that among atomic bomb survivors (ABS), the relative frequency of cases of adult papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) with chromosomal rearrangements (mainly RET/PTC) was significantly greater in those with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. In contrast, the frequency of PTC cases with point mutations (mainly BRAF(V600E)) was significantly lower in patients with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. We also found that among ABS, the frequency of PTC cases with no detectable gene alterations in RET, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1 (NTRK1), BRAF, or RAS was significantly higher in patients with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. However, in ABS with PTC, the relationship between the presence of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fused with other gene partners and radiation exposure has received little study. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the relative frequency of rearranged ALK in ABS with PTC, and with no detectable gene alterations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF, or RAS, would be greater in those having relatively higher radiation exposures. The 105 subjects in the study were drawn from the Life Span Study cohort of ABS of Hiroshima and Nagasaki who were diagnosed with PTC between 1956 and 1993. Seventy-nine were exposed (>0 mGy), and 26 were not exposed to A-bomb radiation. In the 25 ABS with PTC, and with no detectable gene alterations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF, or RAS, we examined archival, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded PTC specimens for rearrangement of ALK using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5' RACE). We found rearranged ALK in 10 of 19 radiation-exposed PTC cases, but none among 6 patients with PTC with no radiation exposure. In addition, solid/trabecular-like architecture in PTC was closely associated with ALK rearrangements, being observed in

  11. Primary central nervous system ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaoqin; Li, Jun; Huo, Na; Wang, Yan; Wu, Zhao; Lin, Xiaohong; Zhao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma. It mostly invades lymph nodes with extranodal involvement observed in the soft tissue, bone, and skin. Patient concerns: We report a 34-year-old Chinese male patient who presented with headache, diplopia, and vomit. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis via lumbar puncture showed elevated CSF pressure, elevated CSF protein concentrations, decreased CSF glucose and chloride concentration significantly, and pleocytosis of 68 to 350 × 106/L, in which lymphocytes and monocytes were predominant. These changes could be suggestive of tuberculous (TB) meningitis. Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord delineated multiple enhancing nodules in spinal cord, cauda equina, and cristae membrane, and multiple abnormal enhancing lesions in bilateral lumbar intervertebral foramen. Diagnoses: Spinal dura mater biopsy and paraffin pathology examination revealed anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive ALCL. Interventions: High-dose methotrexate, cytosine arabinoside craniospinal, and radiotherapy. Outcomes: Last follow-up on September 22, 2015 showed no evidence of tumor recurrence and the lower extremity muscle strength recovered to 4/5. Lessons: ALCL of primary central nervous system is an exceedingly rare tumor, which is usually misdiagnosed as meningitis (especially TB meningitis) according to clinical manifestation and laboratory examination. Thus closely monitoring patient's conditions and timely adjusting therapeutic regimen during treatment are necessary. PMID:27930548

  12. The heat shock protein-90 co-chaperone, Cyclophilin 40, promotes ALK-positive, anaplastic large cell lymphoma viability and its expression is regulated by the NPM-ALK oncoprotein.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Joel D; Mohammed, Zubair; Bacani, Julinor T C; Lai, Raymond; Ingham, Robert J

    2012-06-08

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive, anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALK+ ALCL) is a T cell lymphoma defined by the presence of chromosomal translocations involving the ALK tyrosine kinase gene. These translocations generate fusion proteins (e.g. NPM-ALK) with constitutive tyrosine kinase activity, which activate numerous signalling pathways important for ALK+ ALCL pathogenesis. The molecular chaperone heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90) plays a critical role in allowing NPM-ALK and other signalling proteins to function in this lymphoma. Co-chaperone proteins are important for helping Hsp90 fold proteins and for directing Hsp90 to specific clients; however the importance of co-chaperone proteins in ALK+ ALCL has not been investigated. Our preliminary findings suggested that expression of the immunophilin co-chaperone, Cyclophilin 40 (Cyp40), is up-regulated in ALK+ ALCL by JunB, a transcription factor activated by NPM-ALK signalling. In this study we examined the regulation of the immunophilin family of co-chaperones by NPM-ALK and JunB, and investigated whether the immunophilin co-chaperones promote the viability of ALK+ ALCL cell lines. NPM-ALK and JunB were knocked-down in ALK+ ALCL cell lines with siRNA, and the effect on the expression of the three immunophilin co-chaperones: Cyp40, FK506-binding protein (FKBP) 51, and FKBP52 examined. Furthermore, the effect of knock-down of the immunophilin co-chaperones, either individually or in combination, on the viability of ALK+ ALCL cell lines and NPM-ALK levels and activity was also examined. We found that NPM-ALK promoted the transcription of Cyp40 and FKBP52, but only Cyp40 transcription was promoted by JunB. We also observed reduced viability of ALK+ ALCL cell lines treated with Cyp40 siRNA, but not with siRNAs directed against FKBP52 or FKBP51. Finally, we demonstrate that the decrease in the viability of ALK+ ALCL cell lines treated with Cyp40 siRNA does not appear to be due to a decrease in NPM-ALK levels or the

  13. Onalespib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, Mantle Cell Lymphoma, or Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-02

    ALK Positive; BCL6 Positive; Recurrent Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  14. ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma with urinary bladder involvement diagnosed in urine cytology: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Lobo, João; Henrique, Rui; Monteiro, Paula; Lobo, Cláudia

    2017-04-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma is an aggressive T-cell neoplasm. It rarely involves the urinary bladder, with just twelve cases reported thus far and only one being ALK-negative. Immunophenotyping (particularly for ALK) is mandatory, both for prognostic and therapeutic reasons. Herein, we report the case of a patient with an ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma involving the bladder which was diagnosed and fully characterized by immunocytochemistry in urine cytology. The patient underwent a cystoscopy and the urine sample disclosed tumor diathesis background and aggregates of atypical cells, with evidence of multinucleation and mitotic figures. Immunocytochemistry revealed strong membrane/Golgi positivity for CD30 and negativity for ALK. The patient was submitted to transurethral resection for therapeutic purposes, which confirmed the diagnosis. To the best of our knowledge, this represents only the third case of anaplastic large cell lymphoma with bladder involvement diagnosed in urine cytology and the very first with diagnostic findings allowing for immunophenotyping of the disease in a bladder wash. The present report reinforces the role of urine cytology as a suitable method for establishing an earlier diagnosis and characterization of the disease, avoiding submitting patients to invasive procedures like transurethral resections. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:354-358. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Therapeutic efficacy of the bromodomain inhibitor OTX015/MK-8628 in ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma: an alternative modality to overcome resistant phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Vurchio, Valentina; Yang, Shao Ning; Moon, John; Kwee, Ivo; Rinaldi, Andrea; Pan, Heng; Crescenzo, Ramona; Cheng, Mangeng; Cerchietti, Leandro; Elemento, Olivier; Riveiro, Maria E.; Cvitkovic, Esteban; Bertoni, Francesco; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL) represent a peripheral T-cell lymphoma subgroup, stratified based on the presence or absence of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) chimeras. Although ALK-positive ALCLs have a more favorable outcome than ALK-negative ALCL, refractory and/or relapsed forms are common and novel treatments are needed. Here we investigated the therapeutic potential of a novel bromodomain inhibitor, OTX015/MK-8628 in ALK-positive ALCLs. The effects of OTX015 on a panel of ALK+ ALCL cell lines was evaluated in terms of proliferation, cell cycle and downstream signaling, including gene expression profiling analyses. Synergy was tested with combination targeted therapies. Bromodomain inhibition with OTX015 led primarily to ALCL cell cycle arrest in a dose-dependent manner, along with downregulation of MYC and its downstream regulated genes. MYC overexpression did not compensate this OTX015-mediated phenotype. Transcriptomic analysis of OTX015-treated ALCL cells identified a gene signature common to various hematologic malignancies treated with bromodomain inhibitors, notably large cell lymphoma. OTX015-modulated genes included transcription factors (E2F2, NFKBIZ, FOS, JUNB, ID1, HOXA5 and HOXC6), members of multiple signaling pathways (ITK, PRKCH, and MKNK2), and histones (clusters 1-3). Combination of OTX015 with the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor ibrutinib led to cell cycle arrest then cell death, and combination with suboptimal doses of the ALK inhibitor CEP28122 caused cell cycle arrest. When OTX015 was associated with GANT61, a selective GLI1/2 inhibitor, C1156Y-resistant ALK ALCL growth was impaired. These findings support OTX015 clinical trials in refractory ALCL in combination with inhibitors of interleukin-2-inducible kinase or SHH/GLI1. PMID:27793034

  16. Brentuximab Vedotin or Crizotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-02

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Positive; CD30-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Stage II Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

  17. Consequences of heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) expression and activity on stress-induced apoptosis in CD30+ NPM-ALK+ anaplastic large-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Bonvini, P; Zorzi, E; Mussolin, L; Pillon, M; Romualdi, C; Peron, M; d'Amore, E S G; Lamant, L; Rosolen, A

    2012-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that control stress-induced apoptosis is critical to explain how tumours respond to treatment, as cancer cells frequently escape drug toxicity by regulating stress response through heat shock protein (HSP) expression. The overexpression of Hsp72, in particular, results in increased incidence of cell transformation, and correlates with poor prognosis in a wide range of cancers. We have shown that Hsp72 assists folding of oncogenic NPM-ALK kinase in anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs), but its role in the maintenance of the malignant phenotype remains uncertain. Therefore, we assessed Hsp72 expression in ALCLs, investigating more in detail the mechanisms that regulate its status and activity. We found that Hsp72 is unique among the HSPs involved in tumourigenesis to be overexpressed in ALK(+) tumours and cell lines and to be induced by stress. Different from other HSPs, Hsp72 prevents cell injury, Bax activation and death by apoptosis in ALK(+) cells, acting both upstream and downstream of mitochondria. Conversely, Hsp72 is underexpressed in ALK(-) ALCL cells, and it is unable to protect cells from apoptosis under stress. Moreover, when Hsp72 expression is reduced following NPM-ALK inhibition, lymphoma cells undergo apoptosis, demonstrating the importance of Hsp72 in regulating ALCL stress response and drug sensitivity.

  18. In contrast to agonist monoclonal antibodies, both C-terminal truncated form and full length form of Pleiotrophin failed to activate vertebrate ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)?

    PubMed

    Mathivet, Thomas; Mazot, Pierre; Vigny, Marc

    2007-12-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase essentially and transiently expressed during development in specific regions of the central and peripheral nervous system. ALK expression persists at a lower level in the adult brain. Thus, it might play an important role in both the normal development and function of the nervous system. The nature of the cognate ligand of this receptor in vertebrates is still a matter of debate. Pleiotrophin and midkine have been proposed as ligands of ALK but several independent studies do not confirm this hypothesis. Interestingly, a recent study proposed that a C-terminal truncated form of Pleiotrophin (Pleiotrophin.15) and not the full length form (Pleiotrophin.18) promotes glioblastoma proliferation in an ALK-dependent fashion. These data were obviously a strong basis to conciliate the conflicting results so far reported in the literature. In the present study, we first purified to homogeneity the two forms of Pleiotrophin secreted by HEK 293 cells. In contrast to agonist monoclonal antibodies, both Pleiotrophin.15 and Pleiotrophin.18 failed to activate ALK in neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells expressing this receptor. Thus, for our point of view, ALK is still an orphan receptor in vertebrates.

  19. Breast implant-associated ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma: a case report and discussion of possible pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    George, Eva V; Pharm, John; Houston, Courtney; Al-Quran, Semar; Brian, Grey; Dong, Huijia; Hai, Wang; Reeves, Westley; Yang, Li-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Breast implant associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL) is a recently recognized clinical entity, with only 39 well-documented cases reported worldwide, including 3 fatalities. Because of its rarity, the clinical and pathologic features of this malignancy have yet to be fully defined. Moreover, the pathogenesis of ALCL in association with textured silicone gel breast implants is poorly understood. Here we report a case of BIA-ALCL arising in a 67-year-old woman with a mastectomy due to breast cancer followed by implantation of textured silicone gel breast prosthesis. The patient presented with breast enlargement and tenderness 8 years following reconstructive surgery. MRI revealed a fluid collection surrounding the affected breast implant. Pathologic examination confirmed the presence of malignant ALCL T cells that were CD30+, CD8+, CD15+, HLA-DR+, CD25+ ALK- and p53. A diagnosis of indolent BIA-ALCL was made since tumor cells were not found outside of the capsule. Interestingly, an extensive mixed lymphocytic infiltrate and ectopic lymphoid tissue (lymphoid neogenesis) adjacent to the fibrous implant capsule were present. The patient was treated with capsulectomy and implantation of new breast prostheses. Six months later, the patient was found to have BIA-ALCL involvement of an axillary lymph node with cytogenetic evolution of the tumor. To our knowledge, this is the sixth reported case of aggressive BIA-ALCL. Unique features of this case include the association with lymphoid neogenesis and the in vivo cytogenetic progression of the tumor. This case provides insight into the potential role of chronic inflammation and genetic instability in the pathogenesis of BIA-ALCL.

  20. Clinicopathological features and relation between anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) mutation and histological subtype of lung adenocarcinoma in Eastern European Caucasian population

    PubMed Central

    Zaric, Bojan; Stojsic, Vladimir; Panjkovic, Milana; Tegeltija, Dragana; Stepanov, Vanesa; Kovacevic, Tomi; Sarcev, Tatjana; Radosavljevic, Davorin; Milovancev, Aleksandar; Adamidis, Vasilis; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Trakada, Georgia; Rapti, Aggeliki; Perin, Branislav

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The incidence of echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) mutation among surgically treated patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung of the Eastern European ethnicity is underreported. The aim of this trial was the determination of EML4-ALK mutation frequency in investigated population, and the evaluation of correlations between lung adenocarcinoma subtype and clinical characteristics with mutation status. Patients and methods: This was a prospective trial which included 195 patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung who underwent surgical treatment. ALK mutation screening was performed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). IHC scores of 2+ and 3+ were regarded as positive. Confirmatory FISH was performed in all IHC positive and in 2:1 ratio in negative patients. Results: Overall ALK mutation rate established by IHC was 6.2%, while FISH confirmed rate of 5.1%. The FISH confirmed ALK positivity in 7.6% Hungarians, 5.5% Serbians, and 6.6% Slovakians. Acinar subtype of adenocarcinoma of the lung was significantly (p=0.02) related to EML4-ALK positive mutation status. Most of the patients were males (56.9%), smokers (50.8%), or former smokers (28.7%) with acinar (55.4%) or solid (35.9%) adenocarcinoma of the lung. Sensitivity and specificity of IHC were 100% and 98.9% respectively. Conclusions: ALK mutation rate in surgically treated patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung was found to be 6.2% by IHC and 5.1% by FISH. Acinar subtype of the adenocarcinoma of the lung was significantly related to ALK positive mutation. PMID:27994656

  1. Fine-needle aspiration cytology yield as a basis for morphological, molecular, and cytogenetic diagnosis in alk-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma with atypical clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Bogdanic, Maja; Ostojic Kolonic, Slobodanka; Kaic, Gordana; Kardum Paro, Mirjana Mariana; Lasan Trcic, Ruzica; Kardum-Skelin, Ika

    2017-01-01

    ALK positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a T-cell lymphoma usually occurring in children and young adults. It frequently involves lymph nodes and extranodal sites and is associated with favorable prognosis. A 20-year old man was admitted for painful mass in the left axilla with overlying skin redness. Clinical presentation and US findings were highly suspicious for sarcoma. Definitive diagnosis was established cytolologically and using ancillary technologies from cytological samples. Fine needle aspiration cytology of tumor mass (lymph node conglomerate and surrounding tissue) show predominance of large, pleomorphic, atypical cells with large nuclei and vacuolised cytoplasm. Atypical cells immunocytochemically were positive for LCA, CD30, CD3, EMA, and ALK; negative for CD15 and CD56. NPM-ALK transcript was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCT). Molecular analysis of TCRß and TCRγ genes demonstrated clonal TCR genes rearrangement. Complex karyotype with multiple numerical and structural changes was found on conventional cytogenetics. These findings excluded sarcoma and corroborated the diagnosis of ALK positive ALCL. Cutaneous involvement in ALCL can clinically mimic sarcoma, especially in cases with localized disease without B symptoms. In those cases, immunostaining, PCR, and conventional cytogenetics are helpful to exclude sarcoma. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:51-54. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase status in rhabdomyosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akihiko; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Wakai, Susumu; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Tsuta, Koji; Fukayama, Masashi; Makimoto, Atsushi; Furuta, Koh; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2013-06-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare soft tissue sarcoma that typically affects children, adolescents, and young adults. Despite treatment via a multidisciplinary approach, the prognosis of advance-stage rhabdomyosarcomas remains poor, and a new treatment strategy is needed. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is a potential target for specific inhibitors. In this study, we investigated 116 rhabdomyosarcomas using a polymer-based ALK immunostaining method and correlated the results with clinicopathological parameters. In addition, we examined ALK status using dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization, PCR, and sequencing. In immunohistochemical analysis, ALK was detected in 2 (6%) of 33 embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas, 42 (69%) of 61 alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas, and 0 (0%) of 22 other subtypes, including pleomorphic, adult-spindle-cell/sclerosing, and epithelioid variants. Compared with ALK-negative alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas, ALK-positive ones are presented with metastatic spread more frequently and showed a greater extent of myogenin reactivity. Overall survival was not associated with ALK expression. FOXO1 rearrangement was significantly associated with ALK immunoreactivity. The median ALK copy number was greater in ALK-positive tumors than in ALK-negative tumors. Most (93%) cases tested showed no selective increase in the ALK gene dosage. ALK selective amplification and low-level selective gain were noted in one and three cases, respectively. Further, a high-polysomy pattern (≥4 ALK copies in ≥40% of cells) was observed in seven cases. A significant increase in the ALK copy number was exclusive to the ALK-immunopositive cohort, but it was uncommon, accounting for only 30% of the 37 ALK-positive rhabdomyosarcomas. ALK gene rearrangement was not observed in either cohort, while an ALK somatic mutation (I1277T) was found in one ALK-negative embryonal case. Although it remains controversial whether ALK expression without gene rearrangement

  3. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK 1) staining and molecular analysis in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours of the bladder: a preliminary clinicopathological study of nine cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Alex; Geddes, Nicola; Munson, Philippa; Joseph, Jean; Ramani, Pramila; Sandison, Ann; Fisher, Cyril; Parkinson, M Connie

    2004-07-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours (IMFT) may arise at any anatomical site, including lung, soft tissues, retroperitoneum and bladder. Although morphologically similar, these lesions encompass a spectrum of entities with differing aetiology, ranging from reactive/regenerative proliferations to low-grade neoplasms with a risk of local recurrence, but no significant metastatic potential. Vesical IMFT usually presents as a polypoid mass with a pale firm cut surface and can be of considerable size, mimicking a malignant tumour clinically and radiologically. Its good outcome, however, warrants conservative surgical excision, emphasising the importance of identification and distinction from malignant tumours of the bladder that may require more radical surgery and/or adjuvant therapy. We conducted a preliminary retrospective, comparative immunocytochemical study of 20 bladder tumours, including nine IMFTs, five spindle cell (sarcomatoid) carcinomas, two rhabdomyosarcomas, two leiomyosarcomas and two neurofibromas. The results confirmed IMFT positivity for smooth muscle actin, desmin and cytokeratin in 78-89% cases, resulting in potential confusion with sarcomatoid carcinoma or leiomyosarcoma. In contrast, cytoplasmic anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK 1) staining was present in eight IMFT (89%), but was not seen in any other lesion examined. The ALK 1 staining was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation, with translocation of the ALK gene present in 15-60% tumour cells in four of six IMFT examined, but not in four cases of sarcomatoid carcinoma or three of leiomyosarcoma. In conclusion, ALK 1 staining may be of value in the distinction of vesical IMFT from morphologically similar entities, and often reflects ALK gene translocations in these lesions.

  4. Nodal anaplastic large-cell lymphoma ALK-1- with CD30+ cutaneous lymphoproliferation treated with mistletoe: spontaneous remission or treatment response?

    PubMed

    Kameda, G; Kempf, W; Oschlies, I; Michael, K; Seifert, G; Längler, A

    2011-11-01

    A 12-year old girl presented with general weakness and weight loss, a localised cervical lymph node enlargement and cutaneous lesions compatible with lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP). Biopsies from lymph node and skin revealed a histological diagnosis of nodal large cell ALK-1- anaplastic lymphoma (ALCL) with a synchronous CD30+ cutaneous lymphoproliferation consistent with lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP). The girl was treated with mistletoe (MT) as monotherapy. Within 1 week after initiation of MT-treatment the skin lesions and lymph node enlargement improved. Under continuing MT-therapy 30 months after diagnosis the patient is still in complete remission. It is not possible to know whether this was a rare case of spontaneous remission of the nodal and skin-manifestations of this CD30+ T-cell lymphoproliferation or whether the observed effect was a specific therapeutic response to MT-treatment.

  5. Flow cytometry of ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma of breast implant-associated effusion and capsular tissue.

    PubMed

    Wu, David; Allen, Camilla T; Fromm, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) of the breast capsule is a rare lymphoma involving capsular tissues and/or effusions associated with breast implants. While several studies have detailed the histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) features of these tumors, no study has yet described flow cytometry features of the neoplastic cells of this entity. Here, we report two cases from our institution in which multi-parametric flow cytometry was performed. The immunophenotype of ALCL in association with breast implant was evaluated by flow cytometry. We show that much like CD30+ tumor cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) and ALCL of non-breast implant tumors, the neoplastic cells of this entity can be readily identified by flow cytometry. The neoplastic cells of both cases were largely devoid of T-cell antigens, but had expression of weak CD15, strong CD30, and expression of CD40. These results are correlated with routine morphologic and IHC analysis, supporting the flow cytometry immunophenotype. Flow cytometry can aid in the diagnostic evaluation of effusions or tissue samples in association with breast implant/prostheses. © 2014 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  6. Flow cytometry of ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma of breast implant-associated effusion and capsular tissue.

    PubMed

    Wu, David; Allen, Camilla T; Fromm, Jonathan R

    2014-06-28

    Background: Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) of the breast capsule is a rare lymphoma involving capsular tissues and/or effusions associated with breast implants. While several studies have detailed the histological and immunohistochemical features of these tumors, no study has yet described flow cytometry features of the neoplastic cells of this entity. Here, we report two cases from our institution in which multi-parametric flow cytometry was performed. Methods: The immunophenotype of ALCL in association with breast implant was evaluated by flow cytometry. Results: We show that much like CD30+ tumor cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) and ALCL of non-breast implant tumors, the neoplastic cells of this entity can be readily identified by flow cytometry. The neoplastic cells of both cases were largely devoid of T-cell antigens, but had expression of weak CD15, strong CD30, and expression of CD40. These results are correlated with routine morphologic and immunohistochemical analysis, supporting the flow cytometry immunophenotype. Conclusions: Flow cytometry can aid in the diagnostic evaluation of effusions or tissue samples in association with breast implant/prostheses. © 2014 Clinical Cytometry Society. Copyright © 2014 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  7. The anaplastic lymphoma kinase testing conundrum.

    PubMed

    Conde, Esther; Taniere, Philippe; Lopez-Rios, Fernando

    2015-02-01

    Given the excellent results of the clinical trials with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors, the importance of accurately identifying ALK-positive lung carcinoma patients has never been greater. It brings with it a pressing need for harmonized development of companion diagnostics, for economic, scientific and medical reasons. Therefore, it is crucial that ALK testing assays become more standardized both in performance (analytical phase) and interpretation (post-analytical phase). We find that both methods currently recommended by College of American Pathologists/International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/Association for Molecular Pathology guidelines (FISH and Immunohistochemistry) are reasonable approaches for primary routine ALK testing, if at least 50 tumor cells are scored and protocols are strictly followed. Moreover, due to the high demand to study multiple predictive biomarkers on different assay platforms, quick and reliable approaches to achieve this are essential to guide treatment decisions.

  8. Design, synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of 2-(thiazol-2-amino)-4-arylaminopyrimidines as potent anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiqing; Yue, Xihua; Song, Zilan; Peng, Xia; Guo, Junfeng; Ji, Yinchun; Cheng, Zhen; Ding, Jian; Ai, Jing; Geng, Meiyu; Zhang, Ao

    2014-10-30

    A series of new 2,4-diarylaminopyrimidine analogues (DAAPalogues) was developed by incorporation of a substituted 2-aminothiazole component as the C-2 substituent of the center pyrimidine core. Compound 5i showed highest potency of 12.4 nM against ALK and 24.1 nM against ALK gatekeeper mutation L1196M. Although only having moderate cellular potency in the SUP-M2 cells harboring NPM-ALK, compound 5i showed good kinase selectivity and dose-dependently inhibited phosphorylation of ALK and its down-stream signaling pathways.

  9. Identification of ALK germline mutation (3605delG) in pediatric anaplastic medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Coco, Simona; De Mariano, Marilena; Valdora, Francesca; Servidei, Tiziana; Ridola, Vita; Andolfo, Immacolata; Oberthuer, André; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Longo, Luca

    2012-10-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene has been found either rearranged or mutated in several neoplasms such as anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, non-small-cell lung cancer, neuroblastoma and anaplastic thyroid cancer. Medulloblastoma (MB) is an embryonic pediatric cancer arising from nervous system, a tissue in which ALK is expressed during embryonic development. We performed an ALK mutation screening in 52 MBs and we found a novel heterozygous germline deletion of a single base in exon 23 (3605delG) in a case with marked anaplasia. This G deletion results in a frameshift mutation producing a premature stop codon in exon 25 of ALK tyrosine kinase domain. We also screened three human MB cell lines without finding any mutation of ALK gene. Quantitative expression analysis of 16 out of 52 samples showed overexpression of ALK mRNA in three MBs. In the present study, we report the first mutation of ALK found in MB. Moreover, a deletion of ALK gene producing a stop codon has not been detected in human tumors up to now. Further investigations are now required to elucidate whether the truncated form of ALK may have a role in signal transduction.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of ceritinib in patients previously treated with crizotinib in anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer in Canada.

    PubMed

    Hurry, Manjusha; Zhou, Zheng-Yi; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Chenxue; Fan, Liangyi; Rebeira, Mayvis; Xie, Jipan

    2016-10-01

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of ceritinib vs alternatives in patients who discontinue treatment with crizotinib in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) from a Canadian public healthcare perspective. A partitioned survival model with three health states (stable, progressive, and death) was developed. Comparators were chosen based on reported utilization from a retrospective Canadian chart study; comparators were pemetrexed, best supportive care (BSC), and historical control (HC). HC comprised of all treatment alternatives reported. Progression-free survival and overall survival for ceritinib were estimated using data reported from single-arm clinical trials (ASCEND-1 [NCT01283516] and ASCEND-2 [NCT01685060]). Survival data for comparators were obtained from published clinical trials in a NSCLC population and from a Canadian retrospective chart study. Parametric models were used to extrapolate outcomes beyond the trial period. Drug acquisition, administration, resource use, and adverse event (AE) costs were obtained from databases. Utilities for health states and disutilities for AEs based on EQ-5D were derived from literature. Incremental costs per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained were estimated. Univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Over 4 years, ceritinib was associated with 0.86 QALYs and total direct costs of $89,740 for the post-ALK population. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was $149,117 comparing ceritinib vs BSC, $80,100 vs pemetrexed, and $104,436 vs HC. Additional scenarios included comparison to docetaxel with an ICER of $149,780 and using utility scores reported from PROFILE 1007, with a reported ICER ranging from $67,311 vs pemetrexed to $119,926 vs BSC. Due to limitations in clinical efficacy input, extensive sensitivity analyses were carried out whereby results remained consistent with the base-case findings. Based on the willingness-to-pay threshold for

  11. Primary gastric anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Chen; Zhang, Yizhuo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Most primary stomach lymphomas are now recognized to originate from B-cell. Primary gastric anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) as shown in this case is very rare. Case report A 59-year-old man presented with a 1-month history of epigastric pain. Computed tomography showed a tumor in the stomach with perigastric lymphadenopathy. Biopsy of the tumor with gastroendoscopy showed ALCL. Bone marrow aspiration and trephine biopsy showed no infiltration. A diagnosis of primary gastric ALK-negative ALCL was made. The patient was first treated with four cycles of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone (CHOP) regimen, but his condition did not show improvement. Then he was treated with two cycles of hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone/methotrexate and cytarabine (Hyper-CVAD/MA) regimen. In spite of these treatments, he still died of disease progression. Conclusion The prognosis of ALK-negative ALCLs is usually worse than ALK-positive ALCLs. In this case, the patient was not responsive to a multidrug chemotherapy with CHOP and Hyper-CVAD/MA. PMID:27695344

  12. PAX-5 Positivity in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Negative Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Arun, Indu; Roy, Paromita; Arora, Neeraj; Bhave, Saurabh Jayant; Nair, Reena; Chandy, Mammen

    2017-06-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a subtype of T-cell lymphomas that may mimic several other malignancies morphologically. With the help of immunohistochemistry, most cases of ALCL can be diagnosed on the basis of expression of T-cell lineage associated antigens. However, aberrations in the expression of immunohistochemical markers pose diagnostic challenges. The morphological and immunophenotypic features of ALCL show considerable overlap with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL), which is a B-cell lymphoma. The 2008 World Health Organization Classification of Tumours of Haematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues suggests that staining for the B-cell transcription factor, paired box 5 (PAX-5), is helpful in differentiating between them, as it is weakly positive in most CHL and should be negative in ALCL. We report a rare case of ALK-negative ALCL, which was positive for PAX-5 and CD15, mimicking CHL by immunohistochemistry, resulting in a diagnostic dilemma.

  13. Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... and support programs: • Lymphoma Helpline • Clinical Trials Information Service • Lymphoma Support Network • Publications • Teleconferences • Webcasts & podcasts • In-person conferences Medical ...

  14. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase: signalling in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Ruth H.; Vernersson, Emma; Grabbe, Caroline; Hallberg, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    RTKs (receptor tyrosine kinases) play important roles in cellular proliferation and differentiation. In addition, RTKs reveal oncogenic potential when their kinase activities are constitutively enhanced by point mutation, amplification or rearrangement of the corresponding genes. The ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) RTK was originally identified as a member of the insulin receptor subfamily of RTKs that acquires transforming capability when truncated and fused to NPM (nucleophosmin) in the t(2;5) chromosomal rearrangement associated with ALCL (anaplastic large cell lymphoma). To date, many chromosomal rearrangements leading to enhanced ALK activity have been described and are implicated in a number of cancer types. Recent reports of the EML4 (echinoderm microtubule-associated protein like 4)–ALK oncoprotein in NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer), together with the identification of activating point mutations in neuroblastoma, have highlighted ALK as a significant player and target for drug development in cancer. In the present review we address the role of ALK in development and disease and discuss implications for the future. PMID:19459784

  15. Design, synthesis, and biological activity of urea derivatives as anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    af Gennäs, Gustav Boije; Mologni, Luca; Ahmed, Shaheen; Rajaratnam, Mohanathas; Marin, Oriano; Lindholm, Niko; Viltadi, Michela; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Scapozza, Leonardo; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari

    2011-09-05

    In anaplastic large-cell lymphomas, chromosomal translocations involving the kinase domain of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), generally fused to the 5' part of the nucleophosmin gene, produce highly oncogenic ALK fusion proteins that deregulate cell cycle, apoptosis, and differentiation in these cells. Other fusion oncoproteins involving ALK, such as echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-ALK, were recently found in patients with non-small-cell lung, breast, and colorectal cancers. Recent research has focused on the development of inhibitors for targeted therapy of these ALK-positive tumors. Because kinase inhibitors that target the inactive conformation are thought to be more specific than ATP-targeted inhibitors, we investigated the possibility of using two known inhibitors, doramapimod and sorafenib, which target inactive kinases, to design new urea derivatives as ALK inhibitors. We generated a homology model of ALK in its inactive conformation complexed with doramapimod or sorafenib in its active site. The results elucidated why doramapimod is a weak inhibitor and why sorafenib does not inhibit ALK. Virtual screening of commercially available compounds using the homology model of ALK yielded candidate inhibitors, which were tested using biochemical assays. Herein we present the design, synthesis, biological activity, and structure-activity relationships of a novel series of urea compounds as potent ALK inhibitors. Some compounds showed inhibition of purified ALK in the high nanomolar range and selective antiproliferative activity on ALK-positive cells.

  16. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase: role in cancer pathogenesis and small-molecule inhibitor development for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Thomas R; Slavish, Jake; George, Rani E; Look, A Thomas; Xue, Liquan; Jiang, Qin; Cui, Xiaoli; Rentrop, Walter B; Morris, Stephan W

    2009-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), a receptor tyrosine kinase in the insulin receptor superfamily, was initially identified in constitutively activated oncogenic fusion forms – the most common being nucleophosmin-ALK – in anaplastic large-cell lymphomas, and subsequent studies have identified ALK fusions in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, systemic histiocytosis, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, esophageal squamous cell carcinomas and non-small-cell lung carcinomas. More recently, genomic DNA amplification and protein overexpression, as well as activating point mutations, of ALK have been described in neuroblastomas. In addition to those cancers for which a causative role for aberrant ALK activity is well validated, more circumstantial links implicate the full-length, normal ALK receptor in the genesis of other malignancies – including glioblastoma and breast cancer – via a mechanism of receptor activation involving autocrine and/or paracrine growth loops with the reported ALK ligands, pleiotrophin and midkine. This review summarizes normal ALK biology, the confirmed and putative roles of ALK in the development of human cancers and efforts to target ALK using small-molecule kinase inhibitors. PMID:19275511

  17. [Endobronchial anaplastic large cell lymphoma in childhood].

    PubMed

    Escobosa Sánchez, O M; Herrero Hernández, A; Acha García, T

    2009-05-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a very rare disease in childhood. The most common location of this lymphoma is lymph node and skin, with endobronchial involvement being extremely rare. We report a case of a 10-year-old boy diagnosed by chance with an endobronchial anaplastic large cell lymphoma, while he was being investigated for a a benign bone disease, due to the initial absence of respiratory symptoms.

  18. Treatment of elderly patients or patients who are performance status 2 (PS2) with advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer without epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocations - Still a daily challenge.

    PubMed

    Su, Chunxia; Zhou, Fei; Shen, Jiqiao; Zhao, Jing; O'Brien, Mary

    2017-09-01

    Cytotoxic chemotherapy remains the core treatment strategy for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with tumours that do not have actionable molecular alterations, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-sensitising mutations, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocations or ROS1 translocations. Age and performance status (PS) are two pivotal factors to guide treatment decisions regarding the use of chemotherapy in lung cancer patients. Lung cancer is predominantly a disease of the elderly, with more than two-thirds of patients aged ≥65 years, the current definition of 'elderly'. The prevalence of poor PS, as estimated by patients themselves, can be as high as 50%. Both the elderly and PS2 patients are underrepresented in clinical trials. Therefore, optimising treatment strategy for the subgroup of elderly or PS2 patients with advanced NSCLC remains challenging as a result of a paucity of clinical trial data. The current review focusses on the elderly or PS2 patients without actionable oncogenic drivers and attempts to summarise current available data on recent treatments trials including angiogenesis inhibitors and immune-checkpoint inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Combination therapy with brentuximab vedotin and cisplatin/cytarabine in a patient with primarily refractory anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Simon; Beer, Ambros J; Geissinger, Eva; Rosenwald, Andreas; Peschel, Christian; Ringshausen, Ingo; Keller, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a common subtype of the heterogeneous group of peripheral T-cell lymphomas, which is characterized by large pleomorphic cells with strong expression of CD30. Translocations involving ALK, the anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene, are associated with a favorable clinical outcome. Such ALK-positive ALCLs are usually responsive to a multidrug chemotherapy with CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone). However, there is no general consensus on the optimal therapy for relapsed or refractory ALCL. We report the case of a 24-year-old male suffering from ALK-positive ALCL with an uncommon manifestation of only extranodal disease in the gastric cardia region that showed primary refractoriness to standard CHOP chemotherapy. A combination therapy consisting of the anti-CD30 drug conjugate, brentuximab vedotin, and classical lymphoma salvage regimen DHAP (cisplatin, high-dose cytarabine and dexamethasone) was administered. Following two treatment cycles in 21-day intervals, the lymphoma showed considerable regression based on imaging diagnostics and no evidence of vital lymphoma in a subsequent biopsy. We did not observe any increase in toxicity; in particular, polyneuropathy and febrile neutropenia were not observed. In summary, we report that the antibody-drug conjugate brentuximab vedotin and a classical regimen used for aggressive lymphoma, DHAP, could be combined as salvage therapy in a case of refractory ALK-positive ALCL. Phase I/II studies will be required for safety and efficacy analysis.

  20. Combination therapy with brentuximab vedotin and cisplatin/cytarabine in a patient with primarily refractory anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Heidegger, Simon; Beer, Ambros J; Geissinger, Eva; Rosenwald, Andreas; Peschel, Christian; Ringshausen, Ingo; Keller, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a common subtype of the heterogeneous group of peripheral T-cell lymphomas, which is characterized by large pleomorphic cells with strong expression of CD30. Translocations involving ALK, the anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene, are associated with a favorable clinical outcome. Such ALK-positive ALCLs are usually responsive to a multidrug chemotherapy with CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone). However, there is no general consensus on the optimal therapy for relapsed or refractory ALCL. We report the case of a 24-year-old male suffering from ALK-positive ALCL with an uncommon manifestation of only extranodal disease in the gastric cardia region that showed primary refractoriness to standard CHOP chemotherapy. A combination therapy consisting of the anti-CD30 drug conjugate, brentuximab vedotin, and classical lymphoma salvage regimen DHAP (cisplatin, high-dose cytarabine and dexamethasone) was administered. Following two treatment cycles in 21-day intervals, the lymphoma showed considerable regression based on imaging diagnostics and no evidence of vital lymphoma in a subsequent biopsy. We did not observe any increase in toxicity; in particular, polyneuropathy and febrile neutropenia were not observed. In summary, we report that the antibody-drug conjugate brentuximab vedotin and a classical regimen used for aggressive lymphoma, DHAP, could be combined as salvage therapy in a case of refractory ALK-positive ALCL. Phase I/II studies will be required for safety and efficacy analysis. PMID:25018638

  1. Cytological Diagnosis of Bilateral Breast Implant-Associated Lymphoma of the ALK-Negative Anaplastic Large-Cell Type. Clinical Implications of Peri-Implant Breast Seroma Cytological Reporting.

    PubMed

    Granados, Rosario; Lumbreras, Eva M; Delgado, Manuel; Aramburu, José A; Tardío, Juan C

    2016-07-01

    The cytological examination of peri-prosthetic breast effusions allowed the diagnosis of bilateral breast-implant ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BI-ALCL) in the case reported. Ten years after reconstructive surgery with bilateral breast implants, a large unilateral seroma developed and was cytologically analyzed. The presence of CD30 and CD4-positive large-sized atypical lymphoid cells exhibiting horseshoe-shaped nuclei and a brisk mitotic activity rendered the diagnosis of BI-ALCL. Similar cells were seen in the peri-prosthetic fluid intraoperatively collected from the contralateral breast. Although initial histological analysis of the capsulectomy specimens showed unilateral tumor, the cytological findings prompted a more thorough tissue sampling, resulting in the diagnosis of bilateral disease. BI-ALCL usually follows an indolent clinical course; however, there are reported cases with an aggressive behavior. While the presence of bilateral disease is a putative risk factor for a bad prognosis, the small number of cases reported precludes a definitive assessment of this risk. Since most BI-ALCL present with late seromas, cytologic analysis of these effusions in women with breast implants should be mandatory. Cytology is a safe tool for diagnosis and follow-up of patients with breast implant-related late seromas, sometimes proven more sensitive than histological analysis. Complete bilateral capsulectomy and a detailed histological analysis should follow a cytological diagnosis of BI-ALCL in a breast effusion in order to avoid false negative diagnoses. Our case constitutes the first published report of a bilateral BI-ALCL diagnosed by cytology. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:623-627. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangements in non-small-cell lung cancer: novel applications in diagnostics and treatment.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, Rodney E; Ansari, Junaid M; Wei, Eric X; Alexander, Jonathan S; Cotelingam, James

    2017-08-01

    The ALK gene, first identified as an anaplastic large cell lymphoma driver mutation, is dysregulated in nearly 20 different human malignancies, including 3-7% of non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLC). In NSCLC, ALK commonly fuses with the EML4, forming a constitutively active tyrosine kinase that drives oncogenic progression. Recently, several ALK-inhibiting drugs have been developed that are more effective than standard chemotherapeutic regimens in treating advanced ALK-positive NSCLC. For this reason, molecular diagnostic testing for dysregulated ALK expression is a necessary part of identifying optimal NSCLC treatment options. Here, we review the molecular pathology of ALK-positive NSCLC, ALK molecular diagnostic techniques, ALK-targeted NSCLC treatments, and drug resistance mechanisms to ALK-targeted therapies.

  3. Synergistic activity of ALK and mTOR inhibitors for the treatment of NPM-ALK positive lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Redaelli, Sara; Ceccon, Monica; Antolini, Laura; Rigolio, Roberta; Pirola, Alessandra; Peronaci, Marco; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Mologni, Luca

    2016-01-01

    ALK-positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) represents a subset of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma whose treatment benefited from crizotinib development, a dual ALK/MET inhibitor. Crizotinib blocks ALK-triggered pathways such as PI3K/AKT/mTOR, indispensable for survival of ALK-driven tumors. Despite the positive impact of targeted treatment in ALCL, resistant clones are often selected during therapy. Strategies to overcome resistance include the design of second generation drugs and the use of combined therapies that simultaneously target multiple nodes essential for cells survival. We investigated the effects of combined ALK/mTOR inhibition. We observed a specific synergistic effect of combining ALK inhibitors with an mTOR inhibitor (temsirolimus), in ALK+ lymphoma cells. The positive cooperation resulted in an increased inhibition of mTOR effectors, compared to single treatments, a block in G0/G1 phase and induction of apoptosis. The combination was able to prevent the selection of resistant clones, while long-term exposure to single agents led to the establishment of resistant cell lines, with either ALK inhibitor or temsirolimus. In vivo, mice injected with Karpas 299 cells and treated with low dose combination showed complete regression of tumors, while only partial inhibition was obtained in single agents-treated mice. Upon treatment stop the combination was able to significantly delay tumor relapses. Re-challenge of relapsed tumors at a higher dose led to full regression of xenografts in the combination group, but not in mice treated with lorlatinib alone. In conclusion, our data suggest that the combination of ALK and mTOR inhibitors could be a valuable therapeutic option for ALK+ ALCL patients. PMID:27662658

  4. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in Association with Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Basheer, Aneesh; Padhi, Somanath; Nagarajan, Ramesh; Boopathy, Vinoth; Mookkappan, Sudhagar; Iqbal, Nayyar

    2014-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) has a well known association with lymphomas, especially of T cell origin. Prognosis of lymphoma associated HLH is very poor, especially in T cell lymphomas; and, therefore, early diagnosis might alter the outcome. Though association of HLH with systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is known, its occurrence in primary cutaneous ALCL (C-ALCL) is distinctly rare. We aim to describe a case of C-ALCL (anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)−) in an elderly male who succumbed to the complication of associated HLH, which was possibly triggered by coexistent virus infection. We briefly present the literatures on lymphoma associated HLH and discuss the histopathological differentials of cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders. We do suggest that HLH may pose diagnostic challenges in the evaluation of an underlying lymphoma and hence warrants proper evaluation for the underlying etiologies and/or triggering factors. PMID:25405042

  5. Ethanol activates midkine and anaplastic lymphoma kinase signaling in neuroblastoma cells and in the brain.

    PubMed

    He, Donghong; Chen, Hu; Muramatsu, Hisako; Lasek, Amy W

    2015-11-01

    Alcohol engages signaling pathways in the brain. Midkine (MDK) is a neurotrophic factor that is over-expressed in the prefrontal cortex of alcoholics. MDK and one of its receptors, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), also regulate behavioral responses to ethanol in mice. The goal of this study was to determine whether MDK and ALK expression and signaling are activated by ethanol. We found that ethanol treatment of neuroblastoma cells increased MDK and ALK expression. We also assessed activation of ALK by ethanol in cells and found that ALK and ALK-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation increased rapidly with ethanol exposure. Similarly, treatment of cells with recombinant MDK protein increased ALK, ERK and STAT3 phosphorylation, suggesting that ethanol may utilize MDK to activate ALK signaling. In support of this, transfection of cells with MDK siRNAs attenuated ALK signaling in response to ethanol. Ethanol also activates ERK signaling in the brain. We found that inhibition of ALK or knockout of MDK attenuated ethanol-induced ERK phosphorylation in mouse amygdala. These results demonstrate that ethanol engages MDK and ALK signaling, which has important consequences for alcohol-induced neurotoxicity and the regulation of behaviors related to alcohol abuse.

  6. Redundant and nonredundant roles for Cdc42 and Rac1 in lymphomas developed in NPM-ALK transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Choudhari, Ramesh; Minero, Valerio Giacomo; Menotti, Matteo; Pulito, Roberta; Brakebusch, Cord; Compagno, Mara; Voena, Claudia; Ambrogio, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Rho family GTPases could have a critical role in the biology of T-cell lymphoma. In ALK-rearranged anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), a specific subtype of T-cell lymphoma, the Rho family GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1 are activated by the ALK oncogenic activity. In vitro studies have shown that Cdc42 and Rac1 control rather similar phenotypes of ALCL biology such as the proliferation, survival, and migration of lymphoma cells. However, their role and possible redundancy in ALK-driven lymphoma development in vivo are still undetermined. We genetically deleted Cdc42 or Rac1 in a mouse model of ALK-rearranged ALCL to show that either Cdc42 or Rac1 deletion impaired lymphoma development, modified lymphoma morphology, actin filament distribution, and migration properties of lymphoma cells. Cdc42 or Rac1 deletion primarily affected survival rather than proliferation of lymphoma cells. Apoptosis of lymphoma cells was equally induced following Cdc42 or Rac1 deletion, was associated with upregulation of the proapoptotic molecule Bid, and was blocked by Bcl2 overexpression. Remarkably, Cdc42/Rac1 double deletion, but not Cdc42 or Rac1 single deletions, completely prevented NPM-ALK lymphoma dissemination in vivo. Thus, Cdc42 and Rac1 have nonredundant roles in controlling ALK-rearranged lymphoma survival and morphology but are redundant for lymphoma dissemination, suggesting that targeting both GTPases could represent a preferable therapeutic option for ALCL treatment. PMID:26747246

  7. Adult Systemic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma: Recommendations for Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Bennani-Baiti, Nabila; Ansell, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Summary Systemic anaplastic large cell lymphomas (sALCLs) comprise a heterogeneous group of relatively rare T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas characterized by CD30 expression and other unifying pathologic features. ALK fusions are present in about 50% of cases. Pathological diagnosis can be challenging, particularly in ALK-negative cases. Though ALK-positive and ALK-negative sALCL are similar morphologically and immunophenotypically, they are separate entities with different genetics, clinical behavior, and outcomes. Evidence-based data evaluating treatment regimens are limited as randomized controlled trials are lacking and most prospective studies are too small to draw definitive conclusions. However, recent advances in molecular biology are bringing forth much needed knowledge in this field, and are likely to guide further targeted therapeutic development. PMID:26581318

  8. Diagnostic Assays for Identification of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase–Positive Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weickhardt, Andrew J.; Aisner, Dara L.; Franklin, Wilbur A.; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Doebele, Robert C.; Camidge, D. Ross

    2014-01-01

    In series dominated by adenocarcinoma histology, approximately 5% of non–small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) harbor an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement. Crizotinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor with significant activity against ALK, has demonstrated high response rates and prolonged progression-free survival in ALK-positive patients enrolled in phase 1/2 clinical trials. In 2011, crizotinib received accelerated approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of proven ALK-positive NSCLC using an FDA-approved diagnostic test. Currently, only break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization testing is FDA approved as a companion diagnostic for crizotinib; however, many other assays are available or in development. In the current review, the authors summarize the diagnostic tests available, or likely to become available, that could be used to identify patients with ALK-positive NSCLC, highlighting the pros and cons of each. PMID:23280244

  9. Pharmacological inhibition of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase rescues spatial memory impairments in Neurofibromatosis 1 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Joseph B; Weber, Sydney; Marzulla, Tessa; Raber, Jacob

    2017-08-14

    Heterozygous Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) loss of function mutations are found in 90% of patients with neurofibromatosis, a syndrome associated with disabling cognitive impairment. Drosophila studies have demonstrated a genetic interaction between Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (Alk) and NF1 in cognitive performance. In addition, pharmacologic inhibition of Alk improves cognitive performance in heterozygous NF1 mutant flies. In this study, we tested whether pharmacological inhibition of Alk in heterozygous NF1 mutant mice attenuates or rescues cognitive impairments. Cognitive impairment of spatial memory retention observed in heterozygous NF1 mutant mice was rescued by the Alk inhibitor. These data support the hypothesis that inhibition of Alk may cognitively benefit patients with Neurofibromatosis 1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 negatively regulates anaplastic lymphoma kinase in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Shunpei; Takatori, Atsushi; Ogura, Atsushi; Kohashi, Kenichi; Souzaki, Ryota; Kinoshita, Yoshiaki; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Hossain, Md. Shamim; Ohira, Miki; Nakamura, Yohko; Nakagawara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    In neuroblastoma (NB), one of the most common paediatric solid tumours, activation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is often associated with poor outcomes. Although genetic studies have identified copy number alteration and nonsynonymous mutations of ALK, the regulatory mechanism of ALK signalling at protein levels is largely elusive. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 (NLRR1) is a type 1 transmembrane protein that is highly expressed in unfavourable NB and potentially influences receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Here, we showed that NLRR1 and ALK exhibited a mutually exclusive expression pattern in primary NB tissues by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, dorsal root ganglia of Nlrr1+/+ and Nlrr1−/− mice displayed the opposite expression patterns of Nlrr1 and Alk. Of interest, NLRR1 physically interacted with ALK in vitro through its extracellular region. Notably, the NLRR1 ectodomain impaired ALK phosphorylation and proliferation of ALK-mutated NB cells. A newly identified cleavage of the NLRR1 ectodomain also supported NLRR1-mediated ALK signal regulation in trans. Thus, we conclude that NLRR1 appears to be an extracellular negative regulator of ALK signalling in NB and neuronal development. Our findings may be beneficial to comprehend NB heterogeneity and to develop a novel therapy against unfavourable NB. PMID:27604320

  11. Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With CD30-Positive Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-15

    Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Negative; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Positive; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; CD30-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage III Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

  12. Quantification of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Protein Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Tissues from Patients Treated with Crizotinib.

    PubMed

    Hembrough, Todd; Liao, Wei-Li; Hartley, Christopher P; Ma, Patrick C; Velcheti, Vamsidhar; Lanigan, Christopher; Thyparambil, Sheeno; An, Eunkyung; Monga, Manish; Krizman, David; Burrows, Jon; Tafe, Laura J

    2016-01-01

    Crizotinib has antitumor activity in ALK (anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase)-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The current diagnostic test for ALK rearrangement is breakapart fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), but FISH has low throughput and is not always reflective of protein concentrations. The emergence of multiple clinically relevant biomarkers in NSCLC necessitates efficient testing of scarce tissue samples. We developed an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) protein assay that uses multiplexed selected reaction monitoring (SRM) to quantify absolute amounts of ALK in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor tissue. After validation in formalin-fixed cell lines, the SRM assay was used to quantify concentrations of ALK in 18 FFPE NSCLC samples that had been tested for ALK by FISH and immunohistochemistry. Results were correlated with patient response to crizotinib. We detected ALK in 11 of 14 NSCLC samples with known ALK rearrangements by FISH. Absolute ALK concentrations correlated with clinical response in 5 of 8 patients treated with crizotinib. The SRM assay did not detect ALK in 3 FISH-positive patients who had not responded to crizotinib. In 1 of these cases, DNA sequencing revealed a point mutation that predicts a nonfunctional ALK fusion protein. The SRM assay did not detect ALK in any tumor tissue with a negative ALK status by FISH or immunohistochemistry. ALK concentrations measured by SRM correlate with crizotinib response in NSCLC patients. The ALK SRM proteomic assay, which may be multiplexed with other clinically relevant proteins, allows for rapid identification of patients potentially eligible for targeted therapies. © 2015 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  13. Quantification of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Protein Expression in Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Tissues from Patients Treated with Crizotinib

    PubMed Central

    Hembrough, Todd; Liao, Wei-Li; Hartley, Christopher P.; Ma, Patrick C.; Velcheti, Vamsidhar; Lanigan, Christopher; Thyparambil, Sheeno; An, Eunkyung; Monga, Manish; Krizman, David; Burrows, Jon; Tafe, Laura J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Crizotinib has antitumor activity in ALK (anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase)-rearranged non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The current diagnostic test for ALK rearrangement is breakapart fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), but FISH has low throughput and is not always reflective of protein concentrations. The emergence of multiple clinically relevant biomarkers in NSCLC necessitates efficient testing of scarce tissue samples. We developed an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) protein assay that uses multiplexed selected reaction monitoring (SRM) to quantify absolute amounts of ALK in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor tissue. METHODS After validation in formalin-fixed cell lines, the SRM assay was used to quantify concentrations of ALK in 18 FFPE NSCLC samples that had been tested for ALK by FISH and immunohistochemistry. Results were correlated with patient response to crizotinib. RESULTS We detected ALK in 11 of 14 NSCLC samples with known ALK rearrangements by FISH. Absolute ALK concentrations correlated with clinical response in 5 of 8 patients treated with crizotinib. The SRM assay did not detect ALK in 3 FISH-positive patients who had not responded to crizotinib. In 1 of these cases, DNA sequencing revealed a point mutation that predicts a nonfunctional ALK fusion protein. The SRM assay did not detect ALK in any tumor tissue with a negative ALK status by FISH or immunohistochemistry. CONCLUSIONS ALK concentrations measured by SRM correlate with crizotinib response in NSCLC patients. The ALK SRM proteomic assay, which may be multiplexed with other clinically relevant proteins, allows for rapid identification of patients potentially eligible for targeted therapies. PMID:26585927

  14. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase aberrations correlate with metastatic features in pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Raffaella; Collini, Paola; Alaggio, Rita; Zin, Angelica; Bonvini, Paolo; Antonescu, Cristina R; Boldrini, Renata; Caserini, Roberto; Moro, Massimo; Centonze, Giovanni; Meazza, Cristina; Massimino, Maura; Bergamaschi, Luca; Luksch, Roberto; Chiaravalli, Stefano; Bisogno, Gianni; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Daidone, MariaGrazia

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most frequent soft tissue tumor in childhood and arises from immature mesenchymal cells committed to skeletal muscle differentiation. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase aberrantly expressed in several cancers. Moreover, ALK full-length receptor protein has been observed in RMS, although its clinical and functional significance is yet controversial. The role of ALK and its clinical relevance were investigated in a selected cohort of 74 FFPE pediatric RMS and a panel of RMS cell lines, evaluating its gene and protein status, utilizing Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH), immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blot approaches. Moreover, to get insight into its possible therapeutic relevance, effects of ALK silencing on cell proliferation, invasion and apoptosis were studied in RMS cells. ALK IHC positivity was significantly correlated with gene copy number gain, the alveolar subtype, PAX3/7-FOXO1 rearrangements, the presence of metastasis at diagnosis and a worse overall outcome. Furthermore, EML4-ALK fusion gene associated with higher protein expression was identified in an embryonal RMS. ALK silencing in RH30 ALK positive cells strongly inhibited invasion capability. Overall, our data suggest a potential role of ALK in pediatric RMS. PMID:27385213

  15. An Evolutionary Conserved Role for Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase in Behavioral Responses to Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Lasek, Amy W.; Lim, Jana; Kliethermes, Christopher L.; Berger, Karen H.; Joslyn, Geoff; Brush, Gerry; Xue, Liquan; Robertson, Margaret; Moore, Monica S.; Morris, Stephan W.; Schuckit, Marc A.; White, Raymond L.; Heberlein, Ulrike

    2011-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk) is a gene expressed in the nervous system that encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase commonly known for its oncogenic function in various human cancers. We have determined that Alk is associated with altered behavioral responses to ethanol in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, in mice, and in humans. Mutant flies containing transposon insertions in dAlk demonstrate increased resistance to the sedating effect of ethanol. Database analyses revealed that Alk expression levels in the brains of recombinant inbred mice are negatively correlated with ethanol-induced ataxia and ethanol consumption. We therefore tested Alk gene knockout mice and found that they sedate longer in response to high doses of ethanol and consume more ethanol than wild-type mice. Finally, sequencing of human ALK led to the discovery of four polymorphisms associated with a low level of response to ethanol, an intermediate phenotype that is predictive of future alcohol use disorders (AUDs). These results suggest that Alk plays an evolutionary conserved role in ethanol-related behaviors. Moreover, ALK may be a novel candidate gene conferring risk for AUDs as well as a potential target for pharmacological intervention. PMID:21799923

  16. TrkA is a binding partner of NPM-ALK that promotes the survival of ALK(+) T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenyu; George, Suraj Konnath; George, Bhawana; Curry, Choladda V; Murzabdillaeva, Albina; Alkan, Serhan; Amin, Hesham M

    2017-09-01

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase-expressing (NPM-ALK(+) ) T-cell lymphoma is an aggressive neoplasm that is more commonly seen in children and young adults. The pathogenesis of NPM-ALK(+) T-cell lymphoma is not completely understood. Wild-type ALK is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is physiologically expressed in neural tissues during early stages of human development, which suggests that ALK may interact with neurotrophic factors. The aberrant expression of NPM-ALK results from a translocation between the ALK gene on chromosome 2p23 and the NPM gene on chromosome 5q35. The nerve growth factor (NGF) is the first neurotrophic factor attributed to non-neural functions including cancer cell survival, proliferation, and metastasis. These functions are primarily mediated through the tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA). The expression and role of NGF/TrkA in NPM-ALK(+) T-cell lymphoma are not known. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that TrkA signaling is upregulated and sustains the survival of this lymphoma. Our data illustrate that TrkA and NGF are expressed in five NPM-ALK(+) T-cell lymphoma cell lines and TrkA is expressed in 11 of 13 primary lymphoma tumors from patients. In addition, we found evidence to support that NPM-ALK and TrkA functionally interact. A selective TrkA inhibitor induced apoptosis and decreased cell viability, proliferation, and colony formation of NPM-ALK(+) T-cell lymphoma cell lines. These effects were associated with downregulation of cell survival regulatory proteins. Similar results were also observed using specific knockdown of TrkA in NPM-ALK(+) T-cell lymphoma cells by siRNA. Importantly, the inhibition of TrkA signaling was associated with antitumor effects in vivo, because tumor xenografts in mice regressed and the mice exhibited improved survival. In conclusion, TrkA plays an important role in the pathogenesis of NPM-ALK(+) T-cell lymphoma, and therefore, targeting TrkA signaling may represent a novel approach to

  17. Primary anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma of the breast in a male patient.

    PubMed

    Ko, E S; Seol, H; Shin, J H; Ko, E Y

    2012-04-01

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma is an extremely rare lymphoma subtype. We describe the mammographic and ultrasonographic findings in a 51-year-old male patient who suffered from a palpable lump caused by this rare disease.

