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Sample records for alk protein expression

  1. Anti-ALK Antibodies in Patients with ALK-Positive Malignancies Not Expressing NPM-ALK

    PubMed Central

    Damm-Welk, Christine; Siddiqi, Faraz; Fischer, Matthias; Hero, Barbara; Narayanan, Vignesh; Camidge, David Ross; Harris, Michael; Burke, Amos; Lehrnbecher, Thomas; Pulford, Karen; Oschlies, Ilske; Siebert, Reiner; Turner, Suzanne; Woessmann, Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Nucleophosmin (NPM)- Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) fusion positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma produce autoantibodies against ALK indicative of an immune response against epitopes of the chimeric fusion protein. We asked whether ALK-expression in other malignancies induces specific antibodies. Antibodies against ALK were detected in sera of one of 50 analysed ALK-expressing neuroblastoma patients, 13 of 21 ALK positive non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients, 13 of 22 ALK translocation-positive, but NPM-ALK-negative lymphoma patients and one of one ALK-positive rhabdomyosarcoma patient, but not in 20 healthy adults. These data suggest that boosting a pre-existent anti-ALK immune response may be more feasible for patients with ALK-positive NSCLC, lymphomas and rhabdomyosarcomas than for tumours expressing wild-type ALK. PMID:27471553

  2. SUMOylation Confers Posttranslational Stability on NPM-ALK Oncogenic Protein.

    PubMed

    Vishwamitra, Deeksha; Curry, Choladda V; Shi, Ping; Alkan, Serhan; Amin, Hesham M

    2015-09-01

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase-expressing (NPM-ALK+) T-cell lymphoma is an aggressive form of cancer that commonly affects children and adolescents. The expression of NPM-ALK chimeric oncogene results from the chromosomal translocation t(2;5)(p23;q35) that causes the fusion of the ALK and NPM genes. This translocation generates the NPM-ALK protein tyrosine kinase that forms the constitutively activated NPM-ALK/NPM-ALK homodimers. In addition, NPM-ALK is structurally associated with wild-type NPM to form NPM/NPM-ALK heterodimers, which can translocate to the nucleus. The mechanisms that sustain the stability of NPM-ALK are not fully understood. SUMOylation is a posttranslational modification that is characterized by the reversible conjugation of small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) with target proteins. SUMO competes with ubiquitin for substrate binding and therefore, SUMOylation is believed to protect target proteins from proteasomal degradation. Moreover, SUMOylation contributes to the subcellular distribution of target proteins. Herein, we found that the SUMOylation pathway is deregulated in NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma cell lines and primary lymphoma tumors from patients. We also identified Lys24 and Lys32 within the NPM domain as the sites where NPM-ALK conjugates with SUMO-1 and SUMO-3. Importantly, antagonizing SUMOylation by the SENP1 protease decreased the accumulation of NPM-ALK and suppressed lymphoma cell viability, proliferation, and anchorage-independent colony formation. One possible mechanism for the SENP1-mediated decrease in NPM-ALK levels was the increase in NPM-ALK association with ubiquitin, which facilitates its degradation. Our findings propose a model in which aberrancies in SUMOylation contribute to the pathogenesis of NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma. Unraveling such pathogenic mechanisms may lead to devising novel strategies to eliminate this aggressive neoplasm. PMID:26476082

  3. A new protein superfamily includes two novel 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases from Bacillus cereus, AlkC and AlkD.

    PubMed

    Alseth, Ingrun; Rognes, Torbjørn; Lindbäck, Toril; Solberg, Inger; Robertsen, Kristin; Kristiansen, Knut Ivan; Mainieri, Davide; Lillehagen, Lucy; Kolstø, Anne-Brit; Bjørås, Magnar

    2006-03-01

    Soil bacteria are heavily exposed to environmental methylating agents such as methylchloride and may have special requirements for repair of alkylation damage on DNA. We have used functional complementation of an Escherichia coli tag alkA mutant to screen for 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase genes in genomic libraries of the soil bacterium Bacillus cereus. Three genes were recovered: alkC, alkD and alkE. The amino acid sequence of AlkE is homologous to the E. coli AlkA sequence. AlkC and AlkD represent novel proteins without sequence similarity to any protein of known function. However, iterative and indirect sequence similarity searches revealed that AlkC and AlkD are distant homologues of each other within a new protein superfamily that is ubiquitous in the prokaryotic kingdom. Homologues of AlkC and AlkD were also identified in the amoebas Entamoeba histolytica and Dictyostelium discoideum, but no other eukaryotic counterparts of the superfamily were found. The alkC and alkD genes were expressed in E. coli and the proteins were purified to homogeneity. Both proteins were found to be specific for removal of N-alkylated bases, and showed no activity on oxidized or deaminated base lesions in DNA. B. cereus AlkC and AlkD thus define novel families of alkylbase DNA glycosylases within a new protein superfamily. PMID:16468998

  4. A new protein superfamily includes two novel 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases from Bacillus cereus, AlkC and AlkD

    PubMed Central

    Alseth, Ingrun; Rognes, Torbjørn; Lindbäck, Toril; Solberg, Inger; Robertsen, Kristin; Kristiansen, Knut Ivan; Mainieri, Davide; Lillehagen, Lucy; Kolstø, Anne-Brit; Bjørås, Magnar

    2006-01-01

    Summary Soil bacteria are heavily exposed to environmental methylating agents such as methylchloride and may have special requirements for repair of alkylation damage on DNA. We have used functional complementation of an Escherichia coli tag alkA mutant to screen for 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase genes in genomic libraries of the soil bacterium Bacillus cereus. Three genes were recovered: alkC, alkD and alkE. The amino acid sequence of AlkE is homologous to the E. coli AlkA sequence. AlkC and AlkD represent novel proteins without sequence similarity to any protein of known function. However, iterative and indirect sequence similarity searches revealed that AlkC and AlkD are distant homologues of each other within a new protein superfamily that is ubiquitous in the prokaryotic kingdom. Homologues of AlkC and AlkD were also identified in the amoebas Entamoeba histolytica and Dictyostelium discoideum, but no other eukaryotic counterparts of the superfamily were found. The alkC and alkD genes were expressed in E. coli and the proteins were purified to homogeneity. Both proteins were found to be specific for removal of N-alkylated bases, and showed no activity on oxidized or deaminated base lesions in DNA. B. cereus AlkC and AlkD thus define novel families of alkylbase DNA glycosylases within a new protein superfamily. PMID:16468998

  5. Primary and Metastatic Cutaneous Melanomas Express ALK Through Alternative Transcriptional Initiation.

    PubMed

    Busam, Klaus J; Vilain, Ricardo E; Lum, Trina; Busam, Jonathan A; Hollmann, Travis J; Saw, Robyn P M; Coit, Daniel C; Scolyer, Richard A; Wiesner, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    A number of common driver mutations have been identified in melanoma, but other genetic or epigenetic aberrations are also likely to play a role in the pathogenesis of melanoma and present potential therapeutic targets. Translocations of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), for example, have been reported in spitzoid melanocytic neoplasms leading to kinase-fusion proteins that result in immunohistochemically detectable ALK expression. In this study, we sought to determine whether ALK was also expressed in nonspitzoid primary and metastatic cutaneous melanomas. ALK immunohistochemistry was performed on 603 melanomas (303 primary and 300 metastatic tumors) from 600 patients. ALK immunohistochemistry expression was identified in 7 primary and 9 metastatic tumors. In 5 of 7 primary tumors and in 6 of 9 metastatic lesions, the majority of tumor cells were immunoreactive for ALK. In the other 2 primary and 3 metastatic lesions, positive staining was identified in less than half of the tumor cells. ALK positivity was found in the presence or absence of BRAF or NRAS mutations. In contrast to prior observations with ALK-positive Spitz tumors, none of the ALK-positive melanomas harbored a translocation. Instead, the ALK-positive melanomas predominantly expressed the recently described ALK isoform, ALK, which lacks the extracellular and transmembrane domains of wild-type ALK, consists primarily of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain, and originates from an alternative transcriptional initiation site within the ALK gene. The findings are clinically relevant as patients with metastatic melanoma who have ALK expression may potentially benefit from treatment with ALK kinase inhibitors. PMID:26872010

  6. Viral AlkB proteins repair RNA damage by oxidative demethylation

    PubMed Central

    van den Born, Erwin; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Bekkelund, Anders; Leihne, Vibeke; Koonin, Eugene V.; Dolja, Valerian V.; Falnes, Pål Ø.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial and mammalian AlkB proteins are iron(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases that reverse methylation damage, such as 1-methyladenine and 3-methylcytosine, in RNA and DNA. An AlkB-domain is encoded by the genome of numerous single-stranded, plant-infecting RNA viruses, the majority of which belong to the Flexiviridae family. Our phylogenetic analysis of AlkB sequences suggests that a single plant virus might have acquired AlkB relatively recently, followed by horizontal dissemination among other viruses via recombination. Here, we describe the first functional characterization of AlkB proteins from three plant viruses. The viral AlkB proteins efficiently reactivated methylated bacteriophage genomes when expressed in Escherichia coli, and also displayed robust, iron(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent demethylase activity in vitro. Viral AlkB proteins preferred RNA over DNA substrates, and thus represent the first AlkBs with such substrate specificity. Our results suggest a role for viral AlkBs in maintaining the integrity of the viral RNA genome through repair of deleterious methylation damage, and support the notion that AlkB-mediated RNA repair is biologically relevant. PMID:18718927

  7. Alternative transcription initiation leads to expression of a novel ALK isoform in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Thomas; Lee, William; Obenauf, Anna C.; Ran, Leili; Murali, Rajmohan; Zhang, Qi Fan; Wong, Elissa W. P.; Hu, Wenhuo; Scott, Sasinya N.; Shah, Ronak H.; Landa, Iñigo; Button, Julia; Lailler, Nathalie; Sboner, Andrea; Gao, Dong; Murphy, Devan A.; Cao, Zhen; Shukla, Shipra; Hollmann, Travis J.; Wang, Lu; Borsu, Laetitia; Merghoub, Taha; Schwartz, Gary K.; Postow, Michael A.; Ariyan, Charlotte E.; Fagin, James A.; Zheng, Deyou; Ladanyi, Marc; Busam, Klaus J.; Berger, Michael F.; Chen, Yu; Chi, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Activation of oncogenes by mechanisms other than genetic aberrations such as mutations, translocations, or amplifications is largely undefined. Here we report a novel isoform of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) that is expressed in ~ 11% of melanomas and sporadically in other human cancer types, but not in normal tissues. The novel ALK transcript initiates from a de novo alternative transcription initiation (ATI) site in ALK intron 19, and was termed ALKATI. In ALKATI-expressing tumours, the ATI site is enriched for H3K4me3 and RNA polymerase II, chromatin marks characteristic of active transcription initiation sites1. ALKATI is expressed from both ALK alleles, and no recurrent genetic aberrations are found at the ALK locus, indicating that the transcriptional activation is independent of genetic aberrations at the ALK locus. The ALKATI transcript encodes three proteins with molecular weights of 61.1, 60.8 and 58.7 kilodaltons, consisting primarily of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. ALKATI stimulates multiple oncogenic signalling pathways, drives growth-factor-independent cell proliferation in vitro, and promotes tumorigenesis in vivo in mouse models. ALK inhibitors can suppress the kinase activity of ALKATI, suggesting that patients with ALKATI-expressing tumours may benefit from ALK inhibitors. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism of oncogene activation in cancer through de novo alternative transcription initiation. PMID:26444240

  8. USP15 targets ALK3/BMPR1A for deubiquitylation to enhance bone morphogenetic protein signalling

    PubMed Central

    Herhaus, Lina; Al-Salihi, Mazin A.; Dingwell, Kevin S.; Cummins, Timothy D.; Wasmus, Lize; Vogt, Janis; Ewan, Richard; Bruce, David; Macartney, Thomas; Weidlich, Simone; Smith, James C.; Sapkota, Gopal P.

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase ALK3/BMPR1A mediates bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling through phosphorylation and activation of SMADs 1/5/8. SMAD6, a transcriptional target of BMP, negatively regulates the BMP pathway by recruiting E3 ubiquitin ligases and targeting ALK3 for ubiquitin-mediated degradation. Here, we identify a deubiquitylating enzyme USP15 as an interactor of SMAD6 and ALK3. We show that USP15 enhances BMP-induced phosphorylation of SMAD1 by interacting with and deubiquitylating ALK3. RNAi-mediated depletion of USP15 increases ALK3 K48-linked polyubiquitylation, and reduces both BMP-induced SMAD1 phosphorylation and transcription of BMP target genes. We also show that loss of USP15 expression from mouse myoblast cells inhibits BMP-induced osteoblast differentiation. Furthermore, USP15 modulates BMP-induced phosphorylation of SMAD1 and transcription during Xenopus embryogenesis. PMID:24850914

  9. Development of potent ALK inhibitor and its molecular inhibitory mechanism against NSCLC harboring EML4-ALK proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Chung Hyo; Yun, Jeong In; Lee, Kwangho; Lee, Chong Ock; Lee, Heung Kyoung; Yun, Chang-Soo; Hwang, Jong Yeon; Cho, Sung Yun; Jung, Heejung; Kim, Pilho; Ha, Jae Du; Jeon, Jeong Hee; Choi, Sang Un; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Kim, Hyoung Rae; Park, Chi Hoon

    2015-08-28

    Here, we show the newly synthesized and potent ALK inhibitor having similar scaffold to KRCA-0008, which was reported previously, and its molecular mechanism against cancer cells harboring EML4-ALK fusion protein. Through ALK wild type enzyme assay, we selected two compounds, KRCA-0080 and KRCA-0087, which have trifluoromethyl instead of chloride in R2 position. We characterized these newly synthesized compounds by in vitro and in vivo assays. Enzyme assay shows that KRCA-0080 is more potent against various ALK mutants, including L1196M, G1202R, T1151-L1152insT, and C1156Y, which are seen in crizotinib-resistant patients, than KRCA-0008 is. Cell based assays demonstrate our compounds downregulate the cellular signaling, such as Akt and Erk, by suppressing ALK activity to inhibit the proliferation of the cells harboring EML4-ALK. Interestingly, our compounds induced strong G1/S arrest in H3122 cells leading to the apoptosis, which is proved by PARP-1 cleavage. In vivo H3122 xenograft assay, we found that KRCA-0080 shows significant reduction in tumor size compared to crizotinib and KRCA-0008 by 15–20%. Conclusively, we report a potent ALK inhibitor which shows significant in vivo efficacy as well as excellent inhibitory activity against various ALK mutants. - Highlights: • We synthesized KRCA-0008 derivatives having trifluoromethyl instead of chloride. • KRCA-0080 shows superior activity against several ALK mutants to KRCA-0008. • Cellular assays show our ALK inhibitors suppress only EML4-ALK positive cells. • Our ALK inhibitors induce G1/S arrest to lead apoptosis in H3122 cells. • KRCA-0080 has superior in vivo efficacy to crizotinib and KRCA-0008 by 15–20%.

  10. Understanding the Interplay between Expression, Mutation and Activity of ALK Receptor in Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells for Clinical Application of Small-Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Peron, Marica; Lovisa, Federica; Poli, Elena; Basso, Giuseppe; Bonvini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Background Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) have a central role in cancer initiation and progression, since changes in their expression and activity potentially results in cell transformation. This concept is essential from a therapeutic standpoint, as clinical evidence indicates that tumours carrying deregulated RTKs are particularly susceptible to their activity but also to their inhibition. Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is an aggressive childhood cancer where emerging therapies rely on the use kinase inhibitors, and among druggable kinases ALK represents a potential therapeutic target to commit efforts against. However, the functional relevance of ALK in RMS is not known, likewise the multi-component deregulated RTK profile to which ALK belongs. Methods In this study we used RMS cell lines representative of the alveolar and embrional histotype and looked at ALK intracellular localization, activity and cell signalling. Results We found that ALK was properly located at the plasma membrane of RMS cells, though in an unphosphorylated and inactive state due to intracellular tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) activity. Indeed, increase of ALK phosphorylation was observed upon PTPase inhibition, as well as after ligand binding or protein overexpression. In these conditions, ALK signalling proceeded through the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT pathways, and it was susceptible to ATP-competitive inhibitors exposure. However, drug-induced growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis did not correlate with ALK expression only, but relied also on the expression of other RTKs with akin drug binding affinity. Indeed, analysis of baseline and inducible RTK phosphorylation confirmed that RMS cells were susceptible to ALK kinase inhibitors even in the absence of the primary intended target, due to the presence of compensatory RTKs signalling pathways. Conclusions These data, hence, provided evidences of a potentially active role of ALK in RMS cells, but also suggest caution in considering ALK

  11. Identification of a new subclass of ALK-negative ALCL expressing aberrant levels of ERBB4 transcripts.

    PubMed

    Scarfò, Irene; Pellegrino, Elisa; Mereu, Elisabetta; Kwee, Ivo; Agnelli, Luca; Bergaggio, Elisa; Garaffo, Giulia; Vitale, Nicoletta; Caputo, Manuel; Machiorlatti, Rodolfo; Circosta, Paola; Abate, Francesco; Barreca, Antonella; Novero, Domenico; Mathew, Susan; Rinaldi, Andrea; Tiacci, Enrico; Serra, Sara; Deaglio, Silvia; Neri, Antonino; Falini, Brunangelo; Rabadan, Raul; Bertoni, Francesco; Inghirami, Giorgio; Piva, Roberto

    2016-01-14

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a clinical and biological heterogeneous disease that includes systemic anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive and ALK-negative entities. To discover biomarkers and/or genes involved in ALK-negative ALCL pathogenesis, we applied the cancer outlier profile analysis algorithm to a gene expression profiling data set including 249 cases of T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and normal T cells. Ectopic coexpression of ERBB4 and COL29A1 genes was detected in 24% of ALK-negative ALCL patients. RNA sequencing and 5' RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of complementary DNA ends identified 2 novel ERBB4-truncated transcripts displaying intronic transcription start sites. By luciferase assays, we defined that the expression of ERBB4-aberrant transcripts is promoted by endogenous intronic long terminal repeats. ERBB4 expression was confirmed at the protein level by western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Lastly, we demonstrated that ERBB4-truncated forms show oncogenic potentials and that ERBB4 pharmacologic inhibition partially controls ALCL cell growth and disease progression in an ERBB4-positive patient-derived tumorgraft model. In conclusion, we identified a new subclass of ALK-negative ALCL characterized by aberrant expression of ERBB4-truncated transcripts carrying intronic 5' untranslated regions. PMID:26463425

  12. GPo1 alkB gene expression for improvement of the degradation of diesel oil by a bacterial consortium

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qun; He, Ying; Hou, Deng-Yong; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Shen, Xian-Rong

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate the biodegradation of diesel oil, an oil biodegradation bacterial consortium was constructed. The alkane hydroxylase (alkB) gene of Pseudomonas putida GPo1 was constructed in a pCom8 expression vector, and the pCom8-GPo1 alkB plasmid was transformed into Escherichia coli DH5α. The AlkB protein was expressed by diesel oil induction and detected through SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The culture of the recombinant (pCom8-GPo1 alkB/E. coli DH5α) with the oil biodegradation bacterial consortium increased the degradation ratio of diesel oil at 24 h from 31% to 50%, and the facilitation rates were increased as the proportion of pCom8-GPo1 alkB/E. coli DH5α to the consortium increased. The results suggested that the expression of the GPo1 gene in E. coli DH5α could enhance the function of diesel oil degradation by the bacterial consortium. PMID:26413044

  13. Identification of C/EBPβ Target Genes in ALK+ Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) by Gene Expression Profiling and Chromatin Immunoprecipitation

    PubMed Central

    Bonzheim, Irina; Irmler, Martin; Klier-Richter, Margit; Steinhilber, Julia; Anastasov, Nataša; Schäfer, Sabine; Adam, Patrick; Beckers, Johannes; Raffeld, Mark; Fend, Falko; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia

    2013-01-01

    C/EBPβ (CCAAT enhancer binding protein) is a transcription factor that plays a crucial role in survival and transformation of ALK+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). The aim of this study was to identify the downstream targets of C/EBPβ responsible for ALK-mediated oncogenesis. C/EBPβ was knocked down in ALK+ ALCL cell lines with a C/EBPβ-shRNA, followed by gene expression profiling (GEP). GEP analysis revealed a reproducible signature of genes that were significantly regulated by C/EBPβ. Classification into biological categories revealed overrepresentation of genes involved in the immune response, apoptosis and cell proliferation. Transcriptional regulation by C/EBPβ was found in 6 of 11 (BCL2A1, G0S2, TRIB1, S100A9, DDX21 and DDIT4) genes investigated by chromatin immunoprecipitation. We demonstrated that BCL2A1, G0S2 and DDX21 play a crucial role in survival and proliferation of ALK+ ALCL cells. DDX21, a gene involved in rRNA biogenesis, was found differentially overexpressed in primary ALK+ ALCL cases. All three candidate genes were validated in primary ALCL cases by either immunohistochemistry or RT-qPCR. In conclusion, we identified and validated several key C/EBPβ-regulated genes with major impact on survival and cell growth in ALK+ ALCL, supporting the central role of C/EBPβ in ALK-mediated oncogenesis. PMID:23741337

  14. The ALK inhibitor PF-06463922 is effective as a single agent in neuroblastoma driven by expression of ALK and MYCN.

    PubMed

    Guan, J; Tucker, E R; Wan, H; Chand, D; Danielson, L S; Ruuth, K; El Wakil, A; Witek, B; Jamin, Y; Umapathy, G; Robinson, S P; Johnson, T W; Smeal, T; Martinsson, T; Chesler, L; Palmer, R H; Hallberg, B

    2016-09-01

    The first-in-class inhibitor of ALK, c-MET and ROS1, crizotinib (Xalkori), has shown remarkable clinical efficacy in treatment of ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer. However, in neuroblastoma, activating mutations in the ALK kinase domain are typically refractory to crizotinib treatment, highlighting the need for more potent inhibitors. The next-generation ALK inhibitor PF-06463922 is predicted to exhibit increased affinity for ALK mutants prevalent in neuroblastoma. We examined PF-06463922 activity in ALK-driven neuroblastoma models in vitro and in vivo In vitro kinase assays and cell-based experiments examining ALK mutations of increasing potency show that PF-06463922 is an effective inhibitor of ALK with greater activity towards ALK neuroblastoma mutants. In contrast to crizotinib, single agent administration of PF-06463922 caused dramatic tumor inhibition in both subcutaneous and orthotopic xenografts as well as a mouse model of high-risk neuroblastoma driven by Th-ALK(F1174L)/MYCN Taken together, our results suggest PF-06463922 is a potent inhibitor of crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations, and highlights an important new treatment option for neuroblastoma patients. PMID:27483357

  15. Regulation of Endothelial Barrier Function by TGF-β type I Receptor ALK5: Potential Role of Contractile Mechanisms and Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Antonov, Alexander S.; Antonova, Galina N.; Fujii, Makiko; Dijke, Peter ten; Handa, Vaishali; Catravas, John D.; Verin, Alexander D.

    2013-01-01

    Multifunctional cytokine transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of acute lung inflammation by controlling endothelial monolayer permeability. TGF-β1 regulates endothelial cell (EC) functions via two distinct receptors, activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1) and activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5). The precise roles of ALK1 and ALK5 in the regulation of TGF-β1-induced lung endothelium dysfunction remain mostly unknown. We now report that adenoviral infection with constitutively active ALK5 (caALK5), but not caALK1, induces EC retraction and that this receptor predominantly controls EC permeability. We demonstrate that ubiquitinated ALK5 and phosphorylated heat shock protein 27 (phospho-Hsp27) specifically accumulate in the cytoskeleton fraction, which parallels with microtubule collapse, cortical actin disassembly and increased EC permeability. We have found that ALK1 and ALK5 interact with heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). Moreover, the Hsp90 inhibitor radicicol (RA) prevents accumulation of ubiquitinated caALK5 and phospho-Hsp27 in the cytoskeletal fraction and restore the decreased EC permeability induced by caALK5. We hypothesize that specific translocation of ubiquitinated ALK5 receptor into the cytoskeleton compartment due to its lack of degradation is the mechanism that causes the divergence of caALK1 and caALK5 signaling. PMID:21465483

  16. Differential repair of etheno-DNA adducts by bacterial and human AlkB proteins.

    PubMed

    Zdżalik, Daria; Domańska, Anna; Prorok, Paulina; Kosicki, Konrad; van den Born, Erwin; Falnes, Pål Ø; Rizzo, Carmelo J; Guengerich, F Peter; Tudek, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    AlkB proteins are evolutionary conserved Fe(II)/2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases, which remove alkyl and highly promutagenic etheno(ɛ)-DNA adducts, but their substrate specificity has not been fully determined. We developed a novel assay for the repair of ɛ-adducts by AlkB enzymes using oligodeoxynucleotides with a single lesion and specific DNA glycosylases and AP-endonuclease for identification of the repair products. We compared the repair of three ɛ-adducts, 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine (ɛA), 3,N(4)-ethenocytosine (ɛC) and 1,N(2)-ethenoguanine (1,N(2)-ɛG) by nine bacterial and two human AlkBs, representing four different structural groups defined on the basis of conserved amino acids in the nucleotide recognition lid, engaged in the enzyme binding to the substrate. Two bacterial AlkB proteins, MT-2B (from Mycobacterium tuberculosis) and SC-2B (Streptomyces coelicolor) did not repair these lesions in either double-stranded (ds) or single-stranded (ss) DNA. Three proteins, RE-2A (Rhizobium etli), SA-2B (Streptomyces avermitilis), and XC-2B (Xanthomonas campestris) efficiently removed all three lesions from the DNA substrates. Interestingly, XC-2B and RE-2A are the first AlkB proteins shown to be specialized for ɛ-adducts, since they do not repair methylated bases. Three other proteins, EcAlkB (Escherichia coli), SA-1A, and XC-1B removed ɛA and ɛC from ds and ssDNA but were inactive toward 1,N(2)-ɛG. SC-1A repaired only ɛA with the preference for dsDNA. The human enzyme ALKBH2 repaired all three ɛ-adducts in dsDNA, while only ɛA and ɛC in ssDNA and repair was less efficient in ssDNA. ALKBH3 repaired only ɛC in ssDNA. Altogether, we have shown for the first time that some AlkB proteins, namely ALKBH2, RE-2A, SA-2B and XC-2B can repair 1,N(2)-ɛG and that ALKBH3 removes only ɛC from ssDNA. Our results also suggest that the nucleotide recognition lid is not the sole determinant of the substrate specificity of AlkB proteins. PMID:25797601

  17. The role of AlkB protein in repair of 1,N⁶-ethenoadenine in Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Maciejewska, Agnieszka M; Sokołowska, Beata; Nowicki, Adam; Kuśmierek, Jarosław T

    2011-05-01

    Etheno (ε) DNA adducts, including 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine (εA), are formed by various bifunctional agents of exogenous and endogenous origin. The AT→TA transversion, the most frequent mutation provoked by the presence of εA in DNA, is very common in critical codons of the TP53 and RAS genes in tumours induced by exposure to carcinogenic vinyl compounds. Here, using a method that allows examination of the mutagenic potency of a metabolite of vinyl chloride, chloroacetaldehyde (CAA), but eliminates its cytotoxicity, we studied the participation of alkA, alkB and mug gene products in the repair of εA in Escherichia coli cells. The test system used comprised the pIF105 plasmid bearing the lactose operon of CC105 origin, which allowed monitoring of Lac(+) revertants that arose by AT→TA substitutions due to the modification of adenine by CAA. The plasmid was CAA-modified in vitro and replicated in E.coli of various genetic backgrounds (wt, alkA, alkB, mug, alkAalkB, alkAmug and alkBmug). To modify the levels of the AlkA and AlkB proteins, mutagenesis was studied in E.coli cells induced or not in adaptive response to alkylating agents. Considering the levels of CAA-induced Lac(+) revertants in strains harbouring the CAA-modified pIF105 plasmid and induced or not in adaptive response, we conclude that the AlkB dioxygenase plays a major role in decreasing the level of AT→TA mutations, thus in the repair of εA in E.coli cells. The observed differences of mutation frequencies in the various mutant strains assayed indicate that Mug glycosylase is also engaged in the repair of εA, whereas the role the AlkA glycosylase in this repair is negligible. PMID:21193516

  18. Constitutively Activated ALK2 and Increased SMAD1/5 Cooperatively Induce Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling in Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Toru; Kohda, Masakazu; Kanomata, Kazuhiro; Nojima, Junya; Nakamura, Atsushi; Kamizono, Jyunji; Noguchi, Yasuo; Iwakiri, Kiyofumi; Kondo, Takeo; Kurose, Junichi; Endo, Ken-ichi; Awakura, Takeshi; Fukushi, Junichi; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Chiyonobu, Tomohiro; Kawara, Akira; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Wada, Ikuo; Akita, Masumi; Komori, Tetsuo; Nakayama, Konosuke; Nanba, Akira; Maruki, Yuichi; Yoda, Tetsuya; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Yu, Paul B.; Shore, Eileen M.; Kaplan, Frederick S.; Miyazono, Kohei; Matsuoka, Masaru; Ikebuchi, Kenji; Ohtake, Akira; Oda, Hiromi; Jimi, Eijiro; Owan, Ichiro; Okazaki, Yasushi; Katagiri, Takenobu

    2009-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by congenital malformation of the great toes and by progressive heterotopic bone formation in muscle tissue. Recently, a mutation involving a single amino acid substitution in a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) type I receptor, ALK2, was identified in patients with FOP. We report here that the identical mutation, R206H, was observed in 19 Japanese patients with sporadic FOP. This mutant receptor, ALK2(R206H), activates BMP signaling without ligand binding. Moreover, expression of Smad1 and Smad5 was up-regulated in response to muscular injury. ALK2(R206H) with Smad1 or Smad5 induced osteoblastic differentiation that could be inhibited by Smad7 or dorsomorphin. Taken together, these findings suggest that the heterotopic bone formation in FOP may be induced by a constitutively activated BMP receptor signaling through Smad1 or Smad5. Gene transfer of Smad7 or inhibition of type I receptors with dorsomorphin may represent strategies for blocking the activity induced by ALK2(R206H) in FOP. PMID:18684712

  19. ETV6-NTRK3 Is Expressed in a Subset of ALK-Negative Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Alassiri, Ali H; Ali, Rola H; Shen, Yaoqing; Lum, Amy; Strahlendorf, Caron; Deyell, Rebecca; Rassekh, Rod; Sorensen, Poul H; Laskin, Janessa; Marra, Marco; Yip, Stephen; Lee, Cheng-Han; Ng, Tony L

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a genetically heterogenous tumor of the viscera and soft tissues, with multiple molecular features having been demonstrated in this tumor type. About 50% of cases harbor an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement, and recent studies have described novel fusions involving the ROS1 and PDGFRβ genes in a subset of ALK-negative cases. However, the molecular features of the remaining subset of cases are not yet defined. We report a case of a large, highly aggressive IMT of the lung in a 17-year-old girl. This case was molecularly characterized through whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing. Subsequently, we investigated a cohort of 15 ALK-negative IMTs of various anatomic sites. All cases were screened using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for rearrangement of the ETV6 locus and with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion transcript. Whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing revealed an ETV6-NTRK3 fusion transcript in our index case. This was confirmed by FISH studies for ETV6 gene rearrangement, as well as by RT-PCR. In addition, 2 additional cases in our cohort demonstrated ETV6 rearrangement by FISH. The presence of ETV6-NTRK3 fusion transcript was demonstrated by RT-PCR in one of these additional cases. In summary, we demonstrate the expression of the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion oncogene in a small subset of IMTs, lending further support to the role of oncogenic tyrosine kinases in the pathophysiology of this tumor type. Our data also further expand the growing spectrum of tumor types expressing the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion. PMID:27259007

  20. Expression of an alkane monooxygenase (alkB) gene and methyl tert-butyl ether co-metabolic oxidation in Pseudomonas citronellolis.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Ana Luisa; Sigala, Juan Carlos; Le Borgne, Sylvie; Morales, Marcia

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas citronellolis UAM-Ps1 co-metabolically transforms methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) to tert-butyl alcohol with n-pentane (2.6 mM), n-octane (1.5 mM) or dicyclopropylketone (DCPK) (4.4 mM), a gratuitous inducer of alkane hydroxylase (AlkB) activity. The reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR was used to quantify the alkane monooxygenase (alkB) gene expression. The alkB gene was expressed in the presence of n-alkanes and DCPK and MTBE oxidation occurred only in cultures when alkB was transcribed. A correlation between the number of alkB transcripts and MTBE consumption was found (ΜΤΒΕ consumption in μmol = 1.44e(-13) x DNA copies, R(2) = 0.99) when MTBE (0.84 mM) was added. Furthermore, alkB was cloned and expressed into Escherichia coli and the recombinant AlkB had a molecular weight of 42 kDa. This is the first report where the expression of alkB is related to the co-metabolic oxidation of MTBE. PMID:25432418

  1. Oncogenic TPM3-ALK activation requires dimerization through the coiled-coil structure of TPM3

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, Yosuke; Ishikawa, Rie; Sakatani, Toshio; Ichinose, Junji; Sunohara, Mitsuhiro; Watanabe, Kousuke; Kage, Hidenori; Nakajima, Jun; Nagase, Takahide; Ohishi, Nobuya; Takai, Daiya

    2015-02-13

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a mesenchymal tumor that can arise from anywhere in the body. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements, most often resulting in the tropomyosin 3 (TPM3)-ALK fusion gene, are the main causes of IMT. However, the mechanism of malignant transformation in IMT has yet to be elucidated. The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of the TPM3 region in the transformation of IMT via TPM3-ALK. Lentivirus vectors containing a TPM3-ALK fusion gene lacking various lengths of TPM3 were constructed and expressed in HEK293T and NIH3T3 cell lines. Focus formation assay revealed loss of contact inhibition in NIH3T3 cells transfected with full-length TPM3-ALK, but not with ALK alone. Blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) revealed that TPM3-ALK dimerization increased in proportion to the length of TPM3. Western blot showed phosphorylation of ALK, ERK1/2, and STAT3 in HEK293T cells transfected with TPM3-ALK. Thus, the coiled-coil structure of TPM3 contributes to the transforming ability of the TPM3-ALK fusion protein, and longer TPM3 region leads to higher dimer formation. - Highlights: • TPM3-ALK fusion protein dimerizes through the coiled-coil structure of TPM3. • Longer coiled-coil structure of TPM3 leads to higher TPM3-ALK dimer formation. • Presence of TPM3-ALK dimer leads to ALK, STAT3, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. • Presence of TPM3-ALK leads to loss of contact inhibition. • BN-PAGE is a simple technique for visualizing oncogenic dimerization.

  2. Patterns of response to crizotinib in recurrent glioblastoma according to ALK and MET molecular profile in two patients.

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, Emilie; Chamberlain, Marc C; Zairi, Fahed; Delmaire, Christine; Idbaih, Ahmed; Renaud, Florence; Maurage, Claude Alain; Grégoire, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Two patients with an unmethylated MGMT promoter and IDH1 (R132H) wild-type recurrent glioblastoma were treated with crizotinib. Prolonged stabilization of the disease (17 months) was achieved in the first case. Interestingly, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) expression and c-MET protein overexpression was observed. Conversely, no response to crizotinib was obtained in the second case with MET protein overexpression and c-MET amplification but no ALK expression or ALK gene amplification. These case studies suggest that novel targeted ALK inhibitors may provide relevant clinical benefit in selected cases in which driver mutations are demonstrable. PMID:26498130

  3. ALK(R1275Q) perturbs extracellular matrix, enhances cell invasion and leads to the development of neuroblastoma in cooperation with MYCN.

    PubMed

    Ueda, T; Nakata, Y; Yamasaki, N; Oda, H; Sentani, K; Kanai, A; Onishi, N; Ikeda, K; Sera, Y; Honda, Z-I; Tanaka, K; Sata, M; Ogawa, S; Yasui, W; Saya, H; Takita, J; Honda, H

    2016-08-25

    Overexpression of MYCN is a hallmark of neuroblastoma (NB). ALK(R1275Q), an activating mutation of ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase), has been found in sporadic and familial NB patients. In this report, we demonstrated that ALK(R1275Q) knock-in, MYCN transgenic compound mice developed NB with complete penetrance. Transcriptome analysis revealed that ALK(R1275Q) globally downregulated the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM)- and basement membrane (BM)-associated genes in both primary neuronal cells and NB tumors. Accordingly, ALK(R1275Q)/MYCN tumors exhibited reduced expression of ECM/BM-related proteins as compared with MYCN tumors. In addition, on MYCN transduction, ALK(R1275Q)-expressing neuronal cells exhibited increased migratory and invasive activities. Consistently, enhanced invasion and metastasis were demonstrated in ALK(R1275Q)/MYCN mice. These results collectively indicate that ALK(R1275Q) confers a malignant potential on neuronal cells that overexpress MYCN by impairing normal ECM/BM integrity and enhancing tumor growth and dissemination. Moreover, we found that crizotinib, an ALK inhibitor, almost completely inhibited the growth of ALK(R1275Q)/MYCN tumors in an allograft model. Our findings provided insights into the cooperative mechanism of the mutated ALK and overexpressed MYCN in the pathogenesis of NB and demonstrated the effectiveness of crizotinib on ALK(R1275Q)-positive tumors. PMID:26829053

  4. Chloroacetaldehyde-induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli: the role of AlkB protein in repair of 3,N(4)-ethenocytosine and 3,N(4)-alpha-hydroxyethanocytosine.

    PubMed

    Maciejewska, Agnieszka M; Ruszel, Karol P; Nieminuszczy, Jadwiga; Lewicka, Joanna; Sokołowska, Beata; Grzesiuk, Elzbieta; Kuśmierek, Jarosław T

    2010-02-01

    Etheno (epsilon) adducts are formed in reaction of DNA bases with various environmental carcinogens and endogenously created products of lipid peroxidation. Chloroacetaldehyde (CAA), a metabolite of carcinogen vinyl chloride, is routinely used to generate epsilon-adducts. We studied the role of AlkB, along with AlkA and Mug proteins, all engaged in repair of epsilon-adducts, in CAA-induced mutagenesis. The test system used involved pIF102 and pIF104 plasmids bearing the lactose operon of CC102 or CC104 origin (Cupples and Miller (1989) [17]) which allowed to monitor Lac(+) revertants, the latter arose by GC-->AT or GC-->TA substitutions, respectively, as a result of modification of guanine and cytosine. The plasmids were CAA-damaged in vitro and replicated in Escherichia coli of various genetic backgrounds. To modify the levels of AlkA and AlkB proteins, mutagenesis was studied in E. coli cells induced or not in adaptive response. Formation of varepsilonC proceeds via a relatively stable intermediate, 3,N(4)-alpha-hydroxyethanocytosine (HEC), which allowed to compare repair of both adducts. The results indicate that all three genes, alkA, alkB and microg, are engaged in alleviation of CAA-induced mutagenesis. The frequency of mutation was higher in AlkA-, AlkB- and Mug-deficient strains in comparison to alkA(+), alkB(+), and microg(+) controls. Considering the levels of CAA-induced Lac(+) revertants in strains harboring the pIF plasmids and induced or not in adaptive response, we conclude that AlkB protein is engaged in the repair of epsilonC and HEC in vivo. Using the modified TTCTT 5-mers as substrates, we confirmed in vitro that AlkB protein repairs epsilonC and HEC although far less efficiently than the reference adduct 3-methylcytosine. The pH optimum for repair of HEC and epsilonC is significantly different from that for 3-methylcytosine. We propose that the protonated form of adduct interact in active site of AlkB protein. PMID:19941873

  5. Augmentor α and β (FAM150) are ligands of the receptor tyrosine kinases ALK and LTK: Hierarchy and specificity of ligand–receptor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Andrey V.; Murray, Phillip B.; Shi, Xiarong; Mo, Elizabeth S.; Mohanty, Jyotidarsini; Tome, Francisco; Bai, Hanwen; Gunel, Murat; Lax, Irit; Schlessinger, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are a class of cell surface receptors that, upon ligand binding, stimulate a variety of critical cellular functions. The orphan receptor anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is one of very few RTKs that remain without a firmly established protein ligand. Here we present a novel cytokine, FAM150B, which we propose naming augmentor-α (AUG-α), as a ligand for ALK. AUG-α binds ALK with high affinity and activates ALK in cells with subnanomolar potency. Detailed binding experiments using cells expressing ALK or the related receptor leukocyte tyrosine kinase (LTK) demonstrate that AUG-α binds and robustly activates both ALK and LTK. We show that the previously established LTK ligand FAM150A (AUG-β) is specific for LTK and only weakly binds to ALK. Furthermore, expression of AUG-α stimulates transformation of NIH/3T3 cells expressing ALK, induces IL-3 independent growth of Ba/F3 cells expressing ALK, and is expressed in neuroblastoma, a cancer partly driven by ALK. These experiments reveal the hierarchy and specificity of two cytokines as ligands for ALK and LTK and set the stage for elucidating their roles in development and disease states. PMID:26630010

  6. Amplified expression of the tag+ and alkA+ genes in Escherichia coli: identification of gene products and effects on alkylation resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Kaasen, I; Evensen, G; Seeberg, E

    1986-01-01

    We have constructed plasmids which overproduce the tag and alkA gene products of Escherichia coli, i.e., 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases I and II. The tag and alkA gene products were identified radiochemically in maxi- or minicells as polypeptides of 21 and 30 kilodaltons, respectively, which are consistent with the gel filtration molecular weights of the enzyme activities, thus confirming the identity of the cloned genes. High expression of the tag+-coded glycosylase almost completely suppressed the alkylation sensitivity of alkA mutants, indicating that high levels of 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase I will eliminate the need for 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II in repair of alkylated DNA. Furthermore, overproduction of the alkA+-coded glycosylase greatly sensitizes wild-type cells to alkylation, suggesting that only a limited expression of this enzyme will allow efficient DNA repair. Images PMID:3536857

  7. The role of the ALK receptor in cancer biology.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, B; Palmer, R H

    2016-09-01

    A vast array of oncogenic variants has been identified for anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). Therefore, there is a need to better understand the role of ALK in cancer biology in order to optimise treatment strategies. This review summarises the latest research on the receptor tyrosine kinase ALK, and how this information can guide the management of patients with cancer that is ALK-positive. A variety of ALK gene alterations have been described across a range of tumour types, including point mutations, deletions and rearrangements. A wide variety of ALK fusions, in which the kinase domain of ALK and the amino-terminal portion of various protein partners are fused, occur in cancer, with echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK being the most prevalent in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Different ALK fusion proteins can mediate different signalling outputs, depending on properties such as subcellular localisation and protein stability. The ALK fusions found in tumours lack spatial and temporal regulation, which can also affect dimerisation and substrate specificity. Two ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), crizotinib and ceritinib, are currently approved in Europe for use in ALK-positive NSCLC and several others are in development. These ALK TKIs bind slightly differently within the ATP-binding pocket of the ALK kinase domain and are associated with the emergence of different resistance mutation patterns during therapy. This emphasises the need to tailor the sequence of ALK TKIs according to the ALK signature of each patient. Research into the oncogenic functions of ALK, and fast paced development of ALK inhibitors, has substantially improved outcomes for patients with ALK-positive NSCLC. Limited data are available surrounding the physiological ligand-stimulated activation of ALK signalling and further research is needed. Understanding the role of ALK in tumour biology is key to further optimising therapeutic strategies for ALK

  8. Targeting stemness is an effective strategy to control EML4-ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se Jin; Noh, Kyung Hee; Lee, Young-Ho; Hong, Soon-Oh; Song, Kwon-Ho; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Soyeon; Kim, Tae Min; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Seo, Jae Hong; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Tae Woo

    2015-11-24

    The fusion between anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) is a causative factor in a unique subset of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Although the inhibitor crizotinib, as it blocks the kinase activity of the resulting EML4-ALK fusion protein, displays remarkable initial responses, a fraction of NSCLC cases eventually become resistant to crizotinib by acquiring mutations in the ALK domain or activating bypass pathways via EGFR, KIT, or KRAS. Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory provides a plausible explanation for acquisition of tumorigenesis and resistance. However, the question as to whether EML4-ALK-driven tumorigenesis is linked with the stem-like property and whether the stemness is an effective target in controlling EML4-ALK+ NSCLC including crizotinib-resistant NSCLC cells has not been addressed. Here, we report that stem-like properties stem from ALK activity in EML4-ALK+ NSCLC cells. Notably, treatment with rapamycin, a CSC targeting agent, attenuates stem-like phenotypes of the EML4-ALK+ cells, which increased capability of tumor formation and higher expression of stemness-associated molecules such as ALDH, NANOG, and OCT4. Importantly, combinational treatment with rapamycin and crizotinib leads to synergistic anti-tumor effects on EML4-ALK+ NSCLC cells as well as on those resistant to crizotinib. Thus, we provide a proof of principle that targeting stemness would be a novel strategy to control intractable EML4-ALK+ NSCLC. PMID:26517679

  9. Targeting stemness is an effective strategy to control EML4-ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se Jin; Noh, Kyung Hee; Lee, Young-Ho; Hong, Soon-Oh; Song, Kwon-Ho; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Soyeon; Kim, Tae Min; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Seo, Jae Hong; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Tae Woo

    2015-01-01

    The fusion between anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) is a causative factor in a unique subset of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Although the inhibitor crizotinib, as it blocks the kinase activity of the resulting EML4-ALK fusion protein, displays remarkable initial responses, a fraction of NSCLC cases eventually become resistant to crizotinib by acquiring mutations in the ALK domain or activating bypass pathways via EGFR, KIT, or KRAS. Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory provides a plausible explanation for acquisition of tumorigenesis and resistance. However, the question as to whether EML4-ALK-driven tumorigenesis is linked with the stem-like property and whether the stemness is an effective target in controlling EML4-ALK+ NSCLC including crizotinib-resistant NSCLC cells has not been addressed. Here, we report that stem-like properties stem from ALK activity in EML4-ALK+ NSCLC cells. Notably, treatment with rapamycin, a CSC targeting agent, attenuates stem-like phenotypes of the EML4-ALK+ cells, which increased capability of tumor formation and higher expression of stemness-associated molecules such as ALDH, NANOG, and OCT4. Importantly, combinational treatment with rapamycin and crizotinib leads to synergistic anti-tumor effects on EML4-ALK+ NSCLC cells as well as on those resistant to crizotinib. Thus, we provide a proof of principle that targeting stemness would be a novel strategy to control intractable EML4-ALK+ NSCLC. PMID:26517679

  10. EML4-ALK induces epithelial–mesenchymal transition consistent with cancer stem cell properties in H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fuchun; Liu, Xiaoke Qing, Qin Sang, Yaxiong Feng, Chengjun Li, Xiaoyu Jiang, Li Su, Pei Wang, Yongsheng

    2015-04-10

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4(EML4) – anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene has been identified as a driver mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the role of EML4-ALK in malignant transformation is not entirely clear. Here, for the first time, we showed that H1299 NSCLC cells stably expressing EML4-ALK acquire EMT phenotype, associated with enhanced invasive migration and increased expression of EMT-inducing transcription factors. H1299-EML4-ALK cells also displayed cancer stem cell-like properties with a concomitant up-regulation of CD133 and enhanced ability of mammospheres formation. Moreover, we found that inhibition of ERK1/2 reversed EMT induced by EML4-ALK in H1299 cells. Taken together, these results suggested that EML4-ALK induced ERK activation is mechanistically associated with EMT phenotype. Thus, inhibition of ERK signaling pathway could be a potential strategy in treatment of NSCLC patients with EML4-ALK translocation. - Highlights: • EML4-ALK induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition in H1299 cells. • Expression of EML4-ALK promotes invasion and migration in vitro. • EML4-ALK enhanced sphere formation and stem cell-like properties in H1299 cells. • Blockage of ERK1/2 reverse Epithelial–Mesenchymal transition induced by EML4-ALK.

  11. Novel CAD-ALK gene rearrangement is drugable by entrectinib in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Amatu, Alessio; Somaschini, Alessio; Cerea, Giulio; Bosotti, Roberta; Valtorta, Emanuele; Buonandi, Pasquale; Marrapese, Giovanna; Veronese, Silvio; Luo, David; Hornby, Zachary; Multani, Pratik; Murphy, Danielle; Shoemaker, Robert; Lauricella, Calogero; Giannetta, Laura; Maiolani, Martina; Vanzulli, Angelo; Ardini, Elena; Galvani, Arturo; Isacchi, Antonella; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Siena, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Background: Activated anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fusions are recurrent events in a small fraction of colorectal cancers (CRCs), although these events have not yet been exploited as in other malignancies. Methods: We detected ALK protein expression by immunohistochemistry and gene rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridisation in the ALKA-372-001 phase I study of the pan-Trk, ROS1, and ALK inhibitor entrectinib. One out of 487 CRCs showed ALK positivity with a peculiar pattern that prompted further characterisation by targeted sequencing using anchored multiplex PCR. Results: A novel ALK fusion with the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamylase, and dihydroorotase (CAD) gene (CAD-ALK fusion gene) was identified. It resulted from inversion within chromosome 2 and the fusion of exons 1–35 of CAD with exons 20–29 of ALK. After failure of previous standard therapies, treatment of this patient with the ALK inhibitor entrectinib resulted in a durable objective tumour response. Conclusions: We describe the novel CAD-ALK rearrangement as an oncogene and provide the first evidence of its drugability as a new molecular target in CRC. PMID:26633560

  12. Prospective screening for ALK: clinical features and outcome according to ALK status.

    PubMed

    Fallet, Vincent; Cadranel, Jacques; Doubre, Hélène; Toper, Cécile; Monnet, Isabelle; Chinet, Thierry; Oliviero, Gérard; Foulon, Guillaume; De Cremoux, Hubert; Vieira, Thibault; Antoine, Martine; Wislez, Marie

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the clinico-pathological characteristics and outcomes of a cohort of French patients who were prospectively screened for Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) rearrangement. One hundred and sixteen consecutive patients screened for ALK rearrangement to be recruited into a crizotinib registration trial were included from eight French centres. ALK rearrangement was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Seventeen patients (14.6%) were positive for ALK. ALK+ patients were younger (p = 0.049) and more likely to be males (p=0.032), non- or light-smokers (p = 0.048) and without underlying respiratory disease (p=0.025) compared to ALK- patients. Thyroid-transcription factor-1 expression was present in all ALK+ tumours. ALK+ tumours tended to have lymph node and brain metastases. In multivariate analyses, gender, smoking history and N stage were independently associated with ALK status. Median overall survival (OS) was not reached for ALK+ patients and was significantly longer than for ALK- patients (hazard ratio for death for ALK- patients 2.98; 95% CI [1.29-6.90], p=0.01). French ALK+ patients present a specific phenotype. ALK rearrangement should be determined to improve OS with an effective targeted therapy. PMID:24589437

  13. Alk5 inhibition increases delivery of macromolecular and protein-bound contrast agents to tumors

    PubMed Central

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E.; Mohanty, Suchismita; Ansari, Celina; Lenkov, Olga; Shaw, Aubie; Ito, Ken; Hong, Su Hyun; Hoffmann, Matthias; Pisani, Laura; Boudreau, Nancy; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Limited transendothelial permeability across tumor microvessels represents a significant bottleneck in the development of tumor-specific diagnostic agents and theranostic drugs. Here, we show an approach to increase transendothelial permeability of macromolecular and nanoparticle-based contrast agents via inhibition of the type I TGF-β receptor, activin-like kinase 5 (Alk5), in tumors. Alk5 inhibition significantly increased tumor contrast agent delivery and enhancement on imaging studies, while healthy organs remained relatively unaffected. Imaging data correlated with significantly decreased tumor interstitial fluid pressure, while tumor vascular density remained unchanged. This immediately clinically translatable concept involving Alk5 inhibitor pretreatment prior to an imaging study could be leveraged for improved tumor delivery of macromolecular and nanoparticle-based imaging probes and, thereby, facilitate development of more sensitive imaging tests for cancer diagnosis, enhanced tumor characterization, and personalized, image-guided therapies. PMID:27182558

  14. Exocyclic carbons adjacent to the N6 of adenine are targets for oxidation by the Escherichia coli adaptive response protein AlkB.

    PubMed

    Li, Deyu; Delaney, James C; Page, Charlotte M; Yang, Xuedong; Chen, Alvin S; Wong, Cintyu; Drennan, Catherine L; Essigmann, John M

    2012-05-30

    The DNA and RNA repair protein AlkB removes alkyl groups from nucleic acids by a unique iron- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxidation strategy. When alkylated adenines are used as AlkB targets, earlier work suggests that the initial target of oxidation can be the alkyl carbon adjacent to N1. Such may be the case with ethano-adenine (EA), a DNA adduct formed by an important anticancer drug, BCNU, whereby an initial oxidation would occur at the carbon adjacent to N1. In a previous study, several intermediates were observed suggesting a pathway involving adduct restructuring to a form that would not hinder replication, which would match biological data showing that AlkB almost completely reverses EA toxicity in vivo. The present study uses more sensitive spectroscopic methodology to reveal the complete conversion of EA to adenine; the nature of observed additional putative intermediates indicates that AlkB conducts a second oxidation event in order to release the two-carbon unit completely. The second oxidation event occurs at the exocyclic carbon adjacent to the N(6) atom of adenine. The observation of oxidation of a carbon at N(6) in EA prompted us to evaluate N(6)-methyladenine (m6A), an important epigenetic signal for DNA replication and many other cellular processes, as an AlkB substrate in DNA. Here we show that m6A is indeed a substrate for AlkB and that it is converted to adenine via its 6-hydroxymethyl derivative. The observation that AlkB can demethylate m6A in vitro suggests a role for AlkB in regulation of important cellular functions in vivo. PMID:22512456

  15. EML4-ALK translocation is associated with early onset of disease and other clinicopathological features in Chinese female never-smokers with non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    REN, WEIHONG; ZHANG, BO; MA, JIE; LI, WENCAI; LAN, JIANYUN; MEN, HUI; ZHANG, QINXIAN

    2015-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) translocation is resistant to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), including gefitinib and erlotinib, but responds to the ALK-TKI crizotinib. Characterization of EML4-ALK translocation may provide invaluable information to facilitate disease diagnosis and improve the outcome of customized treatment. Although the occurrence of EML4-ALK translocation is likely to be affected by the smoking habits and gender of patients, the translocation has not been characterized extensively in female never-smokers with NSCLC. Therefore, 280 female never-smokers that were diagnosed with NSCLC were enrolled in the present study, and characteristics of EML4-ALK translocation, including the frequency, were determined in these NSCLC patients. EML4-ALK fusion variants were detected using Multiplex one-step reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and subsequently confirmed by DNA sequencing and Vysis ALK Break Apart fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The EML4-ALK fusion variants were detected in 21 carcinoma tissue specimens, accounting for 7.5% of the enrolled patients. Out of these patients with EML4-ALK fusion variants, EML4-ALK fusion variant 1 was identified in 12 patients, indicating that variant 1 is the most common type of EML4-ALK fusion gene in the present cohort of patients. ALK mRNA was aberrantly expressed in all the tissues with EML4-ALK translocation, but not in the carcinoma tissues without EML4-ALK translocation. In addition, the EML4-ALK translocation was more frequently found in younger patients. The median age of patients with EML4-ALK translocation was 50.95±2.29 years, which was significantly younger (P<0.01) than the median age of the patients without EML4-ALK translocation (57.15±0.56). The EML4-ALK translocation was detected exclusively in undifferentiated tumors that were graded as

  16. Protein Dynamics Control the Progression and Efficiency of the Catalytic Reaction Cycle of the Escherichia coli DNA-Repair Enzyme AlkB*

    PubMed Central

    Ergel, Burçe; Gill, Michelle L.; Brown, Lewis; Yu, Bomina; Palmer, Arthur G.; Hunt, John F.

    2014-01-01

    A central goal of enzymology is to understand the physicochemical mechanisms that enable proteins to catalyze complex chemical reactions with high efficiency. Recent methodological advances enable the contribution of protein dynamics to enzyme efficiency to be explored more deeply. Here, we utilize enzymological and biophysical studies, including NMR measurements of conformational dynamics, to develop a quantitative mechanistic scheme for the DNA repair enzyme AlkB. Like other iron/2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases, AlkB employs a two-step mechanism in which oxidation of 2-oxoglutarate generates a highly reactive enzyme-bound oxyferryl intermediate that, in the case of AlkB, slowly hydroxylates an alkylated nucleobase. Our results demonstrate that a microsecond-to-millisecond time scale conformational transition facilitates the proper sequential order of substrate binding to AlkB. Mutations altering the dynamics of this transition allow generation of the oxyferryl intermediate but promote its premature quenching by solvent, which uncouples 2-oxoglutarate turnover from nucleobase oxidation. Therefore, efficient catalysis by AlkB depends upon the dynamics of a specific conformational transition, establishing another paradigm for the control of enzyme function by protein dynamics. PMID:25043760

  17. Growth differentiation factor 11 signals through the transforming growth factor-beta receptor ALK5 to regionalize the anterior-posterior axis.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Olov; Reissmann, Eva; Ibáñez, Carlos F

    2006-08-01

    Growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) contributes to regionalize the mouse embryo along its anterior-posterior axis by regulating the expression of Hox genes. The identity of the receptors that mediate GDF11 signalling during embryogenesis remains unclear. Here, we show that GDF11 can interact with type I receptors ALK4, ALK5 and ALK7, but predominantly uses ALK4 and ALK5 to activate a Smad3-dependent reporter gene. Alk5 mutant embryos showed malformations in anterior-posterior patterning, including the lack of expression of the posterior determinant Hoxc10, that resemble defects found in Gdf11-null mutants. A heterozygous mutation in Alk5, but not in Alk4 or Alk7, potentiated Gdf11(-/-)-like phenotypes in vertebral, kidney and palate development in an Acvr2b(-/-) background, indicating a genetic interaction between the two receptor genes. Thus, the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) receptor ALK5, which until now has only been associated with the biological functions of TGF-beta1 to TGF-beta3 proteins, mediates GDF11 signalling during embryogenesis. PMID:16845371

  18. Investigations of Activated ACVR1/ALK2, a Bone Morphogenetic Protein Type I Receptor, That Causes Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Frederick S.; Seemann, Petra; Haupt, Julia; Xu, Meiqi; Lounev, Vitali Y.; Mullins, Mary; Shore, Eileen M.

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) type I receptors are serine-threonine kinase transmembrane signal transduction proteins that regulate a vast array of ligand-dependent cell-fate decisions with temporal and spatial fidelity during development and postnatal life. A recent discovery identified a recurrent activating heterozygous missense mutation in a BMP type I receptor [Activin receptor IA/activin-like kinase 2 (ACVR1; also known as ALK2)] in patients with the disabling genetic disorder fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP). Individuals with FOP experience episodes of tissue metamorphosis that convert soft connective tissue such as skeletal muscle into a highly ramified and disabling second skeleton of heterotopic bone. The single nucleotide ACVR1/ALK2 mutation that causes FOP is one of the most specific disease-causing mutations in the human genome and to date the only known inherited activating mutation of a BMP receptor that causes a human disease. Thus, the study of FOP provides the basis for understanding the clinically relevant effects of activating mutations in the BMP signaling pathway. Here we briefly review methodologies that we have applied to studying activated BMP signaling in FOP. PMID:21036241

  19. Alk Is a Transcriptional Target of LMO4 and ERα that Promotes Cocaine Sensitization and Reward

    PubMed Central

    Lasek, Amy W.; Gesch, Julie; Giorgetti, Francesco; Kharazia, Viktor; Heberlein, Ulrike

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we showed that the mouse LIM-domain only 4 (Lmo4) gene, which encodes a protein containing two zinc-finger LIM domains that interact with various DNA-binding transcription factors, attenuates behavioral sensitivity to repeated cocaine administration. Here we show that transcription of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk) is repressed by LMO4 in the striatum and that Alk promotes the development of cocaine sensitization and conditioned place preference, a measure of cocaine reward. Since LMO4 is known to interact with estrogen receptor α (ERα) at the promoters of target genes, we investigated whether Alk expression might be controlled by a similar mechanism. We found that LMO4 and ERα are associated with the Alk promoter by chromatin immunoprecipitation and that Alk is an estrogen-responsive gene in the striatum. Moreover, we show that ERα knockout mice exhibit enhanced cocaine sensitization and conditioned place preference and an increase in Alk expression in the nucleus accumbens. These data define a novel regulatory network involved in behavioral responses to cocaine. Interestingly, sex differences in several behavioral responses to cocaine in humans and rodents have been described and estrogen is thought to mediate some of these differences. Our data suggest that estrogen regulation of Alk may be one mechanism responsible for sexually dimorphic responses to cocaine. PMID:21976498

  20. Rationale for co-targeting IGF-1R and ALK in ALK fusion positive lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lovly, Christine M.; McDonald, Nerina T.; Chen, Heidi; Ortiz-Cuaran, Sandra; Heukamp, Lukas C.; Yan, Yingjun; Florin, Alexandra; Ozretić, Luka; Lim, Diana; Wang, Lu; Chen, Zhao; Chen, Xi; Lu, Pengcheng; Paik, Paul K.; Shen, Ronglai; Jin, Hailing; Buettner, Reinhard; Ansén, Sascha; Perner, Sven; Brockmann, Michael; Bos, Marc; Wolf, Jürgen; Gardizi, Masyar; Wright, Gavin M.; Solomon, Benjamin; Russell, Prudence A.; Rogers, Toni-Maree; Suehara, Yoshiyuki; Red-Brewer, Monica; Tieu, Rudy; de Stanchina, Elisa; Wang, Qingguo; Zhao, Zhongming; Johnson, David H.; Horn, Leora; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Thomas, Roman K.; Ladanyi, Marc; Pao, William

    2014-01-01

    The ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), crizotinib, shows significant activity in patients whose lung cancers harbor ALK fusions but its efficacy is limited by variable primary responses and acquired resistance. In work arising from the intriguing clinical observation of a patient with ALK fusion+ lung cancer who had an ‘exceptional response’ to an IGF-1R antibody, we define a therapeutic synergism between ALK and IGF-1R inhibitors. Similar to IGF-1R, ALK fusion proteins bind to the adaptor, IRS-1, and IRS-1 knockdown enhances the anti-tumor effects of ALK inhibitors. In models of ALK TKI resistance, the IGF-1R pathway is activated, and combined ALK/IGF-1R inhibition improves therapeutic efficacy. Consistent with this finding, IGF-1R/IRS-1 levels are increased in biopsy samples from patients progressing on crizotinib therapy. Collectively, these data support a role for the IGF-1R/IRS-1 pathway in both ALK TKI-sensitive and TKI-resistant states and provide biological rationale for further clinical development of dual ALK/IGF-1R inhibitors. PMID:25173427

  1. Importance of protein flexibility in ranking inhibitor affinities: modeling the binding mechanisms of piperidine carboxamides as Type I1/2 ALK inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiaotian; Pan, Peichen; Li, Dan; Tian, Sheng; Li, Youyong; Hou, Tingjun

    2015-02-28

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has gained increased attention as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of various cancers, especially non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Recently, piperidine carboxamides were reported as Type I1/2 inhibitors of ALK, which occupy both the ATP binding site and the back ATP hydrophobic cavity in DFG-in conformation. Due to the dynamic behavior of ALK in the binding of Type I1/2 inhibitors, the accurate predictions of the binding structures and relative binding potencies of these inhibitors are quite challenging. In this study, different modeling techniques, including molecular docking, ensemble docking based on multiple receptor conformations, molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, were utilized to explore the binding mechanisms of piperidine carboxamides. Our predictions show that the conventional docking protocols are not sufficient to predict the relative binding potencies of the studied inhibitors with high accuracy, but incorporating protein flexibility before or after docking is quite effective to improve the prediction accuracy. Notably, the binding free energies predicted by MM/GBSA or MM/PBSA based on the MD simulations for the docked poses give the highest correlation with the experimental data, highlighting the importance of the inclusion of receptor flexibility for the accurate predictions of the binding potencies for Type I1/2 inhibitors of ALK. Furthermore, the comprehensive analysis of several pairs of representative inhibitors demonstrates the importance of hydrophobic interactions in improving the binding affinities of the inhibitors with the hot-spot residues surrounding the binding pocket. This work is expected to provide valuable clues for further rational design of novel and potent Type I1/2 ALK inhibitors. PMID:25644934

  2. ALK inhibitor resistance in ALK(F1174L)-driven neuroblastoma is associated with AXL activation and induction of EMT.

    PubMed

    Debruyne, D N; Bhatnagar, N; Sharma, B; Luther, W; Moore, N F; Cheung, N-K; Gray, N S; George, R E

    2016-07-14

    The crizotinib-resistant ALK(F1174L) mutation arises de novo in neuroblastoma (NB) and is acquired in ALK translocation-driven cancers, lending impetus to the development of novel anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors with different modes of action. The diaminopyrimidine TAE684 and its derivative ceritinib (LDK378), which are structurally distinct from crizotinib, are active against NB cells expressing ALK(F1174L). Here we demonstrate acquired resistance to TAE684 and LDK378 in ALK(F1174L)-driven human NB cells that is linked to overexpression and activation of the AXL tyrosine kinase and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). AXL phosphorylation conferred TAE684 resistance to NB cells through upregulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling. Inhibition of AXL partly rescued TAE684 resistance, resensitizing these cells to this compound. AXL activation in resistant cells was mediated through increased expression of the active form of its ligand, GAS6, that also served to stabilize the AXL protein. Although ectopic expression of AXL and TWIST2 individually in TAE684-sensitive parental cells led to the elevated expression of mesenchymal markers and invasive capacity, only AXL overexpression induced resistance to TAE684 as well. TAE684-resistant cells showed greater sensitivity to HSP90 inhibition than did their parental counterparts, with downregulation of AXL and AXL-mediated ERK signaling. Our studies indicate that aberrant AXL signaling and development of an EMT phenotype underlie resistance of ALK(F1174L)-driven NB cells to TAE684 and its derivatives. We suggest that the combination of ALK and AXL or HSP90 inhibitors be considered to delay the emergence of such resistance. PMID:26616860

  3. Targeting tumour vasculature by inhibiting activin receptor-like kinase (ALK)1 function.

    PubMed

    de Vinuesa, Amaya García; Bocci, Matteo; Pietras, Kristian; Ten Dijke, Peter

    2016-08-15

    Angiogenesis is a hallmark of cancer and is now a validated therapeutic target in the clinical setting. Despite the initial success, anti-angiogenic compounds impinging on the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway display limited survival benefits in patients and resistance often develops due to activation of alternative pathways. Thus, finding and validating new targets is highly warranted. Activin receptor-like kinase (ALK)1 is a transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) type I receptor predominantly expressed in actively proliferating endothelial cells (ECs). ALK1 has been shown to play a pivotal role in regulating angiogenesis by binding to bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)9 and 10. Two main pharmacological inhibitors, an ALK1-Fc fusion protein (Dalantercept/ACE-041) and a fully human antibody against the extracellular domain of ALK1 (PF-03446962) are currently under clinical development. Herein, we briefly recapitulate the role of ALK1 in blood vessel formation and the current status of the preclinical and clinical studies on inhibition of ALK1 signalling as an anti-angiogenic strategy. Future directions in terms of new combination regimens will also be presented. PMID:27528762

  4. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase translocation is correlated with anaplastic lymphoma kinase expression and mutually exclusive with epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in Taiwanese non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Chi; Hung, Tsai-Hsien; Wang, Chih-Wei; Ng, Kwai-Fong; Chen, Tse-Ching

    2015-05-01

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) fusion gene is an important biomarker for target therapy. The aim of this study is to better understand the clinical and molecular features of the EML4-ALK fusion gene in lung cancer patients in Taiwan and therefore to generate an efficient algorithm for the detection of ALK translocation. In the first cohort, ALK translocation was identified in 1 adenocarcinoma from 100 lung cancer patients by using break apart fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Next, we detected 6 ALK translocations in another 40 EGFR wild type adenocarcinomas but not in 40 cases with EGFR mutation. Histological analysis revealed that solid growth with signet-ring cells or cribriform glands with extracellular mucin were noted in all the 7 ALK translocated cases. One ALK positive cancer with mucinous cribriform pattern had no ALK expression. ALK expression was correlated with ALK translocation (p < 0.001), but not with ALK gene copy number gain (CNG) (P = 0.838). ALK translocation was also mutually exclusive with EGFR mutation in Taiwanese non-small cell lung cancer (P = 0.033). These results indicate that screening tests for EGFR mutation status and/or ALK expression could help efficiently select ALK translocated patients for target therapy. PMID:25708242

  5. Downregulation of NPM-ALK by siRNA causes anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell growth inhibition and augments the anti cancer effects of chemotherapy in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Faye Yuan-yi; Zhao, Yi; Anderson, W French; Johnston, Patrick B

    2007-06-01

    The fusion protein, nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK), results from the chromosome translocation t(2;5)(p23;q25) and is present in 50-70 percent of anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs). NPM-ALK is a constitutively activated kinase that transforms cells through stimulating several mitogenic signaling pathways. To examine if the NPM-ALK is a potential therapeutic target in ALCL, we used siRNA to specifically downregulate the expression of the NPM-ALK in ALCL cell lines. In this report, we demonstrated viability loss in t(2;5)-positive ALCL cell lines, SUDHL-1 and Karpas 299 cells, but not in lymphoma cell lines without the chromosome translocation, Jurkat and Granta 519 cells. Further study demonstrated that the downregulation of NPM-ALK resulted in decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis. When used in combination with chemotherapeutic agents, such as doxorubicin, the inhibition of the NPM-ALK augments the chemosensitivity of the tumor cells. These results revealed the importance of continuous expression of NPM-ALK in maintaining the growth of ALCL cells. Our data also suggested that the repression of the fusion gene might be a potential novel therapeutic strategy for NPM-ALK positive ALCLs. PMID:17612934

  6. The Atomic Resolution Structure of Human AlkB Homolog 7 (ALKBH7), a Key Protein for Programmed Necrosis and Fat Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoqiang; He, Qingzhong; Feng, Chong; Liu, Yang; Deng, Zengqin; Qi, Xiaoxuan; Wu, Wei; Mei, Pinchao; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2014-01-01

    ALKBH7 is the mitochondrial AlkB family member that is required for alkylation- and oxidation-induced programmed necrosis. In contrast to the protective role of other AlkB family members after suffering alkylation-induced DNA damage, ALKBH7 triggers the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and promotes cell death. Moreover, genetic ablation of mouse Alkbh7 dramatically increases body weight and fat mass. Here, we present crystal structures of human ALKBH7 in complex with Mn(II) and α-ketoglutarate at 1.35 Å or N-oxalylglycine at 2.0 Å resolution. ALKBH7 possesses the conserved double-stranded β-helix fold that coordinates a catalytically active iron by a conserved HX(D/E) … Xn … H motif. Self-hydroxylation of Leu-110 was observed, indicating that ALKBH7 has the potential to catalyze hydroxylation of its substrate. Unlike other AlkB family members whose substrates are DNA or RNA, ALKBH7 is devoid of the “nucleotide recognition lid” which is essential for binding nucleobases, and thus exhibits a solvent-exposed active site; two loops between β-strands β6 and β7 and between β9 and β10 create a special outer wall of the minor β-sheet of the double-stranded β-helix and form a negatively charged groove. These distinct features suggest that ALKBH7 may act on protein substrate rather than nucleic acids. Taken together, our findings provide a structural basis for understanding the distinct function of ALKBH7 in the AlkB family and offer a foundation for drug design in treating cell death-related diseases and metabolic diseases. PMID:25122757

  7. Mechanisms of Acquired Resistance to ALK Inhibitors and the Rationale for Treating ALK-positive Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Isozaki, Hideko; Takigawa, Nagio; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of an echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene led to improved clinical outcomes in patients with lung cancer after the development of the first ALK-targeting agent, crizotinib. Some second-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which might be more potent than crizotinib or effective on crizotinib-resistant patients, have been developed. Although these ALK-TKIs show an excellent response initially, most patients eventually acquire resistance. Therefore, careful consideration of the resistance mechanisms might lead to superior therapeutic strategies. Here, we summarize the history of ALK-TKIs and their underlying resistance mechanisms in both the preclinical and clinical settings. In addition, we discuss potential future treatment strategies in ALK-TKI-naïve and -resistant patients with lung cancer harboring the EML4-ALK fusion gene. PMID:25941796

  8. Mechanisms of Acquired Resistance to ALK Inhibitors and the Rationale for Treating ALK-positive Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Isozaki, Hideko; Takigawa, Nagio; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of an echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene led to improved clinical outcomes in patients with lung cancer after the development of the first ALK-targeting agent, crizotinib. Some second-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which might be more potent than crizotinib or effective on crizotinib-resistant patients, have been developed. Although these ALK-TKIs show an excellent response initially, most patients eventually acquire resistance. Therefore, careful consideration of the resistance mechanisms might lead to superior therapeutic strategies. Here, we summarize the history of ALK-TKIs and their underlying resistance mechanisms in both the preclinical and clinical settings. In addition, we discuss potential future treatment strategies in ALK-TKI-naïve and -resistant patients with lung cancer harboring the EML4-ALK fusion gene. PMID:25941796

  9. Peptides derived from the dependence receptor ALK are proapoptotic for ALK-positive tumors

    PubMed Central

    Aubry, A; Galiacy, S; Ceccato, L; Marchand, C; Tricoire, C; Lopez, F; Bremner, R; Racaud-Sultan, C; Monsarrat, B; Malecaze, F; Allouche, M

    2015-01-01

    ALK is a receptor tyrosine kinase with an oncogenic role in various types of human malignancies. Despite constitutive activation of the kinase through gene alterations, such as chromosomal translocation, gene amplification or mutation, treatments with kinase inhibitors invariably lead to the development of resistance. Aiming to develop new tools for ALK targeting, we took advantage of our previous demonstration identifying ALK as a dependence receptor, implying that in the absence of ligand the kinase-inactive ALK triggers or enhances apoptosis. Here, we synthesized peptides mimicking the proapoptotic domain of ALK and investigated their biological effects on tumor cells. We found that an ALK-derived peptide of 36 amino acids (P36) was cytotoxic for ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma and neuroblastoma cell lines. In contrast, ALK-negative tumor cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells were insensitive to P36. The cytotoxic effect was due to caspase-dependent apoptosis and required N-myristoylation of the peptide. Two P36-derived shorter peptides as well as a cyclic peptide also induced apoptosis. Surface plasmon resonance and mass spectrometry analysis of P36-interacting proteins from two responsive cell lines, Cost lymphoma and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma, uncovered partners that could involve p53-dependent signaling and pre-mRNA splicing. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 rescued these cells from P36-induced apoptosis. Finally, we observed that a treatment combining P36 with the ALK-specific inhibitor crizotinib resulted in additive cytotoxicity. Therefore, ALK-derived peptides could represent a novel targeted therapy for ALK-positive tumors. PMID:25950466

  10. The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP){beta}/{zeta} is expressed in different subtypes of human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Garcia-Suarez, Olivia; Menendez-Rodriguez, Primitiva; Mortimer, J.; Chang, Y.; Astudillo, A.; Deuel, T.F.

