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Sample records for alk tyrosine kinase

  1. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells Acquire Resistance to the ALK Inhibitor Alectinib by Activating Alternative Receptor Tyrosine Kinases.

    PubMed

    Isozaki, Hideko; Ichihara, Eiki; Takigawa, Nagio; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Ochi, Nobuaki; Yasugi, Masayuki; Ninomiya, Takashi; Yamane, Hiromichi; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Sakai, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Kunio; Hosokawa, Shinobu; Bessho, Akihiro; Sendo, Toshiaki; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2016-03-15

    Crizotinib is the standard of care for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene, but resistance invariably develops. Unlike crizotinib, alectinib is a selective ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) with more potent antitumor effects and a favorable toxicity profile, even in crizotinib-resistant cases. However, acquired resistance to alectinib, as for other TKIs, remains a limitation of its efficacy. Therefore, we investigated the mechanisms by which human NSCLC cells acquire resistance to alectinib. We established two alectinib-resistant cell lines that did not harbor the secondary ALK mutations frequently occurring in crizotinib-resistant cells. One cell line lost the EML4-ALK fusion gene, but exhibited increased activation of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3), and overexpressed the HER3 ligand neuregulin 1. Accordingly, pharmacologic inhibition of IGF1R and HER3 signaling overcame resistance to alectinib in this cell line. The second alectinib-resistant cell line displayed stimulated HGF autocrine signaling that promoted MET activation and remained sensitive to crizotinib treatment. Taken together, our findings reveal two novel mechanisms underlying alectinib resistance that are caused by the activation of alternative tyrosine kinase receptors rather than by secondary ALK mutations. These studies may guide the development of comprehensive treatment strategies that take into consideration the various approaches ALK-positive lung tumors use to withstand therapeutic insult. PMID:26719536

  2. Augmentor α and β (FAM150) are ligands of the receptor tyrosine kinases ALK and LTK: Hierarchy and specificity of ligand–receptor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Andrey V.; Murray, Phillip B.; Shi, Xiarong; Mo, Elizabeth S.; Mohanty, Jyotidarsini; Tome, Francisco; Bai, Hanwen; Gunel, Murat; Lax, Irit; Schlessinger, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are a class of cell surface receptors that, upon ligand binding, stimulate a variety of critical cellular functions. The orphan receptor anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is one of very few RTKs that remain without a firmly established protein ligand. Here we present a novel cytokine, FAM150B, which we propose naming augmentor-α (AUG-α), as a ligand for ALK. AUG-α binds ALK with high affinity and activates ALK in cells with subnanomolar potency. Detailed binding experiments using cells expressing ALK or the related receptor leukocyte tyrosine kinase (LTK) demonstrate that AUG-α binds and robustly activates both ALK and LTK. We show that the previously established LTK ligand FAM150A (AUG-β) is specific for LTK and only weakly binds to ALK. Furthermore, expression of AUG-α stimulates transformation of NIH/3T3 cells expressing ALK, induces IL-3 independent growth of Ba/F3 cells expressing ALK, and is expressed in neuroblastoma, a cancer partly driven by ALK. These experiments reveal the hierarchy and specificity of two cytokines as ligands for ALK and LTK and set the stage for elucidating their roles in development and disease states. PMID:26630010

  3. Molecular Testing Guideline for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients for EGFR and ALK Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lindeman, Neal I.; Cagle, Philip T.; Beasley, Mary Beth; Chitale, Dhananjay Arun; Dacic, Sanja; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Jenkins, Robert Brian; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Saldivar, Juan-Sebastian; Squire, Jeremy; Thunnissen, Erik; Ladanyi, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish evidence-based recommendations for the molecular analysis of lung cancers that are required to guide EGFR- and ALK-directed therapies, addressing which patients and samples should be tested, and when and how testing should be performed. Participants Three cochairs without conflicts of interest were selected, one from each of the 3 sponsoring professional societies: College of American Pathologists, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, and Association for Molecular Pathology. Writing and advisory panels were constituted from additional experts from these societies. Evidence Three unbiased literature searches of electronic databases were performed to capture articles published from January 2004 through February 2012, yielding 1533 articles whose abstracts were screened to identify 521 pertinent articles that were then reviewed in detail for their relevance to the recommendations. Evidence was formally graded for each recommendation. Consensus Process Initial recommendations were formulated by the cochairs and panel members at a public meeting. Each guideline section was assigned to at least 2 panelists. Drafts were circulated to the writing panel (version 1), advisory panel (version 2), and the public (version 3) before submission (version 4). Conclusions The 37 guideline items address 14 subjects, including 15 recommendations (evidence grade A/B). The major recommendations are to use testing for EGFR mutations and ALK fusions to guide patient selection for therapy with an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, respectively, in all patients with advanced-stage adenocarcinoma, regardless of sex, race, smoking history, or other clinical risk factors, and to prioritize EGFR and ALK testing over other molecular predictive tests. As scientific discoveries and clinical practice outpace the completion of randomized clinical trials, evidence-based guidelines developed by expert

  4. Molecular Testing Guideline for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients for EGFR and ALK Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lindeman, Neal I.; Cagle, Philip T.; Beasley, Mary Beth; Chitale, Dhananjay Arun; Dacic, Sanja; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Jenkins, Robert Brian; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Saldivar, Juan-Sebastian; Squire, Jeremy; Thunnissen, Erik; Ladanyi, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish evidence-based recommendations for the molecular analysis of lung cancers that are that are required to guide EGFR- and ALK-directed therapies, addressing which patients and samples should be tested, and when and how testing should be performed. Participants Three cochairs without conflicts of interest were selected, one from each of the 3 sponsoring professional societies: College of American Pathologists, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, and Association for Molecular Pathology. Writing and advisory panels were constituted from additional experts from these societies. Evidence Three unbiased literature searches of electronic databases were performed to capture articles published published from January 2004 through February 2012, yielding 1533 articles whose abstracts were screened to identify 521 pertinent articles that were then reviewed in detail for their relevance to the recommendations. Evidence was formally graded for each recommendation. Consensus Process Initial recommendations were formulated by the cochairs and panel members at a public meeting. Each guideline section was assigned to at least 2 panelists. Drafts were circulated to the writing panel (version 1), advisory panel (version 2), and the public (version 3) before submission (version 4). Conclusions The 37 guideline items address 14 subjects, including 15 recommendations (evidence grade A/B). The major recommendations are to use testing for EGFR mutations and ALK fusions to guide patient selection for therapy with an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, respectively, in all patients with advanced-stage adenocarcinoma, regardless of sex, race, smoking history, or other clinical risk factors, and to prioritize EGFR and ALK testing over other molecular predictive tests. As scientific discoveries and clinical practice outpace the completion of randomized clinical trials, evidence-based guidelines developed

  5. New therapeutic strategies in neuroblastoma: combined targeting of a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor and liposomal siRNAs against ALK

    PubMed Central

    Di Paolo, Daniela; Yang, D.; Pastorino, Fabio; Emionite, Laura; Cilli, Michele; Daga, Antonio; Destefanis, Elisa; Di Fiore, Annarita; Piaggio, Francesca; Brignole, Chiara; Xu, Xiaobao; Liang, Chris; Gibbons, James

    2015-01-01

    Many different aberrations in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) were found to be oncogenic drivers in several cancers including neuroblastoma (NB), therefore ALK is now considered a critical player in NB oncogenesis and a promising therapeutic target. The ALK-inhibitor crizotinib has a limited activity against the various ALK mutations identified in NB patients. We tested: the activity of the novel ALK-inhibitor X-396 administered alone or in combination with Targeted Liposomes carrying ALK-siRNAs (TL[ALK-siRNA]) that are active irrespective of ALK gene mutational status; the pharmacokinetic profiles and the biodistribution of X-396; the efficacy of X-396 versus crizotinib treatment in NB xenografts; whether the combination of X-396 with the TL[ALK-siRNA] could promote long-term survival in NB mouse models. X-396 revealed good bioavailability, moderate half-life, high mean plasma and tumor concentrations. X-396 was more effective than crizotinib in inhibiting in vitro cell proliferation of NB cells and in reducing tumor volume in subcutaneous NB models in a dose-dependent manner. In orthotopic NB xenografts, X-396 significantly increased life span independently of the ALK mutation status. In combination studies, all effects were significantly improved in the mice treated with TL[ALK-siRNA] and X-396 compared to mice receiving the single agents. Our findings provide a rational basis to design innovative molecular-based treatment combinations for clinical application in ALK-driven NB tumors. PMID:26299615

  6. Overcoming resistance to first/second generation epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors and ALK inhibitors in oncogene-addicted advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Romanidou, Ourania; Landi, Lorenza; Cappuzzo, Federico; Califano, Raffaele

    2016-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activating mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represent the two oncogenic events with an impact on current clinical practice. EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and crizotinib are the standard of care for the treatment of EGFR mutant and ALK gene rearranged advanced NSCLC patients. Unfortunately, despite initial clinical benefit, acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs or crizotinib usually develops after an average of 10-12 months of treatment. The aim of this review is to describe the mechanisms of resistance to first/second generation EGFR-TKIs and crizotinib. In particular, we focus on strategies to overcome resistance due to secondary EGFR T790M mutation and mutations of the ALK domain. PMID:27239236

  7. Overcoming resistance to first/second generation epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors and ALK inhibitors in oncogene-addicted advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Romanidou, Ourania; Landi, Lorenza; Cappuzzo, Federico; Califano, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activating mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represent the two oncogenic events with an impact on current clinical practice. EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and crizotinib are the standard of care for the treatment of EGFR mutant and ALK gene rearranged advanced NSCLC patients. Unfortunately, despite initial clinical benefit, acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs or crizotinib usually develops after an average of 10–12 months of treatment. The aim of this review is to describe the mechanisms of resistance to first/second generation EGFR-TKIs and crizotinib. In particular, we focus on strategies to overcome resistance due to secondary EGFR T790M mutation and mutations of the ALK domain. PMID:27239236

  8. An orally available tyrosine kinase ALK and RET dual inhibitor bearing the tetracyclic benzo[b]carbazolone core.

    PubMed

    Song, Zilan; Xia, Zongjun; Ji, Yinchun; Xing, Li; Gao, Yinglei; Ai, Jing; Geng, Meiyu; Zhang, Ao

    2016-08-01

    Our early structure-activity relationship study has identified benzo[b]carbazolone 6 as a high potency orally bioavailable ALK inhibitor. Further lead profiling disclosed that 6 is active against both ALK resistant and hot spot-activating mutants, and is also highly potent against RET kinase. Tumor stasis and partial tumor regression were achieved with 6 in both NIH/3T3-EML4-ALK and NIH/3T3-EML4-ALK L1196M xenograft models. Based on the optimal in vitro and in vivo antitumor efficacy, compound 6 is now being profiled further in our preclinical settings as a new orally available ALK/RET dual inhibitor. PMID:27131066

  9. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Signaling in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Shirai, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangement in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene was identified as an oncogenic driver in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in 2007. A multi-targeted ALK/ROS1/MET inhibitor, crizotinib, targeting this activated tyrosine kinase has led to significant clinical benefit including tumor shrinkage and prolonged survival without disease progression and has been approved by US FDA since 2011 for the treatment of advanced ALK-rearranged NSCLC (Ou et al. Oncologist 17:1351-1375, 2012). Knowledge gained from treating ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients including the presenting clinicopathologic characteristics, methods of detecting ALK-rearranged NSCLC, pattern of relapse and acquired resistance mechanisms while on crizotinib, and the clinical activities of more potent ALK inhibitors has led us to a detailed and ever expanding knowledge of the ALK signaling pathway in lung cancer but also raising many more questions that remained to be answered in the future. This book chapter will provide a concise summary of the importance of ALK signaling pathway in lung cancer. Understanding the ALK signaling pathway in lung cancer will likely provide the roadmap to the management of major epithelial malignancies driven by receptor tyrosine kinase rearrangement. PMID:26667344

  10. A novel ALK secondary mutation and EGFR signaling cause resistance to ALK kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takaaki; Koivunen, Jussi; Ogino, Atsuko; Yanagita, Masahiko; Nikiforow, Sarah; Zheng, Wei; Lathan, Christopher; Marcoux, J. Paul; Du, Jinyan; Okuda, Katsuhiro; Capelletti, Marzia; Shimamura, Takeshi; Ercan, Dalia; Stumpfova, Magda; Xiao, Yun; Weremowicz, Stanislawa; Butaney, Mohit; Heon, Stephanie; Wilner, Keith; Christensen, James G.; Eck, Michel J.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Lindeman, Neal; Gray, Nathanael S.; Rodig, Scott J.; Jänne, Pasi A.

    2011-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), including crizotinib, are effective treatments in preclinical models and in cancer patients with ALK-translocated cancers. However, their efficacy will ultimately be limited by the development of acquired drug resistance. Here we report two mechanisms of ALK TKI resistance identified from, a crizotinib treated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient and in a cell line generated from the resistant tumor (DFCI076), and from studying a resistant version of the ALK TKI (TAE684) sensitive H3122 cell line. The crizotinib resistant DFCI076 cell line, harboured a unique L1152R ALK secondary mutation, and was also resistant to the structurally unrelated ALK TKI TAE684. Although the DFCI076 cell line was still partially dependent on ALK for survival, it also contained concurrent co-activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling. In contrast, the TAE684 resistant (TR3) H3122 cell line did not contain an ALK secondary mutation but instead harboured co-activation of EGFR signalling. Dual inhibition of both ALK and EGFR was the most effective therapeutic strategy for the DFCI076 and H3122 TR3 cell lines. We further identified a subset (3/50; 6%) of treatment naïve NSCLC patients with ALK rearrangements that also had concurrent EGFR activating mutations. Our studies identify resistance mechanisms to ALK TKIs mediated by both ALK and by a bypass signalling pathway mediated by EGFR. These mechanisms can occur independently, or in the same cancer, suggesting that the combination of both ALK and EGFR inhibitors may represent an effective therapy for these subsets of NSCLC patients. PMID:21791641

  11. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mirshafiey, Abbas; Ghalamfarsa, Ghasem; Asghari, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are essential components of signal transduction pathways that mediate cell-to-cell communication and their function as relay points for signaling pathways. They have a key role in numerous processes that control cellular proliferation and differentiation, regulate cell growth and cellular metabolism, and promote cell survival and apoptosis. Recently, the role of RTKs including TCR, FLT-3, c-Kit, c-Fms, PDGFR, ephrin, neurotrophin receptor, and TAM receptor in autoimmune disorder, especially rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis has been suggested. In multiple sclerosis pathogenesis, RTKs and their tyrosine kinase enzymes are selective important targets for tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) agents. TKIs, compete with the ATP binding site of the catalytic domain of several tyrosine kinases, and act as small molecules that have a favorable safety profile in disease treatment. Up to now, the efficacy of TKIs in numerous animal models of MS has been demonstrated, but application of these drugs in human diseases should be tested in future clinical trials. PMID:25337443

  12. The neuroblastoma associated F1174L ALK mutation causes resistance to an ALK kinase inhibitor in ALK translocated cancers

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takaaki; Okuda, Katsuhiro; Zheng, Wei; Butrynski, James; Capelletti, Marzia; Wang, Liping; Gray, Nathanael S.; Wilner, Keith; Christensen, James G.; Demetri, George; Shapiro, Geoffrey I.; Rodig, Scott J.; Eck, Michael J.; Jänne, Pasi A.

    2011-01-01

    The ALK kinase inhibitor crizotinib (PF-02341066) is clinically effective in patients with ALK-translocated cancers, but its efficacy will ultimately be limited by acquired drug resistance. Here we report the identification of a secondary mutation in ALK, F1174L, as one cause of crizotinib resistance in a patient with an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) harbouring a RANBP2-ALK translocation who progressed while crizotinib therapy. When present in cis with an ALK translocation, this mutation (also detected in neuroblastomas) causes an increase in ALK phosphorylation, cell growth and downstream signaling. Furthermore, the F1174L mutation inhibits crizotinib mediated downregulation of ALK signaling and blocks apoptosis in RANBP2-ALK Ba/F3 cells. A chemically distinct ALK inhibitor, TAE684, or the HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG are both effective in models harbouring the F1174L ALK mutation. Our findings highlight the importance of studying drug resistance mechanisms in order to develop effective clinical treatments for patients with ALK-translocated cancers. PMID:21030459

  13. EML4-ALK fusion gene and efficacy of an ALK kinase inhibitor in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koivunen, Jussi P.; Mermel, Craig; Zejnullahu, Kreshnik; Murphy, Carly; Lifshits, Eugene; Holmes, Alison J.; Choi, Hwan Geun; Kim, Jhingook; Chiang, Derek; Thomas, Roman; Lee, Jinseon; Richards, William G.; Sugarbaker, David J.; Ducko, Christopher; Lindeman, Neal; Marcoux, J. Paul; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Gray, Nathanael S.; Lee, Charles; Meyerson, Matthew; Jänne, Pasi A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The EML4-ALK fusion gene has been detected in ~7% of Japanese non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). We determined the frequency of EML4-ALK in Caucasian NSCLCs and in NSCLC cell lines. We also determined whether TAE684, a specific ALK kinase inhibitor, would inhibit the growth of EML4-ALK containing cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design We screened 305 primary NSCLCs (both US (n=138) and Korean (n=167) patients) and 83 NSCLC cell lines using RT-PCR and by exon array analyses. We evaluated the efficacy of TAE684 against NSCLC cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Results We detected 4 different variants, including two novel variants, of EML4-ALK using RT-PCR in 8/305 tumors (3%) and in 3/83 (3.6%) NSCLC cell lines. All EML4-ALK containing tumors and cell lines were adenocarcinomas. EML4-ALK was detected more frequently in NSCLC patients who were never or light (< 10 pack years) cigarette smokers compared to current/former smokers (6% vs. 1%; p=0.049). TAE684 inhibited the growth of 1 of 3 (H3122) EML4-ALK containing cell lines in vitro and in vivo, inhibited Akt phosphorylation and caused apoptosis. In another EML4-ALK cell line, DFCI032, TAE684 was ineffective due to co-activation of EGFR and ERBB2. The combination of TAE684 and CL-387,785 (EGFR/ERBB2 kinase inhibitor), inhibited growth and Akt phosphorylation and led to apoptosis in the DFCI032 cell line. Conclusions EML4-ALK is found in the minority of NSCLCs. ALK kinase inhibitors alone or in combination may nevertheless be clinically effective treatments for NSCLC patients whose tumors contain EML4-ALK. PMID:18594010

  14. Phosphoproteomic analysis of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) downstream signaling pathways identifies signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 as a functional target of activated ALK in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sattu, Kamaraj; Hochgräfe, Falko; Wu, Jianmin; Umapathy, Ganesh; Schönherr, Christina; Ruuth, Kristina; Chand, Damini; Witek, Barbara; Fuchs, James; Li, Pui-Kai; Hugosson, Fredrik; Daly, Roger J; Palmer, Ruth H; Hallberg, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) receptor tyrosine kinase is a key oncogenic mechanism in a growing number of tumor types. In the majority of cases, ALK is activated by fusion with a dimerizing partner protein as a result of chromosomal translocation events, most studied in the case of the nucleophosmin–ALK and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4–ALK oncoproteins. It is now also appreciated that the full-length ALK receptor can be activated by point mutations and by deletions within the extracellular domain, such as those observed in neuroblastoma. Several studies have employed phosphoproteomics approaches to find substrates of ALK fusion proteins. In this study, we used MS-based phosphotyrosine profiling to characterize phosphotyrosine signaling events associated with the full-length ALK receptor. A number of previously identified and novel targets were identified. One of these, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), has previously been observed to be activated in response to oncogenic ALK signaling, but the significance of this in signaling from the full-length ALK receptor has not been explored further. We show here that activated ALK robustly activates STAT3 on Tyr705 in a number of independent neuroblastoma cell lines. Furthermore, knockdown of STAT3 by RNA interference resulted in a reduction in myelocytomatosis neuroblastom (MYCN) protein levels downstream of ALK signaling. These observations, together with a decreased level of MYCN and inhibition of neuroblastoma cell growth in the presence of STAT3 inhibitors, suggest that activation of STAT3 is important for ALK signaling activity in neuroblastoma. PMID:23889739

  15. Alectinib: a novel second generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor for overcoming clinically-acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zilan; Wang, Meining; Zhang, Ao

    2015-01-01

    The development of inhibitors for the tyrosine anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has advanced rapidly, driven by biology and medicinal chemistry. The first generation ALK inhibitor crizotinib was granted US FDA approval with only four years of preclinical and clinical testing. Although this drug offers significant clinical benefit to the ALK-positive patients, resistance has been developed through a variety of mechanisms. In addition to ceritinib, alectinib is another second-generation ALK inhibitor launched in 2014 in Japan. This drug has a unique chemical structure bearing a 5H-benzo[b]carbazol-11(6H)-one structural scaffold with an IC50 value of 1.9 nmol/L, and is highly potent against ALK bearing the gatekeeper mutation L1196M with an IC50 of 1.56 nmol/L. In the clinic, alectinib is highly efficacious in treatment of ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and retains potency to combat crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations L1196M, F1174L, R1275Q and C1156Y. PMID:26579422

  16. NPM-ALK mediates phosphorylation of MSH2 at tyrosine 238, creating a functional deficiency in MSH2 and the loss of mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Bone, K M; Wang, P; Wu, F; Wu, C; Li, L; Bacani, J T; Andrew, S E; Lai, R

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALK+ALCL) tumors express the characteristic oncogenic fusion protein NPM-ALK, which mediates tumorigenesis by exerting its constitutive tyrosine kinase activity on various substrates. We recently identified MSH2, a protein central to DNA mismatch repair (MMR), as a novel binding partner and phosphorylation substrate of NPM-ALK. Here, using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, we report for the first time that MSH2 is phosphorylated by NPM-ALK at a specific residue, tyrosine 238. Using GP293 cells transfected with NPM-ALK, we confirmed that the MSH2Y238F mutant is not tyrosine phosphorylated. Furthermore, transfection of MSH2Y238F into these cells substantially decreased the tyrosine phosphorylation of endogenous MSH2. Importantly, gene transfection of MSH2Y238F abrogated the binding of NPM-ALK with endogenous MSH2, re-established the dimerization of MSH2:MSH6 and restored the sensitivity to DNA mismatch-inducing drugs, indicative of MMR return. Parallel findings were observed in two ALK+ALCL cell lines, Karpas 299 and SUP-M2. In addition, we found that enforced expression of MSH2Y238F into ALK+ALCL cells alone was sufficient to induce spontaneous apoptosis. In conclusion, our findings have identified NPM-ALK-induced phosphorylation of MSH2 at Y238 as a crucial event in suppressing MMR. Our studies have provided novel insights into the mechanism by which oncogenic tyrosine kinases disrupt MMR. PMID:25978431

  17. Functional Characterization of the Kinase Activation Loop in Nucleophosmin (NPM)-Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Using Tandem Affinity Purification and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Wu, Fang; Ma, Yupo; Li, Liang; Lai, Raymond; Young, Leah C.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the kinase activation loop (KAL) of the oncogenic fusion protein NPM-ALK regulates its overall tyrosine phosphorylation status and tumorigenicity. Using tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, we assessed how the KAL of NPM-ALK regulates the phosphorylation status of its individual tyrosines. Using the lysates of GP293 cells transfected with NPM-ALK, our highly reproducible results showed evidence of phosphorylation in all 3 tyrosines in KAL and 8 tyrosines outside KAL. We created 7 KAL mutants, each of which carried a Tyr-to-Phe mutation of ≥1 of the 3 tyrosines in KAL. A complete loss of the 8 phosphotyrosines outside KAL was found in 3 KAL mutants, and their oncogenicity (assessed by cell viability, colony formation, and the ability to phosphorylate effector proteins) was abrogated. A partial loss of the 8 phosphotyrosines was found in 4 KAL mutants, but their oncogenicity did not show simple correlation with the number of residual phosphotyrosines. Tyr-to-Phe mutations of each of the 8 phosphotyrosines outside KAL did not result in a significant decrease in the oncogenicity. In conclusion, we have provided details of how the KAL in NPM-ALK regulates its tyrosine phosphorylation pattern. Our results challenge some of the current concepts regarding the relationship between the tyrosine phosphorylation and oncogenicity of NPM-ALK. PMID:19887368

  18. Discovering the first tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Tony

    2015-01-01

    In the middle of the 20th century, animal tumor viruses were heralded as possible models for understanding human cancer. By the mid-1970s, the molecular basis by which tumor viruses transform cells into a malignant state was beginning to emerge as the first viral genomic sequences were reported and the proteins encoded by their transforming genes were identified and characterized. This was a time of great excitement and rapid progress. In 1978, prompted by the discovery from Ray Erikson’s group that the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) v-Src–transforming protein had an associated protein kinase activity specific for threonine, my group at the Salk Institute set out to determine whether the polyomavirus middle T-transforming protein had a similar kinase activity. Here, I describe the experiments that led to the identification of a kinase activity associated with middle T antigen and our serendipitous discovery that this activity was specific for tyrosine in vitro, and how this in turn led to the fortuitous observation that the v-Src–associated kinase activity was also specific for tyrosine. Our finding that v-Src increased the level of phosphotyrosine in cellular proteins in RSV-transformed cells confirmed that v-Src is a tyrosine kinase and transforms cells by phosphorylating proteins on tyrosine. My colleague Bart Sefton and I reported these findings in the March issue of PNAS in 1980. Remarkably, all of the experiments in this paper were accomplished in less than one month. PMID:26130799

  19. A Rare Case of Pleomorphic Carcinoma of the Lung Harboring an Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Shiroyama, Takayuki; Tanaka, Ayako; Tamiya, Motohiro; Hamaguchi, Masanari; Osa, Akio; Takeoka, Sawa; Tani, Eriko; Azuma, Yuichiro; Morishita, Naoko; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Okamoto, Norio; Kimura, Kenji; Kadota, Yoshihisa; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Hirashima, Tomonori; Kawase, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Molecular testing for anomalies, such as epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement, is part of the current standard of care for non-small cell lung cancer, particularly adenocarcinoma. ALK rearrangement occurs most frequently in adenocarcinoma cells and rarely in non-adenocarcinoma cells. We herein report a rare case of pleomorphic lung carcinoma with ALK rearrangement in both its adenocarcinoma and spindle cell components. This case suggests the possibility of ALK rearrangement in pleomorphic carcinoma. PMID:26521903

  20. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  1. Tyrosine kinase gene rearrangements in epithelial malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Alice T.; Hsu, Peggy P.; Awad, Mark M.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements that lead to oncogenic kinase activation are observed in many epithelial cancers. These cancers express activated fusion kinases that drive the initiation and progression of malignancy, and often have a considerable response to small-molecule kinase inhibitors, which validates these fusion kinases as ‘druggable’ targets. In this Review, we examine the aetiologic, pathogenic and clinical features that are associated with cancers harbouring oncogenic fusion kinases, including anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), ROS1 and RET. We discuss the clinical outcomes with targeted therapies and explore strategies to discover additional kinases that are activated by chromosomal rearrangements in solid tumours. PMID:24132104

  2. The role of the ALK receptor in cancer biology.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, B; Palmer, R H

    2016-09-01

    A vast array of oncogenic variants has been identified for anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). Therefore, there is a need to better understand the role of ALK in cancer biology in order to optimise treatment strategies. This review summarises the latest research on the receptor tyrosine kinase ALK, and how this information can guide the management of patients with cancer that is ALK-positive. A variety of ALK gene alterations have been described across a range of tumour types, including point mutations, deletions and rearrangements. A wide variety of ALK fusions, in which the kinase domain of ALK and the amino-terminal portion of various protein partners are fused, occur in cancer, with echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK being the most prevalent in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Different ALK fusion proteins can mediate different signalling outputs, depending on properties such as subcellular localisation and protein stability. The ALK fusions found in tumours lack spatial and temporal regulation, which can also affect dimerisation and substrate specificity. Two ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), crizotinib and ceritinib, are currently approved in Europe for use in ALK-positive NSCLC and several others are in development. These ALK TKIs bind slightly differently within the ATP-binding pocket of the ALK kinase domain and are associated with the emergence of different resistance mutation patterns during therapy. This emphasises the need to tailor the sequence of ALK TKIs according to the ALK signature of each patient. Research into the oncogenic functions of ALK, and fast paced development of ALK inhibitors, has substantially improved outcomes for patients with ALK-positive NSCLC. Limited data are available surrounding the physiological ligand-stimulated activation of ALK signalling and further research is needed. Understanding the role of ALK in tumour biology is key to further optimising therapeutic strategies for ALK

  3. Rearranged Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Gene in Adult-Onset Papillary Thyroid Cancer Amongst Atomic Bomb Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Mayumi; Takahashi, Keiko; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakachi, Kei; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously noted that among atomic bomb survivors (ABS), the relative frequency of cases of adult papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) with chromosomal rearrangements (mainly RET/PTC) was significantly greater in those with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. In contrast, the frequency of PTC cases with point mutations (mainly BRAFV600E) was significantly lower in patients with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. We also found that among ABS, the frequency of PTC cases with no detectable gene alterations in RET, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1 (NTRK1), BRAF, or RAS was significantly higher in patients with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. However, in ABS with PTC, the relationship between the presence of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fused with other gene partners and radiation exposure has received little study. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the relative frequency of rearranged ALK in ABS with PTC, and with no detectable gene alterations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF, or RAS, would be greater in those having relatively higher radiation exposures. Methods The 105 subjects in the study were drawn from the Life Span Study cohort of ABS of Hiroshima and Nagasaki who were diagnosed with PTC between 1956 and 1993. Seventy-nine were exposed (>0 mGy), and 26 were not exposed to A-bomb radiation. In the 25 ABS with PTC, and with no detectable gene alterations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF, or RAS, we examined archival, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded PTC specimens for rearrangement of ALK using reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5′ RACE). Results We found rearranged ALK in 10 of 19 radiation-exposed PTC cases, but none among 6 patients with PTC with no radiation exposure. In addition, solid/trabecular-like architecture in PTC was closely associated with ALK

  4. Ocular Toxicity of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mary Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To review common tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as their ocular side effects and management. Data Sources A comprehensive literature search was conducted using cINahl®, Pubmed, and cochrane databases for articles published since 2004 with the following search terms: ocular toxicities, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, ophthalmology, adverse events, eye, and vision. Data Synthesis Tyrosine kinase inhibitors can cause significant eye toxicity. Conclusions Given the prevalence of new tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapies and the complexity of possible pathogenesis of ocular pathology, oncology nurses can appreciate the occurrence of ocular toxicities and the role of nursing in the management of these problems. Implications for Nursing Knowledge of the risk factors and etiology of ocular toxicity of targeted cancer therapies can guide nursing assessment, enhance patient education, and improve care management. Including a review of eye symptoms and vision issues in nursing assessment can enhance early detection and treatment of ocular toxicity. PMID:26906134

  5. Activity-based kinase profiling of approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Daisuke; Yokota, Koichi; Gouda, Masaki; Narumi, Yugo; Ohmoto, Hiroshi; Nishiwaki, Eiji; Akita, Kensaku; Kirii, Yasuyuki

    2013-02-01

    The specificities of nine approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors (imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, gefitinib, erlotinib, lapatinib, sorafenib, sunitinib, and pazopanib) were determined by activity-based kinase profiling using a large panel of human recombinant active kinases. This panel consisted of 79 tyrosine kinases, 199 serine/threonine kinases, three lipid kinases, and 29 disease-relevant mutant kinases. Many potential targets of each inhibitor were identified by kinase profiling at the K(m) for ATP. In addition, profiling at a physiological ATP concentration (1 mm) was carried out, and the IC(50) values of the inhibitors against each kinase were compared with the estimated plasma-free concentration (calculated from published pharmacokinetic parameters of plasma C(trough) and C(max) values). This analysis revealed that the approved kinase inhibitors were well optimized for their target kinases. This profiling also implicates activity at particular off-target kinases in drug side effects. Thus, large-scale kinase profiling at both K(m) and physiological ATP concentrations could be useful in characterizing the targets and off-targets of kinase inhibitors. PMID:23279183

  6. Cell signaling by receptor-tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lemmon, Mark A.; Schlessinger, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Recent structural studies of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) have revealed unexpected diversity in the mechanisms of their activation by growth factor ligands. Strategies for inducing dimerization by ligand binding are surprisingly diverse, as are mechanisms that couple this event to activation of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domains. As our understanding of these details becomes increasingly sophisticated, it provides an important context for therapeutically countering the effects of pathogenic RTK mutations in cancer and other diseases. Much remains to be learned, however, about the complex signaling networks downstream from RTKs and how alterations in these networks are translated into cellular responses. PMID:20602996

  7. ALK-rearrangements and testing methods in non-small cell lung cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, Rodney E.; Vora, Moiz; Mayhall, Kim; Cotelingam, James

    2014-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma tyrosine kinase (ALK) gene was first described as a driver mutation in anaplastic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Dysregulated ALK expression is now an identified driver mutation in nearly twenty different human malignancies, including 4-9% of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). The tyrosine kinase inhibitor crizotinib is more effective than standard chemotherapeutic agents in treating ALK positive NSCLC, making molecular diagnostic testing for dysregulated ALK expression a necessary step in identifying optimal treatment modalities. Here we review ALKmediated signal transduction pathways and compare the molecular protocols used to identify dysregulated ALK expression in NSCLC. We also discuss the use of crizotinib and second generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of ALK positive NSCLC, and the known mechanisms of crizotinib resistance in NSCLC. PMID:24955213

  8. Detection of novel and potentially actionable anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement in colorectal adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry screening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Kim, Sun Young; Jang, Jiryeon; Kim, Seung Tae; Park, Joon Oh; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Young Suk; Lee, Jiyun; Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Yoon Ah; Huh, Jung Wook; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Do, In-Gu; Kim, Seok Hyung; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Stephens, Philip J.; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Li, Gang Gary; Hornby, Zachary; Ali, Siraj M.; Miller, Vincent A.; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement has been detected in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) using advanced molecular diagnostics tests including exon scanning, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and next generation sequencing (NGS). We investigated if immunohistochemistry (IHC) can be used to detect ALK rearrangement in gastrointestinal malignancies. Experimental designs Tissue microarrays (TMAs) from consecutive gastric carcinoma (GC) and CRC patients who underwent surgical resection at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea were screened by IHC using ALK monoclonal antibody 5A4. IHC positive cases were confirmed by FISH, nCounter assays, and NGS-based comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP). ALK IHC was further applied to CRC patients enrolled in a pathway-directed therapeutic trial. Results Four hundred thirty-two GC and 172 CRC cases were screened by IHC. No GC sample was ALK IHC positive. One CRC (0.6%) was ALK IHC positive (3+) that was confirmed by ALK FISH and a novel CAD-ALK (C35; A20) fusion variant that resulted from a paracentric inversion event inv(2)(p22–21p23) was identified by CGP. One out of 50 CRC patients enrolled in a pathway-directed therapeutic trial was ALK IHC positive (3+) confirmed by ALK FISH and found to harbor the EML4-ALK (E21, A20) fusion variant by CGP. Growth of a tumor cell line derived from this EML4-ALK CRC patient was inhibited by ALK inhibitors crizotinib and entrectinib. Conclusions ALK IHC is a viable screening strategy for identifying ALK rearrangement in CRC. ALK rearrangement is a potential actionable driver mutation in CRC based on survival inhibition of patient tumor-derived cell line by potent ALK inhibitors. PMID:26172300

  9. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases with Intracellular Pseudokinase Domains

    PubMed Central

    Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Shi, Fumin; Park, Jin H.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    As with other groups of protein kinases, approximately 10% of the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) in the human proteome contain intracellular pseudokinases that lack one or more conserved catalytically important residues. These include ErbB3, a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family, and a series of unconventional Wnt receptors. We recently showed that, despite its reputation as a pseudokinase, the ErbB3 tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) does retain significant – albeit weak – kinase activity. This led us to suggest that a subgroup of RTKs may be able to signal even with very inefficient kinases. Recent work suggests that this is not the case, however. Other pseudokinase RTKs have not revealed significant kinase activity, and mutations that impair ErbB3’s weak kinase activity have not so far been found to exhibit signaling defects. These findings therefore point to models in which the TKDs of pseudokinase RTKs participate in receptor signaling by allosterically regulating associated kinases (such as ErbB3 regulation of ErbB2) and/or function as regulated ‘scaffolds’ for other intermolecular interactions central to signal propagation. Further structural and functional studies – particularly of the pseudokinase RTKs involved in Wnt signaling – are required to shed new light on these intriguing signaling mechanisms. PMID:23863174

  10. New treatment options for ALK+ advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: critical appraisal of ceritinib

    PubMed Central

    Rothschild, Sacha I

    2016-01-01

    Rearrangements in ALK gene and EML4 gene were first described in 2007. This genomic aberration is found in about 2%–8% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Crizotinib was the first ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor licensed for the treatment of metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC based on a randomized Phase III trial. Despite the initial treatment response of crizotinib, disease progression inevitably develops after approximately 10 months of therapy. Different resistance mechanisms have recently been described. One relevant mechanism of resistance is the development of mutations in ALK. Novel ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been developed to overcome these mutations. Ceritinib is an oral second-generation ALK inhibitor showing clinical activity not only in crizotinib-resistant ALK-positive NSCLC but also in treatment-naïve ALK-positive disease. In this paper, preclinical and clinical data of ceritinib are reviewed, and its role in the clinical setting is put into perspective. PMID:27217763

  11. Discovery of Clinical Candidate CEP-37440, a Selective Inhibitor of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK).

    PubMed

    Ott, Gregory R; Cheng, Mangeng; Learn, Keith S; Wagner, Jason; Gingrich, Diane E; Lisko, Joseph G; Curry, Matthew; Mesaros, Eugen F; Ghose, Arup K; Quail, Matthew R; Wan, Weihua; Lu, Lihui; Dobrzanski, Pawel; Albom, Mark S; Angeles, Thelma S; Wells-Knecht, Kevin; Huang, Zeqi; Aimone, Lisa D; Bruckheimer, Elizabeth; Anderson, Nathan; Friedman, Jay; Fernandez, Sandra V; Ator, Mark A; Ruggeri, Bruce A; Dorsey, Bruce D

    2016-08-25

    Analogues structurally related to anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor 1 were optimized for metabolic stability. The results from this endeavor not only led to improved metabolic stability, pharmacokinetic parameters, and in vitro activity against clinically derived resistance mutations but also led to the incorporation of activity for focal adhesion kinase (FAK). FAK activation, via amplification and/or overexpression, is characteristic of multiple invasive solid tumors and metastasis. The discovery of the clinical stage, dual FAK/ALK inhibitor 27b, including details surrounding SAR, in vitro/in vivo pharmacology, and pharmacokinetics, is reported herein. PMID:27527804

  12. Targeting tumour vasculature by inhibiting activin receptor-like kinase (ALK)1 function.

    PubMed

    de Vinuesa, Amaya García; Bocci, Matteo; Pietras, Kristian; Ten Dijke, Peter

    2016-08-15

    Angiogenesis is a hallmark of cancer and is now a validated therapeutic target in the clinical setting. Despite the initial success, anti-angiogenic compounds impinging on the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway display limited survival benefits in patients and resistance often develops due to activation of alternative pathways. Thus, finding and validating new targets is highly warranted. Activin receptor-like kinase (ALK)1 is a transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) type I receptor predominantly expressed in actively proliferating endothelial cells (ECs). ALK1 has been shown to play a pivotal role in regulating angiogenesis by binding to bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)9 and 10. Two main pharmacological inhibitors, an ALK1-Fc fusion protein (Dalantercept/ACE-041) and a fully human antibody against the extracellular domain of ALK1 (PF-03446962) are currently under clinical development. Herein, we briefly recapitulate the role of ALK1 in blood vessel formation and the current status of the preclinical and clinical studies on inhibition of ALK1 signalling as an anti-angiogenic strategy. Future directions in terms of new combination regimens will also be presented. PMID:27528762

  13. Conservation and early expression of zebrafish tyrosine kinases support the utility of zebrafish as a model for tyrosine kinase biology.

    PubMed

    Challa, Anil Kumar; Chatti, Kiranam

    2013-09-01

    Tyrosine kinases have significant roles in cell growth, apoptosis, development, and disease. To explore the use of zebrafish as a vertebrate model for tyrosine kinase signaling and to better understand their roles, we have identified all of the tyrosine kinases encoded in the zebrafish genome and quantified RNA expression of selected tyrosine kinases during early development. Using profile hidden Markov model analysis, we identified 122 zebrafish tyrosine kinase genes and proposed unambiguous gene names where needed. We found them to be organized into 39 nonreceptor and 83 receptor type, and 30 families consistent with human tyrosine kinase family assignments. We found five human tyrosine kinase genes (epha1, bmx, fgr, srm, and insrr) with no identifiable zebrafish ortholog, and one zebrafish gene (yrk) with no identifiable human ortholog. We also found that receptor tyrosine kinase genes were duplicated more often than nonreceptor tyrosine kinase genes in zebrafish. We profiled expression levels of 30 tyrosine kinases representing all families using direct digital detection at different stages during the first 24 hours of development. The profiling experiments clearly indicate regulated expression of tyrosine kinases in the zebrafish, suggesting their role during early embryonic development. In summary, our study has resulted in the first comprehensive description of the zebrafish tyrosine kinome. PMID:23234507

  14. Conservation and Early Expression of Zebrafish Tyrosine Kinases Support the Utility of Zebrafish as a Model for Tyrosine Kinase Biology

    PubMed Central

    Challa, Anil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Tyrosine kinases have significant roles in cell growth, apoptosis, development, and disease. To explore the use of zebrafish as a vertebrate model for tyrosine kinase signaling and to better understand their roles, we have identified all of the tyrosine kinases encoded in the zebrafish genome and quantified RNA expression of selected tyrosine kinases during early development. Using profile hidden Markov model analysis, we identified 122 zebrafish tyrosine kinase genes and proposed unambiguous gene names where needed. We found them to be organized into 39 nonreceptor and 83 receptor type, and 30 families consistent with human tyrosine kinase family assignments. We found five human tyrosine kinase genes (epha1, bmx, fgr, srm, and insrr) with no identifiable zebrafish ortholog, and one zebrafish gene (yrk) with no identifiable human ortholog. We also found that receptor tyrosine kinase genes were duplicated more often than nonreceptor tyrosine kinase genes in zebrafish. We profiled expression levels of 30 tyrosine kinases representing all families using direct digital detection at different stages during the first 24 hours of development. The profiling experiments clearly indicate regulated expression of tyrosine kinases in the zebrafish, suggesting their role during early embryonic development. In summary, our study has resulted in the first comprehensive description of the zebrafish tyrosine kinome. PMID:23234507

  15. Tyrosine kinase BMX phosphorylates phosphotyrosine-primed motif mediating the activation of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sen; Jiang, Xinnong; Gewinner, Christina A; Asara, John M; Simon, Nicholas I; Cai, Changmeng; Cantley, Lewis C; Balk, Steven P

    2013-05-28

    The nonreceptor tyrosine kinase BMX (bone marrow tyrosine kinase gene on chromosome X) is abundant in various cell types and activated downstream of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) and the kinase Src, but its substrates are unknown. Positional scanning peptide library screening revealed a marked preference for a priming phosphorylated tyrosine (pY) in the -1 position, indicating that BMX substrates may include multiple tyrosine kinases that are fully activated by pYpY sites in the kinase domain. BMX phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr⁵⁷⁷ subsequent to its Src-mediated phosphorylation at Tyr⁵⁷⁶. Loss of BMX by RNA interference or by genetic deletion in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) markedly impaired FAK activity. Phosphorylation of the insulin receptor in the kinase domain at Tyr¹¹⁸⁹ and Tyr¹¹⁹⁰, as well as Tyr¹¹⁸⁵, and downstream phosphorylation of the kinase AKT at Thr³⁰⁸ were similarly impaired by BMX deficiency. However, insulin-induced phosphorylation of AKT at Ser⁴⁷³ was not impaired in Bmx knockout MEFs or liver tissue from Bmx knockout mice, which also showed increased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, possibly because of decreased abundance of the phosphatase PHLPP (PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase). Thus, by identifying the pYpY motif as a substrate for BMX, our findings suggest that BMX functions as a central regulator among multiple signaling pathways mediated by tyrosine kinases. PMID:23716717

  16. Structure Based Drug Design of Crizotinib (PF-02341066), a Potent and Selective Dual Inhibitor of Mesenchymal-Epithelial Transition Factor (c-MET) Kinase and Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK)

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, J Jean; Tran-Dube,; #769; Michelle,; Shen, Hong; Nambu, Mitchell; Kung, Pei-Pei; Pairish, Mason; Jia, Lei; Meng, Jerry; Funk, Lee; Botrous, Iriny; McTigue, Michele; Grodsky, Neil; Ryan, Kevin; Padrique, Ellen; Alton, Gordon; Timofeevski, Sergei; Yamazaki, Shinji; Li, Qiuhua; Zou, Helen; Christensen, James; Mroczkowski, Barbara; Bender, Steve; Kania, Robert S; Edwards, Martin P

    2011-08-03

    Because of the critical roles of aberrant signaling in cancer, both c-MET and ALK receptor tyrosine kinases are attractive oncology targets for therapeutic intervention. The cocrystal structure of 3 (PHA-665752), bound to c-MET kinase domain, revealed a novel ATP site environment, which served as the target to guide parallel, multiattribute drug design. A novel 2-amino-5-aryl-3-benzyloxypyridine series was created to more effectively make the key interactions achieved with 3. In the novel series, the 2-aminopyridine core allowed a 3-benzyloxy group to reach into the same pocket as the 2,6-dichlorophenyl group of 3 via a more direct vector and thus with a better ligand efficiency (LE). Further optimization of the lead series generated the clinical candidate crizotinib (PF-02341066), which demonstrated potent in vitro and in vivo c-MET kinase and ALK inhibition, effective tumor growth inhibition, and good pharmaceutical properties.

  17. Mechanisms of Acquired Resistance to ALK Inhibitors and the Rationale for Treating ALK-positive Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Isozaki, Hideko; Takigawa, Nagio; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of an echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene led to improved clinical outcomes in patients with lung cancer after the development of the first ALK-targeting agent, crizotinib. Some second-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which might be more potent than crizotinib or effective on crizotinib-resistant patients, have been developed. Although these ALK-TKIs show an excellent response initially, most patients eventually acquire resistance. Therefore, careful consideration of the resistance mechanisms might lead to superior therapeutic strategies. Here, we summarize the history of ALK-TKIs and their underlying resistance mechanisms in both the preclinical and clinical settings. In addition, we discuss potential future treatment strategies in ALK-TKI-naïve and -resistant patients with lung cancer harboring the EML4-ALK fusion gene. PMID:25941796

  18. Mechanisms of Acquired Resistance to ALK Inhibitors and the Rationale for Treating ALK-positive Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Isozaki, Hideko; Takigawa, Nagio; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of an echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene led to improved clinical outcomes in patients with lung cancer after the development of the first ALK-targeting agent, crizotinib. Some second-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which might be more potent than crizotinib or effective on crizotinib-resistant patients, have been developed. Although these ALK-TKIs show an excellent response initially, most patients eventually acquire resistance. Therefore, careful consideration of the resistance mechanisms might lead to superior therapeutic strategies. Here, we summarize the history of ALK-TKIs and their underlying resistance mechanisms in both the preclinical and clinical settings. In addition, we discuss potential future treatment strategies in ALK-TKI-naïve and -resistant patients with lung cancer harboring the EML4-ALK fusion gene. PMID:25941796

  19. Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) suppresses osteoblastic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Ebina, Kosuke; Shi, Kenrin; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Otsuki, Dai; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Higuchi, Chikahisa

    2015-09-01

    The Tec family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases has been shown to play a key role in inflammation and bone destruction. Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) has been the most widely studied because of its critical role in B cells. Furthermore, recent evidence has demonstrated that blocking Btk signaling is effective in ameliorating lymphoma progression and experimental arthritis. The role of Btk in osteoblastic differentiation has not been well elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated the role of Btk in osteoblastic differentiation and investigated the effects of a Btk inhibitor on osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells, primary calvarial osteoblasts, and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. Btk expression was detected in all three cell lines. Btk inhibition stimulated mRNA expression of osteoblastic markers (alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and osterix) and promoted mineralization of the extracellular matrix. In addition, Btk knockdown caused increased mRNA expression of osteoblastic markers. Furthermore, Btk inhibition suppressed the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), and protein kinase Cα (PKCα). Our results indicate that Btk may regulate osteoblastic differentiation through the MAPK, NFκB, and PKCα signaling pathways. PMID:25230818

  20. Activin Receptor-Like Kinase Receptors ALK5 and ALK1 Are Both Required for TGFβ-Induced Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Kroon, Laurie M. G.; Narcisi, Roberto; Blaney Davidson, Esmeralda N.; Cleary, Mairéad A.; van Beuningen, Henk M.; Koevoet, Wendy J. L. M.; van Osch, Gerjo J. V. M.; van der Kraan, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are promising for cartilage regeneration because BMSCs can differentiate into cartilage tissue-producing chondrocytes. Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβ) is crucial for inducing chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs and is known to signal via Activin receptor-Like Kinase (ALK) receptors ALK5 and ALK1. Since the specific role of these two TGFβ receptors in chondrogenesis is unknown, we investigated whether ALK5 and ALK1 are expressed in BMSCs and whether both receptors are required for chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs. Materials & Methods ALK5 and ALK1 gene expression in human BMSCs was determined with RT-qPCR. To induce chondrogenesis, human BMSCs were pellet-cultured in serum-free chondrogenic medium containing TGFβ1. Chondrogenesis was evaluated by aggrecan and collagen type IIα1 RT-qPCR analysis, and histological stainings of proteoglycans and collagen type II. To overexpress constitutively active (ca) receptors, BMSCs were transduced either with caALK5 or caALK1. Expression of ALK5 and ALK1 was downregulated by transducing BMSCs with shRNA against ALK5 or ALK1. Results ALK5 and ALK1 were expressed in in vitro-expanded as well as in pellet-cultured BMSCs from five donors, but mRNA levels of both TGFβ receptors did not clearly associate with chondrogenic induction. TGFβ increased ALK5 and decreased ALK1 gene expression in chondrogenically differentiating BMSC pellets. Neither caALK5 nor caALK1 overexpression induced cartilage matrix formation as efficient as that induced by TGFβ. Moreover, short hairpin-mediated downregulation of either ALK5 or ALK1 resulted in a strong inhibition of TGFβ-induced chondrogenesis. Conclusion ALK5 as well as ALK1 are required for TGFβ-induced chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs, and TGFβ not only directly induces chondrogenesis, but also modulates ALK5 and ALK1 receptor signaling in BMSCs. These results imply that optimizing cartilage formation by

  1. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition: An Approach to Drug Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitzki, Alexander; Gazit, Aviv

    1995-03-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) regulate cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and signaling processes in the cells of the immune system. Uncontrolled signaling from receptor tyrosine kinases and intracellular tyrosine kinases can lead to inflammatory responses and to diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis, and psoriasis. Thus, inhibitors that block the activity of tyrosine kinases and the signaling pathways they activate may provide a useful basis for drug development. This article summarizes recent progress in the development of PTK inhibitors and demonstrates their potential use in the treatment of disease.

  2. The Ror receptor tyrosine kinase family.

    PubMed

    Forrester, W C

    2002-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) participate in numerous developmental decisions. Ror RTKs are a family of orphan receptors that are related to muscle specific kinase (MuSK) and Trk neurotrophin receptors. MuSK assembles acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction, and Trk receptors function in the developing nervous system (reviewed in [3-5]). Rors have been identified in nematodes, insects and mammals. Recent studies have begun to shed light on Ror function during development. In most species, Rors are expressed in many tissue types during development. Analyses of mutants that are defective in the single nematode Ror demonstrate a role in cell migration and in orienting cell polarity. Mice lacking one of the two Ror gene products display defects in bone and heart formation. Similarly, two different human bone development disorders, dominant brachydactyly B and recessive Robinow syndrome, result from mutations in one of the human Ror genes. PMID:11846036

  3. Neuroblastoma Tyrosine Kinase Signaling Networks Involve FYN and LYN in Endosomes and Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ailan; Stokes, Matthew P.; Kuehn, Emily D.; George, Lynn; Comb, Michael; Grimes, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a central role in creating a highly dynamic network of interacting proteins that reads and responds to signals from growth factors in the cellular microenvironment. Cells of the neural crest employ multiple signaling mechanisms to control migration and differentiation during development. It is known that defects in these mechanisms cause neuroblastoma, but how multiple signaling pathways interact to govern cell behavior is unknown. In a phosphoproteomic study of neuroblastoma cell lines and cell fractions, including endosomes and detergent-resistant membranes, 1622 phosphorylated proteins were detected, including more than half of the receptor tyrosine kinases in the human genome. Data were analyzed using a combination of graph theory and pattern recognition techniques that resolve data structure into networks that incorporate statistical relationships and protein-protein interaction data. Clusters of proteins in these networks are indicative of functional signaling pathways. The analysis indicates that receptor tyrosine kinases are functionally compartmentalized into distinct collaborative groups distinguished by activation and intracellular localization of SRC-family kinases, especially FYN and LYN. Changes in intracellular localization of activated FYN and LYN were observed in response to stimulation of the receptor tyrosine kinases, ALK and KIT. The results suggest a mechanism to distinguish signaling responses to activation of different receptors, or combinations of receptors, that govern the behavior of the neural crest, which gives rise to neuroblastoma. PMID:25884760

  4. Ceritinib for the treatment of patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Landi, Lorenza; Cappuzzo, Federico

    2016-02-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents the paradigm of personalized treatment of human cancer. Several oncogenic druggable alterations have been so far identified, with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements representing one of the newest and most appealing. Crizotinib is now recognized as the standard of care in ALK-positive NSCLC due to the positive results of recently published trials. Unfortunately, resistance inevitably occurs within the first year of treatment. Overcoming resistance is the major challenge in clinical oncology, and novel potent ALK inhibitors are currently under evaluation, including ceritinib. Ceritinib is an oral, potent, second-generation ALK inhibitor demonstrating activity in patients who develop resistance to crizotinib. Recent data also suggested efficacy in ALK-inhibitor-naive population, thus supporting investigation of the drug in front-line setting. PMID:26582431

  5. Transformation to SCLC after Treatment with the ALK Inhibitor Alectinib.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Shiro; Masago, Katsuhiro; Katakami, Nobuyuki; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2016-06-01

    We report an anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase gene (ALK)-positive patient who showed a paradoxical response to the ALK inhibitor alectinib; the primary lesion increased in size, whereas other metastatic lesions decreased markedly. A biopsy of the primary lesion confirmed an ALK rearrangement; however, the tumor had transformed histologically into small cell lung cancer. The lack of reports of small cell lung cancer transformation in ALK-positive patients implies that this outcome was unusual; this patient was treated with alectinib, which is more selective and has a greater inhibitory effect than crizotinib. This case may reveal resistance mechanisms that differ according to the agent used for treatment. PMID:26751586

  6. Rationale for co-targeting IGF-1R and ALK in ALK fusion positive lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lovly, Christine M.; McDonald, Nerina T.; Chen, Heidi; Ortiz-Cuaran, Sandra; Heukamp, Lukas C.; Yan, Yingjun; Florin, Alexandra; Ozretić, Luka; Lim, Diana; Wang, Lu; Chen, Zhao; Chen, Xi; Lu, Pengcheng; Paik, Paul K.; Shen, Ronglai; Jin, Hailing; Buettner, Reinhard; Ansén, Sascha; Perner, Sven; Brockmann, Michael; Bos, Marc; Wolf, Jürgen; Gardizi, Masyar; Wright, Gavin M.; Solomon, Benjamin; Russell, Prudence A.; Rogers, Toni-Maree; Suehara, Yoshiyuki; Red-Brewer, Monica; Tieu, Rudy; de Stanchina, Elisa; Wang, Qingguo; Zhao, Zhongming; Johnson, David H.; Horn, Leora; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Thomas, Roman K.; Ladanyi, Marc; Pao, William

    2014-01-01

    The ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), crizotinib, shows significant activity in patients whose lung cancers harbor ALK fusions but its efficacy is limited by variable primary responses and acquired resistance. In work arising from the intriguing clinical observation of a patient with ALK fusion+ lung cancer who had an ‘exceptional response’ to an IGF-1R antibody, we define a therapeutic synergism between ALK and IGF-1R inhibitors. Similar to IGF-1R, ALK fusion proteins bind to the adaptor, IRS-1, and IRS-1 knockdown enhances the anti-tumor effects of ALK inhibitors. In models of ALK TKI resistance, the IGF-1R pathway is activated, and combined ALK/IGF-1R inhibition improves therapeutic efficacy. Consistent with this finding, IGF-1R/IRS-1 levels are increased in biopsy samples from patients progressing on crizotinib therapy. Collectively, these data support a role for the IGF-1R/IRS-1 pathway in both ALK TKI-sensitive and TKI-resistant states and provide biological rationale for further clinical development of dual ALK/IGF-1R inhibitors. PMID:25173427

  7. Receptor tyrosine kinase targeting in multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Susan; O'Driscoll, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    While growing cells as a monolayer is the traditional method for cell culture, the incorporation of multicellular spheroids into experimental design is becoming increasingly popular. This is due to the understanding that cells grown as spheroids tend to replicate the in vivo situation more reliably than monolayer cells. Thus, the use of multicellular spheroids may be more clinically relevant than monolayer cell cultures. Here, we describe methods for multicellular 3D spheroid generation that may be used to provide samples for receptor tyrosine kinase (and other protein) detection. Methods described include the forced-floating poly-HEMA method, the hanging-drop method, and the use of ECM to form multicellular 3D spheroids. PMID:25319898

  8. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors and the thyroid.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Steven I

    2009-12-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have emerged as significant targets for novel cancer therapies. For patients with differentiated or medullary carcinomas unresponsive to conventional treatments, multiple novel therapies primarily targeting angiogenesis have entered clinical trials. Partial response rates up to 30% have been reported in single-agent studies, but prolonged disease stabilisation is more commonly seen. The most successful agents target the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Sorafenib and sunitinib have had promising preliminary results reported and are being used selectively for patients who do not qualify for clinical trials. Treatment for patients with metastatic or advanced thyroid carcinoma now emphasises clinical trial opportunities for novel agents with considerable promise. Adverse effects on thyroid function and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been seen with several TKIs, necessitating prospective thyroid function testing for all patients starting therapy. PMID:19942148

  9. Antibodies directed against receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    FAUVEL, Bénédicte; Yasri, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30 therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have already been approved for cancers and inflammatory diseases, and monoclonal antibodies continue to be one of the fastest growing classes of therapeutic molecules. Because aberrant signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is a commonly observed factor in cancer, most of the subclasses of RTKs are being extensively studied as potential targets for treating malignancies. The first two RTKs that have been targeted by antibody therapy, with five currently marketed antibodies, are the growth factor receptors EGFR and HER2. However, due to systemic side effects, refractory patients and the development of drug resistance, these treatments are being challenged by emerging therapeutics. This review examines current monoclonal antibody therapies against RTKs. After an analysis of agents that have already been approved, we present an analysis of antibodies in clinical development that target RTKs. Finally, we highlight promising RTKs that are emerging as new oncological targets for antibody-based therapy. PMID:24859229

  10. Complexity of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signal Processing

    PubMed Central

    Volinsky, Natalia; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2013-01-01

    Our knowledge of molecular mechanisms of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling advances with ever-increasing pace. Yet our understanding of how the spatiotemporal dynamics of RTK signaling control specific cellular outcomes has lagged behind. Systems-centered experimental and computational approaches can help reveal how overlapping networks of signal transducers downstream of RTKs orchestrate specific cell-fate decisions. We discuss how RTK network regulatory structures, which involve the immediate posttranslational and delayed transcriptional controls by multiple feed forward and feedback loops together with pathway cross talk, adapt cells to the combinatorial variety of external cues and conditions. This intricate network circuitry endows cells with emerging capabilities for RTK signal processing and decoding. We illustrate how mathematical modeling facilitates our understanding of RTK network behaviors by unraveling specific systems properties, including bistability, oscillations, excitable responses, and generation of intricate landscapes of signaling activities. PMID:23906711

  11. Two novel ALK mutations mediate acquired resistance to the next generation ALK inhibitor alectinib

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Ryohei; Friboulet, Luc; Koike, Sumie; Lockerman, Elizabeth L.; Khan, Tahsin M.; Gainor, Justin F.; Iafrate, A. John; Takeuchi, Kengo; Taiji, Makoto; Okuno, Yasushi; Fujita, Naoya; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Shaw, Alice T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The first-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) crizotinib is a standard therapy for patients with ALK-rearranged NSCLC. Several next-generation ALK-TKIs have entered the clinic and have shown promising activity in crizotinib-resistant patients. As patients still relapse even on these next-generation ALK-TKIs, we examined mechanisms of resistance to the next-generation ALK-TKI alectinib and potential strategies to overcome this resistance. Experimental Design We established a cell line model of alectinib resistance, and analyzed a resistant tumor specimen from a patient who had relapsed on alectinib. We developed Ba/F3 models harboring alectinib-resistant ALK mutations and evaluated the potency of other next-generation ALK-TKIs in these models. We tested the antitumor activity of the next-generation ALK-TKI ceritinib in the patient with acquired resistance to alectinib. To elucidate structure-activity-relationships of ALK mutations, we performed computational thermodynamic simulation with MP-CAFEE. Results We identified a novel V1180L gatekeeper mutation from the cell line model and a second novel I1171T mutation from the patient who developed resistance to alectinib. Both ALK mutations conferred resistance to alectinib as well as to crizotinib, but were sensitive to ceritinib and other next-generation ALK-TKIs. Treatment of the patient with ceritinib led to a marked response. Thermodynamics simulation suggests that both mutations lead to distinct structural alterations that decrease the binding affinity with alectinib. Conclusions We have identified two novel ALK mutations arising after alectinib exposure which are sensitive to other next generation ALK-TKIs. The ability of ceritinib to overcome alectinib-resistance mutations suggests a potential role for sequential therapy with multiple next-generation ALK-TKIs. PMID:25228534

  12. SUMOylation Confers Posttranslational Stability on NPM-ALK Oncogenic Protein.

    PubMed

    Vishwamitra, Deeksha; Curry, Choladda V; Shi, Ping; Alkan, Serhan; Amin, Hesham M

    2015-09-01

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase-expressing (NPM-ALK+) T-cell lymphoma is an aggressive form of cancer that commonly affects children and adolescents. The expression of NPM-ALK chimeric oncogene results from the chromosomal translocation t(2;5)(p23;q35) that causes the fusion of the ALK and NPM genes. This translocation generates the NPM-ALK protein tyrosine kinase that forms the constitutively activated NPM-ALK/NPM-ALK homodimers. In addition, NPM-ALK is structurally associated with wild-type NPM to form NPM/NPM-ALK heterodimers, which can translocate to the nucleus. The mechanisms that sustain the stability of NPM-ALK are not fully understood. SUMOylation is a posttranslational modification that is characterized by the reversible conjugation of small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) with target proteins. SUMO competes with ubiquitin for substrate binding and therefore, SUMOylation is believed to protect target proteins from proteasomal degradation. Moreover, SUMOylation contributes to the subcellular distribution of target proteins. Herein, we found that the SUMOylation pathway is deregulated in NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma cell lines and primary lymphoma tumors from patients. We also identified Lys24 and Lys32 within the NPM domain as the sites where NPM-ALK conjugates with SUMO-1 and SUMO-3. Importantly, antagonizing SUMOylation by the SENP1 protease decreased the accumulation of NPM-ALK and suppressed lymphoma cell viability, proliferation, and anchorage-independent colony formation. One possible mechanism for the SENP1-mediated decrease in NPM-ALK levels was the increase in NPM-ALK association with ubiquitin, which facilitates its degradation. Our findings propose a model in which aberrancies in SUMOylation contribute to the pathogenesis of NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma. Unraveling such pathogenic mechanisms may lead to devising novel strategies to eliminate this aggressive neoplasm. PMID:26476082

  13. Peptides derived from the dependence receptor ALK are proapoptotic for ALK-positive tumors

    PubMed Central

    Aubry, A; Galiacy, S; Ceccato, L; Marchand, C; Tricoire, C; Lopez, F; Bremner, R; Racaud-Sultan, C; Monsarrat, B; Malecaze, F; Allouche, M

    2015-01-01

    ALK is a receptor tyrosine kinase with an oncogenic role in various types of human malignancies. Despite constitutive activation of the kinase through gene alterations, such as chromosomal translocation, gene amplification or mutation, treatments with kinase inhibitors invariably lead to the development of resistance. Aiming to develop new tools for ALK targeting, we took advantage of our previous demonstration identifying ALK as a dependence receptor, implying that in the absence of ligand the kinase-inactive ALK triggers or enhances apoptosis. Here, we synthesized peptides mimicking the proapoptotic domain of ALK and investigated their biological effects on tumor cells. We found that an ALK-derived peptide of 36 amino acids (P36) was cytotoxic for ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma and neuroblastoma cell lines. In contrast, ALK-negative tumor cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells were insensitive to P36. The cytotoxic effect was due to caspase-dependent apoptosis and required N-myristoylation of the peptide. Two P36-derived shorter peptides as well as a cyclic peptide also induced apoptosis. Surface plasmon resonance and mass spectrometry analysis of P36-interacting proteins from two responsive cell lines, Cost lymphoma and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma, uncovered partners that could involve p53-dependent signaling and pre-mRNA splicing. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 rescued these cells from P36-induced apoptosis. Finally, we observed that a treatment combining P36 with the ALK-specific inhibitor crizotinib resulted in additive cytotoxicity. Therefore, ALK-derived peptides could represent a novel targeted therapy for ALK-positive tumors. PMID:25950466

  14. Therapeutic Targeting of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase in Lung Cancer: A Paradigm for Precision Cancer Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Ryohei; Lovly, Christine M.; Shaw, Alice T.

    2015-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) receptor tyrosine kinase was initially discovered as a component of the fusion protein nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK in anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL). Genomic alterations in ALK, including rearrangements, point mutations, and genomic amplification, have now been identified in several malignancies, including lymphoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), neuroblastoma, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, and others. Importantly, ALK serves as a validated therapeutic target in these diseases. Several ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), including crizotinib, ceritinib and alectinib, have been developed, and some of them have already been approved for clinical use. These ALK inhibitors have all shown remarkable clinical outcomes in ALK-rearranged NSCLC. Unfortunately, as is the case for other kinase inhibitors in clinical use, sensitive tumors inevitably relapse due to acquired resistance. This review focuses on the discovery, function, and therapeutic targeting of ALK, with a particular focus on ALK-rearranged NSCLC. PMID:25979929

  15. Asymmetric Tyrosine Kinase Arrangements in Activation or Autophosphorylation of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    J Bae; J Schlessinger

    2011-12-31

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play important roles in the control of many cellular processes including cell proliferation, cell adhesion, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. Ligand-induced dimerization of RTKs leads to autophosphorylation and activation of RTKs. Structural studies have shown that while isolated ectodomains of several RTKs form symmetric dimers the isolated cytoplasmic kinase domains of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) form asymmetric dimers during their activation. Binding of one kinase molecule of EGFR to a second kinase molecule asymmetrically leads to stimulation of kinase activity and enhanced autophosphorylation. Furthermore, the structures of the kinase domain of FGFR1 and FGFR2 reveal the formation of asymmetric interfaces in the processes of autophosphorylation at their specific phosphotyrosine (pY) sites. Disruption of asymmetric dimer interface of EGFR leads to reduction in enzymatic activity and drastic reduction of autophosphorylation of FGFRs in ligandstimulated live cells. These studies demonstrate that asymmetric dimer formation is as a common phenomenon critical for activation and autophosphorylation of RTKs.

  16. Overcoming acquired resistance to kinase inhibition: the cases of EGFR, ALK and BRAF.

    PubMed

    Giroux, Simon

    2013-01-15

    In the past decade, several kinase inhibitors have been approved based on their clinical benefit for cancer patients. Unfortunately, in many cases, patients develop resistance to these agents via secondary mutations and alternative mechanisms. This review will focus on the cases of acquired resistance to EGFR and ALK inhibitors for non-small cell lung cancer patients and BRAF inhibitors for melanoma patients. I will overview the main causes of acquired resistance, and explore the chemical scaffolds as well as combination of drugs, used to tackle these major causes of resistance. PMID:23245516

  17. Inhibition of Axl improves the targeted therapy against ALK-mutated neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Fei; Li, Hongling; Sun, Yong

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • First reported Axl is co-expressed with ALK in neuroblastoma tissues and cell lines. • Axl activation promotes cell growth and impairs the efficiency of ALK inhibitor. • Further found silence of Axl leads to increased sensitivity to ALK inhibitors. • Axl inhibitor promotes the efficiency of targeted therapy in vitro and in vivo. • Axl activation should be considered in the clinical application of ALK inhibitors. - Abstract: Neuroblastoma (NB) patients harboring mutated ALK can be expected to potentially benefit from targeted therapy based on ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), such as crizotinib and ceritinib. However, the effect of the treatment varies with different individuals, although with the same genic changes. Axl receptor tyrosine kinase is expressed in a variety of human cancers, but little data are reported in NB, particularly in which carrying mutated ALK. In this study, we focus on the roles of Axl in ALK-mutated NB for investigating rational therapeutic strategy. We found that Axl is expressed in ALK-positive NB tissues and cell lines, and could be effectively activated by its ligand GAS6. Ligand-dependent Axl activation obviously rescued crizotinib-mediated suppression of cell proliferation in ALK-mutated NB cells. Genetic inhibition of Axl with specific small interfering RNA markedly increased the sensitivity of cells to ALK-TKIs. Furthermore, a small-molecule inhibitor of Axl significantly enhanced ALK-targeted therapy, as an increased frequency of apoptosis was observed in NB cells co-expressing ALK and Axl. Taken together, our results demonstrated that activation of Axl could lead to insensitivity to ALK inhibitors, and dual inhibition of ALK and Axl might be a potential therapeutic strategy against ALK-mutated NB.

  18. Primary and Metastatic Cutaneous Melanomas Express ALK Through Alternative Transcriptional Initiation.

    PubMed

    Busam, Klaus J; Vilain, Ricardo E; Lum, Trina; Busam, Jonathan A; Hollmann, Travis J; Saw, Robyn P M; Coit, Daniel C; Scolyer, Richard A; Wiesner, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    A number of common driver mutations have been identified in melanoma, but other genetic or epigenetic aberrations are also likely to play a role in the pathogenesis of melanoma and present potential therapeutic targets. Translocations of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), for example, have been reported in spitzoid melanocytic neoplasms leading to kinase-fusion proteins that result in immunohistochemically detectable ALK expression. In this study, we sought to determine whether ALK was also expressed in nonspitzoid primary and metastatic cutaneous melanomas. ALK immunohistochemistry was performed on 603 melanomas (303 primary and 300 metastatic tumors) from 600 patients. ALK immunohistochemistry expression was identified in 7 primary and 9 metastatic tumors. In 5 of 7 primary tumors and in 6 of 9 metastatic lesions, the majority of tumor cells were immunoreactive for ALK. In the other 2 primary and 3 metastatic lesions, positive staining was identified in less than half of the tumor cells. ALK positivity was found in the presence or absence of BRAF or NRAS mutations. In contrast to prior observations with ALK-positive Spitz tumors, none of the ALK-positive melanomas harbored a translocation. Instead, the ALK-positive melanomas predominantly expressed the recently described ALK isoform, ALK, which lacks the extracellular and transmembrane domains of wild-type ALK, consists primarily of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain, and originates from an alternative transcriptional initiation site within the ALK gene. The findings are clinically relevant as patients with metastatic melanoma who have ALK expression may potentially benefit from treatment with ALK kinase inhibitors. PMID:26872010

  19. Therapeutic drug monitoring and tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Herviou, Pauline; Thivat, Emilie; Richard, Damien; Roche, Lucie; Dohou, Joyce; Pouget, Mélanie; Eschalier, Alain; Durando, Xavier; Authier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic activity of drugs can be optimized by establishing an individualized dosage, based on the measurement of the drug concentration in the serum, particularly if the drugs are characterized by an inter-individual variation in pharmacokinetics that results in an under- or overexposure to treatment. In recent years, several tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been developed to block intracellular signaling pathways in tumor cells. These oral drugs are candidates for therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) due to their high inter-individual variability for therapeutic and toxic effects. Following a literature search on PubMed, studies on TKIs and their pharmacokinetic characteristics, plasma quantification and inter-individual variability was studied. TDM is commonly used in various medical fields, including cardiology and psychiatry, but is not often applied in oncology. Plasma concentration monitoring has been thoroughly studied for imatinib, in order to evaluate the usefulness of TDM. The measurement of plasma concentration can be performed by various analytical techniques, with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry being the reference method. This method is currently used to monitor the efficacy and tolerability of imatinib treatments. Although TDM is already being used for imatinib, additional studies are required in order to improve this practice with the inclusion of other TKIs. PMID:27446421

  20. pH regulation of an egg cortex tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Jiang, W P; Veno, P A; Wood, R W; Peaucellier, G; Kinsey, W H

    1991-07-01

    Fertilization of the echinoderm egg is known to result in the phosphorylation, on tyrosine, of a high-molecular-weight cortical protein (HMWCP) localized in the egg cortex. Studies using various parthenogenic agents indicate that this phosphorylation event occurs in response to the alkaline shift in cytoplasmic pHi which normally occurs 1 to 2 min after fertilization. In the present study, the purified egg cell surface complex was used as in vitro system to determine whether a small alkaline shift in pH, such as occurs upon fertilization, could stimulate the activity of the egg cortex-associated tyrosine kinase toward endogenous protein substrates. The results demonstrated that the cell surface complex is highly enriched in a tyrosine kinase activity which accounts for the majority of the protein kinase activity in this preparation. The activity of this tyrosine kinase toward the HMWCP and other cortical proteins was highly dependent on pH over the range pH 6.8 to 7.3. This indicates that the fertilization-associated change in cytoplasmic pH would be sufficient to trigger increased tyrosine phosphorylation of the high-molecular-weight cortical protein in vivo. The regulation of tyrosine phosphorylation by small changes in pH represents a novel control mechanism in which a tyrosine protein kinase may act as a pH-sensitive transducer. PMID:2060713

  1. [Side effect management of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in urology : Hypertension].