  18. Composite lymphoma with coexistence of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and anaplastic large cell lymphoma: Diagnostic pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Meyyappa Devan; Kar, Rakhee; Basu, Debdatta; Cyriac, Sunu Lazar

    2017-01-01

    Composite lymphoma is a rare tumor composed of two or more distinct lymphomas in the same topographic site or tissue. Several combinations of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), T-cell NHL, and Hodgkin lymphoma can occur with different prognoses and treatments. The coexistence of a B-cell NHL and a T-cell NHL is unusual. The exact etiology of composite lymphoma is unknown; however, few mechanisms have been proposed to explain its pathogenesis. The chemotherapeutic protocols are heterogeneous but are essentially targeted against the high-grade component. Most of the cases show worse outcome with a median survival of 12 months. In this article, we report a case of composite lymphoma which was initially diagnosed as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and the presence of CD3-positive atypical cells in the bone marrow urged us to re-evaluate the lymph node biopsy following which a focus of Alk-1-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma was identified.

  19. Discovery of Brigatinib (AP26113), a Phosphine Oxide-Containing, Potent, Orally Active Inhibitor of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Sheng; Liu, Shuangying; Zou, Dong; Thomas, Mathew; Wang, Yihan; Zhou, Tianjun; Romero, Jan; Kohlmann, Anna; Li, Feng; Qi, Jiwei; Cai, Lisi; Dwight, Timothy A; Xu, Yongjin; Xu, Rongsong; Dodd, Rory; Toms, Angela; Parillon, Lois; Lu, Xiaohui; Anjum, Rana; Zhang, Sen; Wang, Frank; Keats, Jeffrey; Wardwell, Scott D; Ning, Yaoyu; Xu, Qihong; Moran, Lauren E; Mohemmad, Qurish K; Jang, Hyun Gyung; Clackson, Tim; Narasimhan, Narayana I; Rivera, Victor M; Zhu, Xiaotian; Dalgarno, David; Shakespeare, William C

    2016-05-26

    In the treatment of echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive (ALK+) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), secondary mutations within the ALK kinase domain have emerged as a major resistance mechanism to both first- and second-generation ALK inhibitors. This report describes the design and synthesis of a series of 2,4-diarylaminopyrimidine-based potent and selective ALK inhibitors culminating in identification of the investigational clinical candidate brigatinib. A unique structural feature of brigatinib is a phosphine oxide, an overlooked but novel hydrogen-bond acceptor that drives potency and selectivity in addition to favorable ADME properties. Brigatinib displayed low nanomolar IC50s against native ALK and all tested clinically relevant ALK mutants in both enzyme-based biochemical and cell-based viability assays and demonstrated efficacy in multiple ALK+ xenografts in mice, including Karpas-299 (anaplastic large-cell lymphomas [ALCL]) and H3122 (NSCLC). Brigatinib represents the most clinically advanced phosphine oxide-containing drug candidate to date and is currently being evaluated in a global phase 2 registration trial.

  20. Genetic inhibition of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase rescues cognitive impairments in Neurofibromatosis 1 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Joseph B; Weber, Sydney J; Torres, Eileen Ruth S; Marzulla, Tessa; Raber, Jacob

    2017-03-15

    Heterozygous Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) loss of function mutations occur in approximately 90% of patients with neurofibromatosis. A major, disabling phenotypic consequence of reduced NF1 function is cognitive impairment; a possibly related behavioral phenotype is impaired sleep. Recent results in Drosophila have demonstrated a genetic interaction between Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (Alk) and NF1 for both associative learning and sleep. Inhibition of Alk improves associative learning and sleep in heterozygous NF1 mutant flies. The results in Drosophila provide a strong motivation to investigate NF1/Alk genetic interactions in mice. In Drosophila, activation of Alk by its ligand, Jelly belly (Jeb), is the physiologically relevant target of negative regulation by NF1. Therefore, we tested whether genetic inhibition of Alk in heterozygous NF1 mutant mice attenuates or rescues cognitive impairments in mice. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that NF1 functions in mice biochemically to inhibit signaling from Alk through Ras. The cognitive phenotypes observed in heterozygous NF1 mutant mice are rescued or ameliorated by genetic inhibition of Alk activity. In two tests of hippocampus-dependent learning, the Morris water maze and extinction of contextual fear, mutation of one or both alleles of Alk was sufficient to improve performance to wild type or near wild type levels in NF1-/+ mice. In addition, in NF1 mice genetic inhibition of Alk improves circadian activity levels. These data are intriguing in light of the circadian alterations seen in NF1 patients and indicate that inhibition of Alk activity may cognitively benefit patients with Neurofibromatosis 1.

  1. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Rearrangement in Digestive Tract Cancer: Implication for Targeted Therapy in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Guo, Lei; Qiu, Tian; Ling, Yun; Shan, Ling; Zhou, Haitao; Zhao, Dongbing; Wang, Jian; Liang, Jianwei; Zhao, Jianjun; Jiao, Yuchen; Lu, Ning; Zhao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements define a subgroup of lung cancer which is eligible to targeted kinase inhibition. The aim of this study is to observe the incidence rate of ALK fusion in a large cohort of Chinese digestive tract cancer patients. Patients and Methods Tissue microarray (TMA) was constructed from 808 digestive tract cancer cases, including 169 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, 182 gastric cancer and 457 colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. We tested all cases for ALK expression via a fully automated immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay. The IHC-positive cases were subjected to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), target gene enrichment and sequencing for confirmation of ALK gene rearrangement and discovery of novel fusion partner. Results Among the tested cases, 2 (0.44%) CRC cases showed positive both by IHC and FISH. By qRT-PCR, EML4–ALK fusion was found in one IHC-positive CRC case. In another IHC-positive CRC case, target gene enrichment and sequencing revealed ALK was fused to a novel partner, spectrin beta non-erythrocytic 1 (SPTBN1). One gastric cancer case showed partially positive IHC result, but no fusion was found by FISH and gene sequencing. Conclusions The incidence rate of ALK gene fusion in Chinese CRC patients was 0.44%,but not detectable in gastric and esophageal cancers. The novel SPTBN1 -ALK fusion, together with other ALK fusion genes, may become a potential target for anti-ALK therapy. PMID:26678488

  2. Effect of single-chain antibody targeting of the ligand-binding domain in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase receptor

    PubMed Central

    Stylianou, DC; Auf der Maur, A; Kodack, DP; Henke, RT; Hohn, S; Toretsky, JA; Riegel, AT; Wellstein, A

    2013-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase receptor anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and its ligand, the growth factor pleiotrophin (PTN), are highly expressed during the development of the nervous system and have been implicated in the malignant progression of different tumor types. Here, we describe human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies that target the ligand-binding domain (LBD) in ALK and show the effect in vitro and in vivo. The ALK LBD was used as a bait in a yeast two-hybdrid system to select human scFv from a library with randomized complementarity-determining region 3 domains. Surface plasmon resonance showed high-affinity binding of the selected scFv. The anti-ALK scFv competed for binding of PTN to ALK in intact cells and inhibited PTN-dependent signal transduction through endogenous ALK. Invasion of an intact endothelial cell monolayer by U87MG human glioblastoma cells was inhibited by the anti-ALK scFv. In addition, the growth of established tumor xenografts in mice was reversed after the induction of the conditional expression of the anti-ALK scFv. In archival malignant brain tumors expression levels of ALK and PTN were found elevated and appear correlated with poor patient survival. This suggests a rate-limiting function of the PTN/ALK interaction that may be exploited therapeutically. PMID:19633684

  3. P-glycoprotein Mediates Ceritinib Resistance in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-rearranged Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Ryohei; Sakashita, Takuya; Yanagitani, Noriko; Ninomiya, Hironori; Horiike, Atsushi; Friboulet, Luc; Gainor, Justin F.; Motoi, Noriko; Dobashi, Akito; Sakata, Seiji; Tambo, Yuichi; Kitazono, Satoru; Sato, Shigeo; Koike, Sumie; John Iafrate, A.; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Shaw, Alice T.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Takeuchi, Kengo; Nishio, Makoto; Fujita, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion oncogene is observed in 3%–5% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Crizotinib and ceritinib, a next-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) active against crizotinib-refractory patients, are clinically available for the treatment of ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients, and multiple next-generation ALK-TKIs are currently under clinical evaluation. These ALK-TKIs exhibit robust clinical activity in ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients; however, the emergence of ALK-TKI resistance restricts the therapeutic effect. To date, various secondary mutations or bypass pathway activation-mediated resistance have been identified, but large parts of the resistance mechanism are yet to be identified. Here, we report the discovery of p-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1) overexpression as a ceritinib resistance mechanism in ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients. P-gp exported ceritinib and its overexpression conferred ceritinib and crizotinib resistance, but not to PF-06463922 or alectinib, which are next-generation ALK inhibitors. Knockdown of ABCB1 or P-gp inhibitors sensitizes the patient-derived cancer cells to ceritinib, in vitro and in vivo. P-gp overexpression was identified in three out of 11 cases with in ALK-rearranged crizotinib or ceritinib resistant NSCLC patients. Our study suggests that alectinib, PF-06463922, or P-gp inhibitor with ceritinib could overcome the ceritinib or crizotinib resistance mediated by P-gp overexpression. PMID:26870817

  4. An Immunohistochemical Study of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sonal; Kumar, Madhu; Kumari, Malti; Mehrotra, Raj; Kushwaha, R A S; Goel, Madhumati; Kumar, Ashutosh; Kant, Surya

    2017-07-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer related death. Targeted treatment for specific markers may help in reducing the cancer related morbidity and mortality. To study expression of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK)and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) mutations in patients of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer NSCLC, that are the targets for specific ALK inhibitors and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Total 69 cases of histologically diagnosed NSCLC were examined retrospectively for immunohistochemical expression of EGFR and ALK, along with positive control of normal placental tissue and anaplastic large cell lymphoma respectively. Of the NSCLC, Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) accounted for 71.0% and adenocarcinoma was 26.1%. ALK expression was seen in single case of 60-year-old female, non-smoker with adenocarcinoma histology. EGFR expression was seen in both SCC (59.18%) and adenocarcinoma in (77.78%) accounting for 63.77% of all cases. Both ALK and EGFR mutation were mutually exclusive. EGFR expression was seen in 63.77% of cases, highlighting the importance of its use in routine analysis, for targeted therapy and better treatment results. Although, ALK expression was seen in 1.45% of all cases, it is an important biomarker in targeted cancer therapy. Also, the mutually exclusive expression of these two markers need further studies to develop a diagnostic algorithm for NSCLC patients.

  5. CTOP/ITE/MTX Compared With CHOP as the First-line Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Young Patients With T Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-24

    ALK-negative Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Peripherial T Cell Lymphoma,Not Otherwise Specified; Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T Cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T Cell Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis Like T Cell Lymphoma

  6. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive large B-cell lymphoma: Literature review and report of an endoscopic fine needle aspiration case with tigroid backgrounds mimicking seminoma.

    PubMed

    Sakr, Hany; Cruise, Michael; Chahal, Prabhleen; Cotta, Claudiu; Cook, James; Chalikonda, Sricharan; Rosenblatt, Steven; Hamadeh, Fatima; Al-Nourhji, Omar; Sturgis, Charles D

    2017-02-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive large B-cell lymphoma (ALK+ LBCL) is a rare distinct type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that arises in association with alterations of the ALK gene. This distinct disease entity is typically associated with an aggressive clinical course and appears in light microscopic preparations as a monomorphic population of large, immunoblast-like cells. In this report, we describe a case of ALK+ LBCL diagnosed by transgastric endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS FNA) of splenic hilar lymph nodes. Modified Giemsa stained direct smears from the FNA sample demonstrated large lesional cells with foamy cytoplasm and macronucleoli admixed with small lymphocytes in tigroid backgrounds, mimicking the cytologic appearance of seminoma. Ancillary immunohistochemical studies subsequently confirmed the diagnosis of ALK+ LBCL with the lesional cells being immunoreactive for CD138, VS38c, MUM1, ALK1, and lambda light chain. The cohesiveness of the cells, the cellular morphology, and the tigroid backgrounds were all pitfalls for accurate diagnosis of this rare specific type of lymphoid malignancy by cytology. To our knowledge this is the first case report detailing the diagnosis of ALK+ LBCL by EUS FNA and the first report describing a glycogen-rich tigroid background in direct FNA smears. Establishing a refined diagnosis in cases of this rare form of LBCL is necessary, as therapies targeting ALK may be of value in clinical management. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:148-155. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Evaluating the effectiveness of RNA in-situ hybridization for detecting lung adenocarcinoma with anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Naoki; Yoshizawa, Akihiko; Kondo, Kyoko; Rokutan-Kurata, Mariyo; Hirata, Masahiro; Furuhata, Ayako; Sumiyoshi, Shinji; Sonobe, Makoto; Menju, Toshi; Momose, Masanobu; Fujimoto, Masakazu; Date, Hiroshi; Haga, Hironori

    2017-07-01

    An easy and rapid assay for detecting mRNA in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples [RNA in-situ hybridization (ISH)] has been reported recently. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of RNA ISH in detecting lung adenocarcinoma (LA) with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement. We tested ALK RNA ISH on 11 resected LAs for which ALK fusion was confirmed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and/or fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). ALK mRNA expression was detected by RNA ISH in all 11 ALK-positive LAs, with a mean positive cell proportion of 68.4% (median, 75.3%; range, 3-98.8%), by counting 100 tumour cells at 10 different loci; RNA ISH did not detect ALK mRNA expression in the normal surrounding lung cells. Next, we explored the concordance between ALK RNA ISH and IHC/FISH tests by using tissue microarrays (TMAs) containing 294 LAs. In the TMA slides, we found five ALK-positive cases with IHC and/or FISH. The mean proportion of ALK RNA ISH-positive cells in these five cases was 75.6% (median, 82%; range, 40-94%), whereas the proportion of ALK RNA ISH-positive cells in the remaining 289 cases was 0.3% (median 0%; range, 0-15%). When the cutoff value was set at 15%, ALK RNA ISH-positive and ALK RNA ISH-negative cases were distinguishable with 100% sensitivity and specificity relative to the IHC/FISH tests. Our findings show that RNA ISH is useful for detecting ALK rearrangement with high sensitivity and specificity relative to conventional IHC/FISH tests. Thus, RNA ISH, which is an easy and rapid assay, could be an alternative method to IHC and FISH. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene copy number gain in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC): prevalence, clinicopathologic features and prognostic implication.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Hwan; Lee, Soohyeon; Koo, Ja Seung; Jung, Kyung Hae; Park, In Hae; Jeong, Joon; Kim, Seung Il; Park, Seho; Park, Hyung Seok; Park, Byeong-Woo; Kim, Joo-Hang; Sohn, Joohyuk

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive form of breast cancer, and its molecular pathogenesis still remains to be elucidated. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and implication of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) copy number change in IBC patients. We retrospectively collected formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor tissues and medical records of IBC patients from several institutes in Korea. ALK gene copy number change and rearrangement were assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay, and ALK expression status was evaluated by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. Thirty-six IBC patients including those with HER2 (+) breast cancer (16/36, 44.4%) and triple-negative breast cancer (13/36, 36.1%) were enrolled in this study. ALK copy number gain (CNG) was observed in 47.2% (17/36) of patients, including one patient who harbored ALK gene amplification. ALK CNG (+) patients showed significantly worse overall survival compared to ALK CNG (-) patients in univariate analysis (24.9 months vs. 38.1 months, p = 0.033). Recurrence free survival (RFS) after curative mastectomy was also significantly shorter in ALK CNG (+) patients than in ALK CNG (-) patients (n = 22, 12.7 months vs. 43.3 months, p = 0.016). Multivariate Cox regression analysis with adjustment for HER2 and ER statuses showed significantly poorer RFS for ALK CNG (+) patients (HR 5.63, 95% CI 1.11-28.44, p = 0.037). This study shows a significant presence of ALK CNG in IBC patients, and ALK CNG was associated with significantly poorer RFS.

  9. Long-term outcome of adults with systemic anaplastic large-cell lymphoma treated within the Groupe d'Etude des Lymphomes de l'Adulte trials.

    PubMed

    Sibon, David; Fournier, Marion; Brière, Josette; Lamant, Laurence; Haioun, Corinne; Coiffier, Bertrand; Bologna, Serge; Morel, Pierre; Gabarre, Jean; Hermine, Olivier; Sonet, Anne; Gisselbrecht, Christian; Delsol, Georges; Gaulard, Philippe; Tilly, Hervé

    2012-11-10

    Systemic anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a T-cell lymphoma, whose anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) expression varies according to age. Long-term outcomes of chemotherapy-treated adults are not definitively established and should be evaluated. Patients treated in three Groupe d'Étude des Lymphomes de l'Adulte prospective clinical trials with confirmed systemic ALCL after immunohistopathologic review and defined ALK expression status were analyzed. Among the 138 adult patients with ALCL, 64 (46%) were ALK positive, and 74 (54%) were ALK negative. Median follow-up was 8 years. At diagnosis, significantly more patients younger than 40 years old were ALK positive than ALK negative (66% v 23%, respectively; P < .001). Comparing patients with ALK-positive and ALK-negative ALCL, β(2)-microglobulin was ≥ 3 mg/L in 12% and 33% (P = .017); International Prognostic Index was high (score, 3 to 5) in 23% and 48% (P = .03); complete response rates to first-line treatment were 86% and 68% (P = .01); and 8-year overall survival (OS) rates were 82% (95% CI, 69% to 89%) and 49% (95% CI, 37% to 61%), respectively (P < .001). The survival difference mostly affected patients age ≥ 40 years. Multivariate analysis identified β(2)-microglobulin ≥ 3 mg/L (P < .001) and age ≥ 40 years (P = .029), but not ALK status, as prognostic for OS. These two variables distinguished four survival risk groups, with 8-year OS ranging from 84% to 22%. CONCLUSION Results of this long-term study enabled refinement of the prognosis of adult systemic ALCL, with ALK prognostic value dependent on age, and could provide guidance for eventual treatment adjustment.

  10. Combination Chemotherapy and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Peripheral T-cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-30

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Negative; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Positive; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage II Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Stage II Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Stage III Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma

  11. Cytomorphology of non-small cell lung carcinoma with anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Toll, Adam D; Maleki, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase demonstrating activating mutations in several malignancies including a subset (1-5%) of non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). Prior work examining, the histologic features of these tumors found a spectrum of findings, notably a solid/acinar pattern, as well as a mucinous cribriform pattern. We present the first study to date describing the cytomorphology of NSCLC harboring ALK rearrangements. A retrospective database search was conducted to identify cytologic specimens of NSCLC demonstrating ALK rearrangement. Cytogenetic analysis was performed with fluorescence in situ hybridization. A total of 12 patients were identified, 10 with available material. Cellular morphology and smear background was evaluated in the study group, as well as control cases lacking ALK rearrangement. A total of 25 specimens from 10 patients were obtained. Five patients never smoked, and four patients had a remote smoking history. ALK rearrangements were identified in cells with unique cytologic characteristics. All cases demonstrated moderate to poor differentiation with a predominance of single cells showing anisonucleosis and frequent intracytoplasmic neutrophils. The control cases showed cells with smaller, less pleomorphic nuclei, and smaller nucleoli with more clusters/tissue fragments. Several unique cytomorphologic features were consistently identified in the study population relative to the control population and include a prominence of single, markedly enlarged tumor cells with plasmacytoid features and anisonucleosis, as well as intracytoplasmic neutrophils. Larger studies are warranted to confirm our preliminary findings, as these features may help establish a more cost-effective means to select patients being tested for ALK mutational analysis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Expression of p63 in anaplastic large cell lymphoma but not in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Immunohistochemical determination of p63 protein is frequently used in the pathologic diagnosis of nonhematological solid tumors. In malignant hematological disease, p63 expression has been reported in 22% of follicular lymphoma, about 35% of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, 23% of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and in some cases of blast crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a rare disease that accounts for less than 5% of all cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. There is little information concerning p63 expression in this specific type of lymphoma. In some cases, the morphological and phenotypic features between anaplastic large cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin's lymphoma are similar, making this differential diagnosis challenging. We studied p63 expression using a tissue microarray approach in 154 cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma, including 38% anaplastic large cell kinase positive and 62% anaplastic large cell kinase negative, and 58 Hodgkin's lymphoma cases. Sixty-eight cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (44%) showed p63 nuclear positivity (41% of anaplastic large cell kinase positive and 47% of anaplastic large cell kinase negative). Of 130 cases of systemic-anaplastic large cell lymphoma, 42% showed p63 positivity. The neoplastic cells expressed p63 in 38% of the cases of CD45-negative/anaplastic large cell kinase–negative null cell–type anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a subgroup that offers the most difficulties in the differential diagnosis with classical Hodgkin's lymphoma. In contrast, none of the cases of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma demonstrated any p63 expression. These results demonstrate that p63 protein expression is frequently expressed in a subset of anaplastic large cell lymphoma cases and may be used as a potential tool in the differential diagnosis between anaplastic large cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:18620733

  13. ALK: a tyrosine kinase target for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Holla, Vijaykumar R.; Elamin, Yasir Y.; Bailey, Ann Marie; Johnson, Amber M.; Litzenburger, Beate C.; Khotskaya, Yekaterina B.; Sanchez, Nora S.; Zeng, Jia; Shufean, Md Abu; Shaw, Kenna R.; Mendelsohn, John; Mills, Gordon B.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Simon, George R.

    2017-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene plays an important physiologic role in the development of the brain and can be oncogenically altered in several malignancies, including non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL). Most prevalent ALK alterations are chromosomal rearrangements resulting in fusion genes, as seen in ALCL and NSCLC. In other tumors, ALK copy-number gains and activating ALK mutations have been described. Dramatic and often prolonged responses are seen in patients with ALK alterations when treated with ALK inhibitors. Three of these—crizotinib, ceritinib, and alectinib—are now FDA approved for the treatment of metastatic NSCLC positive for ALK fusions. However, the emergence of resistance is universal. Newer ALK inhibitors and other targeting strategies are being developed to counteract the newly emergent mechanism(s) of ALK inhibitor resistance. This review outlines the recent developments in our understanding and treatment of tumors with ALK alterations. PMID:28050598

  14. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, thyroid lymphoma, and metastasis to thyroid.

    PubMed

    Untch, Brian R; Olson, John A

    2006-07-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, thyroid lymphoma, and secondary metastasis to the thyroid gland are uncommon thyroid malignancies. They represent significant challenges for the surgeon owing to difficulties in diagnosis, aggressive biology, and the infrequency of their presentation. An awareness and appreciation of multimodality treatment strategies is essential for their management.

  15. Structure Based Drug Design of Crizotinib (PF-02341066), a Potent and Selective Dual Inhibitor of Mesenchymal-Epithelial Transition Factor (c-MET) Kinase and Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK)

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, J Jean; Tran-Dube,; #769; Michelle,; Shen, Hong; Nambu, Mitchell; Kung, Pei-Pei; Pairish, Mason; Jia, Lei; Meng, Jerry; Funk, Lee; Botrous, Iriny; McTigue, Michele; Grodsky, Neil; Ryan, Kevin; Padrique, Ellen; Alton, Gordon; Timofeevski, Sergei; Yamazaki, Shinji; Li, Qiuhua; Zou, Helen; Christensen, James; Mroczkowski, Barbara; Bender, Steve; Kania, Robert S; Edwards, Martin P

    2011-08-03

    Because of the critical roles of aberrant signaling in cancer, both c-MET and ALK receptor tyrosine kinases are attractive oncology targets for therapeutic intervention. The cocrystal structure of 3 (PHA-665752), bound to c-MET kinase domain, revealed a novel ATP site environment, which served as the target to guide parallel, multiattribute drug design. A novel 2-amino-5-aryl-3-benzyloxypyridine series was created to more effectively make the key interactions achieved with 3. In the novel series, the 2-aminopyridine core allowed a 3-benzyloxy group to reach into the same pocket as the 2,6-dichlorophenyl group of 3 via a more direct vector and thus with a better ligand efficiency (LE). Further optimization of the lead series generated the clinical candidate crizotinib (PF-02341066), which demonstrated potent in vitro and in vivo c-MET kinase and ALK inhibition, effective tumor growth inhibition, and good pharmaceutical properties.

  16. Skin involvement as the first manifestation of breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Alcalá, Rebeca; Llombart, Beatriz; Lavernia, Javier; Traves, Víctor; Guillén, Carlos; Sanmartín, Onofre

    2016-07-01

    Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a newly described clinical and pathologic entity that typically presents as seroma in the fibrous scar around the implant. Less frequently, it presents as a solid peri-implant mass, and there have been no reports to date of cutaneous lesions as the presenting manifestation. We report the case of a 56-year-old woman with a history of bilateral breast reconstruction following breast cancer of the right breast who consulted with several papules on the right breast suggestive of metastasis. Histopathology showed a proliferation of large epithelioid lymphocytes with highly pleomorphic cells and nuclei. The neoplastic cells were CD15 and CD30 positive and ALK-1 negative. The epithelial markers were all negative except for epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), which was weakly positive. Molecular analysis showed monoclonal T-cell receptor γ gene rearrangement, confirming a diagnosis of breast implant-associated ALCL. The non-specific morphology of the skin lesions, the epithelioid nature of the neoplastic cells and the expression of EMA can lead to an erroneous diagnosis of skin metastases from a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the breast. We recommend immunohistochemical staining for CD30 and ALK-1 for patients with breast implants who develop anaplastic lesions.

  17. Positron emission tomographic monitoring of dual phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and mTOR inhibition in anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Nicolas; Li, Zhoulei; Herrmann, Ken; Weh, Daniel; Aichler, Michaela; Slawska, Jolanta; Walch, Axel; Peschel, Christian; Schwaiger, Markus; Buck, Andreas K; Dechow, Tobias; Keller, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Background Dual phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition offers an attractive therapeutic strategy in anaplastic large cell lymphoma depending on oncogenic nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) signaling. We tested the efficacy of a novel dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor, NVP-BGT226 (BGT226), in two anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell lines in vitro and in vivo and performed an early response evaluation with positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using the standard tracer, 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) and the thymidine analog, 3′-deoxy-3′-[18F] fluorothymidine (FLT). Methods The biological effects of BGT226 were determined in vitro in the NPM-ALK positive cell lines SU-DHL-1 and Karpas299 by 3-[4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, propidium iodide staining, and biochemical analysis of PI3K and mTOR downstream signaling. FDG-PET and FLT-PET were performed in immunodeficient mice bearing either SU-DHL-1 or Karpas299 xenografts at baseline and 7 days after initiation of treatment with BGT226. Lymphomas were removed for immunohistochemical analysis of proliferation and apoptosis to correlate PET findings with in vivo treatment effects. Results SU-DHL-1 cells showed sensitivity to BGT226 in vitro, with cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and an IC50 in the low nanomolar range, in contrast with Karpas299 cells, which were mainly resistant to BGT226. In vivo, both FDG-PET and FLT-PET discriminated sensitive from resistant lymphoma, as indicated by a significant reduction of tumor-to-background ratios on day 7 in treated SU-DHL-1 lymphoma-bearing animals compared with the control group, but not in animals with Karpas299 xenografts. Imaging results correlated with a marked decrease in the proliferation marker Ki67, and a slight increase in the apoptotic marker, cleaved caspase 3, as revealed by immunostaining of explanted lymphoma tissue. Conclusion Dual PI3K/mTOR inhibition using BGT

  18. Positron emission tomographic monitoring of dual phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and mTOR inhibition in anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Graf, Nicolas; Li, Zhoulei; Herrmann, Ken; Weh, Daniel; Aichler, Michaela; Slawska, Jolanta; Walch, Axel; Peschel, Christian; Schwaiger, Markus; Buck, Andreas K; Dechow, Tobias; Keller, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Dual phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition offers an attractive therapeutic strategy in anaplastic large cell lymphoma depending on oncogenic nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) signaling. We tested the efficacy of a novel dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor, NVP-BGT226 (BGT226), in two anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell lines in vitro and in vivo and performed an early response evaluation with positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using the standard tracer, 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) and the thymidine analog, 3'-deoxy-3'-[(18)F] fluorothymidine (FLT). The biological effects of BGT226 were determined in vitro in the NPM-ALK positive cell lines SU-DHL-1 and Karpas299 by 3-[4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, propidium iodide staining, and biochemical analysis of PI3K and mTOR downstream signaling. FDG-PET and FLT-PET were performed in immunodeficient mice bearing either SU-DHL-1 or Karpas299 xenografts at baseline and 7 days after initiation of treatment with BGT226. Lymphomas were removed for immunohistochemical analysis of proliferation and apoptosis to correlate PET findings with in vivo treatment effects. SU-DHL-1 cells showed sensitivity to BGT226 in vitro, with cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and an IC50 in the low nanomolar range, in contrast with Karpas299 cells, which were mainly resistant to BGT226. In vivo, both FDG-PET and FLT-PET discriminated sensitive from resistant lymphoma, as indicated by a significant reduction of tumor-to-background ratios on day 7 in treated SU-DHL-1 lymphoma-bearing animals compared with the control group, but not in animals with Karpas299 xenografts. Imaging results correlated with a marked decrease in the proliferation marker Ki67, and a slight increase in the apoptotic marker, cleaved caspase 3, as revealed by immunostaining of explanted lymphoma tissue. Dual PI3K/mTOR inhibition using BGT226 is effective in ALK

  19. ANALYSIS OF HUMAN T-CELL LYMPHOTROPIC VIRUS IN CD25-POSITIVE-ANAPLASTIC LARGE CELL LYMPHOMAS IN CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Chioato, Lucimara; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Harrington, William J.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    T-cell lymphomas are rare in children. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is the most common pediatric mature T-cell lymphoma, accounting for about 10-20% of all pediatric non-Hodgkin lymphoma. ALCL is now recognized as two distinct diseases, i.e., ALCL-ALK-positive (ALCL- ALK+) and ALCL-ALK-negative (ALCL- ALK-); ALK-positive ALCL presents at a younger age and has a better prognosis. The human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus that mainly infects helper T lymphocytes and is linked to the development of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). The other type of lymphoma related to this virus family is hairy cell leukemia (HCL). Both of these neoplasms frequently express CD25 (alpha chain-IL-2 receptor). Recently, it was demonstrated that CD25 is significantly expressed in childhood ALCL (75%). In Brazil, HTLV-1 infection is considered endemic, and vertical transmission is responsible for spread to children, and it is important to point out that 90% or more of the HTLV-1 carriers remain asymptomatic. Some cases of HTLV-1-related lymphomas in adults are described as having characteristics of ALCL, but are considered to be CD30-positive subtypes of ATLL based on the virologic findings. No similar cases have been described in children, therefore we analyzed 33 cases of pediatric ALCL, both CD25-positive and CD25-negative, looking for the presence of proviral HTLV-1 DNA, by PCR. All cases corresponded to the common histological type of ALCL and were CD30-positive in virtually all neoplastic cells. ALK expression was observed in all but two cases (93.9%), while CD25 was positive in 27 cases (82%), including one of the ALCL-ALK-. There was a strong positive correlation between ALK and CD25 expression. None of the cases showed proviral HTLV-1-DNA presence. Our study concludes that ALCL in children has no relationship with HTLV-1 and the high frequency of CD25 expression must be explained by a different mechanism than that described in ATLL. PMID:19864230

  20. Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma: two distinct clinicopathological variants with different outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, C.; Delas, A.; Gaulard, P.; Haioun, C.; Moreau, A.; Xerri, L.; Traverse-Glehen, A.; Rousset, T.; Quintin-Roue, I.; Petrella, T.; Emile, J. F.; Amara, N.; Rochaix, P.; Chenard-Neu, M. P.; Tasei, A. M.; Menet, E.; Chomarat, H.; Costes, V.; Andrac-Meyer, L.; Michiels, J. F.; Chassagne-Clement, C.; de Leval, L.; Brousset, P.; Delsol, G.; Lamant, L.

    2016-01-01

    Background ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma associated with breast implant (i-ALCL) has been recently recognized as a distinct entity. Among 43 830 lymphomas registered in the French Lymphopath network since 2010, 300 breast lymphomas comprising 25 peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) were reviewed. Among PTCL, ALK-negative ALCL was the most frequent and all of them were associated with breast implants. Patients and methods Since 2010, all i-ALCL cases were collected from different institutions through Lymphopath. Immuno-morphologic features, molecular data and clinical outcome of 19 i-ALCLs have been retrospectively analyzed. Results The median age of the patients was 61 years and the median length between breast implant and i-ALCL was 9 years. Most implants were silicone-filled and textured. Implant removal was performed in 17 out of 19 patients with additional treatment based on mostly CHOP or CHOP-like chemotherapy regimens (n = 10/19) or irradiation (n = 1/19). CHOP alone or ABVD following radiation without implant removal have been given in two patients. The two clinical presentations, i.e. effusion and less frequently tumor mass correlated with distinct histopathologic features: in situ i-ALCL (anaplastic cell proliferation confined to the fibrous capsule) and infiltrative i-ALCL (pleomorphic cells massively infiltrating adjacent tissue with eosinophils and sometimes Reed–Sternberg-like cells mimicking Hodgkin lymphoma). Malignant cells were CD30-positive, showed a variable staining for EMA and were ALK negative. Most cases had a cytotoxic T-cell immunophenotype with variable T-cell antigen loss and pSTAT3 nuclear expression. T-cell receptor genes were clonally rearranged in 13 out of 13 tested cases. After 18 months of median follow-up, the 2-year overall survival for in situ and infiltrative i-ALCL was 100% and 52.5%, respectively. Conclusions In situ i-ALCLs have an indolent clinical course and generally remain free of disease after implant

  1. Study of Bortezomib and Panobinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma or NK/T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-26

    Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma (Not Otherwise Specified); Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma Nasal Type; Enteropathy- Type T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) (ALK-1 Negative); Relapsed ALCL (ALK-1 Positive) Post Autologous Transplant

  2. Testing for anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement to target crizotinib therapy: oncology, pathology and health economic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lee, James A; Bubendorf, Lukas; Stahel, Rolf; Peters, Solange

    2013-05-01

    Crizotinib is a first-in-class oral anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor targeting ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer. The therapy was approved by the US FDA in August 2011 and received conditional marketing approval by the European Commission in October 2012 for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. A break-apart FISH-based assay was jointly approved with crizotinib by the FDA. This assay and an immunohistochemistry assay that uses a D5F3 rabbit monoclonal primary antibody were also approved for marketing in Europe in October 2012. While ALK rearrangement has relatively low prevalence, a clinical benefit is exhibited in more than 85% of patients with median progression-free survival of 8-10 months. In this article, the authors summarize the therapy and alternative test strategies for identifying patients who are likely to respond to therapy, including key issues for effective and efficient testing. The key economic considerations regarding the joint companion diagnostic and therapy are also presented. Given the observed clinical benefit and relatively high cost of crizotinib therapy, companion diagnostics should be evaluated relative to response to therapy versus correlation alone whenever possible, and both high inter-rater reliability and external quality assessment programs are warranted.

  3. Targeted therapy with anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer even with brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Muhammet Hacioglu, Bekir; Kostek, Osman; Erdogan, Bulent; Uzunoglu, Sernaz; Cicin, Irfan

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of brain metastases has increased as a result of improved systemic disease control and advances in imaging. Brain metastasis can occur approximately in 25-40% of the patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and it is a frequent cause of death. Stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) or surgical resection are the local treatment modalities for brain metastases which are feasible either alone, in combination, or as sequential treatments. Resistance to systemic therapy for brain metastasis poses significant clinical problems. In anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive NSCLC patients; ALK inhibitors may provide a new treatment option for brain metastasis and could improve overall survival (OS). Even in patients with crizotinib-resistant disease, second generation ALK inhibitors display prominent clinical activity. There is rapidly emerging preclinical and clinical data showing improvement in this issue. In this article we reviewed the latest literature data concerning the brain metastases and intracranial efficacy of ALK inhibitors in patients with ALK-positive NSCLC.

  4. Epigenetic Silencing of the Proapoptotic Gene BIM in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma through an MeCP2/SIN3a Deacetylating Complex12

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Rocco; Magistroni, Vera; Mogavero, Angela; Andreoni, Federica; Ambrogio, Chiara; Chiarle, Roberto; Mologni, Luca; Bachmann, Petra S; Lock, Richard B; Collini, Paola; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    BIM is a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family. Here, we investigated the epigenetic status of the BIM locus in NPM/ALK+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) cell lines and in lymph node biopsies from NPM/ALK+ ALCL patients. We show that BIM is epigenetically silenced in cell lines and lymph node specimens and that treatment with the deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A restores the histone acetylation, strongly upregulates BIM expression, and induces cell death. BIM silencing occurs through recruitment of MeCP2 and the SIN3a/histone deacetylase 1/2 (HDAC1/2) corepressor complex. This event requires BIM CpG methylation/demethylation with 5-azacytidine that leads to detachment of the MeCP2 corepressor complex and reacetylation of the histone tails. Treatment with the ALK inhibitor PF2341066 or with an inducible shRNA targeting NPM/ALK does not restore BIM locus reacetylation; however, enforced expression of NPM/ALK in an NPM/ALK-negative cell line significantly increases the methylation at the BIM locus. This study demonstrates that BIM is epigenetically silenced in NPM/ALK-positive cells through recruitment of the SIN3a/HDAC1/2 corepressor complex and that NPM/ALK is dispensable to maintain BIM epigenetic silencing but is able to act as an inducer of BIM methylation. PMID:23633923

  5. Epigenetic silencing of the proapoptotic gene BIM in anaplastic large cell lymphoma through an MeCP2/SIN3a deacetylating complex.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Rocco; Magistroni, Vera; Mogavero, Angela; Andreoni, Federica; Ambrogio, Chiara; Chiarle, Roberto; Mologni, Luca; Bachmann, Petra S; Lock, Richard B; Collini, Paola; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2013-05-01

    BIM is a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family. Here, we investigated the epigenetic status of the BIM locus in NPM/ALK+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) cell lines and in lymph node biopsies from NPM/ALK+ ALCL patients. We show that BIM is epigenetically silenced in cell lines and lymph node specimens and that treatment with the deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A restores the histone acetylation, strongly upregulates BIM expression, and induces cell death. BIM silencing occurs through recruitment of MeCP2 and the SIN3a/histone deacetylase 1/2 (HDAC1/2) corepressor complex. This event requires BIM CpG methylation/demethylation with 5-azacytidine that leads to detachment of the MeCP2 corepressor complex and reacetylation of the histone tails. Treatment with the ALK inhibitor PF2341066 or with an inducible shRNA targeting NPM/ALK does not restore BIM locus reacetylation; however, enforced expression of NPM/ALK in an NPM/ALK-negative cell line significantly increases the methylation at the BIM locus. This study demonstrates that BIM is epigenetically silenced in NPM/ALK-positive cells through recruitment of the SIN3a/HDAC1/2 corepressor complex and that NPM/ALK is dispensable to maintain BIM epigenetic silencing but is able to act as an inducer of BIM methylation.

  6. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma arises in thymocytes and requires transient TCR expression for thymic egress

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, Tim I. M.; Villarese, Patrick; Fairbairn, Camilla J.; Lamant, Laurence; Trinquand, Amélie; Hook, C. Elizabeth; Burke, G. A. Amos; Brugières, Laurence; Hughes, Katherine; Payet, Dominique; Merkel, Olaf; Schiefer, Ana-Iris; Ashankyty, Ibraheem; Mian, Shahid; Wasik, Mariusz; Turner, Martin; Kenner, Lukas; Asnafi, Vahid; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Turner, Suzanne D.

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a peripheral T-cell lymphoma presenting mostly in children and young adults. The natural progression of this disease is largely unknown as is the identity of its true cell of origin. Here we present a model of peripheral ALCL pathogenesis where the malignancy is initiated in early thymocytes, before T-cell receptor (TCR) β-rearrangement, which is bypassed in CD4/NPM–ALK transgenic mice following Notch1 expression. However, we find that a TCR is required for thymic egress and development of peripheral murine tumours, yet this TCR must be downregulated for T-cell lymphomagenesis. In keeping with this, clonal TCR rearrangements in human ALCL are predominantly in-frame, but often aberrant, with clonal TCRα but no comparable clonal TCRβ rearrangement, yielding events that would not normally be permissive for survival during thymic development. Children affected by ALCL may thus harbour thymic lymphoma-initiating cells capable of seeding relapse after chemotherapy. PMID:26753883

  7. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrido[2,3-b]pyrazines as potent and selective inhibitors of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase.

    PubMed

    Milkiewicz, Karen L; Weinberg, Linda R; Albom, Mark S; Angeles, Thelma S; Cheng, Mangeng; Ghose, Arup K; Roemmele, Renee C; Theroff, Jay P; Underiner, Ted L; Zificsak, Craig A; Dorsey, Bruce D

    2010-06-15

    Dysregulation of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is implicated in a variety of cancers. A series of tetrahydropyrido[2,3-b]pyrazines was constructed as ring-constrained analogs of a known aminopyridine kinase scaffold. Chemistry was developed to rapidly elaborate the SAR, structural elements impacting ALK inhibitory activity were exploited, and kinase selective analogs were identified that inhibit ALK with IC(50) values approximately 10 nM (enzyme) and approximately 150 nM (cell). Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Primary Central Nervous System Anaplastic Large T-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Splavski, Bruno; Muzevic, Dario; Ladenhauser-Palijan, Tatjana; Jr, Brano Splavski

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) of T-cell origin is an exceptionally rare, highly malignant intracranial neoplasm. Although such a tumor typically presents with a focal mass lesion. Case report: Past medical history of a 26-year-old male patient with a PCNS lymphoma of T-cell origin was not suggestive of intracranial pathology or any disorder of other organs and organic systems. To achieve a gross total tumor resection, surgery was performed via osteoplastic craniotomy using the left frontal transcortical transventricular approach. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses of the tissue removed described tumor as anaplastic large cell lymphoma of T-cells (T-ALCL). Postoperative and neurological recovery was complete, while control imaging of the brain showed no signs of residual tumor at a six-month follow-up. The patient, who did not appear immunocompromized, was referred to a hematologist and an oncologist where corticosteroids, the particular chemotherapeutic protocol and irradiation therapy were applied. Conclusion: Since PCNS lymphoma is a potentially curable brain tumor, we believe that proper selection of the management options, including early radical tumor resection for solitary PCNS lymphoma, may be proposed as a major treatment of such a tumor in selected patients, resulting in a satisfactory outcome. PMID:27703297

  9. Expression of the Chemokine Receptor Gene, CCR8, is Associated with DUSP22 Rearrangements in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xiaoming; Flotte, Thomas J.; Law, Mark E.; Blahnik, Anthony J.; Chng, Wee-Joo; Huang, Gaofeng; Knudson, Ryan A.; Ketterling, Rhett P.; Porcher, Julie C.; Ansell, Stephen M.; Sidhu, Jagmohan; Dogan, Ahmet; Feldman, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is one of the most common T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas and has two main subtypes: an ALK-positive subtype characterized by ALK gene rearrangements and an ALK-negative subtype that is poorly understood. We recently identified recurrent rearrangements of the DUSP22 locus on 6p25.3 in both primary cutaneous and systemic ALK-negative ALCLs. This study aimed to determine the relationship between these rearrangements and expression of the chemokine receptor gene, CCR8. CCR8 has skin-homing properties, and has been suggested to play a role in limiting extracutaneous spread of primary cutaneous ALCLs. However, overexpression of CCR8 also has been reported in systemic ALK-negative ALCLs. As available antibodies for CCR8 have shown lack of specificity, we examined CCR8 expression using quantitative real-time PCR in frozen tissue and RNA in situ hybridization (ISH) in paraffin tissue. Both approaches showed higher CCR8 expression in ALCLs with DUSP22 rearrangements than in non-rearranged cases (PCR: 19.5-fold increase, p=0.01; ISH: 3.3-fold increase, p=0.0008). CCR8 expression was not associated with cutaneous presentation, cutaneous biopsy site, or cutaneous involvement during the disease course. These findings suggest that CCR8 expression in ALCL is more closely related to the presence of DUSP22 rearrangements than to cutaneous involvement, and that the function of CCR8 may extend beyond its skin-homing properties in this disease. This study also underscores the utility of RNA-ISH as a paraffin-based method for investigating gene expression when reliable antibodies for immunohistochemistry are not available. PMID:25390351

  10. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-22

    Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; HTLV-1 Infection; NK-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable; Primary Systemic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Negative; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides; Refractory Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Refractory Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mycosis Fungoides; Refractory Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified

  11. Diagnosis of anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement in cytological samples through a fluorescence in situ hybridization-based assay: Cytological smears versus cell blocks.

    PubMed

    Zito Marino, Federica; Rossi, Giulio; Brunelli, Matteo; Malzone, Maria Gabriella; Liguori, Giuseppina; Bogina, Giuseppe; Morabito, Alessandro; Rocco, Gaetano; Franco, Renato; Botti, Gerardo

    2017-02-14

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) status analysis of lung cytological specimens should be successfully encouraged in routine practice because biopsy specimens are not always available. To date, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved both fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) as diagnostic tests for identifying ALK-positive patients eligible for treatment with crizotinib. Although ALK IHC is an optimal diagnostic tool, FISH becomes mandatory in equivocal cases. ALK FISH of paraffin-embedded tissue material is still the gold standard, whereas the cytological specimen assay has not yet been completely standardized. Many controversial data have been reported on the adequacy of cytology cell blocks (CBs) versus conventional smears for FISH testing. This review discusses some critical issues related to ALK FISH of cytological samples, including the triaging of collected specimens to optimize the material, the use of CBs versus conventional smears, and alternative methods for an ALK rearrangement diagnosis. Conventional smears have the advantages of an immediate evaluation, no probe tissue-related artifactual loss, no fixation-related alterations, and usually sufficient material for an analytic preparation. On the other hand, CBs have several advantages, including the appropriate conservation of the tissue architecture, an absence of problems related to cell overlapping, and the ability to evaluate neoplastic cells in a dark field. Cancer Cytopathol 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  12. U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval: crizotinib for treatment of advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer that is anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive.

    PubMed

    Malik, Shakun M; Maher, Virginia Ellen; Bijwaard, Karen E; Becker, Robert L; Zhang, Lijun; Tang, Shenghui W; Song, Pengfei; Liu, Qi; Marathe, Anshu; Gehrke, Brenda; Helms, Whitney; Hanner, Diane; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2014-04-15

    On August 26, 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved crizotinib (XALKORI Capsules, Pfizer Inc.) for treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that is anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive as detected by an FDA-approved test. The Vysis ALK Break-Apart FISH Probe Kit (Abbott Molecular, Inc.) was approved concurrently. In two multicenter, single-arm trials, patients with locally advanced or metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC previously treated with one or more systemic therapies received crizotinib orally at a dose of 250 mg twice daily. In 119 patients with ALK-positive NSCLC by local trial assay, the objective response rate (ORR) was 61% [95% confidence intervals (CI), 52%-70%] with a median response duration of 48 weeks. In 136 patients with ALK-positive NSCLC by the to-be-marketed test, the ORR was 50% (95% CI, 42%-59%) with a median response duration of 42 weeks. The most common adverse reactions (≥25%) were vision disorder, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, edema, and constipation. Accelerated approval was granted on the basis of the high ORRs and durable responses. On November 20, 2013, crizotinib received full approval based on an improvement in progression-free survival in patients with metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC previously treated with one platinum-based chemotherapy regimen.

  13. Thyroid cancers. II. Medullary, anaplastic, lymphoma, sarcoma, squamous cell.

    PubMed

    Austin, J R; el-Naggar, A K; Goepfert, H

    1996-08-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma in both sporadic and familial forms is a curable disease if detected early and treated by the proper surgery. The advent of genetic screening for the RET protooncogene portends great promise in the earlier diagnosis and treatment of familial forms of MTC. New chemotherapy protocols have produced some tumor regression in patients with metastatic MTC. Improved use of Adriamycin and hyper-fractionated radiotherapy combined with debulking procedures has prolonged survival in anaplastic thyroid cancer. Thyroid gland lymphoma, if diagnosed early and treated by combined chemoradiotherapy, carries a good prognosis for survival. The best treatment for thyroid sarcomas and SCC of the thyroid is early diagnosis and aggressive surgery combined with radiotherapy.

  14. Array-CGH analysis of cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Szuhai, K; van Doorn, R; Tensen, C P; Van Kester

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes a study in which the pattern of numerical chromosomal alterations in cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (C-ALCL) tumor samples was defined using array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). First, the array-based CGH technique applied is outlined in detail. Next, its application in the analysis of C-ALCL tumor specimens is described. This approach resulted in the identification of highly recurrent chromosomal alterations in C-ALCL that include gain of 7q31 and loss on 6q16-6q21 and 13q34, each affecting 45% of the patients. The pattern characteristic of C-ALCL differs markedly from chromosomal alterations observed in other CTCL such as mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome and yielded several candidate genes with potential relevance in the pathogenesis of C-ALCL.

  15. De novo ALK kinase domain mutations are uncommon in kinase inhibitor-naïve ALK rearranged lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Lucena-Araujo, Antonio R; Moran, Jason P; VanderLaan, Paul A; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Folch, Erik; Majid, Adnan; Kent, Michael S; Gangadharan, Sidharta P; Rangachari, Deepa; Huberman, Mark S; Kobayashi, Susumu S; Costa, Daniel B

    2016-09-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearranged lung adenocarcinomas are responsive to the multitargeted ALK inhibitor crizotinib. One of the common mechanisms of resistance to crizotinib is the acquisition of ALK kinase domain mutations. However, the presence of ALK mutations in crizotinib-naïve tumors has not been widely reported and it is unclear if de novo ALK mutations affect the response to crizotinib. We analyzed preclinical models of ALK rearranged lung cancers that were sensitive/resistant to ALK inhibitors, probed our institutional and other lung cancer databases for tumors with ALK kinase domain mutations, and evaluated tumor response to crizotinib. ALK rearranged cell lines with ALK kinase domain mutations were heterogeneously less inhibited by increasing concentrations of crizotinib than cells driven solely by EML4-ALK fusions. Previous ALK rearranged lung cancer cohorts did not report ALK kinase mutations in inhibitor-naïve tumors. We identified one TKI-naïve ALK rearranged tumor with an ALK kinase domain mutation: ALK-S1206F (mutations at ALK-S1206 shifted crizotinib inhibitory curves only minimally in preclinical models). The never smoker whose tumor harbored de novo EML4-ALK-E5;A20+ALK-S1206F only achieved a 4-month radiographic response to crizotinib 250mg twice daily. Combining data from our and prior cohorts, ALK kinase domain mutations were uncommon events (<3% of cases) in ALK inhibitor-naïve ALK rearranged lung adenocarcinomas but their effect on intrinsic resistance to ALK inhibitors should be better evaluated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Long-term outcomes of adults with first-relapsed/refractory systemic anaplastic large-cell lymphoma in the pre-brentuximab vedotin era: A LYSA/SFGM-TC study.

    PubMed

    Morel, Alexandre; Brière, Josette; Lamant, Laurence; Loschi, Michaël; Haioun, Corinne; Delarue, Richard; Tournilhac, Olivier; Bachy, Emmanuel; Sonet, Anne; Amorim, Sandy; Laurent, Camille; Gaulard, Philippe; Tilly, Hervé; Sibon, David

    2017-09-01

    Long-term outcomes of adults with first-relapsed/refractory (R/R) systemic anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) are not definitively established and should be evaluated. We previously published the long-term outcomes of adults with ALCL initially treated with polychemotherapy in LYmphoma Study Association (LYSA) prospective clinical trials conducted during the pre-brentuximab vedotin era. Herein, we report the long-term outcomes of those patients after the first-relapsed/refractory (R/R) events. Among the 138 (64 (anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK(+)) and 74 ALK(-) ALCL) adults initially treated in clinical trials, 40 (14 ALK(+) and 26 ALK(-)) first-R/R ALCL patients and their long-term outcomes were analysed. Median follow-up from the first-R/R events was 12.5 years. For ALK(+) and ALK(-) patients, respectively, median [range] findings were as follows: age at first-R/R event: 35 [19-76] and 61 [34-81] years; time between inclusion in first-line clinical trials and first-R/R events was 6 [1.5-34] and 11.1 [1-67] months (P = 0.36); with median (95% confidence interval) progression-free survival after the first-R/R events: 3.8 (0.7-14.8) and 5.3 (2.4-8.4) months (P = 0.39); and overall survival: 13.6 (0.7-89) and 8.1 (3.3-25) months (P = 0.96). ALCL was the main cause of death. Most adults with first-R/R ALCL have poor outcomes, with no significant differences between patients with ALK(+) or ALK(-) disease. These results could be used as reference for the evaluation of new drugs to treat R/R ALCL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of benzo[4,5]imidazo[1,2-c]pyrimidine and benzo[4,5]imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazine derivatives as anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tardy, Sébastien; Orsato, Alexandre; Mologni, Luca; Bisson, William H; Donadoni, Carla; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Scapozza, Leonardo; Gueyrard, David; Goekjian, Peter G

    2014-02-15

    Chromosomal translocations involving anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) are the driving mutations for a range of cancers and ALK is thus considered an attractive therapeutic target. We synthesized a series of functionalized benzo[4,5]imidazo[1,2-c]pyrimidines and benzo[4,5]imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazines by an aza-Graebe-Ullman reaction, followed by palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. A sequential regioselective cross-coupling route is reported for the synthesis of unsymmetrically disubstituted benzo[4,5]imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazines. The inhibition of ALK was evaluated and compound 19 in particular showed good activity against both the wild type and crizotinib-resistant L1196M mutant in vitro and in ALK-transfected BaF3 cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. ALK-rearrangements and testing methods in non-small cell lung cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, Rodney E.; Vora, Moiz; Mayhall, Kim; Cotelingam, James

    2014-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma tyrosine kinase (ALK) gene was first described as a driver mutation in anaplastic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Dysregulated ALK expression is now an identified driver mutation in nearly twenty different human malignancies, including 4-9% of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). The tyrosine kinase inhibitor crizotinib is more effective than standard chemotherapeutic agents in treating ALK positive NSCLC, making molecular diagnostic testing for dysregulated ALK expression a necessary step in identifying optimal treatment modalities. Here we review ALKmediated signal transduction pathways and compare the molecular protocols used to identify dysregulated ALK expression in NSCLC. We also discuss the use of crizotinib and second generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of ALK positive NSCLC, and the known mechanisms of crizotinib resistance in NSCLC. PMID:24955213

  19. ALK-rearrangements and testing methods in non-small cell lung cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, Rodney E; Vora, Moiz; Mayhall, Kim; Cotelingam, James

    2014-04-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma tyrosine kinase (ALK) gene was first described as a driver mutation in anaplastic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Dysregulated ALK expression is now an identified driver mutation in nearly twenty different human malignancies, including 4-9% of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). The tyrosine kinase inhibitor crizotinib is more effective than standard chemotherapeutic agents in treating ALK positive NSCLC, making molecular diagnostic testing for dysregulated ALK expression a necessary step in identifying optimal treatment modalities. Here we review ALKmediated signal transduction pathways and compare the molecular protocols used to identify dysregulated ALK expression in NSCLC. We also discuss the use of crizotinib and second generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of ALK positive NSCLC, and the known mechanisms of crizotinib resistance in NSCLC.

  20. Occurrence of anaplastic large cell lymphoma following IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis and cholecystitis and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Mitsuaki; Hodohara, Keiko; Yoshida, Keiko; Kagotani, Akiko; Iwai, Muneo; Yoshii, Miyuki; Okuno, Hiroko; Horinouchi, Akiko; Nakanishi, Ryota; Harada, Ayumi; Yoshida, Takashi; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2013-01-01

    IgG4-related sclerosing disease is an established disease entity with characteristic clinicopathological features. Recently, the association between IgG4-related sclerosing disease and the risk of malignancies has been suggested. IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis with pancreatic cancer has been reported. Further, a few cases of extraocular malignant lymphoma in patients with IgG4-related sclerosing disease have also been documented. Herein, we describe the first documented case of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) following IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis and cholecystitis and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). A 61-year-old Japanese male, with a past history of DLBCL, was detected with swelling of the pancreas and tumorous lesions in the gallbladder. Histopathological study of the resected gallbladder specimen revealed diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration with fibrosclerosis in the entire gallbladder wall. Eosinophilic infiltration and obliterative phlebitis were also noted. Immunohistochemically, many IgG4-positive plasma cells had infiltrated into the lesion, and the ratio of IgG4/IgG-positive plasma cells was 71.6%. Accordingly, a diagnosis of IgG4-related cholecystitis was made. Seven months later, he presented with a painful tumor in his left parotid gland. Histopathological study demonstrated diffuse or cohesive sheet-like proliferation of large-sized lymphoid cells with rich slightly eosinophilic cytoplasm and irregular-shaped large nuclei. These lymphoid cells were positive for CD30, CD4, and cytotoxic markers, but negative for CD3 and ALK. Therefore, a diagnosis of ALK-negative ALCL was made. It has been suggested that the incidence of malignant lymphoma may be high in patients with IgG4-related sclerosing disease, therefore, intense medical follow-up is important in patients with this disorder.

  1. Crizotinib and testing for ALK.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Alice T; Solomon, Benjamin; Kenudson, Mari Mino

    2011-12-01

    Crizotinib was recently approved by the US FDA for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring the ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) gene rearrangement. To ensure identification of patients most likely to benefit, the FDA approved crizotinib concurrently with a companion diagnostic test-the Vysis ALK Break Apart FISH Probe Kit. This kit was used in 1 of the 2 pivotal trials leading to the FDA approval of crizotinib and has become the gold standard for detecting ALK rearrangement in NSCLC. Although ALK FISH is clinically validated, the assay can be technically challenging and costly. Therefore, other diagnostic modalities are being explored, including immunohistochemistry (IHC) and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. This article provides an overview of the diagnostic assays available for detecting ALK rearrangement. Each assay, including ALK FISH, has its strengths and weaknesses. Recent work with commercially available ALK antibodies suggests that IHC-based tests may represent a reliable and cost-effective screening strategy; however, large multicenter studies comparing IHC with FISH are needed to validate ALK IHC. While ALK FISH remains the current standard for diagnosing ALK positivity, large-scale screening of patients with newly diagnosed advanced NSCLC, as recommended by NCCN, may require development and validation of alternative screening strategies, such as combination IHC and FISH.