    2007-10-12

    Increasing evidence suggests mutations in human breast cancer cells that induce inappropriate expression of the 18-kDa cytokine pleiotrophin (PTN, Ptn) initiate progression of breast cancers to a more malignant phenotype. Pleiotrophin signals through inactivating its receptor, the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP){beta}/{zeta}, leading to increased tyrosine phosphorylation of different substrate proteins of RPTP{beta}/{zeta}, including {beta}-catenin, {beta}-adducin, Fyn, GIT1/Cat-1, and P190RhoGAP. PTN signaling thus has wide impact on different important cellular systems. Recently, PTN was found to activate anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) through the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway; this discovery potentially is very important, since constitutive ALK activity of nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK fusion protein is causative of anaplastic large cell lymphomas, and, activated ALK is found in other malignant cancers. Recently ALK was identified in each of 63 human breast cancers from 22 subjects. We now demonstrate that RPTP{beta}/{zeta} is expressed in each of these same 63 human breast cancers that previously were found to express ALK and in 10 additional samples of human breast cancer. RPTP{beta}/{zeta} furthermore was localized not only in its normal association with the cell membrane but also scattered in cytoplasm and in nuclei in different breast cancer cells and, in the case of infiltrating ductal carcinomas, the distribution of RPTP{beta}/{zeta} changes as the breast cancer become more malignant. The data suggest that the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway may be constitutively activated and potentially function to constitutively activate ALK in human breast cancer.

  11. The dichloromethane extract of the ethnomedicinal plant Neurolaena lobata inhibits NPM/ALK expression which is causal for anaplastic large cell lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Unger, Christine; Popescu, Ruxandra; Giessrigl, Benedikt; Laimer, Daniela; Heider, Susanne; Seelinger, Mareike; Diaz, Rene; Wallnöfer, Bruno; Egger, Gerda; Hassler, Melanie; Knöfler, Martin; Saleh, Leila; Sahin, Emine; Grusch, Michael; Fritzer-Szekeres, Monika; Dolznig, Helmut; Frisch, Richard; Kenner, Lukas; Kopp, Brigitte; Krupitza, Georg

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates extracts of Neuolaena lobata, an anti-protozoan ethnomedicinal plant of the Maya, regarding its anti-neoplastic properties. Firstly, extracts of increasing polarity were tested in HL-60 cells analyzing inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis induction. Secondly, the most active extract was further tested in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) cell lines of human and mouse origin. The dichloromethane extract inhibited proliferation of HL-60, human and mouse ALCL cells with an IC50 of ~2.5, 3.7 and 2.4 µg/ml, respectively and arrested cells in the G2/M phase. The extract induced the checkpoint kinases Chk1 and Chk2 and perturbed the orchestrated expression of the Cdc25 family of cell cycle phosphatases which was paralleled by the activation of p53, p21 and downregulation of c-Myc. Importantly, the expression of NPM/ALK and its effector JunB were drastically decreased, which correlated with the activation of caspase 3. Subsequently also platelet derived growth factor receptor β was downregulated, which was recently shown to be transcriptionally controlled by JunB synergizing with ALK in ALCL development. We show that a traditional healing plant extract downregulates various oncogenes, induces tumor suppressors, inhibits cell proliferation and triggers apoptosis of malignant cells. The discovery of the 'Active Principle(s)' is warranted. PMID:23135783

  12. Aberrant Expression of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase in Ovarian Carcinoma Independent of Gene Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shaoxian; Yang, Fei; Du, Xiang; Lu, Yongming; Zhang, Ling; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancies. The oncogenic role of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is well characterized in many hematopoietic and solid tumors. ALK expression in ovarian carcinoma has been reported but the exact status of ALK protein and its association with clinicopathologic features requires further investigation. ALK expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in 110 primary ovarian carcinomas, including 85 cases of serous carcinoma and 25 cases of mucinous carcinoma. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used for evaluating ALK translocation in ALK-positive ovarian carcinomas. Among 110 ovarian carcinomas, 23 (20.9%) cases were ALK positive by immunohistochemistry. All ALK-positive cases were ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma. ALK expression was detected in 23/85 (27.1%) ovarian serous carcinoma and 0/25 (0%) in ovarian mucinous carcinoma. None of the 23 ALK IHC-positive cases harbored ALK gene translocations by FISH or RT-PCR. ALK protein expression was associated with patient age, tumor stage, and histologic type. Specifically, the probability of ALK protein expression was significantly higher in high-grade serous carcinomas in older patients (above 50 y) with advanced disease (FIGO stage III and IV) compared with the low-grade serous and mucinous carcinomas in younger patients with relatively early disease. In conclusion, aberrant ALK expression is observed in ovarian serous carcinoma but not in mucinous carcinoma, is independent of gene translocation, and might be associated with progression and prognosis. PMID:27271776

  13. Wild-type ALK and activating ALK-R1275Q and ALK-F1174L mutations upregulate Myc and initiate tumor formation in murine neural crest progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Montavon, Gisèle; Jauquier, Nicolas; Coulon, Aurélie; Peuchmaur, Michel; Flahaut, Marjorie; Bourloud, Katia Balmas; Yan, Pu; Delattre, Olivier; Sommer, Lukas; Joseph, Jean-Marc; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Gross, Nicole; Mühlethaler-Mottet, Annick

    2014-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene is overexpressed, mutated or amplified in most neuroblastoma (NB), a pediatric neural crest-derived embryonal tumor. The two most frequent mutations, ALK-F1174L and ALK-R1275Q, contribute to NB tumorigenesis in mouse models, and cooperate with MYCN in the oncogenic process. However, the precise role of activating ALK mutations or ALK-wt overexpression in NB tumor initiation needs further clarification. Human ALK-wt, ALK-F1174L, or ALK-R1275Q were stably expressed in murine neural crest progenitor cells (NCPC), MONC-1 or JoMa1, immortalized with v-Myc or Tamoxifen-inducible Myc-ERT, respectively. While orthotopic implantations of MONC-1 parental cells in nude mice generated various tumor types, such as NB, osteo/chondrosarcoma, and undifferentiated tumors, due to v-Myc oncogenic activity, MONC-1-ALK-F1174L cells only produced undifferentiated tumors. Furthermore, our data represent the first demonstration of ALK-wt transforming capacity, as ALK-wt expression in JoMa1 cells, likewise ALK-F1174L, or ALK-R1275Q, in absence of exogenous Myc-ERT activity, was sufficient to induce the formation of aggressive and undifferentiated neural crest cell-derived tumors, but not to drive NB development. Interestingly, JoMa1-ALK tumors and their derived cell lines upregulated Myc endogenous expression, resulting from ALK activation, and both ALK and Myc activities were necessary to confer tumorigenic properties on tumor-derived JoMa1 cells in vitro. PMID:24947326

  14. ALK is a MYCN target gene and regulates cell migration and invasion in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Md Kamrul; Nafady, Asmaa; Takatori, Atsushi; Kishida, Satoshi; Ohira, Miki; Suenaga, Yusuke; Hossain, Shamim; Akter, Jesmin; Ogura, Atsushi; Nakamura, Yohko; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Nakagawara, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Human anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has been identified as an oncogene that is mutated or amplified in NBLs. To obtain a better understanding of the molecular events associated with ALK in the pathogenesis of NBL, it is necessary to clarify how ALK gene contributes to NBL progression. In the present study, we found that ALK expression was significantly high in NBL clinical samples with amplified MYCN (n = 126, P < 0.01) and in developing tumors of MYCN-transgenic mice. Indeed, promoter analysis revealed that ALK is a direct transcriptional target of MYCN. Overexpression and knockdown of ALK demonstrated its function in cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Moreover, treatment with an ALK inhibitor, TAE-684, efficiently suppressed such biological effects in MYCN amplified cells and tumor growth of the xenograft in mice. Our present findings explore the fundamental understanding of ALK in order to develop novel therapeutic tools by targeting ALK for aggressive NBL treatment. PMID:24356251

  15. NPM-ALK mediates phosphorylation of MSH2 at tyrosine 238, creating a functional deficiency in MSH2 and the loss of mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Bone, K M; Wang, P; Wu, F; Wu, C; Li, L; Bacani, J T; Andrew, S E; Lai, R

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALK+ALCL) tumors express the characteristic oncogenic fusion protein NPM-ALK, which mediates tumorigenesis by exerting its constitutive tyrosine kinase activity on various substrates. We recently identified MSH2, a protein central to DNA mismatch repair (MMR), as a novel binding partner and phosphorylation substrate of NPM-ALK. Here, using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, we report for the first time that MSH2 is phosphorylated by NPM-ALK at a specific residue, tyrosine 238. Using GP293 cells transfected with NPM-ALK, we confirmed that the MSH2Y238F mutant is not tyrosine phosphorylated. Furthermore, transfection of MSH2Y238F into these cells substantially decreased the tyrosine phosphorylation of endogenous MSH2. Importantly, gene transfection of MSH2Y238F abrogated the binding of NPM-ALK with endogenous MSH2, re-established the dimerization of MSH2:MSH6 and restored the sensitivity to DNA mismatch-inducing drugs, indicative of MMR return. Parallel findings were observed in two ALK+ALCL cell lines, Karpas 299 and SUP-M2. In addition, we found that enforced expression of MSH2Y238F into ALK+ALCL cells alone was sufficient to induce spontaneous apoptosis. In conclusion, our findings have identified NPM-ALK-induced phosphorylation of MSH2 at Y238 as a crucial event in suppressing MMR. Our studies have provided novel insights into the mechanism by which oncogenic tyrosine kinases disrupt MMR. PMID:25978431

  16. [Protein expression and purification].

    PubMed

    Růčková, E; Müller, P; Vojtěšek, B

    2014-01-01

    Production of recombinant proteins is essential for many applications in both basic research and also in medicine, where recombinant proteins are used as pharmaceuticals. This review summarizes procedures involved in recombinant protein expression and purification, including molecular cloning of target genes into expression vectors, selection of the appropriate expression system, and protein purification techniques. Recombinant DNA technology allows protein engineering to modify protein stability, activity and function or to facilitate protein purification by affinity tag fusions. A wide range of cloning systems enabling fast and effective design of expression vectors is currently available. A first choice of protein expression system is usually the bacteria Escherichia coli. The main advantages of this prokaryotic expression system are low cost and simplicity; on the other hand this system is often unsuitable for production of complex mammalian proteins. Protein expression mediated by eukaryotic cells (yeast, insect and mammalian cells) usually produces properly folded and posttranslationally modified proteins. How-ever, cultivation of insect and, especially, mammalian cells is time consuming and expensive. Affinity tagged recombinant proteins are purified efficiently using affinity chromatography. An affinity tag is a protein or peptide that mediates specific binding to a chromatography column, unbound proteins are removed during a washing step and pure protein is subsequently eluted. PMID:24945544

  17. Molecular mechanisms that underpin EML4-ALK driven cancers and their response to targeted drugs.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, Richard; Choi, Jene; Fennell, Dean A; Fry, Andrew M; Richards, Mark W

    2016-03-01

    A fusion between the EML4 (echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like) and ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) genes was identified in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in 2007 and there has been rapid progress in applying this knowledge to the benefit of patients. However, we have a poor understanding of EML4 and ALK biology and there are many challenges to devising the optimal strategy for treating EML4-ALK NSCLC patients. In this review, we describe the biology of EML4 and ALK, explain the main features of EML4-ALK fusion proteins and outline the therapies that target EML4-ALK. In particular, we highlight the recent advances in our understanding of the structures of EML proteins, describe the molecular mechanisms of resistance to ALK inhibitors and assess current thinking about combinations of ALK drugs with inhibitors that target other kinases or Hsp90. PMID:26755435

  18. Inhibition of Axl improves the targeted therapy against ALK-mutated neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Fei; Li, Hongling; Sun, Yong

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • First reported Axl is co-expressed with ALK in neuroblastoma tissues and cell lines. • Axl activation promotes cell growth and impairs the efficiency of ALK inhibitor. • Further found silence of Axl leads to increased sensitivity to ALK inhibitors. • Axl inhibitor promotes the efficiency of targeted therapy in vitro and in vivo. • Axl activation should be considered in the clinical application of ALK inhibitors. - Abstract: Neuroblastoma (NB) patients harboring mutated ALK can be expected to potentially benefit from targeted therapy based on ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), such as crizotinib and ceritinib. However, the effect of the treatment varies with different individuals, although with the same genic changes. Axl receptor tyrosine kinase is expressed in a variety of human cancers, but little data are reported in NB, particularly in which carrying mutated ALK. In this study, we focus on the roles of Axl in ALK-mutated NB for investigating rational therapeutic strategy. We found that Axl is expressed in ALK-positive NB tissues and cell lines, and could be effectively activated by its ligand GAS6. Ligand-dependent Axl activation obviously rescued crizotinib-mediated suppression of cell proliferation in ALK-mutated NB cells. Genetic inhibition of Axl with specific small interfering RNA markedly increased the sensitivity of cells to ALK-TKIs. Furthermore, a small-molecule inhibitor of Axl significantly enhanced ALK-targeted therapy, as an increased frequency of apoptosis was observed in NB cells co-expressing ALK and Axl. Taken together, our results demonstrated that activation of Axl could lead to insensitivity to ALK inhibitors, and dual inhibition of ALK and Axl might be a potential therapeutic strategy against ALK-mutated NB.

  19. Activated Alk triggers prolonged neurogenesis and Ret upregulation providing a therapeutic target in ALK-mutated neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Cazes, Alex; Lopez-Delisle, Lucille; Tsarovina, Konstantina; Pierre-Eugène, Cécile; De Preter, Katleen; Peuchmaur, Michel; Nicolas, André; Provost, Claire; Louis-Brennetot, Caroline; Daveau, Romain; Kumps, Candy; Cascone, Ilaria; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Prignon, Aurélie; Speleman, Frank; Rohrer, Hermann; Delattre, Olivier; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations of the ALK (Anaplastic lymphoma Kinase) gene have been identified in sporadic and familial cases of neuroblastoma, a cancer of early childhood arising from the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). To decipher ALK function in neuroblastoma predisposition and oncogenesis, we have characterized knock-in (KI) mice bearing the two most frequent mutations observed in neuroblastoma patients. A dramatic enlargement of sympathetic ganglia is observed in AlkF1178L mice from embryonic to adult stages associated with an increased proliferation of sympathetic neuroblasts from E14.5 to birth. In a MYCN transgenic context, the F1178L mutation displays a higher oncogenic potential than the R1279Q mutation as evident from a shorter latency of tumor onset. We show that tumors expressing the R1279Q mutation are sensitive to ALK inhibition upon crizotinib treatment. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that activated ALK triggers RET upregulation in mouse sympathetic ganglia at birth as well as in murine and human neuroblastoma. Using vandetanib, we show that RET inhibition strongly impairs tumor growth in vivo in both MYCN/KI AlkR1279Q and MYCN/KI AlkF1178L mice. Altogether, our findings demonstrate the critical role of activated ALK in SNS development and pathogenesis and identify RET as a therapeutic target in ALK mutated neuroblastoma. PMID:24811913

  20. Activin Receptor-Like Kinase Receptors ALK5 and ALK1 Are Both Required for TGFβ-Induced Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Kroon, Laurie M. G.; Narcisi, Roberto; Blaney Davidson, Esmeralda N.; Cleary, Mairéad A.; van Beuningen, Henk M.; Koevoet, Wendy J. L. M.; van Osch, Gerjo J. V. M.; van der Kraan, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are promising for cartilage regeneration because BMSCs can differentiate into cartilage tissue-producing chondrocytes. Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβ) is crucial for inducing chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs and is known to signal via Activin receptor-Like Kinase (ALK) receptors ALK5 and ALK1. Since the specific role of these two TGFβ receptors in chondrogenesis is unknown, we investigated whether ALK5 and ALK1 are expressed in BMSCs and whether both receptors are required for chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs. Materials & Methods ALK5 and ALK1 gene expression in human BMSCs was determined with RT-qPCR. To induce chondrogenesis, human BMSCs were pellet-cultured in serum-free chondrogenic medium containing TGFβ1. Chondrogenesis was evaluated by aggrecan and collagen type IIα1 RT-qPCR analysis, and histological stainings of proteoglycans and collagen type II. To overexpress constitutively active (ca) receptors, BMSCs were transduced either with caALK5 or caALK1. Expression of ALK5 and ALK1 was downregulated by transducing BMSCs with shRNA against ALK5 or ALK1. Results ALK5 and ALK1 were expressed in in vitro-expanded as well as in pellet-cultured BMSCs from five donors, but mRNA levels of both TGFβ receptors did not clearly associate with chondrogenic induction. TGFβ increased ALK5 and decreased ALK1 gene expression in chondrogenically differentiating BMSC pellets. Neither caALK5 nor caALK1 overexpression induced cartilage matrix formation as efficient as that induced by TGFβ. Moreover, short hairpin-mediated downregulation of either ALK5 or ALK1 resulted in a strong inhibition of TGFβ-induced chondrogenesis. Conclusion ALK5 as well as ALK1 are required for TGFβ-induced chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs, and TGFβ not only directly induces chondrogenesis, but also modulates ALK5 and ALK1 receptor signaling in BMSCs. These results imply that optimizing cartilage formation by

  1. Concurrent progress of reprogramming and gene correction to overcome therapeutic limitation of mutant ALK2-iPSC.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bu-Yeo; Jeong, SangKyun; Lee, Seo-Young; Lee, So Min; Gweon, Eun Jeong; Ahn, Hyunjun; Kim, Janghwan; Chung, Sun-Ku

    2016-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) syndrome is caused by mutation of the gene ACVR1, encoding a constitutive active bone morphogenetic protein type I receptor (also called ALK2) to induce heterotopic ossification in the patient. To genetically correct it, we attempted to generate the mutant ALK2-iPSCs (mALK2-iPSCs) from FOP-human dermal fibroblasts. However, the mALK2 leads to inhibitory pluripotency maintenance, or impaired clonogenic potential after single-cell dissociation as an inevitable step, which applies gene-correction tools to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Thus, current iPSC-based gene therapy approach reveals a limitation that is not readily applicable to iPSCs with ALK2 mutation. Here we developed a simplified one-step procedure by simultaneously introducing reprogramming and gene-editing components into human fibroblasts derived from patient with FOP syndrome, and genetically treated it. The mixtures of reprogramming and gene-editing components are composed of reprogramming episomal vectors, CRISPR/Cas9-expressing vectors and single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide harboring normal base to correct ALK2 c.617G>A. The one-step-mediated ALK2 gene-corrected iPSCs restored global gene expression pattern, as well as mineralization to the extent of normal iPSCs. This procedure not only helps save time, labor and costs but also opens up a new paradigm that is beyond the current application of gene-editing methodologies, which is hampered by inhibitory pluripotency-maintenance requirements, or vulnerability of single-cell-dissociated iPSCs. PMID:27256111

  2. Concurrent progress of reprogramming and gene correction to overcome therapeutic limitation of mutant ALK2-iPSC

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bu-Yeo; Jeong, SangKyun; Lee, Seo-Young; Lee, So Min; Gweon, Eun Jeong; Ahn, Hyunjun; Kim, Janghwan; Chung, Sun-Ku

    2016-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) syndrome is caused by mutation of the gene ACVR1, encoding a constitutive active bone morphogenetic protein type I receptor (also called ALK2) to induce heterotopic ossification in the patient. To genetically correct it, we attempted to generate the mutant ALK2-iPSCs (mALK2-iPSCs) from FOP-human dermal fibroblasts. However, the mALK2 leads to inhibitory pluripotency maintenance, or impaired clonogenic potential after single-cell dissociation as an inevitable step, which applies gene-correction tools to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Thus, current iPSC-based gene therapy approach reveals a limitation that is not readily applicable to iPSCs with ALK2 mutation. Here we developed a simplified one-step procedure by simultaneously introducing reprogramming and gene-editing components into human fibroblasts derived from patient with FOP syndrome, and genetically treated it. The mixtures of reprogramming and gene-editing components are composed of reprogramming episomal vectors, CRISPR/Cas9-expressing vectors and single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide harboring normal base to correct ALK2 c.617G>A. The one-step-mediated ALK2 gene-corrected iPSCs restored global gene expression pattern, as well as mineralization to the extent of normal iPSCs. This procedure not only helps save time, labor and costs but also opens up a new paradigm that is beyond the current application of gene-editing methodologies, which is hampered by inhibitory pluripotency-maintenance requirements, or vulnerability of single-cell-dissociated iPSCs. PMID:27256111

  3. The Bone Morphogenetic Protein Type Ib Receptor Is a Major Mediator of Glial Differentiation and Cell Survival in Adult Hippocampal Progenitor Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Brederlau, A.; Faigle, R.; Elmi, M.; Zarebski, A.; Sjöberg, S.; Fujii, M.; Miyazono, K.; Funa, K.

    2004-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) act as growth regulators and inducers of differentiation. They transduce their signal via three different type I receptors, termed activin receptor-like kinase 2 (Alk2), Alk3, or bone morphogenetic protein receptor Ia (BMPRIa) and Alk6 or BMPRIb. Little is known about functional differences between the three type I receptors. Here, we have investigated consequences of constitutively active (ca) and dominant negative (dn) type I receptor overexpression in adult-derived hippocampal progenitor cells (AHPs). The dn receptors have a nonfunctional intracellular but functional extracellular domain. They thus trap BMPs that are endogenously produced by AHPs. We found that effects obtained by overexpression of dnAlk2 and dnAlk6 were similar, suggesting similar ligand binding patterns for these receptors. Thus, cell survival was decreased, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression was reduced, whereas the number of oligodendrocytes increased. No effect on neuronal differentiation was seen. Whereas the expression of Alk2 and Alk3 mRNA remained unchanged, the Alk6 mRNA was induced after impaired BMP signaling. After dnAlk3 overexpression, cell survival and astroglial differentiation increased in parallel to augmented Alk6 receptor signaling. We conclude that endogenous BMPs mediate cell survival, astroglial differentiation and the suppression of oligodendrocytic cell fate mainly via the Alk6 receptor in AHP culture. PMID:15194807

  4. Expression levels of ROS1/ALK/c-MET and therapeutic efficacy of cetuximab plus chemotherapy in advanced biliary tract cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Nai-Jung; Hsu, Chiun; Chen, Jen-Shi; Tsou, Hsiao-Hui; Shen, Ying-Ying; Chao, Yee; Chen, Ming-Huang; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Shan, Yan-Shen; Huang, Shiu-Feng; Chen, Li-Tzong

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant expression of ROS1, ALK or c-MET (RAM) is implicated in carcinogenesis and cancer drug resistance. We retrospectively evaluated the effect of RAM expression on outcomes for advanced biliary tract cancer patients, who were treated with gemcitabine plus oxaliplatin (GEMOX), with or without cetuximab, in a randomized phase II trial. RAM expression levels on archived tissue sections were scored using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Of 110 tumors with IHC staining for all three markers, 18 were RAMhigh (IHC intensity 3+ for any markers). Ninety-two tumors were RAMlow (IHC intensity <3+ for all markers). All RAMhigh tumors were intra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas (IHCC). Of the patients with IHCC (n = 80), median overall survival (OS) of RAMhigh group was inferior to that of the RAMlow group (5.7 vs. 11.7 months, p = 0.021). In multivariate analysis RAMhigh remained an independently adverse prognostic factor, with a hazard ratio of 2.01 (p = 0.039). In the RAMlow group, GEMOX treatment with cetuximab significantly improved the disease control rate (68% vs. 41%, p = 0.044), median progression-free survival (7.3 vs. 4.9 months, p = 0.026), and marginally prolonged median OS (14.1 vs 9.6 months, p = 0.056), compared to GEMOX treatment alone. Future trials of anti-EGFR inhibitors for IHCC may consider RAM expression as a patient stratification factor. PMID:27136744

  5. ALK-rearrangements and testing methods in non-small cell lung cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, Rodney E.; Vora, Moiz; Mayhall, Kim; Cotelingam, James

    2014-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma tyrosine kinase (ALK) gene was first described as a driver mutation in anaplastic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Dysregulated ALK expression is now an identified driver mutation in nearly twenty different human malignancies, including 4-9% of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). The tyrosine kinase inhibitor crizotinib is more effective than standard chemotherapeutic agents in treating ALK positive NSCLC, making molecular diagnostic testing for dysregulated ALK expression a necessary step in identifying optimal treatment modalities. Here we review ALKmediated signal transduction pathways and compare the molecular protocols used to identify dysregulated ALK expression in NSCLC. We also discuss the use of crizotinib and second generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of ALK positive NSCLC, and the known mechanisms of crizotinib resistance in NSCLC. PMID:24955213

  6. Analysis of Pseudomonas putida alkane-degradation gene clusters and flanking insertion sequences: evolution and regulation of the alk genes.

    PubMed

    van Beilen, J B; Panke, S; Lucchini, S; Franchini, A G; Röthlisberger, M; Witholt, B

    2001-06-01

    The Pseudomonas putida GPo1 (commonly known as Pseudomonas oleovorans GPo1) alkBFGHJKL and alkST gene clusters, which encode proteins involved in the conversion of n-alkanes to fatty acids, are located end to end on the OCT plasmid, separated by 9.7 kb of DNA. This DNA segment encodes, amongst others, a methyl-accepting transducer protein (AlkN) that may be involved in chemotaxis to alkanes. In P. putida P1, the alkBFGHJKL and alkST gene clusters are flanked by almost identical copies of the insertion sequence ISPpu4, constituting a class 1 transposon. Other insertion sequences flank and interrupt the alk genes in both strains. Apart from the coding regions of the GPo1 and P1 alk genes (80-92% sequence identity), only the alkB and alkS promoter regions are conserved. Competition experiments suggest that highly conserved inverted repeats in the alkB and alkS promoter regions bind ALKS: PMID:11390693

  7. Combination of conventional immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR to detect ALK rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Compared with FISH and qRT-PCR analyses, immunohistochemistry (IHC) is the preferred screening test in most pathology practices for ALK-rearrangement detection. With 100% sensitivity and 98% specificity, the VENTANA ALK (D5F3) IHC assay has been approved in the EU and some Asian countries for ALK-rearrangement detection. However, an automated Ventana IHC platform is not available in most pathology labs. In this study, we evaluated the applicability of conventional IHC with D5F3 antibody in routine pathological practice and proposed detection methods and procedures that ensure that patients with ALK+ are not missed. Methods FISH and IHC analyses were performed on 297 lung adenocarcinoma cases. VENTANA IHC and qRT-PCR assay were applied to evaluate ALK-fusion status in the discordant cases of FISH and IHC. The association of ALK+ with clinicopathological characteristics was statistically analyzed. Results IHC had 100% sensitivity and 81.8% specificity for detecting ALK+. Eight ALK-expressed cases were ALK-, five of which had ALK fusion detected by qRT-PCR analysis. Three of these five cases showed ALK expression using VENTANA IHC assay. ALK+ was associated with younger age and lymph node metastasis in this Chinese lung adenocarcinoma patient cohort. Conclusions The advantages of low cost and 100% sensitivity allow conventional IHC to serve as a robust diagnostic tool for screening patients with ALK+, especially in pathology labs without a VENTANA IHC platform. For cases in which ALK is weakly expressed, qRT-PCR is necessary as a diagnostic test for ALK-fusion detection. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2269448351088278. PMID:24422905

  8. SEC31A-ALK Fusion Gene in Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ryong Nam; Choi, Yoon-La; Lee, Mi-Sook; Lira, Maruja E; Mao, Mao; Mann, Derrick; Stahl, Joshua; Licon, Abel; Choi, So Jung; Van Vrancken, Michael; Han, Joungho; Wlodarska, Iwona; Kim, Jhingook

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion is a common mechanism underlying pathogenesis of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) where these rearrangements represent important diagnostic and therapeutic targets. In this study, we found a new ALK fusion gene, SEC31A-ALK, in lung carcinoma from a 53-year-old Korean man. The conjoined region in the fusion transcript was generated by the fusion of SEC31A exon 21 and ALK exon 20 by genomic rearrangement, which contributed to generation of an intact, in-frame open reading frame. SEC31A-ALK encodes a predicted fusion protein of 1,438 amino acids comprising the WD40 domain of SEC31A at the N-terminus and ALK kinase domain at the C-terminus. Fluorescence in situ hybridization studies suggested that SEC31A-ALK was generated by an unbalanced genomic rearrangement associated with loss of the 3'-end of SEC31A. This is the first report of SEC31A-ALK fusion transcript in clinical NSCLC, which could be a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for patients with NSCLC. PMID:25715771

  9. Atractylodin Inhibits Interleukin-6 by Blocking NPM-ALK Activation and MAPKs in HMC-1.

    PubMed

    Chae, Hee-Sung; Kim, Young-Mi; Chin, Young-Won

    2016-01-01

    Atractylodin is one of the major constituents of the rhizome of Atractylodes lancea, which is widely used in Korean traditional medicine as a remedy for the treatment of gastritis and gastric ulcers. Despite of a major constituent of widely used botanical to treat inflammatory responses little is known about anti-inflammatory effect of atractylodin in the human mast cell (HMC-1). Hence, we evaluated the effect of atractylodin on the release of IL-6, the involvement of nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and A23187-induced HMC-1. In addition, Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), phospholipase C (PLC) gamma 1, and AKT phosphorylation relevant to NPM-ALK signal pathway were assessed. IL-6 levels in the HMC-1 stimulated by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and A23187 were apparently decreased by the treatment of atractylodin. Concurrently, atractylodin not only inhibited the phosphorylation of NPM-ALK, but also suppressed the phosphorylation of JAK2, STAT3, PLC gamma 1, and AKT. Furthermore, the activated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and A23187 were inhibited by atractylodin. These results suggested that atractylodin might have a potential regulatory effect on inflammatory mediator expression through blockade of both the phosphorylation of MAPKs and the NPM-ALK signaling pathway. PMID:27598116

  10. Expression levels of ROS1/ALK/c-MET and therapeutic efficacy of cetuximab plus chemotherapy in advanced biliary tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Nai-Jung; Hsu, Chiun; Chen, Jen-Shi; Tsou, Hsiao-Hui; Shen, Ying-Ying; Chao, Yee; Chen, Ming-Huang; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Shan, Yan-Shen; Huang, Shiu-Feng; Chen, Li-Tzong

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant expression of ROS1, ALK or c-MET (RAM) is implicated in carcinogenesis and cancer drug resistance. We retrospectively evaluated the effect of RAM expression on outcomes for advanced biliary tract cancer patients, who were treated with gemcitabine plus oxaliplatin (GEMOX), with or without cetuximab, in a randomized phase II trial. RAM expression levels on archived tissue sections were scored using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Of 110 tumors with IHC staining for all three markers, 18 were RAM(high) (IHC intensity 3+ for any markers). Ninety-two tumors were RAM(low) (IHC intensity <3+ for all markers). All RAM(high) tumors were intra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas (IHCC). Of the patients with IHCC (n = 80), median overall survival (OS) of RAM(high) group was inferior to that of the RAM(low) group (5.7 vs. 11.7 months, p = 0.021). In multivariate analysis RAM(high) remained an independently adverse prognostic factor, with a hazard ratio of 2.01 (p = 0.039). In the RAM(low) group, GEMOX treatment with cetuximab significantly improved the disease control rate (68% vs. 41%, p = 0.044), median progression-free survival (7.3 vs. 4.9 months, p = 0.026), and marginally prolonged median OS (14.1 vs 9.6 months, p = 0.056), compared to GEMOX treatment alone. Future trials of anti-EGFR inhibitors for IHCC may consider RAM expression as a patient stratification factor. PMID:27136744

  11. Phosphoproteomic analysis of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) downstream signaling pathways identifies signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 as a functional target of activated ALK in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sattu, Kamaraj; Hochgräfe, Falko; Wu, Jianmin; Umapathy, Ganesh; Schönherr, Christina; Ruuth, Kristina; Chand, Damini; Witek, Barbara; Fuchs, James; Li, Pui-Kai; Hugosson, Fredrik; Daly, Roger J; Palmer, Ruth H; Hallberg, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) receptor tyrosine kinase is a key oncogenic mechanism in a growing number of tumor types. In the majority of cases, ALK is activated by fusion with a dimerizing partner protein as a result of chromosomal translocation events, most studied in the case of the nucleophosmin–ALK and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4–ALK oncoproteins. It is now also appreciated that the full-length ALK receptor can be activated by point mutations and by deletions within the extracellular domain, such as those observed in neuroblastoma. Several studies have employed phosphoproteomics approaches to find substrates of ALK fusion proteins. In this study, we used MS-based phosphotyrosine profiling to characterize phosphotyrosine signaling events associated with the full-length ALK receptor. A number of previously identified and novel targets were identified. One of these, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), has previously been observed to be activated in response to oncogenic ALK signaling, but the significance of this in signaling from the full-length ALK receptor has not been explored further. We show here that activated ALK robustly activates STAT3 on Tyr705 in a number of independent neuroblastoma cell lines. Furthermore, knockdown of STAT3 by RNA interference resulted in a reduction in myelocytomatosis neuroblastom (MYCN) protein levels downstream of ALK signaling. These observations, together with a decreased level of MYCN and inhibition of neuroblastoma cell growth in the presence of STAT3 inhibitors, suggest that activation of STAT3 is important for ALK signaling activity in neuroblastoma. PMID:23889739

  12. Intratumor Heterogeneity of ALK-Rearrangements and Homogeneity of EGFR-Mutations in Mixed Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Federica Zito; Liguori, Giuseppina; Aquino, Gabriella; La Mantia, Elvira; Bosari, Silvano; Ferrero, Stefano; Rosso, Lorenzo; Gaudioso, Gabriella; De Rosa, Nicla; Scrima, Marianna; Martucci, Nicola; La Rocca, Antonello; Normanno, Nicola; Morabito, Alessandro; Rocco, Gaetano; Botti, Gerardo; Franco, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Background Non Small Cell Lung Cancer is a highly heterogeneous tumor. Histologic intratumor heterogeneity could be ‘major’, characterized by a single tumor showing two different histologic types, and ‘minor’, due to at least 2 different growth patterns in the same tumor. Therefore, a morphological heterogeneity could reflect an intratumor molecular heterogeneity. To date, few data are reported in literature about molecular features of the mixed adenocarcinoma. The aim of our study was to assess EGFR-mutations and ALK-rearrangements in different intratumor subtypes and/or growth patterns in a series of mixed adenocarcinomas and adenosquamous carcinomas. Methods 590 Non Small Cell Lung Carcinomas tumor samples were revised in order to select mixed adenocarcinomas with available tumor components. Finally, only 105 mixed adenocarcinomas and 17 adenosquamous carcinomas were included in the study for further analyses. Two TMAs were built selecting the different intratumor histotypes. ALK-rearrangements were detected through FISH and IHC, and EGFR-mutations were detected through IHC and confirmed by RT-PCR. Results 10/122 cases were ALK-rearranged and 7 from those 10 showing an intratumor heterogeneity of the rearrangements. 12/122 cases were EGFR-mutated, uniformly expressing the EGFR-mutated protein in all histologic components. Conclusion Our data suggests that EGFR-mutations is generally homogeneously expressed. On the contrary, ALK-rearrangement showed an intratumor heterogeneity in both mixed adenocarcinomas and adenosquamous carcinomas. The intratumor heterogeneity of ALK-rearrangements could lead to a possible impact on the therapeutic responses and the disease outcomes. PMID:26422230

  13. Alk7 Depleted Mice Exhibit Prolonged Cardiac Repolarization and Are Predisposed to Ventricular Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Shaozhen; Cao, Hong; Hu, He; Wang, Xin; Tang, Yanhong; Huang, Congxin

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the role of activin receptor-like kinase (ALK7) in regulating cardiac electrophysiology. Here, we showed that Alk7-/- mice exhibited prolonged QT intervals in telemetry ECG recordings. Furthermore, Langendorff-perfused Alk7-/- hearts had significantly longer action potential duration (APD) and greater incidence of ventricular arrhythmia (AV) induced by burst pacing. Using whole-cell patch clamp, we found that the densities of repolarizing K+ currents Ito and IK1 were profoundly reduced in Alk7-/- ventricular cardiomyocytes. Mechanistically, the expression of Kv4.2 (a major subunit of Ito carrying channel) and KCHIP2 (a key accessory subunit of Ito carrying channel), was markedly decreased in Alk7-/- hearts. These findings suggest that endogenous expression of ALK7 is necessary to maintain repolarizing K+ currents in ventricular cardiomyocytes, and finally prevent action potential prolongation and ventricular arrhythmia. PMID:26882027

  14. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase is expressed in different subtypes of human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Chang, Y.; Astudillo, A.; Mortimer, J.; Deuel, T.F. . E-mail: tfdeuel@scripps.edu

    2007-06-29

    Pleiotrophin (PTN, Ptn) is an 18 kDa cytokine expressed in human breast cancers. Since inappropriate expression of Ptn stimulates progression of breast cancer in transgenic mice and a dominant negative PTN reverses the transformed phenotype of human breast cancer cells that inappropriately express Ptn, it is suggested that constitutive PTN signaling in breast cancer cells that inappropriately express Ptn activates pathways that promote a more aggressive breast cancer phenotype. Pleiotrophin signals by inactivating its receptor, the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP){beta}/{zeta}, and, recently, PTN was found to activate anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) through the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway in PTN-stimulated cells, not through a direct interaction of PTN with ALK and thus not through the PTN-enforced dimerization of ALK. Since full-length ALK is activated in different malignant cancers and activated ALK is a potent oncogenic protein, we examined human breast cancers to test the possibility that ALK may be expressed in breast cancers and potentially activated through the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway; we now demonstrate that ALK is strongly expressed in different histological subtypes of human breast cancer; furthermore, ALK is expressed in both nuclei and cytoplasm and, in the 'dotted' pattern characteristic of ALK fusion proteins in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. This study thus supports the possibility that activated ALK may be important in human breast cancers and potentially activated either through the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway, or, alternatively, as an activated fusion protein to stimulate progression of breast cancer in humans.

  15. Regulation of the ALK1 ligands, BMP9 and BMP10.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Salmon, Richard M; Jiang, He; Morrell, Nicholas W

    2016-08-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)9 and BMP10 are high affinity ligands for activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1), a type I BMP receptor mainly expressed on vascular endothelial cells (ECs). ALK1-mediated BMP9/BMP10 signalling pathways have emerged as essential in EC biology and in angiogenesis. Several genetic mutations in the genes encoding the ligands and receptors of this pathway have been reported in two cardiovascular diseases, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Administration of recombinant BMP9 reverses experimental PAH in preclinical rodent models. Dalantercept, an Fc-fusion protein of the extracellular domain of ALK1 and a ligand trap for BMP9 and BMP10, is in phase II clinical trials for anti-tumour angiogenesis. Understanding the regulation of BMP9 and BMP10, at both gene and protein levels, under physiological and pathological conditions, will reveal essential information and potential novel prognostic markers for the BMP9/BMP10-targeted therapies. PMID:27528761

  16. Combating autophagy is a strategy to increase cytotoxic effects of novel ALK inhibitor entrectinib in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Aveic, Sanja; Pantile, Marcella; Seydel, Anke; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Zanon, Carlo; Li, Gary; Tonini, Gian Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a threatening childhood malignancy. Its prognosis is affected by several morphological, and biological characteristics, including the constitutive expression of ALK tyrosine kinase. In this study we examined the therapeutic potential of a novel ALK inhibitor, entrectinib, in obliterating NB tumor cells. Entrectinib showed the growth-inhibitory effects on NB cells with a 50% inhibitory concentration range of 0.03–5 μM. In the ALK-dependent cells, entrectinib mediated G1-arrest, which was associated with modified expression of multiple cell-cycle regulators. Down-regulation of Ki-67, and attenuated phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and STAT3, correlated with observed antiproliferative capacity of entrectinib. Initial cytostatic activity of entrectinib was followed by concentration-dependent apoptotic cell death, and Caspase-3 activation. However, we delineated a reduced sensitivity of ALK mutated NB cells to entrectinib, and demonstrated strong activation of autophagy in SH-SY5YF1174L NB cell line. Abrogation of autophagy by chloroquine increased significantly the toxicity of entrectinib, as confirmed by enhanced death rate, and PARP protein cleavage in SH-SY5YF1174L cells. In aggregate, our data show that entrectinib inhibits proliferation, and induces G1-arrest, and apoptosis in NB cells. We propose entrectinib for further consideration in treatment of NB, and recommend pharmacological inhibition of autophagy to be explored for a combined therapeutic approach in NB patients that might develop resistance to entrectinib. PMID:26735175

  17. Dependence-induced ethanol drinking and GABA neurotransmission are altered in Alk deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Paul; Cates-Gatto, Chelsea; Varodayan, Florence P; Nadav, Tali; Roberto, Marisa; Lasek, Amy W; Roberts, Amanda J

    2016-08-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is expressed in the brain and implicated in alcohol abuse in humans and behavioral responses to ethanol in mice. Previous studies have shown an association of human ALK with acute responses to alcohol and alcohol dependence. In addition, Alk knockout (Alk -/-) mice consume more ethanol in a binge-drinking test and show increased sensitivity to ethanol sedation. However, the function of ALK in excessive drinking following the establishment of ethanol dependence has not been examined. In this study, we tested Alk -/- mice for dependence-induced drinking using the chronic intermittent ethanol-two bottle choice drinking (CIE-2BC) protocol. We found that Alk -/- mice initially consume more ethanol prior to CIE exposure, but do not escalate ethanol consumption after exposure, suggesting that ALK may promote the escalation of drinking after ethanol dependence. To determine the mechanism(s) responsible for this behavioral phenotype we used an electrophysiological approach to examine GABA neurotransmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a brain region that regulates alcohol consumption and shows increased GABA signaling after chronic ethanol exposure. GABA transmission in ethanol-naïve Alk -/- mice was enhanced at baseline and potentiated in response to acute ethanol application when compared to wild-type (Alk +/+) mice. Moreover, basal GABA transmission was not elevated by CIE exposure in Alk -/- mice as it was in Alk +/+ mice. These data suggest that ALK plays a role in dependence-induced drinking and the regulation of presynaptic GABA release in the CeA. PMID:26946429

  18. A Screening Method for the ALK Fusion Gene in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yoshiko; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer research has recently made significant progress in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of lung cancer and in developing treatments for it. Such achievements are directly utilized in clinical practice. Indeed, the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene was first described in non-small cell lung cancer in 2007, and a molecularly targeted drug against the fusion was approved in 2011. However, lung cancer with the ALK fusion constitutes only a small fraction of lung cancers; therefore, efficient patient selection is crucial for successful treatment using the ALK inhibitor. Currently, RT-PCR, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and immunohistochemistry are commonly used to detect the ALK fusion. Although FISH is currently the gold standard technique, there are no perfect methods for detecting these genetic alterations. In this article, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method and the possible criteria for selecting patients who are more likely to have the ALK fusion. If we can successfully screen patients, then ALK inhibitor treatment will be the best example of personalized therapy in terms of selecting patients with an uncommon genotype from a larger group with the same tumor phenotype. In other words, the personalized therapy may offer a new challenge for current clinical oncology. PMID:22655265

  19. A Screening Method for the ALK Fusion Gene in NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Yoshiko; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer research has recently made significant progress in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of lung cancer and in developing treatments for it. Such achievements are directly utilized in clinical practice. Indeed, the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4–anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene was first described in non-small cell lung cancer in 2007, and a molecularly targeted drug against the fusion was approved in 2011. However, lung cancer with the ALK fusion constitutes only a small fraction of lung cancers; therefore, efficient patient selection is crucial for successful treatment using the ALK inhibitor. Currently, RT-PCR, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and immunohistochemistry are commonly used to detect the ALK fusion. Although FISH is currently the gold standard technique, there are no perfect methods for detecting these genetic alterations. In this article, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method and the possible criteria for selecting patients who are more likely to have the ALK fusion. If we can successfully screen patients, then ALK inhibitor treatment will be the best example of personalized therapy in terms of selecting patients with an uncommon genotype from a larger group with the same tumor phenotype. In other words, the personalized therapy may offer a new challenge for current clinical oncology. PMID:22655265

  20. Excess of NPM-ALK oncogenic signaling promotes cellular apoptosis and drug dependency.

    PubMed

    Ceccon, M; Merlo, M E Boggio; Mologni, L; Poggio, T; Varesio, L M; Menotti, M; Bombelli, S; Rigolio, R; Manazza, A D; Di Giacomo, F; Ambrogio, C; Giudici, G; Casati, C; Mastini, C; Compagno, M; Turner, S D; Gambacorti-Passerini, C; Chiarle, R; Voena, C

    2016-07-21

    Most of the anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) cases carry the t(2;5; p23;q35) that produces the fusion protein NPM-ALK (nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase). NPM-ALK-deregulated kinase activity drives several pathways that support malignant transformation of lymphoma cells. We found that in ALK-rearranged ALCL cell lines, NPM-ALK was distributed in equal amounts between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Only the cytoplasmic portion was catalytically active in both cell lines and primary ALCL, whereas the nuclear portion was inactive because of heterodimerization with NPM1. Thus, about 50% of the NPM-ALK is not active and sequestered as NPM-ALK/NPM1 heterodimers in the nucleus. Overexpression or relocalization of NPM-ALK to the cytoplasm by NPM genetic knockout or knockdown caused ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2) increased phosphorylation and cell death through the engagement of an ATM/Chk2- and γH2AX (phosphorylated H2A histone family member X)-mediated DNA-damage response. Remarkably, human NPM-ALK-amplified cell lines resistant to ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) underwent apoptosis upon drug withdrawal as a consequence of ERK1/2 hyperactivation. Altogether, these findings indicate that an excess of NPM-ALK activation and signaling induces apoptosis via oncogenic stress responses. A 'drug holiday' where the ALK TKI treatment is suspended could represent a therapeutic option in cells that become resistant by NPM-ALK amplification. PMID:26657151

  1. TGF-ß induces Lysyl hydroxylase 2b in human synovial osteoarthritic fibroblasts through ALK5 signaling.

    PubMed

    Remst, Dennis F G; Blaney Davidson, Esmeralda N; Vitters, Elly L; Bank, Ruud A; van den Berg, Wim B; van der Kraan, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    Lysyl hydroxylase 2b (LH2b) is known to increase pyridinoline cross-links, making collagen less susceptible to enzymatic degradation. Previously, we observed a relationship between LH2b and osteoarthritis-related fibrosis in murine knee joint. For this study, we investigate if transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-ß) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) regulate procollagen-lysine, 2-oxoglutarate 5-dioxygenase 2 (PLOD2) (gene encoding LH2b) and LH2b expression differently in osteoarthritic human synovial fibroblasts (hSF). Furthermore, we investigate via which TGF-ß route (Smad2/3P or Smad1/5/8P) LH2b is regulated, to explore options to inhibit LH2b during fibrosis. To answer these questions, fibroblasts were isolated from knee joints of osteoarthritis patients. The hSF were stimulated with TGF-ß with or without a kinase inhibitor of ALK4/5/7 (SB-505124) or ALK1/2/3/6 (dorsomorphin). TGF-ß, CTGF, constitutively active (ca)ALK1 and caALK5 were adenovirally overexpressed in hSF. The gene expression levels of PLOD1/2/3, CTGF and COL1A1 were analyzed with Q-PCR. LH2 protein levels were determined with western blot. As expected, TGF-ß induced PLOD2/LH2 expression in hSF, whereas CTGF did not. PLOD1 and PLOD3 were not affected by either TGF-ß or CTGF. SB-505124 prevented the induction of TGF-ß-induced PLOD2, CTGF and COL1A1. Surprisingly, dorsomorphin completely blocked the induction of CTGF and COL1A1, whereas TGF-ß-induced PLOD2 was only slightly reduced. Overexpression of caALK5 in osteoarthritic hSF significantly induced PLOD2/LH2 expression, whereas caALK1 had no effect. We showed, in osteoarthritic hSF, that TGF-ß induced PLOD2/LH2 via ALK5 Smad2/3P. This elevation of LH2b in osteoarthritic hSF makes LH2b an interesting target to interfere with osteoarthritis-related persistent fibrosis. PMID:24192939

  2. ALK5-dependent TGF-β signaling is a major determinant of late stage adult neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    He, Yingbo; Zhang, Hui; Yung, Andrea; Villeda, Saul A; Jaeger, Philipp A; Olayiwola, Oluwatobi; Fainberg, Nina; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2014-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathway serves critical functions in central nervous system (CNS) development, but apart from its proposed neuroprotective actions, its physiological role in the adult brain is unclear. We observed a prominent activation of TGF-β signaling in the adult dentate gyrus and expression of downstream Smad proteins in this neurogenic zone. Consistent with a function of TGF-β signaling in adult neurogenesis, genetic deletion of the TGF-β receptor ALK5 reduced the number, migration, and dendritic arborization of newborn neurons. Conversely, constitutive activation of neuronal ALK5 in forebrain caused a striking increase in these aspects of neurogenesis and was associated with higher expression of c-fos in newborn neurons and with stronger memory function. Our findings describe a new and unexpected role for ALK5-dependent TGF-β signaling as a regulator of the late stages of adult hippocampal neurogenesis which may have implications for changes in neurogenesis during aging and disease. PMID:24859199

  3. Prospective and clinical validation of ALK immunohistochemistry: results from the phase I/II study of alectinib for ALK-positive lung cancer (AF-001JP study)

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, K.; Togashi, Y.; Kamihara, Y.; Fukuyama, T.; Yoshioka, H.; Inoue, A.; Katsuki, H.; Kiura, K.; Nakagawa, K.; Seto, T.; Maemondo, M.; Hida, T.; Harada, M.; Ohe, Y.; Nogami, N.; Yamamoto, N.; Nishio, M.; Tamura, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusions need to be accurately and efficiently detected for ALK inhibitor therapy. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) remains the reference test. Although increasing data are supporting that ALK immunohistochemistry (IHC) is highly concordant with FISH, IHC screening needed to be clinically and prospectively validated. Patients and methods In the AF-001JP trial for alectinib, 436 patients were screened for ALK fusions through IHC (n = 384) confirmed with FISH (n = 181), multiplex RT-PCR (n = 68), or both (n = 16). IHC results were scored with iScore. Result ALK fusion was positive in 137 patients and negative in 250 patients. Since the presence of cancer cells in the samples for RT-PCR was not confirmed, ALK fusion negativity could not be ascertained in 49 patients. IHC interpreted with iScore showed a 99.4% (173/174) concordance with FISH. All 41 patients who had iScore 3 and were enrolled in phase II showed at least 30% tumor reduction with 92.7% overall response rate. Two IHC-positive patients with an atypical FISH pattern responded to ALK inhibitor therapy. The reduction rate was not correlated with IHC staining intensity. Conclusions Our study showed (i) that when sufficiently sensitive and appropriately interpreted, IHC can be a stand-alone diagnostic for ALK inhibitor therapies; (ii) that when atypical FISH patterns are accompanied by IHC positivity, the patients should be considered as candidates for ALK inhibitor therapies, and (iii) that the expression level of ALK fusion is not related to the level of response to ALK inhibitors and is thus not required for patient selection. Registration number JapicCTI-101264 (This study is registered with the Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center). PMID:26487585

  4. Expression of bone morphogenetic proteins in stromal cells from human bone marrow long-term culture.

    PubMed

    Martinovic, Snjezana; Mazic, Sanja; Kisic, Veronika; Basic, Nikolina; Jakic-Razumovic, Jasminka; Borovecki, Fran; Batinic, Drago; Simic, Petra; Grgurevic, Lovorka; Labar, Boris; Vukicevic, Slobodan

    2004-09-01

    Highly purified primitive hemopoietic stem cells express BMP receptors but do not synthesize bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). However, exogenously added BMPs regulate their proliferation, differentiation, and survival. To further explore the mechanism by which BMPs might be involved in hemopoietic differentiation, we tested whether stromal cells from long-term culture (LTC) of normal human bone marrow produce BMPs, BMP receptors, and SMAD signaling molecules. Stromal cells were immunohistochemically characterized by the presence of lyzozyme, CD 31, factor VIII, CD 68, S100, alkaline phosphatase, and vimentin. Gene expression was analyzed by RT-PCR and the presence of BMP protein was confirmed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The supportive role of the stromal cell layer in hemopoiesis in vitro was confirmed by a colony assay of clonogenic progenitors. Bone marrow stromal cells express mRNA and protein for BMP-3, -4, and -7 but not for BMP-2, -5, and -6 from the first to the eighth week of culture. Furthermore, stromal cells express the BMP type I receptors, activin-like kinase-3 (ALK-3), ALK-6, and the downstream transducers SMAD-1, -4, and -5. Thus, human bone marrow stromal cells synthesize BMPs, which might exert their effects on hemopoietic stem cells in a paracrine manner through specific BMP receptors. PMID:15314083

  5. Leptospira Protein Expression During Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are characterizing protein expression in vivo during experimental leptospirosis using immunofluorescence microscopy. Coding regions for several proteins were identified through analysis of Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni and L. borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo genomes. In addition, codi...

  6. Is ALK-gene rearrangement overlooked in primary gastrointestinal T-cell lymphomas? About two cases.

    PubMed

    Mneimneh, Wadad S; Vyas, Shikhar Gautam; Cheng, Liang; Cummings, Oscar W; Czader, Magdalena

    2015-12-01

    A 41-year-old male patient with a history of ankylosing spondylitis and Crohn disease, treated with immunomodulators and disease-modifying drugs, was diagnosed with a primary intestinal T-cell lymphoma that followed a 7.5-year-course. This transmural proliferation lacked cytological characteristics of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), and was CD8-positive, and CD30- and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-negative by immunohistochemistry (IHC). However, ALK-gene rearrangement (ALK-gr) was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in both initial and persistent disease. The possibility of indolent T-cell lymphoproliferative disease of the gastrointestinal tract with atypical features (transmural involvement) related to ALK-gr was suggested. A previous case of aggressive 'enteropathy-associated ALCL' in the context of celiac disease was recently reported, which also lacked anaplastic morphology, and where CD30 and ALK expression was incidentally demonstrated by IHC, and ALK-gr subsequently confirmed by FISH. These two recent cases represent two distinct rare entities pertaining to the group of primary intestinal T-cell lymphomas, and they both show unexpected ALK-gr. This suggests that ALK-gr has been overlooked in the group of primary intestinal T-cell lymphomas. Performing IHC and FISH tests for ALK-gr in primary gastrointestinal T-cell lymphomas might be of importance, particularly with the advancement of targeted therapy that could impact treatment and prognosis. PMID:26531107

  7. Defective processing of methylated single-stranded DNA by E. coli alkB mutants

    PubMed Central

    Dinglay, Suneet; Trewick, Sarah C.; Lindahl, Tomas; Sedgwick, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    Escherichia coli alkB mutants are very sensitive to DNA methylating agents. Despite these mutants being the subject of many studies, no DNA repair or other function has been assigned to the AlkB protein or to its human homolog. Here, we report that reactivation of methylmethanesulfonate (MMS)-treated single-stranded DNA phages, M13, f1, and G4, was decreased dramatically in alkB mutants. No such decrease occurred when using methylated λ phage or M13 duplex DNA. These data show that alkB mutants have a marked defect in processing methylation damage in single-stranded DNA. Recombinant AlkB protein bound more efficiently to single- than double-stranded DNA. The single-strand damage processed by AlkB was primarily cytotoxic and not mutagenic and was induced by SN2 methylating agents, MMS, DMS, and MeI but not by SN1 agent N-methyl-N-nitrosourea or by γ irradiation. Strains lacking other DNA repair activities, alkA tag, xth nfo, uvrA, mutS, and umuC, were not defective in reactivation of methylated M13 phage and did not enhance the defect of an alkB mutant. A recA mutation caused a small but additive defect. Thus, AlkB functions in a novel pathway independent of these activities. We propose that AlkB acts on alkylated single-stranded DNA in replication forks or at transcribed regions. Consistent with this theory, stationary phase alkB cells were less MMS sensitive than rapidly growing cells. PMID:10950872

  8. Co-targeting ALK and EGFR parallel signaling in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Cara B; De La Chapa, Jorge J; Saikumar, Pothana; Singha, Prajjal K; Dybdal-Hargreaves, Nicholas F; Chavez, Jeffery; Horning, Aaron M; Parra, Jamie; Kirma, Nameer B

    2016-08-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) comprises 90% of all head and neck cancers and has a poor survival rate due to late-stage disease that is refractive to traditional therapies. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is over-expressed in greater than 80% of head and neck SCC (HNSCC). However, EGFR targeted therapies yielded little to no efficacy in clinical trials. This study investigated the efficacy of co-targeting EGFR and the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) whose promoter is hypomethylated in late-stage oral SCC (OSCC). We observed increased ALK activity in late-stage human OSCC tumors and invasive OSCC cell lines. We also found that while ALK inhibition alone had little effect on proliferation, co-targeting ALK and EGFR significantly reduced OSCC cell proliferation in vitro. Further analysis showed significant efficacy of combined treatment in HSC3-derived xenografts resulting in a 30% decrease in tumor volumes by 14days (p<0.001). Western blot analysis showed that co-targeting ALK and EGFR significantly reduced EGFR phosphorylation (Y1148) in HSC3 cells but not Cal27 cells. ALK and EGFR downstream signaling interactions are also demonstrated by Western blot analysis in which lone EGFR and ALK inhibitors attenuated AKT activity whereas co-targeting ALK and EGFR completely abolished AKT activation. No effects were observed on ERK1/2 activation. STAT3 activity was significantly induced by lone ALK inhibition in HSC3 cells and to a lower extent in Cal27 cells. Together, these data illustrate that ALK inhibitors enhance anti-tumor activity of EGFR inhibitors in susceptible tumors that display increased ALK expression, most likely through abolition of AKT activation. PMID:27424178

  9. A Functional Landscape of Resistance to ALK Inhibition in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Frederick H.; Johannessen, Cory M.; Piccioni, Federica; Tamayo, Pablo; Kim, Jong Wook; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Corsello, Steven M.; Capelletti, Marzia; Calles, Antonio; Butaney, Mohit; Sharifnia, Tanaz; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Mesirov, Jill P.; Hahn, William C.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Meyerson, Matthew; Root, David E.; Jänne, Pasi A.; Garraway, Levi A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We conducted a large-scale functional genetic study to characterize mechanisms of resistance to ALK inhibition in ALK-dependent lung cancer cells. We identify members of known resistance pathways and additional putative resistance drivers. Among the latter were members of the P2Y purinergic receptor family of G-protein coupled receptors (P2Y1, P2Y2, and P2Y6). P2Y receptors mediated resistance in part through a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent mechanism. Moreover, PKC activation alone was sufficient to confer resistance to ALK inhibitors whereas combined ALK and PKC inhibition restored sensitivity. We observed enrichment of gene signatures associated with several resistance drivers (including P2Y receptors) in crizotinib-resistant ALK-rearranged lung tumors compared to treatment-naïve controls, supporting a role for identified resistance mechanisms in clinical resistance. PMID:25759024

  10. Next-Generation Sequencing Identifies Deregulation of MicroRNAs Involved in Both Innate and Adaptive Immune Response in ALK+ ALCL

    PubMed Central

    Steinhilber, Julia; Bonin, Michael; Walter, Michael; Fend, Falko; Bonzheim, Irina; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is divided into two systemic diseases according to the expression of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). We investigated the differential expression of miRNAs between ALK+ ALCL, ALK- ALCL cells and normal T-cells using next generation sequencing (NGS). In addition, a C/EBPβ-dependent miRNA profile was generated. The data were validated in primary ALCL cases. NGS identified 106 miRNAs significantly differentially expressed between ALK+ and ALK- ALCL and 228 between ALK+ ALCL and normal T-cells. We identified a signature of 56 miRNAs distinguishing ALK+ ALCL, ALK- ALCL and T-cells. The top candidates significant differentially expressed between ALK+ and ALK- ALCL included 5 upregulated miRNAs: miR-340, miR-203, miR-135b, miR-182, miR-183; and 7 downregulated: miR-196b, miR-155, miR-146a, miR-424, miR-503, miR-424*, miR-542-3p. The miR-17-92 cluster was also upregulated in ALK+ cells. Additionally, we identified a signature of 3 miRNAs significantly regulated by the transcription factor C/EBPβ, which is specifically overexpressed in ALK+ ALCL, including the miR-181 family. Of interest, miR-181a, which regulates T-cell differentiation and modulates TCR signalling strength, was significantly downregulated in ALK+ ALCL cases. In summary, our data reveal a miRNA signature linking ALK+ ALCL to a deregulated immune response and may reflect the abnormal TCR antigen expression known in ALK+ ALCL. PMID:25688981

  11. Uterine ALK3 is essential during the window of implantation

    PubMed Central

    Monsivais, Diana; Clementi, Caterina; Peng, Jia; Titus, Mary M.; Barrish, James P.; Creighton, Chad J.; Lydon, John P.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2016-01-01

    The window of implantation is defined by the inhibition of uterine epithelial proliferation, structural epithelial cell remodeling, and attenuated estrogen (E2) response. These changes occur via paracrine signaling between the uterine epithelium and stroma. Because implantation defects are a major cause of infertility in women, identifying these signaling pathways will improve infertility interventions. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are TGF-β family members that regulate the postimplantation and midgestation stages of pregnancy. In this study, we discovered that signaling via activin-like kinase 3 (ALK3/BMPR1A), a BMP type 1 receptor, is necessary for blastocyst attachment. Conditional knockout (cKO) of ALK3 in the uterus was obtained by producing Alk3flox/flox-Pgr-cre–positive females. Alk3 cKO mice are sterile and have defects in the luminal uterine epithelium, including increased microvilli density and maintenance of apical cell polarity. Moreover, Alk3 cKO mice exhibit an elevated uterine E2 response and unopposed epithelial cell proliferation during the window of implantation. We determined that dual transcriptional regulation of Kruppel-like factor 15 (Klf15), by both the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) transcription factor SMAD family member 4 (SMAD4) and progesterone receptor (PR), is necessary to inhibit uterine epithelial cell proliferation, a key step for embryo implantation. Our findings present a convergence of BMP and steroid hormone signaling pathways in the regulation of uterine receptivity. PMID:26721398

  12. Uterine ALK3 is essential during the window of implantation.

    PubMed

    Monsivais, Diana; Clementi, Caterina; Peng, Jia; Titus, Mary M; Barrish, James P; Creighton, Chad J; Lydon, John P; DeMayo, Francesco J; Matzuk, Martin M

    2016-01-19

    The window of implantation is defined by the inhibition of uterine epithelial proliferation, structural epithelial cell remodeling, and attenuated estrogen (E2) response. These changes occur via paracrine signaling between the uterine epithelium and stroma. Because implantation defects are a major cause of infertility in women, identifying these signaling pathways will improve infertility interventions. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are TGF-β family members that regulate the postimplantation and midgestation stages of pregnancy. In this study, we discovered that signaling via activin-like kinase 3 (ALK3/BMPR1A), a BMP type 1 receptor, is necessary for blastocyst attachment. Conditional knockout (cKO) of ALK3 in the uterus was obtained by producing Alk3(flox) (/flox)-Pgr-cre-positive females. Alk3 cKO mice are sterile and have defects in the luminal uterine epithelium, including increased microvilli density and maintenance of apical cell polarity. Moreover, Alk3 cKO mice exhibit an elevated uterine E2 response and unopposed epithelial cell proliferation during the window of implantation. We determined that dual transcriptional regulation of Kruppel-like factor 15 (Klf15), by both the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) transcription factor SMAD family member 4 (SMAD4) and progesterone receptor (PR), is necessary to inhibit uterine epithelial cell proliferation, a key step for embryo implantation. Our findings present a convergence of BMP and steroid hormone signaling pathways in the regulation of uterine receptivity. PMID:26721398

  13. Tackling ALK in non-small cell lung cancer: the role of novel inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Facchinetti, Francesco; Di Maio, Massimo; Graziano, Paolo; Bria, Emilio; Rossi, Giulio; Novello, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Crizotinib is an oral inhibitor of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) with remarkable clinical activity in patients suffering from ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), accounting to its superiority compared to chemotherapy. Unfortunately, virtually all ALK-rearranged tumors acquire resistance to crizotinib, frequently within one year since the treatment initiation. To date, therapeutic strategies to overcome crizotinib resistance have focused on the use of more potent and structurally different compounds. Second-generation ALK inhibitors such as ceritinib (LDK378), alectinib (CH5424802/RO5424802) and brigatinib (AP26113) have shown relevant clinical activity, consequently fostering their rapid clinical development and their approval by health agencies. The third-generation inhibitor lorlatinib (PF-06463922), selectively active against ALK and ROS1, harbors impressive biological potency; its efficacy in reversing resistance to crizotinib and to other ALK inhibitors is being proven by early clinical trials. The NTRK1-3 and ROS1 inhibitor entrectinib (RXDX-101) has been reported to act against NSCLC harboring ALK fusion proteins too. Despite the quick development of these novel agents, several issues remain to be discussed in the treatment of patients suffering from ALK-rearranged NSCLC. This position paper will discuss the development, the current evidence and approvals, as long as the future perspectives of new ALK inhibitors beyond crizotinib. Clinical behaviors of ALK-rearranged NSCLC vary significantly among patients and differential molecular events responsible of crizotinib resistance account for the most important quote of this heterogeneity. The precious availability of a wide range of active anti-ALK compounds should be approached in a critical and careful perspective, in order to develop treatment strategies tailored on the disease evolution of every single patient. PMID:27413712

  14. Anterograde Jelly belly ligand to Alk receptor signaling at developing synapses is regulated by Mind the gap

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbough, Jeffrey; Broadie, Kendal

    2010-01-01

    Bidirectional trans-synaptic signals induce synaptogenesis and regulate subsequent synaptic maturation. Presynaptically secreted Mind the gap (Mtg) molds the synaptic cleft extracellular matrix, leading us to hypothesize that Mtg functions to generate the intercellular environment required for efficient signaling. We show in Drosophila that secreted Jelly belly (Jeb) and its receptor tyrosine kinase Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk) are localized to developing synapses. Jeb localizes to punctate aggregates in central synaptic neuropil and neuromuscular junction (NMJ) presynaptic terminals. Secreted Jeb and Mtg accumulate and colocalize extracellularly in surrounding synaptic boutons. Alk concentrates in postsynaptic domains, consistent with an anterograde, trans-synaptic Jeb-Alk signaling pathway at developing synapses. Jeb synaptic expression is increased in Alk mutants, consistent with a requirement for Alk receptor function in Jeb uptake. In mtg null mutants, Alk NMJ synaptic levels are reduced and Jeb expression is dramatically increased. NMJ synapse morphology and molecular assembly appear largely normal in jeb and Alk mutants, but larvae exhibit greatly reduced movement, suggesting impaired functional synaptic development. jeb mutant movement is significantly rescued by neuronal Jeb expression. jeb and Alk mutants display normal NMJ postsynaptic responses, but a near loss of patterned, activity-dependent NMJ transmission driven by central excitatory output. We conclude that Jeb-Alk expression and anterograde trans-synaptic signaling are modulated by Mtg and play a key role in establishing functional synaptic connectivity in the developing motor circuit. PMID:20876658

  15. VCL-ALK Renal Cell Carcinoma in Children With Sickle-cell Trait

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nathaniel E.; Deyrup, Andrea T.; Marinño-Enriquez, Adrian; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Bridge, Julia A.; Illei, Peter B.; Netto, George J.; Argani, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    We report the third case of a renal cell carcinoma bearing a fusion of the vinculin (VCL) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) genes. Like the 2 other reported cases, this neoplasm occurred in a young patient (6 y old) with sickle-cell trait and demonstrated distinctive morphologic features including medullary epicenter, discohesive polygonal or spindle-shaped cells with prominent cytoplasmic vacuoles, and prominent lymphocytic infiltrate. The neoplastic cells demonstrated focal membranous labeling for ALK protein by immunohistochemistry, ALK gene rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and a specific VCL-ALK gene fusion by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. VCL-ALK renal cell carcinoma may represent the eighth sickle-cell nephropathy. PMID:24698962

  16. Identification of the transforming STRN-ALK fusion as a potential therapeutic target in the aggressive forms of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Lindsey M.; Barila, Guillermo; Liu, Pengyuan; Evdokimova, Viktoria N.; Trivedi, Sumita; Panebianco, Federica; Gandhi, Manoj; Carty, Sally E.; Hodak, Steven P.; Luo, Jianhua; Dacic, Sanja; Yu, Yan P.; Nikiforova, Marina N.; Ferris, Robert L.; Altschuler, Daniel L.; Nikiforov, Yuri E.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common endocrine malignancy that encompasses well-differentiated as well as dedifferentiated cancer types. The latter tumors have high mortality and lack effective therapies. Using a paired-end RNA-sequencing approach, we report the discovery of rearrangements involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene in thyroid cancer. The most common of these involves a fusion between ALK and the striatin (STRN) gene, which is the result of a complex rearrangement involving the short arm of chromosome 2. STRN-ALK leads to constitutive activation of ALK kinase via dimerization mediated by the coiled-coil domain of STRN and to a kinase-dependent, thyroid-stimulating hormone–independent proliferation of thyroid cells. Moreover, expression of STRN-ALK transforms cells in vitro and induces tumor formation in nude mice. The kinase activity of STRN-ALK and the ALK-induced cell growth can be blocked by the ALK inhibitors crizotinib and TAE684. In addition to well-differentiated papillary cancer, STRN-ALK was found with a higher prevalence in poorly differentiated and anaplastic thyroid cancers, and it did not overlap with other known driver mutations in these tumors. Our data demonstrate that STRN-ALK fusion occurs in a subset of patients with highly aggressive types of thyroid cancer and provide initial evidence suggesting that it may represent a therapeutic target for these patients. PMID:24613930

  17. The neuroblastoma associated F1174L ALK mutation causes resistance to an ALK kinase inhibitor in ALK translocated cancers

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takaaki; Okuda, Katsuhiro; Zheng, Wei; Butrynski, James; Capelletti, Marzia; Wang, Liping; Gray, Nathanael S.; Wilner, Keith; Christensen, James G.; Demetri, George; Shapiro, Geoffrey I.; Rodig, Scott J.; Eck, Michael J.; Jänne, Pasi A.

