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Sample records for alk-positive anaplastic large-cell

  1. ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma with soft tissue involvement in a young woman

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kehai; Li, Hongtao; Huang, Caihong; Li, Huazhuang; Fang, Jun; Tian, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has strong expression of CD30. ALCL can sometimes involve the bone marrow, and in advanced stages, it can produce destructive extranodal lesions. But anaplastic large cell lymphoma kinase (ALK)+ ALCL with soft tissue involvement is very rare. Case report A 35-year-old woman presented with waist pain for over 1 month. The biopsy of soft tissue lesions showed that these cells were positive for ALK-1, CD30, TIA-1, GranzymeB, CD4, CD8, and Ki67 (90%+) and negative for CD3, CD5, CD20, CD10, cytokeratin (CK), TdT, HMB-45, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), and pan-CK, which identified ALCL. After six cycles of Hyper-CVAD/MA regimen, she achieved partial remission. Three months later, she died due to disease progression. Conclusion This case illustrates the unusual presentation of ALCL in soft tissue with a bad response to chemotherapy. Because of the tendency for rapid progression, ALCL in young adults with extra-nodal lesions are often treated with high-grade chemotherapy, such as Hyper-CVAD/MA. PMID:27445489

  2. Targeting autophagy enhances the anti-tumoral action of crizotinib in ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Desquesnes, Aurore; Le Gonidec, Sophie; AlSaati, Talal; Beau, Isabelle; Lamant, Laurence; Meggetto, Fabienne; Espinos, Estelle; Codogno, Patrice; Brousset, Pierre; Giuriato, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphomas (ALK+ ALCL) occur predominantly in children and young adults. Their treatment, based on aggressive chemotherapy, is not optimal since ALCL patients can still expect a 30% 2-year relapse rate. Tumor relapses are very aggressive and their underlying mechanisms are unknown. Crizotinib is the most advanced ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor and is already used in clinics to treat ALK-associated cancers. However, crizotinib escape mechanisms have emerged, thus preventing its use in frontline ALCL therapy. The process of autophagy has been proposed as the next target for elimination of the resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In this study, we investigated whether autophagy is activated in ALCL cells submitted to ALK inactivation (using crizotinib or ALK-targeting siRNA). Classical autophagy read-outs such as autophagosome visualization/quantification by electron microscopy and LC3-B marker turn-over assays were used to demonstrate autophagy induction and flux activation upon ALK inactivation. This was demonstrated to have a cytoprotective role on cell viability and clonogenic assays following combined ALK and autophagy inhibition. Altogether, our results suggest that co-treatment with crizotinib and chloroquine (two drugs already used in clinics) could be beneficial for ALK-positive ALCL patients. PMID:26338968

  3. Three Years Sustained Complete Remission Achieved in a Primary Refractory ALK-Positive Anaplastic T Large Cell Lymphoma Treated with Crizotinib

    PubMed Central

    Mahuad, Carolina Valeria; Repáraz, María de los Ángeles Vicente; Zerga, Marta E.; Aizpurua, María Florencia; Casali, Claudia; Garate, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of the primary refractory anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK+) anaplastic T large cell lymphoma is ominous. The identification of molecular targets with potential to drive oncogenesis remains a cornerstone for the designing of new selective cancer therapies. Crizotinib is a selective ATP-competitive inhibitor for ALK, approved for its use in lung cancer with rearrangements on ALK gene. The reported cases describe the use of crizotinib as a bridging strategy prior to allotransplantation; there are no reported prolonged survivals under monotherapy with Crizotinib. We report a case of a primary refractory ALK+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma that sustains complete response after 3 years of crizotinib monotherapy.

  4. Three Years Sustained Complete Remission Achieved in a Primary Refractory ALK-Positive Anaplastic T Large Cell Lymphoma Treated with Crizotinib.