  2. Breast implant associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma: The UK experience. Recommendations on its management and implications for informed consent.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L; O'Donoghue, J M; McLean, N; Turton, P; Khan, A A; Turner, S D; Lennard, A; Collis, N; Butterworth, M; Gui, G; Bristol, J; Hurren, J; Smith, S; Grover, K; Spyrou, G; Krupa, K; Azmy, I A; Young, I E; Staiano, J J; Khalil, H; MacNeill, F A

    2017-08-01

    Breast implant-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL) is a rare, Non-Hodgkin lymphoma arising in the capsule of breast implants. BIA-ALCL presents as a recurrent effusion and/or mass. Tumours exhibit CD30 expression and are negative for Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK). We report the multi-disciplinary management of the UK series and how the stage of disease may be used to stratify treatment. Between 2012 and 2016, 23 cases of BIA-ALCL were diagnosed in 15 regional centres throughout the UK. Data on breast implant surgeries, clinical features, treatment and follow-up were available for 18 patients. The mean lead-time from initial implant insertion to diagnosis was 10 years (range: 3-16). All cases were observed in patients with textured breast implants or expanders. Fifteen patients with breast implants presented with stage I disease (capsule confined), and were treated with implant removal and capsulectomy. One patient received adjuvant chest-wall radiotherapy. Three patients presented with extra-capsular masses (stage IIA). In addition to explantation, capsulectomy and excision of the mass, all patients received neo-/adjuvant chemotherapy with CHOP as first line. One patient progressed on CHOP but achieved pathological complete response (pCR) with Brentuximab Vedotin. After a mean follow-up of 23 months (range: 1-56) all patients reported here remain disease-free. BIA-ALCL is a rare neoplasm with a good prognosis. Our data support the recommendation that stage I disease be managed with surgery alone. Adjuvant chemotherapy may be required for more invasive disease and our experience has shown the efficacy of Brentuximab as a second line treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  3. Heterogeneity of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in lung adenocarcinoma harboring anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangements: A case report.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiong; Wu, Jian-Yu; Jiao, Shun-Chang

    2014-11-01

    Lung cancer is a heterogeneous and complex disease that remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. The identification of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements has changed the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer, creating a personalized treatment era that is based on the appropriate molecular selection of patients. In spite of the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), acquired resistance remains inevitable due to various mechanisms. The present study reports the case of a 30-year-old patient with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma initially harboring an EGFR mutation. However, following disease progression and a series of treatments, the wild-type EGFR gene was observed and the ALK rearrangements were revealed. Erlotinib administration resulted in a good response in the patient initially, but crizotinib did not. This indicated an association between the secondary mutations in kinases and the drug resistance to TKIs. This case should also highlight the clinical significance of repeat biopsies for the subsequent therapeutic choices at the onset of clinical progression.

  4. Bevacizumab and Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumor, Lymphoma, Intracranial Glioblastoma, Gliosarcoma or Anaplastic Astrocytoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-14

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV

  5. Detection of Echinoderm Microtubule Associated Protein Like 4-Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Fusion Genes in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Clinical Samples by a Real-time Quantitative Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Jin-Yin; Chen, Zhi-Xia; Zhong, Wei; Li, Long-Yun; Liu, Li-Cheng; Hu, Xiao-Xu; Chen, Wei-Jun; Wang, Meng-Zhao

    2016-12-20

    Objective To establish a real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay (qRT-PCR) for the rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of echinoderm microtubule associated protein like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) fusion genes in non-small cell lung cancer. Methods The specific primers for the four variants of EML4-ALK fusion genes (V1, V2, V3a, and V3b) and Taqman fluorescence probes for the detection of the target sequences were carefully designed by the Primer Premier 5.0 software. Then, using pseudovirus containing EML4-ALK fusion genes variants (V1, V2, V3a, and V3b) as the study objects, we further analyzed the lower limit, sensitivity, and specificity of this method. Finally, 50 clinical samples, including 3 ALK-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) positive specimens, were collected and used to detect EML4-ALK fusion genes using this method. Results The lower limit of this method for the detection of EML4-ALK fusion genes was 10 copies/μl if no interference of background RNA existed. Regarding the method's sensitivity, the detection resolution was as high as 1% and 0.5% in the background of 500 and 5000 copies/μl wild-type ALK gene, respectively. Regarding the method's specificity, no non-specific amplification was found when it was used to detect EML4-ALK fusion genes in leukocyte and plasma RNA samples from healthy volunteers. Among the 50 clinical samples, 47 ALK-FISH negative samples were also negative. Among 3 ALK-FISH positive samples, 2 cases were detected positive using this method, but another was not detected because of the failure of RNA extraction. Conclusion The proposed qRT-PCR assay for the detection of EML4-ALK fusion genes is rapid, simple, sensitive, and specific, which is deserved to be validated and widely used in clinical settings.

  6. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the breast arising around mammary implant capsule: an Italian report.

    PubMed

    Farace, Francesco; Bulla, Antonio; Marongiu, Francesco; Campus, Gian Vittorio; Tanda, Francesco; Lissia, Amelia; Cossu, Antonio; Fozza, Claudio; Rubino, Corrado

    2013-06-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) of the breast is a very rare nonepithelial neoplasm. In the literature, this tumor has sometimes been described in proximity of breast implants (60 implant-related ALCL reported). In 2010, a patient who had undergone a right mastectomy and tissue expander/implant reconstruction for a "ductal" carcinoma 10 years before was referred to our unit for evaluation. On examination, an enlarged reconstructed right breast was found. The reconstructed breast did not show tenderness or signs of infection, ulceration, or breakdown. Mammograms and ultrasound scan did not suggest the presence of recurrent cancer, infection, deflation of the implant, or severe capsule contracture. The patient underwent mammary implant replacement. About 3 weeks after surgery, the patient came back to our unit for a new mild enlargement of the operated breast and the implant was removed. Three months later, the patient returned with a skin lesion in the right parasternal region. A radical excisional biopsy was performed under local anesthesia and the diagnosis of ALK-1-negative ALCL was finally made. The clinical and histological diagnosis of this disease is difficult as it can often be mistaken for a simple seroma (breast enlargement), an infection, or an unspecific reaction to silicone (redness and/or tension of the skin, itching, and fever). We strongly suggest considering ALCL in any patient with a spontaneous breast seroma lasting more than 6 months after mammary prosthesis implantation. The suspicion of ALCL must be suggested to the pathologist immediately. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  7. Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gidengil, Courtney A; Predmore, Zachary; Mattke, Soeren; van Busum, Kristin; Kim, Benjamin

    2015-03-01

    There is substantial evidence that a type of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is associated with breast implants. However, the course in patients with breast implants seems to be unusually benign compared with other systemic ALCL. The purpose of this study was to identify and analyze recently published cases of breast implant-associated ALCL, with an emphasis on diagnosis, staging, treatment, and outcomes. The authors conducted a systematic literature review of reported cases of ALCL in patients with breast implants. Publications were identified with a search algorithm and forward searches. Case-based data were abstracted independently and reconciled by multiple investigators. Of 248 identified articles, only 102 were relevant to breast implant-associated ALCL, and 27 were included in this study. Fifty-four cases of ALCL in patients with breast implants were identified. Detailed clinical information was lacking in many cases. Most presented with a seroma (76 percent), and approximately half were associated with the capsule (48 percent). Most presented as stage IE (61 percent). All but one case were ALK-negative. Most received chemotherapy (57 percent) and radiation therapy (48 percent), and 11 percent received stem cell transplants. Approximately one-quarter recurred, and 9 percent died. Since the publication of guidance related to breast implant-associated ALCL in 2010, a number of cases have been reported. Despite the typically benign course, many of the cases have been treated with radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. Increasing awareness of this disease entity among clinicians would be helpful, along with standardizing an approach to diagnosis, staging, and treatment. Risk, V.

  8. The long non-coding RNA LINC01013 enhances invasion of human anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chung, I-Hsiao; Lu, Pei-Hsuan; Lin, Yang-Hsiang; Tsai, Ming-Ming; Lin, Yun-Wen; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2017-03-22

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare type of highly malignant, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Currently, only studies on the chimeric oncogene NPM-ALK have reported a link to ALCL progression. However, the specific molecular mechanisms underlying the invasion of ALCL are still unclear. Here, we sought to investigate differentially expressed, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in ALCL and their potential biological function. Our microarray analyses revealed that LINC01013, a novel non-coding RNA gene, was highly expressed in clinical specimens of ALCL and was significantly upregulated in invasive ALCL cell lines. Knockdown of LINC01013 suppressed tumor cell invasion; conversely, its overexpression enhanced tumor cell invasion. LINC01013-induced invasion was mediated by activation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated proteins, snail and fibronectin. Specifically, LINC01013 induced snail, resulting in activation of fibronectin and enhanced ALCL cell invasion. Collectively, these findings support a potential role for LINC01013 in cancer cell invasion through the snail-fibronectin activation cascade and suggest that LINC01013 could potentially be utilized as a metastasis marker in ALCL.

  9. Activity of EGFR-tyrosine kinase and ALK inhibitors for EML4-ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer harbored coexisting EGFR mutation.

    PubMed

    Miyanaga, Akihiko; Shimizu, Kumi; Noro, Rintaro; Seike, Masahiro; Kitamura, Kazuhiro; Kosaihira, Seiji; Minegishi, Yuji; Shukuya, Takehito; Yoshimura, Akinobu; Kawamoto, Masashi; Tsuchiya, Shinichi; Hagiwara, Koichi; Soda, Manabu; Takeuchi, Kengo; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Mano, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Gemma, Akihiko

    2013-05-29

    The EML4-ALK (echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 gene and the anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene) fusion oncogene represents a novel molecular target in a small subset of non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). The EML4-ALK fusion gene occurs generally in NSCLC without mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and KRAS. We report that a case of EML4-ALK-positive NSCLC with EGFR mutation had a response of stable disease to both an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) and ALK inhibitor. We described the first clinical report of a patient with EML4-ALK-positive NSCLC with EGFR mutation that had a response of stable disease to both single-agent EGFR-TKI and ALK inhibitor. EML4-ALK translocation may be associated with resistance to EGFR-TKI, and EGFR signaling may contribute to resistance to ALK inhibitor in EML4-ALK-positive NSCLC.

  10. Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma masquerading as large pyogenic granuloma

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Anupama; Vedant, Deepak; Shanker, Vinay; Tegta, G. R.

    2016-01-01

    Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (pcALCL) forms 9% of the cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. It usually presents as solitary reddish brown ulcerating nodule or indurated plaque. Sometimes, it mimics other dermatological diseases such as eczema, pyoderma gangrenosum, pyogenic granuloma, morphea, and squamous cell carcinoma. Our case presented with large pyogenic granuloma like lesion with regional lymphadenopathy. Since pcALCL is rare, one can misdiagnose such cases and therefore high index of suspicion is necessary. PMID:27990392

  11. Re-Evaluating Progression in an Era of Progress: A Review of First- and Second-Line Treatment Options in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos, Emily H.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of crizotinib, the first small molecule inhibitor against anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), has led to impressive advances in the care of patients with advanced ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer. The development of second-generation ALK inhibitors, starting with the recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of ceritinib, promises to expand the therapeutic landscape for this cohort of patients. With increasing use of molecularly targeted therapy options, it has been observed that disease progression in patients receiving targeted agents has a heterogeneous biology, manifesting as either oligoprogressive or widely progressive disease, which may require development of innovative treatment strategies. This review discusses the first- and second-generation ALK inhibitors approved or in clinical development, as well as the novel challenges and approaches to disease progression in patients on targeted agents. Implications for Practice: The identification of driver mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), most prominently epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), has expanded treatment options for a significant cohort of patients. However, the success of targeted agents has brought new challenges, particularly regarding management of progression. Progression manifests heterogeneously, and management of oligoprogression may differ from diffusely progressive disease. Multiple options for treatment at progression exist, and it is becoming evident that selecting the best avenue of care requires understanding the biology and potential drivers of disease progression. This review discusses the array of treatment options available for patients with ALK-positive NSCLC, as well as evaluation and treatment of progressive disease. PMID:27053502

  12. ALK is a MYCN target gene and regulates cell migration and invasion in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Md. Kamrul; Nafady, Asmaa; Takatori, Atsushi; Kishida, Satoshi; Ohira, Miki; Suenaga, Yusuke; Hossain, Shamim; Akter, Jesmin; Ogura, Atsushi; Nakamura, Yohko; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Nakagawara, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Human anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has been identified as an oncogene that is mutated or amplified in NBLs. To obtain a better understanding of the molecular events associated with ALK in the pathogenesis of NBL, it is necessary to clarify how ALK gene contributes to NBL progression. In the present study, we found that ALK expression was significantly high in NBL clinical samples with amplified MYCN (n = 126, P < 0.01) and in developing tumors of MYCN-transgenic mice. Indeed, promoter analysis revealed that ALK is a direct transcriptional target of MYCN. Overexpression and knockdown of ALK demonstrated its function in cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Moreover, treatment with an ALK inhibitor, TAE-684, efficiently suppressed such biological effects in MYCN amplified cells and tumor growth of the xenograft in mice. Our present findings explore the fundamental understanding of ALK in order to develop novel therapeutic tools by targeting ALK for aggressive NBL treatment. PMID:24356251

  13. ALK is a MYCN target gene and regulates cell migration and invasion in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Md Kamrul; Nafady, Asmaa; Takatori, Atsushi; Kishida, Satoshi; Ohira, Miki; Suenaga, Yusuke; Hossain, Shamim; Akter, Jesmin; Ogura, Atsushi; Nakamura, Yohko; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Nakagawara, Akira

    2013-12-20

    Human anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has been identified as an oncogene that is mutated or amplified in NBLs. To obtain a better understanding of the molecular events associated with ALK in the pathogenesis of NBL, it is necessary to clarify how ALK gene contributes to NBL progression. In the present study, we found that ALK expression was significantly high in NBL clinical samples with amplified MYCN (n = 126, P < 0.01) and in developing tumors of MYCN-transgenic mice. Indeed, promoter analysis revealed that ALK is a direct transcriptional target of MYCN. Overexpression and knockdown of ALK demonstrated its function in cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Moreover, treatment with an ALK inhibitor, TAE-684, efficiently suppressed such biological effects in MYCN amplified cells and tumor growth of the xenograft in mice. Our present findings explore the fundamental understanding of ALK in order to develop novel therapeutic tools by targeting ALK for aggressive NBL treatment.

  14. CRKL mediates EML4-ALK signaling and is a potential therapeutic target for ALK-rearranged lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Voeller, Donna; Gower, Arjan; Kim, In-Kyu; Zhang, Yu-Wen; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements are oncogenic drivers in a small subset of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The ALK inhibitors are highly effective in NSCLC patients harboring ALK rearrangements; however, most patients acquire resistance to the therapy following an initial response. Mechanisms of acquired resistance are complex. We used LC-MS/MS-based phosphotyrosine-peptide profiling in the EML4-ALK rearranged H3122 and H2228 cells treated with ALK inhibitors, to identify downstream effectors of ALK. We then used Western blot, siRNA experiments, cell proliferation, viability and migration assays to validate our findings. We identified CRKL as a novel downstream effector of ALK signaling. We demonstrated that CRKL tyrosine phosphorylation was repressed by pharmacological inhibition or small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of ALK in the ALK-rearranged cells. More importantly, CRKL knockdown attenuated their cell proliferation, viability, and migration, but it had no effect on ALK phosphorylation and expression in these cells. Furthermore, CRKL tyrosine phosphorylation was inhibited by dasatinib (an inhibitor of ABL and SRC kinases), which in combination with the ALK inhibitor crizotinib displayed a synergistic inhibitory effect in vitro. In conclusion, our study suggests that CRKL is a key downstream effector of ALK, and combined inhibition of ALK and CRKL may represent an effective strategy for treating ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients. PMID:27078848

  15. Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma: review of a distinct clinicopathologic entity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Wei, Shi

    2014-06-01

    Primary breast anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is rare but is more commonly seen in patients with implants; fewer than 50 cases of breast implant-associated ALCL have been reported in the English language literature. Breast implant-associated ALCL is not a disease of the breast parenchyma, but instead is a disease of the fibrous capsule surrounding the implant. The patients usually present with an effusion around the implant and, rarely, with a solid mass. Morphologically, the neoplastic cells are large, epithelioid, and pleomorphic, with abundant cytoplasm, vesicular irregular nuclei, and frequent mitoses. Occasional "hallmark" cells may be present. The lesional cells typically show strong and diffuse immunoreactivity for CD30 and often express T-cell markers, cytotoxic-associated antigens, and epithelial membrane antigen. Almost all reported cases are negative for anaplastic lymphoma kinase. Molecular genetic analyses have demonstrated T-cell receptor gene rearrangements. The differential diagnosis essentially includes poorly differentiated carcinoma, other lymphomas, and chronic inflammation. Once a diagnosis of lymphoma is established, it is important to exclude systemic anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative ALCL involving the breast, primary cutaneous ALCL, and other CD30(+) lymphoproliferative disorders. The patients with effusion-associated ALCL often have an indolent course and excellent prognosis, responding well to excision of the fibrous capsule around the implant (capsulectomy) and implant removal. In contrast, patients who present with a distinct mass may have a more aggressive course and poor prognosis, requiring chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy.

  16. Targeted therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma and systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma: focus on brentuximab vedotin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xueyan; Soma, Lorinda A; Fromm, Jonathan R

    2014-01-01

    Despite the relative success of chemotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), novel therapeutic agents are needed for refractory or relapsed patients. Targeted immunotherapy has emerged as a novel treatment option for these patients. Although unconjugated anti-cluster of differentiation (CD)30 antibodies showed minimal antitumor activity in early clinical trials, development of antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs) appears promising. Brentuximab vedotin is an ADC composed of an anti-CD30 antibody linked to a potent microtubule-disrupting agent monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE). It has the ability to target CD30-positive tumor cells and, once bound to CD30, brentuximab vedotin is internalized and MMAE is released to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In two Phase II trials, objective response was reported in 75% and 86% of patients with refractory or relapsed HL and systemic ALCL, respectively, with an acceptable toxicity profile. Based on these studies, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted accelerated approval of brentuximab vedotin in August 2011 for the treatment of refractory and relapsed HL and ALCL. We review the key characteristics of brentuximab vedotin, clinical data supporting its therapeutic efficacy, and current ongoing trials to explore its utility in other CD30-positive malignancies. PMID:24379682

  17. Pediatric MATCH: Ensartinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With ALK or ROS1 Genomic Alterations

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-25

    Advanced Malignant Solid Neoplasm; ALK Fusion Protein Expression; ALK Gene Mutation; ALK Gene Translocation; Histiocytosis; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Refractory Central Nervous System Neoplasm; Refractory Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Refractory Neuroblastoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; ROS1 Fusion Positive; ROS1 Gene Mutation; ROS1 Gene Translocation; Stage III Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  18. Destaining of Diff-Quik stained cytologic smears is not necessary for the detection of anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene rearrangement in lung adenocarcinoma by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weisheng; Khurana, Kamal K; Tull, Jamie; Maciak, Charlene; Zhang, Shengle

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is one of the standard molecular tests for targeted therapy of lung adenocarcinoma. However, insufficient cell block cellularity may impede molecular testing. A recent study showed that Diff-Quik (DQ) stained cytology smear is suitable for ALK by FISH. The aim of our study was to observe the impact of destaining intervals on the quality of FISH signals and determine if DQ smears without destaining would allow FISH analysis. Thirty-five DQ smears from 27 cases of lung adenocarcinoma were analyzed for ALK gene rearrangement by FISH. Twenty three DQ smears were destained for different intervals, including 30 s (13 cases), 1 min (6 cases), or 2 min (4 cases). Twelve DQ smears were not subjected to destaining. For further validation, FISH signals in 8 smears and 6 cell blocks were compared with the paired destained DQ smears. The signal quality was semi-quantified and analyzed with Chi-squared test. Of the total 27 selected cases, three (11%) were positive for ALK gene rearrangement, whereas 24 (89%) were negative. FISH signal was satisfactory in all DQ smears. There was no significant difference in the quality of signal among smears with different destaining intervals (P = 0.55) or between smears with and without destaining (P = 0.41). DQ smears without destaining showed identical FISH results and similar or better signals as compared with paired destained smears and cell blocks in all cases. Duration of destaining intervals does not impact the quality of FISH signal on DQ smears. Destaining of DQ smears is not necessary for ALK by FISH.

  19. Destaining of Diff-Quik stained cytologic smears is not necessary for the detection of anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene rearrangement in lung adenocarcinoma by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weisheng; Khurana, Kamal K; Tull, Jamie; Maciak, Charlene; Zhang, Shengle

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is one of the standard molecular tests for targeted therapy of lung adenocarcinoma. However, insufficient cell block cellularity may impede molecular testing. A recent study showed that Diff-Quik (DQ) stained cytology smear is suitable for ALK by FISH. Aims: The aim of our study was to observe the impact of destaining intervals on the quality of FISH signals and determine if DQ smears without destaining would allow FISH analysis. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five DQ smears from 27 cases of lung adenocarcinoma were analyzed for ALK gene rearrangement by FISH. Twenty three DQ smears were destained for different intervals, including 30 s (13 cases), 1 min (6 cases), or 2 min (4 cases). Twelve DQ smears were not subjected to destaining. For further validation, FISH signals in 8 smears and 6 cell blocks were compared with the paired destained DQ smears. The signal quality was semi-quantified and analyzed with Chi-squared test. Results: Of the total 27 selected cases, three (11%) were positive for ALK gene rearrangement, whereas 24 (89%) were negative. FISH signal was satisfactory in all DQ smears. There was no significant difference in the quality of signal among smears with different destaining intervals (P = 0.55) or between smears with and without destaining (P = 0.41). DQ smears without destaining showed identical FISH results and similar or better signals as compared with paired destained smears and cell blocks in all cases. Conclusions: Duration of destaining intervals does not impact the quality of FISH signal on DQ smears. Destaining of DQ smears is not necessary for ALK by FISH. PMID:27756989

  20. Immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for the detection of anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene rearrangements in patients with non-small cell lung cancer: potential advantages and methodologic pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Demidova, Irina; Barinov, Aleksei; Savelov, Nikita; Gagarin, Ilia; Grinevitch, Viacheslav; Stroiakovaski, Daniil; Popov, Mikhail; Laktionov, Konstantin; Gutorov, Sergei; Smolin, Alexei; Olshanskaya, Yulia; Obukhova, Tatiana

    2014-06-01

    Echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 gene (EML4) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene (ALK) fusion was shown to be the driver of tumorigenesis in approximately 3% to 5% of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and is associated with response to inhibition with crizotinib. However, no complete agreement regarding the best diagnostic test for identification of ALK rearrangements has been achieved yet. To investigate the concordance, sensitivity, and specificity of immunohistochemistry (IHC), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection of ALK rearrangements. Thirty-six prospectively tested patients with NSCLC who had adenocarcinoma and 10 ALK-positive samples were included in the study. All samples were tested by IHC (ALK1 clone, 5A4 clone, D5F3 clone), FISH (LSI ALK Break Apart and ALK FISH Probe), and multiplexed RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry staining was successful in all samples.. Clone D5F3 showed the best sensitivity and specificity of 100%; clones ALK1 and 5A4 showed sensitivities of 91% with specificity of 100%. Both FISH probes showed concordance with sensitivity and specificity of 100%. Hybridization and RT-PCR were successful in 98% and 93.4% of samples, respectively, with sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 100%. Frequent artifacts leading to misinterpretation were observed with all 3 methodologies. All 3 methodologies showed good sensitivity, specificity, and concordance, when artifacts were characterized and excluded. However, all ambiguous cases have to be confirmed as ALK rearranged by at least 2 of the 3 methods.

  1. Alectinib-Induced Erythema Multiforme and Successful Rechallenge with Alectinib in a Patient with Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Rearranged Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tatsuo; Sowa-Osako, Junko; Nakai, Toshiyuki; Ohyama, Ayako; Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Ohsawa, Masahiko; Hirata, Kazuto

    2016-01-01

    Background Alectinib is an oral drug developed for the treatment of patients with fusion gene encoding echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK)-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here, we present the case of a patient treated with alectinib who developed a hypersensitivity reaction with successful rechallenge treatment. Case Presentation A 39-year-old woman who was a passive smoker was referred to Osaka City University Hospital for the evaluation of a skin event caused by treatment for NSCLC with the fusion gene EML4-ALK. The skin reaction was observed on the anterior chest, upper arms, and ear auricles on day 11 of treatment with oral alectinib. The skin event presented as widely distributed erythematous macules that were confluent, indicating a severe and life-threatening form. The skin lesions started to resolve after the initiation of treatment with 40 mg prednisolone. After regrowth of the tumor, she received a rechallenge program for alectinib for 2 weeks; thereafter, alectinib treatment was successfully reinitiated. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, we present the first case in which alectinib, which binds to the adenosine triphosphate site of EML4-ALK, induced erythema multiforme. Moreover, successful readministration of alectinib through our rechallenge program has not been reported so far. PMID:28101031

  2. Analysis of clinical characteristics and prognosis of patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase‐positive and surgically resected lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hong; Cai, Yiran; Shi, Liang; Tang, Junfang; Liu, Zhidong; Wang, Zitong; Bai, Lianqi

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent research into lung cancer‐related driver genes has identified a distinctive molecular subtype of non‐small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) – anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)‐positive NSCLC. We evaluated the clinical features and survival rates of ALK‐positive lung adenocarcinoma patients who had undergone surgery but had not received ALK inhibitor therapy, along with the characteristics of patients with distant metastases. Methods Clinical data of 40 patients with ALK‐positive, postsurgical lung adenocarcinoma were retrospectively analyzed. Relationships between the patients’ clinical characteristics, distant metastases, and their disease‐free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were assessed. Results Most patients were relatively young, never‐smokers, had peripheral tumors, and the tumors were either moderately or poorly differentiated. The most common organ of distant metastases was the brain. The median time from surgery to brain metastasis was 17.2 months. The median OS following brain metastasis was 9.4 months. DFS in patients with early stage disease, peripheral tumors, no lymph node metastases, and treated with adjuvant therapy was significantly longer than for those with late stage disease (P = 0.015), central tumors (P = 0.000), lymph node metastases (P = 0.026), and not treated with adjuvant therapy (P = 0.000). Patients with early stage disease, peripheral tumors, and treated with adjuvant therapy obtained markedly longer OS than those with late stage disease (P = 0.021), central tumors (P = 0.003), and not treated with adjuvant therapy (P = 0.006). Conclusion Patients with ALK‐positive surgically resected lung adenocarcinoma have distinctive clinical characteristics. The brain is the most common site of extrapulmonary metastasis. Survival is associated with stage, tumor location, and the administration of adjuvant therapy. PMID:27779369

  3. Reversal of microRNA-150 silencing disadvantages crizotinib-resistant NPM-ALK(+) cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Hoareau-Aveilla, Coralie; Valentin, Thibaud; Daugrois, Camille; Quelen, Cathy; Mitou, Géraldine; Quentin, Samuel; Jia, Jinsong; Spicuglia, Salvatore; Ferrier, Pierre; Ceccon, Monica; Giuriato, Sylvie; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Brousset, Pierre; Lamant, Laurence; Meggetto, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory microRNA miR-150 is involved in the development of hemopathies and is downregulated in T-lymphomas, such as anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) tumors. ALCL is defined by the presence or absence of translocations that activate the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), with nucleophosmin-ALK (NPM-ALK) fusions being the most common. Here, we compared samples of primary NPM-ALK(+) and NPM-ALK(–) ALCL to investigate the role of miR-150 downstream of NPM-ALK. Methylation of the MIR150 gene was substantially elevated in NPM-ALK(+) biopsies and correlated with reduced miR-150 expression. In NPM-ALK(+) cell lines, DNA hypermethylation–mediated miR-150 repression required ALK-dependent pathways, as ALK inhibition restored miR-150 expression. Moreover, epigenetic silencing of miR-150 was due to the activation of STAT3, a major downstream substrate of NPM-ALK, in cooperation with DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). Accordingly, miR-150 repression was turned off following treatment with the DNMT inhibitor, decitabine. In murine NPM-ALK(+) xenograft models, miR-150 upregulation induced antineoplastic activity. Treatment of crizotinib-resistant NPM-ALK(+) KARPAS-299-CR06 cells with decitabine or ectopic miR-150 expression reduced viability and growth. Altogether, our results suggest that hypomethylating drugs, alone or in combination with other agents, may benefit ALK(+) patients harboring tumors resistant to crizotinib and other anti-ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Moreover, these results support further work on miR-150 in these and other ALK(+) malignancies. PMID:26258416

  4. Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Letter, Haley; Rop, Baiywo; Edison, Michele N; Turner, Patricia

    2016-03-26

    Introduction Anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a very rare T-cell lymphoma that has only recently been found to be associated with breast implants. It has been described in the literature mainly in the form of case reports. This article focuses on the imaging characteristics of this rare disease. We hope to increase awareness of breast imagers and referring physicians to improve early detection rates. Case Report We present the case of a 32-year-old female who presented with several weeks of pain and firmness in her right breast. MRI and ultrasound demonstrated a peri-implant fluid collection. Ultrasound-guided aspiration revealed anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The patient was treated with implant removal alone and has now been in remission for 3 years.  Conclusion Anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the breast is a very rare entity that has mainly been described in the literature as case reports. As in the case of our patient, imaging findings can be very non-specific, and it is important for surgeons, breast imagers, and oncologists to be aware of this rare disease to ensure prompt diagnosis.

  5. Equivocal ALK fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) cases may benefit from ancillary ALK FISH probe testing.

    PubMed

    Selinger, Christina; Cooper, Wendy; Lum, Trina; McNeil, Catriona; Morey, Adrienne; Waring, Paul; Amanuel, Benhur; Millward, Michael; Peverall, Joanne; Van Vliet, Chris; Christie, Michael; Tran, Yen; Diakos, Connie; Pavlakis, Nick; Gill, Anthony J; O'Toole, Sandra

    2015-11-01

    Accurate assessment of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement in non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) is critical to identify patients who are likely to respond to crizotinib. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ALK/EML4 TriCheck FISH probe in a series of NSCLCs enriched for tumours with equivocal ALK status. ALK FISH was prospectively performed on 45 NSCLCs with the ALK/EML4 TriCheck probe (ZytoVision) and the Vysis ALK break-apart probe (Abbott Molecular). ALK immunohistochemistry was performed with 5A4 and D5F3 antibodies. Fourteen cases had equivocal ALK status, based on borderline or focal FISH positivity, an atypical FISH pattern, or discrepancy between ALK FISH and immunohistochemistry. Four of the 14 equivocal cases showed discordance between the two FISH probes. All other cases were concordant. The TriCheck probe showed that, of 31 unequivocal cases, 15 were ALK-rearranged, and 60% of these had EML4 as the translocation partner. Within the group of 14 equivocal cases, 12 showed rearrangement with the Tricheck probe; only one of these showed EML4 rearrangement. Of the six equivocal cases that received crizotinib, four showed clinical benefit. The ALK/EML4 TriCheck FISH probe may be useful for the detection of ALK rearrangements, especially in borderline or atypical cases, where an additional unique ALK FISH probe may provide further confirmation of rearrangement. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. ALK F1174V mutation confers sensitivity while ALK I1171 mutation confers resistance to alectinib. The importance of serial biopsy post progression.

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong; Milliken, Jeffrey C; Azada, Michele C; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M; Klempner, Samuel J

    2016-01-01

    Many acquired resistant mutations to the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene have been identified during treatment of ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with crizotinib, ceritinib, and alectinib. These various acquired resistant ALK mutations confer differential sensitivities to various ALK inhibitors and may provide guidance on how to sequence the use of many of the second generation ALK inhibitors. We described a patient who developed an acquired ALK F1174V resistant mutation on progression from crizotinib that responded to alectinib for 18 months but then developed an acquired ALK I1171S mutation to alectinib. Both tumor samples had essentially the same genomic profile by comprehensive genomic profiling otherwise. This is the first patient report that demonstrates ALK F1174V mutation is sensitive to alectinib and further confirms missense acquired ALK I1171 mutation is resistant to alectinib. Sequential tumor re-biopsy for comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) is important to appreciate the selective pressure during treatment with various ALK inhibitors underpinning the evolution of the disease course of ALK+NSCLC patients while on treatment with the various ALK inhibitors. This approach will likely help inform the optimal sequencing strategy as more ALK inhibitors become available. This case report also validates the importance of developing structurally distinct ALK inhibitors for clinical use to overcome non-cross resistant ALK mutations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Detection of t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocation by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization in CD30-positive primary cutaneous lymphoma and lymphomatoid papulosis.

    PubMed Central

    Beylot-Barry, M.; Lamant, L.; Vergier, B.; de Muret, A.; Fraitag, S.; Delord, B.; Dubus, P.; Vaillant, L.; Delaunay, M.; MacGrogan, G.; Beylot, C.; de Mascarel, A.; Delsol, G.; Merlio, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    The t(2;5) generates a chimeric NPM-ALK transcript encoded by the nucleophosmin NPM gene fused to the anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene ALK. Using a reverse transcriptase nested polymerase chain reaction assay we have detected NPM-ALK transcripts within CD30+ primary cutaneous lymphoma and lymphomatoid papulosis (LP). The t(2;5) was identified in 4 out of 9 CD30+ anaplastic lymphomas and in 1 out of 4 CD30+ pleomorphic lymphomas. Moreover, the t(2;5) was detected in 3 out of 10 LPs. All NPM-ALK-positive lymphomas and 1 NPM-ALK-positive LP exhibited a clonal rearrangement of the T cell receptor gamma-chain gene. The t(2;5) was detected in 2 cases of LP without other evidence for a clonal lymphoid population. To identify cells carrying the t(2;5) translocation, we used immunohistochemistry to detect the ALK-encoded p80 protein and in situ hybridization for the specific detection of NPM-ALK transcripts. Both p80 protein and NPM-ALK transcripts were expressed by anaplastic or large CD30+ lymphoma cells with positive NPM-ALK amplification. The presence of t(2;5) in a subset of CD30+ cutaneous lymphoma and LP may indicate a common pathogenesis with a subset of anaplastic nodal lymphoma. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8701987

  8. ASCEND-8: A Randomized Phase 1 Study of Ceritinib, 450 mg or 600 mg, Taken with a Low-Fat Meal versus 750 mg in Fasted State in Patients with Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK)-Rearranged Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC).

    PubMed

    Cho, Byoung Chul; Kim, Dong-Wan; Bearz, Alessandra; Laurie, Scott A; McKeage, Mark; Borra, Gloria; Park, Keunchil; Kim, Sang-We; Ghosn, Marwan; Ardizzoni, Andrea; Maiello, Evaristo; Greystoke, Alastair; Yu, Richard; Osborne, Karen; Gu, Wen; Scott, Jeffrey W; Passos, Vanessa Q; Lau, Yvonne Y; Wrona, Anna

    2017-09-01

    Ceritinib, 750 mg fasted, is approved for treatment of patients with ALK receptor tyrosine kinase gene (ALK)-rearranged (ALK-positive) NSCLC previously treated with crizotinib. Part 1 of the ASCEND-8 study determined whether administering ceritinib, 450 mg or 600 mg, with a low-fat meal may enhance gastrointestinal (GI) tolerability versus 750 mg fasted in patients with ALK-positive NSCLC while maintaining similar exposure. ASCEND-8 is a multicenter, randomized, open-label, phase 1 study. Part 1 investigated the steady-state pharmacokinetics (PK) and safety of ceritinib, 450 mg or 600 mg, taken with a low-fat meal versus 750 mg fasted in patients with advanced ALK-positive NSCLC who were either treatment naive or pretreated with chemotherapy and/or crizotinib. Part 2 will assess efficacy and safety of ceritinib in treatment-naive patients. As of June 16, 2016, 137 patients were randomized (450 mg fed [n = 44], 600 mg fed [n = 47], and 750 mg fasted [n = 46]); 135 patients received ceritinib. Median follow-up duration was 4.14 months. At steady state, relative to 750 mg fasted, 450 mg with food demonstrated comparable PK as assessed by maximum (peak) concentration of drug in plasma and area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to 24 hours, whereas 600 mg with food demonstrated approximately 25% higher PK. Relative to 750 mg fasted, 450 mg with food was associated with a lower proportion of patients with GI toxicities, mostly grade 1 (diarrhea [43.2%], nausea [29.5%], and vomiting [18.2%]); there were no grade 3 or 4 events, study drug discontinuations, or serious AEs due to GI toxicities. Ceritinib, 450 mg with food, had similar exposure and a more favorable GI safety profile than ceritinib, 750 mg in fasted patients with ALK-positive NSCLC. Copyright © 2017 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Activity of second-generation ALK inhibitors against crizotinib-resistant mutants in an NPM-ALK model compared to EML4-ALK

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Diletta; Ceccon, Monica; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Mologni, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a tyrosine kinase receptor involved in both solid and hematological tumors. About 80% of ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) cases are characterized by the t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocation, encoding for the aberrant fusion protein nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK, whereas 5% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients carry the inv(2)(p21;p23) rearrangement, encoding for the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK fusion. The ALK/c-MET/ROS inhibitor crizotinib successfully improved the treatment of ALK-driven diseases. However, several cases of resistance appeared in NSCLC patients, and ALK amino acid substitutions were identified as a leading cause of resistance to crizotinib. Second-generation ALK inhibitors have been developed in order to overcome crizotinib resistance. In this work, we profiled in vitro the activity of crizotinib, AP26113, ASP3026, alectinib, and ceritinib against six mutated forms of ALK associated with clinical resistance to crizotinib (C1156Y, L1196M, L1152R, G1202R, G1269A, and S1206Y) and provide a classification of mutants according to their level of sensitivity/resistance to the drugs. Since the biological activity of ALK mutations extends beyond the specific type of fusion, both NPM-ALK- and EML4-ALK-positive cellular models were used. Our data revealed that most mutants may be targeted by using different inhibitors. One relevant exception is represented by the G1202R substitution, which was highly resistant to all drugs (>10-fold increased IC50 compared to wild type) and may represent the most challenging mutation to overcome. These results provide a prediction of cross-resistance of known crizotinib-resistant mutations against all second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) clinically available, and therefore could be a useful tool to help clinicians in the management of crizotinib-resistance cases. PMID:25727400

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Resistance to First- and Second-Generation ALK Inhibitors in ALK-Rearranged Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gainor, Justin F; Dardaei, Leila; Yoda, Satoshi; Friboulet, Luc; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Katayama, Ryohei; Dagogo-Jack, Ibiayi; Gadgeel, Shirish; Schultz, Katherine; Singh, Manrose; Chin, Emily; Parks, Melissa; Lee, Dana; DiCecca, Richard H; Lockerman, Elizabeth; Huynh, Tiffany; Logan, Jennifer; Ritterhouse, Lauren L; Le, Long P; Muniappan, Ashok; Digumarthy, Subba; Channick, Colleen; Keyes, Colleen; Getz, Gad; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Heist, Rebecca S; Lennerz, Jochen; Sequist, Lecia V; Benes, Cyril H; Iafrate, A John; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Shaw, Alice T

    2016-10-01

    Advanced, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive lung cancer is currently treated with the first-generation ALK inhibitor crizotinib followed by more potent, second-generation ALK inhibitors (e.g., ceritinib and alectinib) upon progression. Second-generation inhibitors are generally effective even in the absence of crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations, likely reflecting incomplete inhibition of ALK by crizotinib in many cases. Herein, we analyzed 103 repeat biopsies from ALK-positive patients progressing on various ALK inhibitors. We find that each ALK inhibitor is associated with a distinct spectrum of ALK resistance mutations and that the frequency of one mutation, ALK(G1202R), increases significantly after treatment with second-generation agents. To investigate strategies to overcome resistance to second-generation ALK inhibitors, we examine the activity of the third-generation ALK inhibitor lorlatinib in a series of ceritinib-resistant, patient-derived cell lines, and observe that the presence of ALK resistance mutations is highly predictive for sensitivity to lorlatinib, whereas those cell lines without ALK mutations are resistant. Secondary ALK mutations are a common resistance mechanism to second-generation ALK inhibitors and predict for sensitivity to the third-generation ALK inhibitor lorlatinib. These findings highlight the importance of repeat biopsies and genotyping following disease progression on targeted therapies, particularly second-generation ALK inhibitors. Cancer Discov; 6(10); 1118-33. ©2016 AACRSee related commentary by Qiao and Lovly, p. 1084This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 1069. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma associated with breast implants: a unique entity within the spectrum of peri-implant effusions.

    PubMed

    Chai, Siaw Ming; Kavangh, Simon; Ooi, Sin Sin; Sterrett, Gregory F; Cull, Gavin; Plunkett, Myfanwy; Spagnolo, Dominic; Amanuel, Benhur; Joske, David; Leslie, Connull; Barham, Tony; Frost, Felicity

    2014-11-01

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare and newly described complication associated with breast implants. Patients often present with a peri-implant effusion, which is amenable to fine-needle aspiration. The laboratory handling of peri-implant effusions for cytology and ancillary studies is as crucial as recognizing the characteristic cytology of ALCL. All cases of peri-implant effusions were retrieved from the PathWest database between January 2003 and May 2013, yielding four cases of breast implant-associated ALCL and six benign samples. The cytological features were evaluated and information from ancillary studies collated. Clinical and follow-up histology was available in all cases. All ALCL cases contained highly atypical lymphoid cells including 'hallmark' cells. In contrast, benign peri-implant effusions showed a mixture of inflammatory cells, being either neutrophil-rich (three cases) or lymphocyte-rich (three cases). A CD30 positive, ALK1 negative immunophenotype was demonstrated in all cases on cell block immunohistochemistry. Flow cytometry and T-cell receptor clonality studies confirmed aberrant T-cell immunophenotype in four of four and clonally rearranged T-cell receptor antigens in three of three cases. ALCL was identified in three of four subsequent capsulectomies. Staging confirmed disease limited to the capsular tissue or peri-implant effusion in all cases. None of the six patients with benign peri-implant effusions developed lymphoma during follow-up. Cases of ALCL accounted for 40% of peri-implant effusions received over a 10-year period, indicating the rarity of these samples and the high likelihood of malignancy. Awareness of this entity and its presentation should allow for appropriate triage of these specimens and definitive diagnosis on effusion specimens.

  12. The Utility of Thyroid Transcription Factor 1 (TTF-1), Napsin A, Excision Repair Cross-Complementing 1 (ERCC1), Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) and the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Expression in Small Biopsy in Prognosis of Patients with Lung Adenocarcinoma – A Retrograde Single-Center Study from Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Burazer, Marina Piljić; Mladinov, Suzana; Ćapkun, Vesna; Kuret, Sendi; Durdov, Merica Glavina

    2017-01-01

    Background The present study was carried out in order to evaluate our institutional experience with small biopsy in diagnosis and molecular testing of lung adenocarcinoma. Few specific and predictive markers have been evaluated and correlated with clinicopathologic characteristics and survival in patients with lung adenocarcinoma who received platinum-based chemotherapy. There have not been such reports from Croatia. Material/Methods A total of 142 cases of lung adenocarcinoma were retrospectively investigated in small biopsies for the immunohistochemical expression of TTF-1, napsin A, ERCC1, ALK, and the EGFR mutation by real-time polymerase chain reaction (rtPCR). Results TTF-1, napsin A, and ERCC1 expression was found in 81%, 78%, and 69% of patients, respectively, and the expressions were not significantly associated with subtype. Expression of ALK was found in 4% and EGFR mutation in 10% of patients. Exon 19 deletions were the most common. Longer survival was significantly associated with TTF-1 positivity (p=0.007) and napsin A positivity (p=0.026). Higher relative risk of death significantly correlated with positive expression of ERCC1 (p=0.041). Conclusions Positive TTF-1 and napsin A expressions in lung adenocarcinoma tissues were useful diagnostic and favorable prognostic parameters. Positive ERCC1 expression was identified as a negative prognostic marker in patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. The percentages of EGFR and ALK mutations corresponded to those in previously published reports for Caucasians. PMID:28128193

  13. Primary central nervous system anaplastic large-cell lymphoma mimicking lymphomatosis cerebri.

    PubMed

    Sugino, Toshiya; Mikami, Takeshi; Akiyama, Yukinori; Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Mikuni, Nobuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is usually diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) rarely occurs in the central nervous system. PCNSL always presents as single or multiple nodular contrast-enhancing mass lesions within T2-hyperintense areas on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Infrequently, diffuse infiltrating change with little contrast enhancement called lymphomatosis cerebri can be seen in PCNSL. In this report, we describe a 75-year-old immunocompetent man who had progressive dementia. On MRI, diffuse white matter lesions with little contrast enhancement were observed to gradually progress, which was clinically consistent with his worsening condition. A biopsy specimen revealed non-destructive, diffusely infiltrating, anaplastic large CD30-positive lymphoma, indicating a diagnosis of ALCL. After the biopsy, he was treated by whole brain irradiation (total 46 Gy) and focal boost irradiation (total 14 Gy). However, his performance status worsened and there was no symptom improvement. The patient died 8 months after symptom onset. The clinical course, diagnostic workup, pathologic correlates, and treatment outcomes are described herein.

  14. Cardiac Tamponade Associated with the Presentation of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma in a 2-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Mira-Perceval Juan, Gema; Alcalá Minagorre, Pedro J.; Huertas Sánchez, Ana M.; Segura Sánchez, Sheila; López Iniesta, Silvia; De León Marrero, Francisco J.; Costa Navarro, Estela; Niveiro de Jaime, María

    2015-01-01

    The anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a rare entity in pediatric patients. We present an unusual case of pericardial involvement, quite uncommon as extranodal presentation of this type of disorder, that provoked a life-risk situation requiring an urgent pericardiocentesis. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a child with pericardial involvement without an associated cardiac mass secondary to anaplastic large cell lymphoma in pediatric age. We report the case of a 21-month-old Caucasian male infant with cardiac tamponade associated with the presentation of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Initially, the child presented with 24-day prolonged fever syndrome, cutaneous lesions associated with hepatomegaly, inguinal adenopathies, and pneumonia. After a 21-day asymptomatic period, polypnea and tachycardia were detected in a clinical check-up. Chest X-ray revealed a remarkable increase of the cardiothoracic index. The anaplastic large cell lymphoma has a high incidence of extranodal involvement but myocardial or pericardial involvements are rare. For this reason, we recommend a close monitoring of patients with a differential diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. PMID:26435869

  15. The enzymatic activity of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/IMP cyclohydrolase is enhanced by NPM-ALK: new insights in ALK-mediated pathogenesis and the treatment of ALCL.

    PubMed

    Boccalatte, Francesco E; Voena, Claudia; Riganti, Chiara; Bosia, Amalia; D'Amico, Lucia; Riera, Ludovica; Cheng, Mangeng; Ruggeri, Bruce; Jensen, Ole N; Goss, Valerie L; Lee, Kimberly; Nardone, Julie; Rush, John; Polakiewicz, Roberto D; Comb, Michael J; Chiarle, Roberto; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2009-03-19

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma represents a subset of neoplasms caused by translocations that juxtapose the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) to dimerization partners. The constitutive activation of ALK fusion proteins leads to cellular transformation through a complex signaling network. To elucidate the ALK pathways sustaining lymphomagenesis and tumor maintenance, we analyzed the tyrosine-kinase protein profiles of ALK-positive cell lines using 2 complementary proteomic-based approaches, taking advantage of a specific ALK RNA interference (RNAi) or cell-permeable inhibitors. A well-defined set of ALK-associated tyrosine phosphopeptides, including metabolic enzymes, kinases, ribosomal and cytoskeletal proteins, was identified. Validation studies confirmed that vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase (ATIC) associated with nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK, and their phosphorylation required ALK activity. ATIC phosphorylation was documented in cell lines and primary tumors carrying ALK proteins and other tyrosine kinases, including TPR-Met and wild type c-Met. Functional analyses revealed that ALK-mediated ATIC phosphorylation enhanced its enzymatic activity, dampening the methotrexate-mediated transformylase activity inhibition. These findings demonstrate that proteomic approaches in well-controlled experimental settings allow the definition of informative proteomic profiles and the discovery of novel ALK downstream players that contribute to the maintenance of the neoplastic phenotype. Prediction of tumor responses to methotrexate may justify specific molecular-based chemotherapy.

  16. Efficiency of Crizotinib on an ALK-Positive Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor of the Central Nervous System: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chennouf, Anas; Arslanian, Elizabeth; Roberge, David; Berthelet, France; Bojanowski, Michel; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Masucci, Laura; Belanger, Karl; Florescu, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMT) of the central nervous system (CNS) are rare entities that have a predilection for local recurrences. Approximately half of the inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors contain translocations that result in the over-expression of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene. We hereby present the case of a patient diagnosed with a left parieto-occipital IMT that recurred after multiple surgeries and radiotherapy. Immuno-histochemical examination of the tumor demonstrated ALK overexpression and the presence of an ALK rearrangement observed in lung cancers. The patient was subsequently started on an ALK inhibitor. A response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) partial response was observed by the seventh month of ALK inhibition and the tumor remained in control for 14 months. The current case reiterates the activity of ALK inhibitors within the CNS and suggests that radiotherapy may potentiate the permeability of ALK inhibitors in CNS tumors addicted to ALK signalling. PMID:28409069

  17. Excess of NPM-ALK oncogenic signaling promotes cellular apoptosis and drug dependency

    PubMed Central

    Mologni, Luca; Poggio, Teresa; Varesio, Lydia M.; Menotti, Matteo; Bombelli, Silvia; Rigolio, Roberta; Manazza, Andrea D.; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Ambrogio, Chiara; Giudici, Giovanni; Casati, Cesare; Mastini, Cristina; Compagno, Mara; Turner, Suzanne D.; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Chiarle, Roberto; Voena, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Most of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) cases carry the t(2;5; p23;q35) that produces the fusion protein NPM-ALK. NPM-ALK deregulated kinase activity drives several pathways that support malignant transformation of lymphoma cells. We found that in ALK-rearranged ALCL cell lines NPM-ALK was distributed in equal amounts between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Only the cytoplasmic portion was catalytically active in both cell lines and primary ALCL, whereas the nuclear portion was inactive due to heterodimerization with NPM1. Thus, about 50% of the NPM-ALK is not active and sequestered as NPM-ALK/NPM1 heterodimers in the nucleus. Overexpression or re-localization of NPM-ALK to the cytoplasm by NPM genetic knock-out or knock-down caused ERK1/2 increased phosphorylation and cell death through the engagement of an ATM/Chk2 and γH2AX mediated DNA damage response. Remarkably, human NPM-ALK amplified cell lines resistant to ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) underwent apoptosis upon drug withdrawal as a consequence of ERK1/2 hyperactivation. Altogether, these findings indicate that an excess of NPM-ALK activation and signaling induces apoptosis via oncogenic stress responses. A “drug holiday” where the ALK TKI treatment is suspended could represent a therapeutic option in cells that become resistant by NPM-ALK amplification. PMID:26657151

  18. Treating ALK-positive lung cancer--early successes and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Camidge, D Ross; Doebele, Robert C

    2012-04-03

    Rearrangements of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene occur infrequently in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but provide an important paradigm for oncogene-directed therapy in this disease. Crizotinib, an orally bioavailable inhibitor of ALK, provides significant benefit for patients with ALK-positive (ALK+) NSCLC in association with characteristic, mostly mild, toxic effects, and this drug has been approved by the FDA for clinical use in this molecularly defined subgroup of lung cancer. Many new ALK inhibitors are being developed and understanding the challenges of determining and addressing the adverse effects that are likely to be ALK specific, while maximizing the time of benefit on targeted agents, and understanding the mechanisms that underlie drug resistance will be critical in the future for informing the optimal therapy of ALK+ NSCLC.

  19. Novel Technique for Sampling of Breast Implant-associated Seroma in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    van Dorp, Martijn; T'Kindt, Johan; Mertens, Marianne; Colpaert, Steven D M

    2016-04-01

    We describe a novel technique for the sampling of breast implant-associated seroma. Using a blunt-tip lipofilling cannula, we have the freedom of movement to sample all fluid collections and prevent the misfortunes of damaging the implant. Also, we have demonstrated the inability of the Coleman style I lipofilling cannula to perforate a silicone breast implant. This practical and reliable technique will prove to be useful in managing the breast implant-associated seroma, especially with the rising incidence of the anaplastic large cell lymphoma, where the sampling of seroma is mandatory.

  20. Coming of Age: Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma After 18 Years of Investigation.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Mark W; Miranda, Roberto N

    2015-10-01

    Breast implant associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIALCL) is a distinct clinical entity that can present in patients receiving either reconstructive or cosmetic breast implants. Presenting symptoms include onset of a delayed (>1 year after implantation) fluid collection, mass of the capsule, or lymphadenopathy. Treatment has progressed in recent years and most commonly includes implant removal and total resection of the tumor, including capsule, mass, and involved lymph nodes. Further research is warranted to determine potential malignant drivers, disease progression, and optimal treatment strategies in advanced disease.

  1. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma in a reconstructed breast using a silicone implant: a UK case report.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, K; Murphy, J; Lennard, A; Wadehra, V; Menon, G K; Collis, N

    2014-04-01

    We present case of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma discovered as an incidental finding whilst revising an implant based breast reconstruction in a 55 year old woman, whom previously had undergone risk reduction mastectomies and immediate reconstruction. During the procedure a presumed seroma was present but this was macroscopically atypical giving a 'milky' coloured appearance with a pink tinge to it. The atypical fluid was sent for analysis and the diagnosis of ALCL confirmed. Treatment consisted of unilateral capsulectomy on the affected side and bilateral removal of implants with staging scans suggesting the disease being confined to the capsule. She remains in remission 12 months following the original procedure.

  2. Identification of ALK Rearrangements in Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yin P; Dong, Fei; Watkins, Jaclyn C; Nardi, Valentina; Bueno, Raphael; Dal Cin, Paola; Godleski, John J; Crum, Christopher P; Chirieac, Lucian R

    2017-09-14

    Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma is a rare, aggressive tumor arising from the peritoneal lining, induced by asbestos, therapeutic radiation, or germline mutations. Nevertheless, the molecular features remain largely unknown. To investigate anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements in a large series of peritoneal mesothelioma and characterize the mutational landscape of these tumors. We studied 88 consecutive patients (39 men, 49 women; median age 61, range 17-84 years) with peritoneal mesotheliomas diagnosed at a single institution between 2005 and 2015. We identified ALK-positive mesotheliomas by immunohistochemistry and confirmed ALK rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In ALK-rearranged cases, we characterized the fusion partners using targeted next-generation sequencing of both tumor DNA and RNA. In select cases, we quantified asbestos fibers by combined scanning electron microscopy and x-ray spectroscopy. We also explored ALK rearrangement in a separate series of 205 patients with pleural mesothelioma. Identification and characterization of novel ALK rearrangements and correlations with clinicopathologic characteristics. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase was positive by immunohistochemistry in 11 (13%) peritoneal mesotheliomas (focal weak in 8, diffuse strong in 3). In focal weak ALK-positive cases, no ALK rearrangement was detected by FISH or next-generation sequencing. In strong diffuse ALK-positive cases, FISH confirmed ALK rearrangements, and next-generation sequencing identified novel fusion partners ATG16L1, STRN, and TPM1. Patients with ALK-rearranged peritoneal mesotheliomas were women and younger than patients without ALK rearrangement (median age 36 vs 62; Mann-Whitney test, P = .02), but all other clinicopathologic characteristics (size of tumor nodules, histology, treatment, and survival) were not different. No asbestos fibers were detected in ALK-rearranged cases. Furthermore, loss of chromosomal region 9p or 22q or

  3. A novel fusion of TPR and ALK in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon-La; Lira, Maruja E; Hong, Mineui; Kim, Ryong Nam; Choi, So-Jung; Song, Ji-Young; Pandy, Kinnari; Mann, Derrick L; Stahl, Joshua A; Peckham, Heather E; Zheng, Zongli; Han, Joungho; Mao, Mao; Kim, Jhingook

    2014-04-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion is the most common mechanism for overexpression and activation in non-small-cell lung carcinoma. Several fusion partners of ALK have been reported, including echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4, TRK-fused gene, kinesin family member 5B, kinesin light chain 1 (KLC1), protein tyrosine phosphatase and nonreceptor type 3, and huntingtin interacting protein 1 (HIP1). A 60-year-old Korean man had a lung mass which was a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with ALK overexpression. By using an Anchored Multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay and sequencing, we found that tumor had a novel translocated promoter region (TPR)-ALK fusion. The fusion transcript was generated from an intact, in-frame fusion of TPR exon 15 and ALK exon 20 (t(1;2)(q31.1;p23)). The TPR-ALK fusion encodes a predicted protein of 1192 amino acids with a coiled-coil domain encoded by the 5'-2 of the TPR and juxtamembrane and kinase domains encoded by the 3'-end of the ALK. The novel fusion gene and its protein TRP-ALK, harboring coiled-coil and kinase domains, could possess transforming potential and responses to treatment with ALK inhibitors. This case is the first report of TPR-ALK fusion transcript in clinical tumor samples and could provide a novel diagnostic and therapeutic candidate target for patients with cancer, including non-small-cell lung carcinoma.

  4. Expanding the portfolio of anti-ALK weapons.

    PubMed

    Mologni, Luca

    2015-02-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase involved in the onset of several malignancies. In particular, ALK is the driving oncogenic lesion in a small but significant fraction of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. ALK+ NSCLCs can be treated with the dual ALK/MET inhibitor crizotinib, with better outcome compared to standard chemotherapy. However, relapses frequently occur, due to various mechanisms, limiting overall efficacy of the treatment. Point mutations within the ALK catalytic domain or ALK gene amplification account for approximately 30-40% of crizotinib-resistant cases, suggesting that the diseases still relies on ALK activity and that more potent inhibitors could be useful in this setting. Ceritinib is a novel selective ALK inhibitor with preclinical activity against crizotinib-resistant ALK mutants. A recent article in the New England Journal of Medicine reports on clinical evaluation of ceritinib. Response rate and progression-free survival (PFS) were comparable to crizotinib, but most importantly, crizotinib-resistant patients were successfully treated, with efficacy similar to crizotinib-naïve patients. The study extends the array of available anti-ALK drugs. Based on these data, ceritinib was approved by FDA in April 2014.