    2011-01-01

    The ALK kinase inhibitor crizotinib (PF-02341066) is clinically effective in patients with ALK-translocated cancers, but its efficacy will ultimately be limited by acquired drug resistance. Here we report the identification of a secondary mutation in ALK, F1174L, as one cause of crizotinib resistance in a patient with an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) harbouring a RANBP2-ALK translocation who progressed while crizotinib therapy. When present in cis with an ALK translocation, this mutation (also detected in neuroblastomas) causes an increase in ALK phosphorylation, cell growth and downstream signaling. Furthermore, the F1174L mutation inhibits crizotinib mediated downregulation of ALK signaling and blocks apoptosis in RANBP2-ALK Ba/F3 cells. A chemically distinct ALK inhibitor, TAE684, or the HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG are both effective in models harbouring the F1174L ALK mutation. Our findings highlight the importance of studying drug resistance mechanisms in order to develop effective clinical treatments for patients with ALK-translocated cancers. PMID:21030459

  18. Adaptive Response Enzyme AlkB Preferentially Repairs 1-Methylguanine and 3-Methylthymine Adducts in Double-Stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangyi; Tang, Qi; Bian, Ke; Humulock, Zachary T; Yang, Xuedong; Jost, Marco; Drennan, Catherine L; Essigmann, John M; Li, Deyu

    2016-04-18

    The AlkB protein is a repair enzyme that uses an α-ketoglutarate/Fe(II)-dependent mechanism to repair alkyl DNA adducts. AlkB has been reported to repair highly susceptible substrates, such as 1-methyladenine and 3-methylcytosine, more efficiently in ss-DNA than in ds-DNA. Here, we tested the repair of weaker AlkB substrates 1-methylguanine and 3-methylthymine and found that AlkB prefers to repair them in ds-DNA. We also discovered that AlkB and its human homologues, ABH2 and ABH3, are able to repair the aforementioned adducts when the adduct is present in a mismatched base pair. These observations demonstrate the strong adaptability of AlkB toward repairing various adducts in different environments. PMID:26919079

  19. Growth Differentiation Factor-8 Decreases StAR Expression Through ALK5-Mediated Smad3 and ERK1/2 Signaling Pathways in Luteinized Human Granulosa Cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lanlan; Chang, Hsun-Ming; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Yu, Yiping; Leung, Peter C K; Sun, Ying-Pu

    2015-12-01

    Growth differentiation factor-8 (GDF-8) has been recently shown to be expressed in human granulosa cells, and the mature form of GDF-8 protein can be detected in the follicular fluid. However, the biological function and significance of this growth factor in the human ovary remains to be determined. Here, we investigated the effects of GDF-8 on steroidogenic enzyme expression and the potential mechanisms of action in luteinized human granulosa cells. We demonstrated that treatment with GDF-8 did not affect the mRNA levels of P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, whereas it significantly down-regulated steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) expression and decreased progesterone production. The suppressive effect of GDF-8 on StAR expression was abolished by the inhibition of the TGF-β type I receptor. In addition, treatment with GDF-8 activated both Smad2/3 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. Furthermore, knockdown of activin receptor-like kinase 5 reversed the effects of GDF-8 on Smad2/3 phosphorylation and StAR expression. The inhibition of Smad3 or ERK1/2 signaling pathways attenuated the GDF-8-induced down-regulation of StAR and production of progesterone. Interestingly, the concentrations of GDF-8 were negatively correlated with those of progesterone in human follicular fluid. These results indicate a novel autocrine function of GDF-8 to down-regulate StAR expression and decrease progesterone production in luteinized human granulosa cells, most likely through activin receptor-like kinase 5-mediated Smad3 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. Our findings suggest that granulosa cells might play a critical role in the regulation of progesterone production to prevent premature luteinization during the final stage of folliculogenesis. PMID:26393302

  20. The bHLH transcription factor Hand is regulated by Alk in the Drosophila embryonic gut

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, Gaurav K.; Palmer, Ruth H. . E-mail: Ruth.Palmer@ucmp.umu.se

    2006-12-29

    During embryonic development the midgut visceral muscle is formed by fusion of cells within the visceral mesoderm, a process initiated by the specification of a specialised cell type, the founder cell, within this tissue. Activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk) in the developing visceral muscle of Drosophila melanogaster initiates a signal transduction pathway required for muscle fusion. In this paper, we have investigated downstream components which are regulated by this novel signalling pathway. Here we show that Alk-mediated signal transduction drives the expression of the bHLH transcription factor Hand in vivo. Loss of Alk function results in a complete lack of Hand expression in this tissue, whereas Alk gain of function results in an expansion of Hand expression. Finally, we have investigated the process of muscle fusion in the gut of Hand mutant animals and can find no obvious defects in this process, suggesting that Hand is not critical for visceral muscle fusion per se.

  1. Protein identification and Peptide expression resolver: harmonizing protein identification with protein expression data.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Paul; Butler, Heather; Eng, Kevin; Hugo, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    Proteomic discovery platforms generate both peptide expression information and protein identification information. Peptide expression data are used to determine which peptides are differentially expressed between study cohorts, and then these peptides are targeted for protein identification. In this paper, we demonstrate that peptide expression information is also a powerful tool for enhancing confidence in protein identification results. Specifically, we evaluate the following hypothesis: tryptic peptides originating from the same protein have similar expression profiles across samples in the discovery study. Evidence supporting this hypothesis is provided. This hypothesis is integrated into a protein identification tool, PIPER (Protein Identification and Peptide Expression Resolver), that reduces erroneous protein identifications below 5%. PIPER's utility is illustrated by application to a 72-sample biomarker discovery study where it is demonstrated that false positive protein identifications can be reduced below 5%. Consequently, it is recommended that PIPER methodology be incorporated into proteomic studies where both protein expression and identification data are collected. PMID:18062667

  2. The AlkB Family of Fe(II)/α-Ketoglutarate-dependent Dioxygenases: Repairing Nucleic Acid Alkylation Damage and Beyond*

    PubMed Central

    Fedeles, Bogdan I.; Singh, Vipender; Delaney, James C.; Li, Deyu; Essigmann, John M.

    2015-01-01

    The AlkB family of Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases is a class of ubiquitous direct reversal DNA repair enzymes that remove alkyl adducts from nucleobases by oxidative dealkylation. The prototypical and homonymous family member is an Escherichia coli “adaptive response” protein that protects the bacterial genome against alkylation damage. AlkB has a wide variety of substrates, including monoalkyl and exocyclic bridged adducts. Nine mammalian AlkB homologs exist (ALKBH1–8, FTO), but only a subset functions as DNA/RNA repair enzymes. This minireview presents an overview of the AlkB proteins including recent data on homologs, structural features, substrate specificities, and experimental strategies for studying DNA repair by AlkB family proteins. PMID:26152727

  3. Rhein Inhibits AlkB Repair Enzymes and Sensitizes Cells to Methylated DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Huang, Yue; Liu, Xichun; Gan, Jianhua; Chen, Hao; Yang, Cai-Guang

    2016-05-20

    The AlkB repair enzymes, including Escherichia coli AlkB and two human homologues, ALKBH2 and ALKBH3, are iron(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases that efficiently repair N(1)-methyladenine and N(3)-methylcytosine methylated DNA damages. The development of small molecule inhibitors of these enzymes has seen less success. Here we have characterized a previously discovered natural product rhein and tested its ability to inhibit AlkB repair enzymes in vitro and to sensitize cells to methyl methane sulfonate that mainly produces N(1)-methyladenine and N(3)-methylcytosine lesions. Our investigation of the mechanism of rhein inhibition reveals that rhein binds to AlkB repair enzymes in vitro and promotes thermal stability in vivo In addition, we have determined a new structural complex of rhein bound to AlkB, which shows that rhein binds to a different part of the active site in AlkB than it binds to in fat mass and obesity-associated protein (FTO). With the support of these observations, we put forth the hypothesis that AlkB repair enzymes would be effective pharmacological targets for cancer treatment. PMID:27015802

  4. Spitz Tumors: Comparison of Histological Features in Relationship to Immunohistochemical Staining for ALK and NTRK1.

    PubMed

    Kiuru, Maija; Jungbluth, Achim; Kutzner, Heinz; Wiesner, Thomas; Busam, Klaus J

    2016-05-01

    Spitz tumors are a group of melanocytic neoplasms with distinct morphological features that tend to affect young individuals. Distinguishing benign from malignant Spitz tumors can be challenging, but cytogenetic and molecular tests have contributed to improvements in diagnostic accuracy. Spitz tumors harbor diverse genetic alterations, including mutations in HRAS, loss of BAP1, or kinase fusions in ROS1, NTRK1, ALK, BRAF, and RET genes. Limited data exist on the correlation between histopathological features and kinase fusions. Here, we describe the histopathological features of 105 Spitz tumors (Spitz nevi and atypical Spitz tumors), comparing lesions according to their immunoreactivity for ALK or NTRK1. Intersecting fascicular growth of fusiform melanocytes was seen in all but one ALK-positive tumor (27 of 28 or 96.4%), whereas it was infrequent in NTRK1-positive tumors (5 of 20 or 25.0%) and tumors negative for both ALK and NTRK1 (96.4% vs 25.0% vs 8.7%, P < .0027). There was a trend toward ALK-positive tumors being amelanotic compared with NTRK1-positive tumors and combined ALK-/NTRK1-negative tumors (89.3% vs 45% vs 47.4%, respectively, P = .1023) and lacking epithelioid cell morphology (0% vs 45.0% vs 41%, respectively, P = .6985). In conclusion, this study confirms that although not specific, the growth pattern of intersecting fascicles of amelanotic fusiform melanocytes is strongly associated with ALK expression. PMID:26873340

  5. Modeling Protein Expression and Protein Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Telesca, Donatello; Müller, Peter; Kornblau, Steven M.; Suchard, Marc A.; Ji, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput functional proteomic technologies provide a way to quantify the expression of proteins of interest. Statistical inference centers on identifying the activation state of proteins and their patterns of molecular interaction formalized as dependence structure. Inference on dependence structure is particularly important when proteins are selected because they are part of a common molecular pathway. In that case, inference on dependence structure reveals properties of the underlying pathway. We propose a probability model that represents molecular interactions at the level of hidden binary latent variables that can be interpreted as indicators for active versus inactive states of the proteins. The proposed approach exploits available expert knowledge about the target pathway to define an informative prior on the hidden conditional dependence structure. An important feature of this prior is that it provides an instrument to explicitly anchor the model space to a set of interactions of interest, favoring a local search approach to model determination. We apply our model to reverse-phase protein array data from a study on acute myeloid leukemia. Our inference identifies relevant subpathways in relation to the unfolding of the biological process under study. PMID:26246646

  6. Endoglin and Alk5 regulate epithelial-mesenchymal transformation during cardiac valve formation

    PubMed Central

    Mercado-Pimentel, Melania E.; Hubbard, Antony D.; Runyan, Raymond B.

    2007-01-01

    Endoglin is an accessory receptor for TGFß and can associate with Alk5 or Alk2. Although prior studies indicated that endoglin and Alk5 were not directly involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT) in the heart, the expression pattern of endoglin prompted a re-examination. We here show that loss of endoglin expression mediated by either antisense DNA or siRNA results in a direct perturbation of EMT and reduced expression of EMT markers including slug, runx2, RhoA, and latrophilin-2. An examination of BrdU incorporation shows that, while endoglin regulates proliferation at an early stage, reduced endothelial cell proliferation does not account for the loss of mesenchyme. As Alk5 interacts with endoglin, we utilized siRNA and a specific inhibitor, HTS466284 (HTS), to perturb this receptor as well. Alk5 inhibition produced similar effects to inhibition of endoglin. There was a reduction in mesenchymal cell formation and loss of EMT marker expression similar to that seen with endoglin. Alk5 kinase inhibition produced a similar loss of EMT marker expression but showed a contrasting upregulation of the proliferation and remodeling markers, Cyclin B2 and ß-catenin. Alk5 and endoglin both mediate endothelial cell proliferation in younger explants but, by stage 16, loss of endoglin no longer alters proliferation rates. These data show that both Alk5 and endoglin are directly involved in the process of EMT, that they interact with both TGFß-regulated activation and invasion pathways and that the roles of these receptors change during cardiac development. PMID:17250821

  7. Identification of Driving ALK Fusion Genes and Genomic Landscape of Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jae Won; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Kim, DeokGeun; Ji, Yongick; Kim, Duk-Hwan; Park, Woong-Yang; Shin, Hyun-Tae; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Keunchil; Sun, Jong-Mu

    2015-01-01

    The genetic landscape of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is not yet fully understood, although some oncogenic mutations have been identified. To explore genetic profiles of MTCs, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor tissues from MTC patients were assayed on the Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Panel v2. Eighty-four sporadic MTC samples and 36 paired normal thyroid tissues were successfully sequenced. We discovered 101 hotspot mutations in 18 genes in the 84 MTC tissue samples. The most common mutation was in the ret proto-oncogene, which occurred in 47 cases followed by mutations in genes encoding Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (N = 14), serine/threonine kinase 11 (N = 11), v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (N = 6), mutL homolog 1 (N = 4), Kiesten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (N = 3) and MET proto-oncogene (N = 3). We also evaluated anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement by immunohistochemistry and break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Two of 98 screened cases were positive for ALK FISH. To identify the genomic breakpoint and 5’ fusion partner of ALK, customized targeted cancer panel sequencing was performed using DNA from tumor samples of the two patients. Glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate transaminase 1 (GFPT1)-ALK and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK fusions were identified. Additional PCR analysis, followed by Sanger sequencing, confirmed the GFPT1-ALK fusion, indicating that the fusion is a result of intra-chromosomal translocation or deletion. Notably, a metastatic MTC case harboring the EML4-ALK fusion showed a dramatic response to an ALK inhibitor, crizotinib. In conclusion, we found several genetic mutations in MTC and are the first to identify ALK fusions in MTC. Our results suggest that the EML4-ALK fusion in MTC may be a potential driver mutation and a valid target of ALK inhibitors. Furthermore, the GFPT1-ALK fusion may be a potential candidate for molecular target

  8. Intact or broken-apart RNA: an alternative concept for ALK fusion screening in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    PubMed

    Kotoula, Vassiliki; Bobos, Mattheos; Vassilakopoulou, Maria; Tsolaki, Eleftheria; Chrisafi, Sofia; Psyrri, Amanda; Lazaridis, George; Papadopoulou, Kyriaki; Efstratiou, Ioannis; Michail-Strantzia, Catherine; Debelenko, Larisa V; Kosmidis, Paris; Fountzilas, George

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) break-apart fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is currently used in diagnostics for the selection of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to receive crizotinib. We evaluated ALK status in NSCLC with a novel ALK mRNA test based on the break-apart FISH concept, which we called break-apart transcript (BAT) test. ALK5' and ALK3' transcript patterns were established with qPCR for ALK-expressing controls including fusion-negative neuroblastomas, as well as fusion-positive anaplastic large cell lymphomas and NSCLC. The BAT test was evaluated on 271 RNA samples from routinely processed paraffin NSCLC tissues. Test results were compared with ALK FISH (n=121), immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis (n=86), and automated quantitative analysis (AQUA, n=83). On the basis of the nonoverlapping ALK BAT patterns in ALK-expressing controls (P<0.0001), 8/174 adenocarcinomas (4.6%) among 259 informative NSCLC were predicted as fusion positive. Overall concordance for paired method results was high (94.1% to 98.8%) but mainly concerned negative prediction because of the limited availability of positive-matched cases. Tumors with 100% cytoplasmic IHC staining of any intensity (n=3) were positive for AQUA, FISH, and BAT test; tumors with lower IHC positivity and different staining patterns were AQUA-negative. Upon multiple reevaluations, ALK gene status was considered as originally misinterpreted by FISH in 3/121 cases (2.5%). Tumors with >4 ALK gene copies were associated with longer overall survival upon first-line chemotherapy. In conclusion, application of the ALK BAT test on routinely processed NSCLC tissues yields the same fusion partner independent information as ALK break-apart FISH but is more robust and cost-effective. The BAT concept may be considered for the development of further drug-predictive translocation tests. PMID:25153496

  9. Two novel ALK mutations mediate acquired resistance to the next generation ALK inhibitor alectinib

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Ryohei; Friboulet, Luc; Koike, Sumie; Lockerman, Elizabeth L.; Khan, Tahsin M.; Gainor, Justin F.; Iafrate, A. John; Takeuchi, Kengo; Taiji, Makoto; Okuno, Yasushi; Fujita, Naoya; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Shaw, Alice T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The first-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) crizotinib is a standard therapy for patients with ALK-rearranged NSCLC. Several next-generation ALK-TKIs have entered the clinic and have shown promising activity in crizotinib-resistant patients. As patients still relapse even on these next-generation ALK-TKIs, we examined mechanisms of resistance to the next-generation ALK-TKI alectinib and potential strategies to overcome this resistance. Experimental Design We established a cell line model of alectinib resistance, and analyzed a resistant tumor specimen from a patient who had relapsed on alectinib. We developed Ba/F3 models harboring alectinib-resistant ALK mutations and evaluated the potency of other next-generation ALK-TKIs in these models. We tested the antitumor activity of the next-generation ALK-TKI ceritinib in the patient with acquired resistance to alectinib. To elucidate structure-activity-relationships of ALK mutations, we performed computational thermodynamic simulation with MP-CAFEE. Results We identified a novel V1180L gatekeeper mutation from the cell line model and a second novel I1171T mutation from the patient who developed resistance to alectinib. Both ALK mutations conferred resistance to alectinib as well as to crizotinib, but were sensitive to ceritinib and other next-generation ALK-TKIs. Treatment of the patient with ceritinib led to a marked response. Thermodynamics simulation suggests that both mutations lead to distinct structural alterations that decrease the binding affinity with alectinib. Conclusions We have identified two novel ALK mutations arising after alectinib exposure which are sensitive to other next generation ALK-TKIs. The ability of ceritinib to overcome alectinib-resistance mutations suggests a potential role for sequential therapy with multiple next-generation ALK-TKIs. PMID:25228534

  10. Lobatin B inhibits NPM/ALK and NF-κB attenuating anaplastic-large-cell-lymphomagenesis and lymphendothelial tumour intravasation.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Izabella; Unger, Christine; Huu, Chi Nguyen; Atanasov, Atanas Georgiev; Kramer, Nina; Chatruphonprasert, Waranya; Brenner, Stefan; McKinnon, Ruxandra; Peschel, Andrea; Vasas, Andrea; Lajter, Ildiko; Kain, Renate; Saiko, Philipp; Szekeres, Thomas; Kenner, Lukas; Hassler, Melanie R; Diaz, Rene; Frisch, Richard; Dirsch, Verena M; Jäger, Walter; de Martin, Rainer; Bochkov, Valery N; Passreiter, Claus M; Peter-Vörösmarty, Barbara; Mader, Robert M; Grusch, Michael; Dolznig, Helmut; Kopp, Brigitte; Zupko, Istvan; Hohmann, Judit; Krupitza, Georg

    2015-01-28

    An apolar extract of the traditional medicinal plant Neurolaena lobata inhibited the expression of the NPM/ALK chimera, which is causal for the majority of anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCLs). Therefore, an active principle of the extract, the furanoheliangolide sesquiterpene lactone lobatin B, was isolated and tested regarding the inhibition of ALCL expansion and tumour cell intravasation through the lymphendothelium. ALCL cell lines, HL-60 cells and PBMCs were treated with plant compounds and the ALK inhibitor TAE-684 to measure mitochondrial activity, proliferation and cell cycle progression and to correlate the results with protein- and mRNA-expression of selected gene products. Several endpoints indicative for cell death were analysed after lobatin B treatment. Tumour cell intravasation through lymphendothelial monolayers was measured and potential causal mechanisms were investigated analysing NF-κB- and cytochrome P450 activity, and 12(S)-HETE production. Lobatin B inhibited the expression of NPM/ALK, JunB and PDGF-Rβ, and attenuated proliferation of ALCL cells by arresting them in late M phase. Mitochondrial activity remained largely unaffected upon lobatin B treatment. Nevertheless, caspase 3 became activated in ALCL cells. Also HL-60 cell proliferation was attenuated whereas PBMCs of healthy donors were not affected by lobatin B. Additionally, tumour cell intravasation, which partly depends on NF-κB, was significantly suppressed by lobatin B most likely due to its NF-κB-inhibitory property. Lobatin B, which was isolated from a plant used in ethnomedicine, targets malignant cells by at least two properties: I) inhibition of NPM/ALK, thereby providing high specificity in combating this most prevalent fusion protein occurring in ALCL; II) inhibition of NF-κB, thereby not affecting normal cells with low constitutive NF-κB activity. This property also inhibits tumour cell intravasation into the lymphatic system and may provide an option to manage this

  11. Detection of EML4-ALK fusion gene and features associated with EGFR mutations in Chinese patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Miaomiao; Wang, Xuejiao; Sun, Ying; Xia, Jinghua; Fan, Liangbo; Xing, Hao; Zhang, Zhipei; Li, Xiaofei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4–anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) define specific molecular subsets of lung cancer with distinct clinical features. We aimed at revealing the clinical features of EML4-ALK fusion gene and EGFR mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods We enrolled 694 Chinese patients with NSCLC for analysis. EML4-ALK fusion gene was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and EGFR mutations were analyzed by amplified refractory mutation system. Results Among the 694 patients, 60 (8.65%) patients had EML4-ALK fusions. In continuity correction χ2 test analysis, EML4-ALK fusion gene was correlated with sex, age, smoking status, and histology, but no significant association was observed between EML4-ALK fusion gene and clinical stage. A total of 147 (21.18%) patients had EGFR mutations. In concordance with previous reports, EGFR mutation was correlated with age, smoking status, histology, and clinical stage, whereas patient age was not significantly associated with EGFR mutation. Meanwhile, to our surprise, six (0.86%) patients had coexisting EML4-ALK fusions and EGFR mutations. Conclusion EML4-ALK fusion gene defines a new molecular subset in patients with NSCLC. Six patients who harbored both EML4-ALK fusion genes and EGFR mutations were identified in our study. The EGFR mutations and the EML4-ALK fusion genes are coexistent. PMID:27103824

  12. A novel ALK secondary mutation and EGFR signaling cause resistance to ALK kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takaaki; Koivunen, Jussi; Ogino, Atsuko; Yanagita, Masahiko; Nikiforow, Sarah; Zheng, Wei; Lathan, Christopher; Marcoux, J. Paul; Du, Jinyan; Okuda, Katsuhiro; Capelletti, Marzia; Shimamura, Takeshi; Ercan, Dalia; Stumpfova, Magda; Xiao, Yun; Weremowicz, Stanislawa; Butaney, Mohit; Heon, Stephanie; Wilner, Keith; Christensen, James G.; Eck, Michel J.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Lindeman, Neal; Gray, Nathanael S.; Rodig, Scott J.; Jänne, Pasi A.

    2011-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), including crizotinib, are effective treatments in preclinical models and in cancer patients with ALK-translocated cancers. However, their efficacy will ultimately be limited by the development of acquired drug resistance. Here we report two mechanisms of ALK TKI resistance identified from, a crizotinib treated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient and in a cell line generated from the resistant tumor (DFCI076), and from studying a resistant version of the ALK TKI (TAE684) sensitive H3122 cell line. The crizotinib resistant DFCI076 cell line, harboured a unique L1152R ALK secondary mutation, and was also resistant to the structurally unrelated ALK TKI TAE684. Although the DFCI076 cell line was still partially dependent on ALK for survival, it also contained concurrent co-activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling. In contrast, the TAE684 resistant (TR3) H3122 cell line did not contain an ALK secondary mutation but instead harboured co-activation of EGFR signalling. Dual inhibition of both ALK and EGFR was the most effective therapeutic strategy for the DFCI076 and H3122 TR3 cell lines. We further identified a subset (3/50; 6%) of treatment naïve NSCLC patients with ALK rearrangements that also had concurrent EGFR activating mutations. Our studies identify resistance mechanisms to ALK TKIs mediated by both ALK and by a bypass signalling pathway mediated by EGFR. These mechanisms can occur independently, or in the same cancer, suggesting that the combination of both ALK and EGFR inhibitors may represent an effective therapy for these subsets of NSCLC patients. PMID:21791641

  13. ALK-positive large B-cell lymphoma: identification of EML4-ALK and a review of the literature focusing on the ALK immunohistochemical staining pattern.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kana; Nakasone, Hideki; Togashi, Yuki; Sakata, Seiji; Tsuyama, Naoko; Baba, Satoko; Dobashi, Akito; Asaka, Reimi; Tsai, Chien-Chen; Chuang, Shih-Sung; Izutsu, Koji; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Takeuchi, Kengo

    2016-04-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive large B-cell lymphoma (ALK+LBCL) is a rare, aggressive B-cell lymphoma with ALK fusion genes. Histopathologically, the ALK immunohistochemical staining pattern is suggestive of the fusion partner of ALK. Here, we examined an ALK+LBCL case showing a unique diffuse cytoplasmic ALK staining pattern and identified EML4-ALK, which has not previously been reported in ALK+LBCL. Furthermore, to clarify whether the prognosis differs depending on the staining pattern, we reviewed 112 previously reported cases, and analyzed immunohistochemical markers and clinical data stratified by the staining pattern. We found that ALK staining can be classified into a granular cytoplasmic staining (GCS) or a non-GCS patterns. Sixty-four adult cases for which both the ALK staining pattern and survival time were reported were further analyzed for survival trends. The non-GCS pattern was significantly associated with inferior overall survival (P = 0.031). This difference remained significant after adjusting for age and clinical stage (hazard ratio 5.08, 95 % CI 1.88-13.7, P = 0.0013). Given that the ALK immunohistochemical staining pattern is associated with the ALK fusion partner, the present results suggest that the prognosis for ALK+LBCL differs depending on the ALK fusion partner. PMID:26781614

  14. ALK inhibitor resistance in ALKF1174L-driven neuroblastoma is associated with AXL activation and induction of EMT

    PubMed Central

    Debruyne, D N; Bhatnagar, N; Sharma, B; Luther, W; Moore, N F; Cheung, N-K; Gray, N S; George, R E

    2016-01-01

    The crizotinib-resistant ALKF1174L mutation arises de novo in neuroblastoma (NB) and is acquired in ALK translocation-driven cancers, lending impetus to the development of novel anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors with different modes of action. The diaminopyrimidine TAE684 and its derivative ceritinib (LDK378), which are structurally distinct from crizotinib, are active against NB cells expressing ALKF1174L. Here we demonstrate acquired resistance to TAE684 and LDK378 in ALKF1174L-driven human NB cells that is linked to overexpression and activation of the AXL tyrosine kinase and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). AXL phosphorylation conferred TAE684 resistance to NB cells through upregulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling. Inhibition of AXL partly rescued TAE684 resistance, resensitizing these cells to this compound. AXL activation in resistant cells was mediated through increased expression of the active form of its ligand, GAS6, that also served to stabilize the AXL protein. Although ectopic expression of AXL and TWIST2 individually in TAE684-sensitive parental cells led to the elevated expression of mesenchymal markers and invasive capacity, only AXL overexpression induced resistance to TAE684 as well. TAE684-resistant cells showed greater sensitivity to HSP90 inhibition than did their parental counterparts, with downregulation of AXL and AXL-mediated ERK signaling. Our studies indicate that aberrant AXL signaling and development of an EMT phenotype underlie resistance of ALKF1174L-driven NB cells to TAE684 and its derivatives. We suggest that the combination of ALK and AXL or HSP90 inhibitors be considered to delay the emergence of such resistance. PMID:26616860

  15. Data Mining for Expressivity of Recombinant Protein Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Satoshi; Isoai, Atsushi; Yamamura, Masayuki

    We analyzed the expressivity of recombinant proteins by using data mining methods. The expression technique of recombinant protein is a key step towards elucidating the functions of genes discovered through genomic sequence projects. We have studied the productive efficiency of recombinant proteins in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S.pombe), by mining the expression results. We gathered 57 proteins whose expression levels were known roughly in the host. Correlation analysis, principal component analysis and decision tree analysis were applied to these expression data. Analysis featuring codon usage and amino acid composition clarified that the amino acid composition affected to the expression levels of a recombinant protein strongly than the effect of codon usage. Furthermore, analysis of amino acid composition showed that protein solubility and the metabolism cost of amino acids correlated with a protein expressivity. Codon usage was often interesting in the field of recombinant expressions. However, our analysis found the weak correlation codon features with expressivities. These results indicated that ready-made indices of codon bias were irrelevant ones for modeling the expressivities of recombinant proteins. Our data driven approach was an easy and powerful method to improve recombinant protein expression, and this approach should be concentrated attention with the huge amount of expression data accumulating through the post-genome era.

  16. ALK inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer: the latest evidence and developments

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Ivana; Planchard, David

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harbouring chromosomal rearrangements of ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) was revolutionized by crizotinib, a small molecule inhibitor of ALK, ROS1 and MET. Unfortunately, the disease progressed within the first 12 months in most of the patients because of the development of crizotinib resistance in the majority of patients and the emergence of acquired resistance mutations in most of them. Many of them had been reported even before its approval leading to the rapid development of second-generation ALK inhibitors for crizotinib-resistant NSCLC. In the last few years, novel potent ALK inhibitors with promising results and a good toxicity profile have become available: ceritinib (LDK378), alectinib (RG7853/AF-802/RO5424802/CH5424802), brigatinib (AP26113), entrectinib (RXDX-101, NMS-E628), PF-06463922, ASP3026, TSR-011, X-376/X-396 and CEP-28122/CEP-37440. Moreover, HSP90 (90 kDa heat shock protein) inhibitors have demonstrated clinical activity in patients with ALK+ NSCLC. This review focuses on the molecular and clinical properties of this new generation of ALK inhibitors under development in the clinic. PMID:26753004

  17. Adipocyte ALK7 links nutrient overload to catecholamine resistance in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tingqing; Marmol, Patricia; Moliner, Annalena; Björnholm, Marie; Zhang, Chao; Shokat, Kevan M; Ibanez, Carlos F

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is associated with blunted β-adrenoreceptor (β-AR)-mediated lipolysis and lipid oxidation in adipose tissue, but the mechanisms linking nutrient overload to catecholamine resistance are poorly understood. We report that targeted disruption of TGF-β superfamily receptor ALK7 alleviates diet-induced catecholamine resistance in adipose tissue, thereby reducing obesity in mice. Global and fat-specific Alk7 knock-out enhanced adipose β-AR expression, β-adrenergic signaling, mitochondrial biogenesis, lipid oxidation, and lipolysis under a high fat diet, leading to elevated energy expenditure, decreased fat mass, and resistance to diet-induced obesity. Conversely, activation of ALK7 reduced β-AR-mediated signaling and lipolysis cell-autonomously in both mouse and human adipocytes. Acute inhibition of ALK7 in adult mice by a chemical-genetic approach reduced diet-induced weight gain, fat accumulation, and adipocyte size, and enhanced adipocyte lipolysis and β-adrenergic signaling. We propose that ALK7 signaling contributes to diet-induced catecholamine resistance in adipose tissue, and suggest that ALK7 inhibitors may have therapeutic value in human obesity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03245.001 PMID:25161195

  18. Personalized treatment options for ALK-positive metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: potential role for Ceritinib

    PubMed Central

    El-Osta, Hazem; Shackelford, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    The fusion of echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 with the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) is found in 3%–7% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases and confers sensitivity to crizotinib, the first United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved ALK inhibitor drug. Although crizotinib has an excellent initial therapeutic effect, acquired resistance to this drug invariably develops within the first year of treatment. Resistance may involve secondary gatekeeper mutations within the ALK gene interfering with crizotinib–ALK interactions, or compensatory activation of aberrant bypass signaling pathways. New therapeutic strategies to overcome crizotinib resistance are needed. Ceritinib, a second-generation ALK inhibitor, overcomes several crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations and has demonstrated efficacy against tumor growth in several in vitro and in vivo preclinical models of crizotinib resistance. Notably, the dose-escalation Phase I ASCEND-1 trial has shown a marked activity of ceritinib in both crizotinib-naïve and crizotinib-resistant ALK-rearranged lung cancer. The overall response rate was 58% in a subgroup of patients with ALK-rearranged late-stage NSCLC. Drug discontinuation rate due to toxicity was 10%. The standard dose was established at 750 mg daily. This paper outlines the pathogenesis and treatment of ALK-positive lung cancer, focuses on the preclinical and clinical results surrounding the accelerated FDA approval of ceritinib for the treatment of ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC patients who have progressed on/or are crizotinib intolerant, and discusses the potential efforts seeking to maximize ceritinib efficacy and expand its usage to other indications in cancer therapy. PMID:26622190

  19. EML4-ALK fusion gene and efficacy of an ALK kinase inhibitor in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koivunen, Jussi P.; Mermel, Craig; Zejnullahu, Kreshnik; Murphy, Carly; Lifshits, Eugene; Holmes, Alison J.; Choi, Hwan Geun; Kim, Jhingook; Chiang, Derek; Thomas, Roman; Lee, Jinseon; Richards, William G.; Sugarbaker, David J.; Ducko, Christopher; Lindeman, Neal; Marcoux, J. Paul; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Gray, Nathanael S.; Lee, Charles; Meyerson, Matthew; Jänne, Pasi A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The EML4-ALK fusion gene has been detected in ~7% of Japanese non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). We determined the frequency of EML4-ALK in Caucasian NSCLCs and in NSCLC cell lines. We also determined whether TAE684, a specific ALK kinase inhibitor, would inhibit the growth of EML4-ALK containing cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design We screened 305 primary NSCLCs (both US (n=138) and Korean (n=167) patients) and 83 NSCLC cell lines using RT-PCR and by exon array analyses. We evaluated the efficacy of TAE684 against NSCLC cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Results We detected 4 different variants, including two novel variants, of EML4-ALK using RT-PCR in 8/305 tumors (3%) and in 3/83 (3.6%) NSCLC cell lines. All EML4-ALK containing tumors and cell lines were adenocarcinomas. EML4-ALK was detected more frequently in NSCLC patients who were never or light (< 10 pack years) cigarette smokers compared to current/former smokers (6% vs. 1%; p=0.049). TAE684 inhibited the growth of 1 of 3 (H3122) EML4-ALK containing cell lines in vitro and in vivo, inhibited Akt phosphorylation and caused apoptosis. In another EML4-ALK cell line, DFCI032, TAE684 was ineffective due to co-activation of EGFR and ERBB2. The combination of TAE684 and CL-387,785 (EGFR/ERBB2 kinase inhibitor), inhibited growth and Akt phosphorylation and led to apoptosis in the DFCI032 cell line. Conclusions EML4-ALK is found in the minority of NSCLCs. ALK kinase inhibitors alone or in combination may nevertheless be clinically effective treatments for NSCLC patients whose tumors contain EML4-ALK. PMID:18594010

  20. BMP-9 regulates the osteoblastic differentiation and calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells through an ALK1 mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dongxing; Mackenzie, Neil Charles Wallace; Shanahan, Catherine M; Shroff, Rukshana C; Farquharson, Colin; MacRae, Vicky Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The process of vascular calcification shares many similarities with that of physiological skeletal mineralization, and involves the deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in arteries. However, the cellular mechanisms responsible have yet to be fully explained. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-9) has been shown to exert direct effects on both bone development and vascular function. In the present study, we have investigated the role of BMP-9 in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification. Vessel calcification in chronic kidney disease (CKD) begins pre-dialysis, with factors specific to the dialysis milieu triggering accelerated calcification. Intriguingly, BMP-9 was markedly elevated in serum from CKD children on dialysis. Furthermore, in vitro studies revealed that BMP-9 treatment causes a significant increase in VSMC calcium content, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mRNA expression of osteogenic markers. BMP-9-induced calcium deposition was significantly reduced following treatment with the ALP inhibitor 2,5-Dimethoxy-N-(quinolin-3-yl) benzenesulfonamide confirming the mediatory role of ALP in this process. The inhibition of ALK1 signalling using a soluble chimeric protein significantly reduced calcium deposition and ALP activity, confirming that BMP-9 is a physiological ALK1 ligand. Signal transduction studies revealed that BMP-9 induced Smad2, Smad3 and Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. As these Smad proteins directly bind to Smad4 to activate target genes, siRNA studies were subsequently undertaken to examine the functional role of Smad4 in VSMC calcification. Smad4-siRNA transfection induced a significant reduction in ALP activity and calcium deposition. These novel data demonstrate that BMP-9 induces VSMC osteogenic differentiation and calcification via ALK1, Smad and ALP dependent mechanisms. This may identify new potential therapeutic strategies for clinical intervention. PMID:25297851

  1. Native and rearranged ALK copy number and rearranged cell count in NSCLC: Implications for ALK inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Camidge, D. Ross; Skokan, Margaret; Kiatsimkul, Porntip; Helfrich, Barbara; Lu, Xian; Barón, Anna E.; Schulte, Nathan; Maxson, DeLee; Aisner, Dara L.; Franklin, Wilbur A.; Doebele, Robert C.; Varella-Garcia, Marileila

    2013-01-01

    Background Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase positive (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) responds to ALK inhibitors. Clinically, ≥ 15% cells showing rearrangements by break-apart FISH classify tumors as positive. Increases in native and rearranged ALK copy number also occur. Methods 1426 NSCLC clinical specimens (174 ALK+ and 1252 ALK negative), and 24 ALK negative NSCLC cell lines were investigated. ALK copy number and genomic status were assessed by FISH. Results Clinical specimens with 0–9%, 10–15%, 16–30%, 31–50% and >50% of ALK+ cells were found in 79.3%, 8.5%, 1.4%, 2.7% and 8.1% of cases, respectively. Increased native ALK copy number (≥3 copies/cell in ≥40% cells) was detected in 19% of ALK+ and 62% of ALK negative tumors. In ALK negative tumors, abundant focal amplification of native ALK was rare (0.8%). Other atypical patterns occurred in ~6% of tumors. Mean native ALK copy number ranged from 2.1–6.9 in cell lines and was not correlated with crizotinib sensitivity (IC50s 0.34–2.8 uM) (r=0.279, p=0.1764). Neither native, nor rearranged ALK copy number, nor percentage cells positive correlated with extra-central nervous system progression free survivalin ALK+ patients on crizotinib. Conclusions 8.5% of cases are below the established positivity threshold by ≤5%. Further investigation of ALK by other diagnostic techniques in such cases may be warranted. Native ALK copy number increases alone are not associated with sensitivity to ALK inhibition in vitro. However, rare complex patterns of increased native ALK in patients should be studied further as atypical rearrangements contained within these may otherwise be missed. PMID:24022839

  2. Initial Diagnosis of ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Based on Analysis of ALK Status Utilizing Droplet Digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Lund, H Louise; Hughesman, Curtis B; Fakhfakh, Kareem; McNeil, Kelly; Clemens, Shahira; Hocken, Kimberly; Pettersson, Ryan; Karsan, Aly; Foster, Leonard J; Haynes, Charles

    2016-05-01

    We describe a novel droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assay capable of detecting genomic alterations associated with inversion translocations. It is applied here to detection of rearrangements in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene associated with ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). NSCLC patients may carry a nonreciprocal translocation on human chromosome 2, in which synchronized double stranded breaks (DSB) within the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) gene and ALK lead to an inversion of genetic material that forms the non-natural gene fusion EML4-ALK encoding a constitutively active tyrosine kinase that is associated with 3 to 7% of all NSCLCs. Detection of ALK rearrangements is currently achieved in clinics through direct visualization via a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assay, which can detect those rearrangements to a limit of detection (LOD) of ca. 15%. We show that the ddPCR assay presented here provides a LOD of 0.25% at lower cost and with faster turnaround times. PMID:27043019

  3. Identification of bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9) as a novel profibrotic factor in vitro.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Félix, José M; Cuesta, Cristina; Perretta-Tejedor, Nuria; Subileau, Mariela; López-Hernández, Francisco J; López-Novoa, José M; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Upregulated synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins by myofibroblasts is a common phenomenon in the development of fibrosis. Although the role of TGF-β in fibrosis development has been extensively studied, the involvement of other members of this superfamily of cytokines, the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in organ fibrosis has given contradictory results. BMP9 is the main ligand for activin receptor-like kinase-1 (ALK1) TGF-β1 type I receptor and its effect on fibrosis development is unknown. Our purpose was to study the effect of BMP9 in ECM protein synthesis in fibroblasts, as well as the involved receptors and signaling pathways. In cultured mice fibroblasts, BMP9 induces an increase in collagen, fibronectin and connective tissue growth factor expression, associated with Smad1/5/8, Smad2/3 and Erk1/2 activation. ALK5 inhibition with SB431542 or ALK1/2/3/6 with dorsomorphin-1, inhibition of Smad3 activation with SIS3, and inhibition of the MAPK/Erk1/2 with U0126, demonstrates the involvement of these pathways in BMP9-induced ECM synthesis in MEFs. Whereas BMP9 induced Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation through ALK1, it also induces Smad2/3 phosphorylation through ALK5 but only in the presence of ALK1. Summarizing, this is the first study that accurately identifies BMP9 as a profibrotic factor in fibroblasts that promotes ECM protein expression through ALK1 and ALK5 receptors. PMID:27208502

  4. Predictable tuning of protein expression in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bonde, Mads T; Pedersen, Margit; Klausen, Michael S; Jensen, Sheila I; Wulff, Tune; Harrison, Scott; Nielsen, Alex T; Herrgård, Markus J; Sommer, Morten O A

    2016-03-01

    We comprehensively assessed the contribution of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence to protein expression and used the data to develop EMOPEC (Empirical Model and Oligos for Protein Expression Changes; http://emopec.biosustain.dtu.dk). EMOPEC is a free tool that makes it possible to modulate the expression level of any Escherichia coli gene by changing only a few bases. Measured protein levels for 91% of our designed sequences were within twofold of the desired target level. PMID:26752768

  5. Expression of multiple proteins in transgenic plants

    DOEpatents

    Vierstra, Richard D.; Walker, Joseph M.

    2002-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the production of multiple proteins in transgenic plants. A DNA construct for introduction into plants includes a provision to express a fusion protein of two proteins of interest joined by a linking domain including plant ubiquitin. When the fusion protein is produced in the cells of a transgenic plant transformed with the DNA construction, native enzymes present in plant cells cleave the fusion protein to release both proteins of interest into the cells of the transgenic plant. Since the proteins are produced from the same fusion protein, the initial quantities of the proteins in the cells of the plant are approximately equal.

  6. Effects of changes in intracellular iron pool on AlkB-dependent and AlkB-independent mechanisms protecting E.coli cells against mutagenic action of alkylating agent.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Anna; Maciejewska, Agnieszka M; Poznański, Jarosław; Pilżys, Tomasz; Marcinkowski, Michał; Dylewska, Małgorzata; Piwowarski, Jan; Jakubczak, Wioletta; Pawlak, Katarzyna; Grzesiuk, Elżbieta

    2015-08-01

    An Escherichia coli hemH mutant accumulates protoporphyrin IX, causing photosensitivity of cells to visible light. Here, we have shown that intracellular free iron in hemH mutants is double that observed in hemH(+) strain. The aim of this study was to recognize the influence of this increased free iron concentration on AlkB-directed repair of alkylated DNA by analyzing survival and argE3 → Arg(+) reversion induction after λ>320 nm light irradiation and MMS-treatment in E. coli AB1157 hemH and alkB mutants. E.coli AlkB dioxygenase constitutes a direct single-protein repair system using non-hem Fe(II) and cofactors 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) and oxygen (O2) to initiate oxidative dealkylation of DNA/RNA bases. We have established that the frequency of MMS-induced Arg(+) revertants in AB1157 alkB(+)hemH(-)/pMW1 strain was 40 and 26% reduced comparing to the alkB(+)hemH(-) and alkB(+)hemH(+)/pMW1, respectively. It is noteworthy that the effect was observed only when bacteria were irradiated with λ>320 nm light prior MMS-treatment. This finding indicates efficient repair of alkylated DNA in photosensibilized cells in the presence of higher free iron pool and AlkB concentrations. Interestingly, a 31% decrease in the level of Arg(+) reversion was observed in irradiated and MMS-treated hemH(-)alkB(-) cells comparing to the hemH(+)alkB(-) strain. Also, the level of Arg(+) revertants in the irradiated and MMS treated hemH(-) alkB(-) mutant was significantly lower (by 34%) in comparison to the same strain but MMS-treated only. These indicate AlkB-independent repair involving Fe ions and reactive oxygen species. According to our hypothesis it may be caused by non-enzymatic dealkylation of alkylated dNTPs in E. coli cells. In in vitro studies, the absence of AlkB protein in the presence of iron ions allowed etheno(ϵ) dATP and ϵdCTP to spontaneously convert to dAMP and dCMP, respectively. Thus, hemH(-) intra-cellular conditions may favor Fe-dependent dealkylation of modified d

  7. Expression and purification of GST fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Harper, S; Speicher, D W

    2001-05-01

    An increasingly common strategy for expressing proteins and large peptides in prokaryotic systems is to express the protein of interest connected to a "tag" that provides the basis for rapid high-affinity purification. This unit describes the expression and purification of fusion proteins containing the 26-kDa glutathione-S-transferase protein as well as methods for cleaving the affinity tag and repurifying the target protein. Advantages of this popular fusion protein system include high protein yields, high-affinity one-step protein purification of the fusion protein, existence of several alternative protease cleavage sites for removing the affinity tag when required, and ease of removal of the cleaved affinity tag. PMID:18429193

  8. Structure–Activity Relationship of 3,5-Diaryl-2-aminopyridine ALK2 Inhibitors Reveals Unaltered Binding Affinity for Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva Causing Mutants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no effective therapies for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a debilitating and progressive heterotopic ossification disease caused by activating mutations of ACVR1 encoding the BMP type I receptor kinase ALK2. Recently, a subset of these same mutations of ACVR1 have been identified in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) tumors. Here we describe the structure–activity relationship for a series of novel ALK2 inhibitors based on the 2-aminopyridine compound K02288. Several modifications increased potency in kinase, thermal shift, or cell-based assays of BMP signaling and transcription, as well as selectivity for ALK2 versus closely related BMP and TGF-β type I receptor kinases. Compounds in this series exhibited a wide range of in vitro cytotoxicity that was not correlated with potency or selectivity, suggesting mechanisms independent of BMP or TGF-β inhibition. The study also highlights a potent 2-methylpyridine derivative 10 (LDN-214117) with a high degree of selectivity for ALK2 and low cytotoxicity that could provide a template for preclinical development. Contrary to the notion that activating mutations of ALK2 might alter inhibitor efficacy due to potential conformational changes in the ATP-binding site, the compounds demonstrated consistent binding to a panel of mutant and wild-type ALK2 proteins. Thus, BMP inhibitors identified via activity against wild-type ALK2 signaling are likely to be of clinical relevance for the diverse ALK2 mutant proteins associated with FOP and DIPG. PMID:25101911

  9. Coevolution of gene expression among interacting proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Wall, Dennis P.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2004-03-01

    Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another, presumably to maintain proper stoichiometry among interacting components. Here, we show that the expression levels of physically interacting proteins coevolve. We estimate average expression levels of genes from four closely related fungi of the genus Saccharomyces using the codon adaptation index and show that expression levels of interacting proteins exhibit coordinated changes in these different species. We find that this coevolution of expression is a more powerful predictor of physical interaction than is coevolution of amino acid sequence. These results demonstrate previously uncharacterized coevolution of gene expression, adding a different dimension to the study of the coevolution of interacting proteins and underscoring the importance of maintaining coexpression of interacting proteins over evolutionary time. Our results also suggest that expression coevolution can be used for computational prediction of protein protein interactions.

  10. Crystal structure of EML1 reveals the basis for Hsp90 dependence of oncogenic EML4-ALK by disruption of an atypical β-propeller domain

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Mark W.; Law, Edward W. P.; Rennalls, La’Verne P.; Busacca, Sara; O’Regan, Laura; Fry, Andrew M.; Fennell, Dean A.; Bayliss, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Proteins of the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein (EMAP)-like (EML) family contribute to formation of the mitotic spindle and interphase microtubule network. They contain a unique hydrophobic EML protein (HELP) motif and a variable number of WD40 repeats. Recurrent gene rearrangements in nonsmall cell lung cancer fuse EML4 to anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), causing expression of several fusion oncoprotein variants. We have determined a 2.6-Å crystal structure of the representative ∼70-kDa core of EML1, revealing an intimately associated pair of β-propellers, which we term a TAPE (tandem atypical propeller in EMLs) domain. One propeller is highly atypical, having a discontinuous subdomain unrelated to a WD40 motif in place of one of its blades. This unexpected feature shows how a propeller structure can be assembled from subdomains with distinct folds. The HELP motif is not an independent domain but forms part of the hydrophobic core that joins the two β-propellers. The TAPE domain binds α/β-tubulin via its conserved, concave surface, including part of the atypical blade. Mapping the characteristic breakpoints of each EML4-ALK variant onto our structure indicates that the EML4 TAPE domain is truncated in many variants in a manner likely to make the fusion protein structurally unstable. We found that the heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor ganetespib induced degradation of these variants whereas others lacking a partial TAPE domain were resistant in both overexpression models and patient-derived cell lines. The Hsp90-sensitive EML4-ALK variants are exceptions to the rule that oncogenic fusion proteins involve breakpoints in disordered regions of both partners. PMID:24706829

  11. Co-active receptor tyrosine kinases mitigate the effect of FGFR inhibitors in FGFR1-amplified lung cancers with low FGFR1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Kotani, H; Ebi, H; Kitai, H; Nanjo, S; Kita, K; Huynh, T G; Ooi, A; Faber, A C; Mino-Kenudson, M; Yano, S

    2016-07-01

    Targeted therapies are effective in subsets of lung cancers with EGFR mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocations. Large-scale genomics have recently expanded the lung cancer landscape with FGFR1 amplification found in 10-20% of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). However, the response rates have been low for biomarker-directed fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitor therapy in SCC, which contrasts to the relatively high rates of response seen in EGFR mutant and ALK-translocated lung cancers treated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors and ALK inhibitors, respectively. In order to better understand the low response rates of FGFR1-amplified lung cancers to FGFR inhibitors, relationships between gene copy number, mRNA expression and protein expression of FGFR1 were assessed in cell lines, tumor specimens and data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. The importance of these factors for the sensitivity to FGFR inhibitors was determined by analyzing drug screen data and conducting in vitro and in vivo experiments. We report that there was a discrepancy between FGFR1 amplification level and FGFR1 protein expression in a number of these cell lines, and the cancers with unexpectedly low FGFR1 expression were uniformly resistant to the different FGFR inhibitors. Further interrogation of the receptor tyrosine kinase activity in these discordant cell lines revealed co-activation of HER2 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRα) caused by gene amplification or ligand overexpression maintained phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and MEK/ERK signaling even in the presence of FGFR inhibitor. Accordingly, co-inhibition of FGFR1 and HER2 or PDGFRα led to enhanced drug responses. In contrast, FGFR1-amplified high FGFR1 protein-expressing lung cancers are sensitive to FGFR inhibitor monotherapy by downregulating ERK signaling. Addition of a PI3K inhibitor to these high FGFR1 protein-expressing cancers further sensitized them to FGFR

  12. Structural and Mutational Analysis of Escherichia coli AlkB Provides Insight into Substrate Specificity and DNA Damage Searching

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, P.; Hollis, T

    2010-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, cytotoxic DNA methyl lesions on the N1 position of purines and N3 position of pyrimidines are primarily repaired by the 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) iron(II) dependent dioxygenase, AlkB. AlkB repairs 1-methyladenine (1-meA) and 3-methylcytosine (3-meC) lesions, but it also repairs 1-methylguanine (1-meG) and 3-methylthymine (3-meT) at a much less efficient rate. How the AlkB enzyme is able to locate and identify methylated bases in ssDNA has remained an open question. We determined the crystal structures of the E. coli AlkB protein holoenzyme and the AlkB-ssDNA complex containing a 1-meG lesion. We coupled this to site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids in and around the active site, and tested the effects of these mutations on the ability of the protein to bind both damaged and undamaged DNA, as well as catalyze repair of a methylated substrate. A comparison of our substrate-bound AlkB-ssDNA complex with our unliganded holoenzyme reveals conformational changes of residues within the active site that are important for binding damaged bases. Site-directed mutagenesis of these residues reveals novel insight into their roles in DNA damage recognition and repair. Our data support a model that the AlkB protein utilizes at least two distinct conformations in searching and binding methylated bases within DNA: a 'searching' mode and 'repair' mode. Moreover, we are able to functionally separate these modes through mutagenesis of residues that affect one or the other binding state. Finally, our mutagenesis experiments show that amino acid D135 of AlkB participates in both substrate specificity and catalysis.

  13. Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Regulates the Expression of Small GTPase Regulatory Proteins GEFs, GAPs, and GDI

    PubMed Central

    Laukkanen, Mikko O.; Cammarota, Francesca; Esposito, Tiziana; Salvatore, Marco; Castellone, Maria D.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3), which catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide anions to hydrogen peroxide at the cell membranes, regulates the cellular growth in a dose-dependent manner. This enzyme induces primary cell proliferation and immortalization at low expression levels whereas it activates cancer barrier signaling through the p53-p21 pathway at high expression levels, causing growth arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. Because previous reports suggested that the SOD3–induced reduction in the rates of cellular growth and migration also occurred in the absence of functional p53 signaling, in the current study we investigated the SOD3-induced growth-suppressive mechanisms in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells. Based on our data, the robust over-expression of SOD3 increased the level of phosphorylation of the EGFR, ERBB2, RYK, ALK, FLT3, and EPHA10 receptor tyrosine kinases with the consequent downstream activation of the SRC, FYN, YES, HCK, and LYN kinases. However, pull-down experiments focusing on the small GTPase RAS, RAC, CDC42, and RHO revealed a reduced level of growth and migration signal transduction, such as the lack of stimulation of the mitogen pathway, in the SOD3 over-expressing cells, which was confirmed by MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 Western blotting analysis. Interestingly, the mRNA expression analyses indicated that SOD3 regulated the expression of guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (RHO GEF16, RAL GEF RGL1), GTPase-activating proteins (ARFGAP ADAP2, RAS GAP RASAL1, RGS4), and a Rho guanine nucleotide-disassociation inhibitor (RHO GDI 2) in a dose dependent manner, thus controlling signaling through the small G protein GTPases. Therefore, our current data may suggest the occurrence of dose-dependent SOD3–driven control of the GTP loading of small G proteins indicating a novel growth regulatory mechanism of this enzyme. PMID:25751262

  14. Extracellular superoxide dismutase regulates the expression of small gtpase regulatory proteins GEFs, GAPs, and GDI.

    PubMed

    Laukkanen, Mikko O; Cammarota, Francesca; Esposito, Tiziana; Salvatore, Marco; Castellone, Maria D

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3), which catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide anions to hydrogen peroxide at the cell membranes, regulates the cellular growth in a dose-dependent manner. This enzyme induces primary cell proliferation and immortalization at low expression levels whereas it activates cancer barrier signaling through the p53-p21 pathway at high expression levels, causing growth arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. Because previous reports suggested that the SOD3-induced reduction in the rates of cellular growth and migration also occurred in the absence of functional p53 signaling, in the current study we investigated the SOD3-induced growth-suppressive mechanisms in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells. Based on our data, the robust over-expression of SOD3 increased the level of phosphorylation of the EGFR, ERBB2, RYK, ALK, FLT3, and EPHA10 receptor tyrosine kinases with the consequent downstream activation of the SRC, FYN, YES, HCK, and LYN kinases. However, pull-down experiments focusing on the small GTPase RAS, RAC, CDC42, and RHO revealed a reduced level of growth and migration signal transduction, such as the lack of stimulation of the mitogen pathway, in the SOD3 over-expressing cells, which was confirmed by MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 Western blotting analysis. Interestingly, the mRNA expression analyses indicated that SOD3 regulated the expression of guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (RHO GEF16, RAL GEF RGL1), GTPase-activating proteins (ARFGAP ADAP2, RAS GAP RASAL1, RGS4), and a Rho guanine nucleotide-disassociation inhibitor (RHO GDI 2) in a dose dependent manner, thus controlling signaling through the small G protein GTPases. Therefore, our current data may suggest the occurrence of dose-dependent SOD3-driven control of the GTP loading of small G proteins indicating a novel growth regulatory mechanism of this enzyme. PMID:25751262

  15. Novel Alkane Hydroxylase Gene (alkB) Diversity in Sediments Associated with Hydrocarbon Seeps in the Timor Sea, Australia▿

    PubMed Central

    Wasmund, Kenneth; Burns, Kathryn A.; Kurtböke, D. Ipek; Bourne, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrocarbon seeps provide inputs of petroleum hydrocarbons to widespread areas of the Timor Sea. Alkanes constitute the largest proportion of chemical components found in crude oils, and therefore genes involved in the biodegradation of these compounds may act as bioindicators for this ecosystem's response to seepage. To assess alkane biodegradation potential, the diversity and distribution of alkane hydroxylase (alkB) genes in sediments of the Timor Sea were studied. Deduced AlkB protein sequences derived from clone libraries identified sequences only distantly related to previously identified AlkB sequences, suggesting that the Timor Sea maybe a rich reservoir for novel alkane hydroxylase enzymes. Most sequences clustered with AlkB sequences previously identified from marine Gammaproteobacteria though protein sequence identities averaged only 73% (with a range of 60% to 94% sequence identities). AlkB sequence diversity was lower in deep water (>400 m) samples off the continental slope than in shallow water (<100 m) samples on the continental shelf but not significantly different in response to levels of alkanes. Real-time PCR assays targeting Timor Sea alkB genes were designed and used to quantify alkB gene targets. No correlation was found between gene copy numbers and levels of hydrocarbons measured in sediments using sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques, probably due to the very low levels of hydrocarbons found in most sediment samples. Interestingly, however, copy numbers of alkB genes increased substantially in sediments exposed directly to active seepage even though only low or undetectable concentrations of hydrocarbons were measured in these sediments in complementary geochemical analyses due to efficient biodegradation. PMID:19820158

  16. Detection of EML4-ALK in Lung Adenocarcinoma Using Pleural Effusion with FISH, IHC, and RT-PCR Methods

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaodie; Song, Yong; Zhou, Xiaojun; Yu, Like; Wang, Jiandong

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) gene rearrangements occur in approximately 5% of non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLC), leading to the overexpression of anaplastic lymphoma kinase and predicting a response to the targeted inhibitor, crizotinib. Malignant pleural effusion occurs in most patients with advanced lung cancer, especially adenocarcinoma, and tissue samples are not always available from these patients. We attempted to clarify the feasibility of detecting the EML4-ALK fusion gene in pleural effusion cells using different methods. We obtained 66 samples of pleural effusion from NSCLC patients. The pleural effusion fluid was centrifuged, and the cellular components obtained were formalin fixed and paraffin embedded. The EML4-ALK fusion gene status was determined with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), reverse transcription—polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and immunohistochemistry (IHC). EML4-ALK was detected in three of 66 patient samples (4.5%) with RT-PCR. When the RT-PCR data were used as the standard, one false positive and one false negative samples were identified with IHC; and one false negative sample was identified with FISH. These results suggest that a block of pleural effusion cells can be used to detect the EML4-ALK fusion gene. IHC had good sensitivity, but low specificity. FISH had low sensitivity, but high specificity. RT-PCR is a good candidate method for detecting EML4-ALK in blocks of pleural effusion cells from lung cancer patients. PMID:25785456

  17. 3D-QSAR and molecular fragment replacement study on diaminopyrimidine and pyrrolotriazine ALK inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Zhipeng; Lu, Tao; Liu, Haichun; Yuan, Haoliang; Ran, Ting; Zhang, Yanmin; Yao, Sihui; Xiong, Xiao; Xu, Jinxing; Xu, Anyang; Chen, Yadong

    2014-06-01

    Over expression of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has been found in many types of cancer, and ALK is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer. To obtain new potent inhibitors of ALK, we conducted lead optimization using 3D-QSAR modeling and molecular docking investigation of 2,4-diaminopyrimidines and 2,7-disubstituted-pyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazine-based compounds. Three favorable 3D-QSAR models (CoMFA with q2, 0.555; r2, 0.939; CoMSIA with q2, 0.625; r2, 0.974; Topomer CoMFA with q2, 0.557; r2 0.756) have been developed to predict the biological activity of novel compounds. Topomer Search was utilized for virtual screening to obtain suitable fragments. The novel compounds generated by molecular fragment replacement (MFR) were evaluated by Topomer CoMFA prediction, Glide (docking) and further evaluated with CoMFA and CoMSIA prediction. 25 novel 2,7-disubstituted-pyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazine derivatives as potential ALK inhibitors were finally obtained. In this paper, a combination of CoMFA, CoMSIA and Topomer CoMFA could obtain favorable 3D-QSAR models and suitable fragments for ALK inhibitors optimization. The work flow which comprised 3D-QSAR modeling, Topomer Search, MFR, molecular docking and evaluating criteria could be applied to de novo drug design and the resulted compounds initiate us to further optimize and design new potential ALK inhibitors.

  18. Transient Protein Expression by Agroinfiltration in Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Dent, Matthew; Hurtado, Jonathan; Stahnke, Jake; McNulty, Alyssa; Leuzinger, Kahlin; Lai, Huafang

    2016-01-01

    Current systems of recombinant protein production include bacterial, insect, and mammalian cell culture. However, these platforms are expensive to build and operate at commercial scales and/or have limited abilities to produce complex proteins. In recent years, plant-based expression systems have become top candidates for the production of recombinant proteins as they are highly scalable, robust, safe, and can produce complex proteins due to having a eukaryotic endomembrane system. Newly developed "deconstructed" viral vectors delivered via Agrobacterium tumefaciens (agroinfiltration) have enabled robust plant-based production of proteins with a wide range of applications. The leafy Lactuca sativa (lettuce) plant with its strong foundation in agriculture is an excellent host for pharmaceutical protein production. Here, we describe a method for agroinfiltration of lettuce that can rapidly produce high levels of recombinant proteins in a matter of days and has the potential to be scaled up to an agricultural level. PMID:26614281

  19. Biotechnology Protein Expression and Purification Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the Project Scientist Core Facility is to provide purified proteins, both recombinant and natural, to the Biotechnology Science Team Project Scientists and the NRA-Structural Biology Test Investigators. Having a core facility for this purpose obviates the need for each scientist to develop the necessary expertise and equipment for molecular biology, protein expression, and protein purification. Because of this, they are able to focus their energies as well as their funding on the crystallization and structure determination of their target proteins.

  20. Membrane protein expression in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    King, Martin S; Boes, Christoph; Kunji, Edmund R S

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis has many properties that are ideal for the overproduction of membrane proteins in a functional form. Growth of lactococci is rapid, proceeds to high cell densities, and does not require aeration, which facilitates large-scale fermentation. The available promoter systems are strong and tightly regulated, allowing expression of toxic gene products in a controlled manner. Expressed membrane proteins are targeted exclusively to the cytoplasmic membrane, allowing the use of ionophores, ligands, and inhibitors to study activity of the membrane protein in whole cells. Constructed plasmids are stable and expression levels are highly reproducible. The relatively small genome size of the organism causes little redundancy, which facilitates complementation studies and allows for easier purification. The produced membrane proteins are often stable, as the organism has limited proteolytic capability, and they are readily solubilized from the membrane with mild detergents. Lactococci are multiple amino acid auxotrophs, allowing the incorporation of labels, such as selenomethionine. Among the few disadvantages are the low transformation frequency, AT-rich codon usage, and resistance to lysis by mechanical means, but these problems can be overcome fairly easily. We will describe in detail the protocols used to express membrane proteins in L. lactis, from cloning of the target gene to the isolation of membrane vesicles for the determination of expression levels. PMID:25857778

  1. Tmem100, an ALK1 receptor signaling-dependent gene essential for arterial endothelium differentiation and vascular morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Somekawa, Satoshi; Imagawa, Keiichi; Hayashi, Hisaki; Sakabe, Masahide; Ioka, Tomoko; Sato, Genki E.; Inada, Ken; Iwamoto, Takaaki; Mori, Toshio; Uemura, Shiro; Nakagawa, Osamu; Saito, Yoshihiko

    2012-01-01

    Members of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily play essential roles in various aspects of embryonic development and physiological organ function. Among them, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 9 and BMP10 regulate embryonic vascular development by activating their endothelial receptor ALK1 (activin receptor-like kinase 1, also called Acvrl1). ALK1-mediated intracellular signaling is implicated in the etiologies of human diseases, but their downstream functional proteins are largely unknown. In this study, we identified Tmem100, a gene encoding a previously uncharacterized intracellular transmembrane protein, to be an embryonic endothelium-enriched gene activated by BMP9 and BMP10 through the ALK1 receptor. Tmem100 null mice showed embryonic lethality due to impaired differentiation of arterial endothelium and defects of vascular morphogenesis, which phenocopied most of the vascular abnormalities observed with the Acvrl1/Alk1 deficiency. The activity of Notch- and Akt-mediated signaling, which is essential for vascular development, was down-regulated in Tmem100 null mice. Cre-mediated deletion of Tmem100 in endothelial cells was sufficient to recapitulate the null phenotypes. These data indicated that TMEM100 may play indispensable roles downstream of BMP9/BMP10-ALK1 signaling during endothelial differentiation and vascular morphogenesis. PMID:22783020

  2. Proteomics for Protein Expression Profiling in Neuroscience*

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Willard M.; Hemby, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    As the technology of proteomics moves from a theoretical approach to a practical reality, neuroscientists will have to determine the most appropriate applications for this technology. Neuroscientists will have to surmount difficulties particular to their research, such as limited sample amounts, heterogeneous cellular compositions in samples, and the fact that many proteins of interest are rare, hydrophobic proteins. This review examines protein isolation and protein fractionation and separation using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry proteomic methods. Methods for quantifying relative protein expression between samples (e.g., 2-DIGE, and ICAT) are also described. The coverage of the proteome, ability to detect membrane proteins, resource requirements, and quantitative reliability of different approaches is also discussed. Although there are many challenges in proteomic neuroscience, this field promises many rewards in the future. PMID:15176464

  3. Phosphorylation of ΔNp63α via a Novel TGFβ/ALK5 Signaling Mechanism Mediates the Anti-Clonogenic Effects of TGFβ

    PubMed Central

    Cherukuri, Pratima; DeCastro, Andrew J.; Balboni, Amanda L.; Downey, Sondra L.; Liu, Jennifer Y.; Hutchinson, Justine A.; DiRenzo, James

    2012-01-01

    Genetic analysis of TP63 implicates ΔNp63 isoforms in preservation of replicative capacity and cellular lifespan within adult stem cells. ΔNp63α is also an oncogene and survival factor that mediates therapeutic resistance in squamous carcinomas. These diverse activities are the result of genetic and functional interactions between TP63 and an array of morphogenic and morphostatic signals that govern tissue and tumor stasis, mitotic polarity, and cell fate; however the cellular signals that account for specific functions of TP63 are incompletely understood. To address this we sought to identify signaling pathways that regulate expression, stability or activity of ΔNp63α. An siRNA-based screen of the human kinome identified the Type 1 TGFβ receptor, ALK5, as the kinase required for phosphorylation of ΔNp63α at Serine 66/68 (S66/68). This activity is TGFβ-dependent and sensitive to either ALK5-directed siRNA or the ALK5 kinase inhibitor A83-01. Mechanistic studies support a model in which ALK5 is proteolytically cleaved at the internal juxtamembrane region resulting in the translocation of the C-terminal ALK5-intracellular kinase domain (ALK5IKD). In this study, we demonstrate that ALK5-mediated phosphorylation of ΔNp63α is required for the anti-clonogenic effects of TGFΒ and ectopic expression of ALK5IKD mimics these effects. Finally, we present evidence that ultraviolet irradiation-mediated phosphorylation of ΔNp63α is sensitive to ALK5 inhibitors. These findings identify a non-canonical TGFβ-signaling pathway that mediates the anti-clonogenic effects of TGFβ and the effects of cellular stress via ΔNp63α phosphorylation. PMID:23166821

  4. Enhanced expression of adenovirus transforming proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gaynor, R B; Tsukamoto, A; Montell, C; Berk, A J

    1982-01-01

    Proteins encoded in regions EIA and EIB of human adenoviruses cause transformation of rodent cells. One protein from EIA also stimulates transcription of other early regions at early times in a productive infection. In the past, direct analysis of these proteins synthesized in vivo has been difficult because of the low levels produced in both transformed cells and productively infected cells. We present a simple method which leads to expression of EIA and EIB mRNAs and proteins at 30-fold greater levels than those observed during the early phase of a standard productive infection. Under these conditions, these proteins are among the most prominent translation products of infected cells. This allowed direct visualization of EIA and EIB proteins on two-dimensional gels of pulse-labeled total cell protein. Experiments with EIA and EIB mutants confirm that the identified proteins are indeed encoded in these regions. Two EIA proteins are observed, one translated from each of the major early EIA mRNAs. Both of these EIA proteins are phosphorylated. Images PMID:7143568

  5. Stimulation of the midkine/ALK axis renders glioma cells resistant to cannabinoid antitumoral action.

    PubMed

    Lorente, M; Torres, S; Salazar, M; Carracedo, A; Hernández-Tiedra, S; Rodríguez-Fornés, F; García-Taboada, E; Meléndez, B; Mollejo, M; Campos-Martín, Y; Lakatosh, S A; Barcia, J; Guzmán, M; Velasco, G

    2011-06-01

    Identifying the molecular mechanisms responsible for the resistance of gliomas to anticancer treatments is an issue of great therapeutic interest. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major active ingredient of marijuana, and other cannabinoids inhibit tumor growth in animal models of cancer, including glioma, an effect that relies, at least in part, on the stimulation of autophagy-mediated apoptosis in tumor cells. Here, by analyzing the gene expression profile of a large series of human glioma cells with different sensitivity to cannabinoid action, we have identified a subset of genes specifically associated to THC resistance. One of these genes, namely that encoding the growth factor midkine (Mdk), is directly involved in the resistance of glioma cells to cannabinoid treatment. We also show that Mdk mediates its protective effect via the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) receptor and that Mdk signaling through ALK interferes with cannabinoid-induced autophagic cell death. Furthermore, in vivo Mdk silencing or ALK pharmacological inhibition sensitizes cannabinod-resistant tumors to THC antitumoral action. Altogether, our findings identify Mdk as a pivotal factor involved in the resistance of glioma cells to THC pro-autophagic and antitumoral action, and suggest that selective targeting of the Mdk/ALK axis could help to improve the efficacy of antitumoral therapies for gliomas. PMID:21233844

  6. Comprehensive histologic analysis of ALK-rearranged lung carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akihiko; Tsuta, Koji; Nakamura, Harumi; Kohno, Takashi; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Asamura, Hisao; Sekine, Ikuo; Fukayama, Masashi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Furuta, Koh; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2011-08-01

    A subset (1% to 5%) of non-small-cell lung carcinomas harbors the EML4-ALK fusion gene. Data from previous studies on the histomorphology of ALK-rearranged lung cancer are inconsistent, and the specific histologic parameters that characterize this subset and how accurately such parameters predict underlying ALK abnormality remain uncertain. To answer these questions, we performed a comprehensive histologic analysis of 54 surgically resected, extensively sampled ALK-rearranged lung carcinomas and compared them with 100 consecutive resections of ALK-wild-type lung cancers. All 54 cases showed at least a focal adenocarcinoma component, and 3 and 2 cases had additional squamous and sarcomatoid differentiation, respectively. Solid or acinar growth pattern, cribriform structure, presence of mucous cells (signet-ring cells or goblet cells), abundant extracellular mucus, lack of lepidic growth, and lack of significant nuclear pleomorphism were more common in ALK-positive cancers. Two recognizable constellations of findings, a solid signet-ring cell pattern and a mucinous cribriform pattern, were present at least focally in the majority (78%) of ALK-positive tumors, but were rare (1%) in ALK-negative tumors. Multivariate analysis showed that a combination of these 2 patterns was the most powerful histologic indicator of ALK rearrangement. Characteristic histologies were present both in primary sites and in metastases. Thus, histologic findings may help to identify cases for ALK testing. However, none of the histologic parameters were completely sensitive or specific to ALK rearrangement, and histomorphology should not replace confirmatory molecular or immunohistochemical studies. ALK-positive cancers commonly showed coexpression of thyroid transcription factor-1 and p63, and its significance is currently unclear. PMID:21753699

  7. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Signaling in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Shirai, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangement in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene was identified as an oncogenic driver in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in 2007. A multi-targeted ALK/ROS1/MET inhibitor, crizotinib, targeting this activated tyrosine kinase has led to significant clinical benefit including tumor shrinkage and prolonged survival without disease progression and has been approved by US FDA since 2011 for the treatment of advanced ALK-rearranged NSCLC (Ou et al. Oncologist 17:1351-1375, 2012). Knowledge gained from treating ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients including the presenting clinicopathologic characteristics, methods of detecting ALK-rearranged NSCLC, pattern of relapse and acquired resistance mechanisms while on crizotinib, and the clinical activities of more potent ALK inhibitors has led us to a detailed and ever expanding knowledge of the ALK signaling pathway in lung cancer but also raising many more questions that remained to be answered in the future. This book chapter will provide a concise summary of the importance of ALK signaling pathway in lung cancer. Understanding the ALK signaling pathway in lung cancer will likely provide the roadmap to the management of major epithelial malignancies driven by receptor tyrosine kinase rearrangement. PMID:26667344

  8. Transformation to SCLC after Treatment with the ALK Inhibitor Alectinib.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Shiro; Masago, Katsuhiro; Katakami, Nobuyuki; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2016-06-01

    We report an anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase gene (ALK)-positive patient who showed a paradoxical response to the ALK inhibitor alectinib; the primary lesion increased in size, whereas other metastatic lesions decreased markedly. A biopsy of the primary lesion confirmed an ALK rearrangement; however, the tumor had transformed histologically into small cell lung cancer. The lack of reports of small cell lung cancer transformation in ALK-positive patients implies that this outcome was unusual; this patient was treated with alectinib, which is more selective and has a greater inhibitory effect than crizotinib. This case may reveal resistance mechanisms that differ according to the agent used for treatment. PMID:26751586

  9. Expression Pattern of Id Proteins in Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Andrew D.; Dulin-Smith, Ashley N.; Houston, Ronald H.; Durban, Ashley N.; Brisbin, Bethany J.; Oostra, Tyler D.; Marshall, Jordan T.; Kahwash, Basil M.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding or inhibitor of differentiation (Id) proteins are up regulated in a variety of neoplasms, particularly in association with high-grade, poorly differentiated tumors, while differentiated tissues show little or no Id expression. The four Id genes are members of the helix-loop-helix (HLH) family of transcription factors and act as negative regulators of transcription by binding to and sequestering HLH complexes. We tested the hypothesis that Id proteins are overexpressed in medulloblastoma by performing immunohistochemistry using a medulloblastoma tissue microarray with 45 unique medulloblastoma and 11 normal control cerebella, and antibodies specific for Id1, Id2, Id3, and Id4. A semi-quantitative staining score that took staining intensity and the proportion of immunoreactive cells into account was used. Id1 was not detected in normal cerebella or in medulloblastoma cells, but 78 % of tumors showed strong Id1 expression in endothelial nuclei of tumor vessels. Id2 expression was scant in normal cerebella and increased in medulloblastoma (median staining score: 4). Id3 expression was noted in some neurons of the developing cerebellar cortex, but it was markedly up regulated in medulloblastoma (median staining score: 12) and in tumor endothelial cells. Id4 was not expressed in normal cerebella or in tumor cells. Id2 or Id3 overexpression drove proliferation in medulloblastoma cell lines by altering the expression of critical cell cycle regulatory proteins in favor of cell proliferation. This study shows that Id1 expression in endothelial cells may contribute to angiogenic processes and that increased expression of Id2 and Id3 in medulloblastoma is potentially involved in tumor cell proliferation and survival. PMID:23397264

  10. A novel acquired ALK F1245C mutation confers resistance to crizotinib in ALK-positive NSCLC but is sensitive to ceritinib.