    PubMed

    Sikic, D; Meidenbauer, N; Lieb, V; Keck, B

    2016-07-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors like sunitinib, sorafenib, pazopanib or axintinib are regarded the standard of care in the systemic therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. However, the many side effects associated with this therapy pose challenges for the treating physician and the patient. This review offers an overview of the classification and the treatment of hypertension, which is one of the major side effects induced by all tyrosine kinase inhibitors, in order to improve treatment efficacy and patient compliance. PMID:27146871

  2. Treatment of ALK-Rearranged Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Recent Progress and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Laird; Solomon, Benjamin

    2015-07-01

    Rearrangements of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene originally discovered nearly 20 years ago in the context of anaplastic large cell lymphoma were identified as oncogenic drivers in a subset of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) in 2007. These ALK gene rearrangements are present in 3-5 % of NSCLC patients, typically younger, never or light smokers with adenocarcinomas. Crizotinib is a first-in-class ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor with significant activity in ALK-positive NSCLC that received accelerated US Food and Drug Administration approval for treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC in 2011, just 4 years after identification of ALK rearrangements in this setting. Subsequently, two phase III trials have shown crizotinib to have a tolerable toxicity profile and to be superior to standard chemotherapy for the first- or second-line treatment of advanced ALK-positive lung cancer and numerous countries have approved its use. Despite initial responses, acquired resistance to crizotinib invariably leads to disease progression. Mechanisms of resistance have been described to include ALK tyrosine kinase mutations, activation of bypass signalling pathways and pharmacokinetic failure of crizotinib. Several next-generation ALK inhibitors, including ceritinib and alectinib, are in clinical development and show efficacy in both the crizotinib naïve and crizotinib refractory settings. Ongoing clinical trials will identify the optimal strategy to incorporate these novel agents in the treatment of patients with ALK-positive NSCLC. PMID:26076736

  3. A novel nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, Srm: cloning and targeted disruption.

    PubMed Central

    Kohmura, N; Yagi, T; Tomooka, Y; Oyanagi, M; Kominami, R; Takeda, N; Chiba, J; Ikawa, Y; Aizawa, S

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated a novel nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, Srm, that maps to the distal end of chromosome 2. It has SH2, SH2', and SH3 domains and a tyrosine residue for autophosphorylation in the kinase domain but lacks an N-terminal glycine for myristylation and a C-terminal tyrosine which, when phosphorylated, suppresses kinase activity. These are structural features of the recently identified Tec family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. The Srm N-terminal unique domain, however, lacks the structural characteristics of the Tec family kinases, and the sequence similarity is highest to Src in the SH region. The expression of two transcripts is rather ubiquitous and changes according to tissue and developmental stage. Mutant mice were generated by gene targeting in embryonic stem cells but displayed no apparent phenotype as in mutant mice expressing Src family kinases. These results suggest that Srm constitutes a new family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases that may be redundant in function. Images PMID:7935409

  4. Potential sites of CFTR activation by tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Timothy J; Hou, Yue-Xian; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R; Hanrahan, John W

    2016-05-01

    The CFTR chloride channel is tightly regulated by phosphorylation at multiple serine residues. Recently it has been proposed that its activity is also regulated by tyrosine kinases, however the tyrosine phosphorylation sites remain to be identified. In this study we examined 2 candidate tyrosine residues near the boundary between the first nucleotide binding domain and the R domain, a region which is important for channel function but devoid of PKA consensus sequences. Mutating tyrosines at positions 625 and 627 dramatically reduced responses to Src or Pyk2 without altering the activation by PKA, suggesting they may contribute to CFTR regulation. PMID:26645934

  5. Structural insight into selectivity and resistance profiles of ROS1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davare, Monika A.; Vellore, Nadeem A.; Wagner, Jacob P.; Eide, Christopher A.; Goodman, James R.; Drilon, Alexander; Deininger, Michael W.; O’Hare, Thomas; Druker, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic ROS1 fusion proteins are molecular drivers in multiple malignancies, including a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The phylogenetic proximity of the ROS1 and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) catalytic domains led to the clinical repurposing of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved ALK inhibitor crizotinib as a ROS1 inhibitor. Despite the antitumor activity of crizotinib observed in both ROS1- and ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients, resistance due to acquisition of ROS1 or ALK kinase domain mutations has been observed clinically, spurring the development of second-generation inhibitors. Here, we profile the sensitivity and selectivity of seven ROS1 and/or ALK inhibitors at various levels of clinical development. In contrast to crizotinib’s dual ROS1/ALK activity, cabozantinib (XL-184) and its structural analog foretinib (XL-880) demonstrate a striking selectivity for ROS1 over ALK. Molecular dynamics simulation studies reveal structural features that distinguish the ROS1 and ALK kinase domains and contribute to differences in binding site and kinase selectivity of the inhibitors tested. Cell-based resistance profiling studies demonstrate that the ROS1-selective inhibitors retain efficacy against the recently reported CD74-ROS1G2032R mutant whereas the dual ROS1/ALK inhibitors are ineffective. Taken together, inhibitor profiling and stringent characterization of the structure–function differences between the ROS1 and ALK kinase domains will facilitate future rational drug design for ROS1- and ALK-driven NSCLC and other malignancies. PMID:26372962

  6. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase status in rhabdomyosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akihiko; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Wakai, Susumu; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Tsuta, Koji; Fukayama, Masashi; Makimoto, Atsushi; Furuta, Koh; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2013-06-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare soft tissue sarcoma that typically affects children, adolescents, and young adults. Despite treatment via a multidisciplinary approach, the prognosis of advance-stage rhabdomyosarcomas remains poor, and a new treatment strategy is needed. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is a potential target for specific inhibitors. In this study, we investigated 116 rhabdomyosarcomas using a polymer-based ALK immunostaining method and correlated the results with clinicopathological parameters. In addition, we examined ALK status using dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization, PCR, and sequencing. In immunohistochemical analysis, ALK was detected in 2 (6%) of 33 embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas, 42 (69%) of 61 alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas, and 0 (0%) of 22 other subtypes, including pleomorphic, adult-spindle-cell/sclerosing, and epithelioid variants. Compared with ALK-negative alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas, ALK-positive ones are presented with metastatic spread more frequently and showed a greater extent of myogenin reactivity. Overall survival was not associated with ALK expression. FOXO1 rearrangement was significantly associated with ALK immunoreactivity. The median ALK copy number was greater in ALK-positive tumors than in ALK-negative tumors. Most (93%) cases tested showed no selective increase in the ALK gene dosage. ALK selective amplification and low-level selective gain were noted in one and three cases, respectively. Further, a high-polysomy pattern (≥4 ALK copies in ≥40% of cells) was observed in seven cases. A significant increase in the ALK copy number was exclusive to the ALK-immunopositive cohort, but it was uncommon, accounting for only 30% of the 37 ALK-positive rhabdomyosarcomas. ALK gene rearrangement was not observed in either cohort, while an ALK somatic mutation (I1277T) was found in one ALK-negative embryonal case. Although it remains controversial whether ALK expression without gene rearrangement

  7. Monoclonal antibodies to individual tyrosine-phosphorylated protein substrates of oncogene-encoded tyrosine kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Kanner, S.B.; Reynolds, A.B.; Vines, R.R.; Parsons, J.T. )

    1990-05-01

    Cellular transformation by oncogenic retroviruses encoding protein tyrosine kinases coincides with the tyrosine-specific phosphorylation of multiple protein substrates. Previous studies have shown that tyrosine phosphorylation of a protein of 120 kDa, p120, correlated with src transformation in chicken embryo fibroblasts. Additionally, the authors previously identified two phosphotyrosine-containing cellular proteins, p130 and p110, that formed stable complexes with activated variants of pp60{sup src}, the src-encoded tyrosine kinase. To study transformation-relevant tyrosine kinase substrates, they have generated monoclonal antibodies to individual tyrosine phosphoproteins, including p130, p120, p110, and five additional phosphoproteins (p210, p125, p118, p85, and p185/p64). These antibodies detected several of the same tyrosine phosphoproteins in chicken embryo fibroblasts transformed by avian retroviruses Y73 and CT10, encoding the yes and crk oncogenes, respectively. Protein substrates in mouse, rat, hamster, and human cells overexpressing activated variants of chicken pp60{sup src} were also detected by several of the monoclonal antibodies.

  8. Phosphotyrosine enrichment identifies focal adhesion kinase and other tyrosine kinases for targeting in canine hemangiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Marley, K; Maier, C S; Helfand, S C

    2012-09-01

    Canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) is an endothelial cell malignancy driven, in part, by activating mutations in receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases. Proteomics, Western blots and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor were used to elucidate activating mechanisms in HSA cell lines. Phosphotyrosine peptides from focal adhesion kinase (FAK) STAT3, Lyn, Fyn and other signal transduction kinases were identified by mass spectrometry. FAK was constitutively activated at tyrosine 397, the autophosphorylation site, and this was reversible with high concentrations of a FAK inhibitor. FAK inhibitor-14 suppressed migration and phosphorylation of FAK tyrosine 397 and tyrosines 576/577 and was cytotoxic to HSA cells suggesting FAK signalling may be an important contributor to canine HSA survival. PMID:22487216

  9. Anti-ALK Antibodies in Patients with ALK-Positive Malignancies Not Expressing NPM-ALK

    PubMed Central

    Damm-Welk, Christine; Siddiqi, Faraz; Fischer, Matthias; Hero, Barbara; Narayanan, Vignesh; Camidge, David Ross; Harris, Michael; Burke, Amos; Lehrnbecher, Thomas; Pulford, Karen; Oschlies, Ilske; Siebert, Reiner; Turner, Suzanne; Woessmann, Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Nucleophosmin (NPM)- Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) fusion positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma produce autoantibodies against ALK indicative of an immune response against epitopes of the chimeric fusion protein. We asked whether ALK-expression in other malignancies induces specific antibodies. Antibodies against ALK were detected in sera of one of 50 analysed ALK-expressing neuroblastoma patients, 13 of 21 ALK positive non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients, 13 of 22 ALK translocation-positive, but NPM-ALK-negative lymphoma patients and one of one ALK-positive rhabdomyosarcoma patient, but not in 20 healthy adults. These data suggest that boosting a pre-existent anti-ALK immune response may be more feasible for patients with ALK-positive NSCLC, lymphomas and rhabdomyosarcomas than for tumours expressing wild-type ALK. PMID:27471553

  10. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Diabetes: A Novel Treatment Paradigm?

    PubMed

    Fountas, Athanasios; Diamantopoulos, Leonidas-Nikolaos; Tsatsoulis, Agathocles

    2015-11-01

    Deregulation of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity is implicated in various proliferative conditions. Multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are increasingly used for the treatment of different malignancies. Recently, several clinical cases of the reversal of both type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, T2DM) during TKI administration have been reported. Experimental in vivo and in vitro studies have elucidated some of the mechanisms behind this effect. For example, inhibition of Abelson tyrosine kinase (c-Abl) results in β cell survival and enhanced insulin secretion, while platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition leads to improvement in insulin sensitivity. In addition, inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) reduces the degree of islet cell inflammation (insulitis). Therefore, targeting several PTKs may provide a novel approach for correcting the pathophysiologic disturbances of diabetes. PMID:26492832

  11. Novel ALK inhibitor AZD3463 inhibits neuroblastoma growth by overcoming crizotinib resistance and inducing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongfeng; Wang, Long; Guan, Shan; Cao, Wenming; Wang, Hao; Chen, Zhenghu; Zhao, Yanling; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Huiyuan; Pang, Jonathan C.; Huang, Sophia L.; Akiyama, Yo; Yang, Yifan; Sun, Wenjing; Xu, Xin; Shi, Yan; Zhang, Hong; Kim, Eugene S.; Muscal, Jodi A.; Lu, Fengmin; Yang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    ALK receptor tyrosine kinase has been shown to be a therapeutic target in neuroblastoma. Germline ALK activating mutations are responsible for the majority of hereditary neuroblastoma and somatic ALK activating mutations are also frequently observed in sporadic cases of advanced NB. Crizotinib, a first-line therapy in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring ALK rearrangements, demonstrates striking efficacy against ALK-rearranged NB. However, crizotinib fails to effectively inhibit the activity of ALK when activating mutations are present within its kinase domain, as with the F1174L mutation. Here we show that a new ALK inhibitor AZD3463 effectively suppressed the proliferation of NB cell lines with wild type ALK (WT) as well as ALK activating mutations (F1174L and D1091N) by blocking the ALK-mediated PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and ultimately induced apoptosis and autophagy. In addition, AZD3463 enhanced the cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin on NB cells. AZD3463 also exhibited significant therapeutic efficacy on the growth of the NB tumors with WT and F1174L activating mutation ALK in orthotopic xenograft mouse models. These results indicate that AZD3463 is a promising therapeutic agent in the treatment of NB. PMID:26786851

  12. Cell-free expression of functional receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Scharadin, Tiffany M.; Saldana, Matthew; Gellner, Candice; Hoang-Phou, Steven; Takanishi, Christina; Hura, Gregory L.; Tainer, John A; Carraway III, Kermit L.; Henderson, Paul T.; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play critical roles in physiological and pathological processes, and are important anticancer drug targets. In vitro mechanistic and drug discovery studies of full-length RTKs require protein that is both fully functional and free from contaminating proteins. Here we describe a rapid cell-free and detergent-free co-translation method for producing full-length and functional ERBB2 and EGFR receptor tyrosine kinases supported by water-soluble apolipoprotein A-I based nanolipoprotein particles. PMID:26274523

  13. A Molecular Brake in the Kinase Hinge Region Regulates the Activity of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,H.; Ma, J.; Li, W.; Eliseenkova, A.; Xu, C.; Neubert, T.; Miller, W.; Mohammadi, M.

    2007-01-01

    Activating mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) cause cancer and skeletal disorders. Comparison of the crystal structures of unphosphorylated and phosphorylated wild-type FGFR2 kinase domains with those of seven unphosphorylated pathogenic mutants reveals an autoinhibitory 'molecular brake' mediated by a triad of residues in the kinase hinge region of all FGFRs. Structural analysis shows that many other RTKs, including PDGFRs, VEGFRs, KIT, CSF1R, FLT3, TEK, and TIE, are also subject to regulation by this brake. Pathogenic mutations activate FGFRs and other RTKs by disengaging the brake either directly or indirectly.

  14. Redundant kinase activation and resistance of EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Min; Fu, Li-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have shown dramatic effects against that tumors harboring EGFR activating mutations in the EGFR intracytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domain and resulted in cell apoptosis. Unfortunately, a number of patients ultimately developed resistance by multiple mechanisms. Thus, elucidation of the mechanism of resistance to EGFR-TKIs can provide strategies for blocking or reversing the situation. Recent studies suggested that redundant kinase activation plays pivotal roles in escaping from the effects of EGFR-TKIs. Herein, we aimed to characterize several molecular events involved in the resistance to EGFR-TKIs mediated by redundant kinase activation. PMID:25520855

  15. Inhibition of Bcr serine kinase by tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Wu, Y; Ma, G Z; Lu, D; Haataja, L; Heisterkamp, N; Groffen, J; Arlinghaus, R B

    1996-01-01

    The first exon of the BCR gene encodes a new serine/threonine protein kinase. Abnormal fusion of the BCR and ABL genes, resulting from the formation of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph), is the hallmark of Ph-positive leukemia. We have previously demonstrated that the Bcr protein is tyrosine phosphorylated within first-exon sequences by the Bcr-Abl oncoprotein. Here we report that in addition to tyrose 177 (Y-177), Y-360 and Y283 are phosphorylated in Bcr-Abl proteins in vitro. Moreover, Bcr tyrosine 360 is phosphorylated in vivo within both Bcr-Abl and Bcr. Bcr mutant Y177F had a greatly reduced ability to transphosphorylate casein and histone H1, whereas Bcr mutants Y177F and Y283F had wild-type activities. In contrast, the Y360F mutation had little effect on Bcr's autophosphorylation activity. Tyrosine-phosphorylated Bcr, phosphorylated in vitro by Bcr-Abl, was greatly inhibited in its serine/threonine kinase activity, impairing both auto- and transkinase activities of Bcr. Similarly, the isolation of Bcr from cells expressing Bcr-Abl under conditions that preserve phosphotyrosine residues also reduced Bcr's kinase activity. These results indicate that tyrosine 360 of Bcr is critical for the transphosphorylation activity of Bcr and that in Ph-positive leukemia, Bcr serine/threonine kinase activity is seriously impaired. PMID:8622703

  16. Old Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Newcomers in Gastrointestinal Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Erika, Giordani; Federica, Zoratto; Martina, Strudel; Anselmo, Papa; Luigi, Rossi; Marina, Minozzi; Davide, Caruso; Eleonora, Zaccarelli; Monica, Verrico; Silverio, Tomao

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal cancer treatment is based more on molecular biology that has provided increasing knowledge about cancer pathogenesis on which targeted therapy is being developed. Precisely, targeted therapy is defined as a "type of treatment that uses drugs, such as monoclonal antibodies or tyrosine kinase inhibitors, to identify and attack specific cancer cells". Nowadays, the United States Food and Drug Administration has approved many targeted therapies for gastrointestinal cancer treatment, as many are in various phases of development as well. In a previous review we discussed the main monoclonal antibodies used and studied in gastrointestinal cancer. In addition to monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors represent another class of targeted therapy and following the approval of imatinib for gastrointestinal stromal tumours, other tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been approved for gastrointestinal cancers treatment such as sunitinib, regoragenib, sorafenib and erlotinib. Moving forward, the purpose of this review is to focus on the efficacy data of main tyrosine kinase inhibitors commonly used in the personalized treatment of each gastrointestinal tumour and to provide a comprehensive overview about experimental targeted therapies ongoing in this setting. PMID:26278713

  17. Comparative Analysis of Mutant Tyrosine Kinase Chemical Rescue†

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Kathryn E.; Seeliger, Markus A.; Wang, Zhihong; Fomina, Dina; Neiswinger, Johnathan; Havranek, James J.; Baker, David; Kuriyan, John; Cole, Philip A.

    2009-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases are critical cell signaling enzymes. These enzymes have a highly conserved Arg residue in their catalytic loop which is present two residues or four residues downstream from an absolutely conserved Asp catalytic base. Prior studies on protein tyrosine kinases Csk and Src revealed the potential for chemical rescue of catalytically-deficient mutant kinases (Arg to Ala mutations) by small diamino compounds, particularly imidazole, however the potency and efficiency of rescue was greater for Src. This current study further examines the structural and kinetic basis of rescue for mutant Src as compared to mutant Abl tyrosine kinase. An X-ray crystal structure of R388A Src revealed the surprising finding that a histidine residue of the N-terminus of a symmetry-related kinase inserts into the active site of the adjacent Src and mimics the hydrogen bonding pattern seen in wild-type protein tyrosine kinases. Abl R367A shows potent and efficient rescue more comparable to Src, even though its catalytic loop is more like that of Csk. Various enzyme redesigns of the active sites indicate that the degree and specificity of rescue is somewhat flexible, but the overall properties of the enzymes and rescue agents play an overarching role. The newly discovered rescue agent 2-aminoimidazole is about as efficient as imidazole in rescuing R/A Src and Abl. Rate vs. pH studies with these imidazole analogs suggest that the protonated imidazolium is the preferred form for chemical rescue, consistent with structural models. The efficient rescue seen with mutant Abl points to the potential of this approach to be used effectively to analyze Abl phosphorylation pathways in cells. PMID:19260709

  18. Safety of cranial radiotherapy concurrent with tyrosine kinase inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer patients: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Lizza E L; Schoenmaekers, Janna; Zindler, Jaap D; Eekers, Danielle B P; Hoeben, Ann; De Ruysscher, Dirk K M; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C

    2015-07-01

    Recently, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been partly subclassified into molecularly-defined oncogene "addicted" tumors for which targeted agents are available. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) are currently approved for patients with an activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement. In these patients, brain metastases are often the first site of progression while on TKI treatment. The TKI may however still be active on extra-cranial sites and clinicians are thus faced with the question if the TKI may be continued during cranial radiotherapy. Advantages of combining TKI with cranial radiotherapy would be a possible synergistic effect on the brain metastases and the prevention of a systemic disease flare-up. A disadvantage is the possibly increased risk of (neuro)toxicity. The present systematic review addresses the toxicity of combining TKI with cranial radiotherapy in NSCLC patients. PMID:25990950

  19. CDPKs are dual-specificity protein kinases and tyrosine autophosphorylation attenuates kinase activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs or CPKs) are classified as serine/threonine protein kinases but we made the surprising observation that soybean CDPK' and several Arabidopsis isoforms (AtCPK4 and AtCPK34) could also autophosphorylate on tyrosine residues. In studies with His6-GmCDPK', we ide...

  20. The tyrosine kinase FER is responsible for the capacitation-associated increase in tyrosine phosphorylation in murine sperm.

    PubMed

    Alvau, Antonio; Battistone, Maria Agustina; Gervasi, Maria Gracia; Navarrete, Felipe A; Xu, Xinran; Sánchez-Cárdenas, Claudia; De la Vega-Beltran, Jose Luis; Da Ros, Vanina G; Greer, Peter A; Darszon, Alberto; Krapf, Diego; Salicioni, Ana Maria; Cuasnicu, Patricia S; Visconti, Pablo E

    2016-07-01

    Sperm capacitation is required for fertilization. At the molecular level, this process is associated with fast activation of protein kinase A. Downstream of this event, capacitating conditions lead to an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation. The identity of the tyrosine kinase(s) mediating this process has not been conclusively demonstrated. Recent experiments using stallion and human sperm have suggested a role for PYK2 based on the use of small molecule inhibitors directed against this kinase. However, crucially, loss-of-function experiments have not been reported. Here, we used both pharmacological inhibitors and genetically modified mice models to investigate the identity of the tyrosine kinase(s) mediating the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation in mouse sperm. Similar to stallion and human, PF431396 blocks the capacitation-associated increase in tyrosine phosphorylation. Yet, sperm from Pyk2(-/-) mice displayed a normal increase in tyrosine phosphorylation, implying that PYK2 is not responsible for this phosphorylation process. Here, we show that PF431396 can also inhibit FER, a tyrosine kinase known to be present in sperm. Sperm from mice targeted with a kinase-inactivating mutation in Fer failed to undergo capacitation-associated increases in tyrosine phosphorylation. Although these mice are fertile, their sperm displayed a reduced ability to fertilize metaphase II-arrested eggs in vitro. PMID:27226326

  1. Identification of ALK as the Major Familial Neuroblastoma Predisposition Gene

    PubMed Central

    Mossë, Yalë P; Laudenslager, Marci; Longo, Luca; Cole, Kristina A; Wood, Andrew; Attiyeh, Edward F; Laquaglia, Michael J; Sennett, Rachel; Lynch, Jill E; Perri, Patrizia; Laureys, Geneviève; Speleman, Frank; Hakonarson, Hakon; Torkamani, Ali; Schork, Nicholas J; Brodeur, Garrett M; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Rappaport, Eric; Devoto, Marcella; Maris, John M

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Survival rates for the childhood cancer neuroblastoma have not substantively improved despite dramatic escalation in chemotherapy intensity. Like most human cancers, this embryonal malignancy can be inherited, but the genetic etiology of familial and sporadically occurring neuroblastoma was largely unknown. Here we show that germline mutations in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene (ALK) explain the majority of hereditary neuroblastomas, and that activating mutations can also be somatically acquired. We first identified a significant linkage signal at the short arm of chromosome 2 (maximum nonparametric LOD=4.23 at rs1344063) using a whole-genome scan in neuroblastoma pedigrees. Resequencing of regional candidate genes identified three separate missense mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of ALK (G1128A, R1192P and R1275Q) that segregated with the disease in eight separate families. Examination of 491 sporadically occurring human neuroblastoma samples showed that the ALK locus was gained in 22.8%, and highly amplified in an additional 3.3%, and that these aberrations were highly associated with death from disease (P=0.0003). Resequencing of 194 high-risk neuroblastoma samples showed somatically acquired mutations within the tyrosine kinase domain in 12.4%. Nine of the ten mutations map to critical regions of the kinase domain and were predicted to be oncogenic drivers with high probability. Mutations resulted in constitutive phosphorylation consistent with activation, and targeted knockdown of ALK mRNA resulted in profound growth inhibition of 4 of 4 cell lines harboring mutant or amplified ALK, as well as 2 of 6 wild type for ALK. Our results demonstrate that heritable mutations of ALK are the major cause of familial neuroblastoma, and that germline or acquired activation of this cell surface kinase is a tractable therapeutic target for this lethal pediatric malignancy. PMID:18724359

  2. Excess of NPM-ALK oncogenic signaling promotes cellular apoptosis and drug dependency.

    PubMed

    Ceccon, M; Merlo, M E Boggio; Mologni, L; Poggio, T; Varesio, L M; Menotti, M; Bombelli, S; Rigolio, R; Manazza, A D; Di Giacomo, F; Ambrogio, C; Giudici, G; Casati, C; Mastini, C; Compagno, M; Turner, S D; Gambacorti-Passerini, C; Chiarle, R; Voena, C

    2016-07-21

    Most of the anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) cases carry the t(2;5; p23;q35) that produces the fusion protein NPM-ALK (nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase). NPM-ALK-deregulated kinase activity drives several pathways that support malignant transformation of lymphoma cells. We found that in ALK-rearranged ALCL cell lines, NPM-ALK was distributed in equal amounts between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Only the cytoplasmic portion was catalytically active in both cell lines and primary ALCL, whereas the nuclear portion was inactive because of heterodimerization with NPM1. Thus, about 50% of the NPM-ALK is not active and sequestered as NPM-ALK/NPM1 heterodimers in the nucleus. Overexpression or relocalization of NPM-ALK to the cytoplasm by NPM genetic knockout or knockdown caused ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2) increased phosphorylation and cell death through the engagement of an ATM/Chk2- and γH2AX (phosphorylated H2A histone family member X)-mediated DNA-damage response. Remarkably, human NPM-ALK-amplified cell lines resistant to ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) underwent apoptosis upon drug withdrawal as a consequence of ERK1/2 hyperactivation. Altogether, these findings indicate that an excess of NPM-ALK activation and signaling induces apoptosis via oncogenic stress responses. A 'drug holiday' where the ALK TKI treatment is suspended could represent a therapeutic option in cells that become resistant by NPM-ALK amplification. PMID:26657151

  3. Targeting Angiogenesis in Colorectal Cancer: Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kircher, Sheetal Mehta; Nimeiri, Halla S; Benson, Al B

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is commonly diagnosed throughout the world, and treatment options have greatly expanded over the last 2 decades. Targeting angiogenesis has been a major focus of study in a variety of malignancy types. Targeting angiogenesis has been achieved by several mechanisms in colorectal cancer, including use of antiangiogenic small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). There have been many attempts and failures to prove efficacy of TKIs in the treatment of colorectal cancer including sorafenib, sunitinib, vatalanib, and tivozanib. Regorafenib was the first TKI to demonstrate efficacy and is an orally active inhibitor of angiogenic (including the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2, and 3), stromal, and oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases. There are ongoing investigations of both regorafenib and ninetanib; however, there remains a critical need to better understand novel combinations with TKIs that could prove more efficacious than available options. PMID:27341596

  4. Tailoring Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors to Fit the Lung Cancer Genome

    PubMed Central

    Looyenga, Brendan D; Cherni, Irene; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P; Weiss, Glen J

    2011-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been in use as cancer therapeutics for nearly a decade, and their utility in targeting specific malignancies with defined genetic lesions has proven to be remarkably effective. Recent efforts to characterize the spectrum of genetic lesions found in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) have provided important insights into the molecular basis of this disease and have also revealed a wide array of tyrosine kinases that might be effectively targeted for rationally designed therapies. The findings of these studies, however, also provide a cautionary tale about the limitations of single-agent therapies, which fail to account for the genetic heterogeneity and pathway redundancy that characterize advanced NSCLC. Emergence of drug resistance mechanisms to specific TKIs, such as gefitinib and erlotinib, suggests that more sophisticated chemotherapeutic paradigms that target multiple pathways at the same time will be required to effectively treat this disease. PMID:21461169

  5. Novel Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitors currently in development

    PubMed Central

    D’Cruz, Osmond J; Uckun, Fatih M

    2013-01-01

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is intimately involved in multiple signal-transduction pathways regulating survival, activation, proliferation, and differentiation of B-lineage lymphoid cells. Btk is overexpressed and constitutively active in several B-lineage lymphoid malignancies. Btk has emerged as a new antiapoptotic molecular target for treatment of B-lineage leukemias and lymphomas. Preclinical and early clinical results indicate that Btk inhibitors may be useful in the treatment of leukemias and lymphomas. PMID:23493945

  6. Transformation of erythroid progenitors by viral and cellular tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Beug, H; Schroeder, C; Wessely, O; Deiner, E; Meyer, S; Ischenko, I D; Hayman, M J

    1995-08-01

    Recently, two different normal avian erythroid progenitors were described. They differ in the receptor tyrosine kinases they express and in their ability to undergo self-renewal in culture. A common progenitor, termed stem cell factor (SCF) progenitor, expresses the receptor for avian SCF c-Kit, and undergoes short-term self-renewal when grown in the presence of avian SCF. A second progenitor, referred to as SCF/transforming growth factor-alpha progenitor, coexpresses c-Kit and the avian epidermal growth factor receptor homologue c-ErbB. These progenitors undergo sustained self-renewal when grown in the presence of transforming growth factor-alpha plus estradiol. The phenotype of the normal SCF/transforming growth factor-alpha progenitors closely corresponded to that of erythroid cells transformed by the tyrosine kinase oncogenes v-erbB or v-sea. This suggested that these cells, but not the SCF progenitors, would be the target cells for erythroblast transformation by these oncogenes. However, we demonstrate that both progenitor cells can be transformed by the v-erbB and v-sea oncogenes and also by the ligand-activated proto-oncogene product c-ErbB. We conclude that the target cell specificity of certain tyrosine kinase oncoproteins for erythroid cells is a reflection of their ability to provide signals for self-renewal that normally emanate from the endogenous c-ErbB protein. PMID:8547228

  7. MERTK receptor tyrosine kinase is a therapeutic target in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Schlegel, Jennifer; Sambade, Maria J.; Sather, Susan; Moschos, Stergios J.; Tan, Aik-Choon; Winges, Amanda; DeRyckere, Deborah; Carson, Craig C.; Trembath, Dimitri G.; Tentler, John J.; Eckhardt, S. Gail; Kuan, Pei-Fen; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Duncan, Lyn M.; Miller, C. Ryan; Nikolaishvili-Feinberg, Nana; Midkiff, Bentley R.; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Weihe; Yang, Chao; Wang, Xiaodong; Frye, Stephen V.; Earp, H. Shelton; Shields, Janiel M.; Graham, Douglas K.

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of cutaneous cancers. Although recent therapeutic advances have prolonged patient survival, the prognosis remains dismal. C-MER proto-oncogene tyrosine kinase (MERTK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase with oncogenic properties that is often overexpressed or activated in various malignancies. Using both protein immunohistochemistry and microarray analyses, we demonstrate that MERTK expression correlates with disease progression. MERTK expression was highest in metastatic melanomas, followed by primary melanomas, while the lowest expression was observed in nevi. Additionally, over half of melanoma cell lines overexpressed MERTK compared with normal human melanocytes; however, overexpression did not correlate with mutations in BRAF or RAS. Stimulation of melanoma cells with the MERTK ligand GAS6 resulted in the activation of several downstream signaling pathways including MAPK/ERK, PI3K/AKT, and JAK/STAT. MERTK inhibition via shRNA reduced MERTK-mediated downstream signaling, reduced colony formation by up to 59%, and diminished tumor volume by 60% in a human melanoma murine xenograft model. Treatment of melanoma cells with UNC1062, a novel MERTK-selective small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, reduced activation of MERTK-mediated downstream signaling, induced apoptosis in culture, reduced colony formation in soft agar, and inhibited invasion of melanoma cells. This work establishes MERTK as a therapeutic target in melanoma and provides a rationale for the continued development of MERTK-targeted therapies. PMID:23585477

  8. Eph-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of citron kinase controls abscission.

    PubMed

    Jungas, Thomas; Perchey, Renaud T; Fawal, Mohamad; Callot, Caroline; Froment, Carine; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Besson, Arnaud; Davy, Alice

    2016-08-29

    Cytokinesis is the last step of cell division, culminating in the physical separation of daughter cells at the end of mitosis. Cytokinesis is a tightly regulated process that until recently was mostly viewed as a cell-autonomous event. Here, we investigated the role of Ephrin/Eph signaling, a well-known local cell-to-cell communication pathway, in cell division. We show that activation of Eph signaling in vitro leads to multinucleation and polyploidy, and we demonstrate that this is caused by alteration of the ultimate step of cytokinesis, abscission. Control of abscission requires Eph kinase activity, and Src and citron kinase (CitK) are downstream effectors in the Eph-induced signal transduction cascade. CitK is phosphorylated on tyrosines in neural progenitors in vivo, and Src kinase directly phosphorylates CitK. We have identified the specific tyrosine residues of CitK that are phosphorylated and show that tyrosine phosphorylation of CitK impairs cytokinesis. Finally, we show that, similar to CitK, Ephrin/Eph signaling controls neuronal ploidy in the developing neocortex. Our study indicates that CitK integrates intracellular and extracellular signals provided by the local environment to coordinate completion of cytokinesis. PMID:27551053

  9. DIRECT MODULATION OF THE PROTEIN KINASE A CATALYTIC SUBUNIT α BY GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR TYROSINE KINASES

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, George B.; Howe, Alan K.; Nickl, Christian K.; Dostmann, Wolfgang R.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Deming, Paula B.

    2011-01-01

    The cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) regulates processes such as cell proliferation and migration following activation of growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), yet the signaling mechanisms that link PKA with growth factor receptors remain largely undefined. Here we report that RTKs can directly modulate the function of the catalytic subunit of PKA (PKA-C) through post-translational modification. In vitro kinase assays revealed that both the epidermal growth factor and platelet derived growth factor receptors (EGFR and PDGFR, respectively) tyrosine phosphorylate PKA-C. Mass spectrometry identified tyrosine 330 (Y330) as a receptor-mediated phosphorylation site and mutation of Y330 to phenylalanine (Y330F) all but abolished the RTK-mediated phosphorylation of PKA-C in vitro. Y330 resides within a conserved region at the C-terminal tail of PKA-C that allosterically regulates enzymatic activity. Therefore, the effect of phosphorylation at Y330 on the activity of PKA-C was investigated. The Km for a peptide substrate was markedly decreased when PKA-C subunits were tyrosine phosphorylated by the receptors as compared to un-phosphorylated controls. Importantly, tyrosine-phosphorylated PKA-C subunits were detected in cells stimulated with EGF, PDGF and FGF2 and in fibroblasts undergoing PDGF-mediated chemotaxis. These results demonstrate a direct, functional interaction between RTKs and PKA-C and identify tyrosine phosphorylation as a novel mechansim for regulating PKA activity. PMID:21866565

  10. Dependence-induced ethanol drinking and GABA neurotransmission are altered in Alk deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Paul; Cates-Gatto, Chelsea; Varodayan, Florence P; Nadav, Tali; Roberto, Marisa; Lasek, Amy W; Roberts, Amanda J

    2016-08-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is expressed in the brain and implicated in alcohol abuse in humans and behavioral responses to ethanol in mice. Previous studies have shown an association of human ALK with acute responses to alcohol and alcohol dependence. In addition, Alk knockout (Alk -/-) mice consume more ethanol in a binge-drinking test and show increased sensitivity to ethanol sedation. However, the function of ALK in excessive drinking following the establishment of ethanol dependence has not been examined. In this study, we tested Alk -/- mice for dependence-induced drinking using the chronic intermittent ethanol-two bottle choice drinking (CIE-2BC) protocol. We found that Alk -/- mice initially consume more ethanol prior to CIE exposure, but do not escalate ethanol consumption after exposure, suggesting that ALK may promote the escalation of drinking after ethanol dependence. To determine the mechanism(s) responsible for this behavioral phenotype we used an electrophysiological approach to examine GABA neurotransmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a brain region that regulates alcohol consumption and shows increased GABA signaling after chronic ethanol exposure. GABA transmission in ethanol-naïve Alk -/- mice was enhanced at baseline and potentiated in response to acute ethanol application when compared to wild-type (Alk +/+) mice. Moreover, basal GABA transmission was not elevated by CIE exposure in Alk -/- mice as it was in Alk +/+ mice. These data suggest that ALK plays a role in dependence-induced drinking and the regulation of presynaptic GABA release in the CeA. PMID:26946429

  11. Getting Syk: Spleen Tyrosine Kinase as a Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Geahlen, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Syk is a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase well known for its ability to couple immune cell receptors to intracellular signaling pathways that regulate cellular responses to extracellular antigens and antigen-immunoglobulin complexes of particular importance to the initiation of inflammatory responses. Thus, Syk is an attractive target for therapeutic kinase inhibitors designed to ameliorate symptoms and consequences of acute and chronic inflammation. Its more recently recognized role as a promoter of cell survival in numerous cancer cell types ranging from leukemia to retinoblastoma has attracted considerable interest as a target for a new generation of anticancer drugs. This review discusses the biological processes in which Syk participates that have made this kinase such a compelling drug target. PMID:24975478

  12. Bosutinib: a novel second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Isfort, Susanne; Keller-v Amsberg, Gunhild; Schafhausen, Philippe; Koschmieder, Steffen; Brümmendorf, Tim H

    2014-01-01

    Bosutinib (SKI-606) is a 4-anilino-3-quinoline carbonitrile, which acts as a dual inhibitor of Src and ABL kinases. In addition, the BCR-ABL fusion gene product, a constitutively activated tyrosine kinase which is crucial for the development of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), is highly sensitive to bosutinib. Interestingly, distinctly lower concentrations of bosutinib are required to ablate BCR-ABL phosphorylation when compared to the first-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib (IM). Bosutinib is a potent inhibitor of CML cell proliferation in vitro and has demonstrated promising activity in CML patients resistant or intolerant to IM as well as in newly diagnosed patients with chronic phase CML (CML-CP). Remarkably, bosutinib has been found to be capable of overcoming the majority of IM-resistant BCR-ABL mutations. Bosutinib has the potency to induce deep and fast responses in second- and third-/fourth-line treatment, and as a consequence, the drug has recently been licensed for patients previously treated with one or more tyrosine kinase inhibitor(s) and for whom imatinib, nilotinib, and dasatinib are not considered appropriate treatment options. Due to its potency and differing toxicity profile, it promises to be a good therapeutic option for a defined cohort of patients. The most common side effects are gastrointestinal with most of the patients suffering from nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. For the most part, these gastrointestinal symptoms occur early after treatment initiation, are manageable, and often self-limiting. Continuous monitoring of liver enzymes upon treatment initiation is necessary during bosutinib treatment. In addition to CML treatment, bosutinib has shown some efficacy in selected patients suffering from advanced-stage solid tumors. In conclusion, bosutinib is a promising novel small molecule inhibitor approved now for targeted therapy of CML and in clinical development for other malignancies. PMID:24756786

  13. Involvement of the Tyrosine Kinase Fer in Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Rosato, Roberto; Veltmaat, Jacqueline M.; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    1998-01-01

    The Fer protein belongs to the fes/fps family of nontransmembrane receptor tyrosine kinases. Lack of success in attempts to establish a permanent cell line overexpressing it at significant levels suggested a strong negative selection against too much Fer protein and pointed to a critical cellular function for Fer. Using a tetracycline-regulatable expression system, overexpression of Fer in embryonic fibroblasts was shown to evoke a massive rounding up, and the subsequent detachment of the cells from the substratum, which eventually led to cell death. Induction of Fer expression coincided with increased complex formation between Fer and the cadherin/src-associated substrate p120cas and elevated tyrosine phosphorylation of p120cas. β-Catenin also exhibited clearly increased phosphotyrosine levels, and Fer and β-catenin were found to be in complex. Significantly, although the levels of α-catenin, β-catenin, and E-cadherin were unaffected by Fer overexpression, decreased amounts of α-catenin and β-catenin were coimmunoprecipitated with E-cadherin, demonstrating a dissolution of adherens junction complexes. A concomitant decrease in levels of phosphotyrosine in the focal adhesion-associated protein p130 was also observed. Together, these results provide a mechanism for explaining the phenotype of cells overexpressing Fer and indicate that the Fer tyrosine kinase has a function in the regulation of cell-cell adhesion. PMID:9742093

  14. eps15, a novel tyrosine kinase substrate, exhibits transforming activity.

    PubMed Central

    Fazioli, F; Minichiello, L; Matoskova, B; Wong, W T; Di Fiore, P P

    1993-01-01

    An expression cloning method which allows direct isolation of cDNAs encoding substrates for tyrosine kinases was applied to the study of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway. A previously undescribed cDNA was isolated and designated eps15. The structural features of the predicted eps15 gene product allow its subdivision into three domains. Domain I contains signatures of a regulatory domain, including a candidate tyrosine phosphorylation site and EF-hand-type calcium-binding domains. Domain II presents the characteristic heptad repeats of coiled-coil rod-like proteins, and domain III displays a repeated aspartic acid-proline-phenylalanine motif similar to a consensus sequence of several methylases. Antibodies specific for the eps15 gene product recognize two proteins: a major species of 142 kDa and a minor component of 155 kDa, both of which are phosphorylated on tyrosine following EGFR activation by EGF in vivo. EGFR is also able to directly phosphorylate the eps15 product in vitro. In addition, phosphorylation of the eps15 gene product in vivo is relatively receptor specific, since the erbB-2 kinase phosphorylates it very inefficiently. Finally, overexpression of eps15 is sufficient to transform NIH 3T3 cells, thus suggesting that the eps15 gene product is involved in the regulation of mitogenic signals. Images PMID:7689153

  15. Targeting autophagy enhances the anti-tumoral action of crizotinib in ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Desquesnes, Aurore; Le Gonidec, Sophie; AlSaati, Talal; Beau, Isabelle; Lamant, Laurence; Meggetto, Fabienne; Espinos, Estelle; Codogno, Patrice; Brousset, Pierre; Giuriato, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphomas (ALK+ ALCL) occur predominantly in children and young adults. Their treatment, based on aggressive chemotherapy, is not optimal since ALCL patients can still expect a 30% 2-year relapse rate. Tumor relapses are very aggressive and their underlying mechanisms are unknown. Crizotinib is the most advanced ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor and is already used in clinics to treat ALK-associated cancers. However, crizotinib escape mechanisms have emerged, thus preventing its use in frontline ALCL therapy. The process of autophagy has been proposed as the next target for elimination of the resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In this study, we investigated whether autophagy is activated in ALCL cells submitted to ALK inactivation (using crizotinib or ALK-targeting siRNA). Classical autophagy read-outs such as autophagosome visualization/quantification by electron microscopy and LC3-B marker turn-over assays were used to demonstrate autophagy induction and flux activation upon ALK inactivation. This was demonstrated to have a cytoprotective role on cell viability and clonogenic assays following combined ALK and autophagy inhibition. Altogether, our results suggest that co-treatment with crizotinib and chloroquine (two drugs already used in clinics) could be beneficial for ALK-positive ALCL patients. PMID:26338968

  16. Design and synthesis of constrained analogs of LCRF-0004 as potent RON tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Raeppel, Stéphane L; Therrien, Eric; Raeppel, Franck

    2015-09-01

    New fused bicyclic lactam head groups as rigidified analogs of thieno[3,2-b]pyridine-based kinase inhibitor LCRF-0004 were designed and synthesized. Depending on the functionalities and the size of these bicyclic head groups, potent inhibitors of RON tyrosine kinase with various level of selectivity against c-Met tyrosine kinase were obtained. PMID:26112445

  17. Tyrosine kinase receptors as molecular targets In pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas

    PubMed Central

    Cassol, Clarissa A.; Winer, Daniel; Liu, Wei; Guo, Miao; Ezzat, Shereen; Asa, Sylvia L.

    2016-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are neuroendocrine tumors shown to be responsive to multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment. Despite growing knowledge regarding their genetic basis, the ability to predict behavior in these tumors remains challenging. There is also limited knowledge of their tyrosine kinase receptor expression and whether the clinical response observed to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor Sunitinib relates only to its anti-angiogenic properties or also due to a direct effect on tumor cells. To answer these questions, an in vitro model of sunitinib treatment of a pheochromocytoma cell line was created. Sunitinib targets (VEGFRs, PDGFRs, C-KIT), FGFRs and cell cycle regulatory proteins were investigated in human tissue microarrays. SDHB immunohistochemistry was used as a surrogate marker for the presence of succinate dehydrogenase mutations. The FGFR4 G388R SNP was also investigated. Sunitinib treatment in vitro decreases cell proliferation mainly by targeting cell cycle, DNA metabolism, and cell organization genes. FGFR1, -2 and -4, VEGFR2, PDGFRα and p16 were overexpressed in primary human pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas. Discordant results were observed for VEGFR1, p27 and p21 (overexpressed in paragangliomas but underexpressed in pheochromoctyomas); PDGFRβ, Rb and Cyclin D1 (overexpressed in paragangliomas only) and FGFR3 (overexpressed in pheochromocytomas and underexpressed in paragangliomas). Low expression of C-KIT, p53, Aurora Kinase A and B was observed. Nuclear FGFR2 expression was associated with increased risk of metastasis (odds ratio [OR]=7.61; p=0.008), as was membranous PDGFRα (OR= 13.71, p=0.015), membranous VEGFR1 (OR=8.01; p=0.037), nuclear MIB1 (OR=1.26, p=0.008) and cytoplasmic p27 (OR=1.037, p=0.030). FGFR3, VEGFR2 and C-KIT levels were associated with decreased risk of metastasis. We provide new insights into the mechanistic actions of sunitinib in pheochromoctyomas and paragangliomas and support current

  18. Alternative transcription initiation leads to expression of a novel ALK isoform in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Thomas; Lee, William; Obenauf, Anna C.; Ran, Leili; Murali, Rajmohan; Zhang, Qi Fan; Wong, Elissa W. P.; Hu, Wenhuo; Scott, Sasinya N.; Shah, Ronak H.; Landa, Iñigo; Button, Julia; Lailler, Nathalie; Sboner, Andrea; Gao, Dong; Murphy, Devan A.; Cao, Zhen; Shukla, Shipra; Hollmann, Travis J.; Wang, Lu; Borsu, Laetitia; Merghoub, Taha; Schwartz, Gary K.; Postow, Michael A.; Ariyan, Charlotte E.; Fagin, James A.; Zheng, Deyou; Ladanyi, Marc; Busam, Klaus J.; Berger, Michael F.; Chen, Yu; Chi, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Activation of oncogenes by mechanisms other than genetic aberrations such as mutations, translocations, or amplifications is largely undefined. Here we report a novel isoform of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) that is expressed in ~ 11% of melanomas and sporadically in other human cancer types, but not in normal tissues. The novel ALK transcript initiates from a de novo alternative transcription initiation (ATI) site in ALK intron 19, and was termed ALKATI. In ALKATI-expressing tumours, the ATI site is enriched for H3K4me3 and RNA polymerase II, chromatin marks characteristic of active transcription initiation sites1. ALKATI is expressed from both ALK alleles, and no recurrent genetic aberrations are found at the ALK locus, indicating that the transcriptional activation is independent of genetic aberrations at the ALK locus. The ALKATI transcript encodes three proteins with molecular weights of 61.1, 60.8 and 58.7 kilodaltons, consisting primarily of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. ALKATI stimulates multiple oncogenic signalling pathways, drives growth-factor-independent cell proliferation in vitro, and promotes tumorigenesis in vivo in mouse models. ALK inhibitors can suppress the kinase activity of ALKATI, suggesting that patients with ALKATI-expressing tumours may benefit from ALK inhibitors. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism of oncogene activation in cancer through de novo alternative transcription initiation. PMID:26444240

  19. Genomic organization of Bruton`s tyrosine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrer, J.; Conley, M.E.

    1994-09-01

    Bruton`s tyrosine kinase (Btk), is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that has been identified as the defective gene in X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). XLA patients have profound hypogammaglobulinemia and markedly reduced numbers of B cells while their T cell and phagocyte numbers remain normal. To determine the genomic organization of Btk, intron/exon borders were identified by sequencing cosmid DNA using cDNA primers. Nineteen exons spanning 37 kb of genomic DNA were identified. All the intron/exon splice junctions followed the GT/AG rule. The translational ATG start codon was in exon 2 which was 6 kb downstream of exon 1. Exon 19, 519 bp in length and 3.8 kb distal to exon 18, was the largest exon and included the 450 bp of the 3{prime} untranslated region. Exons 6 through 18 formed the largest cluster of exons with no intron being longer than 1550 bp. There was no apparent correlation between the exon boundaries of Btk and the functional domains of the protein or the exon boundaries of src, the nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase prototype. The region 500 bp upstream of the presumed transcriptional start site was sequenced and found to have a G+C content of 52%. No TATA-type promoter elements in the -20 bp to -30 bp region were identified. However, at position -48 bp, a TGTGAA motif was found that bears some similarity to the TATA box. This sequence was preceded by a perfect inverted CCAAT box at position -90 bp. Three retinoic acid binding sites were also identified at positions -50 bp, -83 bp and -197 bp. Defining the genomic structure of Btk will permit us to identify regulatory elements in this gene and to identify mutations in genomic DNA of patients with XLA.

  20. Receptor tyrosine kinases: mechanisms of activation and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Stevan R.; Miller, W. Todd

    2008-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are essential components of signal transduction pathways that mediate cell-to-cell communication. These single-pass transmembrane receptors, which bind polypeptide ligands — mainly growth factors — play key roles in processes such as cellular growth, differentiation, metabolism and motility. Recent progress has been achieved towards an understanding of the precise (and varied) mechanisms by which RTKs are activated by ligand binding and by which signals are propagated from the activated receptors to downstream targets in the cell. PMID:17306972

  1. Monitoring Conformational Changes in the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase EGFR.

    PubMed

    Becker, Christian; Öcal, Sinan; Nguyen, Hoang D; Phan, Trang; Keul, Marina; Simard, Jeffrey R; Rauh, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase EGFR is regulated by complex conformational changes, and this conformational control is disturbed in certain types of cancer. Many ligands are known to bind EGFR in its active conformation, thereby preventing ATP from binding. Only a few ligands are known to stabilize EGFR in its inactive conformation, thus providing novel strategies for perturbing EGFR activity. We report a direct binding assay that enables the identification of novel ligands that bind to and stabilize the inactive conformation of EGFR. PMID:26991964

  2. WEE1 Tyrosine Kinase, A Novel Epigenetic Modifier

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Kiran; Mahajan, Nupam P.

    2013-01-01

    The cell cycle requires cells to duplicate their chromatin, DNA, and histones, while retaining a subset of epigenetic marks, in a highly coordinated manner. The WEE1 kinase was identified as an important regulator during S phase, preventing entry into mitosis until DNA replication has been completed. Interestingly, WEE1 has also emerged as a key player in regulating histone synthesis. It phosphorylates histone H2B at tyrosine 37 in the nucleosomes found upstream of the histone gene cluster, which suppresses histone transcription in late S phase. These observations highlight a dual role for WEE1 as both a mitotic gatekeeper and a surveyor of chromatin synthesis, providing a direct link between epigenetics and cell cycle progression. Importantly, this link has implications for the design of novel epigenetic inhibitors targeting cancers that display elevated expression of this kinase. PMID:23537585

  3. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors: Are they real tumor killers?

    PubMed

    Gaumann, Andreas K A; Kiefer, Friedemann; Alfer, Joachim; Lang, Sven A; Geissler, Edward K; Breier, Georg

    2016-02-01

    Inhibiting tumor growth by targeting the tumor vasculature was first proposed by Judah Folkman almost 40 years ago. Since then, different approaches and numerous drugs and agents have been developed to achieve this goal, either with the aim of inhibiting tumor neoangiogenesis or normalizing the tumor vasculature. Among the most promising therapeutic targets are receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), some of which are predominantly expressed on tumor endothelial cells, although they are sometimes also present on tumor cells. The majority of RTK inhibitors investigated over the past two decades competes with ATP at the active site of the kinase and therefore block the phosphorylation of intracellular targets. Some of these drugs have been approved for therapy, whereas others are still in clinical trials. Here, we discuss the scientific basis, current status, problems and future prospects of RTK inhibition in anti-tumor therapy. PMID:25716346

  4. Role of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signaling in Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Zhuang, Shougang

    2016-01-01

    Renal fibrosis can be induced in different renal diseases, but ultimately progresses to end stage renal disease. Although the pathophysiologic process of renal fibrosis have not been fully elucidated, it is characterized by glomerulosclerosis and/or tubular interstitial fibrosis, and is believed to be caused by the proliferation of renal inherent cells, including glomerular epithelial cells, mesangial cells, and endothelial cells, along with defective kidney repair, renal interstitial fibroblasts activation, and extracellular matrix deposition. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate a variety of cell physiological processes, including metabolism, growth, differentiation, and survival. Many studies from in vitro and animal models have provided evidence that RTKs play important roles in the pathogenic process of renal fibrosis. It is also showed that tyrosine kinases inhibitors (TKIs) have anti-fibrotic effects in basic research and clinical trials. In this review, we summarize the evidence for involvement of specific RTKs in renal fibrosis process and the employment of TKIs as a therapeutic approach for renal fibrosis. PMID:27331812

  5. Growth inhibition by tyrosine kinase inhibitors in mesothelioma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nutt, Joyce E; O'Toole, Kieran; Gonzalez, David; Lunec, John

    2009-06-01

    Clinical outcome following chemotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma is poor and improvements are needed. This preclinical study investigates the effect of five tyrosine kinase inhibitors (PTK787, ZD6474, ZD1839, SU6668 and SU11248) on the growth of three mesothelioma cell lines (NCI H226, NCI H28 and MSTO 211H), the presence of growth factor receptors and inhibition of their downstream signalling pathways. GI50 values were determined: ZD6474 and SU11248, mainly VEGFR2 inhibitors, gave the lowest GI50 across all cell lines (3.5-6.9 microM) whereas ZD1839 gave a GI50 in this range only in H28 cells. All cell lines were positive for EGFR, but only H226 cells were positive for VEGFR2 by Western blotting. ZD6474 and ZD1839 inhibited EGF-induced phosphorylation of EGFR, AKT and ERK, whereas VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR2 was completely inhibited with 0.1 microM SU11248. VEGFR2 was detected in tumour samples by immunohistochemistry. VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors warrant further investigation in mesothelioma. PMID:19318229

  6. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors: New class of antimalarials on the horizon?

    PubMed

    Pathak, Vrushali; Colah, Roshan; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2015-08-01

    Development of the antimalarial drug resistant strains has currently become a major public health challenge. There is an urgent need to develop new antimalarial drugs. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are receiving increasing attention as anticancer therapy. It has revolutionarised the management of CML to say the least. TKIs are also increasingly being implicated in complicated but vital life cycle of malaria parasite. Hence we tested two commonly used but different classes of TKIs (imatinib and sorafenib) in-vitro for their antimalarial activity and possible synergistic activity with existing antimalarial drug. Antimalarial activity was tested with the help of modified WHO microtest technique in-vitro for five different Plasmodium falciparum laboratory strains (3D7, Dd2, 7G8, MRC2, PKL9). Imatinib and sorafenib showed a promising antimalarial activity with all the strains. These compounds caused dose dependent inhibition of parasite maturation. The isobologram analysis of the interactions of these TKIs with standard antimalarial drug, artesunate revealed distinct patterns of synergism, additivity and antagonism at different ratios. Imatinib showed worthwhile synergism with artesunate indicating imatinib and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors may have significant antimalarial activity and can be used in combination therapy. PMID:26142327

  7. Role of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signaling in Renal Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Zhuang, Shougang

    2016-01-01

    Renal fibrosis can be induced in different renal diseases, but ultimately progresses to end stage renal disease. Although the pathophysiologic process of renal fibrosis have not been fully elucidated, it is characterized by glomerulosclerosis and/or tubular interstitial fibrosis, and is believed to be caused by the proliferation of renal inherent cells, including glomerular epithelial cells, mesangial cells, and endothelial cells, along with defective kidney repair, renal interstitial fibroblasts activation, and extracellular matrix deposition. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate a variety of cell physiological processes, including metabolism, growth, differentiation, and survival. Many studies from in vitro and animal models have provided evidence that RTKs play important roles in the pathogenic process of renal fibrosis. It is also showed that tyrosine kinases inhibitors (TKIs) have anti-fibrotic effects in basic research and clinical trials. In this review, we summarize the evidence for involvement of specific RTKs in renal fibrosis process and the employment of TKIs as a therapeutic approach for renal fibrosis. PMID:27331812

  8. Spleen tyrosine kinase suppresses osteoblastic differentiation through MAPK and PKCα.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Higuchi, Chikahisa; Nakura, Akio; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2011-08-12

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is a non-receptor protein kinase present in abundance in a wide range of hematopoietic cells. Syk reportedly plays a crucial role in immune signaling in B cells and cells bearing Fcγ-activation receptors. The role of syk in osteoblastic differentiation has not been well elucidated. We report herein the role of syk in osteoblastic differentiation. We investigated the effects of two syk inhibitors on osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. Expression of syk was detected in these two cell lines. Two syk inhibitors stimulated mRNA expression of osteoblastic markers (ALP, Runx2, Osterix). Mineralization of extracellular matrix was also promoted by treatment with syk inhibitors. Knockdown of Syk caused increased mRNA expression of osteoblastic markers. In addition, syk inhibitor and knockdown of Syk suppressed phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase Cα (PKCα). Our results indicate that syk might regulate osteoblastic differentiation through MAPK and PKCα. PMID:21782794

  9. Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibition in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Maddocks, Kami; Jones, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common adult leukemia and remains incurable outside of the setting of allogeneic stem cell transplant. While the standard therapy for both initial and relapsed CLL has traditionally included monoclonal antibody therapy in combination with chemotherapy, there are patients with high-risk disease features including unmutated IgVH, del(11q22) and del(17p13) that are associated with poor overall responses to these therapies with short time to relapse and shortened overall survival. Additionally, many of these therapies have a high rate of infectious toxicity in a population already at increased risk. Targeting the B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway has emerged as a promising therapeutic advance in a variety of B-cell malignancies, including CLL. Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a tyrosine kinase in the BCR pathway critical to the survival of both normal and malignant B cells and inhibition of this kinase has shown to block the progression of CLL. Ibrutinib, a first in class oral inhibitor of Btk, has shown promise as a very effective agent in the treatment of CLL-in both relapsed and upfront therapy, alone and in combination with other therapies, and in patients of all-risk disease-which has led to its approval in relapsed CLL and as frontline therapy in patients with the high-risk del(17p13) disease. Several studies are ongoing to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ibrutinib in combination with chemotherapy as frontline treatment for CLL and investigation into newer-generation Btk inhibitors is also underway. PMID:27040703

  10. Cross talk of tyrosine kinases with the DNA damage signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Kiran; Mahajan, Nupam P.

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases respond to extracellular and intracellular cues by activating specific cellular signaling cascades to regulate cell cycle, growth, proliferation, differentiation and survival. Likewise, DNA damage response proteins (DDR) activated by DNA lesions or chromatin alterations recruit the DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint machinery to restore genome integrity and cellular homeostasis. Several new examples have been uncovered in recent studies which reveal novel epigenetic and non-epigenetic mechanisms by which tyrosine kinases interact with DDR proteins to dictate cell fate, i.e. survival or apoptosis, following DNA damage. These studies reveal the ability of tyrosine kinases to directly regulate the activity of DNA repair and cell cycle check point proteins by tyrosine phosphorylation. In addition, tyrosine kinases epigenetically regulate DNA damage signaling pathways by modifying the core histones as well as chromatin modifiers at critical tyrosine residues. Thus, deregulated tyrosine kinase driven epigenomic alterations have profound implications in cancer, aging and genetic disorders. Consequently, targeting oncogenic tyrosine kinase induced epigenetic alterations has gained significant traction in overcoming cancer cell resistance to various therapies. This review discusses mechanisms by which tyrosine kinases interact with DDR pathways to regulate processes critical for maintaining genome integrity as well as clinical strategies for targeted cancer therapies. PMID:26546517

  11. Cross talk of tyrosine kinases with the DNA damage signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Kiran; Mahajan, Nupam P

    2015-12-15

    Tyrosine kinases respond to extracellular and intracellular cues by activating specific cellular signaling cascades to regulate cell cycle, growth, proliferation, differentiation and survival. Likewise, DNA damage response proteins (DDR) activated by DNA lesions or chromatin alterations recruit the DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint machinery to restore genome integrity and cellular homeostasis. Several new examples have been uncovered in recent studies which reveal novel epigenetic and non-epigenetic mechanisms by which tyrosine kinases interact with DDR proteins to dictate cell fate, i.e. survival or apoptosis, following DNA damage. These studies reveal the ability of tyrosine kinases to directly regulate the activity of DNA repair and cell cycle check point proteins by tyrosine phosphorylation. In addition, tyrosine kinases epigenetically regulate DNA damage signaling pathways by modifying the core histones as well as chromatin modifiers at critical tyrosine residues. Thus, deregulated tyrosine kinase driven epigenomic alterations have profound implications in cancer, aging and genetic disorders. Consequently, targeting oncogenic tyrosine kinase induced epigenetic alterations has gained significant traction in overcoming cancer cell resistance to various therapies. This review discusses mechanisms by which tyrosine kinases interact with DDR pathways to regulate processes critical for maintaining genome integrity as well as clinical strategies for targeted cancer therapies. PMID:26546517

  12. Unlocking Doors without Keys: Activation of Src by Truncated C-terminal Intracellular Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Lacking Tyrosine Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mezquita, Belén; Mezquita, Pau; Pau, Montserrat; Mezquita, Jovita; Mezquita, Cristóbal

    2014-01-01

    One of the best examples of the renaissance of Src as an open door to cancer has been the demonstration that just five min of Src activation is sufficient for transformation and also for induction and maintenance of cancer stem cells [1]. Many tyrosine kinase receptors, through the binding of their ligands, become the keys that unlock the structure of Src and activate its oncogenic transduction pathways. Furthermore, intracellular isoforms of these receptors, devoid of any tyrosine kinase activity, still retain the ability to unlock Src. This has been shown with a truncated isoform of KIT (tr-KIT) and a truncated isoform of VEGFR-1 (i21-VEGFR-1), which are intracellular and require no ligand binding, but are nonetheless able to activate Src and induce cell migration and invasion of cancer cells. Expression of the i21-VEGFR-1 is upregulated by the Notch signaling pathway and repressed by miR-200c and retinoic acid in breast cancer cells. Both Notch inhibitors and retinoic acid have been proposed as potential therapies for invasive breast cancer. PMID:24709904

  13. Novel Anthraquinone-based Derivatives as Potent Inhibitors for Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Stasevych, M.; Zvarych, V.; Lunin, V.; Halenova, T.; Savchuk, O.; Dudchak, O.; Vovk, M.; Novikov, V.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of new derivatives of 9,10-anthraquinone with benzoylthiourea, thiazole, triazole and amino acid fragments on the activity of membrane-associated tyrosine kinases was investigated. Inhibitors of protein tyrosine kinase activity of the membrane fraction, as promising agents to search for new potential anticancer agents among the studied compounds, were discovered. PMID:26798182

  14. The Next Wave of EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Enter the Clinic.

    PubMed

    Politi, Katerina; Ayeni, Deborah; Lynch, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    The T790M mutation in EGFR accounts for approximately half of all lung cancer cases with acquired resistance to the current clinical EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant lung tumors, rociletinib and AZD9291 are highly active when T790M is present and modestly active when T790M is absent. PMID:26058074

  15. Protein-tyrosine phosphorylation interaction network in Bacillus subtilis reveals new substrates, kinase activators and kinase cross-talk

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Pigeonneau, Nathalie; Ventroux, Magali; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Bidnenko, Vladimir; Mijakovic, Ivan; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Signal transduction in eukaryotes is generally transmitted through phosphorylation cascades that involve a complex interplay of transmembrane receptors, protein kinases, phosphatases and their targets. Our previous work indicated that bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases and phosphatases may exhibit similar properties, since they act on many different substrates. To capture the complexity of this phosphorylation-based network, we performed a comprehensive interactome study focused on the protein-tyrosine kinases and phosphatases in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. The resulting network identified many potential new substrates of kinases and phosphatases, some of which were experimentally validated. Our study highlighted the role of tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases and phosphatases in DNA metabolism, transcriptional control and cell division. This interaction network reveals significant crosstalk among different classes of kinases. We found that tyrosine kinases can bind to several modulators, transmembrane or cytosolic, consistent with a branching of signaling pathways. Most particularly, we found that the division site regulator MinD can form a complex with the tyrosine kinase PtkA and modulate its activity in vitro. In vivo, it acts as a scaffold protein which anchors the kinase at the cell pole. This network highlighted a role of tyrosine phosphorylation in the spatial regulation of the Z-ring during cytokinesis. PMID:25374563

  16. Regulation of therapeutic resistance in cancers by receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei-Kuang; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2016-01-01

    In response to DNA damage lesions due to cellular stress, DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are activated to promote cell survival and genetic stability or unrepaired lesion-induced cell death. Current cancer treatments predominantly utilize DNA damaging agents, such as irradiation and chemotherapy drugs, to inhibit cancer cell proliferation and induce cell death through the activation of DDR. However, a portion of cancer patients is reported to develop therapeutic resistance to these DDR-inducing agents. One significant resistance mechanism in cancer cells is oncogenic kinase overexpression, which promotes cell survival by enhancing DNA damage repair pathways and evading cell cycle arrest. Among the oncogenic kinases, overexpression of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is reported in many of solid tumors, and numerous clinical trials targeting RTKs are currently in progress. As the emerging trend in cancer treatment combines DNA damaging agents and RTK inhibitors, it is important to understand the substrates of RTKs relative to the DDR pathways. In addition, alteration of RTK expression and their phosphorylated substrates can serve as biomarkers to stratify patients for combination therapies. In this review, we summarize the deleterious effects of RTKs on the DDR pathways and the emerging biomarkers for personalized therapy. PMID:27186434

  17. Anterograde Jelly belly ligand to Alk receptor signaling at developing synapses is regulated by Mind the gap

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbough, Jeffrey; Broadie, Kendal

    2010-01-01

    Bidirectional trans-synaptic signals induce synaptogenesis and regulate subsequent synaptic maturation. Presynaptically secreted Mind the gap (Mtg) molds the synaptic cleft extracellular matrix, leading us to hypothesize that Mtg functions to generate the intercellular environment required for efficient signaling. We show in Drosophila that secreted Jelly belly (Jeb) and its receptor tyrosine kinase Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk) are localized to developing synapses. Jeb localizes to punctate aggregates in central synaptic neuropil and neuromuscular junction (NMJ) presynaptic terminals. Secreted Jeb and Mtg accumulate and colocalize extracellularly in surrounding synaptic boutons. Alk concentrates in postsynaptic domains, consistent with an anterograde, trans-synaptic Jeb-Alk signaling pathway at developing synapses. Jeb synaptic expression is increased in Alk mutants, consistent with a requirement for Alk receptor function in Jeb uptake. In mtg null mutants, Alk NMJ synaptic levels are reduced and Jeb expression is dramatically increased. NMJ synapse morphology and molecular assembly appear largely normal in jeb and Alk mutants, but larvae exhibit greatly reduced movement, suggesting impaired functional synaptic development. jeb mutant movement is significantly rescued by neuronal Jeb expression. jeb and Alk mutants display normal NMJ postsynaptic responses, but a near loss of patterned, activity-dependent NMJ transmission driven by central excitatory output. We conclude that Jeb-Alk expression and anterograde trans-synaptic signaling are modulated by Mtg and play a key role in establishing functional synaptic connectivity in the developing motor circuit. PMID:20876658

  18. The bHLH transcription factor Hand is regulated by Alk in the Drosophila embryonic gut

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, Gaurav K.; Palmer, Ruth H. . E-mail: Ruth.Palmer@ucmp.umu.se

    2006-12-29

    During embryonic development the midgut visceral muscle is formed by fusion of cells within the visceral mesoderm, a process initiated by the specification of a specialised cell type, the founder cell, within this tissue. Activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk) in the developing visceral muscle of Drosophila melanogaster initiates a signal transduction pathway required for muscle fusion. In this paper, we have investigated downstream components which are regulated by this novel signalling pathway. Here we show that Alk-mediated signal transduction drives the expression of the bHLH transcription factor Hand in vivo. Loss of Alk function results in a complete lack of Hand expression in this tissue, whereas Alk gain of function results in an expansion of Hand expression. Finally, we have investigated the process of muscle fusion in the gut of Hand mutant animals and can find no obvious defects in this process, suggesting that Hand is not critical for visceral muscle fusion per se.