  5. Rationale for co-targeting IGF-1R and ALK in ALK fusion-positive lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lovly, Christine M; McDonald, Nerina T; Chen, Heidi; Ortiz-Cuaran, Sandra; Heukamp, Lukas C; Yan, Yingjun; Florin, Alexandra; Ozretić, Luka; Lim, Diana; Wang, Lu; Chen, Zhao; Chen, Xi; Lu, Pengcheng; Paik, Paul K; Shen, Ronglai; Jin, Hailing; Buettner, Reinhard; Ansén, Sascha; Perner, Sven; Brockmann, Michael; Bos, Marc; Wolf, Jürgen; Gardizi, Masyar; Wright, Gavin M; Solomon, Benjamin; Russell, Prudence A; Rogers, Toni-Maree; Suehara, Yoshiyuki; Red-Brewer, Monica; Tieu, Rudy; de Stanchina, Elisa; Wang, Qingguo; Zhao, Zhongming; Johnson, David H; Horn, Leora; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Thomas, Roman K; Ladanyi, Marc; Pao, William

    2014-09-01

    Crizotinib, a selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), shows marked activity in patients whose lung cancers harbor fusions in the gene encoding anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase (ALK), but its efficacy is limited by variable primary responses and acquired resistance. In work arising from the clinical observation of a patient with ALK fusion-positive lung cancer who had an exceptional response to an insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R)-specific antibody, we define a therapeutic synergism between ALK and IGF-1R inhibitors. Similar to IGF-1R, ALK fusion proteins bind to the adaptor insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), and IRS-1 knockdown enhances the antitumor effects of ALK inhibitors. In models of ALK TKI resistance, the IGF-1R pathway is activated, and combined ALK and IGF-1R inhibition improves therapeutic efficacy. Consistent with this finding, the levels of IGF-1R and IRS-1 are increased in biopsy samples from patients progressing on crizotinib monotherapy. Collectively these data support a role for the IGF-1R-IRS-1 pathway in both ALK TKI-sensitive and ALK TKI-resistant states and provide a biological rationale for further clinical development of dual ALK and IGF-1R inhibitors.

  6. ALK gene copy number gain and immunohistochemical expression status using three antibodies in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Sewha

    2016-03-17

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene aberrations-such as mutations, amplifications, and copy number gains-represent a major genetic predisposition to neuroblastoma (NB). This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between ALK gene copy number status, ALK protein expression, and clinicopathological parameters. We retrospectively retrieved 30 cases of poorly differentiated NB and constructed tissue microarrays (TMAs). ALK copy number changes were assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays, and ALK immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing was performed using three different antibodies (ALK1, D5F3, and 5A4 clones). ALK amplification and copy number gain were observed in 10% (3/30) and 53.3% (16/30) of the cohort, respectively. There were positive correlations between ALK copy number and IHC positive rate in ALK1 and 5A4 antibodies (p= < 0.001 and 0.019, respectively). ALK1, D5F3, and 5A4 antibodies equally showed 100% sensitivity in detecting ALK amplification. However, the sensitivity for detecting copy number gain differed among the three antibodies, with 75% sensitivity in D5F3 and 0% sensitivity in ALK1. ALK-amplified NBs were correlated with synchronous MYCN amplification and chromosome 1p deletion. ALK IHC positivity was frequently observed in INSS stage IV and high-risk group patients. In conclusion, this study identified that an increase in the ALK copy number is a frequent genetic alteration in poorly differentiated NB. ALK-amplified NBs showed consistent ALK IHC positivity with all kinds of antibodies. In contrast, the detection performance of ALK copy number gain was antibody dependent, with the D5F3 antibody showing the best sensitivity.

  7. ALK Gene Copy Number Gain and Immunohistochemical Expression Status Using Three Antibodies in Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Sewha

    2017-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase ( ALK) gene aberrations-such as mutations, amplifications, and copy number gains-represent a major genetic predisposition to neuroblastoma (NB). This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between ALK gene copy number status, ALK protein expression, and clinicopathological parameters. We retrospectively retrieved 30 cases of poorly differentiated NB and constructed tissue microarrays (TMAs). ALK copy number changes were assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays, and ALK immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing was performed using three different antibodies (ALK1, D5F3, and 5A4 clones). ALK amplification and copy number gain were observed in 10% (3/30) and 53.3% (16/30) of the cohort, respectively. There were positive correlations between ALK copy number and IHC-positive rate in ALK1 and 5A4 antibodies ( P < 0.001 and P = 0.019, respectively). ALK1, D5F3, and 5A4 antibodies equally showed 100% sensitivity in detecting ALK amplification. However, the sensitivity for detecting copy number gain differed among the three antibodies, with 75% sensitivity in D5F3 and 0% sensitivity in ALK1. ALK-amplified NBs were correlated with synchronous MYCN amplification and chromosome 1p deletion. ALK IHC positivity was frequently observed in INSS stage IV and high-risk group patients. In conclusion, this study identified that an increase in the ALK copy number is a frequent genetic alteration in poorly differentiated NB. ALK-amplified NBs showed consistent ALK IHC positivity with all kinds of antibodies. In contrast, the detection performance of ALK copy number gain was antibody dependent, with the D5F3 antibody showing the best sensitivity.

  8. Personalized treatment in advanced ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer: from bench to clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Passaro, Antonio; Lazzari, Chiara; Karachaliou, Niki; Spitaleri, Gianluca; Pochesci, Alessia; Catania, Chiara; Rosell, Rafael; de Marinis, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements and the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) that target them have achieved unprecedented success in the management of patients with ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Despite the high efficacy of crizotinib, the first oral ALK TKI approved for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC, almost all patients inevitably develop acquired resistance, showing disease progression in the brain or in other parenchymal sites. Second- or third-generation ALK TKIs have shown to be active in crizotinib-pretreated or crizotinib-naïve ALK-positive patients, even in those with brain metastases. In this review, the current knowledge regarding ALK-positive NSCLC, focusing on the biology of the disease and the available therapeutic options are discussed. PMID:27799783

  9. Acute spontaneous tumor lysis in anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma presenting with hyperuricemic acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiang-Hao; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2004-01-01

    Acute spontaneous tumor lysis (ASTL) syndrome, an extremely rare disease, requires prompt recognition and aggressive management because it is fulminant at its outset, associated with severe metabolic derangement, and potentially reversible. We describe an unusual case in which spontaneous tumor lysis occurred in anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma associated with acute uric acid nephropathy, persistent oliguria, and shock. This case contrasts markedly with previously reported cases of ASTL syndrome, which developed mainly in the pathologic type of Burkitt lymphoma. To our knowledge, this is the first reported occurrence of ASTL syndrome associated with anaplastic large T-cell type lymphoma. This report also chronicles our successful experience with continuous renal replacement therapy in the presence of compromised hemodynamic status.

  10. Implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the breast: Insight into a poorly understood disease.

    PubMed

    Weathers, William M; Wolfswinkel, Erik M; Hatef, Daniel A; Lee, Edward I; Hollier, Larry H; Brown, Rodger H

    2013-01-01

    Implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is the subject of much debate in the field of plastic surgery. Only a few published cases have been reported and the rarity of the disease may make proving causality exceedingly difficult. Despite this, it is of utmost importance that full attention be devoted to this subject to ensure the safety and well-being of patients. The authors report one new case of implant-associated ALCL that recently presented to their institution. Implant-associated ALCL is a poorly understood disease. It should likely be considered its own clinical entity and categorized into two subtypes: one presenting as a seroma and the other as a distinct mass or masses. When reported, only textured implants have been associated with ALCL. The United States Food and Drug Administration and American Society of Plastic Surgeons have initiated a registry and have collected critical data to gain further understanding of this disease.

  11. Activated Alk triggers prolonged neurogenesis and Ret upregulation providing a therapeutic target in ALK-mutated neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Cazes, Alex; Lopez-Delisle, Lucille; Tsarovina, Konstantina; Pierre-Eugène, Cécile; De Preter, Katleen; Peuchmaur, Michel; Nicolas, André; Provost, Claire; Louis-Brennetot, Caroline; Daveau, Romain; Kumps, Candy; Cascone, Ilaria; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Prignon, Aurélie; Speleman, Frank; Rohrer, Hermann; Delattre, Olivier; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations of the ALK (Anaplastic lymphoma Kinase) gene have been identified in sporadic and familial cases of neuroblastoma, a cancer of early childhood arising from the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). To decipher ALK function in neuroblastoma predisposition and oncogenesis, we have characterized knock-in (KI) mice bearing the two most frequent mutations observed in neuroblastoma patients. A dramatic enlargement of sympathetic ganglia is observed in AlkF1178L mice from embryonic to adult stages associated with an increased proliferation of sympathetic neuroblasts from E14.5 to birth. In a MYCN transgenic context, the F1178L mutation displays a higher oncogenic potential than the R1279Q mutation as evident from a shorter latency of tumor onset. We show that tumors expressing the R1279Q mutation are sensitive to ALK inhibition upon crizotinib treatment. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that activated ALK triggers RET upregulation in mouse sympathetic ganglia at birth as well as in murine and human neuroblastoma. Using vandetanib, we show that RET inhibition strongly impairs tumor growth in vivo in both MYCN/KI AlkR1279Q and MYCN/KI AlkF1178L mice. Altogether, our findings demonstrate the critical role of activated ALK in SNS development and pathogenesis and identify RET as a therapeutic target in ALK mutated neuroblastoma. PMID:24811913

  12. Epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase testing and mutation prevalence in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer in Switzerland: A comprehensive evaluation of real world practices.

    PubMed

    Ess, S M; Herrmann, C; Frick, H; Krapf, M; Cerny, T; Jochum, W; Früh, M

    2017-05-30

    In order to improve outcomes, identification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) genes has become crucial in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of the present study is to analyse time trends and frequency of testing, factors affecting testing as well as prevalence of mutations in the Swiss population. We analysed EGFR and ALK testing in a cohort of patients with newly diagnosed metastasised non-squamous NSCLC in the catchment area of the cancer registry Eastern Switzerland in the years 2008-2014. We analysed prevalence of mutations and studied clinicopathological characteristics and survival of tested and non-tested patients and of patients with and without mutations. Among 718 patients identified, 11% (51/447) harboured an EGFR mutation in the exons 18, 19 or 21 and further 12% (31/265) showed a positive test result for ALK rearrangements. In non-smokers the proportions of mutations were 31% and 23% respectively. Testing rates increased over time and reached 79% in 2014. We observed significantly lower testing rates and poorer survival in elderly, patients with limited life expectancy and patients treated at hospitals not involved in clinical research. Outcomes can be further improved in a considerable proportion of patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Identification of the transforming STRN-ALK fusion as a potential therapeutic target in the aggressive forms of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Lindsey M.; Barila, Guillermo; Liu, Pengyuan; Evdokimova, Viktoria N.; Trivedi, Sumita; Panebianco, Federica; Gandhi, Manoj; Carty, Sally E.; Hodak, Steven P.; Luo, Jianhua; Dacic, Sanja; Yu, Yan P.; Nikiforova, Marina N.; Ferris, Robert L.; Altschuler, Daniel L.; Nikiforov, Yuri E.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common endocrine malignancy that encompasses well-differentiated as well as dedifferentiated cancer types. The latter tumors have high mortality and lack effective therapies. Using a paired-end RNA-sequencing approach, we report the discovery of rearrangements involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene in thyroid cancer. The most common of these involves a fusion between ALK and the striatin (STRN) gene, which is the result of a complex rearrangement involving the short arm of chromosome 2. STRN-ALK leads to constitutive activation of ALK kinase via dimerization mediated by the coiled-coil domain of STRN and to a kinase-dependent, thyroid-stimulating hormone–independent proliferation of thyroid cells. Moreover, expression of STRN-ALK transforms cells in vitro and induces tumor formation in nude mice. The kinase activity of STRN-ALK and the ALK-induced cell growth can be blocked by the ALK inhibitors crizotinib and TAE684. In addition to well-differentiated papillary cancer, STRN-ALK was found with a higher prevalence in poorly differentiated and anaplastic thyroid cancers, and it did not overlap with other known driver mutations in these tumors. Our data demonstrate that STRN-ALK fusion occurs in a subset of patients with highly aggressive types of thyroid cancer and provide initial evidence suggesting that it may represent a therapeutic target for these patients. PMID:24613930

  14. A causal link from ALK to hexokinase II overexpression and hyperactive glycolysis in EML4-ALK-positive lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yibao; Yu, Chunrong; Mohamed, Esraa M.; Shao, Huanjie; Wang, Li; Sundaresan, Gobalakrishnan; Zweit, Jamal; Idowu, Michael; Fang, Xianjun

    2016-01-01

    A high rate of aerobic glycolysis is a hallmark of malignant transformation. Accumulating evidence suggests that diverse regulatory mechanisms mediate this cancer-associated metabolic change seen in a wide spectrum of cancer. The echinoderm microtubule associated protein-like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) fusion protein is found in approximately 3-7% of non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). Molecular evidence and therapeutic effectiveness of FDA-approved ALK inhibitors indicated that EML4-ALK is a driving factor of lung tumorigenesis. A recent clinical study showed that NSCLC harboring EML4-ALK rearrangements displayed higher glucose metabolism compared to EML4-ALK-negative NSCLC. In the current work, we presented evidence that EML4-ALK is coupled to overexpression of hexokinase II (HK2), one of the rate-limiting enzymes of the glycolytic pathway. The link from EML4-ALK to HK2 upregulation is essential for a high rate of glycolysis and proliferation of EML4-ALK-rearranged NSCLC cells. We identified hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) as a key transcription factor to drive HK2 gene expression in normoxia in these cells. EML4-ALK induced hypoxia-independent but glucose-dependent accumulation of HIF1α protein via both transcriptional activation of HIF1α mRNA and the PI3K-AKT pathway to enhance HIF1α protein synthesis. The EML4-ALK-mediated upregulation of HIF1α, HK2 and glycolytic metabolism was also highly active in vivo as demonstrated by FDG-PET imaging of xenografts grown from EML4-ALK-positive NSCLC cells. Our data reveal a novel EML4-ALK-HIF1α-HK2 cascade to enhance glucose metabolism in EML4-ALK-positive NSCLC. PMID:27132509

  15. The discovery and development of brentuximab vedotin for use in relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma and systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Senter, Peter D; Sievers, Eric L

    2012-07-10

    Progress has been made recently in developing antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) that can selectively deliver cancer drugs to tumor cells. In principle, the idea is simple: by attaching drugs to tumor-seeking antibodies, target cells will be killed and nontarget cells will be spared. In practice, many parameters needed to be addressed to develop safe and effective ADCs, including the expression profiles of tumor versus normal tissues, the potency of the drug, the linker attaching the drug and placement of the drug on the antibody, and the pharmacokinetic and stability profiles of the resulting ADC. All these issues had been taken into account in developing brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris), an ADC that recently received accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma and systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). Research is under way to extend the applications of brentuximab vedotin and to advance the field by developing other ADCs with new linker and conjugation strategies.

  16. Breast Implant Informed Consent Should Include the Risk of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Mark W; Miranda, Roberto N; Butler, Charles E

    2016-04-01

    Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare T-cell lymphoma arising around breast implants. Public awareness has increased following a safety communication warning of the association of breast implant-associated ALCL by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2011. Difficulty with determining an accurate assessment of risk, including diagnosis, or standardized treatment regimen has led surgeons to commonly omit preoperative discussion of this rare and frequently misunderstood cancer. Risk disclosure is a form of respect for patient autonomy, and informed consent has positive practical and moral consequences for the practice of plastic surgery. A model of breast implant-associated ALCL informed consent implementation and health care provider education are reviewed with 1-year process follow-up at a tertiary cancer center. Breast implant-associated ALCL should be included during preoperative counseling on the risks of breast implantation when obtaining informed consent. Pertinent aspects of decision-making include disease awareness, presenting symptoms, and resources for concerned patients. Education of health care professionals and provision of patient-focused materials ensures effectiveness of the informed consent process.

  17. Canadian consensus: inhibition of ALK-positive tumours in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Melosky, B.; Agulnik, J.; Albadine, R.; Banerji, S.; Bebb, D.G.; Bethune, D.; Blais, N.; Butts, C.; Cheema, P.; Cheung, P.; Cohen, V.; Deschenes, J.; Ionescu, D.N.; Juergens, R.; Kamel-Reid, S.; Laurie, S.A.; Liu, G.; Morzycki, W.; Tsao, M.S.; Xu, Z.; Hirsh, V.

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (alk) is an oncogenic driver in non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc). Chromosomal rearrangements involving the ALK gene occur in up to 4% of nonsquamous nsclc patients and lead to constitutive activation of the alk signalling pathway. ALK-positive nsclc is found in relatively young patients, with a median age of 50 years. Patients frequently have brain metastasis. Targeted inhibition of the alk pathway prolongs progression-free survival in patients with ALK-positive advanced nsclc. The results of several recent clinical trials confirm the efficacy and safety benefit of crizotinib and ceritinib in this population. Canadian oncologists support the following consensus statement: All patients with advanced nonsquamous nsclc (excluding pure neuroendocrine carcinoma) should be tested for the presence of an ALK rearrangement. If an ALK rearrangement is present, treatment with a targeted alk inhibitor in the first-line setting is recommended. As patients become resistant to first-generation alk inhibitors, other treatments, including second-generation alk inhibitors can be considered. PMID:27330348

  18. Change in the diagnosis from classical Hodgkin's lymphoma to anaplastic large cell lymphoma by (18)F flourodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography: Importance of recognising disease pattern on imaging and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Senthil, Raja; Mohapatra, Ranjan Kumar; Sampath, Mouleeswaran Koramadai; Sundaraiya, Sumati

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare type of nonHodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), but one of the most common subtypes of T-cell lymphoma. It is an aggressive T-cell lymphoma, and some ALCL may mimic less aggressive classical HL histopathlogically. It may be misdiagnosed unless careful immunohistochemical examination is performed. As the prognosis and management of these two lymphomas vary significantly, it is important to make a correct diagnosis. We describe a case who was diagnosed as classical HL by histopathological examination of cervical lymph node, in whom (18)F-flouro deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography appearances were unusual for HL and warranted review of histopathology that revealed anaplastic lymphoma kinase-1 negative anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma, Hodgkin-like variant, thereby changing the management.

  19. ALK rearrangements in EBUS-derived transbronchial needle aspiration cytology in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Neat, M J; Foot, N J; Hicks, A; Breen, R; Wilkins, B; McLean, E; Santis, G

    2013-12-01

    Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) positive for anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements may be treated successfully with the ALK inhibitor crizotinib. ALK copy-number abnormalities have also been described. In this study, we evaluated the suitability of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) to determine ALK status in endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-derived cytology samples. Samples were obtained from 55 consecutive patients with NSCLC who had undergone EBUS-transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) according to our standard clinical protocols. All tumours had been screened previously for epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) and v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations. FISH, using commercially available ALK rearrangement-specific probes, was employed to assess ALK status. IHC using the ALK-1 monoclonal antibody (DAKO) was also performed. FISH analysis was successful in 52 of 55 samples (94.5%); ALK rearrangement was demonstrated in 3 of 52 samples from patients with NSCLC (5.7%). ALK amplification was observed in 3 of 52 patient samples (5.7%) and an increase in ALK copy number was found in 28 of 52 patient samples (53.8%). IHC on cell blocks demonstrated ALK expression in one of three samples with ALK rearrangement. One patient sample had concomitant ALK rearrangement and KRAS mutation. We found FISH to be superior to IHC using the ALK-1 monoclonal antibody for the detection of ALK rearrangement in EBUS-TBNA cytology specimens in NSCLC, and also that ALK rearrangement can co-exist with KRAS mutation in the same tumour. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Detection of Chlamydophila pneumoniae and human herpesvirus 8 in primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Alessandro; Caselli, Elisabetta; Di Luca, Dario; Sebastiani, Adolfo; Perri, Paolo; Seraceni, Silva; Contini, Carlo; Virgili, Annarosa

    2013-10-07

    The etiology of primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell CD30+ lymphoma is largely unknown, and although an infectious involvement has been suspected, the implication of infectious agents in its pathogenesis is still unclear. We report the case of a HIV-negative patient referred to our hospital with a rapidly enlarging skin tumor on her upper eyelid. Surgical excision was performed and histological analysis evidenced a primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. Due to the ocular localization and to the prominent angiogenic component of the lesion, molecular analyses for the detection of Chlamydophila pneumoniae and HHV8 were performed, revealing the presence of an infection by both pathogens in surgical biopsy and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These findings suggest for the first time a possible association of C. pneumoniae and/or HHV8 infection, or both together, with primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma in non-immunocompromised and HIV-negative subjects. This potential pathogenic association, if confirmed, could provide potential indications for future therapy.

  1. Detection of Chlamydophila pneumoniae and human herpesvirus 8 in primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The etiology of primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell CD30+ lymphoma is largely unknown, and although an infectious involvement has been suspected, the implication of infectious agents in its pathogenesis is still unclear. Findings We report the case of a HIV-negative patient referred to our hospital with a rapidly enlarging skin tumor on her upper eyelid. Surgical excision was performed and histological analysis evidenced a primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. Due to the ocular localization and to the prominent angiogenic component of the lesion, molecular analyses for the detection of Chlamydophila pneumoniae and HHV8 were performed, revealing the presence of an infection by both pathogens in surgical biopsy and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Conclusions These findings suggest for the first time a possible association of C. pneumoniae and/or HHV8 infection, or both together, with primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma in non-immunocompromised and HIV-negative subjects. This potential pathogenic association, if confirmed, could provide potential indications for future therapy. PMID:24099147

  2. ALK gene expression status in pleural effusion predicts tumor responsiveness to crizotinib in Chinese patients with lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Wu, Xiaonan; Han, Xiaohong; Cheng, Gang; Mu, Xinlin; Zhang, Yuhui; Cui, Di; Liu, Chang; Liu, Dongge; Shi, Yuankai

    2016-01-01

    Objective The relationship between anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) expression in malignant pleural effusion (MPE) samples detected only by Ventana immunohistochemistry (IHC) ALK (D5F3) and the efficacy of ALK-tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy is uncertain. Methods Ventana anti-ALK (D5F3) rabbit monoclonal primary antibody testing was performed on 313 cell blocks of MPE samples from Chinese patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to verify the ALK gene status in Ventana IHC ALK (D5F3)-positive samples. The follow-up clinical data on patients who received crizotinib treatment were recorded. Results Of the 313 MPE samples, 27 (8.6%) were confirmed as ALK expression-positive, and the Ventana IHC ALK (D5F3)-positive rate was 17.3% (27/156) in wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) MPE samples. Twenty-three of the 27 IHC ALK (D5F3)-positive samples were positive by FISH. Of the 11 Ventana IHC ALK (D5F3)-positive patients who received crizotinib therapy, 2 patients had complete response (CR), 5 had partial response (PR) and 3 had stable disease (SD). Conclusions The ALK gene expression status detected by the Ventana IHC ALK (D5F3) platform in MPE samples may predict tumor responsiveness to crizotinib in Chinese patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:28174489

  3. New therapeutic strategies in neuroblastoma: combined targeting of a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor and liposomal siRNAs against ALK

    PubMed Central

    Di Paolo, Daniela; Yang, D.; Pastorino, Fabio; Emionite, Laura; Cilli, Michele; Daga, Antonio; Destefanis, Elisa; Di Fiore, Annarita; Piaggio, Francesca; Brignole, Chiara; Xu, Xiaobao; Liang, Chris; Gibbons, James

    2015-01-01

    Many different aberrations in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) were found to be oncogenic drivers in several cancers including neuroblastoma (NB), therefore ALK is now considered a critical player in NB oncogenesis and a promising therapeutic target. The ALK-inhibitor crizotinib has a limited activity against the various ALK mutations identified in NB patients. We tested: the activity of the novel ALK-inhibitor X-396 administered alone or in combination with Targeted Liposomes carrying ALK-siRNAs (TL[ALK-siRNA]) that are active irrespective of ALK gene mutational status; the pharmacokinetic profiles and the biodistribution of X-396; the efficacy of X-396 versus crizotinib treatment in NB xenografts; whether the combination of X-396 with the TL[ALK-siRNA] could promote long-term survival in NB mouse models. X-396 revealed good bioavailability, moderate half-life, high mean plasma and tumor concentrations. X-396 was more effective than crizotinib in inhibiting in vitro cell proliferation of NB cells and in reducing tumor volume in subcutaneous NB models in a dose-dependent manner. In orthotopic NB xenografts, X-396 significantly increased life span independently of the ALK mutation status. In combination studies, all effects were significantly improved in the mice treated with TL[ALK-siRNA] and X-396 compared to mice receiving the single agents. Our findings provide a rational basis to design innovative molecular-based treatment combinations for clinical application in ALK-driven NB tumors. PMID:26299615

  4. New therapeutic strategies in neuroblastoma: combined targeting of a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor and liposomal siRNAs against ALK.

    PubMed

    Di Paolo, Daniela; Yang, D; Pastorino, Fabio; Emionite, Laura; Cilli, Michele; Daga, Antonio; Destafanis, Elisa; Di Fiore, Annarita; Piaggio, Francesca; Brignole, Chiara; Xu, Xiaobao; Liang, Chris; Gibbons, James; Ponzoni, Mirco; Perri, Patrizia

    2015-10-06

    Many different aberrations in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) were found to be oncogenic drivers in several cancers including neuroblastoma (NB), therefore ALK is now considered a critical player in NB oncogenesis and a promising therapeutic target. The ALK-inhibitor crizotinib has a limited activity against the various ALK mutations identified in NB patients. We tested: the activity of the novel ALK-inhibitor X-396 administered alone or in combination with Targeted Liposomes carrying ALK-siRNAs (TL[ALK-siRNA]) that are active irrespective of ALK gene mutational status; the pharmacokinetic profiles and the biodistribution of X-396; the efficacy of X-396 versus crizotinib treatment in NB xenografts; whether the combination of X-396 with the TL[ALK-siRNA] could promote long-term survival in NB mouse models. X-396 revealed good bioavailability, moderate half-life, high mean plasma and tumor concentrations. X-396 was more effective than crizotinib in inhibiting in vitro cell proliferation of NB cells and in reducing tumor volume in subcutaneous NB models in a dose-dependent manner. In orthotopic NB xenografts, X-396 significantly increased life span independently of the ALK mutation status. In combination studies, all effects were significantly improved in the mice treated with TL[ALK-siRNA] and X-396 compared to mice receiving the single agents. Our findings provide a rational basis to design innovative molecular-based treatment combinations for clinical application in ALK-driven NB tumors.

  5. Treatment of Primary Cutaneous CD30+ Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, James B.; McNiff, Jennifer M.; Lund, Molly W.; Wilson, Lynn D.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Primary cutaneous CD30+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (CALCL) is a relatively rare and indolent variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). This report examines the response of localized disease to radiation alone. Methods: The Yale Cancer Center records were examined, and all patients with CTCL from January 1, 2001, to September 1, 2006, evaluated in the Department of Therapeutic Radiology were identified. Only those patients with localized or single CALCL lesions, no clinical evidence or history of lymphomatoid papulosis, no history of other CTCLs, no history of other skin disorders, lack of lymph node involvement, unambiguous pathology reports, and treatment with radiation alone were included. Results: Eight patients were identified. Median age was 67 years, and gender was split evenly. Patients received radiation ranging from 34 to 44 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Most patients (5 of 8) received 40 Gy, using 6 to 9 MeV electrons with 0.5 to 2 cm of bolus. All patients had a complete response. All patients were without evidence of disease at the most recent follow-up (median follow-up, 12 months). Radiation therapy was well tolerated, and the only recorded toxicity was Grade I to II dermatitis. Conclusions: Radiation therapy alone for localized CALCL is very well tolerated and clinical response is excellent. A dose of 40 Gy in 2-Gy fractions seems to be well tolerated and effective in inducing a complete response. Lower doses may be effective in achieving the same result, but data are not available. Longer follow-up is necessary before conclusions regarding durable disease-free survival can be made.

  6. Hyperactivation of Alk induces neonatal lethality in knock-in AlkF1178L mice

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Delisle, Lucille; Pierre-Eugène, Cécile; Bloch-Gallego, Evelyne; Birling, Marie-Christine; Duband, Jean-Loup; Durand, Estelle; Bourgeois, Thomas; Matrot, Boris; Sorg, Tania; Huerre, Michel; Meziane, Hamid; Roux, Michel J.; Champy, Marie-France; Gallego, Jorge; Delattre, Olivier; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    The ALK (Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase) gene encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor preferentially expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems. A syndromic presentation associating congenital neuroblastoma with severe encephalopathy and an abnormal shape of the brainstem has been described in patients harbouring de novo germline F1174V and F1245V ALK mutations. Here, we investigated the phenotype of knock-in (KI) mice bearing the AlkF1178L mutation (F1174L in human). Although heterozygous KI mice did not reproduce the severe breathing and feeding difficulties observed in human patients, behavioral tests documented a reduced activity during dark phases and an increased anxiety of mutated mice. Matings of heterozygotes yielded the expected proportions of wild-type, heterozygotes and homozygotes at birth but a high neonatal lethality was noticed for homozygotes. We documented Alk expression in several motor nuclei of the brainstem involved in the control of sucking and swallowing. Evaluation of basic physiological functions 12 hours after birth revealed slightly more apneas but a dramatic reduced milk intake for homozygotes compared to control littermates. Overall, our data demonstrate that Alk activation above a critical threshold is not compatible with survival in mice, in agreement with the extremely severe phenotype of patients carrying aggressive de novo ALK germline mutations. PMID:24811761

  7. Anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma in three black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus)

    PubMed Central

    MATSUMOTO, Isao; CHAMBERS, James Kenn; MIWA, Yasutsugu; NAKAYAMA, Hiroyuki; UCHIDA, Kazuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma (ALTCL) is rarely reported in domestic animals. Accordingly, the histopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics of ALTCL have not been well established in prairie dogs. The present report documents three cases in which prairie dogs were diagnosed with ALTCL arising in the subcutaneous tissue, oral mucosa or the mesenteric lymph nodes. Of the three cases, one was available for necropsy and the others were biopsy cases. Microscopically, moderate to large, pleomorphic neoplastic lymphocytes with ovoid to polygonal, bizarre-shaped nuclei, abundant cytoplasm and eosinophilic granules were seen in all cases. Immunohistochemical staining revealed membranous or cytoplasmic CD3 expression of the neoplastic lymphocytes. The neoplastic cells often had granzyme B-positive cytoplasmic granules. One of the prairie dogs with nodal ALTCL suffered systemic dissemination of the tumor and died suddenly. In the two biopsy cases, one animal died on the day of the biopsy examination and the other died six weeks after chemotherapy. ALTCL in prairie dogs displays a cytotoxic T cell phenotype and presumably carries a poor prognosis regardless of the anatomical type. PMID:28458276

  8. Anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma in three black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus).

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Isao; Chambers, James Kenn; Miwa, Yasutsugu; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Kazuyuki

    2017-06-10

    Anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma (ALTCL) is rarely reported in domestic animals. Accordingly, the histopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics of ALTCL have not been well established in prairie dogs. The present report documents three cases in which prairie dogs were diagnosed with ALTCL arising in the subcutaneous tissue, oral mucosa or the mesenteric lymph nodes. Of the three cases, one was available for necropsy and the others were biopsy cases. Microscopically, moderate to large, pleomorphic neoplastic lymphocytes with ovoid to polygonal, bizarre-shaped nuclei, abundant cytoplasm and eosinophilic granules were seen in all cases. Immunohistochemical staining revealed membranous or cytoplasmic CD3 expression of the neoplastic lymphocytes. The neoplastic cells often had granzyme B-positive cytoplasmic granules. One of the prairie dogs with nodal ALTCL suffered systemic dissemination of the tumor and died suddenly. In the two biopsy cases, one animal died on the day of the biopsy examination and the other died six weeks after chemotherapy. ALTCL in prairie dogs displays a cytotoxic T cell phenotype and presumably carries a poor prognosis regardless of the anatomical type.

  9. Anaplastic T large cell lymphoma diagnosed by exfoliative cytology in a post renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Treaba, Diana; Assad, Lina; Goldberg, Cathryn; Loew, Jerome; Reddy, Vijaya B; Kluskens, Larry; Gattuso, Paolo

    2002-07-01

    In the last two decades posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) have been recognized as a complication of organ transplantation with immunosuppression. The reported incidence of PTLDs in renal transplant patients ranges between 0.3-3% (Birkeland et al., Transplantation 1999;67:876-881). In contrast to the reported incidence of PTLDs in post bone marrow transplant, it is 1% in HLA-matched recipients and up to 20% in HLA mismatched T-cell depleted bone marrow recipients (Curtis et al., Blood 1996;94:2208-2216). In cardiac transplant recipients the reported incidence of PTLDs is between 1.8-9.8 (Mihalov et al., Clin Transplant 1996;10:248-255). PTLDs are predominately extranodal. They have varied morphologic patterns and clonality, but almost all are associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The vast majority are of B cell lineage; only about 10% are of T-cell origin. We report a T-cell anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) presenting with bilateral pleural effusion and liver involvement in a renal transplant recipient.

  10. Oncogenic kinase NPM/ALK induces through STAT3 expression of immunosuppressive protein CD274 (PD-L1, B7-H1)

    PubMed Central

    Marzec, Michal; Zhang, Qian; Goradia, Ami; Raghunath, Puthiyaveettil N.; Liu, Xiaobin; Paessler, Michele; Wang, Hong Yi; Wysocka, Maria; Cheng, Mangeng; Ruggeri, Bruce A.; Wasik, Mariusz A.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms of malignant cell transformation caused by the oncogenic, chimeric nucleophosmin (NPM)/anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) remain only partially understood, with most of the previous studies focusing mainly on the impact of NPM/ALK on cell survival and proliferation. Here we report that the NPM/ALK-carrying T cell lymphoma (ALK+TCL) cells strongly express the immunosuppressive cell-surface protein CD274 (PD-L1, B7-H1), as determined on the mRNA and protein level. The CD274 expression is strictly dependent on the expression and enzymatic activity of NPM/ALK, as demonstrated by inhibition of the NPM/ALK function in ALK+TCL cells by the small molecule ALK inhibitor CEP-14083 and by documenting CD274 expression in IL-3-depleted BaF3 cells transfected with the wild-type NPM/ALK, but not the kinase-inactive NPM/ALK K210R mutant or empty vector alone. NPM/ALK induces CD274 expression by activating its key signal transmitter, transcription factor STAT3. STAT3 binds to the CD274 gene promoter in vitro and in vivo, as shown in the gel electromobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, and is required for the PD-L1 gene expression, as demonstrated by siRNA-mediated STAT3 depletion. These findings identify an additional cell-transforming property of NPM/ALK and describe a direct link between an oncoprotein and an immunosuppressive cell-surface protein. These results also provide an additional rationale to therapeutically target NPM/ALK and STAT3 in ALK+TCL. Finally, they suggest that future immunotherapeutic protocols for this type of lymphoma may need to include the inhibition of NPM/ALK and STAT3 to achieve optimal clinical efficacy. PMID:19088198

  11. Model of inhibition of the NPM-ALK kinase activity by herbimycin A.

    PubMed

    Turturro, Francesco; Arnold, Marilyn D; Frist, Audrey Y; Pulford, Karen

    2002-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) exhibiting the t(2;5) translocation is characterized by the resulting expression of the oncogenic fusion protein nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) gene product. The ALK domain of NPM-ALK contains kinase activity, which is responsible for the autophosphorylation of tyrosine residues of the oncogenic protein and phosphorylation of SH2-protein substrates. Herbimycin A is a general protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor active as an antiproliferative compound against different types of mammalian cells. Herbimycin A inhibited the NPM-ALK-associated autophosphorylating activity in an in vitro cell-free kinase assay. The inhibition was specific when tested against other kinase inhibitors and extended to other cell lines derived from t(2;5)-ALCL. SUDHL-1 cells showed increasing percentage of cells in G(1) after 18 h of incubation with a dose of herbimycin A. NPM-ALK, Akt, and pAkt were down-regulated after 24 h of incubation with herbimycin A. Apoptosis was observed only if the dose of inhibitor was given every 12 h for prolonged time. Our results show that herbimycin A interferes with NPM-ALK and Akt pathways in SUDHL-1 cells. It seems that prolonged inhibition of these biochemical pathways may lead to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. This study supports the idea of investigating protein kinase inhibitors as therapeutic compounds for t(2;5)-ALCL.

  12. Activation of the orphan receptor tyrosine kinase ALK by zinc.

    PubMed

    Bennasroune, Aline; Mazot, Pierre; Boutterin, Marie-Claude; Vigny, Marc

    2010-08-06

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase essentially and transiently expressed during development of the central and peripheral nervous system. The nature of the cognate ligand of this receptor in Vertebrates is still a matter of debate. During synaptic transmission the release of ionic zinc found in vesicles of certain glutamatergic and gabaergic terminals may act as a neuromodulator by binding to pre- or post-synaptic receptors. Recently, zinc has been shown to activate the receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkB, independently of neurotrophins. This activation occurs via increasing the Src family kinase activity. In the present study, we investigated whether the ALK activity could be modulated by extracellular zinc. We first showed that zinc alone rapidly activates ALK. This activation is dependent of ALK tyrosine kinase activity and dimerization of the receptor but is independent of Src family kinase activity. In contrast, addition of sodium pyrithione, a zinc ionophore, led to a further activation of ALK. This stronger activation is dependent of Src family kinase but independent of ALK activity and dimerization. In conclusion, zinc could constitute an endogenous ligand of ALK in vertebrates.

  13. CD13-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma of T-cell origin--a diagnostic and histogenetic problem.

    PubMed

    Popnikolov, N K; Payne, D A; Hudnall, S D; Hawkins, H K; Kumar, M; Norris, B A; Elghetany, M T

    2000-12-01

    The expression of myelomonocytic-associated antigens in anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCLs), particularly those presenting in extranodal sites, can make their distinction from extramedullary myeloid cell tumors (EMCTs) or histiocytic tumors problematic. Yet, this distinction is clinically significant because of its therapeutic and prognostic implications. Herein, we describe a case of extranodal anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive CD30-positive ALCL of T-cell origin in a 12-year-old boy, which was initially called an EMCT because of the expression of CD13 and HLA-DR detected by flow cytometry and the absence of other T-cell-related surface markers. However, the detection of cytoplasmic CD3 by flow cytometry prompted further studies. The tumor was composed of large cells with abundant slightly eosinophilic vacuolated cytoplasm and ovoid or reniform nuclei with a few small nucleoli. Using immunohistochemistry, the tumor was positive for CD45, CD30, CD45RO, and CD43 with a strong cytoplasmic and nuclear anaplastic lymphoma kinase stain. The tumor cells showed a T-cell clonal genotype. Electron microscopy revealed no ultrastructural features of myelomonocytic or histiocytic origin. The patient responded well to the chemotherapy and was in complete remission for 10 months at the time of submission of this manuscript. Review of the literature showed inconsistencies regarding the diagnosis, nomenclature, and, therefore, treatment and prognosis of these tumors. In addition, the CD13 expression in ALCL raises some histogenetic questions and may indicate origin from a pluripotent stem cell, misprogramming during malignant transformation, or a microenvironmental effect on lymphoid cell expression of surface antigens. Therefore, ALCL should be considered in the differential diagnosis of EMCTs or histiocytic tumors, particularly when surface marker lineage assignment is ambiguous.

  14. [Clinical and capillaroscopic regression of CD30 anaplastic lymphoma associated with limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis following autologous bone marrow transplantation].

    PubMed

    Bellis, R; Francès, C; Barète, S; Senet, P

    2014-01-01

    In rare cases, tumors are associated with secondary Raynaud's phenomenon in systemic sclerosis (SSc). We report the case of a patient presenting cutaneous limited SSc associated with CD30 anaplastic lymphoma with cutaneous and lymph node involvement in whom the capillaroscopic scleroderma pattern regressed completely after autologous bone marrow transplantation, with complete remission of the lymphoma. A 37-year-old man presented bilateral Raynaud's phenomenon associated with digital ulcers contracted one year earlier but subsequently neglected. Right axillary lymph nodes and regional cutaneous tumors were present, leading to the diagnosis of CD30+ anaplastic lymphoma with cutaneous and lymph node involvement. Chemotherapy containing cyclophosphamide achieved only partial remission of the lymphoma. Clinical examination showed bilateral Raynaud's phenomenon, sclerodactyly, a right axillary subcutaneous nodule and a pathological Allen's test for the right hand. Antinuclear antibodies were positive without any other immunological abnormalities, and capillaroscopy showed an SSc pattern with numerous megacapillaries. Digital blood pressure was reduced in the right index and the left middle fingers, in which ulcers of the pulp were observed. Bone marrow transplantation was performed, resulting in complete remission of the lymphoma and disappearance of the sclerodactyly, with no recurrence of the pulp ulcers and complete normalization of capillaroscopic appearance and digital pressure. This case raises the question of authentic SSc and neoplasia and highlights the importance of capillaroscopy in the follow-up of SSc. The complete regression of SSc and of capillaroscopic abnormalities could be explained by the paraneoplastic nature of SSc or by the direct action of the chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Other Thyroid Cancers: Medullary, Anaplastic, Lymphoma and So Forth

    PubMed Central

    Araz, Mine; Çayır, Derya

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is used in staging, restaging, and evaluation of therapy response in many cancers as well as differentiated thyroid carcinomas especially in non-iodine avid variants. Its potential in less frequent thyroid tumors like medullary, anaplastic thyroid cancers, thyroid lymphoma and metastatic tumors of the thyroid however, is not well established yet. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the recent applications and indications of 18F-FDG PET/CT in these tumors and to focus on the controversies in the clinical setting. PMID:28291004

  16. Detection of ALK rearrangements in lung cancer patients using a homebrew PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Chang, JianHua; Liu, Fang; Wang, Qifeng; Lu, YongMing; Zhang, ZhuanXu; Shen, Jiabing; Zhai, Qing; Meng, Xia; Wang, Jialei; Ye, Xun

    2017-01-31

    Lung cancer patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements are candidates for targeted therapeutics. However, patients must be tested with a companion diagnostic assay to realize their ALK rearrangement status. We analyzed the publicly available E-GEOD-31210 microarray dataset and identified a non-coding RNA, sweyjawbu, which is strongly associated with ALK rearrangements. We validated these results using quantitative real-time PCR in an independent cohort consisting of 4 cell lines and 83 clinical samples. We could differentiate between ALK rearrangement-positive and -negative lung cancer samples by comparing sweyjawbu expression. Additionally, ALK rearrangement status was determined by comparing the expression of the 5' and 3' regions of the ALK transcript or by detecting known ALK hybrid subtypes. Thus, using our homebrew PCR assay, we were able to accurately detect ALK rearrangements, which could be used for diagnostic screening of lung cancer patients. The prototype could potentially be transferred to an automatic multiplex PCR platform (FilmArray) to differentiate between ALK rearrangement-positive and -negative patients in point-of-care settings.

  17. Novel CAD-ALK gene rearrangement is drugable by entrectinib in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Amatu, Alessio; Somaschini, Alessio; Cerea, Giulio; Bosotti, Roberta; Valtorta, Emanuele; Buonandi, Pasquale; Marrapese, Giovanna; Veronese, Silvio; Luo, David; Hornby, Zachary; Multani, Pratik; Murphy, Danielle; Shoemaker, Robert; Lauricella, Calogero; Giannetta, Laura; Maiolani, Martina; Vanzulli, Angelo; Ardini, Elena; Galvani, Arturo; Isacchi, Antonella; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Siena, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Background: Activated anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fusions are recurrent events in a small fraction of colorectal cancers (CRCs), although these events have not yet been exploited as in other malignancies. Methods: We detected ALK protein expression by immunohistochemistry and gene rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridisation in the ALKA-372-001 phase I study of the pan-Trk, ROS1, and ALK inhibitor entrectinib. One out of 487 CRCs showed ALK positivity with a peculiar pattern that prompted further characterisation by targeted sequencing using anchored multiplex PCR. Results: A novel ALK fusion with the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamylase, and dihydroorotase (CAD) gene (CAD-ALK fusion gene) was identified. It resulted from inversion within chromosome 2 and the fusion of exons 1–35 of CAD with exons 20–29 of ALK. After failure of previous standard therapies, treatment of this patient with the ALK inhibitor entrectinib resulted in a durable objective tumour response. Conclusions: We describe the novel CAD-ALK rearrangement as an oncogene and provide the first evidence of its drugability as a new molecular target in CRC. PMID:26633560

  18. ALK and ROS1 as a joint target for the treatment of lung cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Puig de la Bellacasa, Raimon; Karachaliou, Niki; Estrada-Tejedor, Roger; Teixidó, Jordi; Costa, Carlota; Borrell, José I

    2013-04-01

    Rearrangements of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have been described in multiple malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ALK fusions have gain of function properties while activating mutations in wild-type ALK can also occur within the tyrosine kinase domain. ALK rearrangements define a new molecular subtype of NSCLC that is exquisitely sensitive to ALK inhibition. Crizotinib, an orally available small molecule ATP-mimetic compound which was originally designed as a MET inhibitor, was recognized to have "off-target" anti-ALK activity and has been approved in the USA for the treatment of patients with ALK-positive NSCLC. Chromosomal rearrangements involving the ROS1 receptor tyrosine kinase have also been recently described in NSCLC, while crizotinib is currently under clinical trial in this molecular subset of NSCLC patients. The basic approaches of any computer aided drug design work in terms of structure and ligand based drug design. Details of each of these approaches should be covered with an emphasis on utilizing both in order to develop multi-targeted small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Such multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors can have antiproliferative activity against both ROS1and ALK rearranged NSCLC. Herein, we highlight the importance of targeting these proteins and the advances in optimizing more potent and selective ALK and ROS1 kinase inhibitors.

  19. ALK and ROS1 as a joint target for the treatment of lung cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Puig de la Bellacasa, Raimon; Karachaliou, Niki; Estrada-Tejedor, Roger; Teixidó, Jordi; Costa, Carlota

    2013-01-01

    Rearrangements of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have been described in multiple malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ALK fusions have gain of function properties while activating mutations in wild-type ALK can also occur within the tyrosine kinase domain. ALK rearrangements define a new molecular subtype of NSCLC that is exquisitely sensitive to ALK inhibition. Crizotinib, an orally available small molecule ATP-mimetic compound which was originally designed as a MET inhibitor, was recognized to have “off-target” anti-ALK activity and has been approved in the USA for the treatment of patients with ALK-positive NSCLC. Chromosomal rearrangements involving the ROS1 receptor tyrosine kinase have also been recently described in NSCLC, while crizotinib is currently under clinical trial in this molecular subset of NSCLC patients. The basic approaches of any computer aided drug design work in terms of structure and ligand based drug design. Details of each of these approaches should be covered with an emphasis on utilizing both in order to develop multi-targeted small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Such multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors can have antiproliferative activity against both ROS1and ALK rearranged NSCLC. Herein, we highlight the importance of targeting these proteins and the advances in optimizing more potent and selective ALK and ROS1 kinase inhibitors. PMID:25806218

  20. Bone involvement and abcess formation by neutrophil-rich CD30+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma mimicking skeletal infection in an AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    Mira, José A; Fernández-Alonso, Jorge; Macías, Juan; Sáez, Carmen; Japón, Miguel A; Pereda, Teresa; Pineda, Juan A

    2003-07-01

    Neutrophil-rich CD30+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare pathological entity without distinct clinical behavior. Twelve cases of neutrophil-rich CD30+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) have been reported, three of them were HIV-infected patients. All these reports stressed the presence of neutrophil infiltration as a new morphologic feature of CD30+ ALCL. Only one case of cutaneous involvement presented with microabscess formation. We describe a case of neutrophil-rich CD30+ ALCL in an AIDS patient with a clinical picture determined by the massive neutrophil infiltration of the tumor without necrosis nor local infection, but with the formation of abscesses.

  1. Managing Resistance to EFGR- and ALK-Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Lovly, Christine M; Iyengar, Puneeth; Gainor, Justin F

    2017-01-01

    Targeted therapies have transformed the management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and placed an increased emphasis on stratifying patients on the basis of genetic alterations in oncogenic drivers. To date, the best characterized molecular targets in NSCLC are the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). Despite steady advances in targeted therapies within these molecular subsets, however, acquired resistance to therapy is near universal. Recent preclinical models and translational efforts have provided critical insights into the molecular mechanisms of resistance to EGFR and ALK inhibitors. In this review, we present a framework for understanding resistance to targeted therapies. We also provide overviews of the molecular mechanisms of resistance and strategies to overcome resistance among EGFR-mutant and ALK-rearranged lung cancers. To date, these strategies have centered on the development of novel next-generation inhibitors, rationale combinations, and use of local ablative therapies, such as radiotherapy.

  2. Activated ALK Collaborates with MYCN in Neuroblastoma Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shizhen; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Guo, Feng; Shin, Jimann; Perez-Atayde, Antonio R.; Kutok, Jeffery L.; Rodig, Scott J.; Neuberg, Donna S.; Helman, Daniel; Feng, Hui; Stewart, Rodney A.; Wang, Wenchao; George, Rani E.; Kanki, John P.; Look, A. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Amplification of the MYCN oncogene in childhood neuroblastoma is often accompanied by mutational activation of ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase), suggesting their pathogenic cooperation. We generated a transgenic zebrafish model of neuroblastoma in which MYCN-induced tumors arise from a subpopulation of neuroblasts that migrate into the adrenal medulla analogue following organogenesis. Coexpression of activated ALK with MYCN in this model triples the disease penetrance and markedly accelerates tumor onset. MYCN overexpression induces adrenal sympathetic neuroblast hyperplasia, blocks chromaffin cell differentiation, and ultimately triggers a developmentally-timed apoptotic response in the hyperplastic sympathoadrenal cells. Coexpression of activated ALK with MYCN provides prosurvival signals that block this apoptotic response and allow continued expansion and oncogenic transformation of hyperplastic neuroblasts, thus promoting progression to neuroblastoma. PMID:22439933

  3. Crizotinib for Untreated Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of a NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Philip; Woolacott, Nerys; Biswas, Mousumi; Mebrahtu, Teumzghi; Harden, Melissa; Hodgson, Robert

    2017-03-24

    As part of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) single technology appraisal process, the manufacturer of crizotinib submitted evidence on the clinical and cost effectiveness of crizotinib in untreated anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive (ALK-positive) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Crizotinib has previously been assessed by NICE for patients with previously treated ALK-positive NSCLC (TA 296). It was not approved in this previous appraisal, but had been made available through the cancer drugs fund. As part of this new appraisal, the company included a price discount patient access scheme (PAS). The Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and Centre for Health Economics Technology Appraisal Group at the University of York was commissioned to act as the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG). This article provides a description of the company's submission and the ERG's review and summarises the resulting NICE guidance issued in August 2016. The main clinical-effectiveness data were derived from a multicentre randomised controlled trial-PROFILE 1014-that compared crizotinib with pemetrexed chemotherapy in combination with carboplatin or cisplatin in patients with untreated non-squamous ALK-positive NSCLC. In the trial, crizotinib demonstrated improvements in progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). The company's economic model was a three-state 'area under the curve' Markov model. The base-case incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was estimated to be greater than £50,000 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained (excluding the PAS discount). The ERG assessment of the evidence submitted by the company raised a number of concerns. In terms of the clinical evidence, the OS benefit was highly uncertain due to the cross-over permitted in the trial and the immaturity of the data; only 26% of events had occurred by the data cut-off point. In the economic modelling, the most significant concerns related to the analysis

  4. Oncogenic TPM3-ALK activation requires dimerization through the coiled-coil structure of TPM3

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, Yosuke; Ishikawa, Rie; Sakatani, Toshio; Ichinose, Junji; Sunohara, Mitsuhiro; Watanabe, Kousuke; Kage, Hidenori; Nakajima, Jun; Nagase, Takahide; Ohishi, Nobuya; Takai, Daiya

    2015-02-13

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a mesenchymal tumor that can arise from anywhere in the body. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements, most often resulting in the tropomyosin 3 (TPM3)-ALK fusion gene, are the main causes of IMT. However, the mechanism of malignant transformation in IMT has yet to be elucidated. The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of the TPM3 region in the transformation of IMT via TPM3-ALK. Lentivirus vectors containing a TPM3-ALK fusion gene lacking various lengths of TPM3 were constructed and expressed in HEK293T and NIH3T3 cell lines. Focus formation assay revealed loss of contact inhibition in NIH3T3 cells transfected with full-length TPM3-ALK, but not with ALK alone. Blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) revealed that TPM3-ALK dimerization increased in proportion to the length of TPM3. Western blot showed phosphorylation of ALK, ERK1/2, and STAT3 in HEK293T cells transfected with TPM3-ALK. Thus, the coiled-coil structure of TPM3 contributes to the transforming ability of the TPM3-ALK fusion protein, and longer TPM3 region leads to higher dimer formation. - Highlights: • TPM3-ALK fusion protein dimerizes through the coiled-coil structure of TPM3. • Longer coiled-coil structure of TPM3 leads to higher TPM3-ALK dimer formation. • Presence of TPM3-ALK dimer leads to ALK, STAT3, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. • Presence of TPM3-ALK leads to loss of contact inhibition. • BN-PAGE is a simple technique for visualizing oncogenic dimerization.

  5. A patient previously treated with ALK inhibitors for central nervous system lesions from ALK rearranged lung cancer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kashima, Jumpei; Okuma, Yusuke; Hishima, Tsunekazu

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are now preferentially treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, patients treated with ALK inhibitors end up with acquired resistance. Case presentation We present a patient with recurrent ALK-rearranged NSCLC that developed multiple brain metastases and meningitis carcinomatosa after sequential treatment with several lines of cytotoxic chemotherapy, crizotinib, and alectinib. After the patient underwent retreatment with crizotinib as salvage therapy because of poor performance status, the intracranial metastatic foci and meningeal thickening were shrank within 1 week. Conclusion Our experience with this case suggests that alectinib may restore sensitivity to crizotinib or amplified pathway such as MET which bestowed alectinib resistance was inhibited with crizotinib. PMID:27785052

  6. Dependence-induced ethanol drinking and GABA neurotransmission are altered in Alk deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Paul; Cates-Gatto, Chelsea; Varodayan, Florence P; Nadav, Tali; Roberto, Marisa; Lasek, Amy W; Roberts, Amanda J

    2016-08-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is expressed in the brain and implicated in alcohol abuse in humans and behavioral responses to ethanol in mice. Previous studies have shown an association of human ALK with acute responses to alcohol and alcohol dependence. In addition, Alk knockout (Alk -/-) mice consume more ethanol in a binge-drinking test and show increased sensitivity to ethanol sedation. However, the function of ALK in excessive drinking following the establishment of ethanol dependence has not been examined. In this study, we tested Alk -/- mice for dependence-induced drinking using the chronic intermittent ethanol-two bottle choice drinking (CIE-2BC) protocol. We found that Alk -/- mice initially consume more ethanol prior to CIE exposure, but do not escalate ethanol consumption after exposure, suggesting that ALK may promote the escalation of drinking after ethanol dependence. To determine the mechanism(s) responsible for this behavioral phenotype we used an electrophysiological approach to examine GABA neurotransmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a brain region that regulates alcohol consumption and shows increased GABA signaling after chronic ethanol exposure. GABA transmission in ethanol-naïve Alk -/- mice was enhanced at baseline and potentiated in response to acute ethanol application when compared to wild-type (Alk +/+) mice. Moreover, basal GABA transmission was not elevated by CIE exposure in Alk -/- mice as it was in Alk +/+ mice. These data suggest that ALK plays a role in dependence-induced drinking and the regulation of presynaptic GABA release in the CeA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dependence-induced ethanol drinking and GABA neurotransmission are altered in Alk deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Schweitzer, Paul; Cates-Gatto, Chelsea; Varodayan, Florence P.; Nadav, Tali; Roberto, Marisa; Lasek, Amy W.; Roberts, Amanda J.

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is expressed in the brain and implicated in alcohol abuse in humans and behavioral responses to ethanol in mice. Previous studies have shown an association of human ALK with acute responses to alcohol and alcohol dependence. In addition, Alk knockout (Alk −/−) mice consume more ethanol in a binge-drinking test and show increased sensitivity to ethanol sedation. However, the function of ALK in excessive drinking following the establishment of ethanol dependence has not been examined. In this study, we tested Alk −/− mice for dependence-induced drinking using the chronic intermittent ethanol-two bottle choice drinking (CIE-2BC) protocol. We found that Alk −/− mice initially consume more ethanol prior to CIE exposure, but do not escalate ethanol consumption after exposure, suggesting that ALK may promote the escalation of drinking after ethanol dependence. To determine the mechanism(s) responsible for this behavioral phenotype we used an electrophysiological approach to examine GABA neurotransmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a brain region that regulates alcohol consumption and shows increased GABA signaling after chronic ethanol exposure. GABA transmission in ethanol-naïve Alk −/− mice was enhanced at baseline and potentiated in response to acute ethanol application when compared to wild-type (Alk +/+) mice. Moreover, basal GABA transmission was not elevated by CIE exposure in Alk −/− mice as it was in Alk +/+ mice. These data suggest that ALK plays a role in dependence-induced drinking and the regulation of presynaptic GABA release in the CeA. PMID:26946429

  8. Targeting stemness is an effective strategy to control EML4-ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se Jin; Noh, Kyung Hee; Lee, Young-Ho; Hong, Soon-Oh; Song, Kwon-Ho; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Soyeon; Kim, Tae Min; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Seo, Jae Hong; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Tae Woo

    2015-11-24

    The fusion between anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) is a causative factor in a unique subset of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Although the inhibitor crizotinib, as it blocks the kinase activity of the resulting EML4-ALK fusion protein, displays remarkable initial responses, a fraction of NSCLC cases eventually become resistant to crizotinib by acquiring mutations in the ALK domain or activating bypass pathways via EGFR, KIT, or KRAS. Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory provides a plausible explanation for acquisition of tumorigenesis and resistance. However, the question as to whether EML4-ALK-driven tumorigenesis is linked with the stem-like property and whether the stemness is an effective target in controlling EML4-ALK+ NSCLC including crizotinib-resistant NSCLC cells has not been addressed. Here, we report that stem-like properties stem from ALK activity in EML4-ALK+ NSCLC cells. Notably, treatment with rapamycin, a CSC targeting agent, attenuates stem-like phenotypes of the EML4-ALK+ cells, which increased capability of tumor formation and higher expression of stemness-associated molecules such as ALDH, NANOG, and OCT4. Importantly, combinational treatment with rapamycin and crizotinib leads to synergistic anti-tumor effects on EML4-ALK+ NSCLC cells as well as on those resistant to crizotinib. Thus, we provide a proof of principle that targeting stemness would be a novel strategy to control intractable EML4-ALK+ NSCLC.