    PubMed

    Kodityal, Sandeep; Elvin, Julia A; Squillace, Rachel; Agarwal, Nikita; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M; Klempner, Samuel J; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2016-02-01

    The emergence of acquired anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) resistant mutations is a common molecular mechanism underpinning disease progression during crizotinib treatment of ALK-positive (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Identifying acquired resistance mutations in ALK is paramount for tailoring future therapy with second generation ALK inhibitors and beyond. Comprehensive genomic profiling using hybrid-capture next generation sequencing has been successful in identifying acquired ALK resistance mutations. Here we described the emergence of an ALK F1245C mutation in an advanced ALK+ NSCLC patient (EML4-ALK variant 3a/b) who developed slow disease progression after a durable response to crizotinib. The patient was eventually switched to ceritinib with on-going clinical response. This is the first patient report that ALK F1245C is an acquired resistance mutation to crizotinib that can be overcome by ceritinib. PMID:26775591

  11. ALK F1174V mutation confers sensitivity while ALK I1171 mutation confers resistance to alectinib. The importance of serial biopsy post progression.

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong; Milliken, Jeffrey C; Azada, Michele C; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M; Klempner, Samuel J

    2016-01-01

    Many acquired resistant mutations to the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene have been identified during treatment of ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with crizotinib, ceritinib, and alectinib. These various acquired resistant ALK mutations confer differential sensitivities to various ALK inhibitors and may provide guidance on how to sequence the use of many of the second generation ALK inhibitors. We described a patient who developed an acquired ALK F1174V resistant mutation on progression from crizotinib that responded to alectinib for 18 months but then developed an acquired ALK I1171S mutation to alectinib. Both tumor samples had essentially the same genomic profile by comprehensive genomic profiling otherwise. This is the first patient report that demonstrates ALK F1174V mutation is sensitive to alectinib and further confirms missense acquired ALK I1171 mutation is resistant to alectinib. Sequential tumor re-biopsy for comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) is important to appreciate the selective pressure during treatment with various ALK inhibitors underpinning the evolution of the disease course of ALK+NSCLC patients while on treatment with the various ALK inhibitors. This approach will likely help inform the optimal sequencing strategy as more ALK inhibitors become available. This case report also validates the importance of developing structurally distinct ALK inhibitors for clinical use to overcome non-cross resistant ALK mutations. PMID:26464158

  12. Alk1 and Alk5 inhibition by Nrp1 controls vascular sprouting downstream of Notch

    PubMed Central

    Aspalter, Irene Maria; Gordon, Emma; Dubrac, Alexandre; Ragab, Anan; Narloch, Jarek; Vizán, Pedro; Geudens, Ilse; Collins, Russell Thomas; Franco, Claudio Areias; Abrahams, Cristina Luna; Thurston, Gavin; Fruttiger, Marcus; Rosewell, Ian; Eichmann, Anne; Gerhardt, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Sprouting angiogenesis drives blood vessel growth in healthy and diseased tissues. Vegf and Dll4/Notch signalling cooperate in a negative feedback loop that specifies endothelial tip and stalk cells to ensure adequate vessel branching and function. Current concepts posit that endothelial cells default to the tip-cell phenotype when Notch is inactive. Here we identify instead that the stalk-cell phenotype needs to be actively repressed to allow tip-cell formation. We show this is a key endothelial function of neuropilin-1 (Nrp1), which suppresses the stalk-cell phenotype by limiting Smad2/3 activation through Alk1 and Alk5. Notch downregulates Nrp1, thus relieving the inhibition of Alk1 and Alk5, thereby driving stalk-cell behaviour. Conceptually, our work shows that the heterogeneity between neighbouring endothelial cells established by the lateral feedback loop of Dll4/Notch utilizes Nrp1 levels as the pivot, which in turn establishes differential responsiveness to TGF-β/BMP signalling. PMID:26081042

  13. Insertion element analysis and mapping of the Pseudomonas plasmid alk regulon.

    PubMed Central

    Fennewald, M; Benson, S; Oppici, M; Shapiro, J

    1979-01-01

    We characterized and mapped new mutations of the alk (alkane utilization) genes found on Pseudomonas plasmids of the Inc P-2 group. These mutations were isolated after (i) nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis, (ii) transposition of the Tn7 trimethoprim and streptomycin resistance determinant, and (iii) reversion of polarity effects of alk::Tn7 insertion mutations. Our results indicate the existence of two alk loci not previously described--alkD, whose product is required for synthesis of membrane alkane-oxidizing activities, and alkE, whose product is required for synthesis of inducible membrane alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Polarity of alk::Tn7 insertion mutations indicates the existence of an alkBAE operon. Mapping of alk loci by transduction in P. aeruginosa shows that there are at least three alk clusters in the CAM-OCT plasmid--alkRD, containing regulatory genes; alkBAE, containing genes for specific biochemical activities; and alkC, containing one or more genes needed for normal synthesis of membrane alcohol dehydrogenase. The alkRD and alkBAE clusters are linked but separated by about 42 kilobases. The alkC cluster is not linked to either of the other two alk regions. Altogether, these results indicate a complex genetic control of the alkane utilization phenotype in P. putida and P. aeruginosa involving at least six separate genes. Images PMID:479111

  14. Microgravity alters the expression of salivary proteins.

    PubMed

    Mednieks, Maija; Khatri, Aditi; Rubenstein, Renee; Burleson, Joseph A; Hand, Arthur R

    2014-06-01

    Spaceflight provides a unique opportunity to study how physiologic responses are influenced by the external environment. Microgravity has been shown to alter the function of a number of tissues and organ systems. Very little, however, is known about how microgravity affects the oral cavity. The rodent model is useful for study in that their salivary gland morphology and physiology is similar to that of humans. Useful also is the fact that saliva, a product of the salivary glands with a major role in maintaining oral health, can be easily collected in humans whereas the glands can be studied in experimental animals. Our working hypothesis is that expression of secretory proteins in saliva will respond to microgravity and will be indicative of the nature of physiologic reactions to travel in space. This study was designed to determine which components of the salivary proteome are altered in mice flown on the US space shuttle missions and to determine if a subset with predictive value can be identified using microscopy and biochemistry methods. The results showed that the expression of secretory proteins associated with beta-adrenergic hormone regulated responses and mediated via the cyclic AMP pathway was significantly altered, whereas that of a number of unrelated proteins was not. The findings are potentially applicable to designing a biochemical test system whereby specific salivary proteins can be biomarkers for stress associated with travel in space and eventually for monitoring responses to conditions on earth. PMID:24984624

  15. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation. PMID:26734569

  16. Endocytic deficiency induced by ITSN-1s knockdown alters the Smad2/3-Erk1/2 signaling balance downstream of Alk5

    PubMed Central

    Bardita, Cristina; Predescu, Dan N.; Sha, Fei; Patel, Monal; Balaji, Ganesh; Predescu, Sanda A.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated in cultured endothelial cells and in vivo that deficiency of an isoform of intersectin-1, ITSN-1s, impairs caveolae and clathrin-mediated endocytosis and functionally upregulates compensatory pathways and their morphological carriers (i.e. enlarged endocytic structures, membranous rings or tubules) that are normally underrepresented. We now show that these endocytic structures internalize the broadly expressed transforming growth factor β receptor I (TGFβ-RI or TGFBR1), also known as Alk5, leading to its ubiquitylation and degradation. Moreover, the apoptotic or activated vascular cells of the ITSN-1s-knockdown mice release Alk5-bearing microparticles to the systemic circulation. These interact with and transfer Alk5 to endocytosis-deficient endothelial cells, resulting in lung endothelial cell survival and phenotypic alteration towards proliferation through activation of Erk1 and Erk2 (also known as MAPK3 and MAPK1, respectively). We also show that non-productive assembly of the Alk5–Smad–SARA (Smad anchor for receptor activation, also known as ZFYVE9) signaling complex and preferential formation of the Alk5–mSos–Grb2 complex account for Erk1/2 activation downstream of Alk5 and proliferation of pulmonary endothelial cells. Taken together, our studies demonstrate a functional relationship between the intercellular transfer of Alk5 by microparticles and endothelial cell survival and proliferation, and define a novel molecular mechanism for TGFβ and Alk5-dependent Erk1/2MAPK signaling that is significant for proliferative signaling and abnormal growth. PMID:25720380

  17. Endocytic deficiency induced by ITSN-1s knockdown alters the Smad2/3-Erk1/2 signaling balance downstream of Alk5.

    PubMed

    Bardita, Cristina; Predescu, Dan N; Sha, Fei; Patel, Monal; Balaji, Ganesh; Predescu, Sanda A

    2015-04-15

    Recently, we demonstrated in cultured endothelial cells and in vivo that deficiency of an isoform of intersectin-1, ITSN-1s, impairs caveolae and clathrin-mediated endocytosis and functionally upregulates compensatory pathways and their morphological carriers (i.e. enlarged endocytic structures, membranous rings or tubules) that are normally underrepresented. We now show that these endocytic structures internalize the broadly expressed transforming growth factor β receptor I (TGFβ-RI or TGFBR1), also known as Alk5, leading to its ubiquitylation and degradation. Moreover, the apoptotic or activated vascular cells of the ITSN-1s-knockdown mice release Alk5-bearing microparticles to the systemic circulation. These interact with and transfer Alk5 to endocytosis-deficient endothelial cells, resulting in lung endothelial cell survival and phenotypic alteration towards proliferation through activation of Erk1 and Erk2 (also known as MAPK3 and MAPK1, respectively). We also show that non-productive assembly of the Alk5-Smad-SARA (Smad anchor for receptor activation, also known as ZFYVE9) signaling complex and preferential formation of the Alk5-mSos-Grb2 complex account for Erk1/2 activation downstream of Alk5 and proliferation of pulmonary endothelial cells. Taken together, our studies demonstrate a functional relationship between the intercellular transfer of Alk5 by microparticles and endothelial cell survival and proliferation, and define a novel molecular mechanism for TGFβ and Alk5-dependent Erk1/2(MAPK) signaling that is significant for proliferative signaling and abnormal growth. PMID:25720380

  18. Structure of Escherichia coli AlkA in Complex with Undamaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Brian R.; Lee, Seongmin; Wang, Shuyu; Verdine, Gregory L

    2010-11-22

    Because DNA damage is so rare, DNA glycosylases interact for the most part with undamaged DNA. Whereas the structural basis for recognition of DNA lesions by glycosylases has been studied extensively, less is known about the nature of the interaction between these proteins and undamaged DNA. Here we report the crystal structures of the DNA glycosylase AlkA in complex with undamaged DNA. The structures revealed a recognition mode in which the DNA is nearly straight, with no amino acid side chains inserted into the duplex, and the target base pair is fully intrahelical. A comparison of the present structures with that of AlkA recognizing an extrahelical lesion revealed conformational changes in both the DNA and protein as the glycosylase transitions from the interrogation of undamaged DNA to catalysis of nucleobase excision. Modeling studies with the cytotoxic lesion 3-methyladenine and accompanying biochemical experiments suggested that AlkA actively interrogates the minor groove of the DNA while probing for the presence of lesions.

  19. A novel molecular variant of the chimeric NPM-ALK transcript in Ki-1 positive large cell lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ladanyi, M.

    1994-09-01

    The breakpoints of the t(2;5)(p23;q35), reported to be present in 30-40% of Ki-1 positive large cell lymphoma (Ki-1 LCL), have recently been cloned. They involve a novel tyrosine kinase gene, ALK, at 2p23 and the nucleophosmin gene, NPM, at 5q35. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using NPM and ALK primers detects a consistent fusion product in Ki-1 cases with the translocation. We performed NPM-ALK RT-PCR on 16 cases of Ki-1 LCL, of which 13 had informative cytogenetics. Amplifiable template was confirmed in all samples by RT-PCR using {beta}-actin primers. Ten cases showed the expected 177 base pair (bp) RT-PCR product indicative of the translocation, including all 6 cases with cytogenetic evidence of the t(2;5) and 3 cases without 5q35 abnormalities. One additional case, which had uninformative cytogenetics, showed only a novel 144 bp RT-PCR product. Sequencing of this PCR product showed an in-frame junction of NPM to ALK, 20 bp distal to the usual NPM junction site and 53 bp distal to usual ALK junction site. The predicted chimeric protein is thus shorter by 11 amino acids, but the putative ALK catalytic domain remains intact. This case was a histologically typical anaplastic Ki-1 LCL which showed a clonal rearrangement of the T-cell receptor {beta} gene. The functional significance of this molecular variant and its relation to the exon structure of both genes require further study. The overall incidence of the translocation in this series, about 70%, is higher than suspected from cytogenetic analysis alone.

  20. Expression of Contractile Protein Isoforms in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Page A. W.

    1996-01-01

    The general objective of this experiment is to determine the effect of space flight parameters, including microgravity, on ontogenesis and embryogenesis of Japanese quail. Nine U.S. and two Russian investigators are cooperating in this study. Specific objectives of the participating scientists include assessing the gross and microscopic morphological and histological development of the embryo, as well as the temporal and spacial development of specific cells, tissues, and organs. Temporally regulated production of specific proteins is also being investigated. Our objective is to determine the effects of microgravity on developmentally programmed expression of Troponin T and I isoforms known to regulate cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction.

  1. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant AlkB enzyme

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-11-13

    AlkB from Pseudomonas putida was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small chain alkanes. Mutant AlkB-BMO1 hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. Mutant AlkB-BMO2 similarly hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. These biocatalysts are highly active for small chain alkane substrates and their regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  2. The ALK/ROS1 inhibitor PF-06463922 overcomes primary resistance to crizotinib in ALK-driven neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Infarinato, Nicole R.; Park, Jin H.; Krytska, Kateryna; Ryles, Hannah T.; Sano, Renata; Szigety, Katherine M.; Li, Yimei; Zou, Helen Y.; Lee, Nathan V.; Smeal, Tod; Lemmon, Mark A.; Mossé, Yael P.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastomas (NBs) harboring activating point mutations in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) are differentially sensitive to the ALK inhibitor crizotinib, with certain mutations conferring intrinsic crizotinib resistance. To overcome this clinical obstacle, our goal was to identify inhibitors with improved potency that can target intractable ALK variants such as F1174L. We find that PF-06463922 has high potency across ALK variants, and inhibits ALK more effectively than crizotinib in vitro. Most importantly, PF-06463922 induces complete tumor regression in both crizotinib-resistant and sensitive xenograft mouse models of NB, as well as in PDXs harboring the crizotinib-resistant F1174L or F1245C mutations. These studies demonstrate that PF-06463922 has the potential to overcome crizotinib resistance, and exerts unprecedented activity as a single targeted agent against F1174L and F1245C ALK-mutated xenograft tumors, while also inducing responses in a R1275Q xenograft model. Taken together, these results provide the rationale to move PF-06463922 into clinical trials for treatment of patients with ALK-mutated NB. PMID:26554404

  3. Arabidopsis thaliana SEPALLATA3 protein prokaryotic expression and purification.

    PubMed

    He, Q; Fu, A Y; Zhang, G C; Li, T J; Zhang, J H

    2015-01-01

    SEPALLATA3 (SEP3) can be attributed to E class gene of the ABCE model of floral organ development. In order to reveal how SEP3 proteins form polymers, and the relationship between the polymers and their biological functions, the experiments of Arabidopsis thaliana AtSEP3 protein soluble expression in vitro were performed to construct a vector of prokaryotic expression, and investigate induced expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli cells. The protein soluble expression was analyzed through the aspects of different protein domains, induction time, induction temperature, etc. Different structural domains and expression conditions were screened, and 0.1% IPTG inducing at 22 oC for 15 h was estimated as an optimal expression strategy. The nickel chelating resin was used to purify the protein in size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and the results indicated that AtSEP3 protein was present in the form of tetramer. PMID:26025404

  4. Alk1 controls arterial endothelial cell migration in lumenized vessels.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Elizabeth R; Menon, Prahlad G; Roman, Beth L

    2016-07-15

    Heterozygous loss of the arterial-specific TGFβ type I receptor, activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1; ACVRL1), causes hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). HHT is characterized by development of fragile, direct connections between arteries and veins, or arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). However, how decreased ALK1 signaling leads to AVMs is unknown. To understand the cellular mis-steps that cause AVMs, we assessed endothelial cell behavior in alk1-deficient zebrafish embryos, which develop cranial AVMs. Our data demonstrate that alk1 loss has no effect on arterial endothelial cell proliferation but alters arterial endothelial cell migration within lumenized vessels. In wild-type embryos, alk1-positive cranial arterial endothelial cells generally migrate towards the heart, against the direction of blood flow, with some cells incorporating into endocardium. In alk1-deficient embryos, migration against flow is dampened and migration in the direction of flow is enhanced. Altered migration results in decreased endothelial cell number in arterial segments proximal to the heart and increased endothelial cell number in arterial segments distal to the heart. We speculate that the consequent increase in distal arterial caliber and hemodynamic load precipitates the flow-dependent development of downstream AVMs. PMID:27287800

  5. Over-expression of secreted proteins from mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Annamarie C; Barton, William A

    2014-01-01

    Secreted mammalian proteins require the development of robust protein over-expression systems for crystallographic and biophysical studies of protein function. Due to complex disulfide bonds and distinct glycosylation patterns preventing folding and expression in prokaryotic expression hosts, many secreted proteins necessitate production in more complex eukaryotic expression systems. Here, we elaborate on the methods used to obtain high yields of purified secreted proteins from transiently or stably transfected mammalian cell lines. Among the issues discussed are the selection of appropriate expression vectors, choice of signal sequences for protein secretion, availability of fusion tags for enhancing protein stability and purification, choice of cell line, and the large-scale growth of cells in a variety of formats. PMID:24510886

  6. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in chlamydomonas chloroplast

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2010-03-16

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery or proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  7. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in Chlamydomonas chloroplast

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-01-13

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery of proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  8. Functional Characterization of the Kinase Activation Loop in Nucleophosmin (NPM)-Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Using Tandem Affinity Purification and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Wu, Fang; Ma, Yupo; Li, Liang; Lai, Raymond; Young, Leah C.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the kinase activation loop (KAL) of the oncogenic fusion protein NPM-ALK regulates its overall tyrosine phosphorylation status and tumorigenicity. Using tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, we assessed how the KAL of NPM-ALK regulates the phosphorylation status of its individual tyrosines. Using the lysates of GP293 cells transfected with NPM-ALK, our highly reproducible results showed evidence of phosphorylation in all 3 tyrosines in KAL and 8 tyrosines outside KAL. We created 7 KAL mutants, each of which carried a Tyr-to-Phe mutation of ≥1 of the 3 tyrosines in KAL. A complete loss of the 8 phosphotyrosines outside KAL was found in 3 KAL mutants, and their oncogenicity (assessed by cell viability, colony formation, and the ability to phosphorylate effector proteins) was abrogated. A partial loss of the 8 phosphotyrosines was found in 4 KAL mutants, but their oncogenicity did not show simple correlation with the number of residual phosphotyrosines. Tyr-to-Phe mutations of each of the 8 phosphotyrosines outside KAL did not result in a significant decrease in the oncogenicity. In conclusion, we have provided details of how the KAL in NPM-ALK regulates its tyrosine phosphorylation pattern. Our results challenge some of the current concepts regarding the relationship between the tyrosine phosphorylation and oncogenicity of NPM-ALK. PMID:19887368

  9. Purify First: rapid expression and purification of proteins from XMRV.

    PubMed

    Gillette, William K; Esposito, Dominic; Taylor, Troy E; Hopkins, Ralph F; Bagni, Rachel K; Hartley, James L

    2011-04-01

    Purifying proteins from recombinant sources is often difficult, time-consuming, and costly. We have recently instituted a series of improvements in our protein purification pipeline that allows much more accurate choice of expression host and conditions and purification protocols. The key elements are parallel cloning, small scale parallel expression and lysate preparation, and small scale parallel protein purification. Compared to analyzing expression data only, results from multiple small scale protein purifications predict success at scale-up with greatly improved reliability. Using these new procedures we purified eight of nine proteins from xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) on the first attempt at large scale. PMID:21146612

  10. Calreticulin: Roles in Cell-Surface Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yue; Dey, Sandeepa; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    In order to perform their designated functions, proteins require precise subcellular localizations. For cell-surface proteins, such as receptors and channels, they are able to transduce signals only when properly targeted to the cell membrane. Calreticulin is a multi-functional chaperone protein involved in protein folding, maturation, and trafficking. However, evidence has been accumulating that calreticulin can also negatively regulate the surface expression of certain receptors and channels. In these instances, depletion of calreticulin enhances cell-surface expression and function. In this review, we discuss the role of calreticulin with a focus on its negative effects on the expression of cell-surface proteins. PMID:25230046

  11. The ALK inhibitor ASP3026 eradicates NPM-ALK+ T-cell anaplastic large-cell lymphoma in vitro and in a systemic xenograft lymphoma model

    PubMed Central

    Manshouri, Roxsan; Shi, Ping; Amin, Hesham M.

    2014-01-01

    NPM-ALK+ T-cell anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is an aggressive type of cancer. Standard treatment of NPM-ALK+ ALCL is CHOP polychemotherapy. Although patients initially respond favorably to CHOP, resistance, relapse, and death frequently occur. Recently, selective targeting of ALK has emerged as an alternative therapeutic strategy. ASP3026 is a second-generation ALK inhibitor that can overcome crizotinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer, and is currently being evaluated in clinical trials of patients with ALK+ solid tumors. However, NPM-ALK+ ALCL patients are not included in these trials. We studied the effects of ASP3026 on NPM-ALK+ ALCL cell lines in vitro and on systemic lymphoma growth in vivo. ASP3026 decreased the viability, proliferation, and colony formation, as well as induced apoptotic cell death of NPM-ALK+ ALCL cells. In addition, ASP3026 significantly reduced the proliferation of 293T cells transfected with NPM-ALK mutants that are resistant to crizotinib and downregulated tyrosine phosphorylation of these mutants. Moreover, ASP3026 abrogated systemic NPM-ALK+ ALCL growth in mice. Importantly, the survival of ASP3026-treated mice was superior to that of control and CHOP-treated mice. Our data suggest that ASP3026 is an effective treatment for NPM-ALK+ ALCL, and support the enrollment of patients with this lymphoma in the ongoing clinical trials. PMID:25026277

  12. Proteomics beyond large-scale protein expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Boersema, Paul J; Kahraman, Abdullah; Picotti, Paola

    2015-08-01

    Proteomics is commonly referred to as the application of high-throughput approaches to protein expression analysis. Typical results of proteomics studies are inventories of the protein content of a sample or lists of differentially expressed proteins across multiple conditions. Recently, however, an explosion of novel proteomics workflows has significantly expanded proteomics beyond the analysis of protein expression. Targeted proteomics methods, for example, enable the analysis of the fine dynamics of protein systems, such as a specific pathway or a network of interacting proteins, and the determination of protein complex stoichiometries. Structural proteomics tools allow extraction of restraints for structural modeling and identification of structurally altered proteins on a proteome-wide scale. Other variations of the proteomic workflow can be applied to the large-scale analysis of protein activity, location, degradation and turnover. These exciting developments provide new tools for multi-level 'omics' analysis and for the modeling of biological networks in the context of systems biology studies. PMID:25636126

  13. PF-06463922, an ALK/ROS1 inhibitor, overcomes resistance to 1st and 2nd generation ALK inhibitors in pre-clinical models

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Helen Y.; Friboulet, Luc; Kodack, David P.; Engstrom, Lars D.; Li, Qiuhua; West, Melissa; Tang, Ruth W.; Wang, Hui; Tsaparikos, Konstantinos; Wang, Jinwei; Timofeevski, Sergei; Katayama, Ryohei; Dinh, Dac M.; Lam, Hieu; Lam, Justine L.; Yamazaki, Shinji; Hu, Wenyue; Patel, Bhushankumar; Bezwada, Divya; Frias, Rosa L.; Lifshits, Eugene; Mahmood, Sidra; Gainor, Justin F.; Affolter, Timothy; Lappin, Patrick B.; Gukasyan, Hovhannes; Lee, Nathan; Deng, Shibing; Jain, Rakesh K; Johnson, Ted W.; Shaw, Alice T.; Fantin, Valeria R.; Smeal, Tod

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY We report the preclinical evaluation of PF-06463922, a potent and brain penetrant ALK/ROS1 inhibitor. Compared to other clinically available ALK inhibitors, PF-06463922 displayed superior potency against all known clinically acquired ALK mutations, including the highly resistant G1202R mutant. Furthermore, PF-06463922 treatment led to regression of EML4-ALK driven brain metastases, leading to prolonged mouse survival, in a superior manner. Finally, PF-06463922 demonstrated high selectivity and safety margins in a variety of preclinical studies. These results suggest that PF-06463922 will be highly effective for the treatment of patients with ALK-driven lung cancers, including those who relapsed on clinically available ALK inhibitors due to secondary ALK kinase domain mutations and/or due to the failed control of brain metastases. PMID:26144315

  14. HeLa Based Cell Free Expression Systems for Expression of Plasmodium Rhoptry Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yadavalli, Raghavendra; Sam-Yellowe, Tobili

    2015-01-01

    Malaria causes significant global morbidity and mortality. No routine vaccine is currently available. One of the major reasons for lack of a vaccine is the challenge of identifying suitable vaccine candidates. Malarial proteins expressed using prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell based expression systems are poorly glycosylated, generally insoluble and undergo improper folding leading to reduced immunogenicity. The wheat germ, rabbit reticulocyte lysate and Escherichia coli lysate cell free expression systems are currently used for expression of malarial proteins. However, the length of expression time and improper glycosylation of proteins still remains a challenge. We demonstrate expression of Plasmodium proteins in vitro using HeLa based cell free expression systems, termed "in vitro human cell free expression systems". The 2 HeLa based cell free expression systems transcribe mRNA in 75 min and 3 µl of transcribed mRNA is sufficient to translate proteins in 90 min. The 1-step expression system is a transcription and translation coupled expression system; the transcription and co-translation occurs in 3 hr. The process can also be extended for 6 hr by providing additional energy. In the 2-step expression system, mRNA is first transcribed and then added to the translation mix for protein expression. We describe how to express malaria proteins; a hydrophobic PF3D7_0114100 Maurer's Cleft - 2 transmembrane (PfMC-2TM) protein, a hydrophilic PF3D7_0925900 protein and an armadillo repeats containing protein PF3D7_1361800, using the HeLa based cell free expression system. The proteins are expressed in micro volumes employing 2-step and 1-step expression strategies. An affinity purification method to purify 25 µl of proteins expressed using the in vitro human cell free expression system is also described. Protein yield is determined by Bradford's assay and the expressed and purified proteins can be confirmed by western blotting analysis. Expressed recombinant proteins can be

  15. Identification of ALK as the Major Familial Neuroblastoma Predisposition Gene

    PubMed Central

    Mossë, Yalë P; Laudenslager, Marci; Longo, Luca; Cole, Kristina A; Wood, Andrew; Attiyeh, Edward F; Laquaglia, Michael J; Sennett, Rachel; Lynch, Jill E; Perri, Patrizia; Laureys, Geneviève; Speleman, Frank; Hakonarson, Hakon; Torkamani, Ali; Schork, Nicholas J; Brodeur, Garrett M; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Rappaport, Eric; Devoto, Marcella; Maris, John M

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Survival rates for the childhood cancer neuroblastoma have not substantively improved despite dramatic escalation in chemotherapy intensity. Like most human cancers, this embryonal malignancy can be inherited, but the genetic etiology of familial and sporadically occurring neuroblastoma was largely unknown. Here we show that germline mutations in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene (ALK) explain the majority of hereditary neuroblastomas, and that activating mutations can also be somatically acquired. We first identified a significant linkage signal at the short arm of chromosome 2 (maximum nonparametric LOD=4.23 at rs1344063) using a whole-genome scan in neuroblastoma pedigrees. Resequencing of regional candidate genes identified three separate missense mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of ALK (G1128A, R1192P and R1275Q) that segregated with the disease in eight separate families. Examination of 491 sporadically occurring human neuroblastoma samples showed that the ALK locus was gained in 22.8%, and highly amplified in an additional 3.3%, and that these aberrations were highly associated with death from disease (P=0.0003). Resequencing of 194 high-risk neuroblastoma samples showed somatically acquired mutations within the tyrosine kinase domain in 12.4%. Nine of the ten mutations map to critical regions of the kinase domain and were predicted to be oncogenic drivers with high probability. Mutations resulted in constitutive phosphorylation consistent with activation, and targeted knockdown of ALK mRNA resulted in profound growth inhibition of 4 of 4 cell lines harboring mutant or amplified ALK, as well as 2 of 6 wild type for ALK. Our results demonstrate that heritable mutations of ALK are the major cause of familial neuroblastoma, and that germline or acquired activation of this cell surface kinase is a tractable therapeutic target for this lethal pediatric malignancy. PMID:18724359

  16. SUMO fusion technology for difficult-to-express proteins.

    PubMed

    Butt, Tauseef R; Edavettal, Suzanne C; Hall, John P; Mattern, Michael R

    2005-09-01

    The demands of structural and functional genomics for large quantities of soluble, properly folded proteins in heterologous hosts have been aided by advancements in the field of protein production and purification. Escherichia coli, the preferred host for recombinant protein expression, presents many challenges which must be surmounted in order to over-express heterologous proteins. These challenges include the proteolytic degradation of target proteins, protein misfolding, poor solubility, and the necessity for good purification methodologies. Gene fusion technologies have been able to improve heterologous expression by overcoming many of these challenges. The ability of gene fusions to improve expression, solubility, purification, and decrease proteolytic degradation will be discussed in this review. The main disadvantage, cleaving the protein fusion, will also be addressed. Focus will be given to the newly described SUMO fusion system and the improvements that this technology has advanced over traditional gene fusion systems. PMID:16084395

  17. Data presenting a modified bacterial expression vector for expressing and purifying Nus solubility-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nidhi; Wu, Heng; Terman, Jonathan R

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria are the predominant source for producing recombinant proteins but while many exogenous proteins are expressed, only a fraction of those are soluble. We have found that a new actin regulatory enzyme Mical is poorly soluble when expressed in bacteria but the use of a Nus fusion protein tag greatly increases its solubility. However, available vectors containing a Nus tag have been engineered in a way that hinders the separation of target proteins from the Nus tag during protein purification. We have now used recombinant DNA approaches to overcome these issues and reengineer a Nus solubility tag-containing bacterial expression vector. The data herein present a modified bacterial expression vector useful for expressing proteins fused to the Nus solubility tag and separating such target proteins from the Nus tag during protein purification. PMID:27547802

  18. Alk3 Mediated Bmp Signaling Controls the Contribution of Epicardially Derived Cells to the Tissues of the Atrioventricular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, Marie M.; Boukens, Bastiaan J. D.; Phelps, Aimee L.; Brown, Christina-Lin M.; Toomer, Katelynn A.; Burns, Tara A.; Mukherjee, Rupak D.; Norris, Russell A.; Trusk, Thomas C.; van den Hoff, Maurice J.B.; Wessels, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies using mouse models for cell fate tracing of epicardial derived cells (EPDCs) have demonstrated that at the atrioventricular (AV) junction EPDCs contribute to the mesenchyme of the AV sulcus, the annulus fibrosus, and the parietal leaflets of the AV valves. There is little insight, however, into the mechanisms that govern the contribution of EPDCs to these tissues. While it has been demonstrated that bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp) signaling is required for AV cushion formation, its role in regulating EPDC contribution to the AV junction remains unexplored. To determine the role of Bmp signaling in the contribution of EPDCs to the AV junction, the Bmp receptor activin-like kinase 3 (Alk3; or Bmpr1a) was conditionally deleted in the epicardium and EPDCs using the mWt1/IRES/GFP-Cre (Wt1Cre) mouse. Embryonic Wt1Cre;Alk3fl/fl specimens showed a significantly smaller AV sulcus and a severely underdeveloped annulus fibrosus. Electrophysiological analysis of adult Wt1Cre;Alk3fl/fl mice showed, unexpectedly, no ventricular pre-excitation. Cell fate tracing revealed a significant decrease in the number of EPDCs within the parietal leaflets of the AV valves. Postnatal Wt1Cre;Alk3fl/fl specimens showed myxomatous changes in the leaflets of the mitral valve. Together these observations indicate that Alk3 mediated Bmp signaling is important in the cascade of events that regulate the contribution of EPDCs to the AV sulcus, annulus fibrosus, and the parietal leaflets of the AV valves. Furthermore, this study shows that EPDCs do not only play a critical role in early developmental events at the AV junction, but that they also are important in the normal maturation of the AV valves. PMID:25300579

  19. New treatment options for ALK+ advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: critical appraisal of ceritinib

    PubMed Central

    Rothschild, Sacha I

    2016-01-01

    Rearrangements in ALK gene and EML4 gene were first described in 2007. This genomic aberration is found in about 2%–8% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Crizotinib was the first ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor licensed for the treatment of metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC based on a randomized Phase III trial. Despite the initial treatment response of crizotinib, disease progression inevitably develops after approximately 10 months of therapy. Different resistance mechanisms have recently been described. One relevant mechanism of resistance is the development of mutations in ALK. Novel ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been developed to overcome these mutations. Ceritinib is an oral second-generation ALK inhibitor showing clinical activity not only in crizotinib-resistant ALK-positive NSCLC but also in treatment-naïve ALK-positive disease. In this paper, preclinical and clinical data of ceritinib are reviewed, and its role in the clinical setting is put into perspective. PMID:27217763

  20. Aberrant expression of signaling proteins in essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Hui, Wuhan; Ye, Fei; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Congyan; Cui, Miao; Li, Wei; Xu, Juan; Zhang, David Y

    2013-09-01

    Dysregulated expression of signaling proteins may contribute to the pathophysiology of essential thrombocythemia (ET). This study aimed to characterize protein expression in ET and to correlate the dysregulated proteins with phenotypes and prognosis of ET patients. The expression of 128 proteins in peripheral blood neutrophils from 74 ET patients was assessed and compared with those from 29 healthy subjects and 35 polycythemia vera (PV) patients using protein pathway array. Fifteen proteins were differentially expressed between ET patients and normal controls. These dysregulated proteins were involved in the signaling pathways related with apoptosis and inflammation. Our results showed a significant overlap in protein expression between ET patients with JAK2V617F mutation and PV patients. In addition, nine proteins were associated with JAK2V617F mutation status in ET patients. Furthermore, estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) and Stat3 were independent risk factors for subsequent thrombosis during follow-up on multivariable analysis. Our study shows a broad dysregulation of signaling protein in ET patients, suggesting their roles in ET pathogenesis. The expression levels of ERβ and Stat3 could be promising predictors of subsequent thrombosis in ET patients. PMID:23639951

  1. Cloning and expression of special F protein from human liver

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shu-Ye; Yu, Xin-Da; Song, Chun-Juan; Lu, Wei; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Shi, Xin-Rong; Duan, Ying; Zhang, Ju

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To clone human liver special F protein and to express it in a prokaryotic system. METHODS: Total RNA was isolated from human liver tissue and first-strand cDNA was reverse transcribed using the PCR reverse primer. Following this, cDNA of the F protein was ligated into the clone vector pUCm-T. The segment of F protein’s cDNA was subcloned into the expression vector pET-15b and transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) pLyss. Isopropy-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) was then used to induce expression of the target protein. RESULTS: The cDNA clone of human liver special F protein (1134bp) was successfully produced, with the cDNA sequence being published in Gene-bank: DQ188836. We confirmed the expression of F protein by Western blot with a molecular weight of 43 kDa. The expressed protein accounted for 40% of the total protein extracted. CONCLUSION: F protein expresses cDNA clone in a prokaryotic system, which offers a relatively simple way of producing sufficient quantities of F protein and contributes to understanding the principal biological functions of this protein. PMID:17465469

  2. Relating protein adduction to gene expression changes: a systems approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bing; Shi, Zhiao; Duncan, Dexter T; Prodduturi, Naresh; Marnett, Lawrence J; Liebler, Daniel C

    2013-01-01

    Modification of proteins by reactive electrophiles such as the 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) plays a critical role in oxidant-associated human diseases. However, little is known about protein adduction and the mechanism by which protein damage elicits adaptive effects and toxicity. We developed a systems approach for relating protein adduction to gene expression changes through the integration of protein adduction, gene expression, protein-DNA interaction, and protein-protein interaction data. Using a random walk strategy, we expanded a list of responsive transcription factors inferred from gene expression studies to upstream signaling networks, which in turn allowed overlaying protein adduction data on the network for the prediction of stress sensors and their associated regulatory mechanisms. We demonstrated the general applicability of transcription factor-based signaling network inference using 103 known pathways. Applying our workflow on gene expression and protein adduction data from HNE-treatment not only rediscovered known mechanisms of electrophile stress but also generated novel hypotheses regarding protein damage sensors. Although developed for analyzing protein adduction data, the framework can be easily adapted for phosphoproteomics and other types of protein modification data. PMID:21594272

  3. Pannexin 2 protein expression is not restricted to the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Le Vasseur, Maxence; Lelowski, Jonathan; Bechberger, John F.; Sin, Wun-Chey; Naus, Christian C.

    2014-01-01

    Pannexins (Panx) are proteins homologous to the invertebrate gap junction proteins called innexins (Inx) and are traditionally described as transmembrane channels connecting the intracellular and extracellular compartments. Three distinct Panx paralogs (Panx1, Panx2 and Panx3) have been identified in vertebrates but previous reports on Panx expression and functionality focused primarily on Panx1 and Panx3 proteins. Several gene expression studies reported that Panx2 transcript is largely restricted to the central nervous system (CNS) hence suggesting that Panx2 might serve an important role in the CNS. However, the lack of suitable antibodies prevented the creation of a comprehensive map of Panx2 protein expression and Panx2 protein localization profile is currently mostly inferred from the distribution of its transcript. In this study, we characterized novel commercial monoclonal antibodies and surveyed Panx2 expression and distribution at the mRNA and protein level by real-time qPCR, Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Panx2 protein levels were readily detected in every tissue examined, even when transcriptional analysis predicted very low Panx2 protein expression. Furthermore, our results indicate that Panx2 transcriptional activity is a poor predictor of Panx2 protein abundance and does not correlate with Panx2 protein levels. Despite showing disproportionately high transcript levels, the CNS expressed less Panx2 protein than any other tissues analyzed. Additionally, we showed that Panx2 protein does not localize at the plasma membrane like other gap junction proteins but remains confined within cytoplasmic compartments. Overall, our results demonstrate that the endogenous expression of Panx2 protein is not restricted to the CNS and is more ubiquitous than initially predicted. PMID:25505382

  4. A Rare Case of Pleomorphic Carcinoma of the Lung Harboring an Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Shiroyama, Takayuki; Tanaka, Ayako; Tamiya, Motohiro; Hamaguchi, Masanari; Osa, Akio; Takeoka, Sawa; Tani, Eriko; Azuma, Yuichiro; Morishita, Naoko; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Okamoto, Norio; Kimura, Kenji; Kadota, Yoshihisa; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Hirashima, Tomonori; Kawase, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Molecular testing for anomalies, such as epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement, is part of the current standard of care for non-small cell lung cancer, particularly adenocarcinoma. ALK rearrangement occurs most frequently in adenocarcinoma cells and rarely in non-adenocarcinoma cells. We herein report a rare case of pleomorphic lung carcinoma with ALK rearrangement in both its adenocarcinoma and spindle cell components. This case suggests the possibility of ALK rearrangement in pleomorphic carcinoma. PMID:26521903

  5. Expression strategies for structural studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Joseph A; Shahsavar, Azadeh; Paulsen, Peter Aasted; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul

    2016-06-01

    Integral membrane proteins in eukaryotes are central to various cellular processes and key targets in structural biology, biotechnology and drug development. However, the number of available structures for eukaryotic membrane protein belies their physiological importance. Recently, the number of available eukaryotic membrane protein structures has been steadily increasing due to the development of novel strategies in construct design, expression and structure determination. Here, we examine the major expression systems exploited for eukaryotic membrane proteins. Additionally we strive to tabulate and describe the recent expression strategies in eukaryotic membrane protein structural biology. We find that a majority of targets have been expressed in advanced host systems and modified from their wild-type form with distinct focus on conformation and thermostabilisation. However, strategies for native protein purification should also be considered where possible, particularly in light of the recent advances in single particle cryo electron microscopy. PMID:27362979

  6. Expression of S100 Protein in CD4-positive T-cell Lymphomas Is Often Associated With T-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Nidhi; Pongpruttipan, Tawatchai; Patel, Snehal; Bayerl, Michael G; Alkan, Serhan; Nathwani, Bharat; Surti, Urvashi; Kitahara, Sumire; Chinthammitr, Yingyong; Swerdlow, Steven H

    2015-12-01

    S100 T-cell lymphomas are infrequent, and except 1 all have been CD4 negative. On the basis of an index case of CD4 S100 T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL), we studied S100 protein expression in 19 additional T-PLLs and 56 other T-cell lymphomas that are usually CD4, including 15 angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas, 24 anaplastic large cell lymphomas (16 ALK and 8 ALK), 7 mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome, and 10 peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (PTCL, NOS). Two additional S100 CD4 PTCL, NOS cases were also reviewed. Thirty percent (6/20) of T-PLLs were S100 compared with 0/56 other T-cell lymphomas with previously unstudied S100 reactivity (40 CD4, 2 CD8, 11 CD4/CD8, 3 unknown) (P=0.0007). There were no significant differences between the S100 and S100 T-PLLs with regard to the male:female ratio (2:1 vs. 1:1), age (71.6±7.7 vs. 65.4±9.3), peripheral blood lymphocyte count (67.2±116.6 vs. 101.1±159.7×10/L), or median survival (463 vs. 578 d, where known). The 2 S100 PTCL, NOS cases occurred in a 7-year-old boy and a 45-year-old woman. Both had involvement of the bone marrow and peripheral blood but were morphologically unlike T-PLL and lacked TCL1 gene rearrangement. These results demonstrate that S100 T-cell lymphomas include a subset that are CD4 and most often, but not exclusively, are T-PLL. Although having diagnostic implications, there were no documented clinical differences between the S100 and S100 T-PLLs. PMID:26379148

  7. mir-29 regulates Mcl-1 protein expression and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mott, J L; Kobayashi, S; Bronk, S F; Gores, G J

    2007-09-13

    Cellular expression of Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member, is tightly regulated. Recently, Bcl-2 expression was shown to be regulated by microRNAs, small endogenous RNA molecules that regulate protein expression through sequence-specific interaction with messenger RNA. By analogy, we reasoned that Mcl-1 expression may also be regulated by microRNAs. We chose human immortalized, but non-malignant, H69 cholangiocyte and malignant KMCH cholangiocarcinoma cell lines for these studies, because Mcl-1 is dysregulated in cells with the malignant phenotype. By in silico analysis, we identified a putative target site in the Mcl-1 mRNA for the mir-29 family, and found that mir-29b was highly expressed in cholangiocytes. Interestingly, mir-29b was downregulated in malignant cells, consistent with Mcl-1 protein upregulation. Enforced mir-29b expression reduced Mcl-1 protein expression in KMCH cells. This effect was direct, as mir-29b negatively regulated the expression of an Mcl-1 3' untranslated region (UTR)-based reporter construct. Enforced mir-29b expression reduced Mcl-1 cellular protein levels and sensitized the cancer cells to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) cytotoxicity. Transfection of non-malignant cells (that express high levels of mir-29) with a locked-nucleic acid antagonist of mir-29b increased Mcl-1 levels and reduced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Thus mir-29 is an endogenous regulator of Mcl-1 protein expression, and thereby, apoptosis. PMID:17404574

  8. mir-29 Regulates Mcl-1 Protein Expression and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Justin L.; Kobayashi, Shogo; Bronk, Steven F.; Gores, Gregory J.

    2008-01-01

    Cellular expression of Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member, is tightly regulated. Recently, Bcl-2 expression was shown to be regulated by microRNAs, small endogenous RNA molecules that regulate protein expression through sequence-specific interaction with messenger RNA. By analogy, we reasoned that Mcl-1 expression may also be regulated by microRNAs. We chose human immortalized, but non-malignant, H69 cholangiocyte and malignant KMCH cholangiocarcinoma cell lines for these studies because Mcl-1 is dysregulated in cells with the malignant phenotype. In silico analysis identified a putative target site in the Mcl-1 mRNA for the mir-29 family, and we found that mir-29b was highly expressed in cholangiocytes. Interestingly, mir-29b was downregulated in malignant cells, consistent with Mcl-1 protein upregulation. Enforced mir-29b expression reduced Mcl-1 protein expression in KMCH cells. This effect was direct, as mir-29b negatively regulated expression of an Mcl-1 3’ untranslated region (UTR)-based reporter construct. Enforced mir-29b expression reduced Mcl-1 cellular protein levels and sensitized the cancer cells to TRAIL cytotoxicity. Transfection of non-malignant cells (that express high levels of mir-29) with a locked-nucleic acid antagonist of mir-29b increased Mcl-1 levels and reduced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Thus mir-29 is an endogenous regulator of Mcl-1 protein expression and, thereby, apoptosis. PMID:17404574

  9. Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP), a Secretion-Enhancing Tag for Mammalian Protein Expression Systems

    PubMed Central

    Reuten, Raphael; Nikodemus, Denise; Oliveira, Maria B.; Patel, Trushar R.; Brachvogel, Bent; Breloy, Isabelle; Stetefeld, Jörg; Koch, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are commonly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems to ensure the formation of disulfide bridges and proper glycosylation. Although many proteins can be expressed easily, some proteins, sub-domains, and mutant protein versions can cause problems. Here, we investigated expression levels of recombinant extracellular, intracellular as well as transmembrane proteins tethered to different polypeptides in mammalian cell lines. Strikingly, fusion of proteins to the prokaryotic maltose-binding protein (MBP) generally enhanced protein production. MBP fusion proteins consistently exhibited the most robust increase in protein production in comparison to commonly used tags, e.g., the Fc, Glutathione S-transferase (GST), SlyD, and serum albumin (ser alb) tag. Moreover, proteins tethered to MBP revealed reduced numbers of dying cells upon transient transfection. In contrast to the Fc tag, MBP is a stable monomer and does not promote protein aggregation. Therefore, the MBP tag does not induce artificial dimerization of tethered proteins and provides a beneficial fusion tag for binding as well as cell adhesion studies. Using MBP we were able to secret a disease causing laminin β2 mutant protein (congenital nephrotic syndrome), which is normally retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. In summary, this study establishes MBP as a versatile expression tag for protein production in eukaryotic expression systems. PMID:27029048

  10. Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP), a Secretion-Enhancing Tag for Mammalian Protein Expression Systems.

    PubMed

    Reuten, Raphael; Nikodemus, Denise; Oliveira, Maria B; Patel, Trushar R; Brachvogel, Bent; Breloy, Isabelle; Stetefeld, Jörg; Koch, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are commonly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems to ensure the formation of disulfide bridges and proper glycosylation. Although many proteins can be expressed easily, some proteins, sub-domains, and mutant protein versions can cause problems. Here, we investigated expression levels of recombinant extracellular, intracellular as well as transmembrane proteins tethered to different polypeptides in mammalian cell lines. Strikingly, fusion of proteins to the prokaryotic maltose-binding protein (MBP) generally enhanced protein production. MBP fusion proteins consistently exhibited the most robust increase in protein production in comparison to commonly used tags, e.g., the Fc, Glutathione S-transferase (GST), SlyD, and serum albumin (ser alb) tag. Moreover, proteins tethered to MBP revealed reduced numbers of dying cells upon transient transfection. In contrast to the Fc tag, MBP is a stable monomer and does not promote protein aggregation. Therefore, the MBP tag does not induce artificial dimerization of tethered proteins and provides a beneficial fusion tag for binding as well as cell adhesion studies. Using MBP we were able to secret a disease causing laminin β2 mutant protein (congenital nephrotic syndrome), which is normally retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. In summary, this study establishes MBP as a versatile expression tag for protein production in eukaryotic expression systems. PMID:27029048

  11. Protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after chronic clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piastuch, William C.; Brown, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    Soluble protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heynh.) leaf and stem tissue was examined after chronic clinorotation. Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated and plants grown to maturity on horizontal or vertical slow-rotating clinostats (1 rpm) or in stationary vertical control units. Total soluble proteins and in vivo-labeled soluble proteins isolated from these plants were analyzed by two-dimensional sodium doedocyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE) and subsequent fluorography. Visual and computer analysis of the resulting protein patterns showed no significant differences in either total protein expression or in active protein synthesis between horizontal clinorotation and vertical controls in the Arabidopsis leaf and stem tissue. These results show chronic clinorotation does not cause gross changes in protein expression in Arabidopsis.

  12. Protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after chronic clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piastuch, W. C.; Brown, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Soluble protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heynh.) leaf and stem tissue was examined after chronic clinorotation. Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated and plants grown to maturity on horizontal or vertical slow-rotating clinostats (1 rpm) or in stationary vertical control units. Total soluble proteins and in vivo-labeled soluble proteins isolated from these plants were analyzed by two-dimensional SDS PAGE and subsequent fluorography. Visual and computer analysis of the resulting protein patterns showed no significant differences in either total protein expression or in active protein synthesis between horizontal clinorotation and vertical controls in the Arabidopsis leaf and stem tissue. These results show chronic clinorotation does not cause gross changes in protein expression in Arabidopsis.

  13. Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Array: A Just-In-Time Multiplexed Protein Expression and Purification Platform

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Systematic study of proteins requires the availability of thousands of proteins in functional format. However, traditional recombinant protein expression and purification methods have many drawbacks for such study at the proteome level. We have developed an innovative in situ protein expression and capture system, namely NAPPA (nucleic acid programmable protein array), where C-terminal tagged proteins are expressed using an in vitro expression system and efficiently captured/purified by antitag antibodies coprinted at each spot. The NAPPA technology presented in this chapter enable researchers to produce and display fresh proteins just in time in a multiplexed high-throughput fashion and utilize them for various downstream biochemical researches of interest. This platform could revolutionize the field of functional proteomics with it ability to produce thousands of spatially separated proteins in high density with narrow dynamic rand of protein concentrations, reproducibly and functionally. PMID:21943897

  14. 40 CFR 721.435 - Alkylphenylpolyether-alk-a-nol-a-mines (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkylphenylpolyether-alk-a-nol-a-mines... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.435 Alkylphenylpolyether-alk-a-nol-a-mines (generic). (a) Chemical... as alkylphenylpolyether-alk-a-nol-a-mines (PMNs P-97-880/881/882) are subject to reporting under...

  15. 40 CFR 721.435 - Alkylphenylpolyether-alk-a-nol-a-mines (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkylphenylpolyether-alk-a-nol-a-mines... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.435 Alkylphenylpolyether-alk-a-nol-a-mines (generic). (a) Chemical... as alkylphenylpolyether-alk-a-nol-a-mines (PMNs P-97-880/881/882) are subject to reporting under...

  16. 40 CFR 721.435 - Alkylphenylpolyether-alk-a-nol-a-mines (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkylphenylpolyether-alk-a-nol-a-mines... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.435 Alkylphenylpolyether-alk-a-nol-a-mines (generic). (a) Chemical... as alkylphenylpolyether-alk-a-nol-a-mines (PMNs P-97-880/881/882) are subject to reporting under...

  17. 40 CFR 721.435 - Alkylphenylpolyether-alk-a-nol-a-mines (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkylphenylpolyether-alk-a-nol-a-mines... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.435 Alkylphenylpolyether-alk-a-nol-a-mines (generic). (a) Chemical... as alkylphenylpolyether-alk-a-nol-a-mines (PMNs P-97-880/881/882) are subject to reporting under...

  18. Expression of heat shock protein genes in insect stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The heat shock proteins (HSPs) that are abundantly expressed in insects are important modulators of insect survival. Expression of HSP genes in insects is not only developmentally regulated, but also induced by various stressors in order to confer protection against such stressors. The expression o...

  19. Activated ALK Collaborates with MYCN in Neuroblastoma Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shizhen; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Guo, Feng; Shin, Jimann; Perez-Atayde, Antonio R.; Kutok, Jeffery L.; Rodig, Scott J.; Neuberg, Donna S.; Helman, Daniel; Feng, Hui; Stewart, Rodney A.; Wang, Wenchao; George, Rani E.; Kanki, John P.; Look, A. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Amplification of the MYCN oncogene in childhood neuroblastoma is often accompanied by mutational activation of ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase), suggesting their pathogenic cooperation. We generated a transgenic zebrafish model of neuroblastoma in which MYCN-induced tumors arise from a subpopulation of neuroblasts that migrate into the adrenal medulla analogue following organogenesis. Coexpression of activated ALK with MYCN in this model triples the disease penetrance and markedly accelerates tumor onset. MYCN overexpression induces adrenal sympathetic neuroblast hyperplasia, blocks chromaffin cell differentiation, and ultimately triggers a developmentally-timed apoptotic response in the hyperplastic sympathoadrenal cells. Coexpression of activated ALK with MYCN provides prosurvival signals that block this apoptotic response and allow continued expansion and oncogenic transformation of hyperplastic neuroblasts, thus promoting progression to neuroblastoma. PMID:22439933

  20. Evolution, diversification, and expression of KNOX proteins in plants

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Yang, Xue; Zhao, Wei; Lang, Tiange; Samuelsson, Tore

    2015-01-01

    The KNOX (KNOTTED1-like homeobox) transcription factors play a pivotal role in leaf and meristem development. The majority of these proteins are characterized by the KNOX1, KNOX2, ELK, and homeobox domains whereas the proteins of the KNATM family contain only the KNOX domains. We carried out an extensive inventory of these proteins and here report on a total of 394 KNOX proteins from 48 species. The land plant proteins fall into two classes (I and II) as previously shown where the class I family seems to be most closely related to the green algae homologs. The KNATM proteins are restricted to Eudicots and some species have multiple paralogs of this protein. Certain plants are characterized by a significant increase in the number of KNOX paralogs; one example is Glycine max. Through the analysis of public gene expression data we show that the class II proteins of this plant have a relatively broad expression specificity as compared to class I proteins, consistent with previous studies of other plants. In G. max, class I protein are mainly distributed in axis tissues and KNATM paralogs are overall poorly expressed; highest expression is in the early plumular axis. Overall, analysis of gene expression in G. max demonstrates clearly that the expansion in gene number is associated with functional diversification. PMID:26557129

  1. Expression of Recombinant Proteins in the Methylotrophic Yeast Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Weidner, Maria; Taupp, Marcus; Hallam, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    Protein expression in the microbial eukaryotic host Pichia pastoris offers the possibility to generate high amounts of recombinant protein in a fast and easy to use expression system. As a single-celled microorganism P. pastoris is easy to manipulate and grows rapidly on inexpensive media at high cell densities. Being a eukaryote, P. pastoris is able to perform many of the post-translational modifications performed by higher eukaryotic cells and the obtained recombinant proteins undergo protein folding, proteolytic processing, disulfide bond formation and glycosylation [1]. As a methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris is capable of metabolizing methanol as its sole carbon source. The strong promoter for alcohol oxidase, AOX1, is tightly regulated and induced by methanol and it is used for the expression of the gene of interest. Accordingly, the expression of the foreign protein can be induced by adding methanol to the growth medium [2; 3]. Another important advantage is the secretion of the recombinant protein into the growth medium, using a signal sequence to target the foreign protein to the secretory pathway of P. pastoris. With only low levels of endogenous protein secreted to the media by the yeast itself and no added proteins to the media, a heterologous protein builds the majority of the total protein in the medium and facilitates following protein purification steps [3; 4]. The vector used here (pPICZαA) contains the AOX1 promoter for tightly regulated, methanol-induced expression of the gene of interest; the α-factor secretion signal for secretion of the recombinant protein, a Zeocin resistance gene for selection in both E. coli and Pichia and a C-terminal peptide containing the c-myc epitope and a polyhistidine (6xHis) tag for detection and purification of a recombinant protein. We also show western blot analysis of the recombinant protein using the specific Anti-myc-HRP antibody recognizing the c-myc epitope on the parent vector. PMID:20186119

  2. Engineering Cells to Improve Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Su; Shiloach, Joseph; Betenbaugh, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular engineering of bacteria, fungi, insect cells and mammalian cells is a promising methodology to improve recombinant protein production for structural, biochemical, and commercial applications. Increased understanding of the host organism biology has suggested engineering strategies targeting bottlenecks in transcription, translation, protein processing and secretory pathways, as well as cell growth and survival. A combination of metabolic engineering and synthetic biology has been used to improve the properties of cells for protein production, which has resulted in enhanced yields of multiple protein classes. PMID:24704806

  3. Measuring mass transfer processes of octane with the help of an alkSalkB::gfp-tagged Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, M C; Meier, C; Zehnder, A J; Harms, H; van der Meer, J R

    2001-08-01

    Diffusion of octane from oily droplets in different microscale settings was measured using Escherichia coli expressing the stable green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the alkB promoter of Pseudomonas oleovorans. GFP fluorescence intensities were determined quantitatively at the single-cell level after 1.0 or 2.5 h incubation and compared with different calibration series using known concentrations of octane. By immobilizing the E. coli sensor cells on the bottom glass plate of a microscope flow chamber, it was possible to monitor the diffusion process for octane in aqueous solution as a function of time and distance from non-aqueous phase droplets of octane alone or oily octane mixtures. When a gas phase was included in the flow chambers, octane transport could be demonstrated from the oily mixtures to the cells through both gas and liquid phase. Assays of non-immobilized sensor cells in microdroplets in the presence or absence of soil particles incubated with octane through the vapour phase revealed a slight reduction in the total amount of induced E. coli cells in the presence of soil. Our results indicate the power of using GFP-marked single-cell biosensors in determining microscale bioavailability of organic pollutants. PMID:11578312

  4. Optimizing transient recombinant protein expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Ralph F; Wall, Vanessa E; Esposito, Dominic

    2012-01-01

    Transient gene expression (TGE) in mammalian cells has become a routine process for expressing recombinant proteins in cell lines such as human embryonic kidney 293 and Chinese hamster ovary cells. The rapidly increasing need for recombinant proteins requires further improvements in TGE technology. While a great deal of focus has been directed toward optimizing the secretion of antibodies and other naturally secreted targets, much less work has been done on ways to improve cytoplasmic expression in mammalian cells. The benefits to protein production in mammalian cells, particularly for eukaryotic proteins, should be very significant - glycosylation and other posttranslational modifications will likely be native or near-native, solubility and protein folding would likely improve overexpression in heterologous hosts, and expression of proteins in their proper intracellular compartments is much more likely to occur. Improvements in this area have been slow, however, due to limited development of the cell culture processes needed for low-cost, higher-throughput expression in mammalian cells, and the relatively low diversity of DNA vectors for protein production in these systems. Here, we describe how the use of recombinational cloning, coupled with improvements in transfection protocols which increase speed and lower cost, can be combined to make mammalian cells much more amenable for routine recombinant protein expression. PMID:21987258

  5. Insulin influenced expression of myelin proteins in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rachana, Kuruvanthe S; Manu, Mallahalli S; Advirao, Gopal M

    2016-08-26

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one of the downstream complications of diabetes. This complication is caused by the deficiency of insulin action and subsequent hyperglycemia, but the details of their pathogenesis remain unclear. Hence, it is of critical importance to understand how such hormonal variation affects the expression of myelin proteins such as myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in the peripheral nerve. An earlier report from our lab has demonstrated the expression of insulin receptors (IR) in Schwann cells (SCs) of sciatic nerve. To assess the neurotrophic role of insulin in diabetic neuropathy, we studied the expression of these myelin proteins under control, DPN and insulin treated DPN subjects at developmental stages. Further, the expression of these myelin proteins was correlated with the expression of insulin receptor. Expression of myelin proteins was significantly reduced in the diabetic model compared to normal, and upregulated in insulin treated diabetic rats. Similarly, an in vitro study was also carried out in SCs grown at high glucose and insulin treated conditions. The expression pattern of myelin proteins in SCs was comparable to that of in vivo samples. In addition, quantitative study of myelin genes by real time PCR has also showed the significant expression pattern change in the insulin treated and non-treated DPN subjects. Taken together, these results corroborate the critical importance of insulin as a neurotrophic factor in demyelinized neurons in diabetic neuropathy. PMID:27373589

  6. Major cancer protein amplifies global gene expression

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists may have discovered why a protein called MYC can provoke a variety of cancers. Like many proteins associated with cancer, MYC helps regulate cell growth. A new study carried out by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and colleagues

  7. Transient protein expression in three Pisum sativum (green pea) varieties.

    PubMed

    Green, Brian J; Fujiki, Masaaki; Mett, Valentina; Kaczmarczyk, Jon; Shamloul, Moneim; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Underkoffler, Susan; Yusibov, Vidadi; Mett, Vadim

    2009-02-01

    The expression of proteins in plants both transiently and via permanently transformed lines has been demonstrated by a number of groups. Transient plant expression systems, due to high expression levels and speed of production, show greater promise for the manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals when compared to permanent transformants. Expression vectors based on a tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are the most commonly utilized and the primary plant used, Nicotiana benthamiana, has demonstrated the ability to express a wide range of proteins at levels amenable to purification. N. benthamiana has two limitations for its use; one is its relatively slow growth, and the other is its low biomass. To address these limitations we screened a number of legumes for transient protein expression. Using the alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and the cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) vectors, delivered via Agrobacterium, we were able to identify three Pisum sativum varieties that demonstrated protein expression transiently. Expression levels of 420 +/- 26.24 mg GFP/kgFW in the green pea variety speckled pea were achieved. We were also able to express three therapeutic proteins indicating promise for this system in the production of biopharmaceuticals. PMID:19156736

  8. Protein expression analyses at the single cell level.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Masae; Karagiannis, Peter; Taniguchi, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology explains how genetic information is converted into its end product, proteins, which are responsible for the phenotypic state of the cell. Along with the protein type, the phenotypic state depends on the protein copy number. Therefore, quantification of the protein expression in a single cell is critical for quantitative characterization of the phenotypic states. Protein expression is typically a dynamic and stochastic phenomenon that cannot be well described by standard experimental methods. As an alternative, fluorescence imaging is being explored for the study of protein expression, because of its high sensitivity and high throughput. Here we review key recent progresses in fluorescence imaging-based methods and discuss their application to proteome analysis at the single cell level. PMID:25197931

  9. Comparison of CRP and ALK-P serum levels in prediction of preterm delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shahshahan, Zahra; Iravani, Hoda

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preterm birth, defined as birth occurring before 37 weeks of gestation, is a common complication of pregnancy and may lead to death or long-term disability in newborns. Accurate diagnosis is, therefore, crucial for identifying those women undergoing preterm labor who are at greatest risk of preterm delivery. This may allow transport to a regional obstetrical center and permit time for corticosteroid therapy. Recent study recommends several markers such as CRP (C-reactive protein) and ALK-P (alkaline phosphatase) to predict preterm delivery. Materials and Methods: We select a total of 300 pregnant women that had symptoms of premature birth. All of them were under treatment with tocolytic and serum sample were taken to assess the level of CRP-ALKp. Cervix length and the time of response to tocolytic were measured. 110 pregnant of them had preterm labor. 110 patient that had a term labor selected as a control group. Results: Qualitative evaluation of efficacy CRP level on preterm delivery showed a significant relationship with 27 as a cut of point of CRP (P < 0.00001 –OR = 7.5). Investigate of effect of ALK-P level on preterm delivery refers to a significant relationship with 399 as a cut of point of ALKP (P < 0.00001 –OR = 5). Inquire of efficacy of CRP level and ALK-P level on preterm delivery demonstrate a significant relationship (P < 0.0001 1OR = 9). Conclusions: Maternal concentrations of CRP and ALKP and cervix length can be used as appropriate biomarker for predicting preterm labor and response to tocolytic therapy in pregnant women. PMID:26962519

  10. An integrated molecular modeling approach for in silico design of new tetracyclic derivatives as ALK inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Peddi, Saikiran Reddy; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2016-10-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), a promising therapeutic target for treatment of human cancers, is a receptor tyrosine kinase that instigates the activation of several signal transduction pathways. In the present study, in silico methods have been employed in order to explore the structural features and functionalities of a series of tetracyclic derivatives displaying potent inhibitory activity toward ALK. Initially docking was performed using GLIDE 5.6 to probe the bioactive conformation of all the compounds and to understand the binding modes of inhibitors. The docking results revealed that ligand interaction with Met 1199 plays a crucial role in binding of inhibitors to ALK. Further to establish a robust 3D-QSAR model using CoMFA and CoMSIA methods, the whole dataset was divided into three splits. Model obtained from Split 3 showed high accuracy ([Formula: see text] of 0.700 and 0.682, [Formula: see text] of 0.971 and 0.974, [Formula: see text] of 0.673 and 0.811, respectively for CoMFA and CoMSIA). The key structural requirements for enhancing the inhibitory activity were derived from CoMFA and CoMSIA contours in combination with site map analysis. Substituting small electronegative groups at Position 8 by replacing either morpholine or piperidine rings and maintaining hydrophobic character at Position 9 in tetracyclic derivatives can enhance the inhibitory potential. Finally, we performed molecular dynamics simulations in order to investigate the stability of protein ligand interactions and MM/GBSA calculations to compare binding free energies of co-crystal ligand and newly designed molecule N1. Based on the coherence of outcome of various molecular modeling studies, a set of 11 new molecules having potential predicted inhibitory activity were designed. PMID:26758803

  11. Expression of trisomic proteins in Down syndrome model systems.

    PubMed

    Spellman, Claire; Ahmed, Md Mahiuddin; Dubach, Daphne; Gardiner, Katheleen J

    2013-01-10

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic aberration leading to intellectual disability. DS results from an extra copy of the long arm of human chromosome 21 (HSA21) and the increased expression of trisomic genes due to gene dosage. While expression in DS and DS models has been studied extensively at the RNA level, much less is known about expression of trisomic genes at the protein level. We have used quantitative Western blotting with antibodies to 20 proteins encoded by HSA21 to assess trisomic protein expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from patients with DS and in brains from two mouse models of DS. These antibodies have recently become available and the 20 proteins largely have not been investigated previously for their potential contributions to the phenotypic features of DS. Twelve proteins had detectable expression in LCLs and three, CCT8, MX1 and PWP2, showed elevated levels in LCLs derived from patients with DS compared with controls. Antibodies against 15 proteins detected bands of appropriate sizes in lysates from mouse brain cortex. Genes for 12 of these proteins are trisomic in the Tc1 mouse model of DS, but only SIM2 and ZNF295 showed elevated expression in Tc1 cortex when compared with controls. Genes for eight of the 15 proteins are trisomic in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS, but only ZNF294 was over expressed in cortex. Comparison of trisomic gene expression at the protein level with previous reports at the mRNA level showed many inconsistencies. These may be caused by natural inter-individual variability, differences in the age of mice analyzed, or post-transcriptional regulation of gene dosage effects. These antibodies provide resources for further investigation of the molecular basis of intellectual disability in DS. PMID:23103828

  12. Human SUMO fusion systems enhance protein expression and solubility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongyuan; Li, Haolong; Guan, Wei; Ling, Haili; Wang, Zhiyong; Mu, Tianyang; Shuler, Franklin D; Fang, Xuexun

    2010-10-01

    A major challenge associated with recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli is generation of large quantities of soluble, functional protein. Yeast SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier), has been shown to enhance heterologous protein expression and solubility as fusion tag, however, the effects of human SUMOs on protein expression have not been investigated. Here we describe the use of human SUMO1 and SUMO2 as a useful gene fusion technology. Human SUMO1 and SUMO2 fusion expression vectors were constructed and tested in His-tag and ubiquitin fusion expression systems. Two difficult-to-express model proteins, matrix metalloprotease-13 (MMP13) and enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) were fused to the C-terminus of the human SUMO1 and SUMO2 expression vectors. These constructs were expressed in E. coli and evaluation of MMP13 and eGFP expression and solubility was conducted. We found that both SUMO1 and SUMO2 had the ability to enhance the solubility of MMP13 and eGFP, with the SUMO2 tag having a more significant effect. Since fusion tags produce varying quantities of soluble proteins, we assessed the effect of SUMO2 coupled with ubiquitin (Ub). SUMO2-ubiquitin and ubiquitin-SUMO2 fusion expression plasmids were constructed with eGFP as a passenger protein. Following expression in E. coli, both plasmids could improve eGFP expression and solubility similar to the SUMO2 fusion and better than the ubiquitin fusion. The sequential order of SUMO2 and ubiquitin had little effect on expression and solubility of eGFP. Purification of eGFP from the gene fusion product, SUMO2-ubiquitin-eGFP, involved cleavage by a deubiquitinase (Usp2-cc) and Ni-Sepharose column chromatography. The eGFP protein was purified to high homogeneity. In summary, human SUMO1 and SUMO2 are useful gene fusion technologies enhancing the expression, solubility and purification of model heterologous proteins. PMID:20457256

  13. Canadian consensus: inhibition of ALK-positive tumours in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Melosky, B.; Agulnik, J.; Albadine, R.; Banerji, S.; Bebb, D.G.; Bethune, D.; Blais, N.; Butts, C.; Cheema, P.; Cheung, P.; Cohen, V.; Deschenes, J.; Ionescu, D.N.; Juergens, R.; Kamel-Reid, S.; Laurie, S.A.; Liu, G.; Morzycki, W.; Tsao, M.S.; Xu, Z.; Hirsh, V.