  19. Tyrosine Kinase Receptor Landscape in Lung Cancer: Therapeutical Implications.

    PubMed

    Quintanal-Villalonga, A; Paz-Ares, Luis; Ferrer, Irene; Molina-Pinelo, S

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease responsible for the most cases of cancer-related deaths. The majority of patients are clinically diagnosed at advanced stages, with a poor survival rate. For this reason, the identification of oncodrivers and novel biomarkers is decisive for the future clinical management of this pathology. The rise of high throughput technologies popularly referred to as "omics" has accelerated the discovery of new biomarkers and drivers for this pathology. Within them, tyrosine kinase receptors (TKRs) have proven to be of importance as diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive tools and, due to their molecular nature, as therapeutic targets. Along this review, the role of TKRs in the different lung cancer histologies, research on improvement of anti-TKR therapy, and the current approaches to manage anti-TKR resistance will be discussed. PMID:27528792

  20. Recent developments in receptor tyrosine kinases targeted anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Samir H.; Singh, Ratn D.; Joshi, Dilip V.; Patel, Hitesh B.; Mody, Shailesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Novel concepts and understanding of receptors lead to discoveries and optimization of many small molecules and antibodies as anti-cancerous drugs. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are such a promising class of receptors under the investigation in past three decades. RTKs are one of the essential mediators of cell signaling mechanism for various cellular processes. Transformations such as overexpression, dysregulation, or mutations of RTKs may result into malignancy, and thus are an important target for anticancer therapy. Numerous subfamilies of RTKs, such as epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptors, insulin-like growth factor receptor, and hepatocyte growth factor receptor, have been being investigated in recent years as target for anticancer therapy. The present review focuses several small molecules drugs as well as monoclonal antibodies targeting aforesaid subfamilies either approved or under investigation to treat the various cancers. PMID:27051190

  1. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Molecular Switches Regulating CNS Axon Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vigneswara, Vasanthy; Kundi, Sarina; Ahmed, Zubair

    2012-01-01

    The poor or lack of injured adult central nervous system (CNS) axon regeneration results in devastating consequences and poor functional recovery. The interplay between the intrinsic and extrinsic factors contributes to robust inhibition of axon regeneration of injured CNS neurons. The insufficient or lack of trophic support for injured neurons is considered as one of the major obstacles contributing to their failure to survive and regrow their axons after injury. In the CNS, many of the signalling pathways associated with neuronal survival and axon regeneration are regulated by several classes of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) that respond to a variety of ligands. This paper highlights and summarises the most relevant recent findings pertinent to different classes of the RTK family of molecules, with a particular focus on elucidating their role in CNS axon regeneration. PMID:22848811

  2. Analysis of receptor tyrosine kinase internalization using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Hill, Kristen S; Elferink, Lisa A

    2008-01-01

    The internalization of activated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) by endocytosis and their subsequent down regulation in lysosomes plays a critical role in regulating the duration and intensity of downstream signaling events. Uncoupling of the RTK cMet from ligand-induced degradation was recently shown to correlate with sustained receptor signaling and increased cell tumorigenicity, suggesting that the corruption of these endocytic mechanisms could contribute to increased cMet signaling in metastatic cancers. To understand how cMet signaling for normal cell growth is controlled by endocytosis and how these mechanisms are dysregulated in metastatic cancers, we developed flow cytometry-based assays to examine cMet internalization. PMID:19066037

  3. Mechanisms of resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lihua; Fu, Liwu

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is driven by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs, e.g., gefitinib and elrotinib) have been effectively used for clinical treatment. However, patients eventually develop drug resistance. Resistance to EGFR-TKIs is inevitable due to various mechanisms, such as the secondary mutation (T790M), activation of alternative pathways (c-Met, HGF, AXL), aberrance of the downstream pathways (K-RAS mutations, loss of PTEN), impairment of the EGFR-TKIs-mediated apoptosis pathway (BCL2-like 11/BIM deletion polymorphism), histologic transformation, ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter effusion, etc. Here we review and summarize the known resistant mechanisms to EGFR-TKIs and provide potential targets for development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26579470

  4. Tyrosine Kinase Receptor Landscape in Lung Cancer: Therapeutical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Quintanal-Villalonga, A.; Paz-Ares, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease responsible for the most cases of cancer-related deaths. The majority of patients are clinically diagnosed at advanced stages, with a poor survival rate. For this reason, the identification of oncodrivers and novel biomarkers is decisive for the future clinical management of this pathology. The rise of high throughput technologies popularly referred to as “omics” has accelerated the discovery of new biomarkers and drivers for this pathology. Within them, tyrosine kinase receptors (TKRs) have proven to be of importance as diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive tools and, due to their molecular nature, as therapeutic targets. Along this review, the role of TKRs in the different lung cancer histologies, research on improvement of anti-TKR therapy, and the current approaches to manage anti-TKR resistance will be discussed. PMID:27528792

  5. Understanding the Interplay between Expression, Mutation and Activity of ALK Receptor in Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells for Clinical Application of Small-Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Peron, Marica; Lovisa, Federica; Poli, Elena; Basso, Giuseppe; Bonvini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Background Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) have a central role in cancer initiation and progression, since changes in their expression and activity potentially results in cell transformation. This concept is essential from a therapeutic standpoint, as clinical evidence indicates that tumours carrying deregulated RTKs are particularly susceptible to their activity but also to their inhibition. Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is an aggressive childhood cancer where emerging therapies rely on the use kinase inhibitors, and among druggable kinases ALK represents a potential therapeutic target to commit efforts against. However, the functional relevance of ALK in RMS is not known, likewise the multi-component deregulated RTK profile to which ALK belongs. Methods In this study we used RMS cell lines representative of the alveolar and embrional histotype and looked at ALK intracellular localization, activity and cell signalling. Results We found that ALK was properly located at the plasma membrane of RMS cells, though in an unphosphorylated and inactive state due to intracellular tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) activity. Indeed, increase of ALK phosphorylation was observed upon PTPase inhibition, as well as after ligand binding or protein overexpression. In these conditions, ALK signalling proceeded through the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT pathways, and it was susceptible to ATP-competitive inhibitors exposure. However, drug-induced growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis did not correlate with ALK expression only, but relied also on the expression of other RTKs with akin drug binding affinity. Indeed, analysis of baseline and inducible RTK phosphorylation confirmed that RMS cells were susceptible to ALK kinase inhibitors even in the absence of the primary intended target, due to the presence of compensatory RTKs signalling pathways. Conclusions These data, hence, provided evidences of a potentially active role of ALK in RMS cells, but also suggest caution in considering ALK

  6. Presence of anaplastic lymphoma kinase in inflammatory breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Fredika M; Petricoin Iii, Emanuel F; Van Laere, Steven J; Bertucci, Francois; Chu, Khoi; Fernandez, Sandra V; Mu, Zhaomei; Alpaugh, Katherine; Pei, Jianming; Circo, Rita; Wulfkuhle, Julia; Ye, Zaiming; Boley, Kimberly M; Liu, Hui; Moraes, Ricardo; Zhang, Xuejun; Demaria, Ruggero; Barsky, Sanford H; Sun, Guoxian; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Although Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) is recognized as the most metastatic variant of locally advanced breast cancer, the molecular basis for the distinct clinical presentation and accelerated program of metastasis of IBC is unknown. Reverse phase protein arrays revealed activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and biochemically-linked downstream signaling molecules including JAK1/STAT3, AKT, mTor, PDK1, and AMPKβ in pre-clinical models of IBC. To evaluate the clinical relevance of ALK in IBC, analysis of 25 IBC patient tumors using the FDA approved diagnostic test for ALK genetic abnormalities was performed. These studies revealed that 20/25 (80%) had either increased ALK copy number, low level ALK gene amplification, or ALK gene expression, with a prevalence of ALK alterations in basal-like IBC. One of 25 patients was identified as having an EML4-ALK translocation. The generality of gains in ALK copy number in basal-like breast tumors with IBC characteristics was demonstrated by analysis of 479 breast tumors using the TGCA data-base and our newly developed 79 IBC-like gene signature. The small molecule dual tyrosine kinase cMET/ALK inhibitor, Crizotinib (PF-02341066/Xalkori®, Pfizer Inc), induced both cytotoxicity (IC50 = 0.89 μM) and apoptosis, with abrogation of pALK signaling in IBC tumor cells and in FC-IBC01 tumor xenograft model, a new IBC model derived from pleural effusion cells isolated from an ALK(+) IBC patient. Based on these studies, IBC patients are currently being evaluated for the presence of ALK genetic abnormalities and when eligible, are being enrolled into clinical trials evaluating ALK targeted therapeutics. PMID:24102046

  7. The EGFR Family: Not So Prototypical Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lemmon, Mark A.; Schlessinger, Joseph; Ferguson, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was among the first receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) for which ligand binding was studied and for which the importance of ligand-induced dimerization was established. As a result, EGFR and its relatives have frequently been termed “prototypical” RTKs. Many years of mechanistic studies, however, have revealed that—far from being prototypical—the EGFR family is quite unique. As we discuss in this review, the EGFR family uses a distinctive “receptor-mediated” dimerization mechanism, with ligand binding inducing a dramatic conformational change that exposes a dimerization arm. Intracellular kinase domain regulation in this family is also unique, being driven by allosteric changes induced by asymmetric dimer formation rather than the more typical activation-loop phosphorylation. EGFR family members also distinguish themselves from other RTKs in having an intracellular juxtamembrane (JM) domain that activates (rather than autoinhibits) the receptor and a very large carboxy-terminal tail that contains autophosphorylation sites and serves an autoregulatory function. We discuss recent advances in mechanistic aspects of all of these components of EGFR family members, attempting to integrate them into a view of how RTKs in this important class are regulated at the cell surface. PMID:24691965

  8. Detection of rearrangement of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and mutation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in primary pulmonary lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Lin, Yongbin; Cai, Qingqing; Long, Hao; Zhang, Yu; Rong, Tiehua

    2015-01-01

    Background Primary pulmonary lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma (LELC) is a distinct rare subtype of lung cancer. The prevalence of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation in primary pulmonary LELC had not been thoroughly investigated. Methods We investigated a cohort of 42 patients with primary pulmonary LELC and genotyped for ALK rearrangement and EGFR mutation. ALK rearrangement was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). EGFR mutational analysis of exons 18 through 21 was analyzed by TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNAs (EBERs) showed positive signals in all 42 patients. By immunohistochemistry staining, all patients demonstrated positive expression of CK5/6 and P63, but almost all patients were negative for TTF-1 (34/34, 100%) or CK7 (34/35, 97.1%). None of the 42 patients had ALK rearrangement. Of 42 patients tested, only one patient (2.4%) harbored L858R mutation and gefitinib was applied to this case, however no objective response was observed and the progression free survival (PFS) time was only 1 month. Conclusions Primary pulmonary LELC is a unique histological subtype of lung cancer. ALK rearrangement and EGFR mutation are lack and they may not be the oncogenic driver gene in pulmonary LELC. Future efforts should be made to explore other oncogenic driver gene to guide targeted therapy in this rare disease to determine the optimal treatment. Keywords Pulmonary lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma (LELC); anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK); epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR); targeted therapy; Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) PMID:26543602

  9. The role of non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases in the excitotoxicity induced by the overactivation of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongjun; Chen, You; Zhan, Liying; Zhang, Linan; Hu, Jie; Gao, Zibin

    2016-04-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is one of the primary modes of regulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. The non-receptor tyrosine kinases are one of the two types of protein tyrosine kinases that are involved in this process. The overactivation of NMDA receptors is a primary reason for neuron death following cerebral ischemia. Many studies have illustrated the important role of non-receptor tyrosine kinases in ischemia insults. This review introduces the roles of Src, Fyn, focal adhesion kinase, and proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 in the excitotoxicity induced by the overactivation of NMDA receptors following cerebral ischemia. PMID:26540220

  10. Antigen receptor signaling: integration of protein tyrosine kinase functions.

    PubMed

    Tamir, I; Cambier, J C

    1998-09-17

    Antigen receptors on T and B cells function to transduce signals leading to a variety of biologic responses minimally including antigen receptor editing, apoptotic death, developmental progression, cell activation, proliferation and survival. The response to antigen depends upon antigen affinity and valence, involvement of coreceptors in signaling and differentiative stage of the responding cell. The requirement that these receptors integrate signals that drive an array of responses may explain their evolved structural complexity. Antigen receptors are composed of multiple subunits compartmentalized to provide antigen recognition and signal transduction function. In lieu of on-board enzymatic activity these receptors rely on associated Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) for their signaling function. By aggregating the receptors, and hence their appended PTKs, antigens induce PTK transphosphorylation, activating them to phosphorylate the receptor within conserved motifs termed Immunoreceptor Tyrosine-based Activation Motifs (ITAMs) found in transducer subunits. The tyrosyl phosphorylated ITAMs then interact with Src Homology 2 (SH2) domains within the PTKs leading to their further activation. As receptor phosphorylation is amplified, other effectors, such as Shc, dock by virtue of SH2 binding, and serve, in-turn, as substrates for these PTKs. This sequence of events not only provides a signal amplification mechanism by combining multiple consecutive steps with positive feedback, but also allows for signal diversification by differential recruitment of effectors that provide access to distinct parallel downstream signaling pathways. The subject of antigen receptor signaling has been recently reviewed in depth (DeFranco, 1997; Kurosaki, 1997). Here we discuss the biochemical basis of antigen receptor signal transduction, using the B cell receptor (BCR) as a paradigm, with specific emphasis on the involved PTKs. We review several specific mechanisms by which responses

  11. EML4-ALK translocation is associated with early onset of disease and other clinicopathological features in Chinese female never-smokers with non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    REN, WEIHONG; ZHANG, BO; MA, JIE; LI, WENCAI; LAN, JIANYUN; MEN, HUI; ZHANG, QINXIAN

    2015-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) translocation is resistant to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), including gefitinib and erlotinib, but responds to the ALK-TKI crizotinib. Characterization of EML4-ALK translocation may provide invaluable information to facilitate disease diagnosis and improve the outcome of customized treatment. Although the occurrence of EML4-ALK translocation is likely to be affected by the smoking habits and gender of patients, the translocation has not been characterized extensively in female never-smokers with NSCLC. Therefore, 280 female never-smokers that were diagnosed with NSCLC were enrolled in the present study, and characteristics of EML4-ALK translocation, including the frequency, were determined in these NSCLC patients. EML4-ALK fusion variants were detected using Multiplex one-step reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and subsequently confirmed by DNA sequencing and Vysis ALK Break Apart fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The EML4-ALK fusion variants were detected in 21 carcinoma tissue specimens, accounting for 7.5% of the enrolled patients. Out of these patients with EML4-ALK fusion variants, EML4-ALK fusion variant 1 was identified in 12 patients, indicating that variant 1 is the most common type of EML4-ALK fusion gene in the present cohort of patients. ALK mRNA was aberrantly expressed in all the tissues with EML4-ALK translocation, but not in the carcinoma tissues without EML4-ALK translocation. In addition, the EML4-ALK translocation was more frequently found in younger patients. The median age of patients with EML4-ALK translocation was 50.95±2.29 years, which was significantly younger (P<0.01) than the median age of the patients without EML4-ALK translocation (57.15±0.56). The EML4-ALK translocation was detected exclusively in undifferentiated tumors that were graded as

  12. Cross-phosphorylation of bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases on key regulatory residues

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Pigeonneau, Nathalie; Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Dobrinic, Paula; Macek, Boris; Franjevic, Damjan; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Francoise; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria possess protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases which resemble eukaryal kinases in their capacity to phosphorylate multiple substrates. We hypothesized that the analogy might extend further, and bacterial kinases may also undergo mutual phosphorylation and activation, which is currently considered as a hallmark of eukaryal kinase networks. In order to test this hypothesis, we explored the capacity of all members of four different classes of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases present in the firmicute model organism Bacillus subtilis to phosphorylate each other in vitro and interact with each other in vivo. The interactomics data suggested a high degree of connectivity among all types of kinases, while phosphorylation assays revealed equally wide-spread cross-phosphorylation events. Our findings suggest that the Hanks-type kinases PrkC, PrkD, and YabT exhibit the highest capacity to phosphorylate other B. subtilis kinases, while the BY-kinase PtkA and the two-component-like kinases RsbW and SpoIIAB show the highest propensity to be phosphorylated by other kinases. Analysis of phosphorylated residues on several selected recipient kinases suggests that most cross-phosphorylation events concern key regulatory residues. Therefore, cross-phosphorylation events are very likely to influence the capacity of recipient kinases to phosphorylate substrates downstream in the signal transduction cascade. We therefore conclude that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases probably engage in a network-type behavior previously described only in eukaryal cells. PMID:25278935

  13. Precision medicine in NSCLC and pathology: how does ALK fit in the pathway?

    PubMed

    Kerr, K M; López-Ríos, F

    2016-09-01

    The evolution of personalised medicine in lung cancer has dramatically impacted diagnostic pathology. Current challenges centre on the growing demands placed on small tissue samples by molecular diagnostic techniques. In this review, expert recommendations are provided regarding successful identification of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Steps to correctly process and conserve tumour tissue during diagnostic testing are essential to ensure tissue availability. For example, storing extra tissue sections ready for molecular diagnostic steps allows faster testing and preserves tissue. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) is commonly used to detect ALK rearrangements, with most laboratories favouring screening by immunohistochemistry followed by a confirmatory FISH assay. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction can also identify ALK fusion gene mRNA transcripts but can be limited by the quality of RNA and the risk that rare fusion variants may not be captured. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has recently provided an alternative method for detecting ALK rearrangements. While current experience is limited, NGS is set to become the most efficient approach as an increasing number of genetic abnormalities is required to be tested. Upfront, reflex testing for ALK gene rearrangement should become routine as ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy moves into the first-line setting. Guidelines recommend that EGFR and ALK tests are carried out in parallel on all confirmed and potential adenocarcinomas, and this is more efficient in terms of tissue usage and testing turnaround time for both of these actionable gene alterations. The practice of sequential testing is not recommended. Identification of ALK rearrangements is now essential for the diagnosis of NSCLC, underpinned by the benefits of ALK inhibitors. As scientific understanding and diagnostic technology develops, ALK testing will continue to be an

  14. Mechanisms of Activation of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Monomers or Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Ichiro N.

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play essential roles in cellular processes, including metabolism, cell-cycle control, survival, proliferation, motility and differentiation. RTKs are all synthesized as single-pass transmembrane proteins and bind polypeptide ligands, mainly growth factors. It has long been thought that all RTKs, except for the insulin receptor (IR) family, are activated by ligand-induced dimerization of the receptors. An increasing number of diverse studies, however, indicate that RTKs, previously thought to exist as monomers, are present as pre-formed, yet inactive, dimers prior to ligand binding. The non-covalently associated dimeric structures are reminiscent of those of the IR family, which has a disulfide-linked dimeric structure. Furthermore, recent progress in structural studies has provided insight into the underpinnings of conformational changes during the activation of RTKs. In this review, I discuss two mutually exclusive models for the mechanisms of activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, the neurotrophin receptor and IR families, based on these new insights. PMID:24758840

  15. Have adjuvant tyrosine kinase inhibitors lost their shine?

    PubMed Central

    Sabari, Joshua K.

    2016-01-01

    Despite broad advances in molecularly targeted therapies, lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer related mortality in the United States. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations occur in approximately 17% of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the US population. The remarkable efficacy of small-molecule EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in this unique subset of patients has revolutionized the therapeutic approach to lung cancer. The success of these agents in the metastatic setting leads to the logical question of what role these drugs may have in the adjuvant setting for patients with earlier stage disease. RADIANT, an international randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled phase III study in patients with completely resected stage IB to IIIA NSLC whose tumors expressed EGFR by IHC and EGFR amplification by FISH, attempted to answer the question of whether erlotinib would improve disease free survival and overall survival in the adjuvant setting. While RADIANT does not conclude for or against adjuvant use of EGFR-TKIs, all data points towards benefit in a selected population. As clinicians, we must continue to enroll to potentially practice changing therapeutic neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy studies internationally. PMID:27568486

  16. Have adjuvant tyrosine kinase inhibitors lost their shine?

    PubMed

    Sabari, Joshua K; Chaft, Jamie E

    2016-08-01

    Despite broad advances in molecularly targeted therapies, lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer related mortality in the United States. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations occur in approximately 17% of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the US population. The remarkable efficacy of small-molecule EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in this unique subset of patients has revolutionized the therapeutic approach to lung cancer. The success of these agents in the metastatic setting leads to the logical question of what role these drugs may have in the adjuvant setting for patients with earlier stage disease. RADIANT, an international randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled phase III study in patients with completely resected stage IB to IIIA NSLC whose tumors expressed EGFR by IHC and EGFR amplification by FISH, attempted to answer the question of whether erlotinib would improve disease free survival and overall survival in the adjuvant setting. While RADIANT does not conclude for or against adjuvant use of EGFR-TKIs, all data points towards benefit in a selected population. As clinicians, we must continue to enroll to potentially practice changing therapeutic neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy studies internationally. PMID:27568486

  17. Mutations in Bruton's tyrosine kinase impair IgA responses.

    PubMed

    Mitsuiki, Noriko; Yang, Xi; Bartol, Sophinus J W; Grosserichter-Wagener, Christina; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Takada, Hidetoshi; Imai, Kohsuke; Kanegane, Hirokazu; Mizutani, Shuki; van der Burg, Mirjam; van Zelm, Menno C; Ohara, Osamu; Morio, Tomohiro

    2015-03-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), and is characterized by markedly decreased numbers of blood B cells and an absence of all immunoglobulin isotypes. We performed whole exome sequencing in a male pediatric patient with dysgammaglobulinemia with IgA deficiency. Genetic analysis revealed a BTK missense mutation (Thr316Ala). To investigate whether a BTK mutation underlay this antibody deficiency with marked decrease of IgA in this patient, we performed functional analyses of B cells and phagocytes, and molecular analyses of somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination. The BTK missense mutation resulted in B cells with reduced BTK and high IgM expression. Equal proportions of CD19(low) and CD19(normal) fractions were observed, and both included naïve and memory B cells. Calcium influx and phospholipase Cγ2 phosphorylation upon IgM stimulation were marginally impaired in CD19(low), but not in CD19(+) B cells. Similar to XLA patients, IgA transcripts showed low SHM levels, whereas IgG transcripts were hardly affected. Our analyses suggest that the BTK mutation likely underlies the disease in this case, and that hypomorphic BTK mutations can result in normal circulating B cell numbers, but specifically impair IgA responses. PMID:25589397

  18. Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Whang, Jennifer A; Chang, Betty Y

    2014-08-01

    The function and role of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) in human B cell development was demonstrated by its association with X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) manifested by a substantial reduction in immunoglobulins and B cells. BTK has a crucial role in pre-B cell receptor (BCR) and BCR signaling during normal B cell development and activation. Aberrant BCR signaling is associated with autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, BTK is also expressed in myeloid cell populations, including monocytes, macrophages, neutrophils and mast cells. These innate cells infiltrate the synovial cavity and produce inflammatory cytokines, aggravating arthritic symptoms. In myeloid cell populations, BTK functions downstream of the Fcγ receptors (FcγR) and Fcɛ receptors (FcɛR). In the absence of BTK, FcR-mediated functions, such as cytokine production, are impaired. In addition, Xid mice, which have a mutation in BTK, have decreased susceptibility to developing collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Given that BTK is involved in multiple signaling pathways downstream of the BCR and FcR, it is an attractive therapeutic target for RA. PMID:24721226

  19. Estrus cycle effect on muscle tyrosine kinase activity in bitches.

    PubMed

    Gomes Pöppl, Álan; Costa Valle, Sandra; Hilário Díaz González, Félix; de Castro Beck, Carlos Afonso; Kucharski, Luiz Carlos; Silveira Martins Da Silva, Roselis

    2012-03-01

    Estrus cycle is a well recognized cause of insulin resistance in bitches. The insulin receptor (IR) as well as the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor belong to the same subfamily of tyrosine kinase (TK) receptors. The objective of this study was to evaluate basal TK activity in muscle tissue of bitches during the estrus cycle. Twenty-four bitches were used in the study (7 in anestrus, 7 in estrus, and 10 in diestrus). Muscle samples, taken after spaying surgery to determine TK activity, were immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen and then stored at -80°C until the membranes were prepared by sequential centrifugation after being homogenized. TK activity was determined by Poly (Glu 4:Tyr 1) phosphorylation and expressed in cpm/μg of protein. TK activity was significantly lower (P < 0.001) in the animals in estrus (104.5 ± 11.9 cpm/μg of protein) and diestrus (94.5 ± 16.9 cpm/μg of protein) when compared with bitches in anestrus (183.2 ± 39.2 cpm/μg of protein). These results demonstrate, for the first time, lower basal TK activity in the muscle tissue of female dogs during estrus and diestrus, which may represent lower insulin signaling capacity, opening a new field of investigation into the molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance in dogs. PMID:22139063

  20. Studying N-linked glycosylation of receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Itkonen, Harri M; Mills, Ian G

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic alterations have been identified as a frequent event in cancer. This is often associated with increased flux through glycolysis, and also a secondary pathway to glycolysis, hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP). HBP provides substrate for N-linked glycosylation, which occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. N-linked glycosylation supports protein folding and correct sorting of proteins to plasma membrane and secretion. This process generates complex glycoforms, which can be recognized by other proteins and glycosylation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) can also regulate their plasma-membrane retention time. Of special interest for experimental biologists, plants produce proteins, termed lectins, which bind with high specificity to glyco-conjugates. For the purposes of molecular biology, plant lectins can be conjugated to different moieties, such as agarose beads, which enable precipitation of specifically glycosylated proteins. In this chapter, we describe in detail how to perform pull-down experiments with commercially available lectins to identify changes in the glycosylation of RTKs. PMID:25319893

  1. Cheminfomatic-based Drug Discovery of Human Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Reid, Terry-Elinor; Fortunak, Joseph M; Wutoh, Anthony; Simon Wang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) are essential components for regulating cell-cell signaling and communication events in cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, survival and metabolism. Deregulation of RTKs and their associated signaling pathways can lead to a wide variety of human diseases such as immunodeficiency, diabetes, arterosclerosis, psoriasis and cancer. Thus RTKs have become one of the most important drug targets families in recent decade. Pharmaceutical companies have dedicated their research efforts towards the discovery of small-molecule inhibitors of RTKs, many of which had been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) or are currently in clinical trials. The great successes in the development of small-molecule inhibitors of RTKs are largely attributed to the use of modern cheminformatic approaches to identifying lead scaffolds. Those include the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling, as well as the structure-, and ligand-based pharmacophore modeling techniques in this case. Herein we inspected the literature thoroughly in an effort to conduct a comparative analysis of major findings regarding the essential structure-activity relationships (SARs)/pharmacophore features of known active RTK inhibitors, most of which were collected from cheminformatic modeling approaches. PMID:26369823

  2. Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Varma, Gaurav; Johnson, Tyler P; Advani, Ranjana H

    2016-07-01

    The development of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors and their introduction into clinical practice represent a major advance in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and other B-cell lymphomas. Although ibrutinib is the only BTK inhibitor that has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, several others are under investigation. Ibrutinib is currently approved for use in relapsed/refractory CLL, CLL with 17p deletion (del[17p]), relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma, and Waldenström macroglobulinemia. Although it is clear that ibrutinib has altered treatment paradigms and outcomes in these diseases, several questions remain regarding (1) its role in frontline vs salvage therapy; (2) its use as a single agent vs in combination with biologic agents, other small molecules, or traditional chemoimmunotherapy; (3) the optimal duration of treatment; and (4) the treatment of patients who cannot tolerate or have disease resistant to ibrutinib. Because sparse clinical data are available on other BTK inhibitors, it is unclear at present whether their clinical efficacy and toxicity will differ from those of ibrutinib. PMID:27379948

  3. Role of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases and Their Ligands in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-García, Estefanía; Saceda, Miguel; Martínez-Lacaci, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most frequent, aggressive and fatal type of brain tumor. Glioblastomas are characterized by their infiltrating nature, high proliferation rate and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. Recently, oncologic therapy experienced a rapid evolution towards “targeted therapy,” which is the employment of drugs directed against particular targets that play essential roles in proliferation, survival and invasiveness of cancer cells. A number of molecules involved in signal transduction pathways are used as molecular targets for the treatment of various tumors. In fact, inhibitors of these molecules have already entered the clinic or are undergoing clinical trials. Cellular receptors are clear examples of such targets and in the case of glioblastoma multiforme, some of these receptors and their ligands have become relevant. In this review, the importance of glioblastoma multiforme in signaling pathways initiated by extracellular tyrosine kinase receptors such as EGFR, PDGFR and IGF-1R will be discussed. We will describe their ligands, family members, structure, activation mechanism, downstream molecules, as well as the interaction among these pathways. Lastly, we will provide an up-to-date review of the current targeted therapies in cancer, in particular glioblastoma that employ inhibitors of these pathways and their benefits. PMID:24709958

  4. Emerging Role of Tyrosine Kinases as Drugable Targets in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Na, Il-Kang; le Coutre, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases (TKs) play a significant role in cancerogenesis and cancer cell function. Initial developments in this field go back to the early 80s, but the success story really started with the selective BCR-ABL inhibitor, imatinib. Owing to the cancer-driving role of BCR-ABL in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), excellent response rates lead to fast FDA approval in both the first and second treatments of CML patients. Since then, numerous TKs were identified. TK inhibitors have been developed accordingly, and technology to test for ideal drug–target interactions has profoundly improved. By now, medical oncologists and hematologists struggle to have a pool of potential TK inhibitors, where the most efficient one could be picked out to treat a specific cancer patient, which might also help overcome the occurring resistance mechanisms against TK inhibitors. Whether disease eradication can be achieved via single or sequential TK inhibitor treatment(s) needs to be tested in the present and in the future. PMID:26401097

  5. Proteolytic cleavage, trafficking, and functions of nuclear receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Kuang; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-10-01

    Intracellular localization has been reported for over three-quarters of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) families in response to environmental stimuli. Internalized RTK may bind to non-canonical substrates and affect various cellular processes. Many of the intracellular RTKs exist as fragmented forms that are generated by γ-secretase cleavage of the full-length receptor, shedding, alternative splicing, or alternative translation initiation. Soluble RTK fragments are stabilized and intracellularly transported into subcellular compartments, such as the nucleus, by binding to chaperone or transcription factors, while membrane-bound RTKs (full-length or truncated) are transported from the plasma membrane to the ER through the well-established Rab- or clathrin adaptor protein-coated vesicle retrograde trafficking pathways. Subsequent nuclear transport of membrane-bound RTK may occur via two pathways, INFS or INTERNET, with the former characterized by release of receptors from the ER into the cytosol and the latter characterized by release of membrane-bound receptor from the ER into the nucleoplasm through the inner nuclear membrane. Although most non-canonical intracellular RTK signaling is related to transcriptional regulation, there may be other functions that have yet to be discovered. In this review, we summarize the proteolytic processing, intracellular trafficking and nuclear functions of RTKs, and discuss how they promote cancer progression, and their clinical implications. PMID:26096795

  6. The Role of Tyrosine Kinase Receptors in Peritoneal Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zhuang, Shougang

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a modality for treatment of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) that depends on the structural and functional integrity of the peritoneal membrane. However, long-term PD can lead to morphological and functional changes in the peritoneum; in particular, peritoneal fibrosis has become one of the most common complications that ultimately results in ultrafiltration failure (UFF) and discontinuation of PD. Several factors and mechanisms such as inflammation and overproduction of transforming growth factor-β1 have been implicated in the development of peritoneal fibrosis, but there is no effective therapy to prevent or delay this process. Recent studies have shown that activation of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is associated with the development and progression of tissue fibrosis in various organs, and there are also reports indicating the involvement of some RTKs in peritoneal fibrosis. This review will describe the role and mechanisms of RTKs in peritoneal fibrosis and discuss the possibility of using them as therapeutic targets for prevention and treatment of this complication. PMID:26450477

  7. Insight into drug resistance mechanisms and discovery of potential inhibitors against wild-type and L1196M mutant ALK from FDA-approved drugs.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzong; Liu, Wei; Luo, Hao; Bao, Jinku

    2016-09-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) plays a crucial role in multiple malignant cancers. It is known as a well-established target for the treatment of ALK-dependent cancers. Even though substantial efforts have been made to develop ALK inhibitors, only crizotinib, ceritinib, and alectinib had been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for patients with ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The secondary mutations with drug-resistance bring up difficulties to develop effective drugs for ALK-positive cancers. To give a comprehensive understanding of molecular mechanism underlying inhibitor response to ALK tyrosine kinase mutations, we established an accurate assessment for the extensive profile of drug against ALK mutations by means of computational approaches. The molecular mechanics-generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) method based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was carried out to calculate relative binding free energies for receptor-drug systems. In addition, the structure-based virtual screening was utilized to screen effective inhibitors targeting wild-type ALK and the gatekeeper mutation L1196M from 3180 approved drugs. Finally, the mechanism of drug resistance was discussed, several novel potential wild-type and L1196M mutant ALK inhibitors were successfully identified. PMID:27585676

  8. De novo design of VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors based on a linked-fragment approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Zhou; Wang, Xiao-Li; Wang, Xin-Ying; Yu, Ri-Lei; Liu, Dong-Qing; Kang, Cong-Min

    2016-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been demonstrated to possess substantial antitumor activity. VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors are crucial for development of antitumor drugs. Based on the crystal structure of VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase, a linked-fragment strategy was employed to design novel VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and 1000 compounds were generated in this process. Absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADMET) were used to screen the 1000 compounds, and 59 compounds were acceptable. Scaffold hopping was then used for further screening, and only four compounds were obtained in this way. Then, the binding energy of the four molecules to VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase was calculated using molecular docking, and their values were found to be lower than that of Sorafenib. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations were performed on the complex of the compound with the lowest binding energy with VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase, and the binding model was analyzed. At the end, four chemical entities with novel structures were obtained, and were suggested for experimental testing in future studies. PMID:27558799

  9. Characterization of a Mn sup 2+ -dependent membrane serine kinase that is activated by tyrosine phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, T.J. )

    1991-03-11

    It is hypothesized that the insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase may directly phosphorylate and activate one or more serine kinases. The identities of such serine kinases as well as their modes of activation are unclear. The authors have described a serine kinase from rat liver membranes that copurifies with the IR on wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-sepharose. The kinase is activated after phosphorylation of the WGA-sepharose-purified fraction by casein kinase-1, casein kinase-2, or casein kinase-3. A tyrosine kinase, possibly IR tyrosine kinase, also participates in the activation process since a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor such as vanadate, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, or phosphotyrosine is required in reaction mixtures for activation to be observed. By contrast, phosphoserine and phosphothreonine do not support activation. The activated kinase can use IR {beta}-subunit, myelin basic protein (MBP), and histones as substrates. IR {beta}-subunit phosphorylation was stimulated by MBP, histones, and polylysine, and inhibited by heparin and poly(glu, tyr). The kinase prefers Mn{sup 2+} over Mg{sup 2+} as a metal cofactor.

  10. Dimerization mediated through a leucine zipper activates the oncogenic potential of the met receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, G A; Park, M

    1993-01-01

    Oncogenic activation of the met (hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor) receptor tyrosine kinase involves a genomic rearrangement that generates a hybrid protein containing tpr-encoded sequences at its amino terminus fused directly to the met-encoded receptor kinase domain. Deletion of Tpr sequences abolishes the transforming ability of this protein, implicating this region in oncogenic activation. We demonstrate, by site-directed mutagenesis and coimmunoprecipitation experiments, that a leucine zipper motif within Tpr mediates dimerization of the tpr-met product and is essential for the transforming activity of the met oncogene. By analogy with ligand-stimulated activation of receptor tyrosine kinases, we propose that constitutive dimerization mediated by a leucine zipper motif within Tpr is responsible for oncogenic activation of the Met kinase. The possibility that this mechanism of activation represents a paradigm for a class of receptor tyrosine kinase oncogenes activated by DNA rearrangement is discussed. Images PMID:8413267

  11. Co-expression of protein tyrosine kinases EGFR-2 and PDGFRβ with protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Tu, Pham Ngoc; Wang, Yamin; Cai, Menghao; Zhou, Xiangshan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2014-02-28

    The regulation of protein tyrosine phosphorylation is mediated by protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and is essential for cellular homeostasis. Coexpression of PTKs with PTPs in Pichia pastoris was used to facilitate the expression of active PTKs by neutralizing their apparent toxicity to cells. In this study, the gene encoding phosphatase PTP1B with or without a blue fluorescent protein or peroxisomal targeting signal 1 was cloned into the expression vector pAG32 to produce four vectors. These vectors were subsequently transformed into P. pastoris GS115. The tyrosine kinases EGFR-2 and PDGFRβ were expressed from vector pPIC3.5K and were fused with a His-tag and green fluorescent protein at the N-terminus. The two plasmids were transformed into P. pastoris with or without PTP1B, resulting in 10 strains. The EGFR-2 and PDGFRβ fusion proteins were purified by Ni(2+) affinity chromatography. In the recombinant P. pastoris, the PTKs co-expressed with PTP1B exhibited higher kinase catalytic activity than did those expressing the PTKs alone. The highest activities were achieved by targeting the PTKs and PTP1B into peroxisomes. Therefore, the EGFR-2 and PDGFRβ fusion proteins expressed in P. pastoris may be attractive drug screening targets for anticancer therapeutics. PMID:24248091

  12. A Novel Isoform of the B Cell Tyrosine Kinase BTK Protects Breast Cancer Cells from Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Eifert, Cheryl; Wang, Xianhui; Kokabee, Leila; Kourtidis, Antonis; Jain, Ritu; Gerdes, Michael J.; Conklin, Douglas S.

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases orchestrate key cellular signaling pathways and their dysregulation is often associated with cellular transformation. Several recent cases in which inhibitors of tyrosine kinases have been successfully used as anticancer agents have underscored the importance of this class of proteins in the development of targeted cancer therapies. We have carried out a large-scale loss-of-function analysis of the human tyrosine kinases using RNA interference to identify novel survival factors for breast cancer cells. In addition to kinases with known roles in breast and other cancers, we identified several kinases that were previously unknown to be required for breast cancer cell survival. The most surprising of these was the cytosolic, nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK), which has been extensively studied in B cell development. Down regulation of this protein with RNAi or inhibition with pharmacological inhibitors causes apoptosis; overexpression inhibits apoptosis induced by Doxorubicin in breast cancer cells. Our results surprisingly show that BTK is expressed in several breast cancer cell lines and tumors. The predominant form of BTK found in tumor cells is transcribed from an alternative promoter and results in a protein with an amino-terminal extension. This alternate form of BTK is expressed at significantly higher levels in tumorigenic breast cells than in normal breast cells. Since this protein is a survival factor for these cells, it represents both a potential marker and novel therapeutic target for breast cancer. PMID:23913792

  13. Pyridazinone derivatives displaying highly potent and selective inhibitory activities against c-Met tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Jin, Shiyu; Peng, Xia; Lu, Dong; Zeng, Limin; Sun, Yiming; Ai, Jing; Geng, Meiyu; Hu, Youhong

    2016-01-27

    Over activation of c-Met tyrosine kinase is known to promote tumorigenesis and metastasis, as well as to cause therapeutic resistance. Herein we describe the design, synthesis and biological activities of novel, ATP-competitive, c-Met tyrosine kinase inhibitors that are members of the 6-aryl-2-(3-(heteroarylamino)benzyl)pyridazinone family. A structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of these substances led to identification of pyridazinone 19 as a highly selective and potent c-Met tyrosine inhibitor, which displays favorable pharmacokinetic properties in mice and significant antitumor activity against a c-Met driven EBC-1 tumor xenograft. PMID:26698536

  14. Agonistic TAM-163 antibody targeting tyrosine kinase receptor-B

    PubMed Central

    Vugmeyster, Yulia; Rohde, Cynthia; Perreault, Mylene; Gimeno, Ruth E.; Singh, Pratap

    2013-01-01

    TAM-163, an agonist monoclonal antibody targeting tyrosine receptor kinase-B (TrkB), is currently being investigated as a potential body weight modulatory agent in humans. To support the selection of the dose range for the first-in-human (FIH) trial of TAM-163, we conducted a mechanistic analysis of the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) data (e.g., body weight gain) obtained in lean cynomolgus and obese rhesus monkeys following single doses ranging from 0.3 to 60 mg/kg. A target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) model was used to describe the observed nonlinear PK and Emax approach was used to describe the observed dose-dependent PD effect. The TMDD model development was supported by the experimental determination of the binding affinity constant (9.4 nM) and internalization rate of the drug-target complex (2.08 h−1). These mechanistic analyses enabled linking of exposure, target (TrkB) coverage, and pharmacological activity (e.g., PD) in monkeys, and indicated that ≥ 38% target coverage (time-average) was required to achieve significant body weight gain in monkeys. Based on the scaling of the TMDD model from monkeys to humans and assuming similar relationship between the target coverage and pharmacological activity between monkey and humans, subcutaneous (SC) doses of 1 and 15 mg/kg in humans were projected to be the minimally and the fully pharmacologically active doses, respectively. Based on the minimal anticipated biological effect level (MABEL) approach for starting dose selection, the dose of 0.05 mg/kg (3 mg for a 60 kg human) SC was recommended as the starting dose for FIH trials, because at this dose level < 10% target coverage was projected at Cmax (and all other time points). This study illustrates a rational mechanistic approach for the selection of FIH dose range for a therapeutic protein with a complex model of action. PMID:23529133

  15. DNA sequence, structure, and tyrosine kinase activity of the Drosophila melanogaster abelson proto-oncogene homolog

    SciTech Connect

    Henkemeyer, M.J.; Bennett, R.L.; Gertler, F.B.; Hoffmann, F.M.

    1988-02-01

    The authors report their molecular characterization of the Drosophila melanogaster Abelson gene (abl), a gene in which recessive loss-of-function mutations result in lethality at the pupal stage of development. This essential gene consists of 10 exons extending over 26 kilobase pairs of genomic DNA. The DNA sequence encodes a protein of 1,520 amino acids with strong sequence similarity to the human c-abl proto-oncogene beginning in the type 1b 5' exon and extending through the region essential for tyrosine kinase activity. When the tyrosine kinase homologous region was expressed in Escherichia coli, phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine residues was observed with an antiphosphotyrosine antibody. These results show that the abl gene is highly conserved through evolution and encodes a functional tyrosine protein kinase required for Drosophila development.

  16. Tyrosine phosphorylation of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 is important for cancer metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hitosugi, Taro; Fan, Jun; Chung, Tae-Wook; Lythgoe, Katherine; Wang, Xu; Xie, Jianxin; Ge, Qingyuan; Gu, Ting-Lei; Polakiewicz, Roberto D.; Roesel, Johannes L.; Chen, Zhuo (Georgia); Boggon, Titus J.; Lonial, Sagar; Fu, Haian; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Kang, Sumin; Chen, Jing

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Many tumor cells rely on aerobic glycolysis instead of oxidative phosphorylation for their continued proliferation and survival. Myc and HIF-1 are believed to promote such a metabolic switch by, in part, upregulating gene expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase 1 (PDHK1), which phosphorylates and inactivates mitochondrial PDH and consequently pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). Here we report that tyrosine phosphorylation enhances PDHK1 kinase activity by promoting ATP and PDC binding. Functional PDC can form in mitochondria outside of matrix in some cancer cells and PDHK1 is commonly tyrosine phosphorylated in human cancers by diverse oncogenic tyrosine kinases localized to different mitochondrial compartments. Expression of phosphorylation-deficient, catalytic hypomorph PDHK1 mutants in cancer cells leads to decreased cell proliferation under hypoxia and increased oxidative phosphorylation with enhanced mitochondrial utilization of pyruvate, and reduced tumor growth in xenograft nude mice. Together, tyrosine phosphorylation activates PDHK1 to promote the Warburg effect and tumor growth. PMID:22195962

  17. Automation of ALK gene rearrangement testing with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH): a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Zwaenepoel, Karen; Merkle, Dennis; Cabillic, Florian; Berg, Erica; Belaud-Rotureau, Marc-Antoine; Grazioli, Vittorio; Herelle, Olga; Hummel, Michael; Le Calve, Michele; Lenze, Dido; Mende, Stefanie; Pauwels, Patrick; Quilichini, Benoit; Repetti, Elena

    2015-02-01

    In the past several years we have observed a significant increase in our understanding of molecular mechanisms that drive lung cancer. Specifically in the non-small cell lung cancer sub-types, ALK gene rearrangements represent a sub-group of tumors that are targetable by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor Crizotinib, resulting in significant reductions in tumor burden. Phase II and III clinical trials were performed using an ALK break-apart FISH probe kit, making FISH the gold standard for identifying ALK rearrangements in patients. FISH is often considered a labor and cost intensive molecular technique, and in this study we aimed to demonstrate feasibility for automation of ALK FISH testing, to improve laboratory workflow and ease of testing. This involved automation of the pre-treatment steps of the ALK assay using various protocols on the VP 2000 instrument, and facilitating automated scanning of the fluorescent FISH specimens for simplified enumeration on various backend scanning and analysis systems. The results indicated that ALK FISH can be automated. Significantly, both the Ikoniscope and BioView system of automated FISH scanning and analysis systems provided a robust analysis algorithm to define ALK rearrangements. In addition, the BioView system facilitated consultation of difficult cases via the internet. PMID:25576649

  18. Global Analysis of Human Nonreceptor Tyrosine Kinase Specificity Using High-Density Peptide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases phosphorylate substrates in the context of specific phosphorylation site sequence motifs. The knowledge of the specific sequences that are recognized by kinases is useful for mapping sites of phosphorylation in protein substrates and facilitates the generation of model substrates to monitor kinase activity. Here, we have adapted a positional scanning peptide library method to a microarray format that is suitable for the rapid determination of phosphorylation site motifs for tyrosine kinases. Peptide mixtures were immobilized on glass slides through a layer of a tyrosine-free Y33F mutant avidin to facilitate the analysis of phosphorylation by radiolabel assay. A microarray analysis provided qualitatively similar results in comparison with the solution phase peptide library “macroarray” method. However, much smaller quantities of kinases were required to phosphorylate peptides on the microarrays, which thus enabled a proteome scale analysis of kinase specificity. We illustrated this capability by microarray profiling more than 80% of the human nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs). Microarray results were used to generate a universal NRTK substrate set of 11 consensus peptides for in vitro kinase assays. Several substrates were highly specific for their cognate kinases, which should facilitate their incorporation into kinase-selective biosensors. PMID:25164267

  19. Multiplexed tyrosine kinase activity detection in cancer cells using hydrogel immobilized substrate

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Alicia D.; Han, Wenquing; Liu, Bi; Palecek, Sean P.

    2013-01-01

    Kinases play a key role in cellular signaling, and the overactivation or overexpression of these kinases has been linked to a variety of cancers. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors treat the mechanism of these cancers by targeting the specific kinases that are overactive. Some patients, however, do not respond to these inhibitors or develop resistance to these inhibitors during treatment. Additionally, even within cancers of the same tissue type, different kinases may be overactive in different patients. For example, some lung cancers overexpress epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and respond to EGFR inhibitors, while other lung cancers do not overexpress EGFR and receive no benefit from this treatment. Even among patients exhibiting EGFR overexpression, some do not respond to EGFR kinase inhibitors because other kinases, such as Met kinase, are also overactivated. Here we describe a quantitative and specific multiplexed microfluidic assay using a hydrogel immobilized substrate for measuring the kinase activity of Met and Abl kinase from cancer cells. We immobilized kinase specific substrates into macroporous hydrogel micropillars in microchannels. These microchannels were incubated with 6 µl of a kinase reaction solution containing cancer cell lysate and measured kinase activity via fluorescence detection of a phosphotyrosine antibody. We showed that the assay can specifically measure the activity of both Met and Abl kinase within one microchannel with potential to measure the activity of as many as 5 kinases within one microchannel. The assay also detected Met kinase inhibition from lysates of cancer cells grown in the Met kinase inhibitor PHA665752. PMID:23624904

  20. The ALK inhibitor ceritinib overcomes crizotinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christian C.; Gainor, Justin F.; Crystal, Adam S.; Michellys, Pierre-Yves; Awad, Mark M.; Yanagitani, Noriko; Kim, Sungjoon; Pferdekamper, AnneMarie C.; Li, Jie; Kasibhatla, Shailaja; Sun, Frank; Sun, Xiuying; Hua, Su; McNamara, Peter; Mahmood, Sidra; Lockerman, Elizabeth L.; Fujita, Naoya; Nishio, Makoto; Harris, Jennifer L.; Shaw, Alice T.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) harboring anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements invariably develop resistance to the ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) crizotinib. Herein, we report the first preclinical evaluation of the next-generation ALK TKI, ceritinib (LDK378) in the setting of crizotinib resistance. Interrogation of in vitro and in vivo models of acquired resistance to crizotinib, including cell lines established from biopsies of crizotinib-resistant NSCLC patients revealed that ceritinib potently overcomes crizotinib resistance mutations. In particular, ceritinib effectively inhibits ALK harboring L1196M, G1269A, I1171T and S1206Y mutations, and a co-crystal of ceritinib bound to ALK provides structural bases for this increased potency. However, we observed that ceritinib did not overcome two crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations, G1202R and F1174C, and one of these mutations were identified in 5 out of 11 biopsies from patients with acquired resistance to ceritinib. Altogether our results demonstrate that ceritinib can overcome crizotinib resistance, consistent with clinical data showing marked efficacy of ceritinib in patients with crizotinib-resistant disease. PMID:24675041

  1. Regulatory Interactions between a Bacterial Tyrosine Kinase and Its Cognate Phosphatase*

    PubMed Central

    Temel, Deniz B.; Dutta, Kaushik; Alphonse, Sébastien; Nourikyan, Julien; Grangeasse, Christophe; Ghose, Ranajeet

    2013-01-01

    The cyclic process of autophosphorylation of the C-terminal tyrosine cluster (YC) of a bacterial tyrosine kinase and its subsequent dephosphorylation following interactions with a counteracting tyrosine phosphatase regulates diverse physiological processes, including the biosynthesis and export of polysaccharides responsible for the formation of biofilms or virulence-determining capsules. We provide here the first detailed insight into this hitherto uncharacterized regulatory interaction at residue-specific resolution using Escherichia coli Wzc, a canonical bacterial tyrosine kinase, and its opposing tyrosine phosphatase, Wzb. The phosphatase Wzb utilizes a surface distal to the catalytic elements of the kinase, Wzc, to dock onto its catalytic domain (WzcCD). WzcCD binds in a largely YC-independent fashion near the Wzb catalytic site, inducing allosteric changes therein. YC dephosphorylation is proximity-mediated and reliant on the elevated concentration of phosphorylated YC near the Wzb active site resulting from WzcCD docking. Wzb principally recognizes the phosphate of its phosphotyrosine substrate and further stabilizes the tyrosine moiety through ring stacking interactions with a conserved active site tyrosine. PMID:23543749

  2. Elucidation of Resistance Mechanisms to Second-Generation ALK Inhibitors Alectinib and Ceritinib in Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xuyuan; Fernandez-Salas, Ester; Li, Enxiao; Wang, Shaomeng

    2016-01-01

    Crizotinib is the first anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor to have been approved for the treatment of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring an ALK fusion gene, but it has been found that, in the clinic, patients develop resistance to it. Alectinib and ceritinib are second-generation ALK inhibitors which show remarkable clinical responses in both crizotinib-naive and crizotinib-resistant NSCLC patients harboring an ALK fusion gene. Despite their impressive activity, clinical resistance to alectinib and ceritinib has also emerged. In the current study, we elucidated the resistance mechanisms to these second-generation ALK inhibitors in the H3122 NSCLC cell line harboring the EML4-ALK variant 1 fusion in vitro. Prolonged treatment of the parental H3122 cells with alectinib and ceritinib led to two cell lines which are 10 times less sensitive to alectinib and ceritinib than the parental H3122 cell line. Although mutations of ALK in its kinase domain are a common resistance mechanism for crizotinib, we did not detect any ALK mutation in these resistant cell lines. Rather, overexpression of phospho-ALK and alternative receptor tyrosine kinases such as phospho-EGFR, phospho-HER3, and phospho-IGFR-1R was observed in both resistant cell lines. Additionally, NRG1, a ligand for HER3, is upregulated and responsible for resistance by activating the EGFR family pathways through the NRG1-HER3-EGFR axis. Combination treatment with EGFR inhibitors, in particular afatinib, was shown to be effective at overcoming resistance. Our study provides new mechanistic insights into adaptive resistance to second-generation ALK inhibitors and suggests a potential clinical strategy to combat resistance to these second-generation ALK inhibitors in NSCLC. PMID:26992917

  3. Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase and Kinase Specificity in Regulation of SRC and Breast Tumor Kinase* ♦

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Gaofeng; Aleem, Saadat; Yang, Ming; Miller, W. Todd; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant evidence to the contrary, the view that phosphatases are “nonspecific” still pervades the field. Systems biology approaches to defining how signal transduction pathways are integrated at the level of whole organisms also often downplay the contribution of phosphatases, defining them as “erasers” that serve merely to restore the system to its basal state. Here, we present a study that counteracts the idea of “nonspecific phosphatases.” We have characterized two structurally similar and functionally related kinases, BRK and SRC, which are regulated by combinations of activating autophosphorylation and inhibitory C-terminal sites of tyrosine phosphorylation. We demonstrated specificity at the level of the kinases in that SRMS phosphorylated the C terminus of BRK, but not SRC; in contrast, CSK is the kinase responsible for C-terminal phosphorylation of SRC, but not BRK. For the phosphatases, we observed that RNAi-mediated suppression of PTP1B resulted in opposing effects on the activity of BRK and SRC and have defined the mechanisms underlying this specificity. PTP1B inhibited BRK by directly dephosphorylating the Tyr-342 autophosphorylation site. In contrast, PTP1B potentiated SRC activity, but not by dephosphorylating SRC itself directly; instead, PTP1B regulated the interaction between CBP/PAG and CSK. SRC associated with, and phosphorylated, the transmembrane protein CBP/PAG at Tyr-317, resulting in CSK recruitment. We identified PAG as a substrate of PTP1B, and dephosphorylation abolished recruitment of the inhibitory kinase CSK. Overall, these findings illustrate how the combinatorial effects of PTKs and PTPs may be integrated to regulate signaling, with both classes of enzymes displaying exquisite specificity. PMID:25897081

  4. Contractile effects of angiotensin peptides in rat aorta are differentially dependent on tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Petrescu, G; Costuleanu, M; Slatineanu, S M; Costuleanu, N; Foia, L; Costuleanu, A

    2001-09-01

    It has been suggested that tyrosine kinase activity participates in the regulation of signal transduction associated with angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced pharmaco-mechanical coupling in rat aortic smooth muscle. We further tested the effects of genistein, a tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, and its inactive analogue, daidzein, on angiotensin I (Ang I), angiotensin III (Ang III) and angiotensin IV (Ang IV) contractions, as compared with those on Ang II. Genistein partially inhibited Ang II- and Ang I-induced contractions. The genistein-induced inhibition was more evident on Ang III and especially important on Ang IV contractile effects. Thus, Ang IV- and Ang III-induced contractions seem to be more dependent on tyrosine kinase activity than those evoked by Ang II or Ang I. Daidzein did not significantly affect the contractile effects of any of angiotensin peptides tested. These results clearly suggest that the inhibition of the action of angiotensin peptides actions by genistein is mediated by inhibition of endogenous tyrosine kinase activity. Furthermore, our data show that the type and/or intensity of tyrosine kinase activity is differentially associated with the contractile effects of different angiotensin peptides in rat aorta. Nifedipine, a blocker of membrane L-type Ca2+ channels, strongly inhibited Ang IV-induced contractions. At the same time, it significantly inhibited Ang III contractile effects as compared with Ang II and Ang I contractions. Meanwhile, we observed a close relationship between calcium influx and tyrosine kinase phosphorylation activity under the stimulatory effects of angiotensin peptides. Furthermore, genistein did not significantly influence the phasic contractions induced by angiotensin peptides in Ca2+-free Krebs-Henseleit solution. Thus, it appears that Ca2+ influx, rather than the release of Ca2+ from IP3-sensitive stores, may play a major role in the contractile effects of angiotensin peptides in rat aorta via tyrosine kinase activation

  5. Identification and analysis of a novel protein-tyrosine kinase from bovine thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Zioncheck, T.F.; Harrison, M.L.; Geahlen, R.L.

    1986-05-01

    A cytosolic protein-tyrosine kinase has been identified and purified to near homogeneity from calf thymus by using the phosphorylation of the tyrosine-containing peptide angiotensin I as an assay. Specific peptide phosphorylating activity was enhanced by carrying out the assay at high ionic strength (2M NaCl). The inclusion of NaCl at this concentration acts to stimulate endogenous protein-tyrosine kinase activity while simultaneously inhibiting other endogenous kinases. The purification procedure involved extraction of the enzyme from calf-thymus and sequential chromatography on columns of DEAE-cellulose, heparin-agarose, casein-sepharose, butylagarose, and Sephadex G-75. Analysis of the most highly purified preparations by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a single Coomassie blue-stained band of 41 KDa. This molecular weight was consistent with results obtained from gel filtration, indicating that the enzyme exists as a monomer. The enzyme has also been found to catalyze an autophosphorylation reaction. Incubation of the enzyme with Mn/sup 2 +/ and (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP led to its modification on a tyrosine residue. Phosphopeptide mapping experiments indicated that the 41 KDa kinase was distinct from p56, the major membrane-associated protein-tyrosine kinase in T lymphocytes.

  6. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Acts in the Drosophila Mushroom Body to Negatively Regulate Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lei; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Though evidence is mounting that a major function of sleep is to maintain brain plasticity and consolidate memory, little is known about the molecular pathways by which learning and sleep processes intercept. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk), the gene encoding a tyrosine receptor kinase whose inadvertent activation is the cause of many cancers, is implicated in synapse formation and cognitive functions. In particular, Alk genetically interacts with Neurofibromatosis 1 (Nf1) to regulate growth and associative learning in flies. We show that Alk mutants have increased sleep. Using a targeted RNAi screen we localized the negative effects of Alk on sleep to the mushroom body, a structure important for both sleep and memory. We also report that mutations in Nf1 produce a sexually dimorphic short sleep phenotype, and suppress the long sleep phenotype of Alk. Thus Alk and Nf1 interact in both learning and sleep regulation, highlighting a common pathway in these two processes. PMID:26536237

  7. Enhancement of cytosolic tyrosine kinase activity by propylthiouracil-induced hyperplasia in the rat thyroid.

    PubMed

    Polychronakos, C; Piscina, R; Fantus, I G

    1989-01-01

    Hyperplasia of the thyroid gland induced by propylthiouracil (PTU) is a well established model of rapid cell proliferation in vivo. Recent evidence indicates that tyrosine kinase activity is associated with growth factor receptors and oncogene protein products and may have an important regulatory action in the control of cell growth. Thus, we examined tyrosine kinase activity in rat thyroid membrane and cytosol preparations at rest and during PTU-induced hyperplasia. Although kinase activity was present in a crude microsomal membrane preparation, no change was observed during thyroid growth. In contrast, tyrosine kinase activity assayed with the artificial substrate poly(Glu,Na:Tyr) 4:1 was present in normal rat thyroid cytosol and increased 2- to 6-fold during the rapid phase of hyperplasia in the first 5-10 days of PTU treatment. It declined to control values by day 15, when the size and DNA content of the thyroid reached a plateau. Preincubation of the cytosolic preparations with several peptides known to bind to and activate growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases failed to enhance the activity, suggesting, along with the cytosolic localization, that the activity was distinct from these receptors. By gel filtration chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, tyrosine kinase activity was associated with a 55 kDa protein. Partial purification over a poly(Glu,Na:Tyr)4:1-Sepharose column, yielded a protein that appeared capable of autophosphorylation. It is suggested that this tyrosine kinase plays a role in mediating the growth-promoting effects of this model of thyroid cell hyperplasia. PMID:2909378

  8. Structures of human Bruton's tyrosine kinase in active and inactive conformations suggest a mechanism of activation for TEC family kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Marcotte, Douglas J.; Liu, Yu-Ting; Arduini, Robert M.; Hession, Catherine A.; Miatkowski, Konrad; Wildes, Craig P.; Cullen, Patrick F.; Hong, Victor; Hopkins, Brian T.; Mertsching, Elisabeth; Jenkins, Tracy J.; Romanowski, Michael J.; Baker, Darren P.; Silvian, Laura F.

    2010-11-15

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a member of the TEC family of kinases, plays a crucial role in B-cell maturation and mast cell activation. Although the structures of the unphosphorylated mouse BTK kinase domain and the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated kinase domains of human ITK are known, understanding the kinase selectivity profiles of BTK inhibitors has been hampered by the lack of availability of a high resolution, ligand-bound BTK structure. Here, we report the crystal structures of the human BTK kinase domain bound to either Dasatinib (BMS-354825) at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution or to 4-amino-5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-7H-pyrrolospyrimidin- 7-yl-cyclopentane at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution. This data provides information relevant to the development of small molecule inhibitors targeting BTK and the TEC family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. Analysis of the structural differences between the TEC and Src families of kinases near the Trp-Glu-Ile motif in the N-terminal region of the kinase domain suggests a mechanism of regulation of the TEC family members.

  9. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Bruton's tyrosine kinase regulate overlapping sets of genes in B lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fruman, David A.; Ferl, Gregory Z.; An, Sam S.; Donahue, Amber C.; Satterthwaite, Anne B.; Witte, Owen N.

    2002-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) acts downstream of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) in a pathway required for B cell receptor (BCR)-dependent proliferation. We used DNA microarrays to determine what fraction of genes this pathway influences and to investigate whether PI3K and Btk mediate distinct gene regulation events. As complete loss-of-function mutations in PI3K and Btk alter B cell subpopulations and may cause compensatory changes in gene expression, we used B cells with partial loss of function in either PI3K or Btk. Only about 5% of the BCR-dependent gene expression changes were significantly affected by reduced PI3K or Btk. The results indicate that PI3K and Btk share target genes, and that PI3K influences additional genes independently of Btk. These data are consistent with PI3K acting through Btk and other effectors to regulate expression of a critical subset of BCR target genes that determine effective entry into the cell cycle. PMID:11756681

  10. Focal adhesion kinases and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases regulate protein tyrosine phosphorylation in stallion sperm.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, Lauro; Macías-García, Beatriz; Loux, Shavahn C; Varner, Dickson D; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2013-06-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation (PY) is a hallmark of sperm capacitation. In stallion sperm, calcium inhibits PY at pH <7.8, mediated by calmodulin. To explore the mechanism of that inhibition, we incubated stallion sperm in media without added calcium, with calcium, or with calcium plus the calmodulin inhibitor W-7 (Ca/W-7 treatment). Treatment with inhibitors of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases, protein kinase A (PRKA), or Src family kinases suppressed the PY induced by the absence of added calcium, but not that induced by the Ca/W-7 treatment, indicating that PY in the absence of added calcium occurred via the canonical PRKA pathway, but that PY in the Ca/W-7 treatment did not. This suggested that when calmodulin was inhibited, calcium stimulated PY via a noncanonical pathway. Incubation with PF-431396, an inhibitor of focal adhesion kinases (FAKs), a family of calcium-induced protein tyrosine kinases, inhibited the PY induced both by the absence of added calcium and by the Ca/W-7 treatment. Western blotting demonstrated that both FAK family members, protein tyrosine kinases 2 and 2B, were phosphorylated in the absence of added calcium and in the Ca/W-7 treatment, but not in the presence of calcium without calmodulin inhibitors. Inhibition of FAK proteins inhibited PY in stallion sperm incubated under capacitating conditions (in the presence of calcium, bovine serum albumin, and bicarbonate at pH >7.8). These results show for the first time a role for calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases in PRKA-dependent sperm PY; a non-PRKA-dependent pathway regulating sperm PY; and the apparent involvement of the FAK family of protein tyrosine kinases downstream in both pathways. PMID:23595906

  11. Chromosomal location of the Syk and ZAP-70 tyrosine kinase genes in mice and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, G.; Malissen, B.; Mattei, M.G.

    1994-12-31

    Several protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), which may be grouped into two structurally different families, have been implicated in antigen receptor proximal signaling. Blk, Fyn, Lck, Lyn, and Yes belong to the Src-family kinases, whereas the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and the CD3-{zeta}-associated PTK (ZAP-70) define a new one, the Syk family. These kinases differ from the Src-family kinases in that they are non-myristylated cytoplasmic polypeptides composed of two N-terminal Src homology-2 (SH2) domains and a C-terminal catalytic domain. ZAP-70 appears to be expressed exclusively in T cells and NK cells, whereas Syk is preferentially expressed in B cells, T cells, and myeloid cells. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  12. ALK inhibitor resistance in ALK(F1174L)-driven neuroblastoma is associated with AXL activation and induction of EMT.

    PubMed

    Debruyne, D N; Bhatnagar, N; Sharma, B; Luther, W; Moore, N F; Cheung, N-K; Gray, N S; George, R E

    2016-07-14

    The crizotinib-resistant ALK(F1174L) mutation arises de novo in neuroblastoma (NB) and is acquired in ALK translocation-driven cancers, lending impetus to the development of novel anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors with different modes of action. The diaminopyrimidine TAE684 and its derivative ceritinib (LDK378), which are structurally distinct from crizotinib, are active against NB cells expressing ALK(F1174L). Here we demonstrate acquired resistance to TAE684 and LDK378 in ALK(F1174L)-driven human NB cells that is linked to overexpression and activation of the AXL tyrosine kinase and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). AXL phosphorylation conferred TAE684 resistance to NB cells through upregulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling. Inhibition of AXL partly rescued TAE684 resistance, resensitizing these cells to this compound. AXL activation in resistant cells was mediated through increased expression of the active form of its ligand, GAS6, that also served to stabilize the AXL protein. Although ectopic expression of AXL and TWIST2 individually in TAE684-sensitive parental cells led to the elevated expression of mesenchymal markers and invasive capacity, only AXL overexpression induced resistance to TAE684 as well. TAE684-resistant cells showed greater sensitivity to HSP90 inhibition than did their parental counterparts, with downregulation of AXL and AXL-mediated ERK signaling. Our studies indicate that aberrant AXL signaling and development of an EMT phenotype underlie resistance of ALK(F1174L)-driven NB cells to TAE684 and its derivatives. We suggest that the combination of ALK and AXL or HSP90 inhibitors be considered to delay the emergence of such resistance. PMID:26616860

  13. The role of tyrosine kinases in systemic lupus erythematosus and their potential as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Wen-Hai; Cohen, Philip L

    2014-01-01

    The autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus is characterized by loss of tolerance to nuclear antigens. Breakdown of tolerance is associated with alterations in T-cell and B-cell receptor signal transduction, including increased protein phosphorylation that may underlie pathogenesis and explain the characteristic hyperactivity of T and B cells and other immune cells in active disease. Tyrosine kinases play a central role in signaling processes in cells known to be important in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Considerable progress has been made in understanding the function of tyrosine kinases in immune cell signaling pathways. In this review, we will summarize the function of tyrosine kinases and their novel inhibitors from studies made in animal lupus models and systemic lupus erythematosus patients. PMID:24678775

  14. ACK1/TNK2 Tyrosine Kinase: Molecular Signaling and Evolving Role in Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Kiran; Mahajan, Nupam P.

    2014-01-01

    Deregulated tyrosine kinase signaling alters cellular homeostasis to drive cancer progression. The emergence of a non-receptor tyrosine kinase, ACK1 as an oncogenic kinase, has uncovered novel mechanisms by which tyrosine kinase signaling promotes cancer progression. While early studies focused on ACK1 (also known as activated Cdc42-associated kinase 1 or TNK2) as a cytosolic effecter of activated transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), wherein it shuttles between the cytosol and the nucleus to rapidly transduce extracellular signals from the RTKs to the intracellular effectors, recent data unfold a new aspect of its functionality as an epigenetic regulator. ACK1 interacts with the Estrogen Receptor (ER)/histone demethylase KDM3A (JHDM2a) complex, modifies KDM3A by tyrosine phosphorylation to regulate transcriptional outcome at HOXA1 locus to promote the growth of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer. It is also well established that ACK1 regulates the activity of Androgen Receptor (AR) by tyrosine phosphorylation to fuel the growth of hormone-refractory prostate cancers. Further, recent explosion in genomic sequencing has revealed recurrent ACK1 gene amplification and somatic mutations in a variety of human malignancies, providing a molecular basis for its role in neoplastic transformation. In this review, we will discuss the various facets of ACK1 signaling, including its newly uncovered epigenetic regulator function, which enables cells to bypass the blockade to major survival pathways to promote resistance to standard cancer treatments. Not surprisingly, cancer cells appear to acquire an `addiction’ to ACK1 mediated survival, particularly under stress conditions, such as growth factor deprivation or genotoxic insults or hormone deprivation. With the accelerated development of potent and selective ACK1 inhibitors, targeted treatment for cancers harboring aberrant ACK1 activity may soon become a clinical reality. PMID:25347744

  15. Identification of novel inhibitors of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase via virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Huang, Niu; Qi, Jing; Xie, Ping; Xu, Chen; Wang, Jianxiang; Yang, Chunzheng

    2003-11-01

    Inhibition of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase activity has shown to be essential for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). However, drug resistance has quickly arisen in recent clinical trials for STI571 (Gleevec), which is the first approved drug of CML by inhibiting ABL tyrosine kinase. It is desirable to develop new types of ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors that may overcome this drug resistance problem. Here we present the discovery of novel inhibitors targeted at the catalytic domain of ABL tyrosine kinase by using three-dimensional database searching techniques. From a database containing 200,000 commercially available compounds, the top 1000 compounds with the best DOCK energy score were selected and subjected to structural diversity and drug likeness analysis, 15 compounds were submitted for biological assay. Eight out of the 15 showed inhibitory activity against K562 cells with IC(50) value ranging from 10 to 200 microM. Two promising compounds showed inhibition in further ABL tyrosine phosphorylation assay. It is anticipated that those two compounds can serve as lead compounds for further drug design and optimization. PMID:14552760

  16. Prospective screening for ALK: clinical features and outcome according to ALK status.

    PubMed

    Fallet, Vincent; Cadranel, Jacques; Doubre, Hélène; Toper, Cécile; Monnet, Isabelle; Chinet, Thierry; Oliviero, Gérard; Foulon, Guillaume; De Cremoux, Hubert; Vieira, Thibault; Antoine, Martine; Wislez, Marie

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the clinico-pathological characteristics and outcomes of a cohort of French patients who were prospectively screened for Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) rearrangement. One hundred and sixteen consecutive patients screened for ALK rearrangement to be recruited into a crizotinib registration trial were included from eight French centres. ALK rearrangement was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Seventeen patients (14.6%) were positive for ALK. ALK+ patients were younger (p = 0.049) and more likely to be males (p=0.032), non- or light-smokers (p = 0.048) and without underlying respiratory disease (p=0.025) compared to ALK- patients. Thyroid-transcription factor-1 expression was present in all ALK+ tumours. ALK+ tumours tended to have lymph node and brain metastases. In multivariate analyses, gender, smoking history and N stage were independently associated with ALK status. Median overall survival (OS) was not reached for ALK+ patients and was significantly longer than for ALK- patients (hazard ratio for death for ALK- patients 2.98; 95% CI [1.29-6.90], p=0.01). French ALK+ patients present a specific phenotype. ALK rearrangement should be determined to improve OS with an effective targeted therapy. PMID:24589437

  17. Using ovality to predict nonmutagenic, orally efficacious pyridazine amides as cell specific spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Matthew C; Bhagirath, Niala; Chiao, Eric; Goldstein, David M; Hermann, Johannes C; Hsu, Pei-Yuan; Kirchner, Stephan; Kennedy-Smith, Joshua J; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Lukacs, Christine; Menke, John; Niu, Linghao; Padilla, Fernando; Peng, Ying; Polonchuk, Liudmila; Railkar, Aruna; Slade, Michelle; Soth, Michael; Xu, Daigen; Yadava, Preeti; Yee, Calvin; Zhou, Mingyan; Liao, Cheng

    2014-03-27

    Inhibition of spleen tyrosine kinase has attracted much attention as a mechanism for the treatment of cancers and autoimmune diseases such as asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematous. We report the structure-guided optimization of pyridazine amide spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Early representatives of this scaffold were highly potent and selective but mutagenic in an Ames assay. An approach that led to the successful identification of nonmutagenic examples, as well as further optimization to compounds with reduced cardiovascular liabilities is described. Select pharmacokinetic and in vivo efficacy data are presented. PMID:24520947

  18. Initial Diagnosis of ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Based on Analysis of ALK Status Utilizing Droplet Digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Lund, H Louise; Hughesman, Curtis B; Fakhfakh, Kareem; McNeil, Kelly; Clemens, Shahira; Hocken, Kimberly; Pettersson, Ryan; Karsan, Aly; Foster, Leonard J; Haynes, Charles

    2016-05-01

    We describe a novel droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assay capable of detecting genomic alterations associated with inversion translocations. It is applied here to detection of rearrangements in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene associated with ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). NSCLC patients may carry a nonreciprocal translocation on human chromosome 2, in which synchronized double stranded breaks (DSB) within the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) gene and ALK lead to an inversion of genetic material that forms the non-natural gene fusion EML4-ALK encoding a constitutively active tyrosine kinase that is associated with 3 to 7% of all NSCLCs. Detection of ALK rearrangements is currently achieved in clinics through direct visualization via a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assay, which can detect those rearrangements to a limit of detection (LOD) of ca. 15%. We show that the ddPCR assay presented here provides a LOD of 0.25% at lower cost and with faster turnaround times. PMID:27043019

  19. Design and synthesis of novel selective anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Michellys, Pierre-Yves; Chen, Bei; Jiang, Tao; Jin, Yunho; Lu, Wenshuo; Marsilje, Thomas H; Pei, Wei; Uno, Tetsuo; Zhu, Xuefeng; Wu, Baogen; Nguyen, Truc Ngoc; Bursulaya, Badry; Lee, Christian; Li, Nanxin; Kim, Sungjoon; Tuntland, Tove; Liu, Bo; Sun, Frank; Steffy, Auzon; Hood, Tami

    2016-02-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the insulin receptor superfamily. Expression of ALK in normal human tissues is only found in a subset of neural cells, however it is involved in the genesis of several cancers through genetic aberrations involving translocation of the kinase domain with multiple fusion partners (e.g., NPM-ALK in anaplastic large cell lymphoma ALCL or EML4-ALK in non-small cell lung cancer) or activating mutations in the full-length receptor resulting in ligand-independent constitutive activation (e.g., neuroblastoma). Here we are reporting the discovery of novel and selective anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors from specific modifications of the 2,4-diaminopyridine core present in TAE684 and LDK378. Synthesis, structure activity relationships (SAR), absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) profile, and in vivo efficacy in a mouse xenograft model of anaplastic large cell lymphoma are described. PMID:26750252

  20. Involvement of the N-terminal unique domain of Chk tyrosine kinase in Chk-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Yuji; Kawana, Akiko; Igarashi, Asae; Yamaguchi, Naoto . E-mail: nyama@p.chiba-u.ac.jp

    2006-07-15

    Chk tyrosine kinase phosphorylates Src-family kinases and suppresses their kinase activity. We recently showed that Chk localizes to the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm and inhibits cell proliferation. In this study, we explored the role of the N-terminal unique domain of Chk in nuclear localization and Chk-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the nucleus. In situ binding experiments showed that the N-terminal domain of Chk was associated with the nucleus and the nuclear matrix. The presence of the N-terminal domain of Chk led to a fourfold increase in cell population exhibiting Chk-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the nucleus. Expression of Chk but not kinase-deficient Chk induced tyrosine phosphorylation of a variety of proteins ranging from 23 kDa to {approx}200 kDa, especially in Triton X-100-insoluble fraction that included chromatin and the nuclear matrix. Intriguingly, in situ subnuclear fractionations revealed that Chk induced tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins that were associated with the nuclear matrix. These results suggest that various unidentified substrates of Chk, besides Src-family kinases, may be present in the nucleus. Thus, our findings indicate that the importance of the N-terminal domain to Chk-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the nucleus, implicating that these nuclear tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins may contribute to inhibition of cell proliferation.

  1. Targeting Bruton's tyrosine kinase signaling as an emerging therapeutic agent of B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    XIA, BING; QU, FULIAN; YUAN, TIAN; ZHANG, YIZHUO

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is central to the development and function of B cells. BCR signaling has emerged as a pivotal pathway and a key driver of numerous B-cell lymphomas. Disruption of BCR signaling can be lethal to malignant B cells. Recently, kinase inhibitors that target BCR signaling have induced notable clinical responses. These inhibitors include spleen tyrosine kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, phosphoinositide 3′-kinase and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). Ibrutinib, an oral irreversible BTK inhibitor, has emerged as a promising targeted therapy for patients with B-cell malignancies. The present review discusses the current understanding of BTK-mediated BCR signaling in the biology and pathobiology of normal and malignant B cells, and the cellular interaction with the tumor microenvironment. The data on ibrutinib in the preclinical and clinical settings is also discussed, and perspectives for the future use of ibrutinib are outlined. PMID:26788133

  2. Jelly Belly Trans-Synaptic Signaling to Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Regulates Neurotransmission Strength and Synapse Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbough, Jeffrey; Kent, Karla S.; Broadie, Kendal; Weiss, Joseph B.