    PubMed

    Mahuad, Carolina Valeria; Repáraz, María de Los Ángeles Vicente; Zerga, Marta E; Aizpurua, María Florencia; Casali, Claudia; Garate, Gonzalo

    2016-06-28

    The prognosis of the primary refractory anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK+) anaplastic T large cell lymphoma is ominous. The identification of molecular targets with potential to drive oncogenesis remains a cornerstone for the designing of new selective cancer therapies. Crizotinib is a selective ATP-competitive inhibitor for ALK, approved for its use in lung cancer with rearrangements on ALK gene. The reported cases describe the use of crizotinib as a bridging strategy prior to allotransplantation; there are no reported prolonged survivals under monotherapy with Crizotinib. We report a case of a primary refractory ALK+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma that sustains complete response after 3 years of crizotinib monotherapy. PMID:27441079

  5. AT13387 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, Mantle Cell Lymphoma, or Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-01

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Positive; Recurrent Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  6. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma in paediatric and young adult patients.

    PubMed

    Turner, Suzanne D; Lamant, Laurence; Kenner, Lukas; Brugières, Laurence

    2016-05-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a heterogeneous disease of debateable origin that, in children, is largely anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive with aberrant ALK activity induced following the formation of chromosomal translocations. Whilst the survival rates for this disease are relatively high, a significant proportion (20-40%) of patients suffer disease relapse, in some cases on multiple occasions and therefore suffer the toxic side-effects of combination chemotherapy. Traditionally, patients are treated with a combination of agents although recent data from relapse patients have suggested that low risk patients might benefit from single agent vinblastine and, going forward, the addition of ALK inhibitors to the therapeutic regimen may have beneficial consequences. There are also a plethora of other drugs that might be advantageous to patients with ALCL and many of these have been identified through laboratory research although the decision as to which drugs to implement in trials will not be trivial. PMID:26913827

  7. Ceritinib for the treatment of patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Landi, Lorenza; Cappuzzo, Federico

    2016-02-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents the paradigm of personalized treatment of human cancer. Several oncogenic druggable alterations have been so far identified, with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements representing one of the newest and most appealing. Crizotinib is now recognized as the standard of care in ALK-positive NSCLC due to the positive results of recently published trials. Unfortunately, resistance inevitably occurs within the first year of treatment. Overcoming resistance is the major challenge in clinical oncology, and novel potent ALK inhibitors are currently under evaluation, including ceritinib. Ceritinib is an oral, potent, second-generation ALK inhibitor demonstrating activity in patients who develop resistance to crizotinib. Recent data also suggested efficacy in ALK-inhibitor-naive population, thus supporting investigation of the drug in front-line setting. PMID:26582431

  8. Genetics of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yu; Feldman, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) comprises a group of T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas unified by common morphologic and immunophenotypic characteristics, but with a spectrum of clinical presentations and behaviors. Early identification of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements in some ALCLs led to recognition of ALK as an important diagnostic and prognostic biomarker, and a key driver of ALCL pathobiology. Rearrangements and other genetic abnormalities of ALK subsequently were identified in diverse other human malignancies. Recent clinical, pathologic, and genetic data have begun to shed light on ALK-negative ALCLs, revealing significant heterogeneity within this more ill-defined entity. PMID:26104084

  9. Anti-ALK Antibodies in Patients with ALK-Positive Malignancies Not Expressing NPM-ALK

    PubMed Central

    Damm-Welk, Christine; Siddiqi, Faraz; Fischer, Matthias; Hero, Barbara; Narayanan, Vignesh; Camidge, David Ross; Harris, Michael; Burke, Amos; Lehrnbecher, Thomas; Pulford, Karen; Oschlies, Ilske; Siebert, Reiner; Turner, Suzanne; Woessmann, Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Nucleophosmin (NPM)- Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) fusion positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma produce autoantibodies against ALK indicative of an immune response against epitopes of the chimeric fusion protein. We asked whether ALK-expression in other malignancies induces specific antibodies. Antibodies against ALK were detected in sera of one of 50 analysed ALK-expressing neuroblastoma patients, 13 of 21 ALK positive non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients, 13 of 22 ALK translocation-positive, but NPM-ALK-negative lymphoma patients and one of one ALK-positive rhabdomyosarcoma patient, but not in 20 healthy adults. These data suggest that boosting a pre-existent anti-ALK immune response may be more feasible for patients with ALK-positive NSCLC, lymphomas and rhabdomyosarcomas than for tumours expressing wild-type ALK. PMID:27471553