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (alk) is an oncogenic driver in non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc). Chromosomal rearrangements involving the ALK gene occur in up to 4% of nonsquamous nsclc patients and lead to constitutive activation of the alk signalling pathway. ALK-positive nsclc is found in relatively young patients, with a median age of 50 years. Patients frequently have brain metastasis. Targeted inhibition of the alk pathway prolongs progression-free survival in patients with ALK-positive advanced nsclc. The results of several recent clinical trials confirm the efficacy and safety benefit of crizotinib and ceritinib in this population. Canadian oncologists support the following consensus statement: All patients with advanced nonsquamous nsclc (excluding pure neuroendocrine carcinoma) should be tested for the presence of an ALK rearrangement. If an ALK rearrangement is present, treatment with a targeted alk inhibitor in the first-line setting is recommended. As patients become resistant to first-generation alk inhibitors, other treatments, including second-generation alk inhibitors can be considered. PMID:27330348

  14. Canadian consensus: inhibition of ALK-positive tumours in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Melosky, B; Agulnik, J; Albadine, R; Banerji, S; Bebb, D G; Bethune, D; Blais, N; Butts, C; Cheema, P; Cheung, P; Cohen, V; Deschenes, J; Ionescu, D N; Juergens, R; Kamel-Reid, S; Laurie, S A; Liu, G; Morzycki, W; Tsao, M S; Xu, Z; Hirsh, V

    2016-06-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (alk) is an oncogenic driver in non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc). Chromosomal rearrangements involving the ALK gene occur in up to 4% of nonsquamous nsclc patients and lead to constitutive activation of the alk signalling pathway. ALK-positive nsclc is found in relatively young patients, with a median age of 50 years. Patients frequently have brain metastasis. Targeted inhibition of the alk pathway prolongs progression-free survival in patients with ALK-positive advanced nsclc. The results of several recent clinical trials confirm the efficacy and safety benefit of crizotinib and ceritinib in this population. Canadian oncologists support the following consensus statement: All patients with advanced nonsquamous nsclc (excluding pure neuroendocrine carcinoma) should be tested for the presence of an ALK rearrangement. If an ALK rearrangement is present, treatment with a targeted alk inhibitor in the first-line setting is recommended. As patients become resistant to first-generation alk inhibitors, other treatments, including second-generation alk inhibitors can be considered. PMID:27330348

  15. Novel ALK inhibitor AZD3463 inhibits neuroblastoma growth by overcoming crizotinib resistance and inducing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongfeng; Wang, Long; Guan, Shan; Cao, Wenming; Wang, Hao; Chen, Zhenghu; Zhao, Yanling; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Huiyuan; Pang, Jonathan C.; Huang, Sophia L.; Akiyama, Yo; Yang, Yifan; Sun, Wenjing; Xu, Xin; Shi, Yan; Zhang, Hong; Kim, Eugene S.; Muscal, Jodi A.; Lu, Fengmin; Yang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    ALK receptor tyrosine kinase has been shown to be a therapeutic target in neuroblastoma. Germline ALK activating mutations are responsible for the majority of hereditary neuroblastoma and somatic ALK activating mutations are also frequently observed in sporadic cases of advanced NB. Crizotinib, a first-line therapy in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring ALK rearrangements, demonstrates striking efficacy against ALK-rearranged NB. However, crizotinib fails to effectively inhibit the activity of ALK when activating mutations are present within its kinase domain, as with the F1174L mutation. Here we show that a new ALK inhibitor AZD3463 effectively suppressed the proliferation of NB cell lines with wild type ALK (WT) as well as ALK activating mutations (F1174L and D1091N) by blocking the ALK-mediated PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and ultimately induced apoptosis and autophagy. In addition, AZD3463 enhanced the cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin on NB cells. AZD3463 also exhibited significant therapeutic efficacy on the growth of the NB tumors with WT and F1174L activating mutation ALK in orthotopic xenograft mouse models. These results indicate that AZD3463 is a promising therapeutic agent in the treatment of NB. PMID:26786851

  16. Durable brain response with pulse-dose crizotinib and ceritinib in ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer compared with brain radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dudnik, Elizabeth; Siegal, Tali; Zach, Leor; Allen, Aaron M; Flex, Dov; Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Limon, Dror; Hirsch, Fred R; Peled, Nir

    2016-04-01

    Crizotinib achieves excellent systemic control in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-rearranged (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); however, central nervous system (CNS) metastases frequently occur as an early event. Whole brain irradiation, the standard treatment, results in neurocognitive impairment. We present a case series of three ALK+ NSCLC patients with progressing CNS metastases who were treated with pulse-dose crizotinib followed by ceritinib. Three ALK+ NSCLC patients treated between 2011 and 2014 (two males, two never smokers, age range 20-54years, all echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4/ALK rearrangement), were diagnosed with progressing cerebral disease while receiving crizotinib. Clinico-pathological characteristics, treatments, and outcomes were analyzed. In two patients the progression was limited to the CNS, and radiological evidence of leptomeningeal spread was present in one patient. Sequential use of crizotinib 500mg administered once daily (pulse-dose) followed by ceritinib on progression achieved control of the disease in the CNS for over 18 months and over 7 months in Patient 1 and Patient 2, respectively. This strategy provided durable CNS control after whole-brain radiotherapy failure in Patient 1, and allowed the whole-brain radiotherapy to be deferred in Patient 2. Limited CNS progression was documented in Patient 3 while he was on standard-dose/pulse-dose crizotinib for 15months; durable (over 7 months) complete remission was achieved with stereotactic radiotherapy and ceritinib. Manipulating the crizotinib schedule in ALK+ NSCLC patients with CNS metastases and using a novel ALK-inhibitor at the time of further progression may provide durable CNS control and allow brain radiotherapy to be deferred. PMID:26677785

  17. Detection of rearrangement of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and mutation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in primary pulmonary lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Lin, Yongbin; Cai, Qingqing; Long, Hao; Zhang, Yu; Rong, Tiehua

    2015-01-01

    Background Primary pulmonary lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma (LELC) is a distinct rare subtype of lung cancer. The prevalence of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation in primary pulmonary LELC had not been thoroughly investigated. Methods We investigated a cohort of 42 patients with primary pulmonary LELC and genotyped for ALK rearrangement and EGFR mutation. ALK rearrangement was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). EGFR mutational analysis of exons 18 through 21 was analyzed by TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNAs (EBERs) showed positive signals in all 42 patients. By immunohistochemistry staining, all patients demonstrated positive expression of CK5/6 and P63, but almost all patients were negative for TTF-1 (34/34, 100%) or CK7 (34/35, 97.1%). None of the 42 patients had ALK rearrangement. Of 42 patients tested, only one patient (2.4%) harbored L858R mutation and gefitinib was applied to this case, however no objective response was observed and the progression free survival (PFS) time was only 1 month. Conclusions Primary pulmonary LELC is a unique histological subtype of lung cancer. ALK rearrangement and EGFR mutation are lack and they may not be the oncogenic driver gene in pulmonary LELC. Future efforts should be made to explore other oncogenic driver gene to guide targeted therapy in this rare disease to determine the optimal treatment. Keywords Pulmonary lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma (LELC); anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK); epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR); targeted therapy; Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) PMID:26543602

  18. Protein Expression Dynamics During Postnatal Mouse Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Laeremans, Annelies; Van de Plas, Babs; Clerens, Stefan; Van den Bergh, Gert; Arckens, Lutgarde; Hu, Tjing-Tjing

    2013-01-01

    We explored differential protein expression profiles in the mouse forebrain at different stages of postnatal development, including 10-day (P10), 30-day (P30), and adult (Ad) mice, by large-scale screening of proteome maps using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis. Mass spectrometry analysis resulted in the identification of 251 differentially expressed proteins. Most molecular changes were observed between P10 compared to both P30 and Ad. Computational ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) confirmed these proteins as crucial molecules in the biological function of nervous system development. Moreover, IPA revealed Semaphorin signaling in neurons and the protein ubiquitination pathway as essential canonical pathways in the mouse forebrain during postnatal development. For these main biological pathways, the transcriptional regulation of the age-dependent expression of selected proteins was validated by means of in situ hybridization. In conclusion, we suggest that proteolysis and neurite outgrowth guidance are key biological processes, particularly during early brain maturation. PMID:25157209

  19. Proteins and an Inflammatory Network Expressed in Colon Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenhong; Fang, Changming; Gramatikoff, Kosi; Niemeyer, Christina C.; Smith, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) protein is crucial to homeostasis of normal intestinal epithelia because it suppresses the β-catenin/TCF pathway. Consequently, loss or mutation of the APC gene causes colorectal tumors in humans and mice. Here, we describe our use of Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) to compare protein expression in colon tumors to that of adjacent healthy colon tissue from ApcMin/+ mice. Twenty-seven proteins were found to be up-regulated in colon tumors and twenty-five down-regulated. As an extension of the proteomic analysis, the differentially expressed proteins were used as “seeds” to search for co-expressed genes. This approach revealed a co-expression network of 45 genes that is up-regulated in colon tumors. Members of the network include the antibacterial peptide cathelicidin (CAMP), Toll-like receptors (TLRs), IL-8, and triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM1). The co-expression network is associated with innate immunity and inflammation, and there is significant concordance between its connectivity in humans versus mice (Friedman: p value = 0.0056). This study provides new insights into the proteins and networks that are likely to drive the onset and progression of colon cancer. PMID:21366352

  20. Biomarkers that currently affect clinical practice: EGFR, ALK, MET, KRAS

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, M.D.; Kuruvilla, M.S.; Leighl, N.B.; Kamel–Reid, S.

    2012-01-01

    New drugs such as pemetrexed, the epidermal growth factor receptor (egfr) tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and the Alk inhibitor crizotinib have recently enabled progress in the management of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc). More drugs, especially Met inhibitors, will follow. However, the benefits of these agents are not uniform across the spectrum of nsclc, and optimizing their utility requires some degree of subgrouping of nsclc by the presence or absence of certain biomarkers. The biomarkers of current or imminent value are EGFR and KRAS mutational status, ALK rearrangements, and MET immunohistochemistry. As a predictor of benefit for anti-egfr monoclonal antibodies, EGFR immunohistochemistry is also of potential interest. Some of the foregoing biomarkers (EGFR, ALK, MET) are direct drivers of the malignant phenotype. As such, they are, quite rationally, the direct targets of inhibitory drugs. However, KRAS, while definitely a driver, has resisted attempts at direct pharmacologic manipulation, and its main value might lie in its role as part of an efficient testing algorithm, because KRAS mutations appear to exclude EGFR and ALK mutations. The indirect value of KRAS in determining sensitivity to other targeted agents or to pemetrexed remains controversial. The other biomarkers (EGFR, ALK, MET) may also have indirect value as predictors of sensitivity to chemotherapy in general, to pemetrexed specifically, and to radiotherapy and molecularly targeted agents. These biomarkers have all enabled the co-development of new drugs with companion diagnostics, and they illustrate the paradigm that will govern progress in oncology in the immediate future. However, in nsclc, the acquisition of sufficient biopsy material remains a stubborn obstacle to the evolution of novel targeted therapies. PMID:22787409

  1. GTP Cyclohydrolase I Expression, Protein, and Activity Determine Intracellular Tetrahydrobiopterin Levels, Independent of GTP Cyclohydrolase Feedback Regulatory Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tatham, Amy L.; Crabtree, Mark J.; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J.; Channon, Keith M.

    2009-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r2 = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r2 = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression. PMID:19286659

  2. GTP cyclohydrolase I expression, protein, and activity determine intracellular tetrahydrobiopterin levels, independent of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tatham, Amy L; Crabtree, Mark J; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J; Channon, Keith M

    2009-05-15

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression. PMID:19286659

  3. Small-scale expression of proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zerbs, Sarah; Giuliani, Sarah; Collart, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Proteins participate in virtually every cellular activity, and a knowledge of protein function is essential for an understanding of biological systems. However, protein diversity necessitates the application of an array of in vivo and in vitro approaches for characterization of the functional and biochemical properties of proteins. Methods that enable production of proteins for in vitro studies are critical for determination of the molecular, kinetic, and thermodynamic properties of these molecules. Ideally, proteins could be purified from the original source; however, the native host is often unsuitable for a number of reasons. Consequently, systems for heterologous protein production are commonly used to produce large amounts of protein. Heterologous expression hosts are chosen using a number of criteria, including genetic tractability, advantageous production or processing characteristics (secretion or posttranslational modifications), or economy of time and growth requirements. The subcloning process also provides an opportunity to introduce purification tags, epitope tags, fusions, truncations, and mutations into the coding sequence that may be useful in downstream purification or characterization applications. Bacterial systems for heterologous protein expression have advantages in ease of use, cost, short generation times, and scalability. These expression systems have been widely used by high-throughput protein production projects and often represent an initial experiment for any expression target. Escherichia coli has been studied for many years as a model bacterial organism and is one of the most popular hosts for heterologous protein expression (Terpe, 2006). Its protein production capabilities have been intensively studied, and the ease of genetic manipulation in this organism has led to the development of strains engineered exclusively for use in protein expression. These resources are widely available from commercial sources and public repositories

  4. High-Throughput Baculovirus Expression System for Membrane Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Kalathur, Ravi C; Panganiban, Marinela; Bruni, Renato

    2016-01-01

    The ease of use, robustness, cost-effectiveness, and posttranslational machinery make baculovirus expression system a popular choice for production of eukaryotic membrane proteins. This system can be readily adapted for high-throughput operations. This chapter outlines the techniques and procedures for cloning, transfection, small-scale production, and purification of membrane protein samples in a high-throughput manner. PMID:27485337

  5. Ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis in yeast cells expressing neurotoxic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Ralf J.

    2015-01-01

    Critically impaired protein degradation is discussed to contribute to neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's, Huntington's, Alzheimer's, and motor neuron diseases. Misfolded, aggregated, or surplus proteins are efficiently degraded via distinct protein degradation pathways, including the ubiquitin-proteasome system, autophagy, and vesicular trafficking. These pathways are regulated by covalent modification of target proteins with the small protein ubiquitin and are evolutionary highly conserved from humans to yeast. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an established model for deciphering mechanisms of protein degradation, and for the elucidation of pathways underlying programmed cell death. The expression of human neurotoxic proteins triggers cell death in yeast, with neurotoxic protein-specific differences. Therefore, yeast cell death models are suitable for analyzing the role of protein degradation pathways in modulating cell death upon expression of disease-causing proteins. This review summarizes which protein degradation pathways are affected in these yeast models, and how they are involved in the execution of cell death. I will discuss to which extent this mimics the situation in other neurotoxic models, and how this may contribute to a better understanding of human disorders. PMID:25814926

  6. Translation Levels Control Multi-Spanning Membrane Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Cecilia; Bostrom, Jenny; Fuh, Germaine; Lee, Chingwei V.; Huang, Arthur; Vandlen, Richard L.; Yansura, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    Attempts to express eukaryotic multi-spanning membrane proteins at high-levels have been generally unsuccessful. In order to investigate the cause of this limitation and gain insight into the rate limiting processes involved, we have analyzed the effect of translation levels on the expression of several human membrane proteins in Escherichia coli (E. coli). These results demonstrate that excessive translation initiation rates of membrane proteins cause a block in protein synthesis and ultimately prevent the high-level accumulation of these proteins. Moderate translation rates allow coupling of peptide synthesis and membrane targeting, resulting in a significant increase in protein expression and accumulation over time. The current study evaluates four membrane proteins, CD20 (4-transmembrane (TM) helixes), the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, 7-TMs) RA1c and EG-VEGFR1, and Patched 1 (12-TMs), and demonstrates the critical role of translation initiation rates in the targeting, insertion and folding of integral membrane proteins in the E. coli membrane. PMID:22563408

  7. Proteomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum core metabolism: relative protein expression profiles and growth phase-dependent changes in protein expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clostridium thermocellum produces H2 and ethanol, as well as CO2, acetate, formate, and lactate, directly from cellulosic biomass. It is therefore an attractive model for biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. Optimization of end-product yields and titres is crucial for making biofuel production economically feasible. Relative protein expression profiles may provide targets for metabolic engineering, while understanding changes in protein expression and metabolism in response to carbon limitation, pH, and growth phase may aid in reactor optimization. We performed shotgun 2D-HPLC-MS/MS on closed-batch cellobiose-grown exponential phase C. thermocellum cell-free extracts to determine relative protein expression profiles of core metabolic proteins involved carbohydrate utilization, energy conservation, and end-product synthesis. iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation) based protein quantitation was used to determine changes in core metabolic proteins in response to growth phase. Results Relative abundance profiles revealed differential levels of putative enzymes capable of catalyzing parallel pathways. The majority of proteins involved in pyruvate catabolism and end-product synthesis were detected with high abundance, with the exception of aldehyde dehydrogenase, ferredoxin-dependent Ech-type [NiFe]-hydrogenase, and RNF-type NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Using 4-plex 2D-HPLC-MS/MS, 24% of the 144 core metabolism proteins detected demonstrated moderate changes in expression during transition from exponential to stationary phase. Notably, proteins involved in pyruvate synthesis decreased in stationary phase, whereas proteins involved in glycogen metabolism, pyruvate catabolism, and end-product synthesis increased in stationary phase. Several proteins that may directly dictate end-product synthesis patterns, including pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductases, alcohol dehydrogenases, and a putative bifurcating hydrogenase

  8. Recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli: advances and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Rosano, Germán L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the organisms of choice for the production of recombinant proteins. Its use as a cell factory is well-established and it has become the most popular expression platform. For this reason, there are many molecular tools and protocols at hand for the high-level production of heterologous proteins, such as a vast catalog of expression plasmids, a great number of engineered strains and many cultivation strategies. We review the different approaches for the synthesis of recombinant proteins in E. coli and discuss recent progress in this ever-growing field. PMID:24860555

  9. Mapping the expression of soluble olfactory proteins in the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Dani, Francesca Romana; Iovinella, Immacolata; Felicioli, Antonio; Niccolini, Alberto; Calvello, Maria Antonietta; Carucci, Maria Giovanna; Qiao, Huili; Pieraccini, Giuseppe; Turillazzi, Stefano; Moneti, Gloriano; Pelosi, Paolo

    2010-04-01

    Chemical communication in insects is mediated by soluble binding proteins, belonging to two large families, Odorant-binding Proteins (OBPs) and Chemosensory Proteins (CSPs). Recently, evidence has been provided that OBPs are involved in recognition of chemical stimuli. We therefore decided to investigate the expression of OBPs and CSPs in the honeybee at the protein level, using a proteomic approach. Our results are in agreement with previous reports of expression at the RNA level and show that 12 of the 21 OBPs predicted in the genome of the honeybee Apis mellifera and 2 of the 6 CSPs are present in the foragers' antennae, while the larvae express only three OBPs and a single CSP. MALDI mass spectrometry on crude antennal extracts and MALDI profiling on sections of antennae demonstrated that these techniques can be applied to investigate individual differences in the expression of abundant proteins, such as OBPs and CSPs, as well as to detect the presence of proteins in different regions of the antenna. Finally, as part of a project aimed at the characterization of all OBPs and CSPs of the honeybee, we expressed 5 OBPs and 4 CSPs in a bacterial system and measured their affinity to a number of ligands. Clear differences in their binding spectra have been observed between OBPs, as well as CSPs. PMID:20155982

  10. Cell-Free Expression of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Segers, Kenneth; Masure, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The large-scale production of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is one of the major bottlenecks that hamper functional and structural studies of this important class of integral membrane proteins. Heterologous overexpression of GPCRs often results in low yields of active protein, usually due to a combination of several factors, such as low expression levels, protein insolubility, host cell toxicity, and the need to use harsh and often denaturing detergents (e.g., SDS, LDAO, OG, and DDM, among others) to extract the recombinant receptor from the host cell membrane. Many of these problematic issues are inherently linked to cell-based expression systems and can therefore be circumvented by the use of cell-free systems. In this unit, we provide a range of protocols for the production of GPCRs in a cell-free expression system. Using this system, we typically obtain GPCR expression levels of ∼1 mg per ml of reaction mixture in the continuous-exchange configuration. Although the protocols in this unit have been optimized for the cell-free expression of GPCRs, they should provide a good starting point for the production of other classes of membrane proteins, such as ion channels, aquaporins, carrier proteins, membrane-bound enzymes, and even large molecular complexes. PMID:26237676

  11. Expression of Eukaryotic Membrane Proteins in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Lucie; Kugler, Valérie; Wagner, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    A key point when it comes to heterologous expression of eukaryotic membrane proteins (EMPs) is the choice of the best-suited expression platform. The yeast Pichia pastoris has proven to be a very versatile system showing promising results in a growing number of cases. Indeed, its particular methylotrophic characteristics combined to the very simple handling of a eukaryotic microorganism that possesses the majority of mammalian-like machineries make it a very competitive expression system for various complex proteins, in amounts compatible with functional and structural studies. This chapter describes a set of robust methodologies routinely used for the successful expression of a variety of EMPs, going from yeast transformation with the recombinant plasmid to the analysis of the quality and quantity of the proteins produced. PMID:27485335

  12. Individual expression of influenza virus PA protein induces degradation of coexpressed proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Ezquerro, J J; de la Luna, S; Ortín, J; Nieto, A

    1995-01-01

    In the process of in vivo reconstitution of influenza virus transcriptase-replicase complex, an inhibitory effect was observed when the level of PA protein expression was increased. This inhibition was paralleled by a decrease in the accumulation of the other influenza virus core proteins. The sole expression of PA protein was sufficient to reduce the accumulation level of the proteins encoded by the coexpressed genes. The PA effect was observed upon influenza virus and non-influenza virus proteins and independently of the expression system chosen and the origin of cell line used. The expression of PA protein did not induce variations in the translation of the target proteins but did induce variations on their half-lives, which were clearly reduced. A functional PA subunit seems to be necessary to induce this negative effect, because an inactive point mutant was unable to decrease the steady-state levels or the half-lives of the reporter proteins. The PA effect was observed as early as 5 h after its expression, and continuous synthesis of proteins was not required for performance of its biological activity. The results presented represent the first biological activity of individually expressed PA polymerase subunit. PMID:7884889

  13. ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma with soft tissue involvement in a young woman

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kehai; Li, Hongtao; Huang, Caihong; Li, Huazhuang; Fang, Jun; Tian, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has strong expression of CD30. ALCL can sometimes involve the bone marrow, and in advanced stages, it can produce destructive extranodal lesions. But anaplastic large cell lymphoma kinase (ALK)+ ALCL with soft tissue involvement is very rare. Case report A 35-year-old woman presented with waist pain for over 1 month. The biopsy of soft tissue lesions showed that these cells were positive for ALK-1, CD30, TIA-1, GranzymeB, CD4, CD8, and Ki67 (90%+) and negative for CD3, CD5, CD20, CD10, cytokeratin (CK), TdT, HMB-45, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), and pan-CK, which identified ALCL. After six cycles of Hyper-CVAD/MA regimen, she achieved partial remission. Three months later, she died due to disease progression. Conclusion This case illustrates the unusual presentation of ALCL in soft tissue with a bad response to chemotherapy. Because of the tendency for rapid progression, ALCL in young adults with extra-nodal lesions are often treated with high-grade chemotherapy, such as Hyper-CVAD/MA. PMID:27445489

  14. Differential Protein Expression in Congenital and Acquired Cholesteatomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Huhn; Choi, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cholesteatomas are epithelial lesions that present as an epithelial pearl behind an intact eardrum. Congenital and acquired cholesteatomas progress quite differently from each other and progress patterns can provide clues about the unique origin and pathogenesis of the abnormality. However, the exact pathogenic mechanisms by which cholesteatomas develop remain unknown. In this study, key proteins that directly affect cholesteatoma pathogenesis are investigated with proteomics and immunohistochemistry. Congenital cholesteatoma matrices and retroauricular skin were harvested during surgery in 4 patients diagnosed with a congenital cholesteatoma. Tissue was also harvested from the retraction pocket in an additional 2 patients during middle ear surgery. We performed 2-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis to detect and analyze spots that are expressed only in congenital cholesteatoma and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) to separate proteins by molecular weight. Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. The image analysis of 2D electrophoresis showed that 4 congenital cholesteatoma samples had very similar protein expression patterns and that 127 spots were exclusively expressed in congenital cholesteatomas. Of these 127 spots, 10 major spots revealed the presence of titin, forkhead transcription activator homolog (FKH 5–3), plectin 1, keratin 10, and leucine zipper protein 5 by MALDI-TOF/MS analysis. Immunohistochemical staining showed that FKH 5–3 and titin were expressed in congenital cholesteatoma matrices, but not in acquired cholesteatomas. Our study shows that protein expression patterns are completely different in congenital cholesteatomas, acquired cholesteatomas, and skin. Moreover, non-epithelial proteins, including FKH 5–3 and titin, were unexpectedly expressed in congenital cholesteatoma tissue. Our data indicates that congenital cholesteatoma origins may differ

  15. Treatment of ALK-Rearranged Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Recent Progress and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Laird; Solomon, Benjamin

    2015-07-01

    Rearrangements of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene originally discovered nearly 20 years ago in the context of anaplastic large cell lymphoma were identified as oncogenic drivers in a subset of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) in 2007. These ALK gene rearrangements are present in 3-5 % of NSCLC patients, typically younger, never or light smokers with adenocarcinomas. Crizotinib is a first-in-class ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor with significant activity in ALK-positive NSCLC that received accelerated US Food and Drug Administration approval for treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC in 2011, just 4 years after identification of ALK rearrangements in this setting. Subsequently, two phase III trials have shown crizotinib to have a tolerable toxicity profile and to be superior to standard chemotherapy for the first- or second-line treatment of advanced ALK-positive lung cancer and numerous countries have approved its use. Despite initial responses, acquired resistance to crizotinib invariably leads to disease progression. Mechanisms of resistance have been described to include ALK tyrosine kinase mutations, activation of bypass signalling pathways and pharmacokinetic failure of crizotinib. Several next-generation ALK inhibitors, including ceritinib and alectinib, are in clinical development and show efficacy in both the crizotinib naïve and crizotinib refractory settings. Ongoing clinical trials will identify the optimal strategy to incorporate these novel agents in the treatment of patients with ALK-positive NSCLC. PMID:26076736

  16. Enzymological and Structural Studies of the Mechanism of Promiscuous Substrate Recognition by the Oxidative DNA Repair Enzyme AlkB

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, B.; Hunt, J

    2009-01-01

    Promiscuous substrate recognition, the ability to catalyze transformations of chemically diverse compounds, is an evolutionarily advantageous, but poorly understood phenomenon. The promiscuity of DNA repair enzymes is particularly important, because it enables diverse kinds of damage to different nucleotide bases to be repaired in a metabolically parsimonious manner. We present enzymological and crystallographic studies of the mechanisms underlying promiscuous substrate recognition by Escherichia coli AlkB, a DNA repair enzyme that removes methyl adducts and some larger alkylation lesions from endocyclic positions on purine and pyrimidine bases. In vitro Michaelis-Menten analyses on a series of alkylated bases show high activity in repairing N1-methyladenine (m1A) and N3-methylcytosine (m3C), comparatively low activity in repairing 1,N6-ethenoadenine, and no detectable activity in repairing N1-methylguanine or N3-methylthymine. AlkB has a substantially higher kcat and Km for m3C compared with m1A. Therefore, the enzyme maintains similar net activity on the chemically distinct substrates by increasing the turnover rate of the substrate with nominally lower affinity. Cocrystal structures provide insight into the structural basis of this 'kcat/Km compensation,' which makes a significant contribution to promiscuous substrate recognition by AlkB. In analyzing a large ensemble of crystal structures solved in the course of these studies, we observed 2 discrete global conformations of AlkB differing in the accessibility of a tunnel hypothesized to control diffusion of the O2 substrate into the active site. Steric interactions between a series of protein loops control this conformational transition and present a plausible mechanism for preventing O2 binding before nucleotide substrate binding.

  17. Expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 by reactive astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Geisert, E E; Johnson, H G; Binder, L I

    1990-01-01

    After an injury to the central nervous system, a dramatic change in the astrocytes bordering the wound occurs. The most characteristic feature of this process, termed reactive gliosis, is the upregulation of the intermediate filament protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein. In the present study, we show that reactive astrocytes express high levels of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), a protein normally found in the somatodendritic compartment of neurons. When sections of injured brain are double-stained with antibodies directed against MAP-2 and glial fibrillary protein, all of the reactive astrocytes are found to contain MAP-2. The high levels of this protein appear to represent a permanent change in reactive astrocytes. In parallel quantitative studies, an elevated level of MAP-2 in the injured brain is confirmed by an immunoblot analysis of injured and normal white matter. This report demonstrates the direct involvement of a microtubule protein in the process of reactive gliosis. Images PMID:1692628

  18. Expressing and purifying membrane transport proteins in high yield.

    PubMed

    Hale, Calvin C; Hill, Chananada K; Price, Elmer M; Bossuyt, Julie

    2002-01-01

    Structural analysis of native or recombinant membrane transport proteins has been hampered by the lack of effective methodologies to purify sufficient quantities of active protein. We addressed this problem by expressing a polyhistidine tagged construct of the cardiac sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX1) in Trichoplusia ni larvae (caterpillars) from which membrane vesicles were prepared. Larvae vesicles containing recombinant NCX1-his protein supported NCX1 transport activity that was mechanistically not different from activity in native cardiac sarcolemmal vesicles although the specific activity was reduced. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis demonstrated the presence of both the 120 and 70 kDa forms of the NCX1 protein. Larvae vesicle proteins were solubilized in sodium cholate detergent and fractionated on a chelated Ni(2+) affinity chromatography column. After extensive washing, eluted fractions were mixed with soybean phospholipids and reconstituted. The resulting proteoliposomes contained NCX1 activity suggesting the protein retained native conformation. SDS-PAGE revealed two major bands at 120 and 70 kDa. Purification of large amounts of active NCX1 via this methodology should facilitate biophysical analysis of the protein. The larva expression system has broad-based application for membrane proteins where expression and purification of quantities required for physical analyses is problematic. PMID:11741710

  19. Expression of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins: A macroarray study

    PubMed Central

    FUTYMA, KONRAD; MIOTŁA, PAWEŁ; RÓŻYŃSKA, KRYSTYNA; ZDUNEK, MAŁGORZATA; SEMCZUK, ANDRZEJ; RECHBERGER, TOMASZ; WOJCIEROWSKI, JACEK

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most common gynecological malignancies in Poland, with well-established risk factors. Genetic instability and molecular alterations responsible for endometrial carcinogenesis have been systematically investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate, by means of cDNA macroarrays, the expression profiles of genes encoding extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in ECs. Tissue specimens were collected during surgical procedures from 40 patients with EC, and control tissue was collected from 9 patients with uterine leiomyomas. RNA was isolated and RT-PCR with radioisotope-labeled cDNA was performed. The levels of ECM protein gene expression in normal endometrial tissues were compared to the expression of these genes in EC specimens. Statistically significant differences in gene expression, stratified by clinical stage of the ECs, were detected for aggrecan, vitronectin, tenascin R, nidogen and two collagen proteins: type VIII chain α1 and type XI chain α2. All of these proteins were overexpressed in stage III endometrial carcinomas compared to levels in stage I and II uterine neoplasms. In conclusion, increased expression of genes encoding ECM proteins may play an important role in facilitating accelerated disease progression of human ECs. PMID:25231141

  20. Genome engineering for improved recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mahalik, Shubhashree; Sharma, Ashish K; Mukherjee, Krishna J

    2014-01-01

    A metabolic engineering perspective which views recombinant protein expression as a multistep pathway allows us to move beyond vector design and identify the downstream rate limiting steps in expression. In E.coli these are typically at the translational level and the supply of precursors in the form of energy, amino acids and nucleotides. Further recombinant protein production triggers a global cellular stress response which feedback inhibits both growth and product formation. Countering this requires a system level analysis followed by a rational host cell engineering to sustain expression for longer time periods. Another strategy to increase protein yields could be to divert the metabolic flux away from biomass formation and towards recombinant protein production. This would require a growth stoppage mechanism which does not affect the metabolic activity of the cell or the transcriptional or translational efficiencies. Finally cells have to be designed for efficient export to prevent buildup of proteins inside the cytoplasm and also simplify downstream processing. The rational and the high throughput strategies that can be used for the construction of such improved host cell platforms for recombinant protein expression is the focus of this review. PMID:25523647

  1. Subcellular localization of transiently expressed fluorescent fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Collings, David A

    2013-01-01

    The recent and massive expansion in plant genomics data has generated a large number of gene sequences for which two seemingly simple questions need to be answered: where do the proteins encoded by these genes localize in cells, and what do they do? One widespread approach to answering the localization question has been to use particle bombardment to transiently express unknown proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) or its numerous derivatives. Confocal fluorescence microscopy is then used to monitor the localization of the fluorescent protein as it hitches a ride through the cell. The subcellular localization of the fusion protein, if not immediately apparent, can then be determined by comparison to localizations generated by fluorescent protein fusions to known signalling sequences and proteins, or by direct comparison with fluorescent dyes. This review aims to be a tour guide for researchers wanting to travel this hitch-hiker's path, and for reviewers and readers who wish to understand their travel reports. It will describe some of the technology available for visualizing protein localizations, and some of the experimental approaches for optimizing and confirming localizations generated by particle bombardment in onion epidermal cells, the most commonly used experimental system. As the non-conservation of signal sequences in heterologous expression systems such as onion, and consequent mis-targeting of fusion proteins, is always a potential problem, the epidermal cells of the Argenteum mutant of pea are proposed as a model system. PMID:23996319

  2. Identification of prognostic biomarkers for glioblastomas using protein expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    JUNG, YONG; JOO, KYEUNG MIN; SEONG, DONG HO; CHOI, YOON-LA; KONG, DOO-SIK; KIM, YONGHYUN; KIM, MI HYUN; JIN, JUYOUN; SUH, YEON-LIM; SEOL, HO JUN; SHIN, CHUL SOO; LEE, JUNG-IL; KIM, JONG-HYUN; SONG, SANG YONG; NAM, DO-HYUN

    2012-01-01

    A set of proteins reflecting the prognosis of patients have clinical significance since they could be utilized as predictive biomarkers and/or potential therapeutic targets. With the aim of finding novel diagnostic and prognostic markers for glioblastoma (GBM), a tissue microarray (TMA) library consisting of 62 GBMs and 28 GBM-associated normal spots was constructed. Immunohistochemistry against 78 GBM-associated proteins was performed. Expression levels of each protein for each patient were analyzed using an image analysis program and converted to H-score [summation of the intensity grade of staining (0–3) multiplied by the percentage of positive cells corresponding to each grade]. Based on H-score and hierarchical clustering methods, we divided the GBMs into two groups (n=19 and 37) that had significantly different survival lengths (p<0.05). In the two groups, expression of nine proteins (survivin, cyclin E, DCC, TGF-β, CDC25B, histone H1, p-EGFR, p-VEGFR2/3, p16) was significantly changed (q<0.05). Prognosis-predicting potential of these proteins were validated with another independent library of 82 GBM TMAs and a public GBM DNA microarray dataset. In addition, we determined 32 aberrant or mislocalized subcellular protein expression patterns in GBMs compared with relatively normal brain tissues, which could be useful for diagnostic biomarkers of GBM. We therefore suggest that these proteins can be used as predictive biomarkers and/or potential therapeutic targets for GBM. PMID:22179774

  3. Protein Co-Expression Network Analysis (ProCoNA)

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, David L.; Baratt, Arie; Baric, Ralph; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Smith, Richard D.; Orwoll, Eric S.; Katze, Michael G.; Mcweeney, Shannon K.

    2013-06-01

    Biological networks are important for elucidating disease etiology due to their ability to model complex high dimensional data and biological systems. Proteomics provides a critical data source for such models, but currently lacks robust de novo methods for network construction, which could bring important insights in systems biology. We have evaluated the construction of network models using methods derived from weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA). We show that approximately scale-free peptide networks, composed of statistically significant modules, are feasible and biologically meaningful using two mouse lung experiments and one human plasma experiment. Within each network, peptides derived from the same protein are shown to have a statistically higher topological overlap and concordance in abundance, which is potentially important for inferring protein abundance. The module representatives, called eigenpeptides, correlate significantly with biological phenotypes. Furthermore, within modules, we find significant enrichment for biological function and known interactions (gene ontology and protein-protein interactions). Biological networks are important tools in the analysis of complex systems. In this paper we evaluate the application of weighted co-expression network analysis to quantitative proteomics data. Protein co-expression networks allow novel approaches for biological interpretation, quality control, inference of protein abundance, a framework for potentially resolving degenerate peptide-protein mappings, and a biomarker signature discovery.

  4. Increased functional protein expression using nucleotide sequence features enriched in highly expressed genes in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Horstick, Eric J.; Jordan, Diana C.; Bergeron, Sadie A.; Tabor, Kathryn M.; Serpe, Mihaela; Feldman, Benjamin; Burgess, Harold A.

    2015-01-01

    Many genetic manipulations are limited by difficulty in obtaining adequate levels of protein expression. Bioinformatic and experimental studies have identified nucleotide sequence features that may increase expression, however it is difficult to assess the relative influence of these features. Zebrafish embryos are rapidly injected with calibrated doses of mRNA, enabling the effects of multiple sequence changes to be compared in vivo. Using RNAseq and microarray data, we identified a set of genes that are highly expressed in zebrafish embryos and systematically analyzed for enrichment of sequence features correlated with levels of protein expression. We then tested enriched features by embryo microinjection and functional tests of multiple protein reporters. Codon selection, releasing factor recognition sequence and specific introns and 3′ untranslated regions each increased protein expression between 1.5- and 3-fold. These results suggested principles for increasing protein yield in zebrafish through biomolecular engineering. We implemented these principles for rational gene design in software for codon selection (CodonZ) and plasmid vectors incorporating the most active non-coding elements. Rational gene design thus significantly boosts expression in zebrafish, and a similar approach will likely elevate expression in other animal models. PMID:25628360

  5. Effects of Chemically Modified Messenger RNA on Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Luo, Xiao; Dong, Yizhou

    2016-03-16

    Chemically modified nucleotides play significant roles in the effectiveness of mRNA translation. Here, we describe the synthesis of two sets of chemically modified mRNAs [encoding firefly Luciferase (FLuc) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), respectively], evaluation of protein expression, and correlation analysis of expression level under various conditions. The results indicate that chemical modifications of mRNAs are able to significantly improve protein expression, which is dependent on cell types and coding sequences. Moreover, eGFP mRNAs with N1-methylpseudouridine (me(1)ψ), 5-methoxyuridine (5moU), and pseudouridine (ψ) modifications ranked top three in cell lines tested. Interestingly, 5moU-modified eGFP mRNA was more stable than other eGFP mRNAs. Consequently, me(1)ψ, 5moU, and ψ are promising nucleotides for chemical modification of mRNAs. PMID:26906521

  6. Using ion exchange chromatography to purify a recombinantly expressed protein.

    PubMed

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C; Gabelli, Sandra B

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange chromatography (IEX) separates molecules by their surface charge, a property that can vary vastly between different proteins. There are two types of IEX, cation exhange and anion exchange chromatography. The protocol that follows was designed by the authors for anion exchange chromatography of a recombinantly expressed protein having a pI of 4.9 and containing two cysteine residues and one tryptophan residue, using an FPLC system. Prior to anion exchange, the protein had been salted out using ammonium sulfate precipitation and partially purified via hydrophobic interaction chromatography (see Salting out of proteins using ammonium sulfate precipitation and Use and Application of Hydrophobic Interaction Chromatography for Protein Purification). Slight modifications to this protocol may be made to accommodate both the protein of interest and the availability of equipment. PMID:24674065

  7. Recombinant baculovirus vectors expressing glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Davies, A H; Jowett, J B; Jones, I M

    1993-08-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses are a popular means of producing heterologous protein in eukaryotic cells. Purification of recombinant proteins away from the insect cell background can, however, remain an obstacle for many developments. Recently, prokaryotic fusion protein expression systems have been developed allowing single-step purification of the heterologous protein and specific proteolytic cleavage of the affinity tag moiety from the desired antigen. Here we report the introduction of these attributes to the baculovirus system. "Baculo-GEX" vectors enable baculovirus production of fusion proteins with the above advantages, but in a eukaryotic post-translational processing environment. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusions are stable cytoplasmic proteins in insect cells and may therefore be released by sonication alone, avoiding the solubility problems and detergent requirements of bacterial systems. Thus large amounts of authentic antigen may be purified in a single, non-denaturing step. PMID:7763917

  8. ALK Signaling and Target Therapy in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tabbó, Fabrizio; Barreca, Antonella; Piva, Roberto; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    The discovery by Morris et al. (1994) of the genes contributing to the t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocation has laid the foundation for a molecular based recognition of anaplastic large cell lymphoma and highlighted the need for a further stratification of T-cell neoplasia. Likewise the detection of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) genetic lesions among many human cancers has defined unique subsets of cancer patients, providing new opportunities for innovative therapeutic interventions. The objective of this review is to appraise the molecular mechanisms driving ALK-mediated transformation, and to maintain the neoplastic phenotype. The understanding of these events will allow the design and implementation of novel tailored strategies for a well-defined subset of cancer patients. PMID:22649787

  9. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor with RANBP2 and ALK gene rearrangement with bland cytological features mimicking desmoid-type fibromatosis: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YU-HUA; TIAN, YU-FENG; LI, CHIEN-FENG

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present an uncommon case of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) involving the mesentery. The tumor was composed of loosely arranged round-to-spindle-shaped tumor cells with amphophilic cytoplasm in an inflammatory and myxoid background. The mitotic activity was low (1 per 50 high-power fields) and the tumor cells lacked cellular atypism. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells demonstrated strong nuclear membranous staining with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). In situ hybridization for ALK gene rearrangement revealed a splitting apart of the two signals within the tumor cells. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the tumor harbored a ran-binding protein 2 (RANBP2)-ALK rearrangement. IMTs are usually characterized by epithelioid-to-round cells featuring increased mitotic activity, occasionally demonstrating unusual tumor cells and more aggressive clinical behavior. To date, 23 IMTs have been reported with RANBP2 and ALK gene rearrangements. However, the present case demonstrated indolent cytological features, leading to a difficulty in differentiating it from desmoid-type fibromatosis. PMID:26893756

  10. Monitoring the alkane monooxygenase gene alkB in different soil interfaces during plant litter degradation of C3 and C4 plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, S.; Munch, J. C.; Schloter, M.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrocarbons like n-alkanes are ubiquitous in the environment as a result of anthropogenic contamination (e.g. oil spills) as well as a part of an ecosystem's biomass. For example n-alkanes become released during plant litter degradation; consequently they become a high abundant carbon source for microorganism. One possibility for the prokaryotic hydrocarbon metabolisation is an aerobic degradation pathway where the initial step is catalysed by the membrane bound alkane monooxygenase alkB. We analysed the influence of alkanes on the abundance of the alkB gene in different interfaces of the litter-soil system during the degradation of maize and pea litter. Therefore soil samples of a sandy and a loamy soil have been incubated with straw of maize and pea plants up to 30 weeks with constant soil moisture and temperature. Using quantitative real-time PCR we were able to monitor the changes of the abundance and the expression rates of alkB. In our experiments we focused on the straw layer, the litter/soil interface and the soil 1 cm below this interface (bulk soil). Our results clearly demonstrate time and space dependent abundance patterns of alkB genes and transcripts in the different layers studied, which are additionally shaped by the soil type used.

  11. Green fluorescent protein-based expression screening of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation. PMID

  12. Bovine parotid secretory protein: structure, expression and relatedness to other BPI (bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein)-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, T T; Hood, K; Oden, K; McCracken, J; Morris, C A

    2003-08-01

    Members of the family of BPI (bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein)-like proteins are as yet incompletely characterized, particularly in cattle, where full-length sequence information is available for only three of the 13 family members known from other species. Structural bioinformatic analyses incorporating bovine homologues of several members of the BPI-like protein family, including two forms of bovine parotid secretory protein (PSP), showed that this family is also present in cattle. Expression analyses of several members of the BPI-like protein family in cattle, including PSP (Bsp30), von Ebner's minor salivary gland protein (VEMSGP) and lung-specific X protein (LUNX), showed a restricted pattern of expression, consistent with earlier hypotheses that these proteins function in the innate immune response to bacteria. The possible role of bovine PSP in susceptibility to pasture bloat in cattle is discussed. PMID:12887305

  13. Combining in Vitro Folding with Cell Free Protein Synthesis for Membrane Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Focke, Paul J; Hein, Christopher; Hoffmann, Beate; Matulef, Kimberly; Bernhard, Frank; Dötsch, Volker; Valiyaveetil, Francis I

    2016-08-01

    Cell free protein synthesis (CFPS) has emerged as a promising methodology for protein expression. While polypeptide production is very reliable and efficient using CFPS, the correct cotranslational folding of membrane proteins during CFPS is still a challenge. In this contribution, we describe a two-step protocol in which the integral membrane protein is initially expressed by CFPS as a precipitate followed by an in vitro folding procedure using lipid vesicles for converting the protein precipitate to the correctly folded protein. We demonstrate the feasibility of using this approach for the K(+) channels KcsA and MVP and the amino acid transporter LeuT. We determine the crystal structure of the KcsA channel obtained by CFPS and in vitro folding to show the structural similarity to the cellular expressed KcsA channel and to establish the feasibility of using this two-step approach for membrane protein production for structural studies. Our studies show that the correct folding of these membrane proteins with complex topologies can take place in vitro without the involvement of the cellular machinery for membrane protein biogenesis. This indicates that the folding instructions for these complex membrane proteins are contained entirely within the protein sequence. PMID:27384110

  14. p53 AND MDM2 PROTEIN EXPRESSION IN ACTINIC CHEILITIS

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Maria da Conceição Andrade; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira; Xavier, Flávia Caló Aquino; Moreira, André Luis Gomes; Reis, Sílvia Regina Almeida

    2008-01-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a potentially malignant lip lesion caused by excessive and prolonged exposure to ultraviolet radiation, which can lead to histomorphological alterations indicative of abnormal cell differentiation. In this pathology, varying degrees of epithelial dysplasia may be found. There are few published studies regarding the p53 and MDM2 proteins in actinic cheilitis. Fifty-eight cases diagnosed with actinic cheilitis were histologically evaluated using Banóczy and Csiba (1976) parameters, and were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis using the streptavidin-biotin method in order to assess p53 and MDM2 protein expression. All studied cases expressed p53 proteins in basal and suprabasal layers. In the basal layer, the nuclei testing positive for p53 were stained intensely, while in the suprabasal layer, cells with slightly stained nuclei were predominant. All cases also tested positive for the MDM2 protein, but with varying degrees of nuclear expression and a predominance of slightly stained cells. A statistically significant correlation between the percentage of p53 and MDM2-positive cells was established, regardless of the degree of epithelial dysplasia. The expression of p53 and MDM2 proteins in actinic cheilitis can be an important indicator in lip carcinogenesis, regardless of the degree of epithelial dysplasia. PMID:19082401

  15. Beyond protein expression, MOPED goes multi-omics.

    PubMed

    Montague, Elizabeth; Janko, Imre; Stanberry, Larissa; Lee, Elaine; Choiniere, John; Anderson, Nathaniel; Stewart, Elizabeth; Broomall, William; Higdon, Roger; Kolker, Natali; Kolker, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    MOPED (Multi-Omics Profiling Expression Database; http://moped.proteinspire.org) has transitioned from solely a protein expression database to a multi-omics resource for human and model organisms. Through a web-based interface, MOPED presents consistently processed data for gene, protein and pathway expression. To improve data quality, consistency and use, MOPED includes metadata detailing experimental design and analysis methods. The multi-omics data are integrated through direct links between genes and proteins and further connected to pathways and experiments. MOPED now contains over 5 million records, information for approximately 75,000 genes and 50,000 proteins from four organisms (human, mouse, worm, yeast). These records correspond to 670 unique combinations of experiment, condition, localization and tissue. MOPED includes the following new features: pathway expression, Pathway Details pages, experimental metadata checklists, experiment summary statistics and more advanced searching tools. Advanced searching enables querying for genes, proteins, experiments, pathways and keywords of interest. The system is enhanced with visualizations for comparing across different data types. In the future MOPED will expand the number of organisms, increase integration with pathways and provide connections to disease. PMID:25404128

  16. Interfacial polymerization for colorimetric labeling of protein expression in cells.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Jacob L; Sheldon, Phillip R; Hoversten, Liv J; Romero, Gabriela; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Berron, Brad J

    2014-01-01

    Determining the location of rare proteins in cells typically requires the use of on-sample amplification. Antibody based recognition and enzymatic amplification is used to produce large amounts of visible label at the site of protein expression, but these techniques suffer from the presence of nonspecific reactivity in the biological sample and from poor spatial control over the label. Polymerization based amplification is a recently developed alternative means of creating an on-sample amplification for fluorescence applications, while not suffering from endogenous labels or loss of signal localization. This manuscript builds upon polymerization based amplification by developing a stable, archivable, and colorimetric mode of amplification termed Polymer Dye Labeling. The basic concept involves an interfacial polymer grown at the site of protein expression and subsequent staining of this polymer with an appropriate dye. The dyes Evans Blue and eosin were initially investigated for colorimetric response in a microarray setting, where both specifically stained polymer films on glass. The process was translated to the staining of protein expression in human dermal fibroblast cells, and Polymer Dye Labeling was specific to regions consistent with desired protein expression. The labeling is stable for over 200 days in ambient conditions and is also compatible with modern mounting medium. PMID:25536421

  17. Interfacial Polymerization for Colorimetric Labeling of Protein Expression in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lilly, Jacob L.; Sheldon, Phillip R.; Hoversten, Liv J.; Romero, Gabriela; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Berron, Brad J.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the location of rare proteins in cells typically requires the use of on-sample amplification. Antibody based recognition and enzymatic amplification is used to produce large amounts of visible label at the site of protein expression, but these techniques suffer from the presence of nonspecific reactivity in the biological sample and from poor spatial control over the label. Polymerization based amplification is a recently developed alternative means of creating an on-sample amplification for fluorescence applications, while not suffering from endogenous labels or loss of signal localization. This manuscript builds upon polymerization based amplification by developing a stable, archivable, and colorimetric mode of amplification termed Polymer Dye Labeling. The basic concept involves an interfacial polymer grown at the site of protein expression and subsequent staining of this polymer with an appropriate dye. The dyes Evans Blue and eosin were initially investigated for colorimetric response in a microarray setting, where both specifically stained polymer films on glass. The process was translated to the staining of protein expression in human dermal fibroblast cells, and Polymer Dye Labeling was specific to regions consistent with desired protein expression. The labeling is stable for over 200 days in ambient conditions and is also compatible with modern mounting medium. PMID:25536421

  18. Argonaute Family Protein Expression in Normal Tissue and Cancer Entities

    PubMed Central

    Bruckmann, Astrid; Hauptmann, Judith; Deutzmann, Rainer; Meister, Gunter; Bosserhoff, Anja Katrin

    2016-01-01

    The members of the Argonaute (AGO) protein family are key players in miRNA-guided gene silencing. They enable the interaction between small RNAs and their respective target mRNA(s) and support the catalytic destruction of the gene transcript or recruit additional proteins for downstream gene silencing. The human AGO family consists of four AGO proteins (AGO1-AGO4), but only AGO2 harbors nuclease activity. In this study, we characterized the expression of the four AGO proteins in cancer cell lines and normal tissues with a new mass spectrometry approach called AGO-APP (AGO Affinity Purification by Peptides). In all analyzed normal tissues, AGO1 and AGO2 were most prominent, but marked tissue-specific differences were identified. Furthermore, considerable changes during development were observed by comparing fetal and adult tissues. We also identified decreased overall AGO expression in melanoma derived cell lines compared to other tumor cell lines and normal tissues, with the largest differences in AGO2 expression. The experiments described in this study suggest that reduced amounts of AGO proteins, as key players in miRNA processing, have impact on several cellular processes. Deregulated miRNA expression has been attributed to chromosomal aberrations, promoter regulation and it is known to have a major impact on tumor development and progression. Our findings will further increase our basic understanding of the molecular basis of miRNA processing and its relevance for disease. PMID:27518285

  19. Beyond protein expression, MOPED goes multi-omics

    PubMed Central

    Montague, Elizabeth; Janko, Imre; Stanberry, Larissa; Lee, Elaine; Choiniere, John; Anderson, Nathaniel; Stewart, Elizabeth; Broomall, William; Higdon, Roger; Kolker, Natali; Kolker, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    MOPED (Multi-Omics Profiling Expression Database; http://moped.proteinspire.org) has transitioned from solely a protein expression database to a multi-omics resource for human and model organisms. Through a web-based interface, MOPED presents consistently processed data for gene, protein and pathway expression. To improve data quality, consistency and use, MOPED includes metadata detailing experimental design and analysis methods. The multi-omics data are integrated through direct links between genes and proteins and further connected to pathways and experiments. MOPED now contains over 5 million records, information for approximately 75 000 genes and 50 000 proteins from four organisms (human, mouse, worm, yeast). These records correspond to 670 unique combinations of experiment, condition, localization and tissue. MOPED includes the following new features: pathway expression, Pathway Details pages, experimental metadata checklists, experiment summary statistics and more advanced searching tools. Advanced searching enables querying for genes, proteins, experiments, pathways and keywords of interest. The system is enhanced with visualizations for comparing across different data types. In the future MOPED will expand the number of organisms, increase integration with pathways and provide connections to disease. PMID:25404128

  20. Argonaute Family Protein Expression in Normal Tissue and Cancer Entities.

    PubMed

    Völler, Daniel; Linck, Lisa; Bruckmann, Astrid; Hauptmann, Judith; Deutzmann, Rainer; Meister, Gunter; Bosserhoff, Anja Katrin

    2016-01-01

    The members of the Argonaute (AGO) protein family are key players in miRNA-guided gene silencing. They enable the interaction between small RNAs and their respective target mRNA(s) and support the catalytic destruction of the gene transcript or recruit additional proteins for downstream gene silencing. The human AGO family consists of four AGO proteins (AGO1-AGO4), but only AGO2 harbors nuclease activity. In this study, we characterized the expression of the four AGO proteins in cancer cell lines and normal tissues with a new mass spectrometry approach called AGO-APP (AGO Affinity Purification by Peptides). In all analyzed normal tissues, AGO1 and AGO2 were most prominent, but marked tissue-specific differences were identified. Furthermore, considerable changes during development were observed by comparing fetal and adult tissues. We also identified decreased overall AGO expression in melanoma derived cell lines compared to other tumor cell lines and normal tissues, with the largest differences in AGO2 expression. The experiments described in this study suggest that reduced amounts of AGO proteins, as key players in miRNA processing, have impact on several cellular processes. Deregulated miRNA expression has been attributed to chromosomal aberrations, promoter regulation and it is known to have a major impact on tumor development and progression. Our findings will further increase our basic understanding of the molecular basis of miRNA processing and its relevance for disease. PMID:27518285

  1. The Expression and Significance of Neuronal Iconic Proteins in Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu; Zhang, Hongxia; Hu, Ruimin; Sun, Jianyong; Mao, Xing; Zhao, Zhonghua; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that there are many common cell biological features shared by neurons and podocytes; however, the mechanism of podocyte foot process formation remains unclear. Comparing the mechanisms of process formation between two cell types should provide useful guidance from the progress of neuron research. Studies have shown that some mature proteins of podocytes, such as podocin, nephrin, and synaptopodin, were also expressed in neurons. In this study, using cell biological experiments and immunohistochemical techniques, we showed that some neuronal iconic molecules, such as Neuron-specific enolase, nestin and Neuron-specific nuclear protein, were also expressed in podocytes. We further inhibited the expression of Neuron-specific enolase, nestin, synaptopodin and Ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolase-1 by Small interfering RNA in cultured mouse podocytes and observed the significant morphological changes in treated podocytes. When podocytes were treated with Adriamycin, the protein expression of Neuron-specific enolase, nestin, synaptopodin and Ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolase-1 decreased over time. Meanwhile, the morphological changes in the podocytes were consistent with results of the Small interfering RNA treatment of these proteins. The data demonstrated that neuronal iconic proteins play important roles in maintaining and regulating the formation and function of podocyte processes. PMID:24699703

  2. Expression of bone matrix proteins in urolithiasis model rats.

    PubMed

    Yasui, T; Fujita, K; Sasaki, S; Sato, M; Sugimoto, M; Hirota, S; Kitamura, Y; Nomura, S; Kohri, K

    1999-08-01

    Urinary calcium stones are a pathological substance, and they show similarities to physiological mineralization and other pathological mineralizations. The expression of messenger (m) RNAs of osteopontin (OPN), matrix Gla protein (MGP), osteonectin (ON) and osteocalcin (OC) in bones and teeth has been described. We previously identified OPN as an important stone matrix protein. In addition, the spontaneous calcification of arteries and cartilage in mice lacking MGP was recently reported, a finding which indicates that MGP has a function as an inhibitor of mineralization. Here, we examined the mRNA expressions of OPN, MGP, ON, and OC in the kidneys of stone-forming model rats administered an oxalate precursor, ethylene glycol (EG) for up to 28 days. The Northern blotting showed that the mRNA expressions of OPN and MGP were markedly increased with the administration of EG, but their expression patterns differed. The OPN mRNA expression reached the maximal level at day 7 after the initiation of the EG treatment and showed no significant difference after 14 and 28 days, whereas the MGP mRNA expression rose gradually to day 28. The in situ hybridization demonstrated that the cell type expressing OPN mRNA was different from that expressing MGP. We suggest that OPN acts on calcification and MGP acts on suppression. PMID:10460895

  3. hTERT protein expression is independent of clinicopathological parameters and c-Myc protein expression in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elkak, AE; Meligonis, G; Salhab, M; Mitchell, B; Blake, JRS; Newbold, RF; Mokbel, K

    2005-01-01

    Background Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that synthesises telomeres after cell division and maintains chromosomal length and stability thus leading to cellular immortalisation. The hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase) subunit seems to be the rate-limiting determinant of telomerase and knowledge of factors controlling hTERT transcription may be useful in therapeutic strategies. The hTERT promoter contains binding sites for c-Myc and there is some experimental and in vitro evidence that c-Myc may increase hTERT expression. We previously reported no correlation between c-Myc mRNA expression and hTERT mRNA or telomerase activity in human breast cancer. This study aims to examine the correlation between hTERT expression as determined by immunohistochemistry and c-Myc expression, lymph node status, and tumour size and grade in human breast cancer. Materials and methods The immunohistochemical expression of hTERT and c-Myc was investigated in 38 malignant breast tumours. The expression of hTERT was then correlated with the lymph node status, c-Myc expression and other clinicopathological parameters of the tumours. Results hTERT expression was positive in 27 (71%) of the 38 tumours. 15 (79%) of 19 node positive tumours were hTERT positive compared with 11 (63%) of 19 node negative tumours. The expression was higher in node positive tumours but this failed to reach statistical significance (p = 0.388). There was no significant association with tumour size, tumour grade or c-Myc expression. However, hTERT expression correlated positively with patients' age (correlation coefficient = 0.415, p = 0.0097). Conclusion hTERT protein expression is independent of lymph node status, tumour size and grade and c-Myc protein expression in human breast cancer PMID:16202165

  4. Human Cementum Protein 1 induces expression of bone and cementum proteins by human gingival fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona-Rodriguez, Bruno; Alvarez-Perez, Marco Antonio; Narayanan, A. Sampath; Zeichner-David, Margarita; Reyes-Gasga, Jose; Molina-Guarneros, Juan; Garcia-Hernandez, Ana Lilia; Suarez-Franco, Jose Luis; Chavarria, Ivet Gil; Villarreal-Ramirez, Eduardo; Arzate, Higinio . E-mail: harzate@servidor.unam.mx

    2007-07-06

    We recently presented evidence showing that a human cementoblastoma-derived protein, named Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1) may play a role as a local regulator of cementoblast differentiation and cementum-matrix mineralization. This protein was shown to be expressed by cementoblasts and progenitor cells localized in the periodontal ligament. In this study we demonstrate that transfection of CEMP1 into human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) induces mineralization and expression of bone and cementum-matrix proteins. The transfected HGF cells had higher alkaline phosphatase activity and proliferation rate and they expressed genes for alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin, the transcription factor Runx2/Cbfa1, and cementum attachment protein (CAP). They also produced biological-type hydroxyapatite. These findings indicate that the CEMP1 might participate in differentiation and mineralization of nonosteogenic cells, and that it might have a potential function in cementum and bone formation.

  5. Expression of Yes Associated Protein, YAP, Modulates Survivin Expression in Primary Liver Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Haibo; Gayyed, Mariana F.; Lam-Himlin, Dora M.; Klein, Alison P.; Nayar, Suresh K.; Xu, Yang; Khan, Mehtab; Argani, Pedram; Pan, Duojia; Anders, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) account for 95% of primary liver cancer. For each of these malignancies the outcome is dismal; incidence is rapidly increasing and mechanistic understanding is limited. We observed abnormal proliferation of both biliary epithelium and hepatocytes in mice following genetic manipulation of Yes associated protein (YAP), a transcription co-activator. Here we comprehensively documented YAP protein expression in the human liver and primary liver cancers. We showed that nuclear YAP expression is significantly increased in human ICC and HCC. We found that increased YAP protein levels in HCC are due to multiple mechanisms including gene amplification, transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation. Survivin, a member of the inhibitors-of-apoptosis protein (IAPs) family, has been reported as an independent prognostic factor for poor survival in both HCC and ICC. We found nuclear YAP expression correlates significantly with nuclear Survivin expression for both ICC and HCC. Furthermore, using mice engineered to conditionally overexpress YAP in the liver, we found Survivin mRNA expression depends upon YAP protein levels. Our findings suggested that YAP contributes to primary liver tumorigenesis and likely mediates its oncogenic effects through modulating Survivin expression. PMID:22436626

  6. Biochemical Analysis of Recombinant AlkJ from Pseudomonas putida Reveals a Membrane-Associated, Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide-Dependent Dehydrogenase Suitable for the Biosynthetic Production of Aliphatic Aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Kirmair, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    The noncanonical alcohol dehydrogenase AlkJ is encoded on the alkane-metabolizing alk operon of the mesophilic bacterium Pseudomonas putida GPo1. To gain insight into the enzymology of AlkJ, we have produced the recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and purified it to homogeneity using His6 tag affinity and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Despite synthesis in the cytoplasm, AlkJ was associated with the bacterial cell membrane, and solubilization with n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside was necessary to liberate the enzyme. SEC and spectrophotometric analysis revealed a dimeric quaternary structure with stoichiometrically bound reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH2). The holoenzyme showed thermal denaturation at moderate temperatures around 35°C, according to both activity assay and temperature-dependent circular dichroism spectroscopy. The tightly bound coenzyme was released only upon denaturation with SDS or treatment with urea-KBr and, after air oxidation, exhibited the characteristic absorption spectrum of FAD. The enzymatic activity of purified AlkJ for 1-butanol, 1-hexanol, and 1-octanol as well as the n-alkanol derivative ω-hydroxy lauric acid methyl ester (HLAMe) was quantified in the presence of the artificial electron acceptors phenazine methosulfate (PMS) and 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP), indicating broad substrate specificity with the lowest activity on the shortest alcohol, 1-butanol. Furthermore, AlkJ was able to accept as cosubstrates/oxidants the ubiquinone derivatives Q0 and Q1, also in conjunction with cytochrome c, which suggests coupling to the bacterial respiratory chain of this membrane-associated enzyme in its physiological environment. Using gas chromatographic analysis, we demonstrated specific biocatalytic conversion by AlkJ of the substrate HLAMe to the industrially relevant aldehyde, thus enabling the biotechnological production of 12-amino lauric acid methyl ester via subsequent enzymatic transamination. PMID:24509930

  7. Over-producing soluble protein complex and validating protein-protein interaction through a new bacterial co-expression system.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jumei; Zhang, Lei; Li, Yuqing; Wang, Yi; Wang, Mingchao; Duan, Xin; He, Zheng-Guo

    2010-01-01

    Many proteins exert their functions through a protein complex and protein-protein interactions. However, the study of these types of interactions is complicated when dealing with toxic or hydrophobic proteins. It is difficult to use the popular Escherichia coli host for their expression, as these proteins in all likelihood require a critical partner protein to ensure their proper folding and stability. In the present study, we have developed a novel co-expression vector, pHEX, which is compatible with, and thus can be partnered with, many commercially available E. coli vectors, such as pET, pGEX and pMAL. The pHEX contains the p15A origin of replication and a T7 promoter, which can over-produce a His-tagged recombinant protein. The new co-expression system was demonstrated to efficiently co-produce and co-purify heterodimeric protein complexes, for example PE25/PPE41 (Rv2430c/Rv2431c) and ESAT6/CFP10 (Rv3874/Rv3875), from the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. Furthermore, the system was also effectively used to characterize protein-protein interactions through convenient affinity tags. Using an in vivo pull-down assay, for the first time we have confirmed the presence of three pairs of PE/PPE-related novel protein interactions in this pathogen. In summary, a convenient and efficient co-expression vector system has been successfully developed. The new system should be applicable to any protein complex or any protein-protein interaction of interest in a wide range of biological organisms. PMID:19747546

  8. Total Body Metabolic Tumor Response in ALK Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with ALK Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Koole, Michel J. B.; Bongaerts, Alphons H. H.; Pruim, Jan; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background In ALK-positive advanced NSCLC, crizotinib has a high response rate and effectively increases quality of life and survival. CT measurement of the tumor may insufficiently reflect the actual tumor load changes during targeted therapy with crizotinib. We explored whether 18F-FDG PET measured metabolic changes are different from CT based changes and studied the impact of these changes on disease progression. Methods 18F-FDG PET/CT was performed prior to and after 6 weeks of crizotinib treatment. Tumor response on CT was classified with RECIST 1.1, while 18F-FDG PET response was assessed according to the 1999 EORTC recommendations and PERCIST criteria. Agreement was assessed using McNemars test. During follow-up, patients received additional PET/CT during crizotinib treatment and second generation ALK inhibition. We assessed whether PET was able to detect progression earlier then CT. Results In this exploratory study 15 patients were analyzed who were treated with crizotinib. There was a good agreement in the applicability of CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT using the EORTC recommendations. During first line crizotinib and subsequent second line ALK inhibitors, PET was able to detect progression earlier then CT in 10/22 (45%) events of progression and in the others disease progression was detected simultaneously. Conclusion In advanced ALK positive NSCLC PET was able to detect progressive disease earlier than with CT in nearly half of the assessments while both imaging tests performed similar in the others. PMID:27137772

  9. The protein expression landscape of the Arabidopsis root

    PubMed Central

    Petricka, Jalean J.; Schauer, Monica A.; Megraw, Molly; Breakfield, Natalie W.; Thompson, J. Will; Georgiev, Stoyan; Soderblom, Erik J.; Ohler, Uwe; Moseley, Martin Arthur; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Benfey, Philip N.

    2012-01-01

    Because proteins are the major functional components of cells, knowledge of their cellular localization is crucial to gaining an understanding of the biology of multicellular organisms. We have generated a protein expression map of the Arabidopsis root providing the identity and cell type-specific localization of nearly 2,000 proteins. Grouping proteins into functional categories revealed unique cellular functions and identified cell type-specific biomarkers. Cellular colocalization provided support for numerous protein–protein interactions. With a binary comparison, we found that RNA and protein expression profiles are weakly correlated. We then performed peak integration at cell type-specific resolution and found an improved correlation with transcriptome data using continuous values. We performed GeLC-MS/MS (in-gel tryptic digestion followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry) proteomic experiments on mutants with ectopic and no root hairs, providing complementary proteomic data. Finally, among our root hair-specific proteins we identified two unique regulators of root hair development. PMID:22447775

  10. microRNA expression profiling identifies molecular signatures associated with anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cuiling; Iqbal, Javeed; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Shen, Yulei; Dabrowska, Magdalena Julia; Dybkaer, Karen; Lim, Megan S.; Piva, Roberto; Barreca, Antonella; Pellegrino, Elisa; Spaccarotella, Elisa; Lachel, Cynthia M.; Kucuk, Can; Jiang, Chun-Sun; Hu, Xiaozhou; Bhagavathi, Sharathkumar; Greiner, Timothy C.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Aoun, Patricia; Perkins, Sherrie L.; McKeithan, Timothy W.; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs) encompass at least 2 systemic diseases distinguished by the presence or absence of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) expression. We performed genome-wide microRNA (miRNA) profiling on 33 ALK-positive (ALK[+]) ALCLs, 25 ALK-negative (ALK[−]) ALCLs, 9 angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas, 11 peripheral T-cell lymphomas not otherwise specified (PTCLNOS), and normal T cells, and demonstrated that ALCLs express many of the miRNAs that are highly expressed in normal T cells with the prominent exception of miR-146a. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering demonstrated distinct clustering of ALCL, PTCL-NOS, and the AITL subtype of PTCL. Cases of ALK(+) ALCL and ALK(–) ALCL were interspersed in unsupervised analysis, suggesting a close relationship at the molecular level. We identified an miRNA signature of 7 miRNAs (5 upregulated: miR-512-3p, miR-886-5p, miR-886-3p, miR-708, miR-135b; 2 downregulated: miR-146a, miR-155) significantly associated with ALK(+) ALCL cases. In addition, we derived an 11-miRNA signature (4 upregulated: miR-210, miR-197, miR-191, miR-512-3p; 7 downregulated: miR-451, miR-146a, miR-22, miR-455-3p, miR-455-5p, miR-143, miR-494) that differentiates ALK(–) ALCL from other PTCLs. Our in vitro studies identified a set of 32 miRNAs associated with ALK expression. Of these, the miR-17∼92 cluster and its paralogues were also highly expressed in ALK(+) ALCL and may represent important downstream effectors of the ALK oncogenic pathway. PMID:23801630

  11. Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) interacting proteins exhibit different expression patterns during development.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, C M; Spatuzza, M; Di Marco, B; Gloria, A; Barrancotto, G; Cupo, A; Musumeci, S A; D'Antoni, S; Bardoni, B; Catania, M V

    2015-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by the lack of expression of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding protein involved in mRNA transport and translation. FMRP is a component of mRNA ribonucleoprotein complexes and it can interact with a range of proteins either directly or indirectly, as demonstrated by two-hybrid selection and co-immunoprecipitation, respectively. Most of FMRP-interacting proteins are RNA-binding proteins such as FXR1P, FXR2P and 82-FIP. Interestingly, FMRP can also interact directly with the cytoplasmic proteins CYFIP1 and CYFIP2, which do not bind RNA and link FMRP to the RhoGTPase pathway. The interaction with these different proteins may modulate the functions of FMRP by influencing its affinity to RNA and by affecting the FMRP ability of cytoskeleton remodeling through Rho/Rac GTPases. To better define the relationship of FMRP with its interacting proteins during brain development, we have analyzed the expression pattern of FMRP and its interacting proteins in the cortex, striatum, hippocampus and cerebellum at different ages in wild type (WT) mice. FMRP and FXR2P were strongly expressed during the first week and gradually decreased thereafter, more rapidly in the cerebellum than in the cortex. FXR1P was also expressed early and showed a reduction at later stages of development with a similar developmental pattern in these two regions. CYFIP1 was expressed at all ages and peaked in the third post-natal week. In contrast, CYFIP2 and 82-FIP (only in forebrain regions) were moderately expressed at P3 and gradually increased after P7. In general, the expression pattern of each protein was similar in the regions examined, except for 82-FIP, which exhibited a strong expression at P3 and low levels at later developmental stages in the cerebellum. Our data indicate that FMRP and its interacting proteins have distinct developmental patterns of expression and suggest that FMRP may be preferentially associated to certain proteins in

  12. Expression of extracellular matrix proteins in adenomatoid odontogenic tumor.

    PubMed

    Modolo, Filipe; Biz, Michelle Tillmann; Martins, Marília Trierveiller; Machado de Sousa, Suzana Orsini; de Araújo, Ney Soares

    2010-03-01

    Altered expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) components has been reported in several pathologies; however, few ECM proteins have been evaluated in adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT). The aim of this study was to analyze the expression and distribution of the ECM proteoglycans: biglycan and decorin; and glycoproteins: osteonectin, osteopontin, bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin in the AOT. Three-micrometer sections from paraffin-embedded specimens were evaluated employing a streptavidin-biotin immunohistochemical method with the antibodies against the proteins previously cited. Only the osteonectin was expressed in the epithelial cells. The eosinophilic amorphous material and the connective tissue showed expression of all components studied. The calcification foci expressed only osteopontin. In conclusion, the low expression of the components studied in neoplastic epithelial cells suggests that the epithelial cells act probably as stimulators of the expression by the stroma, which in turn can act as agonist or antagonist of the tumor growth. These results suggest that the components studied probably have a key role in the biological behavior of the AOT. PMID:20070486

  13. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling by an ALK5 inhibitor protects rats from dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    de Gouville, Anne-Charlotte; Boullay, Valerie; Krysa, Gael; Pilot, Julia; Brusq, Jean-Marie; Loriolle, Florence; Gauthier, Jean-Michel; Papworth, Stephen A; Laroze, Alain; Gellibert, Françoise; Huet, Stephane

    2005-01-01

    Chronic liver disease is characterized by an exacerbated accumulation of matrix, causing progressive fibrosis, which may lead to cirrhosis. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), a well-known profibrotic cytokine, transduces its signal through the ALK5 ser/thr kinase receptor, and increases transcription of different genes including PAI-1 and collagens. The identification of GW6604 (2-phenyl-4-(3-pyridin-2-yl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)pyridine), an ALK5 inhibitor, allowed us to evaluate the therapeutic potential of inhibiting TGF-β pathway in different models of liver disease. A cellular assay was used to identify GW6604 as a TGF-β signaling pathway inhibitor. This ALK5 inhibitor was then tested in a model of liver hepatectomy in TGF-β-overexpressing transgenic mice, in an acute model of liver disease and in a chronic model of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced liver fibrosis. In vitro, GW6604 inhibited autophosphorylation of ALK5 with an IC50 of 140 nM and in a cellular assay inhibited TGF-β-induced transcription of PAI-1 (IC50: 500 nM). In vivo, GW6604 (40 mg kg−1 p.o.) increased liver regeneration in TGF-β-overexpressing mice, which had undergone partial hepatectomy. In an acute model of liver disease, GW6604 reduced by 80% the expression of collagen IA1. In a chronic model of DMN-induced fibrosis where DMN was administered for 6 weeks and GW6604 dosed for the last 3 weeks (80 mg kg−1 p.o., b.i.d.), mortality was prevented and DMN-induced elevations of mRNA encoding for collagen IA1, IA2, III, TIMP-1 and TGF-β were reduced by 50–75%. Inhibition of matrix genes overexpression was accompanied by reduced matrix deposition and reduction in liver function deterioration, as assessed by bilirubin and liver enzyme levels. Our results suggest that inhibition of ALK5 could be an attractive new approach to treatment of liver fibrotic diseases by both preventing matrix deposition and promoting hepatocyte regeneration. PMID:15723089

  14. PROTEIN EXPRESSION AND SECRETION BY TRICHODERMA REESEI UNDER LOW ENDOGENOUS PROTEIN BACKGROUND

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) is one of the most commonly used fungi for the manufacturing of industrial enzyme products. The fungus is capable of secreting proteins in levels up to 100 grams per liter. A number of homologous and heterologous proteins have been successfully over-expressed...