    2012-01-01

    In Drosophila the secreted signaling molecule Jelly Belly (Jeb) activates Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (Alk), a receptor tyrosine kinase, in multiple developmental and adult contexts. We have shown previously that Jeb and Alk are highly enriched at Drosophila synapses within the CNS neuropil and neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and postulated a conserved intercellular signaling function. At the embryonic and larval NMJ Jeb is localized in the motor neuron presynaptic terminal whereas Alk is concentrated in the muscle postsynaptic domain surrounding boutons, consistent with anterograde trans-synaptic signaling. Here, we show by functional inhibition of Jeb-Alk signaling that neurotransmission is regulated by Jeb secretion. Jeb is a novel negative regulator of neuromuscular transmission. Reduction or inhibtion of Alk function results in enhanced synaptic transmission. Activation of Alk conversely inhibits synaptic transmission. Restoration of wildtype postsynaptic Alk expression in Alk partial loss-of-function mutants rescues NMJ transmission phenotypes and confirms that postsynaptic Alk regulates NMJ transmission. The effects of impaired Alk signaling on neurotransmission are observed in the absence of associated changes in NMJ structure. Complete removal of Jeb in motor neurons, however, disrupts both presynaptic bouton architecture and postsynaptic differentiation. Non-physiologic activation of Alk signaling also negatively regulates NMJ growth. Activation of Jeb-Alk signaling triggers the Ras-MAP kinase cascade in both pre- and postsynaptic compartments. These novel roles for Jeb-Alk signaling in the modulation of synaptic function and structure have potential implications for recently reported Alk functions in human addiction, retention of spatial memory, cognitive dysfunction in neurofibromatosis and the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:22949158

  3. Endothelial Bmx tyrosine kinase activity is essential for myocardial hypertrophy and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, Tanja; Räsänen, Markus; Anisimov, Andrey; Tuomainen, Tomi; Zheng, Wei; Tvorogov, Denis; Hulmi, Juha J; Andersson, Leif C; Cenni, Bruno; Tavi, Pasi; Mervaala, Eero; Kivelä, Riikka; Alitalo, Kari

    2015-10-20

    Cardiac hypertrophy accompanies many forms of heart disease, including ischemic disease, hypertension, heart failure, and valvular disease, and it is a strong predictor of increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Deletion of bone marrow kinase in chromosome X (Bmx), an arterial nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, has been shown to inhibit cardiac hypertrophy in mice. This finding raised the possibility of therapeutic use of Bmx tyrosine kinase inhibitors, which we have addressed here by analyzing cardiac hypertrophy in gene-targeted mice deficient in Bmx tyrosine kinase activity. We found that angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy is significantly reduced in mice deficient in Bmx and in mice with inactivated Bmx tyrosine kinase compared with WT mice. Genome-wide transcriptomic profiling showed that Bmx inactivation suppresses myocardial expression of genes related to Ang II-induced inflammatory and extracellular matrix responses whereas expression of RNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins after Ang II administration was maintained in Bmx-inactivated hearts. Very little or no Bmx mRNA was expressed in human cardiomyocytes whereas human cardiac endothelial cells expressed abundant amounts. Ang II stimulation of endothelial cells increased Bmx phosphorylation, and Bmx gene silencing inhibited downstream STAT3 signaling, which has been implicated in cardiac hypertrophy. Furthermore, activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway by Ang II treatment was decreased in the Bmx-deficient hearts. Our results demonstrate that inhibition of the cross-talk between endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes by Bmx inactivation suppresses Ang II-induced signals for cardiac hypertrophy. These results suggest that the endothelial Bmx tyrosine kinase could provide a target to attenuate the development of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26430242

  4. Endothelial Bmx tyrosine kinase activity is essential for myocardial hypertrophy and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Holopainen, Tanja; Räsänen, Markus; Anisimov, Andrey; Tuomainen, Tomi; Zheng, Wei; Tvorogov, Denis; Hulmi, Juha J.; Andersson, Leif C.; Cenni, Bruno; Tavi, Pasi; Mervaala, Eero; Kivelä, Riikka; Alitalo, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy accompanies many forms of heart disease, including ischemic disease, hypertension, heart failure, and valvular disease, and it is a strong predictor of increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Deletion of bone marrow kinase in chromosome X (Bmx), an arterial nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, has been shown to inhibit cardiac hypertrophy in mice. This finding raised the possibility of therapeutic use of Bmx tyrosine kinase inhibitors, which we have addressed here by analyzing cardiac hypertrophy in gene-targeted mice deficient in Bmx tyrosine kinase activity. We found that angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy is significantly reduced in mice deficient in Bmx and in mice with inactivated Bmx tyrosine kinase compared with WT mice. Genome-wide transcriptomic profiling showed that Bmx inactivation suppresses myocardial expression of genes related to Ang II-induced inflammatory and extracellular matrix responses whereas expression of RNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins after Ang II administration was maintained in Bmx-inactivated hearts. Very little or no Bmx mRNA was expressed in human cardiomyocytes whereas human cardiac endothelial cells expressed abundant amounts. Ang II stimulation of endothelial cells increased Bmx phosphorylation, and Bmx gene silencing inhibited downstream STAT3 signaling, which has been implicated in cardiac hypertrophy. Furthermore, activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway by Ang II treatment was decreased in the Bmx-deficient hearts. Our results demonstrate that inhibition of the cross-talk between endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes by Bmx inactivation suppresses Ang II-induced signals for cardiac hypertrophy. These results suggest that the endothelial Bmx tyrosine kinase could provide a target to attenuate the development of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26430242

  5. Intracellular Ca2+ stores modulate SOCCs and NMDA receptors via tyrosine kinases in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Koss, David J; Riedel, Gernot; Platt, Bettina

    2009-07-01

    The regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) signalling by phosphorylation processes remains poorly defined, particularly with regards to tyrosine phosphorylation. Evidence from non-excitable cells implicates tyrosine phosphorylation in the activation of so-called store-operated Ca(2+) channels (SOCCs), but their involvement in neuronal Ca(2+) signalling is still elusive. In the present study, we determined the role of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) in the coupling between intracellular Ca(2+) stores and SOCCs in neonatal rat hippocampal neurons by Fura-2 Ca(2+) imaging. An early Ca(2+) response from intracellular stores was triggered with thapsigargin, and followed by a secondary plasma membrane Ca(2+) response. This phase was blocked by the non-specific Ca(2+) channel blocker NiCl and the SOCC blocker, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB). Interestingly, two structurally distinct PTK inhibitors, genistein and AG126, also inhibited this secondary response. Application of the PTP inhibitor sodium orthovanadate (OV) also activated a sustained and tyrosine kinase dependent Ca(2+) response, blocked by NiCl and 2-APB. In addition, OV resulted in a Ca(2+) store dependent enhancement of NMDA responses, corresponding to, and occluding the signalling pathway for group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). This study provides first evidence for tyrosine based phospho-regulation of SOCCs and NMDA signalling in neurons. PMID:19423160

  6. Role of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Indolent and Other Mature B-Cell Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kutsch, Nadine; Marks, Reinhard; Ratei, Richard; Held, Thomas K; Schmidt-Hieber, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Targeting tyrosine kinases represents a highly specific treatment approach for different malignancies. This also includes non-Hodgkin lymphoma since it is well known that these enzymes are frequently involved in the lymphomagenesis. Hereby, tyrosine kinases might either be dysregulated intrinsically or be activated within signal transduction pathways leading to tumor survival and growth. Among others, Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is of particular interest as a potential therapeutic target. Btk is stimulated by B-cell receptor signaling and activates different transcription factors such as nuclear factor κB. The Btk inhibitor ibrutinib has been approved for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle-cell lymphoma recently. Numerous clinical trials evaluating this agent in different combinations (eg, with rituximab or classical chemotherapeutic agents) as a treatment option for aggressive and indolent lymphoma are under way. Here, we summarize the role of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of indolent and other non-Hodgkin lymphomas (eg, mantle-cell lymphoma). PMID:26327780

  7. Computer-aided identification of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors using ginsenosides from Panax ginseng.

    PubMed

    Sathishkumar, Natarajan; Karpagam, Veerappan; Sathiyamoorthy, Subramaniyam; Woo, Min Jin; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2013-07-01

    Natural products have served as structural resources in the history of drug discovery for cancer therapy. Among these natural products, Korean Panax ginseng serves as a potential anti-cancer medicinal plant. To determine the anti-cancer activities of Korean P. ginseng active compounds, we performed pharmacophore-based virtual screening and molecular docking studies on EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) tyrosine kinase domain. The EGFR family tyrosine kinase receptor is a cell surface receptor that regulates diverse biological processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. Over expression of EGFR tyrosine kinase domain associated with the development and progression of numerous human cancers. In our study, we developed the best pharmacophore model (Hypo1) using a diverse training set and validated by Fischer's randomization, a test set, and a decoy set. The best validated model was employed in the virtual screening of P. ginseng compound database. Further, chosen molecules were evaluated by applying ADMET screening and molecular docking studies. Finally, 14 compounds were obtained based on binding affinity scores and interactions with protein active site residues. These final lead compounds from P. ginseng can be used in the designing of new EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:23668355

  8. A p60v-src-related tyrosine kinase in the acetylcholine receptor-rich membranes of Narke japonica: association and dissociation of phosphatidylinositol kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Y; Owada, M K; Sumi, M; Hayashi, F

    1986-09-14

    We have isolated a tyrosine-specific protein kinase from the acetylcholine receptor (AChR)-rich membranes of the electric ray Narke japonica. The enzyme is immunologically related to p60v-src, the product of the transforming gene of Rous sarcoma virus. A substantial phosphatidylinositol (PI) kinase activity was associated with this enzyme when it was purified through tyrosine-agarose affinity chromatography used previously for the purification of p60v-src. However, by subsequent chromatography on casein-agarose, most of the associated PI kinase activity was separated from the tyrosine kinase activity. The results suggest that the tyrosine-specific protein kinase in the AChR-rich membranes of N. japonica has no intrinsic PI kinase activity. PMID:3094516

  9. Co-active receptor tyrosine kinases mitigate the effect of FGFR inhibitors in FGFR1-amplified lung cancers with low FGFR1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Kotani, H; Ebi, H; Kitai, H; Nanjo, S; Kita, K; Huynh, T G; Ooi, A; Faber, A C; Mino-Kenudson, M; Yano, S

    2016-07-01

    Targeted therapies are effective in subsets of lung cancers with EGFR mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocations. Large-scale genomics have recently expanded the lung cancer landscape with FGFR1 amplification found in 10-20% of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). However, the response rates have been low for biomarker-directed fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitor therapy in SCC, which contrasts to the relatively high rates of response seen in EGFR mutant and ALK-translocated lung cancers treated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors and ALK inhibitors, respectively. In order to better understand the low response rates of FGFR1-amplified lung cancers to FGFR inhibitors, relationships between gene copy number, mRNA expression and protein expression of FGFR1 were assessed in cell lines, tumor specimens and data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. The importance of these factors for the sensitivity to FGFR inhibitors was determined by analyzing drug screen data and conducting in vitro and in vivo experiments. We report that there was a discrepancy between FGFR1 amplification level and FGFR1 protein expression in a number of these cell lines, and the cancers with unexpectedly low FGFR1 expression were uniformly resistant to the different FGFR inhibitors. Further interrogation of the receptor tyrosine kinase activity in these discordant cell lines revealed co-activation of HER2 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRα) caused by gene amplification or ligand overexpression maintained phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and MEK/ERK signaling even in the presence of FGFR inhibitor. Accordingly, co-inhibition of FGFR1 and HER2 or PDGFRα led to enhanced drug responses. In contrast, FGFR1-amplified high FGFR1 protein-expressing lung cancers are sensitive to FGFR inhibitor monotherapy by downregulating ERK signaling. Addition of a PI3K inhibitor to these high FGFR1 protein-expressing cancers further sensitized them to FGFR

  10. Pim kinases modulate resistance to FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors in FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Green, Alexa S.; Maciel, Thiago T.; Hospital, Marie-Anne; Yin, Chae; Mazed, Fetta; Townsend, Elizabeth C.; Pilorge, Sylvain; Lambert, Mireille; Paubelle, Etienne; Jacquel, Arnaud; Zylbersztejn, Florence; Decroocq, Justine; Poulain, Laury; Sujobert, Pierre; Jacque, Nathalie; Adam, Kevin; So, Jason C. C.; Kosmider, Olivier; Auberger, Patrick; Hermine, Olivier; Weinstock, David M.; Lacombe, Catherine; Mayeux, Patrick; Vanasse, Gary J.; Leung, Anskar Y.; Moura, Ivan C.; Bouscary, Didier; Tamburini, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) is frequently detected in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and is associated with a dismal long-term prognosis. FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors provide short-term disease control, but relapse invariably occurs within months. Pim protein kinases are oncogenic FLT3-ITD targets expressed in AML cells. We show that increased Pim kinase expression is found in relapse samples from AML patients treated with FLT3 inhibitors. Ectopic Pim-2 expression induces resistance to FLT3 inhibition in both FLT3-ITD–induced myeloproliferative neoplasm and AML models in mice. Strikingly, we found that Pim kinases govern FLT3-ITD signaling and that their pharmacological or genetic inhibition restores cell sensitivity to FLT3 inhibitors. Finally, dual inhibition of FLT3 and Pim kinases eradicates FLT3-ITD+ cells including primary AML cells. Concomitant Pim and FLT3 inhibition represents a promising new avenue for AML therapy. PMID:26601252

  11. A conserved isoleucine maintains the inactive state of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Boyken, Scott E.; Chopra, Nikita; Xie, Qian; Joseph, Raji E.; Wales, Thomas E.; Fulton, D. Bruce; Engen, John R.; Jernigan, Robert L.; Andreotti, Amy H.

    2014-01-01

    Despite high homology among non-receptor tyrosine kinases, different kinase families employ a diverse array of regulatory mechanisms. For example, the catalytic kinase domains of the Tec family kinases are inactive without assembly of the adjacent regulatory domains, whereas the Src kinase domains are autoinhibited by the assembly of similar adjacent regulatory domains. Using molecular dynamic simulations, biochemical assays, and biophysical approaches, we have uncovered an isoleucine residue in the kinase domain of the Tec family member Btk that, when mutated to the closely related leucine, leads to a shift in the conformational equilibrium of the kinase domain toward the active state. The single amino acid mutation results in measureable catalytic activity for the Btk kinase domain in the absence of the regulatory domains. We suggest this isoleucine side chain in the Tec family kinases acts as a ‘wedge’ that restricts the conformational space available to key regions in the kinase domain, preventing activation until the kinase domain associates with its regulatory subunits and overcomes the energetic barrier to activation imposed by the isoleucine side chain. PMID:25193673

  12. Structural Basis for Autoinhibition of c-Abl Tyrosine Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Nagar, Bhushan; Hantschel, Oliver; Young, Matthew A.; Scheffzek,Klaus; Veach, Darren; Bornmann, William; Clarkson, Bayard; Superti-Furga,Giulio; Kuriyan, John

    2003-03-21

    c-Abl is normally regulated by an autoinhibitory mechanism, the disruption of which leads to chronic myelogenous leukemia. The details of this mechanism have been elusive because c-Abl lacks aphosphotyrosine residue that triggers the assembly of the autoinhibited form of the closely related Src kinases by internally engaging the SH2 domain. Crystal structures of c-Abl show that the N-terminal myristoyl modification of c-Abl 1b binds to the kinase domain and induces conformational changes that allow the SH2 and SH3 domains to dock onto it. Autoinhibited c-Abl forms an assembly that is strikingly similar to that of inactive Src kinases but with specific differences that explain the differential ability of the drug STI-571/Gleevec/imatinib (STI-571)to inhibit the catalytic activity of Abl, but not that of c-Src.

  13. Clinical Utility of Circulating Tumor Cells in ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Faugeroux, Vincent; Pailler, Emma; Auger, Nathalie; Taylor, Melissa; Farace, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    The advent of rationally targeted therapies such as small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has considerably transformed the therapeutic management of a subset of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring defined molecular abnormalities. When such genetic molecular alterations are detected the use of specific TKI has demonstrated better results (overall response rate, progression free survival) compared to systemic therapy. However, the detection of such molecular abnormalities is complicated by the difficulty in obtaining sufficient tumor material, in terms of quantity and quality, from a biopsy. Here, we described how circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can have a clinical utility in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive NSCLC patients to diagnose ALK-EML4 gene rearrangement and to guide therapeutic management of these patients. The ability to detect genetic abnormalities such ALK rearrangement in CTCs shows that these cells could offer new perspectives both for the diagnosis and the monitoring of ALK-positive patients eligible for treatment with ALK inhibitors. PMID:25414829

  14. Clinical Utility of Circulating Tumor Cells in ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Faugeroux, Vincent; Pailler, Emma; Auger, Nathalie; Taylor, Melissa; Farace, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    The advent of rationally targeted therapies such as small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has considerably transformed the therapeutic management of a subset of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring defined molecular abnormalities. When such genetic molecular alterations are detected the use of specific TKI has demonstrated better results (overall response rate, progression free survival) compared to systemic therapy. However, the detection of such molecular abnormalities is complicated by the difficulty in obtaining sufficient tumor material, in terms of quantity and quality, from a biopsy. Here, we described how circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can have a clinical utility in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive NSCLC patients to diagnose ALK-EML4 gene rearrangement and to guide therapeutic management of these patients. The ability to detect genetic abnormalities such ALK rearrangement in CTCs shows that these cells could offer new perspectives both for the diagnosis and the monitoring of ALK-positive patients eligible for treatment with ALK inhibitors. PMID:25414829

  15. Expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic studies on the catalytic region of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Fes

    SciTech Connect

    Gnemmi, Ilaria; Scotti, Claudia; Cappelletti, Donata; Canonico, Pier Luigi; Condorelli, Fabrizio; Rosano, Camillo

    2007-01-01

    The catalytic domain of human Fes tyrosine kinase has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. The proto-oncogene tyrosine protein kinase c-fps/fes encodes a structurally unique protein (Fes) of the nonreceptor protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK) family. Its expression has been demonstrated in myeloid haematopoietic cells, vascular endothelial cells and in neurons. In human-derived and murine-derived cell lines, the activated form of this kinase can induce cellular transformation; moreover, it has been shown that Fes is involved in the regulation of cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions mediated by adherens junctions and focal adhesions. The N-terminus of Fes contains the FCH (Fps/Fes/Fer/CIP4 homology) domain, which is unique to the Fes/Fer kinase family. It is followed by three coiled-coil domains and an SH2 (Src-homology 2) domain. The catalytic region (Fes-CR) is located at the C-terminus of the protein. The successful expression, purification and crystallization of the catalytic part of Fes (Fes-CR) are described.

  16. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 negatively regulates anaplastic lymphoma kinase in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Shunpei; Takatori, Atsushi; Ogura, Atsushi; Kohashi, Kenichi; Souzaki, Ryota; Kinoshita, Yoshiaki; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Hossain, Md. Shamim; Ohira, Miki; Nakamura, Yohko; Nakagawara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    In neuroblastoma (NB), one of the most common paediatric solid tumours, activation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is often associated with poor outcomes. Although genetic studies have identified copy number alteration and nonsynonymous mutations of ALK, the regulatory mechanism of ALK signalling at protein levels is largely elusive. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 (NLRR1) is a type 1 transmembrane protein that is highly expressed in unfavourable NB and potentially influences receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Here, we showed that NLRR1 and ALK exhibited a mutually exclusive expression pattern in primary NB tissues by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, dorsal root ganglia of Nlrr1+/+ and Nlrr1−/− mice displayed the opposite expression patterns of Nlrr1 and Alk. Of interest, NLRR1 physically interacted with ALK in vitro through its extracellular region. Notably, the NLRR1 ectodomain impaired ALK phosphorylation and proliferation of ALK-mutated NB cells. A newly identified cleavage of the NLRR1 ectodomain also supported NLRR1-mediated ALK signal regulation in trans. Thus, we conclude that NLRR1 appears to be an extracellular negative regulator of ALK signalling in NB and neuronal development. Our findings may be beneficial to comprehend NB heterogeneity and to develop a novel therapy against unfavourable NB. PMID:27604320

  17. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 negatively regulates anaplastic lymphoma kinase in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Shunpei; Takatori, Atsushi; Ogura, Atsushi; Kohashi, Kenichi; Souzaki, Ryota; Kinoshita, Yoshiaki; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Hossain, Md Shamim; Ohira, Miki; Nakamura, Yohko; Nakagawara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    In neuroblastoma (NB), one of the most common paediatric solid tumours, activation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is often associated with poor outcomes. Although genetic studies have identified copy number alteration and nonsynonymous mutations of ALK, the regulatory mechanism of ALK signalling at protein levels is largely elusive. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 (NLRR1) is a type 1 transmembrane protein that is highly expressed in unfavourable NB and potentially influences receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Here, we showed that NLRR1 and ALK exhibited a mutually exclusive expression pattern in primary NB tissues by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, dorsal root ganglia of Nlrr1+/+ and Nlrr1-/- mice displayed the opposite expression patterns of Nlrr1 and Alk. Of interest, NLRR1 physically interacted with ALK in vitro through its extracellular region. Notably, the NLRR1 ectodomain impaired ALK phosphorylation and proliferation of ALK-mutated NB cells. A newly identified cleavage of the NLRR1 ectodomain also supported NLRR1-mediated ALK signal regulation in trans. Thus, we conclude that NLRR1 appears to be an extracellular negative regulator of ALK signalling in NB and neuronal development. Our findings may be beneficial to comprehend NB heterogeneity and to develop a novel therapy against unfavourable NB. PMID:27604320

  18. Novel morpholin-3-one fused quinazoline derivatives as EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xuemei; Lv, Yongjuan; Liu, Peng; Li, Zhipeng; Hu, Liming; Zeng, Chengchu; Yang, Leifu

    2016-03-15

    A series of novel morpholin-3-one-fused quinazoline derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated as EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Nineteen compounds showed significant inhibitory activities against EGFR(wt) kinase (IC50<1 μM). Compound a8 demonstrated the most potent inhibitory activity toward EGFR(wt) (IC50=53.1 nM). Compound a7 and a8 showed excellent inhibitory activities against mutant EGFR(T790M/L858R) and strong antiproliferative activity against H358 and A549 cell lines. Finally, molecular docking studies were performed to predict the possible binding mode of the target compounds. It is believed that this work would be very useful for designing a new series of tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting EGFR. PMID:26879314

  19. Atomistic Insights into Regulatory Mechanisms of the HER2 Tyrosine Kinase Domain: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Telesco, Shannon E.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2009-01-01

    HER2 (ErbB2/Neu) is a receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB family and is overexpressed in 20–30% of human breast cancers. Although several crystal structures of ErbB kinases have been solved, the precise mechanism of HER2 activation remains unknown, and it has been suggested that HER2 is unique in its requirement for phosphorylation of Y877, a key tyrosine residue located in the activation loop. To elucidate mechanistic details of kinase domain regulation, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of a homology-modeled HER2 kinase structure in active and inactive conformations. Principal component analysis of the atomistic fluctuations reveals a tight coupling between the activation loop and catalytic loop that may contribute to alignment of residues required for catalysis in the active kinase. The free energy perturbation method is also employed to predict a role for phosphorylated Y877 in stabilizing the kinase conformations. Finally, simulation results are presented for a HER2/EGFR heterodimer and reveal that the dimeric interface induces a rearrangement of the αC helix toward the active conformation. Elucidation of the molecular regulatory mechanisms in HER2 will help establish structure-function relationships in the wild-type kinase, as well as predict mutations with a propensity for constitutive activation in HER2-mediated cancers. PMID:19289058

  20. Tyrosine kinase activity, cytoskeletal organization, and motility in human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Romer, L H; McLean, N; Turner, C E; Burridge, K

    1994-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins occurs during integrin-mediated cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins. We have investigated the role of tyrosine phosphorylation in the migration and initial spreading of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Elevated phosphotyrosine concentrations were noted in the focal adhesions of HUVEC migrating into wounds. Anti-phosphotyrosine Western blots of extracts of wounded HUVEC monolayers demonstrated increased phosphorylation at 120-130 kDa when compared with extracts of intact monolayers. The pp125FAK immunoprecipitated from wounded monolayers exhibited increased kinase activity as compared to pp125FAK from intact monolayers. The time to wound closure in HUVEC monolayers was doubled by tyrphostin AG 213 treatment. The same concentration of AG 213 interfered with HUVEC focal adhesion and stress fiber formation. AG 213 inhibited adhesion-associated tyrosine phosphorylation of pp125FAK in HUVEC. Tyrphostins AG 213 and AG 808 inhibited pp125FAK activity in in vitro kinase assays. pp125FAK immunoprecipitates from HUVEC treated with both of these inhibitors also had kinase activity in vitro that was below levels seen in untreated HUVEC. These findings suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins may be important in HUVEC spreading and migration and that pp125FAK may mediate phosphotyrosine formation during these processes. Images PMID:8049526

  1. Endostatin-induced tyrosine kinase signaling through the Shb adaptor protein regulates endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dixelius, J; Larsson, H; Sasaki, T; Holmqvist, K; Lu, L; Engström, A; Timpl, R; Welsh, M; Claesson-Welsh, L

    2000-06-01

    Endostatin, which corresponds to the C-terminal fragment of collagen XVIII, is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-induced angiogenesis in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane was inhibited by endostatin, but not by an endostatin mutant R158/270A, lacking heparin-binding ability. Endostatin was internalized by endothelial cells, but not by mouse fibroblasts. Treatment of murine brain endothelial (IBE) cells with endostatin reduced the proportion of cells in S phase, whereas growth-arrested IBE cells in collagen gels treated with endostatin displayed enhanced tubular morphogenesis. IBE cells overexpressing Shb, an adaptor protein implicated in angiostatin-induced apoptosis, displayed elevated apoptosis and decreased tubular morphogenesis in collagen gels in response to endostatin when added together with FGF-2. Induction of apoptosis was dependent on the heparin-binding ability of endostatin and the expression of Shb with a functional Src homology 2 (SH2)-domain. Endostatin treatment for 10 minutes or 24 hours induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Shb and formation of multiprotein complexes. An Shb SH2 domain fusion protein precipitated a 125-kd phosphotyrosyl protein in endostatin-treated cells. The 125-kd component either contained intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity or occurred in complex with a tyrosine kinase. In conclusion, our data show that endostatin induces tyrosine kinase activity and enhanced apoptosis in FGF-treated endothelial cells. PMID:10828022

  2. Effect of sialylation on EGFR phosphorylation and resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Yen, Hsin-Yung; Liu, Ying-Chih; Chen, Nai-Yu; Tsai, Chia-Feng; Wang, Yi-Ting; Chen, Yu-Ju; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2015-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a heavily glycosylated transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase. Upon EGF-binding, EGFR undergoes conformational changes to dimerize, resulting in kinase activation and autophosphorylation and downstream signaling. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been used to treat lung cancer by inhibiting EGFR phosphorylation. Previously, we demonstrated that EGFR sialylation suppresses its dimerization and phosphorylation. In this report, we further investigated the effect of sialylation on the phosphorylation profile of EGFR in TKI-sensitive and TKI-resistant cells. Sialylation was induced in cancer progression to inhibit the association of EGFR with EGF and the subsequent autophosphorylation. In the absence of EGF the TKI-resistant EGFR mutant (L858R/T790M) had a higher degree of sialylation and phosphorylation at Y1068, Y1086, and Y1173 than the TKI-sensitive EGFR. In addition, although sialylation in the TKI-resistant mutants suppresses EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation, with the most significant effect on the Y1173 site, the sialylation effect is not strong enough to stop cancer progression by inhibiting the phosphorylation of these three sites. These findings were supported further by the observation that the L858R/T790M EGFR mutant, when treated with sialidase or sialyltransferase inhibitor, showed an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation, and the sensitivity of the corresponding resistant lung cancer cells to gefitinib was reduced by desialylation and was enhanced by sialylation. PMID:25971727

  3. A systematic analysis of the resistance and sensitivity of HER2YVMA receptor tyrosine kinase mutant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in HER2-positive lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaokun; Chen, Beibei; Ma, Zhaosheng; Xie, Bojian; Cao, Xinguang; Yang, Tiejun; Zhao, Yuzhou; Qin, Jianjun; Li, Jicheng; Cao, Feilin; Chen, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) has become a well-established target for the treatment of HER2-positive lung cancer. However, a frequently observed in-frame mutation that inserts amino acid quadruplex Tyr776-Val777-Met778-Ala779 at G776 (G776(YVMA)) in HER2 kinase domain can cause drug resistance and sensitivity, largely limiting the application of reversible tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer therapy. A systematic investigation of the intermolecular interactions between the HER2(YVMA) mutant and clinical small-molecule inhibitors would help to establish a complete picture of drug response to HER2 G776(YVMA) insertion in lung cancer, and to design new tyrosine kinase inhibitors with high potency and selectivity to target the lung cancer-related HER2(YVMA) mutant. Here, we combined homology modeling, ligand grafting, structure minimization, molecular simulation and binding affinity analysis to profile a number of tyrosine kinase inhibitors against the G776(YVMA) insertion in HER2. It is found that the insertion is far away from HER2 active pocket and thus cannot contact inhibitor ligand directly. However, the insertion is expected to induce marked allosteric effect on some regions around the pocket, including A-loop and hinges connecting between the N- and C-lobes of HER2 kinase domain, which may exert indirect influence to inhibitor binding. Most investigated inhibitors exhibit weak binding strength to both wild-type and mutant HER2, which can be attributed to steric hindrance that impairs ligand compatibility with HER2 active pocket. However, the cognate inhibitor lapatinib and the non-cognate inhibitor bosutinib were predicted to have low affinity for wild-type HER2 but high affinity for HER2(YVMA) mutant, which was confirmed by subsequent kinase assay experiments; the inhibitory potencies of bosutinib against wild-type and mutant HER2 were determined to be IC(50) > 1000 and =27 nM, respectively, suggesting that the bosutinib might be

  4. The cardiotoxicity and myocyte damage caused by small molecule anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitors is correlated with lack of target specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Hasinoff, Brian B.

    2010-04-15

    The use of the new anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) has revolutionized the treatment of certain cancers. However, the use of some of these results in cardiotoxicity. Large-scale profiling data recently made available for the binding of 7 of the 9 FDA-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors to a panel of 317 kinases has allowed us to correlate kinase inhibitor binding selectivity scores with TKI-induced damage to neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. The tyrosine kinase selectivity scores, but not the serine-threonine kinase scores, were highly correlated with the myocyte damaging effects of the TKIs. Additionally, we showed that damage to myocytes gave a good rank order correlation with clinical cardiotoxicity. Finally, strength of TKI binding to colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) was highly correlated with myocyte damage, thus possibly implicating this kinase in contributing to TKI-induced cardiotoxicity.

  5. Hydrophobic Core Variations Provide a Structural Framework for Tyrosine Kinase Evolution and Functional Specialization

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Annie; Byrne, Dominic P.; Ferries, Samantha; Ruan, Zheng; Hanold, Laura E.; Katiyar, Samiksha; Kennedy, Eileen J.; Eyers, Patrick A.; Kannan, Natarajan

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) are a group of closely related enzymes that have evolutionarily diverged from serine/threonine kinases (STKs) to regulate pathways associated with multi-cellularity. Evolutionary divergence of PTKs from STKs has occurred through accumulation of mutations in the active site as well as in the commonly conserved hydrophobic core. While the functional significance of active site variations is well understood, relatively little is known about how hydrophobic core variations contribute to PTK evolutionary divergence. Here, using a combination of statistical sequence comparisons, molecular dynamics simulations, mutational analysis and in vitro thermostability and kinase assays, we investigate the structural and functional significance of key PTK-specific variations in the kinase core. We find that the nature of residues and interactions in the hydrophobic core of PTKs is strikingly different from other protein kinases, and PTK-specific variations in the core contribute to functional divergence by altering the stability and dynamics of the kinase domain. In particular, a functionally critical STK-conserved histidine that stabilizes the regulatory spine in STKs is selectively mutated to an alanine, serine or glutamate in PTKs, and this loss-of-function mutation is accommodated, in part, through compensatory PTK-specific interactions in the core. In particular, a PTK-conserved phenylalanine in the I-helix appears to structurally and functionally compensate for the loss of STK-histidine by interacting with the regulatory spine, which has far-reaching effects on enzyme activity, inhibitor sensing, and stability. We propose that hydrophobic core variations provide a selective advantage during PTK evolution by increasing the conformational flexibility, and therefore the allosteric potential of the kinase domain. Our studies also suggest that Tyrosine Kinase Like kinases such as RAF are intermediates in PTK evolutionary divergence inasmuch as they

  6. Rapid and dramatic response to alectinib in an anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer patient who is critically ill.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tatsuya; Hida, Toyoaki; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have shown promising clinical activity in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that harbors ALK rearrangement. The next-generation ALK-TKI, alectinib, has been reported to have potent efficacy in ALK-positive NSCLC patients including on mutations that confer resistance to crizotinib, which was the first ALK-TKI approved for ALK-positive NSCLC. The efficacy and safety of ALK-TKIs, including crizotinib and alectinib, as the first-line treatment in critically ill patients is unclear. We report one ALK-positive NSCLC patient with poor performance status (PS) and disseminated intravascular coagulation because of respiratory failure and multiple metastases, and experienced the rapid and dramatic response to alectinib without adverse events that can lead to discontinuation and dose reduction of the drug. After a couple of months of treatment with alectinib, radiological review indicated a complete response. The present case is the first reported case of rapid and marked response to alectinib in ALK-positive NSCLC patients who had poor PS and severe organ dysfunction, such as disseminated intravascular coagulation. Further investigation of the safety and efficacy of ALK-TKI for ALK-positive NSCLC patients who are critically ill is warranted. PMID:26938871

  7. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the BRI1 receptor kinase occurs via a posttranslational modification and is activated by the juxtamembrane domain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In metazoans, receptor kinases control many essential processes related to growth and development and response to the environment. The receptor kinases in plants and animals are structurally similar but evolutionarily distinct from one another, and thus while most animal receptor kinases are tyrosin...

  8. Identification of the flavoprotein of succinate dehydrogenase and aconitase as in vitro mitochondrial substrates of Fgr tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Mauro; Morrice, Nick A; Brunati, Anna Maria; Toninello, Antonio

    2007-12-11

    Overlooked until recently, mitochondrial protein phosphorylation is now emerging as a key post-translational mechanism in the regulation of mitochondrial functions. In particular, tyrosine phosphorylation represents a promising field to discover new mechanisms of bioenergetic regulation. Tyrosine kinases belonging to the Src kinase family have been observed in mitochondrial compartments, however their substrates are almost unknown. Here, we provide evidence that the flavoprotein of succinate dehydrogenase and aconitase are "in vitro" substrates of Fgr tyrosine kinase. Fgr phosphorylates flavoprotein of succinate dehydrogenase at Y535 and Y596 and aconitase at Y71, Y544 and Y665. The significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:17997986

  9. The Src-family tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP1 interferes with the activation of ribosomal protein S6 kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Shah, O Jameel; Kimball, Scot R; Jefferson, Leonard S

    2002-01-01

    Considerable biochemical and pharmacological evidence suggests that the activation of ribosomal protein S6 kinases (S6Ks) by activated receptor tyrosine kinases involves multiple co-ordinated input signals. However, the identities of many of these inputs remain poorly described, and their precise involvement in S6K activation has been the subject of great investigative effort. In the present study, we have shown that 4-amino-5-(4-methylphenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP1), a selective inhibitor of the Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases, interferes with the activation of 70 and 85 kDa S6K gene products (p70S6K1 and p85S6K1) by insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1, sodium orthovanadate and activated alleles of phosphoinositide 3-kinase and H-Ras. PP1 also impedes the activation of AKT/protein kinase B and the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 by these various stimuli. Insulin-like growth factor 1 was observed to induce a sustained increase in c-Src autophosphorylation as revealed using anti-phospho-Y416 antisera, but this effect was absent from the cells treated with PP1. To conclude, an activated allele of p70S6K1 is compared with the wild-type allele, resistant to inhibition by PP1 when co-expressed with phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1), suggesting that PP1 affects p70S6K1 via a PDK1-independent pathway. Thus activation of Src may supply a necessary signal for the activation of p70S6K1 and possibly other S6Ks. PMID:12014987

  10. c-Abl Tyrosine Kinase Adopts Multiple Active Conformational States in Solution

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases of the Abl family have diverse roles in normal cellular regulation and drive several forms of leukemia as oncogenic fusion proteins. In the crystal structure of the inactive c-Abl kinase core, the SH2 and SH3 domains dock onto the back of the kinase domain, resulting in a compact, assembled state. This inactive conformation is stabilized by the interaction of the myristoylated N-cap with a pocket in the C-lobe of the kinase domain. Mutations that perturb these intramolecular interactions result in kinase activation. Here, we present X-ray scattering solution structures of multidomain c-Abl kinase core proteins modeling diverse active states. Surprisingly, the relative positions of the regulatory N-cap, SH3, and SH2 domains in an active myristic acid binding pocket mutant (A356N) were virtually identical to those of the assembled wild-type kinase core, indicating that Abl kinase activation does not require dramatic reorganization of the downregulated core structure. In contrast, the positions of the SH2 and SH3 domains in a clinically relevant imatinib-resistant gatekeeper mutant (T315I) appear to be reconfigured relative to their positions in the wild-type protein. Our results demonstrate that c-Abl kinase activation can occur either with (T315I) or without (A356N) global allosteric changes in the core, revealing the potential for previously unrecognized signaling diversity. PMID:27166638

  11. Non-Invasive Methods to Monitor Mechanisms of Resistance to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed Central

    Ulivi, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The induction of resistance mechanisms represents an important problem for the targeted therapy of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The best-known resistance mechanism induced during treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) is EGFR T790M mutation for which specific drugs are have been developed. However, other molecular alterations have also been reported as induced resistance mechanisms to EGFR-TKIs. Similarly, there is growing evidence of acquired resistance mechanisms to anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-TKI treatment. A better understanding of these acquired resistance mechanisms is essential in clinical practice as patients could be treated with specific drugs that are active against the induced alterations. The use of free circulating tumor nucleic acids or circulating tumor cells (CTCs) enables resistance mechanisms to be characterized in a non-invasive manner and reduces the need for tumor re-biopsy. This review discusses the main resistance mechanisms to TKIs and provides a comprehensive overview of innovative strategies to evaluate known resistance mechanisms in free circulating nucleic acids or CTCs and potential future orientations for these non-invasive approaches. PMID:27455248

  12. ALK-positive large B-cell lymphoma: identification of EML4-ALK and a review of the literature focusing on the ALK immunohistochemical staining pattern.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kana; Nakasone, Hideki; Togashi, Yuki; Sakata, Seiji; Tsuyama, Naoko; Baba, Satoko; Dobashi, Akito; Asaka, Reimi; Tsai, Chien-Chen; Chuang, Shih-Sung; Izutsu, Koji; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Takeuchi, Kengo

    2016-04-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive large B-cell lymphoma (ALK+LBCL) is a rare, aggressive B-cell lymphoma with ALK fusion genes. Histopathologically, the ALK immunohistochemical staining pattern is suggestive of the fusion partner of ALK. Here, we examined an ALK+LBCL case showing a unique diffuse cytoplasmic ALK staining pattern and identified EML4-ALK, which has not previously been reported in ALK+LBCL. Furthermore, to clarify whether the prognosis differs depending on the staining pattern, we reviewed 112 previously reported cases, and analyzed immunohistochemical markers and clinical data stratified by the staining pattern. We found that ALK staining can be classified into a granular cytoplasmic staining (GCS) or a non-GCS patterns. Sixty-four adult cases for which both the ALK staining pattern and survival time were reported were further analyzed for survival trends. The non-GCS pattern was significantly associated with inferior overall survival (P = 0.031). This difference remained significant after adjusting for age and clinical stage (hazard ratio 5.08, 95 % CI 1.88-13.7, P = 0.0013). Given that the ALK immunohistochemical staining pattern is associated with the ALK fusion partner, the present results suggest that the prognosis for ALK+LBCL differs depending on the ALK fusion partner. PMID:26781614

  13. Targeting kinases with anilinopyrimidines: discovery of N-phenyl-N’-[4-(pyrimidin-4-ylamino)phenyl]urea derivatives as selective inhibitors of class III receptor tyrosine kinase subfamily

    PubMed Central

    Gandin, Valentina; Ferrarese, Alessandro; Dalla Via, Martina; Marzano, Cristina; Chilin, Adriana; Marzaro, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Kinase inhibitors are attractive drugs/drug candidates for the treatment of cancer. The most recent literature has highlighted the importance of multi target kinase inhibitors, although a correct balance between specificity and non-specificity is required. In this view, the discovery of multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitors with subfamily selectivity is a challenging goal. Herein we present the synthesis and the preliminary kinase profiling of a set of novel 4-anilinopyrimidines. Among the synthesized compounds, the N-phenyl-N’-[4-(pyrimidin-4-ylamino)phenyl]urea derivatives selectively targeted some members of class III receptor tyrosine kinase family. Starting from the structure of hit compound 19 we synthesized a further compound with an improved affinity toward the class III receptor tyrosine kinase members and endowed with a promising antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo in a murine solid tumor model. Molecular modeling simulations were used in order to rationalize the behavior of the title compounds. PMID:26568452

  14. P-glycoprotein Mediates Ceritinib Resistance in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-rearranged Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Ryohei; Sakashita, Takuya; Yanagitani, Noriko; Ninomiya, Hironori; Horiike, Atsushi; Friboulet, Luc; Gainor, Justin F.; Motoi, Noriko; Dobashi, Akito; Sakata, Seiji; Tambo, Yuichi; Kitazono, Satoru; Sato, Shigeo; Koike, Sumie; John Iafrate, A.; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Shaw, Alice T.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Takeuchi, Kengo; Nishio, Makoto; Fujita, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion oncogene is observed in 3%–5% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Crizotinib and ceritinib, a next-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) active against crizotinib-refractory patients, are clinically available for the treatment of ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients, and multiple next-generation ALK-TKIs are currently under clinical evaluation. These ALK-TKIs exhibit robust clinical activity in ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients; however, the emergence of ALK-TKI resistance restricts the therapeutic effect. To date, various secondary mutations or bypass pathway activation-mediated resistance have been identified, but large parts of the resistance mechanism are yet to be identified. Here, we report the discovery of p-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1) overexpression as a ceritinib resistance mechanism in ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients. P-gp exported ceritinib and its overexpression conferred ceritinib and crizotinib resistance, but not to PF-06463922 or alectinib, which are next-generation ALK inhibitors. Knockdown of ABCB1 or P-gp inhibitors sensitizes the patient-derived cancer cells to ceritinib, in vitro and in vivo. P-gp overexpression was identified in three out of 11 cases with in ALK-rearranged crizotinib or ceritinib resistant NSCLC patients. Our study suggests that alectinib, PF-06463922, or P-gp inhibitor with ceritinib could overcome the ceritinib or crizotinib resistance mediated by P-gp overexpression. PMID:26870817

  15. TEC protein tyrosine kinase is involved in the Erk signaling pathway induced by HGF

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Feifei; Jiang, Yinan; Zheng, Qiping; Yang, Xiaoming; Wang, Siying

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} TEC is rapidly tyrosine-phosphorylated and activated by HGF-stimulation in vivo or after partial hepatectomy in mice. {yields} TEC enhances the activity of Elk and serum response element (SRE) in HGF signaling pathway in hepatocyte. {yields} TEC promotes hepatocyte proliferation through the Erk-MAPK pathway. -- Abstract: Background/aims: TEC, a member of the TEC family of non-receptor type protein tyrosine kinases, has recently been suggested to play a role in hepatocyte proliferation and liver regeneration. This study aims to investigate the putative mechanisms of TEC kinase regulation of hepatocyte differentiation, i.e. to explore which signaling pathway TEC is involved in, and how TEC is activated in hepatocyte after hepatectomy and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) stimulation. Methods: We performed immunoprecipitation (IP) and immunoblotting (IB) to examine TEC tyrosine phosphorylation after partial hepatectomy in mice and HGF stimulation in WB F-344 hepatic cells. The TEC kinase activity was determined by in vitro kinase assay. Reporter gene assay, antisense oligonucleotide and TEC dominant negative mutant (TEC{sup KM}) were used to examine the possible signaling pathways in which TEC is involved. The cell proliferation rate was evaluated by {sup 3}H-TdR incorporation. Results: TEC phosphorylation and kinase activity were increased in 1 h after hepatectomy or HGF treatment. TEC enhanced the activity of Elk and serum response element (SRE). Inhibition of MEK1 suppressed TEC phosphorylation. Blocking TEC activity dramatically decreased the activation of Erk. Reduced TEC kinase activity also suppressed the proliferation of WB F-344 cells. These results suggest TEC is involved in the Ras-MAPK pathway and acts between MEK1 and Erk. Conclusions: TEC promotes hepatocyte proliferation and regeneration and is involved in HGF-induced Erk signaling pathway.

  16. Native and rearranged ALK copy number and rearranged cell count in NSCLC: Implications for ALK inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Camidge, D. Ross; Skokan, Margaret; Kiatsimkul, Porntip; Helfrich, Barbara; Lu, Xian; Barón, Anna E.; Schulte, Nathan; Maxson, DeLee; Aisner, Dara L.; Franklin, Wilbur A.; Doebele, Robert C.; Varella-Garcia, Marileila

    2013-01-01

    Background Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase positive (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) responds to ALK inhibitors. Clinically, ≥ 15% cells showing rearrangements by break-apart FISH classify tumors as positive. Increases in native and rearranged ALK copy number also occur. Methods 1426 NSCLC clinical specimens (174 ALK+ and 1252 ALK negative), and 24 ALK negative NSCLC cell lines were investigated. ALK copy number and genomic status were assessed by FISH. Results Clinical specimens with 0–9%, 10–15%, 16–30%, 31–50% and >50% of ALK+ cells were found in 79.3%, 8.5%, 1.4%, 2.7% and 8.1% of cases, respectively. Increased native ALK copy number (≥3 copies/cell in ≥40% cells) was detected in 19% of ALK+ and 62% of ALK negative tumors. In ALK negative tumors, abundant focal amplification of native ALK was rare (0.8%). Other atypical patterns occurred in ~6% of tumors. Mean native ALK copy number ranged from 2.1–6.9 in cell lines and was not correlated with crizotinib sensitivity (IC50s 0.34–2.8 uM) (r=0.279, p=0.1764). Neither native, nor rearranged ALK copy number, nor percentage cells positive correlated with extra-central nervous system progression free survivalin ALK+ patients on crizotinib. Conclusions 8.5% of cases are below the established positivity threshold by ≤5%. Further investigation of ALK by other diagnostic techniques in such cases may be warranted. Native ALK copy number increases alone are not associated with sensitivity to ALK inhibition in vitro. However, rare complex patterns of increased native ALK in patients should be studied further as atypical rearrangements contained within these may otherwise be missed. PMID:24022839

  17. [Possibilities for inhibiting tumor-induced angiogenesis: results with multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Török, Szilvia; Döme, Balázs

    2012-03-01

    Functional blood vasculature is essential for tumor progression. The main signalization pathways that play a key role in the survival and growth of tumor vessels originate from the VEGF-, PDGF- and FGF tyrosine kinase receptors. In the past decade, significant results have been published on receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (RTKIs). In this paper, the mechanisms of action and the results so far available of experimental and clinical studies on multi-target antiangiogenic TKIs are discussed. On the one hand, notable achievements have been made recently and these drugs are already used in clinical practice in some patient populations. On the other hand, the optimal combination and dosage of these drugs, selection of the apropriate biomarker and better understanding of the conflicting role of PDGFR and FGFR signaling in angiogenesis remain future challenges. PMID:22403757

  18. How tyrosine kinase inhibitors impair metabolism and endocrine system function: a systematic updated review.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Molica, Matteo; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-12-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) advent has deeply changed the outcome of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients, with improved rates of response and overall survival. However, for this success some patients paid the price of a number of peculiar side effects, the so-called off-target side effects, specific for each one TKI. These effects are due to non-selective inhibition of other tyrosine kinase receptors, such as PDGFR, c-KIT, Src, VEGF. Consequences of this inhibition, some metabolic changes during the treatment with TKIs are reported. Aim of present review is to report metabolic changes and potential mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis related to imatinib, second (nilotinib and dasatinib) and third generation (bosutinib and ponatinib) TKIs. PMID:25449685

  19. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors for non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asami, Kazuhiro; Atagi, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    First-generation epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), including gefitinib and erlotinib, have proven to be highly effective agents for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients harboring an activating EGFR mutation such as the exon 19 deletion mutation and L858R. Although those reversible small molecular targeted agents provide a significant response and survival benefit, all responders eventually acquire resistance. Second-generation EGFR-targeting agents, such as irreversible EGFR/HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors and pan-HER TKIs, may improve survival further and be useful for patients who acquired resistance to first-generation EGFR-TKIs. This review discusses novel therapeutic strategies for EGFR-mutated advanced NSCLC using first- and second-generation EGFR-TKIs. PMID:25302168

  20. Ly-6A is required for T cell receptor expression and protein tyrosine kinase fyn activity.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S K; Su, B; Maher, S E; Bothwell, A L

    1994-01-01

    To characterize the function of the Ly-6A antigen in T cell activation, antisense Ly-6 RNA was expressed in a stably transfected antigen-specific T cell clone. Reduced Ly-6A expression results in inhibition of responses to antigen, anti-TCR (anti-T cell receptor) crosslinking and concanavalin A plus recombinant interleukin 1 and causes impairment of in vitro fyn tyrosine kinase activity. More substantial reduction of Ly-6A results in reduction of TCR expression. Analysis of mRNA species indicates that the reduction is specific for the TCR beta chain. These data demonstrate that Ly-6A may regulate TCR expression and may be involved in early events of T cell activation via regulation of fyn tyrosine kinase activity. Images PMID:8187770

  1. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Vascular Toxicity: Impetus for a Classification System?

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Joerg

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of molecularly targeted therapies with tyrosine kinase inhibitors has revolutionized cancer therapy and has contributed to a steady decline in cancer-related mortality since the late 1990s. However, not only cardiac but also vascular toxicity has been reported for these agents, some as expected on-target effects (e.g., VEGF receptor inhibitors) and others as unanticipated events (e.g., BCR-Abl inhibitors). A sound understanding of these cardiovascular toxic effects is critical to advance mechanistic insight into vascular disease and clinical care. From a conceptual standpoint, there might be value in defining type I (permanent) and type II (transient) vascular toxicity. This review will focus on the tyrosine kinase inhibitors in current clinical use and their associated vascular side effects. PMID:27099141

  2. Identification of Fer tyrosine kinase localized on microtubules as a platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 phosphorylating kinase in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kogata, Naoko; Masuda, Michitaka; Kamioka, Yuji; Yamagishi, Akiko; Endo, Akira; Okada, Masato; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2003-09-01

    Platelet endothelial adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) is a part of intercellular junctions and triggers intracellular signaling cascades upon homophilic binding. The intracellular domain of PECAM-1 is tyrosine phosphorylated upon homophilic engagement. However, it remains unclear which tyrosine kinase phosphorylates PECAM-1. We sought to isolate tyrosine kinases responsible for PECAM-1 phosphorylation and identified Fer as a candidate, based on expression cloning. Fer kinase specifically phosphorylated PECAM-1 at the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif. Notably, Fer induced tyrosine phosphorylation of SHP-2, which is known to bind to the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif of PECAM-1, and Fer also induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Gab1 (Grb2-associated binder-1). Engagement-dependent PECAM-1 phosphorylation was inhibited by the overexpression of a kinase-inactive mutant of Fer, suggesting that Fer is responsible for the tyrosine phosphorylation upon PECAM-1 engagement. Furthermore, by using green fluorescent protein-tagged Fer and a time-lapse fluorescent microscope, we found that Fer localized at microtubules in polarized and motile vascular endothelial cells. Fer was dynamically associated with growing microtubules in the direction of cell-cell contacts, where p120catenin, which is known to associate with Fer, colocalized with PECAM-1. These results suggest that Fer localized on microtubules may play an important role in phosphorylation of PECAM-1, possibly through its association with p120catenin at nascent cell-cell contacts. PMID:12972546

  3. Efficacy of ponatinib against ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okabe, Seiichi Tauchi, Tetsuzo; Tanaka, Yuko; Ohyashiki, Kazuma

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Efficacy of ponatinib against ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant leukemia cells okabe et al. •Imatinib or nilotinib resistance was involved Src family kinase. •The BCR-ABL point mutation (E334V) was highly resistant to imatinib or nilotinib. •Ponatinib was a powerful strategy against imatinib or nilotinib resistant Ph-positive cells. -- Abstract: Because a substantial number of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia acquire resistance to ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), their management remains a challenge. Ponatinib, also known as AP24534, is an oral multi-targeted TKI. Ponatinib is currently being investigated in a pivotal phase 2 clinical trial. In the present study, we analyzed the molecular and functional consequences of ponatinib against imatinib- or nilotinib-resistant (R) K562 and Ba/F3 cells. The proliferation of imatinib- or nilotinib-resistant K562 cells did not decrease after treatment with imatinib or nilotinib. Src family kinase Lyn was activated. Point mutation Ba/F3 cells (E334 V) were also highly resistant to imatinib and nilotinib. Treatment with ponatinib for 72 h inhibited the growth of imatinib- and nilotinib-resistant cells. The phosphorylation of BCR-ABL, Lyn, and Crk-L was reduced. This study demonstrates that ponatinib has an anti-leukemia effect by reducing ABL and Lyn kinase activity and this information may be of therapeutic relevance.

  4. Purification, characterization, and crystallization of membrane bound Escherichia coli tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Chesterman, Chelsy; Jia, Zongchao

    2016-09-01

    Escherichia coli tyrosine kinase (Etk) is a membrane bound kinase in gram-negative bacteria that regulates the export of capsular polysaccharides (CPS). The molecular mechanism behind CPS regulation remains unclear, despite access to a crystal structure of the cytoplasmic kinase domain of Etk. In this study, an efficient protocol to produce full length Etk solubilized in n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside has been established with high yield. We have determined that detergent solubilized Etk retains kinase activity, but the protein is prone to aggregation, degradation, and has been unsuccessful in protein crystallization trials. In response, we designed and characterized truncations of Etk that do not aggregate and have led to successful crystallization experiments. In this article, we discuss our optimized expression and purification protocol for Etk, the design of Etk protein truncations, and the behavior of Etk during purification in a range of stabilizing detergents. These efforts have successfully produced protein suitable for crystallization. Our results will be a useful guide for future structural and functional studies of the bacterial tyrosine kinase family. PMID:26363120

  5. Autoinhibition of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) and activation by soluble inositol hexakisphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Vogan, Erik M; Nocka, Laura M; Rosen, Connor E; Zorn, Julie A; Harrison, Stephen C; Kuriyan, John

    2015-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk), a Tec-family tyrosine kinase, is essential for B-cell function. We present crystallographic and biochemical analyses of Btk, which together reveal molecular details of its autoinhibition and activation. Autoinhibited Btk adopts a compact conformation like that of inactive c-Src and c-Abl. A lipid-binding PH-TH module, unique to Tec kinases, acts in conjunction with the SH2 and SH3 domains to stabilize the inactive conformation. In addition to the expected activation of Btk by membranes containing phosphatidylinositol triphosphate (PIP3), we found that inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6), a soluble signaling molecule found in both animal and plant cells, also activates Btk. This activation is a consequence of a transient PH-TH dimerization induced by IP6, which promotes transphosphorylation of the kinase domains. Sequence comparisons with other Tec-family kinases suggest that activation by IP6 is unique to Btk. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06074.001 PMID:25699547

  6. Nitric oxide reversibly inhibits the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, C; Gómez, C; Martín-Nieto, J; De Frutos, T; Jiménez, A; Villalobo, A

    1997-01-01

    Although it has been demonstrated that NO inhibits the proliferation of different cell types, the mechanisms of its anti-mitotic action are not well understood. In this work we have studied the possible interaction of NO with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), using transfected fibroblasts which overexpress the human EGFR. The NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), 1,1-diethyl-2-hydroxy-2-nitrosohydrazine (DEA-NO) and N-¿4-[1-(3-aminopropyl)-2-hydroxy-2-nitrosohydrazino]butyl¿propane -1, 3-diamine (DETA-NO) inhibited DNA synthesis of fibroblasts growing in the presence of fetal calf serum, epidermal growth factor (EGF) or EGF plus insulin, as assessed by [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation. Neither 8-bromo-cGMP nor the cGMP-phosphodiesterase inhibitor zaprinast mimicked this effect, suggesting that NO is unlikely to inhibit cell proliferation via a cGMP-dependent pathway. SNAP, DEA-NO and DETA-NO also inhibited the transphosphorylation of the EGFR and its tyrosine kinase activity toward the exogenous substrate poly-l-(Glu-Tyr), as measured in permeabilized cells using [gamma-32P]ATP as phosphate donor. In contrast, 3-[morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride] (SIN-1), a peroxynitrite-forming compound, did not significantly inhibit either DNA synthesis or the EGFR tyrosine kinase activity. The inhibitory action of DEA-NO on the EGFR tyrosine kinase was prevented by haemoglobin, an NO scavenger, but not by superoxide dismutase, and was reversed by dithiothreitol. The binding of EGF to its receptor was unaffected by DEA-NO. The inhibitory action of DEA-NO on the EGF-dependent transphosphorylation of the receptor was also demonstrated in intact cells by immunoblot analysis using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. Taken together, these results suggest that NO, but not peroxynitrite, inhibits in a reversible manner the EGFR tyrosine kinase activity by S-nitrosylation of the receptor. PMID:9291107

  7. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor-associated syndrome of inappropriate secretion of anti-diuretic hormone.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jordan; Shields, Jenna; Passero, Vida

    2016-10-01

    Hyponatremia is a common complication among cancer patients. Certain antineoplastic agents have been associated with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of anti-diuretic hormone-induced hyponatremia. The most common agents associated with secretion of anti-diuretic hormone are vinca alkaloids, platinum compounds, and alkylating agents. We report a case of secretion of anti-diuretic hormone associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:26089312

  8. Molecular cloning of a docking protein, BRDG1, that acts downstream of the Tec tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ohya, Ken-ichi; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Kitanaka, Akira; Yoshida, Koji; Miyazato, Akira; Yamashita, Yoshihiro; Yamanaka, Takeo; Ikeda, Uichi; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Ozawa, Keiya; Mano, Hiroyuki

    1999-01-01

    Tec, Btk, Itk, Bmx, and Txk constitute the Tec family of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), a family with the distinct feature of containing a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. Tec acts in signaling pathways triggered by the B cell antigen receptor (BCR), cytokine receptors, integrins, and receptor-type PTKs. Although upstream regulators of Tec family kinases are relatively well characterized, little is known of the downstream effectors of these enzymes. The yeast two-hybrid system has identified several proteins that interact with the kinase domain of Tec, one of which is now revealed to be a previously unknown docking protein termed BRDG1 (BCR downstream signaling 1). BRDG1 contains a proline-rich motif, a PH domain, and multiple tyrosine residues that are potential target sites for Src homology 2 domains. In 293 cells expressing recombinant BRDG1 and various PTKs, Tec and Pyk2, but not Btk, Bmx, Lyn, Syk, or c-Abl, induced marked phosphorylation of BRDG1 on tyrosine residues. BRDG1 was also phosphorylated by Tec directly in vitro. Efficient phosphorylation of BRDG1 by Tec required the PH and SH2 domains as well as the kinase domain of the latter. Furthermore, BRDG1 was shown to participate in a positive feedback loop by increasing the activity of Tec. BRDG1 transcripts are abundant in the human B cell line Ramos, and the endogenous protein underwent tyrosine phosphorylation in response to BCR stimulation. BRDG1 thus appears to function as a docking protein acting downstream of Tec in BCR signaling. PMID:10518561

  9. axl, a transforming gene isolated from primary human myeloid leukemia cells, encodes a novel receptor tyrosine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    O'Bryan, J.P.; Frye, R.A.; Cogswell, P.C.; Neubauer, A.; Kitch, B.; Prokop, C.; Earp, H.S.; Liu, E.T. ); Espinosa, R. III; Le Beau, M.M. )

    1991-10-01

    Using a sensitive transfection-tumorigenicity assay, the authors have isolated a novel transforming gene from the DNA of two patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia. Sequence analysis indicates that the product of this gene, axl, is a receptor tyrosine kinase. Overexpression of axl cDNA in NIH 3T3 cells induces neoplastic transformation with the concomitant appearance of a 140-kDa axl tyrosine-phosphorylated protein. Expression of axl cDNA in the baculovirus system results in the expression of the appropriate recombinant protein that is recognized by antophosphotyrosine antibodies, confirming that the axl protein is a tyrosine kinase. The juxtaposition of fibronectin type II and immunoglobulinlike repeats in the extracellular domain, as well as distinct amino acid sequences in the kinase domain, indicate that the axl protein represents a novel subclass of receptor tyrosine kinases.

  10. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in human and pet tumours with special reference to breast cancer: a comparative review.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, Girolamo; Pantaleo, Marianna; Piccinno, Mariagrazia; Roncetti, Maria; Mutinati, Maddalena; Marech, Ilaria; Patruno, Rosa; Rizzo, Annalisa; Sciorsci, Raffaele Luigi

    2013-11-01

    Tyrosine kinase receptors (TKRs) play a key role in tumour cell proliferation and survival since they are involved in endothelial cell activation leading to tumour neoangiogenesis. In particular, vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), stem cell factor receptor (c-KitR), and colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) are overexpressed or constitutively activated in human and pet malignancies. A variety of small molecule inhibitors targeting specific tyrosine kinases (known as tyrosine kinase inhibitors or TKIs) have recently been approved, or are under investigation, for the treatment of human cancer. TKI application in animal cancer is however relatively recent. This review aims to illustrate the major aspects of tyrosine kinase dysfunctions, with special regard to human and animal cancer of the mammary gland, providing an update on the background of the anti-angiogenic and anti-neoplastic properties of TKIs in human and veterinary cancer. PMID:23768779

  11. rlk/TXK Encodes Two Forms of a Novel Cysteine String Tyrosine Kinase Activated by Src Family Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, Jayantha; Chamorro, Mario; Czar, Michael J.; Schaeffer, Edward M.; Lenardo, Michael J.; Varmus, Harold E.; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.

    1999-01-01

    Rlk/Txk is a member of the BTK/Tec family of tyrosine kinases and is primarily expressed in T lymphocytes. Unlike other members of this kinase family, Rlk lacks a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain near the amino terminus and instead contains a distinctive cysteine string motif. We demonstrate here that Rlk protein consists of two isoforms that arise by alternative initiation of translation from the same cDNA. The shorter, internally initiated protein species lacks the cysteine string motif and is located in the nucleus when expressed in the absence of the larger form. In contrast, the larger form is cytoplasmic. We show that the larger form is palmitoylated and that mutation of its cysteine string motif both abolishes palmitoylation and allows the protein to migrate to the nucleus. The cysteine string, therefore, is a critical determinant of both fatty acid modification and protein localization for the larger isoform of Rlk, suggesting that Rlk regulation is distinct from the other Btk family kinases. We further show that Rlk is phosphorylated and changes localization in response to T-cell-receptor (TCR) activation and, like the other Btk family kinases, can be phosphorylated and activated by Src family kinases. However, unlike the other Btk family members, Rlk is activated independently of the activity of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, consistent with its lack of a PH domain. Thus, Rlk has two distinct isoforms, each of which may have unique properties in signaling downstream from the TCR. PMID:9891083

  12. Biomarkers that currently affect clinical practice: EGFR, ALK, MET, KRAS

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, M.D.; Kuruvilla, M.S.; Leighl, N.B.; Kamel–Reid, S.

    2012-01-01

    New drugs such as pemetrexed, the epidermal growth factor receptor (egfr) tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and the Alk inhibitor crizotinib have recently enabled progress in the management of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc). More drugs, especially Met inhibitors, will follow. However, the benefits of these agents are not uniform across the spectrum of nsclc, and optimizing their utility requires some degree of subgrouping of nsclc by the presence or absence of certain biomarkers. The biomarkers of current or imminent value are EGFR and KRAS mutational status, ALK rearrangements, and MET immunohistochemistry. As a predictor of benefit for anti-egfr monoclonal antibodies, EGFR immunohistochemistry is also of potential interest. Some of the foregoing biomarkers (EGFR, ALK, MET) are direct drivers of the malignant phenotype. As such, they are, quite rationally, the direct targets of inhibitory drugs. However, KRAS, while definitely a driver, has resisted attempts at direct pharmacologic manipulation, and its main value might lie in its role as part of an efficient testing algorithm, because KRAS mutations appear to exclude EGFR and ALK mutations. The indirect value of KRAS in determining sensitivity to other targeted agents or to pemetrexed remains controversial. The other biomarkers (EGFR, ALK, MET) may also have indirect value as predictors of sensitivity to chemotherapy in general, to pemetrexed specifically, and to radiotherapy and molecularly targeted agents. These biomarkers have all enabled the co-development of new drugs with companion diagnostics, and they illustrate the paradigm that will govern progress in oncology in the immediate future. However, in nsclc, the acquisition of sufficient biopsy material remains a stubborn obstacle to the evolution of novel targeted therapies. PMID:22787409

  13. A combination of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, crizotinib and dasatinib for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Nehoff, Hayley; Parayath, Neha N.; McConnell, Melanie J.; Taurin, Sebastien; Greish, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor. Despite the advances in surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, patient survival averages only 14.6 months. In most GBM tumors, tyrosine kinases show increased activity and/or expression and actively contribute to the development, recurrence and onset of treatment resistance; making their inhibition an appealing therapeutic strategy. We compared the cytotoxicity of 12 tyrosine kinase inhibitors in vitro. A combination of crizotinib and dasatinib emerged as the most cytotoxic across established and primary human GBM cell lines. The combination treatment induced apoptotic cell death and polyploidy. Furthermore, the combination treatment led to the altered expression and localization of several tyrosine kinase receptors such as Met and EGFR and downstream effectors as such as SRC. Furthermore, the combination treatment reduced the migration and invasion of GBM cells and prevented endothelial cell tube formation in vitro. Overall, our study demonstrated the broad specificity of a combination of crizotinib and dasatinib across multiple GBM cell lines. These findings provide insight into the development of alternative therapy for the treatment of GBM. PMID:26517812

  14. Tyrosine kinase receptor alteration of renal vasoconstriction in rats is sex- and age-related.

    PubMed

    Passmore, John C; Fleming, John T; Tyagi, Suresh C; Falcone, Jeff C

    2012-10-01

    Male rat renal blood vessels undergo reduced contraction to norepinephrine with aging. There is a greater renal vascular impairment in male compared with female rats. We investigated specific tyrosine kinase receptor inhibition of renal interlobar artery responsiveness to phenylephrine in male and female rats at specifically designated ages. Vessels from young male rats contracted much less to phenylephrine when the vessels were pretreated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors Lavendustin A, HNMPA-(AM)₃, or AG1478. Vessels from adult female rats pretreated with Lavendustin A showed no difference in contraction from control, but did demonstrate a slightly reduced contraction when pretreated with AG1478. Middle-aged male rat vessels treated with Lavendustin A demonstrated no inhibition, but the insulin and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antagonists both induced a decline in contraction. Vessels from aged male rats demonstrated no effect related to the 3 pretreatments. Middle-aged and aged female rats pretreated with any inhibitor demonstrated no inhibitor-dependent alterations. We conclude that maximum contraction of interlobar arteries from adult male rats is reduced when tyrosine kinase receptor activity is reduced. Female rats demonstrated much less inhibitor-related change of contraction. PMID:22724583

  15. Identification of therapeutic targets in ovarian cancer through active tyrosine kinase profiling

    PubMed Central

    Ocaña, Alberto; Pandiella, Atanasio

    2015-01-01

    The activation status of a set of pro-oncogenic tyrosine kinases in ovarian cancer patient samples was analyzed to define potential therapeutic targets. Frequent activation of HER family receptor tyrosine kinases, especially HER2, was observed. Studies in ovarian cancer cell lines confirmed the activation of HER2. Moreover, knockdown of HER2 caused a strong inhibition of their proliferation. Analyses of the action of agents that target HER2 indicated that the antibody drug conjugate trastuzumab-emtansine (T-DM1) caused a substantial antitumoral effect in vivo and in vitro, and potentiated the action of drugs used in the therapy of ovarian cancer. T-DM1 provoked cell cycle arrest in mitosis, and caused the appearance of aberrant mitotic spindles in cells treated with the drug. Biochemical experiments confirmed accumulation of the mitotic markers phospho-Histone H3 and phospho-BUBR1 in cells treated with the drug. Prolonged treatment of ovarian cancer cells with T-DM1 provoked the appearance of multinucleated cells which later led to cell death. Together, these data indicate that HER2 represents an important oncogene in ovarian cancer, and suggest that targeting this tyrosine kinase with T-DM1 may be therapeutically effective, especially in ovarian tumors with high content of HER2. PMID:26336133

  16. Activation of Protein Tyrosine Kinases by Coxiella burnetii: Role in Actin Cytoskeleton Reorganization and Bacterial Phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Meconi, Sonia; Capo, Christian; Remacle-Bonnet, Maryse; Pommier, Gilbert; Raoult, Didier; Mege, Jean-Louis

    2001-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii, the agent of Q fever, is an obligate intracellular microorganism that grows in monocytes/macrophages. The internalization of virulent organisms by monocytes is lower than that of avirulent variants and is associated with actin cytoskeleton reorganization. We studied the activation of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) by C. burnetii in THP-1 monocytes. Virulent organisms induced early PTK activation and the tyrosine phosphorylation of several endogenous substrates, including Hck and Lyn, two Src-related kinases. PTK activation reflects C. burnetii virulence since avirulent variants were unable to stimulate PTK. We also investigated the role of PTK activation in C. burnetii-stimulated F-actin reorganization. Tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins were colocalized with F-actin inside cell protrusions induced by C. burnetii, and PTK activity was increased in Triton X-100-insoluble fractions. In addition, lavendustin A, a PTK inhibitor, and PP1, a Src kinase inhibitor, prevented C. burnetii-induced cell protrusions and F-actin reorganization. We finally assessed the role of PTK activation in bacterial phagocytosis. Pretreatment of THP-1 cells with lavendustin A and PP1 upregulated the uptake of virulent C. burnetii but had no effect on the phagocytosis of avirulent organisms. Thus, it is likely that PTK activation by C. burnetii negatively regulates bacterial uptake by interfering with cytoskeleton organization. PMID:11254615

  17. QSAR and molecular docking studies on oxindole derivatives as VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Cong-Min; Liu, Dong-Qing; Zhao, Xu-Hao; Dai, Ying-Jie; Cheng, Jia-Gao; Lv, Ying-Tao

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (3D-QSAR) were established for 30 oxindole derivatives as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) tyrosine kinase inhibitors by using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative similarity indices analysis comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) techniques. With the CoMFA model, the cross-validated value (q(2)) was 0.777, the non-cross-validated value (R(2)) was 0.987, and the external cross-validated value ([Formula: see text]) was 0.72. And with the CoMSIA model, the corresponding q(2), R(2) and [Formula: see text] values were 0.710, 0.988 and 0.78, respectively. Docking studies were employed to bind the inhibitors into the active site to determine the probable binding conformation. The binding mode obtained by molecular docking was in good agreement with the 3D-QSAR results. Based on the QSAR models and the docking binding mode, a set of new VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors were designed, which showed excellent predicting inhibiting potencies. The result revealed that both QSAR models have good predictive capability to guide the design and structural modification of homologic compounds. It is also helpful for further research and development of new VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:26416217

  18. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III mutations in lung tumorigenesis and sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hongbin; Zhao, Xiaojun; Yuza, Yuki; Shimamura, Takeshi; Li, Danan; Protopopov, Alexei; Jung, Boonim L; McNamara, Kate; Xia, Huili; Glatt, Karen A; Thomas, Roman K; Sasaki, Hidefumi; Horner, James W; Eck, Michael; Mitchell, Albert; Sun, Yangping; Al-Hashem, Ruqayyah; Bronson, Roderick T; Rabindran, Sridhar K; Discafani, Carolyn M; Maher, Elizabeth; Shapiro, Geoffrey I; Meyerson, Matthew; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2006-05-16

    The tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib (Iressa) and erlotinib (Tarceva) have shown anti-tumor activity in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Dramatic and durable responses have occurred in NSCLC tumors with mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In contrast, these inhibitors have shown limited efficacy in glioblastoma, where a distinct EGFR mutation, the variant III (vIII) in-frame deletion of exons 2-7, is commonly found. In this study, we determined that EGFRvIII mutation was present in 5% (3/56) of analyzed human lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) but was not present in human lung adenocarcinoma (0/123). We analyzed the role of the EGFRvIII mutation in lung tumorigenesis and its response to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Tissue-specific expression of EGFRvIII in the murine lung led to the development of NSCLC. Most importantly, these lung tumors depend on EGFRvIII expression for maintenance. Treatment with an irreversible EGFR inhibitor, HKI-272, dramatically reduced the size of these EGFRvIII-driven murine tumors in 1 week. Similarly, Ba/F3 cells transformed with the EGFRvIII mutant were relatively resistant to gefitinib and erlotinib in vitro but proved sensitive to HKI-272. These findings suggest a therapeutic strategy for cancers harboring the EGFRvIII mutation. PMID:16672372

  19. Functions of the Lyn tyrosine kinase in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Src family kinases such as Lyn are important signaling intermediaries, relaying and modulating different inputs to regulate various outputs, such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration and metabolism. Intriguingly, Lyn can mediate both positive and negative signaling processes within the same or different cellular contexts. This duality is exemplified by the B-cell defect in Lyn−/− mice in which Lyn is essential for negative regulation of the B-cell receptor; conversely, B-cells expressing a dominant active mutant of Lyn (Lynup/up) have elevated activities of positive regulators of the B-cell receptor due to this hyperactive kinase. Lyn has well-established functions in most haematopoietic cells, viz. progenitors via influencing c-kit signaling, through to mature cell receptor/integrin signaling, e.g. erythrocytes, platelets, mast cells and macrophages. Consequently, there is an important role for this kinase in regulating hematopoietic abnormalities. Lyn is an important regulator of autoimmune diseases such as asthma and psoriasis, due to its profound ability to influence immune cell signaling. Lyn has also been found to be important for maintaining the leukemic phenotype of many different liquid cancers including acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) and B-cell lymphocytic leukaemia (BCLL). Lyn is also expressed in some solid tumors and here too it is establishing itself as a potential therapeutic target for prostate, glioblastoma, colon and more aggressive subtypes of breast cancer. Lay Abstract To relay information, a cell uses enzymes that put molecular markers on specific proteins so they interact with other proteins or move to specific parts of the cell to have particular functions. A protein called Lyn is one of these enzymes that regulate information transfer within cells to modulate cell growth, survival and movement. Depending on which type of cell and the source of the information input, Lyn can

  20. Ligand-independent tyrosine kinase signalling in RTH 149 trout hepatoma cells: comparison among heavy metals and pro-oxidants.