  10. CD30-Positive Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Negative Systemic Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma in a 9-Year-Old Boy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Eun; Oh, Eui Hyun; Ro, Young Suck

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a CD30-positive T-cell/null-cell lymphoma that is clinically classified into either primary cutaneous ALCL or systemic ALCL (S-ALCL) sub-types. Because 90% of childhood S-ALCL cases are anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive, there is a lack of data on ALK-negative S-ALCL cases among pediatric patients. Herein, we report a rare case of ALK-negative S-ALCL in a 9-year-old Korean boy who initially presented with itchy erythematous maculopapules and an erosive nodule on the trunk area. We emphasize the need of high index of suspicion of an underlying malignant disease in the presence of refractory eczematous lesions. PMID:27274637

  11. CD30-Positive Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Negative Systemic Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma in a 9-Year-Old Boy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Eun; Oh, Eui Hyun; Ro, Young Suck; Ko, Joo Yeon

    2016-06-01

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a CD30-positive T-cell/null-cell lymphoma that is clinically classified into either primary cutaneous ALCL or systemic ALCL (S-ALCL) sub-types. Because 90% of childhood S-ALCL cases are anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive, there is a lack of data on ALK-negative S-ALCL cases among pediatric patients. Herein, we report a rare case of ALK-negative S-ALCL in a 9-year-old Korean boy who initially presented with itchy erythematous maculopapules and an erosive nodule on the trunk area. We emphasize the need of high index of suspicion of an underlying malignant disease in the presence of refractory eczematous lesions. PMID:27274637

  12. PAX5-positive T-cell Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphomas Associated with Extra Copies of the PAX5 Gene Locus

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Andrew L; Law, Mark E; Inwards, David J; Dogan, Ahmet; McClure, Rebecca F; Macon, William R

    2010-01-01

    Cell lineage is the major criterion by which lymphomas are classified. Immunohistochemistry has greatly facilitated lymphoma diagnosis by detecting expression of lineage-associated antigens. However, loss or aberrant expression of these antigens may present diagnostic challenges. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a T-cell lymphoma that shows morphologic and phenotypic overlap with classical Hodgkin lymphoma, a tumor of B-cell derivation. Staining for the B-cell transcription factor, PAX5, has been suggested to be helpful in this differential, as it is positive in most classical Hodgkin lymphomas, but absent in anaplastic large cell lymphomas. Herein, we report four systemic T-cell anaplastic large cell lymphomas positive for PAX5 by immunohistochemistry, with weak staining intensity similar to that seen in classical Hodgkin lymphoma. All diagnoses were confirmed by a combination of morphologic, phenotypic, and molecular criteria. Three cases were ALK-negative and one was ALK-positive. PAX5 immunohistochemistry was negative in 198 additional peripheral T-cell lymphomas, including 66 anaplastic large cell lymphomas. Unexpectedly, though PAX5 translocations were absent, all evaluable PAX5-positive anaplastic large cell lymphomas showed extra copies of the PAX5 gene locus by fluorescence in situ hybridization. In contrast, only 4% of PAX5-negative peripheral T-cell lymphomas had extra copies of PAX5. We conclude that aberrant expression of PAX5 occurs rarely in T-cell anaplastic large cell lymphomas, and may be associated with extra copies of the PAX5 gene. PAX5-positive lymphomas with morphologic features overlapping different lymphoma types should be evaluated with an extensive immunohistochemical panel and/or molecular studies to avoid diagnostic errors that could lead to inappropriate treatment. Since PAX5 overexpression causes T-cell neoplasms in experimental models, PAX5 may have contributed to lymphomagenesis in our cases. PMID:20118907