  15. Using Green and Red Fluorescent Proteins to Teach Protein Expression, Purification, and Crystallization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yifeng; Zhou, Yangbin; Song, Jiaping; Hu, Xiaojian; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Zhihong

    2008-01-01

    We have designed a laboratory curriculum using the green and red fluorescent proteins (GFP and RFP) to visualize the cloning, expression, chromatography purification, crystallization, and protease-cleavage experiments of protein science. The EGFP and DsRed monomer (mDsRed)-coding sequences were amplified by PCR and cloned into pMAL (MBP-EGFP) or…

  16. The Use of a Combination of alkB Primers to Better Characterize the Distribution of Alkane-Degrading Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Jurelevicius, Diogo; Alvarez, Vanessa Marques; Peixoto, Raquel; Rosado, Alexandre S.; Seldin, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    The alkane monooxygenase AlkB, which is encoded by the alkB gene, is a key enzyme involved in bacterial alkane degradation. To study the alkB gene within bacterial communities, researchers need to be aware of the variations in alkB nucleotide sequences; a failure to consider the sequence variations results in the low representation of the diversity and richness of alkane-degrading bacteria. To minimize this shortcoming, the use of a combination of three alkB-targeting primers to enhance the detection of the alkB gene in previously isolated alkane-degrading bacteria was proposed. Using this approach, alkB-related PCR products were detected in 79% of the strains tested. Furthermore, the chosen set of primers was used to study alkB richness and diversity in different soils sampled in Carmópolis, Brazil and King George Island, Antarctica. The DNA extracted from the different soils was PCR amplified with each set of alkB-targeting primers, and clone libraries were constructed, sequenced and analyzed. A total of 255 alkB phylotypes were detected. Venn diagram analyses revealed that only low numbers of alkB phylotypes were shared among the different libraries derived from each primer pair. Therefore, the combination of three alkB-targeting primers enhanced the richness of alkB phylotypes detected in the different soils by 45% to 139%, when compared to the use of a single alkB-targeting primer. In addition, a dendrogram analysis and beta diversity comparison of the alkB composition showed that each of the sampling sites studied had a particular set of alkane-degrading bacteria. The use of a combination of alkB primers was an efficient strategy for enhancing the detection of the alkB gene in cultivable bacteria and for better characterizing the distribution of alkane-degrading bacteria in different soil environments. PMID:23825163

  17. Detection of novel and potentially actionable anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement in colorectal adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry screening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Kim, Sun Young; Jang, Jiryeon; Kim, Seung Tae; Park, Joon Oh; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Young Suk; Lee, Jiyun; Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Yoon Ah; Huh, Jung Wook; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Do, In-Gu; Kim, Seok Hyung; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Stephens, Philip J.; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Li, Gang Gary; Hornby, Zachary; Ali, Siraj M.; Miller, Vincent A.; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement has been detected in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) using advanced molecular diagnostics tests including exon scanning, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and next generation sequencing (NGS). We investigated if immunohistochemistry (IHC) can be used to detect ALK rearrangement in gastrointestinal malignancies. Experimental designs Tissue microarrays (TMAs) from consecutive gastric carcinoma (GC) and CRC patients who underwent surgical resection at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea were screened by IHC using ALK monoclonal antibody 5A4. IHC positive cases were confirmed by FISH, nCounter assays, and NGS-based comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP). ALK IHC was further applied to CRC patients enrolled in a pathway-directed therapeutic trial. Results Four hundred thirty-two GC and 172 CRC cases were screened by IHC. No GC sample was ALK IHC positive. One CRC (0.6%) was ALK IHC positive (3+) that was confirmed by ALK FISH and a novel CAD-ALK (C35; A20) fusion variant that resulted from a paracentric inversion event inv(2)(p22–21p23) was identified by CGP. One out of 50 CRC patients enrolled in a pathway-directed therapeutic trial was ALK IHC positive (3+) confirmed by ALK FISH and found to harbor the EML4-ALK (E21, A20) fusion variant by CGP. Growth of a tumor cell line derived from this EML4-ALK CRC patient was inhibited by ALK inhibitors crizotinib and entrectinib. Conclusions ALK IHC is a viable screening strategy for identifying ALK rearrangement in CRC. ALK rearrangement is a potential actionable driver mutation in CRC based on survival inhibition of patient tumor-derived cell line by potent ALK inhibitors. PMID:26172300

  18. Methods and constructs for expression of foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms

    DOEpatents

    Laible, Philip D.; Hanson, Deborah K.

    2002-01-01

    A method for expressing and purifying foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms comprising the simultaneous expression of both the heterologous protein and a means for compartmentalizing or sequestering of the protein.

  19. ALK-positive inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor harboring ALK gene rearrangement, occurring after allogeneic stem cell transplant in an adult male.

    PubMed

    Vroobel, Katherine; Judson, Ian; Dainton, Melissa; McCormick, Alison; Fisher, Cyril; Thway, Khin

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor arose as a defined neoplasm from the disparate group of tumors (both neoplastic and inflammatory) originally described as inflammatory pseudotumors. The morphologic features are well described, and 50-60% of cases are associated with fusions of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene. We describe an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in the lower abdominal wall of an adult male, which occurred 88days after he received an allogeneic stem cell transplant for T-lymphoblastic lymphoma, and which was positive for ALK immunohistochemistry and showed ALK gene rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Two other cases are reported in the post-stem cell transplant setting, but both occurred in children and did not have molecular analysis performed. The etiology remains unclear, but may be due to immune dysregulation caused by any combination of prior chemotherapy, radiotherapy and immune suppression. These neoplasms should be considered as a rare consequence of allogeneic stem cell transplantation and referral to a specialist sarcoma center for further management may be required. PMID:27155927

  20. Controlling for Gene Expression Changes in Transcription Factor Protein Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Charles A. S.; Lee, Zachary T.; Boanca, Gina; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Groppe, Brad D.; Wen, Zhihui; Hattem, Gaye L.; Seidel, Chris W.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    The development of affinity purification technologies combined with mass spectrometric analysis of purified protein mixtures has been used both to identify new protein–protein interactions and to define the subunit composition of protein complexes. Transcription factor protein interactions, however, have not been systematically analyzed using these approaches. Here, we investigated whether ectopic expression of an affinity tagged transcription factor as bait in affinity purification mass spectrometry experiments perturbs gene expression in cells, resulting in the false positive identification of bait-associated proteins when typical experimental controls are used. Using quantitative proteomics and RNA sequencing, we determined that the increase in the abundance of a set of proteins caused by overexpression of the transcription factor RelA is not sufficient for these proteins to then co-purify non-specifically and be misidentified as bait-associated proteins. Therefore, typical controls should be sufficient, and a number of different baits can be compared with a common set of controls. This is of practical interest when identifying bait interactors from a large number of different baits. As expected, we found several known RelA interactors enriched in our RelA purifications (NFκB1, NFκB2, Rel, RelB, IκBα, IκBβ, and IκBε). We also found several proteins not previously described in association with RelA, including the small mitochondrial chaperone Tim13. Using a variety of biochemical approaches, we further investigated the nature of the association between Tim13 and NFκB family transcription factors. This work therefore provides a conceptual and experimental framework for analyzing transcription factor protein interactions. PMID:24722732

  1. Cementum attachment protein/protein-tyrosine phosphotase-like member A is not expressed in teeth.

    PubMed

    Schild, Christof; Beyeler, Michael; Lang, Niklaus P; Trueb, Beat

    2009-02-01

    Cementum is a highly specialized connective tissue that covers tooth roots. The only cementum-specific protein described to date is the cementum attachment protein (CAP). A putative sequence for CAP was established from a cDNA clone isolated from a human cementifying fibroma cDNA library. This sequence overlaps with a phosphatase-like protein in muscle termed the protein-tyrosine phosphatase-like member A (PTPLA). To clarify the nature of CAP/PTPLA, we cloned the homologous rat protein and determined its sequence. The rat protein shared 94% sequence identity with the human protein. On Northern blots containing RNA from various rat tissues of different developmental stages, the cDNA hybridized to an mRNA expressed in heart and skeletal muscle but not in teeth. These results were confirmed by real-time PCR. Thus, the sequence deposited in public databanks under the name 'cementum attachment protein' does not represent genuine CAP. PMID:19148556

  2. Computational codon optimization of synthetic gene for protein expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The construction of customized nucleic acid sequences allows us to have greater flexibility in gene design for recombinant protein expression. Among the various parameters considered for such DNA sequence design, individual codon usage (ICU) has been implicated as one of the most crucial factors affecting mRNA translational efficiency. However, previous works have also reported the significant influence of codon pair usage, also known as codon context (CC), on the level of protein expression. Results In this study, we have developed novel computational procedures for evaluating the relative importance of optimizing ICU and CC for enhancing protein expression. By formulating appropriate mathematical expressions to quantify the ICU and CC fitness of a coding sequence, optimization procedures based on genetic algorithm were employed to maximize its ICU and/or CC fitness. Surprisingly, the in silico validation of the resultant optimized DNA sequences for Escherichia coli, Lactococcus lactis, Pichia pastoris and Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggests that CC is a more relevant design criterion than the commonly considered ICU. Conclusions The proposed CC optimization framework can complement and enhance the capabilities of current gene design tools, with potential applications to heterologous protein production and even vaccine development in synthetic biotechnology. PMID:23083100

  3. Expression and Characterization of Recombinant Campylobacter jejuni Chemotactic Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Expression and Characterization of Recombinant Campylobacter jejuni Chemotactic Proteins Hung-Yueh Yeh*, Kelli L. Hiett, John E. Line, Brian B. Oakley and Bruce S. Seal, Poultry Microbiological Safety Research Unit, Richard B. Russell Agricultural Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, Uni...

  4. Heterologous Expression of Membrane Proteins: Choosing the Appropriate Host

    PubMed Central

    Pochon, Nathalie; Dementin, Sébastien; Hivin, Patrick; Boutigny, Sylvain; Rioux, Jean-Baptiste; Salvi, Daniel; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné; Richaud, Pierre; Joyard, Jacques; Pignol, David; Sabaty, Monique; Desnos, Thierry; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva; Darrouzet, Elisabeth; Vernet, Thierry; Rolland, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Background Membrane proteins are the targets of 50% of drugs, although they only represent 1% of total cellular proteins. The first major bottleneck on the route to their functional and structural characterisation is their overexpression; and simply choosing the right system can involve many months of trial and error. This work is intended as a guide to where to start when faced with heterologous expression of a membrane protein. Methodology/Principal Findings The expression of 20 membrane proteins, both peripheral and integral, in three prokaryotic (E. coli, L. lactis, R. sphaeroides) and three eukaryotic (A. thaliana, N. benthamiana, Sf9 insect cells) hosts was tested. The proteins tested were of various origins (bacteria, plants and mammals), functions (transporters, receptors, enzymes) and topologies (between 0 and 13 transmembrane segments). The Gateway system was used to clone all 20 genes into appropriate vectors for the hosts to be tested. Culture conditions were optimised for each host, and specific strategies were tested, such as the use of Mistic fusions in E. coli. 17 of the 20 proteins were produced at adequate yields for functional and, in some cases, structural studies. We have formulated general recommendations to assist with choosing an appropriate system based on our observations of protein behaviour in the different hosts. Conclusions/Significance Most of the methods presented here can be quite easily implemented in other laboratories. The results highlight certain factors that should be considered when selecting an expression host. The decision aide provided should help both newcomers and old-hands to select the best system for their favourite membrane protein. PMID:22216205

  5. Escherichia coli Protein Expression System for Acetylcholine Binding Proteins (AChBPs)

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Nikita; Paul, Blessy; Ragnarsson, Lotten; Lewis, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are ligand gated ion channels, identified as therapeutic targets for a range of human diseases. Drug design for nAChR related disorders is increasingly using structure-based approaches. Many of these structural insights for therapeutic lead development have been obtained from co-crystal structures of nAChR agonists and antagonists with the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP). AChBP is a water soluble, structural and functional homolog of the extracellular, ligand-binding domain of nAChRs. Currently, AChBPs are recombinantly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems for structural and biophysical studies. Here, we report the establishment of an Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system that significantly reduces the cost and time of production compared to the existing expression systems. E. coli can efficiently express unglycosylated AChBP for crystallography and makes the expression of isotopically labelled forms feasible for NMR. We used a pHUE vector containing an N-terminal His-tagged ubiquitin fusion protein to facilitate AChBP expression in the soluble fractions, and thus avoid the need to recover protein from inclusion bodies. The purified protein yield obtained from the E. coli expression system is comparable to that obtained from existing AChBP expression systems. E. coli expressed AChBP bound nAChR agonists and antagonists with affinities matching those previously reported. Thus, the E. coli expression system significantly simplifies the expression and purification of functional AChBP for structural and biophysical studies. PMID:27304486

  6. Optimization of Translation Profiles Enhances Protein Expression and Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Anne-Katrin; Saffert, Paul; Liebeton, Klaus; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    mRNA is translated with a non-uniform speed that actively coordinates co-translational folding of protein domains. Using structure-based homology we identified the structural domains in epoxide hydrolases (EHs) and introduced slow-translating codons to delineate the translation of single domains. These changes in translation speed dramatically improved the solubility of two EHs of metagenomic origin in Escherichia coli. Conversely, the importance of transient attenuation for the folding, and consequently solubility, of EH was evidenced with a member of the EH family from Agrobacterium radiobacter, which partitions in the soluble fraction when expressed in E. coli. Synonymous substitutions of codons shaping the slow-transiting regions to fast-translating codons render this protein insoluble. Furthermore, we show that low protein yield can be enhanced by decreasing the free folding energy of the initial 5’-coding region, which can disrupt mRNA secondary structure and enhance ribosomal loading. This study provides direct experimental evidence that mRNA is not a mere messenger for translation of codons into amino acids but bears an additional layer of information for folding, solubility and expression level of the encoded protein. Furthermore, it provides a general frame on how to modulate and fine-tune gene expression of a target protein. PMID:25965266

  7. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression

    SciTech Connect

    Doorbar, John

    2013-10-15

    The papillomavirus E4 open reading frame (ORF) is contained within the E2 ORF, with the primary E4 gene-product (E1{sup ∧}E4) being translated from a spliced mRNA that includes the E1 initiation codon and adjacent sequences. E4 is located centrally within the E2 gene, in a region that encodes the E2 protein′s flexible hinge domain. Although a number of minor E4 transcripts have been reported, it is the product of the abundant E1{sup ∧}E4 mRNA that has been most extensively analysed. During the papillomavirus life cycle, the E1{sup ∧}E4 gene products generally become detectable at the onset of vegetative viral genome amplification as the late stages of infection begin. E4 contributes to genome amplification success and virus synthesis, with its high level of expression suggesting additional roles in virus release and/or transmission. In general, E4 is easily visualised in biopsy material by immunostaining, and can be detected in lesions caused by diverse papillomavirus types, including those of dogs, rabbits and cattle as well as humans. The E4 protein can serve as a biomarker of active virus infection, and in the case of high-risk human types also disease severity. In some cutaneous lesions, E4 can be expressed at higher levels than the virion coat proteins, and can account for as much as 30% of total lesional protein content. The E4 proteins of the Beta, Gamma and Mu HPV types assemble into distinctive cytoplasmic, and sometimes nuclear, inclusion granules. In general, the E4 proteins are expressed before L2 and L1, with their structure and function being modified, first by kinases as the infected cell progresses through the S and G2 cell cycle phases, but also by proteases as the cell exits the cell cycle and undergoes true terminal differentiation. The kinases that regulate E4 also affect other viral proteins simultaneously, and include protein kinase A, Cyclin-dependent kinase, members of the MAP Kinase family and protein kinase C. For HPV16 E1{sup

  8. Combined protein construct and synthetic gene engineering for heterologous protein expression and crystallization using Gene Composer

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Amy; Lovell, Scott; Lorimer, Don; Walchli, John; Mixon, Mark; Wallace, Ellen; Thompkins, Kaitlin; Archer, Kimberly; Burgin, Alex; Stewart, Lance

    2009-12-01

    With the goal of improving yield and success rates of heterologous protein production for structural studies we have developed the database and algorithm software package Gene Composer. This freely available electronic tool facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their engineered synthetic gene sequences, as detailed in the accompanying manuscript. In this report, we compare heterologous protein expression levels from native sequences to that of codon engineered synthetic gene constructs designed by Gene Composer. A test set of proteins including a human kinase (P38{alpha}), viral polymerase (HCV NS5B), and bacterial structural protein (FtsZ) were expressed in both E. coli and a cell-free wheat germ translation system. We also compare the protein expression levels in E. coli for a set of 11 different proteins with greatly varied G:C content and codon bias. The results consistently demonstrate that protein yields from codon engineered Gene Composer designs are as good as or better than those achieved from the synonymous native genes. Moreover, structure guided N- and C-terminal deletion constructs designed with the aid of Gene Composer can lead to greater success in gene to structure work as exemplified by the X-ray crystallographic structure determination of FtsZ from Bacillus subtilis. These results validate the Gene Composer algorithms, and suggest that using a combination of synthetic gene and protein construct engineering tools can improve the economics of gene to structure research.

  9. Easy mammalian expression and crystallography of maltose-binding protein-fused human proteins.

    PubMed

    Bokhove, Marcel; Sadat Al Hosseini, Hamed; Saito, Takako; Dioguardi, Elisa; Gegenschatz-Schmid, Katharina; Nishimura, Kaoru; Raj, Isha; de Sanctis, Daniele; Han, Ling; Jovine, Luca

    2016-04-01

    We present a strategy to obtain milligrams of highly post-translationally modified eukaryotic proteins, transiently expressed in mammalian cells as rigid or cleavable fusions with a mammalianized version of bacterial maltose-binding protein (mMBP). This variant was engineered to combine mutations that enhance MBP solubility and affinity purification, as well as provide crystal-packing interactions for increased crystallizability. Using this cell type-independent approach, we could increase the expression of secreted and intracellular human proteins up to 200-fold. By molecular replacement with MBP, we readily determined five novel high-resolution structures of rigid fusions of targets that otherwise defied crystallization. PMID:26850170

  10. Easy mammalian expression and crystallography of maltose-binding protein-fused human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bokhove, Marcel; Sadat Al Hosseini, Hamed; Saito, Takako; Dioguardi, Elisa; Gegenschatz-Schmid, Katharina; Nishimura, Kaoru; Raj, Isha; de Sanctis, Daniele; Han, Ling; Jovine, Luca

    2016-01-01

    We present a strategy to obtain milligrams of highly post-translationally modified eukaryotic proteins, transiently expressed in mammalian cells as rigid or cleavable fusions with a mammalianized version of bacterial maltose-binding protein (mMBP). This variant was engineered to combine mutations that enhance MBP solubility and affinity purification, as well as provide crystal-packing interactions for increased crystallizability. Using this cell type-independent approach, we could increase the expression of secreted and intracellular human proteins up to 200-fold. By molecular replacement with MBP, we readily determined five novel high-resolution structures of rigid fusions of targets that otherwise defied crystallization. PMID:26850170

  11. The therapeutic potential of p53 reactivation by nutlin-3a in ALK+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma with wild-type or mutated p53.

    PubMed

    Drakos, E; Atsaves, V; Schlette, E; Li, J; Papanastasi, I; Rassidakis, G Z; Medeiros, L J

    2009-12-01

    p53 is expressed frequently, but is rarely mutated in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) tumours. Nutlin-3a is a recently developed small molecule that targets Mdm2, a critical negative regulator of p53, and disrupts the p53-Mdm2 interaction resulting in p53 stabilization and activation. We show that nutlin-3a activates p53 in ALK+ ALCL cells carrying a wild type (wt) or mutated but partially functional p53 gene resulting in p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Cell-cycle arrest was associated with upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. Nutlin-3a-induced apoptotic cell death was accompanied by Bax and Puma upregulation, downregulation of Bcl-xl, survivin, and caspase-3 cleavage, and this was reduced when p53-dependent transactivation activity was inhibited by pifithrin-alpha, or when pifithrin-mu was used to inhibit direct p53 targeting of mitochondria. Nutlin-3a sensitized the activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in wt-p53 ALK+ ALCL cells, in part, through upregulation of DR-5 and downregulation of c-Flip(S/L), and was synergistic with TRAIL in cell death induction. In addition, nutlin-3a treatment enhanced doxorubicin cytotoxicity against ALK+ ALCL cells harbouring mt p53, and this was associated with p73 upregulation. These data suggest that disruption of the p53-mdm2 interaction by nutlin-3a offers a novel therapeutic approach for ALK+ ALCL patients. PMID:19741726

  12. Expression, Delivery and Function of Insecticidal Proteins Expressed by Recombinant Baculoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, Jeremy A.; Bonning, Bryony C.; Harrison, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Since the development of methods for inserting and expressing genes in baculoviruses, a line of research has focused on developing recombinant baculoviruses that express insecticidal peptides and proteins. These recombinant viruses have been engineered with the goal of improving their pesticidal potential by shortening the time required for infection to kill or incapacitate insect pests and reducing the quantity of crop damage as a consequence. A wide variety of neurotoxic peptides, proteins that regulate insect physiology, degradative enzymes, and other potentially insecticidal proteins have been evaluated for their capacity to reduce the survival time of baculovirus-infected lepidopteran host larvae. Researchers have investigated the factors involved in the efficient expression and delivery of baculovirus-encoded insecticidal peptides and proteins, with much effort dedicated to identifying ideal promoters for driving transcription and signal peptides that mediate secretion of the expressed target protein. Other factors, particularly translational efficiency of transcripts derived from recombinant insecticidal genes and post-translational folding and processing of insecticidal proteins, remain relatively unexplored. The discovery of RNA interference as a gene-specific regulation mechanism offers a new approach for improvement of baculovirus biopesticidal efficacy through genetic modification. PMID:25609310

  13. Expression and localization of X11 family proteins in neurons.

    PubMed

    Motodate, Rika; Saito, Yuhki; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2016-09-01

    The X11/Mint family of proteins comprises X11/X11α/Mint1, X11L/X11β/Mint2, and X11L2/X11γ/Mint3. Each of these molecules is an adaptor protein that contains a phosphotyrosine interaction/binding (PI/PTB) and two PDZ domains in its carboxy-terminal region. X11/Mint family members associate with a broad spectrum of membrane proteins, including Alzheimer's β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), alcadeins, and low density lipoprotein receptor proteins, as well as various cytoplasmic proteins including Arf, kalirin-7, and Munc18. In particular, X11 and X11L are thought to play various roles in the regulation of neural functions in brain. Nevertheless, the protein levels and respective localization of individual family members remain controversial. We analyzed the protein levels of X11 and X11L in the corresponding single- and double-knockout mice. X11 and X11L did not exhibit obvious changes of their protein levels when the other was absent, especially in cerebrum in which they were widely co-expressed. In cerebellum, X11 and X11L localized in characteristic patterns in various types of neurons, and X11 protein level increased without an obvious ectopic localization in X11L-knockout mice. Interestingly, only X11L protein existed specifically in brain, whereas, contrary to the accepted view, X11 protein was detected at the highest levels in brain but was also strongly detected in pancreas, testis, and paranephros. Together, our results indicate that both X11 and X11L exert largely in brain neurons, but X11 may also function in peripheral tissues. PMID:27268412

  14. LC–MS Based Detection of Differential Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tuli, Leepika; Ressom, Habtom W.

    2010-01-01

    While several techniques are available in proteomics, LC-MS based analysis of complex protein/peptide mixtures has turned out to be a mainstream analytical technique for quantitative proteomics. Significant technical advances at both sample preparation/separation and mass spectrometry levels have revolutionized comprehensive proteome analysis. Moreover, automation and robotics for sample handling process permit multiple sampling with high throughput. For LC-MS based quantitative proteomics, sample preparation turns out to be critical step, as it can significantly influence sensitivity of downstream analysis. Several sample preparation strategies exist, including depletion of high abundant proteins or enrichment steps that facilitate protein quantification but with a compromise of focusing on a smaller subset of a proteome. While several experimental strategies have emerged, certain limitations such as physiochemical properties of a peptide/protein, protein turnover in a sample, analytical platform used for sample analysis and data processing, still imply challenges to quantitative proteomics. Other aspects that make analysis of a proteome a challenging task include dynamic nature of a proteome, need for efficient and fast analysis of protein due to its constant modifications inside a cell, concentration range of proteins that exceed dynamic range of a single analytical method, and absence of appropriate bioinformatics tools for analysis of large volume and high dimensional data. This paper gives an overview of various LC-MS methods currently used in quantitative proteomics and their potential for detecting differential protein expression. Fundamental steps such as sample preparation, LC separation, mass spectrometry, quantitative assessment and protein identification are discussed. For quantitative assessment of protein expression, both label and label free approaches are evaluated for their set of merits and demerits. While most of these methods edge on providing

  15. Altered Expression of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Accessory Proteins in Murine and Human Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Noelle; Gaynor, Katherine U; Rowan, Simon C; Walsh, Sinead M; Fabre, Aurelie; Boylan, John; Keane, Michael P; McLoughlin, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic, progressive fibrotic disease with a poor prognosis. The balance between transforming growth factor β1 and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling plays an important role in tissue homeostasis, and alterations can result in pulmonary fibrosis. We hypothesized that multiple BMP accessory proteins may be responsible for maintaining this balance in the lung. Using the bleomycin mouse model for fibrosis, we examined an array of BMP accessory proteins for changes in mRNA expression. We report significant increases in mRNA expression of gremlin 1, noggin, follistatin, and follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1), and significant decreases in mRNA expression of chordin, kielin/chordin-like protein, nephroblastoma overexpressed gene, and BMP and activin membrane-bound inhibitor (BAMBI). Protein expression studies demonstrated increased levels of noggin, BAMBI, and FSTL1 in the lungs of bleomycin-treated mice and in the lungs of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that transforming growth factor β stimulation resulted in increased expression of noggin, BAMBI, and FSTL1 in human small airway epithelial cells. These results provide the first evidence that multiple BMP accessory proteins are altered in fibrosis and may play a role in promoting fibrotic injury. PMID:26765958

  16. Morbillivirus and henipavirus attachment protein cytoplasmic domains differently affect protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Bevan; Bente, Dennis A; Czub, Markus; von Messling, Veronika

    2016-05-01

    The amino-terminal cytoplasmic domains of paramyxovirus attachment glycoproteins include trafficking signals that influence protein processing and cell surface expression. To characterize the role of the cytoplasmic domain in protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly in more detail, we constructed chimeric Nipah virus (NiV) glycoprotein (G) and canine distemper virus (CDV) haemagglutinin (H) proteins carrying the respective heterologous cytoplasmic domain, as well as a series of mutants with progressive deletions in this domain. CDV H retained fusion function and was normally expressed on the cell surface with a heterologous cytoplasmic domain, while the expression and fusion support of NiV G was dramatically decreased when its cytoplasmic domain was replaced with that of CDV H. The cell surface expression and fusion support functions of CDV H were relatively insensitive to cytoplasmic domain deletions, while short deletions in the corresponding region of NiV G dramatically decreased both. In addition, the first 10 residues of the CDV H cytoplasmic domain strongly influence its incorporation into virus-like particles formed by the CDV matrix (M) protein, while the co-expression of NiV M with NiV G had no significant effect on incorporation of G into particles. The cytoplasmic domains of both the CDV H and NiV G proteins thus contribute differently to the virus life cycle. PMID:26813519

  17. Expression of Exocytosis Proteins in Rat Supraoptic Nucleus Neurones

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, V.; Schwab, Y.; Lelos, N.; Onaka, T.; Pittman, Q. J.; Ludwig, M.

    2012-01-01

    In magnocellular neurones of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), the neuropeptides vasopressin and oxytocin are synthesised and packaged into large dense-cored vesicles (LDCVs). These vesicles undergo regulated exocytosis from nerve terminals in the posterior pituitary gland and from somata/dendrites in the SON. Regulated exocytosis of LDCVs is considered to involve the soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex [comprising vesicle associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP-2), syntaxin-1 and soluble N-ethylmaleimide attachment protein-25 (SNAP-25)] and regulatory proteins [such as synaptotagmin-1, munc-18 and Ca2+-dependent activator protein for secretion (CAPS-1)]. Using fluorescent immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy, in both oxytocin and vasopressin neurones, we observed VAMP-2, SNAP-25 and syntaxin-1-immunoreactivity in axon terminals. The somata and dendrites contained syntaxin-1 and other regulatory exocytosis proteins, including munc-18 and CAPS-1. However, the distribution of VAMP-2 and synaptotagmin-1 in the SON was limited to putative pre-synaptic contacts because they co-localised with synaptophysin (synaptic vesicle marker) and had no co-localisation with either oxytocin or vasopressin. SNAP-25 immunoreactivity in the SON was limited to glial cell processes and was not detected in oxytocin or vasopressin somata/dendrites. The present results indicate differences in the expression and localisation of exocytosis proteins between the axon terminals and somata/dendritic compartment. The absence of VAMP-2 and SNAP-25 immunoreactivity from the somata/dendrites suggests that there might be different SNARE protein isoforms expressed in these compartments. Alternatively, exocytosis of LDCVs from somata/dendrites may use a different mechanism from that described by the SNARE complex theory. PMID:21988098

  18. Tools to cope with difficult-to-express proteins.

    PubMed

    Saccardo, Paolo; Corchero, José Luís; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus

    2016-05-01

    The identification of DNA coding sequences contained in the genome of many organisms coupled to the use of high throughput approaches has fueled the field of recombinant protein production. Apart from basic research interests, the growing relevance of this field is highlighted by the global sales of the top ten biopharmaceuticals on the market, which exceeds the trillion USD in a steady increasing tendency. Therefore, the demand of biological compounds seems to have a long run on the market. One of the most popular expression systems is based on Escherichia coli cells which apart from being cost-effective counts with a large selection of resources. However, a significant percentage of the genes of interest are not efficiently expressed in this system, or the expressed proteins are accumulated within aggregates, degraded or lacking the desired biological activity, being finally discarded. In some instances, expressing the gene in a homologous expression system might alleviate those drawbacks but then the process usually increases in complexity and is not as cost-effective as the prokaryotic systems. An increasing toolbox is available to approach the production and purification of those difficult-to-express proteins, including different expression systems, promoters with different strengths, cultivation media and conditions, solubilization tags and chaperone coexpression, among others. However, in most cases, the process follows a non-integrative trial and error strategy with discrete success. This review is focused on the design of the whole process by using an integrative approach, taken into account the accumulated knowledge of the pivotal factors that affect any of the key processes, in an attempt to rationalize the efforts made in this appealing field. PMID:27079572

  19. Differential Expression of Borrelia burgdorferi Proteins during Growth In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Ramesh; Philipp, Mario T.

    1998-01-01

    In an earlier paper we described the transcriptionally regulated differential levels of expression of two lipoproteins of Borrelia burgdorferi, P35 and P7.5, during growth of the spirochetes in culture from logarithmic phase to stationary phase (K. J. Indest, R. Ramamoorthy, M. Solé, R. D. Gilmore, B. J. B. Johnson, and M. T. Philipp, Infect. Immun. 65:1165–1171, 1997). Here we further assess this phenomenon by investigating whether the expression of other antigens of B. burgdorferi, including some well-characterized ones, are also regulated in a growth-phase-dependent manner in vitro. These studies revealed 13 additional antigens, including OspC, BmpD, and GroEL, that were upregulated 2- to 66-fold and a 28-kDa protein that was downregulated 2- to 10-fold, during the interval between the logarithmic- and stationary-growth phases. Unlike with these in vitro-regulated proteins, the levels of expression of OspA, OspB, P72, flagellin, and BmpA remained unchanged throughout growth of the spirochetes in culture. Furthermore, ospAB, bmpAB, groEL, and fla all exhibited similar mRNA profiles, which is consistent with the constitutive expression of these genes. By contrast, the mRNA and protein profiles of ospC and bmpD indicated regulated expression of these genes. While bmpD exhibited a spike in mRNA expression in early stationary phase, ospC maintained a relatively higher level of mRNA throughout culture. These findings demonstrate that there are additional genes besides P7.5 and P35 whose regulated expression can be investigated in vitro and which may thus serve as models to facilitate the study of regulatory mechanisms in an organism that cycles between an arthropod and a vertebrate host. PMID:9784512

  20. Expression of interleukin-17RC protein in normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dongxia; You, Zongbing

    2008-01-01

    Background Interleukin-17 (IL-17) cytokines and receptors play an important role in many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. IL-17 receptors IL-17RA and IL-17RC have been found to form a heterodimer for mediating the signals of IL-17A and IL-17F cytokines. While the function and signaling pathway of IL-17RA has been revealed, IL-17RC has not been well characterized. The function and signaling pathway of IL-17RC remain largely unknown. The purpose of the present study was to systematically examine IL-17RC protein expression in 53 human tissues. Results IL-17RC expression in 51 normal human tissues and two benign tumors (i.e., lymphangioma and parathyroid adenoma) on the tissue microarrays was determined by immunohistochemical staining, using two polyclonal antibodies against IL-17RC. IL-17RC protein was expressed in many cell types including the myocardial cells, vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells, glandular cells (of the adrenal, parathyroid, pituitary, thyroid, pancreas, parotid salivary, and subepidermal glands), epithelial cells (of the esophagus, stomach, intestine, anus, renal tubule, breast, cervix, Fallopian tube, epididymis, seminal vesicle, prostate, gallbladder, bronchus, lung, and skin), oocytes in the ovary, Sertoli cells in the testis, motor neurons in the spinal cord, autonomic ganglia and nerves in the intestine, skeletal muscle cells, adipocytes, articular chondrocytes, and synovial cells. High levels of IL-17RC protein expression were observed in most vascular and lymphatic endothelium and squamous epithelium. The epithelium of the breast, cervix, Fallopian tube, kidney, bladder and bronchus also expressed high levels of IL-17RC, so did the glandular cells in the adrenal cortex, parotid salivary and subepidermal glands. In contrast, IL-17RC protein was not detectable in the smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, antral mucosa of the stomach, mucosa of the colon, endometrium of the uterus, neurons of the brain, hepatocytes, or lymphocytes

  1. Survivin and related proteins in canine mammary tumors: immunohistochemical expression.

    PubMed

    Bongiovanni, L; Romanucci, M; Malatesta, D; D'Andrea, A; Ciccarelli, A; Della Salda, L

    2015-03-01

    Survivin is reexpressed in most human breast cancers, where its expression has been associated with tumor aggressiveness, poor prognosis, and poor response to therapy. Survivin expression was evaluated in 41 malignant canine mammary tumors (CMTs) by immunohistochemistry, in relation to histological grade and stage, and correlated with that of some related molecules (β-catenin, caspase 3, heat shock proteins) to understand their possible role in canine mammary tumorigenesis. An increase in nuclear survivin expression, compared with healthy mammary glands, was observed in CMTs, where nuclear immunolabeling was related to the presence of necrosis. No statistically significant relation was found between the expression of the investigated molecules and the histological grade or stage. The present study may suggest an important involvement of survivin in CMT tumorigenesis. Its overexpression in most of the cases evaluated might suggest that targeting survivin in CMTs may be a valid anticancer therapy. PMID:24686389

  2. Expression and serological reactivity of hemorrhagic enteritis virus hexon protein.

    PubMed

    Lobová, Dana; Celer, Vladimír

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to express the recombinant hexon protein of the hemorrhagic enteritis virus, to establish the diagnostic value of this protein for serological detection of antibodies in turkey serum samples and to assess seroprevalence of the infection in the Czech Republic. The N' terminal part of the hexon protein was expressed in a bacterial expression system and used as an antigen in an ELISA test for the detection of hemorrhagic enteritis virus specific antibodies in turkey sera. Validation of the test was performed by comparison with a commercially available ELISA test. Serological reactivity was assessed on a panel of 126 turkey sera by a newly developed ELISA test. Serum samples were taken from turkey farms with the history of hemorrhagic enteritis virus infection, from farms with animals free of infection, and from turkey farms following vaccination. Both ELISA kits gave identical results (100 %) with the tested sera. ELISA based on the recombinant hexon protein thus proved useful and cheaper for detection of antibodies in turkey flocks infected with the hemorrhagic enteritis virus. PMID:26471497

  3. Human testis expresses a specific poly(A)-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Féral, C; Guellaën, G; Pawlak, A

    2001-05-01

    In testis mRNA stability and translation initiation are extensively under the control of poly(A)-binding proteins (PABP). Here we have cloned a new human testis-specific PABP (PABP3) of 631 amino acids (70.1 kDa) with 92.5% identical residues to the ubiquitous PABP1. A northern blot of multiple human tissues hybridised with PABP3- and PABP1-specific oligonucleotide probes revealed two PABP3 mRNAs (2.1 and 2.5 kb) detected only in testis, whereas PABP1 mRNA (3.2 kb) was present in all tested tissues. In human adult testis, PABP3 mRNA expression was restricted to round spermatids, whereas PABP1 was expressed in these cells as well as in pachytene spermatocytes. PABP3-specific antibodies identified a protein of 70 kDa in human testis extracts. This protein binds poly(A) with a slightly lower affinity as compared to PABP1. The human PABP3 gene is intronless with a transcription start site 61 nt upstream from the initiation codon. A sequence of 256 bp upstream from the transcription start site drives the promoter activity of PABP3 and its tissue-specific expression. The expression of PABP3 might be a way to bypass PABP1 translational repression and to produce the amount of PABP needed for active mRNA translation in spermatids. PMID:11328870

  4. Expression of Tyrosine Hydroxylase is Negatively Regulated Via Prion Protein.

    PubMed

    da Luz, Marcio Henrique Mello; Glezer, Isaias; Xavier, Andre Machado; da Silva, Marcelo Alberti Paiva; Pino, Jessica Monteiro Volejnik; Zamith, Thiago Panaro; Vieira, Taynara Fernanda; Antonio, Bruno Brito; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Martins, Vilma Regina; Lee, Kil Sun

    2016-07-01

    Cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is a glycoprotein of the plasma membrane that plays pleiotropic functions by interacting with multiple signaling complexes at the cell surface. Recently, a number of studies have reported the involvement of PrP(C) in dopamine metabolism and signaling, including its interactions with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine receptors. However, the outcomes reported by independent studies are still debatable. Therefore in this study, we investigated the effects of PrP(C) on the TH expression during the differentiation of N2a cells with dibutyryl-cAMP, a well-known cAMP analog that activates TH transcription. Upon differentiation, TH was induced with concomitant reduction of PrP(C) at protein level, but not at mRNA level. shRNA-mediated PrP(C) reduction increased the basal level of TH at both mRNA and protein levels without dibutyryl-cAMP treatment. This phenotype was reversed by re-expression of PrP(C). PrP(C) knockdown also potentiated the effect of dibutyryl-cAMP on TH expression. Our findings suggest that PrP(C) has suppressive effects on TH expression. As a consequence, altered PrP(C) functions may affect the regulation of dopamine metabolism and related neurological disorders. PMID:26975317

  5. Stepwise optimization of a low-temperature Bacillus subtilis expression system for "difficult to express" proteins.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Norma; Homuth, Georg; Schweder, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    In order to improve the overproduction of "difficult to express" proteins, a low-temperature expression system for Bacillus subtilis based on the cold-inducible promoter of the desaturase-encoding des gene was constructed. Selected regulatory DNA sequence elements from B. subtilis genes known to be cold-inducible were fused to different model genes. It could be demonstrated that these regulatory elements are able to mediate increased heterologous gene expression, either by improved translation efficiency or by higher messenger RNA (mRNA) stability. In case of a cold-adapted β-galactosidase from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAE79A serving as the model, significantly higher expression was achieved by fusing its coding sequence to the so-called "downstream box" sequence of cspB encoding the major B. subtilis cold-shock protein. The combination of this fusion with a cspB 5'-UTR stem-loop structure resulted in further enhancement of the β-galactosidase expression. In addition, integration of the transcription terminator of the B. subtilis cold-inducible bkd operon downstream of the target genes caused a higher mRNA stability and enabled thus a further significant increase in expression. Finally, the fully optimized expression system was validated by overproducing a B. subtilis xylanase as well as an α-glucosidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the latter known for tending to form inclusion bodies. These analyses verified the applicability of the engineered expression system for extracellular and intracellular protein synthesis in B. subtilis, thereby confirming the suitability of this host organism for the overproduction of critical, poorly soluble proteins. PMID:25851716

  6. Alternative Eukaryotic Expression Systems for the Production of Proteins and Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Sara; López-Estepa, Miguel; Fernández, Francisco J; Suárez, Teresa; Vega, M Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Besides the most established expression hosts, several eukaryotic microorganisms and filamentous fungi have also been successfully used as platforms for the production of foreign proteins. Filamentous fungi and Dictyostelium discoideum are two prominent examples. Filamentous fungi, typically Aspergillus and Trichoderma, are usually employed for the industrial production of enzymes and secondary metabolites for food processing, pharmaceutical drugs production, and textile and paper applications, with multiple products already accepted for their commercialization. The low cost of culture medium components, high secretion capability directly to the extracellular medium, and the intrinsic ability to produce post-translational modifications similar to the mammalian type, have promoted this group as successful hosts for the expression of proteins, including examples from phylogenetically distant groups: humans proteins such as IL-2, IL-6 or epithelial growth factor; α-galactosidase from plants; or endoglucanase from Cellulomonas fimi, among others. D. discoideum is a social amoeba that can be used as an expression platform for a variety of proteins, which has been extensively illustrated for cytoskeletal proteins. New vectors for heterologous expression in D. discoideum have been recently developed that might increase the usefulness of this system and expand the range of protein classes that can be tackled. Continuous developments are ongoing to improve strains, promoters, production and downstream processes for filamentous fungi, D. discoideum, and other alternative eukaryotic hosts. Either for the overexpression of individual genes, or in the coexpression of multiples genes, this chapter illustrates the enormous possibilities offered by these groups of eukaryotic organisms. PMID:27165325

  7. Expression, purification and crystallization of a lyssavirus matrix (M) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Assenberg, René; Delmas, Olivier; Graham, Stephen C.; Verma, Anil; Berrow, Nick; Stuart, David I.; Owens, Raymond J.; Bourhy, Hervé; Grimes, Jonathan M.

    2008-04-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of the full-length matrix protein from three lyssaviruses is described. The matrix (M) proteins of lyssaviruses (family Rhabdoviridae) are crucial to viral morphogenesis as well as in modulating replication and transcription of the viral genome. To date, no high-resolution structural information has been obtained for full-length rhabdovirus M. Here, the cloning, expression and purification of the matrix proteins from three lyssaviruses, Lagos bat virus (LAG), Mokola virus and Thailand dog virus, are described. Crystals have been obtained for the full-length M protein from Lagos bat virus (LAG M). Successful crystallization depended on a number of factors, in particular the addition of an N-terminal SUMO fusion tag to increase protein solubility. Diffraction data have been recorded from crystals of native and selenomethionine-labelled LAG M to 2.75 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Preliminary analysis indicates that these crystals belong to space group P6{sub 1}22 or P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 56.9–57.2, c = 187.9–188.6 Å, consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit, and structure determination is currently in progress.

  8. Effectiveness of crizotinib in a patient with ALK IHC-positive/FISH-negative metastatic lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rosoux, A; Pauwels, P; Duplaquet, F; D'Haene, N; Weynand, B; Delos, M; Menon, R; Heukamp, L C; Thunnissen, E; Ocak, S

    2016-08-01

    We report a case of crizotinib effectiveness in a heavily pretreated patient with a metastatic NSCLC initially considered IHC-positive and FISH-negative for ALK rearrangement. After repeated analyses of tumor samples, borderline ALK FISH-positivity (18.5% positive cells) was demonstrated. PMID:27393517

  9. Detection of tumor ALK status in neuroblastoma patients using peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Combaret, Valérie; Iacono, Isabelle; Bellini, Angela; Bréjon, Stéphanie; Bernard, Virginie; Marabelle, Aurélien; Coze, Carole; Pierron, Gaelle; Lapouble, Eve; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Blay, Jean Yves

    2015-04-01

    New protocols based on ALK-targeted therapy by crizotinib or other ALK-targeting molecules have opened for the treatment of patients with neuroblastoma (NB) if their tumors showed mutation and/or amplification of the ALK gene. However, tumor samples are not always available for analysis of ALK mutational status in particular at relapse. Here, we evaluated the ALK mutational status of NB samples by analysis of circulating DNA, using the droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) system. ddPCR assays was developed for the detection of ALK mutations at F1174 and R1275 hotspots found in NB tumors and was applied for the analysis of circulating DNA obtained from 200 μL of serum or plasma samples collected from 114 patients with NB. The mutations F1174L (exon 23 position 3520, T>C and position 3522, C>A) and the mutation R1275Q (exon 25 position 3824, G>A) were detected in circulating DNA. The sensitivity of our test was 100%, 85%, and 92%, respectively, and the specificity was 100%, 91%, and 98%, respectively. In conclusion, the assay that we have developed offers a reliable, noninvasive blood test to assess ALK mutational status at F1174 and R1275 hotspots and should help clinicians to identify patients showing an ALK mutation in particular when no tumor tissue is available. PMID:25653133

  10. Shear induced collateral artery growth modulated by endoglin but not by ALK1

    PubMed Central

    Seghers, Leonard; de Vries, Margreet R; Pardali, Evangelia; Hoefer, Imo E; Hierck, Beerend P; ten Dijke, Peter ten; Goumans, Marie Jose; Quax, Paul HA

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) stimulates both ischaemia induced angiogenesis and shear stress induced arteriogenesis by signalling through different receptors. How these receptors are involved in both these processes of blood flow recovery is not entirely clear. In this study the role of TGF-β receptors 1 and endoglin is assessed in neovascularization in mice. Unilateral femoral artery ligation was performed in mice heterozygous for either endoglin or ALK1 and in littermate controls. Compared with littermate controls, blood flow recovery, monitored by laser Doppler perfusion imaging, was significantly hampered by maximal 40% in endoglin heterozygous mice and by maximal 49% in ALK1 heterozygous mice. Collateral artery size was significantly reduced in endoglin heterozygous mice compared with controls but not in ALK1 heterozygous mice. Capillary density in ischaemic calf muscles was unaffected, but capillaries from endoglin and ALK1 heterozygous mice were significantly larger when compared with controls. To provide mechanistic evidence for the differential role of endoglin and ALK1 in shear induced or ischaemia induced neovascularization, murine endothelial cells were exposed to shear stress in vitro. This induced increased levels of endoglin mRNA but not ALK1. In this study it is demonstrated that both endoglin and ALK1 facilitate blood flow recovery. Importantly, endoglin contributes to both shear induced collateral artery growth and to ischaemia induced angiogenesis, whereas ALK1 is only involved in ischaemia induced angiogenesis. PMID:22436015

  11. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  12. High level expression of mammalian protein farnesyltransferase in a baculovirus system. The purified protein contains zinc.

    PubMed

    Chen, W J; Moomaw, J F; Overton, L; Kost, T A; Casey, P J

    1993-05-01

    The mammalian enzyme protein farnesyltransferase is a heterodimeric protein that catalyzes the addition of a farnesyl isoprenoid to a cysteine in ras proteins. Since oncogenic forms of ras proteins require the farnesyl group for transforming activity, the structure and mechanism of this enzyme are important to define. However, such studies have been difficult to approach because of the low abundance of the enzyme in mammalian tissues and hence the problems of obtaining large quantities of the protein. We report here the co-expression of the two subunits of protein farnesyltransferase by Sf9 cells infected with a recombinant baculovirus containing the coding sequences of both polypeptides. This results in the production of milligram quantities of enzyme which can be readily purified by conventional chromatographic methods. The individual subunits of the enzyme can also be expressed in the Sf9 cells, but the ability to reconstitute active enzyme from extracts containing individual subunits is quite low. In contrast, the enzyme produced by co-expression of the two subunits is fully active and retains the properties of the mammalian form, including the specificity for the COOH-terminal amino acid of substrate proteins and the ability to bind short peptides encompassing the prenylation site of a ras protein. Furthermore, through atomic absorption analysis of the purified protein, we have confirmed the previous tentative assignment of protein farnesyltransferase as a zinc metalloenzyme by demonstrating that it contains an essentially stoichiometric amount of zinc. The ability to produce and purify milligram quantities of protein farnesyltransferase readily will allow detailed mechanistic and structural studies on this enzyme. PMID:8486655

  13. New therapeutic strategies in neuroblastoma: combined targeting of a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor and liposomal siRNAs against ALK

    PubMed Central

    Di Paolo, Daniela; Yang, D.; Pastorino, Fabio; Emionite, Laura; Cilli, Michele; Daga, Antonio; Destefanis, Elisa; Di Fiore, Annarita; Piaggio, Francesca; Brignole, Chiara; Xu, Xiaobao; Liang, Chris; Gibbons, James

    2015-01-01

    Many different aberrations in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) were found to be oncogenic drivers in several cancers including neuroblastoma (NB), therefore ALK is now considered a critical player in NB oncogenesis and a promising therapeutic target. The ALK-inhibitor crizotinib has a limited activity against the various ALK mutations identified in NB patients. We tested: the activity of the novel ALK-inhibitor X-396 administered alone or in combination with Targeted Liposomes carrying ALK-siRNAs (TL[ALK-siRNA]) that are active irrespective of ALK gene mutational status; the pharmacokinetic profiles and the biodistribution of X-396; the efficacy of X-396 versus crizotinib treatment in NB xenografts; whether the combination of X-396 with the TL[ALK-siRNA] could promote long-term survival in NB mouse models. X-396 revealed good bioavailability, moderate half-life, high mean plasma and tumor concentrations. X-396 was more effective than crizotinib in inhibiting in vitro cell proliferation of NB cells and in reducing tumor volume in subcutaneous NB models in a dose-dependent manner. In orthotopic NB xenografts, X-396 significantly increased life span independently of the ALK mutation status. In combination studies, all effects were significantly improved in the mice treated with TL[ALK-siRNA] and X-396 compared to mice receiving the single agents. Our findings provide a rational basis to design innovative molecular-based treatment combinations for clinical application in ALK-driven NB tumors. PMID:26299615

  14. ALK and ROS1 as targeted therapy paradigms and clinical implications to overcome crizotinib resistance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Zhang, Yong; Jing, Pengyu; Chang, Ning; Wu, Jianxiong; Ren, Xinling; Zhang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, more than 10 targetable oncogenic driver genes have been validated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and ROS1 kinase are two new driver genes implicated in ALK- and ROS1-rearranged NSCLC. Inhibition of ALK and ROS1 by crizotinib has been reported to be highly effective and well tolerated in these patients. However, resistance to crizotinib emerges years after treatment, and increasing efforts have been made to overcome this issue. Here, we review the biology of ALK and ROS1 and their roles in cancer progression. We also summarize the ongoing and completed clinical trials validating ALK and ROS1 as targets for cancer treatment. In the last section of the review, we will discuss the molecular mechanisms of crizotinib resistance and focus approaches to overcome it. This review describes an exciting new area of research and may provide new insights for targeted cancer therapies. PMID:26802023

  15. HIV-1 Tat Protein Enhances Expression and Function of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yancong; Zhang, Kun; Yin, Xiaojie; Nie, Qichang; Ma, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters can transfer a variety of antiviral agents from the cytoplasm to body fluid, which results in a reduced intracellular concentration of the drugs. Proteins of HIV-1, e.g., Tat and gp120, altered some types of ABC transporter expression in brain microvascular endothelial cells and astrocytes. However, the effect of Tat on ABC transporters in T lymphocytes is unclear. In this study the status of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) in Tat expressing cell lines was examined with real-time PCR and flow cytometry. It was found that HIV-1 Tat protein upregulated BCRP expression and enhanced efflux mediated by BCRP significantly, which could inhibit antiviral drugs from entering infected cells and interfere with the therapeutic effect of HAART. PMID:26367065

  16. Cooperative working of bacterial chromosome replication proteins generated by a reconstituted protein expression system

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Kei; Katayama, Tsutomu; Nomura, Shin-ichiro M.

    2013-01-01

    Replication of all living cells relies on the multirounds flow of the central dogma. Especially, expression of DNA replication proteins is a key step to circulate the processes of the central dogma. Here we achieved the entire sequential transcription–translation–replication process by autonomous expression of chromosomal DNA replication machineries from a reconstituted transcription–translation system (PURE system). We found that low temperature is essential to express a complex protein, DNA polymerase III, in a single tube using the PURE system. Addition of the 13 genes, encoding initiator, DNA helicase, helicase loader, RNA primase and DNA polymerase III to the PURE system gave rise to a DNA replication system by a coupling manner. An artificial genetic circuit demonstrated that the DNA produced as a result of the replication is able to provide genetic information for proteins, indicating the in vitro central dogma can sequentially undergo two rounds. PMID:23737447

  17. Ribozymes, riboswitches and beyond: regulation of gene expression without proteins

    PubMed Central

    Serganov, Alexander; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Although various functions of RNA are carried out in conjunction with proteins, some catalytic RNAs, or ribozymes, which contribute to a range of cellular processes, require little or no assistance from proteins. Furthermore, the discovery of metabolite-sensing riboswitches and other types of RNA sensors has revealed RNA-based mechanisms that cells use to regulate gene expression in response to internal and external changes. Structural studies have shown how these RNAs can carry out a range of functions. In addition, the contribution of ribozymes and riboswitches to gene expression is being revealed as far more widespread than was previously appreciated. These findings have implications for understanding how cellular functions might have evolved from RNA-based origins. PMID:17846637

  18. Improving Protein Expression Prediction Using Extra Features and Ensemble Averaging

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Armando; Vinga, Susana

    2016-01-01

    The article focus is the improvement of machine learning models capable of predicting protein expression levels based on their codon encoding. Support vector regression (SVR) and partial least squares (PLS) were used to create the models. SVR yields predictions that surpass those of PLS. It is shown that it is possible to improve the models predictive ability by using two more input features, codon identification number and codon count, besides the already used codon bias and minimum free energy. In addition, applying ensemble averaging to the SVR or PLS models also improves the results even further. The present work motivates the test of different ensembles and features with the aim of improving the prediction models whose correlation coefficients are still far from perfect. These results are relevant for the optimization of codon usage and enhancement of protein expression levels in synthetic biology problems. PMID:26934190

  19. Expression data on liver metabolic pathway genes and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Raja Gopal Reddy, Mooli; Pavan Kumar, Chodisetti; Mahesh, Malleswarapu; Sravan Kumar, Manchiryala; Jeyakumar, Shanmugam M.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the expression data on various metabolic pathways of liver with special emphasize on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthesis, both at gene and protein levels. The data were obtained to understand the effect of vitamin A deficiency on the expression status (both gene and protein levels) of some of the key factors involved in lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, triglyceride secretion, long chain PUFA, resolvin D1 synthesis, glucose transport and glycogen synthesis of liver, using modern biology tools, such as quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting techniques. This data article provides the supporting evidence to the article “Vitamin A deficiency suppresses high fructose-induced triglyceride synthesis and elevates resolvin D1 levels” [1] and therefore, these data may be referred back, for comprehensive understanding and interpretations and for future studies. PMID:26909377

  20. Fibroblast adhesion to recombinant tropoelastin expressed as a protein A-fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, L E; Parks, W C; Wu, L J; Mecham, R P

    1991-01-01

    A bovine tropoelastin cDNA encoding exons 15-36 that includes the elastin-receptor binding site was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with Protein A from Staphylococcus aureus. After isolation of the fusion protein by affinity chromatography on Ig-Sepharose, the tropoelastin domain was separated from plasmid-pR1T2T-encoded Protein A (Protein A') by CNBr cleavage. Cell-adhesion assays demonstrated specific adhesion to the recombinant tropoelastin. Furthermore, the data indicate that interactions involving the bovine elastin receptor mediate nuchalligament fibroblast adhesion to the recombinant protein. In agreement with earlier studies of fibroblast chemotaxis to bovine tropoelastin, nuchal-ligament fibroblast adhesion demonstrated developmental regulation of the elastin receptor. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:1996952

  1. Altered surfactant protein A gene expression and protein metabolism associated with repeat exposure to inhaled endotoxin.

    PubMed

    George, Caroline L S; White, Misty L; O'Neill, Marsha E; Thorne, Peter S; Schwartz, David A; Snyder, Jeanne M

    2003-12-01

    Chronically inhaled endotoxin, which is ubiquitous in many occupational and domestic environments, can adversely affect the respiratory system resulting in an inflammatory response and decreased lung function. Surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) is part of the lung innate immune system and may attenuate the inflammatory response in various types of lung injury. Using a murine model to mimic occupational exposures to endotoxin, we hypothesized that SP-A gene expression and protein would be elevated in response to repeat exposure to inhaled grain dust and to purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our results demonstrate that repeat exposure to inhaled endotoxin, either in the form of grain dust or purified LPS, results in increased whole lung SP-A gene expression and type II alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia, whereas SP-A protein levels in lung lavage fluid are decreased. Furthermore, these alterations in SP-A gene activity and protein metabolism are dependent on an intact endotoxin signaling system. PMID:12922979

  2. Serum protein-expression profiling using the ProteinChip biomarker system.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kate; Figueredo, Sharel; Meng, Xiao-Ying; Yip, Christine; Fung, Eric T

    2004-01-01

    Protein-expression profiling of serum is a common approach to the discovery of potential diagnostic and therapeutic markers of disease. Like any other proteome, the serum proteome is characterized by protein expression across a large dynamic range. This single facet requires the employment of fractionation procedures prior to detection of protein. The authors use a combination of conventional column chromatography with array-based chromatography to simplify the serum proteome into subproteomes, thus providing a greater representation of the serum proteome. Robotics is employed to increase the throughput of sample processing. These procedures result in large amounts of data that are analyzed through a series of preprocessing and postprocessing steps. A well-designed serum profiling project can therefore result in the discovery of statistically sound, clinically meaningful protein biomarkers. PMID:15020796

  3. Precision medicine in NSCLC and pathology: how does ALK fit in the pathway?

    PubMed

    Kerr, K M; López-Ríos, F

    2016-09-01

    The evolution of personalised medicine in lung cancer has dramatically impacted diagnostic pathology. Current challenges centre on the growing demands placed on small tissue samples by molecular diagnostic techniques. In this review, expert recommendations are provided regarding successful identification of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Steps to correctly process and conserve tumour tissue during diagnostic testing are essential to ensure tissue availability. For example, storing extra tissue sections ready for molecular diagnostic steps allows faster testing and preserves tissue. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) is commonly used to detect ALK rearrangements, with most laboratories favouring screening by immunohistochemistry followed by a confirmatory FISH assay. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction can also identify ALK fusion gene mRNA transcripts but can be limited by the quality of RNA and the risk that rare fusion variants may not be captured. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has recently provided an alternative method for detecting ALK rearrangements. While current experience is limited, NGS is set to become the most efficient approach as an increasing number of genetic abnormalities is required to be tested. Upfront, reflex testing for ALK gene rearrangement should become routine as ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy moves into the first-line setting. Guidelines recommend that EGFR and ALK tests are carried out in parallel on all confirmed and potential adenocarcinomas, and this is more efficient in terms of tissue usage and testing turnaround time for both of these actionable gene alterations. The practice of sequential testing is not recommended. Identification of ALK rearrangements is now essential for the diagnosis of NSCLC, underpinned by the benefits of ALK inhibitors. As scientific understanding and diagnostic technology develops, ALK testing will continue to be an

  4. Differential expression of ribosomal proteins in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Rinker, Elizabeth B; Dueber, Julie C; Qualtieri, Julianne; Tedesco, Jason; Erdogan, Begum; Bosompem, Amma; Kim, Annette S

    2016-02-01

    Aberrations of ribosomal biogenesis have been implicated in several congenital bone marrow failure syndromes, such as Diamond-Blackfan anaemia, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and Dyskeratosis Congenita. Recent studies have identified haploinsufficiency of RPS14 in the acquired bone marrow disease isolated 5q minus syndrome, a subtype of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, the expression of various proteins comprising the ribosomal subunits and other proteins enzymatically involved in the synthesis of the ribosome has not been explored in non-5q minus MDS. Furthermore, differences in the effects of these expression alterations among myeloid, erythroid and megakaryocyte lineages have not been well elucidated. We examined the expression of several proteins related to ribosomal biogenesis in bone marrow biopsy specimens from patients with MDS (5q minus patients excluded) and controls with no known myeloid disease. Specifically, we found that there is overexpression of RPS24, DKC1 and SBDS in MDS. This overexpression is in contrast to the haploinsufficiency identified in the congenital bone marrow failure syndromes and in acquired 5q minus MDS. Potential mechanisms for these differences and aetiology for these findings in MDS are discussed. PMID:26408650

  5. Inhibitory Effect of Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 in Retinal Pigment Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Haipei; Li, Hui; Yang, Shuai; Li, Min; Zhao, Chun; Zhang, Jingfa; Xu, Guotong; Wang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), a serious vision-threatening complication of retinal detachment (RD), is characterized by the formation of contractile fibrotic membranes, in which epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a major event. Recent studies suggest an important role of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) in the suppression of fibrosis. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of BMP4 in the pathological process of PVR, particularly in the EMT of RPE cells. We found that BMP4 and its receptors were co-labelled with cytokeratin and α-SMA positive cells within the PVR membrane. Moreover, the mRNA and protein expression levels of BMP4 were decreased whereas BMP4 receptors ALK2, ALK3 and ALK6 were increased during TGF-β-induced EMT in primary RPE cells. Exogenous BMP4 inhibited TGF-β-induced epithelial marker down-regulation, as well as mesenchymal marker up-regulation at both the mRNA and protein levels in RPE cells. In addition, BMP4 treatment attenuated the TGF-β-induced gel contraction, cell migration and Smad2/3 phosphorylation. However, knockdown of endogenous BMP4 stimulated changes in EMT markers. Our results confirm the hypothesis that BMP4 might inhibit TGF-β-mediated EMT in RPE cells via the Smad2/3 pathway and suppress contraction. This might represent a potential treatment for PVR. PMID:27586653

  6. Inhibitory Effect of Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 in Retinal Pigment Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Yao, Haipei; Li, Hui; Yang, Shuai; Li, Min; Zhao, Chun; Zhang, Jingfa; Xu, Guotong; Wang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), a serious vision-threatening complication of retinal detachment (RD), is characterized by the formation of contractile fibrotic membranes, in which epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a major event. Recent studies suggest an important role of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) in the suppression of fibrosis. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of BMP4 in the pathological process of PVR, particularly in the EMT of RPE cells. We found that BMP4 and its receptors were co-labelled with cytokeratin and α-SMA positive cells within the PVR membrane. Moreover, the mRNA and protein expression levels of BMP4 were decreased whereas BMP4 receptors ALK2, ALK3 and ALK6 were increased during TGF-β-induced EMT in primary RPE cells. Exogenous BMP4 inhibited TGF-β-induced epithelial marker down-regulation, as well as mesenchymal marker up-regulation at both the mRNA and protein levels in RPE cells. In addition, BMP4 treatment attenuated the TGF-β-induced gel contraction, cell migration and Smad2/3 phosphorylation. However, knockdown of endogenous BMP4 stimulated changes in EMT markers. Our results confirm the hypothesis that BMP4 might inhibit TGF-β-mediated EMT in RPE cells via the Smad2/3 pathway and suppress contraction. This might represent a potential treatment for PVR. PMID:27586653

  7. Proteomic analysis of the differentially expressed proteins by airborne nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Park, Seul Ki; Jeon, Yu Mi; Son, Bu Soon; Youn, Hyung Sun; Lee, Mi Young

    2011-07-01

    Airborne nanoparticles with thermodynamic diameters less than 56 nm (PM(0.056)) were collected using a Moudi cascade impactor, and the differentially expressed proteins upon exposure to the airborne nanoparticles were identified in human bronchial epithelial cells. More than 600 protein spots were detected on the two-dimensional gel, and the identified 13 of these proteins showed notable changes. Nine were up-regulated and four were down-regulated following treatment with the airborne nanoparticles. Notably, malignant transformation-associated multiple forms of keratins, epigenetic regulation-related MBD1-containing chromatin associated factor 2, epithelial malignancy-related vimentin and exocytosis-related annexin A2 were changed upon exposure to airborne nanoparticle PM(0.056). PMID:21491466

  8. Mechanism of expression of the rat HCNP precursor protein gene.

    PubMed

    Tohdoh, N; Tojo, S; Kimura, M; Ishii, T; Ojika, K

    1997-04-01

    The hippocampal cholinergic neurostimulating peptide (HCNP), isolated from hippocampal tissue of 10- to 12-day-old rats, enhances the in vitro synthesis of acetylcholine in medial septal tissue explants. The HCNP precursor is a 21 kDa protein that binds hydrophobic ligands and Mg-ATP, and is associated with the opioid-binding protein. We employed an HCNP-precursor cDNA as probe to clone the genomic DNA, used for mapping of the exon-intron structure of the gene. We also determined the nucleotide structure of the promoter region of the rat HCNP precursor protein gene. By using S1 mapping and CAT as a reporter, we found multiple promoters that were aligned in the 5' untranslated region. In addition, the presence of several putative enhancer binding sequences were tested by electrophoresis mobility shift assays. Northern blot analysis revealed that the gene is expressed in a variety of rat tissues and various subregions of the brain. These results suggest that HCNP-precursor gene expression is regulated by a general transactivation factor such as SP1, and that the specific presence of the bioactive HCNP in certain tissues results from post-translational events such as proteolytic processing of the precursor protein, which takes place predominantly in the hippocampus of young rats. PMID:9105667

  9. Grizzly bear corticosteroid binding globulin: Cloning and serum protein expression.

    PubMed

    Chow, Brian A; Hamilton, Jason; Alsop, Derek; Cattet, Marc R L; Stenhouse, Gordon; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2010-06-01

    Serum corticosteroid levels are routinely measured as markers of stress in wild animals. However, corticosteroid levels rise rapidly in response to the acute stress of capture and restraint for sampling, limiting its use as an indicator of chronic stress. We hypothesized that serum corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), the primary transport protein for corticosteroids in circulation, may be a better marker of the stress status prior to capture in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos). To test this, a full-length CBG cDNA was cloned and sequenced from grizzly bear testis and polyclonal antibodies were generated for detection of this protein in bear sera. The deduced nucleotide and protein sequences were 1218 bp and 405 amino acids, respectively. Multiple sequence alignments showed that grizzly bear CBG (gbCBG) was 90% and 83% identical to the dog CBG nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively. The affinity purified rabbit gbCBG antiserum detected grizzly bear but not human CBG. There were no sex differences in serum total cortisol concentration, while CBG expression was significantly higher in adult females compared to males. Serum cortisol levels were significantly higher in bears captured by leg-hold snare compared to those captured by remote drug delivery from helicopter. However, serum CBG expression between these two groups did not differ significantly. Overall, serum CBG levels may be a better marker of chronic stress, especially because this protein is not modulated by the stress of capture and restraint in grizzly bears. PMID:20347821

  10. Gi/o proteins: expression for direct activation enquiry.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Pacini, Alessandra; Toscano, Annarita; Fortini, Martina; Berti, Debora; Ghelardini, Carla; Galeotti, Nicoletta; Baglioni, Piero; Bartolini, Alessandro

    2006-05-01

    G protein-mediated pathways are fundamental mechanisms of cell signaling. In this paper, the expression and the characterization of the alphai1, alphai3, alphao1, beta1, and gamma2 subunits of the human G protein are described. This approach was developed to evaluate the G protein activation profile of new compounds. pCR-TOPO T7 vectors, engineered to contain the target sequences, were used to transform Escherichia coli competent cells. Subunits were over-expressed in a preparative scale as fusion proteins with a six-histidine tag, and subsequently purified by metal chelate chromatography. Afterward, the His-tag was removed by enterokinase digestion, and the secondary structures of the recombinant subunits were analyzed by circular dichroism. To assess the functionality of the subunits, the rate of GTP hydrolysis and GTPgammaS binding were evaluated both in the absence and in the presence of two modulators: the peptidic activator Mastoparan and the non-peptidic activator N-dodecyl-lysinamide (ML250). Tests were conducted on isolated alpha-subunit and on heterotrimeric alphabetagamma complex, alone or reconstituted in phospholipidic vesicles. Our results show that recombinant subunits are stable, properly folded and, fully active, which makes them suitable candidates for functional studies. PMID:16364655

  11. Expression cloning of genes encoding human peroxisomal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Spathaky, J.M.; Tate, A.W.; Cox, T.M.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous metabolic disorders associated with diverse peroxisomal defects have been identified but their molecular characterization has been hampered by difficulties associated with the purification of proteins from this fragile organelle. We have utilized antibodies directed against the C-terminal tripeptide peroxisomal targeting signal to detect hitherto unknown peroxisomal proteins in tissue fractions and to isolate genes encoding peroxisonal proteins from human expression libraries. We immunized rabbits with a peptide conjugate encompassing the C-terminal nine amino acids of rat peroxisomal acyl CoA oxidase. Immunoprecipitation assays using radio-labelled peptide showed that the antibody specifically recognizes the terminal SKL motif as well as C-terminal SHL and SRL but not SHL at an internal position. Affinity-purified antibody was used to probe Western blots of crude and peroxisome-enriched monkey liver preparations and detected 8-10 proteins specifically in the peroxisome fractions. 100 positive clones were identified on screening a human liver cDNA expression library in {lambda}-gt11. Sequence analysis has confirmed the identity of cDNA clones for human acyl CoA oxidase and epoxide hydrolase. Four clones show no sequence identity and their putative role in the human peroxisome is being explored.