    PubMed

    Burlando, Bruno; Magnelli, Valeria; Panfoli, Isabella; Berti, Elena; Viarengo, Aldo

    2003-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation depends on the activity of receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases and promote cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Different stressors are known to stimulate tyrosine kinase activities and this could explain a wide spectrum of effects that these agents produce on different organisms. We studied the effects of heavy metals and pro-oxidants on tyrosine kinase signalling in trout hepatoma cells (RTH 149) by Western immunoblotting. Use of antiphosphotyrosine showed that Hg(2+) and Cu(2+)in the microM range, and H(2)O(2) in the mM range, induced tyrosine phosphorylation. The effect of Cu(2+)was prevented by pre-incubation with genistein, while those of Hg(2+)and H(2)O(2) were only decreased, probably due to tyrosine kinase stimulation coupled to phosphatase inhibition. Phosphospecific antibodies against the three types of MAPKs showed that ERK is activated by heavy metals only, while p38 and SAPK/JNK are activated by H(2)O(2), Hg(2+), and Cu(2+) plus low H(2)O(2). Cell pre-incubation with p38 inhibitors indicated that ERK activation by H(2)O(2) is prevented by concomitant activation of p38. Phosphospecific STAT antibodies revealed activation by H(2)O(2) only. In conclusion, fish cell exposure to heavy metals and pro-oxidants produce specific tyrosine kinase responses, involving cross talk and redox modulatory effects. PMID:12876385

  1. Evidence that simulated microgravity may alter the vascular nonreceptor tyrosine kinase second messenger pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahwaji, C. I.; Sheibani, S.; Han, S.; Siu, W. O.; Kaka, A. H.; Fathy, T. M.; el-Abbadi, N. H.; Purdy, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    Simulated microgravity (hind limb unweighting; HU) reduces maximal contractile capacity to norepinephrine (NE) but not 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the rat abdominal aorta of male Wistar rats. Our earlier study showed that voltage-operated calcium channels, the MAPK pathway [1], and vasoconstrictive prostaglandins contribute to the NE-induced contraction of control (C) but not HU, aorta rings. Genistein, a general tyrosine kinase inhibitor, caused a significant reduction in vascular contractility in C but not HU arteries. The present study explored the role of protein kinase C (PKC) and extracellular receptor-activated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in the HU-induced vascular hyporesponsiveness to NE. Microgravity was simulated in Wistar rats by 20 day HU. The abdominal aorta was removed from control and HU rats, cut into 3 mm rings, and mounted in tissue baths to measure isometric contraction. Protein levels were determined using Western blot analysis. PD98059, a selective MAPKK inhibitor, caused a marked inhibition of NE-induced contraction in both C and HU arteries. Calphostin C, a PKC inhibitor, completely abolished the contractile response to NE in both C and HU tissues. Phosphorylated (activated) ERK1/2 protein mass was greater in C, compared to HU, aortas, and was reduced by genistein only in C tissues. MAPK total protein levels in the rat aorta were increased in the HU-treated, compared to C, animals. These results indicate that PKC represents an early transduction step in the contractile response to NE in the rat abdominal aorta. That inhibition of the step immediately before activation of MAPK reduced contraction in both C and HU tissues, while general tyrosine kinase inhibition with genistein blocked only the control responses, suggests that a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase may be involved in HU-induced vascular hyporesponsiveness to NE.

  2. Role(s) of IL-2 inducible T cell kinase and Bruton's tyrosine kinase in mast cell response to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weishan; August, Avery

    2016-06-01

    Mast cells play critical roles during immune responses to the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that can lead to fatal septic hypothermia [1], [2], [3]. IL-2 inducible T cell kinase (ITK) and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) are non-receptor tyrosine kinases that act downstream of numerous receptors, and have been shown to modulate mast cell responses downstream of FcεRIα [4], however, their roles in regulating mast cell responses to endotoxic stimuli were unclear. We found that the absence of ITK and BTK alters the mast cell response to LPS, and leads to enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production by mast cells and more severe LPS-induced hypothermia in mice [5]. Here, we detail our investigation using microarray analysis to study the transcriptomic profiles of mast cell responses to LPS, and the roles of ITK and/or BTK expression in this process. Mouse whole genome array data of WT, Itk (-/-) , Btk (-/-) , and Itk (-/-)  Btk (-/-) bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) stimulated by PBS (control) or LPS for 1 h were used in our latest research article [5] and is available in the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE64287. PMID:27081634

  3. Phosphorylation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein tyrosine kinase A PtkA by Ser/Thr protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peifu; Wong, Dennis; Li, Wu; Xie, Jianping; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2015-11-13

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), has inflicted about one third of mankind and claims millions of deaths worldwide annually. Signalling plays an important role in Mtb pathogenesis and persistence, and thus represents attractive resource for drug target candidates. Here, we show that protein tyrosine kinase A (PtkA) can be phosphorylated by Mtb endogenous eukaryotic-like Ser/Thr protein kinases (eSTPKs). Kinase assays showed that PknA, PknD, PknF, and PknK can phosphorylate PtkA in dose- and time-dependent manner. Enzyme kinetics suggests that PknA has the highest affinity and enzymatic efficiency towards PtkA. Furthermore, protein-protein interaction assay in surrogate host showed that PtkA interacts with multi-eSTPKs in vivo, including PknA. Lastly, we show that PtkA phosphorylation by eSTPKs occurs on threonine residues and may effect tyrosine phosphorylation levels and thus PtkA activity in vitro. These results demonstrate that PtkA can serve as a substrate to many eSTPKs and suggests that's its activity can be regulated. PMID:26417687

  4. A review of a novel, Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor, ibrutinib.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Shien; Rattu, Mohammad A; Kim, Sara S

    2016-02-01

    Ibrutinib, a Bruton's kinase inhibitor, was granted an accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration in November, 2013, for the treatment of relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma and subsequently for the treatment of relapsed refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia in February, 2014. In the pivotal phase 2 study of 111 patients with relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma, the overall response rate in patients who received ibrutinib 560 mg daily was 68%. The median progression-free survival was 13.9 months, and the overall survival was 58% at 18 months. In a recently published phase 3 trial (RESONATE) that compared ibrutinib and ofatumumab for the treatment of relapsed and refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma, ibrutinib at the daily dosage of 420 mg demonstrated a significantly higher overall response rate (43% in ibrutinib vs. 4% in ofatumumab) and a significantly improved overall survival at 12 months (90% ibrutinib vs. 81% ofatumumab). Similar clinical benefits were shown regardless of del (17 p). Ibrutinib was well tolerated, and dose-limiting toxicity was not observed. Ibrutinib has shown durable remission, improved progression-free survival and overall survival, and favorable safety profile in indolent B-cell lymphoid malignancies. Ibrutinib, as a monotherapy, is an effective treatment modality as a salvage therapy for treatment of mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia / small lymphocytic lymphoma, particularly in older patients (age ≥70 years) who are not a candidate for intensive chemotherapy and/or those with del (17 p). In patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and del (17 p), the current practice guideline recommends ibrutinib as an upfront treatment option. Current on-going trials will further define its role as upfront therapy and/or as a combination therapy in indolent B-cell lymphoid malignancies. PMID:25425007

  5. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM)-mediated inhibitory signaling is regulated by sequential phosphorylation mediated by distinct nonreceptor tyrosine kinases: a case study involving PECAM-1.

    PubMed

    Tourdot, Benjamin E; Brenner, Michelle K; Keough, Kathleen C; Holyst, Trudy; Newman, Peter J; Newman, Debra K

    2013-04-16

    The activation state of many blood and vascular cells is tightly controlled by a delicate balance between receptors that contain immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) and those that contain immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs). Precisely how the timing of cellular activation by ITAM-coupled receptors is regulated by ITIM-containing receptors is, however, poorly understood. Using platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) as a prototypical ITIM-bearing receptor, we demonstrate that initiation of inhibitory signaling occurs via a novel, sequential process in which Src family kinases phosphorylate the C-terminal ITIM, thereby enabling phosphorylation of the N-terminal ITIM of PECAM-1 by other Src homology 2 domain-containing nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs). NRTKs capable of mediating the second phosphorylation event include C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk). Btk and Csk function downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activation during ITAM-dependent platelet activation. In ITAM-activated platelets that were treated with a PI3K inhibitor, PECAM-1 was phosphorylated but did not bind the tandem SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2, indicating that it was not phosphorylated on its N-terminal ITIM. Csk bound to and phosphorylated PECAM-1 more efficiently than did Btk and required its SH2 domain to perform these functions. Additionally, the phosphorylation of the N-terminal ITIM of Siglec-9 by Csk is enhanced by the prior phosphorylation of its C-terminal ITIM, providing evidence that the ITIMs of other dual ITIM-containing receptors are also sequentially phosphorylated. On the basis of these findings, we propose that sequential ITIM phosphorylation provides a general mechanism for precise temporal control over the recruitment and activation of tandem SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatases that dampen ITAM-dependent signals. PMID:23418871

  6. Role of Protein Kinase C, PI3-kinase and Tyrosine Kinase in Activation of MAP Kinase by Glucose and Agonists of G-protein Coupled Receptors in INS-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Böcker, Dietmar

    2001-01-01

    MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase (also called Erk 1/2) plays a crucial role in cell proliferation and differentiation. Its impact on secretory events is less well established. The interplay of protein kinase C (PKC), PI3-kinase nd cellular tyrosine kinase with MAP kinase activity using inhibitors and compounds such as glucose, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and agonists of G-protein coupled receptors like gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), oxytocin (OT) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) was investigated in INS-1 cells, an insulin secreting cell line. MAP kinase activity was determined by using a peptide derived from the EGF receptor as a MAP kinase substrate and [ P 32 ]ATP. Glucose as well as GRP, OT and GIP exhibited a time-dependent increase in MAP kinase activity with a maximum at time point 2.5 min. All further experiments were performed using 2.5 min incubations. The flavone PD 098059 is known to bind to the inactive forms of MEK1 (MAPK/ERK-Kinase) thus preventing activation by upstream activators. 20 μM PD 098059 ( IC 50 =51 μM) inhibited MAP kinase stimulated by either glucose, GRP, OT, GIP or PMA. Inhibiton (“downregulation”) of PKC by a long term (22h) pretreatment with 1 μM PMA did not influence MAP kinase activity when augmented by either of the above mentioned compound. To investigate whether PI3-kinase and cellular tyrosine kinase are involved in G-protein mediated effects on MAP kinase, inhibitors were used: 100 nM wortmannin (PI3-kinase inhibitor) reduced the effects of GRP, OT and GIP but not that of PMA; 100 μM genistein (tyrosine kinase inhibitor) inhibited the stimulatory effect of either above mentioned compound on MAP kinase activation. Inhibition of MAP kinase by 20 μM PD 098059 did not influence insulin secretion modulated by either compound (glucose, GRP, OT or GIP). [ H 3 ]Thymidine incorporation, however, was severely inhibited by PD 098059. Thus MAP kinase is important for INS-1 cell proliferation but

  7. Spleen tyrosine kinase regulates mammary epithelial cell proliferation in mammary glands of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaoming; Lin, Lin; Xing, Weinan; Yang, Yang; Duan, Xiaoyu; Li, Qingzhang; Gao, Xuejun; Lin, Ye

    2016-05-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that has been considered a hematopoietic cell-specific signal transducer involved in cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the role of SYK in normal mammary gland is still poorly understood. Here we show that SYK is expressed in mammary glands of dairy cows. Expression of SYK was higher in dry period mammary tissues than in lactating mammary tissues. Knockdown and overexpression of SYK affected dairy cow mammary epithelial cell proliferation as well as the expression of signal molecules involved in proliferation, including protein kinase B (PKB, also known as AKT1), p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5). Dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that SYK increased the transcriptional activity of the AKT1 promoter, and cis-elements within the AKT1 promoter region from -439 to -84 bp mediated this regulation. These results suggest that SYK affects mammary epithelial cell proliferation by activating AKT1 at the transcriptional level in mammary glands of dairy cows, which is important for the mammary remodeling process in dry cows as well as for increasing persistency of lactation in lactating cows. PMID:26947307

  8. Beyond trastuzumab: small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors in HER-2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Roy, Vivek; Perez, Edith A

    2009-11-01

    HER-2 is a transmembrane, tyrosine kinase (TK) receptor whose overexpression is associated with adverse prognosis in breast cancer. The biological effects of HER-2 are mediated by kinase activity causing phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic domain of the receptor molecule, leading to activation of downstream growth-promoting pathways. Antibody-mediated inhibition by trastuzumab as well as TK inhibition are clinically effective anti-HER-2 strategies. Kinase inhibitors offer some potential therapeutic advantages over antibody-based therapies. Being small molecules, TK inhibitors (TKIs) have oral bioavailability and ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Because of their different mode of action, TKIs may be able to overcome some of the mechanisms of trastuzumab resistance. Preclinical, and limited clinical data also suggest that TKIs and trastuzumab have synergistic activity. Lapatinib is the only TKI available for clinical use at present, but several molecules with anti-HER-2 activity have been identified and are undergoing evaluation. These differ in the spectrum of kinases that they inhibit, potency of HER-2 inhibition, pharmacokinetic properties, and toxicity profiles, and are at various stages of clinical development. In this article we summarize selected HER-2 TKIs approved for clinical use or in development for which clinical data are available. PMID:19887469

  9. Characterization of all possible single-nucleotide change caused amino acid substitutions in the kinase domain of Bruton tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Väliaho, Jouni; Faisal, Imrul; Ortutay, Csaba; Smith, C I Edvard; Vihinen, Mauno

    2015-06-01

    Knowledge about features distinguishing deleterious and neutral variations is crucial for interpretation of novel variants. Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) contains the highest number of unique disease-causing variations among the human protein kinases, still it is just 10% of all the possible single-nucleotide substitution-caused amino acid variations (SNAVs). In the BTK kinase domain (BTK-KD) can appear altogether 1,495 SNAVs. We investigated them all with bioinformatic and protein structure analysis methods. Most disease-causing variations affect conserved and buried residues disturbing protein stability. Minority of exposed residues is conserved, but strongly tied to pathogenicity. Sixty-seven percent of variations are predicted to be harmful. In 39% of the residues, all the variants are likely harmful, whereas in 10% of sites, all the substitutions are tolerated. Results indicate the importance of the entire kinase domain, involvement in numerous interactions, and intricate functional regulation by conformational change. These results can be extended to other protein kinases and organisms. PMID:25777788

  10. Identification of targets of c-Src tyrosine kinase by chemical complementation and phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Isabel Martinez; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Zhong, Jun; Molina, Henrik; Jacob, Harrys K C; Herbst-Robinson, Katie; Dancy, Beverley M; Katju, Vikram; Bose, Ron; Zhang, Jin; Pandey, Akhilesh; Cole, Philip A

    2012-08-01

    The cellular proto-oncogene c-Src is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase involved in cell growth and cytoskeletal regulation. Despite being dysregulated in a variety of human cancers, its precise functions are not fully understood. Identification of the substrates of c-Src remains a major challenge, because there is no simple way to directly stimulate its activity. Here we combine the chemical rescue of mutant c-Src and global quantitative phosphoproteomics to obtain the first high resolution snapshot of the range of tyrosine phosphorylation events that occur in the cell immediately after specific c-Src stimulation. After enrichment by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies, we identified 29 potential novel c-Src substrate proteins. Tyrosine phosphopeptide mapping allowed the identification of 382 nonredundant tyrosine phosphopeptides on 213 phosphoproteins. Stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture-based quantitation allowed the detection of 97 nonredundant tyrosine phosphopeptides whose level of phosphorylation is increased by c-Src. A large number of previously uncharacterized c-Src putative protein targets and phosphorylation sites are presented here, a majority of which play key roles in signaling and cytoskeletal networks, particularly in cell adhesion. Integrin signaling and focal adhesion kinase signaling pathway are two of the most altered pathways upon c-Src activation through chemical rescue. In this context, our study revealed the temporal connection between c-Src activation and the GTPase Rap1, known to stimulate integrin-dependent adhesion. Chemical rescue of c-Src provided a tool to dissect the spatiotemporal mechanism of activation of the Rap1 guanine exchange factor, C3G, one of the identified potential c-Src substrates that plays a role in focal adhesion signaling. In addition to unveiling the role of c-Src in the cell and, specifically, in the Crk-C3G-Rap1 pathway, these results exemplify a strategy for obtaining a comprehensive understanding of

  11. A Novel Triazolopyridine-Based Spleen Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor That Arrests Joint Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Gregory D.; Delgado, Mercedes; Plantevin-Krenitsky, Veronique; Jensen-Pergakes, Kristen; Bates, R. J.; Torres, Sanaa; Celeridad, Maria; Brown, Heather; Burnett, Kelven; Nadolny, Lisa; Tehrani, Lida; Packard, Garrick; Pagarigan, Barbra; Haelewyn, Jason; Nguyen, Trish; Xu, Li; Tang, Yang; Hickman, Matthew; Baculi, Frans; Pierce, Steven; Miyazawa, Keiji; Jackson, Pilgrim; Chamberlain, Philip; LeBrun, Laurie; Xie, Weilin; Bennett, Brydon; Blease, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies and the immunoreceptors to which they bind can contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Spleen Tyrosine Kinase (Syk) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase with a central role in immunoreceptor (FcR) signaling and immune cell functionality. Syk kinase inhibitors have activity in antibody-dependent immune cell activation assays, in preclinical models of arthritis, and have progressed into clinical trials for RA and other autoimmune diseases. Here we describe the characterization of a novel triazolopyridine-based Syk kinase inhibitor, CC-509. This compound is a potent inhibitor of purified Syk enzyme, FcR-dependent and FcR-independent signaling in primary immune cells, and basophil activation in human whole blood. CC-509 is moderately selective across the kinome and against other non-kinase enzymes or receptors. Importantly, CC-509 was optimized away from and has modest activity against cellular KDR and Jak2, kinases that when inhibited in a preclinical and clinical setting may promote hypertension and neutropenia, respectively. In addition, CC-509 is orally bioavailable and displays dose-dependent efficacy in two rodent models of immune-inflammatory disease. In passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA), CC-509 significantly inhibited skin edema. Moreover, CC-509 significantly reduced paw swelling and the tissue levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines RANTES and MIP-1α in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. In summary, CC-509 is a potent, moderately selective, and efficacious inhibitor of Syk that has a differentiated profile when compared to other Syk compounds that have progressed into the clinic for RA. PMID:26756335

  12. Human biliverdin reductase: a member of the insulin receptor substrate family with serine/threonine/tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Lerner-Marmarosh, Nicole; Shen, Jenny; Torno, Michael D; Kravets, Anatoliy; Hu, Zhenbo; Maines, Mahin D

    2005-05-17

    We describe here the tyrosine kinase activity of human biliverdin reductase (BVR) and its potential role in the insulin-signaling pathway. BVR is both a substrate for insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase (IRK) activity and a kinase for serine phosphorylation of IR substrate 1 (IRS-1). Our previous studies have revealed serine/threonine kinase activity of BVR. Y198, in the YMKM motif found in the C-terminal domain of BVR, is shown to be a substrate for insulin-activated IRK. This motif in IRS proteins provides a docking site for proteins that contain a Src homology 2 domain. Additionally, Y228 in the YLSF sequence and Y291 are IRK substrates; the former sequence provides optimum recognition motif in the tyrosine phosphatase, SHP-1, and for SHC (Src homology 2 domain containing transfroming protein 1). BVR autophosphorylates N-terminal tyrosines Y72 and Y83. Serine residues in IRS-1 are targets for BVR phosphorylation, and point mutation of serine residues in the kinase domain of the reductase inhibits phosphotransferase activity. Because tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 activates the insulin signaling pathway and serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 blocks insulin action, our findings that insulin increases BVR tyrosine phosphorylation and that there is an increase in glucose uptake in response to insulin when expression of BVR is "knocked down" by small interfering RNA suggest a potential role for BVR in the insulin signaling pathway. PMID:15870194

  13. SRC protein tyrosine kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and NF-kappaBp65 signaling in commercial and wild-type turkey leukocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies comparing signaling in wild-type turkey (WT) leukocytes and commercial turkey (CT) leukocytes found that the activity of protein tyrosine kinases (PTK) and MAP kinases, ERK 1/2 and p38, were significantly higher in WT leukocytes compared to CT lines upon exposure to both SE and OPSE on days...

  14. Grb2, a Double-Edged Sword of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Belov, Artur A.; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2013-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) exhibit basal tyrosine phosphorylation and activity in the absence of ligand stimulation, which has been attributed to the “leaky” nature of tyrosine kinase autoinhibition and stochastic collisions of receptors in the membrane bilayer. This basal phosphorylation does not produce a signal of sufficient amplitude and intensity to manifest in a biological response and hence is considered to be a passive, futile process that does not have any biological function. This paradigm has now been challenged by a study showing that the basal phosphorylation of RTKs is a physiologically relevant process that is actively inhibited by the intracellular adaptor protein growth factor receptor-bound 2 (Grb2) and serves to “prime” receptors for a rapid response to ligand stimulation. Grb2 is conventionally known for playing positive roles in RTK signaling. The discovery of a negative regulatory role for Grb2 reveals that this adaptor acts as a double-edged sword in the regulation of RTK signaling. PMID:23131845

  15. Structure of Escherichia coli tyrosine Kinase Etk Reveals a Novel Activation Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,D.; Zheng, J.; She, Y.; Jia, Z.

    2008-01-01

    While protein tyrosine (Tyr) kinases (PTKs) have been extensively characterized in eukaryotes, far less is known about their emerging counterparts in prokaryotes. The inner-membrane Wzc/Etk protein belongs to the bacterial PTK family, which has an important function in regulating the polymerization and transport of virulence-determining capsular polysaccharide (CPS). The kinase uses a unique two-step activation process involving intra-phosphorylation of a Tyr residue, although the molecular mechanism remains unknown. Herein, we report the first crystal structure of a bacterial PTK, the C-terminal kinase domain of Escherichia coli Tyr kinase (Etk) at 2.5-Angstroms resolution. The fold of the Etk kinase domain differs markedly from that of eukaryotic PTKs. Based on the observed structure and supporting mass spectrometric evidence of Etk, a unique activation mechanism is proposed that involves the phosphorylated Tyr residue, Y574, at the active site and its specific interaction with a previously unidentified key Arg residue, R614, to unblock the active site. Both in vitro kinase activity and in vivo antibiotics resistance studies using structure-guided mutants further support the novel activation mechanism.

  16. Allosteric inhibition of SHP2 phosphatase inhibits cancers driven by receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Nan P; LaMarche, Matthew J; Chan, Ho Man; Fekkes, Peter; Garcia-Fortanet, Jorge; Acker, Michael G; Antonakos, Brandon; Chen, Christine Hiu-Tung; Chen, Zhouliang; Cooke, Vesselina G; Dobson, Jason R; Deng, Zhan; Fei, Feng; Firestone, Brant; Fodor, Michelle; Fridrich, Cary; Gao, Hui; Grunenfelder, Denise; Hao, Huai-Xiang; Jacob, Jaison; Ho, Samuel; Hsiao, Kathy; Kang, Zhao B; Karki, Rajesh; Kato, Mitsunori; Larrow, Jay; La Bonte, Laura R; Lenoir, Francois; Liu, Gang; Liu, Shumei; Majumdar, Dyuti; Meyer, Matthew J; Palermo, Mark; Perez, Lawrence; Pu, Minying; Price, Edmund; Quinn, Christopher; Shakya, Subarna; Shultz, Michael D; Slisz, Joanna; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Wang, Ping; Warmuth, Markus; Williams, Sarah; Yang, Guizhi; Yuan, Jing; Zhang, Ji-Hu; Zhu, Ping; Ramsey, Timothy; Keen, Nicholas J; Sellers, William R; Stams, Travis; Fortin, Pascal D

    2016-07-01

    The non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2, encoded by PTPN11, has an important role in signal transduction downstream of growth factor receptor signalling and was the first reported oncogenic tyrosine phosphatase. Activating mutations of SHP2 have been associated with developmental pathologies such as Noonan syndrome and are found in multiple cancer types, including leukaemia, lung and breast cancer and neuroblastoma. SHP2 is ubiquitously expressed and regulates cell survival and proliferation primarily through activation of the RAS–ERK signalling pathway. It is also a key mediator of the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) immune checkpoint pathways. Reduction of SHP2 activity suppresses tumour cell growth and is a potential target of cancer therapy. Here we report the discovery of a highly potent (IC50 = 0.071 μM), selective and orally bioavailable small-molecule SHP2 inhibitor, SHP099, that stabilizes SHP2 in an auto-inhibited conformation. SHP099 concurrently binds to the interface of the N-terminal SH2, C-terminal SH2, and protein tyrosine phosphatase domains, thus inhibiting SHP2 activity through an allosteric mechanism. SHP099 suppresses RAS–ERK signalling to inhibit the proliferation of receptor-tyrosine-kinase-driven human cancer cells in vitro and is efficacious in mouse tumour xenograft models. Together, these data demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of SHP2 is a valid therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancers. PMID:27362227

  17. Design, synthesis and evaluation of small molecule imidazo[2,1-b][1,3,4]thiadiazoles as inhibitors of transforming growth factor-β type-I receptor kinase (ALK5).

    PubMed

    Patel, Harun M; Sing, Baljeet; Bhardwaj, Varun; Palkar, Mahesh; Shaikh, Mahamadhanif S; Rane, Rajesh; Alwan, Wesam S; Gadad, Andanappa K; Noolvi, Malleshappa N; Karpoormath, Rajshekhar

    2015-03-26

    A new series of imidazo[2,1-b][1,3,4]thiadiazoles 5(a-g), 6(a-g), 9(a-i) and 12(a-h) were synthesized as transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) type I receptor (also known as activin receptor-like kinase 5 or ALK5) inhibitors. These compounds were evaluated for their ALK5 inhibitory activity in an enzyme assay and their TGF-β -induced Smad2/3 phosphorylation inhibitory activity in a cell-based assay. Compound 6d, 2-(5-((2-cyclopropyl-6-(4-fluorophenyl) imidazo [2,1-b][1,3,4]thiadiazol-5-yl)methylene)-4-oxo-2-thioxothiazolidin-3-yl) acetic acid, shows prominent ALK5 inhibition (IC50 = 0.0012 μM) and elective inhibition (91%) against the P38αkinase at10 μM. The binding mode of compound 6d by XP docking studies shows that it fits well into the active site cavity of ALK5 by forming broad and tight interactions. Lipinski's rule and in silico ADME pharmacokinetic parameters are within the acceptable range defined for human use thereby indicating their potential as a drug-like molecules. PMID:25234355

  18. Inhibition of isoprenylcysteine carboxylmethyltransferase augments BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibition-induced apoptosis in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen Tian; Xiang, Wei; Ng, Bee Ling; Asari, Kartini; Bunte, Ralph M; Casey, Patrick J; Wang, Mei; Chuah, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Despite the success of BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors remains a therapeutic challenge. One strategy used to overcome resistance is combination of existing BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors with agents that target alternative pathways. We report that inhibition of isoprenylcysteine carboxylmethyltransferase (Icmt), a key enzyme in the protein prenylation pathway, with the selective inhibitor cysmethynil enhances the effect of BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors in killing CML cells. Cysmethynil augments tyrosine kinase inhibitor-induced apoptosis in both BCR-ABL1 wild type and BCR-ABL1 kinase domain mutant-expressing cell lines. Importantly, the enhanced apoptosis observed with the combination of cysmethynil and imatinib is significant only in primary CML CD34+ progenitor cells, not normal cord blood progenitor cells. The combination was also selective in inhibiting colony formation in CML CD34+ cells. The enhanced apoptosis appears to be due to combination of immediate and persistent inhibition of MAPK signaling. Consistent with in vitro studies, cysmethynil and imatinib, in combination, enhance the in vivo effects of either drug used alone. We found that simultaneous inhibition of BCR-ABL1 and Icmt may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for CML. PMID:26706195

  19. Spatial and Temporal Regulation of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Activation and Intracellular Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, John J M; Di Guglielmo, Gianni M; Dahan, Sophie; Dominguez, Michel; Posner, Barry I

    2016-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) exemplify how receptor location is coupled to signal transduction. Extracellular binding of ligands to these RTKs triggers their concentration into vesicles that bud off from the cell surface to generate intracellular signaling endosomes. On the exposed cytosolic surface of these endosomes, RTK autophosphorylation selects the downstream signaling proteins and lipids to effect growth factor and polypeptide hormone action. This selection is followed by the recruitment of protein tyrosine phosphatases that inactivate the RTKs and deliver them by membrane fusion and fission to late endosomes. Coincidentally, proteinases inside the endosome cleave the EGF and insulin ligands. Subsequent inward budding of the endosomal membrane generates multivesicular endosomes. Fusion with lysosomes then results in RTK degradation and downregulation. Through the spatial positioning of RTKs in target cells for EGF and insulin action, the temporal extent of signaling, attenuation, and downregulation is regulated. PMID:27023845

  20. Erkitinib, a novel EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor screened using a ProteoChip system from a phytochemical library

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eung-Yoon; Choi, Young-Jin; Park, Chan-Won; Kang, In-Cheol

    2009-11-20

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (PTKs) play key roles in the pathogenesis of numerous human diseases, including cancer. Therefore PTK inhibitors are currently under intensive investigation as potential drug candidates. Herein, we report on a ProteoChip-based screening of an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibitor, Erkitinibs, from phytochemical libraries. PLC-{gamma}-1 was used as a substrate immobilized on a ProteoChip and incubated with an EGFR kinase to phosphorylate tyrosine residues of the substrate, followed by a fluorescence detection of the substrate recognized by a phospho-specific monoclonal antibody. Erkitinibs inhibited HeLa cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, these data suggest that Erkitinibs can be a specific inhibitor of an EGFR kinase and can be further developed as a potent anti-tumor agent.

  1. Endocytosis and the Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Reinecke, James; Caplan, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The regulated intracellular transport of nutrient, adhesion, and growth factor receptors is crucial for maintaining cell and tissue homeostasis. Endocytosis, or endocytic membrane trafficking, involves the steps of intracellular transport that include, but are not limited to: internalization from the plasma membrane, sorting in early endosomes, transport to late endosomes/lysosomes followed by degradation, and/or recycling back to the plasma membrane via tubular recycling endosomes. In addition to regulating the localization of transmembrane receptor proteins, the endocytic pathway also controls the localization of non-receptor molecules. The non-receptor tyrosine kinase c-Src (Src), and its closely related family members Yes and Fyn, represent three proteins whose localization and signaling activities are tightly regulated by endocytic trafficking. Here, we provide a brief overview of endocytosis, Src function and its biochemical regulation. We will then concentrate on recent advances in understanding how Src intracellular localization is regulated and how its subcellular localization ultimately dictates downstream functioning. Since Src kinases are hyperactive in many cancers, it is essential to decipher the spatiotemporal regulation of this important family of tyrosine kinases. PMID:25372749

  2. Protein tyrosine kinase 6 mediates TNFα-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Haines, RJ; Beard, RS; Wu, MH

    2014-01-01

    A key event in the progression of systemic inflammation resulting from severe trauma or shock involves microvascular hyperpermeability, which leads to excessive plasma fluid and proteins accumulating in extravascular space resulting in tissue edema. The precise molecular mechanism of the hyperpermeability response is not completely understood. Protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6, also known as breast tumor kinase BRK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase related to Src-family proteins. Although it has also been shown that PTK6 participates in regulating epithelial barrier function, the role of PTK6 in endothelial barrier function has not been reported. In this study, we hypothesized that PTK6 is 1) expressed in vascular endothelial cells, and 2) contributes to vascular endothelial hyperpermeability in response to TNFα. Results showed that PTK6 was detected in mouse endothelial cells at the level of protein and mRNA. In addition, PTK6 knockdown attenuated TNFα induced decrease in endothelial barrier function as measured by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) and in vitro transwell albumin-flux assays. Furthermore, we showed that TNFα treatment of endothelial cells increased active PTK6 association with p120-catenin at endothelial cell-cell junctions. Further analysis using immunocytochemistry and immunoprecipitation demonstrated that PTK6 knockdown attenuated TNFα induced VE-cadherin internalization as well as promoting its association with p120-catenin. Our study demonstrates a novel role of PTK6 in mediating endothelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:25446122

  3. Multiple Functions of Let-23, a Caenorhabditis Elegans Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Gene Required for Vulval Induction

    PubMed Central

    Aroian, R. V.; Sternberg, P. W.

    1991-01-01

    The let-23 gene, which encodes a putative tyrosine kinase of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor subfamily, has multiple functions during Caenorhabditis elegans development. We show that let-23 function is required for vulval precursor cells (VPCs) to respond to the signal that induces vulval differentiation: a complete loss of let-23 function results in no induction. However, some let-23 mutations that genetically reduce but do not eliminate let-23 function result in VPCs apparently hypersensitive to inductive signal: as many as five of six VPCs can adopt vulval fates, in contrast to the three that normally do. These results suggest that the let-23 receptor tyrosine kinase controls two opposing pathways, one that stimulates vulval differentiation and another that negatively regulates vulval differentiation. Furthermore, analysis of 16 new let-23 mutations indicates that the let-23 kinase functions in at least five tissues. Since various let-23 mutant phenotypes can be obtained independently, the let-23 gene is likely to have tissue-specific functions. PMID:2071015

  4. Intersecting roles of protein tyrosine kinase and calcium signaling during fertilization.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, William H

    2013-01-01

    The oocyte is a highly specialized cell that must respond to fertilization with a preprogrammed series of signal transduction events that establish a block to polyspermy, trigger resumption of the cell cycle and execution of a developmental program. The fertilization-induced calcium transient is a key signal that initiates the process of oocyte activation and studies over the last several years have examined the signaling pathways that act upstream and downstream of this calcium transient. Protein tyrosine kinase signaling was found to be an important component of the upstream pathways that stimulated calcium release at fertilization in oocytes from animals that fertilize externally, but a similar pathway has not been found in mammals which fertilize internally. The following review will examine the diversity of signaling in oocytes from marine invertebrates, amphibians, fish and mammals in an attempt to understand the basis for the observed differences. In addition to the pathways upstream of the fertilization-induced calcium transient, recent studies are beginning to unravel the role of protein tyrosine kinase signaling downstream of the calcium transient. The PYK2 kinase was found to respond to fertilization in the zebrafish system and seems to represent a novel component of the response of the oocyte to fertilization. The potential impact of impaired PTK signaling in oocyte quality will also be discussed. PMID:23201334

  5. Structure and activation of MuSK, a receptor tyrosine kinase central to neuromuscular junction formation.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Stevan R; Gnanasambandan, Kavitha

    2013-10-01

    MuSK (muscle-specific kinase) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a central signaling role in the formation of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). MuSK is activated in a complex spatio-temporal manner to cluster acetylcholine receptors on the postsynaptic (muscle) side of the synapse and to induce differentiation of the nerve terminal on the presynaptic side. The ligand for MuSK is LRP4 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4), a transmembrane protein in muscle, whose binding affinity for MuSK is potentiated by agrin, a neuronally derived heparan-sulfate proteoglycan. In addition, Dok7, a cytoplasmic adaptor protein, is also required for MuSK activation in vivo. This review focuses on the physical interplay between these proteins and MuSK for activation and downstream signaling, which culminates in NMJ formation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Emerging recognition and activation mechanisms of receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23467009

  6. Molecular identification and expression of Lyn tyrosine kinase isoforms in marsupials.

    PubMed

    Suthers, Amy N; Young, Lauren J

    2013-10-01

    Lyn is a tyrosine kinase molecule required for modulation of signalling cascades in cell populations including B lymphocytes of the mammalian immune system. We have characterised the coding domain of the marsupial lyn gene of two macropod marsupials; the Tammar Wallaby (Macropus eugenii) and the Bridled Nailtail Wallaby (Onychogalea fraenata) and show the co-expression of two Lyn isoforms in cells and tissues of these and three other marsupials (Brush-tail Possum, Trichosurus vulpecula; American Grey Short-tailed Opossum, Monodelphis domestica and Red-tailed Phascogale, Phascogale calura). The predicted Lyn proteins (LynA and LynB) were highly conserved across vertebrate species, with amino acid identities of 94% with their human orthologues and conservation of key tyrosine kinase motifs that suggests that marsupial Lyn most likely functions in cell signalling. Comparison of our cDNA data to annotations for Lyn transcripts (available through the Ensembl Genome Browser) for the Tammar Wallaby confirm splice sites for a number of exons in the wallaby transcript that are missing from the current annotation. This is the first report of the expression of kinase signalling molecules that influence immunity in metatherian mammals and provides key information to support ongoing studies of immune regulation in marsupials. PMID:23522727

  7. Nuclear localization of Src-family tyrosine kinases is required for growth factor-induced euchromatinization

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Akinori; Obata, Yuuki; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Nakayama, Yuji; Kasahara, Kousuke; Kuga, Takahisa; Higashiyama, Yukihiro; Saito, Takashi; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2009-04-15

    Src-family kinases (SFKs), which participate in various signaling events, are found at not only the plasma membrane but also several subcellular compartments, including the nucleus. Nuclear structural changes are frequently observed during transcription, cell differentiation, senescence, tumorigenesis, and cell cycle. However, little is known about signal transduction in the alteration of chromatin texture. Here, we develop a pixel imaging method for quantitatively evaluating chromatin structural changes. Growth factor stimulation increases euchromatic hypocondensation and concomitant heterochromatic hypercondensation in G{sub 1} phase, and the levels reach a plateau by 30 min, sustain for at least 5 h and return to the basal levels after 24 h. Serum-activated SFKs in the nucleus were more frequently detected in the euchromatin areas than the heterochromatin areas. Nuclear expression of kinase-active SFKs, but not unrelated Syk kinase, drastically increases both euchromatinization and heterochromatinization in a manner dependent on the levels of nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation. However, growth factor stimulation does not induce chromatin structural changes in SYF cells lacking SFKs, and reintroduction of one SFK member into SYF cells can, albeit insufficiently, induce chromatin structural changes. These results suggest that nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation by SFKs plays an important role in chromatin structural changes upon growth factor stimulation.

  8. Management of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients Resistant to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, Agnieszka; Uharek, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder associated with a characteristic chromosomal translocation called the Philadelphia chromosome. This oncogene is generated by the fusion of breakpoint cluster region (BCR) and Abelson leukemia virus (ABL) genes and encodes a novel fusion gene translating into a protein with constitutive tyrosine kinase activity. The discovery and introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) irreversibly changed the landscape of CML treatment, leading to dramatic improvement in long-term survival rates. The majority of patients with CML in the chronic phase have a life expectancy comparable with that of healthy age-matched individuals. Although an enormous therapeutic improvement has been accomplished, there are still some unresolved issues in the treatment of patients with CML. One of the most important problems is based on the fact that TKIs can efficiently target proliferating mature cells but do not eradicate leukemic stem cells, allowing persistence of the malignant clone. Owing to the resistance mechanisms arising during the course of the disease, treatment with most of the approved BCR-ABL1 TKIs may become ineffective in a proportion of patients. This article highlights the different molecular mechanisms of acquired resistance being developed during treatment with TKIs as well as the pharmacological strategies to overcome it. Moreover, it gives an overview of novel drugs and therapies that are aiming in overcoming drug resistance, loss of response, and kinase domain mutations. PMID:26917943

  9. Phosphorylation by the c-Abl protein tyrosine kinase inhibits parkin's ubiquitination and protective function

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Han Seok; Lee, Yunjong; Shin, Joo-Ho; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S.; Gadad, Bharathi Shrikanth; Koleske, Anthony J.; Pletnikova, Olga; Troncoso, Juan C.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in PARK2/Parkin, which encodes a ubiquitin E3 ligase, cause autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PD). Here we show that the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl phosphorylates tyrosine 143 of parkin, inhibiting parkin's ubiquitin E3 ligase activity and protective function. c-Abl is activated by dopaminergic stress and by dopaminergic neurotoxins, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) in vitro and in vivo by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), leading to parkin inactivation, accumulation of the parkin substrates aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase-interacting multifunctional protein type 2 (AIMP2) (p38/JTV-1) and fuse-binding protein 1 (FBP1), and cell death. STI-571, a c-Abl-family kinase inhibitor, prevents the phosphorylation of parkin, maintaining parkin in a catalytically active and protective state. STI-571’s protective effects require parkin, as shRNA knockdown of parkin prevents STI-571 protection. Conditional knockout of c-Abl in the nervous system also prevents the phosphorylation of parkin, the accumulation of its substrates, and subsequent neurotoxicity in response to MPTP intoxication. In human postmortem PD brain, c-Abl is active, parkin is tyrosine-phosphorylated, and AIMP2 and FBP1 accumulate in the substantia nigra and striatum. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation of parkin by c-Abl is a major posttranslational modification that inhibits parkin function, possibly contributing to pathogenesis of sporadic PD. Moreover, inhibition of c-Abl may be a neuroprotective approach in the treatment of PD. PMID:20823226

  10. Will the Requirement by the US FDA to Simultaneously Co-Develop Companion Diagnostics (CDx) Delay the Approval of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for RTK-Rearranged (ROS1-, RET-, AXL-, PDGFR-α-, NTRK1-) Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Globally?

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Soo, Ross A; Kubo, Akihito; Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Ahn, Myung-Ju

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in 2007 and the approval of crizotinib for the treatment of advanced ALK-rearranged NSCLC in 2011 represents a landmark in the development of targeted oncology therapy. The approval of crizotinib was accompanied simultaneously by the approval of the Vysis (Abbott Molecular) break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) test as the companion diagnostic (CDx) test to detect ALK rearrangement. Pfizer, the manufacturer of crizotinib, sponsored the screening of thousands of patients and the standardization of the ALK FISH test as part of the approval process for crizotinib, a first in class ALK inhibitor. Many pharmaceutical companies are now using the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved ALK FISH assay to enroll patients onto trials for their own respective ALK inhibitors. In essence they are "piggybacking" on the FDA-approved ALK FISH assay without having to pay for the development of a CDx, nor screening for ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients in the protocols because screening for ALK rearrangement is now the standard of care in NSCLC after the approval of crizotinib. Since 2007, rearrangement in more receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) such as ROS1, RET, AXL, PDGFR-α, and NTRK1 have been discovered in NSCLC but the incidence of each subtype of RTK-rearranged NSCLC is quite rare. Crizotinib has now demonstrated significant clinical activity in ROS1-rearranged NSCLC patients. Whether crizotinib will gain official FDA approval for use in ROS1-rearranged NSCLC, on the other hand, remains unclear as there is no test for ROS1-rearrangement currently being developed to support US FDA approval as a CDx. This may be due in part to the fact that the full cost associated with the development of a pre-market approved-approved CDx must be borne by the company seeking the first drug approval in a new indication. Given the low incidence of ROS1-rearrangement in NSCLC, and

  11. Novel Bioluminescent Activatable Reporter for Src Tyrosine Kinase Activity in Living Mice.

    PubMed

    Leng, Weibing; Li, Dezhi; Chen, Liang; Xia, Hongwei; Tang, Qiulin; Chen, Baoqin; Gong, Qiyong; Gao, Fabao; Bi, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the Src kinase is implicated in the development of a variety of human malignancies. However, it is almost impossible to monitor Src activity in an in vivo setting with current biochemical techniques. To facilitate the noninvasive investigation of the activity of Src kinase both in vitro and in vivo, we developed a genetically engineered, activatable bioluminescent reporter using split-luciferase complementation. The bioluminescence of this reporter can be used as a surrogate for Src activity in real time. This hybrid luciferase reporter was constructed by sandwiching a Src-dependent conformationally responsive unit (SH2 domain-Srcpep) between the split luciferase fragments. The complementation bioluminescence of this reporter was dependent on the Src activity status. In our study, Src kinase activity in cultured cells and tumor xenografts was monitored quantitatively and dynamically in response to clinical small-molecular kinase inhibitors, dasatinib and saracatinib. This system was also applied for high-throughput screening of Src inhibitors against a kinase inhibitor library in living cells. These results provide unique insights into drug development and pharmacokinetics/phoarmocodynamics of therapeutic drugs targeting Src signaling pathway enabling the optimization of drug administration schedules for maximum benefit. Using both Firefly and Renilla luciferase imaging, we have successfully monitored Src tyrosine kinase activity and Akt serine/threonine kinase activity concurrently in one tumor xenograft. This dual luciferase reporter imaging system will be helpful in exploring the complex signaling networks in vivo. The strategies reported here can also be extended to study and image other important kinases and the cross-talks among them. PMID:26941850

  12. Novel Bioluminescent Activatable Reporter for Src Tyrosine Kinase Activity in Living Mice

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Weibing; Li, Dezhi; Chen, Liang; Xia, Hongwei; Tang, Qiulin; Chen, Baoqin; Gong, Qiyong; Gao, Fabao; Bi, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the Src kinase is implicated in the development of a variety of human malignancies. However, it is almost impossible to monitor Src activity in an in vivo setting with current biochemical techniques. To facilitate the noninvasive investigation of the activity of Src kinase both in vitro and in vivo, we developed a genetically engineered, activatable bioluminescent reporter using split-luciferase complementation. The bioluminescence of this reporter can be used as a surrogate for Src activity in real time. This hybrid luciferase reporter was constructed by sandwiching a Src-dependent conformationally responsive unit (SH2 domain-Srcpep) between the split luciferase fragments. The complementation bioluminescence of this reporter was dependent on the Src activity status. In our study, Src kinase activity in cultured cells and tumor xenografts was monitored quantitatively and dynamically in response to clinical small-molecular kinase inhibitors, dasatinib and saracatinib. This system was also applied for high-throughput screening of Src inhibitors against a kinase inhibitor library in living cells. These results provide unique insights into drug development and pharmacokinetics/phoarmocodynamics of therapeutic drugs targeting Src signaling pathway enabling the optimization of drug administration schedules for maximum benefit. Using both Firefly and Renilla luciferase imaging, we have successfully monitored Src tyrosine kinase activity and Akt serine/threonine kinase activity concurrently in one tumor xenograft. This dual luciferase reporter imaging system will be helpful in exploring the complex signaling networks in vivo. The strategies reported here can also be extended to study and image other important kinases and the cross-talks among them. PMID:26941850

  13. Role of tyrosine-kinase inhibitors in myeloproliferative neoplasms: comparative lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Sweet, Kendra L; Corrales-Yepez, Gabriela M; Komrokji, Rami S

    2016-01-01

    An important pathogenetic distinction in the classification of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) is the presence or absence of the BCR-ABL fusion gene, which encodes a unique oncogenic tyrosine kinase. The BCR-ABL fusion, caused by the formation of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) through translocation, constitutes the disease-initiating event in chronic myeloid leukemia. The development of successive BCR-ABL-targeted tyrosine-kinase inhibitors has led to greatly improved outcomes in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, including high rates of complete hematologic, cytogenetic, and molecular responses. Such levels of treatment success have long been elusive for patients with Ph-negative MPNs, because of the difficulties in identifying specific driver proteins suitable as drug targets. However, in recent years an improved understanding of the complex pathobiology of classic Ph-negative MPNs, characterized by variable, overlapping multimutation profiles, has prompted the development of better and more broadly targeted (to pathway rather than protein) treatment options, particularly JAK inhibitors. In classic Ph-negative MPNs, overactivation of JAK-dependent signaling pathways is a central pathogenic mechanism, and mutually exclusive mutations in JAK2, MPL, and CALR linked to aberrant JAK activation are now recognized as key drivers of disease progression in myelofibrosis (MF). In clinical trials, the JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib - the first therapy approved for MF worldwide - improved disease-related splenomegaly and symptoms independent of JAK2 (V617F) mutational status, and prolonged survival compared with placebo or standard therapy in patients with advanced MF. In separate trials, ruxolitinib also provided comprehensive hematologic control in patients with another Ph-negative MPN - polycythemia vera. However, complete cytogenetic or molecular responses with JAK inhibitors alone are normally not observed, underscoring the need for novel combination

  14. Attenuation of serum inducibility of immediate early genes by oncoproteins in tyrosine kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, C L; Prochownik, E V; Imperiale, M J; Jove, R

    1993-01-01

    Immediate early genes involved in controlling cell proliferation are rapidly and transiently induced following stimulation of susceptible cells with serum. To study how oncoproteins regulate immediate early genes, we examined serum inducibility of these genes in cells transformed by various oncoproteins. We found that induction of the immediate early gene, c-fos, by serum stimulation was markedly attenuated in four independent cell lines stably transformed by the v-Src tyrosine kinase. Cells chronically transformed by other oncoproteins implicated in tyrosine kinase signaling pathways, including v-Sis, v-Ras, and v-Raf, showed the same pattern of attenuation. In contrast, serum inducibility of c-fos was not attenuated in cells transformed by simian virus 40, which is thought to transform cells through a different pathway. Cell cycle analyses showed that proliferation of these transformed cell lines could be arrested effectively in 0.1% serum, demonstrating that the attenuation was not simply due to continuous cycling of transformed cells after serum deprivation. Moreover, serum inducibility of other immediate early genes, including c-jun, junB, egr-1, and NGFI-B, also was strikingly attenuated by these same oncoproteins. Nuclear run-on transcription assays established that this attenuation of serum inducibility occurred at the transcriptional level. Finally, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that serum-starved v-Src-transformed cells were viable and able to progress into S phase of the cell cycle after serum stimulation, even though the induction of immediate early genes was greatly attenuated in these cells. Our results suggest that activation of immediate early genes is repressed by chronic stimulation of tyrosine kinase signaling pathways in transformed cells. Images PMID:8384301

  15. Cross-talk between receptors with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity and alpha1b-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed Central

    del Carmen Medina, L; Vázquez-Prado, J; García-Sáinz, J A

    2000-01-01

    The effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) on the phosphorylation and function of alpha(1b)-adrenoceptors transfected into Rat-1 fibroblasts was studied. EGF and PDGF increased the phosphorylation of these adrenoceptors. The effect of EGF was blocked by tyrphostin AG1478 and that of PDGF was blocked by tyrphostin AG1296, inhibitors of the intrinsic tyrosine kinase activities of the receptors for these growth factors. Wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase, blocked the alpha(1b)-adrenoceptor phosphorylation induced by EGF but not that induced by PDGF. Inhibition of protein kinase C blocked the adrenoceptor phosphorylation induced by EGF and PDGF. The ability of noradrenaline to increase [(35)S]guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate ([(35)S]GTP[S]) binding in membrane preparations was used as an index of the functional coupling of the alpha(1b)-adrenoceptors and G-proteins. Noradrenaline-stimulated [(35)S]GTP[S] binding was markedly decreased in membranes from cells pretreated with EGF or PDGF. Our data indicate that: (i) activation of EGF and PDGF receptors induces phosphorylation of alpha(1b)-adrenoceptors, (ii) phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is involved in the EGF response, but does not seem to play a major role in the action of PDGF, (iii) protein kinase C mediates this action of both growth factors and (iv) the phosphorylation of alpha(1b)-adrenoceptors induced by EGF and PDGF is associated with adrenoceptor desensitization. PMID:10947955

  16. Structure-activity relationship study of EphB3 receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Lixin; Choi, Sungwoon; Case, April; Gainer, Thomas G.; Seyb, Kathleen; Glicksman, Marcie A.; Lo, Donald C.; Stein, Ross L.; Cuny, Gregory D.

    2009-01-01

    A structure-activity relationship study for a 2-chloroanilide derivative of pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridine revealed that increased EphB3 kinase inhibitory activity could be accomplished by retaining the 2-chloroanilide and introducing a phenyl or small electron donating substituents to the 5-position of the pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridine. In addition, replacement of the pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridine with imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine was well tolerated and resulted in enhanced mouse liver microsome stability. The structure-activity relationship for EphB3 inhibition of both heterocyclic series was similar. Kinase inhibitory activity was also demonstrated for representative analogs in cell culture. An analog (32, LDN-211904) was also profiled for inhibitory activity against a panel of two hundred and eighty eight kinases and found to be quite selective for tyrosine kinases. Overall, these studies provide useful molecular probes for examining the in vitro, cellular and potentially in vivo kinase-dependent function of EphB3 receptor. PMID:19783434

  17. Recognizing Endocrinopathies Associated With Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy in Children With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Samis, Jill; Lee, Paul; Zimmerman, Donald; Arceci, Robert J; Suttorp, Meinolf; Hijiya, Nobuko

    2016-08-01

    Side effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment vary in children and adults with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). As children have a much longer life expectancy than adults, TKI therapy may continue for decades and with long-term consequences that differ from adults. Children may develop endocrinopathies related to "off-target" effects of TKIs, such as delayed growth, changes in bone metabolism, thyroid abnormalities, and effects on puberty and fertility. These endocrinopathies present additional challenges for pediatric patients with CML. This review critically evaluates the literature on long-term endocrine side effects of TKIs in the pediatric CML population and provides suggested recommendations. PMID:27100618

  18. Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans: is mohs surgery truly superior? And the success of tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kallini, Joseph R; Khachemoune, Amor

    2014-12-01

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans is a rare, slow growing tumor. This growth occurs most frequently in males from ages 20 to 50. The most common area on which DFSP originates is the trunk. DFSP presents clinically as a pink nodule or as a firm, flesh-colored to brown, indurated and exophytic plaque. Pathology shows atypical spindle cells of fibroblast origin surrounding a core of collagen. The definitive treatment of DFSP is surgical excision. Imatinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has been approved for use in DFSP refractory to surgery. PMID:25607791

  19. A novel 2,5-diaminopyrimidine-based affinity probe for Bruton’s tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Yingying; Shi, Yanxia; Li, Xitao; Teng, Yingqi; Pan, Zhengying

    2015-01-01

    As a critical regulator of the B-cell receptor signaling pathway, Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) has attracted intensive drug discovery efforts for treating B-cell lineage cancers and autoimmune disorders. In particular, covalent inhibitors targeting Cys481 in Btk have demonstrated impressive clinical benefits, and their companion affinity probes have been crucial in the drug development process. Recently, we have discovered a novel series of 2,5-diaminopyrimidine-based covalent irreversible inhibitors of Btk. Here, we present the discovery of a novel affinity Btk probe based on the aforementioned scaffold and demonstrate its usage in evaluating the target engagement of Btk inhibitors in live cells. PMID:26531233

  20. Patient adherence to tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Elias J; Kantarjian, Hagop; Eliasson, Lina; Cornelison, A Megan; Marin, David

    2012-07-01

    Dramatically improved survival associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy has transformed the disease model for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) to one of long-term management, but treatment success is challenged with poor medication adherence. Many risk factors associated with poor adherence can be ameliorated by close monitoring, dose modification, and supportive care. Controlling risk factors for poor adherence in combination with patient education that includes direct communication between the health care team and the patient are essential components for maximizing the benefits of TKI therapy. PMID:22473898

  1. Management of tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance in lung cancer with EGFR mutation

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Kevin; Xu, Yiqing

    2014-01-01

    The identification of driver mutations and drugs that inhibit their activity has been a major therapeutic advance for patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma. Unfortunately, the success of these drugs is limited by the universal development of resistance. Treatment failure can result from inadequate drug exposure or selection of resistant malignant clones. Clinically distinct mechanisms of disease progression have been identified and can inform treatment decisions. Investigations into the biochemical mechanisms of tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance may provide additional therapeutic targets by which the efficacy of targeted therapy can be improved. PMID:25302160

  2. High-Throughput Screening of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Resistant Genes in CML.

    PubMed

    Ma, Leyuan; Roderick, Justine; Kelliher, Michelle A; Green, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screening in mammalian cells has proven to be a powerful tool for identifying new genes and molecular pathways relevant to many cellular processes and diseases. For example, screening for genes that, when inactivated, lead to resistance to cancer therapeutic drugs can reveal new mechanisms for how resistance develops and identify potential targetable strategies to overcome drug resistance. Here, we describe a detailed procedure for performing a high-throughput RNAi screen using a genome-wide human short hairpin RNA (shRNA) library for identifying tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-resistance genes in a human CML cell line model. PMID:27581147

  3. A novel 2,5-diaminopyrimidine-based affinity probe for Bruton’s tyrosine kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Yingying; Shi, Yanxia; Li, Xitao; Teng, Yingqi; Pan, Zhengying

    2015-11-01

    As a critical regulator of the B-cell receptor signaling pathway, Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) has attracted intensive drug discovery efforts for treating B-cell lineage cancers and autoimmune disorders. In particular, covalent inhibitors targeting Cys481 in Btk have demonstrated impressive clinical benefits, and their companion affinity probes have been crucial in the drug development process. Recently, we have discovered a novel series of 2,5-diaminopyrimidine-based covalent irreversible inhibitors of Btk. Here, we present the discovery of a novel affinity Btk probe based on the aforementioned scaffold and demonstrate its usage in evaluating the target engagement of Btk inhibitors in live cells.

  4. Single cell imaging of Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase using an irreversible inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turetsky, Anna; Kim, Eunha; Kohler, Rainer H.; Miller, Miles A.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-04-01

    A number of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors are currently in development, yet it has been difficult to visualize BTK expression and pharmacological inhibition in vivo in real time. We synthesized a fluorescent, irreversible BTK binder based on the drug Ibrutinib and characterized its behavior in cells and in vivo. We show a 200 nM affinity of the imaging agent, high selectivity, and irreversible binding to its target following initial washout, resulting in surprisingly high target-to-background ratios. In vivo, the imaging agent rapidly distributed to BTK expressing tumor cells, but also to BTK-positive tumor-associated host cells.

  5. Tyrosine kinase/p21ras/MAP-kinase pathway activation by estradiol-receptor complex in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, A; Di Domenico, M; Castoria, G; de Falco, A; Bontempo, P; Nola, E; Auricchio, F

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism by which estradiol acts on cell multiplication is still unclear. Under conditions of estradiol-dependent growth, estradiol treatment of human mammary cancer MCF-7 cells triggers rapid and transient activation of the mitogen-activated (MAP) kinases, erk-1 and erk-2, increases the active form of p21ras, tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc and p190 protein and induces association of p190 to p21ras-GAP. Both Shc and p190 are substrates of activated src and once phosphorylated, they interact with other proteins and upregulate p21ras. Estradiol activates the tyrosine kinase/p21ras/MAP-kinase pathway in MCF-7 cells with kinetics which are similar to those of peptide mitogens. It is only after introduction of the human wild-type 67 kDa estradiol receptor cDNA that Cos cells become estradiol-responsive in terms of erk-2 activity. This finding, together with the inhibition by the pure anti-estrogen ICI 182 780 of the stimulatory effect of estradiol on each step of the pathway in MCF-7 cells proves that the classic estradiol receptor is responsible for the transduction pathway activation. Transfection experiments of Cos cells with the estradiol receptor cDNA and in vitro experiments with c-src show that the estradiol receptor activates c-src and this activation requires occupancy of the receptor by hormone. Our experiments suggest that c-src is an initial and integral part of the signaling events mediated by the estradiol receptor. Images PMID:8635462

  6. DMBA induces tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-[gamma]1 and activates the tyrosine kinases lck and fyn in the HPB-ALL human T-cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, M.M.; Schieven, G.L.; Ledbetter, J.A.; Burchiel, S.W. . Coll. of Pharmacy)

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies in this laboratory have demonstrated that DMBA alters biochemical events associated with lymphocyte activation including formation of the second messenger IP[sub 3] and the release of intracellular Ca[sup 2+]. The purpose of the present studies was to evaluate the mechanisms by which DMBA induces IP[sub 3] formation and Ca[sup 2+] release by examining phosphorylation of membrane associated proteins and activation of protein tyrosine kinases lck and fyn. These studies demonstrated that exposure of HPB-ALL cells to 10[mu]M DMBA resulted in a time- and dose-dependent increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-[gamma]1 that correlated with our earlier findings of IP[sub 3] formation and Ca[sup 2+] release. These results indicate that the effects of DMBA on the PI-PLC signaling pathway are in part, the result of DMBA-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the PLC-[gamma]1 enzyme. The mechanism of DMBA- induced tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-[gamma]1 may be due to activation of fyn or lck kinase activity, since it was found that DMBA increased the activity of these PTKs by more than 2-fold. Therefore, these studies demonstrate that DMBA may disrupt T cell activation by stimulating PTK activation with concomitant tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-[gamma]1, release of IP[sub 3], and mobilization of intracellular Ca[sup 2+].

  7. DMBA induces tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-{gamma}1 and activates the tyrosine kinases lck and fyn in the HPB-ALL human T-cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, M.M.; Schieven, G.L.; Ledbetter, J.A.; Burchiel, S.W.

    1993-02-01

    Previous studies in this laboratory have demonstrated that DMBA alters biochemical events associated with lymphocyte activation including formation of the second messenger IP{sub 3} and the release of intracellular Ca{sup 2+}. The purpose of the present studies was to evaluate the mechanisms by which DMBA induces IP{sub 3} formation and Ca{sup 2+} release by examining phosphorylation of membrane associated proteins and activation of protein tyrosine kinases lck and fyn. These studies demonstrated that exposure of HPB-ALL cells to 10{mu}M DMBA resulted in a time- and dose-dependent increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-{gamma}1 that correlated with our earlier findings of IP{sub 3} formation and Ca{sup 2+} release. These results indicate that the effects of DMBA on the PI-PLC signaling pathway are in part, the result of DMBA-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the PLC-{gamma}1 enzyme. The mechanism of DMBA- induced tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-{gamma}1 may be due to activation of fyn or lck kinase activity, since it was found that DMBA increased the activity of these PTKs by more than 2-fold. Therefore, these studies demonstrate that DMBA may disrupt T cell activation by stimulating PTK activation with concomitant tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-{gamma}1, release of IP{sub 3}, and mobilization of intracellular Ca{sup 2+}.

  8. A novel acquired ALK F1245C mutation confers resistance to crizotinib in ALK-positive NSCLC but is sensitive to ceritinib.

    PubMed

    Kodityal, Sandeep; Elvin, Julia A; Squillace, Rachel; Agarwal, Nikita; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M; Klempner, Samuel J; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2016-02-01

    The emergence of acquired anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) resistant mutations is a common molecular mechanism underpinning disease progression during crizotinib treatment of ALK-positive (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Identifying acquired resistance mutations in ALK is paramount for tailoring future therapy with second generation ALK inhibitors and beyond. Comprehensive genomic profiling using hybrid-capture next generation sequencing has been successful in identifying acquired ALK resistance mutations. Here we described the emergence of an ALK F1245C mutation in an advanced ALK+ NSCLC patient (EML4-ALK variant 3a/b) who developed slow disease progression after a durable response to crizotinib. The patient was eventually switched to ceritinib with on-going clinical response. This is the first patient report that ALK F1245C is an acquired resistance mutation to crizotinib that can be overcome by ceritinib. PMID:26775591

  9. Completing the structural family portrait of the human EphB tyrosine kinase domains

    PubMed Central

    Overman, Ross C; Debreczeni, Judit E; Truman, Caroline M; McAlister, Mark S; Attwood, Teresa K

    2014-01-01

    The EphB receptors have key roles in cell morphology, adhesion, migration and invasion, and their aberrant action has been linked with the development and progression of many different tumor types. Their conflicting expression patterns in cancer tissues, combined with their high sequence and structural identity, present interesting challenges to those seeking to develop selective therapeutic molecules targeting this large receptor family. Here, we present the first structure of the EphB1 tyrosine kinase domain determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.5Å. Our comparative crystalisation analysis of the human EphB family kinases has also yielded new crystal forms of the human EphB2 and EphB4 catalytic domains. Unable to crystallize the wild-type EphB3 kinase domain, we used rational engineering (based on our new structures of EphB1, EphB2, and EphB4) to identify a single point mutation which facilitated its crystallization and structure determination to 2.2 Å. This mutation also improved the soluble recombinant yield of this kinase within Escherichia coli, and increased both its intrinsic stability and catalytic turnover, without affecting its ligand-binding profile. The partial ordering of the activation loop in the EphB3 structure alludes to a potential cis-phosphorylation mechanism for the EphB kinases. With the kinase domain structures of all four catalytically competent human EphB receptors now determined, a picture begins to emerge of possible opportunities to produce EphB isozyme-selective kinase inhibitors for mechanistic studies and therapeutic applications. PMID:24677421

  10. A novel calmodulin-β-PIX interaction and its implication in receptor tyrosine kinase regulation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vinay K; Munro, Kim; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-09-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, regulates numerous cellular processes, primarily in response to calcium flux. We have identified and characterized a novel interaction between CaM and β-p21-activated kinase interacting exchange factor (β-PIX), a putative guanine exchange factor implicated in cell signaling, using affinity pull-down assays, co-immunoprecipitation, co-localization and circular dichroism studies. Fluorescence-based titration and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments revealed a Ca(2+)-dependent binding mechanism (K(D)≤10μM). Further, we show that CaM participates in a multi-protein complex involving β-PIX and E3 ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl (casitas B-cell lymphoma), which may play a critical role in receptor tyrosine kinase regulation and downstream signaling. PMID:22588125

  11. The TAM family: phosphatidylserine sensing receptor tyrosine kinases gone awry in cancer.

    PubMed

    Graham, Douglas K; DeRyckere, Deborah; Davies, Kurtis D; Earp, H Shelton

    2014-12-01

    The TYRO3, AXL (also known as UFO) and MERTK (TAM) family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are aberrantly expressed in multiple haematological and epithelial malignancies. Rather than functioning as oncogenic drivers, their induction in tumour cells predominately promotes survival, chemoresistance and motility. The unique mode of maximal activation of this RTK family requires an extracellular lipid–protein complex. For example, the protein ligand, growth arrest-specific protein 6 (GAS6), binds to phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) that is externalized on apoptotic cell membranes, which activates MERTK on macrophages. This triggers engulfment of apoptotic material and subsequent anti-inflammatory macrophage polarization. In tumours, autocrine and paracrine ligands and apoptotic cells are abundant, which provide a survival signal to the tumour cell and favour an anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive microenvironment. Thus, TAM kinase inhibition could stimulate antitumour immunity, reduce tumour cell survival, enhance chemosensitivity and diminish metastatic potential. PMID:25568918

  12. Structure and Activation of MuSK, a Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Central to Neuromuscular Junction Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Stevan R.; Gnanasambandan, Kavitha

    2014-01-01

    MuSK (muscle-specific kinase) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a central signaling role in formation of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). MuSK is activated in a complex spatio-temporal manner to cluster acetylcholine receptors on the postsynaptic (muscle) side of the synapse and to induce differentiation of the nerve terminal on the presynaptic side. The ligand for MuSK is LRP4 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4), a transmembrane protein in muscle, whose binding affinity for MuSK is potentiated by agrin, a neuronally derived heparan-sulfate proteoglycan. In addition, Dok7, a cytoplasmic adaptor protein, is also required for MuSK activation in vivo. This review focuses on the physical interplay between these proteins and MuSK for activation and downstream signaling, which culminates in NMJ formation. PMID:23467009

  13. N-terminal sequences direct the autophosphorylation states of the FER tyrosine kinases in vivo.

    PubMed

    Orlovsky, K; Ben-Dor, I; Priel-Halachmi, S; Malovany, H; Nir, U

    2000-09-12

    p94(fer) and p51(ferT) are two tyrosine kinases which share identical SH2 and kinase domains but differ in their N-terminal regions. While p94(fer) is expressed in most mammalian cells, the accumulation of p51(ferT) is restricted to meiotic spermatocytes. Here we show that the different N-terminal tails of p94(fer) and p51(ferT) direct different autophosphorylation states of these two kinases in vivo. N-terminal coiled-coil domains cooperated to drive the oligomerization and autophosphorylation in trans of p94(fer). Moreover, the ectopically expressed N-terminal tail of p94(fer) could act as a dominant negative mutant and associated with the endogenous p94(fer) protein in CHO cells. This increased significantly the percentage of cells residing in the G0/G1 phase, thus suggesting a role for p94(fer) in the regulation of G1 progression. Unlike p94(fer), overexpressed p51(ferT) was not autophosphorylated in COS1 cells. However, removal of the unique N-terminal 43 aa of p51(ferT) or the replacement of this region by a parallel segment from p94(fer) endowed the modified p51(ferT) with the ability to autophosphorylate. The unique N-terminal sequences of p51(ferT) thus interfere with its ability to autophosphorylate in vivo. These experiments indicate that the N-terminal sequences of the FER tyrosine kinases direct their different cellular autophosphorylation states, thereby dictating their different cellular functions. PMID:10998246

  14. Nuclear localization of Lyn tyrosine kinase mediated by inhibition of its kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kikuko; Nakayama, Yuji; Togashi, Yuuki; Obata, Yuuki; Kuga, Takahisa; Kasahara, Kousuke; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2008-11-01

    Src-family kinases, cytoplasmic enzymes that participate in various signaling events, are found at not only the plasma membrane but also subcellular compartments, such as the nucleus, the Golgi apparatus and late endosomes/lysosomes. Lyn, a member of the Src-family kinases, is known to play a role in DNA damage response and cell cycle control in the nucleus. However, it is still unclear how the localization of Lyn to the nucleus is regulated. Here, we investigated the mechanism of the distribution of Lyn between the cytoplasm and the nucleus in epitheloid HeLa cells and hematopoietic THP-1 cells. Lyn was definitely detected in purified nuclei by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting analyses. Nuclear accumulation of Lyn was enhanced upon treatment of cells with leptomycin B (LMB), an inhibitor of Crm1-mediated nuclear export. Moreover, Lyn mutants lacking the sites for lipid modification were highly accumulated in the nucleus upon LMB treatment. Intriguingly, inhibition of the kinase activity of Lyn by SU6656, Csk overexpression, or point mutation in the ATP-binding site induced an increase in nuclear Lyn levels. These results suggest that Lyn being imported into and rapidly exported from the nucleus preferentially accumulates in the nucleus by inhibition of the kinase activity and lipid modification.

  15. BCR first exon sequences specifically activate the BCR/ABL tyrosine kinase oncogene of Philadelphia chromosome-positive human leukemias

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, A.J.; Witte, O.N. ); Young, J.C.; Pendergast, A.; Pondel, M. ); Landau, N.R.; Littman, D.R. )

    1991-04-01

    The c-abl proto-oncogene encodes a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase which is homologous to the src gene product in its kinase domain and in the upstream kinase regulatory domains SH2 (src homology region 2) and SH3 (src homology region 3). The murine v-abl oncogene product has lost the SH3 domain as a consequence of N-terminal fusion of gag sequences. Deletion of the SH3 domain is sufficient to render the murine c-abl proto-oncogene product transforming when myristylated N-terminal membrane localization sequences are also present. In contrast, the human BCR/ABL oncogene of the Philadelphia chromosome translocation has an intact SH3 domain and its product is not myristylated at the N terminus. To analyze the contribution of BCR-encoded sequences to BCR/ABL-mediated transformation, the effects of a series of deletions and substitutions were assessed in fibroblast and hematopoietic-cell transformation assays. BCR first-exon sequences specifically potentiate transformation and tyrosine kinase activation when they are fused to the second exon of otherwise intact c-ABL. This suggests that BCR-encoded sequences specifically interfere with negative regulation of the ABL-encoded tyrosine kinase, which would represent a novel mechanism for the activation of nonreceptor tyrosine kinase-encoding proto-oncogenes.

  16. Metachronous primary uterine cancer surgically resected during Crizotinib treatment in a ALK-rearranged advanced lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Misino, Andrea; Scattone, Anna; Caldarola, Lucia; Petroni, Stella; Logroscino, Antonio; Montagna, Elisabetta Sara; Serio, Gabriella; Simone, Giovanni; Galetta, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Rearrangements of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene are present in 3% to 7% of non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). Patients harboring ALK rearrangements show very favourable outcomes if treated with targeted agents, among which crizotinib is the first and best studied. Crizotinib, an oral small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor of ALK, MET, and ROS1 kinases, is a very active and well tolerated drug. Nevertheless, the optimal therapy management with this new drug is still partially unknown, especially with regard to the safety of combined treatments. Recently, the integration of locoregional treatments has been proposed as a feasible multimodality strategy in selected patients with good clinical conditions and slow-growing or oligoprogressive disease. In this report, a case of advanced lung adenocarcinoma, progressed after first line chemotherapy and re-biopsied detecting ALK rearrangement, is described. During crizotinib treatment the primary lung tumor showed an excellent regression; meanwhile a major surgery for a metachronous uterine cancer was safely and successfully carried out. PMID:26958511

  17. A computational study of the phosphorylation mechanism of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Baojing; Wong, Chung F

    2009-04-30

    Although various groups have studied the phosphorylation mechanism of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase (IRK), an unanimous picture has not yet emerged. In this work, we performed a computational study to gain further insights. We first built a structural model of the reactant complex with the guide of several crystal structures and previous computational studies of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. We then optimized the structure by performing geometry optimization using a quantum mechanical model containing nearly 300 atoms. A reaction path was then traced between the reactant and the product by using a multiple coordinate-driven method. The calculations mapped out a sequence of structural changes depicting the conversion of the reactant to the product. Analysis of the structural changes revealed the formation of a dissociative transition state and the involvement of a proton transfer from the hydroxyl group of the tyrosyl residue of the peptide substrate to a conserved aspartate in the active site of the enzyme. The proton transfer began well before the transition state was reached and finished only shortly before the product was completely formed. In addition, the formation of a hydrogen bonding network among Arg1136, Asp1132, the gamma-phosphate of ATP, and the tyrosine residue of the substrate appeared to hold the latter two in a near-attack position for reaction. The model estimated a reaction barrier of 14 kcal/mol, semiquantitatively in accord with experiment. PMID:19334696

  18. Regulation of Connexin43 Function and Expression by Tyrosine Kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Li, Hanjun; Spagnol, Gaelle; Zheng, Li; Stauch, Kelly L; Sorgen, Paul L

    2016-07-22

    Connexin43 (Cx43) assembly and degradation, the regulation of electrical and metabolic coupling, as well as modulating the interaction with other proteins, involve phosphorylation. Here, we identified and characterized the biological significance of a novel tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates Cx43, tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2). Activation of Tyk2 led to a decrease in Cx43 gap junction communication by increasing the turnover rate of Cx43 from the plasma membrane. Tyk2 directly phosphorylated Cx43 residues Tyr-247 and Tyr-265, leading to indirect phosphorylation on residues Ser-279/Ser-282 (MAPK) and Ser-368 (PKC). Although this phosphorylation pattern is similar to what has been observed following Src activation, the response caused by Tyk2 occurred when Src was inactive in NRK cells. Knockdown of Tyk2 at the permissive temperature (active v-Src) in LA-25 cells decreased Cx43 phosphorylation, indicating that although activation of Tyk2 and v-Src leads to phosphorylation of the same Cx43CT residues, they are not identical in level at each site. Additionally, angiotensin II activation of Tyk2 increased the intracellular protein level of Cx43 via STAT3. These findings indicate that, like Src, Tyk2 can also inhibit gap junction communication by phosphorylating Cx43. PMID:27235399

  19. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Ph+ Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Therapy: a Review.