  13. microRNA expression profiling identifies molecular signatures associated with anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cuiling; Iqbal, Javeed; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Shen, Yulei; Dabrowska, Magdalena Julia; Dybkaer, Karen; Lim, Megan S.; Piva, Roberto; Barreca, Antonella; Pellegrino, Elisa; Spaccarotella, Elisa; Lachel, Cynthia M.; Kucuk, Can; Jiang, Chun-Sun; Hu, Xiaozhou; Bhagavathi, Sharathkumar; Greiner, Timothy C.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Aoun, Patricia; Perkins, Sherrie L.; McKeithan, Timothy W.; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs) encompass at least 2 systemic diseases distinguished by the presence or absence of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) expression. We performed genome-wide microRNA (miRNA) profiling on 33 ALK-positive (ALK[+]) ALCLs, 25 ALK-negative (ALK[−]) ALCLs, 9 angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas, 11 peripheral T-cell lymphomas not otherwise specified (PTCLNOS), and normal T cells, and demonstrated that ALCLs express many of the miRNAs that are highly expressed in normal T cells with the prominent exception of miR-146a. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering demonstrated distinct clustering of ALCL, PTCL-NOS, and the AITL subtype of PTCL. Cases of ALK(+) ALCL and ALK(–) ALCL were interspersed in unsupervised analysis, suggesting a close relationship at the molecular level. We identified an miRNA signature of 7 miRNAs (5 upregulated: miR-512-3p, miR-886-5p, miR-886-3p, miR-708, miR-135b; 2 downregulated: miR-146a, miR-155) significantly associated with ALK(+) ALCL cases. In addition, we derived an 11-miRNA signature (4 upregulated: miR-210, miR-197, miR-191, miR-512-3p; 7 downregulated: miR-451, miR-146a, miR-22, miR-455-3p, miR-455-5p, miR-143, miR-494) that differentiates ALK(–) ALCL from other PTCLs. Our in vitro studies identified a set of 32 miRNAs associated with ALK expression. Of these, the miR-17∼92 cluster and its paralogues were also highly expressed in ALK(+) ALCL and may represent important downstream effectors of the ALK oncogenic pathway. PMID:23801630

  14. ALK Signaling and Target Therapy in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tabbó, Fabrizio; Barreca, Antonella; Piva, Roberto; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    The discovery by Morris et al. (1994) of the genes contributing to the t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocation has laid the foundation for a molecular based recognition of anaplastic large cell lymphoma and highlighted the need for a further stratification of T-cell neoplasia. Likewise the detection of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) genetic lesions among many human cancers has defined unique subsets of cancer patients, providing new opportunities for innovative therapeutic interventions. The objective of this review is to appraise the molecular mechanisms driving ALK-mediated transformation, and to maintain the neoplastic phenotype. The understanding of these events will allow the design and implementation of novel tailored strategies for a well-defined subset of cancer patients. PMID:22649787

  15. Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Associated With Breast Implants

    PubMed Central

    Ravi-Kumar, Shalini; Sanaei, Omid; Vasef, Mohammad; Rabinowitz, Ian; Fekrazad, Mohammad Houman

    2012-01-01

    A forty two years old woman with a history of bilateral breast augmentation for cosmetic reasons was presented for poor healing of the surgical site. Tissue and periprosthetic fluid were removed from the wound site revealing an atypical lymphoid infiltrate. Subsequently the patient developed axillary lymph adenopathy. Excisional biopsy was performed. Flow cytometry was non-diagnostic. She continued to heal poorly and eventually had removal of implant during a simple mastectomy. A nodular area in the breast specimen showed ALK negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). The patient was treated in the private section, with only a pathology consultation being done at our institution (Figures 1-3). PMID:25734041

  16. [Breast implant-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Jarjis, Reem Dina; Matzen, Steen Henrik

    2015-11-23

    Breast implant-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL) is a rare entity. Due to the lack of awareness of BIA-ALCL, patients with prior history of breast implants who present with non-specific implant-related complications might experience a delay in diagnosis and appropriate treatment of this distinct condition. There are still no evidence-based guidelines on how this condition should be diagnosed, treated or followed because of the rarity of available data. We review current literature in order to raise awareness and discuss management options of this unique clinical entity. PMID:26617170