  12. Regulation of RAG-2 protein expression in avian thymocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, S E; Accavitti, M A; Wang, D D; Chen, C L; Thompson, C B

    1994-01-01

    The recombinase-activating genes, RAG-1 and RAG-2, have been shown to be necessary to initiate the process of V(D)J recombination during the ontogeny of lymphocytes. While much is known about the end products of this rearrangement process, little is known about the function or regulation of the components of the recombinase system. To this end, we have generated a monoclonal antibody to the chicken RAG-2 protein. Chicken thymocytes were found to express high levels of RAG-2, part of which is phosphorylated. Within thymocytes, RAG-2 is expressed primarily within the nucleus. RAG-2 protein levels are high in the CD4- CD8- and CD4+ CD8+ immature thymocytes but absent at the single-positive CD4+ CD8- or CD4- CD8+ stage of thymocyte development. Mitogenic stimulation of thymocytes with phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin results in down-regulation of RAG-2 expression. Consistent with these data, in vivo levels of RAG-2 are markedly lower in proliferating thymocytes than in smaller, G0/G1 cells. Down-regulation of RAG-2 expression appears to occur before cells enter S phase, suggesting that RAG-2 function may be limited to noncycling cells. Images PMID:7935443

  13. Expression pattern of Protein Kinase C ϵ during mouse embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein kinase C epsilon (PKCϵ) belongs to the novel PKC subfamily, which consists of diacylglycerol dependent- and calcium independent-PKCs. Previous studies have shown that PKCϵ is important in different contexts, such as wound healing or cancer. In this study, we contribute to expand the knowledge on PKCϵ by reporting its expression pattern during murine midgestation using the LacZ reporter gene and immunostaining procedures. Results Sites showing highest PKCϵ expression were heart at ealier stages, and ganglia in older embryos. Other stained domains included somites, bone, stomach, kidney, and blood vessels. Conclusions The seemingly strong expression of PKCϵ in heart and ganglia shown in this study suggests a important role of this isoform in the vascular and nervous systems during mouse development. However, functional redundancy with other PKCs during midgestation within these domains and others reported here possibly exists since PKCϵ deficient mice do not display obvious embryonic developmental defects. PMID:23639204

  14. Mutational Analysis of the Rift Valley Fever Virus Glycoprotein Precursor Proteins for Gn Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, Inaia; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Nishiyama, Shoko; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) M-segment encodes the 78 kD, NSm, Gn, and Gc proteins. The 1st AUG generates the 78 kD-Gc precursor, the 2nd AUG generates the NSm-Gn-Gc precursor, and the 3rd AUG makes the NSm'-Gn-Gc precursor. To understand biological changes due to abolishment of the precursors, we quantitatively measured Gn secretion using a reporter assay, in which a Gaussia luciferase (gLuc) protein is fused to the RVFV M-segment pre-Gn region. Using the reporter assay, the relative expression of Gn/gLuc fusion proteins was analyzed among various AUG mutants. The reporter assay showed efficient secretion of Gn/gLuc protein from the precursor made from the 2nd AUG, while the removal of the untranslated region upstream of the 2nd AUG (AUG2-M) increased the secretion of the Gn/gLuc protein. Subsequently, recombinant MP-12 strains encoding mutations in the pre-Gn region were rescued, and virological phenotypes were characterized. Recombinant MP-12 encoding the AUG2-M mutation replicated slightly less efficiently than the control, indicating that viral replication is further influenced by the biological processes occurring after Gn expression, rather than the Gn abundance. This study showed that, not only the abolishment of AUG, but also the truncation of viral UTR, affects the expression of Gn protein by the RVFV M-segment. PMID:27231931

  15. Mutational Analysis of the Rift Valley Fever Virus Glycoprotein Precursor Proteins for Gn Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Phoenix, Inaia; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Nishiyama, Shoko; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) M-segment encodes the 78 kD, NSm, Gn, and Gc proteins. The 1st AUG generates the 78 kD-Gc precursor, the 2nd AUG generates the NSm-Gn-Gc precursor, and the 3rd AUG makes the NSm’-Gn-Gc precursor. To understand biological changes due to abolishment of the precursors, we quantitatively measured Gn secretion using a reporter assay, in which a Gaussia luciferase (gLuc) protein is fused to the RVFV M-segment pre-Gn region. Using the reporter assay, the relative expression of Gn/gLuc fusion proteins was analyzed among various AUG mutants. The reporter assay showed efficient secretion of Gn/gLuc protein from the precursor made from the 2nd AUG, while the removal of the untranslated region upstream of the 2nd AUG (AUG2-M) increased the secretion of the Gn/gLuc protein. Subsequently, recombinant MP-12 strains encoding mutations in the pre-Gn region were rescued, and virological phenotypes were characterized. Recombinant MP-12 encoding the AUG2-M mutation replicated slightly less efficiently than the control, indicating that viral replication is further influenced by the biological processes occurring after Gn expression, rather than the Gn abundance. This study showed that, not only the abolishment of AUG, but also the truncation of viral UTR, affects the expression of Gn protein by the RVFV M-segment. PMID:27231931

  16. Expression of odorant-binding proteins and chemosensory proteins in some Hymenoptera.

    PubMed

    Calvello, M; Brandazza, A; Navarrini, A; Dani, F R; Turillazzi, S; Felicioli, A; Pelosi, P

    2005-04-01

    The expression of chemosensory proteins (CSPs) and odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) in individuals of different castes and ages have been monitored in three species of social hymenopterans, Polistes dominulus (Hymenoptera, Vespidae), Vespa crabro (Hymenoptera, Vespidae) and Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera, Apidae), using PCR with specific primers and polyclonal antibodies. In the paper wasp P. dominulus, OBP is equally expressed in antennae, wings and legs of all castes and ages, while CSP is often specifically present in antennae and in some cases also in legs. In the vespine species V. crabro CSP is antennal specific, while OBP is also expressed in legs and wings. The three CSPs and the five OBPs of A. mellifera show a complex pattern of expression, where both classes of proteins include members specifically expressed in antennae and others present in other parts of the body. These data indicate that at least in some hymenopteran species CSPs are specifically expressed in antennae and could perform roles in chemosensory perception so far assigned only to OBPs. PMID:15763466

  17. Unique expression of cytoskeletal proteins in human soft palate muscles.

    PubMed

    Shah, Farhan; Berggren, Diana; Holmlund, Thorbjörn; Levring Jäghagen, Eva; Stål, Per

    2016-03-01

    The human oropharyngeal muscles have a unique anatomy with diverse and intricate functions. To investigate if this specialization is also reflected in the cytoarchitecture of muscle fibers, intermediate filament proteins and the dystrophin-associated protein complex have been analyzed in two human palate muscles, musculus uvula (UV) and musculus palatopharyngeus (PP), with immunohistochenmical and morphological techniques. Human limb muscles were used as reference. The findings show that the soft palate muscle fibers have a cytoskeletal architecture that differs from the limb muscles. While all limb muscles showed immunoreaction for a panel of antibodies directed against different domains of cytoskeletal proteins desmin and dystrophin, a subpopulation of palate muscle fibers lacked or had a faint immunoreaction for desmin (UV 11.7% and PP 9.8%) and the C-terminal of the dystrophin molecule (UV 4.2% and PP 6.4%). The vast majority of these fibers expressed slow contractile protein myosin heavy chain I. Furthermore, an unusual staining pattern was also observed in these fibers for β-dystroglycan, caveolin-3 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase nNOS, which are all membrane-linking proteins associated with the dystrophin C-terminus. While the immunoreaction for nNOS was generally weak or absent, β-dystroglycan and caveolin-3 showed a stronger immunostaining. The absence or a low expression of cytoskeletal proteins otherwise considered ubiquitous and important for integration and contraction of muscle cells indicate a unique cytoarchitecture designed to meet the intricate demands of the upper airway muscles. It can be concluded that a subgroup of muscle fibers in the human soft palate appears to have special biomechanical properties, and their unique cytoarchitecture must be taken into account while assessing function and pathology in oropharyngeal muscles. PMID:26597319

  18. Amyloid Precursor Protein Expression Modulates Intestine Immune Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Kendra L.; Swigost, Adam J.; Zhou, Xudong; Sens, MaryAnn; Combs, Colin K.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is widely expressed across many tissue and cell types. Proteolytic processing of the protein gives rise to a plethora of protein fragments with varied biological activities. Although a large amount of data has been generated describing the metabolism of the protein in neurons, its role in regulating the phenotype of other cells remains unclear. Based upon prior work demonstrating that APP regulates the activation phenotype of monocytic lineage cells, we hypothesized that APP can regulate macrophage activation phenotype in tissues other than brain. Ileums of the small intestines from C57BL6/J wild type and APP−/− mice were compared as a representative tissue normally associated with abundant macrophage infiltration. APP−/− intestines demonstrated diminished CD68 immunoreactivity compared to wild type mice. This correlated with significantly less cycloxygenase-2 (cox-2), CD68, CD40, CD11c, and βIII-tubulin protein levels. Peritoneal macrophage from APP−/− mice demonstrated decreased in vitro migratory ability compared to wild type cells and diminished basal KC cytokine secretion. Whereas, APP−/− intestinal macrophage had an increase in basal KC cytokine secretion compared to wild type cells. Conversely, there was a significant decrease in multiple cytokine levels in APP−/− compared to wild type ileums. Finally, APP−/− mice demonstrated impaired absorption and increased motility compared to wild type mice. These data demonstrate the APP expression regulates immune cell secretions and phenotype and intestinal function. This data set describes a novel function for this protein or its metabolites that may be relevant not only for Alzheimer’s disease but a range of immune-related disorders. PMID:22124967

  19. Expression and Localization of Lung Surfactant Proteins in Human Testis

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Walter; Matthies, Cord; Ruf, Christian; Hartmann, Arndt; Garreis, Fabian; Paulsen, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    Background Surfactant proteins (SPs) have been described in various tissues and fluids including tissues of the nasolacrimal apparatus, airways and digestive tract. Human testis have a glandular function as a part of the reproductive and the endocrine system, but no data are available on SPs in human testis and prostate under healthy and pathologic conditions. Objective The aim of the study was the detection and characterization of the surfactant proteins A, B, C and D (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D) in human testis. Additionally tissue samples affected by testicular cancer were investigated. Results Surfactant proteins A, B, C and D were detected using RT-PCR in healthy testis. By means of Western blot analysis, these SPs were detected at the protein level in normal testis, seminoma and seminal fluid, but not in spermatozoa. Expression of SPs was weaker in seminoma compared to normal testicular tissue. SPs were localized in combination with vimentin immunohistochemically in cells of Sertoli and Leydig. Conclusion Surfactant proteins seem to be inherent part of the human testis. By means of physicochemical properties the proteins appear to play a role during immunological and rheological process of the testicular tissue. The presence of SP-B and SP-C in cells of Sertoli correlates with their function of fluid secretion and may support transportation of spermatozoa. In seminoma the expression of all SP's was generally weaker compared to normal germ cells. This could lead to a reduction of immunomodulatory and rheology processes in the germ cell tumor. PMID:26599233

  20. GDF-15 inhibits integrin activation and mouse neutrophil recruitment through the ALK-5/TGF-βRII heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Artz, Annette; Butz, Stefan; Vestweber, Dietmar

    2016-07-28

    Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) is the first cytokine known to counteract chemokine-induced activation of leukocyte integrins. We showed recently that this activity dampens neutrophil recruitment into inflamed tissue and is required for survival of myocardial infarction in mice. The receptor responsible for this GDF-15-triggered anti-inflammatory mechanism on myeloid cells is not known. Here, we identify this receptor as transforming growth factor β receptor I (TGF-βRI) (activin receptor-like kinase 5 [ALK-5]) and TGF-β receptor II (TGF-βRII). We show that interference with these receptors by small-molecule inhibitors, antibodies, or small interfering RNA, blocked the GDF-15 effect on leukocyte integrin activation. Likewise, gene inactivation of each of the 2 receptors in neutrophils isolated from conditional gene-deficient mice abolished the inhibitory effect of GDF-15 on CXCL1-induced β2-integrin activation and neutrophil diapedesis. Rapid neutrophil arrest induced by CXCL1 in vivo was inhibited by GDF-15 in an ALK-5 and TGF-βRII dependent way. As for GDF-15 gene-deficient mice, we found that extravasation of neutrophils deficient for ALK-5 or TGF-βRII was strongly increased in the interleukin-1β inflamed cremaster. The inhibitory effects of GDF-15 on neutrophil integrin activation and in vivo neutrophil arrest were also found for TGF-β1. Mechanistically, GDF-15 and TGF-β1 interfered with integrin activation by inhibiting the activation of Ras-related protein 1 (Rap-1), an effect that depended on CalDAG- guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (GEF1) and cell division control protein 42 homolog. We conclude that both GDF-15 and TGF-β1 counteract chemokine-induced integrin activation on neutrophils via the ALK-5/TGF-βRII heterodimer. This represents a novel, rapid anti-inflammatory activity of the 2 TGF-β receptors and of TGF-β1. PMID:27235139

  1. Identification of differentially expressed serum proteins in gastric adenocarcinoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Mir, Sartaj Ahmad; Renuse, Santosh; Manda, Srikanth S.; Pinto, Sneha M.; Puttamallesh, Vinuth N.; Solanki, Hitendra Singh; Manju, H.C.; Syed, Nazia; Sharma, Rakesh; Christopher, Rita; Vijayakumar, M.; Kumar, K.V. Veerendra; Prasad, T.S. Keshava; Ramaswamy, Girija; Kumar, Rekha V.; Chatterjee, Aditi; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gowda, Harsha

    2015-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is an aggressive cancer with poor prognosis. Blood based biomarkers of gastric cancer have the potential to improve diagnosis and monitoring of these tumors. Proteins that show altered levels in the circulation of gastric cancer patients could prove useful as putative biomarkers. We used an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach to identify proteins that show altered levels in the sera of patients with gastric cancer. Our study resulted in identification of 643 proteins, of which 48 proteins showed increased levels and 11 proteins showed decreased levels in serum from gastric cancer patients compared to age and sex matched healthy controls. Proteins that showed increased expression in gastric cancer included inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 (ITIH4), Mannose-binding protein C (MBL2), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2), serum amyloid A protein (SAA1), Orosomucoid 1 (ORM1) and extracellular superoxide dismutase [Cu–Zn] (SOD3). We used multiple reaction monitoring assays and validated elevated levels of ITIH4 and SAA1 proteins in serum from gastric cancer patients. Biological significance Gastric cancer is a highly aggressive cancer associated with high mortality. Serum-based biomarkers are of considerable interest in diagnosis and monitoring of various diseases including cancers. Gastric cancer is often diagnosed at advanced stages resulting in poor prognosis and high mortality. Pathological diagnosis using biopsy specimens remains the gold standard for diagnosis of gastric cancer. Serum-based biomarkers are of considerable importance as they are minimally invasive. In this study, we carried out quantitative proteomic profiling of serum from gastric cancer patients to identify proteins that show altered levels in gastric cancer patients. We identified more than 50 proteins that showed altered levels in gastric cancer patient sera. Validation in a large cohort of well

  2. Constraints imposed by nonfunctional protein-protein interactions on gene expression and proteome size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingshan; Maslov, Sergei; Shakhnovich, Eugene

    2009-03-01

    Crowded intracellular environments present a challenge for proteins to form functional specific complexes while reducing nonfunctional interactions with promiscuous nonfunctional partners. Here we show how nonfunctional interactions limit the proteome diversity and the average concentration of co-expressed and co-localized proteins. We use yeast compartments to verify our hypothesis that the yeast proteome has evolved to operate closely to the upper limit of its size, while keeping individual protein concentrations sufficiently low to reduce nonfunctional interactions. These findings have implication for conceptual understanding of intracellular compartmentalization, multicellularity, and differentiation.

  3. A systematic approach for testing expression of human full-length proteins in cell-free expression systems

    PubMed Central

    Langlais, Claudia; Guilleaume, Birgit; Wermke, Nadja; Scheuermann, Tina; Ebert, Lars; LaBaer, Joshua; Korn, Bernhard

    2007-01-01

    Background The growing field of proteomics and systems biology is resulting in an ever increasing demand for purified recombinant proteins for structural and functional studies. Here, we show a systematic approach to successfully express a full-length protein of interest by using cell-free and cell-based expression systems. Results In a pre-screen, we evaluated the expression of 960 human full-length open reading frames in Escherichia coli (in vivo and in vitro). After analysing the protein expression rate and solubility, we chose a subset of 87 plasmids yielding no protein product in E. coli in vivo. These targets were subjected to a more detailed analysis comparing a prokaryotic cell-free E. coli system with an eukaryotic wheat germ system. In addition, we determined the expression rate, yield and solubility of those proteins. After sequence optimisation for the E. coli in vitro system and generating linear templates for wheat germ expression, the success rate of cell-free protein expression reached 93%. Conclusion We have demonstrated that protein expression in cell-free systems is an appropriate technology for the successful expression of soluble full-length proteins. In our study, wheat germ expression using a two compartment system is the method of choice as it shows high solubility and high protein yield. PMID:17915018

  4. Optimizing Escherichia coli as a protein expression platform to produce Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunogenic proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A number of valuable candidates as tuberculosis vaccine have been reported, some of which have already entered clinical trials. The new vaccines, especially subunit vaccines, need multiple administrations in order to maintain adequate life-long immune memory: this demands for high production levels and degree of purity. Results In this study, TB10.4, Ag85B and a TB10.4-Ag85B chimeric protein (here-after referred as full) - immunodominant antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis - were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The rational design of expression constructs and optimization of fermentation and purification conditions allowed a marked increase in solubility and yield of the recombinant antigens. Indeed, scaling up of the process guaranteed mass production of all these three antigens (2.5-25 mg of pure protein/L cultivation broth). Quality of produced soluble proteins was evaluated both by mass spectrometry to assess the purity of final preparations, and by circular dichroism spectroscopy to ascertain the protein conformation. Immunological tests of the different protein products demonstrated that when TB10.4 was fused to Ag85B, the chimeric protein was more immunoreactive than either of the immunogenic protein alone. Conclusions We reached the goal of purifying large quantities of soluble antigens effective in generating immunological response against M. tuberculosis by a robust, controlled, scalable and economically feasible production process. PMID:24252280

  5. Downregulation of hepatocyte nuclear factor-4{alpha} and its role in regulation of gene expression by TGF-{beta} in mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Nose, Kiyoshi; Shibanuma, Motoko

    2008-06-10

    We found that a specific isoform of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF-4{alpha}), HNF-4{alpha}8, was expressed in mouse mammary epithelial NMuMG cells, and that its expression was repressed by TGF-{beta}. The repression was interfered by dominant negative forms of activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5) and Smad3, and sensitive to cycloheximide, suggesting the involvement of additional protein(s) as well as ALK5 and Smad3 in the repression. Further study showed that high mobility group A2 (HMGA2), which is reported to be directly upregulated by Smads, repressed HNF-4{alpha}8 expression. Therefore, it is likely that HMGA2 mediates the downregulation of HNF-4{alpha}8 downstream of ALK5 and Smads To determine the significance of the downregulation of HNF-4{alpha}8 in TGF-{beta} signaling, we performed DNA microarray analysis and extracted a subgroup of TGF-{beta}1-regulated genes, including tenascin C and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP-3), whose regulation by TGF-{beta}1 was attenuated by forced expression of HNF-4{alpha}8. HMGA2 has recently emerged as a transcriptional organizer of TGF-{beta} signaling, regulating several key factors involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In this study, we identified an isoform of HNF-4{alpha} as a new target downstream of HMGA2 and assigned a new role to HNF-4{alpha} in the TGF-{beta} signaling/transcriptional cascade driven by ALK5/Smad/HMGA2 and associated with the malignant transformation of cells.

  6. Expression of proteoglycan core proteins in human bone marrow stroma.

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, K P; Gallagher, J T; David, G

    1999-01-01

    Heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs) present on the surface of bone marrow stromal cells and in the extracellular matrix (ECM) have important roles in the control of adhesion and growth of haemopoietic stem and progenitor cells. The two main groups of proteoglycans which contain heparan sulphate chains are members of the syndecan and glypican families. In this study we have identified the main surface membrane and matrix-associated HSPGs present in normal human bone marrow stroma formed in long-term culture. Proteoglycans were extracted from the adherent stromal layers and treated with heparitinase and chondroitinase ABC. The core proteins were detected by Western blotting using antibodies directed against syndecans-1-4, glypican-1 and the ECM HSPG, perlecan. Stromal cell expression at the RNA level was detected by Northern blotting and by reverse transcription PCR. Glypican-1, syndecan-3 and syndecan-4 were the major cell-membrane HSPG species and perlecan was the major ECM proteoglycan. There was no evidence for expression of syndecan-1 protein. Syndecan-3 was expressed mainly as a variant or processed 50-55 kDa core protein and in lower amounts as the characteristic 125 kDa core protein. These results suggest that syndecan-3, syndecan-4 and glypican-1 present on the surface of marrow stromal cells, together with perlecan in the ECM, may be responsible for creating the correct stromal 'niche' for the maintenance and development of haemopoietic stem and progenitor cells. The detection of a variant form of syndecan-3 as a major stromal HSPG suggests a specific role for this syndecan in haemopoiesis. PMID:10527946

  7. Entrectinib, a Pan-TRK, ROS1, and ALK Inhibitor with Activity in Multiple Molecularly Defined Cancer Indications.

    PubMed

    Ardini, Elena; Menichincheri, Maria; Banfi, Patrizia; Bosotti, Roberta; De Ponti, Cristina; Pulci, Romana; Ballinari, Dario; Ciomei, Marina; Texido, Gemma; Degrassi, Anna; Avanzi, Nilla; Amboldi, Nadia; Saccardo, Maria Beatrice; Casero, Daniele; Orsini, Paolo; Bandiera, Tiziano; Mologni, Luca; Anderson, David; Wei, Ge; Harris, Jason; Vernier, Jean-Michel; Li, Gang; Felder, Eduard; Donati, Daniele; Isacchi, Antonella; Pesenti, Enrico; Magnaghi, Paola; Galvani, Arturo

    2016-04-01

    Activated ALK and ROS1 tyrosine kinases, resulting from chromosomal rearrangements, occur in a subset of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) as well as other tumor types and their oncogenic relevance as actionable targets has been demonstrated by the efficacy of selective kinase inhibitors such as crizotinib, ceritinib, and alectinib. More recently, low-frequency rearrangements of TRK kinases have been described in NSCLC, colorectal carcinoma, glioblastoma, and Spitzoid melanoma. Entrectinib, whose discovery and preclinical characterization are reported herein, is a novel, potent inhibitor of ALK, ROS1, and, importantly, of TRK family kinases, which shows promise for therapy of tumors bearing oncogenic forms of these proteins. Proliferation profiling against over 200 human tumor cell lines revealed that entrectinib is exquisitely potent in vitro against lines that are dependent on the drug's pharmacologic targets. Oral administration of entrectinib to tumor-bearing mice induced regression in relevant human xenograft tumors, including the TRKA-dependent colorectal carcinoma KM12, ROS1-driven tumors, and several ALK-dependent models of different tissue origins, including a model of brain-localized lung cancer metastasis. Entrectinib is currently showing great promise in phase I/II clinical trials, including the first documented objective responses to a TRK inhibitor in colorectal carcinoma and in NSCLC. The drug is, thus, potentially suited to the therapy of several molecularly defined cancer settings, especially that of TRK-dependent tumors, for which no approved drugs are currently available. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(4); 628-39. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26939704

  8. Automated brightfield break-apart in situ hybridization (ba-ISH) application: ALK and MALT1 genes as models.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Hiroaki; Zhang, Wenjun; Kelly, Brian D; Miller, Melanie; Pestic-Dragovich, Lidija; Bieniarz, Christopher; Vasicek, Thomas J; Marafioti, Teresa; Rimsza, Lisa; Grogan, Thomas M

    2010-12-01

    Cancer diagnosis can be a complex process, which takes consideration of histopathological, clinical, immunophenotypic, and genetic features. Since non-random chromosomal translocations are specifically involved in the development of various cancers, the detection of these gene aberrations becomes increasingly important. In recent years, break-apart (or split-signal) fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has emerged as an advantageous technique to detect gene translocations on tissue sections. However, FISH assays are technically challenging and require specialized fluorescence microscopes. Furthermore, the FISH signal is not stable for long term archiving due to photo bleaching. Our objective was to demonstrate the feasibility of brightfield break-apart in situ hybridization (ba-ISH) for anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue translocation protein 1 (MALT1) genes as models. ALK or MALT1 break-apart probes were labeled with digoxigenin (DIG) or 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP) on both sides of a known gene breakpoint region and the hybridization sites were visualized with the combination of alkaline phosphatase (AP)-based blue and red detection. Therefore, normal genes are detected as purple dots by mixing blue and red colors while translocated genes are detected as isolated blue or red dots. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tonsil was used as control for the co-localized 5' and 3' probes. Gene translocations of ALK or MALT1 were detected as separate blue and red dots on ALCL and MALT lymphoma cases. Thus, ISH analyses of gene translocations can be conducted with a regular light microscope and the long term archiving of break-apart ISH slides can be achieved. PMID:20621192

  9. Protein expression and characterization of SEP3 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q; Zhou, J; Wang, P; Lin, X; Xu, Y

    2015-01-01

    SEPALLATA (SEP) MADS-box genes play crucial roles in the regulation of floral growth and development. They are required for the specification of sepals, petals, stamens, and carpels as well as for floral determinacy. SEPs perform their functions through the formation of homo- or hetero-polymers, which are the molecular basis of floral quartets. In vitro assays indicated that SEP3 forms a tetramer after binding to DNA, but it is unclear whether DNA binding induces the tetramer, because SEP3 is often reported to form a dimer. Here, we analyzed the oligomeric status of SEP3 domains in the absence of the DNA-binding MADS-box domain. The truncated SEP3 was constructed as a fusion protein and expressed in prokaryotic cells. The purified protein fragment displayed as a tetramer in the size exclusion chromatographic column, and a glutaraldehyde cross-linking assay demonstrated that the protein contained a dimer unit. Yeast two-hybrid tests further verified that the fragments form homologous polymers in vivo, and that the K domain is involved in tetramer formation. Current results imply that the SEP3 protein regulates the formation of flower meristems using the tetramer as a unit, and that the DNA-binding MADS-box is dispensable for polymer formation. The C-terminal region does not contribute to homo-tetramer formation, but it may be reserved to glue other proteins. PMID:26505403

  10. Preliminary identification of differentially expressed tear proteins in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Wasinger, Valerie C.; Pye, David C.; Willcox, Mark D. P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To examine the proteins differentially expressed in the tear film of people with keratoconus and normal subjects. Methods Unstimulated tears from people with keratoconus (KC) and controls (C) were collected using a capillary tube. Tear proteins from people with KC and controls were partitioned using a novel in-solution electrophoresis, Microflow 10 (ProteomeSep), and analyzed using linear ion trap quadrupole fourier transform mass spectrometry. Spectral counting was used to quantify the individual tear proteins. Results Elevated levels of cathepsin B (threefold) were evident in the tears of people with KC. Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (ninefold), fibrinogen alpha chain (eightfold), cystatin S (twofold), and cystatin SN (twofold) were reduced in tears from people with KC. Keratin type-1 cytoskeletal-14 and keratin type-2 cytoskeletal-5 were present only in the tears of people with KC. Conclusions The protein changes in tears, that is, the decrease in protease inhibitors and increase in proteases, found in the present and other previously published studies reflect the pathological events involved in KC corneas. Further investigations into tear proteins may help elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of KC, which could result in better treatment options. PMID:24194634

  11. Protein expression strategies in Tobacco necrosis virus-D.

    PubMed

    Chkuaseli, Tamari; Newburn, Laura R; Bakhshinyan, David; White, K Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Tobacco necrosis virus (TNV-D) has a plus-strand RNA genome that is neither 5' capped nor 3' poly-adenylated. Instead, it utilizes a 3' cap-independent translational enhancer (3'CITE) located in its 3' untranslated region (UTR) for translation of its proteins. We have examined the protein expression strategies used by TNV-D and our results indicate that: (i) a base pairing interaction between conserved ACCA and UGGU motifs in the genomic 5'UTR and 3'CITE, respectively, is not required for efficient plant cell infection, (ii) similar potential 5'UTR-3'CITE interactions in the two viral subgenomic mRNAs are not needed for efficient translation of viral proteins in vitro, (iii) a small amount of capsid protein is translated from the viral genome by a largely 3'CITE-independent mechanism, (iv) the larger of two possible forms of capsid protein is efficiently translated, and (v) p7b is translated from subgenomic mRNA1 by a leaky scanning mechanism. PMID:26402375

  12. Protein body formation in stable transgenic tobacco expressing elastin-like polypeptide and hydrophobin fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plants are recognized as an efficient and inexpensive system to produce valuable recombinant proteins. Two different strategies have been commonly used for the expression of recombinant proteins in plants: transient expression mediated by Agrobacterium; or stable transformation of the plant genome. However, the use of plants as bioreactors still faces two main limitations: low accumulation levels of some recombinant proteins and lack of efficient purification methods. Elastin-like polypeptide (ELP), hydrophobin I (HFBI) and Zera® are three fusion partners found to increase the accumulation levels of recombinant proteins and induce the formation of protein bodies (PBs) in leaves when targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in transient expression assays. In this study the effects of ELP and HFBI fusion tags on recombinant protein accumulation levels and PB formation was examined in stable transgenic Nicotiana tabacum. Results The accumulation of recombinant protein and PB formation was evaluated in two cultivars of Nicotiana tabacum transformed with green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to ELP or HFBI, both targeted and retrieved to the ER. The ELP and HFBI tags increased the accumulation of the recombinant protein and induced the formation of PBs in leaves of stable transgenic plants from both cultivars. Furthermore, these tags induced the formation of PBs in a concentration-dependent manner, where a specific level of recombinant protein accumulation was required for PBs to appear. Moreover, agro-infiltration of plants accumulating low levels of recombinant protein with p19, a suppressor of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), increased accumulation levels in four independent transgenic lines, suggesting that PTGS might have caused the low accumulation levels in these plants. Conclusion The use of ELP and HFBI tags as fusion partners in stable transgenic plants of tobacco is feasible and promising. In a constitutive environment, these tags

  13. Blue Light Modulates Murine Microglial Gene Expression in the Absence of Optogenetic Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kevin P.; Kiernan, Elizabeth A.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Williams, Justin C.; Watters, Jyoti J.

    2016-01-01

    Neural optogenetic applications over the past decade have steadily increased; however the effects of commonly used blue light paradigms on surrounding, non-optogenetic protein-expressing CNS cells are rarely considered, despite their simultaneous exposure. Here we report that blue light (450 nm) repetitively delivered in both long-duration boluses and rapid optogenetic bursts gene-specifically altered basal expression of inflammatory and neurotrophic genes in immortalized and primary murine wild type microglial cultures. In addition, blue light reduced pro-inflammatory gene expression in microglia activated with lipopolysaccharide. These results demonstrate previously unreported, off-target effects of blue light in cells not expressing optogenetic constructs. The unexpected gene modulatory effects of blue light on wild type CNS resident immune cells have novel and important implications for the neuro-optogenetic field. Further studies are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms and potential therapeutic utility of blue light modulation of the wild type CNS. PMID:26883795

  14. An engineered chaperonin caging a guest protein: Structural insights and potential as a protein expression tool

    PubMed Central

    Furutani, Masahiro; Hata, Jun-Ichi; Shomura, Yasuhito; Itami, Keisuke; Yoshida, Takao; Izumoto, Yoshitaka; Togi, Akiko; Ideno, Akira; Yasunaga, Takuo; Miki, Kunio; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2005-01-01

    The structure of a chaperonin caging a substrate protein is not quite clear. We made engineered group II chaperonins fused with a guest protein and analyzed their structural and functional features. Thermococcus sp. KS-1 chaperonin α-subunit (TCP) which forms an eightfold symmetric double-ring structure was used. Expression plasmids were constructed which carried two or four TCP genes ligated head to tail in phase and a target protein gene at the 3′ end of the linked TCP genes. Electron microscopy showed that the expressed gene products with the molecular sizes of ~120 kDa (di-TCP) and ~230 kDa (tetra-TCP) formed double-ring complexes similar to those of wild-type TCP. The tetra-TCP retained ATPase activity and its thermostability was significantly higher than that of the wild type. A 260-kDa fusion protein of tetra-TCP and green fluorescent protein (GFP, 27 kDa) was able to form the double-ring complexes with green fluorescence. Image analyses indicated that the GFP moiety of tetra-TCP/GFP fusion protein was accommodated in the central cavity, and tetra-TCP/GFP formed the closed-form similar to that crystallographically resolved in group II chaperonins. Furthermore, it was suggested that caging GFP expanded the cavity around the bottom. Using this tetra-TCP fusion strategy, two virus structural proteins (21–25 kDa) toxic to host cells or two antibody fragments (25–36 kDa) prone to aggregate were well expressed in the soluble fraction of Escherichia coli. These fusion products also assembled to double-ring complexes, suggesting encapsulation of the guest proteins. The antibody fragments liberated by site-specific protease digestion exhibited ligand-binding activities. PMID:15659368

  15. Expression of recombinant green fluorescent protein in Bacillus methanolicus.

    PubMed

    Nilasari, Dewi; Dover, Nir; Rech, Sabine; Komives, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biocatalysts are used in a wide range of industries to produce large scale quantities of proteins, amino acids, and commodity chemicals. While the majority of these processes use glucose or other low-cost sugars as the substrate, Bacillus methanolicus is one example of a biocatalyst that has shown sustained growth on methanol as a carbon source at elevated temperature (50-53°C optimum) resulting in reduced feed and utility costs. Specifically, the complete chemical process enabled by this approach takes methane from natural gas, and following a low-cost conversion to methanol, can be used for the production of high value products. In this study, production of recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) by B. methanolicus is explored. A plasmid was constructed that incorporates the methanol dehydrogenase (mdh) promoter of B. methanolicus MGA3 together with the GFPuv gene. The plasmid, pNW33N, was shown to be effective for expression in other Bacillus strains, although not previously in B. methanolicus. A published electroporation protocol for transformation of B. methanolicus was modified to result in expression of GFP using plasmid pNW33N-mdh-GFPuv (pNmG). Transformation was confirmed by both agarose gel electrophoresis and by observation of green fluorescence under UV light exposure. The mass yield of cells and protein were measured in shake flask experiments. The optimum concentration of methanol for protein production was found to be at 200 mM. Higher concentrations than 200 mM resulted in slightly higher biomass production but lower amounts of recombinant protein. PMID:22275315

  16. P53 protein expression in human leukemia and lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Koníková, E; Kusenda, J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the value of p53 protein overexpression in human leukemia and lymphoma cells. We examined PB and/or BM samples on a series of 111 patients with immunophenotypically defined hematological malignancies at diagnosis, in remission and in relapsed disease comparing to 20 control samples of healthy individuals. p53 protein has been studied by flow cytometry using three monoclonal antibodies specific for epitopes on N-terminus (Bp53-12, DO-1) and central region (DO-11) of p53 protein. Our findigs showed, that p53 expression may contribute to phenotype of leukemic cells and that overexpression of this protein is often associated with progression of disease. All samples of early B-ALL patients and samples of patients with immunophenotypically defined T- cell disorders examined at diagnosis of disease were p53 positive. Eleven of 19 patient samples from AML at diagnosis showed also increased expression of p53 protein. The cells of all patients who responded to therapy with complete immunophenotypically defined remission were p53 negative. Relapsed T-, B- ALL and AML develop p53 alteration. We reported positive p53 expression in cells of patients with advanced stages of CLL in comparison to them with initial stage of disease at examination. As well as in the group of B- cell lymphomas only samples of patients with generalized FCC lymphoma at diagnosis were p53 positive. We detected p53 positive cells in immunologically defined myeloid blast crisis of CML opposite to p53 negativity in chronic phase of disease. The finding of p53 positive BM cells without immunophenotypic blast markers in two of followed cases documented the contributing value of p53 detection in their characterization. On the basis of above findings we conclude, that cytofluorometric determination of p53 expression may contribute to the better definition of leukemic phenotype. Loss of the normal p53 function may be important in the genesis of some leukemias

  17. Common and specific signatures of gene expression and protein-protein interactions in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Tuller, T; Atar, S; Ruppin, E; Gurevich, M; Achiron, A

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is to understand intracellular regulatory mechanisms in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), which are either common to many autoimmune diseases or specific to some of them. We incorporated large-scale data such as protein-protein interactions, gene expression and demographical information of hundreds of patients and healthy subjects, related to six autoimmune diseases with available large-scale gene expression measurements: multiple sclerosis (MS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC) and type 1 diabetes (T1D). These data were analyzed concurrently by statistical and systems biology approaches tailored for this purpose. We found that chemokines such as CXCL1-3, 5, 6 and the interleukin (IL) IL8 tend to be differentially expressed in PBMCs of patients with the analyzed autoimmune diseases. In addition, the anti-apoptotic gene BCL3, interferon-γ (IFNG), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene physically interact with significantly many genes that tend to be differentially expressed in PBMCs of patients with the analyzed autoimmune diseases. In general, similar cellular processes tend to be differentially expressed in PBMC in the analyzed autoimmune diseases. Specifically, the cellular processes related to cell proliferation (for example, epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, nuclear factor-κB, Wnt/β-catenin signaling, stress-activated protein kinase c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase), inflammatory response (for example, interleukins IL2 and IL6, the cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and the B-cell receptor), general signaling cascades (for example, mitogen-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 and TRK) and apoptosis are activated in most of the analyzed autoimmune diseases. However, our results suggest that in each of the analyzed diseases, apoptosis and chemotaxis are activated via

  18. Immunohistochemical evaluation of mx protein expression in canine encephalitides.

    PubMed

    Porter, B F; Ambrus, A; Storts, R W

    2006-11-01

    Mx proteins are a group of interferon-induced GTPases whose expression has been demonstrated in a number of human viral infections and in some idiopathic inflammatory diseases. In this study, the expression of Mx protein was evaluated in known viral, nonviral, and idiopathic encephalitides in the dog via immunohistochemistry using an antibody against human MxA. All 12 cases of confirmed viral encephalitis, including 7 cases of canine distemper, 4 cases of canine herpesvirus, and 1 case of rabies, were Mx positive. In canine distemper cases, staining was particularly strong and a variety of cell types were positive, including astrocytes, macrophages/microglia, and neurons. Immunoreactivity for Mx protein was evident in a few cases of nonviral infectious encephalitis, including neosporosis (1/1), Chagas disease (2/3), aspergillosis (1/2), and encephalitozoonosis (1/1). Consistent staining was observed in most cases of idiopathic encephalitis, including granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis (7/7), necrotizing meningoencephalitis of pug dogs (6/7), and necrotizing encephalitis of the Yorkshire Terrier (3/3) and Maltese (1/1) breeds. Mx staining was negative in 5 normal dog brains; 3 cases of cryptococcosis; and single cases of blastomycosis, protothecosis, and bacterial meningitis. PMID:17099155

  19. Transient Expression of Proteins by Hydrodynamic Gene Delivery in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kovacsics, Daniella; Raper, Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Efficient expression of transgenes in vivo is of critical importance in studying gene function and developing treatments for diseases. Over the past years, hydrodynamic gene delivery (HGD) has emerged as a simple, fast, safe and effective method for delivering transgenes into rodents. This technique relies on the force generated by the rapid injection of a large volume of physiological solution to increase the permeability of cell membranes of perfused organs and thus deliver DNA into cells. One of the main advantages of HGD is the ability to introduce transgenes into mammalian cells using naked plasmid DNA (pDNA). Introducing an exogenous gene using a plasmid is minimally laborious, highly efficient and, contrary to viral carriers, remarkably safe. HGD was initially used to deliver genes into mice, it is now used to deliver a wide range of substances, including oligonucleotides, artificial chromosomes, RNA, proteins and small molecules into mice, rats and, to a limited degree, other animals. This protocol describes HGD in mice and focuses on three key aspects of the method that are critical to performing the procedure successfully: correct insertion of the needle into the vein, the volume of injection and the speed of delivery. Examples are given to show the application of this method to the transient expression of two genes that encode secreted, primate-specific proteins, apolipoprotein L-I (APOL-I) and haptoglobin-related protein (HPR). PMID:24837006

  20. Transient expression of proteins by hydrodynamic gene delivery in mice.

    PubMed

    Kovacsics, Daniella; Raper, Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Efficient expression of transgenes in vivo is of critical importance in studying gene function and developing treatments for diseases. Over the past years, hydrodynamic gene delivery (HGD) has emerged as a simple, fast, safe and effective method for delivering transgenes into rodents. This technique relies on the force generated by the rapid injection of a large volume of physiological solution to increase the permeability of cell membranes of perfused organs and thus deliver DNA into cells. One of the main advantages of HGD is the ability to introduce transgenes into mammalian cells using naked plasmid DNA (pDNA). Introducing an exogenous gene using a plasmid is minimally laborious, highly efficient and, contrary to viral carriers, remarkably safe. HGD was initially used to deliver genes into mice, it is now used to deliver a wide range of substances, including oligonucleotides, artificial chromosomes, RNA, proteins and small molecules into mice, rats and, to a limited degree, other animals. This protocol describes HGD in mice and focuses on three key aspects of the method that are critical to performing the procedure successfully: correct insertion of the needle into the vein, the volume of injection and the speed of delivery. Examples are given to show the application of this method to the transient expression of two genes that encode secreted, primate-specific proteins, apolipoprotein L-I (APOL-I) and haptoglobin-related protein (HPR). PMID:24837006

  1. Heat shock protein 70-hom gene polymorphism and protein expression in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Boiocchi, C; Monti, M C; Osera, C; Mallucci, G; Pistono, C; Ferraro, O E; Nosari, G; Romani, A; Cuccia, M; Govoni, S; Pascale, A; Montomoli, C; Bergamaschi, R

    2016-09-15

    Immune-mediated and neurodegenerative mechanisms are involved in multiple sclerosis (MS). Growing evidences highlight the role of HSP70 genes in the susceptibility of some neurological diseases. In this explorative study we analyzed a polymorphism (i.e. HSP70-hom rs2227956) of the gene HSPA1L, which encodes for the protein hsp70-hom. We sequenced the polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in 191 MS patients and 365 healthy controls. The hsp70-hom protein expression was quantified by western blotting. We reported a strong association between rs2227956 polymorphism and MS risk, which is independent from the association with HSP70-2 rs1061581, and a significant link between hsp70-hom protein expression and MS severity. PMID:27609295

  2. Simvastatin enhances bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hong; Sung, Arthur; Zhao, Guohua; Shi, Lingfang; Qiu Daoming; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Kao, Peter N. . E-mail: peterkao@stanford.edu

    2006-01-06

    Statins confer therapeutic benefits in systemic and pulmonary vascular diseases. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors serve essential signaling functions in cardiovascular development and skeletal morphogenesis. Mutations in BMP receptor type II (BMPR2) are associated with human familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and pathologic neointimal proliferation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells within small pulmonary arteries. In severe experimental pulmonary hypertension, simvastatin reversed disease and conferred a 100% survival advantage. Here, modulation of BMPR2 gene expression by simvastatin is characterized in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T, pulmonary artery smooth muscle, and lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs). A 1.4 kb BMPR2 promoter containing Egr-1 binding sites confers reporter gene activation in 293T cells which is partially inhibited by simvastatin. Simvastatin enhances steady-state BMPR2 mRNA and protein expression in HLMVEC, through posttranscriptional mRNA stabilization. Simvastatin induction of BMPR2 expression may improve BMP-BMPR2 signaling thereby enhancing endothelial differentiation and function.

  3. Protein tyrosine phosphatases expression during development of mouse superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Jacqueline; Horvat-Bröcker, Andrea; Illes, Sebastian; Zaremba, Angelika; Knyazev, Piotr; Ullrich, Axel; Faissner, Andreas

    2009-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key regulators of different processes during development of the central nervous system. However, expression patterns and potential roles of PTPs in the developing superior colliculus remain poorly investigated. In this study, a degenerate primer-based reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) approach was used to isolate seven different intracellular PTPs and nine different receptor-type PTPs (RPTPs) from embryonic E15 mouse superior colliculus. Subsequently, the expression patterns of 11 PTPs (TC-PTP, PTP1C, PTP1D, PTP-MEG2, PTP-PEST, RPTPJ, RPTPε, RPTPRR, RPTPσ, RPTPκ and RPTPγ) were further analyzed in detail in superior colliculus from embryonic E13 to postnatal P20 stages by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Each of the 11 PTPs exhibits distinct spatiotemporal regulation of mRNAs and proteins in the developing superior colliculus suggesting their versatile roles in genesis of neuronal and glial cells and retinocollicular topographic mapping. At E13, additional double-immunohistochemical analysis revealed the expression of PTPs in collicular nestin-positive neural progenitor cells and RC-2-immunoreactive radial glia cells, indicating the potential functional importance of PTPs in neurogenesis and gliogenesis. PMID:19727691

  4. Transformation of Escherichia coli and protein expression using lipoplex mimicry.

    PubMed

    Yun, Chul-Ho; Bae, Chun-Sik; Ahn, Taeho

    2016-11-01

    We investigated a "one-step" method for transformation of and protein expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli) using a complex of n-stearylamine, a cationic lipid, and plasmid DNA, which mimics lipoplex-based approaches. When E. coli cells were treated with the cationic lipid-plasmid complex, the transformation efficiencies were in the range of approximately 2-3 × 10(6) colony-forming units. Further increase in the efficiency was obtained by co-treatment with calcium chloride (or rubidium chloride) and the complexes. Moreover, after DNA transfer, E. coli cells successfully expressed plasmid-encoded proteins such as cytochrome P450s and glutathione-S-transferase without overnight incubation of the cells to form colonies, an indispensable step in other bacterial transformation methods. In this study, we provide a simple method for E. coli transformation, which does not require the preparation of competent cells. The present method also shortens the overall procedures for transformation and gene expression in E. coli by omitting the colony-forming step. PMID:27416742

  5. Automation of ALK gene rearrangement testing with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH): a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Zwaenepoel, Karen; Merkle, Dennis; Cabillic, Florian; Berg, Erica; Belaud-Rotureau, Marc-Antoine; Grazioli, Vittorio; Herelle, Olga; Hummel, Michael; Le Calve, Michele; Lenze, Dido; Mende, Stefanie; Pauwels, Patrick; Quilichini, Benoit; Repetti, Elena

    2015-02-01

    In the past several years we have observed a significant increase in our understanding of molecular mechanisms that drive lung cancer. Specifically in the non-small cell lung cancer sub-types, ALK gene rearrangements represent a sub-group of tumors that are targetable by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor Crizotinib, resulting in significant reductions in tumor burden. Phase II and III clinical trials were performed using an ALK break-apart FISH probe kit, making FISH the gold standard for identifying ALK rearrangements in patients. FISH is often considered a labor and cost intensive molecular technique, and in this study we aimed to demonstrate feasibility for automation of ALK FISH testing, to improve laboratory workflow and ease of testing. This involved automation of the pre-treatment steps of the ALK assay using various protocols on the VP 2000 instrument, and facilitating automated scanning of the fluorescent FISH specimens for simplified enumeration on various backend scanning and analysis systems. The results indicated that ALK FISH can be automated. Significantly, both the Ikoniscope and BioView system of automated FISH scanning and analysis systems provided a robust analysis algorithm to define ALK rearrangements. In addition, the BioView system facilitated consultation of difficult cases via the internet. PMID:25576649

  6. Alectinib: a novel second generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor for overcoming clinically-acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zilan; Wang, Meining; Zhang, Ao

    2015-01-01

    The development of inhibitors for the tyrosine anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has advanced rapidly, driven by biology and medicinal chemistry. The first generation ALK inhibitor crizotinib was granted US FDA approval with only four years of preclinical and clinical testing. Although this drug offers significant clinical benefit to the ALK-positive patients, resistance has been developed through a variety of mechanisms. In addition to ceritinib, alectinib is another second-generation ALK inhibitor launched in 2014 in Japan. This drug has a unique chemical structure bearing a 5H-benzo[b]carbazol-11(6H)-one structural scaffold with an IC50 value of 1.9 nmol/L, and is highly potent against ALK bearing the gatekeeper mutation L1196M with an IC50 of 1.56 nmol/L. In the clinic, alectinib is highly efficacious in treatment of ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and retains potency to combat crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations L1196M, F1174L, R1275Q and C1156Y. PMID:26579422

  7. A novel Patient Derived Tumorgraft model with TRAF1-ALK Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma translocation

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Francesco; Todaro, Maria; van der Krogt, Jo-Anne; Boi, Michela; Landra, Indira; Machiorlatti, Rodolfo; Tabbo’, Fabrizio; Messana, Katia; Barreca, Antonella; Novero, Domenico; Gaudiano, Marcello; Aliberti, Sabrina; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Tousseyn, Thomas; Lasorsa, Elena; Crescenzo, Ramona; Bessone, Luca; Ficarra, Elisa; Acquaviva, Andrea; Rinaldi, Andrea; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Longo, Dario Livio; Aime, Silvio; Cheng, Mangeng; Ruggeri, Bruce; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Pileri, Stefano; Tiacci, Enrico; Falini, Brunangelo; Pera-Gresely, Benet; Cerchietti, Leandro; Iqbal, Javeed; Chan, Wing C; Shultz, Leonard D.; Kwee, Ivo; Piva, Roberto; Wlodarska, Iwona; Rabadan, Raul; Bertoni, Francesco; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Although Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphomas (ALCL) carrying Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) have a relatively good prognosis, aggressive forms exist. We have identified a novel translocation, causing the fusion of the TRAF1 and ALK genes, in one patient who presented with a leukemic ALK+ ALCL (ALCL-11). To uncover the mechanisms leading to high-grade ALCL, we developed a human Patient Derived Tumorgraft (hPDT) line. Molecular characterization of primary and PDT cells demonstrated the activation of ALK and of NFkB pathways. Genomic studies of ALCL-11 showed the TP53 loss and the in vivo subclonal expansion of lymphoma cells lacking PRDM1/Blimp-1 and with c-MYC gene amplification. The treatment with proteasome inhibitors of TRAF1-ALK cells led to down-regulation of p50/p52 and lymphoma growth inhibition. Moreover a NFkB gene set classifier stratified ALCL in distinct subsets with different clinical outcome. Moreover, a selective ALK inhibitor (CEP28122) resulted in a significant clinical response of hPDT mice, but the disease could not be eradicated. These data indicate that the activation of NFkB signaling contributes to the neoplastic phenotype of TRAF1-ALK ALCL. ALCL hPDTs are invaluable to validate the role of druggable molecules, predict therapeutic responses and are helpful tools for the implementation of patient specific therapies. PMID:25533804

  8. Structure and expression of a novel compact myelin protein – Small VCP-interacting protein (SVIP)

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jiawen; Peng, Dungeng; Voehler, Markus; Sanders, Charles R.; Li, Jun

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •SVIP (small p97/VCP-interacting protein) co-localizes with myelin basic protein (MBP) in compact myelin. •We determined that SVIP is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). •The helical content of SVIP increases dramatically during its interaction with negatively charged lipid membrane. •This study provides structural insight into interactions between SVIP and myelin membranes. -- Abstract: SVIP (small p97/VCP-interacting protein) was initially identified as one of many cofactors regulating the valosin containing protein (VCP), an AAA+ ATPase involved in endoplasmic-reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD). Our previous study showed that SVIP is expressed exclusively in the nervous system. In the present study, SVIP and VCP were seen to be co-localized in neuronal cell bodies. Interestingly, we also observed that SVIP co-localizes with myelin basic protein (MBP) in compact myelin, where VCP was absent. Furthermore, using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic measurements, we determined that SVIP is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). However, upon binding to the surface of membranes containing a net negative charge, the helical content of SVIP increases dramatically. These findings provide structural insight into interactions between SVIP and myelin membranes.

  9. Detecting Protein Complexes in Protein Interaction Networks Modeled as Gene Expression Biclusters

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Eileen Marie; Zaki, Nazar; Amin, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Developing suitable methods for the detection of protein complexes in protein interaction networks continues to be an intriguing area of research. The importance of this objective originates from the fact that protein complexes are key players in most cellular processes. The more complexes we identify, the better we can understand normal as well as abnormal molecular events. Up till now, various computational methods were designed for this purpose. However, despite their notable performance, questions arise regarding potential ways to improve them, in addition to ameliorative guidelines to introduce novel approaches. A close interpretation leads to the assent that the way in which protein interaction networks are initially viewed should be adjusted. These networks are dynamic in reality and it is necessary to consider this fact to enhance the detection of protein complexes. In this paper, we present “DyCluster”, a framework to model the dynamic aspect of protein interaction networks by incorporating gene expression data, through biclustering techniques, prior to applying complex-detection algorithms. The experimental results show that DyCluster leads to higher numbers of correctly-detected complexes with better evaluation scores. The high accuracy achieved by DyCluster in detecting protein complexes is a valid argument in favor of the proposed method. DyCluster is also able to detect biologically meaningful protein groups. The code and datasets used in the study are downloadable from https://github.com/emhanna/DyCluster. PMID:26641660

  10. Detecting Protein Complexes in Protein Interaction Networks Modeled as Gene Expression Biclusters.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Eileen Marie; Zaki, Nazar; Amin, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Developing suitable methods for the detection of protein complexes in protein interaction networks continues to be an intriguing area of research. The importance of this objective originates from the fact that protein complexes are key players in most cellular processes. The more complexes we identify, the better we can understand normal as well as abnormal molecular events. Up till now, various computational methods were designed for this purpose. However, despite their notable performance, questions arise regarding potential ways to improve them, in addition to ameliorative guidelines to introduce novel approaches. A close interpretation leads to the assent that the way in which protein interaction networks are initially viewed should be adjusted. These networks are dynamic in reality and it is necessary to consider this fact to enhance the detection of protein complexes. In this paper, we present "DyCluster", a framework to model the dynamic aspect of protein interaction networks by incorporating gene expression data, through biclustering techniques, prior to applying complex-detection algorithms. The experimental results show that DyCluster leads to higher numbers of correctly-detected complexes with better evaluation scores. The high accuracy achieved by DyCluster in detecting protein complexes is a valid argument in favor of the proposed method. DyCluster is also able to detect biologically meaningful protein groups. The code and datasets used in the study are downloadable from https://github.com/emhanna/DyCluster. PMID:26641660

  11. Beyond ALK-RET, ROS1 and other oncogene fusions in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Takashi; Nakaoku, Takashi; Tsuta, Koji; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Shingo; Yoh, Kiyotaka; Goto, Koichi

    2015-04-01

    Fusions of the RET and ROS1 protein tyrosine kinase oncogenes with several partner genes were recently identified as new targetable genetic aberrations in cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lacking activating EGFR, KRAS, ALK, BRAF, or HER2 oncogene aberrations. RET and ROS1 fusion-positive tumors are mainly observed in young, female, and/or never smoking patients. Studies based on in vitro and in vivo (i.e., mouse) models and studies of several fusion-positive patients indicate that inhibiting the kinase activity of the RET and ROS1 fusion proteins is a promising therapeutic strategy. Accordingly, there are several ongoing clinical trials aimed at examining the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) against RET and ROS1 proteins in patients with fusion-positive lung cancer. Other gene fusions (NTRK1, NRG1, and FGFR1/2/3) that are targetable by existing TKIs have also been identified in NSCLCs. Options for personalized lung cancer therapy will be increased with the help of multiplex diagnosis systems able to detect multiple druggable gene fusions. PMID:25870798

  12. Beyond ALK-RET, ROS1 and other oncogene fusions in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakaoku, Takashi; Tsuta, Koji; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Shingo; Yoh, Kiyotaka; Goto, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Fusions of the RET and ROS1 protein tyrosine kinase oncogenes with several partner genes were recently identified as new targetable genetic aberrations in cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lacking activating EGFR, KRAS, ALK, BRAF, or HER2 oncogene aberrations. RET and ROS1 fusion-positive tumors are mainly observed in young, female, and/or never smoking patients. Studies based on in vitro and in vivo (i.e., mouse) models and studies of several fusion-positive patients indicate that inhibiting the kinase activity of the RET and ROS1 fusion proteins is a promising therapeutic strategy. Accordingly, there are several ongoing clinical trials aimed at examining the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) against RET and ROS1 proteins in patients with fusion-positive lung cancer. Other gene fusions (NTRK1, NRG1, and FGFR1/2/3) that are targetable by existing TKIs have also been identified in NSCLCs. Options for personalized lung cancer therapy will be increased with the help of multiplex diagnosis systems able to detect multiple druggable gene fusions. PMID:25870798

  13. Design of riboregulators for control of cyanobacterial (Synechocystis) protein expression.

    PubMed

    Abe, Koichi; Sakai, Yuta; Nakashima, Saki; Araki, Masataka; Yoshida, Wataru; Sode, Koji; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2014-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are attractive host bacteria for biofuel production because they can covert CO2 to biofuel lipids using only sunlight, water, and inorganic ions. For genetically engineering an ideal cyanobacterium, a synthetic biological approach is promising but few genetic components have been characterized in cyanobacteria. Here for controlling cyanobacterial protein expression, we constructed riboregulators, that one of the post-transcriptional regulators composed of RNAs. Riboregulators harboring a ribosome-binding site suitable for Synechocystis sp. were designed by trial and error using Escherichia coli as host bacteria. The designed riboregulators were effective in Synechocystis sp. as well as E. coli with slight interference on growth only observed in E. coli. They will therefore be useful tools for controlling target gene expression. PMID:24068508

  14. Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor Heterocomplex of Yas1p and Yas2p Regulates Cytochrome P450 Expression in Response to Alkanes in the Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica▿

    PubMed Central

    Endoh-Yamagami, Setsu; Hirakawa, Kiyoshi; Morioka, Daisuke; Fukuda, Ryouichi; Ohta, Akinori

    2007-01-01

    The expression of the ALK1 gene, which encodes cytochrome P450, catalyzing the first step of alkane oxidation in the alkane-assimilating yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, is highly regulated and can be induced by alkanes. Previously, we identified a cis-acting element (alkane-responsive element 1 [ARE1]) in the ALK1 promoter. We showed that a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein, Yas1p, binds to ARE1 in vivo and mediates alkane-dependent transcription induction. Yas1p, however, does not bind to ARE1 by itself in vitro, suggesting that Yas1p requires another bHLH protein partner for its DNA binding, as many bHLH transcription factors function by forming heterodimers. To identify such a binding partner of Yas1p, here we screened open reading frames encoding proteins with the bHLH motif from the Y. lipolytica genome database and identified the YAS2 gene. The deletion of the YAS2 gene abolished the alkane-responsive induction of ALK1 transcription and the growth of the yeast on alkanes. We revealed that Yas2p has transactivation activity. Furthermore, Yas1p and Yas2p formed a protein complex that was required for the binding of these proteins to ARE1. These findings allow us to postulate a model in which bHLH transcription factors Yas1p and Yas2p form a heterocomplex and mediate the transcription induction in response to alkanes. PMID:17322346

  15. Evaluation of photodynamic therapy in adhesion protein expression

    PubMed Central

    PACHECO-SOARES, CRISTINA; MAFTOU-COSTA, MAIRA; DA CUNHA MENEZES COSTA, CAROLINA GENÚNCIO; DE SIQUEIRA SILVA, ANDREZA CRISTINA; MORAES, KAREN C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality that has clinical applications in both non-neoplastic and neoplastic diseases. PDT involves a light-sensitive compound (photosensitizer), light and molecular oxygen. This procedure may lead to several different cellular responses, including cell death. Alterations in the attachment of cancer cells to the substratum and to each other are important consequences of photodynamic treatment. PDT may lead to changes in the expression of cellular adhesion structure and cytoskeleton integrity, which are key factors in decreasing tumor metastatic potential. HEp-2 cells were photosensitized with aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate and zinc phthalocyanine, and the proteins β1-integrin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were assayed using fluorescence microscopy. The verification of expression changes in the genes for FAK and β1 integrin were performed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results revealed that HEp-2 cells do not express β-integrin or FAK 12 h following PDT. It was concluded that the PDT reduces the adhesive ability of HEp-2 cells, inhibiting their metastatic potential. The present study aimed to analyze the changes in the expression and organization of cellular adhesion elements and the subsequent metastatic potential of HEp-2 cells following PDT treatment. PMID:25013490

  16. Extracellular matrix protein expression is brain region dependent.

    PubMed

    Dauth, Stephanie; Grevesse, Thomas; Pantazopoulos, Harry; Campbell, Patrick H; Maoz, Ben M; Berretta, Sabina; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-05-01

    In the brain, extracellular matrix (ECM) components form networks that contribute to structural and functional diversity. Maladaptive remodeling of ECM networks has been reported in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders, suggesting that the brain microenvironment is a dynamic structure. A lack of quantitative information about ECM distribution in the brain hinders an understanding of region-specific ECM functions and the role of ECM in health and disease. We hypothesized that each ECM protein as well as specific ECM structures, such as perineuronal nets (PNNs) and interstitial matrix, are differentially distributed throughout the brain, contributing to the unique structure and function in the various regions of the brain. To test our hypothesis, we quantitatively analyzed the distribution, colocalization, and protein expression of aggrecan, brevican, and tenascin-R throughout the rat brain utilizing immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry analysis and assessed the effect of aggrecan, brevican, and/or tenascin-R on neurite outgrowth in vitro. We focused on aggrecan, brevican, and tenascin-R as they are especially expressed in the mature brain, and have established roles in brain development, plasticity, and neurite outgrowth. The results revealed a differentiated distribution of all three proteins throughout the brain and indicated that their presence significantly reduces neurite outgrowth in a 3D in vitro environment. These results underline the importance of a unique and complex ECM distribution for brain physiology and suggest that encoding the distribution of distinct ECM proteins throughout the brain will aid in understanding their function in physiology and in turn assist in identifying their role in disease. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1309-1336, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26780384

  17. n-Alkane and clofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator, activate transcription of ALK2 gene encoding cytochrome P450alk2 through distinct cis-acting promoter elements in Candida maltosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kogure, Takahisa; Takagi, Masamichi; Ohta, Akinori . E-mail: aaohta@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2005-04-01

    The ALK2 gene, encoding one of the n-alkane-hydroxylating cytochromes P450 in Candida maltosa, is induced by n-alkanes and a peroxisome proliferator, clofibrate. Deletion analysis of this gene's promoter revealed two cis-acting elements-an n-alkane-responsive element (ARE2) and a clofibrate-responsive element (CRE2)-that partly overlap in sequence but have distinct functions. ARE2-mediated activation responded to n-alkanes but not to clofibrate and was repressed by glucose. CRE2-mediated activation responded to polyunsaturated fatty acids and steroid hormones as well as to peroxisome proliferators but not to n-alkanes, and it was not repressed by glucose. Both elements mediated activation by oleic acid. Mutational analysis demonstrated that three CCG sequences in CRE2 were critical to the activation by clofibrate as well as to the in vitro binding of a specific protein to this element. These findings suggest that ALK2 is induced by peroxisome proliferators and steroid hormones through a specific CRE2-mediated regulatory mechanism.

  18. Trichohyalin-like 1 protein, a member of fused S100 proteins, is expressed in normal and pathologic human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakoshi, Takako; Makino, Teruhiko; Ur Rehman, Mati; Yoshihisa, Yoko; Sugimori, Michiya; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► Trichohyalin-like 1 protein is a member of the fused-type S100 protein gene family. ► Specific antibodies against the C-terminus of the TCHHL1 protein were generated. ► TCHHL1 proteins were expressed in the basal layer of the normal epidermis. ► TCHHL1 proteins were strongly expressed in tumor nests of BCC and SCC. ► The expression of TCHHL1 proteins increased in epidermis of psoriasis vulgaris. - Abstract: Trichohyalin-like 1 (TCHHL1) protein is a novel member of the fused-type S100 protein gene family. The deduced amino acid sequence of TCHHL1 contains an EF-hand domain in the N-terminus, one trans-membrane domain and a nuclear localization signal. We generated specific antibodies against the C-terminus of the TCHHL1 protein and examined the expression of TCHHL1 proteins in normal and pathological human skin. An immunohistochemical study showed that TCHHL1 proteins were expressed in the basal layer of the normal epidermis. In addition, signals of TCHHL1 proteins were observed around the nuclei of cultured growing keratinocytes. Accordingly, TCHHL1 mRNA has been detected in normal skin and cultured growing keratinocytes. Furthermore, TCHHL1 proteins were strongly expressed in the peripheral areas of tumor nests in basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas. A dramatic increase in the number of Ki67 positive cells was observed in TCHHL1-expressing areas. The expression of TCHHL1 proteins also increased in non-cancerous hyperproliferative epidermal tissues such as those of psoriasis vulgaris and lichen planus. These findings highlight the possibility that TCHHL1 proteins are expressed in growing keratinocytes of the epidermis and might be associated with the proliferation of keratinocytes.

  19. Expression and purification of recombinant polyomavirus VP2 protein and its interactions with polyomavirus proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, X.; Chang, D.; Rottinghaus, S.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant polyomavirus VP2 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448), using the recombinant expression system pFPYV2. Recombinant VP2 was purified to near homogeneity by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, electroelution, and Extracti-Gel chromatography. Polyclonal serum to this protein which reacted specifically with recombinant VP2 as well as polyomavirus virion VP2 and VP3 on Western blots (immunoblots) was produced. Purified VP2 was used to establish an in vitro protein-protein interaction assay with polyomavirus structural proteins and purified recombinant VP1. Recombinant VP2 interacted with recombinant VP1, virion VP1, and the four virion histones. Recombinant VP1 coimmunoprecipitated with recombinant VP2 or truncated VP2 (delta C12VP2), which lacked the carboxy-terminal 12 amino acids. These experiments confirmed the interaction between VP1 and VP2 and revealed that the carboxyterminal 12 amino acids of VP2 and VP3 were not necessary for formation of this interaction. In vivo VP1-VP2 interaction study accomplished by cotransfection of COS-7 cells with VP2 and truncated VP1 (delta N11VP1) lacking the nuclear localization signal demonstrated that VP2 was capable of translocating delta N11VP1 into the nucleus. These studies suggest that complexes of VP1 and VP2 may be formed in the cytoplasm and cotransported to the nucleus for virion assembly to occur.

  20. Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGF-β1) Activates Hepcidin mRNA Expression in Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Simeng; Feng, Teng; Vujić Spasić, Maja; Altamura, Sandro; Breitkopf-Heinlein, Katja; Altenöder, Jutta; Weiss, Thomas S; Dooley, Steven; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2016-06-17

    The hepatic hormone hepcidin is the master regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. Its expression level is adjusted to alterations in iron levels, inflammatory cues, and iron requirements for erythropoiesis. Bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6) contributes to the iron-dependent control of hepcidin. In addition, TGF-β1 may stimulate hepcidin mRNA expression in murine hepatocytes and human leukocytes. However, receptors and downstream signaling proteins involved in TGF-β1-induced hepcidin expression are still unclear. Here we show that TGF-β1 treatment of mouse and human hepatocytes, as well as ectopic expression of TGF-β1 in mice, increases hepcidin mRNA levels. The hepcidin response to TGF-β1 depends on functional TGF-β1 type I receptor (ALK5) and TGF-β1 type II receptor (TβRII) and is mediated by a noncanonical mechanism that involves Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. Interestingly, increasing availability of canonical Smad2/3 decreases TGF-β1-induced hepcidin regulation, whereas the BMP6-hepcidin signal was enhanced, indicating a signaling component stoichiometry-dependent cross-talk between the two pathways. Although ALK2/3-dependent hepcidin activation by BMP6 can be modulated by each of the three hemochromatosis-associated proteins: HJV (hemojuvelin), HFE (hemochromatosis protein), and TfR2 (transferrin receptor 2), these proteins do not control the ALK5-mediated hepcidin response to TGF-β1. TGF-β1 mRNA levels are increased in mouse models of iron overload, indicating that TGF-β1 may contribute to hepcidin synthesis under these conditions. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that a complex regulatory network involving TGF-β1 and BMP6 may control the sensing of systemic and/or hepatic iron levels. PMID:27129231

  1. Cell-Free Protein Expression under Macromolecular Crowding Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xumeng; Luo, Dan; Xu, Jianfeng

    2011-01-01

    Background Cell-free protein expression (CFPE) comprised of in vitro transcription and translation is currently manipulated in relatively dilute solutions, in which the macromolecular crowding effects present in living cells are largely ignored. This may not only affect the efficiency of protein synthesis in vitro, but also limit our understanding of the functions and interactions of biomolecules involved in this fundamental biological process. Methodology/Principal Findings Using cell-free synthesis of Renilla luciferase in wheat germ extract as a model system, we investigated the CFPE under macromolecular crowding environments emulated with three different crowding agents: PEG-8000, Ficoll-70 and Ficoll-400, which vary in chemical properties and molecular size. We found that transcription was substantially enhanced in the macromolecular crowding solutions; up to 4-fold increase in the mRNA production was detected in the presence of 20% (w/v) of Ficoll-70. In contrast, translation was generally inhibited by the addition of each of the three crowding agents. This might be due to PEG-induced protein precipitation and non-specific binding of translation factors to Ficoll molecules. We further explored a two-stage CFPE in which transcription and translation was carried out under high then low macromolecular crowding conditions, respectively. It produced 2.2-fold higher protein yield than the coupled CFPE control. The macromolecular crowding effects on CFPE were subsequently confirmed by cell-free synthesis of an approximately two-fold larger protein, Firefly luciferase, under macromolecular crowding environments. Conclusions/Significance Three macromolecular crowding agents used in this research had opposite effects on transcription and translation. The results of this study should aid researchers in their choice of macromolecular crowding agents and shows that two-stage CFPE is more efficient than coupled CFPE. PMID:22174874

  2. Characterization of protein expression levels with label-free detected reverse phase protein arrays.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuexue; Deng, Yihong; Zhu, Chenggang; Cai, Junlong; Zhu, Xiangdong; Landry, James P; Zheng, Fengyun; Cheng, Xunjia; Fei, Yiyan

    2016-09-15

    In reverse-phase protein arrays (RPPA), one immobilizes complex samples (e.g., cellular lysate, tissue lysate or serum etc.) on solid supports and performs parallel reactions of antibodies with immobilized protein targets from the complex samples. In this work, we describe a label-free detection of RPPA that enables quantification of RPPA data and thus facilitates comparison of studies performed on different samples and on different solid supports. We applied this detection platform to characterization of phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT) expression levels in Acanthamoeba lysates treated with artemether and the results were confirmed by Western blot studies. PMID:27372609

  3. Protein kinase C alpha expression in breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lahn, Michael; Köhler, Gabriele; Sundell, Karen; Su, Chen; Li, Shuyu; Paterson, Blake M; Bumol, Thomas F

    2004-01-01

    In recent years research has focused on the development of specific, targeted drugs to treat cancer. One approach has been to block intracellular signaling proteins, such as protein kinase C alpha (PKC-alpha). To help support the rationale for clinical studies of a PKC-alpha-targeted therapy in breast and ovarian cancers, we reviewed publications studying PKC-alpha expression in these tumors. Since these investigations were mostly performed in cell lines, we supplemented this review with some preliminary findings from studies examining PKC-alpha expression in tumor tissue biopsies obtained from patients with breast and ovarian cancer. Based on the reviewed publications using representative cell lines and our preliminary findings on tumor tissue of patients with breast cancer, we infer that PKC-alpha levels may especially be increased in breast cancer patients with low or negative estrogen receptor (ER) levels. Thus, clinical studies determining efficacy of selective or specific inhibitors of PKC-alpha should include determination of ER status in order to help answer whether blocking PKC-alpha in patients with low or absent ER can result in clinical benefit. PMID:15459489

  4. PPAR-β/δ activation promotes phospholipid transfer protein expression.

    PubMed

    Chehaibi, Khouloud; Cedó, Lídia; Metso, Jari; Palomer, Xavier; Santos, David; Quesada, Helena; Naceur Slimane, Mohamed; Wahli, Walter; Julve, Josep; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel; Jauhiainen, Matti; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles

    2015-03-15

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-β/δ has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for treating dyslipidemia, including beneficial effects on HDL cholesterol (HDL-C). In the current study, we determined the effects of the PPAR-β/δ agonist GW0742 on HDL composition and the expression of liver HDL-related genes in mice and cultured human cells. The experiments were carried out in C57BL/6 wild-type, LDL receptor (LDLR)-deficient mice and PPAR-β/δ-deficient mice treated with GW0742 (10mg/kg/day) or a vehicle solution for 14 days. GW0742 upregulated liver phospholipid transfer protein (Pltp) gene expression and increased serum PLTP activity in mice. When given to wild-type mice, GW0742 significantly increased serum HDL-C and HDL phospholipids; GW0742 also raised serum potential to generate preβ-HDL formation. The GW0742-mediated effects on liver Pltp expression and serum enzyme activity were completely abolished in PPAR-β/δ-deficient mice. GW0742 also stimulated PLTP mRNA expression in mouse J774 macrophages, differentiated human THP-1 macrophages and human hepatoma Huh7. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a common transcriptional upregulation by GW0742-activated PPAR-β/δ of Pltp expression in cultured cells and in mouse liver resulting in enhanced serum PLTP activity. Our results also indicate that PPAR-β/δ activation may modulate PLTP-mediated preβ-HDL formation and macrophage cholesterol efflux. PMID:25662586

  5. Population proteomics: quantitative variation within and among populations in cardiac protein expression.

    PubMed

    Rees, Bernard B; Andacht, Tracy; Skripnikova, Elena; Crawford, Douglas L

    2011-03-01

    Population analysis of gene expression is typically achieved by quantifying levels of mRNA; however, gene expression is also a function of protein translation and turnover. Therefore, a complete understanding of population variation in gene expression requires quantitative knowledge of protein expression within and among natural populations. We used two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) to quantitatively compare expression of heart ventricle proteins among 18 individuals in three populations of the teleost fish Fundulus. Among populations, expressions between orthologous proteins and mRNAs were generally positively correlated. Additionally, similar to the pattern of cardiac mRNA expression for the same populations, we found considerable variation in protein expression both within and among populations: Of 408 protein features in 2D gels, 34% are significantly different (P < 0.01) among individuals within a population, 9% differ between populations, and 12% have a pattern of expression that suggests they have evolved by natural selection. Although similar to mRNA expression, the frequency of significant differences among populations is larger for proteins. Similar to mRNA expressions, expressions of most proteins are correlated to the expressions of many other proteins. However, the correlations among proteins are more extensive than the correlation for similar RNAs. These correlations suggest a greater coordinate regulation of protein than mRNA expression. The larger frequency of significant differences among populations and the greater frequency of correlated expression among proteins versus among RNAs suggest that the molecular mechanisms affecting protein expression enhance the differences among populations, and these regulatory steps could be a source of variation for adaptation. PMID:21109588

  6. Ras protein expression as a marker for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    CALAF, GLORIA M.; ABARCA-QUINONES, JORGE

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer, the most common neoplasm in women of all ages, is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in women worldwide. Markers to help to predict the risk of progression and ultimately provide non-surgical treatment options would be of great benefit. At present, there are no available molecular markers to predict the risk of carcinoma in situ progression to invasive cancer; therefore, all women diagnosed with this type of malignancy must undergo surgery. Breast cancer is a heterogeneous complex disease, and different patients respond differently to different treatments. In breast cancer, analysis using immunohistochemical markers remains an essential component of routine pathological examinations, and plays an import role in the management of the disease by providing diagnostic and prognostic strategies. The aim of the present study was to identify a marker that can be used as a prognostic tool for breast cancer. For this purpose, we firstly used an established breast cancer model. MCF-10F, a spontaneously immortalized breast epithelial cell line was transformed by exposure to estrogen and radiation. MCF-10F cells were exposed to low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) α particles (150 keV/μm) of radiation, and subsequently cultured in the presence of 17β-estradiol. Three cell lines were used: i) MCF-10F cells as a control; ii) Alpha5 cells, a malignant and tumorigenic cell line; and iii) Tumor2 cells derived from Alpha5 cells injected into nude mice. Secondly, we also used normal, benign and malignant breast specimens obtained from biopsies. The results revealed that the MCF-10F cells were negative for c-Ha-Ras protein expression; however, the Alpha5 and Tumor2 cell lines were positive for c-Ha-Ras protein expression. The malignant breast samples were also strongly positive for c-Ha-Ras expression. The findings of our study indicate that c-Ha-Ras protein expression may be used as a marker to predict the progression of breast cancer; this

  7. mRNA expression and protein localization of dentin matrix protein 1 during dental root formation.