    PubMed

    Shah, Krupa; Parikh, Sonia; Rawal, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative hematopoietic stem cell disorder. Deregulated BCRABL fusion tyrosine kinase activity is the main cause of CML disease pathogenesis, making BCRABL an ideal target for inhibition. Current tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) designed to inhibit BCRABL oncoprotein activity, have completely transformed the prognosis of CML. Interruption of TKI treatment leads to minimal residual disease reside (MRD), thought to reside in TKIinsensitive leukaemia stem cells which remain a potential reservoir for disease relapse. This highlights the need to develop new therapeutic strategies for CML either as small molecule master TKIs or phytopharmaceuticals derived from nature to achieve chronic molecular remission. This review outlines the past, present and future therapeutic approaches for CML including coverage of relevant mechanisms, whether ABL dependent or independent, and epigenetic factors responsible for developing resistance against TKIs. Appearance of mutant clones along the course of therapy either preexisting or induced due to therapy is still a challenge for the clinician. A proposed invitro model of generating colony forming units from CML stem cells derived from diagnostic samples seems to be achievable in the era of high throughput technology which can take care of single cell genomic profiling. PMID:27509925

  20. Oral administration of Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors impairs GPVI-mediated platelet function.

    PubMed

    Rigg, Rachel A; Aslan, Joseph E; Healy, Laura D; Wallisch, Michael; Thierheimer, Marisa L D; Loren, Cassandra P; Pang, Jiaqing; Hinds, Monica T; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J T

    2016-03-01

    The Tec family kinase Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) plays an important signaling role downstream of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs in hematopoietic cells. Mutations in Btk are involved in impaired B-cell maturation in X-linked agammaglobulinemia, and Btk has been investigated for its role in platelet activation via activation of the effector protein phospholipase Cγ2 downstream of the platelet membrane glycoprotein VI (GPVI). Because of its role in hematopoietic cell signaling, Btk has become a target in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle cell lymphoma; the covalent Btk inhibitor ibrutinib was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of these conditions. Antihemostatic events have been reported in some patients taking ibrutinib, although the mechanism of these events remains unknown. We sought to determine the effects of Btk inhibition on platelet function in a series of in vitro studies of platelet activation, spreading, and aggregation. Our results show that irreversible inhibition of Btk with two ibrutinib analogs in vitro decreased human platelet activation, phosphorylation of Btk, P-selectin exposure, spreading on fibrinogen, and aggregation under shear flow conditions. Short-term studies of ibrutinib analogs administered in vivo also showed abrogation of platelet aggregation in vitro, but without measurable effects on plasma clotting times or on bleeding in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that inhibition of Btk significantly decreased GPVI-mediated platelet activation, spreading, and aggregation in vitro; however, prolonged bleeding was not observed in a model of bleeding. PMID:26659727

  1. Radiation induction of the receptor tyrosine kinase gene Ptk-3 in normal rat astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuma, S.; Hideyuki, S.; Akihiro, I.

    1995-07-01

    Radiation-induced gene expression was examined in rat astrocyte cultures using differential display of mRNA via reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. A 0.3-kb cDNA that was consistently observed in irradiated cultures but not in unirradiated cultures was cloned and sequenced. It was found to be identical to Ptk-3, a receptor tyrosine kinase gene identified recently. The protein encoded by Ptk-3 is a member of a novel class of receptor tyrosine kinases whose extracellular domain contains regions of homology with coagulation factors V and VIII and complement component C1. Northern blot analysis revealed that the expression of Ptk-3 was increased in rat astrocytes by 0.5 h after exposure to 10 Gy and remained at the same elevated level for at least 24 h. The maximum increase occurred after 5 Gy cloning studies indicated the presence of at least two Ptk-3 mRNA transcripts, which are probable the result of an alternative splicing mechanism. The short isoform lacks a 37 amino acid sequence in the glycine/proline-rich juxtamembrane region. The splicing pattern of the Ptk-3 gene was not altered by radiation. However, the ratios of the longer to the shorter mRNA transcripts differed between adult cortex, neonatal cortex and in vitro astrocyte cultures. 36 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Antibacterial and EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitory activities of polyhydroxylated xanthones from Garcinia succifolia.

    PubMed

    Duangsrisai, Susawat; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Bessa, Lucinda J; Costa, Paulo M; Amat, Nurmuhammat; Kijjoa, Anake

    2014-01-01

    Chemical investigation of the methanol extract of the wood of Garcinia succifolia Kurz (Clusiaceae) led to the isolation of 1,5-dihydroxyxanthone (1), 1,7-dihydroxyxanthone (2), 1,3,7-trihydroxyxanthone (3), 1,5,6-trihydroxyxanthone (4), 1,6,7-trihydroxyxanthone (5), and 1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthone (6). All of the isolated xanthones were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against bacterial reference strains, two Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus ATTC 25923, Bacillus subtillis ATCC 6633) and two Gram-negative (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853), and environmental drug-resistant isolates (S. aureus B1, Enteroccoccus faecalis W1, and E. coli G1), as well as for their epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) of tyrosine kinase inhibitory activity. Only 1,5,6-trihydroxy-(4), 1,6,7-trihydroxy-(5), and 1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthones (6) exhibited antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, however none was active against vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis. Additionally, 1,7-dihydroxyxanthone (2) showed synergism with oxacillin, but not with ampicillin. On the other hand, only 1,5-dihydroxyxanthone (1) and 1,7-dihydroxyxanthone (2) were found to exhibit the EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitory activity, with IC50 values of 90.34 and 223 nM, respectively. PMID:25460314

  3. Pre-clinical Evaluation of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for Treatment of Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Christoph, Sandra; Lee-Sherick, Alisa B.; Sather, Susan; DeRyckere, Deborah; Graham, Douglas K.

    2013-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases have been implicated in the development and progression of many cancers, including both leukemia and solid tumors, and are attractive druggable therapeutic targets. Here we describe an efficient four-step strategy for pre-clinical evaluation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the treatment of acute leukemia. Initially, western blot analysis is used to confirm target inhibition in cultured leukemia cells. Functional activity is then evaluated using clonogenic assays in methylcellulose or soft agar cultures. Experimental compounds that demonstrate activity in cell culture assays are evaluated in vivo using NOD-SCID-gamma (NSG) mice transplanted orthotopically with human leukemia cell lines. Initial in vivo pharmacodynamic studies evaluate target inhibition in leukemic blasts isolated from the bone marrow. This approach is used to determine the dose and schedule of administration required for effective target inhibition. Subsequent studies evaluate the efficacy of the TKIs in vivo using luciferase expressing leukemia cells, thereby allowing for non-invasive bioluminescent monitoring of leukemia burden and assessment of therapeutic response using an in vivo bioluminescence imaging system. This strategy has been effective for evaluation of TKIs in vitro and in vivo and can be applied for identification of molecularly-targeted agents with therapeutic potential or for direct comparison and prioritization of multiple compounds. PMID:24084362

  4. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Promising Tools for Targeted Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic and cytotoxic drugs are widely used in the treatment of cancer. In spite of the improvements in the life quality of patients, their effectiveness is compromised by several disadvantages. This represents a demand for developing new effective strategies with focusing on tumor cells and minimum side effects. Targeted cancer therapies and personalized medicine have been defined as a new type of emerging treatments. Small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) are among the most effective drugs for targeted cancer therapy. The growing number of approved SMIs of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) i.e., tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the clinical oncology imply the increasing attention and application of these therapeutic tools. Most of the current approved RTK–TKIs in preclinical and clinical settings are multi-targeted inhibitors with several side effects. Only a few specific/selective RTK–TKIs have been developed for the treatment of cancer patients. Specific/selective RTK–TKIs have shown less deleterious effects compared to multi-targeted inhibitors. This review intends to highlight the importance of specific/selective TKIs for future development with less side effects and more manageable agents. This article provides an overview of: (1) the characteristics and function of RTKs and TKIs; (2) the recent advances in the improvement of specific/selective RTK–TKIs in preclinical or clinical settings; and (3) emerging RTKs for targeted cancer therapies by TKIs. PMID:25110867

  5. Oxido-reductive regulation of vascular remodeling by receptor tyrosine kinase ROS1

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ziad A.; de Jesus Perez, Vinicio; Yuan, Ke; Orcholski, Mark; Pan, Stephen; Qi, Wei; Chopra, Gaurav; Adams, Christopher; Kojima, Yoko; Leeper, Nicholas J.; Qu, Xiumei; Zaleta-Rivera, Kathia; Kato, Kimihiko; Yamada, Yoshiji; Oguri, Mitsutoshi; Kuchinsky, Allan; Hazen, Stanley L.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Nabel, Elizabeth G.; Channon, Keith; Leon, Martin B.; Charest, Alain; Quertermous, Thomas; Ashley, Euan A.

    2014-01-01

    Angioplasty and stenting is the primary treatment for flow-limiting atherosclerosis; however, this strategy is limited by pathological vascular remodeling. Using a systems approach, we identified a role for the network hub gene glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPX1) in pathological remodeling following human blood vessel stenting. Constitutive deletion of Gpx1 in atherosclerotic mice recapitulated this phenotype of increased vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and plaque formation. In an independent patient cohort, gene variant pair analysis identified an interaction of GPX1 with the orphan protooncogene receptor tyrosine kinase ROS1. A meta-analysis of the only genome-wide association studies of human neointima-induced in-stent stenosis confirmed the association of the ROS1 variant with pathological remodeling. Decreased GPX1 expression in atherosclerotic mice led to reductive stress via a time-dependent increase in glutathione, corresponding to phosphorylation of the ROS1 kinase activation site Y2274. Loss of GPX1 function was associated with both oxidative and reductive stress, the latter driving ROS1 activity via s-glutathiolation of critical residues of the ROS1 tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2. ROS1 inhibition with crizotinib and deglutathiolation of SHP-2 abolished GPX1-mediated increases in VSMC proliferation while leaving endothelialization intact. Our results indicate that GPX1-dependent alterations in oxido-reductive stress promote ROS1 activation and mediate vascular remodeling. PMID:25401476

  6. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signaling: Regulating Neural Crest Development One Phosphate at a Time

    PubMed Central

    Fantauzzo, Katherine A.; Soriano, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) bind to a subset of growth factors on the surface of cells and elicit responses with broad roles in developmental and postnatal cellular processes. Receptors in this subclass consist of an extracellular ligand-binding domain, a single transmembrane domain, and an intracellular domain harboring a catalytic tyrosine kinase and regulatory sequences that are phosphorylated either by the receptor itself or various interacting proteins. Once activated, RTKs bind signaling molecules and recruit effector proteins to mediate downstream cellular responses through various intracellular signaling pathways. In this chapter, we will highlight the role of a subset of RTK families in regulating the activity of neural crest cells (NCCs) and the development of their derivatives in mammalian systems. NCCs are migratory, multipotent cells that can be subdivided into four axial populations, cranial, cardiac, vagal and trunk. These cells migrate throughout the vertebrate embryo along defined pathways and give rise to unique cell types and structures. Interestingly, individual RTK families often have specific functions in a subpopulation of NCCs that contribute to the diversity of these cells and their derivatives in the mammalian embryo. We will additionally discuss current methods used to investigate RTK signaling, including genetic, biochemical, large-scale proteomic and biosensor approaches, which can be applied to study intracellular signaling pathways active downstream of this receptor subclass during NCC development. PMID:25662260

  7. ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor-induced pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Mariko; Kojima, Kensuke; Tomimasu, Rika; Fukushima, Noriyasu; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Sueoka, Eisaburo; Kimura, Shinya

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease characterized by the accumulation of eosinophilic periodic acid Schiff-positive material in the intra-alveolar and bronchiolar spaces. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including imatinib, nilotinib, and dasatinib, have shown excellent efficacy in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We report a case of acquired PAP in a patient with CML receiving tyrosine kinase inhibitors. A 67-year-old man with CML presented with progressive back pain 5 months after starting imatinib treatment. Acquired PAP was diagnosed based on physical, radiographic, and histopathological findings. The presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating autoantibodies suggested that autoimmune mechanisms were involved in the pathogenesis. Interestingly, PAP developed in association with imatinib and dasatinib administration, but not with nilotinib treatment. The patient died of refractory leukemia in lymphoid blast crisis with a newly emerged T315I mutation. Although the incidence is very rare, imatinib and dasatinib associated with PAP development has been reported. Meanwhile, PAP in nilotinib-treated patients has not been reported. Our observation in one patient receiving multiple TKIs suggests that nilotinib may be safer than imatinib or dasatinib in avoiding the development or exacerbation of PAP. PMID:25212679

  8. Knockdown of Burton's tyrosine kinase confers potent protection against sepsis-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Panyu; Ma, Bing; Xu, Shuogui; Zhang, Shijie; Tang, Hongtai; Zhu, Shihui; Xiao, Shichu; Ben, Daofeng; Xia, Zhaofan

    2014-11-01

    Sepsis is a common and critical complication in surgical patients that often leads to multiple organ failure syndrome (MOFS), including acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Despite intensive supportive care and treatment modalities, the mortality of these patients remains high. In this study, we investigated the role of Burton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a member of the Btk/Tec family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases, in the pathogenesis of sepsis, and evaluated the protective effect of in vivo Btk RNA interference in a mouse model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis. After intratracheal injection of Btk siRNA, the mice were then subjected to CLP to induce sepsis. The results demonstrated that this approach conferred potent protection against sepsis-induced ALI, as evidenced by a significant reduction in pathological scores, epithelial cell apoptosis, pulmonary edema, vascular permeability, and the expression of inflammatory cytokines and neutrophil infiltration in the lung tissues of septic mice. In addition, RNA interference of Btk significantly suppressed p-38 and iNOS signaling pathways in transduced alveolar macrophages in vitro. These results identify a novel role for BTK in lethal sepsis and provide a potential new therapeutic approach to sepsis and ALI. PMID:24906236

  9. Spleen Tyrosine Kinase: A Crucial Player and Potential Therapeutic Target in Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Terry King-Wing; McAdoo, Stephen P; Tam, Frederick Wai-Keung

    2016-01-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), a 72 kDa cytoplasmic non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinase, plays an important role in signal transduction in a variety of cell types. Ever since its discovery in the early 1990s, there has been accumulating evidence to suggest a pathogenic role of Syk in various allergic disorders, autoimmune diseases and malignancies. Additionally, there is emerging data from both pre-clinical and clinical studies that Syk is implicated in the pathogenesis of proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN), including anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated GN, lupus nephritis and immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN). Moreover, recent animal studies have shed light on the importance of Syk in mediating acute renal allograft rejection, Epstein Barr virus-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease and kidney fibrosis. Fostamatinib, an oral Syk inhibitor, has undergone clinical testing in rheumatoid arthritis, refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura, leukemia and lymphoma. The recent STOP-IgAN trial showed that the addition of non-selective immunosuppressive therapy to intensive supportive care did not improve clinical outcomes in high-risk IgAN patients. A Syk-targeted approach may be beneficial and is currently being evaluated in a phase II randomized controlled trial. In this review, we will discuss the pathogenic role of Syk and potential use of Syk inhibitor in a variety of renal diseases. PMID:27476075

  10. QSAR Study of p56lck Protein Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitory Activity of Flavonoid Derivatives Using MLR and GA-PLS

    PubMed Central

    Fassihi, Afshin; Sabet, Razieh

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative relationships between molecular structure and p56lck protein tyrosine kinase inhibitory activity of 50 flavonoid derivatives are discovered by MLR and GA-PLS methods. Different QSAR models revealed that substituent electronic descriptors (SED) parameters have significant impact on protein tyrosine kinase inhibitory activity of the compounds. Between the two statistical methods employed, GA-PLS gave superior results. The resultant GA-PLS model had a high statistical quality (R2 = 0.74 and Q2 = 0.61) for predicting the activity of the inhibitors. The models proposed in the present work are more useful in describing QSAR of flavonoid derivatives as p56lck protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors than those provided previously. PMID:19325836

  11. Serine/Threonine/Tyrosine Protein Kinase Phosphorylates Oleosin, a Regulator of Lipid Metabolic Functions1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Parthibane, Velayoudame; Iyappan, Ramachandiran; Vijayakumar, Anitha; Venkateshwari, Varadarajan; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2012-01-01

    Plant oils are stored in oleosomes or oil bodies, which are surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids embedded with oleosin proteins that stabilize the structure. Recently, a structural protein, Oleosin3 (OLE3), was shown to exhibit both monoacylglycerol acyltransferase and phospholipase A2 activities. The regulation of these distinct dual activities in a single protein is unclear. Here, we report that a serine/threonine/tyrosine protein kinase phosphorylates oleosin. Using bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis, we demonstrate that this kinase interacts with OLE3 and that the fluorescence was associated with chloroplasts. Oleosin-green fluorescent protein fusion protein was exclusively associated with the chloroplasts. Phosphorylated OLE3 exhibited reduced monoacylglycerol acyltransferase and increased phospholipase A2 activities. Moreover, phosphatidylcholine and diacylglycerol activated oleosin phosphorylation, whereas lysophosphatidylcholine, oleic acid, and Ca2+ inhibited phosphorylation. In addition, recombinant peanut (Arachis hypogaea) kinase was determined to predominantly phosphorylate serine residues, specifically serine-18 in OLE3. Phosphorylation levels of OLE3 during seed germination were determined to be higher than in developing peanut seeds. These findings provide direct evidence for the in vivo substrate selectivity of the dual-specificity kinase and demonstrate that the bifunctional activities of oleosin are regulated by phosphorylation. PMID:22434039

  12. Structural Recognition of an Optimized Substrate for the Ephrin family of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Tara L.; Walker, John R.; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Parker, Sirlester A.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2010-01-01

    Summary Ephrin receptor tyrosine kinase A3 (EphA3, EC 2.7.10.1) is a member of a unique branch of the kinome in which downstream signaling occurs in both ligand- and receptor- expressing cells. Consequently the ephrins and ephrin RTKs often mediate processes involving cell:cell contact, including cellular adhesion or repulsion, developmental remodeling, and neuronal mapping. The receptor is also frequently overexpressed in invasive cancers, including breast, small-cell lung and gastrointestinal cancers. However, little is known about direct substrates of EphA3 kinase and no chemical probes are available. Using a library approach, we found a short peptide sequence that is a good substrate for EphA3 and that is suitable for cocrystallization studies. Complex structures show multiple contacts between kinase and substrates, and in particular two residues undergo conformational changes and by mutation are found to be important for substrate binding and turnover. In addition, a difference in catalytic efficiency between EPH kinase family members is observed. These results provide insight into the mechanism of substrate binding to these developmentally integral enzymes. PMID:19678838

  13. SOCS3 tyrosine phosphorylation as a potential bio-marker for myeloproliferative neoplasms associated with mutant JAK2 kinases

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Joanne; Suessmuth, Yvonne; Scott, Linda M.; Nahlik, Krystyna; McMullin, Mary Frances; Constantinescu, Stefan N.; Green, Anthony R.; Johnston, James A.

    2009-01-01

    JAK2 V617F, identified in the majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms, tyrosine phosphorylates SOCS3 and escapes its inhibition. Here, we demonstrate that the JAK2 exon 12 mutants described in a subset of V617F-negative MPN cases, also stabilize tyrosine phosphorylated SOCS3. SOCS3 tyrosine phosphorylation was also observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and granulocytes isolated from patients with JAK2 H538QK539L or JAK2 F537-K539delinsL mutations. JAK kinase inhibitors, which effectively inhibited the proliferation of cells expressing V617F or K539L, also caused a dose-dependent reduction in both mutant JAK2 and SOCS3 tyrosine phosphorylation. We propose, therefore, that SOCS3 tyrosine phosphorylation may be a novel bio-marker of myeloproliferative neoplasms resulting from a JAK2 mutation and a potential reporter of effective JAK2 inhibitor therapy currently in clinical development. PMID:19229050

  14. Identification of Nuclear Protein Targets for Six Leukemogenic Tyrosine Kinases Governed by Post-Translational Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Andrew; Williamson, Andrew; Jaworska, Ewa; Griffiths, John R.; Taylor, Sam; Walker, Michael; O’Dea, Mark Aspinall; Spooncer, Elaine; Unwin, Richard D.; Poolman, Toryn; Ray, David; Whetton, Anthony D.

    2012-01-01

    Mutated tyrosine kinases are associated with a number of different haematological malignancies including myeloproliferative disorders, lymphoma and acute myeloid leukaemia. The potential commonalities in the action of six of these leukemogenic proteins on nuclear proteins were investigated using systematic proteomic analysis. The effects on over 3600 nuclear proteins and 1500 phosphopeptide sites were relatively quantified in seven isogenic cell lines. The effects of the kinases were diverse although some commonalities were found. Comparison of the nuclear proteomic data with transcriptome data and cytoplasmic proteomic data indicated that the major changes are due to post-translational mechanisms rather than changes in mRNA or protein distribution. Analysis of the promoter regions of genes whose protein levels changed in response to the kinases showed the most common binding site found was that for NFκB whilst other sites such as those for the glucocorticoid receptor were also found. Glucocorticoid receptor levels and phosphorylation were decreased by all 6 PTKs. Whilst Glucocorticoid receptor action can potentiate NFκB action those proteins where genes have NFκB binding sites were in often regulated post-translationally. However all 6 PTKs showed evidence of NFkB pathway modulation via activation via altered IkB and NFKB levels. Validation of a common change was also undertaken with PMS2, a DNA mismatch repair protein. PMS2 nuclear levels were decreased in response to the expression of all 6 kinases, with no concomitant change in mRNA level or cytosolic protein level. Response to thioguanine, that requires the mismatch repair pathway, was modulated by all 6 oncogenic kinases. In summary common targets for 6 oncogenic PTKs have been found that are regulated by post-translational mechanisms. They represent potential new avenues for therapies but also demonstrate the post-translational regulation is a key target of leukaemogenic kinases. PMID:22745689

  15. Hypotonicity stimulates renal epithelial sodium transport by activating JNK via receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Taruno, Akiyuki; Niisato, Naomi; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2007-07-01

    We previously reported that hypotonic stress stimulated transepithelial Na(+) transport via a pathway dependent on protein tyrosine kinase (PTK; Niisato N, Van Driessche W, Liu M, Marunaka Y. J Membr Biol 175: 63-77, 2000). However, it is still unknown what type of PTK mediates this stimulation. In the present study, we investigated the role of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) in the hypotonic stimulation of Na(+) transport. In renal epithelial A6 cells, we observed inhibitory effects of AG1478 [an inhibitor of the EGF receptor (EGFR)] and AG1296 [an inhibitor of the PDGF receptor (PDGFR)] on both the hypotonic stress-induced stimulation of Na(+) transport and the hypotonic stress-induced ligand-independent activation of EGFR. We further studied whether hypotonic stress activates members of the MAP kinase family, ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and JNK/SAPK, via an RTK-dependent pathway. The present study indicates that hypotonic stress induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK/SAPK, but not p38 MAPK, that the hypotonic stress-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK/SAPK was diminished by coapplication of AG1478 and AG1296, and that only JNK/SAPK was involved in the hypotonic stimulation of Na(+) transport. A further study using cyclohexamide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) suggests that both RTK and JNK/SAPK contributed to the protein synthesis-independent early phase in hypotonic stress-induced Na(+) transport, but not to the protein synthesis-dependent late phase. The present study also suggests involvement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) in RTK-JNK/SAPK cascade-mediated Na(+) transport. These observations indicate that 1) hypotonic stress activates JNK/SAPK via RTKs in a ligand-independent pathway, 2) the RTK-JNK/SAPK cascade acts as a mediator of hypotonic stress for stimulation of Na(+) transport, and 3) PI3-kinase is involved in the RTK-JNK/SAPK cascade for the hypotonic stress-induced stimulation of Na(+) transport. PMID:17344192

  16. The ALK inhibitor PF-06463922 is effective as a single agent in neuroblastoma driven by expression of ALK and MYCN.

    PubMed

    Guan, J; Tucker, E R; Wan, H; Chand, D; Danielson, L S; Ruuth, K; El Wakil, A; Witek, B; Jamin, Y; Umapathy, G; Robinson, S P; Johnson, T W; Smeal, T; Martinsson, T; Chesler, L; Palmer, R H; Hallberg, B

    2016-09-01

    The first-in-class inhibitor of ALK, c-MET and ROS1, crizotinib (Xalkori), has shown remarkable clinical efficacy in treatment of ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer. However, in neuroblastoma, activating mutations in the ALK kinase domain are typically refractory to crizotinib treatment, highlighting the need for more potent inhibitors. The next-generation ALK inhibitor PF-06463922 is predicted to exhibit increased affinity for ALK mutants prevalent in neuroblastoma. We examined PF-06463922 activity in ALK-driven neuroblastoma models in vitro and in vivo In vitro kinase assays and cell-based experiments examining ALK mutations of increasing potency show that PF-06463922 is an effective inhibitor of ALK with greater activity towards ALK neuroblastoma mutants. In contrast to crizotinib, single agent administration of PF-06463922 caused dramatic tumor inhibition in both subcutaneous and orthotopic xenografts as well as a mouse model of high-risk neuroblastoma driven by Th-ALK(F1174L)/MYCN Taken together, our results suggest PF-06463922 is a potent inhibitor of crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations, and highlights an important new treatment option for neuroblastoma patients. PMID:27483357

  17. Autoregulation by the Juxtamembrane Region of the Human Ephrin Receptor Tyrosine Kinase A3 (EphA3)

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Tara L.; Walker, John R.; Loppnau, Peter; Butler-Cole, Christine; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2008-07-08

    Ephrin receptors (Eph) affect cell shape and movement, unlike other receptor tyrosine kinases that directly affect proliferative pathways. The kinase domain of EphA3 is activated by ephrin binding and receptor oligomerization. This activation is associated with two tyrosines in the juxtamembrane region; these tyrosines are sites of autophosphorylation and interact with the active site of the kinase to modulate activity. This allosteric event has important implications both in terms of understanding signal transduction pathways mediated by Eph kinases as well as discovering specific therapeutic ligands for receptor kinases. In order to provide further details of the molecular mechanism through which the unphosphorylated juxtamemebrane region blocks catalysis, we studied wild-type and site-specific mutants in detail. High-resolution structures of multiple states of EphA3 kinase with and without the juxtamembrane segment allowed us to map the coupled pathway of residues that connect the juxtamembrane segment, the activation loop, and the catalytic residues of the kinase domain. This highly conserved set of residues likely delineates a molecular recognition pathway for most of the Eph RTKs, helping to characterize the dynamic nature of these physiologically important enzymes.

  18. Structural features that specify tyrosine kinase activity deduced from homology modeling of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Knighton, D R; Cadena, D L; Zheng, J; Ten Eyck, L F; Taylor, S S; Sowadski, J M; Gill, G N

    1993-01-01

    To identify structural features that distinguish protein-tyrosine kinases from protein-serine kinases, a molecular model of the kinase domain of epidermal growth factor receptor was constructed by substituting its amino acid sequence for the amino acid sequence of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase in a 2.7-A refined crystallographic model. General folding was conserved as was the configuration of invariant residues at the active site. Two sequence motifs that distinguish the two families correspond to loops that converge at the active site of the enzyme. A conserved arginine in the catalytic loop is proposed to interact with the gamma phosphate of ATP. The second loop provides a binding surface that positions the tyrosine of the substrate. A positively charged surface provides additional sites for substrate recognition. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8389462

  19. ALK F1174V mutation confers sensitivity while ALK I1171 mutation confers resistance to alectinib. The importance of serial biopsy post progression.

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong; Milliken, Jeffrey C; Azada, Michele C; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M; Klempner, Samuel J

    2016-01-01

    Many acquired resistant mutations to the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene have been identified during treatment of ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with crizotinib, ceritinib, and alectinib. These various acquired resistant ALK mutations confer differential sensitivities to various ALK inhibitors and may provide guidance on how to sequence the use of many of the second generation ALK inhibitors. We described a patient who developed an acquired ALK F1174V resistant mutation on progression from crizotinib that responded to alectinib for 18 months but then developed an acquired ALK I1171S mutation to alectinib. Both tumor samples had essentially the same genomic profile by comprehensive genomic profiling otherwise. This is the first patient report that demonstrates ALK F1174V mutation is sensitive to alectinib and further confirms missense acquired ALK I1171 mutation is resistant to alectinib. Sequential tumor re-biopsy for comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) is important to appreciate the selective pressure during treatment with various ALK inhibitors underpinning the evolution of the disease course of ALK+NSCLC patients while on treatment with the various ALK inhibitors. This approach will likely help inform the optimal sequencing strategy as more ALK inhibitors become available. This case report also validates the importance of developing structurally distinct ALK inhibitors for clinical use to overcome non-cross resistant ALK mutations. PMID:26464158

  20. Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase (BTK)-dependent immune cell crosstalk drives pancreas cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, Andrew J.; Kaneda, Megan M.; Tsujikawa, Takahiro; Nguyen, Abraham V.; Affara, Nesrine I.; Ruffell, Brian; Gorjestani, Sara; Liudahl, Shannon M.; Truitt, Morgan; Olson, Peter; Kim, Grace; Hanahan, Douglas; Tempero, Margaret A.; Sheppard, Brett; Irving, Bryan; Chang, Betty Y.; Varner, Judith A.; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has one of the worst five-year survival rates of all solid tumors, and thus new treatment strategies are urgently needed. Here we report that targeting Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase (BTK), a key B cell and macrophage kinase, restores T cell-dependent anti-tumor immune responses, thereby inhibiting PDAC growth and improving responsiveness to standard-of-care chemotherapy (CTX). We report that PDAC tumor growth depends on crosstalk between B cells and FcRγ+ tumor-associated macrophages, resulting in TH2-type macrophage programming via BTK activation in a phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)γ-dependent manner. Treatment of PDAC-bearing mice with the BTK inhibitor PCI32765 (ibrutinib) or by PI3Kγ inhibition reprogrammed macrophages toward a TH1 phenotype that fostered CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity, and suppressed PDAC growth, indicating that BTK signaling mediates PDAC immunosuppression. These data indicate that pharmacological inhibition of BTK in PDAC can reactivate adaptive immune responses, presenting a new therapeutic modality for this devastating tumor type. PMID:26715645

  1. The ROR2 tyrosine kinase receptor regulates dendritic spine morphogenesis in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Iván E; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Varas-Godoy, Manuel; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2015-07-01

    Wnt signaling regulates synaptic development and function and contributes to the fine-tuning of the molecular and morphological differentiation of synapses. We have shown previously that Wnt5a activates non-canonical Wnt signaling to stimulate postsynaptic differentiation in excitatory hippocampal neurons promoting the clustering of the postsynaptic scaffold protein PSD-95 and the development of dendritic spines. At least three different kinds of Wnt receptors have been associated with Wnt5a signaling: seven trans-membrane Frizzled receptors and the tyrosine kinase receptors Ryk and ROR2. We report here that ROR2 is distributed in the dendrites of hippocampal neurons in close proximity to synaptic contacts and it is contained in dendritic spine protrusions. We demonstrate that ROR2 is necessary to maintain dendritic spine number and morphological distribution in cultured hippocampal neurons. ROR2 overexpression increased dendritic spine growth without affecting the density of dendritic spine protrusions in a form dependent on its extracellular Wnt binding cysteine rich domain (CRD) and kinase domain. Overexpression of dominant negative ROR2 lacking the extracellular CRD decreased spine density and the proportion of mushroom like spines, while ROR2 lacking the C-terminal and active kinase domains only affected spine morphology. Our results indicate a crucial role of the ROR2 in the formation and maturation of the postsynaptic dendritic spines in hippocampal neurons. PMID:26003414

  2. The Atlantic salmon protein tyrosine kinase Tyk2: molecular cloning, modulation of expression and function.

    PubMed

    Sobhkhez, Mehrdad; Hansen, Tom; Iliev, Dimitar B; Skjesol, Astrid; Jørgensen, Jorunn B

    2013-12-01

    Tyk2, a member of the Janus Kinase (JAK) family of protein tyrosine kinases, is required for interferon-α/β binding and signaling in higher vertebrates. Currently, little is known about the role of the different JAKs in signaling responses to interferon (IFN) in lower vertebrates including fish. In this paper we report the identification and characterization of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) Tyk2. Four cDNA sequences, two containing an open reading frame encoding full-length Tyk protein and two with an up-stream in frame stop codon, were identified. The deduced amino acid sequences of the salmon full-length Tyk2 proteins showed highest identity with Tyk2 from other species and their transcripts were ubiquitously expressed. Like in mammals the presented data suggests that salmon Tyk2 is auto-phosporylated when ectopically expressed in cells. In our experiments, full-length salmon Tyk2 overexpressed in CHSE-cells phosphorylated itself, while both a kinase-deficient mutant and the truncated Tyk2 (Tyk-short) were inactive. Interestingly, the overexpression of full length Tyk2 was shown to up-regulate the transcript levels of the IFN induced gene Mx, thus indicating the involvement of salmon Tyk2 in the salmon IFN I pathway. PMID:23872231

  3. erbB3 Is an Active Tyrosine Kinase Capable of Homo- and Heterointeractions

    PubMed Central

    Steinkamp, Mara P.; Low-Nam, Shalini T.; Yang, Shujie; Lidke, Keith A.; Lidke, Diane S.

    2014-01-01

    Often considered to be a “dead” kinase, erbB3 is implicated in escape from erbB-targeted cancer therapies. Here, heregulin stimulation is shown to markedly upregulate kinase activity in erbB3 immunoprecipitates. Intact, activated erbB3 phosphorylates tyrosine sites in an exogenous peptide substrate, and this activity is abolished by mutagenesis of lysine 723 in the catalytic domain. Enhanced erbB3 kinase activity is linked to heterointeractions with catalytically active erbB2, since it is largely blocked in cells pretreated with lapatinib or pertuzumab. erbB2 activation of erbB3 is not dependent on equal surface levels of these receptors, since it occurs even in erbB3-transfected CHO cells with disproportionally small amounts of erbB2. We tested a model in which transient erbB3/erbB2 heterointeractions set the stage for erbB3 homodimers to be signaling competent. erbB3 homo- and heterodimerization events were captured in real time on live cells using single-particle tracking of quantum dot probes bound to ligand or hemagglutinin tags on recombinant receptors. PMID:24379439

  4. JAK2 Tyrosine Kinase Phosphorylates and Is Negatively Regulated by Centrosomal Protein Ninein

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Jennifer; Hammer, Alan; Nestor-Kalinoski, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    JAK2 is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase critical for cytokine signaling. In this study, we have identified a novel centrosome-associated complex containing ninein and JAK2. We have found that active JAK2 localizes around the mother centrioles, where it partly colocalizes with ninein, a protein involved in microtubule (MT) nucleation and anchoring. We demonstrated that JAK2 is an important regulator of centrosome function. Depletion of JAK2 or use of JAK2-null cells causes defects in MT anchoring and increased numbers of cells with mitotic defects; however, MT nucleation is unaffected. We showed that JAK2 directly phosphorylates the N terminus of ninein while the C terminus of ninein inhibits JAK2 kinase activity in vitro. Overexpressed wild-type (WT) or C-terminal (amino acids 1179 to 1931) ninein inhibits JAK2. This ninein-dependent inhibition of JAK2 significantly decreases prolactin- and interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-induced tyrosyl phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT5. Downregulation of ninein enhances JAK2 activation. These results indicate that JAK2 is a novel member of centrosome-associated complex and that this localization regulates both centrosomal function and JAK2 kinase activity, thus controlling cytokine-activated molecular pathways. PMID:25332239

  5. Role of tyrosine-kinase inhibitors in myeloproliferative neoplasms: comparative lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Sweet, Kendra L; Corrales-Yepez, Gabriela M; Komrokji, Rami S

    2016-01-01

    An important pathogenetic distinction in the classification of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) is the presence or absence of the BCR–ABL fusion gene, which encodes a unique oncogenic tyrosine kinase. The BCR–ABL fusion, caused by the formation of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) through translocation, constitutes the disease-initiating event in chronic myeloid leukemia. The development of successive BCR–ABL-targeted tyrosine-kinase inhibitors has led to greatly improved outcomes in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, including high rates of complete hematologic, cytogenetic, and molecular responses. Such levels of treatment success have long been elusive for patients with Ph-negative MPNs, because of the difficulties in identifying specific driver proteins suitable as drug targets. However, in recent years an improved understanding of the complex pathobiology of classic Ph-negative MPNs, characterized by variable, overlapping multimutation profiles, has prompted the development of better and more broadly targeted (to pathway rather than protein) treatment options, particularly JAK inhibitors. In classic Ph-negative MPNs, overactivation of JAK-dependent signaling pathways is a central pathogenic mechanism, and mutually exclusive mutations in JAK2, MPL, and CALR linked to aberrant JAK activation are now recognized as key drivers of disease progression in myelofibrosis (MF). In clinical trials, the JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib – the first therapy approved for MF worldwide – improved disease-related splenomegaly and symptoms independent of JAK2V617F mutational status, and prolonged survival compared with placebo or standard therapy in patients with advanced MF. In separate trials, ruxolitinib also provided comprehensive hematologic control in patients with another Ph-negative MPN – polycythemia vera. However, complete cytogenetic or molecular responses with JAK inhibitors alone are normally not observed, underscoring the need for novel

  6. H-Ras Modulates N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptor Function via Inhibition of Src Tyrosine Kinase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Claire; Yaka, Rami; Dinh, Son; Ron, Dorit

    2005-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation of the NR2A and NR2B subunits of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor by Src protein-tyrosine kinases modulates receptor channel activity and is necessary for the induction of long term potentiation (LTP). Deletion of H-Ras increases both NR2 tyrosine phosphorylation and NMDA receptor-mediated hippocampal LTP. Here we investigated whether H-Ras regulates phosphorylation and function of the NMDA receptor via Src family protein-tyrosine kinases. We identified Src as a novel H-Ras binding partner. H-Ras bound to Src but not Fyn both in vitro and in brain via the Src kinase domain. Cotransfection of H-Ras and Src inhibited Src activity and decreased NR2A tyrosine phosphorylation. Treatment of rat brain slices with Tat-H-Ras depleted NR2A from the synaptic membrane, decreased endogenous Src activity and NR2A phosphorylation, and decreased the magnitude of hip-pocampal LTP. No change was observed for NR2B. We suggest that H-Ras negatively regulates Src phosphorylation of NR2A and retention of NR2A into the synaptic membrane leading to inhibition of NMDA receptor function. This mechanism is specific for Src and NR2A and has implications for studies in which regulation of NMDA receptor-mediated LTP is important, such as synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory and addiction. PMID:12695509

  7. Delineation of a T-cell activation motif required for binding of protein tyrosine kinases containing tandem SH2 domains.

    PubMed Central

    Koyasu, S; Tse, A G; Moingeon, P; Hussey, R E; Mildonian, A; Hannisian, J; Clayton, L K; Reinherz, E L

    1994-01-01

    To define the T-cell receptor signal transduction motif, we have transfected human and murine T-cell lines with a chimeric receptor consisting of the extracellular and transmembrane domains of human CD8 alpha and the membrane-proximal portion of CD3 zeta containing at its C terminus either an 18-amino acid segment (NQLYNELNLGRREEYDVL) or alanine-scanning point mutant derivatives. Crosslinking of the extracellular domain of the chimera is sufficient to initiate Ca2+ flux, interleukin 2 production, and tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins including the chimera. Subsequently, the chimera becomes associated with several tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins, among them the 70-kDa protein tyrosine kinase ZAP70. Mutational data identify the T-cell activation motif as Y(X)2L(X)7Y(X)2L and show that each of the four designated residues is necessary for the above activation events. Recombinant protein containing the two tandem SH2 domains derived from ZAP70 binds to a synthetic peptide corresponding to the above 18-amino acid motif but only when both tyrosines are phosphorylated; in contrast, little or no binding is observed to monophosphorylated or nonphosphorylated analogues. These results imply that after receptor crosslinking in T cells, and by inference also in B cells and mast cells, the motif is phosphorylated on both tyrosine residues, thereafter serving as a docking site for protein tyrosine kinases containing tandem SH2 domains. Images PMID:7517560

  8. Tyrosine kinase-mediated axial motility of basal cells revealed by intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Jeremy; Kim, Bongki; Hill, Eric; Visconti, Pablo; Krapf, Dario; Vinegoni, Claudio; Weissleder, Ralph; Brown, Dennis; Breton, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial cells are generally considered to be static relative to their neighbours. Basal cells in pseudostratified epithelia display a single long cytoplasmic process that can cross the tight junction barrier to reach the lumen. Using in vivo microscopy to visualize the epididymis, a model system for the study of pseudostratified epithelia, we report here the surprising discovery that these basal cell projections—which we call axiopodia—periodically extend and retract over time. We found that axiopodia extensions and retractions follow an oscillatory pattern. This movement, which we refer to as periodic axial motility (PAM), is controlled by c-Src and MEK1/2–ERK1/2. Therapeutic inhibition of tyrosine kinase activity induces a retraction of these projections. Such unexpected cell motility may reflect a novel mechanism by which specialized epithelial cells sample the luminal environment. PMID:26868824

  9. [Side effect management of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in urology : Fatigue and hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Sikic, D; Lüdecke, G; Lieb, V; Keck, B

    2016-05-01

    Not only has the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinomas (mRCC) changed the therapeutic options for this disease significantly, but with the occurrence of typical side effects this therapy also poses a challenge for the treating physician. Fatigue und hypothyroidism are two common side effects of TKI therapy that can often appear simultaneously. By reducing the patients' quality of life these side effects often lead to a discontinuation of therapy. With this review we want to give the treating physician an overview of the classification and the specific treatment of TKI-induced fatigue and hypothyroidism in order to maximize patients' compliance and the therapeutic efficacy of TKI therapy. PMID:27119958

  10. The TAM family receptor tyrosine kinase TYRO3 is a negative regulator of type 2 immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Pamela Y.; Carrera Silva, Eugenio A.; De Kouchkovsky, Dimitri; Joannas, Leonel D.; Hao, Liming; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; Eng, Celeste; Licona-Limón, Paula; Weinstein, Jason S.; Herbert, De’Broski R.; Craft, Joseph E.; Flavell, Richard A.; Repetto, Silvia; Correale, Jorge; Burchard, Esteban G.; Torgerson, Dara G.; Ghosh, Sourav; Rothlin, Carla V.

    2016-01-01

    Host responses against metazoan parasites or an array of environmental substances elicit type 2 immunity. Despite its protective function, type 2 immunity also drives allergic diseases. The mechanisms that regulate the magnitude of the type 2 response remain largely unknown. Here, we show that genetic ablation of a receptor tyrosine kinase encoded by Tyro3 in mice or the functional neutralization of its ortholog in human dendritic cells resulted in enhanced type 2 immunity. Furthermore, the TYRO3 agonist PROS1 was induced in T cells by the quintessential type 2 cytokine, interleukin-4. T cell–specific Pros1 knockouts phenocopied the loss of Tyro3. Thus, a PROS1-mediated feedback from adaptive immunity engages a rheostat, TYRO3, on innate immune cells to limit the intensity of type 2 responses. PMID:27034374

  11. Rewiring the Pneumococcal Cell Cycle with Serine/Threonine- and Tyrosine-kinases.

    PubMed

    Grangeasse, Christophe

    2016-09-01

    Over the past decade, Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) has gained prominence as a model for studying the bacterial cell cycle. This important human pathogen possesses a characteristic diplo-ovococcal cell shape and produces a protective polysaccharide capsule required for virulence, and it has been used to investigate natural genetic transformation. Recent advances have demonstrated that the pneumococcus has evolved phosphorylation-dependent regulatory mechanisms dedicated to controlling cell division and ensuring the concealment of the newborn cells by the capsule. In this review, I survey the role of the only two serine/threonine- (StkP) and tyrosine-kinases (CpsD) of the pneumococcus and discuss the existence of interconnected phosphorylation networks coordinating cell division and morphogenesis with key aspects of the cell cycle. PMID:27130634

  12. Bruton's tyrosine kinase: from X-linked agammaglobulinemia toward targeted therapy for B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ponader, Sabine; Burger, Jan A

    2014-06-10

    Discovery of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) mutations as the cause for X-linked agammaglobulinemia was a milestone in understanding the genetic basis of primary immunodeficiencies. Since then, studies have highlighted the critical role of this enzyme in B-cell development and function, and particularly in B-cell receptor signaling. Because its deletion affects mostly B cells, BTK has become an attractive therapeutic target in autoimmune disorders and B-cell malignancies. Ibrutinib (PCI-32765) is the most advanced BTK inhibitor in clinical testing, with ongoing phase III clinical trials in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle-cell lymphoma. In this article, we discuss key discoveries related to BTK and clinically relevant aspects of BTK inhibitors, and we provide an outlook into clinical development and open questions regarding BTK inhibitor therapy. PMID:24778403

  13. Proteome-wide dataset supporting functional study of tyrosine kinases in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Angelopoulos, Nicos; Stebbing, Justin; Xu, Yichen; Giamas, Georgios; Zhang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases (TKs) play an essential role in regulating various cellular activities and dysregulation of TK signaling contributes to oncogenesis. However, less than half of the TKs have been thoroughly studied. Through a combined use of RNAi and stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics, a global functional proteomic landscape of TKs in breast cancer was recently revealed highlighting a comprehensive and highly integrated signaling network regulated by TKs (Stebbing et al., 2015) [1]. We collate the enormous amount of the proteomic data in an open access platform, providing a valuable resource for studying the function of TKs in cancer and benefiting the science community. Here we present a detailed description related to this study (Stebbing et al., 2015) [1] and the raw data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the identifier PXD002065. PMID:27054188

  14. Receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is a functional molecular target in human lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Qian, Ming D.; Salameh, Ahmad; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Edwards, Julianna K.; Cimino, Daniel F.; Moeller, Benjamin J.; Kelly, Patrick; Nunez, Maria I.; Tang, Ximing; Liu, Diane D.; Lee, J. Jack; Hong, Waun Ki; Ferrara, Fortunato; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Lobb, Roy R.; Edelman, Martin J.; Sidman, Richard L.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2015-03-20

    Lung cancer is often refractory to radiotherapy, but molecular mechanisms of tumor resistance remain poorly defined. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is specifically overexpressed in lung cancer and is involved in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic insult. In the absence of EphA5, lung cancer cells displayed a defective G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, were unable to resolve DNA damage, and became radiosensitive. Upon irradiation, EphA5 was transported into the nucleus where it interacted with activated ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) at sites of DNA repair. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a new monoclonal antibody against human EphA5 sensitized lung cancer cells and human lung cancer xenografts to radiotherapy and significantly prolonged survival, thus suggesting the likelihood of translational applications.

  15. Receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is a functional molecular target in human lung cancer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Qian, Ming D.; Salameh, Ahmad; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Edwards, Julianna K.; Cimino, Daniel F.; Moeller, Benjamin J.; Kelly, Patrick; Nunez, Maria I.; Tang, Ximing; et al

    2015-03-20

    Lung cancer is often refractory to radiotherapy, but molecular mechanisms of tumor resistance remain poorly defined. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is specifically overexpressed in lung cancer and is involved in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic insult. In the absence of EphA5, lung cancer cells displayed a defective G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, were unable to resolve DNA damage, and became radiosensitive. Upon irradiation, EphA5 was transported into the nucleus where it interacted with activated ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) at sites of DNA repair. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a new monoclonal antibody against human EphA5 sensitized lungmore » cancer cells and human lung cancer xenografts to radiotherapy and significantly prolonged survival, thus suggesting the likelihood of translational applications.« less

  16. Proteome-wide dataset supporting functional study of tyrosine kinases in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Angelopoulos, Nicos; Stebbing, Justin; Xu, Yichen; Giamas, Georgios; Zhang, Hua

    2016-06-01

    Tyrosine kinases (TKs) play an essential role in regulating various cellular activities and dysregulation of TK signaling contributes to oncogenesis. However, less than half of the TKs have been thoroughly studied. Through a combined use of RNAi and stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics, a global functional proteomic landscape of TKs in breast cancer was recently revealed highlighting a comprehensive and highly integrated signaling network regulated by TKs (Stebbing et al., 2015) [1]. We collate the enormous amount of the proteomic data in an open access platform, providing a valuable resource for studying the function of TKs in cancer and benefiting the science community. Here we present a detailed description related to this study (Stebbing et al., 2015) [1] and the raw data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the identifier PXD002065. PMID:27054188

  17. The role of Bruton's tyrosine kinase in autoimmunity and implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Crofford, Leslie J; Nyhoff, Lindsay E; Sheehan, Jonathan H; Kendall, Peggy L

    2016-07-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) mediates B cell signaling and is also present in innate immune cells but not T cells. BTK propagates B cell receptor (BCR) responses to antigen-engagement as well as to stimulation via CD40, toll-like receptors (TLRs), Fc receptors (FCRs) and chemokine receptors. Importantly, BTK can modulate signaling, acting as a "rheostat" rather than an "on-off" switch; thus, overexpression leads to autoimmunity while decreased levels improve autoimmune disease outcomes. Autoreactive B cells depend upon BTK for survival to a greater degree than normal B cells, reflected as loss of autoantibodies with maintenance of total antibody levels when BTK is absent. This review describes contributions of BTK to immune tolerance, including studies testing BTK-inhibitors for treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26864273

  18. Overcoming mutagenicity and ion channel activity: optimization of selective spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ellis, J Michael; Altman, Michael D; Bass, Alan; Butcher, John W; Byford, Alan J; Donofrio, Anthony; Galloway, Sheila; Haidle, Andrew M; Jewell, James; Kelly, Nancy; Leccese, Erica K; Lee, Sandra; Maddess, Matthew; Miller, J Richard; Moy, Lily Y; Osimboni, Ekundayo; Otte, Ryan D; Reddy, M Vijay; Spencer, Kerrie; Sun, Binyuan; Vincent, Stella H; Ward, Gwendolyn J; Woo, Grace H C; Yang, Chiming; Houshyar, Hani; Northrup, Alan B

    2015-02-26

    Development of a series of highly kinome-selective spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) inhibitors with favorable druglike properties is described. Early leads were discovered through X-ray crystallographic analysis, and a systematic survey of cores within a selected chemical space focused on ligand binding efficiency. Attenuation of hERG ion channel activity inherent within the initial chemotype was guided through modulation of physicochemical properties including log D, PSA, and pKa. PSA proved most effective for prospective compound design. Further profiling of an advanced compound revealed bacterial mutagenicity in the Ames test using TA97a Salmonella strain, and subsequent study demonstrated that this mutagenicity was pervasive throughout the series. Identification of intercalation as a likely mechanism for the mutagenicity-enabled modification of the core scaffold. Implementation of a DNA binding assay as a prescreen and models in DNA allowed resolution of the mutagenicity risk, affording molecules with favorable potency, selectivity, pharmacokinetic, and off-target profiles. PMID:25625541

  19. The TAM family receptor tyrosine kinase TYRO3 is a negative regulator of type 2 immunity.

    PubMed

    Chan, Pamela Y; Carrera Silva, Eugenio A; De Kouchkovsky, Dimitri; Joannas, Leonel D; Hao, Liming; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; Eng, Celeste; Licona-Limón, Paula; Weinstein, Jason S; Herbert, De'Broski R; Craft, Joseph E; Flavell, Richard A; Repetto, Silvia; Correale, Jorge; Burchard, Esteban G; Torgerson, Dara G; Ghosh, Sourav; Rothlin, Carla V

    2016-04-01

    Host responses against metazoan parasites or an array of environmental substances elicit type 2 immunity. Despite its protective function, type 2 immunity also drives allergic diseases. The mechanisms that regulate the magnitude of the type 2 response remain largely unknown. Here, we show that genetic ablation of a receptor tyrosine kinase encoded byTyro3in mice or the functional neutralization of its ortholog in human dendritic cells resulted in enhanced type 2 immunity. Furthermore, the TYRO3 agonist PROS1 was induced in T cells by the quintessential type 2 cytokine, interleukin-4. T cell-specificPros1knockouts phenocopied the loss ofTyro3 Thus, a PROS1-mediated feedback from adaptive immunity engages a rheostat, TYRO3, on innate immune cells to limit the intensity of type 2 responses. PMID:27034374

  20. Disruption of epithelial gamma delta T cell repertoires by mutation of the Syk tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Mallick-Wood, C A; Pao, W; Cheng, A M; Lewis, J M; Kulkarni, S; Bolen, J B; Rowley, B; Tigelaar, R E; Pawson, T; Hayday, A C

    1996-01-01

    Chimeric mice in which lymphocytes are deficient in the Syk tyrosine kinase have been created. Compared with Syk-positive controls, mice with Syk -/- lymphocytes display substantial depletion of intraepithelial gamma delta T cells in the skin and gut, with developmental arrest occurring after antigen receptor gene rearrangement. In this dependence on Syk, subsets of intraepithelial gamma delta T cells are similar to B cells, but distinct from splenic gamma delta T cells that develop and expand in Syk-deficient mice. The characteristic associations of certain T-cell receptor V gamma/V delta gene rearrangements with specific epithelia are also disrupted by Syk deficiency. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8790395

  1. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase EphA5 Is a Functional Molecular Target in Human Lung Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Qian, Ming D.; Salameh, Ahmad; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Edwards, Julianna K.; Cimino, Daniel F.; Moeller, Benjamin J.; Kelly, Patrick; Nunez, Maria I.; Tang, Ximing; Liu, Diane D.; Lee, J. Jack; Hong, Waun Ki; Ferrara, Fortunato; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Lobb, Roy R.; Edelman, Martin J.; Sidman, Richard L.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is often refractory to radiotherapy, but molecular mechanisms of tumor resistance remain poorly defined. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is specifically overexpressed in lung cancer and is involved in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic insult. In the absence of EphA5, lung cancer cells displayed a defective G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, were unable to resolve DNA damage, and became radiosensitive. Upon irradiation, EphA5 was transported into the nucleus where it interacted with activated ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) at sites of DNA repair. Finally, we demonstrate that a new monoclonal antibody against human EphA5 sensitized lung cancer cells and human lung cancer xenografts to radiotherapy and significantly prolonged survival, thus suggesting the likelihood of translational applications. PMID:25623065

  2. Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors in first-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML).

    PubMed

    Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Breccia, Massimo; Latagliata, Roberto

    2014-02-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have contributed to marked improvements in survival in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). This article discusses the place of the second-generation TKIs dasatinib and nilotinib in the first-line treatment of CML and is based on published literature. The new agents are more potent and effective than imatinib. Data from pivotal clinical trials indicate that response to dasatinib and nilotinib is greater and more rapid than that to imatinib, resulting in a higher probability of patients achieving an optimal response to treatment. Differences between the newer agents with respect to patient groups for whom caution is advised, drug interaction potential, haematological toxicity, pulmonary toxicity, changes in the immune system and effects on laboratory parameters are discussed. With similar levels of efficacy, the choice of second-generation agents should be guided by the characteristics of the individual patient and the most suitable dosing regimen. PMID:24043361

  3. TAM receptor tyrosine kinases: Expression, disease and oncogenesis in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Angela M.; Keating, Amy K.

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are cell surface proteins that tightly regulate a variety of downstream intra-cellular processes; ligand-receptor interactions result in cascades of signaling events leading to growth, proliferation, differentiation and migration. There are 58 described RTKs, which are further categorized into 20 different RTK families. When dysregulated or overexpressed, these RTKs are implicated in disordered growth, development, and oncogenesis. The TAM family of RTKs, consisting of Tyro3, Axl, and MerTK, is prominently expressed during the development and function of the central nervous system (CNS). Aberrant expression and dysregulated activation of TAM family members has been demonstrated in a variety of CNS-related disorders and diseases, including the most common but least treatable brain cancer in children and adults: glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:24184575

  4. Identification of genes from pattern formation, tyrosine kinase, and potassium channel families by DNA amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Kamb, A.; Weir, M.; Rudy, B.; Varmus, H.; Kenyon, C. )

    1989-06-01

    The study of gene family members has been aided by the isolation of related genes on the basis of DNA homology. The authors have adapted the polymerase chain reaction to screen animal genomes very rapidly and reliably for likely gene family members. Using conserved amino acid sequences to design degenerate oligonucleotide primers, they have shown that the genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans contains sequences homologous to many Drosophila genes involved in pattern formation, including the segment polarity gene wingless (vertebrate int-1), and homeobox sequences characteristic of the Antennapedia, engrailed, and paired families. In addition, they have used this method to show that C. elegans contains at least five different sequences homologous to genes in the tyrosine kinase family. Lastly, they have isolated six potassium channel sequences from humans, a result that validates the utility of the method with large genomes and suggests that human potassium channel gene diversity may be extensive.

  5. Characterization of a novel Eph receptor tyrosine kinase, EphA10, expressed in testis.

    PubMed

    Aasheim, Hans-Christian; Patzke, Sebastian; Hjorthaug, Hanne Sagsveen; Finne, Eivind Farmen

    2005-05-25

    In mammals, 14 members of the Eph receptor tyrosine kinase family have been described so far. Here we present a not yet described member of this family denoted EphA10. We report the identification of three putative EphA10 isoforms: one soluble and two transmembrane isoforms. One of the latter isoforms lacked the sterile alpha motif commonly found in Eph receptors. The gene encoding EphA10 is located on chromosome 1p34 and expression studies show that EphA10 mRNA is mainly expressed in testis. Binding studies to ephrin ligands suggests that this receptor belongs to the EphA subclass of Eph receptors binding mainly to ephrin-A ligands. PMID:15777695

  6. AXL receptor tyrosine kinase is required for T cell priming and antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Edward T; Pang, Iris K; Carrera Silva, Eugenio A; Bosurgi, Lidia; Miner, Jonathan J; Diamond, Michael S; Iwasaki, Akiko; Rothlin, Carla V

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) AXL is induced in response to type I interferons (IFNs) and limits their production through a negative feedback loop. Enhanced production of type I IFNs in Axl(-/-) dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro have led to speculation that inhibition of AXL would promote antiviral responses. Notwithstanding, type I IFNs also exert potent immunosuppressive functions. Here we demonstrate that ablation of AXL enhances the susceptibility to infection by influenza A virus and West Nile virus. The increased type I IFN response in Axl(-/-) mice was associated with diminished DC maturation, reduced production of IL-1β, and defective antiviral T cell immunity. Blockade of type I IFN receptor or administration of IL-1β to Axl(-/-) mice restored the antiviral adaptive response and control of infection. Our results demonstrate that AXL is essential for limiting the immunosuppressive effects of type I IFNs and enabling the induction of protective antiviral adaptive immunity. PMID:27350258

  7. Receptor tyrosine kinases: Characterisation, mechanism of action and therapeutic interests for bone cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ségaliny, Aude I.; Tellez-Gabriel, Marta; Heymann, Marie-Françoise; Heymann, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Bone cancers are characterised by the development of tumour cells in bone sites, associated with a dysregulation of their environment. In the last two decades, numerous therapeutic strategies have been developed to target the cancer cells or tumour niche. As the crosstalk between these two entities is tightly controlled by the release of polypeptide mediators activating signalling pathways through several receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), RTK inhibitors have been designed. These inhibitors have shown exciting clinical impacts, such as imatinib mesylate, which has become a reference treatment for chronic myeloid leukaemia and gastrointestinal tumours. The present review gives an overview of the main molecular and functional characteristics of RTKs, and focuses on the clinical applications that are envisaged and already assessed for the treatment of bone sarcomas and bone metastases. PMID:26579483

  8. Tyrosine kinase-mediated axial motility of basal cells revealed by intravital imaging.

    PubMed

    Roy, Jeremy; Kim, Bongki; Hill, Eric; Visconti, Pablo; Krapf, Dario; Vinegoni, Claudio; Weissleder, Ralph; Brown, Dennis; Breton, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial cells are generally considered to be static relative to their neighbours. Basal cells in pseudostratified epithelia display a single long cytoplasmic process that can cross the tight junction barrier to reach the lumen. Using in vivo microscopy to visualize the epididymis, a model system for the study of pseudostratified epithelia, we report here the surprising discovery that these basal cell projections--which we call axiopodia--periodically extend and retract over time. We found that axiopodia extensions and retractions follow an oscillatory pattern. This movement, which we refer to as periodic axial motility (PAM), is controlled by c-Src and MEK1/2-ERK1/2. Therapeutic inhibition of tyrosine kinase activity induces a retraction of these projections. Such unexpected cell motility may reflect a novel mechanism by which specialized epithelial cells sample the luminal environment. PMID:26868824

  9. Tyrosine kinase chimeras for antigen-selective T-body therapy.

    PubMed

    Eshhar; Fitzer-Attas

    1998-04-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) transmit activation signals in almost every cell type, including immune effector cells. The aberrant or constitutive activation of PTKs can often cause neoplastic transformation. The use of chimeric receptors based on PTKs may enable us to elucidate the signaling pathways of normal immune cells and other cell types, and the abnormal events that can lead to malignant transformation. In this review, we focus on antigen specific chimeric PTKs in which antibody-derived scFv are joined to the Syk family of PTKs. These chimeric receptors yielded reagents that can selectively redirect immune effector cells and specifically activate them to produce cytokines or lyse their target. The advantages of using such PTK-based chimeras to redirect lymphocytes to tumor targets and their potential as an immunotherapeutic approach to malignant disease is discussed. PMID:10837624

  10. The SYK tyrosine kinase: a crucial player in diverse biological functions

    PubMed Central

    Mócsai, Attila; Ruland, Jürgen; Tybulewicz, Victor L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) has been known to relay adaptive immune receptor signalling. However, recent reports indicate that SYK also mediates other, unexpectedly diverse biological functions including cellular adhesion, innate immune recognition, osteoclast maturation, platelet activation and vascular development. SYK is activated by C-type lectins and integrins, and activates novel targets including the CARD9/CARMA1–BCL10–MALT1 pathway and the NLRP3 inflammasome. Drosophila studies indicate evolutionary ancient origin of SYK-mediated signalling. Moreover, SYK has a crucial role in autoimmune diseases and haematological malignancies. This Review summarizes our current understanding of SYK functions and the translation of this knowledge for therapeutic purposes. PMID:20467426

  11. KSHV-TK is a tyrosine kinase that disrupts focal adhesions and induces Rho-mediated cell contraction

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Michael B; Turner, Rachel; Stevenson, Philip G; Way, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Paradoxically, the thymidine kinase (TK) encoded by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an extremely inefficient nucleoside kinase, when compared to TKs from related herpesviruses. We now show that KSHV-TK, in contrast to HSV1-TK, associates with the actin cytoskeleton and induces extensive cell contraction followed by membrane blebbing. These dramatic changes in cell morphology depend on the auto-phosphorylation of tyrosines 65, 85 and 120 in the N-terminus of KSHV-TK. Phosphorylation of tyrosines 65/85 and 120 results in an interaction with Crk family proteins and the p85 regulatory subunit of PI3-Kinase, respectively. The interaction of Crk with KSHV-TK leads to tyrosine phoshorylation of this cellular adaptor. Auto-phosphorylation of KSHV-TK also induces a loss of FAK and paxillin from focal adhesions, resulting in activation of RhoA-ROCK signalling to myosin II and cell contraction. In the absence of FAK or paxillin, KSHV-TK has no effect on focal adhesion integrity or cell morphology. Our observations demonstrate that by acting as a tyrosine kinase, KSHV-TK modulates signalling and cell morphology. PMID:25471072

  12. Neoadjuvant Tyrosine Kinase Downstaging of T2 Renal Cell Carcinoma in Solitary Kidney Before Robotic Partial Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Mary K.; Sartor, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We highlight the use of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, pazopanib, for neoadjuvant downstaging a 7.4 cm right biopsy-proven clear cell renal-cell carcinoma in a solitary kidney before surgical intervention of robotic partial nephrectomy with retrograde cooling to induce cold ischemia in a 79-year-old male.

  13. A Myxococcus xanthus Bacterial Tyrosine Kinase, BtkA, Is Required for the Formation of Mature Spores▿

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yoshio; Yamashita, Shinji; Mori, Yumi; Kitajima, Yuki; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2011-01-01

    A Myxococcus xanthus cytoplasmic bacterial tyrosine kinase, BtkA, showed phosphorylation activity in the presence of Exo. Phosphorylated BtkA was expressed late after starvation induction and early after glycerol induction. The btkA mutant was unable to complete maturation to heat- and sonication-resistant spores under both starvation- and glycerol-induced developmental conditions. PMID:21840977

  14. PROLACTIN-INDUCED TYROSINE PHOSPHORYLATION, ACTIVATION AND RECEPTOR ASSOCIATION OF FOCAL ADHESION KINASE (FAK) IN MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prolactin-Induced Tyrosine Phosphorylation, Activation and Receptor
    Association of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) in Mammary Epithelial Cells.
    Suzanne E. Fenton1 and Lewis G. Sheffield2. 1U.S. Environmental Protection
    Agency, MD-72, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, and

  15. Activation of tyrosine kinase c-Abl contributes to α-synuclein-induced neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Brahmachari, Saurav; Ge, Preston; Lee, Su Hyun; Kim, Donghoon; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S; Kumar, Manoj; Mao, Xiaobo; Shin, Joo Ho; Lee, Yunjong; Pletnikova, Olga; Troncoso, Juan C; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Ko, Han Seok

    2016-08-01

    Aggregation of α-synuclein contributes to the formation of Lewy bodies and neurites, the pathologic hallmarks of Parkinson disease (PD) and α-synucleinopathies. Although a number of human mutations have been identified in familial PD, the mechanisms that promote α-synuclein accumulation and toxicity are poorly understood. Here, we report that hyperactivity of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl critically regulates α-synuclein-induced neuropathology. In mice expressing a human α-synucleinopathy-associated mutation (hA53Tα-syn mice), deletion of the gene encoding c-Abl reduced α-synuclein aggregation, neuropathology, and neurobehavioral deficits. Conversely, overexpression of constitutively active c-Abl in hA53Tα-syn mice accelerated α-synuclein aggregation, neuropathology, and neurobehavioral deficits. Moreover, c-Abl activation led to an age-dependent increase in phosphotyrosine 39 α-synuclein. In human postmortem samples, there was an accumulation of phosphotyrosine 39 α-synuclein in brain tissues and Lewy bodies of PD patients compared with age-matched controls. Furthermore, in vitro studies show that c-Abl phosphorylation of α-synuclein at tyrosine 39 enhances α-synuclein aggregation. Taken together, this work establishes a critical role for c-Abl in α-synuclein-induced neurodegeneration and demonstrates that selective inhibition of c-Abl may be neuroprotective. This study further indicates that phosphotyrosine 39 α-synuclein is a potential disease indicator for PD and related α-synucleinopathies. PMID:27348587

  16. Human RON receptor tyrosine kinase induces complete epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition but causes cellular senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Cote, Marceline; Miller, A. Dusty; Liu, Shan-Lu . E-mail: shan-lu.liu@mcgill.ca

    2007-08-17

    The RON receptor tyrosine kinase is a member of the MET proto-oncogene family and is important for cell proliferation, differentiation, and cancer development. Here, we created a series of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cell clones that express different levels of RON, and have investigated their biological properties. While low levels of RON correlated with little morphological change in MDCK cells, high levels of RON expression constitutively led to morphological scattering or complete and stabilized epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Unexpectedly, MDCK clones expressing higher levels of RON exhibited retarded proliferation and senescence, despite increased motility and invasiveness. RON was constitutively tyrosine-phosphorylated in MDCK cells expressing high levels of RON and undergoing EMT, and the MAPK signaling pathway was activated. This study reveals for the first time that RON alone is sufficient to induce complete and stabilized EMT in MDCK cells, and overexpression of RON does not cause cell transformation but rather induces cell cycle arrest and senescence, leading to impaired cell proliferation.

  17. Whole Genome Duplications Shaped the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Repertoire of Jawed Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Frédéric G.; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Schartl, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) gene family, involved primarily in cell growth and differentiation, comprises proteins with a common enzymatic tyrosine kinase intracellular domain adjacent to a transmembrane region. The amino-terminal portion of RTKs is extracellular and made of different domains, the combination of which characterizes each of the 20 RTK subfamilies among mammals. We analyzed a total of 7,376 RTK sequences among 143 vertebrate species to provide here the first comprehensive census of the jawed vertebrate repertoire. We ascertained the 58 genes previously described in the human and mouse genomes and established their phylogenetic relationships. We also identified five additional RTKs amounting to a total of 63 genes in jawed vertebrates. We found that the vertebrate RTK gene family has been shaped by the two successive rounds of whole genome duplications (WGD) called 1R and 2R (1R/2R) that occurred at the base of the vertebrates. In addition, the Vegfr and Ephrin receptor subfamilies were expanded by single gene duplications. In teleost fish, 23 additional RTK genes have been retained after another expansion through the fish-specific third round (3R) of WGD. Several lineage-specific gene losses were observed. For instance, birds have lost three RTKs, and different genes are missing in several fish sublineages. The RTK gene family presents an unusual high gene retention rate from the vertebrate WGDs (58.75% after 1R/2R, 64.4% after 3R), resulting in an expansion that might be correlated with the evolution of complexity of vertebrate cellular communication and intracellular signaling. PMID:27260203

  18. Separate domains of the insulin receptor contain sites of autophosphorylation and tyrosine kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, H.J.; White, M.F.; Khan, C.R.

    1987-04-21

    The authors have studied the structure and function of the solubilized insulin receptor before and after partial proteolytic digestion to define domains in the ..beta..-subunit that undergo autophosphorylation and contain the tyrosine kinase activity. Wheat germ agglutinin purified insulin receptor from Fao cells was digested briefly at 22/sup 0/C with low concentrations of trypsin, staphylococcal V8 protease, or elastase. Autophosphorylation of the ..beta..-subunit was carried out before and after digestion, and the (/sup 32/P)phosphoproteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, detected by autoradiography, and analyzed by tryptic peptide mapping by use of reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The 85-kDa fragment was not immunoprecipitated by an antibody directed against the C-terminal domain of the ..beta..-subunit (..cap alpha..Pep-1), indicating that this region of the receptor was lost. The 85-kDa fragment contained about half of the (/sup 32/P)phosphate originally found in the ..beta..-subunit, and tryptic peptide mapping showed that two major tryptic phosphopeptides (previously called pY2 and pY3) were removed. Three other tryptic phosphopeptides (pY1, pY1a, and pY4) were found in the 85- and 70-kDa fragments. To determined the structural requirements for kinase activity, the insulin receptor was subjected to tryptic digestion for 30 s-30 min, such that the receptor was composed exclusively of 85- and 70-kDa fragments of the ..beta..-subunit. The 85-kDa fragment exhibited autophosphorylation at pY1, pY1a, and pY4. Both the 85- and 70-kDa fragments phosphorylated tyrosine residues in a synthetic decapeptide that has the sequence of the C-terminal domain of the ..beta..-subunit of human insulin rare in the receptor.