  17. Expression of p63 in anaplastic large cell lymphoma but not in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Immunohistochemical determination of p63 protein is frequently used in the pathologic diagnosis of nonhematological solid tumors. In malignant hematological disease, p63 expression has been reported in 22% of follicular lymphoma, about 35% of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, 23% of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and in some cases of blast crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a rare disease that accounts for less than 5% of all cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. There is little information concerning p63 expression in this specific type of lymphoma. In some cases, the morphological and phenotypic features between anaplastic large cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin's lymphoma are similar, making this differential diagnosis challenging. We studied p63 expression using a tissue microarray approach in 154 cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma, including 38% anaplastic large cell kinase positive and 62% anaplastic large cell kinase negative, and 58 Hodgkin's lymphoma cases. Sixty-eight cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (44%) showed p63 nuclear positivity (41% of anaplastic large cell kinase positive and 47% of anaplastic large cell kinase negative). Of 130 cases of systemic-anaplastic large cell lymphoma, 42% showed p63 positivity. The neoplastic cells expressed p63 in 38% of the cases of CD45-negative/anaplastic large cell kinase–negative null cell–type anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a subgroup that offers the most difficulties in the differential diagnosis with classical Hodgkin's lymphoma. In contrast, none of the cases of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma demonstrated any p63 expression. These results demonstrate that p63 protein expression is frequently expressed in a subset of anaplastic large cell lymphoma cases and may be used as a potential tool in the differential diagnosis between anaplastic large cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:18620733

  18. Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Involving Anterior Segment of the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Park, Choul Yong; Hwang, Sang Won; Kim, Do Yeun; Huh, Hee Jin

    2014-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman was diagnosed with anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) by excisional biopsy of a left frontal skin lesion. During the first cycle of chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone), the patient complained of right ocular pain and inflammation. Cytologic examination using aqueous humor revealed atypical lymphocytes, suggesting intraocular ALCL involvement. Acute angle closure developed in the anterior chamber due to rapid progression of ALCL, causing pupillary block. Laser and surgical interventions were attempted but failed to relieve the pupillary block. Finally, radiation therapy resolved the pupillary block to restore the anterior chamber and normalize intraocular pressure. This is the first case in the English literature of ALCL involving the iris to cause acute secondary angle closure. PMID:24505208

  19. Primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cao, Can; Zeng, Kang; Wang, Menglei; Han, Kai; Peng, Yusheng; Xiong, Hao; Wang, Qi; Li, Qian; Wang, Qian; Li, Li

    2016-07-01

    Primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (PCALCL) is a part of the spectrum of CD30+ lymphoproliferative cutaneous processes. The characteristics include single or multifocal nodules that ulcerate as skin lesion, slow disease progression, autoregressive, and recurrent in few years. The present study report the case of a 16-year-old boy presenting PCALCL with single nodules, ulcer, keloid, and scab in his right-side face. He showed a good response to the treatment with systemic chemotherapy and dermatoplasty, and regained confidence after the appearance of recovery. There is no relapse of the primary lesion and organs involved till now. The chemotherapy combining with surgical excision and dermatoplasty is a good method for PCALCL, per the lesion biopsy and positron emission tomography-computed tomography before and after treatment. PMID:26970422

  20. Rapidly Progressive Acute Pustular Secondary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mordorski, Breanne; Friedman, Adam; Han, George

    2016-09-01

    Cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is an uncommon diagnosis that may either present as a primary cutaneous process or develop secondary to systemic disease. It is imperative to distinguish between these two entities due to differences in treatment recommendations and prognosis. Here, their salient features will be reviewed. It is also important that clinicians recognize atypical clinical morphologies of cutaneous ALCL, including pustular lesions, which may masquerade as infectious or other inflammatory conditions, thereby delaying the onset of treatment. In this report, we present a case of secondary cutaneous ALCL associated with an atypical pustular morphology and an aggressive, fatal course.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(9):1132-1135. PMID:27602978