  9. Screening for ALK abnormalities in central nervous system metastases of non-small-cell lung cancer: ALK abnormalities in CNS metastases of NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Nicoś, Marcin; Jarosz, Bożena; Krawczyk, Paweł; Wojas-Krawczyk, Kamila; Kucharczyk, Tomasz; Sawicki, Marek; Pankowski, Juliusz; Trojanowski, Tomasz; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-11-23

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement was reported in 3-7% of primary non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its presence is commonly associated with adenocarcinoma (AD) type and non-smoking history. ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as crizotinib, alectinib and ceritinib showed efficiency in patients with primary NSCLC harboring ALK gene rearrangement. Moreover, response to ALK TKIs was observed in central nervous system (CNS) metastatic lesions of NSCLC. However, there are no reports concerning the frequency of ALK rearrangement in CNS metastases. We assessed the frequency of ALK abnormalities in 145 formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue samples from CNS metastases of NSCLC using immunohistochemical (IHC) automated staining (BenchMark GX, Ventana, USA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique (Abbot Molecular, USA). The studied group was heterogeneous in terms of histopathology and smoking status. ALK abnormalities were detected in 4.8% (7/145) of CNS metastases. ALK abnormalities were observed in six AD (7.5%; 6/80) and in single patients with adenosuqamous lung carcinoma. Analysis of clinical and demographic factors indicated that expression of abnormal ALK was significantly more frequently observed (p=0.0002; χ(2) =16.783) in former-smokers. Comparison of IHC and FISH results showed some discrepancies, which were caused by unspecific staining of macrophages and glial/nerve cells, which constitute the background of CNS tissues. Our results indicate high frequency of ALK gene rearrangement in CNS metastatic sites of NSCLC that are in line with prior studies concerning evaluation of the presence of ALK abnormalities in such patients. However, we showed that assessment of ALK by IHC and FISH methods in CNS tissues require additional standardizations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Non-anaplastic peripheral T cell lymphoma in children and adolescents-an international review of 143 cases.

    PubMed

    Mellgren, K; Attarbaschi, A; Abla, O; Alexander, S; Bomken, S; Bubanska, E; Chiang, A; Csóka, M; Fedorova, A; Kabickova, E; Kapuscinska-Kemblowska, L; Kobayashi, R; Krenova, Z; Meyer-Wentrup, F; Miakova, N; Pillon, M; Plat, G; Uyttebroeck, A; Williams, D; Wróbel, G; Kontny, U

    2016-08-01

    Peripheral T cell lymphomas (PTCL) are rare in children and adolescents, and data about outcome and treatment results are scarce. The present study is a joint, international, retrospective analysis of 143 reported cases of non-anaplastic PTCL in patients <19 years of age, with a focus on treatment and outcome features. One hundred forty-three patients, between 0.3 and 18.7 years old, diagnosed between 2000 and 2015 were included in the study. PTCL not otherwise specified was the largest subgroup, followed by extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, hepatosplenic T cell lymphoma (HS TCL), and subcutaneous panniculitis-like T cell lymphoma (SP TCL). Probability of overall survival (pOS) at 5 years for the whole group was 0.56 ± 0.05, and probability of event-free survival was (pEFS) 0.45 ± 0.05. Patients with SP TCL had a good outcome with 5-year pOS of 0.78 ± 0.1 while patients with HS TCL were reported with 5-year pOS of only 0.13 ± 0.12. Twenty-five percent of the patients were reported to have a pre-existing condition, and this group had a dismal outcome with 5-year pOS of 0.29 ± 0.09. The distribution of non-anaplastic PTCL subtypes in pediatric and adolescent patients differs from what is reported in adult patients. Overall outcome depends on the subtype with some doing better than others. Pre-existing conditions are frequent and associated with poor outcomes. There is a clear need for subtype-based treatment recommendations for children and adolescents with PTCL.

  11. [Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Delsol, G

    2010-11-01

    Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in lymphomas. They are of diagnostic and prognostic value and are taken into account for the WHO classification of these tumors. They also shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in lymphomas. Overall, four types of molecular abnormalities are involved: mutations, translocations, amplifications and deletions of tumor suppressor genes. Several techniques are available to detect these molecular anomalies: conventional cytogenetic analysis, multicolor FISH, CGH array or gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. In some lymphomas, genetic abnormalities are responsible for the expression of an abnormal protein (e.g. tyrosine-kinase, transcription factor) detectable by immunohistochemistry. In the present review, molecular abnormalities observed in the most frequent B, T or NK cell lymphomas are discussed. In the broad spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas microarray analysis shows mostly two subgroups of tumors, one with gene expression signature corresponding to germinal center B-cell-like (GCB: CD10+, BCL6 [B-Cell Lymphoma 6]+, centerine+, MUM1-) and a subgroup expressing an activated B-cell-like signature (ABC: CD10-, BCL6-, centerine-, MUM1+). Among other B-cell lymphomas with well characterized molecular abnormalies are follicular lymphoma (BCL2 deregulation), MALT lymphoma (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue) [API2-MALT1 (mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue-lymphoma-translocation-gene1) fusion protein or deregulation BCL10, MALT1, FOXP1. MALT1 transcription factors], mantle cell lymphoma (cycline D1 [CCND1] overexpression) and Burkitt lymphoma (c-Myc expression). Except for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, well characterized molecular anomalies are rare in lymphomas developed from T or NK cells. Peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are a heterogeneous group of tumors with frequent but not recurrent molecular abnormalities

  12. The pleiotrophin-ALK axis is required for tumorigenicity of glioblastoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Koyama-Nasu, R; Haruta, R; Nasu-Nishimura, Y; Taniue, K; Katou, Y; Shirahige, K; Todo, T; Ino, Y; Mukasa, A; Saito, N; Matsui, M; Takahashi, R; Hoshino-Okubo, A; Sugano, H; Manabe, E; Funato, K; Akiyama, T

    2014-04-24

    Increasing evidence suggests that brain tumors arise from the transformation of neural stem/precursor/progenitor cells. Much current research on human brain tumors is focused on the stem-like properties of glioblastoma. Here we show that anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and its ligand pleiotrophin are required for the self-renewal and tumorigenicity of glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs). Furthermore, we demonstrate that pleiotrophin is transactivated directly by SOX2, a transcription factor essential for the maintenance of both neural stem cells and GSCs. We speculate that the pleiotrophin-ALK axis may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma.

  13. Transformation of Sézary syndrome into CD30+ anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma after alemtuzumab therapy with evidence of clonal unity.

    PubMed

    Nevet, Mariela Judith; Zuckerman, Tsila; Sahar, Dvora; Bergman, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized mouse antibody targeting the CD52 cell surface, which has been effective in patients with advanced stage mycosis fungoides (MF) including erythrodermic MF and Sézary syndrome. There are a few descriptions of large cell transformation after its administration. A young patient with an acute onset of Sézary syndrome treated initially unsuccessfully with fludarabine and cyclophosphamide and later on successfully with alemtuzumab has been described. Three weeks after the beginning of therapy, however, she developed transformed T-cell lymphoma indistinguishable from CD30 anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. After bone marrow transplantation, the transformed CD30 cutaneous T-cell lymphoma recurred as a transformed CD30 plaque MF. All 3 types of lesions showed the same T-cell receptor clonal gene rearrangement, which supports the notion that Sézary syndrome, CD30 anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, and MF are interrelated.

  14. De novo cystic brain lesions mimicking neurocysticercosis in ALK-positive lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Hyun; Hyun, Jae-Won; Kim, Ho Jin; Gwak, Ho-Shin; Lee, Sang Hyun; Hong, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Youngjoo

    2017-08-01

    Cystic brain metastases (CBM) have been recently reported in a minority of patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). All previously reported ALK-positive CBM developed during crizotinib treatment and were often asymptomatic and indolent, even without CNS-directed therapy. Thus, crizotinib was suggested as an etiologic agent for the development of CBM. Here, we report a case of de novo CBM in a patient with ALK-positive NSCLC prior to crizotinib treatment; the ALK-positive NSCLC had initially been misdiagnosed as neurocysticercosis because of the atypical radiological presentation of brain metastases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The bHLH transcription factor Hand is regulated by Alk in the Drosophila embryonic gut

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, Gaurav K.; Palmer, Ruth H. . E-mail: Ruth.Palmer@ucmp.umu.se

    2006-12-29

    During embryonic development the midgut visceral muscle is formed by fusion of cells within the visceral mesoderm, a process initiated by the specification of a specialised cell type, the founder cell, within this tissue. Activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk) in the developing visceral muscle of Drosophila melanogaster initiates a signal transduction pathway required for muscle fusion. In this paper, we have investigated downstream components which are regulated by this novel signalling pathway. Here we show that Alk-mediated signal transduction drives the expression of the bHLH transcription factor Hand in vivo. Loss of Alk function results in a complete lack of Hand expression in this tissue, whereas Alk gain of function results in an expansion of Hand expression. Finally, we have investigated the process of muscle fusion in the gut of Hand mutant animals and can find no obvious defects in this process, suggesting that Hand is not critical for visceral muscle fusion per se.

  16. Resensitization to Crizotinib by the Lorlatinib ALK Resistance Mutation L1198F.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Alice T; Friboulet, Luc; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Gainor, Justin F; Bergqvist, Simon; Brooun, Alexei; Burke, Benjamin J; Deng, Ya-Li; Liu, Wei; Dardaei, Leila; Frias, Rosa L; Schultz, Kate R; Logan, Jennifer; James, Leonard P; Smeal, Tod; Timofeevski, Sergei; Katayama, Ryohei; Iafrate, A John; Le, Long; McTigue, Michele; Getz, Gad; Johnson, Ted W; Engelman, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-07

    In a patient who had metastatic anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged lung cancer, resistance to crizotinib developed because of a mutation in the ALK kinase domain. This mutation is predicted to result in a substitution of cysteine by tyrosine at amino acid residue 1156 (C1156Y). Her tumor did not respond to a second-generation ALK inhibitor, but it did respond to lorlatinib (PF-06463922), a third-generation inhibitor. When her tumor relapsed, sequencing of the resistant tumor revealed an ALK L1198F mutation in addition to the C1156Y mutation. The L1198F substitution confers resistance to lorlatinib through steric interference with drug binding. However, L1198F paradoxically enhances binding to crizotinib, negating the effect of C1156Y and resensitizing resistant cancers to crizotinib. The patient received crizotinib again, and her cancer-related symptoms and liver failure resolved. (Funded by Pfizer and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01970865.).

  17. Resensitization to Crizotinib by the Lorlatinib ALK Resistance Mutation L1198F

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Alice T.; Friboulet, Luc; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Gainor, Justin F.; Bergqvist, Simon; Brooun, Alexei; Burke, Benjamin J.; Deng, Ya-Li; Liu, Wei; Dardaei, Leila; Frias, Rosa L.; Schultz, Kate R.; Logan, Jennifer; James, Leonard P.; Smeal, Tod; Timofeevski, Sergei; Katayama, Ryohei; Iafrate, A. John; Le, Long; McTigue, Michele; Getz, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Summary In a patient who had metastatic anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged lung cancer, resistance to crizotinib developed because of a mutation in the ALK kinase domain. This mutation is predicted to result in a substitution of cysteine by tyrosine at amino acid residue 1156 (C1156Y). Her tumor did not respond to a second-generation ALK inhibitor, but it did respond to lorlatinib (PF-06463922), a third-generation inhibitor. When her tumor relapsed, sequencing of the resistant tumor revealed an ALK L1198F mutation in addition to the C1156Y mutation. The L1198F substitution confers resistance to lorlatinib through steric interference with drug binding. However, L1198F paradoxically enhances binding to crizotinib, negating the effect of C1156Y and resensitizing resistant cancers to crizotinib. The patient received crizotinib again, and her cancer-related symptoms and liver failure resolved. PMID:26698910

  18. EML4-ALK induces epithelial–mesenchymal transition consistent with cancer stem cell properties in H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fuchun; Liu, Xiaoke Qing, Qin Sang, Yaxiong Feng, Chengjun Li, Xiaoyu Jiang, Li Su, Pei Wang, Yongsheng

    2015-04-10

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4(EML4) – anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene has been identified as a driver mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the role of EML4-ALK in malignant transformation is not entirely clear. Here, for the first time, we showed that H1299 NSCLC cells stably expressing EML4-ALK acquire EMT phenotype, associated with enhanced invasive migration and increased expression of EMT-inducing transcription factors. H1299-EML4-ALK cells also displayed cancer stem cell-like properties with a concomitant up-regulation of CD133 and enhanced ability of mammospheres formation. Moreover, we found that inhibition of ERK1/2 reversed EMT induced by EML4-ALK in H1299 cells. Taken together, these results suggested that EML4-ALK induced ERK activation is mechanistically associated with EMT phenotype. Thus, inhibition of ERK signaling pathway could be a potential strategy in treatment of NSCLC patients with EML4-ALK translocation. - Highlights: • EML4-ALK induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition in H1299 cells. • Expression of EML4-ALK promotes invasion and migration in vitro. • EML4-ALK enhanced sphere formation and stem cell-like properties in H1299 cells. • Blockage of ERK1/2 reverse Epithelial–Mesenchymal transition induced by EML4-ALK.

  19. Augmentor α and β (FAM150) are ligands of the receptor tyrosine kinases ALK and LTK: Hierarchy and specificity of ligand–receptor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Andrey V.; Murray, Phillip B.; Shi, Xiarong; Mo, Elizabeth S.; Mohanty, Jyotidarsini; Tome, Francisco; Bai, Hanwen; Gunel, Murat; Lax, Irit; Schlessinger, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are a class of cell surface receptors that, upon ligand binding, stimulate a variety of critical cellular functions. The orphan receptor anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is one of very few RTKs that remain without a firmly established protein ligand. Here we present a novel cytokine, FAM150B, which we propose naming augmentor-α (AUG-α), as a ligand for ALK. AUG-α binds ALK with high affinity and activates ALK in cells with subnanomolar potency. Detailed binding experiments using cells expressing ALK or the related receptor leukocyte tyrosine kinase (LTK) demonstrate that AUG-α binds and robustly activates both ALK and LTK. We show that the previously established LTK ligand FAM150A (AUG-β) is specific for LTK and only weakly binds to ALK. Furthermore, expression of AUG-α stimulates transformation of NIH/3T3 cells expressing ALK, induces IL-3 independent growth of Ba/F3 cells expressing ALK, and is expressed in neuroblastoma, a cancer partly driven by ALK. These experiments reveal the hierarchy and specificity of two cytokines as ligands for ALK and LTK and set the stage for elucidating their roles in development and disease states. PMID:26630010

  20. Brief report: Clinical implications of variant ALK FISH rearrangement patterns

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xin; Sholl, Lynette M.; Nishino, Mizuki; Heng, Jennifer; Jänne, Pasi A.; Oxnard, Geoffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is the FDA-approved assay for detecting anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), identifying patients who can gain dramatic benefit from ALK kinase inhibitors. Assay interpretation can be technically challenging, and either splitting of the 5′ and 3′ probes or loss of the 5′ probe constitute rearrangement. We hypothesized that there may be clinical differences depending upon rearrangement pattern on FISH. Methods An IRB-approved database of NSCLC patients at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute was queried for ALK rearrangement. Clinical characteristics and response to crizotinib were reviewed. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) were obtained when available. Results Of 1,614 NSCLC patients with ALK testing, 82 (5.1%) patients had ALK rearrangement by FISH: 30 with split signals, 25 with 5′ deletion, and 27 with details unavailable. Patients with 5′ deletion were older (p=0.01) and tended to have more extensive smoking histories (p=0.08). IHC was positive for ALK rearrangement in all 27 patients with FISH split signals, while 3 of 21 patients with FISH 5′ deletion had negative IHC (p=0.05). Targeted NGS on 2 of 3 cases with discordant FISH and IHC results did not identify ALK rearrangement, instead finding driver mutations in EGFR and KRAS. Patients with 5′ deletion treated with crizotinib had a smaller magnitude of tumor response (p=0.03). Conclusions Patients with 5′ deletion on ALK FISH harbor features less typical of ALK-rearranged tumors, potentially indicating that some cases with this variant are false-positives. Corroborative testing with IHC or NGS may be beneficial. PMID:26536196

  1. Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma: Report of 2 Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Hart, Alexandra M; Lechowicz, Mary Jo; Peters, Kendall K; Holden, Jeannine; Carlson, Grant W

    2014-08-01

    Although primary breast lymphomas are exceedingly rare, cases of breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (iALCL) continue to be reported. The authors describe their experience with 2 patients and review the literature. Both patients presented with periprosthetic fluid collection. Neither had evidence of systemic disease nor received systemic therapy. Both were disease free after bilateral capsulectomies and implant removal without implant replacement, and disease did not recur. During the literature review, 63 cases of iALCL (including our 2 patients) were identified. The median time from implant placement to diagnosis was 9 years. Both saline and silicone implants were associated with iALCL. Of the 26 cases for which implant surface was reported, the surface was textured in 24. Of the 58 patients with an identifiable presentation, 39 had periprosthetic fluid collection, including 7 with an associated mass; 13 had an isolated mass at presentation, including 1 with axillary adenopathy. Forty patients had capsulectomy, 7 of whom underwent implant replacement. Of the 44 patients with known treatment, 33 received chemotherapy and 23 received radiation. Of the 49 patients with known anaplastic large cell lymphoma, 15 had disease recurrence, and 4 patient deaths were reported. Of the 18 patients presenting with a mass, 11 had disease recurrence, including all 4 patients who died. This study represents the largest review of patients with iALCL described to date. Although most cases have an indolent clinical course, the variety of presentations defined as "seroma" vs "capsular involvement" emphasizes the importance of investigating a definitive method of diagnosis, management, and treatment of this disease. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 5.

  2. Insights into brain metastasis in patients with ALK+ lung cancer: is the brain truly a sanctuary?

    PubMed

    Toyokawa, Gouji; Seto, Takashi; Takenoyama, Mitsuhiro; Ichinose, Yukito

    2015-12-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has been identified to exert a potent transforming activity through its rearrangement in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and patients (pts) with ALK rearrangement can be treated more successfully with ALK inhibitors, such as crizotinib, alectinib, and ceritinib, than with chemotherapy. Despite the excellent efficacy of ALK inhibitors, resistance to these drugs is inevitably encountered in most ALK-rearranged pts. Cases of resistance are subtyped into three groups, i.e., systemic, oligo, and central nervous system (CNS) types, with the CNS being used to be considered a sanctuary. With regard to the management of CNS lesions in pts with ALK+ NSCLC, a growing body of evidence has gradually demonstrated the intracranial (IC) efficacy of ALK inhibitor (ALKi) in ALK+ NSCLC pts with brain metastases (BMs). Although the efficacy of crizotinib for the CNS lesions remains controversial, a recent retrospective investigation of ALK+ pts with BM enrolled in PROFILE 1005 and PROFILE 1007 demonstrated that crizotinib is associated with a high disease control rate for BM. However, BM comprises the most common site of progressive disease in pts with or without baseline BMs, which is a serious problem for crizotinib. Furthermore, alectinib can be used to achieve strong and long-lasting inhibitory effects on BM. In addition to alectinib, the IC efficacy of other next-generation ALK inhibitors, such as ceritinib, AP26113 and PF-06463922, has been demonstrated. In this article, we review the latest evidence regarding the BM and IC efficacy of ALK inhibitors in pts with ALK+ NSCLC.

  3. Crizotinib-Resistant Mutants of EML4-ALK Identified Through an Accelerated Mutagenesis Screen

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sen; Wang, Frank; Keats, Jeffrey; Zhu, Xiaotian; Ning, Yaoyu; Wardwell, Scott D; Moran, Lauren; Mohemmad, Qurish K; Anjum, Rana; Wang, Yihan; Narasimhan, Narayana I; Dalgarno, David; Shakespeare, William C; Miret, Juan J; Clackson, Tim; Rivera, Victor M

    2011-01-01

    Activating gene rearrangements of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have been identified as driver mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, and other cancers. Crizotinib, a dual MET/ALK inhibitor, has demonstrated promising clinical activity in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors harboring ALK translocations. Inhibitors of driver kinases often elicit kinase domain mutations that confer resistance, and such mutations have been successfully predicted using in vitro mutagenesis screens. Here, this approach was used to discover an extensive set of ALK mutations that can confer resistance to crizotinib. Mutations at 16 residues were identified, structurally clustered into five regions around the kinase active site, which conferred varying degrees of resistance. The screen successfully predicted the L1196M, C1156Y, and F1174L mutations, recently identified in crizotinib-resistant patients. In separate studies, we demonstrated that crizotinib has relatively modest potency in ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines. A more potent ALK inhibitor, TAE684, maintained substantial activity against mutations that conferred resistance to crizotinib. Our study identifies multiple novel mutations in ALK that may confer clinical resistance to crizotinib, suggests that crizotinib's narrow selectivity window may underlie its susceptibility to such resistance and demonstrates that a more potent ALK inhibitor may be effective at overcoming resistance. PMID:22034911

  4. RANBP2-ALK fusion combined with monosomy 7 in acute myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji-Hun; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Cho, Young-Uk; Lee, Je-Hwan; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Lee, Jin-Ok; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Kim, Jong-Il; Huh, Jooryung; Seo, Eul-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase (ALK) is located on chromosome 2p23; the chromosomal rearrangements of this gene are common genetic alterations, resulting in the creation of multiple fusion genes involved in tumorigenesis. However, the presence of an ALK fusion in myeloid malignancies is extremely rare. We report a case of acute myelomonocytic leukemia in a 31-year-old woman with an unusual rearrangement between RAN-binding protein 2 (RANBP2) and ALK and a karyotype of 45,XX,inv(2)(p23q21),-7[20]. We detected an ALK rearrangement using fluorescence in situ hybridization, identified the ALK fusion partner by using RNA transcriptome sequencing, and demonstrated the RANBP2-ALK fusion transcript by reverse transcriptase--PCR and Sanger sequencing. Immunohistochemistry for ALK showed strong staining of the nuclear membrane in leukemic cells. The patient had an unfavorable clinical course. Our results, together with a literature review, suggest the RANBP2-ALK fusion combined with monosomy 7 may be related to a unique clonal hematologic disorder of childhood and adolescence, characterized by myelomonocytic leukemia and a poor prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prospective and clinical validation of ALK immunohistochemistry: results from the phase I/II study of alectinib for ALK-positive lung cancer (AF-001JP study)

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, K.; Togashi, Y.; Kamihara, Y.; Fukuyama, T.; Yoshioka, H.; Inoue, A.; Katsuki, H.; Kiura, K.; Nakagawa, K.; Seto, T.; Maemondo, M.; Hida, T.; Harada, M.; Ohe, Y.; Nogami, N.; Yamamoto, N.; Nishio, M.; Tamura, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusions need to be accurately and efficiently detected for ALK inhibitor therapy. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) remains the reference test. Although increasing data are supporting that ALK immunohistochemistry (IHC) is highly concordant with FISH, IHC screening needed to be clinically and prospectively validated. Patients and methods In the AF-001JP trial for alectinib, 436 patients were screened for ALK fusions through IHC (n = 384) confirmed with FISH (n = 181), multiplex RT-PCR (n = 68), or both (n = 16). IHC results were scored with iScore. Result ALK fusion was positive in 137 patients and negative in 250 patients. Since the presence of cancer cells in the samples for RT-PCR was not confirmed, ALK fusion negativity could not be ascertained in 49 patients. IHC interpreted with iScore showed a 99.4% (173/174) concordance with FISH. All 41 patients who had iScore 3 and were enrolled in phase II showed at least 30% tumor reduction with 92.7% overall response rate. Two IHC-positive patients with an atypical FISH pattern responded to ALK inhibitor therapy. The reduction rate was not correlated with IHC staining intensity. Conclusions Our study showed (i) that when sufficiently sensitive and appropriately interpreted, IHC can be a stand-alone diagnostic for ALK inhibitor therapies; (ii) that when atypical FISH patterns are accompanied by IHC positivity, the patients should be considered as candidates for ALK inhibitor therapies, and (iii) that the expression level of ALK fusion is not related to the level of response to ALK inhibitors and is thus not required for patient selection. Registration number JapicCTI-101264 (This study is registered with the Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center). PMID:26487585

  6. CCL11-CCR3 interactions promote survival of anaplastic large cell lymphoma cells via ERK1/2 activation.

    PubMed

    Miyagaki, Tomomitsu; Sugaya, Makoto; Murakami, Takashi; Asano, Yoshihide; Tada, Yayoi; Kadono, Takafumi; Okochi, Hitoshi; Tamaki, Kunihiko; Sato, Shinichi

    2011-03-15

    CCR3 is a specific marker of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) cells. ALCL cells also express CCL11, a ligand for CCR3, leading to the hypothesis that CCL11 may play an autocrine role in ALCL progression. In this study, we investigated a role of CCL11 in cell survival and growth of human Ki-JK cells, established from an ALCL patient, and murine EL-4 lymphoma cells. Both Ki-JK and EL-4 cells expressed cell surface CCR3. CCL11 increased cell survival rates of Ki-JK cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas it promoted EL-4 cell proliferation. Furthermore, CCL11 induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in both Ki-JK cells and EL-4 cells. Cell survival and tumor proliferation promoted by CCL11 was completely blocked by inhibition of ERK phosphorylation. CCL11 induced expression of antiapoptotic proteins, Bcl-xL and survivin, in Ki-JK cells. CCL11 also enhanced tumor growth of EL-4 and Ki-JK cells in vivo. Consistent with these results, tumor cells of cutaneous ALCL expressed CCR3 and increased levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2, Bcl-xL, and survivin in situ. Thus, our findings prompt a novel therapeutic approach to treat relapses of an aggressive form of lymphoma based on the discovery that a cell surface marker of disease functions as a critical autocrine growth receptor.

  7. For staining of ALK protein, the novel D5F3 antibody demonstrates superior overall performance in terms of intensity and extent of staining in comparison to the currently used ALK1 antibody.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Diana; Zahavi, David J; Del Carmen Rodriguez, Maria; Meliti, Abdelrazak; Rezaee, Neda; Yonescu, Raluca; Ricardo, Bernardo F P; Dolatkhah, Shahaboddin; Ning, Yi; Bishop, Justin A; Netto, George J; Sharma, Rajni

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare neoplasm. Approximately 50 % of IMTs show an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fusion resulting in ALK overexpression on immunohistochemistry (IHC). A novel anti-ALK monoclonal antibody (D5F3) has been suggested to be of superior sensitivity to the ALK1 antibody which is currently used. We compared the performance of D5F3 in detecting ALK protein expression in IMTs from various anatomic sites compared to the currently utilized ALK1. We selected 25 IMTs from our surgical pathology files (2005-2015). The novel rabbit monoclonal anti-human CD246 (clone D5F3) and the currently used mouse monoclonal anti-human CD246 (clone ALK1) were used for immunohistochemical staining (IHC) in an automated slide stainer. The percentage of immunoreactive tumor cells (0, <5 %, 5-50 %, >50 %) and cytoplasmic staining intensity (graded 0-3) were assessed and compared between the two antibodies. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies for ALK gene rearrangement were performed on 11 tumors. D5F3 antibody stained 76 % and ALK1 antibody stained 72 % of IMTs (p = 0.747). Compared to staining with ALK1, D5F3 stained a higher proportion of cases extensively (>50 % cells) (76 vs. 28 %, p < 0.001) and with high intensity (grade 3 76 % vs 0; p < 0.001). FISH and IHC findings (for both antibodies) were concordant in 9/10 (90 %) IMTs, in which results were informative. The novel anti-ALK rabbit monoclonal antibody (D5F3 clone) demonstrates superior overall performance in term of intensity and extent of staining of ALK protein in IMT. We found IHC staining with both antibody clones to correlate equally well with FISH results for detection of ALK rearrangement.

  8. Cytomorphological features of ALK-positive lung adenocarcinomas: psammoma bodies and signet ring cells.

    PubMed

    Pareja, Fresia; Crapanzano, John P; Mansukhani, Mahesh M; Bulman, William A; Saqi, Anjali

    2015-03-01

    Correlation between histology and genotype has been described in lung adenocarcinomas. For example, studies have demonstrated that adenocarcinomas with an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement may have mucinous features. The objective of the current study was to determine whether a similar association can be identified in cytological specimens. A retrospective search for ALK-rearranged cytopathology (CP) and surgical pathology (SP) lung carcinomas was conducted. Additional ALK-negative (-) lung adenocarcinomas served as controls. For CP and SP cases, the clinical data (i.e., age, sex, and smoking history), architecture, nuclear features, presence of mucin-containing cells (including signet ring cells), and any additional salient characteristics were evaluated. The search yielded 20 ALK-positive (+) adenocarcinomas. Compared with patients with ALK(-) lung adenocarcinomas (33 patients; 12 with epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR]-mutation, 11 with Kristen rat sarcoma [KRAS]-mutation, and 10 wild-type adenocarcinomas), patients with ALK(+) adenocarcinoma presented at a younger age; and there was no correlation noted with sex or smoking status. The most common histological pattern in SP was papillary/micropapillary. Mucinous features were associated with ALK rearrangement in SP specimens. Signet ring cells and psammoma bodies were evident in and significantly associated with ALK(+) SP and CP specimens. However, psammoma bodies were observed in rare adenocarcinomas with an EGFR mutation. Both the ALK(+) and ALK(-) groups had mostly high nuclear grade. Salient features, including signet ring cells and psammoma bodies, were found to be significantly associated with ALK(+) lung adenocarcinomas and are identifiable on CP specimens. Recognizing these may be especially helpful in the molecular triage of scant CP samples. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  9. Tackling ALK in non-small cell lung cancer: the role of novel inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Facchinetti, Francesco; Di Maio, Massimo; Graziano, Paolo; Bria, Emilio; Rossi, Giulio; Novello, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Crizotinib is an oral inhibitor of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) with remarkable clinical activity in patients suffering from ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), accounting to its superiority compared to chemotherapy. Unfortunately, virtually all ALK-rearranged tumors acquire resistance to crizotinib, frequently within one year since the treatment initiation. To date, therapeutic strategies to overcome crizotinib resistance have focused on the use of more potent and structurally different compounds. Second-generation ALK inhibitors such as ceritinib (LDK378), alectinib (CH5424802/RO5424802) and brigatinib (AP26113) have shown relevant clinical activity, consequently fostering their rapid clinical development and their approval by health agencies. The third-generation inhibitor lorlatinib (PF-06463922), selectively active against ALK and ROS1, harbors impressive biological potency; its efficacy in reversing resistance to crizotinib and to other ALK inhibitors is being proven by early clinical trials. The NTRK1-3 and ROS1 inhibitor entrectinib (RXDX-101) has been reported to act against NSCLC harboring ALK fusion proteins too. Despite the quick development of these novel agents, several issues remain to be discussed in the treatment of patients suffering from ALK-rearranged NSCLC. This position paper will discuss the development, the current evidence and approvals, as long as the future perspectives of new ALK inhibitors beyond crizotinib. Clinical behaviors of ALK-rearranged NSCLC vary significantly among patients and differential molecular events responsible of crizotinib resistance account for the most important quote of this heterogeneity. The precious availability of a wide range of active anti-ALK compounds should be approached in a critical and careful perspective, in order to develop treatment strategies tailored on the disease evolution of every single patient. PMID:27413712

  10. Tackling ALK in non-small cell lung cancer: the role of novel inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Facchinetti, Francesco; Tiseo, Marcello; Di Maio, Massimo; Graziano, Paolo; Bria, Emilio; Rossi, Giulio; Novello, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Crizotinib is an oral inhibitor of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) with remarkable clinical activity in patients suffering from ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), accounting to its superiority compared to chemotherapy. Unfortunately, virtually all ALK-rearranged tumors acquire resistance to crizotinib, frequently within one year since the treatment initiation. To date, therapeutic strategies to overcome crizotinib resistance have focused on the use of more potent and structurally different compounds. Second-generation ALK inhibitors such as ceritinib (LDK378), alectinib (CH5424802/RO5424802) and brigatinib (AP26113) have shown relevant clinical activity, consequently fostering their rapid clinical development and their approval by health agencies. The third-generation inhibitor lorlatinib (PF-06463922), selectively active against ALK and ROS1, harbors impressive biological potency; its efficacy in reversing resistance to crizotinib and to other ALK inhibitors is being proven by early clinical trials. The NTRK1-3 and ROS1 inhibitor entrectinib (RXDX-101) has been reported to act against NSCLC harboring ALK fusion proteins too. Despite the quick development of these novel agents, several issues remain to be discussed in the treatment of patients suffering from ALK-rearranged NSCLC. This position paper will discuss the development, the current evidence and approvals, as long as the future perspectives of new ALK inhibitors beyond crizotinib. Clinical behaviors of ALK-rearranged NSCLC vary significantly among patients and differential molecular events responsible of crizotinib resistance account for the most important quote of this heterogeneity. The precious availability of a wide range of active anti-ALK compounds should be approached in a critical and careful perspective, in order to develop treatment strategies tailored on the disease evolution of every single patient.

  11. Comparison of methods in the detection of ALK and ROS1 rearrangements in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Toni-Maree; Russell, Prudence A; Wright, Gavin; Wainer, Zoe; Pang, Jia-Min; Henricksen, Leigh A; Singh, Shalini; Stanislaw, Stacey; Grille, James; Roberts, Esteban; Solomon, Benjamin; Fox, Stephen B

    2015-04-01

    The use of targeted therapies toward specific oncogenic driver mutations has become a critical factor in the treatment of patients with lung cancer. It is therefore essential to utilize tests with high performance characteristics. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is the standard method for detecting anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and ROS1 rearrangements in non-small-cell lung cancer but the utility of other methods such as immunohistochemistry (IHC) and chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) is unclear. Three hundred and sixty-two lung cancer patients were tested with FISH, CISH, and IHC using three ALK antibodies (ALK1, 5A4, D5F3) and one ROS1 antibody in the detection of ALK and ROS1 rearrangements. There was a 97.4% concordance (298 of 306) between FISH and CISH for detection of ALK rearrangements. The ROS1 rearrangement status had a 97% (291 of 300) concordance between CISH and FISH. ALK protein expression was observed in 6 of 341 samples with the ALK1 and 5A4 antibodies and 5 of 341 samples with D5F3. All three antibodies stained each of the ALK FISH-positive samples (100% sensitivity). ROS1 protein expression was observed in 2 of 322 samples. One of three samples with a ROS1 rearrangement by FISH showed ROS1 protein expression (33.3% sensitivity). Our findings show good correlation between FISH versus CISH in the detection of ALK and ROS1 rearrangements. FISH versus IHC showed good correlation in the detection of ALK rearrangements but showed weak correlation in the detection of ROS1 rearrangements. These results suggest CISH and IHC could be complimentary detection methods to FISH in the detection of ALK and ROS1 rearrangements.

  12. Complete Surgical Excision Is Essential for the Management of Patients With Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Mark W; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Butler, Charles E; Hunt, Kelly K; Fanale, Michelle A; Horwitz, Steven; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Liu, Jun; Morgan, Elizabeth A; Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi; Parkash, Vinita; Ning, Jing; Sohani, Aliyah R; Ferry, Judith A; Mehta-Shah, Neha; Dogan, Ahmed; Liu, Hui; Thormann, Nora; Di Napoli, Arianna; DiNapoli, Arianna; Lade, Stephen; Piccolini, Jorge; Reyes, Ruben; Williams, Travis; McCarthy, Colleen M; Hanson, Summer E; Nastoupil, Loretta J; Gaur, Rakesh; Oki, Yasuhiro; Young, Ken H; Miranda, Roberto N

    2016-01-10

    Breast implant-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (BI-ALCL) is a rare type of T-cell lymphoma that arises around breast implants. The optimal management of this disease has not been established. The goal of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of different therapies used in patients with BI-ALCL to determine an optimal treatment approach. In this study, we applied strict criteria to pathologic findings, assessed therapies used, and conducted a clinical follow-up of 87 patients with BI-ALCL, including 50 previously reported in the literature and 37 unreported. A Prentice, Williams, and Peterson model was used to assess the rate of events for each therapeutic intervention. The median and mean follow-up times were 45 and 30 months, respectively (range, 3 to 217 months). The median overall survival (OS) time after diagnosis of BI-ALCL was 13 years, and the OS rate was 93% and 89% at 3 and 5 years, respectively. Patients with lymphoma confined by the fibrous capsule surrounding the implant had better event-free survival (EFS) and OS than did patients with lymphoma that had spread beyond the capsule (P = .03). Patients who underwent a complete surgical excision that consisted of total capsulectomy with breast implant removal had better OS (P = .022) and EFS (P = .014) than did patients who received partial capsulectomy, systemic chemotherapy, or radiation therapy. Surgical management with complete surgical excision is essential to achieve optimal EFS in patients with BI-ALCL. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. Complete Surgical Excision Is Essential for the Management of Patients With Breast Implant–Associated Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Mark W.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Butler, Charles E.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Fanale, Michelle A.; Horwitz, Steven; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Liu, Jun; Morgan, Elizabeth A.; Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi; Parkash, Vinita; Ning, Jing; Sohani, Aliyah R.; Ferry, Judith A.; Mehta-Shah, Neha; Dogan, Ahmed; Liu, Hui; Thormann, Nora; Di Napoli, Arianna; Lade, Stephen; Piccolini, Jorge; Reyes, Ruben; Williams, Travis; McCarthy, Colleen M.; Hanson, Summer E.; Nastoupil, Loretta J.; Gaur, Rakesh; Oki, Yasuhiro; Young, Ken H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Breast implant–associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (BI-ALCL) is a rare type of T-cell lymphoma that arises around breast implants. The optimal management of this disease has not been established. The goal of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of different therapies used in patients with BI-ALCL to determine an optimal treatment approach. Patients and Methods In this study, we applied strict criteria to pathologic findings, assessed therapies used, and conducted a clinical follow-up of 87 patients with BI-ALCL, including 50 previously reported in the literature and 37 unreported. A Prentice, Williams, and Peterson model was used to assess the rate of events for each therapeutic intervention. Results The median and mean follow-up times were 45 and 30 months, respectively (range, 3 to 217 months). The median overall survival (OS) time after diagnosis of BI-ALCL was 13 years, and the OS rate was 93% and 89% at 3 and 5 years, respectively. Patients with lymphoma confined by the fibrous capsule surrounding the implant had better event-free survival (EFS) and OS than did patients with lymphoma that had spread beyond the capsule (P = .03). Patients who underwent a complete surgical excision that consisted of total capsulectomy with breast implant removal had better OS (P = .022) and EFS (P = .014) than did patients who received partial capsulectomy, systemic chemotherapy, or radiation therapy. Conclusion Surgical management with complete surgical excision is essential to achieve optimal EFS in patients with BI-ALCL. PMID:26628470

  14. A Unique "Composite" PTLD with Diffuse Large B-Cell and T/Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Components Occurring 17 Years after Transplant.

    PubMed

    La Fortune, Kristin; Zhang, Dahua; Raca, Gordana; Ranheim, Erik A

    2013-01-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) comprises a spectrum ranging from polyclonal hyperplasia to aggressive monoclonal lymphomas. The majority of PTLDs are of B-cell origin while T-cell PTLDs and Hodgkin lymphoma-like PTLDs are uncommon. Here, we report a unique case of a 56-year-old man in whom a lymphoma with two distinct components developed as a duodenal mass seventeen years following a combined kidney-pancreas transplant. This PTLD, which has features not previously reported in the literature, consisted of one component of CD20 positive and EBV negative monomorphic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The other component showed anaplastic morphology, expressed some but not all T-cell markers, failed to express most B-cell markers except for PAX5, and was diffusely EBV positive. Possible etiologies for this peculiar constellation of findings are discussed and the literature reviewed for "composite-like" lymphomas late in the posttransplant setting.

  15. EXTRINSIC APOPTOTIC PATHWAYS: A NEW POTENTIAL “TARGET” FOR MORE SUFFICIENT THERAPY IN A CASE OF CUTANEOUS ANAPLASTIC LARGE CD30+ ALK–T-CELL LYMPHOMA

    PubMed Central

    Georgi, Tchernev; Carlos, Cardoso José; Lubomir, Arseniev; Hiroyuki, Okamoto

    2011-01-01

    The primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) represent a clonal T-lymphocyte proliferation infiltrating the skin. CD30+T-cell lymphomas present clinically as nodules with a diameter between 1 and 15 cm, mostly in elderly patients. The role of the CD30 molecule in patients suffering from T-cell lymphomas is not completely clear yet. The signal transduction pathway which includes CD30 seems to play a key role in tumor progression. In certain forms of T-cellular lymphomas, the interaction between CD30/CD30-ligand is able to provoke apoptosis of the “tumor lymphocytes”. The modern conceptions of the pathogenesis of T-cell lymphomas include disorders in the pathways involved in programmed cellular death and disregulation in the expression of certain of its regulatory molecules. We are presenting an unusual case of a female patient with a primary cutaneous form of CD30+/ALK− anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma. Upon the introduction of systemic PUVA, (psoralen plus ultraviolet light radiation) combined with beam therapy, a complete remission could be noticed. Eight months later, we observed a local recurrence, which was overcome by CHOP chemotherapy (Cyclophosphamide, Hydroxydaunorubicin (Doxorubicin), Vincristin (Oncovin®), Predniso(lo)n). Six months later, new cutaneous lesions had been noticed again. A new therapeutic hope for the patients with anaplastic large CTCL is actually based on the influence of the activity of the different apoptotic pathways. Death ligands, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, CD95L/FasL, and TRAIL, mediate also some important safeguard mechanisms against tumor growth in patients with CD30+ cutaneous anaplastic large T-cell lymphomas and critically contribute to lymphocyte homeostasis. PMID:21572802

  16. [Successful long-term control of recurrent primary central nervous system anaplastic large cell lymphoma after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with concurrent whole brain and spinal cord radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, Yuki; Kaiume, Hiroko; Kirihara, Takehiko; Takeda, Wataru; Kurihara, Taro; Sato, Keijiro; Shimizu, Ikuo; Ueki, Toshimitsu; Sumi, Masahiko; Ueno, Mayumi; Ichikawa, Naoaki; Asano, Naoko; Watanabe, Masahide; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2015-12-01

    A 24-year-old woman was hospitalized with seizures in 2002. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an intraspinal mass and inhomogeneous gadolinium enhancement along the cerebrospinal meninges. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology showed large atypical cells expressing CD2, cytoplasmic CD3, CD7, CD13 and CD30. The patient was finally diagnosed with primary central nervous system anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). She completed 5 courses of methotrexate (MTX)/ procarbazine (PCZ)/ vincristine (VCR) (MPV) chemotherapy, followed by 2 courses of high dose cytarabine (AraC) and achieved a complete remission. In 2003, she suffered from headache. CSF analysis showed atypical lymphoid cells expressing CD 30. First CNS relapse was diagnosed. She then underwent autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (auto-PBSCT) after administration of thiotepa, buslfan, and cyclophosphamide. However, second CNS relapse occurred in 2004. She received 5 courses of MPV chemotherapy followed by 36 Gy of craniospinal irradiation. Although there was no recurrence of the CNS disease, a third relapse was detected in the right breast in 2009. Pathological and immunohistochemistry analysis revealed ALK-1 positive ALCL. She was treated with 6 courses of cyclophosphamide/adriamycin/vincristine/predonine (CHOP) chemotherapy and 30.6 Gy of local radiation therapy. She has remained in remission for 6 years, to date, since the last therapy and has an excellent quality of life.

  17. French multicentric validation of ALK rearrangement diagnostic in 547 lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Rouquette, Isabelle; Blons, Hélène; Le Stang, Nolwenn; Ilie, Marius; Begueret, Hugues; Grégoire, Valerie; Hofman, Paul; Gros, Audrey; Garcia, Stephane; Monhoven, Nathalie; Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan; Mansuet-Lupo, Audrey; Thivolet, Françoise; Antoine, Martine; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Penault-Llorca, Frederique; Galateau-Sallé, Françoise; McLeer-Florin, Anne

    2015-07-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements in lung adenocarcinoma result in kinase activity targetable by crizotinib. Although fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) is the reference diagnostic technique, immunohistochemistry (IHC) could be useful for pre-screening. Diagnostic yields of ALK IHC, FISH and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR performed in 14 French pathology/molecular genetics platforms were compared. 547 lung adenocarcinoma specimens were analysed using 5A4 and D5F3 antibodies, two break-apart FISH probes and TaqMan kits. Clinicopathological data were recorded. 140 tumours were ALK rearranged (FISH with ≥15% of rearranged cells) and 400 were ALK FISH negative (<15%). FISH was not interpretable for seven cases. ALK patients were young (p=0.003), mostly females (p=0.007) and light/nonsmokers (p<0.0001). 13 cases were IHC negative but FISH ≥15%, including six cases with FISH between 15% and 20%; eight were IHC positive with FISH between 10% and 14%. Sensitivity and specificity for 5A4 and D5F3 were 87% and 92%, and 89% and 76%, respectively. False-negative IHC, observed in 2.4% of cases, dropped to 1.3% for FISH >20%. Variants were undetected in 36% of ALK tumours. Discordances predominated with FISH ranging from 10% to 20% of rearranged cells and were centre dependent. IHC remains a reliable pre-screening method for ALK rearrangement detection. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  18. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors in phase I and phase II clinical trials for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Karachaliou, Niki; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Gonzalez Cao, Maria; Teixido, Cristina; Sosa, Aaron E; Berenguer, Jordi; Rodriguez Capote, Alejandra; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Rosell, Rafael

    2017-06-01

    Crizotinib is a first-in-class ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), which has proven its superiority over standard platinum-based chemotherapy for the first-line therapy of ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. The development of acquired resistance to crizotinib represents an ongoing challenge with the central nervous system being one of the most common sites of relapse. Ceritinib and alectinib are approved second-generation ALK TKIs. Several novel ALK inhibitors, more potent and with different selectivity compared to crizotinib, are currently in development. Areas covered: This review will focus on new ALK inhibitors, currently in phase 1 or 2 clinical studies. We will also comment on the mechanisms of resistance to ALK inhibition and the strategies to delay or overcome resistance. Expert opinion: The therapeutic management of ALK-rearranged NSCLC has been greatly improved. Next-generation ALK inhibitors have shown differential potency against ALK rearrangements and ALK resistance mutations. The molecular profile of the tumor at the time of disease progression to crizotinib is crucial for the sequencing of novel ALK TKIs. Ongoing clinical studies will address key issues, including the optimal therapeutic algorithm and whether combinational approaches are more effective than single ALK inhibition for the outcome of ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients.

  19. Oncogenic ALK regulates EMT in non-small cell lung carcinoma through repression of the epithelial splicing regulatory protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Menotti, Matteo; Poggio, Teresa; Panizza, Elena; Wang, Qi; Minero, Valerio G.; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Compagno, Mara; Altruda, Fiorella; Monti, Stefano; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    A subset of Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC) carries chromosomal rearrangements involving the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) gene. ALK-rearranged NSCLC are typically adenocarcinoma characterized by a solid signet-ring cell pattern that is frequently associated with a metastatic phenotype. Recent reports linked the presence of ALK rearrangement to an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype in NSCLC, but the extent and the mechanisms of an ALK-mediated EMT in ALK-rearranged NSCLC are largely unknown. We found that the ALK-rearranged H2228 and DFCI032, but not the H3122, cell lines displayed a mesenchymal phenotype. In these cell lines, oncogenic ALK activity dictated an EMT phenotype by directly suppressing E-cadherin and up-regulating vimentin expression, as well as expression of other genes involved in EMT. We found that the epithelial splicing regulatory protein 1 (ESRP1), a key regulator of the splicing switch during EMT, was repressed by EML4-ALK activity. The treatment of NSCLC cells with ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) led to up-regulation of ESRP1 and E-cadherin, thus reverting the phenotype from mesenchymal to epithelial (MET). Consistently, ESRP1 knock-down impaired E-cadherin up-regulation upon ALK inhibition, whereas enforced expression of ESRP1 was sufficient to increase E-cadherin expression. These findings demonstrate an ALK oncogenic activity in the regulation of an EMT phenotype in a subset of NSCLC with potential implications for the biology of ALK-rearranged NSCLC in terms of metastatic propensity and resistance to therapy. PMID:27119231

  20. Oncogenic ALK regulates EMT in non-small cell lung carcinoma through repression of the epithelial splicing regulatory protein 1.

    PubMed

    Voena, Claudia; Varesio, Lydia M; Zhang, Liye; Menotti, Matteo; Poggio, Teresa; Panizza, Elena; Wang, Qi; Minero, Valerio G; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Compagno, Mara; Altruda, Fiorella; Monti, Stefano; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-05-31

    A subset of Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC) carries chromosomal rearrangements involving the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) gene. ALK-rearranged NSCLC are typically adenocarcinoma characterized by a solid signet-ring cell pattern that is frequently associated with a metastatic phenotype. Recent reports linked the presence of ALK rearrangement to an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype in NSCLC, but the extent and the mechanisms of an ALK-mediated EMT in ALK-rearranged NSCLC are largely unknown. We found that the ALK-rearranged H2228 and DFCI032, but not the H3122, cell lines displayed a mesenchymal phenotype. In these cell lines, oncogenic ALK activity dictated an EMT phenotype by directly suppressing E-cadherin and up-regulating vimentin expression, as well as expression of other genes involved in EMT. We found that the epithelial splicing regulatory protein 1 (ESRP1), a key regulator of the splicing switch during EMT, was repressed by EML4-ALK activity. The treatment of NSCLC cells with ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) led to up-regulation of ESRP1 and E-cadherin, thus reverting the phenotype from mesenchymal to epithelial (MET). Consistently, ESRP1 knock-down impaired E-cadherin up-regulation upon ALK inhibition, whereas enforced expression of ESRP1 was sufficient to increase E-cadherin expression. These findings demonstrate an ALK oncogenic activity in the regulation of an EMT phenotype in a subset of NSCLC with potential implications for the biology of ALK-rearranged NSCLC in terms of metastatic propensity and resistance to therapy.

  1. Identification of different ALK mutations in a pair of neuroblastoma cell lines established at diagnosis and relapse

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lindi; Humphreys, Angharad; Turnbull, Lisa; Bellini, Angela; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Salwen, Helen; Cohn, Susan L.; Bown, Nick; Tweddle, Deborah A.

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) is a transmembrane receptor kinase that belongs to the insulin receptor superfamily and has previously been shown to play a role in cell proliferation, migration and invasion in neuroblastoma. Activating ALK mutations are reported in both hereditary and sporadic neuroblastoma tumours, and several ALK inhibitors are currently under clinical evaluation as novel treatments for neuroblastoma. Overall, mutations at codons F1174, R1275 and F1245 together account for ∼85% of reported ALK mutations in neuroblastoma. NBLW and NBLW-R are paired cell lines originally derived from an infant with metastatic MYCN amplified Stage IVS (Evans Criteria) neuroblastoma, at diagnosis and relapse, respectively. Using both Sanger and targeted deep sequencing, this study describes the identification of distinct ALK mutations in these paired cell lines, including the rare R1275L mutation, which has not previously been reported in a neuroblastoma cell line. Analysis of the sensitivity of NBLW and NBLW-R cells to a panel of ALK inhibitors (TAE-684, Crizotinib, Alectinib and Lorlatinib) revealed differences between the paired cell lines, and overall NBLW-R cells with the F1174L mutation were more resistant to ALK inhibitor induced apoptosis compared with NBLW cells. This pair of cell lines represents a valuable pre-clinical model of clonal evolution of ALK mutations associated with neuroblastoma progression. PMID:27888620

  2. Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder Manifesting as Intestinal Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma in an Adult Renal Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Börcek, Pelin; Özdemir, B Handan; Özgün, Gonca; Haberal, Mehmet

    2016-11-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder is a relatively common posttransplant malignancy affecting as many as 10% of all solid-organ recipients. Most cases of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder are of B-cell origin, with common Epstein-Barr virus association. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders of T-cell origin are much rarer and less frequently associated with Epstein-Barr virus. Here, we report an unusual case of Epstein-Barr virus-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma causing an intestinal perforation in an adult renal transplant recipient. A 52-year-old male patient with renal allograft developed cryptogenic end-stage liver failure and was accepted as a candidate for liver transplant. Before transplant, he was admitted with severe abdominal pain, which turned out to result from ileal perforation. Pathologic evaluation of the intestinal resection showed diffuse malignant lymphoid infiltration of the ileum, consistent with anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. The tumor was positive for Epstein-Barr virus genome. Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma is a rare form of T-cell posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder that is infrequently associated with Epstein-Barr virus. The occurrence of this extraordinary form of post transplant lymphoproliferative disorder, its late onset, intestinal localization, and Epstein-Barr virus as sociation represent a unique clinical rarity.

  3. Precision medicine in NSCLC and pathology: how does ALK fit in the pathway?

    PubMed

    Kerr, K M; López-Ríos, F

    2016-09-01

    The evolution of personalised medicine in lung cancer has dramatically impacted diagnostic pathology. Current challenges centre on the growing demands placed on small tissue samples by molecular diagnostic techniques. In this review, expert recommendations are provided regarding successful identification of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Steps to correctly process and conserve tumour tissue during diagnostic testing are essential to ensure tissue availability. For example, storing extra tissue sections ready for molecular diagnostic steps allows faster testing and preserves tissue. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) is commonly used to detect ALK rearrangements, with most laboratories favouring screening by immunohistochemistry followed by a confirmatory FISH assay. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction can also identify ALK fusion gene mRNA transcripts but can be limited by the quality of RNA and the risk that rare fusion variants may not be captured. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has recently provided an alternative method for detecting ALK rearrangements. While current experience is limited, NGS is set to become the most efficient approach as an increasing number of genetic abnormalities is required to be tested. Upfront, reflex testing for ALK gene rearrangement should become routine as ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy moves into the first-line setting. Guidelines recommend that EGFR and ALK tests are carried out in parallel on all confirmed and potential adenocarcinomas, and this is more efficient in terms of tissue usage and testing turnaround time for both of these actionable gene alterations. The practice of sequential testing is not recommended. Identification of ALK rearrangements is now essential for the diagnosis of NSCLC, underpinned by the benefits of ALK inhibitors. As scientific understanding and diagnostic technology develops, ALK testing will continue to be an

  4. Molecular Testing for Selection of Patients With Lung Cancer for Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors: American Society of Clinical Oncology Endorsement of the College of American Pathologists/International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/Association for Molecular Pathology Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Leighl, Natasha B.; Rekhtman, Natasha; Biermann, William A.; Huang, James; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; West, Howard; Whitlock, Sara; Somerfield, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The College of American Pathologists (CAP), the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), and the Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP) guideline on molecular testing for the selection of patients with lung cancer for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine kinase inhibitors was considered for endorsement. Methods American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) staff reviewed the CAP/IASLC/AMP guideline for developmental rigor; an ASCO ad hoc review panel of experts reviewed the guideline content. Results The ASCO panel concurred that the recommendations are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence in this content area and present options that will be acceptable to patients. The CAP/IASLC/AMP guideline comprises 37 recommendations (evidence grade A or B), expert consensus opinions, or suggestions that address the following five principal questions: (1) When should molecular testing be performed? (2) How should EGFR testing be performed? (3) How should ALK testing be performed? (4) Should other genes be routinely tested in lung adenocarcinoma? (5) How should molecular testing be implemented and operationalized? Conclusion The ASCO review panel endorses the CAP/IASLC/AMP guideline. This guideline represents an important advance toward standardization of EGFR and ALK testing practices and is of major clinical relevance in advancing the care of patients with lung cancer. In the Discussion section, the ASCO review panel highlights three evolving areas: advances in ALK testing methodology, considerations for selecting appropriate populations for molecular testing, and emergence of other targetable molecular alterations. PMID:25311215

  5. Crizotinib for the Treatment of ALK-Rearranged Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Success Story to Usher in the Second Decade of Molecular Targeted Therapy in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Cynthia Huang; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Cui, Jean; Iafrate, A. John

    2012-01-01

    Crizotinib, an ALK/MET/ROS1 inhibitor, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in August 2011, merely 4 years after the first publication of ALK-rearranged NSCLC. The crizotinib approval was accompanied by the simultaneous approval of an ALK companion diagnostic fluorescent in situ hybridization assay for the detection of ALK-rearranged NSCLC. Crizotinib continued to be developed as an ALK and MET inhibitor in other tumor types driven by alteration in ALK and MET. Crizotinib has recently been shown to be an effective ROS1 inhibitor in ROS1-rearranged NSCLC, with potential future clinical applications in ROS1-rearranged tumors. Here we summarize the heterogeneity within the ALK- and ROS1-rearranged molecular subtypes of NSCLC. We review the past and future clinical development of crizotinib for ALK-rearranged NSCLC and the diagnostic assays to detect ALK-rearranged NSCLC. We highlight how the success of crizotinib has changed the paradigm of future drug development for targeted therapies by targeting a molecular-defined subtype of NSCLC despite its rarity and affected the practice of personalized medicine in oncology, emphasizing close collaboration between clinical oncologists, pathologists, and translational scientists. PMID:22989574

  6. Inactivation of the putative ubiquitin-E3 ligase PDLIM2 in classical Hodgkin and anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Wurster, K D; Hummel, F; Richter, J; Giefing, M; Hartmann, S; Hansmann, M-L; Kreher, S; Köchert, K; Krappmann, D; Klapper, W; Hummel, M; Wenzel, S-S; Lenz, G; Janz, M; Dörken, B; Siebert, R; Mathas, S

    2017-01-01

    Apart from its unique histopathological appearance with rare tumor cells embedded in an inflammatory background of bystander cells, classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) is characterized by an unusual activation of a broad range of signaling pathways involved in cellular activation. This includes constitutive high-level activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT), activator protein-1 (AP-1) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) transcription factors (TFs) that are physiologically only transiently activated. Here, we demonstrate that inactivation of the putative ubiquitin E3-ligase PDLIM2 contributes to this TF activation. PDLIM2 expression is lost at the mRNA and protein levels in the majority of cHL cell lines and Hodgkin and Reed–Sternberg (HRS) cells of nearly all cHL primary samples. This loss is associated with PDLIM2 genomic alterations, promoter methylation and altered splicing. Reconstitution of PDLIM2 in HRS cell lines inhibits proliferation, blocks NF-κB transcriptional activity and contributes to cHL-specific gene expression. In non-Hodgkin B-cell lines, small interfering RNA-mediated PDLIM2 knockdown results in superactivation of TFs NF-κB and AP-1 following phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulation. Furthermore, expression of PDLIM2 is lost in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) that shares key biological aspects with cHL. We conclude that inactivation of PDLIM2 is a recurrent finding in cHL and ALCL, promotes activation of inflammatory signaling pathways and thereby contributes to their pathogenesis. PMID:27538486

  7. Therapeutic strategies to overcome crizotinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancers harboring the fusion oncogene EML4-ALK

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Ryohei; Khan, Tahsin M.; Benes, Cyril; Lifshits, Eugene; Ebi, Hiromichi; Rivera, Victor M.; Shakespeare, William C.; Iafrate, A. John; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Shaw, Alice T.