  19. Dynamics of the Tec-family tyrosine kinase SH3 domains.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Justin M; Tarafdar, Sreya; Joseph, Raji E; Andreotti, Amy H; Smithgall, Thomas E; Engen, John R; Wales, Thomas E

    2016-04-01

    The Src Homology 3 (SH3) domain is an important regulatory domain found in many signaling proteins. X-ray crystallography and NMR structures of SH3 domains are generally conserved but other studies indicate that protein flexibility and dynamics are not. We previously reported that based on hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HX MS) studies, there is variable flexibility and dynamics among the SH3 domains of the Src-family tyrosine kinases and related proteins. Here we have extended our studies to the SH3 domains of the Tec family tyrosine kinases (Itk, Btk, Tec, Txk, Bmx). The SH3 domains of members of this family augment the variety in dynamics observed in previous SH3 domains. Txk and Bmx SH3 were found to be highly dynamic in solution by HX MS and Bmx was unstructured by NMR. Itk and Btk SH3 underwent a clear EX1 cooperative unfolding event, which was localized using pepsin digestion and mass spectrometry after hydrogen exchange labeling. The unfolding was localized to peptide regions that had been previously identified in the Src-family and related protein SH3 domains, yet the kinetics of unfolding were not. Sequence alignment does not provide an easy explanation for the observed dynamics behavior, yet the similarity of location of EX1 unfolding suggests that higher-order structural properties may play a role. While the exact reason for such dynamics is not clear, such motions can be exploited in intra- and intermolecular binding assays of proteins containing the domains. PMID:26808198

  20. Whole Genome Duplications Shaped the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Repertoire of Jawed Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Frédéric G; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Schartl, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) gene family, involved primarily in cell growth and differentiation, comprises proteins with a common enzymatic tyrosine kinase intracellular domain adjacent to a transmembrane region. The amino-terminal portion of RTKs is extracellular and made of different domains, the combination of which characterizes each of the 20 RTK subfamilies among mammals. We analyzed a total of 7,376 RTK sequences among 143 vertebrate species to provide here the first comprehensive census of the jawed vertebrate repertoire. We ascertained the 58 genes previously described in the human and mouse genomes and established their phylogenetic relationships. We also identified five additional RTKs amounting to a total of 63 genes in jawed vertebrates. We found that the vertebrate RTK gene family has been shaped by the two successive rounds of whole genome duplications (WGD) called 1R and 2R (1R/2R) that occurred at the base of the vertebrates. In addition, the Vegfr and Ephrin receptor subfamilies were expanded by single gene duplications. In teleost fish, 23 additional RTK genes have been retained after another expansion through the fish-specific third round (3R) of WGD. Several lineage-specific gene losses were observed. For instance, birds have lost three RTKs, and different genes are missing in several fish sublineages. The RTK gene family presents an unusual high gene retention rate from the vertebrate WGDs (58.75% after 1R/2R, 64.4% after 3R), resulting in an expansion that might be correlated with the evolution of complexity of vertebrate cellular communication and intracellular signaling. PMID:27260203

  1. A novel protein isoform of the RON tyrosine kinase receptor transforms human pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chakedis, Jeffery; French, Randall; Babicky, Michele; Jaquish, Dawn; Howard, Haleigh; Mose, Evangeline; Lam, Raymond; Holman, Patrick; Miyamoto, Jaclyn; Walterscheid, Zakk; Lowy, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    The MST1R gene is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer producing elevated levels of the RON tyrosine kinase receptor protein. While mutations in MST1R are rare, alternative splice variants have been previously reported in epithelial cancers. We report the discovery of a novel RON isoform discovered in human pancreatic cancer. Partial splicing of exons 5 and 6 (P5P6) produces a RON isoform that lacks the first extracellular immunoglobulin-plexin-transcription (IPT) domain. The splice variant is detected in 73% of pancreatic adenocarcinoma patient derived xenografts and 71% of pancreatic cancer cell lines. Peptides specific to RON P5P6 detected in human pancreatic cancer specimens by mass spectrometry confirms translation of the protein isoform. The P5P6 isoform is found to be constitutively phosphorylated, present in the cytoplasm, and it traffics to the plasma membrane. Expression of P5P6 in immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cells activates downstream AKT, and in human pancreatic epithelial nestin-expressing (HPNE) cells activates both the AKT and MAPK pathways. Inhibiting RON P5P6 in HPDE cells using a small molecule inhibitor BMS-777607 blocked constitutive activation and decreased AKT signaling. P5P6 transforms NIH3T3 cells and induces tumorigenicity in HPDE cells. Resultant HPDE-P5P6 tumors develop a dense stromal compartment similar to that seen in pancreatic cancer. In summary, we have identified a novel and constitutively active isoform of the RON tyrosine kinase receptor that has transforming activity and is expressed in human pancreatic cancer. These findings provide additional insight into the biology of the RON receptor in pancreatic cancer and are clinically relevant to the study of RON as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26477314

  2. A novel protein isoform of the RON tyrosine kinase receptor transforms human pancreatic duct epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chakedis, J; French, R; Babicky, M; Jaquish, D; Howard, H; Mose, E; Lam, R; Holman, P; Miyamoto, J; Walterscheid, Z; Lowy, A M

    2016-06-23

    The MST1R gene is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer producing elevated levels of the RON tyrosine kinase receptor protein. While mutations in MST1R are rare, alternative splice variants have been previously reported in epithelial cancers. We report the discovery of a novel RON isoform discovered in human pancreatic cancer. Partial splicing of exons 5 and 6 (P5P6) produces a RON isoform that lacks the first extracellular immunoglobulin-plexin-transcription domain. The splice variant is detected in 73% of xenografts derived from pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients and 71% of pancreatic cancer cell lines. Peptides specific to RON P5P6 detected in human pancreatic cancer specimens by mass spectrometry confirm translation of the protein isoform. The P5P6 isoform is found to be constitutively phosphorylated, present in the cytoplasm, and it traffics to the plasma membrane. Expression of P5P6 in immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cells activates downstream AKT, and in human pancreatic epithelial nestin-expressing cells, activates both the AKT and MAPK pathways. Inhibiting RON P5P6 in HPDE cells using a small molecule inhibitor BMS-777607 blocked constitutive activation and decreased AKT signaling. P5P6 transforms NIH3T3 cells and induces tumorigenicity in HPDE cells. Resultant HPDE-P5P6 tumors develop a dense stromal compartment similar to that seen in pancreatic cancer. In summary, we have identified a novel and constitutively active isoform of the RON tyrosine kinase receptor that has transforming activity and is expressed in human pancreatic cancer. These findings provide additional insight into the biology of the RON receptor in pancreatic cancer and are clinically relevant to the study of RON as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26477314

  3. The receptor tyrosine kinase EphB2 promotes hepatic fibrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mimche, Patrice N.; Brady, Lauren M.; Bray, Christian F.; Mimche, Sylvie M.; Thapa, Manoj; King, Thayer P.; Quicke, Kendra; McDermott, Courtney D.; Lee, Choon M.; Grakoui, Arash; Morgan, Edward T.; Lamb, Tracey J.

    2015-01-01

    Beyond the well-defined role of the Eph receptor tyrosine kinases in developmental processes, cell motility, cell trafficking/adhesion and cancer, nothing is known about their involvement in liver pathologies. During blood-stage rodent malaria infection we have found that EphB2 transcripts and proteins were upregulated in the liver, a result likely driven by elevated surface expression on immune cells including macrophages. This was significant for malaria pathogenesis because EphB2−/− mice were protected from malaria-induced liver fibrosis despite having a similar liver parasite burden compared with littermate control mice. This protection was correlated with a defect in the inflammatory potential of hepatocytes from EphB2−/− mice resulting in a reduction in adhesion molecules, chemokines/chemokines receptors RNA levels and infiltration of leukocytes including macrophages/Kupffer cells which mediate liver fibrosis during rodent malaria infections. These observations are recapitulated in the well-established carbon tetrachloride (CCL4) model of liver fibrosis in which EphB2−/− CCL4-treated mice showed a significant reduction of liver fibrosis compared to CCL4-treated littermate mice. Depletion of macrophages by clodronate-liposome abrogates liver EphB2 mRNA and proteins up-regulation and fibrosis in malaria-infected mice. Conclusion: During rodent malaria, EphB2 expression promotes malaria-associated liver fibrosis. To our knowledge, our data is the first to reveal the implication of the EphB family of receptor tyrosine kinases in liver fibrosis or in the pathogenesis of malaria infection. PMID:25784101

  4. Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemia stem cells in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs), which constitute a minority of the tumor bulk, are functionally defined on the basis of their ability to transfer leukemia into an immunodeficient recipient animal. The presence of LSCs has been demonstrated in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), of which ALL with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+). The use of imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), as part of front-line treatment and in combination with cytotoxic agents, has greatly improved the proportions of complete response and molecular remission and the overall outcome in adults with newly diagnosed Ph+ ALL. New challenges have emerged with respect to induction of resistance to imatinib via Abelson tyrosine kinase mutations. An important recent addition to the arsenal against Ph+ leukemias in general was the development of novel TKIs, such as nilotinib and dasatinib. However, in vitro experiments have suggested that TKIs have an antiproliferative but not an antiapoptotic or cytotoxic effect on the most primitive ALL stem cells. None of the TKIs in clinical use target the LSC. Second generation TKI dasatinib has been shown to have a more profound effect on the stem cell compartment but the drug was still unable to kill the most primitive LSCs. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) remains the only curative treatment available for these patients. Several mechanisms were proposed to explain the resistance of LSCs to TKIs in addition to mutations. Hence, TKIs may be used as a bridge to SCT rather than monotherapy or combination with standard chemotherapy. Better understanding the biology of Ph+ ALL will open new avenues for effective management. In this review, we highlight recent findings relating to the question of LSCs in Ph+ ALL. PMID:22993661

  5. Suppression of VEGF-induced angiogenesis by the protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, lavendustin A.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, D E; Fan, T P

    1995-01-01

    1. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a heparin-binding angiogenic factor which specifically acts on endothelial cells via distinct membrane-spanning tyrosine kinase receptors. Here we used the rat sponge implant model to test the hypothesis that the angiogenic activity of VEGF can be suppressed by protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitors. 2. Neovascular responses in subcutaneous sponge implants were determined by measurements of relative sponge blood flow by use of a 133Xe clearance technique, and confirmed by histological studies and morphometric analysis. 3. Daily local administration of 250 ng VEGF165 accelerated the rate of 133Xe clearance from the sponges and induced an intense neovascularisation. This VEGF165-induced angiogenesis was inhibited by daily co-administration of the selective PTK inhibitor, lavendustin A (10 micrograms), but not its negative control, lavendustin B (10 micrograms). Blood flow measurements and morphometric analysis of 8-day-old sponges showed that lavendustin A reduced the 133Xe clearance of VEGF165-treated sponges from 32.9 +/- 1.5% to 20.9 +/- 1.6% and the total fibrovascular growth area from 62.4 +/- 6.1% to 21.6 +/- 6.8% (n = 12, P < 0.05). 4. Co-injection of suramin (3 mg), an inhibitor of heparin-binding growth factors, also suppressed the VEGF165-elicited neovascular response. In contrast, neither lavendustin A nor suramin produced any effect on the basal sponge-induced angiogenesis. 5. When given alone, low doses of VEGF165 (25 ng) or basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF; 10 ng) did not modify the basal sponge-induced neovascularisation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 2 Figure 2 PMID:7533611

  6. Aberrant Mer receptor tyrosine kinase expression contributes to leukemogenesis in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee-Sherick, A B; Eisenman, K M; Sather, S; McGranahan, A; Armistead, P M; McGary, C S; Hunsucker, S A; Schlegel, J; Martinson, H; Cannon, C; Keating, A K; Earp, H S; Liang, X; DeRyckere, D; Graham, D K

    2013-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) continues to be extremely difficult to treat successfully, and the unacceptably low overall survival rates mandate that we assess new potential therapies to ameliorate poor clinical response to conventional therapy. Abnormal tyrosine kinase activation in AML has been associated with poor prognosis and provides strategic targets for novel therapy development. We found that Mer receptor tyrosine kinase was over-expressed in a majority of pediatric (29/36, 80%) and adult (10/10, 100%) primary AML patient blasts at the time of diagnosis, and 100% of patient samples at the time of relapse. Mer was also found to be expressed in 12 of 14 AML cell lines (86%). In contrast, normal bone marrow myeloid precursors expressed little to no Mer. Following AML cell line stimulation with Gas6, a Mer ligand, we observed activation of prosurvival and proliferative signaling pathways, including phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, MSK1, CREB, ATF1, AKT and STAT6. To assess the phenotypic role of Mer in AML, two independent short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) constructs were used to decrease Mer expression in the AML cell lines Nomo-1 and Kasumi-1. Reduction of Mer protein levels significantly increased rates of myeloblast apoptosis two to threefold in response to serum starvation. Furthermore, myeloblasts with knocked-down Mer demonstrated decreased colony formation by 67–87%, relative to control cell lines (P<0.01). NOD-SCID-gamma mice transplanted with Nomo-1 myeloblasts with reduced levels of Mer had a significant prolongation in survival compared with mice transplanted with the parental or control cell lines (median survival 17 days in parental and control cell lines, versus 32–36 days in Mer knockdown cell lines, P<0.0001). These data suggest a role for Mer in acute myeloid leukemogenesis and indicate that targeted inhibition of Mer may be an effective therapeutic strategy in pediatric and adult AML. PMID:23474756

  7. Aberrant Mer receptor tyrosine kinase expression contributes to leukemogenesis in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lee-Sherick, A B; Eisenman, K M; Sather, S; McGranahan, A; Armistead, P M; McGary, C S; Hunsucker, S A; Schlegel, J; Martinson, H; Cannon, C; Keating, A K; Earp, H S; Liang, X; DeRyckere, D; Graham, D K

    2013-11-14

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) continues to be extremely difficult to treat successfully, and the unacceptably low overall survival rates mandate that we assess new potential therapies to ameliorate poor clinical response to conventional therapy. Abnormal tyrosine kinase activation in AML has been associated with poor prognosis and provides strategic targets for novel therapy development. We found that Mer receptor tyrosine kinase was over-expressed in a majority of pediatric (29/36, 80%) and adult (10/10, 100%) primary AML patient blasts at the time of diagnosis, and 100% of patient samples at the time of relapse. Mer was also found to be expressed in 12 of 14 AML cell lines (86%). In contrast, normal bone marrow myeloid precursors expressed little to no Mer. Following AML cell line stimulation with Gas6, a Mer ligand, we observed activation of prosurvival and proliferative signaling pathways, including phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, MSK1, CREB, ATF1, AKT and STAT6. To assess the phenotypic role of Mer in AML, two independent short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) constructs were used to decrease Mer expression in the AML cell lines Nomo-1 and Kasumi-1. Reduction of Mer protein levels significantly increased rates of myeloblast apoptosis two to threefold in response to serum starvation. Furthermore, myeloblasts with knocked-down Mer demonstrated decreased colony formation by 67-87%, relative to control cell lines (P<0.01). NOD-SCID-gamma mice transplanted with Nomo-1 myeloblasts with reduced levels of Mer had a significant prolongation in survival compared with mice transplanted with the parental or control cell lines (median survival 17 days in parental and control cell lines, versus 32-36 days in Mer knockdown cell lines, P<0.0001). These data suggest a role for Mer in acute myeloid leukemogenesis and indicate that targeted inhibition of Mer may be an effective therapeutic strategy in pediatric and adult AML. PMID:23474756

  8. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Expression Predicts Response to Sunitinib in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Spanheimer, Philip M.; Lorenzen, Allison W.; De Andrade, James P.; Kulak, Mikhail V.; Carr, Jennifer C.; Woodfield, George W.; Sugg, Sonia L.; Weigel, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Preliminary data indicate that tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) function through rearranged during transfection (RET) in breast cancer. However, TKIs are not specific and can block several receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). This study used cell lines and primary breast cancer specimens to determine factors associated with TKI response. Methods Proliferation was assessed after short interfering RNA knockdown with or without sunitinib in breast cancer cell lines by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylhiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide). Breast cancer tissue and matched normal breast was obtained from 30 women with invasive breast carcinoma. Gene expression was assessed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Fresh tissue was treated in vitro with sunitinib or control media for 30 min, and response was assessed by phosphorylation-specific western blot. Results The RTKs including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR1-3), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFRa/b), and Kit were overexpressed in triple-negative breast tumors relative to HER2- and estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα)-positive tumors and normal breast tissue. Knockdown of EGFR reduced in vitro proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 but not in SKBR-3 or ZR-75-1 breast cancer cells. With the exception of RET, response to sunitinib was independent of RTK expression in all four cell lines. Both ERα-positive and low-EGFR-expressing tumors had an increased in vitro sunitinib response, as determined by alteration of Erk activation. Expression of other RTKs and additional clinical factors were not associated with response. Conclusion Triple-negative breast cancers overexpress RTKs but have decreased in vitro response to the TKI sunitinib. In addition to RET, TKIs that block EGFR may increase the therapeutic efficacy of TKIs in breast cancer. PMID:25971960

  9. Effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors on the contractility of rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Toma, C; Jensen, P E; Prieto, D; Hughes, A; Mulvany, M J; Aalkjaer, C

    1995-01-01

    1. A pharmacological characterization of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) belonging to two distinct groups (competitors at the ATP-binding site and the substrate-binding site, respectively) was performed, based on their effects on the contractility of rat mesenteric arteries. 2. Both the ATP-site competitors (genistein and its inactive analogue, daidzein) and the substrate-site competitors (tyrphostins A-23, A-47 and the inactive analogue, A-1) reversibly inhibited noradrenaline (NA, (10 microM)) and KCl (125 mM) induced contractions, concentration-dependently. Genistein was slightly but significantly more potent than daidzein; the tyrphostins were all less potent than genistein, and there were no significant differences between the individual potencies. The tyrosine kinase substrate-site inhibitor bis-tyrphostin had no inhibitory effect. 3. Genistein, daidzein, A-23 and A-47 each suppressed the contraction induced by Ca2+ (1 microM) in alpha-toxin permeabilized arteries. A-1 and bis-tyrphostin had little or no effect on contraction of the permeabilized arteries. 4. Genistein was significantly more potent than daidzein with respect to inhibition of the contraction induced by 200 nM Ca2+ in the presence of NA (100 microM) and GTP (3 microM). The effect of A-23, A-47, A-1 and bis-tyrphostin was similar in permeabilized arteries activated with Ca2+ (200 nM) + NA (100 microM) + GTP (3 microM) and permeabilized arteries activated with 1 microM Ca2+.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7620718

  10. FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) inhibitors: Molecular docking and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Mashkani, Baratali; Tanipour, Mohammad Hossein; Saadatmandzadeh, Mohammad; Ashman, Leonie K; Griffith, Renate

    2016-04-01

    Activating mutations in FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) occur in 25% of acute lymphoid and 30% of acute myeloid leukaemia cases. Therefore, FLT3 is a potential therapeutic target for small molecule kinase inhibitors. In this study, protein-ligand interactions between FLT3 and kinase inhibitors (CEP701, PKC412, sunitinib, imatinib and dasatinib) were obtained through homology modelling and molecular docking. A cellular system for experimental testing of the inhibitors was also established by expressing wildtype and internal tandem duplication mutant FLT3 (FLT3-WT and FLT3-ITD) in FDC-P1 cells. Imatinib and dasatinib could not be docked into any of the FLT3 models, consistent with their lack of activity in the experimental assays. CEP701, PKC412 and sunitinib interacted with the ATP-binding pocket of FLT3, forming H-bonds with Cys694 and Glu692. Based on the EC50 values in the cell proliferation assay, CEP701 was the most potent inhibitor; sunitinib and PKC412 were ranked second and third, respectively. Sunitinib was the most selective inhibitor, followed by PKC421 and CEP701. The potency of sunitinib and to a lesser extent CEP701 in inhibition of FLT3 autophosphorylation was lower than the cell proliferation inhibition, indicating that inhibition of FLT3 downstream proteins may contribute to the cellular effects. It was shown in this study that the docking procedure was able to differentiate FLT3 inhibitors from ineffective compounds. Additionally, interaction with the phosphate binding region in the ATP-binding pocket increased potency at the cost of selectivity. These findings can be applied in designing highly effective and selective inhibitors for FLT3 and other related kinases. PMID:26896780

  11. Regulation of the human WEE1Hu CDK tyrosine 15-kinase during the cell cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, N; Broome, M; Hunter, T

    1995-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are negatively regulated by phosphorylation on threonine 14 (T14) and tyrosine 15 (Y15). In fission yeast, the Wee1 and mitosis inhibitory kinase 1 (Mik1) protein kinases phosphorylate Y15 in Cdc2. WEE1Hu is the only known protein kinase that can carry out this inhibitory phosphorylation on Y15 in higher eukaryotes. In the present study, we examined the endogenous products of WEE1Hu in human cells and found that the original WEE1Hu cDNA lacked 214 amino acids at the N-terminus. The predicted full-length protein has weak, but significant, similarity over its entire length with Mik1. Thus, we suggest that 'WEE1Hu' is a Mik1-related protein rather than a Wee1 homologue. When isolated in immunoprecipitates, the endogenous WEE1Hu phosphorylated several cyclin-associated CDKs on Y15. WEE1Hu activity increased during S and G2 phases in parallel with the level of protein. Its activity decreased at M phase when WEE1Hu became transiently hyperphosphorylated. In addition, a decrease in WEE1Hu protein level was observed at M/G1 phase. Apparently, the hyperphosphorylation and degradation in combination caused inactivation of WEE1Hu at M phase and the following G1 phase. These results suggest that the activity of WEE1Hu is regulated by phosphorylation and proteolytic degradation, and that WEE1Hu plays a role in inhibiting mitosis before M phase by phosphorylating cyclin B1-Cdc2. Images PMID:7743995

  12. Development of Specific, Irreversible Inhibitors for a Receptor Tyrosine Kinase EphB3.

    PubMed

    Kung, Alvin; Chen, Ying-Chu; Schimpl, Marianne; Ni, Feng; Zhu, Jianfa; Turner, Maurice; Molina, Henrik; Overman, Ross; Zhang, Chao

    2016-08-24

    Erythropoietin-producing human hepatocellular carcinoma (Eph) receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate a variety of dynamic cellular events, including cell protrusion, migration, proliferation, and cell-fate determination. Small-molecule inhibitors of Eph kinases are valuable tools for dissecting the physiological and pathological roles of Eph. However, there is a lack of small-molecule inhibitors that are selective for individual Eph isoforms due to the high homology within the family. Herein, we report the development of the first potent and specific inhibitors of a single Eph isoform, EphB3. Through structural bioinformatic analysis, we identified a cysteine in the hinge region of the EphB3 kinase domain, a feature that is not shared with any other human kinases. We synthesized and characterized a series of electrophilic quinazolines to target this unique, reactive feature in EphB3. Some of the electrophilic quinazolines selectively and potently inhibited EphB3 both in vitro and in cells. Cocrystal structures of EphB3 in complex with two quinazolines confirmed the covalent linkage between the protein and the inhibitors. A "clickable" version of an optimized inhibitor was created and employed to verify specific target engagement in the whole proteome and to probe the extent and kinetics of target engagement of existing EphB3 inhibitors. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the autophosphorylation of EphB3 within the juxtamembrane region occurs in trans using a specific inhibitor. These exquisitely specific inhibitors will facilitate the dissection of EphB3's role in various biological processes and disease contribution. PMID:27478969

  13. Casein kinase 2 dependent phosphorylation of neprilysin regulates receptor tyrosine kinase signaling to Akt.

    PubMed

    Siepmann, Martin; Kumar, Sathish; Mayer, Günter; Walter, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    Neprilysin (NEP) is a type II membrane metalloproteinase that cleaves physiologically active peptides at the cell surface thus regulating the local concentration of these peptides available for receptor binding and signal transduction. In addition, the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain of NEP interacts with the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) thereby regulating intracellular signaling via Akt. Thus, NEP serves dual functions in extracellular and intracellular signal transduction. Here, we show that NEP undergoes phosphorylation at serine residue 6 within the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain. In vitro and cell culture experiments demonstrate that Ser 6 is efficiently phosphorylated by protein kinase CK2. The phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain of NEP inhibits its interaction with PTEN. Interestingly, expression of a pseudophosphorylated NEP variant (Ser6Asp) abrogates the inhibitory effect of NEP on insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) stimulated activation of Akt. Thus, our data demonstrate a regulatory role of CK2 in the interaction of NEP with PTEN and insulin/IGF-1 signaling. PMID:20957047

  14. Antitumor Effect of the Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Nilotinib on Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) and Imatinib-Resistant GIST Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sako, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Saikawa, Yoshiro; Nakamura, Rieko; Takahashi, Tsunehiro; Wada, Norihito; Kawakubo, Hirohumi; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Ohmori, Tai; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    Despite the benefits of imatinib for treating gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), the prognosis for high risk GIST and imatinib-resistant (IR) GIST remains poor. The mechanisms of imatinib resistance have not yet been fully clarified. The aim of the study was to establish imatinib-resistant cell lines and investigate nilotinib, a second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), in preclinical models of GIST and imatinib-resistant GIST. For a model of imatinib-resistant GIST, we generated resistant cells from GK1C and GK3C cell lines by exposing them to imatinib for 6 months. The parent cell lines GK1C and GK3C showed imatinib sensitivity with IC50 of 4.59±0.97 µM and 11.15±1.48 µM, respectively. The imatinib-resistant cell lines GK1C-IR and GK3C-IR showed imatinib resistance with IC50 values of 11.74±0.17 µM (P<0.001) and 41.37±1.07 µM (P<0.001), respectively. The phosphorylation status of key cell signaling pathways, receptor tyrosine kinase KIT (CD117), platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) and downstream signaling kinases: serine-threonine kinase Akt (AKT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) or the non-receptor tyrosine kinase: proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase Src (SRC), was analyzed in established cell lines and ERK1/2 phosphorylation was found to be increased compared to the parental cells. Nilotinib demonstrated significant antitumor efficacy against GIST xenograft lines and imatinib-resistant GIST cell lines. Thus, nilotinib may have clinical potential for patients with GIST or imatinib-resistant GIST. PMID:25221952

  15. Activated type I TGFbeta receptor (Alk5) kinase confers enhancedsurvival to mammary epithelial cells and accelerates mammary tumorprogression

    SciTech Connect

    Muraoka-Cook, Rebecca S.; Shin, Incheol; Yi, Jae Youn; Easterly,Evangeline; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Yingling, Jonathan M.; Zent, Roy; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2005-01-02

    The transforming growth factor-betas (TGF{beta}s) are members of a large superfamily of pleiotropic cytokines that also includes the activins and the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Members of the TGF{beta} family regulate complex physiological processes such cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, motility, and cell death, among others (Massague, 1998). Dysregulation of TGF{beta} signaling contributes to several pathological processes including cancer, fibrosis, and auto-immune disorders (Massague et al., 2000). The TGF{beta}s elicit their biological effects by binding to type II and type I transmembrane receptor serine-threonine kinases (T{beta}RII and T{beta}RI) which, in turn, phosphorylated Smad 2 and Smad 3. Phosphorylated Smad 2/3 associate with Smad 4 and, as a heteromeric complex, translocate to the nucleus where they regulate gene transcription. The inhibitory Smad7 down regulates TGF{beta} signaling by binding to activated T{beta}RI and interfering with its ability to phosphorylate Smad 2/3 (Derynck and Zhang, 2003; Shi and Massague, 2003). Signaling is also regulated by Smad proteolysis. TGF{beta} receptor-mediated activation results in multi-ubiquitination of Smad 2 in the nucleus and subsequent degradation of Smad 2 by the proteasome (Lo and Massague, 1999). Activation of TGF{beta} receptors also induces mobilization of a Smad 7-Smurf complex from the nucleus to the cytoplasm; this complex recognizes the activated receptors and mediates their ubiquitination and internalization via caveolin-rich vesicles, leading to termination of TGF{beta} signaling (Di Guglielmo et al., 2003). Other signal transducers/pathways have been implicated in TGF{beta} actions. These include the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (Jnk), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), protein phosphatase PP2A, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), and the family of Rho GTPases [reviewed in

  16. Identification of tyrosines 154 and 307 in the extracellular domain and 653 and 766 in the intracellular domain as phosphorylation sites in the heparin-binding fibroblast growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (flg).

    PubMed Central

    Hou, J.; McKeehan, K.; Kan, M.; Carr, S. A.; Huddleston, M. J.; Crabb, J. W.; McKeehan, W. L.

    1993-01-01

    Four tyrosine residues have been identified as phosphorylation sites in the tyrosine kinase isoform of the heparin-binding fibroblast growth factor receptor flg (FGF-R1). Baculoviral-insect cell-derived recombinant FGF-R1 was phosphorylated and fragmented with trypsin while immobilized on heparin-agarose beads. Phosphotyrosine peptides were purified by chromatography on immobilized anti-phosphotyrosine antibody and analyzed by Edman degradation and electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Tyrosine residue 653, which is in a homologous spatial position to major autophosphorylation sites in the catalytic domain of the src and insulin receptor kinases, is the major intracellular FGF-R1 phosphorylation site. Residue 766 in the COOH-terminus outside the kinase domain is a secondary site. Tyrosine residues 154 and 307, which are in the extracellular domain of transmembrane receptor isoforms and are in an unusual sequence context for tyrosine phosphorylation, were also phosphorylated. PMID:8443592

  17. A point mutation at tyrosine-809 in the human colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor impairs mitogenesis without abrogating tyrosine kinase activity, association with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, or induction of c-fos and junB genes

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel, M.F. ); Shurtleff, S.A.; Downing, J.R. ); Sherr, C.J. Saint Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN )

    1990-09-01

    Substitution of phenylalanine for tyrosine-809 in the human colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) inhibited its ability to transduce ligand-dependent mitogenic signals in mouse NIH 3T3 cells. When combined with an activating mutation at codon 301 that induces constitutive CSF-1R tyrosine kinase activity, the codon 809 mutation suppressed ligand-independent cell transformation. Comparative mapping tryptic phosphopeptides from mutant and wild-type CSF-1R indicated that tyrosine-809 is a site of ligand-dependent receptor phosphorylation in vivo. The mutant receptor was active as a tyrosine kinase in vitro and in vivo, underwent CSF-1-dependent association with a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and induced expression of the protooncogenes c-fos and junB, underscoring its ability to trigger some of the known cellular responses to CSF-1. The mutant receptor is likely to be impaired in its ability to interact with critical cellular effectors whose activity is required for mitogenesis.

  18. Downregulation of the Ras–Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway by the EphB2 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Is Required for Ephrin-Induced Neurite Retraction

    PubMed Central

    Elowe, Sabine; Holland, Sacha J.; Kulkarni, Sarang; Pawson, Tony

    2001-01-01

    Activation of the EphB2 receptor tyrosine kinase by clustered ephrin-B1 induces growth cone collapse and neurite retraction in differentiated NG108 neuronal cells. We have investigated the cytoplasmic signaling events associated with EphB2-induced cytoskeletal reorganization in these neuronal cells. We find that unlike other receptor tyrosine kinases, EphB2 induces a pronounced downregulation of GTP-bound Ras and consequently of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. A similar inhibition of the Ras-MAPK pathway was observed on stimulation of endogenous EphB2 in COS-1 cells. Inactivation of Ras, induced by ephrin B1 stimulation of NG108 neuronal cells, requires EphB2 tyrosine kinase activity and is blocked by a truncated form of p120-Ras GTPase-activating protein (p120-RasGAP), suggesting that EphB2 signals through the SH2 domain protein p120-RasGAP to inhibit the Ras-MAPK pathway. Suppression of Ras activity appears functionally important, since expression of a constitutively active variant of Ras impaired the ability of EphB2 to induce neurite retraction. In addition, EphB2 attenuated the elevation in ERK activation induced by attachment of NG108 cells to fibronectin, indicating that the EphB2 receptor can modulate integrin signaling to the Ras GTPase. These results suggest that a primary function of EphB2, a member of the most populous family of receptor tyrosine kinases, is to inactivate the Ras-MAPK pathway in a fashion that contributes to cytoskeletal reorganization and adhesion responses in neuronal growth cones. PMID:11585923

  19. Dialkoxyquinazolines: Screening Epidermal Growth Factor ReceptorTyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for Potential Tumor Imaging Probes

    SciTech Connect

    VanBrocklin, Henry F.; Lim, John K.; Coffing, Stephanie L.; Hom,Darren L.; Negash, Kitaw; Ono, Michele Y.; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Taylor,Scott E.; Vanderpoel, Jennifer L.; Slavik, Sarah M.; Morris, Andrew B.; Riese II, David J.

    2005-09-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a long-standingdrug development target, is also a desirable target for imaging. Sixteendialkoxyquinazoline analogs, suitable for labeling with positron-emittingisotopes, have been synthesized and evaluated in a battery of in vitroassays to ascertain their chemical and biological properties. Thesecharacteristics provided the basis for the adoption of a selection schemato identify lead molecules for labeling and in vivo evaluation. A newEGFR tyrosine kinase radiometric binding assay revealed that all of thecompounds possessed suitable affinity (IC50 = 0.4 - 51 nM) for the EGFRtyrosine kinase. All of the analogs inhibited ligand-induced EGFRtyrosine phosphorylation (IC50 = 0.8 - 20 nM). The HPLC-estimatedoctanol/water partition coefficients ranged from 2.0-5.5. Four compounds,4-(2'-fluoroanilino)- and 4-(3'-fluoroanilino)-6,7-diethoxyquinazoline aswell as 4-(3'-chloroanilino)- and4-(3'-bromoanilino)-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline, possess the bestcombination of characteristics that warrant radioisotope labeling andfurther evaluation in tumor-bearing mice.

  20. Deletion of the endothelial Bmx tyrosine kinase decreases tumor angiogenesis and growth.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, Tanja; López-Alpuche, Vanessa; Zheng, Wei; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Jones, Dennis; He, Yun; Tvorogov, Denis; D'Amico, Gabriela; Wiener, Zoltan; Andersson, Leif C; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Min, Wang; Alitalo, Kari

    2012-07-15

    Bmx, [corrected] also known as Etk, is a member of the Tec family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. Bmx is expressed mainly in arterial endothelia and in myeloid hematopoietic cells. Bmx regulates ischemia-mediated arteriogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, but its role in tumor angiogenesis is not known. In this study, we characterized the function of Bmx in tumor growth using both Bmx knockout and transgenic mice. Isogenic colon, lung, and melanoma tumor xenotransplants showed reductions in growth and tumor angiogenesis in Bmx gene-deleted ((-/-)) mice, whereas developmental angiogenesis was not affected. In addition, growth of transgenic pancreatic islet carcinomas and intestinal adenomas was also slower in Bmx(-/-) mice. Knockout mice showed high levels of Bmx expression in endothelial cells of tumor-associated and peritumoral arteries. Moreover, endothelial cells lacking Bmx showed impaired phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) upon VEGF stimulation, indicating that Bmx contributes to the transduction of vascular endothelial growth factor signals. In transgenic mice overexpressing Bmx in epidermal keratinocytes, tumors induced by a two-stage chemical skin carcinogenesis treatment showed increased growth and angiogenesis. Our findings therefore indicate that Bmx activity contributes to tumor angiogenesis and growth. PMID:22593188

  1. Novel Small Molecule Activators of the Trk Family of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Obianyo, Obiamaka; Ye, Keqiang

    2012-01-01

    The Tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) receptors are a subset of the receptor tyrosine kinase family with an important functionality in the regulation of neurotrophic signaling in the peripheral and central nervous system. As the receptors are able to mediate neuronal survival by associating with their respective neurotrophin ligands, many studies have focused on the therapeutic potential of generating small-molecule mimetic compounds that elicit agonistic effects similar to those of the natural protein ligands. To this end, various structure-based studies have led to the generation of bivalent peptide-based agonists and antibodies that selectively initiate Trk receptor signaling; however, these compounds do not possess the ideal characteristics of a potential drug. Additionally, the reliance of structure-based data to generate the compound libraries, limits the potential identification of novel chemical structures with desirable activity. Therefore, subsequent investigations utilized a cell-based apoptotic screen to facilitate the analysis of large, diverse chemical libraries of small molecules and quickly identify compounds with Trk-dependent antiapoptotic activity. Herein, we describe the Trk agonists that have been identified by this screening methodology and summarize their in vitro and in vivo neurotrophic activity as well as their efficacy in various neurological disease models, implicating their future utility as therapeutic compounds. PMID:22982231

  2. EGFRvIII-mediated transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases in glioma: mechanism and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Greenall, S A; Donoghue, J F; Van Sinderen, M; Dubljevic, V; Budiman, S; Devlin, M; Street, I; Adams, T E; Johns, T G

    2015-10-01

    A truncation mutant of the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFRvIII, is commonly expressed in glioma, an incurable brain cancer. EGFRvIII is tumorigenic, in part, through its transactivation of other receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Preventing the effects of this transactivation could form part of an effective therapy for glioma; however, the mechanism by which the transactivation occurs is unknown. Focusing on the RTK MET, we show that MET transactivation in U87MG human glioma cells in vitro is proportional to EGFRvIII activity and involves MET heterodimerization associated with a focal adhesion kinase (FAK) scaffold. The transactivation of certain other RTKs was, however, independent of FAK. Simultaneously targeting EGFRvIII (with panitumumab) and the transactivated RTKs themselves (with motesanib) in an intracranial mouse model of glioma resulted in significantly greater survival than with either agent alone, indicating that cotargeting these RTKs has potent antitumor efficacy and providing a strategy for treating EGFRvIII-expressing gliomas, which are usually refractory to treatment. PMID:25659577

  3. Are tyrosine kinase inhibitors promising for the treatment of systemic sclerosis and other fibrotic diseases?

    PubMed

    Beyer, Christian; Distler, Jörg H W; Distler, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Tissue fibrosis causes organ failure and death in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), but clearly effective anti-fibrotic therapies are not available. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib, which blocks the pro-fibrotic c-Abl kinase and PDGF receptor, is currently evaluated in clinical proof-of-concept trials for the treatment of patients with SSc. In experimental models, imatinib efficiently prevented and reduced tissue fibrosis. First clinical case studies demonstrated anti-fibrotic effects of imatinib in selected patients with SSc and other fibrotic diseases, and observational studies in sclerotic chronic graft-versus-host disease showed promising results. Besides imatinib, the two novel TKIs of c-Abl and PDGF receptor nilotinib and dasatinib have recently proven efficacy in experimental models of SSc. The potential of TKIs of the VEGF receptor (e.g., semaxinib, vatalanib, sutent, and sorafenib) and the EGF receptor (e.g., erlotinib, gefitinib, lapatinib, and canertinib) as anti-fibrotic treatments are also discussed in this review. Prior to clinical use, however, controlled trials need to address efficacy as well as tolerability of TKIs in patients with different fibrotic diseases. PMID:20419513

  4. JAK2 inhibition sensitizes resistant EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma to tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Sizhi P.; Chang, Qing; Mao, Ninghui; Daly, Laura A.; Vogel, Robert; Chan, Tyler; Liu, Shu Hui; Bournazou, Eirini; Schori, Erez; Zhang, Haiying; Brewer, Monica Red; Pao, William; Morris, Luc; Ladanyi, Marc; Arcila, Maria; Manova-Todorova, Katia; de Stanchina, Elisa; Norton, Larry; Levine, Ross L.; Altan-Bonnet, Gregoire; Solit, David; Zinda, Michael; Huszar, Dennis; Lyden, David; Bromberg, Jacqueline F.

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinomas with mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) respond to EGFR-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), but resistance invariably occurs. We found that the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transduction and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway was aberrantly increased in TKI-resistant EGFR-mutant non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. JAK2 inhibition restored sensitivity to the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib in TKI-resistant cell lines and xenograft models of EGFR-mutant TKI-resistant lung cancer. JAK2 inhibition uncoupled EGFR from its negative regulator, suppressor of cytokine signaling 5 (SOCS5), consequently increasing EGFR abundance and restoring the tumor cells’ dependence on EGFR signaling. Furthermore, JAK2 inhibition led to heterodimerization of mutant and wild-type EGFR subunits, the activity of which was then blocked by TKIs. Our results reveal a mechanism whereby JAK2 inhibition overcomes acquired resistance to EGFR inhibitors and support the use of combination therapy with JAK and EGFR inhibitors for the treatment of EGFR-dependent NSCLC. PMID:27025877

  5. Lemur Tyrosine Kinase 2, a novel target in prostate cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kalpit; Bradbury, Neil A

    2015-06-10

    Progression from early forms of prostate cancer to castration-resistant disease is associated with an increase in signal transduction activity. The majority of castration-resistance cancers persist in the expression of the androgen receptor (AR), as well as androgen-dependent genes. The AR is regulated not only by it associated steroid hormone, but also by manifold regulatory and signaling molecules, including several kinases. We undertook evaluation of the role of Lemur Tyrosine Kinase 2 (LMTK2) in modulating AR activity, as several Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have shown a marked association of LMTK2 activity with the development of prostate cancer. We confirm that not only is LMTK2 mRNA reduced in prostate cancer tissue, but also LMTK2 protein levels are markedly diminished. Knockdown of LMTK2 protein in prostate cell lines greatly increased the transcription of androgen-responsive genes. In addition, LMTK2 knockdown led to an increase in prostate cancer stem cell populations in LNCaP cells, indicative of increased tumorogenicity. Using multiple approaches, we also demonstrate that LMTK2 interacts with the AR, thus putting LMTK2 as a component of a signaling complex modulating AR activity. Our finding that LMTK2 is a negative regulator of AR activity defines a novel cellular pathway for activation of AR-responsive genes in castrate resistant-prostate cancer. Moreover, pharmacologic manipulation of LMTK2 activity will provide a novel therapeutic target for more effective treatments for patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:26008968

  6. Receptor tyrosine kinase expression of circulating tumor cells in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Gerhard; Rath, Barbara; Klameth, Lukas; Hochmair, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has a poor prognosis and is found disseminated at first presentation in the majority of cases. The cell biological mechanisms underlying metastasis and drug resistance are not clear. SCLC is characterized by high numbers of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and we were able to expand several CTC lines ex vivo and to relate chitinase-3-like-1/YKL-40 (CHI3L1) as marker. Availability of expanded SCLC CTC cells allowed for a screening of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) expressed. The metastatic CHI3L1-negative SCLC cell line SCLC26A, established from a pleural effusion was used for comparison. The CTC cell line BHGc10 was found to exhibit increased expression of RYK, AXL, Tie-1, Dtk, ROR1/2, several ephrins (Eph) and FGF/EGF receptors compared to SCLC26A. All of these RTKs have been associated with cell motility, invasion and poor prognosis in diverse cancer entities without knowledge of their association with CTCs. The identification of RYK, AXL and ROR1/2 as pseudokinases, lacking activity, seems to be related to the observed failure of RTK inhibitors in SCLC. These kinases are involved in the noncanonical WNT pathway and their expression in SCLC CTCs represents a cancer stem cell-like phenotype. PMID:26328272

  7. Clinical pharmacology of tyrosine kinase inhibitors becoming generic drugs: the regulatory perspective

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, billions have been spent and huge efforts have been taken in basic and clinical cancer research [CA Cancer J Clin 63: 11-30]. About a decade ago, the arms race between drugs and cancer cells reached a new level by introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) into pharmacological anti-cancer therapy. According to their molecular mechanism of action, TKI in contrast to so-called “classic” or “conventional” cytostatics belong to the group of targeted cancer medicines, characterized by accurately fitting with biological structures (i.e. active centers of kinases). Numerous (partly orphan) indications are covered by this new class of substances. Approximately ten years after the first substances of this class of medicines were authorized, patent protection will end within the next years. The following article covers clinical meaning and regulatory status of anti-cancer TKI and gives an outlook to what is expected from the introduction of generic anti-cancer TKI. PMID:24502453

  8. Dopamine agonists rescue Aβ-induced LTP impairment by Src-family tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Yuan Xiang, PingAn; Janc, Oliwia; Grochowska, Katarzyna M; Kreutz, Michael R; Reymann, Klaus G

    2016-04-01

    Soluble forms of oligomeric amyloid beta (AβO) are involved in the loss of synaptic plasticity and memory, especially in early phases of Alzheimer's disease. Stimulation of dopamine D1/D5 receptors (D1R/D5R) is known to increase surface expression of synaptic α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate subtype glutamate and N-methyl-D-aspartate subtype glutamate receptors and facilitates the induction of the late phase of long-term potentiation (LTP), probably via a related mechanism. In this study, we show that the D1/D5R agonist SKF38393 protects LTP of hippocampal CA1 synapses from the deleterious action of oligomeric amyloid beta. Unexpectedly, the D1R/D5R-mediated recovery of LTP is independent of protein kinase A or phospholipase C pathways. Instead, we found that the inhibition of Src-family tyrosine kinases completely abolished the protective effects of D1R/D5R stimulation in a cellular model of learning and memory. PMID:26973108

  9. Characterization of interactions and pharmacophore development for DFG-out inhibitors to RET tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunxia; Grøtli, Morten; Eriksson, Leif A

    2015-07-01

    RET (rearranged during transfection) tyrosine kinase is a promising target for several human cancers. Abt-348, Birb-796, Motesanib and Sorafenib are DFG-out multi-kinase inhibitors that have been reported to inhibit RET activity with good IC50 values. Although the DFG-out conformation has attracted great interest in the design of type II inhibitors, the structural requirements for binding to the RET DFG-out conformation remains unclear. Herein, the DFG-out conformation of RET was determined by homology modelling, the four inhibitors were docked, and the binding modes investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. Binding free energies were calculated using the molecular mechanics/Poisson-Bolzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method. The trends in predicted binding free affinities correlated well with experimental data and were used to explain the activity difference of the studied inhibitors. Per-residue energy decomposition analyses provided further information on specific interaction properties. Finally, we also conducted a detailed e-pharmacophore modelling of the different RET-inhibitor complexes, explaining the common and specific pharmacophore features of the different complexes. The results reported herein will be useful in future rational design of novel DFG-out RET inhibitors. PMID:26044359

  10. JAK2 inhibition sensitizes resistant EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma to tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Sizhi P; Chang, Qing; Mao, Ninghui; Daly, Laura A; Vogel, Robert; Chan, Tyler; Liu, Shu Hui; Bournazou, Eirini; Schori, Erez; Zhang, Haiying; Red Brewer, Monica; Pao, William; Morris, Luc; Ladanyi, Marc; Arcila, Maria; Manova-Todorova, Katia; de Stanchina, Elisa; Norton, Larry; Levine, Ross L; Altan-Bonnet, Gregoire; Solit, David; Zinda, Michael; Huszar, Dennis; Lyden, David; Bromberg, Jacqueline F

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinomas with mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) respond to EGFR-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), but resistance invariably occurs. We found that the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transduction and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway was aberrantly increased in TKI-resistant EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. JAK2 inhibition restored sensitivity to the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib in TKI-resistant cell lines and xenograft models of EGFR-mutant TKI-resistant lung cancer. JAK2 inhibition uncoupled EGFR from its negative regulator, suppressor of cytokine signaling 5 (SOCS5), consequently increasing EGFR abundance and restoring the tumor cells' dependence on EGFR signaling. Furthermore, JAK2 inhibition led to heterodimerization of mutant and wild-type EGFR subunits, the activity of which was then blocked by TKIs. Our results reveal a mechanism whereby JAK2 inhibition overcomes acquired resistance to EGFR inhibitors and support the use of combination therapy with JAK and EGFR inhibitors for the treatment of EGFR-dependent NSCLC. PMID:27025877

  11. Imipramine protects retinal ganglion cells from oxidative stress through the tyrosine kinase receptor B signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ming-lei; Liu, Guo-hua; Guo, Jin; Yu, Shu-juan; Huang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration is irreversible in glaucoma and tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB)-associated signaling pathways have been implicated in the process. In this study, we attempted to examine whether imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant, may protect hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced RGC degeneration through the activation of the TrkB pathway in RGC-5 cell lines. RGC-5 cell lines were pre-treated with imipramine 30 minutes before exposure to H2O2. Western blot assay showed that in H2O2 -damaged RGC-5 cells, imipramine activated TrkB pathways through extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase/TrkB phosphorylation. TUNEL staining assay also demonstrated that imipramine ameliorated H2O2 -induced apoptosis in RGC-5 cells. Finally, TrkB-IgG intervention was able to reverse the protective effect of imipramine on H2O2 -induced RGC-5 apoptosis. Imipramine therefore protects RGCs from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through the TrkB signaling pathway. PMID:27127489

  12. Mer receptor tyrosine kinase mediates both tethering and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Dransfield, I; Zagórska, A; Lew, E D; Michail, K; Lemke, G

    2015-01-01

    Billions of inflammatory leukocytes die and are phagocytically cleared each day. This regular renewal facilitates the normal termination of inflammatory responses, suppressing pro-inflammatory mediators and inducing their anti-inflammatory counterparts. Here we investigate the role of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) Mer and its ligands Protein S and Gas6 in the initial recognition and capture of apoptotic cells (ACs) by macrophages. We demonstrate extremely rapid binding kinetics of both ligands to phosphatidylserine (PtdSer)-displaying ACs, and show that ACs can be co-opsonized with multiple PtdSer opsonins. We further show that macrophage phagocytosis of ACs opsonized with Mer ligands can occur independently of a requirement for αV integrins. Finally, we demonstrate a novel role for Mer in the tethering of ACs to the macrophage surface, and show that Mer-mediated tethering and subsequent AC engulfment can be distinguished by their requirement for Mer kinase activity. Our results identify Mer as a receptor uniquely capable of both tethering ACs to the macrophage surface and driving their subsequent internalization. PMID:25695599

  13. Gold nanoparticles enhance the effect of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in acute myeloid leukemia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Petrushev, Bobe; Boca, Sanda; Simon, Timea; Berce, Cristian; Frinc, Ioana; Dima, Delia; Selicean, Sonia; Gafencu, Grigore-Aristide; Tanase, Alina; Zdrenghea, Mihnea; Florea, Adrian; Suarasan, Sorina; Dima, Liana; Stanciu, Raluca; Jurj, Ancuta; Buzoianu, Anca; Cucuianu, Andrei; Astilean, Simion; Irimie, Alexandru; Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Every year, in Europe, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is diagnosed in thousands of adults. For most subtypes of AML, the backbone of treatment was introduced nearly 40 years ago as a combination of cytosine arabinoside with an anthracycline. This therapy is still the worldwide standard of care. Two-thirds of patients achieve complete remission, although most of them ultimately relapse. Since the FLT3 mutation is the most frequent, it serves as a key molecular target for tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) that inhibit FLT3 kinase. In this study, we report the conjugation of TKIs onto spherical gold nanoparticles. Materials and methods The internalization of TKI-nanocarriers was proved by the strongly scattered light from gold nanoparticles and was correlated with the results obtained by transmission electron microscopy and dark-field microscopy. The therapeutic effect of the newly designed drugs was investigated by several methods including cell counting assay as well as the MTT assay. Results We report the newly described bioconjugates to be superior when compared with the drug alone, with data confirmed by state-of-the-art analyses of internalization, cell biology, gene analysis for FLT3-IDT gene, and Western blotting to assess degradation of the FLT3 protein. Conclusion The effective transmembrane delivery and increased efficacy validate its use as a potential therapeutic. PMID:26929621

  14. Receptor tyrosine kinase (c-Kit) inhibitors: a potential therapeutic target in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour Babaei, Maryam; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Saleem, Mohammad; Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Ahmadipour, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    c-Kit, a receptor tyrosine kinase, is involved in intracellular signaling, and the mutated form of c-Kit plays a crucial role in occurrence of some cancers. The function of c-Kit has led to the concept that inhibiting c-Kit kinase activity can be a target for cancer therapy. The promising results of inhibition of c-Kit for treatment of cancers have been observed in some cancers such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor, acute myeloid leukemia, melanoma, and other tumors, and these results have encouraged attempts toward improvement of using c-Kit as a capable target for cancer therapy. This paper presents the findings of previous studies regarding c-Kit as a receptor tyrosine kinase and an oncogene, as well as its gene targets and signaling pathways in normal and cancer cells. The c-Kit gene location, protein structure, and the role of c-Kit in normal cell have been discussed. Comprehending the molecular mechanism underlying c-Kit-mediated tumorogenesis is consequently essential and may lead to the identification of future novel drug targets. The potential mechanisms by which c-Kit induces cellular transformation have been described. This study aims to elucidate the function of c-Kit for future cancer therapy. In addition, it has c-Kit inhibitor drug properties and their functions have been listed in tables and demonstrated in schematic pictures. This review also has collected previous studies that targeted c-Kit as a novel strategy for cancer therapy. This paper further emphasizes the advantages of this approach, as well as the limitations that must be addressed in the future. Finally, although c-Kit is an attractive target for cancer therapy, based on the outcomes of treatment of patients with c-Kit inhibitors, it is unlikely that Kit inhibitors alone can lead to cure. It seems that c-Kit mutations alone are not sufficient for tumorogenesis, but do play a crucial role in cancer occurrence. PMID:27536065

  15. Receptor tyrosine kinase (c-Kit) inhibitors: a potential therapeutic target in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbaspour Babaei, Maryam; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Saleem, Mohammad; Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Ahmadipour, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    c-Kit, a receptor tyrosine kinase, is involved in intracellular signaling, and the mutated form of c-Kit plays a crucial role in occurrence of some cancers. The function of c-Kit has led to the concept that inhibiting c-Kit kinase activity can be a target for cancer therapy. The promising results of inhibition of c-Kit for treatment of cancers have been observed in some cancers such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor, acute myeloid leukemia, melanoma, and other tumors, and these results have encouraged attempts toward improvement of using c-Kit as a capable target for cancer therapy. This paper presents the findings of previous studies regarding c-Kit as a receptor tyrosine kinase and an oncogene, as well as its gene targets and signaling pathways in normal and cancer cells. The c-Kit gene location, protein structure, and the role of c-Kit in normal cell have been discussed. Comprehending the molecular mechanism underlying c-Kit-mediated tumorogenesis is consequently essential and may lead to the identification of future novel drug targets. The potential mechanisms by which c-Kit induces cellular transformation have been described. This study aims to elucidate the function of c-Kit for future cancer therapy. In addition, it has c-Kit inhibitor drug properties and their functions have been listed in tables and demonstrated in schematic pictures. This review also has collected previous studies that targeted c-Kit as a novel strategy for cancer therapy. This paper further emphasizes the advantages of this approach, as well as the limitations that must be addressed in the future. Finally, although c-Kit is an attractive target for cancer therapy, based on the outcomes of treatment of patients with c-Kit inhibitors, it is unlikely that Kit inhibitors alone can lead to cure. It seems that c-Kit mutations alone are not sufficient for tumorogenesis, but do play a crucial role in cancer occurrence. PMID:27536065

  16. Tyrosines 868, 966, and 972 in the Kinase Domain of JAK2 Are Autophosphorylated and Required for Maximal JAK2 Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Argetsinger, Lawrence S.; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Robertson, Scott A.; Koleva, Rositsa I.; Cline, Joel M.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Myers, Martin G.; Carter-Su, Christin

    2010-01-01

    Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) is activated by a majority of cytokine family receptors including receptors for GH, leptin, and erythropoietin. To identify novel JAK2-regulatory and/or -binding sites, we set out to identify autophosphorylation sites in the kinase domain of JAK2. Two-dimensional phosphopeptide mapping of in vitro autophosphorylated JAK2 identified tyrosines 868, 966, and 972 as sites of autophosphorylation. Phosphorylated tyrosines 868 and 972 were also identified by mass spectrometry analysis of JAK2 activated by an erythropoietin-bound chimeric erythropoietin receptor/leptin receptor. Phosphospecific antibodies suggest that the phosphorylation of all three tyrosines increases in response to GH. Compared with wild-type JAK2, which is constitutively active when overexpressed, JAK2 lacking tyrosine 868, 966, or 972 has substantially reduced activity. Coexpression with GH receptor and protein tyrosine phosphatase1B allowed us to investigate GH-dependent activation of these mutated JAK2s in human embryonic kidney 293T cells. All three mutated JAK2s are activated by GH, although to a lesser extent than wild-type JAK2. The three mutated JAK2s also mediate GH activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3), signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (Stat5b) and ERK1, but at reduced levels. Coexpression with Src-homology 2B1β (SH2B1β), like coexpression with GH-bound GH receptor, partially restores the activity of all three JAK2 mutants. Based on these results and the crystal structure of the JAK2 kinase domain, we hypothesize that small changes in the conformation of the regions of JAK2 surrounding tyrosines 868, 966, and 972 due to e.g. phosphorylation, binding to a ligand-bound cytokine receptor, and/or binding to Src-homology 2B1, may be essential for JAK2 to assume a maximally active conformation. PMID:20304997

  17. Resistance to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor axitinib is associated with increased glucose metabolism in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hudson, C D; Hagemann, T; Mather, S J; Avril, N

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in energy (glucose) metabolism are key events in the development and progression of cancer. In pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells, we investigated changes in glucose metabolism induced by resistance to the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (RTKI) axitinib. Here, we show that human cell lines and mouse PDAC cell lines obtained from the spontaneous pancreatic cancer mouse model (Kras(G12D)Pdx1-cre) were sensitive to axitinib. The anti-proliferative effect was due to a G2/M block resulting in loss of 70-75% cell viability in the most sensitive PDAC cell line. However, a surviving sub-population showed a 2- to 3-fold increase in [C-14]deoxyglucose ([C-14]DG) uptake. This was sustained in axitinib-resistant cell lines, which were derived from parental PDAC. In addition to the axitinib-induced increase in [C-14]DG uptake, we observed a translocation of glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) transporters from cytosolic pools to the cell surface membrane and a 2-fold increase in glycolysis rates measured by the extracellular acidification rate (ECAR). We demonstrated an axitinib-induced increase in phosphorylated Protein Kinase B (pAkt) and by blocking pAkt with a phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor we reversed the Glut-1 translocation and restored sensitivity to axitinib treatment. Combination treatment with both axitinib and Akt inhibitor in parental pancreatic cell line resulted in a decrease in cell viability beyond that conferred by single therapy alone. Our study shows that PDAC resistance to axitinib results in increased glucose metabolism mediated by activated Akt. Combining axitinib and an Akt inhibitor may improve treatment in PDAC. PMID:24722285

  18. The discovery of novel vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases inhibitors: pharmacophore modeling, virtual screening and docking studies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Wang, Zhanli; Zhang, Liangren; Zhang, Jufeng; Huang, Qian

    2007-03-01

    We have applied pharmacophore generation, database searching and docking methodologies to discover new structures for the design of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, the tyrosine kinase insert domain-containing receptor kinase inhibitors. The chemical function based pharmacophore models were built for kinase insert domain-containing receptor kinase inhibitors from a set of 10 known inhibitors using the algorithm HipHop, which is implemented in the CATALYST software. The highest scoring HipHop model consists of four features: one hydrophobic, one hydrogen bond acceptor, one hydrogen bond donor and one ring aromatic function. Using the algorithm CatShape within CATALYST, the bound conformation of 4-amino-furo [2, 3-d] pyrimidine binding to kinase insert domain-containing receptor kinase was used to generate a shape query. A merged shape and hypothesis query that is in an appropriate alignment was then built. The combined shape and hypothesis model was used as a query to search Maybridge database for other potential lead compounds. A total of 39 compounds were retrieved as hits. The hits obtained were docked into kinase insert domain-containing receptor kinase active site. One novel potential lead was proposed based on CATALYST fit value, LigandFit docking scores, and examination of how the hit retain key interactions known to be required for kinase binding. This compound inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor stimulated kinase insert domain-containing receptor phosphorylation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. PMID:17441906

  19. Global phosphotyrosine survey in triple-negative breast cancer reveals activation of multiple tyrosine kinase signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Binyun; Liu, Ren; Renuse, Santosh; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini A.; Chen, Lily; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Kim, Min-Sik; Zhong, Jun; Jelinek, Christine; Barbhuiya, Mustafa A.; Leal-Rojas, Pamela; Yang, Yi; Kashyap, Manoj Kumar; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Ling, Min; Fackler, Mary Jo; Merino, Vanessa; Zhang, Zhen; Zahnow, Cynthia A.; Gabrielson, Edward; Stearns, Vered; Roa, Juan Carlos; Sukumar, Saraswati; Gill, Parkash S.; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in women worldwide. About 15–20% of all breast cancers are triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) and are often highly aggressive when compared to other subtypes of breast cancers. To better characterize the biology that underlies the TNBC phenotype, we profiled the phosphotyrosine proteome of a panel of twenty-six TNBC cell lines using quantitative high resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry. A heterogeneous pattern of tyrosine kinase activation was observed based on 1,789 tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides identified from 969 proteins. One of the tyrosine kinases, AXL, was found to be activated in a majority of aggressive TNBC cell lines and was accompanied by a higher level of AXL expression. High levels of AXL expression are correlated with a significant decrease in patient survival. Treatment of cells bearing activated AXL with a humanized AXL antibody inhibited cell proliferation and migration in vitro, and tumor growth in mice. Overall, our global phosphoproteomic analysis provided new insights into the heterogeneity in the activation status of tyrosine kinase pathways in TNBCs. Our approach presents an effective means of identifying important novel biomarkers and targets for therapy such as AXL in TNBC. PMID:26356563

  20. ALK is a MYCN target gene and regulates cell migration and invasion in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Md Kamrul; Nafady, Asmaa; Takatori, Atsushi; Kishida, Satoshi; Ohira, Miki; Suenaga, Yusuke; Hossain, Shamim; Akter, Jesmin; Ogura, Atsushi; Nakamura, Yohko; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Nakagawara, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Human anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has been identified as an oncogene that is mutated or amplified in NBLs. To obtain a better understanding of the molecular events associated with ALK in the pathogenesis of NBL, it is necessary to clarify how ALK gene contributes to NBL progression. In the present study, we found that ALK expression was significantly high in NBL clinical samples with amplified MYCN (n = 126, P < 0.01) and in developing tumors of MYCN-transgenic mice. Indeed, promoter analysis revealed that ALK is a direct transcriptional target of MYCN. Overexpression and knockdown of ALK demonstrated its function in cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Moreover, treatment with an ALK inhibitor, TAE-684, efficiently suppressed such biological effects in MYCN amplified cells and tumor growth of the xenograft in mice. Our present findings explore the fundamental understanding of ALK in order to develop novel therapeutic tools by targeting ALK for aggressive NBL treatment. PMID:24356251

  1. Molecular mechanisms that underpin EML4-ALK driven cancers and their response to targeted drugs.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, Richard; Choi, Jene; Fennell, Dean A; Fry, Andrew M; Richards, Mark W

    2016-03-01

    A fusion between the EML4 (echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like) and ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) genes was identified in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in 2007 and there has been rapid progress in applying this knowledge to the benefit of patients. However, we have a poor understanding of EML4 and ALK biology and there are many challenges to devising the optimal strategy for treating EML4-ALK NSCLC patients. In this review, we describe the biology of EML4 and ALK, explain the main features of EML4-ALK fusion proteins and outline the therapies that target EML4-ALK. In particular, we highlight the recent advances in our understanding of the structures of EML proteins, describe the molecular mechanisms of resistance to ALK inhibitors and assess current thinking about combinations of ALK drugs with inhibitors that target other kinases or Hsp90. PMID:26755435

  2. The Physarum polycephalum Genome Reveals Extensive Use of Prokaryotic Two-Component and Metazoan-Type Tyrosine Kinase Signaling.

    PubMed

    Schaap, Pauline; Barrantes, Israel; Minx, Pat; Sasaki, Narie; Anderson, Roger W; Bénard, Marianne; Biggar, Kyle K; Buchler, Nicolas E; Bundschuh, Ralf; Chen, Xiao; Fronick, Catrina; Fulton, Lucinda; Golderer, Georg; Jahn, Niels; Knoop, Volker; Landweber, Laura F; Maric, Chrystelle; Miller, Dennis; Noegel, Angelika A; Peace, Rob; Pierron, Gérard; Sasaki, Taeko; Schallenberg-Rüdinger, Mareike; Schleicher, Michael; Singh, Reema; Spaller, Thomas; Storey, Kenneth B; Suzuki, Takamasa; Tomlinson, Chad; Tyson, John J; Warren, Wesley C; Werner, Ernst R; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele; Wilson, Richard K; Winckler, Thomas; Gott, Jonatha M; Glöckner, Gernot; Marwan, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Physarum polycephalum is a well-studied microbial eukaryote with unique experimental attributes relative to other experimental model organisms. It has a sophisticated life cycle with several distinct stages including amoebal, flagellated, and plasmodial cells. It is unusual in switching between open and closed mitosis according to specific life-cycle stages. Here we present the analysis of the genome of this enigmatic and important model organism and compare it with closely related species. The genome is littered with simple and complex repeats and the coding regions are frequently interrupted by introns with a mean size of 100 bases. Complemented with extensive transcriptome data, we define approximately 31,000 gene loci, providing unexpected insights into early eukaryote evolution. We describe extensive use of histidine kinase-based two-component systems and tyrosine kinase signaling, the presence of bacterial and plant type photoreceptors (phytochromes, cryptochrome, and phototropin) and of plant-type pentatricopeptide repeat proteins, as well as metabolic pathways, and a cell cycle control system typically found in more complex eukaryotes. Our analysis characterizes P. polycephalum as a prototypical eukaryote with features attributed to the last common ancestor of Amorphea, that is, the Amoebozoa and Opisthokonts. Specifically, the presence of tyrosine kinases in Acanthamoeba and Physarum as representatives of two distantly related subdivisions of Amoebozoa argues against the later emergence of tyrosine kinase signaling in the opisthokont lineage and also against the acquisition by horizontal gene transfer. PMID:26615215

  3. Identification of the human pim-1 gene product as a 33-kilodalton cytoplasmic protein with tyrosine kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Telerman, A.; Amson, R.; Zakut-Houri, R.; Givol, D.

    1988-04-01

    The human pim-1 gene was recently identified as a new putative oncogene located on chromosome 6p21, a region showing karyotypic abnormalities in particular leukemias. In the present work the authors characterized the pim protein product. In vitro translation of positively selected poly(A)/sup +/ mRNA indicates that this gene encodes a 33-kilodalton protein. Anti-pim antibodies were raised against a fused TrpE-pim protein induced in a bacterial expression vector. This antibody immunoprecipitated a 33-kilodalton protein from in vivo (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled K562 and KCl myelogenous origin cell lines. This protein was localized to the cytoplasm, and in vivo labeling as well as in vitro kinase assay suggests that it is a phosphoprotein with tyrosine kinase activity. This was further confirmed by performing autophosphorylation directly on a p33/sup pim/-containing gel band cut out after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrphoresis. The results imply that the tyrosine kinase activity of pim can be recovered after boiling the pim-1 protein in sample buffer: a feature not described yet for this class of protein. These results suggest that pim-1 is a new member of the subgroup of oncogenes encoding tyrosine kinases.

  4. Defect in tyrosine kinase activity of the insulin receptor from a patient with insulin resistance and acanthosis nigricans.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, R; Shiba, T; Tobe, K; Shibasaki, Y; Koshio, O; Izumi, T; Odawara, M; Mikami, Y; Matsuura, N; Akanuma, Y

    1990-04-01

    We report here a defect in tyrosine kinase activity of the insulin receptor from an insulin-resistant patient with acanthosis nigricans using cultured Ebstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B-lymphocytes. As judged by affinity labeling and immunoblotting, the alpha- and beta-subunits of insulin receptors from the patient's lymphocytes exhibited the same mol wt as those from control subjects. Lectin-purified extracts from lymphocytes of the patient and the control subjects containing the same insulin-binding capacity were assayed for autophosphorylation and the ability to phosphorylate histone H2B. The degree of insulin-dependent autophosphorylation and the tyrosine kinase activity of the insulin receptor from the patient's lymphocytes were decreased to 15% and 13%, respectively, in a cell-free system. The insulin-dependent autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor was also impaired in intact EBV lymphocytes from the patient. Consistent with these results, we found that one of this patient's alleles had a mutation in which valine is substituted for Gly996, the third glycine in the conserved Gly-X-Gly-X-X-Gly motif in the kinase domain. Thus, it seems likely that the defect in tyrosine kinase activity of the insulin receptor cause the insulin resistance in this patient. The EBV lymphocyte can be a good system to detect genetically determined abnormalities in the insulin receptor. PMID:2180980

  5. The Physarum polycephalum Genome Reveals Extensive Use of Prokaryotic Two-Component and Metazoan-Type Tyrosine Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Schaap, Pauline; Barrantes, Israel; Minx, Pat; Sasaki, Narie; Anderson, Roger W.; Bénard, Marianne; Biggar, Kyle K.; Buchler, Nicolas E.; Bundschuh, Ralf; Chen, Xiao; Fronick, Catrina; Fulton, Lucinda; Golderer, Georg; Jahn, Niels; Knoop, Volker; Landweber, Laura F.; Maric, Chrystelle; Miller, Dennis; Noegel, Angelika A.; Peace, Rob; Pierron, Gérard; Sasaki, Taeko; Schallenberg-Rüdinger, Mareike; Schleicher, Michael; Singh, Reema; Spaller, Thomas; Storey, Kenneth B.; Suzuki, Takamasa; Tomlinson, Chad; Tyson, John J.; Warren, Wesley C.; Werner, Ernst R.; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele; Wilson, Richard K.; Winckler, Thomas; Gott, Jonatha M.; Glöckner, Gernot; Marwan, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Physarum polycephalum is a well-studied microbial eukaryote with unique experimental attributes relative to other experimental model organisms. It has a sophisticated life cycle with several distinct stages including amoebal, flagellated, and plasmodial cells. It is unusual in switching between open and closed mitosis according to specific life-cycle stages. Here we present the analysis of the genome of this enigmatic and important model organism and compare it with closely related species. The genome is littered with simple and complex repeats and the coding regions are frequently interrupted by introns with a mean size of 100 bases. Complemented with extensive transcriptome data, we define approximately 31,000 gene loci, providing unexpected insights into early eukaryote evolution. We describe extensive use of histidine kinase-based two-component systems and tyrosine kinase signaling, the presence of bacterial and plant type photoreceptors (phytochromes, cryptochrome, and phototropin) and of plant-type pentatricopeptide repeat proteins, as well as metabolic pathways, and a cell cycle control system typically found in more complex eukaryotes. Our analysis characterizes P. polycephalum as a prototypical eukaryote with features attributed to the last common ancestor of Amorphea, that is, the Amoebozoa and Opisthokonts. Specifically, the presence of tyrosine kinases in Acanthamoeba and Physarum as representatives of two distantly related subdivisions of Amoebozoa argues against the later emergence of tyrosine kinase signaling in the opisthokont lineage and also against the acquisition by horizontal gene transfer. PMID:26615215

  6. The protein tyrosine kinases EpsB and PtkA differentially affect biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Gerwig, Jan; Kiley, Taryn B.; Gunka, Katrin; Stanley-Wall, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis is able to choose between motile and sessile lifestyles. The sessile way of life, also referred to as biofilm, depends on the formation of an extracellular polysaccharide matrix and some extracellular proteins. Moreover, a significant proportion of cells in a biofilm form spores. The first two genes of the 15-gene operon for extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, epsA and epsB, encode a putative transmembrane modulator protein and a putative protein tyrosine kinase, respectively, with similarity to the TkmA/PtkA modulator/kinase couple. Here we show that the putative kinase EpsB is required for the formation of structured biofilms. However, an epsB mutant is still able to form biofilms. As shown previously, a ptkA mutant is also partially defective in biofilm formation, but this defect is related to spore formation in the biofilm. The absence of both kinases resulted in a complete loss of biofilm formation. Thus, EpsB and PtkA fulfil complementary functions in biofilm formation. The activity of bacterial protein tyrosine kinases depends on their interaction with modulator proteins. Our results demonstrate the specific interaction between the putative kinase EpsB and its modulator protein EpsA and suggest that EpsB activity is stimulated by its modulator EpsA. PMID:24493247

  7. The protein tyrosine kinases EpsB and PtkA differentially affect biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Gerwig, Jan; Kiley, Taryn B; Gunka, Katrin; Stanley-Wall, Nicola; Stülke, Jörg

    2014-04-01

    The Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis is able to choose between motile and sessile lifestyles. The sessile way of life, also referred to as biofilm, depends on the formation of an extracellular polysaccharide matrix and some extracellular proteins. Moreover, a significant proportion of cells in a biofilm form spores. The first two genes of the 15-gene operon for extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, epsA and epsB, encode a putative transmembrane modulator protein and a putative protein tyrosine kinase, respectively, with similarity to the TkmA/PtkA modulator/kinase couple. Here we show that the putative kinase EpsB is required for the formation of structured biofilms. However, an epsB mutant is still able to form biofilms. As shown previously, a ptkA mutant is also partially defective in biofilm formation, but this defect is related to spore formation in the biofilm. The absence of both kinases resulted in a complete loss of biofilm formation. Thus, EpsB and PtkA fulfil complementary functions in biofilm formation. The activity of bacterial protein tyrosine kinases depends on their interaction with modulator proteins. Our results demonstrate the specific interaction between the putative kinase EpsB and its modulator protein EpsA and suggest that EpsB activity is stimulated by its modulator EpsA. PMID:24493247

  8. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Induce Down-Regulation of c-Kit by Targeting the ATP Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Descarpentries, Clotilde; Frisan, Emilie; Adam, Kevin; Verdier, Frederique; Floquet, Célia; Dubreuil, Patrice; Lacombe, Catherine; Fontenay, Michaela; Mayeux, Patrick; Kosmider, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The stem cell factor receptor (SCF) c-Kit plays a pivotal role in regulating cell proliferation and survival in many cell types. In particular, c-Kit is required for early amplification of erythroid progenitors, while it must disappear from cell surface for the cell entering the final steps of maturation in an erythropoietin-dependent manner. We initially observed that imatinib (IM), an inhibitor targeting the tyrosine kinase activity of c-Kit concomitantly down-regulated the expression of c-Kit and accelerated the Epo-driven differentiation of erythroblasts in the absence of SCF. We investigated the mechanism by which IM or related masitinib (MA) induce c-Kit down-regulation in the human UT-7/Epo cell line. We found that the down-regulation of c-Kit in the presence of IM or MA was inhibited by a pre-incubation with methyl-β-cyclodextrin suggesting that c-Kit was internalized in the absence of ligand. By contrast to SCF, the internalization induced by TKI was independent of the E3 ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl. Furthermore, c-Kit was degraded through lysosomal, but not proteasomal pathway. In pulse-chase experiments, IM did not modulate c-Kit synthesis or maturation. Analysis of phosphotyrosine peptides in UT-7/Epo cells treated or not with IM show that IM did not modify overall tyrosine phosphorylation in these cells. Furthermore, we showed that a T670I mutation preventing the full access of IM to the ATP binding pocket, did not allow the internalization process in the presence of IM. Altogether these data show that TKI-induced internalization of c-Kit is linked to a modification of the integrity of ATP binding pocket. PMID:23637779

  9. The Novel Smad Protein Expansion Regulates Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Pathway to Control Drosophila Tracheal Tube Size

    PubMed Central

    Iordanou, Ekaterini; Chandran, Rachana R.; Yang, Yonghua; Essak, Mina; Blackstone, Nicholas; Jiang, Lan

    2014-01-01

    Tubes with distinct shapes and sizes are critical for the proper function of many tubular organs. Here we describe a unique phenotype caused by the loss of a novel, evolutionarily-conserved, Drosophila Smad-like protein, Expansion. In expansion mutants, unicellular and intracellular tracheal branches develop bubble-like cysts with enlarged apical membranes. Cysts in unicellular tubes are enlargements of the apical lumen, whereas cysts in intracellular tubes are cytoplasmic vacuole-like compartments. The cyst phenotype in expansion mutants is similar to, but weaker than, that observed in double mutants of Drosophila type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs), Ptp4E and Ptp10D. Ptp4E and Ptp10D negatively regulate the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) pathways, especially epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) and fibroblast growth factor receptor/breathless (FGFR, Btl) signaling to maintain the proper size of unicellular and intracellular tubes. We show Exp genetically interacts with RTK signaling, the downstream targets of RPTPs. Cyst size and number in expansion mutants is enhanced by increased RTK signaling and suppressed by reduced RTK signaling. Genetic interaction studies strongly suggest that Exp negatively regulates RTK (EGFR, Btl) signaling to ensure proper tube sizes. Smad proteins generally function as intermediate components of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β, DPP) signaling pathway. However, no obvious genetic interaction between expansion and TGF-β (DPP) signaling was observed. Therefore, Expansion does not function as a typical Smad protein. The expansion phenotype demonstrates a novel role for Smad-like proteins in epithelial tube formation. PMID:24973580

  10. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor bafetinib inhibits PAR2-induced activation of TRPV4 channels in vitro and pain in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Grace, M S; Lieu, T; Darby, B; Abogadie, F C; Veldhuis, N; Bunnett, N W; McIntyre, P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is expressed on nociceptive neurons, and can sensitize transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels to amplify neurogenic inflammation and pain. The mechanisms by which this occurs are not fully understood. PAR2 causes receptor-operated activation of TRPV4 channels and TRPV4 null mice have attenuated PAR2-stimulated neurogenic inflammation and mechanical hyperalgesia. Here we investigate the intracellular signalling mechanisms underlying PAR2-induced TRPV4 channel activation and pain. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Responses of non-transfected and TRPV4-transfected HEK293 cells to agonists of PAR2 (trypsin and SLIGRL) and TRPV4 channels (GSK1016790A) were determined using calcium imaging. Inhibitors of TRPV4 channels (HC067047), sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium transport ATPase (thapsigargin), Gαq (UBO-QIC), tyrosine kinases (bafetinib and dasatinib) or PI3 kinases (wortmannin and LY294002) were used to investigate signalling mechanisms. In vivo effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors on PAR2-induced mechanical hyperalgesia were assessed in mice. KEY RESULTS In non-transfected HEK293 cells, PAR2 activation transiently increased intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i). Functional expression of TRPV4 channels caused a sustained increase of [Ca2+]i, inhibited by HC067047, bafetinib and wortmannin; but not by thapsigargin, UBO-QIC, dasatinib or LY294002. Bafetinib but not dasatinib inhibited PAR2-induced mechanical hyperalgesia in vivo. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This study supports a role for tyrosine kinases in PAR2-mediated receptor-operated gating of TRPV4 channels, independent of Gαq stimulation. The ability of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor to diminish PAR2-induced activation of TRPV4 channels and consequent mechanical hyperalgesia identifies bafetinib (which is in development in oncology) as a potential novel analgesic therapy. PMID:24779362

  11. Role of lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (LCK) in the expansion of glioma-initiating cells by fractionated radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Rae-Kwon; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Hyun, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Hyejin; An, Sungkwan; Park, Myung-Jin; Kim, Min-Jung; Lee, Su-Jae

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} Activation of Lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (LCK) is involved in the fractionated radiation-induced expansion of glioma stem-like cells. {yields} Inhibition of LCK prevents acquisition of fractionated radiation-induced resistance to chemotherapeutic treatment. {yields} LCK activity is critical for the maintenance of self-renewal in glioma stem-like cells. -- Abstract: Brain cancers frequently recur or progress as focal masses after treatment with ionizing radiation. Radiation used to target gliomas may expand the cancer stem cell population and enhance the aggressiveness of tumors; however, the mechanisms underlying the expansion of cancer stem cell population after radiation have remained unclear. In this study, we show that LCK (lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase) is involved in the fractionated radiation-induced expansion of the glioma-initiating cell population and acquisition of resistance to anticancer treatments. Fractionated radiation caused a selective increase in the activity of LCK, a Src family non-receptor tyrosine kinase. The activities of other Src family kinases Src, Fyn, and Lyn were not significantly increased. Moreover, knockdown of LCK expression with a specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) effectively blocked fractionated radiation-induced expansion of the CD133{sup +} cell population. siRNA targeting of LCK also suppressed fractionated radiation-induced expression of the glioma stem cell marker proteins CD133, Nestin, and Musashi. Expression of the known self-renewal-related proteins Notch2 and Sox2 in glioma cells treated with fractionated radiation was also downregulated by LCK inhibition. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knockdown of LCK effectively restored the sensitivity of glioma cells to cisplatin and etoposide. These results indicate that the non-receptor tyrosine kinase LCK is critically involved in fractionated radiation-induced expansion of the glioma-initiating cell population and

  12. Src-family tyrosine kinases in activation of ERK-1 and p85/p110-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase by G/CCKB receptors.