    PubMed

    Toyosawa, S; Okabayashi, K; Komori, T; Ijuhin, N

    2004-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is an acidic phosphoprotein. DMP1 was initially detected in dentin and later in other mineralized tissues including cementum and bone, but the DMP1 expression pattern in tooth is still controversial. To determine the precise localization of DMP1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and the protein in the tooth, we performed in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses using rat molars and incisors during various stages of root formation. During root dentin formation of molars, DMP1 mRNA was detected in root odontoblasts in parallel with mineralization of the dentin. However, the level of DMP1 mRNA expression in root odontoblasts decreased near the coronal part and was absent in coronal odontoblasts. DMP1 protein was localized along dentinal tubules and their branches in mineralized root dentin, and the distribution of DMP1 shifted from the end of dentinal tubules to the base of the tubules as dentin formation progressed. During the formation of the acellular cementum, DMP1 mRNA was detected in cementoblasts lining the acellular cementum where its protein was localized. During the formation of the cellular cementum, DMP1 mRNA was detected in cementocytes embedded in the cellular cementum but not in cementoblasts, and its protein was localized in the pericellular cementum of cementocytes including their processes. During dentin formation of incisors, DMP1 mRNA was detected in odontoblasts on the cementum-related dentin, where its protein was localized along dentinal tubules near the mineralization front. The localization of DMP1 mRNA and protein in dentin and cementum was related to their mineralization, suggesting that one of the functions of DMP1 may be involved in the mineralization of dentin and cementum during root formation. PMID:14751569

  8. Real-time quantification of protein expression at the single-cell level via dynamic protein synthesis translocation reporters

    PubMed Central

    Aymoz, Delphine; Wosika, Victoria; Durandau, Eric; Pelet, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein expression is a dynamic process, which can be rapidly induced by extracellular signals. It is widely appreciated that single cells can display large variations in the level of gene induction. However, the variability in the dynamics of this process in individual cells is difficult to quantify using standard fluorescent protein (FP) expression assays, due to the slow maturation of their fluorophore. Here we have developed expression reporters that accurately measure both the levels and dynamics of protein synthesis in live single cells with a temporal resolution under a minute. Our system relies on the quantification of the translocation of a constitutively expressed FP into the nucleus. As a proof of concept, we used these reporters to measure the transient protein synthesis arising from two promoters responding to the yeast hyper osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (pSTL1 and pGPD1). They display distinct expression dynamics giving rise to strikingly different instantaneous expression noise. PMID:27098003

  9. Chronic intermittent mechanical stress increases MUC5AC protein expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Ah; Tschumperlin, Daniel J

    2009-10-01

    Increased abundance of mucin secretory cells is a characteristic feature of the epithelium in asthma and other chronic airway diseases. We showed previously that the mechanical stresses of airway constriction, both in the intact mouse lung and a cell culture model, activate the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a known modulator of mucin expression in airway epithelial cells. Here we tested whether chronic, intermittent, short-duration compressive stress (30 cm H(2)O) is sufficient to increase the abundance of MUC5AC-positive cells and intracellular mucin levels in human bronchial epithelial cells cultured at an air-liquid interface. Compressive stress applied for 1 hour per day for 14 days significantly increased the percentage of cells staining positively for MUC5AC protein (22.0 +/- 3.8%, mean +/- SD) relative to unstimulated controls (8.6 +/- 2.6%), and similarly changed intracellular MUC5AC protein levels measured by Western and slot blotting. The effect of compressive stress was gradual, with significant changes in MUC5AC-positive cell numbers evident by Day 7, but required as little as 10 minutes of compressive stress daily. Daily treatment of cells with an EGFR kinase inhibitor (AG1478, 1 muM) significantly but incompletely attenuated the response to compressive stress. Complete attenuation could be accomplished by simultaneous treatment with the combination of AG1478 and a transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta(2) (1 microg/ml)-neutralizing antibody, or with anti-TGF-beta(2) alone. Our findings demonstrate that short duration episodes of mechanical stress, representative of those occurring during bronchoconstriction, are sufficient to increase goblet cell number and MUC5AC protein expression in bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. We propose that the mechanical environment present in asthma may fundamentally bias the composition of airway epithelial lining in favor of mucin secretory cells. PMID:19168703

  10. Protein expression patterns of the yeast mating response.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Haiyu; Zhang, Rongfei; Shao, Bin; Wang, Xuan; Ouyang, Qi; Hao, Nan; Luo, Chunxiong

    2016-06-13

    Microfluidics, in combination with time-lapse microscopy, is a transformative technology that significantly enhances our ability to monitor and probe biological processes in living cells. However, high-throughput microfluidic devices mostly require sophisticated preparatory and setup work and are thus hard to adopt by non-experts. In this work, we designed an easy-to-use microfluidic chip, which enables tracking of 48 GFP-tagged yeast strains, with each strain under two different stimulus conditions, in a single experiment. We used this technology to investigate the dynamic pattern of protein expression during the yeast mating differentiation response. High doses of pheromone induce cell cycle arrest and the shmoo morphology, whereas low doses of pheromone lead to elongation and chemotrophic growth. By systematically analyzing the protein dynamics of 156 pheromone-regulated genes, we identified groups of genes that are preferentially induced in response to low-dose pheromone (elongation during growth) or high-dose pheromone (shmoo formation and cell cycle arrest). The protein dynamics of these genes may provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the differentiation switch induced by different doses of pheromone. PMID:27177258

  11. Wilms Tumor 1 protein is not expressed in oral lymphangiomas.

    PubMed

    Netto, Ana Carolina de Mesquita; de Oliveira, Mariana Batista; Bernardes, Vanessa Fátima; Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2012-01-01

    Lymphangiomas are benign hamartomatous lesions of lymphatic vessels. Wilms Tumor 1 (WT1) is a transcription factor that is activated in some human neoplasias. WT1 protein expression is observed in endothelial cells during angiogenesis and is a useful marker to distinguish between vascular proliferations and vascular malformations. The purpose of the present study is to report a case series of oral lymphangiomas together with an immunohistochemical investigation of WT1. Seventeen cases of oral lymphangioma were retrieved and reviewed. Immunohistochemical analysis of WT1 protein was performed and pyogenic granuloma samples were used as positive controls. The male/female ratio was 1.125 and most of the lesions occurred in young subjects. While pyogenic granuloma showed positive staining for WT1, the endothelial cells lining the thin-walled dilated lymphatic vessels of lymphangiomas were negative for this protein. The findings strengthen the idea that oral lymphangioma is a vascular malformation characterized by lymphatic dilatation without significant endothelial proliferation. PMID:23338265

  12. Expression of Water Channel Proteins in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum1

    PubMed Central

    Kirch, Hans-Hubert; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Golldack, Dortje; Quigley, Francoise; Michalowski, Christine B.; Barkla, Bronwyn J.; Bohnert, Hans J.

    2000-01-01

    We have characterized transcripts for nine major intrinsic proteins (MIPs), some of which function as water channels (aquaporins), from the ice plant Mesembryanthemum crystallinum. To determine the cellular distribution and expression of these MIPs, oligopeptide-based antibodies were generated against MIP-A, MIP-B, MIP-C, or MIP-F, which, according to sequence and functional characteristics, are located in the plasma membrane (PM) and tonoplast, respectively. MIPs were most abundant in cells involved in bulk water flow and solute flux. The tonoplast MIP-F was found in all cells, while signature cell types identified different PM-MIPs: MIP-A predominantly in phloem-associated cells, MIP-B in xylem parenchyma, and MIP-C in the epidermis and endodermis of immature roots. Membrane protein analysis confirmed MIP-F as tonoplast located. MIP-A and MIP-B were found in tonoplast fractions and also in fractions distinct from either the tonoplast or PM. MIP-C was most abundant but not exclusive to PM fractions, where it is expected based on its sequence signature. We suggest that within the cell, MIPs are mobile, which is similar to aquaporins cycling through animal endosomes. MIP cycling and the differential regulation of these proteins observed under conditions of salt stress may be fundamental for the control of tissue water flux. PMID:10806230

  13. The analysis of ALK gene rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization in non-small cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Paweł Adam; Ramlau, Rodryg Adam; Szumiło, Justyna; Kozielski, Jerzy; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Bryl, Maciej; Knopik-Dąbrowicz, Alina; Spychalski, Łukasz; Szczęsna, Aleksandra; Rydzik, Ewelina; Milanowski, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction ALK gene rearrangement is observed in a small subset (3–7%) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. The efficacy of crizotinib was shown in lung cancer patients harbouring ALK rearrangement. Nowadays, the analysis of ALK gene rearrangement is added to molecular examination of predictive factors. Aim of the study The frequency of ALK gene rearrangement as well as the type of its irregularity was analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) in tissue samples from NSCLC patients. Material and methods The ALK gene rearrangement was analysed in 71 samples including 53 histological and 18 cytological samples. The analysis could be performed in 56 cases (78.87%), significantly more frequently in histological than in cytological materials. The encountered problem with ALK rearrangement diagnosis resulted from the scarcity of tumour cells in cytological samples, high background fluorescence noises and fragmentation of cell nuclei. Results The normal ALK copy number without gene rearrangement was observed in 26 (36.62%) patients ALK gene polysomy without gene rearrangement was observed in 25 (35.21%) samples while in 3 (4.23%) samples ALK gene amplification was found. ALK gene rearrangement was observed in 2 (2.82%) samples from males, while in the first case the rearrangement coexisted with ALK amplification. In the second case, signet-ring tumour cells were found during histopathological examination and this patient was successfully treated with crizotinib with partial remission lasting 16 months. Conclusions FISH is a useful technique for ALK gene rearrangement analysis which allows us to specify the type of gene irregularities. ALK gene examination could be performed in histological as well as cytological (cellblocks) samples, but obtaining a reliable result in cytological samples depends on the cellularity of examined materials. PMID:24592134

  14. Protein Expression Analysis of Melanocyte Differentiation Antigen TRP-2.

    PubMed

    Avogadri, Francesca; Gnjatic, Sacha; Tassello, Jodie; Frosina, Denise; Hanson, Nicole; Laudenbach, Megan; Ritter, Erika; Merghoub, Taha; Busam, Klaus J; Jungbluth, Achim A

    2016-03-01

    Melanocyte differentiation antigens, such as gp100, tyrosinase, and Melan-A and their corresponding antibodies HMB45, T311, and A103, are major diagnostic tools in surgical pathology. Little is known about tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP-2, or dopachrome tautomerase/DCT) another melanocyte differentiation antigen, which is an enzymatic component of melanogenesis. We identified a commercial reagent to TRP-2, monoclonal antibody (mAb) C-9 and undertook a comprehensive analysis to assess its specificity and usefulness for surgical pathology. Subsequently, we analyzed panels of normal tissues and tumors. We show that TRP-2 is regularly expressed in melanocytes of the normal skin. In cutaneous nevi, TRP-2 is present in junctional as well as in dermal nevocytes. In malignant tumors, C-9 reactivity is restricted to melanocytic and related lesions and present in 84% and 58% of primary and metastatic melanomas, respectively. Ten primary melanomas of the anorectal mucosa were all positive. Like the other melanocyte differentiation antigens, TRP-2 was absent in 6 desmoplastic melanomas. Also, only 2 of 9 angiomyolipomas were TRP-2 positive. We conclude that mAb C-9 is a valuable reagent for the analysis of TRP-2 expression in archival surgical pathology material. The expression pattern of TRP-2 in melanocytic and related lesions appears to parallel other melanocyte differentiation antigens, although the overall incidence is lower than other antigens, such as Melan-A or gp100. PMID:26894771

  15. Improved protein quality in transgenic soybean expressing a de novo synthetic protein, MB-16.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfang; Schernthaner, Johann; Labbé, Natalie; Hefford, Mary A; Zhao, Jiping; Simmonds, Daina H

    2014-06-01

    To improve soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] seed nutritional quality, a synthetic gene, MB-16 was introduced into the soybean genome to boost seed methionine content. MB-16, an 11 kDa de novo protein enriched in the essential amino acids (EAAs) methionine, threonine, lysine and leucine, was originally developed for expression in rumen bacteria. For efficient seed expression, constructs were designed using the soybean codon bias, with and without the KDEL ER retention sequence, and β-conglycinin or cruciferin seed specific protein storage promoters. Homozygous lines, with single locus integrations, were identified for several transgenic events. Transgene transmission and MB-16 protein expression were confirmed to the T5 and T7 generations, respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of developing seed showed that the transcript peaked in growing seed, 5-6 mm long, remained at this peak level to the full-sized green seed and then was significantly reduced in maturing yellow seed. Transformed events carrying constructs with the rumen bacteria codon preference showed the same transcription pattern as those with the soybean codon preference, but the transcript levels were lower at each developmental stage. MB-16 protein levels, as determined by immunoblots, were highest in full-sized green seed but the protein virtually disappeared in mature seed. However, amino acid analysis of mature seed, in the best transgenic line, showed a significant increase of 16.2 and 65.9 % in methionine and cysteine, respectively, as compared to the parent. This indicates that MB-16 elevated the sulfur amino acids, improved the EAA seed profile and confirms that a de novo synthetic gene can enhance the nutritional quality of soybean. PMID:24435987

  16. Comprehensive bioinformatics analysis of cell-free protein synthesis: identification of multiple protein properties that correlate with successful expression.

    PubMed

    Kurotani, Atsushi; Takagi, Tetsuo; Toyama, Mitsutoshi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Fukami, Yasuo; Tokmakov, Alexander A

    2010-04-01

    High-throughput cell-free protein synthesis is being used increasingly in structural/functional genomics projects. However, the factors determining expression success are poorly understood. Here, we evaluated the expression of 3066 human proteins and their domains in a bacterial cell-free system and analyzed the correlation of protein expression with 39 physicochemical and structural properties of proteins. As a result of the bioinformatics analysis performed, we determined the 18 most influential features that affect protein amenability to cell-free expression. They include protein length; hydrophobicity; pI; content of charged, nonpolar, and aromatic residues;, cysteine content; solvent accessibility; presence of coiled coil; content of intrinsically disordered and structured (alpha-helix and beta-sheet) sequence; number of disulfide bonds and functional domains; presence of transmembrane regions; PEST motifs; and signaling sequences. This study represents the first comprehensive bioinformatics analysis of heterologous protein synthesis in a cell-free system. The rules and correlations revealed here provide a plethora of important insights into rationalization of cell-free protein production and can be of practical use for protein engineering with the aim of increasing expression success.-Kurotani, A., Takagi, T., Toyama, M., Shirouzu, M., Yokoyama, S., Fukami, Y., Tokmakov, A. A. Comprehensive bioinformatics analysis of cell-free protein synthesis: identification of multiple protein properties that correlate with successful expression. PMID:19940260

  17. Segmental expression and C-terminal labeling of protein ERp44 through protein trans-splicing.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xudong; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Meng, Qing

    2015-08-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum resident protein 44 (ERp44) is a member of the protein disulfide isomerase family and functions in oxidative protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. A structurally flexible C-terminal tail (C-tail) of ERp44 plays critical roles in dynamically regulating ERp44's function in protein folding quality control. The structure-function dynamics of ERp44's C-tail may be studied further using fluorescence and other techniques, if methods are found to label the C-tail site-specifically with a fluorescent group or segmentally with other desired labels. Here we have developed such methods, employing split inteins capable of protein trans-splicing, and identifying atypical S1 split inteins able to function efficiently at a suitable split site in the ERp44 sequence. One method demonstrated segmental expression of ERp44 for segmental labeling of the C-tail, another method efficiently added a commercially available fluorescent group to the C-terminus of ERp44, and both methods may also be generally useful for studying other proteins. PMID:25907381

  18. Drastic initial response and subsequent response to two ALK inhibitors in a patient with a highly aggressive ALK-rearranged inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor arising in the pleural cavity.

    PubMed

    Ono, Akira; Murakami, Haruyasu; Serizawa, Masakuni; Wakuda, Kazushige; Kenmotsu, Hirotsugu; Naito, Tateaki; Taira, Tetsuhiko; Koh, Yasuhiro; Ohde, Yasuhisa; Nakajima, Takashi; Endo, Masahiro; Takahashi, Toshiaki

    2016-09-01

    A 57-year-old male current smoker was diagnosed with an aggressive variant of ALK-rearranged inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) arising in the pleural cavity. First line treatment with ASP3026 was initiated at a dose of 125mg once daily. A follow-up CT scan revealed drastic regression of the pleural lesion. After disease progression with ASP3026 treatment, LDK378 (ceritinib) was initiated at a dose of 750mg once daily. A follow-up CT scan revealed a second drastic regression of the pleural lesion. Furthermore, it is noteworthy that this case represents the use of serum hyaluronan levels to assist in monitoring of treatment efficacy in an IMT. Herein, we present the first case of a patient with a highly aggressive ALK-rearranged IMT arising in the pleural cavity, who showed both initial and subsequent drastic response to two ALK inhibitors while being monitored for serum hyaluronan. PMID:27565932

  19. Design of novel quinazoline derivatives and related analogues as potent and selective ALK5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gellibert, F.; Fouchet, M.-H.; Nguyen, V.-L.; Wang, R.; Krysa, G.; de Gouville, A.-C.; Huet, S.; Dodic, N.

    2009-07-23

    Starting from quinazoline 3a, we designed potent and selective ALK5 inhibitors over p38MAP kinase from a rational drug design approach based on co-crystal structures in the human ALK5 kinase domain. The quinazoline 3d exhibited also in vivo activity in an acute rat model of DMN-induced liver fibrosis when administered orally at 5 mg/kg (bid).

  20. Expression-Enhanced Fluorescent Proteins Based on Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein for Super-resolution Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Duwé, Sam; De Zitter, Elke; Gielen, Vincent; Moeyaert, Benjamien; Vandenberg, Wim; Grotjohann, Tim; Clays, Koen; Jakobs, Stefan; Van Meervelt, Luc; Dedecker, Peter

    2015-10-27

    "Smart fluorophores", such as reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins, are crucial for advanced fluorescence imaging. However, only a limited number of such labels is available, and many display reduced biological performance compared to more classical variants. We present the development of robustly photoswitchable variants of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), named rsGreens, that display up to 30-fold higher fluorescence in E. coli colonies grown at 37 °C and more than 4-fold higher fluorescence when expressed in HEK293T cells compared to their ancestor protein rsEGFP. This enhancement is not due to an intrinsic increase in the fluorescence brightness of the probes, but rather due to enhanced expression levels that allow many more probe molecules to be functional at any given time. We developed rsGreens displaying a range of photoswitching kinetics and show how these can be used for multimodal diffraction-unlimited fluorescence imaging such as pcSOFI and RESOLFT, achieving a spatial resolution of ∼70 nm. By determining the first ever crystal structures of a negative reversibly switchable FP derived from Aequorea victoria in both the "on"- and "off"-conformation we were able to confirm the presence of a cis-trans isomerization and provide further insights into the mechanisms underlying the photochromism. Our work demonstrates that genetically encoded "smart fluorophores" can be readily optimized for biological performance and provides a practical strategy for developing maturation- and stability-enhanced photochromic fluorescent proteins. PMID:26308583

  1. Recombinant protein production data after expression in the bacterium Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cantu-Bustos, J Enrique; Cano Del Villar, Kevin D; Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-06-01

    Fusion proteins have become essential for the expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. The metal-binding protein CusF has shown several features that make it an attractive fusion protein and affinity tag: "Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the metal-binding protein CusF" (Cantu-Bustos et al., 2016 [1]). Here we present accompanying data from protein expression experiments; we tested different protein tags, temperatures, expression times, cellular compartments, and concentrations of inducer in order to obtain soluble protein and low formation of inclusion bodies. Additionally, we present data from the purification of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged with CusF, using Ag(I) metal affinity chromatography. PMID:27014739

  2. Recombinant protein production data after expression in the bacterium Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cantu-Bustos, J. Enrique; Cano del Villar, Kevin D.; Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-01-01

    Fusion proteins have become essential for the expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. The metal-binding protein CusF has shown several features that make it an attractive fusion protein and affinity tag: "Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the metal-binding protein CusF" (Cantu-Bustos et al., 2016 [1]). Here we present accompanying data from protein expression experiments; we tested different protein tags, temperatures, expression times, cellular compartments, and concentrations of inducer in order to obtain soluble protein and low formation of inclusion bodies. Additionally, we present data from the purification of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged with CusF, using Ag(I) metal affinity chromatography. PMID:27014739

  3. Effect of various protein kinase inhibitors on the induction of milk protein gene expression by prolactin.

    PubMed

    Bayat-Sarmadi, M; Houdebine, L M

    1993-03-01

    Prolactin has many known functions and one of them is to induce the expression of milk protein gene expression in the mammary gland. Specific membrane receptors have been recently characterized but the transduction mechanism involved in the transfer of the prolactin signal to milk protein genes remains unknown. In the present work, it is shown that several protein kinase inhibitors block prolactin action on milk protein genes. Primary rabbit mammary cells were cultured for several days on floating collagen gel in a serum-free medium. Prolactin and the inhibitors of protein kinase were then added to the culture medium. After 1 day, the concentration of alpha s1-casein in the culture medium was measured using a specific radioimmunoassay. The concentration of several mRNAs in cell extracts was also evaluated using Northern blot analysis. alpha s1-Casein secretion and alpha s1-casein mRNA accumulation were induced by prolactin. This induction was blocked by staurosporine, sphingosine, quercetin, genistein and to some extent by o-hydroxyphenyl acetate, but not by H7, polymyxin B, benzylsuccinate and lavendustin A. The concentration of the mRNA coding for transferrin, which is abundantly secreted in rabbit milk independently of prolactin action, was only moderately altered by the inhibitors. The concentration of two house-keeping mRNAs, beta-actin and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, was lowered only by genistein after 1 day but not after 4 h of culture. These data show for the first time that a Ser/Thre kinase, which is not kinase C, and possibly a tyrosine kinase is involved in the transduction of the prolactin message from the receptor to the milk protein genes. PMID:8472863

  4. The ALK inhibitor ceritinib overcomes crizotinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christian C.; Gainor, Justin F.; Crystal, Adam S.; Michellys, Pierre-Yves; Awad, Mark M.; Yanagitani, Noriko; Kim, Sungjoon; Pferdekamper, AnneMarie C.; Li, Jie; Kasibhatla, Shailaja; Sun, Frank; Sun, Xiuying; Hua, Su; McNamara, Peter; Mahmood, Sidra; Lockerman, Elizabeth L.; Fujita, Naoya; Nishio, Makoto; Harris, Jennifer L.; Shaw, Alice T.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) harboring anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements invariably develop resistance to the ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) crizotinib. Herein, we report the first preclinical evaluation of the next-generation ALK TKI, ceritinib (LDK378) in the setting of crizotinib resistance. Interrogation of in vitro and in vivo models of acquired resistance to crizotinib, including cell lines established from biopsies of crizotinib-resistant NSCLC patients revealed that ceritinib potently overcomes crizotinib resistance mutations. In particular, ceritinib effectively inhibits ALK harboring L1196M, G1269A, I1171T and S1206Y mutations, and a co-crystal of ceritinib bound to ALK provides structural bases for this increased potency. However, we observed that ceritinib did not overcome two crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations, G1202R and F1174C, and one of these mutations were identified in 5 out of 11 biopsies from patients with acquired resistance to ceritinib. Altogether our results demonstrate that ceritinib can overcome crizotinib resistance, consistent with clinical data showing marked efficacy of ceritinib in patients with crizotinib-resistant disease. PMID:24675041

  5. Phytomonas: A non-pathogenic trypanosomatid model for functional expression of proteins.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Mariana R; Sayé, Melisa; Reigada, Chantal; Carrillo, Carolina; Pereira, Claudio A

    2015-10-01

    Phytomonas are protozoan parasites from the Trypanosomatidae family which infect a wide variety of plants. Herein, Phytomonas Jma was tested as a model for functional expression of heterologous proteins. Green fluorescent protein expression was evaluated in Phytomonas and compared with Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Phytomonas was able to express GFP at levels similar to T. cruzi although the transgenic selection time was higher. It was possible to establish an efficient transfection and selection protocol for protein expression. These results demonstrate that Phytomonas can be a good model for functional expression of proteins from other trypanosomatids, presenting the advantage of being completely safe for humans. PMID:26142019

  6. Lytic Promoters Express Protein during Herpes Simplex Virus Latency

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Tiffany A.; Tscharke, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has provided the prototype for viral latency with previously well-defined acute or lytic and latent phases. More recently, the deep quiescence of HSV latency has been questioned with evidence that lytic genes can be transcribed in this state. However, to date the only evidence that these transcripts might be translated has come from immunological studies that show activated T cells persist in the nervous system during latency. Here we use a highly sensitive Cre-marking model to show that lytic and latent phases are less clearly defined in two significant ways. First, around half of the HSV spread leading to latently infected sites occurred beyond the initial acute infection and second, we show direct evidence that lytic promoters can drive protein expression during latency. PMID:27348812

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1096 protein: gene cloning, protein expression, and peptidoglycan deacetylase activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many bacteria modulate and evade the immune defenses of their hosts through peptidoglycan (PG) deacetylation. The PG deacetylases from Streptococcus pneumonia, Listeria monocytogenes and Lactococcus lactis have been characterized. However, thus far, the PG deacetylase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has not been identified. Results In this study, we cloned the Rv1096 gene from the M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain and expressed Rv1096 protein in both Escherichia coli and M. smegmatis. The results showed that the purified Rv1096 protein possessed metallo-dependent PG deacetylase activity, which increased in the presence of Co2+. The kinetic parameters of the PG deacetylase towards M. smegmatis PG as a substrate were as follows: Km, 0.910 ± 0.007 mM; Vmax, 0.514 ± 0.038 μMmin-1; and Kcat = 0.099 ± 0.007 (S-1). Additionally, the viability of M. smegmatis in the presence of over-expressed Rv1096 protein was 109-fold higher than that of wild-type M. smegmatis after lysozyme treatment. Additionally, light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that in the presence of over-expressed Rv1096 protein, M. smegmatis kept its regular shape, with an undamaged cell wall and smooth surface. These results indicate that Rv1096 caused deacetylation of cell wall PG, leading to lysozyme resistance in M. smegmatis. Conclusion We have determined that M. tuberculosis Rv1096 is a PG deacetylase. The PG deacetylase activity of Rv1096 contributed to lysozyme resistance in M. smegmatis. Our findings suggest that deacetylation of cell wall PG may be involved in evasion of host immune defenses by M. tuberculosis. PMID:24975018

  8. Protein expression and secretion in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Madzak, Catherine; van den Broek, Peter; Gysler, Christof; Duboc, Philippe; Niederberger, Peter; Gaillardin, Claude

    2002-08-01

    Strains and vectors for protein expression and secretion have been developed in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. Host strains were constructed with non-reverting auxotrophic markers, deletions of protease-encoding genes, and carrying a docking platform. To drive transcription, either the synthetic hp4d or the inducible POX2 promoter were used. Protein secretion is either directed by the targeting sequence of the alkaline extracellular protease or the extracellular lipase (LIP2p) signal sequence. We describe a set of vectors based on these promoters, targeting sequences and two URA3 alleles as selection markers. The wild-type URA3 allele, ura3d1, was used for single-copy integration and a mutant URA3 allele, ura3d4, was used to select for multi-copy integration into the genome. These vectors were used to express the Y. lipolytica extracellular lipase LIP2p and the Aspergillus oryzae leucine amino peptidase II. Lipase production under the control of the hp4d promoter by a strain containing a single copy reached 1000 U ml(-1) in shake flasks, while a strain containing multiple integrations reached 2000 U ml(-1) in shake flasks, 11500 U ml(-1) in batch and 90500 U ml(-1) in fed batch. Leucine amino peptidase production under the control of the hp4d promoter reached 320 mU ml(-1) in batch with a mono-copy lapA integrant and 28000 mU ml(-1) in fed batch with a multi-copy transformant. PMID:12702287

  9. Neurotoxocarosis alters myelin protein gene transcription and expression.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Lea; Beyerbach, Martin; Lühder, Fred; Beineke, Andreas; Strube, Christina

    2015-06-01

    Neurotoxocarosis is an infection of the central nervous system caused by migrating larvae of the common dog and cat roundworms (Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati), which are zoonotic agents. As these parasites are prevalent worldwide and neuropathological and molecular investigations on neurotoxocarosis are scare, this study aims to characterise nerve fibre demyelination associated with neurotoxocarosis on a molecular level. Transcription of eight myelin-associated genes (Cnp, Mag, Mbp, Mog, Mrf-1, Nogo-A, Plp1, Olig2) was determined in the mouse model during six time points of the chronic phase of infection using qRT-PCR. Expression of selected proteins was analysed by Western blotting or immunohistochemistry. Additionally, demyelination and neuronal damage were investigated histologically. Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between transcription rates of T. canis-infected and uninfected control mice were detected for all analysed genes while T. cati affected five of eight investigated genes. Interestingly, 2', 3 ´-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (Cnp) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (Mog) were upregulated in both T. canis- and T. cati-infected mice preceding demyelination. Later, CNPase expression was additionally enhanced. As expected, myelin basic protein (Mbp) was downregulated in cerebra and cerebella of T. canis-infected mice when severe demyelination was present 120 days post infectionem (dpi). The transcriptional pattern observed in the present study appears to reflect direct traumatic and hypoxic effects of larval migration as well as secondary processes including host immune reactions, demyelination and attempts to remyelinate damaged areas. PMID:25773181

  10. Fast plasmid based protein expression analysis in insect cells using an automated SplitGFP screen.

    PubMed

    Bleckmann, Maren; Schmelz, Stefan; Schinkowski, Christian; Scrima, Andrea; van den Heuvel, Joop

    2016-09-01

    Recombinant protein expression often presents a bottleneck for the production of proteins for use in many areas of animal-cell biotechnology. Difficult-to-express proteins require the generation of numerous expression constructs, where popular prokaryotic screening systems often fail to identify expression of multi domain or full-length protein constructs. Post-translational modified mammalian proteins require an alternative host system such as insect cells using the Baculovirus Expression Vector System (BEVS). Unfortunately this is time-, labor-, and cost-intensive. It is clearly desirable to find an automated and miniaturized fast multi-sample screening method for protein expression in such systems. With this in mind, in this paper a high-throughput initial expression screening method is described using an automated Microcultivation system in conjunction with fast plasmid based transient transfection in insect cells for the efficient generation of protein constructs. The applicability of the system is demonstrated for the difficult to express Nucleotide-binding Oligomerization Domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2). To enable detection of proper protein expression the rather weak plasmid based expression has been improved by a sensitive inline detection system. Here we present the functionality and application of the sensitive SplitGFP (split green fluorescent protein) detection system in insect cells. The successful expression of constructs is monitored by direct measurement of the fluorescence in the BioLector Microcultivation system. Additionally, we show that the results obtained with our plasmid-based SplitGFP protein expression screen correlate directly to the level of soluble protein produced in BEVS. In conclusion our automated SplitGFP screen outlines a sensitive, fast and reliable method reducing the time and costs required for identifying the optimal expression construct prior to large scale protein production in baculovirus infected insect cells

  11. Human odontoblasts express transient receptor protein and acid-sensing ion channel mechanosensor proteins.

    PubMed

    Solé-Magdalena, Antonio; Revuelta, Enrique G; Menénez-Díaz, Ivan; Calavia, Marta G; Cobo, Teresa; García-Suárez, Olivia; Pérez-Piñera, Pablo; De Carlos, Felix; Cobo, Juan; Vega, Jose A

    2011-05-01

    Diverse proteins of the denegerin/epithelial sodium channel (DEG/ENa(+) C) superfamily, in particular those belonging to the acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) family, as well as some members of the transient receptor protein (TRP) channel, function as mechanosensors or may be required for mechanosensation in a diverse range of species and cell types. Therefore, we investigated the putative mechanosensitive function of human odontoblasts using immunohistochemistry to detect ENa(+) C subunits (α, β, and γ) and ASIC (1, 2, 3, and 4) proteins, as well as TRPV4, in these cells. Positive and specific immunoreactivity in the odontoblast soma and/or processes was detected for all proteins studied except α-ENa(+) C. The intensity of immunostaining was high for β-ENa(+) C and ASIC2, whereas it was low for ASIC1, ASIC3, γ-ENa(+) C, and TRPV4, being absent for α-ENa(+) C and ASIC4. These results suggest that human odontoblasts in situ express proteins related to mechanosensitive channels that probably participate in the mechanisms involved in teeth sensory transmission. PMID:20836083

  12. Cognitive and emotional information processing: protein synthesis and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Navakkode, Sheeja; Korz, Volker; Frey, Julietta U

    2007-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that functional plasticity phenomena such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) – cellular processes underlying memory – are restricted to functional dendritic compartments. It was also shown, however, that a relatively strong activation of a synaptic input can abolish compartment restrictions. Our data support these findings and we present one cellular pathway responsible for uncompartmentalization of the normally localized plasticity processes by the action of rolipram, an inhibitor of type 4 phosphodiesterases. In contrast with compartment-restricted information processing, uncompartmentalization requires transcription. In the search for system relevance of compartmentalization versus uncompartmentalization we describe firstly data which show that more cognitive information processing in rats' behaviour may follow rules of compartmentalization, whereas stressful, more life-threatening, inputs abolish compartment-restricted information processing involving transcription. Our findings allow us to suggest that consolidation of processes which take place during the cognitive event most probably depend on local protein synthesis, whereas stress immediately induces gene expression in addition, resulting in a compartment-unspecific up-regulation of plasticity-related proteins (PRPs), providing the entire neuron with a higher level of ‘reactiveness’. These data would provide a specific functional cellular mechanism to respond differentially and effectively to behaviourally weighted inputs. PMID:17702813

  13. Human Articular Chondrocytes Express Multiple Gap Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mayan, Maria D.; Carpintero-Fernandez, Paula; Gago-Fuentes, Raquel; Martinez-de-Ilarduya, Oskar; Wang, Hong-Zhang; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter; Blanco, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease and involves progressive degeneration of articular cartilage. The aim of this study was to investigate if chondrocytes from human articular cartilage express gap junction proteins called connexins (Cxs). We show that human chondrocytes in tissue express Cx43, Cx45, Cx32, and Cx46. We also find that primary chondrocytes from adults retain the capacity to form functional voltage-dependent gap junctions. Immunohistochemistry experiments in cartilage from OA patients revealed significantly elevated levels of Cx43 and Cx45 in the superficial zone and down through the next approximately 1000 μm of tissue. These zones corresponded with regions damaged in OA that also had high levels of proliferative cell nuclear antigen. An increased number of Cxs may help explain the increased proliferation of cells in clusters that finally lead to tissue homeostasis loss. Conversely, high levels of Cxs in OA cartilage reflect the increased number of adjacent cells in clusters that are able to interact directly by gap junctions as compared with hemichannels on single cells in normal cartilage. Our data provide strong evidence that OA patients have a loss of the usual ordered distribution of Cxs in the damaged zones and that the reductions in Cx43 levels are accompanied by the loss of correct Cx localization in the nondamaged areas. PMID:23416160

  14. Patagonfibrase modifies protein expression of tissue factor and protein disulfide isomerase in rat skin.

    PubMed

    Peichoto, María Elisa; Santoro, Marcelo Larami

    2016-09-01

    Patagonfibrase is a hemorrhagic metalloproteinase isolated from the venom of the South American rear-fanged snake Philodryas patagoniensis, and is an important contributor to local lesions inflicted by this species. The tissue factor (TF)-factor VIIa complex, besides triggering the coagulation cascade, has been demonstrated to be involved in inflammatory events. Our aim was to determine whether patagonfibrase affects the expression of TF and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), an enzyme that controls TF biological activity, at the site of patagonfibrase injection, and thus if they may play a role in hemostatic and inflammatory events induced by snake venoms. Patagonfibrase (60 μg/kg) was administered s.c. to rats, and after 3 h blood was collected to evaluate hemostasis parameters, and skin fragments close to the site of injection were taken to assess TF and PDI expression. Patagonfibrase did not alter blood cell counts, plasma fibrinogen levels, or levels of TF activity in plasma. However, by semiquantitative Western blotting, patagonfibrase increased TF expression by 2-fold, and decreased PDI expression by 3-fold in skin samples. In agreement, by immunohistochemical analyses, prominent TF expression was observed in the subcutaneous tissue. Thus, patagonfibrase affects the local expression of TF and PDI without inducing any systemic hemostatic disturbance, although that they may be involved in the local inflammatory events induced by hemorrhagic metalloproteinases. Once antivenom therapy is not totally effective to treat the local injury induced by snake venoms, modulation of the activity and expression of TF and/or PDI might become a strategy for treating snake envenomation. PMID:27390042

  15. Neuroendocrine secretory protein 7B2: structure, expression and functions.

    PubMed Central

    Mbikay, M; Seidah, N G; Chrétien, M

    2001-01-01

    7B2 is an acidic protein residing in the secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. Its sequence has been elucidated in many phyla and species. It shows high similarity among mammals. A Pro-Pro-Asn-Pro-Cys-Pro polyproline motif is its most conserved feature, being carried by both vertebrate and invertebrate sequences. It is biosynthesized as a precursor protein that is cleaved into an N-terminal fragment and a C-terminal peptide. In neuroendocrine cells, 7B2 functions as a specific chaperone for the proprotein convertase (PC) 2. Through the sequence around its Pro-Pro-Asn-Pro-Cys-Pro motif, it binds to an inactive proPC2 and facilitates its transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to later compartments of the secretory pathway where the zymogen is proteolytically matured and activated. Its C-terminal peptide can inhibit PC2 in vitro and may contribute to keep the enzyme transiently inactive in vivo. The PC2-7B2 model defines a new neuroendocrine paradigm whereby proteolytic activation of prohormones and proneuropeptides in the secretory pathway is spatially and temporally regulated by the dynamics of interactions between converting enzymes and their binding proteins. Interestingly, unlike PC2-null mice, which are viable, 7B2-null mutants die early in life from Cushing's disease due to corticotropin ('ACTH') hypersecretion by the neurointermediate lobe, suggesting a possible involvement of 7B2 in secretory granule formation and in secretion regulation. The mechanism of this regulation is yet to be elucidated. 7B2 has been shown to be a good marker of several neuroendocrine cell dysfunctions in humans. The possibility that anomalies in its structure and expression could be aetiological causes of some of these dysfunctions warrants investigation. PMID:11439082

  16. Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the metal-binding protein CusF.

    PubMed

    Cantu-Bustos, J Enrique; Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Galbraith, David W; McEvoy, Megan M; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-05-01

    Production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli has been improved considerably through the use of fusion proteins, because they increase protein solubility and facilitate purification via affinity chromatography. In this article, we propose the use of CusF as a new fusion partner for expression and purification of recombinant proteins in E. coli. Using a cell-free protein expression system, based on the E. coli S30 extract, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was expressed with a series of different N-terminal tags, immobilized on self-assembled protein microarrays, and its fluorescence quantified. GFP tagged with CusF showed the highest fluorescence intensity, and this was greater than the intensities from corresponding GFP constructs that contained MBP or GST tags. Analysis of protein production in vivo showed that CusF produces large amounts of soluble protein with low levels of inclusion bodies. Furthermore, fusion proteins can be exported to the cellular periplasm, if CusF contains the signal sequence. Taking advantage of its ability to bind copper ions, recombinant proteins can be purified with readily available IMAC resins charged with this metal ion, producing pure proteins after purification and tag removal. We therefore recommend the use of CusF as a viable alternative to MBP or GST as a fusion protein/affinity tag for the production of soluble recombinant proteins in E. coli. PMID:26805756

  17. Expression of epithelial adhesion proteins and integrins in chronic inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Haapasalmi, K.; Mäkelä, M.; Oksala, O.; Heino, J.; Yamada, K. M.; Uitto, V. J.; Larjava, H.

    1995-01-01

    Epithelial cell behavior in chronic inflammation is poorly characterized. During inflammation of tooth-supporting structures (periodontal disease), increased proliferation of epithelial cells into the inflamed connective tissue stroma is commonly seen. In some areas ulceration and degeneration take place. We studied alterations in the expression of adhesion molecules and integrins during chronic periodontal inflammation. In inflamed tissue, laminin-1 and type IV collagen were still present in the basement membrane and surrounding blood vessels, but they were also found extravascularly in inflamed connective tissue stroma. Type VII collagen and laminin-5 (also known as kalinin, epiligrin, or nicein) were poorly preserved in the basement membrane zone, but both were found in unusual streak-like distributions in the subepithelial connective tissue stroma in inflamed tissue. Both fibronectin and tenascin were substantially decreased in chronically inflamed connective tissue, showing only punctate staining at the basement membrane zone. Integrins of the beta 1 family showed two distinct staining patterns in epithelial cells during chronic inflammation; focal losses of beta 1 integrins (alpha 2 beta 1 and alpha 3 beta 1) were found in most areas, while in other areas the entire pocket epithelium was found to be strongly positive for beta 1 integrins. No members of the alpha v integrin family were found in any epithelia studied. Expression of the alpha 6 beta 4 integrin was high in basal cells of healthy tissue, but weak in epithelium associated with chronic inflammation. Chronic inflammation therefore involves alterations in both adhesion proteins and integrins expressed by epithelial cells. Basement membrane components found at abnormal sites in stroma in chronic inflammation might serve as new adhesive ligands for various cell types in inflamed stroma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7541610

  18. Trichohyalin-like 1 protein, a member of fused S100 proteins, is expressed in normal and pathologic human skin.

    PubMed

    Yamakoshi, Takako; Makino, Teruhiko; Ur Rehman, Mati; Yoshihisa, Yoko; Sugimori, Michiya; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2013-03-01

    Trichohyalin-like 1 (TCHHL1) protein is a novel member of the fused-type S100 protein gene family. The deduced amino acid sequence of TCHHL1 contains an EF-hand domain in the N-terminus, one trans-membrane domain and a nuclear localization signal. We generated specific antibodies against the C-terminus of the TCHHL1 protein and examined the expression of TCHHL1 proteins in normal and pathological human skin. An immunohistochemical study showed that TCHHL1 proteins were expressed in the basal layer of the normal epidermis. In addition, signals of TCHHL1 proteins were observed around the nuclei of cultured growing keratinocytes. Accordingly, TCHHL1 mRNA has been detected in normal skin and cultured growing keratinocytes. Furthermore, TCHHL1 proteins were strongly expressed in the peripheral areas of tumor nests in basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas. A dramatic increase in the number of Ki67 positive cells was observed in TCHHL1-expressing areas. The expression of TCHHL1 proteins also increased in non-cancerous hyperproliferative epidermal tissues such as those of psoriasis vulgaris and lichen planus. These findings highlight the possibility that TCHHL1 proteins are expressed in growing keratinocytes of the epidermis and might be associated with the proliferation of keratinocytes. PMID:23376073

  19. Differential dissolved protein expression throughout the life cycle of Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Lingdan, Li; Pengtao, Gong; Wenchao, Li; Jianhua, Li; Ju, Yang; Chengwu, Liu; He, Li; Guocai, Zhang; Wenzhi, Ren; Yujiang, Chen; Xichen, Zhang

    2012-12-01

    Giardia lamblia (G. lamblia) has a simple life cycle that alternates between a cyst and a trophozoite, and this parasite is an important human and animal pathogen. To increase our understanding of the molecular basis of the G. lamblia encystment, we have analyzed the soluble proteins expressed by trophozoites and cysts extracted from feces by quantitative proteomic analysis. A total of 63 proteins were identified by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling, and were categorized as cytoskeletal proteins, a cell-cycle-specific kinase, metabolic enzymes and stress resistance proteins. Importantly, we demonstrated that the expression of seven proteins differed significantly between trophozoites and cysts. In cysts, the expression of three proteins (one variable surface protein (VSP), ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OTC), β-tubulin) increased, whereas the expression of four proteins (14-3-3 protein, α-tubulin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), protein disulfide isomerase 2 (PDI-2)) decreased significantly when compared with the levels of these proteins in trophozoites. The mRNA expression patterns of four of these proteins (OTC, α-tubulin, GAPDH, VSP) were similar to the expression levels of the proteins. These seven proteins appear to play an important role in the completion of the life cycle of G. lamblia. PMID:23058231

  20. Expression and purification of toxic anti-breast cancer p28-NRC chimeric protein

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani, Meysam; Mirmohammad-Sadeghi, Hamid; Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chimeric proteins consisting of a targeting moiety and a cytotoxic moiety are now under intense research focus for targeted therapy of cancer. Here, we report cloning, expression, and purification of such a targeted chimeric protein made up of p28 peptide as both targeting and anticancer moiety fused to NRC peptide as a cytotoxic moiety. However, since the antimicrobial activity of the NRC peptide would intervene expression of the chimeric protein in Escherichia coli, we evaluated the effects of two fusion tags, that is, thioredoxin (Trx) and 6x-His tags, and various expression conditions, on the expression of p28-NRC chimeric protein. Materials and Methods: In order to express the chimeric protein with only 6x-His tag, pET28 expression plasmid was used. Cloning in pET32 expression plasmid was performed to add both Trx and 6x-His tags to the chimeric protein. Expression of the chimeric protein with both plasmids was evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blot analysis following optimization of expression conditions and host strains. Results: Expression of the chimeric protein in pET28a was performed. However, expression yield of the chimeric protein was low. Optimization of culture conditions and host strains led to reasonable expression yield of the toxic chimeric protein in pET32a vector. In cases of both plasmids, approximately 10 kDa deviation of the apparent molecular weight from the theoretical one was seen in SDS-PAGE of purified chimeric proteins. Conclusions: The study leads to proper expression and purification yield of p28-NRC chimeric protein with Trx tag following optimizing culture conditions and host strains. PMID:27169101

  1. The Up-Regulation of Ribosomal Proteins Further Regulates Protein Expression Profile in Female Schistosoma japonicum after Pairing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jun; Li, Chen; Wang, Suwen

    2015-01-01

    Background Pairing of Schistosoma males and females leads to and maintains female sexual maturation. However, the mechanism by which pairing facilitates sexual maturation of females is not clear. An increasing body of evidence suggests that ribosomal proteins have regulatory rather than constitutive roles in protein translation. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the effect of ribosome regulation on female sex maturation, Solexa and iTRAQ techniques were used to analyze the relationship between ribosomal gene or protein expression and sexual development of Schistosoma females. In the present study, considerably higher number of ribosomal genes or proteins were found to be differentially expressed in paired 23-day-old females. Moreover, mature female-specific proteins associated with egg production, such as ferritin-1 heavy chain and superoxide dismutase, were selectively highly expressed in paired females, rather than higher level of protein synthesis of all transcripts compared with those in unpaired 23-day-old females. Furthermore, other developmental stages were utilized to investigate different expression pattern of ribosomal proteins in females by analysing 18-day-old female schistosomula from single- or double-sex infections to determine the relationship between ribosomal protein expression pattern and development. Results showed that undeveloped 18-day-old females from single- and double-sex infections, as well as 23-day-old unpaired females, possessed similar ribosomal protein expression patterns, which were distinct from those in 23-day-old paired females. Conclusions/Significance Our findings reveal that the pairing of females and males triggers a specialized ribosomal protein expression profile which further regulates the protein profile for sexual maturation in Schistosoma japonicum, based on its gene expression profile. PMID:26070205

  2. Use of high-throughput protein array for profiling of differentially expressed proteins in normal and malignant breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Hudelist, Gernot; Pacher-Zavisin, Margit; Singer, Christian F; Holper, Tina; Kubista, Ernst; Schreiber, Martin; Manavi, Mahmood; Bilban, Martin; Czerwenka, Klaus

    2004-08-01

    cDNA arrays provide a powerful tool to identify gene expression pattern that are potentially associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. However, genes work at the protein level and, since the transcriptional activity of a gene does not necessarily reflect cellular protein expression, the identification and quantification of proteins is essential for the understanding of molecular events leading to malignant transformation. We have therefore employed a high-throughput protein microarray system which contains 378 well-characterized monoclonal antibodies in order to compare the gene expression pattern of malignant and adjacent normal breast tissue in a patient with primary breast cancer. Using this technique, we have identified a number of proteins that show increased expression levels in malignant breast tissues such as casein kinase Ie, p53, annexin XI, CDC25C, eIF-4E and MAP kinase 7. The expression of other proteins, such as the multifunctional regulator 14-3-3e was found to be decreased in malignant breast tissue, whereas the majority of proteins remained unchanged when compared to the corresponding non-malignant samples. The protein expression pattern was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, in which antibodies against 8 representative proteins known to be involved in carcinogenesis were employed in paraffin-embedded normal and malignant tissue sections deriving from the same patient. In each case, the results obtained by IHC matched the data obtained by antibody microarray system. Taken together, we have described for the first time a tumor cell specificity protein expression pattern by use of a novel commercially available antibody microarray system. We have thus demonstrated the feasibility of high-throughput protein arrays in the proteomic analysis of human breast tissue. We hypothesize that the use of protein arrays will not only increase our understanding of the molecular events, but could prove useful in evaluating prognosis and in determining optimal

  3. A set of ligation-independent expression vectors for co-expression of proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Pranab K; Edris, Wade A; Kennedy, Jeffrey D

    2006-05-01

    A set of ligation-independent expression vectors system has been developed for co-expression of proteins in Escherichia coli. These vectors contain a strong T7 promoter, different drug resistant genes, and an origin of DNA replication from a different incompatibility group, allowing combinations of these plasmids to be stably maintained together. In addition, these plasmids also contain the lacI gene, a transcriptional terminator, and a 3' polyhistidine (6x His) affinity tag (H6) for easy purification of target proteins. All of these vectors contain an identical transportable cassette flanked by suitable restriction enzyme cleavage sites for easy cloning and shuttling among different vectors. This cassette incorporates a ligation-independent cloning (LIC) site for LIC manipulations, an optimal ribosome binding site for efficient protein translation, and a 6x His affinity tag for protein purification Therefore, any E. coli expression vector of choice can be easily converted to LIC type expression vectors by shuttling the cassette using the restriction enzyme cleavage sites at the ends. We have demonstrated the expression capabilities of these vectors by co-expressing three bacterial (dsbA, dsbG, and Trx) and also two other mammalian proteins (KChIP1 and Kv4.3). We further show that co-expressed KChIP1/Kv4.3 forms soluble protein complexes that can be purified for further studies. PMID:16325426

  4. SP PROTEINS AND RUNX2 MEDIATE REGULATION OF MATRIX GLA PROTEIN (MGP) EXPRESSION BY PARATHYROID HORMONE

    PubMed Central

    Suttamanatwong, Supaporn; Jensen, Eric D; Shilling, Jody; Franceschi, Renny T.; Carlson, Ann E.; Mansky, Kim C.; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram

    2009-01-01

    As part of its catabolic action in bone, parathyroid hormone (PTH) inhibits extracellular matrix mineralization. We previously showed that PTH dose-dependently induces matrix gla protein (MGP) expression in osteoblasts and this induction is at least partially responsible for PTH-mediated inhibition of mineralization. Recently, we identified PKA and ERK/MAPK as the key signaling pathways involved in PTH regulation of MGP expression. The goal of this study was to further characterize the mechanism by which PTH stimulates expression of MGP. Deletion analysis of the murine Mgp gene promoter identified a PTH-responsive region between -173 bp and -49 bp. Using gel-mobility shift assays we found that Sp1, Sp3 and Runx2 bind to distinct sites within this region. Mutation of either the Sp or the Runx2 site reduced MGP induction by PTH, while mutation of both sites completely abolished PTH responsiveness. Overexpression of Runx2 or Sp1 activated the Mgp reporter, while Sp3 was a dose-dependent repressor of MGP expression. Collectively, these data show that PTH regulates MGP gene transcription in osteoblasts through altered activities of Sp and Runx2 transcription factors. PMID:19306294

  5. Cloning, expression, and antigenic characterization of recombinant protein of Mycoplasma gallisepticum expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rocha, T S; Tramuta, C; Catania, S; Matucci, A; Giuffrida, M G; Baro, C; Profiti, M; Bertolotti, L; Rosati, S

    2015-04-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a member of the most important avian mycoplasmas, causing chronic respiratory disease in chickens and leading to important economic losses in the poultry industry. Recombinant technology represents a strategic approach used to achieve highly reliable and specific diagnostic tests in veterinary diseases control: in particular this aspect is crucial for confirming mycoplasma infection and for maintaining mycoplasma-free breeder flocks. In this study, we identified a component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (i.e., E2) protein by 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), characterized it in immunoblotting assays, and analyzed its recombinant (r-E2) in a rec-ELISA test. For full-length protein expression in Escherichia coli (EC) a point mutation was introduced. A rabbit antiserum produced against r-E2 was tested in a Western Blot using different samples of Mycoplasma species. The results showed the applicability of site-directed mutagenesis, with a good yield of the r-E2 after purification. Also, anti-E2 serum reacted with all the tested MG strains showing no cross reaction with other mycoplasmas. The developed E2 ELISA test was capable of detecting MG antibodies in the sera examined. Those results demonstrate the antigenic stability of the E2 protein which could represent a recombinant antigen with potential diagnostic applications. PMID:25667423

  6. Differentially expressed proteins associated with Fusarium head blight resistance in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), mainly caused by Fusarium graminearum, substantially reduces wheat grain yield and quality worldwide. Proteins play important roles in defense against the fungal infection. This study characterized differentially expressed proteins between near-isogenic lines (NILs) contr...

  7. An Approach to Heterologous Expression of Membrane Proteins. The Case of Bacteriorhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Round, Ekaterina; Shevchenko, Vitaly; Gushchin, Ivan; Polovinkin, Vitaly; Borshchevskiy, Valentin; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Heterologous overexpression of functional membrane proteins is a major bottleneck of structural biology. Bacteriorhodopsin from Halobium salinarum (bR) is a striking example of the difficulties in membrane protein overexpression. We suggest a general approach with a finite number of steps which allows one to localize the underlying problem of poor expression of a membrane protein using bR as an example. Our approach is based on constructing chimeric proteins comprising parts of a protein of interest and complementary parts of a homologous protein demonstrating advantageous expression. This complementary protein approach allowed us to increase bR expression by two orders of magnitude through the introduction of two silent mutations into bR coding DNA. For the first time the high quality crystals of bR expressed in E. Coli were obtained using the produced protein. The crystals obtained with in meso nanovolume crystallization diffracted to 1.67 Å. PMID:26046789

  8. Protective Effect of Aliskiren in Experimental Ischemic Stroke: Up-Regulated p-PI3K, p-AKT, Bcl-2 Expression, Attenuated Bax Expression.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jiangyong; Wang, Lina; Zhang, Xiangjian; Zhu, Chunhua; Cui, Lili; Ji, Hui; Liu, Ying; Wang, Xiaolu

    2016-09-01

    Aliskiren (ALK), a pharmacological renin inhibitor, is an effective antihypertensive drug and has potent anti-apoptotic activity, but it is currently unknown whether ALK is able to attenuate brain damage caused by acute cerebral ischemia independent of its blood pressure-lowering effects. This study aimed to investigate the role of ALK and its potential mechanism in cerebral ischemia. C57/BL6 mice were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) and treated for 5 days with Vehicle or ALK (10 or 25 mg/kg per day via intragastric administration), whereas Sham-operated animals served as controls. Treatment with ALK significantly improved neurological deficits, infarct volume, brain water content and Nissl bodies after stroke (P < 0.05), which did not affect systemic blood pressure. Furthermore, the protection of ALK was also related to decreased levels of apoptosis in mice by enhanced activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway, increased level of Bcl-2 and reduced Bax expression (P < 0.05). In addition, ALK's effects were reversed by PI3K inhibitors LY294002 (P < 0.05). Our data indicated that ALK protected the brain from reperfusion injuries without affecting blood pressure, and this effect may be through PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. PMID:27180190

  9. p53 protein expression in human breast carcinoma: relationship to expression of epidermal growth factor receptor, c-erbB-2 protein overexpression, and oestrogen receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Poller, D. N.; Hutchings, C. E.; Galea, M.; Bell, J. A.; Nicholson, R. A.; Elston, C. W.; Blamey, R. W.; Ellis, I. O.

    1992-01-01

    The expression of p53 protein, oestrogen receptor protein, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and overexpression of the c-erbB-2 oncoprotein was examined in a series of 149 primary symptomatic breast carcinomas. Expression of p53 was present in 62 of 146 cases (42.5%) of the invasive carcinoma and one of three cases (33.3%) of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) examined. Statistical associations of tumour oestrogen receptor positivity and lack of p53 protein expression, chi 2 = 19.78 (d.f. = 1), P less than 0.001, positive tumour p53 status and poor tumour grade; chi 2 = 14.1 (d.f. = 2), P less than 0.001, EGFR expression chi 2 = 7.07, (d.f. = 1), P less than 0.01 and tumour c-erbB-2 protein overexpression; chi 2 = 4.61 (d.f. = 1), P = 0.032 were identified. Expression of p53 is rare in invasive lobular carcinoma of classical type (8.3% of cases examined) in contrast to other common types of mammary carcinoma. Non-significant trends of p53 protein expression and increased regional tumour recurrence; chi 2 = 3.20 (d.f. = 1), P = 0.074 and also poorer patient survival; chi 2 = 3.76 (d.f. = 1), P = 0.053 were identified. p53 protein expression is a common event in human breast cancer and is present in both DCIS and invasive mammary carcinoma. Abnormal expression of p53 protein is a feature of both in situ and invasive breast carcinoma, implying that the abnormal p53 protein expression may be implicated in the early stages of mammary carcinoma progression. Images Figure 1 PMID:1355662

  10. Investigations of TGF-β signaling in preantral follicles of female mice reveal differential roles for bone morphogenetic protein 15.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Mark A; Mora, Jocelyn M; Mansour, Yosef T; Baithun, Christina; Franks, Stephen; Hardy, Kate

    2013-09-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) and growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) are 2 closely related TGF-β ligands implicated as key regulators of follicle development and fertility. Animals harboring mutations of these factors often exhibit a blockage in follicle development beyond the primary stage and therefore little is known about the role of these ligands during subsequent (preantral) stages. Preantral follicles isolated from immature mice were cultured with combinations of BMP15, GDF9, and activin receptor-like kinase (ALK) inhibitors. Individually, GDF9 and BMP15 promoted follicle growth during the first 24 hours, whereas BMP15 subsequently (48-72 h) caused follicle shrinkage and atresia with increased granulosa cell apoptosis. Inhibition of ALK6 prevented the BMP15-induced reduction in follicle size and under basal conditions promoted a rapid increase in granulosa cell proliferation, suggesting BMP15 signals through ALK6, which in turn acts to restrain follicle growth. In the presence of GDF9, BMP15 no longer promoted atresia and in fact follicle growth was increased significantly more than with either ligand alone. This cooperative effect was accompanied by differential expression of Id1-3, Smad6-7, and Has2 and was blocked by the same ALK5 inhibitor used to block GDF9 signaling. Immunostaining for SMAD2/3 and SMAD1/5/8, representing the 2 main branches of TGF-β signaling, supported the fact that both canonical pathways have the potential to be active in growing follicles, whereas primordial follicles only express SMAD2/3. Overall results highlight differential effects of the 2 main TGF-β signaling pathways during preantral follicle growth. PMID:23782946

  11. Proteasome dysfunction inhibits surfactant protein gene expression in lung epithelial cells: mechanism of inhibition of SP-B gene expression.

    PubMed

    Das, Aparajita; Boggaram, Vijayakumar

    2007-01-01

    Surfactant proteins maintain lung function through their actions to reduce alveolar surface tension and control of innate immune responses in the lung. The ubiquitin proteasome pathway is responsible for the degradation of majority of intracellular proteins in eukaryotic cells, and proteasome dysfunction has been linked to the development of neurodegenerative, cardiac, and other diseases. Proteasome function is impaired in interstitial lung diseases associated with surfactant protein C (SP-C) mutation mapping to the BRICHOS domain located in the proSP-C protein. In this study we determined the effects of proteasome inhibition on surfactant protein expression in H441 and MLE-12 lung epithelial cells to understand the relationship between proteasome dysfunction and surfactant protein gene expression. Proteasome inhibitors lactacystin and MG132 reduced the levels of SP-A, SP-B, and SP-C mRNAs in a concentration-dependent manner in H441 and MLE-12 cells. In H441 cells, lactacystin and MG132 inhibition of SP-B mRNA was associated with similar decreases in SP-B protein, and the inhibition was due to inhibition of gene transcription. Proteasome inhibitors decreased thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1)/Nkx2.1 DNA binding activity, and the reduced TTF-1 DNA binding activity was due to reduced expression levels of TTF-1 protein. These data indicated that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway is essential for the maintenance of surfactant protein gene expression and that disruption of this pathway inhibits surfactant protein gene expression via reduced expression of TTF-1 protein. PMID:16905641

  12. Expression and purification of SARS coronavirus proteins using SUMO-fusions.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Xun; Mattern, Michael R; Tan, Robin; Li, Shuisen; Hall, John; Sterner, David E; Shoo, Joshua; Tran, Hiep; Lim, Peter; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Kazi, Lubna; Navas-Martin, Sonia; Weiss, Susan R; Butt, Tauseef R

    2005-07-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) proteins belong to a large group of proteins that is difficult to express in traditional expression systems. The ability to express and purify SARS-CoV proteins in large quantities is critical for basic research and for development of pharmaceutical agents. The work reported here demonstrates: (1) fusion of SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier), a 100 amino acid polypeptide, to the N-termini of SARS-CoV proteins dramatically enhances expression in Escherichia coli cells and (2) 6x His-tagged SUMO-fusions facilitate rapid purification of the viral proteins on a large scale. We have exploited the natural chaperoning properties of SUMO to develop an expression system suitable for proteins that cannot be expressed by traditional methodologies. A unique feature of the system is the SUMO tag, which enhances expression, facilitates purification, and can be efficiently cleaved by a SUMO-specific protease to generate native protein with a desired N-terminus. We have purified various SARS-CoV proteins under either native or denaturing conditions. These purified proteins have been used to generate highly specific polyclonal antibodies. Our study suggests that the SUMO-fusion technology will be useful for enhancing expression and purification of the viral proteins for structural and functional studies as well as for therapeutic uses. PMID:15939295

  13. RRE-dependent HIV-1 Env RNA effects on Gag protein expression, assembly and release

    SciTech Connect

    López, Claudia S.; Sloan, Rachel; Cylinder, Isabel; Kozak, Susan L.; Kabat, David; Barklis, Eric

    2014-08-15

    The HIV-1 Gag proteins are translated from the full-length HIV-1 viral RNA (vRNA), whereas the envelope (Env) protein is translated from incompletely spliced Env mRNAs. Nuclear export of vRNAs and Env mRNAs is mediated by the Rev accessory protein which binds to the rev-responsive element (RRE) present on these RNAs. Evidence has shown there is a direct or indirect interaction between the Gag protein, and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Our current work shows that env gene expression impacts HIV-1 Gag expression and function in two ways. At the protein level, full-length Env expression altered Gag protein expression, while Env CT-deletion proteins did not. At the RNA level, RRE-containing Env mRNA expression reduced Gag expression, processing, and virus particle release from cells. Our results support models in which Gag is influenced by the Env CT, and Env mRNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export. - Highlights: • At the protein level, full-length HIV-1 Env alters Gag protein expression. • HIV-1 Env RNA expression reduces Gag levels and virus release. • Env RNA effects on Gag are dependent on the RRE. • RRE-containing Env RNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export.

  14. High-throughput instant quantification of protein expression and purity based on photoactive yellow protein turn off/on label.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngmin; Ganesan, Prabhakar; Ihee, Hyotcherl

    2013-08-01

    Quantifying the concentration and purity of a target protein is essential for high-throughput protein expression test and rapid screening of highly soluble proteins. However, conventional methods such as PAGE and dot blot assay generally involve multiple time-consuming tasks requiring hours or do not allow instant quantification. Here, we demonstrate a new method based on the Photoactive yellow protein turn Off/On Label (POOL) system that can instantly quantify the concentration and purity of a target protein. The main idea of POOL is to use Photoactive Yellow Protein (PYP), or its miniaturized version, as a fusion partner of the target protein. The characteristic blue light absorption and the consequent yellow color of PYP is absent when initially expressed without its chromophore, but can be turned on by binding its chromophore, p-coumaric acid. The appearance of yellow color upon adding a precursor of chromophore to the co-expressed PYP can be used to check the expression amount of the target protein via visual inspection within a few seconds as well as to quantify its concentration and purity with the aid of a spectrometer within a few minutes. The concentrations measured by the POOL method, which usually takes a few minutes, show excellent agreement with those by the BCA Kit, which usually takes ∼1 h. We demonstrate the applicability of POOL in E. coli, insect, and mammalian cells, and for high-throughput protein expression screening. PMID:23740751

  15. Solitary pulmonary metastasis from lung cancer harboring EML4-ALK after a 15-year disease-free interval.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Kenji; Ito, Simon; Suda, Kenichi; Fukui, Takayuki; Usami, Noriyasu; Hatooka, Shunzo; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Yatabe, Yasushi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2013-04-01

    It is often difficult to differentiate metachronous primary lung cancers from local pulmonary recurrences when the histopathological findings are similar. A 43-year-old man underwent right upper lobectomy with lymph node dissection for primary lung adenocarcinoma (p-T2aN0M0, stage IB). Fifteen years later, he developed a lung nodule in his right middle lobe. The tumor was preoperatively thought to be a metachronous second primary lung adenocarcinoma, and was surgically resected. Histopathological findings for both tumors were of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with mucus production. Both tumors also harbored the EML4 (echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4)-ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) fusion gene (variant 3a+b). Based on this molecular finding, the pulmonary nodule was considered to be a recurrence after very long latent period. PMID:23279872

  16. Expression of liver fatty acid binding protein in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soo-Jin; Ferrell, Linda D; Gill, Ryan M

    2016-04-01

    Loss of expression of liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) by immunohistochemistry has been shown to be characteristic of a subset of hepatocellular adenomas (HCAs) in which HNF1A is inactivated. Transformation to hepatocellular carcinoma is thought to be a very rare phenomenon in the HNF1A-inactivated variant of HCA. However, we recently observed 2 cases at our institution, 1 definite hepatocellular carcinoma and 1 possible hepatocellular carcinoma, with loss of LFABP staining, raising the possibility that LFABP down-regulation may be associated with hepatocellular carcinogenesis. Our aim was to evaluate hepatocellular carcinomas arising in various backgrounds and with varying degrees of differentiation for loss of LFABP staining. Twenty total cases of hepatocellular carcinoma were examined. Thirteen cases arose in a background of cirrhosis due to hepatitis C (n = 8) or steatohepatitis (n = 5); 7 cases arose in a noncirrhotic background, with 2 cases arising within HNF1A-inactivated variant HCA and 2 cases arising within inflammatory variant HCA. Complete loss of expression of LFABP was seen in 6 of 20 cases, including 2 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma arising within HNF1A-inactivated variant HCA. Thus, loss of staining for LFABP appears to be common in hepatocellular carcinoma and may be seen in well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. Therefore, LFABP loss should not be interpreted as evidence for hepatocellular adenoma over carcinoma, when other features support a diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma. The findings raise consideration for a role of HNF1A inactivation in hepatocellular carcinogenesis, particularly in less differentiated tumors. PMID:26997447

  17. Identities of Sequestered Proteins in Aggregates from Cells with Induced Polyglutamine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Suhr, Steven T.; Senut, Marie-Claude; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Faull, Kym F.; Cuizon, Denise B.; Gage, Fred H.

    2001-01-01

    Proteins with expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) tracts have been linked to neurodegenerative diseases. One common characteristic of expanded-polyQ expression is the formation of intracellular aggregates (IAs). IAs purified from polyQ-expressing cells were dissociated and studied by protein blot assay and mass spectrometry to determine the identity, condition, and relative level of several proteins sequestered within aggregates. Most of the sequestered proteins comigrated with bands from control extracts, indicating that the sequestered proteins were intact and not irreversibly bound to the polyQ polymer. Among the proteins found sequestered at relatively high levels in purified IAs were ubiquitin, the cell cycle–regulating proteins p53 and mdm-2, HSP70, the global transcriptional regulator Tata-binding protein/TFIID, cytoskeleton proteins actin and 68-kD neurofilament, and proteins of the nuclear pore complex. These data reveal that IAs are highly complex structures with a multiplicity of contributing proteins. PMID:11309410

  18. Sustained co-cultivation with human placenta-derived MSCs enhances ALK5/Smad3 signaling in human breast epithelial cells, leading to EMT and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Young A; Kang, Myoung Hee; Kim, Byung Soo; Kim, Jun Suk; Seo, Jae Hong

    2009-06-01

    The interaction between mammary epithelial cells and their surrounding microenvironment are important in the development of the mammary gland. Thus, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which retain pluripotency for various mesenchymal lineages, may provide a permissive environment for the morphologic alteration and differentiation of mammary epithelial cells. To this end, we investigated whether the interactions between mammary epithelial cells and human placenta-derived MSCs (hPMSC) affect the morphology, proliferation, and differentiation of epithelial cells in a co-culture system. We show that after co-culture with hPMSCs, human mammary epithelial cell lines (MCF-10F and HEMC) underwent significant morphologic alterations and a dramatic increase in ductal-alveolar branching, which was accompanied by a decrease or loss of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and a gain of the mesenchymal markers, alpha-SMA and vimentin. MCF-10F and HEMC proliferation was also inhibited in the presence of hPMSCs, and this retardation in growth was due to cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, in MCF-10F and HMEC cells, hPMSCs induced the production of lipid droplets, milk fat globule protein, and milk protein lactoferrin, which are markers of functional mammary differentiation. We also noticed an elevation in ALK5 and phosphorylated Smad3 protein levels upon hPMSC co-culture. Strikingly, the changes in morphology, proliferation, and differentiation were reversed by treatment with ALK5 or Smad3 knockdown in MCF-10F/hPMSC co-cultures. Collectively, our findings suggest that co-cultivation with hPMSCs leads to epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and differentiation of human breast epithelial cells through the ALK5/Smad3 signaling pathway. PMID:19375841

  19. Heterochromatin Protein 1 Binding Protein 3 Expression as a Candidate Marker of Intrinsic 5-Fluorouracil Resistance

    PubMed Central

    HADAC, JAMIE N.; MILLER, DEVON D.; GRIMES, IAN C.; CLIPSON, LINDA; NEWTON, MICHAEL A.; SCHELMAN, WILLIAM R.; HALBERG, RICHARD B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite receiving post-operative 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy, approximately 50% of patients with stage IIIC colon cancer experience recurr