  1. Identification of putative pathogenic microRNA and its downstream targets in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Meenakshi; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Sargent, Rachel L; Yao, Hui; Barkoh, Bedia A; Singh, Rajesh; Patel, Keyur P

    2014-10-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL) are tumors of T/null-cell lineage characterized by uniform CD30 expression. The 2008 World Health Organization classification subdivided ALCLs into 2 groups: anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive (established entity) and ALK-negative (proposed new entity) ALCL. The genetic basis for the pathogenesis of newly categorized ALK- ALCL is poorly understood. In this study, we used microRNA microarray analysis to identify differentially expressed microRNAs in ALK+ and ALK- ALCL. ALK- ALCL showed significantly higher expression of miR-155 (0.888 ± 0.228) compared with ALK+ ALCL (0.0565 ± 0.009) on microarray and by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in ALK- ALCL compared with ALK+ ALCL (P < .05) with a strong correlation between the 2 platforms (R = 0.9, P < .0003). A novel in situ hybridization method allows direct visualization of expression patterns and relative quantitation of miR-155 (mean score, 2.3 versus 1.3; P = .01) for the first time in tissue sections of ALCL. Among computationally predicted targets of miR-155, we identified ZNF652 (r = -0.57, P = .05), BACH1 (r = 0.88, P = .02), RBAK (r = 0.81, P = .05), TRIM32 (r = 0.92, P = .01), E2F2 (r = 0.81, P = .05), and TP53INP1 (r = -0.31, P = .03) as genes whose expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction correlated significantly with the level of miR-155 in ALCL tumor tissue. PMID:25128227

  2. ANALYSIS OF HUMAN T-CELL LYMPHOTROPIC VIRUS IN CD25-POSITIVE-ANAPLASTIC LARGE CELL LYMPHOMAS IN CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Chioato, Lucimara; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Harrington, William J.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    T-cell lymphomas are rare in children. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is the most common pediatric mature T-cell lymphoma, accounting for about 10-20% of all pediatric non-Hodgkin lymphoma. ALCL is now recognized as two distinct diseases, i.e., ALCL-ALK-positive (ALCL- ALK+) and ALCL-ALK-negative (ALCL- ALK-); ALK-positive ALCL presents at a younger age and has a better prognosis. The human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus that mainly infects helper T lymphocytes and is linked to the development of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). The other type of lymphoma related to this virus family is hairy cell leukemia (HCL). Both of these neoplasms frequently express CD25 (alpha chain-IL-2 receptor). Recently, it was demonstrated that CD25 is significantly expressed in childhood ALCL (75%). In Brazil, HTLV-1 infection is considered endemic, and vertical transmission is responsible for spread to children, and it is important to point out that 90% or more of the HTLV-1 carriers remain asymptomatic. Some cases of HTLV-1-related lymphomas in adults are described as having characteristics of ALCL, but are considered to be CD30-positive subtypes of ATLL based on the virologic findings. No similar cases have been described in children, therefore we analyzed 33 cases of pediatric ALCL, both CD25-positive and CD25-negative, looking for the presence of proviral HTLV-1 DNA, by PCR. All cases corresponded to the common histological type of ALCL and were CD30-positive in virtually all neoplastic cells. ALK expression was observed in all but two cases (93.9%), while CD25 was positive in 27 cases (82%), including one of the ALCL-ALK-. There was a strong positive correlation between ALK and CD25 expression. None of the cases showed proviral HTLV-1-DNA presence. Our study concludes that ALCL in children has no relationship with HTLV-1 and the high frequency of CD25 expression must be explained by a different mechanism than that described in ATLL. PMID:19864230

  3. Primary anaplastic large cell lymphoma of trachea with subcutaneous emphysema and progressive dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Khodadad, K; Karimi, S; Arab, M; Esfahani-Monfared, Z