    PubMed

    Daulhac, L; Kowalski-Chauvel, A; Pradayrol, L; Vaysse, N; Seva, C

    1999-07-16

    We have analyzed in Chinese hamster ovary cells the upstream mediators by which the G protein-coupled receptor, gastrin/CCKB, activates the extracellular-regulated kinases (ERKs) and p85/p110-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) pathways. Overexpression of an inhibitory mutant of Shc completely blocked gastrin-stimulated Shc.Grb2 complex formation but partially inhibited ERK-1 activation by this peptide. Expression of Csk, which inactivates Src-family kinases, totally inhibited gastrin-induced Src-like activity detected in anti-Src and anti-Shc precipitates but diminished by 50% Shc phosphorylation and ERK-1 activation. We observed a rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and an increase in Src-like kinase activity in anti-IRS-1 immunoprecipitates from gastrin-stimulated cells, suggesting that IRS-1 may be a direct substrate of Src. This hypothesis was supported by the inhibition of gastrin-induced Src. IRS-1 complex formation and IRS-1 phosphorylation in Csk-transfected cells. In addition, the increase in PI 3-kinase activity measured in anti-p85 or anti-IRS-1 precipitates following gastrin stimulation was abolished by Csk. Our results demonstrate the existence of two mechanisms in gastrin-mediated ERKs activation. One requires Shc phosphorylation by Src-family kinases, and the other one is independent of these two proteins. They also indicate that tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 by Src-family kinases could lead to the recruitment and the activation of the p85/p110-PI 3-kinase in response to gastrin. PMID:10400698

  13. The mixed-lineage kinase DLK undergoes Src-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation and activation in cells exposed to vanadate or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF).

    PubMed

    Daviau, Alex; Di Fruscio, Marco; Blouin, Richard

    2009-04-01

    Some data in the literature suggest that serine/threonine phosphorylation is required for activation of the mixed-lineage kinases (MLKs), a subgroup of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAPKKKs). In this report, we demonstrate that the MLK family member DLK is activated and concurrently tyrosine-phosphorylated in cells exposed to the protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate. Tyrosine phosphorylation appears crucial for activation as incubation of vanadate-activated DLK molecules with a tyrosine phosphatase substantially reduced DLK enzymatic activity. Interestingly, the effects of vanadate on DLK are completely blocked by treatment with a Src family kinase inhibitor, PP2, or the expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) directed against Src. DLK also fails to undergo vanadate-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation and activation in fibroblasts which lack expression of Src, Yes and Fyn, but reintroduction of wild-type Src or Fyn followed by vanadate treatment restores this response. In addition to vanadate, stimulation of cells with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) also induces tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of DLK by a Src-dependent mechanism. DLK seems important for PDGF signaling because its depletion by RNA interference substantially reduces PDGF-stimulated ERK and Akt kinase activation. Thus, our findings suggest that Src-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of DLK may be important for regulation of its activity, and they support a role for DLK in PDGF signaling. PMID:19146952

  14. p120 Catenin-Associated Fer and Fyn Tyrosine Kinases Regulate β-Catenin Tyr-142 Phosphorylation and β-Catenin-α-Catenin Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Piedra, Jose; Miravet, Susana; Castaño, Julio; Pálmer, Héctor G.; Heisterkamp, Nora; García de Herreros, Antonio; Duñach, Mireia

    2003-01-01

    β-Catenin has a key role in the formation of adherens junction through its interactions with E-cadherin and α-catenin. We show here that interaction of β-catenin with α-catenin is regulated by the phosphorylation of β-catenin Tyr-142. This residue can be phosphorylated in vitro by Fer or Fyn tyrosine kinases. Transfection of these kinases to epithelial cells disrupted the association between both catenins. We have also examined whether these kinases are involved in the regulation of this interaction by K-ras. Stable transfectants of the K-ras oncogene in intestinal epithelial IEC18 cells were generated which show little α-catenin-β-catenin association with respect to control clones; this effect is accompanied by increased Tyr-142 phosphorylation and activation of Fer and Fyn kinases. As reported for Fer, Fyn kinase is constitutively bound to p120 catenin; expression of K-ras induces the phosphorylation of p120 catenin on tyrosine residues increasing its affinity for E-cadherin and, consequently, promotes the association of Fyn with the adherens junction complex. Yes tyrosine kinase also binds to p120 catenin but only upon activation, and stimulates Fer and Fyn tyrosine kinases. These results indicate that p120 catenin acts as a docking protein facilitating the activation of Fer/Fyn tyrosine kinases by Yes and demonstrate the role of these p120 catenin-associated kinases in the regulation of β-catenin-α-catenin interaction. PMID:12640114

  15. Axl receptor tyrosine kinase is up-regulated in metformin resistant prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Nitu; Mishra, Prasun J.; Stein, Mark; DiPaola, Robert S.; Bertino, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies showed that metformin, a widely used anti-diabetic drug might prevent certain cancers. Metformin also has an anti-proliferative effect in preclinical studies of both hematologic malignancies as well as solid cancers and clinical studies testing metformin as an anti-cancer drug are in progress. However, all cancer types do not respond to metformin with the same effectiveness or acquire resistance. To understand the mechanism of acquired resistance and possibly its mechanism of action as an anti-proliferative agent, we developed metformin resistant LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Metformin resistant LNCaP cells had an increased proliferation rate, increased migration and invasion ability as compared to the parental cells, and expressed markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). A detailed gene expression microarray comparing the resistant cells to the wild type cells revealed that Edil2, Ereg, Axl, Anax2, CD44 and Anax3 were the top up-regulated genes and calbindin 2 and TPTE (transmembrane phosphatase with tensin homology) and IGF1R were down regulated. We focused on Axl, a receptor tyrosine kinase that has been shown to be up regulated in several drug resistance cancers. Here, we show that the metformin resistant cell line as well as castrate resistant cell lines that over express Axl were more resistant to metformin, as well as to taxotere compared to androgen sensitive LNCaP and CWR22 cells that do not overexpress Axl. Forced overexpression of Axl in LNCaP cells decreased metformin and taxotere sensitivity and knockdown of Axl in resistant cells increased sensitivity to these drugs. Inhibition of Axl activity by R428, a small molecule Axl kinase inhibitor, sensitized metformin resistant cells that overexpressed Axl to metformin. Inhibitors of Axl may enhance tumor responses to metformin and other chemotherapy in cancers that over express Axl. PMID:26036314

  16. Construction and Stable Expression of a Truncated Human Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Ror1 (Ror1-ECD).

    PubMed

    Forouzesh, Flora; Tabarian, Samira Shakeri; Emami, Shaghayegh; Tehrani, Mahmood-Jeddi; Hadavi, Reza; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2012-01-01

    Expression of receptor tyrosine kinase Ror1 in a wide variety of cancers has emerged as a new era focusing on targeting this receptor in cancer therapy. Our preliminary results indicate the presence of a truncated transcript of Ror1 in tumor cells. The truncated Ror1 encompasses extracellular and transmembrane domains, lacking catalytic kinase domain (Ror1-ECD). As enzyme activity is highly dependent on the catalytic domain, we were wondering how this transcript and its encoded protein could play a possible role in tumorigenesis. To understand the function of this truncated transcript and whether or not the encoded protein translocates to the cell surface, we constructed a mammalian expression vector containing exon 1 to exon 8 of human Ror1 gene as a model system. The encoded protein by this construct covers the entire extracellular and transmembrane domains of Ror1. The Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell line (CHO) was used for transfection. Our results showed that this construct could express Ror1-ECD at protein level and also the protein could effectively translocate to the surface of transfected cells. Such model may suggest that a proportion of Ror1 molecules expressed by tumor cells are not full-length Ror1. This notion may be considered when applying flow cytometry using antibodies against Ror1 for screening of tumor cells in order to avoid any miscalculation in the number of Ror1 molecules expressed by tumor cells. Furthermore, such expression may bring about assumptions on functional roles of Ror1-ECD in tumorigenesis, which requires extensive functional studies. PMID:23408137

  17. Construction and Stable Expression of a Truncated Human Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Ror1 (Ror1-ECD)

    PubMed Central

    Forouzesh, Flora; Tabarian, Samira Shakeri; Emami, Shaghayegh; Tehrani, Mahmood-Jeddi; Hadavi, Reza; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2012-01-01

    Expression of receptor tyrosine kinase Ror1 in a wide variety of cancers has emerged as a new era focusing on targeting this receptor in cancer therapy. Our preliminary results indicate the presence of a truncated transcript of Ror1 in tumor cells. The truncated Ror1 encompasses extracellular and transmembrane domains, lacking catalytic kinase domain (Ror1-ECD). As enzyme activity is highly dependent on the catalytic domain, we were wondering how this transcript and its encoded protein could play a possible role in tumorigenesis. To understand the function of this truncated transcript and whether or not the encoded protein translocates to the cell surface, we constructed a mammalian expression vector containing exon 1 to exon 8 of human Ror1 gene as a model system. The encoded protein by this construct covers the entire extracellular and transmembrane domains of Ror1. The Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell line (CHO) was used for transfection. Our results showed that this construct could express Ror1-ECD at protein level and also the protein could effectively translocate to the surface of transfected cells. Such model may suggest that a proportion of Ror1 molecules expressed by tumor cells are not full-length Ror1. This notion may be considered when applying flow cytometry using antibodies against Ror1 for screening of tumor cells in order to avoid any miscalculation in the number of Ror1 molecules expressed by tumor cells. Furthermore, such expression may bring about assumptions on functional roles of Ror1-ECD in tumorigenesis, which requires extensive functional studies. PMID:23408137

  18. Comprehensive translational control of tyrosine kinase expression by upstream open reading frames

    PubMed Central

    Wethmar, K; Schulz, J; Muro, E M; Talyan, S; Andrade-Navarro, M A; Leutz, A

    2016-01-01

    Post-transcriptional control has emerged as a major regulatory event in gene expression and often occurs at the level of translation initiation. Although overexpression or constitutive activation of tyrosine kinases (TKs) through gene amplification, translocation or mutation are well-characterized oncogenic events, current knowledge about translational mechanisms of TK activation is scarce. Here, we report the presence of translational cis-regulatory upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the majority of transcript leader sequences of human TK mRNAs. Genetic ablation of uORF initiation codons in TK transcripts resulted in enhanced translation of the associated downstream main protein-coding sequences (CDSs) in all cases studied. Similarly, experimental removal of uORF start codons in additional non-TK proto-oncogenes, and naturally occurring loss-of-uORF alleles of the c-met proto-oncogene (MET) and the kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), was associated with increased CDS translation. Based on genome-wide sequence analyses we identified polymorphisms in 15.9% of all human genes affecting uORF initiation codons, associated Kozak consensus sequences or uORF-related termination codons. Together, these data suggest a comprehensive role of uORF-mediated translational control and delineate how aberrant induction of proto-oncogenes through loss-of-function mutations at uORF initiation codons may be involved in the etiology of cancer. We provide a detailed map of uORFs across the human genome to stimulate future research on the pathogenic role of uORFs. PMID:26096937

  19. Comprehensive translational control of tyrosine kinase expression by upstream open reading frames.

    PubMed

    Wethmar, K; Schulz, J; Muro, E M; Talyan, S; Andrade-Navarro, M A; Leutz, A

    2016-03-31

    Post-transcriptional control has emerged as a major regulatory event in gene expression and often occurs at the level of translation initiation. Although overexpression or constitutive activation of tyrosine kinases (TKs) through gene amplification, translocation or mutation are well-characterized oncogenic events, current knowledge about translational mechanisms of TK activation is scarce. Here, we report the presence of translational cis-regulatory upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the majority of transcript leader sequences of human TK mRNAs. Genetic ablation of uORF initiation codons in TK transcripts resulted in enhanced translation of the associated downstream main protein-coding sequences (CDSs) in all cases studied. Similarly, experimental removal of uORF start codons in additional non-TK proto-oncogenes, and naturally occurring loss-of-uORF alleles of the c-met proto-oncogene (MET) and the kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), was associated with increased CDS translation. Based on genome-wide sequence analyses we identified polymorphisms in 15.9% of all human genes affecting uORF initiation codons, associated Kozak consensus sequences or uORF-related termination codons. Together, these data suggest a comprehensive role of uORF-mediated translational control and delineate how aberrant induction of proto-oncogenes through loss-of-function mutations at uORF initiation codons may be involved in the etiology of cancer. We provide a detailed map of uORFs across the human genome to stimulate future research on the pathogenic role of uORFs. PMID:26096937

  20. The Plasticity of Oncogene Addiction: Implications for Targeted Therapies Directed to Receptor Tyrosine Kinases12

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Vinochani; Allaf, Layal; Wilding, Alexander L; Donoghue, Jacqui F; Court, Naomi W; Greenall, Steve A; Scott, Andrew M; Johns, Terrance G

    2009-01-01

    A common mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an extracellular truncation known as the de2-7 EGFR (or EGFRvIII). Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is the ligand for the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) c-Met, and this signaling axis is often active in GBM. The expression of the HGF/c-Met axis or de2-7 EGFR independently enhances GBMgrowth and invasiveness, particularly through the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/pAkt pathway. Using RTK arrays, we show that expression of de2-7 EGFR in U87MG GBM cells leads to the coactivation of several RTKs, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor β and c-Met. A neutralizing antibody to HGF (AMG102) did not inhibit de2-7 EGFR-mediated activation of c-Met, demonstrating that it is ligand-independent. Therapy for parental U87MG xenografts with AMG 102 resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth, whereas U87MG.Δ2-7 xenografts were profoundly resistant. Treatment of U87MG.Δ2-7 xenografts with panitumumab, an anti-EGFR antibody, only partially inhibited tumor growth as xenografts rapidly reverted to the HGF/c-Met signaling pathway. Cotreatment with panitumumab and AMG 102 prevented this escape leading to significant tumor inhibition through an apoptotic mechanism, consistent with the induction of oncogenic shock. This observation provides a rationale for using panitumumab and AMG 102 in combination for the treatment of GBM patients. These results illustrate that GBM cells can rapidly change the RTK driving their oncogene addiction if the alternate RTK signals through the same downstream pathway. Consequently, inhibition of a dominant oncogene by targeted therapy can alter the hierarchy of RTKs resulting in rapid therapeutic resistance. PMID:19412429

  1. Molecular basis for primary and secondary tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance in gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Gounder, Mrinal M.

    2012-01-01

    Small molecule kinase inhibitors have irrevocably altered cancer treatment. March 2010 marks the 10th anniversary of using imatinib in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), a cardinal example of the utility of such targeted therapy in a solid tumor. Before imatinib, metastatic GIST was frustrating to treat due to its resistance to standard cytotoxic chemotherapy. Median survival for patients with metastatic GIST improved from 19 to 60 months with imatinib. In treating patients with GIST, two patterns of tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance have been observed. In the first, ~9–14% of patients have progression within 3 months of starting imatinib. These patients are classified as having primary or early resistance. Median progression-free survival (PFS) on imatinib is approximately 24 months; patients with later progression are classified as having secondary or acquired resistance. Primary studies and a meta-analysis of studies of imatinib in GIST patients have identified prognostic features that contribute to treatment failure. One of the strongest predictors for success of therapy is KIT or PDGFRA mutational status. Patients with KIT exon 11 mutant GIST have better response rates, PFS, and overall survival compared to other mutations. A great deal has been learned in the last decade about sensitivity and resistance of GIST to imatinib; however, many unanswered questions remain about secondary resistance mechanisms and clinical management in the third- and fourth-line setting. This review will discuss the role of dose effects, and early and late resistance to imatinib and their clinical implications. Patients intolerant to imatinib (5%) and those who progress on imatinib are treated with sunitinib. The mechanism of resistance to sunitinib is unknown at this time but is also appears related to growth of clones with secondary mutations in KIT. Third- and fourth-line treatments of GIST and with future treatment strategies are also discussed. PMID:21116624

  2. Delta Opioid activation of the Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade does not require transphosphorylation of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, H Kenneth; Onoprishvili, Irma; Andria, Matthew L; Hanna, Kayane; Sheinkman, Karina; Haddad, Lisa B; Simon, Eric J

    2002-01-01

    Background In this study, we investigated the mechanism(s) by which delta opioids induce their potent activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERKs) in different cell lines expressing the cloned δ-opioid receptor (δ-OR). While it has been known for some time that OR stimulation leads to the phosphorylation of both ERK isoforms, the exact progression of events has remained elusive. Results Our results indicate that the transphosphorylation of an endogenous epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in the human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cell line does not occur when co-expressed δ-ORs are stimulated by the δ-opioid agonist, D-Ser-Leu-enkephalin-Thr (DSLET). Moreover, neither pre-incubation of cultures with the selective EGFR antagonist, AG1478, nor down-regulation of the EGFR to a point where EGF could no longer activate ERKs had an inhibitory effect on ERK activation by DSLET. These results appear to rule out any structural or catalytic role for the EGFR in the δ-opioid-mediated MAPK cascade. To confirm these results, we used C6 glioma cells, a cell line devoid of the EGFR. In δ-OR-expressing C6 glioma cells, opioids produce a robust phosphorylation of ERK 1 and 2, whereas EGF has no stimulatory effect. Furthermore, antagonists to the RTKs that are endogenously expressed in C6 glioma cells (insulin receptor (IR) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)) were unable to reduce opioid-mediated ERK activation. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that the transactivation of resident RTKs does not appear to be required for OR-mediated ERK phosphorylation and that the tyrosine-phosphorylated δ-OR, itself, is likely to act as its own signalling scaffold. PMID:11897012

  3. A novel molecular variant of the chimeric NPM-ALK transcript in Ki-1 positive large cell lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ladanyi, M.

    1994-09-01

    The breakpoints of the t(2;5)(p23;q35), reported to be present in 30-40% of Ki-1 positive large cell lymphoma (Ki-1 LCL), have recently been cloned. They involve a novel tyrosine kinase gene, ALK, at 2p23 and the nucleophosmin gene, NPM, at 5q35. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using NPM and ALK primers detects a consistent fusion product in Ki-1 cases with the translocation. We performed NPM-ALK RT-PCR on 16 cases of Ki-1 LCL, of which 13 had informative cytogenetics. Amplifiable template was confirmed in all samples by RT-PCR using {beta}-actin primers. Ten cases showed the expected 177 base pair (bp) RT-PCR product indicative of the translocation, including all 6 cases with cytogenetic evidence of the t(2;5) and 3 cases without 5q35 abnormalities. One additional case, which had uninformative cytogenetics, showed only a novel 144 bp RT-PCR product. Sequencing of this PCR product showed an in-frame junction of NPM to ALK, 20 bp distal to the usual NPM junction site and 53 bp distal to usual ALK junction site. The predicted chimeric protein is thus shorter by 11 amino acids, but the putative ALK catalytic domain remains intact. This case was a histologically typical anaplastic Ki-1 LCL which showed a clonal rearrangement of the T-cell receptor {beta} gene. The functional significance of this molecular variant and its relation to the exon structure of both genes require further study. The overall incidence of the translocation in this series, about 70%, is higher than suspected from cytogenetic analysis alone.

  4. Compartmentalized signaling by GPI-anchored ephrin-A5 requires the Fyn tyrosine kinase to regulate cellular adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Davy, Alice; Gale, Nicholas W.; Murray, Elizabeth W.; Klinghoffer, Richard A.; Soriano, Philippe; Feuerstein, Claude; Robbins, Stephen M.

    1999-01-01

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their corresponding surface-bound ligands, the ephrins, provide cues to the migration of cells and growth cones during embryonic development. Here we show that ephrin-A5, which is attached to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchor, induces compartmentalized signaling within a caveolae-like membrane microdomain when bound to the extracellular domain of its cognate Eph receptor. The physiological response induced by this signaling event is concomitant with a change in the cellular architecture and adhesion of the ephrin-A5-expressing cells and requires the activity of the Fyn protein tyrosine kinase. This study stresses the relevance of bidirectional signaling involving the ephrins and Eph receptors during brain development. PMID:10601038

  5. Distinct cellular properties of oncogenic KIT receptor tyrosine kinase mutants enable alternative courses of cancer cell inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiarong; Sousa, Leiliane P; Mandel-Bausch, Elizabeth M; Tome, Francisco; Reshetnyak, Andrey V; Hadari, Yaron; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lax, Irit

    2016-08-16

    Large genomic sequencing analysis as part of precision medicine efforts revealed numerous activating mutations in receptor tyrosine kinases, including KIT. Unfortunately, a single approach is not effective for inhibiting cancer cells or treating cancers driven by all known oncogenic KIT mutants. Here, we show that each of the six major KIT oncogenic mutants exhibits different enzymatic, cellular, and dynamic properties and responds distinctly to different KIT inhibitors. One class of KIT mutants responded well to anti-KIT antibody treatment alone or in combination with a low dose of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). A second class of KIT mutants, including a mutant resistant to imatinib treatment, responded well to a combination of TKI with anti-KIT antibodies or to anti-KIT toxin conjugates, respectively. We conclude that the preferred choice of precision medicine treatments for cancers driven by activated KIT and other RTKs may rely on clear understanding of the dynamic properties of oncogenic mutants. PMID:27482095

  6. Clinical efficacy of second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor and 5-azacytidine combination in chronic myelogenous leukaemia in myeloid blast crisis.

    PubMed

    Ghez, David; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Pasquier, Florence; Auger, Nathalie; Saada, Véronique; Spentchian, Marc; Ianotto, Jean-Christophe; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Anelyse; Terré, Christine; Castaigne, Sylvie; Rigaudeau, Sophie; Rousselot, Philippe; de Botton, Stéphane

    2013-11-01

    Even in the tyrosine kinase inhibitors era, the prognosis of patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia in myeloid blast crisis remains dismal with few patients surviving longer than 6 months. Here we report the cases of 5 patients treated with the combination of 5-azacytidine and tyrosine kinase inhibitors for myeloid blast crisis CML. All patients achieved a complete haematological response including two with a complete cytogenetic and major molecular response. Two patients underwent an allogeneic stem cell transplantation. One died from relapse 34 months from diagnosis. The second is alive and free from disease at 11 months from diagnosis. The other 3 patients are still in complete haematological response after 15, 24 and 33 months of follow-up. These results suggest that the combination has a significant activity in myeloid blast crisis and may increase survival. PMID:23968731

  7. The yes-related cellular gene lyn encodes a possible tyrosine kinase similar to p56lck.

    PubMed Central

    Yamanashi, Y; Fukushige, S; Semba, K; Sukegawa, J; Miyajima, N; Matsubara, K; Yamamoto, T; Toyoshima, K

    1987-01-01

    With v-yes DNA as the probe, a human cDNA library made from placental RNA was screened under relaxed conditions, and DNA clones derived from a novel genetic locus, termed lyn, were obtained. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that lyn could encode a novel tyrosine kinase that was very similar to mouse T-lymphocyte-specific tyrosine kinase p56lck and the v-yes protein as well as to the gene products of v-fgr and v-src. Northern hybridization analysis revealed that a 3.2-kilobase lyn mRNA was expressed in a variety of tissues of the human fetus. The pattern of lyn mRNA expression was different from those of related genes, such as yes and syn. Hybridization analysis of DNA from sorted chromosomes showed that the lyn gene is located on human chromosome 8 q13-qter. Images PMID:3561390

  8. Eradication of T315I mutation in chronic myeloid leukemia without third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Venton, Geoffroy; Colle, Julien; Mercier, Cedric; Fanciullino, Raphaelle; Ciccolini, Joseph; Ivanov, Vadim; Suchon, Pierre; Sebahoun, Gerard; Beaufils, Nathalie; Gabert, Jean; Hadjaj, Djamal; Costello, Regis

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a patient bearing a T315I-mutant chronic myeloid leukemia resistant to nilotinib, successfully treated with omacetaxine and then with dasatinib. After 9 months of nilotinib, the patient achieved a major molecular response but relapsed 3 months later due to the T315I mutation. Because third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor was not available and the patient refused bone marrow transplantation, he received two cycles of omacetaxine. This treatment had been stopped after two cycles because of clinical intolerance, but a major molecular response and total disappearance of the T315I clone was obtained. Treatment with dasatinib was then started and after 34-month follow-up the patient is still in major molecular response, thus suggesting that eradication of the T315I mutation could be achieved without third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:25950190

  9. The Serine/Threonine Kinase STK11 Promotes Shigella flexneri Dissemination through Establishment of Cell-Cell Contacts Competent for Tyrosine Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dragoi, Ana-Maria

    2014-01-01

    Shigella flexneri is an intracellular pathogen that disseminates in the intestinal epithelium by displaying actin-based motility. We found that although S. flexneri displayed comparable actin-based motilities in the cytosols of HeLa229 and HT-29 epithelial cell lines, the overall dissemination process was much more efficient in HT-29 cells. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that as motile bacteria reached the cell cortex in HT-29 cells, they formed membrane protrusions that resolved into vacuoles, from which the bacteria escaped and gained access to the cytosol of adjacent cells. In HeLa229 cells, S. flexneri also formed membrane protrusions that extended into adjacent cells, but the protrusions rarely resolved into vacuoles. Instead, the formed protrusions collapsed and retracted, bringing the bacteria back to the cytosol of the primary infected cells. Silencing the serine/threonine kinase STK11 (also known as LKB1) in HT-29 cells decreased the efficiency of protrusion resolution into vacuoles. Conversely, expressing STK11 in HeLa229 cells, which lack the STK11 locus, dramatically increased the efficiency of protrusion resolution into vacuoles. S. flexneri dissemination in HT-29 cells led to the local phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in protrusions, a signaling event that was not observed in HeLa229 cells but was restored in STK11-expressing HeLa229 cells. Treatment of HT-29 cells with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib abrogated tyrosine kinase signaling in protrusions, which correlated with a severe decrease in the efficiency of protrusion resolution into vacuoles. We suggest that the formation of STK11-dependent lateral cell-cell contacts competent for tyrosine kinase signaling promotes S. flexneri dissemination in epithelial cells. PMID:25114112

  10. Convergent mutations and kinase fusions lead to oncogenic STAT3 activation in anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Crescenzo, Ramona; Abate, Francesco; Lasorsa, Elena; Tabbo', Fabrizio; Gaudiano, Marcello; Chiesa, Nicoletta; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Spaccarotella, Elisa; Barbarossa, Luigi; Ercole, Elisabetta; Todaro, Maria; Boi, Michela; Acquaviva, Andrea; Ficarra, Elisa; Novero, Domenico; Rinaldi, Andrea; Tousseyn, Thomas; Rosenwald, Andreas; Kenner, Lukas; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Tzankov, Alexander; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Paulli, Marco; Weisenburger, Dennis; Chan, Wing C; Iqbal, Javeed; Piris, Miguel A; Zamo', Alberto; Ciardullo, Carmela; Rossi, Davide; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pileri, Stefano; Tiacci, Enrico; Falini, Brunangelo; Shultz, Leonard D; Mevellec, Laurence; Vialard, Jorge E; Piva, Roberto; Bertoni, Francesco; Rabadan, Raul; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2015-04-13

    A systematic characterization of the genetic alterations driving ALCLs has not been performed. By integrating massive sequencing strategies, we provide a comprehensive characterization of driver genetic alterations (somatic point mutations, copy number alterations, and gene fusions) in ALK(-) ALCLs. We identified activating mutations of JAK1 and/or STAT3 genes in ∼20% of 88 [corrected] ALK(-) ALCLs and demonstrated that 38% of systemic ALK(-) ALCLs displayed double lesions. Recurrent chimeras combining a transcription factor (NFkB2 or NCOR2) with a tyrosine kinase (ROS1 or TYK2) were also discovered in WT JAK1/STAT3 ALK(-) ALCL. All these aberrations lead to the constitutive activation of the JAK/STAT3 pathway, which was proved oncogenic. Consistently, JAK/STAT3 pathway inhibition impaired cell growth in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25873174

  11. A platinum-based hybrid drug design approach to circumvent acquired resistance to molecular targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yuming; Poon, Daniel C.; Fei, Rong; Lam, Amy S. M.; Au-Yeung, Steve C. F.; To, Kenneth K. W.

    2016-05-01

    Three molecular targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) were conjugated to classical platinum-based drugs with an aim to circumvent TKI resistance, predominately mediated by the emergence of secondary mutations on oncogenic kinases. The hybrids were found to maintain specificity towards the same oncogenic kinases as the original TKI. Importantly, they are remarkably less affected by TKI resistance, presumably due to their unique structure and the observed dual mechanism of anticancer activity (kinase inhibition and DNA damage). The study is also the first to report the application of a hybrid drug approach to switch TKIs from being efflux transporter substrates into non-substrates. TKIs cannot penetrate into the brain for treating metastases because of efflux transporters at the blood brain barrier. The hybrids were found to escape drug efflux and they accumulate more than the original TKI in the brain in BALB/c mice. Further development of the hybrid compounds is warranted.

  12. A homogeneous fluorescence polarization assay adaptable for a range of protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Gaudet, Elizabeth A; Huang, Kuo-Sen; Zhang, Yan; Huang, Wei; Mark, David; Sportsman, J Richard

    2003-04-01

    Recently, a new technology for high-throughput screening has been developed, called IMAP(patent pending). IMAP technology has previously been implemented in an assay for cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE). The authors describe the development of a homogeneous, non-antibody-based fluorescence polarization (FP) assay for a variety of protein kinases. In this assay, fluorescently labeled peptide substrate phosphorylated by the kinase is captured on modified nanoparticles through interactions with immobilized metal (M(III)) coordination complexes, resulting in a change from low to high polarization values. This assay is applicable to protein kinases that phosphorylate serine, threonine, or tyrosine residues. The IMAP platform is very compatible with high-throughput robotics and can be applied to the 1536-well format. As there are hundreds of different kinases coded for in the human genome, the assay platform described in this report is a valuable new tool in drug discovery. PMID:12844437

  13. A platinum-based hybrid drug design approach to circumvent acquired resistance to molecular targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yuming; Poon, Daniel C.; Fei, Rong; Lam, Amy S. M.; Au-Yeung, Steve C. F.; To, Kenneth K. W.

    2016-01-01

    Three molecular targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) were conjugated to classical platinum-based drugs with an aim to circumvent TKI resistance, predominately mediated by the emergence of secondary mutations on oncogenic kinases. The hybrids were found to maintain specificity towards the same oncogenic kinases as the original TKI. Importantly, they are remarkably less affected by TKI resistance, presumably due to their unique structure and the observed dual mechanism of anticancer activity (kinase inhibition and DNA damage). The study is also the first to report the application of a hybrid drug approach to switch TKIs from being efflux transporter substrates into non-substrates. TKIs cannot penetrate into the brain for treating metastases because of efflux transporters at the blood brain barrier. The hybrids were found to escape drug efflux and they accumulate more than the original TKI in the brain in BALB/c mice. Further development of the hybrid compounds is warranted. PMID:27150583

  14. Protein kinase C and tyrosine kinase pathways regulate lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide synthase activity in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, A; Pendreigh, R H; Plevin, R

    1995-01-01

    1. In RAW 264.7 macrophages, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and gamma-interferon (IFN gamma) alone or in combination stimulated the induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity and increased the expression of the 130 kDa isoform of NOS. 2. LPS-induced NOS activity was reduced by incubation with CD14 neutralising antibodies and abolished in macrophages deprived of serum. 3. LPS stimulated a small increase in protein kinase C (PKC) activity in RAW 264.7 macrophages which was dependent on the presence of serum. However, IFN gamma did not potentiate LPS-stimulated PKC activity. 4. The protein kinase C inhibitor, Ro-318220, abolished both LPS- and IFN gamma-stimulated protein kinase C activity and the induction of NOS activity. 5. LPS- and IFN gamma-induced NOS activity was reduced by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genestein. Genestein also reduced LPS-stimulated protein kinase C activity but did not affect the response to the protein kinase C activator, tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA). 6. Nicotinamide, an inhibitor of poly-ADP ribosylation, abolished LPS- and IFN gamma-induced NOS activity. 7. Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of a factor which stimulates nucleotide exchange activity on the 21 kDa ADP-ribosylation factor, ARF, reduced LPS- and IFN gamma-induced NOS activity by approximately 80%. 8. These results suggest the involvement of protein kinase C, tyrosine kinase and poly-ADP ribosylation pathways in the regulation of the induction of nitric oxide synthase in RAW 264.7 macrophages by LPS and IFN gamma. Images Figure 2 PMID:7533621

  15. The Fer tyrosine kinase regulates interactions of Rho GDP-Dissociation Inhibitor α with the small GTPase Rac

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background RhoGDI proteins are important regulators of the small GTPase Rac, because they shuttle Rac from the cytoplasm to membranes and also protect Rac from activation, deactivation and degradation. How the binding and release of Rac from RhoGDI is regulated is not precisely understood. Results We report that the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Fer is able to phosphorylate RhoGDIα and form a direct protein complex with it. This interaction is mediated by the C-terminal end of RhoGDIα. Activation of Fer by reactive oxygen species caused increased phosphorylation of RhoGDIα and pervanadate treatment further augmented this. Tyrosine phosphorylation of RhoGDIα by Fer prevented subsequent binding of Rac to RhoGDIα, but once a RhoGDIα-Rac complex was formed, the Fer kinase was not able to cause Rac release through tyrosine phosphorylation of preformed RhoGDIα-Rac complexes. Conclusions These results identify tyrosine phosphorylation of RhoGDIα by Fer as a mechanism to regulate binding of RhoGDIα to Rac. PMID:21122136

  16. Inhibition of human neutrophil responses by alpha-cyano-3,4-dihydroxythiocinnamamide; a protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Dryden, P.; Duronio, V.; Martin, L.; Hudson, A. T.; Salari, H.

    1992-01-01

    1. Activation of neutrophils results in increased tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins that may have important roles in receptor/effector coupling. In this study, the effect of a protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor on receptor-mediated neutrophil activation by platelet-activating factor (PAF), leukotriene, B4 (LTB4) and N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (FMLP) is investigated. 2. alpha-Cyano-3,4-dihydroxythiocinnamamide dose-dependently inhibited intracellular calcium release and superoxide generation from human neutrophils activated by 1 microM LTB4, PAF, and FMLP. 3. In the presence of cytochalasin B, FMLP stimulated elastase release from neutrophils was also inhibited to unstimulated levels by 5 min pretreatment with alpha-cyano-3,4-dihydroxythiocinnamamide. 4. The inhibitory action of alpha-cyano-3,4-dihydroxythiocinnamamide was found to be at or upstream of phospholipase C activation, blocking both phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis and protein kinase C activation. alpha-Cyano-3,4-dihydroxythiocinnamamide did not affect agonist receptor binding sites or receptor affinity in neutrophils. 5. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated the tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins of 41, 56, 66, and 104 kDa in neutrophils treated with agonists. Treatment of neutrophils with alpha-cyano-3,4-dihydroxythiocinnamamide prior to stimulation with chemoattractants reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of the above phosphoproteins. 6. These results indicate that alpha-cyano-3,4-dihydroxythiocinnamamide might be a useful agent in characterizing the essential proteins and biochemical pathways that regulate neutrophil activation. PMID:1504749

  17. Targeting the Spleen Tyrosine Kinase with Fostamatinib as a Strategy Against Waldenström’s Macroglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Kuiatse, Isere; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Lin, Heather Y.; Thomas, Sheeba K.; Bjorklund, Chad C.; Weber, Donna M.; Wang, Michael; Shah, Jatin J.; Zhang, Xing-Ding; Jones, Richard J.; Ansell, Stephen M.; Yang, Guang; Treon, Steven P.; Orlowski, Robert Z.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia (WM) is a lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by good initial responses to standard therapeutics, but only a minority of patients achieve complete remissions, and most inevitably relapse, indicating a need for novel agents. B-cell receptor signaling has been linked to clonal evolution in WM, and Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is over-expressed in primary cells, suggesting that it could be a novel and rational target. Experimental Design We studied the impact of the Syk inhibitor fostamatinib on BCWM.1 and MWCL-1 Waldenstrom’s-derived cell lines both in vitro and in vivo, as well as on primary patient cells. Results In WM-derived cell lines, fostamatinib induced a time- and dose-dependent reduction in viability, associated with activation of apoptosis. At the molecular level, fostamatinib reduced activation of Syk and Bruton’s tyrosine kinase, and also downstream signaling through mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK), p44/42 MAPK, and protein kinase B/Akt. As a single agent, fostamatinib induced tumor growth delay in an in vivo model of WM, and reduced viability of primary WM cells, along with inhibition of p44/42 MAPK signaling. Finally, fostamatinib in combination with other agents, including dexamethasone, bortezomib, and rituximab, showed enhanced activity. Conclusions Taken together, these data support the translation of approaches targeting Syk with fostamatinib to the clinic for patients with relapsed, and possibly even newly diagnosed Waldenstrom’s. PMID:25748087

  18. A high-content EMT screen identifies multiple receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors with activity on TGFβ receptor.

    PubMed

    Lotz-Jenne, Carina; Lüthi, Urs; Ackerknecht, Sabine; Lehembre, François; Fink, Tobias; Stritt, Manuel; Wirth, Matthias; Pavan, Simona; Bill, Ruben; Regenass, Urs; Christofori, Gerhard; Meyer-Schaller, Nathalie

    2016-05-01

    An epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) enables epithelial tumor cells to break out of the primary tumor mass and to metastasize. Understanding the molecular mechanisms driving EMT in more detail will provide important tools to interfere with the metastatic process. To identify pharmacological modulators and druggable targets of EMT, we have established a novel multi-parameter, high-content, microscopy-based assay and screened chemical compounds with activities against known targets. Out of 3423 compounds, we have identified 19 drugs that block transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)-induced EMT in normal murine mammary gland epithelial cells (NMuMG). The active compounds include inhibitors against TGFβ receptors (TGFBR), Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK), myosin II, SRC kinase and uridine analogues. Among the EMT-repressing compounds, we identified a group of inhibitors targeting multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, and biochemical profiling of these multi-kinase inhibitors reveals TGFBR as a thus far unknown target of their inhibitory spectrum. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of a multi-parameter, high-content microscopy screen to identify modulators and druggable targets of EMT. Moreover, the newly discovered "off-target" effects of several receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors have important consequences for in vitro and in vivo studies and might beneficially contribute to the therapeutic effects observed in vivo. PMID:27036020

  19. Net Increase of platelet membrane tyrosine specific-protein kinase activity by phorbol myristate acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Noriko; Sakamoto, Hikaru; Iwama, Minako; Kobayashi, Bonro )

    1990-01-01

    Tyrosine protein kinase (TPK) activity in rabbit platelets after stimulation by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or thrombin was directly estimated by {sup 32}P incorporation from ({gamma}-{sup 32})ATP into synthetic peptide angiotensin II. By PMA-treatment a net increase of TPK activity was obtained, while thrombin acted on the TPK quickly but stimulation was limited within the range attained by the control after lengthy incubation. The responsive TPK to these stimulators was localized mainly in membrane but much less in cytosol. The specific activity of the particulate TPK was low in the sonicate of control ice cold platelets but increased about 6-fold when the platelets were incubated at 37{degree}C. On a brief contact of platelets with PMA at 37{degrees}C the TPK was fully activated and reached a maximum value about 130% of the control. Determination of phosphotyrosine phosphatase in the stimulated platelet sonicate revealed that its participation in the above described increase of {sup 32}P-incorporation was meagre. The quick response suggested a possible role of TPK in the signal transduction through the platelet cell membrane.

  20. Rapid and transient palmitoylation of the tyrosine kinase Lck mediates Fas signaling

    PubMed Central

    Akimzhanov, Askar M.; Boehning, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Palmitoylation is the posttranslational modification of proteins with a 16-carbon fatty acid chain through a labile thioester bond. The reversibility of protein palmitoylation and its profound effect on protein function suggest that this modification could play an important role as an intracellular signaling mechanism. Evidence that palmitoylation of proteins occurs with the kinetics required for signal transduction is not clear, however. Here we show that engagement of the Fas receptor by its ligand leads to an extremely rapid and transient increase in palmitoylation levels of the tyrosine kinase Lck. Lck palmitoylation kinetics are consistent with the activation of downstream signaling proteins, such as Zap70 and PLC-γ1. Inhibiting Lck palmitoylation not only disrupts proximal Fas signaling events, but also renders cells resistant to Fas-mediated apoptosis. Knockdown of the palmitoyl acyl transferase DHHC21 eliminates activation of Lck and downstream signaling after Fas receptor stimulation. Our findings demonstrate highly dynamic Lck palmitoylation kinetics that are essential for signaling downstream of the Fas receptor. PMID:26351666

  1. Two putative protein-tyrosine kinases identified by application of the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Wilks, A F

    1989-01-01

    The pivotal role that protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) play in the growth regulation of eukaryotic cells is manifest in the frequent appearance of members of the PTK family as growth factor receptors or as the transforming agents of acutely transforming retroviruses. A feature common to all members of the PTK family is a highly conserved catalytic domain which is characteristic of the group as a whole and whose activity appears to be tightly regulated within the cell by other domains of the PTK. Degenerate oligonucleotide probes corresponding to two invariant amino acid sequence motifs within the catalytic domains of all PTK family members were synthesized and employed in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify cDNA sequences between them. An M13 PCR library was produced in this way from cDNA prepared against mRNA from the murine hemopoietic cell line FDC-P1. The PCR library was then screened by DNA sequencing for PTK-related sequences. Two sequences were identified that, on the basis of sequence comparison with known PTKs, may encode representatives of a new class of PTK. Images PMID:2466296

  2. Spatio-temporally precise activation of engineered receptor tyrosine kinases by light

    PubMed Central

    Grusch, Michael; Schelch, Karin; Riedler, Robert; Reichhart, Eva; Differ, Christopher; Berger, Walter; Inglés-Prieto, Álvaro; Janovjak, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are a large family of cell surface receptors that sense growth factors and hormones and regulate a variety of cell behaviours in health and disease. Contactless activation of RTKs with spatial and temporal precision is currently not feasible. Here, we generated RTKs that are insensitive to endogenous ligands but can be selectively activated by low-intensity blue light. We screened light-oxygen-voltage (LOV)-sensing domains for their ability to activate RTKs by light-activated dimerization. Incorporation of LOV domains found in aureochrome photoreceptors of stramenopiles resulted in robust activation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and rearranged during transfection (RET). In human cancer and endothelial cells, light induced cellular signalling with spatial and temporal precision. Furthermore, light faithfully mimicked complex mitogenic and morphogenic cell behaviour induced by growth factors. RTKs under optical control (Opto-RTKs) provide a powerful optogenetic approach to actuate cellular signals and manipulate cell behaviour. PMID:24986882

  3. Intestinal Epithelial Cell Tyrosine Kinase 2 Transduces IL-22 Signals To Protect from Acute Colitis.

    PubMed

    Hainzl, Eva; Stockinger, Silvia; Rauch, Isabella; Heider, Susanne; Berry, David; Lassnig, Caroline; Schwab, Clarissa; Rosebrock, Felix; Milinovich, Gabriel; Schlederer, Michaela; Wagner, Michael; Schleper, Christa; Loy, Alexander; Urich, Tim; Kenner, Lukas; Han, Xiaonan; Decker, Thomas; Strobl, Birgit; Müller, Mathias

    2015-11-15

    In the intestinal tract, IL-22 activates STAT3 to promote intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) homeostasis and tissue healing. The mechanism has remained obscure, but we demonstrate that IL-22 acts via tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2), a member of the Jak family. Using a mouse model for colitis, we show that Tyk2 deficiency is associated with an altered composition of the gut microbiota and exacerbates inflammatory bowel disease. Colitic Tyk2(-/-) mice have less p-STAT3 in colon tissue and their IECs proliferate less efficiently. Tyk2-deficient primary IECs show reduced p-STAT3 in response to IL-22 stimulation, and expression of IL-22-STAT3 target genes is reduced in IECs from healthy and colitic Tyk2(-/-) mice. Experiments with conditional Tyk2(-/-) mice reveal that IEC-specific depletion of Tyk2 aggravates colitis. Disease symptoms can be alleviated by administering high doses of rIL-22-Fc, indicating that Tyk2 deficiency can be rescued via the IL-22 receptor complex. The pivotal function of Tyk2 in IL-22-dependent colitis was confirmed in Citrobacter rodentium-induced disease. Thus, Tyk2 protects against acute colitis in part by amplifying inflammation-induced epithelial IL-22 signaling to STAT3. PMID:26432894

  4. Synergism of FAK and tyrosine kinase inhibition in Ph+ B-ALL

    PubMed Central

    Churchman, Michelle L.; Evans, Kathryn; Richmond, Jennifer; Robbins, Alissa; Jones, Luke; Shapiro, Irina M.; Pachter, Jonathan A.; Weaver, David T.; Houghton, Peter J.; Smith, Malcolm A.; Lock, Richard B.; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2016-01-01

    BCR-ABL1+ B progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ B-ALL) is an aggressive disease that frequently responds poorly to currently available therapies. Alterations in IKZF1, which encodes the lymphoid transcription factor Ikaros, are present in over 80% of Ph+ ALL and are associated with a stem cell–like phenotype, aberrant adhesion molecule expression and signaling, leukemic cell adhesion to the bone marrow stem cell niche, and poor outcome. Here, we show that FAK1 is upregulated in Ph+ B-ALL with further overexpression in IKZF1-altered cells and that the FAK inhibitor VS-4718 potently inhibits aberrant FAK signaling and leukemic cell adhesion, potentiating responsiveness to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, inducing cure in vivo. Thus, targeting FAK with VS-4718 is an attractive approach to overcome the deleterious effects of FAK overexpression in Ph+ B-ALL, particularly in abrogating the adhesive phenotype induced by Ikaros alterations, and warrants evaluation in clinical trials for Ph+ B-ALL, regardless of IKZF1 status. PMID:27123491

  5. Beneficial effects of nilotinib, tyrosine kinase inhibitor on cyclosporine-A induced renal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Nader, Manar A; Attia, Ghalia M

    2016-04-01

    Nilotinib is a known tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has been approved for treatment of leukemia. The possible protective effect of nilotinib on cyclosporine A-induced nephropathy was investigated in this study and the possible underlying mechanism was explored. Nilotinib (25mg/kg, orally) and cyclosporine A (15 mg/kg/day, subcutaneous) were given to male SD rats for 28 days. Cyclosporine A alone was found to significantly increase serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, lactate dehydrogenase, urinary micrototal protein, renal thiobarbituric acid reactive substance, Bax, cytosol cytochrome c release and nuclear factor kappa B activation. Moreover, cyclosporine A significantly reduced serum albumin, creatinine clearance, urinary total antioxidant, superoxide dismutase, glutathione and Bcl2 protein levels. Pathological results showed that in the model group; there was an obvious shrinkage and congestion of the glomeruli and widening of urinary spaces of renal corpuscles, in addition to marked renal tubular injury and fibrosis, while in the group pretreated with nilotinib all measured serum, renal and pathological changes were significantly reduced. This protective effect of nilotinib is linked to the enhanced antioxidant status and reduced inflammation and apoptosis induced by cyclosporine A. PMID:26844915

  6. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors in Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: facts and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Malagola, Michele; Papayannidis, Cristina; Baccarani, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Two tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), imatinib and dasatinib, are registered for the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in adults. Other two TKIs (nilotinib and ponatinib) have been tested in the second-line, can offer an alternative in the patients who fail the first-line, and can acquire a role also in the first-line. Here, we provide a summary of the reports of TKIs, used alone, and in combination with chemotherapy. TKIs are very effective alone and with corticosteroids and are likely to improve substantially the outcome when they are combined with standard or dose-adapted chemotherapy. While the complete haematologic remission rate is always very high, close to 100 %, the cytogenetic and molecular remission rates are lower, so that TKIs are still considered as a complement to chemotherapy and as a bridge to allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). However, many patients relapse before transplant, and many patients still relapse, even if they have been submitted to allo-SCT. A proper use of TKIs, the introduction of ponatinib, and of "new generation" TKIs should improve further on the outcome of Ph+ ALL. PMID:26891878

  7. Long-Term Side Effects of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Caldemeyer, Lauren; Dugan, Michael; Edwards, John; Akard, Luke

    2016-04-01

    Most patients with chronic myeloid leukemia have deep and durable responses when treated with BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Imatinib (the first approved TKI), nilotinib, and dasatinib are used in newly diagnosed, relapsed or intolerant patients, while bosutinib and ponatinib are used only in relapsed or intolerant patients. Previously the drug of choice was related to the likelihood of response and, to a small extent, patient comorbidities. The long-term toxicities, particularly cardiopulmonary side effects, are now impacting treatment choice, making patient comorbidities of significant concern. About 10 % of patients do not tolerate their initial BCR-ABL1 TKI and an increasing number are developing long-term side effects, particularly with the second generation drugs. Side effects of the five drugs reviewed here highlight the differences between cardiovascular, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, and endocrine toxicities, as well as possible second malignancies. There is increasing evidence that patients whose disease is controlled by TKI's will have greater impact on their quality of life from comorbidities or drug adverse events than from the disease itself. Research into management of long-term toxicities is needed. PMID:26922746

  8. Bruton's tyrosine kinase is essential for NLRP3 inflammasome activation and contributes to ischaemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Minako; Shichita, Takashi; Okada, Masahiro; Komine, Ritsuko; Noguchi, Yoshiko; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Morita, Rimpei

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasome activation has been implicated in various inflammatory diseases including post-ischaemic inflammation after stroke. Inflammasomes mediate activation of caspase-1, which subsequently induces secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-18, as well as a form of cell death called pyroptosis. In this study, we report that Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is an essential component of the NLRP3 inflammasome, in which BTK physically interacts with ASC and NLRP3. Inhibition of BTK by pharmacological or genetic means severely impairs activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. The FDA-approved BTK inhibitor ibrutinib (PCI-32765) efficiently suppresses infarct volume growth and neurological damage in a brain ischaemia/reperfusion model in mice. Ibrutinib inhibits maturation of IL-1β by suppressing caspase-1 activation in infiltrating macrophages and neutrophils in the infarcted area of ischaemic brain. Our study indicates that BTK is essential for NLRP3 inflammasome activation and could be a potent therapeutic target in ischaemic stroke. PMID:26059659

  9. The receptor tyrosine kinase Pvr promotes tissue closure by coordinating corpse removal and epidermal zippering.

    PubMed

    Garlena, Rebecca A; Lennox, Ashley L; Baker, Lewis R; Parsons, Trish E; Weinberg, Seth M; Stronach, Beth E

    2015-10-01

    A leading cause of human birth defects is the incomplete fusion of tissues, often manifested in the palate, heart or neural tube. To investigate the molecular control of tissue fusion, embryonic dorsal closure and pupal thorax closure in Drosophila are useful experimental models. We find that Pvr mutants have defects in dorsal midline closure with incomplete amnioserosa internalization and epidermal zippering, as well as cardia bifida. These defects are relatively mild in comparison to those seen with other signaling mutants, such as in the JNK pathway, and we demonstrate that JNK signaling is not perturbed by altering Pvr receptor tyrosine kinase activity. Rather, modulation of Pvr levels in the ectoderm has an impact on PIP3 membrane accumulation, consistent with a link to PI3K signal transduction. Polarized PI3K activity influences protrusive activity from the epidermal leading edge and the protrusion area changes in accord with Pvr signaling intensity, providing a possible mechanism to explain Pvr mutant phenotypes. Tissue-specific rescue experiments indicate a partial requirement in epithelial tissue, but confirm the essential role of Pvr in hemocytes for embryonic survival. Taken together, we argue that inefficient removal of the internalizing amnioserosa tissue by mutant hemocytes coupled with impaired midline zippering of mutant epithelium creates a situation in some embryos whereby dorsal midline closure is incomplete. Based on these observations, we suggest that efferocytosis (corpse clearance) could contribute to proper tissue closure and thus might underlie some congenital birth defects. PMID:26293306

  10. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: Mutation analysis of the receptor tyrosine kinase RET

    SciTech Connect

    Bolk, S.; Angrist, M.; Schwartz, S.; Chakravarti, A.

    1996-06-28

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) usually occurs as an isolated phenotype. However, 16% of the index cases are also affected with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). Complex segregation analysis suggests that CCHS is familial and has the same inheritance pattern with or without HSCR. We postulate that alteration of normal function of the receptor tyrosine kinase, RET, may contribute to CCHS based on RET`s expression pattern and the identification of RET mutations in HSCR patients. To further explore the nature of the inheritance of CCHS, we have undertaken two main routes of investigation: cytogenetic analysis and mutation detection. Cytogenetic analysis of metaphase chromosomes showed normal karyotypes in 13 of the 14 evaluated index cases; one index case carried a familial pericentric inversion on chromosome 2. Mutation analysis showed no sequence changes unique to index cases, as compared to control individuals, and as studied by single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the coding region of RET. We conclude that point mutations in the RET coding region cannot account for a substantial fraction of CCHS in this patient population, and that other candidate genes involved in neural crest cell differentiation and development must be considered. 54 refs.

  11. Axl, a receptor tyrosine kinase, mediates flow-induced vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Korshunov, Vyacheslav A; Mohan, Amy M; Georger, Mary A; Berk, Bradford C

    2006-06-01

    Intima-media thickening (IMT) in response to hemodynamic stress is a physiological process that requires coordinated signaling among endothelial, inflammatory, and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Axl, a receptor tyrosine kinase, whose ligand is Gas6, is highly induced in VSMC after carotid injury. Because Axl regulates cell migration, phagocytosis and apoptosis, we hypothesized that Axl would play a role in IMT. Vascular remodeling in mice deficient in Axl (Axl(-/-)) and wild-type littermates (Axl(+/+)) was induced by ligation of the left carotid artery (LCA) branches maintaining flow via the left occipital artery. Both genotypes had similar baseline hemodynamic parameters and carotid artery structure. Partial ligation altered blood flow equally in both genotypes: increased by 60% in the right carotid artery (RCA) and decreased by 80% in the LCA. There were no significant differences in RCA remodeling between genotypes. However, in the LCA Axl(-/-) developed significantly smaller intima+media compared with Axl(+/+) (31+/-4 versus 42+/-6x10(-6) microm3, respectively). Quantitative immunohistochemistry of Axl(-/-) LCA showed increased apoptosis compared with Axl(+/+) (5-fold). As expected, p-Akt was decreased in Axl(-/-), whereas there was no difference in Gas6 expression. Cell composition also changed significantly, with increases in CD45+ cells and decreases in VSMC, macrophages, and neutrophils in Axl(-/-) compared with Axl(+/+). These data demonstrate an important role for Axl in flow-dependent remodeling by regulating vascular apoptosis and vascular inflammation. PMID:16627783

  12. Anks1a regulates COPII-mediated anterograde transport of receptor tyrosine kinases critical for tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haeryung; Noh, Hyuna; Mun, Jiyoung; Gu, Changkyu; Sever, Sanja; Park, Soochul

    2016-01-01

    ErbB2 signalling, which is amplified by EphA2 binding, is an important therapeutic target for breast cancer. Despite the importance of the EphA2/ErbB2 complex in promoting breast tumorigenesis, the mechanism by which these receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are exported from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) remains poorly understood. Here we report that the PTB adaptor Anks1a is specifically localized to the ER on its own serine phosphorylation. Once there, Anks1a acts as an important regulator of COPII-mediated EphA2 ER export. The Anks1a ankyrin repeat domain binds EphA2 and causes it to accumulate at sites of ER exit. Simultaneously, the Anks1a PTB domain binds Sec23. This induces internalization of EphA2 via COPII vesicles, while Anks1a remains behind on the ER membrane. EphA2 also binds ErbB2 in the ER and seems to load ErbB2 into growing COPII carriers. Together, our study reveals a novel mechanism that regulates the loading of RTKs into COPII vesicles. PMID:27619642

  13. AXL receptor tyrosine kinase is required for T cell priming and antiviral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Edward T; Pang, Iris K; Carrera Silva, Eugenio A; Bosurgi, Lidia; Miner, Jonathan J; Diamond, Michael S; Iwasaki, Akiko; Rothlin, Carla V

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) AXL is induced in response to type I interferons (IFNs) and limits their production through a negative feedback loop. Enhanced production of type I IFNs in Axl-/-dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro have led to speculation that inhibition of AXL would promote antiviral responses. Notwithstanding, type I IFNs also exert potent immunosuppressive functions. Here we demonstrate that ablation of AXL enhances the susceptibility to infection by influenza A virus and West Nile virus. The increased type I IFN response in Axl-/- mice was associated with diminished DC maturation, reduced production of IL-1β, and defective antiviral T cell immunity. Blockade of type I IFN receptor or administration of IL-1β to Axl-/- mice restored the antiviral adaptive response and control of infection. Our results demonstrate that AXL is essential for limiting the immunosuppressive effects of type I IFNs and enabling the induction of protective antiviral adaptive immunity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12414.001 PMID:27350258

  14. Effective virtual screening strategy focusing on the identification of novel Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianhu; Zhang, Shengping; Luo, Minghao; Zou, Yi; Zhang, Yihua; Lai, Yisheng

    2015-07-01

    Dysregulation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway plays a vital role in the pathogenesis and development of B-cell malignancies. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a key component in the BCR signaling, has been validated as a valuable target for the treatment of B-cell malignancies. In an attempt to find novel and potent BTK inhibitors, both ligand- and structure-based pharmacophore models were generated using Discovery Studio 2.5 and Ligandscout 3.11 with the aim of screening the ChemBridge database. The resulting hits were then subjected to sequential docking experiments using two independent docking programs, CDOCKER and Glide. Molecules displaying high glide scores and H-bond interactions with the key residue Met477 in both of the docking programs were retained. Drug-like criteria including Lipinski's rule of five and ADMET properties filters were employed for further refinement of the retrieved hits. By clustering, eight promising compounds with novel chemical scaffolds were finally selected and the top two ranking compounds were evaluated by molecular dynamics simulation. We believe that these compounds are of great potential in BTK inhibition and will be used for further investigation. PMID:26043662

  15. Outcome of Treatment of CML with 2nd Generation Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors After Imatinib Failure

    PubMed Central

    Cornelison, A. Megan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Cortes, Jorge; Jabbour, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Although imatinib revolutionized the management of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), recent data indicate a transformation in the treatment approach likely in the near future. For patients who fail with standard-dose imatinib therapy, imatinib dose escalation is a second-line option. However, high-dose imatinib is not an appropriate approach for patients experiencing drug toxicity, and there remain questions over the durability of responses achieved with this strategy. Alternative second-line options include the newer tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) like dasatinib and nilotinib. A substantial amount of long-term data for these agents is available. Although both are potent and specific BCR-ABL TKIs, dasatinib and nilotinib exhibit unique pharmacological profiles and response patterns relative to different patient characteristics, such as disease stage and BCR-ABL mutational status. The superiority of second generation TKIs over imatinib in newly diagnosed disease has been recognized as well. They induce high and rapid rates of cytogenetic and molecular response, with less progression to advanced forms of disease in comparison with imatinib. Several investigational agents specific for those patients with the T315I mutation remain under evaluation. The future of CML therapy may include early use of these potent agents to help more patients achieve molecular remission and potentially be a path to a CML cure. PMID:22035738

  16. Therapeutic Blockade of Immune Complex-Mediated Glomerulonephritis by Highly Selective Inhibition of Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Samantha A; Doerner, Jessica; Bosanac, Todd; Khalil, Sara; Smith, Dustin; Harcken, Christian; Dimock, Janice; Der, Evan; Herlitz, Leal; Webb, Deborah; Seccareccia, Elise; Feng, Di; Fine, Jay S; Ramanujam, Meera; Klein, Elliott; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a potentially dangerous end organ pathology that affects upwards of 60% of lupus patients. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is important for B cell development, Fc receptor signaling, and macrophage polarization. In this study, we investigated the effects of a novel, highly selective and potent BTK inhibitor, BI-BTK-1, in an inducible model of LN in which mice receive nephrotoxic serum (NTS) containing anti-glomerular antibodies. Mice were treated once daily with vehicle alone or BI-BTK-1, either prophylactically or therapeutically. When compared with control treated mice, NTS-challenged mice treated prophylactically with BI-BTK-1 exhibited significantly attenuated kidney disease, which was dose dependent. BI-BTK-1 treatment resulted in decreased infiltrating IBA-1+ cells, as well as C3 deposition within the kidney. RT-PCR on whole kidney RNA and serum profiling indicated that BTK inhibition significantly decreased levels of LN-relevant inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Renal RNA expression profiling by RNA-seq revealed that BI-BTK-1 dramatically modulated pathways related to inflammation and glomerular injury. Importantly, when administered therapeutically, BI-BTK-1 reversed established proteinuria and improved renal histopathology. Our results highlight the important role for BTK in the pathogenesis of immune complex-mediated nephritis, and BTK inhibition as a promising therapeutic target for LN. PMID:27192942

  17. Current status of ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors stop studies for chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) dramatically improves chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) prognosis and most CML patients are now able to lead lives that are equivalent to those of healthy individuals. However, high cost to CML patients of long-term treatment and adverse effects (AEs) remain problems. At the setout, a clinical study involving the discontinuation of imatinib was conducted in France. Then, several stop studies of first-generation (imatinib) and second-generation ABL TKIs (dasatinib, nilotinib), which induce earlier response than imatinib, have also been started. These studies revealed that almost half of CML patients who are treated with ABL TKIs and achieve a certain period of sustained deep molecular response can stop ABL TKIs safely and obtain treatment free remission (TFR). AEs of ABL TKIs withdrawal and predicting factors for successful discontinuation including immunity are becoming clear gradually through these studies. It is important to conduct a comprehensive examination of the results of studies with a wide variety of protocols in order to determine which discontinuation method results in the highest probability of TFR in clinical settings. PMID:27583255

  18. Preclinical Evidence That Trametinib Enhances the Response to Antiangiogenic Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bridgeman, Victoria L; Wan, Elaine; Foo, Shane; Nathan, Mark R; Welti, Jonathan C; Frentzas, Sophia; Vermeulen, Peter B; Preece, Natasha; Springer, Caroline J; Powles, Thomas; Nathan, Paul D; Larkin, James; Gore, Martin; Vasudev, Naveen S; Reynolds, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    Sunitinib and pazopanib are antiangiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) used to treat metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, the ability of these drugs to extend progression-free and overall survival in this patient population is limited by drug resistance. It is possible that treatment outcomes in RCC patients could be improved by rationally combining TKIs with other agents. Here, we address whether inhibition of the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1/2 pathway is a rational means to improve the response to TKIs in RCC. Using a xenograft model of RCC, we found that tumors that are resistant to sunitinib have a significantly increased angiogenic response compared with tumors that are sensitive to sunitinib in vivo. We also observed significantly increased levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2 in the vasculature of resistant tumors, when compared with sensitive tumors. These data suggested that the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1/2 pathway, an important driver of angiogenesis in endothelial cells, remains active in the vasculature of TKI-resistant tumors. Using an in vitro angiogenesis assay, we identified that the MEK inhibitor (MEKI) trametinib has potent antiangiogenic activity. We then show that, when trametinib is combined with a TKI in vivo, more effective suppression of tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis is achieved than when either drug is utilized alone. In conclusion, we provide preclinical evidence that combining a TKI, such as sunitinib or pazopanib, with a MEKI, such as trametinib, is a rational and efficacious treatment regimen for RCC. PMID:26487278

  19. Dermatologic Toxicities from Monoclonal Antibodies and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors against EGFR: Pathophysiology and Management

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Shaad E.; Haigentz, Missak; Piperdi, Bilal

    2012-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition has now been well established as an effective treatment for various cancers. The EGFR belongs to the ErbB family of tyrosine kinase receptors which regulate tumor cell differentiation, survival and proliferation. Activation of EGFR drives tumorigenesis in lung, head and neck, colorectal and pancreatic cancers. Irrespective of the type of cancer being treated and the mechanism by which tumor EGFR drives tumorigenesis, the major side effect of EGFR inhibition is a papulopustular (also described as maculopapular or acneiform) rash which occurs in about two thirds of treated patients. Interestingly, this rash has been commonly correlated with better clinical outcomes (objective tumor response and patient survival). The pathophysiology of dermatological toxicity from EGFR inhibitors is an important area of clinical research, and the proper management of the rash is essential to increase the therapeutic index from this class of drugs. In this paper, we review the dermatologic toxicities associated with EGFR inhibitors with an emphasis on its pathophysiology and clinical management. PMID:22997576

  20. Tyrosine Kinase Signal Modulation: A Matter of H2O2 Membrane Permeability?

    PubMed Central

    Bertolotti, Milena; Bestetti, Stefano; García-Manteiga, Jose M.; Medraño-Fernandez, Iria; Dal Mas, Andrea; Malosio, Maria Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Abstract H2O2 produced by extracellular NADPH oxidases regulates tyrosine kinase signaling inhibiting phosphatases. How does it cross the membrane to reach its cytosolic targets? Silencing aquaporin-8 (AQP8), but not AQP3 or AQP4, inhibited H2O2 entry into HeLa cells. Re-expression of AQP8 with silencing-resistant vectors rescued H2O2 transport, whereas a C173A-AQP8 mutant failed to do so. Lowering AQP8 levels affected H2O2 entry into the endoplasmic reticulum, but not into mitochondria. AQP8 silencing also inhibited the H2O2 spikes and phosphorylation of downstream proteins induced by epidermal growth factor. These observations lead to the hypothesis that H2O2 does not freely diffuse across the plasma membrane and AQP8 and other H2O2 transporters are potential targets for manipulating key signaling pathways in cancer and degenerative diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1447–1451. PMID:23541115

  1. NADPH Oxidase Biology and the Regulation of Tyrosine Kinase Receptor Signaling and Cancer Drug Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Paletta-Silva, Rafael; Rocco-Machado, Nathália; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The outdated idea that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are only dangerous products of cellular metabolism, causing toxic and mutagenic effects on cellular components, is being replaced by the view that ROS have several important functions in cell signaling. In aerobic organisms, ROS can be generated from different sources, including the mitochondrial electron transport chain, xanthine oxidase, myeloperoxidase, and lipoxygenase, but the only enzyme family that produces ROS as its main product is the NADPH oxidase family (NOX enzymes). These transfer electrons from NADPH (converting it to NADP−) to oxygen to make O2•−. Due to their stability, the products of NADPH oxidase, hydrogen peroxide, and superoxide are considered the most favorable ROS to act as signaling molecules. Transcription factors that regulate gene expression involved in carcinogenesis are modulated by NADPH oxidase, and it has emerged as a promising target for cancer therapies. The present review discusses the mechanisms by which NADPH oxidase regulates signal transduction pathways in view of tyrosine kinase receptors, which are pivotal to regulating the hallmarks of cancer, and how ROS mediate the cytotoxicity of several cancer drugs employed in clinical practice. PMID:23434665

  2. Rapid and transient palmitoylation of the tyrosine kinase Lck mediates Fas signaling.

    PubMed

    Akimzhanov, Askar M; Boehning, Darren

    2015-09-22

    Palmitoylation is the posttranslational modification of proteins with a 16-carbon fatty acid chain through a labile thioester bond. The reversibility of protein palmitoylation and its profound effect on protein function suggest that this modification could play an important role as an intracellular signaling mechanism. Evidence that palmitoylation of proteins occurs with the kinetics required for signal transduction is not clear, however. Here we show that engagement of the Fas receptor by its ligand leads to an extremely rapid and transient increase in palmitoylation levels of the tyrosine kinase Lck. Lck palmitoylation kinetics are consistent with the activation of downstream signaling proteins, such as Zap70 and PLC-γ1. Inhibiting Lck palmitoylation not only disrupts proximal Fas signaling events, but also renders cells resistant to Fas-mediated apoptosis. Knockdown of the palmitoyl acyl transferase DHHC21 eliminates activation of Lck and downstream signaling after Fas receptor stimulation. Our findings demonstrate highly dynamic Lck palmitoylation kinetics that are essential for signaling downstream of the Fas receptor. PMID:26351666

  3. Mer receptor tyrosine kinase is a therapeutic target in pre–B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Linger, Rachel M. A.; Lee-Sherick, Alisa B.; DeRyckere, Deborah; Cohen, Rebecca A.; Jacobsen, Kristen M.; McGranahan, Amy; Brandão, Luis N.; Winges, Amanda; Sawczyn, Kelly K.; Liang, Xiayuan; Keating, Amy K.; Tan, Aik Choon; Earp, H. Shelton

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is currently treated with an intense regimen of chemotherapy yielding cure rates near 85%. However, alterations to treatment strategies using available drugs are unlikely to provide significant improvement in survival or decrease therapy-associated toxicities. Here, we report ectopic expression of the Mer receptor tyrosine kinase in pre–B-cell ALL (B-ALL) cell lines and pediatric patient samples. Inhibition of Mer in B-ALL cell lines decreased activation of AKT and MAPKs and led to transcriptional changes, including decreased expression of antiapoptotic PRKCB gene and increase in proapoptotic BAX and BBC3 genes. Further, Mer inhibition promoted chemosensitization, decreased colony-forming potential in clonogenic assays, and delayed disease onset in a mouse xenograft model of leukemia. Our results identify Mer as a potential therapeutic target in B-ALL and suggest that inhibitors of Mer may potentiate lymphoblast killing when used in combination with chemotherapy. This strategy could reduce minimal residual disease and/or allow for chemotherapy dose reduction, thereby leading to improved event-free survival and reduced therapy-associated toxicity for patients with B-ALL. Additionally, Mer is aberrantly expressed in numerous other malignancies suggesting that this approach may have broad applications. PMID:23861246

  4. Mer receptor tyrosine kinase is a therapeutic target in pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Linger, Rachel M A; Lee-Sherick, Alisa B; DeRyckere, Deborah; Cohen, Rebecca A; Jacobsen, Kristen M; McGranahan, Amy; Brandão, Luis N; Winges, Amanda; Sawczyn, Kelly K; Liang, Xiayuan; Keating, Amy K; Tan, Aik Choon; Earp, H Shelton; Graham, Douglas K

    2013-08-29

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is currently treated with an intense regimen of chemotherapy yielding cure rates near 85%. However, alterations to treatment strategies using available drugs are unlikely to provide significant improvement in survival or decrease therapy-associated toxicities. Here, we report ectopic expression of the Mer receptor tyrosine kinase in pre-B-cell ALL (B-ALL) cell lines and pediatric patient samples. Inhibition of Mer in B-ALL cell lines decreased activation of AKT and MAPKs and led to transcriptional changes, including decreased expression of antiapoptotic PRKCB gene and increase in proapoptotic BAX and BBC3 genes. Further, Mer inhibition promoted chemosensitization, decreased colony-forming potential in clonogenic assays, and delayed disease onset in a mouse xenograft model of leukemia. Our results identify Mer as a potential therapeutic target in B-ALL and suggest that inhibitors of Mer may potentiate lymphoblast killing when used in combination with chemotherapy. This strategy