    2011-01-01

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion oncogene represents a molecular target in a small subset of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). This fusion leads to constitutive ALK activation with potent transforming activity. In a pivotal phase 1 clinical trial, the ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) crizotinib (PF-02341066) demonstrated impressive antitumor activity in the majority of patients with NSCLC harboring ALK fusions. However, despite these remarkable initial responses, cancers eventually develop resistance to crizotinib, usually within 1 y, thereby limiting the potential clinical benefit. To determine how cancers acquire resistance to ALK inhibitors, we established a model of acquired resistance to crizotinib by exposing a highly sensitive EML4-ALK–positive NSCLC cell line to increasing doses of crizotinib until resistance emerged. We found that cells resistant to intermediate doses of crizotinib developed amplification of the EML4-ALK gene. Cells resistant to higher doses (1 μM) also developed a gatekeeper mutation, L1196M, within the kinase domain, rendering EML4-ALK insensitive to crizotinib. This gatekeeper mutation was readily detected using a unique and highly sensitive allele-specific PCR assay. Although crizotinib was ineffectual against EML4-ALK harboring the gatekeeper mutation, we observed that two structurally different ALK inhibitors, NVP-TAE684 and AP26113, were highly active against the resistant cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, these resistant cells remained highly sensitive to the Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG. Thus, we have developed a model of acquired resistance to ALK inhibitors and have shown that second-generation ALK TKIs or Hsp90 inhibitors are effective in treating crizotinib-resistant tumors harboring secondary gatekeeper mutations. PMID:21502504

  8. Evaluation of EML4-ALK Fusion Proteins in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Small Molecule Inhibitors12

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongjun; Ye, Xiaofen; Liu, Jinfeng; Zha, Jiping; Pei, Lin

    2011-01-01

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) fusion gene resulting from an inversion within chromosome 2p occurs in approximately 5% of non-small cell lung cancer and is mutually exclusive with Ras and EGFR mutations. In this study, we have used a potent and selective ALK small molecule inhibitor, NPV-TAE684, to assess the oncogenic role of EML4-ALK in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We show here that TAE684 inhibits proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and tumor regression in two NSCLC models that harbor EML4-ALK fusions. TAE684 inhibits EML4-ALK activation and its downstream signaling including ERK, AKT, and STAT3. We used microarray analysis to carry out targeted pathway studies of gene expression changes in H2228 NSCLC xenograft model after TAE684 treatment and identified a gene signature of EML4-ALK inhibition. The gene signature represents 1210 known human genes, and the top biologic processes represented by these genes are cell cycle, DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and cell death. We also compared the effect of TAE684 with PF2341066, a c-Met and ALK small molecule inhibitor currently in clinical trial in cancers harboring ALK fusions, and demonstrated that TAE684 is a much more potent inhibitor of EML4-ALK. Our data demonstrate that EML4-ALK plays an important role in the pathogenesis of a subset of NSCLC and provides insight into the mechanism of EML4-ALK inhibition by a small molecule inhibitor. PMID:21245935

  9. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for relapsed or refractory anaplastic large cell lymphoma: a study of children and adolescents in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fukano, Reiji; Mori, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Mitsui, Tetsuo; Fujita, Naoto; Iwasaki, Fuminori; Suzumiya, Junji; Chin, Motoaki; Goto, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Hara, Junichi; Park, Yong-Dong; Inoue, Masami; Koga, Yuhki; Inagaki, Jiro; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Adachi, Souichi; Kawa, Keisei; Kato, Koji; Suzuki, Ritsuro

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in children and adolescents, we reviewed the records of 47 patients who were ≤18 years, had relapsed or refractory anaplastic large cell lymphoma, and received HSCT between 1990 and 2010. At HSCT, complete remission (CR) was less common in allogeneic HSCT recipients (n = 24) than in autologous HSCT recipients (n = 23) (P = 0·01). The autologous and allogeneic HSCT groups differed in terms of 5-year event-free survival (EFS) (38% vs. 50%, P = 0·63), cumulative incidence of progress or relapse (49% vs. 28%, P = 0·25), and treatment-related mortality (12% vs. 25%, P = 0·40). However, these differences were not significant. Patients with non-CR at autologous HSCT had a significantly lower EFS rate (14% vs. 48%, P = 0·03). Conversely, although those with non-CR at allogeneic HSCT had a lower EFS rate, this was not significant (44% vs. 63%, P = 0·26). Reduced-intensity conditioning regimens were used for three of the 16 allogeneic HSCTs received by patients with non-CR. These three patients achieved CR, surviving 32-65 months after HSCT. These results demonstrated that allogeneic HSCT might be a treatment option for patients who do not achieve CR through conventional chemotherapy.

  10. Clinical outcomes of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients with EGFR mutation, ALK rearrangement and EGFR/ALK co-alterations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Jun; Zhou, Qing; Yan, Li-Xu; Xie, Zhi; Su, Jian; Chen, Zhi-Hong; Tu, Hai-Yan; Yan, Hong-Hong; Wang, Zhen; Xu, Chong-Rui; Jiang, Ben-Yuan; Wang, Bin-Chao; Bai, Xiao-Yan; Zhong, Wen-Zhao; Wu, Yi-Long; Yang, Jin-Ji

    2016-01-01

    The co-occurrence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements constitutes a rare molecular subtype of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Herein, we assessed the clinical outcomes and incidence of acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in this subtype. So we enrolled 118 advanced NSCLC treated with TKIs. EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangements were detected by DNA sequencing or Scorpion amplification refractory mutation system and fluorescence in situ hybridization respectively. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the activation of associated proteins. We found that nine in ten patients with EGFR/ALK co-alterations had good response with first-line EGFR TKI, and the objective response rate (ORR) of EGFR TKIs was 80% (8/10) for EGFR/ALK co-altered and 65.5% (55/84) for EGFR-mutant (P = 0.57), with a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 11.2 and 13.2 months, (hazard ratio [HR]=0.95, 95% [CI], 0.49-1.84, P= 0.87). ORR of crizotinib was 40% (2/5) for EGFR/ALK co-altered and 73.9% (17/23) for ALK-rearranged (P= 0.29), with a median PFS of 1.9 and 6.9 months (hazard ratio [HR], 0.40; 95% [CI] 0.15-1.10, P = 0.08). The median overall survival (OS) was 21.3, 23.7, and 18.5 months in EGFR-mutant, ALK-rearranged, and EGFR/ALK co-altered (P= 0.06), and there existed a statistically significant difference in OS between ALK-rearranged and EGFR/ALK co-altered (P=0.03). Taken together, the first-line EGFR-TKI might be the reasonable care for advanced NSCLC harbouring EGFR/ALK co-alterations, whether or nor to use sequential crizotinib should be guided by the status of ALK rearrangement and the relative level of phospho-EGFR and phospho-ALK. PMID:27533086

  11. Clinicopathological Study of 18 Cases of Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumors with Reference to ALK-1 Expression: 5-Year Experience in a Tertiary Care Center.

    PubMed

    Telugu, Ramesh Babu; Prabhu, Anne Jennifer; Kalappurayil, Nobin Babu; Mathai, John; Gnanamuthu, Birla Roy; Manipadam, Marie Therese

    2017-05-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is a histopathologically distinctive neoplasm of children and young adults. According to World Health Organization (WHO) classification, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is an intermediate-grade tumor, with potential for recurrence and rare metastasis. There are no definite histopathologic, molecular, or cytogenetic features to predict malignant transformation, recurrence, or metastasis. A 5-year retrospective study of histopathologically diagnosed inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors of various anatomic sites was conducted to correlate anaplastic lymphoma kinase-1 (ALK-1) expression with histological atypia, multicentric origin of tumor, recurrence, and metastasis. Clinical details of all the cases were noted from the clinical work station. Immunohistochemical stains for ALK-1 and other antibodies were performed. Statistical analysis was done using Fisher exact test. A total of 18 cases of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors were found during the study period, of which 14 were classical. The female-male ratio was 1:1 and the mean age was 23.8 years. Histologically atypical (four cases) and multifocal tumors (three cases, multicentric in origin) were noted. Recurrence was noted in 30% of ALK-1 positive and 37.5% of ALK-1 negative cases, whereas metastasis to the lung, liver, and pelvic bone was noted in the ALK-1 positive group only. Overall, ALK-1 protein was expressed in 55.6% of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors. There was no statistically significant correlation between ALK-1 expression, tumor type, recurrence and metastasis. However, ALK-1 immunohistochemistry is a useful diagnostic aid in the appropriate clinical and histomorphologic context.

  12. Personalized treatment options for ALK-positive metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: potential role for Ceritinib.

    PubMed

    El-Osta, Hazem; Shackelford, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    The fusion of echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 with the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) is found in 3%-7% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases and confers sensitivity to crizotinib, the first United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved ALK inhibitor drug. Although crizotinib has an excellent initial therapeutic effect, acquired resistance to this drug invariably develops within the first year of treatment. Resistance may involve secondary gatekeeper mutations within the ALK gene interfering with crizotinib-ALK interactions, or compensatory activation of aberrant bypass signaling pathways. New therapeutic strategies to overcome crizotinib resistance are needed. Ceritinib, a second-generation ALK inhibitor, overcomes several crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations and has demonstrated efficacy against tumor growth in several in vitro and in vivo preclinical models of crizotinib resistance. Notably, the dose-escalation Phase I ASCEND-1 trial has shown a marked activity of ceritinib in both crizotinib-naïve and crizotinib-resistant ALK-rearranged lung cancer. The overall response rate was 58% in a subgroup of patients with ALK-rearranged late-stage NSCLC. Drug discontinuation rate due to toxicity was 10%. The standard dose was established at 750 mg daily. This paper outlines the pathogenesis and treatment of ALK-positive lung cancer, focuses on the preclinical and clinical results surrounding the accelerated FDA approval of ceritinib for the treatment of ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC patients who have progressed on/or are crizotinib intolerant, and discusses the potential efforts seeking to maximize ceritinib efficacy and expand its usage to other indications in cancer therapy.

  13. Personalized treatment options for ALK-positive metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: potential role for Ceritinib

    PubMed Central

    El-Osta, Hazem; Shackelford, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    The fusion of echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 with the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) is found in 3%–7% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases and confers sensitivity to crizotinib, the first United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved ALK inhibitor drug. Although crizotinib has an excellent initial therapeutic effect, acquired resistance to this drug invariably develops within the first year of treatment. Resistance may involve secondary gatekeeper mutations within the ALK gene interfering with crizotinib–ALK interactions, or compensatory activation of aberrant bypass signaling pathways. New therapeutic strategies to overcome crizotinib resistance are needed. Ceritinib, a second-generation ALK inhibitor, overcomes several crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations and has demonstrated efficacy against tumor growth in several in vitro and in vivo preclinical models of crizotinib resistance. Notably, the dose-escalation Phase I ASCEND-1 trial has shown a marked activity of ceritinib in both crizotinib-naïve and crizotinib-resistant ALK-rearranged lung cancer. The overall response rate was 58% in a subgroup of patients with ALK-rearranged late-stage NSCLC. Drug discontinuation rate due to toxicity was 10%. The standard dose was established at 750 mg daily. This paper outlines the pathogenesis and treatment of ALK-positive lung cancer, focuses on the preclinical and clinical results surrounding the accelerated FDA approval of ceritinib for the treatment of ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC patients who have progressed on/or are crizotinib intolerant, and discusses the potential efforts seeking to maximize ceritinib efficacy and expand its usage to other indications in cancer therapy. PMID:26622190

  14. Stereotactic Radiation Therapy can Safely and Durably Control Sites of Extra-Central Nervous System Oligoprogressive Disease in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Positive Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Crizotinib

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Gregory N.; Weickhardt, Andrew J.; Scheier, Benjamin; Doebele, Robert C.; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Camidge, D. Ross

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To analyze the durability and toxicity of radiotherapeutic local ablative therapy (LAT) applied to extra-central nervous system (eCNS) disease progression in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive NSCLC patients receiving crizotinib and manifesting ≤4 discrete sites of eCNS progression were classified as having oligoprogressive disease (OPD). If subsequent progression met OPD criteria, additional courses of LAT were considered. Crizotinib was continued until eCNS progression was beyond OPD criteria or otherwise not suitable for further LAT. Results: Of 38 patients, 33 progressed while taking crizotinib. Of these, 14 had eCNS progression meeting OPD criteria suitable for radiotherapeutic LAT. Patients with eCNS OPD received 1-3 courses of LAT with radiation therapy. The 6- and 12-month actuarial local lesion control rates with radiation therapy were 100% and 86%, respectively. The 12-month local lesion control rate with single-fraction equivalent dose >25 Gy versus ≤25 Gy was 100% versus 60% (P=.01). No acute or late grade >2 radiation therapy-related toxicities were observed. Median overall time taking crizotinib among those treated with LAT versus those who progressed but were not suitable for LAT was 28 versus 10.1 months, respectively. Patients continuing to take crizotinib for >12 months versus ≤12 months had a 2-year overall survival rate of 72% versus 12%, respectively (P<.0001). Conclusions: Local ablative therapy safely and durably eradicated sites of individual lesion progression in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive NSCLC patients receiving crizotinib. A dose–response relationship for local lesion control was observed. The suppression of OPD by LAT in patients taking crizotinib allowed an extended duration of exposure to crizotinib, which was associated with longer overall survival.

  15. Breast Implant–Associated Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma: Long-Term Follow-Up of 60 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Roberto N.; Aladily, Tariq N.; Prince, H. Miles; Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi; de Jong, Daphne; Fayad, Luis E.; Amin, Mitual B.; Haideri, Nisreen; Bhagat, Govind; Brooks, Glen S.; Shifrin, David A.; O'Malley, Dennis P.; Cheah, Chan Y.; Bacchi, Carlos E.; Gualco, Gabriela; Li, Shiyong; Keech, John A.; Hochberg, Ephram P.; Carty, Matthew J.; Hanson, Summer E.; Mustafa, Eid; Sanchez, Steven; Manning, John T.; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y.; Miranda, Alonso R.; Fox, Patricia; Bassett, Roland L.; Castillo, Jorge J.; Beltran, Brady E.; de Boer, Jan Paul; Chakhachiro, Zaher; Ye, Dongjiu; Clark, Douglas; Young, Ken H.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Breast implant–associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a recently described clinicopathologic entity that usually presents as an effusion-associated fibrous capsule surrounding an implant. Less frequently, it presents as a mass. The natural history of this disease and long-term outcomes are unknown. Patients and Methods We reviewed the literature for all published cases of breast implant–associated ALCL from 1997 to December 2012 and contacted corresponding authors to update clinical follow-up. Results The median overall survival (OS) for 60 patients was 12 years (median follow-up, 2 years; range, 0-14 years). Capsulectomy and implant removal was performed on 56 of 60 patients (93%). Therapeutic data were available for 55 patients: 39 patients (78%) received systemic chemotherapy, and of the 16 patients (28%) who did not receive chemotherapy, 12 patients opted for watchful waiting and four patients received radiation therapy alone. Thirty-nine (93%) of 42 patients with disease confined by the fibrous capsule achieved complete remission, compared with complete remission in 13 (72%) of 18 patients with a tumor mass. Patients with a breast mass had worse OS and progression-free survival (PFS; P = .052 and P = .03, respectively). The OS or PFS were similar between patients who received and did not receive chemotherapy (P = .44 and P = .28, respectively). Conclusion Most patients with breast implant–associated ALCL who had disease confined within the fibrous capsule achieved complete remission. Proper management for these patients may be limited to capsulectomy and implant removal. Patients who present with a mass have a more aggressive clinical course that may be fatal, justifying cytotoxic chemotherapy in addition to removal of implants. PMID:24323027

  16. Breast implant-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma: long-term follow-up of 60 patients.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Roberto N; Aladily, Tariq N; Prince, H Miles; Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi; de Jong, Daphne; Fayad, Luis E; Amin, Mitual B; Haideri, Nisreen; Bhagat, Govind; Brooks, Glen S; Shifrin, David A; O'Malley, Dennis P; Cheah, Chan Y; Bacchi, Carlos E; Gualco, Gabriela; Li, Shiyong; Keech, John A; Hochberg, Ephram P; Carty, Matthew J; Hanson, Summer E; Mustafa, Eid; Sanchez, Steven; Manning, John T; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Miranda, Alonso R; Fox, Patricia; Bassett, Roland L; Castillo, Jorge J; Beltran, Brady E; de Boer, Jan Paul; Chakhachiro, Zaher; Ye, Dongjiu; Clark, Douglas; Young, Ken H; Medeiros, L Jeffrey

    2014-01-10

    Breast implant-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a recently described clinicopathologic entity that usually presents as an effusion-associated fibrous capsule surrounding an implant. Less frequently, it presents as a mass. The natural history of this disease and long-term outcomes are unknown. We reviewed the literature for all published cases of breast implant-associated ALCL from 1997 to December 2012 and contacted corresponding authors to update clinical follow-up. The median overall survival (OS) for 60 patients was 12 years (median follow-up, 2 years; range, 0-14 years). Capsulectomy and implant removal was performed on 56 of 60 patients (93%). Therapeutic data were available for 55 patients: 39 patients (78%) received systemic chemotherapy, and of the 16 patients (28%) who did not receive chemotherapy, 12 patients opted for watchful waiting and four patients received radiation therapy alone. Thirty-nine (93%) of 42 patients with disease confined by the fibrous capsule achieved complete remission, compared with complete remission in 13 (72%) of 18 patients with a tumor mass. Patients with a breast mass had worse OS and progression-free survival (PFS; P = .052 and P = .03, respectively). The OS or PFS were similar between patients who received and did not receive chemotherapy (P = .44 and P = .28, respectively). Most patients with breast implant-associated ALCL who had disease confined within the fibrous capsule achieved complete remission. Proper management for these patients may be limited to capsulectomy and implant removal. Patients who present with a mass have a more aggressive clinical course that may be fatal, justifying cytotoxic chemotherapy in addition to removal of implants.

  17. Loss of CD30 Expression in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Following Brentuximab Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nielson, Colton; Fischer, Ryan; Fraga, Garth; Aires, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Monoclonal antibody therapy is a new innovation in cancer therapy. Binding of monoclonal antibodies to tumor cells facilitates their destruction by the immune system. Tumor cells with mutated target antigens may escape detection by monoclonal antibodies and exhibit a selective growth advantage. This phenomenon was first recognized in CD20-negative B-cell lymphomas in patients previously treated with the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab. We report a cutaneous recurrence of systemic ALCL with an anomalous CD30-negative immunophenotype. The patient had been previously treated with the anti-CD30 monoclonal antibody brentuximab. To our knowledge, we present the first reported case of a cutaneous recurrence of systemic ALCL with an anomalous CD30-negative immunophenotype following chronic brentuximab therapy.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(7):894-895.

  18. A molecular dynamics investigation on the crizotinib resistance mechanism of C1156Y mutation in ALK

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hui-Yong; Ji, Feng-Qin

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study revealed the detailed resistance mechanism of the non-active mutation C1156Y in ALK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C1156Y leads to crizotinib displacement and conformational changes in the binding cavity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The conformations cause a decline in the vdW and electrostatic energy between crizotinib and ALK. -- Abstract: Crizotinib is an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor that has recently been approved in the US for the treatment of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Despite its outstanding safety and efficacy, several resistant mutations against crizotinib have been detected in the treatment of NSCLC. However, in contrast to the widely accepted mechanism of steric hindrance by mutations at the active site, the mechanism by which the C1156Y non-active site mutation confers resistance against crizotinib remains unclear. In the present study, the resistance mechanism of C1156Y in ALK was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The results suggest that despite the non-active site mutation, C1156Y causes the dislocation of crizotinib as well as the indirect conformational changes in the binding cavity, which results in a marked decrease in the van der Waals and electrostatic interactions between crizotinib and ALK. The obtained results provide a detailed explanation of the resistance caused by C1156Y and may give a vital clue for the design of drugs to combat crizotinib resistance.

  19. Concurrent EGFR Mutation and ALK Translocation in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sachdev; Bank, Bruce; Fishkin, Paul; Mooney, Colin; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements are now routine biomarkers that have been incorporated into the practice of managing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Historically, the two molecular alterations have been viewed as mutually exclusive, but recent identified cases suggest otherwise. In this report, we describe cases of lung cancer with concurrent EGFR mutation and ALK rearrangement and identify their clinical characteristics. Non-small cell lung cancer patients with multiple molecular alterations were retrospectively analyzed from an academic referral center from 2011–2013. An additional review was conducted of reported cases with dual alterations. Four cases of NSCLC with alterations in both EGFR and ALK were identified and evaluated with 16 published cases for a total of 20 cases. The age of patients ranged from 37 to 77 years. Nine patients were never smokers. The disease control rates in patients treated with EGFR inhibitors and ALK inhibitors were 46% (6/13) and 71% (5/7), respectively. This series highlights the importance of comprehensive molecular profiling of newly diagnosed lung cancer, as NSCLC may be driven by concurrent molecular alterations. EGFR- and ALK-targeted therapies appear to have modest activity in patients with tumors possessing both alterations. Dual-altered NSCLC patients may have distinct clinical characteristics warranting further study. Combination targeted therapy or novel multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors may prove important in these patients, though necessary studies remain ongoing. PMID:27026837

  20. L1198F Mutation Resensitizes Crizotinib to ALK by Altering the Conformation of Inhibitor and ATP Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Sun, Rong; Wu, Yuehong; Song, Mingzhu; Li, Jia; Yang, Qianye; Chen, Xiaoyi; Bao, Jinku; Zhao, Qi

    2017-02-24

    The efficacy of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment with small molecule inhibitors is greatly challenged by acquired resistance. A recent study reported the newest generation inhibitor resistant mutation L1198F led to the resensitization to crizotinib, which is the first Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drug for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC. It is of great importance to understand how this extremely rare event occurred for the purpose of overcoming the acquired resistance of such inhibitors. In this study, we exploited molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to dissect the molecular mechanisms. Our MD results revealed that L1198F mutation of ALK resulted in the conformational change at the inhibitor site and altered the binding affinity of ALK to crizotinib and lorlatinib. L1198F mutation also affected the autoactivation of ALK as supported by the identification of His1124 and Tyr1278 as critical amino acids involved in ATP binding and phosphorylation. Our findings are valuable for designing more specific and potent inhibitors for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC and other types of cancer.

  1. L1198F Mutation Resensitizes Crizotinib to ALK by Altering the Conformation of Inhibitor and ATP Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Sun, Rong; Wu, Yuehong; Song, Mingzhu; Li, Jia; Yang, Qianye; Chen, Xiaoyi; Bao, Jinku; Zhao, Qi

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment with small molecule inhibitors is greatly challenged by acquired resistance. A recent study reported the newest generation inhibitor resistant mutation L1198F led to the resensitization to crizotinib, which is the first Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drug for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC. It is of great importance to understand how this extremely rare event occurred for the purpose of overcoming the acquired resistance of such inhibitors. In this study, we exploited molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to dissect the molecular mechanisms. Our MD results revealed that L1198F mutation of ALK resulted in the conformational change at the inhibitor site and altered the binding affinity of ALK to crizotinib and lorlatinib. L1198F mutation also affected the autoactivation of ALK as supported by the identification of His1124 and Tyr1278 as critical amino acids involved in ATP binding and phosphorylation. Our findings are valuable for designing more specific and potent inhibitors for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC and other types of cancer. PMID:28245558

  2. A malignant inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the hypopharynx harboring the 3a/b variants of the EML4-ALK fusion gene

    PubMed Central

    Muscarella, Lucia Anna; Rossi, Giulio; Trombetta, Domenico; La Torre, Annamaria; Di Candia, Leonarda; Mengoli, Maria Cecilia; Sparaneo, Angelo; Fazio, Vito Michele; Graziano, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMT) in the head and neck region are rare neoplasms that generally mimic benign/low-grade neoplasms. Overexpression of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has been reported in 50% of IMT cases, secondary to ALK activation by structural rearrangements in the ALK gene, which results in a fusion protein with echinoderm microtubule associated protein like 4 (EML4) in ~20% of cases. The present study describes a case of a 74-year-old woman with a malignant IMT in the right posterior hypopharynx harboring a previously unreported chromosomal rearrangement resulting in EML4 and ALK gene fusion. Strong ALK immunoreactivity was observed in neoplastic cells, while fluorescent in situ hybridization combined with fluorescent fragment analysis and direct sequencing identified the first case of the 3a/b variants of the EML4-ALK fusion gene in IMT. The results of the current study highlight the uncommon occurrence of ALK-positive IMT in the head/neck region and demonstrate the importance of integrating different molecular methodologies to identify unequivocal gene fusion characterization. PMID:28356934

  3. EML4-ALK induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition consistent with cancer stem cell properties in H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fuchun; Liu, Xiaoke; Qing, Qin; Sang, Yaxiong; Feng, Chengjun; Li, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Li; Su, Pei; Wang, Yongsheng

    2015-04-10

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4(EML4)--anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene has been identified as a driver mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the role of EML4-ALK in malignant transformation is not entirely clear. Here, for the first time, we showed that H1299 NSCLC cells stably expressing EML4-ALK acquire EMT phenotype, associated with enhanced invasive migration and increased expression of EMT-inducing transcription factors. H1299-EML4-ALK cells also displayed cancer stem cell-like properties with a concomitant up-regulation of CD133 and enhanced ability of mammospheres formation. Moreover, we found that inhibition of ERK1/2 reversed EMT induced by EML4-ALK in H1299 cells. Taken together, these results suggested that EML4-ALK induced ERK activation is mechanistically associated with EMT phenotype. Thus, inhibition of ERK signaling pathway could be a potential strategy in treatment of NSCLC patients with EML4-ALK translocation.

  4. CRISPR/Cas9 Technology-Based Xenograft Tumors as Candidate Reference Materials for Multiple EML4-ALK Rearrangements Testing.

    PubMed

    Peng, Rongxue; Zhang, Rui; Lin, Guigao; Yang, Xin; Li, Ziyang; Zhang, Kuo; Zhang, Jiawei; Li, Jinming

    2017-09-01

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) receptor tyrosine kinase (EML4-ALK) rearrangement is an important biomarker that plays a pivotal role in therapeutic decision making for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Ensuring accuracy and reproducibility of EML4-ALK testing by fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and next-generation sequencing requires reliable reference materials for monitoring assay sensitivity and specificity. Herein, we developed novel reference materials for various kinds of EML4-ALK testing. CRISPR/Cas9 was used to edit various NSCLC cell lines containing EML4-ALK rearrangement variants 1, 2, and 3a/b. After s.c. inoculation, the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples from xenografts were prepared and tested for suitability as candidate reference materials by fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and next-generation sequencing. Sample validation and commutability assessments showed that all types of FFPE samples derived from xenograft tumors have typical histological structures, and EML4-ALK testing results were similar to the clinical ALK-positive NSCLC specimens. Among the four methods for EML4-ALK detection, the validation test showed 100% concordance. Furthermore, these novel FFPE reference materials showed good stability and homogeneity. Without limitations on variant types and production, our novel FFPE samples based on CRISPR/Cas9 editing and xenografts are suitable as candidate reference materials for the validation, verification, internal quality control, and proficiency testing of EML4-ALK detection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hodgkin's disease and CD30-positive anaplastic large cell lymphomas--a continuous spectrum of malignant disorders. A quantitative morphometric and immunohistologic study.

    PubMed Central

    Leoncini, L.; Del Vecchio, M. T.; Kraft, R.; Megha, T.; Barbini, P.; Cevenini, G.; Poggi, S.; Pileri, S.; Tosi, P.; Cottier, H.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have examined cellular areas of lymphoma tissue in 28 cases of Hodgkin's disease (HD) or anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL, 'Ki-1 cell lymphoma') to evaluate the boundaries between the two entities. Methods applied included conventional histology; test point analysis; semiautomated morphometry of nuclear profile features of Reed-Sternberg and other atypical large cells (RSALCs); and immunohistochemistry of these elements on all paraffin sections and, in 15 cases, on frozen sections. Mean nuclear profile morphotypes of RSALCs per case varied independently of immunophenotype and histologic diagnosis. Conversely, immunohistochemistry demonstrated significant, although not consistent, preferential positivities of these CD30+ elements for CD15 in HD, and for epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and CD43 in ALCLs. In the latter, RSALCs also exhibited a tendency for CD45 and CD45RO positivity and for the expression of T-cell-associated antigens. However, there were considerable overlaps. This continuous spectrum of RSALC nuclear profile morphotypes and immunophenotypes, ranging from HD over questionable cases, intermediate between HD and ALCL, to ALCLs, was paralleled by differences in the reactive component of lymphomas. Lymphocytes and granulocytes were significantly deficient in ALCLs. Images Figure 1 PMID:2173409

  6. Silicone-induced granuloma of breast implant capsule (SIGBIC): similarities and differences with anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and their differential diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, Eduardo de Faria Castro; Rêgo, Milena Morais; Ramalho, Luciana Costa; Ayres, Veronica Jorge; Seleti, Rodrigo Oliveira; Ferreira, Carlos Alberto Pecci; Roveda, Decio

    2017-01-01

    Primary breast lymphoma is a rare disease and accounts for 0.5% of cases of breast cancer. Most primary breast lymphomas develop from B cells, and the involvement of T cells is rare. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a recently discovered T-cell lymphoma associated with breast implants. Only a few cases have been reported to date. It is believed that the incidence of ALCL is increasing because of the increasing number of breast implants. The clinical presentation is variable and can manifest as a palpable mass in the breast or armpit, breast pain, or capsular contracture. Because of the rarity of the disease and the lack of knowledge to date, clinical diagnosis is often delayed, with consequent delays in treatment. The cause and pathogenesis have not been fully elucidated, and there are no evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, or follow-up of this disease. We present a review of cases of patients with silicone breast implants, including ALCL, a rare type of breast cancer that is still under study, and silicone-induced granuloma of breast implant capsule and its differential diagnosis, and discuss if a silicone-induced granuloma of breast implant capsule could be the precursor of the disease. PMID:28331364

  7. Silicone-induced granuloma of breast implant capsule (SIGBIC): similarities and differences with anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and their differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Eduardo de Faria Castro; Rêgo, Milena Morais; Ramalho, Luciana Costa; Ayres, Veronica Jorge; Seleti, Rodrigo Oliveira; Ferreira, Carlos Alberto Pecci; Roveda, Decio

    2017-01-01

    Primary breast lymphoma is a rare disease and accounts for 0.5% of cases of breast cancer. Most primary breast lymphomas develop from B cells, and the involvement of T cells is rare. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a recently discovered T-cell lymphoma associated with breast implants. Only a few cases have been reported to date. It is believed that the incidence of ALCL is increasing because of the increasing number of breast implants. The clinical presentation is variable and can manifest as a palpable mass in the breast or armpit, breast pain, or capsular contracture. Because of the rarity of the disease and the lack of knowledge to date, clinical diagnosis is often delayed, with consequent delays in treatment. The cause and pathogenesis have not been fully elucidated, and there are no evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, or follow-up of this disease. We present a review of cases of patients with silicone breast implants, including ALCL, a rare type of breast cancer that is still under study, and silicone-induced granuloma of breast implant capsule and its differential diagnosis, and discuss if a silicone-induced granuloma of breast implant capsule could be the precursor of the disease.

  8. Combination of the human anti-CD30 antibody 5F11 with cytostatic drugs enhances its antitumor activity against Hodgkin and anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Heuck, Friederike; Ellermann, Julia; Borchmann, Peter; Rothe, Achim; Hansen, Hinrich; Engert, Andreas; von Strandmann, Elke Pogge

    2004-01-01

    Due to its selective overexpression on the malignant cells of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and large cell anaplastic lymphoma (ALCL), CD30 is an excellent target for immunotherapy of these diseases. The fully human monoclonal anti-CD30-antibody 5F11 has been shown to be effective against CD30-expressing cell lines both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, 5F11 shows promising antitumor activity in phase 1/2 clinical trials. To extend these promising results, the authors evaluated combinations of 5F11 with conventional cytostatic drugs against a variety of lymphoma cell lines in vitro. Most combinations tested showed at least additive cytotoxic effects on the HL-derived cell lines L428, L540, and L1236 and the ALCL-derived cell line Karpas 299 as measured by proliferation assays (XTT) and the induction of apoptosis (annexin-V FACS analysis). The most impressive results were detected with the combination of 5F11 and gemcitabine or etoposide. The data suggest that the combination of the human antibody 5F11 with conventional chemotherapy might be beneficial in the combined chemo-immunotherapy of CD30-positive lymphomas.

  9. Progress in the treatment of mature T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ritsuro

    Treatment outcomes of malignant lymphoma have improved due to the discovery of novel chemotherapeutic and molecular targeted agents as well as advances in their combination uses. However, the prognosis of T-cell lymphoma remains poorer than that of B-cell lymphomas, and progress is slow. The reasons include their chemotherapeutic resistant nature and the absence of effective antibody agents for T-cell lymphomas. The number of T-cell lymphoma subtypes increased from 21 in the WHO classification 2008 to 29 in the WHO classification 2016. This means that T-cell lymphomas are heterogeneous. T-cell lymphomas can be divided to ALK-positive anaplastic lymphoma (ALCL) with a good prognosis and others with poorer prognoses. ALK-positive ALCL can be successfully treated with CHOP, but the others cannot. P-glycoprotein resistant anthracyclines, etoposide, or hematopoietic stem cell transplantations are increasingly applied to improve outcomes, but no standard treatment approach has yet been established. Regarding relapsed/refractory T-cell lymphoma, many novel agents are currently under development. The treatment outcomes of T-cell lymphoma need to be improved by applying innovative strategies including further novel agents.

  10. Clonal T-Cell Receptor γ-Chain Gene Rearrangements in Differential Diagnosis of Lymphomatoid Papulosis From Skin Metastasis of Nodal Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Akilov, Oleg E.; Pillai, Raju K.; Grandinetti, Lisa M.; Kant, Jeffrey A.; Geskin, Larisa

    2012-01-01

    Background In patients with a history of nodal anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL), differentiation of type C lymphomatoid papulosis from cutaneous involvement of systemic ALCL may be challenging because the 2 entities may exhibit identical histologic features. Although metastatic ALCL generally carries the same clone as the primary lymphoma, expression of a distinct clone likely represents a distinct process. Observations A 54-year-old white man had a history of anaplastic lymphoma kinase 1–negative ALCL in the right inguinal lymph node 6 years ago. A complete response was achieved after 6 cycles of CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine [Oncovin], and prednisone administered in 21-day cycles) and radiation therapy. After 3½ years, the patient observed waxing and waning papules and nodules. Examination of the biopsy specimen revealed a dense CD30+ lymphocytic infiltrate; no evidence of systemic malignancy was evident on positron emission tomography. Although clinically the presentation was consistent with lymphomatoid papulosis, metastatic ALCL had to be excluded. Polymerase chain reaction analysis with T-cell receptor γ-chain gene rearrangement (TCR-γR) was performed on the original lymph node and new skin lesions. Results of the TCR-γR analysis were positive for clonality in both lesions. However, separate clonal processes were identified. The identification of distinct clones supported the clinical impression of lymphomatoid papulosis. Conclusion Polymerase chain reaction analysis of TCR-γR is a useful method for distinguishing different clonal processes and is recommended when differentiation of primary and secondary lymphoproliferative disorders is required. PMID:21844453

  11. A large, single-center, real-world study of clinicopathological characteristics and treatment in advanced ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Yaxiong; Yan, Fang; Fang, Wenfeng; Yang, Yunpeng; Hong, Shaodong; Miao, Siyu; Wu, Manli; Huang, Xiaodan; Luo, Youli; Zhou, Cong; Gong, Run; Huang, Yan; Zhou, Ningning; Zhao, Hongyun; Zhang, Li

    2017-04-04

    Crizotinib has achieved astonishing success in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement. However, no real-world studies described the clinicopathological characteristics and treatment of such patients in China. Patients were consecutively collected from Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center. Chi-square test was applied to explore the relationship between ALK fusion status and metastasis sites. Kaplan-Meier methods and multivariable analyses were used to estimate progression-free survival (PFS). A total of 291 advanced NSCLC patients (ALK (+), N = 97; both ALK & epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (-), N = 194) were enrolled. The occurrence of brain metastasis in ALK-positive patients was significantly higher than double-negative ones both at baseline (26.5% vs. 16.5%, P = 0.038) and during treatment (25.8% vs. 11.9%, P = 0.003), but opposite for pleural effusion (6.2% vs. 26.9%, P < 0.001 at baseline; 3.1% vs. 10.3%, P = 0.031 during treatment). ALK-positive patients of 53.6% used crizotinib, whereas others only received chemotherapy (37.1%) or supportive care (9.3%). Usage of crizotinib prolonged PFS compared with chemotherapy in ALK-positive patients (median PFS 17.6 m vs. 4.8 m, P < 0.001). ALK-positive NSCLC had more brain metastasis and less pleural effusion than double-negative ones. Crizotinib showed better PFS than chemotherapy in advanced ALK-positive NSCLC at any line. However, half advanced ALK-positive patients never received crizotinib, which was grim and need improving.

  12. Overcoming resistance to first/second generation epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors and ALK inhibitors in oncogene-addicted advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Romanidou, Ourania; Landi, Lorenza; Cappuzzo, Federico; Califano, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activating mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represent the two oncogenic events with an impact on current clinical practice. EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and crizotinib are the standard of care for the treatment of EGFR mutant and ALK gene rearranged advanced NSCLC patients. Unfortunately, despite initial clinical benefit, acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs or crizotinib usually develops after an average of 10–12 months of treatment. The aim of this review is to describe the mechanisms of resistance to first/second generation EGFR-TKIs and crizotinib. In particular, we focus on strategies to overcome resistance due to secondary EGFR T790M mutation and mutations of the ALK domain. PMID:27239236

  13. Anaplastic large cell (CD30/Ki-1+) lymphoma in HIV+ patients: clinical and pathological findings in a group of ten patients.

    PubMed

    Nosari, A; Cantoni, S; Oreste, P; Schiantarelli, C; Landonio, G; Alexiadis, S; Gargantini, L; Caggese, L; Gambacorta, M; Morra, E

    1996-12-01

    We compared the clinical and pathological features of 10 HIV+ CD30+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) patients with 28 HIV+ CD30- non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients. The incidence of ALCL among 38 HIV+ systemic NHL patients was 26%. Clinical features were similar in all the HIV-related NHL cases, but ALCL patients seemed to differ from HIV+ CD30- systemic NHL only in the greater frequency of lung tumours (40% v 21%) without concomitant mediastinal mass, bone marrow (75% v 18%) and gastroenteric involvement (40% v 25%). Among the HIV+ ALCL patients, histologic subtypes did not differ in frequency from ALCL in the general population. The B phenotype was predominant (50%) as in other HIV-related NHL. EBV genoma, studied in all HIV+ ALCL patients, was present in 3/10 by in situ hybridization (ISH) and in 5/10 cases using PCR. The clinical course of lymphomas was similar in CD30 positive and negative NHL patients. Overall survival also was short in our series, particularly in HIV+ ALCL (84 v 188 d), probably because of profound immunodepression of the ALCL patients. Our findings suggest that severe immunodepression due to HIV infection determines-more than any other factor-the clinical features of HIV+ ALCL, making them very similar to those of other high-grade systemic HIV+ NHL.

  14. Pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia in anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a mimicker of poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Price, Alexandra; Miller, Jason H; Junkins-Hopkins, Jacqueline M

    2015-11-01

    Pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia can occasionally be observed in biopsies of CD30-positive lymphoproliferative disorders. It is important to be cognizant of this association, because epithelial hyperproliferation can overshadow large atypical lymphoid cells, leading to an erroneous diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or keratoacanthoma. Herein, we present a case of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) with pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia simulating a poorly differentiated carcinoma and review the literature on this subject. Immunohistochemical staining with p63 helped delineate the infiltrating tongues of pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia from the malignant infiltrate. We present this case to raise awareness of the potential for pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia to occur in the setting of CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders. Clinicians and dermatopathologists should consider the possibility of ALCL or lymphomatoid papulosis when examining lesions with features of inflamed SCC, especially if the tumor presents on a site or in a patient that is not typical of SCC. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Use of minimal disseminated disease and immunity to NPM-ALK antigen to stratify ALK-positive ALCL patients with different prognosis.

    PubMed

    Mussolin, L; Damm-Welk, C; Pillon, M; Zimmermann, M; Franceschetto, G; Pulford, K; Reiter, A; Rosolen, A; Woessmann, W

    2013-02-01

    We studied the prognostic value of minimal disseminated disease (MDD) and anti-ALK immune response in children with NPM-ALK-positive anaplastic-large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and evaluated their potential for risk stratification. NPM-ALK transcripts were analyzed by RT-PCR in bone marrow/peripheral blood of 128 ALCL patients at diagnosis, whereas ALK antibody titers in plasma were assessed using an immunocytochemical approach. MDD was positive in 59% of patients and 96% showed an anti-ALK response. Using MDD and antibody titer results, patients could be divided into three biological risk groups (bRG) with different prognosis: high risk (bHR): MDD-positive and antibody titer ≤ 1/750, 26/128 (20%); low risk (bLR): MDD negative and antibody titer >1/750, 40/128 (31%); intermediate risk (bIR): all remaining patients, 62/128 (48%). Progression-free survival was 28% (s.e., 9%), 68% (s.e., 6%) and 93% (s.e., 4%) for bHR, bIR and bLR, respectively (P<0.0001). Survival was 71% (s.e., 9%), 83% (s.e., 5%) and 98% (s.e., 2%) for bHR, bIR and bLR (P=0.02). Only bHR and histology other than common type were predictive of higher risk of failure (hazard ratio 4.9 and 2.7, respectively) in multivariate analysis. Stratification of ALCL patients based on MDD and anti-ALK titer should be considered in future ALCL trials to optimize treatment.

  16. Alectinib induced CNS radiation necrosis in an ALK+NSCLC patient with a remote (7 years) history of brain radiation.

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Weitz, Michael; Jalas, John R; Kelly, Daniel F; Wong, Vanessa; Azada, Michele C; Quines, Oliver; Klempner, Samuel J

    2016-06-01

    Alectinib is a second generation ALK inhibitor that has significant clinical activity in central nervous system (CNS) metastases in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Pseudoprogression (PsP) due to radiation necrosis during alecitnib treatment of central nervous system (CNS) metastases from ALK-rearranged NSCLC as been reported. Hence, distinguishing radiation-related PsP from alectinib-induced radiographic changes is important to avoid erroneous early trial discontinuation and abandonment of an effective treatment. However, it remains difficult to assess casuality of radiation necrosis is related to recent direct radiation or induced by alectinib treatment or both. It is also unknown how long from previous radiation can alectinib still induce radiation necrosis. Here we reported a crizotinib-refractory ALK-positive NSCLC patient who develop radiation necrosis in one of his metastatic CNS lesions after approximately 12 months of alectinib treatment who otherwise had on-going CNS response on alectinib. His most recent radiation to his CNS metastases was 7 years prior to the start of alectinib. This case illustrates that in the setting of pror CNS radiation, given the significant clinical activity of alectinib in CNS metastases in ALK-positive NSCLC patients the risk of CNS radiation necrosis remains long after previous radiation to the CNS metastases has been completed and can occur after durable response of treatment.

  17. Molecular dynamics and pharmacophore modelling studies of different subtype (ALK and EGFR (T790M)) inhibitors in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Silakari, O

    2017-03-01

    Extensively validated 3D pharmacophore models for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) and EGFR (T790M) (epithelial growth factor receptor with acquired secondary mutation) were developed. The pharmacophore model for ALK (r(2) = 0.96, q(2) = 0.692) suggested that two hydrogen bond acceptors and three hydrophobic groups arranged in 3-D space are essential for the binding affinity of ALK inhibitors. Similarly, the pharmacophore model for EGFR (T790M) (r(2) = 0.92, q(2) = 0.72) suggested that the presence of a hydrogen bond acceptor, two hydrogen bond donors and a hydrophobic group plays vital role in binding of an inhibitor of EGFR (T790M). These pharmacophore models allowed searches for novel ALK and EGFR (T790M) dual inhibitors from multiconformer 3D databases (Asinex, Chembridge and Maybridge). Finally, the eight best hits were selected for molecular dynamics simulation, to study the stability of their complexes with both proteins and final binding orientations of these molecules. After molecular dynamics simulations, one hit has been predicted to possess good binding affinity for both ALK and EGFR (T790M), which can be further investigated for its experimental in-vitro/in-vivo activities.

  18. Responses to crizotinib in patients with ALK-positive lung adenocarcinoma who tested immunohistochemistry (IHC)-positive and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-negative

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Mu, Xinlin; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Xinming; Li, Junling; Lin, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    Although the Ventana immunohistochemistry (IHC) platform for detecting anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene (ALK) (D5F3) expression was recently approved by the US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is still the “gold-standard” method recommended by the US National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guideline for NSCLC. We evaluated 6 ALK-positive lung adenocarcinoma patients who tested Ventana IHC-positive and FISH-negative and assessed their clinical responses to the ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) crizotinib. Histologic and cytologic specimens from the 6 patients were stained with Ventana anti-ALK(D5F3) rabbit monoclonal primary antibody using the OptiView™ DAB IHC detection kit and OptiView™ amplification kit on a Ventana BenchMark XT processor. In addition, they were also tested by FISH, qRT-PCR, next-generation sequencing (NGS), and RNAscope ISH analysis. All patients received crizotinib treatment and their follow-up clinical data were recorded. The objective response rate achieved with crizotinib therapy was 66.7% (4/6 partial responses and 2/6 stable disease). One patient in whom a new fusion type (EML4->EXOC6B->ALK fusion) was identified obtained a partial response. These findings indicate that patients with ALK-positive lung adenocarcinoma who test Ventana IHC-positive and FISH-negative may still respond to crizotinib therapy. PMID:27418132

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal the allosteric effect of F1174C resistance mutation to ceritinib in ALK-associated lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ni, Zhong; Wang, Xiting; Zhang, Tianchen; Jin, Rong Zhong

    2016-12-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has become as an important target for the treatment of various human cancers, especially non-small-cell lung cancer. A mutation, F1174C, suited in the C-terminal helix αC of ALK and distal from the small-molecule inhibitor ceritinib bound to the ATP-binding site, causes the emergence of drug resistance to ceritinib. However, the detailed mechanism for the allosteric effect of F1174C resistance mutation to ceritinib remains unclear. Here, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and binding free energy calculations [Molecular Mechanics/Generalized Born Surface Area (MM/GBSA)] were carried out to explore the advent of drug resistance mutation in ALK. MD simulations observed that the exquisite aromatic-aromatic network formed by residues F1098, F1174, F1245, and F1271 in the wild-type ALK-ceritinib complex was disrupted by the F1174C mutation. The resulting mutation allosterically affected the conformational dynamic of P-loop and caused the upward movement of the P-loop from the ATP-binding site, thereby weakening the interaction between ceritinib and the P-loop. The subsequent MM/GBSA binding free energy calculations and decomposition analysis of binding free energy validated this prediction. This study provides mechanistic insight into the allosteric effect of F1174C resistance mutation to ceritinib in ALK and is expected to contribute to design the next-generation of ALK inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of small biopsy specimens and surgical specimens for the detection of EGFR mutations and EML4-ALK in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, DeSheng; Lu, Can; Zhu, Wei; He, QiuYan; Li, Yong; Fu, ChunYan; Zhou, JianHua; Liu, Shuang; Tao, YongGuang

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion genes represent novel oncogenes that are associated with non–small-cell lung cancers (NSCLC). The feasibility of detecting EGFR mutations and ALK fusion genes in small biopsy specimens or surgical specimens was determined. Of the 721 NSCLC patients, a total of 305 cases were positive for EGFR mutations (42.3%). The rate of EGFR mutations in women was significantly higher than that in men. Histologically, the EGFR mutation rate in adenocarcinomas was significantly higher than that in squamous cell carcinomas. No difference in the EGFR mutation rate was observed between surgical specimens (42.1%) and small biopsy specimens (42.4%), which indicated that the EGFR mutation ratios in surgical specimens and small biopsy specimens were not different. In 385 NSCLC patients, 26 cases were positive for EML4-ALK (6.8%). However, 11.7% of the surgical specimens were EML4-ALK-positive, whereas the positive proportion in the small biopsy specimens was only 4.7%, which indicated that EML4-ALK-positive rate in the surgical specimens was significantly higher than that in the small biopsy specimens. Detection of EGFR gene mutations was feasible in small biopsy specimens, and screening for EML4-ALK expression in small biopsy specimens can be used to guide clinical treatments. PMID:27322143

  1. An Unusual Case of Systemic Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor with Successful Treatment with ALK-Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Sanjivini V.; Reith, John D.; Kojima, Angerika Y.; Williams, William D.; Liu, Chen; Vila Duckworth, Lizette

    2014-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is an exceedingly rare entity. A 45-year-old Hispanic female presented with a 6-month history of left-sided thigh pain, low back pain, and generalized weakness. PET/CT scan revealed abnormal activity in the liver, adrenal gland, and pancreas. MRI of the abdomen demonstrated two 6-7 cm masses in the liver. MRI of the lumbar spine demonstrated lesions in the L2 to L4 spinous processes, paraspinal muscles, and subcutaneous tissues, as well as an 8 mm enhancing intradural lesion at T11, all thought to be metastatic disease. A biopsy of the liver showed portal tract expansion by a spindle cell proliferation rich in inflammation. Tumor cells showed immunoreactivity for smooth muscle actin and anaplastic lymphoma kinase 1 (ALK1). Tissue from the L5 vertebra showed a process histologically identical to that seen in the liver. FISH analysis of these lesions demonstrated an ALK (2p23) gene rearrangement. The patient was successfully treated with an ALK-inhibitor, Crizotinib, and is now in complete remission. We present the first reported case, to our knowledge, of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor with systemic manifestations and ALK translocation. This case is a prime example of how personalized medicine has vastly improved patient care through the use of molecular-targeted therapy. PMID:25045570

  2. ALK and ROS1 testing on lung cancer cytologic samples: Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pisapia, Pasquale; Lozano, Maria D; Vigliar, Elena; Bellevicine, Claudio; Pepe, Francesco; Malapelle, Umberto; Troncone, Giancarlo

    2017-07-25

    Cytologic sampling is the mainstay of diagnosing advanced lung cancer. Moreover, to select patients for personalized first-line or second-line treatment, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and c-ros oncogene 1 (ROS1) rearrangements are tested on cytologic preparations. Commercially available fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunocytochemistry (ICC) assays have primarily been used for the identification of cells harboring ALK or ROS1 gene fusions on histologic rather than cytologic preparations. However, it is now recognized that FISH and ICC also can be applied on cytologic samples provided the cytopathologist is aware that FISH and ICC results are not always concordant and that the performance of ICC largely depends on antibody clones, signal detection systems, and scoring systems. Notably, the routine clinical use of FISH and ICC may be replaced by emerging next-generation sequencing and digital, color-coded barcode technologies, which have the advantage of simultaneously evaluating ALK, ROS1, and EGFR alterations in a single analysis. Although their use in clinical cytologic practice remains to be fully established, it is conceivable that this technology will replace both FISH and ICC analyses in future diagnostic algorithms. Here, the authors review studies devoted to testing ALK and ROS1 on cytology specimens in an attempt to provide an update for the cytopathologist regarding current and evolving practice. Cancer (Cancer Cytopathol) 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  3. Stimulation of the midkine/ALK axis renders glioma cells resistant to cannabinoid antitumoral action

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, M; Torres, S; Salazar, M; Carracedo, A; Hernández-Tiedra, S; Rodríguez-Fornés, F; García-Taboada, E; Meléndez, B; Mollejo, M; Campos-Martín, Y; Lakatosh, S A; Barcia, J; Guzmán, M; Velasco, G

    2011-01-01

    Identifying the molecular mechanisms responsible for the resistance of gliomas to anticancer treatments is an issue of great therapeutic interest. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major active ingredient of marijuana, and other cannabinoids inhibit tumor growth in animal models of cancer, including glioma, an effect that relies, at least in part, on the stimulation of autophagy-mediated apoptosis in tumor cells. Here, by analyzing the gene expression profile of a large series of human glioma cells with different sensitivity to cannabinoid action, we have identified a subset of genes specifically associated to THC resistance. One of these genes, namely that encoding the growth factor midkine (Mdk), is directly involved in the resistance of glioma cells to cannabinoid treatment. We also show that Mdk mediates its protective effect via the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) receptor and that Mdk signaling through ALK interferes with cannabinoid-induced autophagic cell death. Furthermore, in vivo Mdk silencing or ALK pharmacological inhibition sensitizes cannabinod-resistant tumors to THC antitumoral action. Altogether, our findings identify Mdk as a pivotal factor involved in the resistance of glioma cells to THC pro-autophagic and antitumoral action, and suggest that selective targeting of the Mdk/ALK axis could help to improve the efficacy of antitumoral therapies for gliomas. PMID:21233844

  4. 3D-QSAR and molecular fragment replacement study on diaminopyrimidine and pyrrolotriazine ALK inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Zhipeng; Lu, Tao; Liu, Haichun; Yuan, Haoliang; Ran, Ting; Zhang, Yanmin; Yao, Sihui; Xiong, Xiao; Xu, Jinxing; Xu, Anyang; Chen, Yadong

    2014-06-01

    Over expression of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has been found in many types of cancer, and ALK is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer. To obtain new potent inhibitors of ALK, we conducted lead optimization using 3D-QSAR modeling and molecular docking investigation of 2,4-diaminopyrimidines and 2,7-disubstituted-pyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazine-based compounds. Three favorable 3D-QSAR models (CoMFA with q2, 0.555; r2, 0.939; CoMSIA with q2, 0.625; r2, 0.974; Topomer CoMFA with q2, 0.557; r2 0.756) have been developed to predict the biological activity of novel compounds. Topomer Search was utilized for virtual screening to obtain suitable fragments. The novel compounds generated by molecular fragment replacement (MFR) were evaluated by Topomer CoMFA prediction, Glide (docking) and further evaluated with CoMFA and CoMSIA prediction. 25 novel 2,7-disubstituted-pyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazine derivatives as potential ALK inhibitors were finally obtained. In this paper, a combination of CoMFA, CoMSIA and Topomer CoMFA could obtain favorable 3D-QSAR models and suitable fragments for ALK inhibitors optimization. The work flow which comprised 3D-QSAR modeling, Topomer Search, MFR, molecular docking and evaluating criteria could be applied to de novo drug design and the resulted compounds initiate us to further optimize and design new potential ALK inhibitors.

  5. Enhanced Antitumorigenic Effects in Glioblastoma on Double Targeting of Pleiotrophin and Its Receptor ALK1

    PubMed Central

    Grzelinski, Marius; Steinberg, Florian; Martens, Tobias; Czubayko, Frank; Lamszus, Katrin; Aigner, Achim

    2009-01-01

    In adults, glioblastomas are the most lethal and most frequent malignant brain tumors, and the poor prognosis despite aggressive treatment indicates the need to establish novel targets for molecular intervention. The secreted growth factor pleiotrophin (PTN, HB-GAM, HBNF, OSF-1) shows mitogenic, chemotactic, and transforming activity. Whereas PTN expression is tightly regulated during embryogenesis and is very limited in normal adult tissues, a marked PTN up-regulation is seen in tumors including glioblastomas. Likewise, the PTN receptor anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has been shown previously to be upregulated and functionally relevant in glioblastoma. In this study, we explore the antitumorigenic effects of the simultaneous ribozyme-mediated knockdown of both receptor and ligand. Various glioblastoma cell lines are analyzed for PTN and ALK expression. Beyond the individual efficacies of several specific ribozymes against PTN or ALK, respectively, antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of a single gene targeting approach are strongly enhanced on double knockdown of both genes in vitro. More importantly, this results in the abolishment of tumor growth in an in vivo subcutaneous tumor xenograft model. Finally, the analysis of various downstream signaling pathways by antibody arrays reveals a distinct pattern of changes in the activation of signal transduction molecules on PTN/ALK double knockdown. Beyond the already known ones, it identifies additional pathways relevant for PTN/ALK signaling. We conclude that double targeting of PTN and ALK leads to enhanced antitumorigenic effects over single knockdown approaches, which offers novel therapeutic options owing to increased efficacy also after prolonged knockdown. PMID:19177199

  6. microRNA classifiers are powerful diagnostic/prognostic tools in ALK-, EGFR-, and KRAS-driven lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Pierluigi; Cascione, Luciano; Landi, Lorenza; Carasi, Stefania; Lovat, Francesca; Tibaldi, Carmelo; Alì, Greta; D'Incecco, Armida; Minuti, Gabriele; Chella, Antonio; Fontanini, Gabriella; Fassan, Matteo; Cappuzzo, Federico; Croce, Carlo M

    2015-12-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) can act as oncosuppressors or oncogenes, induce chemoresistance or chemosensitivity, and are major posttranscriptional gene regulators. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), EGF receptor (EGFR), and V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) are major drivers of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of this study was to assess the miRNA profiles of NSCLCs driven by translocated ALK, mutant EGFR, or mutant KRAS to find driver-specific diagnostic and prognostic miRNA signatures. A total of 85 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples were considered: 67 primary NSCLCs and 18 matched normal lung tissues. Of the 67 primary NSCLCs, 17 were echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-ALK translocated (ALK(+)) lung cancers; the remaining 50 were not (ALK(-)). Of the 50 ALK(-) primary NSCLCs, 24 were EGFR and KRAS mutation-negative (i.e., WT; triple negative); 11 were mutant EGFR (EGFR(+)), and 15 were mutant KRAS (KRAS(+)). We developed a diagnostic classifier that shows how miR-1253, miR-504, and miR-26a-5p expression levels can classify NSCLCs as ALK-translocated, mutant EGFR, or mutant KRAS versus mutation-free. We also generated a prognostic classifier based on miR-769-5p and Let-7d-5p expression levels that can predict overall survival. This classifier showed better performance than the commonly used classifiers based on mutational status. Although it has several limitations, this study shows that miRNA signatures and classifiers have great potential as powerful, cost-effective next-generation tools to improve and complement current genetic tests. Further studies of these miRNAs can help define their roles in NSCLC biology and in identifying best-performing chemotherapy regimens.

  7. Clinicopathological Study of 18 Cases of Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumors with Reference to ALK-1 Expression: 5-Year Experience in a Tertiary Care Center

    PubMed Central

    Telugu, Ramesh Babu; Prabhu, Anne Jennifer; Kalappurayil, Nobin Babu; Mathai, John; Gnanamuthu, Birla Roy; Manipadam, Marie Therese

    2017-01-01

    Background Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is a histopathologically distinctive neoplasm of children and young adults. According to World Health Organization (WHO) classification, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is an intermediate-grade tumor, with potential for recurrence and rare metastasis. There are no definite histopathologic, molecular, or cytogenetic features to predict malignant transformation, recurrence, or metastasis. Methods A 5-year retrospective study of histopathologically diagnosed inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors of various anatomic sites was conducted to correlate anaplastic lymphoma kinase-1 (ALK-1) expression with histological atypia, multicentric origin of tumor, recurrence, and metastasis. Clinical details of all the cases were noted from the clinical work station. Immunohistochemical stains for ALK-1 and other antibodies were performed. Statistical analysis was done using Fisher exact test. Results A total of 18 cases of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors were found during the study period, of which 14 were classical. The female-male ratio was 1:1 and the mean age was 23.8 years. Histologically atypical (four cases) and multifocal tumors (three cases, multicentric in origin) were noted. Recurrence was noted in 30% of ALK-1 positive and 37.5% of ALK-1 negative cases, whereas metastasis to the lung, liver, and pelvic bone was noted in the ALK-1 positive group only. Conclusions Overall, ALK-1 protein was expressed in 55.6% of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors. There was no statistically significant correlation between ALK-1 expression, tumor type, recurrence and metastasis. However, ALK-1 immunohistochemistry is a useful diagnostic aid in the appropriate clinical and histomorphologic context. PMID:28415158

  8. Effective Crizotinib schedule for an elderly patient with ALK rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fukuizumi, Aya; Miyanaga, Akihiko; Seike, Masahiro; Kato, Yasuhiro; Nakamichi, Shinji; Chubachi, Kumi; Matsumoto, Masaru; Noro, Rintaro; Minegishi, Yuji; Kunugi, Shinobu; Kubota, Kaoru; Gemma, Akihiko

    2015-04-23

    Non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) harboring translocations in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) are highly sensitive to small-molecule ALK kinase inhibitors, such as crizotinib. We describe a case of post-operative local recurrence of lung adenocarcinoma in an 81 year-old male. He underwent radiation and received chemotherapy with docetaxel, but neither treatment regimen was effective. Following identification of ALK rearrangements, crizotinib treatment was initiated. After treatment with crizotinib for 5 days, adverse events including acute renal failure (grade 2/CTCAE ver4.0) and congestive heart failure (grade 3) occurred. Crizotinib modified treatment was required. Half dose of crizotinib treatment could not control tumor progression. Ultimately, crizotinib was administrated at a dose of 250 mg twice daily every 3 day dosing for 13 months with maintenance of the anti-tumor effect. This is the first case report that skip schedule was more effective than dose reduction daily in crizotinib administration for ALK rearranged NSCLC patient with severe adverse events.

  9. Management of crizotinib therapy for ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung carcinoma: an expert consensus.

    PubMed

    Cappuzzo, Federico; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Gautschi, Oliver; Boleti, Ekaterini; Felip, Enriqueta; Groen, Harry J M; Germonpré, Paul; Meldgaard, Peter; Arriola, Edurne; Steele, Nicola; Fox, Jesme; Schnell, Patrick; Engelsberg, Arne; Wolf, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    Within 4 years of the discovery of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the ALK inhibitor crizotinib gained US and European approval for the treatment of advanced ALK-positive NSCLC. This was due to the striking response data observed with crizotinib in phase I and II trials in patients with ALK-positive NSCLC, as well as the favorable tolerability and safety profile observed. Recently published phase III data established crizotinib as a new standard of care for this NSCLC molecular subset. A consequence of such rapid approval, however, is the limited clinical experience and relative paucity of information concerning optimal therapy management. In this review, we discuss the development of crizotinib and the clinical relevance of its safety profile, examining crizotinib-associated adverse events in detail and making specific management recommendations. Crizotinib-associated adverse events were mostly mild to moderate in severity in clinical studies, and appropriate monitoring and supportive therapies are considered effective in avoiding the need for dose interruption or reduction in most cases. Therapy management of patients following disease progression on crizotinib is also discussed. Based on available clinical data, it is evident that patients may have prolonged benefit from crizotinib after Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors-defined disease progression, and crizotinib should be continued for as long as the patient derives benefit.

  10. Ixabepilone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  11. RT-PCR for Detecting ALK Translocations in Cytology Samples from Lung Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Shinji; Seike, Masahiro; Miyanaga, Akihiko; Chiba, Mika; Matsuda, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kenichi; Takahashi, Akiko; Takeuchi, Susumu; Minegishi, Yuji; Kubota, Kaoru; Gemma, Akihiko

    2017-06-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detecting anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocations using cytology samples from lung cancer patients. We analyzed ALK translocations by RT-PCR in cytology samples from lung cancer patients diagnosed at the Nippon Medical School Hospital between 2013 and 2015. Immunochemistry (IHC) and break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were also performed on available tissue samples. A total of 155 cytology samples were analyzed in our study. We obtained 115 (68%) samples from bronchial lavage. We were able to determine 153 (99%) results by RT-PCR with 4 (3%) positive samples. The four samples positive by RT-PCR were also positive by IHC and FISH performed on the tissue samples collected simultaneously. RT-PCR is a suitable method for detecting ALK translocations using cytology samples from patients with primary lung cancer, especially when tissue samples are not available. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  12. Uncommon features of surgically resected ALK-positive cavitary lung adenocarcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takamori, Shinkichi; Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Taguchi, Kenichi; Edagawa, Makoto; Shimamatsu, Shinichiro; Toyozawa, Ryo; Nosaki, Kaname; Hirai, Fumihiko; Seto, Takashi; Takenoyama, Mitsuhiro; Ichinose, Yukito

    2017-12-01

    Some features found on chest computed tomography (CT), such as central tumor location, large pleural effusion, and the absence of a pleural tail, and a patient age of less than 60 years, have been suggested to be useful in predicting anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).A 68-year-old female patient with a history of gynecological treatment was found to have a cavitary mass in the right lower lobe on an annual chest roentgenogram. The tumor was located in the peripheral area with a pleural tail showing no pleural effusion. In addition, two pure ground-glass-opacity nodules (p-GGNs) in the right upper lobe of the lung were detected on consecutive chest CT scans. The patient underwent right lower lobectomy, partial resection of the right upper lobe, and hilar mediastinal lymph node dissection for complete resection of each tumor. The pathological diagnosis was invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma with signet-ring cells for the cavitary mass in the right lower lobe and invasive adenocarcinoma for the rest of the p-GGNs; subcarinal lymph node metastasis was also detected. The ALK rearrangement was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization from the cavitary mass. The patient underwent four cycles of cisplatin and vinorelbine chemotherapy as standard adjuvant chemotherapy for pStage III NSCLC. The ALK fusion gene status of NSCLC with atypical CT features should also be investigated.

  13. Fatal Haemoptysis Associated with Dramatic Response to Crizotinib in an ALK-Rearranged Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mussat, Elodie; Giraud, Violaine; Julie, Catherine; Chinet, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The presence of an ALK (Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase) rearrangement is a rare molecular feature in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC), and concerns mainly non- or light smokers, young patients, with adenocarcinoma histological type. These tumours are particularly sensitive to Alk-targeted therapies, as crizotinib. Crizotinib is usually well-tolerated. We report a case of fatal haemoptysis associated with dramatic response to crizotinib in a patient with an ALK-rearranged lung adenocarcinoma. The patient presented a mediastinal invasion with tracheal involvement and compression of the right pulmonary artery. The initial evolution under crizotinib was good with tumour response. At 6 weeks of crizotinib the patient presented a massive haemoptysis with a tracheobronchial fistula and pneumomediastinum. She died of acute respiratory failure. Our case is the first to report a fatal effect of crizotinib associated with tumour necrosis and good tumour response on a massive mediastinal infiltration. Precautions are recommended with the use of crizotinib in proximal lung tumours with vascular invasion. PMID:27134984

  14. Composite biomarkers defined by multiparametric immunofluorescence analysis identify ALK-positive adenocarcinoma as a potential target for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Hélène; De Guillebon, Eléonore; Biard, Lucie; Mandavit, Marion; Gibault, Laure; Fabre, Elisabeth; Antoine, Martine; Hofman, Paul; Beau-Faller, Michèle; Blons, Hélène; Danel, Claire; Barthes, Françoise Le Pimpec; Gey, Alain; Granier, Clémence; Wislez, Marie; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Oudard, Stéphane; Bruneval, Patrick; Badoual, Cécile; Cadranel, Jacques; Tartour, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors have been successfully developed for non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) displaying chromosomal rearrangements of the ALK gene, but unfortunately resistance invariably occurs. Blockade of the PD-1-PD-L1/2 inhibitory pathway constitutes a breakthrough for the treatment of NSCLC. Some predictive biomarkers of clinical response to this therapy are starting to emerge, such as PD-L1 expression by tumor/stromal cells and infiltration by CD8(+) T cells expressing PD-1. To more effectively integrate all of these potential biomarkers of clinical response to immunotherapy, we have developed a multiparametric immunofluorescence technique with automated immune cell counting to comprehensively analyze the tumor microenvironment of ALK-positive adenocarcinoma (ADC). When analyzed as either a continuous or a dichotomous variable, the mean number of tumor cells expressing PD-L1 (p = 0.012) and the percentage of tumor cells expressing PD-L1 were higher in ALK-positive ADC than in EGFR-mutated ADC or WT (non-EGFR-mutated and non-KRAS-mutated) NSCLC. A very strong correlation between PD-L1 expression on tumor cells and intratumoral infiltration by CD8(+) T cells was observed, suggesting that an adaptive mechanism may partly regulate this expression. A higher frequency of tumors combining positive PD-L1 expression and infiltration by intratumoral CD8(+) T cells or PD-1(+)CD8(+) T cells was also observed in ALK-positive lung cancer patients compared with EGFR-mutated (p = 0.03) or WT patients (p = 0.012). These results strongly suggest that a subgroup of ALK-positive lung cancer patients may constitute good candidates for anti-PD-1/-PD-L1 therapies.

  15. PIM Kinases as Potential Therapeutic Targets in a Subset of Peripheral T Cell Lymphoma Cases

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Sánchez, Esperanza; Odqvist, Lina; Rodríguez-Pinilla, Socorro M.; Sánchez-Beato, Margarita; Roncador, Giovanna; Domínguez-González, Beatriz; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; García Collazo, Ana M.; Cantalapiedra, Esther González; Fernández, Joaquín Pastor; del Olmo, Soraya Curiel; Pisonero, Helena; Madureira, Rebeca; Almaraz, Carmen; Mollejo, Manuela; Alves, F. Javier; Menárguez, Javier; González-Palacios, Fernando; Rodríguez-Peralto, José Luis; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo L.; Real, Francisco X.; García, Juan F.; Bischoff, James R.; Piris, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no efficient therapy for patients with peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL). The Proviral Integration site of Moloney murine leukemia virus (PIM) kinases are important mediators of cell survival. We aimed to determine the therapeutic value of PIM kinases because they are overexpressed in PTCL patients, T cell lines and primary tumoral T cells. PIM kinases were inhibited genetically (using small interfering and short hairpin RNAs) and pharmacologically (mainly with the pan-PIM inhibitor (PIMi) ETP-39010) in a panel of 8 PTCL cell lines. Effects on cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle, key proteins and gene expression were evaluated. Individual inhibition of each of the PIM genes did not affect PTCL cell survival, partially because of a compensatory mechanism among the three PIM genes. In contrast, pharmacological inhibition of all PIM kinases strongly induced apoptosis in all PTCL cell lines, without cell cycle arrest, in part through the induction of DNA damage. Therefore, pan-PIMi synergized with Cisplatin. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of PIM reduced primary tumoral T cell viability without affecting normal T cells ex vivo. Since anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALK+ ALCL) cell lines were the most sensitive to the pan-PIMi, we tested the simultaneous inhibition of ALK and PIM kinases and found a strong synergistic effect in ALK+ ALCL cell lines. Our findings suggest that PIM kinase inhibition could be of therapeutic value in a subset of PTCL, especially when combined with ALK inhibitors, and might be clinically beneficial in ALK+ ALCL. PMID:25386922

  16. Ceritinib in ALK-Rearranged Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Alice T.; Kim, Dong-Wan; Mehra, Ranee; Tan, Daniel S.W.; Felip, Enriqueta; Chow, Laura Q.M.; Camidge, D. Ross; Vansteenkiste, Johan; Sharma, Sunil; De Pas, Tommaso; Riely, Gregory J.; Solomon, Benjamin J.; Wolf, Juergen; Thomas, Michael; Schuler, Martin; Liu, Geoffrey; Santoro, Armando; Lau, Yvonne Y.; Goldwasser, Meredith; Boral, Anthony L.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring the anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene (ALK) rearrangement is sensitive to the ALK inhibitor crizotinib, but resistance invariably develops. Ceritinib (LDK378) is a new ALK inhibitor that has shown greater antitumor potency than crizotinib in preclinical studies. METHODS In this phase 1 study, we administered oral ceritinib in doses of 50 to 750 mg once daily to patients with advanced cancers harboring genetic alterations in ALK. In an expansion phase of the study, patients received the maximum tolerated dose. Patients were assessed to determine the safety, pharmacokinetic properties, and antitumor activity of ceritinib. Tumor biopsies were performed before ceritinib treatment to identify resistance mutations in ALK in a group of patients with NSCLC who had had disease progression during treatment with crizotinib. RESULTS A total of 59 patients were enrolled in the dose-escalation phase. The maximum tolerated dose of ceritinib was 750 mg once daily; dose-limiting toxic events included diarrhea, vomiting, dehydration, elevated aminotransferase levels, and hypophosphatemia. This phase was followed by an expansion phase, in which an additional 71 patients were treated, for a total of 130 patients overall. Among 114 patients with NSCLC who received at least 400 mg of ceritinib per day, the overall response rate was 58% (95% confidence interval [CI], 48 to 67). Among 80 patients who had received crizotinib previously, the response rate was 56% (95% CI, 45 to 67). Responses were observed in patients with various resistance mutations in ALK and in patients without detectable mutations. Among patients with NSCLC who received at least 400 mg of ceritinib per day, the median progression-free survival was 7.0 months (95% CI, 5.6 to 9.5). CONCLUSIONS Ceritinib was highly active in patients with advanced, ALK-rearranged NSCLC, including those who had had disease progression during crizotinib treatment, regardless of the

  17. Oral Clofarabine for Relapsed/Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-17

    Follicular Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Low Grade B-cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large-cell Lymphoma

  18. Clinical Practice Recommendations on Indication and Timing of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Mature T Cell and NK/T Cell Lymphomas: An International Collaborative Effort on Behalf of the Guidelines Committee of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A; Kumar, Ambuj; Ayala, Ernesto; Hamadani, Mehdi; Reimer, Peter; Gisselbrecht, Christian; d'Amore, Francesco; Jantunen, Esa; Ishida, Takashi; Bazarbachi, Ali; Foss, Francine; Advani, Ranjana; Fenske, Timothy S; Lazarus, Hillard M; Friedberg, Jonathan W; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Sokol, Lubomir; Tobinai, Kensei; Tse, Eric; Burns, Linda J; Chavez, Julio C; Reddy, Nishitha M; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Ahmed, Sairah; Nademanee, Auayporn; Mohty, Mohamad; Gopal, Ajay K; Fanale, Michelle A; Pro, Barbara; Moskowitz, Alison J; Sureda, Anna; Perales, Miguel Angel; Carpenter, Paul A; Savani, Bipin N

    2017-08-07

    Recognizing the significant biological and clinical heterogeneity of mature T cell and natural killer (NK)/T cell lymphomas, the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation invited experts to develop clinical practice recommendations related to the role of autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (auto-HCT) and allogeneic HCT (allo-HCT) for specific histological subtypes. We used the GRADE methodology to aid in moving from evidence to decision making and ultimately to generating final recommendations. Auto-HCT in front-line consolidation is recommended in peripheral T cell lymphoma not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS), angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma (AITL), anaplastic large cell lymphoma-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALCL-ALK)-negative, NK/T cell (disseminated), enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma (EATL), and hepatosplenic lymphomas. Auto-HCT in relapsed-sensitive disease is recommended for NK/T cell (localized and disseminated), EATL, subcutaneous panniculitis-like T cell, and ALCL-ALK-positive lymphomas. Auto-HCT is also recommended for PTCL-NOS, AITL, and ALCL-ALK-negative lymphomas if not performed as front-line therapy. Auto-HCT in refractory (primary or relapsed) disease is not recommended for any of the histological subtypes discussed. Allo-HCT in front-line consolidation is recommended for NK/T cell (disseminated), adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL; acute and lymphoma type), and hepatosplenic lymphomas. Allo-HCT for relapsed-sensitive disease is recommended for PTCL-NOS, AITL, ALCL-ALK-negative, ALCL-ALK-positive, NK/T cell (localized and disseminated), ATLL (acute, lymphoma type, smoldering/chronic), mycosis fungoides/Sezary syndrome (advanced stage IIB-IVB or tumor stage/extracutaneous), EATL, subcutaneous panniculitis-like T cell, and hepatosplenic lymphoma. Allo-HCT in refractory (primary or relapsed refractory) disease is recommended for any aforementioned histological subtypes. Emerging novel therapies will likely be incorporated

  19. Recurrence of lung adenocarcinoma after an interval of 15 years revealed by demonstration of the same type of EML4-ALK fusion gene.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Yoshitane; Kanamori, Kiyonobu; Watanabe, Takahiro; Mikami, Koji; Ieki, Ryuji; Nakano, Takashi; Kajimoto, Kazuyoshi; Hirota, Seiichi

    2014-12-01

    We carried out an experiment on a 58-year-old man with multiple left lung tumors and swelling of multiple lymph nodes. For clinical staging and therapeutic purposes, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cytology and lung biopsy were performed. The biopsy specimen revealed the left lower lung mass to be immunohistochemically ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive adenocarcinoma. Using the BAL specimen from the left lower lung, EML4 (echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4)-ALK variant 1 fusion gene was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). His past history showed that he had undergone an operation for lung adenocarcinoma of the right lower lobe 15 years before, and the pathological specimen at that time revealed that the lung adenocarcinoma with pleural invasion and single metastasis of mediastinal lymph node showed a mucinous cribriform pattern and/or signet-ring cell pattern. The typical histology led us to examine the ALK rearrangement in the primary lung cancer and mediastinal metastatic tumor. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for ALK was positive, and ALK break apart fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed a positive result. Moreover, RT-PCR using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from the right lung cancer also demonstrated EML4-ALK variant 1 fusion gene. Although there is a possibility that the left lung cancer is de novo one with multiple metastases, detection of the same fusion gene of the very rare EML4-ALK variant 1 in both tumors suggests that the left cancer is a recurrence of the right lung cancer after an interval of 15 years. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma in Australia and New Zealand: High-Surface-Area Textured Implants Are Associated with Increased Risk.

    PubMed

    Loch-Wilkinson, Anna; Beath, Kenneth J; Knight, Robert John William; Wessels, William Louis Fick; Magnusson, Mark; Papadopoulos, Tim; Connell, Tony; Lofts, Julian; Locke, Michelle; Hopper, Ingrid; Cooter, Rodney; Vickery, Karen; Joshi, Preeti Avinash; Prince, H Miles; Deva, Anand K

    2017-10-01

    The association between breast implants and breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) has been confirmed. Implant-related risk has been difficult to estimate to date due to incomplete datasets. All cases in Australia and New Zealand were identified and analyzed. Textured implants reported in this group were subjected to surface area analysis. Sales data from three leading breast implant manufacturers (i.e., Mentor, Allergan, and Silimed) dating back to 1999 were secured to estimate implant-specific risk. Fifty-five cases of breast implant-associated ALCL were diagnosed in Australia and New Zealand between 2007 and 2016. The mean age of patients was 47.1 years and the mean time of implant exposure was 7.46 years. There were four deaths in the series related to mass and/or metastatic presentation. All patients were exposed to textured implants. Surface area analysis confirmed that higher surface area was associated with 64 of the 75 implants used (85.3 percent). Biocell salt loss textured (Allergan, Inamed, and McGhan) implants accounted for 58.7 percent of the implants used in this series. Comparative analysis showed the risk of developing breast implant-associated ALCL to be 14.11 times higher with Biocell textured implants and 10.84 higher with polyurethane (Silimed) textured implants compared with Siltex textured implants. This study has calculated implant-specific risk of breast implant-associated ALCL. Higher-surface-area textured implants have been shown to significantly increase the risk of breast implant-associated ALCL in Australia and New Zealand. The authors present a unifying hypothesis to explain these observations.

  1. Molecular Testing Guideline for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients for EGFR and ALK Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lindeman, Neal I.; Cagle, Philip T.; Beasley, Mary Beth; Chitale, Dhananjay Arun; Dacic, Sanja; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Jenkins, Robert Brian; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Saldivar, Juan-Sebastian; Squire, Jeremy; Thunnissen, Erik; Ladanyi, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish evidence-based recommendations for the molecular analysis of lung cancers that are that are required to guide EGFR- and ALK-directed therapies, addressing which patients and samples should be tested, and when and how testing should be performed. Participants Three cochairs without conflicts of interest were selected, one from each of the 3 sponsoring professional societies: College of American Pathologists, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, and Association for Molecular Pathology. Writing and advisory panels were constituted from additional experts from these societies. Evidence Three unbiased literature searches of electronic databases were performed to capture articles published published from January 2004 through February 2012, yielding 1533 articles whose abstracts were screened to identify 521 pertinent articles that were then reviewed in detail for their relevance to the recommendations. Evidence was formally graded for each recommendation. Consensus Process Initial recommendations were formulated by the cochairs and panel members at a public meeting. Each guideline section was assigned to at least 2 panelists. Drafts were circulated to the writing panel (version 1), advisory panel (version 2), and the public (version 3) before submission (version 4). Conclusions The 37 guideline items address 14 subjects, including 15 recommendations (evidence grade A/B). The major recommendations are to use testing for EGFR mutations and ALK fusions to guide patient selection for therapy with an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, respectively, in all patients with advanced-stage adenocarcinoma, regardless of sex, race, smoking history, or other clinical risk factors, and to prioritize EGFR and ALK testing over other molecular predictive tests. As scientific discoveries and clinical practice outpace the completion of randomized clinical trials, evidence-based guidelines developed

  2. Molecular Testing Guideline for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients for EGFR and ALK Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lindeman, Neal I.; Cagle, Philip T.; Beasley, Mary Beth; Chitale, Dhananjay Arun; Dacic, Sanja; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Jenkins, Robert Brian; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Saldivar, Juan-Sebastian; Squire, Jeremy; Thunnissen, Erik; Ladanyi, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish evidence-based recommendations for the molecular analysis of lung cancers that are required to guide EGFR- and ALK-directed therapies, addressing which patients and samples should be tested, and when and how testing should be performed. Participants Three cochairs without conflicts of interest were selected, one from each of the 3 sponsoring professional societies: College of American Pathologists, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, and Association for Molecular Pathology. Writing and advisory panels were constituted from additional experts from these societies. Evidence Three unbiased literature searches of electronic databases were performed to capture articles published from January 2004 through February 2012, yielding 1533 articles whose abstracts were screened to identify 521 pertinent articles that were then reviewed in detail for their relevance to the recommendations. Evidence was formally graded for each recommendation. Consensus Process Initial recommendations were formulated by the cochairs and panel members at a public meeting. Each guideline section was assigned to at least 2 panelists. Drafts were circulated to the writing panel (version 1), advisory panel (version 2), and the public (version 3) before submission (version 4). Conclusions The 37 guideline items address 14 subjects, including 15 recommendations (evidence grade A/B). The major recommendations are to use testing for EGFR mutations and ALK fusions to guide patient selection for therapy with an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, respectively, in all patients with advanced-stage adenocarcinoma, regardless of sex, race, smoking history, or other clinical risk factors, and to prioritize EGFR and ALK testing over other molecular predictive tests. As scientific discoveries and clinical practice outpace the completion of randomized clinical trials, evidence-based guidelines developed by expert

  3. A novel lead compound CM-118: antitumor activity and new insight into the molecular mechanism and combination therapy strategy in c-Met- and ALK-dependent cancers.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lanfang; Shu, Mengjun; Chen, Yaqing; Yang, Dexiao; He, Qun; Zhao, Hui; Feng, Zhiyong; Liang, Chris; Yu, Ker

    2014-06-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and the c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase play essential roles in the pathogenesis in multiple human cancers and present emerging targets for cancer treatment. Here, we describe CM-118, a novel lead compound displaying low nanomolar biochemical potency against both ALK and c-Met with selectivity over>90 human kinases. CM-118 potently abrogated hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-induced c-Met phosphorylation and cell migration, phosphorylation of ALK, EML4-ALK, and ALK resistance mutants in transfected cells. CM-118 inhibited proliferation and/or induced apoptosis in multiple c-Met- and ALK-addicted cancer lines with dose response profile correlating target blockade. We show that the CM-118-induced apoptosis in c-Met-amplified H1993 NSCLC cells involved a rapid suppression of c-Met activity and c-Met-to-EGFR cross-talk, and was profoundly potentiated by EGFR inhibitors as shown by the increased levels of apoptotic proteins cleaved-PARP and Bim as well as reduction of the survival protein Mcl-1. Bim-knockdown or Mcl-1 overexpression each significantly attenuated apoptosis. We also revealed a key role by mTOR in mediating CM-118 action against the EML4-ALK-dependent NSCLC cells. Abrogation of EML4-ALK in H2228 cells profoundly reduced signaling capacity of the rapamycin-sensitive mTOR pathway leading to G 1 cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial hyperpolarization, a metabolic perturbation linked to mTOR inhibition. Depletion of mTOR or mTORC1 inhibited H2228 cell growth, and mTOR inhibitors potentiated CM-118's antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Oral administration of CM-118 at a wide range of well tolerated dosages diminished c-Met- and ALK phosphorylation in vivo, and caused tumor regression or growth inhibition in multiple c-Met- and ALK-dependent tumor xenografts in mice. CM-118 exhibits favorable pharmacokinetic and drug metabolism properties hence presents a candidate for clinical evaluation.

  4. Alectinib's activity against CNS metastases from ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer: a single institution case series.

    PubMed

    Metro, Giulio; Lunardi, Gianluigi; Bennati, Chiara; Chiarini, Pietro; Sperduti, Isabella; Ricciuti, Biagio; Marcomigni, Luca; Costa, Cinzia; Crinò, Lucio; Floridi, Piero; Gori, Stefania; Chiari, Rita

    2016-09-01

    In the present study we assessed the activity of the next-generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (-TKI) alectinib, in patients with ALK-postive, advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and central nervous system (CNS) metastases. NSCLCs with ALK-positive disease, as assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and CNS metastases were treated with alectinib 600 mg BID. Included patients were followed prospectively in order to evaluate the efficacy of the drug, with particular emphasis on activity in the CNS. Eleven consecutive patients were enrolled. The majority of them were pretreated with crizotinib (n = 10, 90.9 %), and cranial radiotherapy (n = 8, 72.7 %). Six of the seven patients with measurable CNS disease experienced a CNS response, including three patients who were naïve for cranial radiation. Median duration of response was 8 months. For the whole population, median CNS-progression-free survival (-PFS), systemic-PFS, overall-PFS, overall survival, and 1-year survival were 8, 11, 8, 13 months, and 31.1 %, respectively. Two patients experiencing a CNS response were assessed for alectinib's concentrations in serum and cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), and showed a CSF-to-serum ratio ranging from 0.001 to 0.003 ng/mL. Alectinib is highly active against CNS metastases from ALK-positive NSCLCs, irrespective of prior treatment(s) with ALK-TKI(s) and/or cranial radiotherapy. The low CSF-to-serum ratio of alectinib suggests that measuring the concentrations of the drug in the CSF may not be a reliable surrogate of its distribution into the CNS.

  5. Decoding Tumor Phenotypes for ALK, ROS1, and RET Fusions in Lung Adenocarcinoma Using a Radiomics Approach.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Sohn, Insuk; Cho, Jong Ho; Lee, Ho Yun; Kim, Jae-Hun; Choi, Yoon-La; Kim, Hyeseung; Lee, Genehee; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Jhingook

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative imaging using radiomics can capture distinct phenotypic differences between tumors and may have predictive power for certain phenotypes according to specific genetic mutations. We aimed to identify the clinicoradiologic predictors of tumors with ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase), ROS1 (c-ros oncogene 1), or RET (rearranged during transfection) fusions in patients with lung adenocarcinoma.A total of 539 pathologically confirmed lung adenocarcinomas were included in this retrospective study. The baseline clinicopathologic characteristics were retrieved from the patients' medical records and the ALK/ROS1/RET fusion status was reviewed. Quantitative computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography imaging characteristics were evaluated using a radiomics approach. Significant features for the fusion-positive tumor prediction model were extracted from all of the clinicoradiologic features, and were used to calculate diagnostic performance for predicting 3 fusions' positivity. The clinicoradiologic features were compared between ALK versus ROS1/RET fusion-positive tumors to identify the clinicoradiologic similarity between the 2 groups.The fusion-positive tumor prediction model was a combination of younger age, advanced tumor stage, solid tumor on CT, higher values for SUV(max) and tumor mass, lower values for kurtosis and inverse variance on 3-voxel distance than those of fusion-negative tumors (sensitivity and specificity, 0.73 and 0.70, respectively). ALK fusion-positive tumors were significantly different in tumor stage, central location, SUV(max), homogeneity on 1-, 2-, and 3-voxel distances, and sum mean on 2-voxel distance compared with ROS1/RET fusion-positive tumors.ALK/ROS1/RET fusion-positive lung adenocarcinomas possess certain clinical and imaging features that enable good discrimination of fusion-positive from fusion-negative lung adenocarcinomas.

  6. Decoding Tumor Phenotypes for ALK, ROS1, and RET Fusions in Lung Adenocarcinoma Using a Radiomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Sohn, Insuk; Cho, Jong Ho; Lee, Ho Yun; Kim, Jae-Hun; Choi, Yoon-La; Kim, Hyeseung; Lee, Genehee; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Jhingook

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Quantitative imaging using radiomics can capture distinct phenotypic differences between tumors and may have predictive power for certain phenotypes according to specific genetic mutations. We aimed to identify the clinicoradiologic predictors of tumors with ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase), ROS1 (c-ros oncogene 1), or RET (rearranged during transfection) fusions in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. A total of 539 pathologically confirmed lung adenocarcinomas were included in this retrospective study. The baseline clinicopathologic characteristics were retrieved from the patients’ medical records and the ALK/ROS1/RET fusion status was reviewed. Quantitative computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography imaging characteristics were evaluated using a radiomics approach. Significant features for the fusion-positive tumor prediction model were extracted from all of the clinicoradiologic features, and were used to calculate diagnostic performance for predicting 3 fusions’ positivity. The clinicoradiologic features were compared between ALK versus ROS1/RET fusion-positive tumors to identify the clinicoradiologic similarity between the 2 groups. The fusion-positive tumor prediction model was a combination of younger age, advanced tumor stage, solid tumor on CT, higher values for SUVmax and tumor mass, lower values for kurtosis and inverse variance on 3-voxel distance than those of fusion-negative tumors (sensitivity and specificity, 0.73 and 0.70, respectively). ALK fusion-positive tumors were significantly different in tumor stage, central location, SUVmax, homogeneity on 1-, 2-, and 3-voxel distances, and sum mean on 2-voxel distance compared with ROS1/RET fusion-positive tumors. ALK/ROS1/RET fusion-positive lung adenocarcinomas possess certain clinical and imaging features that enable good discrimination of fusion-positive from fusion-negative lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:26469915

  7. Genotype-driven therapies for non-small cell lung cancer: focus on EGFR, KRAS and ALK gene abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gaughan, Elizabeth M; Costa, Daniel B

    2011-05-01

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) are heterogeneous cancers. In 2004, the identification of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) somatic mutations provided the first glimpse of a clinically relevant NSCLC oncogene. Approximately 70% of NSCLCs with EGFR mutations (exon 19 deletions or the exon 21 L858R) attain responses to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib and erlotinib, with improved response rate (RR), progression-free survival (PFS) and in some reports overall survival (OS) when compared with EGFR wildtype (WT) cases. Three randomized trials of gefitinib versus chemotherapy (IPASS, WJTOG3405, NEJ002) in stage IV NSCLC have consistently demonstrated better RR and PFS (hazard ratios of 0.48 [IPASS], 0.49 [WJTOG3405] and 0.30 [NEJ002]) for EGFR-mutated NSCLCs treated with gefitinib. Novel irreversible EGFR TKIs (afatinib, XL647, PF00299804) show similar activity in EGFR-mutated patients. A translocation involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene with EML4, identified in 2007, is the most recent oncogene found in NSCLC. Crizotinib (PF02341066), an ALK TKI, has shown impressive activity against ALK translocated NSCLC in an expanded cohort of a phase I trial (NCT00585195). Over 80 patients have been treated and the RR is ∼60% with the 6-month PFS rate exceeding 70%. A registration phase III trial of crizotinib versus second-line chemotherapy (pemetrexed/docetaxel) is underway (PROFILE 1007, NCT00932893). KRAS, EGFR mutations and ALK translocations are mutually exclusive and few EGFR WT NSCLCs respond to EGFR TKIs. The promising results of EGFR and ALK TKIs in molecular subgroups of NSCLCs herald a new age of drug and clinical trial development for patients with NSCLC.

  8. Clinical application of immunocytochemical detection of ALK rearrangement on cytology slides for detection or screening of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hisashi; Tone, Kiyoshi; Hayashi, Akihito; Morimoto, Takeshi; Taima, Kageaki; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Nakagawa, Hideyuki; Takanashi, Shingo; Okumura, Ken; Kurose, Akira

    2013-06-01

    Immunohistochemical screening of Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement has been regarded essential and routinely carried out to select treatment for lung adenocarcinoma. However, difficulty to approach a tumor by transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB), it often fails to obtain tumor tissues whereas tumor cells are contained in cytology specimens simultaneously obtained when the bronchoscopy is done. Therefore we evaluated the expression of ALK protein by using immunohistochemistry (IHC) on TBLB specimens and immunocytochemistry (ICC) on brushing smear cytology slides in the same cases, and compared the concordance rate of IHC and ICC results. ICC was carried out on routine Papanicolau-stained slides after cytology diagnosis and decolorization. Eighteen patients with adenocarcinoma were extracted in the Hirosaki University Hospital and the Hirosaki National Hospital. IHC and ICC results showed a very high concordance rate: sensitivity of ICC in comparison with IHC was 85.7% (6/7), specificity was 100% (11/11), positive predictive value was 100% (6/6), and negative predictive value was 91.6% (11/12). Detection of ALK rearrangement using ICC on routine Papanicolau cytology slides is considered to be advantageous for lung cancer treatments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. ALK-positive gastric inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in an adult with familial adenomatous polyposis and diffuse fundic polyposis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jun; Huang, Bo; Yang, Xiuping; Yang, Ming; He, Jun; Nie, Xiu

    2017-09-18

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) of the stomach is extremely rare in adults and exhibits a variable biological behavior that ranges from frequently benign lesions to more aggressive variants. Here we report a case of gastric IMT with lymph node metastasis in an adult who had undergone total colectomy for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). A 37-year-old man presented gradual-onset epigastric discomfort; he had undergone total colectomy for FAP 6 years before. The upper endoscopy revealed diffuse polyposis in the body of stomach and a submucosal protruding tumor of approximately 4.5 × 3.5 cm in the gastric angular incisure, appearing like gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Histology after surgery verified the diagnosis of fundic gland polyposis (FGPs) and gastric IMT with lymph node metastasis. Both the primary IMT tissue and its metastatic lesion but not the FGP or FAP tissue were positive for anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) on immunohistochemical staining. Fluorescent in situ hybridization confirmed the existence of ALK rearrangement in IMT tissues. However, the patient exhibited no abnormalities in microsatellite instability or mismatch repair-system components, including MSH6, MSH2, MLH1 and PMS2, in IMT, FGP or FAP tissue. This case allowed for exploring the relationship among IMT, FGP and FAP and indicates that gastric IMT should be considered in the diagnosis of a gastric mass in patients with FAP. ALK may be a useful biomarker in the diagnosis of IMT and its metastatic lesions.

  10. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease-Related Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Exhibits a Low Prevalence of EGFR and ALK Driver Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Chin Kook; Kim, Yong Hyun; Park, Chan Kwon; Kim, Ju Sang; Kim, Jin Woo; Lee, Sang Haak; Kim, Seung Joon; Yoon, Hyoung Kyu; Kim, Tae-Jung; Lee, Kyo Young

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are two major lung diseases. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, v‐Ki‐ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma (KRAS) mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements represent driver mutations that are frequently assessed on initial evaluation of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The present study focused on the expression of driver mutations in NSCLC patients presenting with COPD and further evaluated the association between NSCLC and COPD. Data from 501 consecutive patients with histologically proven recurrent or metastatic NSCLC were analyzed retrospectively. The patients underwent spirometry and genotyping of EGFR, ALK, and KRAS in tissue samples. Patient characteristics and expression of driver mutations were compared between the COPD and non-COPD groups. Among 350 patients with spirometric results, 106 (30.3%) were diagnosed with COPD, 108 (30.9%) had EGFR mutations, 31 (8.9%) had KRAS mutations, and 34 (9.7%) showed ALK rearrangements. COPD was independently associated with lower prevalences of EGFR mutations (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.254–0.931, p = 0.029) and ALK rearrangements (95% CI, 0.065–0.600, p = 0.004). The proportions of EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangements decreased as the severity of airflow obstruction increased (p = 0.001). In never smokers, the prevalence of EGFR mutations was significantly lower in the COPD group than in the non-COPD group (12.7% vs. 49.0%, p = 0.002). COPD-related NSCLC patients exhibited low prevalences of EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangements compared with the non-COPD group. Further studies are required regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying lung cancer associated with COPD. PMID:26555338

  11. Three-Year Follow-Up of an Alectinib Phase I/II Study in ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: AF-001JP.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Tomohide; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Seto, Takashi; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Maemondo, Makoto; Inoue, Akira; Hida, Toyoaki; Yoshioka, Hiroshige; Harada, Masao; Ohe, Yuichiro; Nogami, Naoyuki; Murakami, Haruyasu; Kuriki, Hiroshi; Shimada, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Takeuchi, Kengo; Nishio, Makoto

    2017-03-15

    Purpose Alectinib is an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) -specific kinase inhibitor that seems to be effective against non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with a variety of ALK mutations. The primary analysis of AF-001JP reported a promising overall response rate. To assess progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), patients from the phase II part of AF-001JP were followed up for approximately 3 years. Patients and Methods Oral alectinib 300 mg was administered twice per day to patients with ALK inhibitor-naïve, ALK-positive NSCLC who had progressed after one or more regimens of previous chemotherapy. In this long-term follow-up, efficacy (PFS, OS), correlation between tumor shrinkage and PFS, safety of alectinib, and relief of cancer symptoms were evaluated. Results At the updated data cutoff (September 10, 2015; first patient in August 30, 2011, last patient in April 18, 2012), 25 of 46 phase II patients were still receiving alectinib. Disease progression was confirmed in 18 patients (39%); median PFS was not reached (3-year PFS rate, 62%; 95% CI, 45 to 75). Fourteen patients had brain metastases at baseline; of these, 6 remained in the study without CNS and systemic progression. Tumor shrinkage and PFS showed no correlation. The 3-year OS rate was 78% (13 events). The most common treatment-related adverse event (all grades) was increased blood bilirubin (36.2%). Most cancer symptoms were relieved early, and medication for symptoms was dramatically decreased during alectinib therapy. Conclusion Alectinib was effective in this 3-year follow-up with a favorable safety profile over a long administration period in ALK-positive NSCLC without previous ALK inhibitor treatment.

  12. Durable brain response with pulse-dose crizotinib and ceritinib in ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer compared with brain radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dudnik, Elizabeth; Siegal, Tali; Zach, Leor; Allen, Aaron M; Flex, Dov; Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Limon, Dror; Hirsch, Fred R; Peled, Nir

    2016-04-01

    Crizotinib achieves excellent systemic control in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-rearranged (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); however, central nervous system (CNS) metastases frequently occur as an early event. Whole brain irradiation, the standard treatment, results in neurocognitive impairment. We present a case series of three ALK+ NSCLC patients with progressing CNS metastases who were treated with pulse-dose crizotinib followed by ceritinib. Three ALK+ NSCLC patients treated between 2011 and 2014 (two males, two never smokers, age range 20-54years, all echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4/ALK rearrangement), were diagnosed with progressing cerebral disease while receiving crizotinib. Clinico-pathological characteristics, treatments, and outcomes were analyzed. In two patients the progression was limited to the CNS, and radiological evidence of leptomeningeal spread was present in one patient. Sequential use of crizotinib 500mg administered once daily (pulse-dose) followed by ceritinib on progression achieved control of the disease in the CNS for over 18 months and over 7 months in Patient 1 and Patient 2, respectively. This strategy provided durable CNS control after whole-brain radiotherapy failure in Patient 1, and allowed the whole-brain radiotherapy to be deferred in Patient 2. Limited CNS progression was documented in Patient 3 while he was on standard-dose/pulse-dose crizotinib for 15months; durable (over 7 months) complete remission was achieved with stereotactic radiotherapy and ceritinib. Manipulating the crizotinib schedule in ALK+ NSCLC patients with CNS metastases and using a novel ALK-inhibitor at the time of further progression may provide durable CNS control and allow brain radiotherapy to be deferred. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation and Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Gene Fusion: Detection in Malignant Pleural Effusion by RNA or PNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Lin; Lee, Chung-Ta; Lu, Cheng-Chan; Yang, Shu-Ching; Chen, Wan-Li; Lee, Yang-Cheng; Yang, Chung-Hsien; Peng, Shu-Ling; Su, Wu-Chou; Chow, Nan-Haw; Ho, Chung-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing EGFR mutations and detecting ALK gene fusion are indispensable when planning to treat pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is a devastating complication of lung cancer and sometimes the only source for mutation analysis. The percentage of tumor cells in the pleural effusion may be low; therefore, mutant enrichment is required for a successful analysis. The EGFR mutation status in MPE was determined using three methods: (1) PCR sequencing of genomic DNA (direct sequencing), (2) mutant-enriched PCR sequencing of genomic DNA using peptide nucleic acid (PNA-sequencing), and (3) PCR sequencing of cDNA after reverse transcription for cellular RNA (RNA-sequencing). RT-PCR was also used to test cases for ALK gene fusion. PNA-sequencing and RNA-sequencing had similar analytical sensitivities (< 1%), which indicates similar enrichment capabilities. The clinical sensitivity in 133 cases when detecting the common EGFR exon 19 and exon 21 mutations was 56.4% (75/133) for direct sequencing, 63.2% (84/133) for PNA-sequencing, and 65.4% (87/133) for RNA-sequencing. RT-PCR and sequencing showed 5 cases (3.8%) with ALK gene fusion. All had wild-type EGFR. For EGFR analysis of MPE, RNA-sequencing is at least as sensitive as PNA-sequencing but not limited to specific mutations. Detecting ALK fusion can be incorporated in the same RNA workflow. Therefore, RNA is a better source for comprehensive molecular diagnoses in MPE. PMID:27352172

  14. Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, arising in association with saline breast implant: expanding the spectrum of breast implant-associated lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Aladily, Tariq N; Nathwani, Bharat N; Miranda, Roberto N; Kansal, Rina; Yin, C Cameron; Protzel, Richard; Takowsky, Gary S; Medeiros, L Jeffrey

    2012-11-01

    Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, is a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is most common in Asia and is driven by Epstein-Barr virus infection. These tumors usually arise in the nasal region; in rare cases they can involve extranasal sites, most often skin, with involvement of the breast being rare. Lymphomas arising adjacent to breast implants are rare, and most cases reported to date have been anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Here we report a 41-year-old white woman with bilateral saline breast implants placed for cosmetic reasons who almost 9 years later developed painful swelling at the right-breast implant site. Excisional biopsy revealed lymphoma composed of monomorphic large cells associated with necrosis and angioinvasion. Immunohistochemical analysis showed an aberrant, NK/T-cell immunophenotype with the lymphoma cells being CD2+, CD3+, CD56+, partial CD30+, granzyme B, TIA-1+, CD4+, CD5+, CD7+, and CD8+. In situ hybridization analysis showed Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA within the neoplastic cells. Polymerase chain reaction analysis showed monoclonal T-cell receptor-γ chain gene rearrangement. These findings support the diagnosis of extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type. On the basis of our review of the literature, this case is unique. In addition, we believe this case is important to report, because it expands the spectrum of T-cell lymphomas that can be associated with breast implants and may be a forerunner of additional cases to follow.

  15. Anaplastic thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000352.htm Anaplastic thyroid cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... of cancer of the thyroid gland. Causes Anaplastic thyroid cancer is an invasive type of thyroid cancer that ...

  16. Treatment patterns and survival in patients with ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer: a Canadian retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Kayaniyil, S.; Hurry, M.; Wilson, J.; Wheatley-Price, P.; Melosky, B.; Rothenstein, J.; Cohen, V.; Koch, C.; Zhang, J.; Osenenko, K.; Liu, G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Crizotinib was the first agent approved for the treatment of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)–positive (+) non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc), followed by ceritinib. However, patients eventually progress or develop resistance to crizotinib. With limited real-world data available, the objective of the present work was to evaluate treatment patterns and survival after crizotinib in patients with locally advanced or metastatic ALK+ nsclc in Canada. Methods In this retrospective study at 6 oncology centres across Canada, medical records of patients with locally advanced or metastatic ALK+ nsclc were reviewed. Demographic and clinical characteristics, treatments, and outcomes data were abstracted. Analyses focused on patients who discontinued crizotinib treatment. Results Of the 97 patients included, 9 were crizotinib-naïve, and 39 were still receiving crizotinib at study end. The 49 patients who discontinued crizotinib treatment were included in the analysis. Of those 49 patients, 43% received ceritinib at any time, 20% subsequently received systemic chemotherapy only (but never ceritinib), and 37% received no further treatment or died before receiving additional treatment. Median overall survival from crizotinib discontinuation was shorter in patients who did not receive ceritinib than in those who received ceritinib (1.7 months vs. 20.4 months, p < 0.001). In a multivariable analysis, factors associated with poorer survival included lack of additional therapies (particularly ceritinib), male sex, and younger age, but not smoking status; patients of Asian ethnicity showed a nonsignificant trend toward improved survival. Conclusions A substantial proportion of patients with ALK+ nsclc received no further treatment or died before receiving additional treatment after crizotinib. Treatment with systemic agents was associated with improved survival, with ceritinib use being associated with the longest survival. PMID:28050149

  17. Amphiregulin triggered epidermal growth factor receptor activation confers in vivo crizotinib-resistance of EML4-ALK lung cancer and circumvention by epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Takeuchi, Shinji; Fukuda, Koji; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Arai, Sachiko; Nanjo, Shigeki; Yamada, Tadaaki; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Mukae, Hiroshi; Yano, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Crizotinib, a first-generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, is known to be effective against echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancers. Nonetheless, the tumors subsequently become resistant to crizotinib and recur in almost every case. The mechanism of the acquired resistance needs to be deciphered. In this study, we established crizotinib-resistant cells (A925LPE3-CR) via long-term administration of crizotinib to a mouse model of pleural carcinomatous effusions; this model involved implantation of the A925LPE3 cell line, which harbors the EML4-ALK gene rearrangement. The resistant cells did not have the secondary ALK mutations frequently occurring in crizotinib-resistant cells, and these cells were cross-resistant to alectinib and ceritinib as well. In cell clone #2, which is one of the clones of A925LPE3-CR, crizotinib sensitivity was restored via the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by means of an EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitor (erlotinib) or an anti-EGFR antibody (cetuximab) in vitro and in the murine xenograft model. Cell clone #2 did not have an EGFR mutation, but the expression of amphiregulin (AREG), one of EGFR ligands, was significantly increased. A knockdown of AREG with small interfering RNAs restored the sensitivity to crizotinib. These data suggest that overexpression of EGFR ligands such as AREG can cause resistance to crizotinib, and that inhibition of EGFR signaling may be a promising strategy to overcome crizotinib resistance in EML4-ALK lung cancer.

  18. An integrated molecular modeling approach for in silico design of new tetracyclic derivatives as ALK inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Peddi, Saikiran Reddy; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2016-10-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), a promising therapeutic target for treatment of human cancers, is a receptor tyrosine kinase that instigates the activation of several signal transduction pathways. In the present study, in silico methods have been employed in order to explore the structural features and functionalities of a series of tetracyclic derivatives displaying potent inhibitory activity toward ALK. Initially docking was performed using GLIDE 5.6 to probe the bioactive conformation of all the compounds and to understand the binding modes of inhibitors. The docking results revealed that ligand interaction with Met 1199 plays a crucial role in binding of inhibitors to ALK. Further to establish a robust 3D-QSAR model using CoMFA and CoMSIA methods, the whole dataset was divided into three splits. Model obtained from Split 3 showed high accuracy ([Formula: see text] of 0.700 and 0.682, [Formula: see text] of 0.971 and 0.974, [Formula: see text] of 0.673 and 0.811, respectively for CoMFA and CoMSIA). The key structural requirements for enhancing the inhibitory activity were derived from CoMFA and CoMSIA contours in combination with site map analysis. Substituting small electronegative groups at Position 8 by replacing either morpholine or piperidine rings and maintaining hydrophobic character at Position 9 in tetracyclic derivatives can enhance the inhibitory potential. Finally, we performed molecular dynamics simulations in order to investigate the stability of protein ligand interactions and MM/GBSA calculations to compare binding free energies of co-crystal ligand and newly designed molecule N1. Based on the coherence of outcome of various molecular modeling studies, a set of 11 new molecules having potential predicted inhibitory activity were designed.

  19. Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... don't know why a person gets non-Hodgkin lymphoma. You are at increased risk if you have ... system or have certain types of infections. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can cause many symptoms, such as Swollen, painless ...

  20. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-05

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  1. Smac mimetic LCL161 supports neuroblastoma chemotherapy in a drug class-dependent manner and synergistically interacts with ALK inhibitor TAE684 in cells with ALK mutation F1174L

    PubMed Central

    Najem, Safiullah; Langemann, Doerte; Appl, Birgit; Trochimiuk, Magdalena; Hundsdoerfer, Patrick; Reinshagen, Konrad; Eschenburg, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor during infancy and childhood. Outcome of high-risk and late-stage disease remains poor despite intensive treatment regimens. Suppressing inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) using Smac mimetics (SM) significantly sensitizes neuroblastoma (NB) cells for chemotherapy, however strongly dependent on the cytotoxic drug combined with SM. Therefore, a systematic analysis of the impact of SM in combination with different classes of chemotherapeutics was of crucial importance. Treatment of NB cell lines with SM LCL161 and vinca alkaloids revealed a strong synergistic inhibition of proliferation and significant induction of apoptosis in virtually all established and de novo NB cell lines (n=8). In contrast, combination of anthracyclines or topoisomerase inhibitors with LCL161 showed a synergism for single drugs and/or cell lines only. Furthermore, we could show that insensibility to LCL161-mediated sensitization for chemotherapeutics is associated with aberrant activation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) by common mutation F1174L. Inhibition of ALK using TAE684 is able to overcome this resistance in a synergistic fashion, a finding that could be highly relevant for improvement of neuroblastoma therapy. PMID:27655666

  2. Smac mimetic LCL161 supports neuroblastoma chemotherapy in a drug class-dependent manner and synergistically interacts with ALK inhibitor TAE684 in cells with ALK mutation F1174L.

    PubMed

    Najem, Safiullah; Langemann, Doerte; Appl, Birgit; Trochimiuk, Magdalena; Hundsdoerfer, Patrick; Reinshagen, Konrad; Eschenburg, Georg

    2016-11-08

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor during infancy and childhood.Outcome of high-risk and late-stage disease remains poor despite intensive treatment regimens.Suppressing inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) using Smac mimetics (SM) significantly sensitizes neuroblastoma (NB) cells for chemotherapy, however strongly dependent on the cytotoxic drug combined with SM.Therefore, a systematic analysis of the impact of SM in combination with different classes of chemotherapeutics was of crucial importance. Treatment of NB cell lines with SM LCL161 and vinca alkaloids revealed a strong synergistic inhibition of proliferation and significant induction of apoptosis in virtually all established and de novo NB cell lines (n=8).In contrast, combination of anthracyclines or topoisomerase inhibitors with LCL161 showed a synergism for single drugs and/or cell lines only.Furthermore, we could show that insensibility to LCL161-mediated sensitization for chemotherapeutics is associated with aberrant activation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) by common mutation F1174L. Inhibition of ALK using TAE684 is able to overcome this resistance in a synergistic fashion, a finding that could be highly relevant for improvement of neuroblastoma therapy.

  3. [Gene expression profiling by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH): a example for its application to the study of lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Villalva, C; Trempat, P; Zenou, R C; Delsol, G; Brousset, P

    2001-03-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to isolate genes that were differentially expressed in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive and ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma. In addition, this approach was applied to Hodgkin's disease cases with different clinical outcomes. SSH combines a normalization step that equalizes the abundance of cDNAs within the sequences to be tested and a subtraction step that excludes the common sequences between the target and the control. In a model system, the SSH technique enriches for rare sequences up to 5,000-fold in one round. We have isolated several genes whose expression varied significantly with regard to the tumour subtypes. There were different genes with known or unknown functions. We aim to compare the results of the SSH approach with those obtained with high density filters. In a near future, we would like to design DNA chips specific of each pathology that could be used for clinical purposes (evaluation of prognosis and therapeutic response).

  4. The European Medicines Agency Review of Brentuximab Vedotin (Adcetris) for the Treatment of Adult Patients With Relapsed or Refractory CD30+ Hodgkin Lymphoma or Systemic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma: Summary of the Scientific Assessment of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use.

    PubMed

    Gravanis, Iordanis; Tzogani, Kyriaki; van Hennik, Paula; de Graeff, Pieter; Schmitt, Petra; Mueller-Berghaus, Jan; Salmonson, Tomas; Gisselbrecht, Christian; Laane, Edward; Bergmann, Lothar; Pignatti, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    On October 25, 2012, a conditional marketing authorization valid throughout the European Union (EU) was issued for brentuximab vedotin for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory CD30+ Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (sALCL). For HL, the indication is restricted to treatment after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) or after at least two previous therapies when ASCT or multiagent chemotherapy is not a treatment option. Brentuximab vedotin is an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) composed of a CD30-directed monoclonal antibody (recombinant chimeric IgG1) that is covalently linked to the antimicrotubule agent monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE). Binding of the ADC to CD30 on the cell surface initiates internalization of the MMAE-CD30 complex, followed by proteolytic cleavage that releases MMAE. The recommended dose is 1.8 mg/kg administered as an intravenous infusion over 30 minutes every 3 weeks. Brentuximab vedotin as a single agent was evaluated in two single-arm studies. Study SG035-003 included 102 patients with relapsed or refractory HL. An objective response was observed in 76 patients (75%), with complete remission in 34 (33%). Study SG035-004 included 58 patients with relapsed or refractory sALCL. An objective response was observed in 50 patients (86%), with complete remission in 34 (59%). The most frequently observed toxicities were peripheral sensory neuropathy, fatigue, nausea, diarrhea, neutropenia, vomiting, pyrexia, and upper respiratory tract infection. The present report summarizes the scientific review of the application leading to approval in the EU. The detailed scientific assessment report and product information, including the summary of the product characteristics, are available on the European Medicines Agency website (http://www.ema.europa.eu). Brentuximab vedotin was approved in the European Union for the treatment of adult

  5. Panobinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-21

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  6. The expression of SALL4 is significantly associated with EGFR, but not KRAS or EML4-ALK mutations in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiangbo; Qian, Rulin; Zhang, Binbin

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide; unfortunately, its prognosis is still very poor. Therefore, developing the target molecular is very important for lung cancer diagnosis and treatment, especially in the early stage. With this in view, spalt-like transcription factor 4 (SALL4) is considered a potential biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis in cancers, including lung cancer. Methods In order to better investigate the association between the expression of SALL4 and driver genes mutation, 450 histopathologically diagnosed patients with lung cancer and 11 non-cancer patients were enrolled to test the expression of SALL4 and the status of driver genes mutation. This investigation included epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), and a fusion gene of the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) and the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). Results The results of the study showed that females harbored more EGFR mutation in adenocarcinoma (ADC). The mutation rate of KRAS and EML4-ALK was about 5%, and the double mutations of EGFR/EML4-ALK were higher than EGFR/KRAS. In the expression analysis, the expression of SALL4 was much higher in cancer tissues than normally expected, especially in tissues that carried EGFR mutation (P<0.05), however, there were no significant differences between different mutation types. Likewise, there were no significant differences between expression of SALL4 and KRAS and EML4-ALK mutations. Conclusions SALL4 is up regulated in lung cancer specimens and harbors EGFR mutation; this finding indicates that SALL4 expression may be relevant with EGFR, which could provide a new insight to lung cancer therapy. The mechanism needs further investigation and analysis. PMID:27867542

  7. Efficacy of alectinib in central nervous system metastases in crizotinib-resistant ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer: Comparison of RECIST 1.1 and RANO-HGG criteria.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Leena; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Shaw, Alice T; Barlesi, Fabrice; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C; Kim, Dong-Wan; Camidge, D Ross; Hughes, Brett G M; Yang, James C-H; de Castro, Javier; Crino, Lucio; Léna, Hervé; Do, Pascal; Golding, Sophie; Bordogna, Walter; Zeaiter, Ali; Kotb, Ahmed; Gadgeel, Shirish

    2017-09-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) progression is common in patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive (ALK+) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving crizotinib. Next-generation ALK inhibitors have shown activity against CNS metastases, but accurate assessment of response and progression is vital. Data from two phase II studies in crizotinib-refractory ALK+ NSCLC were pooled to examine the CNS efficacy of alectinib, a CNS-active ALK inhibitor, using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST version 1.1) and Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology high-grade glioma (RANO-HGG) criteria. Both studies enrolled patients aged ≥18 years who had previously received crizotinib. NP28761 was conducted in North America and NP28673 was a global study. All patients received 600 mg oral alectinib twice daily and had baseline CNS imaging. CNS response for those with baseline CNS metastases was determined by an independent review committee. Baseline measurable CNS disease was identified in 50 patients by RECIST and 43 by RANO-HGG. CNS objective response rate was 64.0% by RECIST (95% confidence interval [CI]: 49.2-77.1; 11 CNS complete responses [CCRs]) and 53.5% by RANO-HGG (95% CI: 37.7-68.8; eight CCRs). CNS responses were durable, with consistent estimates of median duration of 10.8 months with RECIST and 11.1 months with RANO-HGG. Of the 39 patients with measurable CNS disease by both RECIST and RANO-HGG, only three (8%) had CNS progression according to one criteria but not the other (92% concordance rate). Alectinib demonstrated promising efficacy in the CNS for ALK+ NSCLC patients pretreated with crizotinib, regardless of the assessment criteria used. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Plasma Cell-Free DNA in Paediatric Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Mussolin, Lara; Burnelli, Roberta; Pillon, Marta; Carraro, Elisa; Farruggia, Piero; Todesco, Alessandra; Mascarin, Maurizio; Rosolen, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Extracellular circulating DNA (cfDNA) can be found in small amounts in plasma of healthy individuals. Increased levels of cfDNA have been reported in patients with cancer of breast, cervix, colon, liver and it was shown that cfDNA can originate from both tumour and non-tumour cells. Objectives: Levels of cfDNA of a large series of children with lymphoma were evaluated and analyzed in relation with clinical characteristics. Methods: plasma cfDNA levels obtained at diagnosis in 201 paediatric lymphoma patients [43 Hodgkin lymphomas (HL), 45 anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL), 88 Burkitt lymphomas (BL), 17 lymphoblastic (LBL), 8 diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL)] and 15 healthy individuals were determined using a quantitative PCR assay for POLR2 gene and, in addition, for NPM-ALK fusion gene in ALCL patients. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare plasma levels among different patient subgroups and controls and to analyze relationship between levels of cfDNA and clinical characteristics. Results: Levels of cfDNA in lymphoma patients were significantly higher compared with controls (p<0.0001). CfDNA was associated with median age (p=0.01) in HL, and with stage in ALCL (p=0.01). In HL patients high cfDNA levels were correlated with poor prognosis (p=0.03). In ALCL we found that most of the cfDNA (77%) was non-tumor DNA. Conclusion: level of plasma cfDNA might constitute an important non-invasive tool at diagnosis in lymphoma patients' management; in particular in patients with HL, cfDNA seems to be a promising prognostic biomarker. PMID:23678368

  9. Fusion Protein Cytokine Therapy After Rituximab in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  10. Alisertib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  11. Pediatric Extranodal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ellen M; Pavio, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoma is the third most common pediatric neoplasm. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) accounts for nearly half of cases and commonly involves extranodal sites. Compared with adults, this histologic spectrum of pediatric NHL is very narrow and consists of aggressive tumors. Patients typically present with widespread disease. Generally, NHL occurring in children includes Burkitt lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Staging and assessment of therapeutic response are usually based on FDG-PET/CT. Due to the increased susceptibility of young patients to the effects of ionizing radiation, alternative methods of imaging are being explored. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Airway management in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shaha, Ashok R

    2008-07-01

    In patients who present with advanced anaplastic thyroid cancer, airway management is difficult because of bilateral vocal cord paralysis or tracheal invasion by the tumor. Airway management can be extremely complex in these patients. This is the author's 25 year experience with 30 patients who presented with anaplastic thyroid cancer and acute airway problems. The patients' airway issues developed soon after presentation or a few months after treatment. Ten patients presented with initial symptoms of acute airway distress. All of these patients were treated with tracheostomy or cricothyrotomy. The 10 patients who presented with initial symptoms of acute airway distress died within 4 months. Eight of the remaining 20 patients developed bilateral vocal cord paralysis. Airway management for these patients depended on the extent of distant disease and the family's understanding of the advanced nature of the disease and the palliative efforts. The remaining patients had a palliative and supportive approach. Airway management was the most critical issue in patients who presented with anaplastic thyroid cancer and initial airway distress. Cricothyrotomy was helpful in avoiding acute airway catastrophe. It is important to distinguish between poorly differentiated and anaplastic thyroid cancer and lymphoma for appropriate airway management.

  13. Everolimus and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-21

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  14. CEOP/IVE/GDP Compared With CEOP as the First-line Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Adult Patients With PTCL

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma; ALK-negative Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T Cell Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis Like T Cell Lymphoma; Acute Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  15. Purely Cortical Anaplastic Ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Flávio Ramalho; Zanini, Marco Antônio; Ducati, Luis Gustavo; Vital, Roberto Bezerra; de Lima Neto, Newton Moreira; Gabarra, Roberto Colichio

    2012-01-01

    Ependymomas are glial tumors derived from ependymal cells lining the ventricles and the central canal of the spinal cord. It may occur outside the ventricular structures, representing the extraventicular form, or without any relationship of ventricular system, called ectopic ependymona. Less than fifteen cases of ectopic ependymomas were reported and less than five were anaplastic. We report a rare case of pure cortical ectopic anaplastic ependymoma. PMID:23119204

  16. MORAb-004 in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  17. Clinical features of Bim deletion polymorphism and its relation with crizotinib primary resistance in Chinese patients with ALK/ROS1 fusion-positive non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limin; Jiang, Tao; Li, Xuefei; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Chao; Zhao, Sha; Xi, Lei; Zhang, Shijia; Liu, Xiaozhen; Jia, Yijun; Yang, Hui; Shi, Jinpeng; Su, Chunxia; Ren, Shengxiang; Zhou, Caicun

    2017-08-01

    The authors' previous study demonstrated that the B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma (Bcl-2)-like 11 (BCL2L11) (Bim) deletion polymorphism was associated with poor clinical response to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with EGFR mutations. The objective of the current study was to investigate the impact of the Bim deletion polymorphism among patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive or ROS proto-oncogene 1, receptor tyrosine kinase (ROS1)-positive NSCLC who were treated with crizotinib. A total of 55 patients with ALK-positive NSCLC and 14 patients with ROS1-positive NSCLC who were treated with crizotinib were enrolled into the current study. The Bim deletion polymorphism was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction. The clinical features of the Bim deletion polymorphism and its impact on the effect of crizotinib were investigated. The Bim deletion polymorphism was present in 9 of 69 patients with ALK-positive or ROS1-positive NSCLC (13.0%). There were no differences noted with regard to clinicopathological features between patients with and without the Bim deletion polymorphism. Patients with the Bim deletion polymorphism had a significantly shorter progression-free survival (PFS) and lower objective response rate compared with those without (median PFS, 182 days vs 377 days [P = .008]) (objective response rate, 44.4% vs 81.7% [P =.041]) in all populations. The significant difference in PFS was observed in patients with ALK-positive NSCLC (83 days vs 305 days [P =.0304]) compared with those with ROS1-positive NSCLC (218 days vs not reached [P =.082]). Multivariate analysis indicated that the Bim deletion polymorphism was an independent predictive factor for patients with ALK-positive NSCLC who were treated with crizotinib (hazard ratio, 4.786 [P =.006]). The Bim deletion polymorphism was found to be associated with poor clinical response to crizotinib in

  18. Controversies on Hodgkin's disease and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Hematopathology Study Group of the Società Italiana di Anatomia Patologica.

    PubMed

    Pileri, S

    1994-01-01

    Just one year ago the Italian Society of Pathology (S.I.A.P.) created a Study Group which included members of the most active Italian hematopathology teams. Prof. Pasquale Calapso was asked to chair the Group and Prof. Stefano Pileri to take care of secretarial duties. The aim of the Group is to spread hematopathologic knowledge among young pathologists and to promote activities that can contribute to updating Italian pathologists on topics of both speculative and diagnostic interest. The first Workshop of the S.I.A.P. Hematopathology Group was held at the Palazzo dei Congressi in Bologna, November 20, 1993. About 150 pathologists from all over Italy took part in the meeting, which consisted of two sections devoted to: a) discussion of the boundaries between Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, and b) a case seminar illustrating the impact of immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of bone-marrow biopsy. The first section included 5 presentations and a Round Table chaired by Prof. Luciano Fiore-Donati. Below, the contributors to this section summarize the content of their presentations, which were aimed at answering specific questions the Organizers had put to them.

  19. Lenalidomide Therapy for Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory, Peripheral T-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-04-18

    Peripheral T-cell Lymphomas; Adult T-cell Leukemia; Adult T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma Unspecified; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; T/Null Cell Systemic Type; Cutaneous t-Cell Lymphoma With Nodal/Visceral Disease

  20. Panobinostat and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Multiple Myeloma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  1. Crizotinib versus chemotherapy on ALK-positive NSCLC :a systematic review of efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingxia; Wang, Guanqi; Ma, Haiyan; Shan, Baoen

    2017-06-23

    Introduction Crizotinib was approved to treat anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by the Food and Drug Administration in 2011.We conducted a systematic review of clinical trials and retrospective studies to compare the efficacy and safety of crizotinib with chemotherapy. Methods We searched electronic databases from inception to Dec. 2016. Clinical trials and retrospective studies regarding crizotinib and crizotinib versus chemotherapy in treatment of NSCLC were eligible. The primary outcome were the objective response rate (ORR) and disease control rate (DCR). Results Nine studies (five clinical trials and four retrospective studies) including 729 patients met the inclusion criteria. Crizotinib treatment revealed 1-year OS of 77.1% and PFS of 9.17 months. And crizotinib had a better performance than chemotherapy in ORR(OR: 4.97 , 95%CI: 3.16 to 7.83 ,P<0.00001, I2=35%). DCR revealed superiority with crizotinib than chemotherapy(OR: 3.42 , 95% CI: 2.33 to 5.01 , P<0.00001, I2=0%). PR (partial response) were significant superior to that of chemotherapy through direct systematic review. No statistically significant difference in CR (complete response) were found between crizotinib-treated group and chemotherapy-treated group. Regarding SD(stable disease), chemotherapy-treated group had a better performance than crizotinib-treated group. Common adverse events associated with crizotinib were visual disorder, gastrointestinal side effects, and elevated liver aminotransferase levels, whereas common adverse events with chemotherapy were fatigue, nausea, and hematologic toxicity. Conclusions This systematic review revealed improved objective response rate and increased disease control rate in crizotinib group comparing with chemotherapy group. Crizotinib treatment would be a favorable treatment option for patients with ALK-positive NSCLC. ALK inhibitors may have future potential applications in other cancers driven by ALK or c

  2. Effects of adenovirus-mediated expression of p27Kip1, p21Waf1 and p16INK4A in cell lines derived from t(2;5) anaplastic large cell lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Turturro, Franceso; Arnold, Marilyn D; Frist, Audrey Y; Seth, Prem

    2002-06-01

    We investigated the response of SUDHL-1 and L428 cells, derived from t(2;5)-anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and Hodgkin's disease (HD), respectively, to recombinant adenoviruses expressing cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs) p27Kip1 (Adp27), p21Waf1 (Adp21) and p16INK4A (Adp16). Cell cycle analysis of SUDHL-1 cells after 24 h of infection with 200 multiplicity of infection (MOI) of Adp27, Adp21, and Adp16, showed very high levels of cell debris in the subG1 area. The magnitude of cell debris-events was Adp27/Adp21 > Adp16. Cell cycle analysis of L428 cells revealed absence of cell debris and increased G2 phase in all the groups of cells tested as compared to the controls (mock and AdNull). A minimal increase in G1 phase was also evident in cells infected with Adp27 (52%) compared to uninfected cells (43%), AdNull (45%) and to cells infected with Adp21 (37%) and Adp16 (31%). The presence of significant levels of Coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) on the cell surface of L428 cells excluded the cell membrane-barrier as responsible for the differences in cell observed in response to the recombinant adenovirus-mediated CDKIs expression as compared to SUDHL-1. We also showed that the recombinant adenovirus-mediated cytotoxicity measured as apoptosis was MOI- and vector-dependent in SUDHL-1 cells at lower MOI (100). In conclusion, the therapeutic effect induced by recombinant adenoviruses expressing p27Kip1, p21Waf1 and p16INK4A is cell-dependent in cells derived from selected lymphoid malignancies. Biochemical cellular differences more than cell surface barriers seem to be responsible for differences in response to recombinant adenovirus-mediated expression of cytotoxic genes. Moreover, the cytotoxicity of recombinant adenoviruses expressing p27Kip1, p21Waf1 and p16INK4A may be further explored as a tool for gene therapy of t(2;5)-derived ALCL.

  3. Salvia Hispanica Seed in Reducing Risk of Disease Recurrence in Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-26

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; B Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Burkitt Leukemia; Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Mycosis Fungoides; Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis-Like T-Cell Lymphoma; Systemic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Transformed Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  4. CPI-613 and Bendamustine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  5. Targeting Neuroblastoma Cell Surface Proteins: Recommendations for Homology Modeling of hNET, ALK, and TrkB

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Yazan; Heger, Zbyněk; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-01-01

    Targeted therapy is a promising approach for treatment of neuroblastoma as evident from the large number of targeting agents employed in clinical practice today. In the absence of known crystal structures, researchers rely on homology modeling to construct template-based theoretical structures for drug design and testing. Here, we discuss three candidate cell surface proteins that are suitable for homology modeling: human norepinephrine transporter (hNET), anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 2 (NTRK2 or TrkB). When choosing templates, both sequence identity and structure quality are important for homology modeling and pose the first of many challenges in the modeling process. Homology modeling of hNET can be improved using template models of dopamine and serotonin transporters instead of the leucine transporter (LeuT). The extracellular domains of ALK and TrkB are yet to be exploited by homology modeling. There are several idiosyncrasies that require direct attention throughout the process of model construction, evaluation and refinement. Shifts/gaps in the alignment between the template and target, backbone outliers and side-chain rotamer outliers are among the main sources of physical errors in the structures. Low-conserved regions can be refined with loop modeling method. Residue hydrophobicity, accessibility to bound metals or glycosylation can aid in model refinement. We recommend resolving these idiosyncrasies as part of “good modeling practice” to obtain highest quality model. Decreasing physical errors in protein structures plays major role in the development of targeting agents and understanding of chemical interactions at the molecular level. PMID:28163672

  6. Targeting Neuroblastoma Cell Surface Proteins: Recommendations for Homology Modeling of hNET, ALK, and TrkB.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Yazan; Heger, Zbyněk; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-01-01

    Targeted therapy is a promising approach for treatment of neuroblastoma as evident from the large number of targeting agents employed in clinical practice today. In the absence of known crystal structures, researchers rely on homology modeling to construct template-based theoretical structures for drug design and testing. Here, we discuss three candidate cell surface proteins that are suitable for homology modeling: human norepinephrine transporter (hNET), anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 2 (NTRK2 or TrkB). When choosing templates, both sequence identity and structure quality are important for homology modeling and pose the first of many challenges in the modeling process. Homology modeling of hNET can be improved using template models of dopamine and serotonin transporters instead of the leucine transporter (LeuT). The extracellular domains of ALK and TrkB are yet to be exploited by homology modeling. There are several idiosyncrasies that require direct attention throughout the process of model construction, evaluation and refinement. Shifts/gaps in the alignment between the template and target, backbone outliers and side-chain rotamer outliers are among the main sources of physical errors in the structures. Low-conserved regions can be refined with loop modeling method. Residue hydrophobicity, accessibility to bound metals or glycosylation can aid in model refinement. We recommend resolving these idiosyncrasies as part of "good modeling practice" to obtain highest quality model. Decreasing physical errors in protein structures plays major role in the development of targeting agents and understanding of chemical interactions at the molecular level.

  7. Synthesis and preliminary PET imaging of 11C and 18F isotopologues of the ROS1/ALK inhibitor lorlatinib

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Thomas Lee; Normandin, Marc D.; Stephenson, Nickeisha A.; Livni, Eli; Liang, Steven H.; Wooten, Dustin W.; Esfahani, Shadi A.; Stabin, Michael G.; Mahmood, Umar; Chen, Jianqing; Wang, Wei; Maresca, Kevin; Waterhouse, Rikki N.; El Fakhri, Georges; Richardson, Paul; Vasdev, Neil

    2017-06-01

    Lorlatinib (PF-06463922) is a next-generation small-molecule inhibitor of the orphan receptor tyrosine kinase c-ros oncogene 1 (ROS1), which has a kinase domain that is physiologically related to anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), and is undergoing Phase I/II clinical trial investigations for non-small cell lung cancers. An early goal is to measure the concentrations of this drug in brain tumour lesions of lung cancer patients, as penetration of the blood-brain barrier is important for optimal therapeutic outcomes. Here we prepare both 11C- and 18F-isotopologues of lorlatinib to determine the biodistribution and whole-body dosimetry assessments by positron emission tomography (PET). Non-traditional radiolabelling strategies are employed to enable an automated multistep 11C-labelling process and an iodonium ylide-based radiofluorination. Carbon-11-labelled lorlatinib is routinely prepared with good radiochemical yields and shows reasonable tumour uptake in rodents. PET imaging in non-human primates confirms that this radiotracer has high brain permeability.

  8. Pathologic and clinical features of 77 Hodgkin's lymphoma patients treated in a lymphoma protocol (LNH87): a GELA study.

    PubMed

    Cazals-Hatem, D; André, M; Mounier, N; Copin, M C; Divine, M; Berger, F; Bosly, A; Kerneis, Y; Brière, J; Quesnel, B; Diebold, J; Gaulard, P

    2001-03-01

    Between 1987 and 1993, 77 of 2855 lymphomas included in the LNH87 protocol of the GELA as non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and reviewed by a panel of pathologists had a diagnosis changed to Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Some of these lymphomas had been initially interpreted as anaplastic large-cell lymphoma Hodgkin-like (ALCL-HL subtype). The purpose of this study was to analyze the histologic pitfalls initially encountered, to define more clearly the diagnostic criteria of lymphomas placed in the gray zone around HL, and to follow the survival of these 77 patients affected with HL and initially treated with NHL regimens. The 77 cases of HL were reviewed by three hematopathologists and immunostained with a large panel of antibodies, including CD30, CD15, CD3, CD20, CD45, CD43, LMP-1, EMA, BNH-9, TiA1, and ALK1. Each case was classified according to the Lukes-Rye system and the British National Lymphoma Investigation (BNLI) grading. The initial clinical presentation of patients was analyzed, and the overall and event-free survival rates of the 77 patients were estimated. Among the 77 HLs, 46 were misinterpreted as NHL by primary individual pathologists (12 as ALCL, 8 as ALCL-HL, 12 as peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), 6 as B-cell lymphoma, and 8 as unclassifiable NHL). The other 31 cases had been first considered by the panel as consistent with ALCL-HL (n = 18) or with PTCL (n = 13) and were changed later in view of an immunophenotype concordant with HL. Fifty-five percent of the patients completed the full NHL treatment. The 5-year event-free and overall survival rates were 54% and 77%, respectively. The current results indicate that lymphomas initially called ALCL-HL should not be regarded as a variant of ALCL, but as HL. The clinical consequences of misdiagnoses seem to be a lower event-free survival rate compared with that of classical HL, probably because of more relapses of initially inappropriately treated HL.

  9. Iodine I 131 Tositumomab, Etoposide and Cyclophosphamide Followed by Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-21

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  10. Bortezomib and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  11. Vorinostat, Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Previously Untreated T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  12. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in Children and Adolescents: Progress Through Effective Collaboration, Current Knowledge, and Challenges Ahead

    PubMed Central

    Minard-Colin, Véronique; Brugières, Laurence; Reiter, Alfred; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Gross, Thomas G.; Woessmann, Wilhelm; Burkhardt, Birgit; Sandlund, John T.; Williams, Denise; Pillon, Marta; Horibe, Keizo; Auperin, Anne; Le Deley, Marie-Cécile; Zimmerman, Martin; Perkins, Sherrie L.; Raphael, Martine; Lamant, Laurence; Klapper, Wolfram; Mussolin, Lara; Poirel, Hélène A.; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Damm-Welk, Christine; Rosolen, Angelo; Patte, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is the fourth most common malignancy in children, has an even higher incidence in adolescents, and is primarily represented by only a few histologic subtypes. Dramatic progress has been achieved, with survival rates exceeding 80%, in large part because of a better understanding of the biology of the different subtypes and national and international collaborations. Most patients with Burkitt lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma are cured with short intensive pulse chemotherapy containing cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, and high-dose methotrexate. The benefit of the addition of rituximab has not been established except in the case of primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma. Lymphoblastic lymphoma is treated with intensive, semi-continuous, longer leukemia-derived protocols. Relapses in B-cell and lymphoblastic lymphomas are rare and infrequently curable, even with intensive approaches. Event-free survival rates of approximately 75% have been achieved in anaplastic large-cell lymphomas with various regimens that generally include a short intensive B-like regimen. Immunity seems to play an important role in prognosis and needs further exploration to determine its therapeutic application. ALK inhibitor therapeutic approaches are currently under investigation. For all pediatric lymphomas, the intensity of induction/consolidation therapy correlates with acute toxicities, but because of low cumulative doses of anthracyclines and alkylating agents, minimal or no long-term toxicity is expected. Challenges that remain include defining the value of prognostic factors, such as early response on positron emission tomography/computed tomography and minimal disseminated and residual disease, using new biologic technologies to improve risk stratification, and developing innovative therapies, both in the first-line setting and for relapse. PMID:26304908

  13. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Multiple Myeloma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  14. Lymphoma of the eyelid.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Frederik Holm; Heegaard, Steffen

    Lymphoma of the eyelid constitutes 5% of ocular adnexal lymphoma. In previously published cases, 56% of lymphomas of the eyelid are of B-cell origin and 44% are of T-cell origin. The most frequent B-cell lymphomas are extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (27 cases-14%) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (18 cases-9%). T-cell lymphomas are most frequently mycosis fungoides (25 cases-13%), extranodal natural killer/T-cell, nasal-type lymphoma (12 cases-6%), and primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (12 cases-6%). This distribution differs from the distribution of ocular adnexal lymphoma and that of cutaneous lymphoma. The majority of subtypes occur in elderly patients, except for lymphoblastic lymphoma of B-cell and T-cell origin and Burkitt lymphoma, which occur in children and adolescents. Several subtypes have a male predominance, including peripheral T-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma. Only lymphomatoid papulosis has a female predominance. Signs of B-cell and T-cell lymphomas are tumor and swelling of the eyelid. Ulceration and erythema occur frequently among patients with T-cell lymphoma. Radiotherapy with or without surgery is the treatment of choice for low-grade, solitary lymphomas, whereas chemotherapy with or without adjuvant treatment is the treatment of choice for high-grade or disseminated lymphomas. The majority of subtypes, especially low-grade subtypes, have a good prognosis with few recurrences or progression. Some subtypes, including mycosis fungoides, have a poorer prognosis. Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type has an exceedingly poor prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Bendamustine Hydrochloride, Etoposide, Dexamethasone, and Filgrastim For Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Mobilization in Treating Patients With Refractory or Recurrent Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-08

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  16. Cilengitide (EMD 121974) in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2

  17. Genetically Modified Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-06

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage II AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  18. Treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation or ALK gene rearrangement: results of an international expert panel meeting of the Italian Association of Thoracic Oncology.

    PubMed

    Gridelli, Cesare; de Marinis, Filippo; Cappuzzo, Federico; Di Maio, Massimo; Hirsch, Fred R; Mok, Tony; Morgillo, Floriana; Rosell, Rafael; Spigel, David R; Yang, James Chih-Hsin; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2014-05-01

    The availability of targeted drugs has made the assessment of the EGFR mutation and ALK rearrangement critical in choosing the optimal treatment for patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In May 2013, the Italian Association of Thoracic Oncology (AIOT) organized an International Experts Panel Meeting to review strengths and limitations of the available evidence for the diagnosis and treatment of advanced NSCLC with EGFR or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) alterations and to discuss implications for clinical practice and future clinical research. All patients with advanced NSCLC, with the exclusion of pure squamous cell carcinoma in former or current smokers, should be tested for EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangements before decisions are made on first-line treatment. First-line treatment of EGFR-mutated cases should be with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). Any available agent (gefitinib, erlotinib, or afatinib) can be used, until further data from comparative studies may better guide TKI selection. As general rule, and when clinically feasible, results of EGFR mutational status should be awaited before starting first-line treatment. Panelists agreed that the use of crizotinib is justified in any line of treatment. Although solid evidence supporting the continuation of EGFR TKIs or crizotinib beyond progression is lacking, in some cases (minimal, asymptomatic progression, or oligoprogression manageable by local therapy), treatment continuation beyond progression could be justified. Experimental strategies to target tumor heterogeneity and to treat patients after failure of EGFR TKIs or crizotinib are considered high-priority areas of research. A number of relevant research priorities were identified to optimize available treatment options.

  19. Proactive management strategies for potential gastrointestinal adverse reactions with ceritinib in patients with advanced ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Eric S; Baik, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fusions occur in 3%–7% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. Ceritinib, a once-daily, oral ALK inhibitor, has activity against crizotinib-resistant and crizotinib-naïve NSCLC, including brain metastases. Ceritinib (Zykadia™) was granted accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2014 for treating crizotinib-resistant ALK-positive NSCLC. Adverse events (AEs), particularly gastrointestinal (GI) AEs, are commonly experienced at the recommended dose of 750 mg/d and ∼38% of patients require dose interruption or reduction for GI AEs. This case study details our experience with the use of proactive GI AE management regimens in patients treated with ceritinib (750 mg/d) across two study sites. Proactive Regimens A and B were implemented in patients with metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC treated with ceritinib to manage drug-related GI AEs. Regimen A comprised ondansetron and diphenoxylate/atropine or loperamide, taken 30 minutes prior to ceritinib dose. Regimen B included dicyclomine (taken with the first ceritinib dose), ondansetron (taken 30 minutes prior to ceritinib dose for the first seven doses), and loperamide (taken as needed with the onset of diarrhea). The proactive medications were tapered off depending on patient tolerability to ceritinib. Nine patient cases are presented. Starting Regimens A or B before the first dose of ceritinib, or as soon as GI symptoms were encountered, prevented the need for dose reduction due to GI toxicity in eight of the nine patients. Using these regimens, 78% of patients were able to remain on 750 mg/d fasting. Two patients received 23 months and 16 months of therapy and remain on ceritinib 750 mg/d and 600 mg/d, respectively. Although not currently recommended or implemented in clinical studies, based on the patients evaluated here, upfront or proactive treatment plans that address AEs early on can allow the majority of patients to remain on the approved 750 mg

  20. Central nervous system involvement in T-cell lymphoma: A single center experience.

    PubMed

    Gurion, Ronit; Mehta, Neha; Migliacci, Jocelyn C; Zelenetz, Andrew; Moskowitz, Alison; Lunning, Matthew; Moskowitz, Craig; Hamlin, Paul; Horwitz, Steven

    2016-05-01

    Background We characterized the incidence of central nervous system (CNS) involvement, risk factors and outcome in a large single institution dataset of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). Methods Retrospective review of the PTCL database at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. We identified 231 patients with any subtype of PTCL between 1994-2011 with a minimum six months of follow-up or an event defined as relapse or death. Results Histologies included peripheral T-cell lymphoma-not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS) (31.6%), angioimmunoblastic (16.9%), anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), ALK- (12.1%), ALCL, ALK + (6.1%), extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma (7.4%), adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) (7.4%), and transformed mycosis fungoides (8.7%). Seventeen patients had CNS disease (7%). Fifteen had CNS involvement with PTCL and two had diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and glioblastoma. Median time to CNS involvement was 3.44 months (0.16-103.1). CNS prophylaxis was given to 24 patients (primarily intrathecal methotrexate). Rates of CNS involvement were not different in patients who received prophylaxis. Univariate analysis identified stage III-IV, bone marrow involvement, >1 extranodal site and ATLL as risk factors for CNS disease. On multivariate analysis, >1 extranodal site and international prognostic index (IPI) ≥ 3 were predictive for CNS involvement. The median survival of patients with CNS involvement was 2.63 months (0.10-75). Conclusions Despite high relapse rates, PTCL, except ATLL, carries a low risk of CNS involvement. Prognosis with CNS involvement is poor and risk factors include: >1 extra nodal site and IPI ≥3.

  1. 506U78 in Treating Patients With Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  2. Acantholytic anaplastic Paget's disease.

    PubMed

    Mobini, Narciss

    2009-03-01

    Classic Paget's disease (PD) can be diagnosed relatively easily by histopathologic examination. 'Anaplastic' variant of this disease is a less-recognized subset that may pose as a diagnostic challenge and pitfall. We describe two cases who presented with scaly erythematous plaques on their nipple/areola. In the first patient, there was no palpable mass and imaging studies were negative. The second case presented with a lesion 5 years after a lumpectomy. Initial shave biopsies revealed histopathologic changes indistinguishable from Bowen's disease with no readily identifiable classic Paget's cells, associated with prominent superficial acantholysis. The neoplastic cells were negative for mucin, GCDFP-15, negative/minimally positive for CEA and strongly positive for CK7 markers. A high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ in the underlying breast was ultimately found in both cases. Anaplastic PD is a rare variant of this disease that histologically mimics Bowen's disease with an associated prominent superficial acantholysis. There is mucin, CEA and GCDFP-15 negativity with positive CK7 reaction. A high index of suspicion along with a complete immunohistochemical panel should be considered in evaluating any Bowenoid neoplasm of the breast skin, particularly in superficial skin shave biopsies along with negative imaging studies and no palpable mass clinically.

  3. Alisertib in Combination With Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma, B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-26

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  4. VSV-hIFNbeta-NIS in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-10

    Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Refractory Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mycosis Fungoides; Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  5. The role of high dose chemotherapy and autologous stem-cell transplantation in peripheral T-cell lymphoma: a review of the literature and new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Yared, Jean; Kimball, Amy

    2013-02-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) is a heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that carries, except for ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a poor prognosis. Only a third of patients live 5years past diagnosis. The incidence of PTCL has been increasing during the last two decades. In recent years, there was a rising interest in PTCL manifested by the abundance of publications dedicated exclusively to this disease. The international T-cell lymphoma project was formed with an aim of unifying efforts towards a better understanding of the diagnosis and management of this disease. Given the poor outcomes of PTCL patients, high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem-cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) have been used in the up-front and salvage settings, with different success rates. However, there are no prospective randomized controlled trials addressing the role of HDT/ASCT in a PTCL-restricted population. This article critically reviews the data available from the retrospective and prospective studies addressing this topic. We will emphasize the favorable prognostic factors of HDT/ASCT such as a solid remission at the time of transplantation, a chemotherapy sensitive disease and a low prognostic index score. As novel agents and new therapeutic strategies are introduced, there is a continued need for prospective randomized trials to define the optimal use of HDT/ASCT in managing PTCL. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Vorinostat and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-12-08

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  7. Dose Monitoring of Busulfan and Combination Chemotherapy in Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-12

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult

  8. Integrating In Silico Prediction Methods, Molecular Docking, and Molecular Dynamics Simulation to Predict the Impact of ALK Missense Mutations in Structural Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Priya Doss, C. George; Chen, Luonan

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, advancements in next generation sequencing technology have placed personalized genomic medicine upon horizon. Understanding the likelihood of disease causing mutations in complex diseases as pathogenic or neutral remains as a major task and even impossible in the structural context because of its time consuming and expensive experiments. Among the various diseases causing mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) play a vital role in defining individual's susceptibility to disease and drug response. Understanding the genotype-phenotype relationship through SNPs is the first and most important step in drug research and development. Detailed understanding of the effect of SNPs on patient drug response is a key factor in the establishment of personalized medicine. In this paper, we represent a computational pipeline in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) for SNP-centred study by the application of in silico prediction methods, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics simulation approaches. Combination of computational methods provides a way in understanding the impact of deleterious mutations in altering the protein drug targets and eventually leading to variable patient's drug response. We hope this rapid and cost effective pipeline will also serve as a bridge to connect the clinicians and in silico resources in tailoring treatments to the patients' specific genotype. PMID:25054154

  9. Integrating in silico prediction methods, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics simulation to predict the impact of ALK missense mutations in structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Doss, C George Priya; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Chen, Luonan; Zhu, Hailong

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, advancements in next generation sequencing technology have placed personalized genomic medicine upon horizon. Understanding the likelihood of disease causing mutations in complex diseases as pathogenic or neutral remains as a major task and even impossible in the structural context because of its time consuming and expensive experiments. Among the various diseases causing mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) play a vital role in defining individual's susceptibility to disease and drug response. Understanding the genotype-phenotype relationship through SNPs is the first and most important step in drug research and development. Detailed understanding of the effect of SNPs on patient drug response is a key factor in the establishment of personalized medicine. In this paper, we represent a computational pipeline in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) for SNP-centred study by the application of in silico prediction methods, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics simulation approaches. Combination of computational methods provides a way in understanding the impact of deleterious mutations in altering the protein drug targets and eventually leading to variable patient's drug response. We hope this rapid and cost effective pipeline will also serve as a bridge to connect the clinicians and in silico resources in tailoring treatments to the patients' specific genotype.

  10. Activity and safety of brigatinib in ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer and other malignancies: a single-arm, open-label, phase 1/2 trial.

    PubMed

    Gettinger, Scott N; Bazhenova, Lyudmila A; Langer, Corey J; Salgia, Ravi; Gold, Kathryn A; Rosell, Rafael; Shaw, Alice T; Weiss, Glen J; Tugnait, Meera; Narasimhan, Narayana I; Dorer, David J; Kerstein, David; Rivera, Victor M; Clackson, Timothy; Haluska, Frank G; Camidge, David Ross

    2016-12-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements are oncogenic drivers of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Brigatinib (AP26113) is an investigational ALK inhibitor with potent preclinical activity against ALK mutants resistant to crizotinib and other ALK inhibitors. We aimed to assess brigatinib in patients with advanced malignancies, particularly ALK-rearranged NSCLC. In this ongoing, single-arm, open-label, phase 1/2 trial, we recruited patients from nine academic hospitals or cancer centres in the USA and Spain. Eligible patients were at least 18 years of age and had advanced malignancies, including ALK-rearranged NSCLC, and disease that was refractory to available therapies or for which no curative treatments existed. In the initial dose-escalation phase 1 stage of the trial, patients received oral brigatinib at total daily doses of 30-300 mg (according to a standard 3 + 3 design). The phase 1 primary endpoint was establishment of the recommended phase 2 dose. In the phase 2 expansion stage, we assessed three oral once-daily regimens: 90 mg, 180 mg, and 180 mg with a 7 day lead-in at 90 mg; one patient received 90 mg twice daily. We enrolled patients in phase 2 into five cohorts: ALK inhibitor-naive ALK-rearranged NSCLC (cohort 1), crizotinib-treated ALK-rearranged NSCLC (cohort 2), EGFR(T790M)-positive NSCLC and resistance to one previous EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (cohort 3), other cancers with abnormalities in brigatinib targets (cohort 4), and crizotinib-naive or crizotinib-treated ALK-rearranged NSCLC with active, measurable, intracranial CNS metastases (cohort 5). The phase 2 primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with an objective response. Safety and activity of brigatinib were analysed in all patients in both phases of the trial who had received at least one dose of treatment. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01449461. Between Sept 20, 2011, and July 8, 2014, we enrolled 137 patients (79 [58%] with ALK

  11. 17-DMAG in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenstr

  12. FAU in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-06

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell

  13. Oxaliplatin, Ifosfamide and Etoposide in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  14. Drug-induced reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients with ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer treated with the ALK inhibitor crizotinib.

    PubMed

    Brosnan, Evelyn M; Weickhardt, Andrew J; Lu, Xian; Maxon, Delee A; Barón, Anna E; Chonchol, Michel; Camidge, D Ross

    2014-03-01

    To the best of the authors' knowledge, the renal side effects of crizotinib have not been investigated previously. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration creatinine-based prediction equation during the first 12 weeks of crizotinib therapy and after crizotinib but before the introduction of any further systemic therapy. A total of 38 patients with stage IV anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive non-small cell lung cancer who were treated with crizotinib were identified. The mean eGFR decreased by 23.9% compared with baseline (P < .0001; 95% confidence interval, 21.3%-26.6%), with the majority of the decrease occurring within the first 2 weeks of therapy. Clinical history and blood urea nitrogen/creatinine ratios did not suggest prerenal causes. The objective response rate among evaluable patients (n = 27) was 41%. Tumor shrinkage was not correlated with changes in eGFR (correlation coefficient, -0.052; P = .798). Among the 16 patients for whom data after treatment with crizotinib were available, recovery to within 84% of the baseline eGFR occurred in all patients. After adjusting for the number of scans with intravenous contrast and the use of known nephrotoxic drugs, the issue of whether a patient was on or off crizotinib treatment was found to be significantly associated with changes in eGFR (P < .0001). As assessed by the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration prediction equation, eGFR is reduced by treatment with crizotinib, but the majority of patients will recover their eGFR after the cessation of therapy. The early onset, size of the change, minimal cumulative effect, and rapid reversibility raise the possibility that this may be a pharmacological and/or tubular creatinine secretion effect rather than a direct nephrotoxic effect. Increased vigilance with regard to the concomitant use of renally cleared medications or nephrotoxic agents should be considered

  15. Arthritis as a presenting feature of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Falcini, F.; Bardare, M.; Cimaz, R.; Lippi, A.; Corona, F.

    1998-01-01

    Leukaemia can present with joint swelling in the absence of abnormal haematological findings. Arthritis as a presenting sign of lymphoma, however, is extremely rare. Three children with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who had joint swelling at the onset of their disease are reported. Two cases showed histological features of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (Ki-l/CD30 positive), and one of angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma. In all patients the unusual presentation delayed correct diagnosis.

 PMID:9623403

  16. Real-world first-line treatment and overall survival in non-small cell lung cancer without known EGFR mutations or ALK rearrangements in US community oncology setting

    PubMed Central

    Abernethy, Amy P.; Arunachalam, Ashwini; Burke, Thomas; McKay, Caroline; Cao, Xiting; Sorg, Rachael; Carbone, David P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To establish a baseline for care and overall survival (OS) based upon contemporary first-line treatments prescribed in the era before the introduction of immune checkpoint inhibitors, for people with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) without common actionable mutations. Methods Using a nationally representative electronic health record data from the Flatiron dataset which included 162 practices from different regions in US, we identified patients (≥18 years old) newly diagnosed with stage IV NSCLC initiating first-line anticancer therapy (November 2012- January 2015, with follow-up through July 2015). Patients with documented epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocation were excluded. Anti-cancer drug therapy and overall survival were described overall, and by histology. Results A total of 2,014 patients with stage IV NSCLC without known EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations initiated systemic anticancer therapy, 22% with squamous and 78% with nonsquamous histology. Their mean (SD) age was 67 (10) years, 55% were male, and 87% had a smoking history. In nonsquamous NSCLC, carboplatin plus pemetrexed either without (25.7%) or with bevacizumab (16%) were the most common regimens; 26.6% of nonsquamous patients receiving induction therapy also received continuation maintenance therapy. In squamous NSCLC, carboplatin plus paclitaxel (37.6%) or nab-paclitaxel (21.1%) were the most commonly used regimens. Overall median OS was 9.7 months (95% CI: 9.1, 10.3), 8.5 months (95% CI: 7.4, 10.0) for squamous, and 10.0 months (95% CI: 9.4, 10.8) for nonsquamous NSCLC. Conclusion The results provide context for evaluating the effect of shifting treatment patterns of NSCLC treatments on patient outcomes, and for community oncology benchmarking initiatives. PMID:28644837

  17. Novel ALK fusion partners in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Iyevleva, Aglaya G; Raskin, Grigory A; Tiurin, Vladislav I; Sokolenko, Anna P; Mitiushkina, Natalia V; Aleksakhina, Svetlana N; Garifullina, Aigul R; Strelkova, Tatiana N; Merkulov, Valery O; Ivantsov, Alexandr O; Kuligina, Ekatherina Sh; Pozharisski, Kazimir M; Togo, Alexandr V; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2015-06-28

    Detection of ALK rearrangements in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) presents a significant technical challenge due to the existence of multiple translocation partners and break-points. To improve the performance of PCR-based tests, we utilized the combination of 2 assays, i.e. the variant-specific PCR for the 5 most common ALK rearrangements and the test for unbalanced 5'/3'-end ALK expression. Overall, convincing evidence for the presence of ALK translocation was obtained for 34/400 (8.5%) cases, including 14 EML4ex13/ALKex20, 12 EML4ex6/ALKex20, 3 EML4ex18/ALKex20, 2 EML4ex20/ALKex20 variants and 3 tumors with novel translocation partners. 386 (96.5%) out of 400 EGFR mutation-negative NSCLCs were concordant for both tests, being either positive (n = 26) or negative (n = 360) for ALK translocation; 49 of these samples (6 ALK+, 43 ALK-) were further evaluated by FISH, and there were no instances of disagreement. Among the 14 (3.5%) "discordant" tumors, 5 demonstrated ALK translocation by the first but not by the second PCR assay, and 9 had unbalanced ALK expression in the absence of known ALK fusion variants. 5 samples from the latter group were subjected to FISH, and the presence of translocation was confirmed in 2 cases. Next generation sequencing analysis of these 2 samples identified novel translocation partners, DCTN1 and SQSTM1; furthermore, the DCTN1/ALK fusion was also found in another NSCLC sample with unbalanced 5'/3'-end ALK expression, indicating a recurrent nature of this translocation. We conclude that the combination of 2 different PCR tests is a viable approach for the diagnostics of ALK rearrangements. Systematic typing of ALK fusions is likely to reveal new NSCLC-specific ALK partners.

  18. Pediatric lymphomas in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Klumb, Claudete E; Barber, Glen N; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study provides the clinical pathological characteristics of 1301 cases of pediatric/adolescent lymphomas in patients from different geographic regions of Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective analyses of diagnosed pediatric lymphoma cases in a 10‐year period was performed. We believe that it represents the largest series of pediatric lymphomas presented from Brazil. RESULTS: Non‐Hodgkin lymphomas represented 68% of the cases, including those of precursor (36%) and mature (64%) cell origin. Mature cell lymphomas comprised 81% of the B‐cell phenotype and 19% of the T‐cell phenotype. Hodgkin lymphomas represented 32% of all cases, including 87% of the classical type and 13% of nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The geographic distribution showed 38.4% of the cases in the Southeast region, 28.7% in the Northeast, 16.1% in the South, 8.8% in the North, and 8% in the Central‐west region. The distribution by age groups was 15–18 years old, 33%; 11–14 years old, 26%; 6–10 years old, 24%; and 6 years old or younger, 17%. Among mature B‐cell lymphomas, most of the cases were Burkitt lymphomas (65%), followed by diffuse large B‐cell lymphomas (24%). In the mature T‐cell group, anaplastic large cell lymphoma, ALK‐positive was the most prevalent (57%), followed by peripheral T‐cell lymphoma, then not otherwise specified (25%). In the group of classic Hodgkin lymphomas, the main histological subtype was nodular sclerosis (76%). Nodular lymphocyte predominance occurred more frequently than in other series. CONCLUSION: Some of the results found in this study may reflect the heterogeneous socioeconomical status and environmental factors of the Brazilian population in different regions. PMID:21340214

  19. Alectinib versus crizotinib in patients with ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer (J-ALEX): an open-label, randomised phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Hida, Toyoaki; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Kondo, Masashi; Kim, Young Hak; Azuma, Koichi; Seto, Takashi; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Nishio, Makoto; Yoshioka, Hiroshige; Imamura, Fumio; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Watanabe, Satoshi; Goto, Koichi; Satouchi, Miyako; Kozuki, Toshiyuki; Shukuya, Takehito; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Asakawa, Takashi; Asabe, Ryoichi; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Tamura, Tomohide

    2017-07-01

    Alectinib, a potent, highly selective, CNS-active inhibitor of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), showed promising efficacy and tolerability in the single-arm phase 1/2 AF-001JP trial in Japanese patients with ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer. Given those promising results, we did a phase 3 trial to directly compare the efficacy and safety of alectinib and crizotinib. J-ALEX was a randomised, open-label, phase 3 trial that recruited ALK inhibitor-naive Japanese patients with ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer, who were chemotherapy-naive or had received one previous chemotherapy regimen, from 41 study sites in Japan. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) via an interactive web response system using a permuted-block method stratified by Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, treatment line, and disease stage to receive oral alectinib 300 mg twice daily or crizotinib 250 mg twice daily until progressive disease, unacceptable toxicity, death, or withdrawal. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival assessed by an independent review facility. The efficacy analysis was done in the intention-to-treat population, and safety analyses were done in all patients who received at least one dose of the study drug. The study is ongoing and patient recruitment is closed. This study is registered with the Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center (number JapicCTI-132316). Between Nov 18, 2013, and Aug 4, 2015, 207 patients were recruited and assigned to the alectinib (n=103) or crizotinib (n=104) groups. At data cutoff for the second interim analysis, 24 patients in the alectinib group had discontinued treatment compared with 61 in the crizotinib group, mostly due to lack of efficacy or adverse events. At the second interim analysis (data cutoff date Dec 3, 2015), an independent data monitoring committee determined that the primary endpoint of the study had been met (hazard ratio 0·34 [99·7% CI 0·17-0·71], stratified log-rank p<0·0001) and

  20. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphoma and Liver Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage

  1. MS-275 and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  2. AR-42 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Relapsed Multiple Myeloma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-21

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large

  3. Genetic Testing Plus Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic

  4. Blood Sample Markers of Reproductive Hormones in Assessing Ovarian Reserve in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-20

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone

  5. Pediatric intracranial primary anaplastic ganglioglioma.

    PubMed

    Lüdemann, Wolf; Banan, Rouzbeh; Hartmann, Christian; Bertalanffy, Helmut; Di Rocco, Concezio

    2017-02-01

    Primary intracranial anaplastic gangliogliomas are rare tumors in the pediatric patient group. Most of them present with symptoms of elevated pressure or symptomatic epilepsy. Extraaxial location is far more common than axial location. On MRI examination, they mimic pilocytic astrocytomas. The outcome after surgery depends mainly on the possible amount of surgical resection, and oncological therapy is necessary to prevent recurrence of the disease. An 11-year-old boy presented with headache and double vision due to obstructive hydrocephalus. MRI of the brain revealed an axial partially contrast enhancing lesion in the quadrigeminal plate extending from the cerebellum to the pineal gland and causing hydrocephalus. Subtotal removal of the lesion was performed, and the diagnosis of an anaplastic ganglioglioma was established and confirmed by the reference center. At the latest follow up (3 months), the boy is without any neurological symptoms and scheduled for radiation therapy as well as chemotherapy.

  6. T-cell lymphomas, a challenging disease: types, treatments, and future.

    PubMed

    Ma, Helen; Abdul-Hay, Maher

    2017-02-01

    T-cell lymphomas are rare and aggressive malignancies associated with poor outcome, often because of the development of resistance in the lymphoma against chemotherapy as well as intolerance in patients to the established and toxic chemotherapy regimens. In this review article, we discuss the epidemiology, pathophysiology, current standard of care, and future treatments of common types of T-cell lymphomas, including adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, aggressive NK/T-cell lymphoma, and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

  7. 3-AP and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T

  8. PXD101 and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin

  9. 17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Patients With Advanced Epithelial Cancer, Malignant Lymphoma, or Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-06

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Chondrosarcoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small

  10. Doxorubicin has a synergistic cytotoxicity with cucurbitacin B in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si Hyoung; Kang, Jun Goo; Kim, Chul Sik; Ihm, Sung-Hee; Choi, Moon Gi; Yoo, Hyung Joon; Lee, Seong Jin

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the combined effect of doxorubicin with cucurbitacin B on survival of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells was evaluated. For experiments, 8505C and CAL62 human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells were used. Cell viability, the percentage of viable cells, and cytotoxic activity were measured using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, multiplexed cytotoxicity assay, and cytotoxicity assay, respectively. Reactive oxygen species production was measured. In experiments, doxorubicin and cucurbitacin B reduced cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Cotreatment of doxorubicin and cucurbitacin B, compared with treatment of doxorubicin alone, decreased the percentage of viable cells and increased cytotoxic activity. All of the combination index values were lower than 1.0, suggesting the synergism between doxorubicin and cucurbitacin B in induction of cytotoxicity. In cells treated with both doxorubicin and cucurbitacin B, compared with doxorubicin alone, the protein levels of cleaved poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase and cyclooxygenase 2 and reactive oxygen species production were enhanced. In contrast, the protein levels of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma 2 and survivin and B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma 2/B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma 2-associated x protein ratio were diminished. The protein levels of Janus kinase 2 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 were reduced, while phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 protein levels were elevated without change in total extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 protein levels. These results suggest that doxorubicin synergizes with cucurbitacin B in induction of cytotoxicity in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells. Moreover, synergistic cytotoxicity of doxorubicin with cucurbitacin B is mediated by B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma 2 family proteins, survivin, and reactive oxygen

  11. Obatoclax Mesylate, Vincristine Sulfate, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Dexrazoxane Hydrochloride in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-30

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  12. First-line ceritinib versus platinum-based chemotherapy in advanced ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (ASCEND-4): a randomised, open-label, phase 3 study.

    PubMed

    Soria, Jean-Charles; Tan, Daniel S W; Chiari, Rita; Wu, Yi-Long; Paz-Ares, Luis; Wolf, Juergen; Geater, Sarayut L; Orlov, Sergey; Cortinovis, Diego; Yu, Chong-Jen; Hochmair, Maximillian; Cortot, Alexis B; Tsai, Chun-Ming; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Campelo, Rosario G; McCulloch, Tracey; Sen, Paramita; Dugan, Margaret; Pantano, Serafino; Branle, Fabrice; Massacesi, Cristian; de Castro, Gilberto

    2017-03-04

    The efficacy of ceritinib in patients with untreated anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is not known. We assessed the efficacy and safety of ceritinib versus platinum-based chemotherapy in these patients. This randomised, open-label, phase 3 study in untreated patients with stage IIIB/IV ALK-rearranged non-squamous NSCLC was done in 134 centres across 28 countries. Eligible patients were assigned via interactive response technology to oral ceritinib 750 mg/day or platinum-based chemotherapy ([cisplatin 75 mg/m(2) or carboplatin AUC 5-6 plus pemetrexed 500 mg/m(2)] every 3 weeks for four cycles followed by maintenance pemetrexed); randomisation was stratified by World Health Organization performance status (0 vs 1-2), previous neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy, and presence of brain metastases as per investigator's assessment at screening. Investigators and patients were not masked to treatment assignment. The primary endpoint was blinded independent review committee assessed progression-free survival, based on all randomly assigned patients (the full analysis set). Efficacy analyses were done based on the full analysis set. All safety analyses were done based on the safety set, which included all patients who received at least one dose of study drug. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01828099. Between Aug 19, 2013, and May 11, 2015, 376 patients were randomly assigned to ceritinib (n=189) or chemotherapy (n=187). Median progression-free survival (as assessed by blinded independent review committee) was 16·6 months (95% CI 12·6-27·2) in the ceritinib group and 8·1 months (5·8-11·1) in the chemotherapy group (hazard ratio 0·55 [95% CI 0·42-0·73]; p<0·00001). The most common adverse events were diarrhoea (in 160 [85%] of 189 patients), nausea (130 [69%]), vomiting (125 [66%]), and an increase in alanine aminotransferase (114 [60%]) in the ceritinib group and nausea (in 97 [55%] of 175

  13. Lenalidomide With or Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Progressive or Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Prolymphocytic Leukemia, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-24

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  14. CD30-positive cutaneous lymphoma: report of four cases with an emphasis on clinicopathological correlations*

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Thiago Jeunon de Sousa; Jorge, Samira Barroso; Gonzaga, Yung Bruno de Mello

    2017-01-01

    The classification of cutaneous lymphomas is multidisciplinary and requires the correlation between clinical, histopathological, immunohistochemical, and molecular diagnostic elements. In this article, we present four different cases of CD30-positive T-cell lymphoma with cutaneous manifestations. We compare cases with definitive diagnosis of papulosis lymphomatoid type C, primary cutaneous anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma, systemic anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma with secondary skin involvement, and mycosis fungoides with large cell transformation, highlighting the importance of clinicopathological correlation to classify these cases. PMID:28225962

  15. Veliparib, Bendamustine Hydrochloride, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, or Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-14

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  16. Tanespimycin and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous

  17. ALK oncoproteins in atypical inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours: novel RRBP1-ALK fusions in epithelioid inflammatory myofibroblastic sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jen-Chieh; Li, Chien-Feng; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Zhu, Mei-Jun; Mariño-Enríquez, Adrián; Lee, Chung-Ta; Ou, Wen-Bin; Hornick, Jason L; Fletcher, Jonathan A

    2017-02-01

    ALK oncogenic activation mechanisms were characterized in four conventional spindle-cell inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours (IMT) and five atypical IMT, each of which had ALK genomic perturbations. Constitutively activated ALK oncoproteins were purified by ALK immunoprecipitation and electrophoresis, and were characterized by mass spectrometry. The four conventional IMT had TPM3/4-ALK fusions (two cases) or DCTN1-ALK fusions (two cases), whereas two atypical spindle-cell IMT had TFG-ALK and TPM3-ALK fusion in one case each, and three epithelioid inflammatory myofibroblastic sarcomas had RANBP2-ALK fusions in two cases, and a novel RRBP1-ALK fusion in one case. The epithelioid inflammatory myofibroblastic sarcoma with RRBP1-ALK fusion had cytoplasmic ALK expression with perinuclear accentuation, different from the nuclear membranous ALK localization in epithelioid inflammatory myofibroblastic sarcomas with RANBP2-ALK fusions. Evaluation of three additional uncharacterized epithelioid inflammatory myofibroblastic sarcomas with ALK cytoplasmic/perinuclear- accentuation expression demonstrated RRBP1-ALK fusion in two cases. These studies show that atypical spindle-cell IMT can utilize the same ALK fusion mechanisms described previously in conventional IMT, whereas in clinically aggressive epithelioid inflammatory myofibroblastic sarcoma we identify a novel recurrent ALK oncogenic mechanism, resulting from fusion with the RRBP1 gene. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Lenalidomide as Maintenance Therapy After Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Rituximab and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma That is Resistant to Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  19. Ipilimumab and Local Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Melanoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Colon, or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-12

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  20. Etoposide, Filgrastim, and Plerixafor in Improving Stem Cell Mobilization in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-06

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  1. Nivolumab With or Without Varlilumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive B-cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Activated B-Cell-Like Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; ALK-Positive Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Atypical Burkitt/Burkitt-Like Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Associated With Chronic Inflammation; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Epstein-Barr Virus Positive Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Elderly; Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive Mucocutaneous Ulcer; Germinal Center B-Cell-Like Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; High-Grade B-Cell Lymphoma With MYC and BCL2 and/or BCL6 Rearrangements; Human Herpesvirus-8-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma; MYC-Negative B-Cell Lymphoma With 11q Aberration Resembling Burkitt Lymphoma; Plasmablastic Lymphoma; Primary Cutaneous Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Primary Cutaneous Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Leg Type; Primary Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Central Nervous System; Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Skin Ulcer; Small Intestinal B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; T-Cell/Histiocyte-Rich Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  2. PXD101 and 17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-15

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV

  3. Rationale for co-targeting IGF-1R and ALK in ALK fusion positive lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lovly, Christine M.; McDonald, Nerina T.; Chen, Heidi; Ortiz-Cuaran, Sandra; Heukamp, Lukas C.; Yan, Yingjun; Florin, Alexandra; Ozretić, Luka; Lim, Diana; Wang, Lu; Chen, Zhao; Chen, Xi; Lu, Pengcheng; Paik, Paul K.; Shen, Ronglai; Jin, Hailing; Buettner, Reinhard; Ansén, Sascha; Perner, Sven; Brockmann, Michael; Bos, Marc; Wolf, Jürgen; Gardizi, Masyar; Wright, Gavin M.; Solomon, Benjamin; Russell, Prudence A.; Rogers, Toni-Maree; Suehara, Yoshiyuki; Red-Brewer, Monica; Tieu, Rudy; de Stanchina, Elisa; Wang, Qingguo; Zhao, Zhongming; Johnson, David H.; Horn, Leora; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Thomas, Roman K.; Ladanyi, Marc; Pao, William

    2014-01-01

    The ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), crizotinib, shows significant activity in patients whose lung cancers harbor ALK fusions but its efficacy is limited by variable primary responses and acquired resistance. In work arising from the intriguing clinical observation of a patient with ALK fusion+ lung cancer who had an ‘exceptional response’ to an IGF-1R antibody, we define a therapeutic synergism between ALK and IGF-1R inhibitors. Similar to IGF-1R, ALK fusion proteins bind to the adaptor, IRS-1, and IRS-1 knockdown enhances the anti-tumor effects of ALK inhibitors. In models of ALK TKI resistance, the IGF-1R pathway is activated, and combined ALK/IGF-1R inhibition improves therapeutic efficacy. Consistent with this finding, IGF-1R/IRS-1 levels are increased in biopsy samples from patients progressing on crizotinib therapy. Collectively, these data support a role for the IGF-1R/IRS-1 pathway in both ALK TKI-sensitive and TKI-resistant states and provide biological rationale for further clinical development of dual ALK/IGF-1R inhibitors. PMID:25173427

  4. A case of an anaplastic meningioma metastasizing to the mediastinal lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Norihiro; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Imajo, Yasuaki; Suzuki, Hidenori; Yoshida, Yuichiro; Kato, Yoshihiko; Hoshii, Yoshinobu; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Context Grade II and III (World Health Organization classification) meningiomas rarely develop in the spinal cord. However, we experienced a case with an anaplastic meningioma that developed in the spinal cord at the cervicothoracic junction and metastasized to the mediastinal lymph nodes. No such cases have previously been reported. Findings The patient was a 68-year-old man who developed back pain that did not affect his daily living. He developed left lower limb paralysis, and was admitted after magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an intramedullary tumor at the level of cervical vertebra 7 and thoracic vertebra 1. Positron emission tomography revealed tracer uptake in the intramedullary tumor and the mediastinal lymph nodes, suggesting a metastatic spinal cord tumor or malignant lymphoma. A lymph node biopsy was then performed. Although the tumor was highly malignant, its primary site was not identified. Detailed examinations by several other departments revealed no abnormalities. On hospital day 30, his left lower limb paralysis deteriorated, and MRI revealed that the tumor had grown. Thus, laminaplasty, laminectomy, and tumor resection were performed. The tumor was an anaplastic meningioma that resembled mediastinal lymph node tissue, and other tumor lesions were not found. These findings suggested that an anaplastic meningioma had metastasized to the mediastinal lymph nodes. The patient did not respond to radiotherapy, and he was transferred to another hospital. Conclusion In cases of intramedullary spinal tumors with metastasis without other potential primary tumor lesions, early diagnosis and treatment should be performed while considering anaplastic meningioma. PMID:25738779

  5. Anaplastic glioma: current treatment and management.

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, Emilie; Taillibert, Sophie; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2015-06-01

    Anaplastic glioma (AG) is divided into three morphology-based groups (anaplastic astrocytoma, anaplastic oligodendroglioma, anaplastic oligoastrocytoma) as well as three molecular groups (glioma-CpG island methylation phenotype [G-CIMP] negative, G-CIMP positive non-1p19q codeleted tumors and G-CIMP positive codeleted tumors). The RTOG 9402 and EORTC 26951 trials established radiotherapy plus (procarbazine, lomustine, vincristine) chemotherapy as the standard of care in 1p/19q codeleted AG. Uni- or non-codeleted AG are currently best treated with radiotherapy only or alkylator-based chemotherapy only as determined by the NOA-04 trial. Maturation of NOA-04 and results of the currently accruing studies, CODEL (for codeleted AG) and CATNON (for uni or non-codeleted AG), will likely refine current up-front treatment recommendations for AG.

  6. [Surgical seeding of an anaplastic ependymoma].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masayuki; Sato, Taku; Kuromi, Y