    2011-01-01

    Primary anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the trachea is a rare tumor. Common complaints are dyspnea and cough that could mimic a partially refractory asthma in some cases. We report a 16-year-old female with an anaplastic large cell lymphoma (null cell type) in which tracheal involvement was presented with life-threatening airway obstruction and subcutaneous emphysema. After debulking the tumor by endobronchial curettage, the patient was treated with chemotherapy followed by local radiotherapy. She had no evidence of local or distant recurrence after 25 months. Primary anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the trachea is a rare life-threatening disease. Nevertheless, this condition has a good prognosis if diagnosed immediately and treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. PMID:22198193

  4. Association of Systemic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma and Active Toxoplasmosis in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Sayyahfar, Shirin; Karimi, Abdollah; Gharib, Atoosa; Fahimzad, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a subset of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and an unusual disease in children. Case Presentation: Herein we have reported a 7- year- old girl with a large necrotic skin ulcer on the chest caused by systemic form of anaplastic large-cell lymphoma and simultaneous active toxoplasmosis diagnosed by PCR on lymph node specimen. There were few reports showing a role for toxoplasma infection to cause some malignancies such as lymphoma in adults. Conclusions: Based to our knowledge, this has been the first report of simultaneous systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma and active toxoplasmosis, documented by positive PCR on tissue biopsy in a child. This case report has suggested more attention to the accompanying Toxoplasma gondii infection as a probable cause of some types of lymphomas. PMID:26478795

  5. Downregulation of NPM-ALK by siRNA causes anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell growth inhibition and augments the anti cancer effects of chemotherapy in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Faye Yuan-yi; Zhao, Yi; Anderson, W French; Johnston, Patrick B

    2007-06-01

    The fusion protein, nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK), results from the chromosome translocation t(2;5)(p23;q25) and is present in 50-70 percent of anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs). NPM-ALK is a constitutively activated kinase that transforms cells through stimulating several mitogenic signaling pathways. To examine if the NPM-ALK is a potential therapeutic target in ALCL, we used siRNA to specifically downregulate the expression of the NPM-ALK in ALCL cell lines. In this report, we demonstrated viability loss in t(2;5)-positive ALCL cell lines, SUDHL-1 and Karpas 299 cells, but not in lymphoma cell lines without the chromosome translocation, Jurkat and Granta 519 cells. Further study demonstrated that the downregulation of NPM-ALK resulted in decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis. When used in combination with chemotherapeutic agents, such as doxorubicin, the inhibition of the NPM-ALK augments the chemosensitivity of the tumor cells. These results revealed the importance of continuous expression of NPM-ALK in maintaining the growth of ALCL cells. Our data also suggested that the repression of the fusion gene might be a potential novel therapeutic strategy for NPM-ALK positive ALCLs. PMID:17612934

  6. A Case of Lymphomatoid Papulosis Occurred Simultaneously with Ki-1-Positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nam-Su; Cha, Sang-Woo; Hong, Su-Jin; Shin, Won-Yong; Lee, Gyu-Taeg; Jeon, Jin-Woo; Won, Jong-Ho; Baick, Seung-Ho; Hong, Dae-Sik; Park, Hee-Sook

    1997-01-01

    Lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP) is a chronic self-healing skin eruption that is clinically benign but histologically mimics a malignant lymphoma. However, lymphomatoid papulosis with anaplastic large cell lymphoma responds poorly to medical treatments, including chemotherapies. We experienced a 60-year-old male patient with lymphomatoid papulosis occurred simultaneously with relapsed Ki-1-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma who was treated with salvage chemotherapy but, unfortunately, failed to be rescued. We report it with a review of the literature. PMID:9159045

  7. Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Rop, Baiywo; Edison, Michele N; Turner, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a very rare T-cell lymphoma that has only recently been found to be associated with breast implants. It has been described in the literature mainly in the form of case reports. This article focuses on the imaging characteristics of this rare disease. We hope to increase awareness of breast imagers and referring physicians to improve early detection rates. Case Report We present the case of a 32-year-old female who presented with several weeks of pain and firmness in her right breast. MRI and ultrasound demonstrated a peri-implant fluid collection. Ultrasound-guided aspiration revealed anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The patient was treated with implant removal alone and has now been in remission for 3 years.  Conclusion Anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the breast is a very rare entity that has mainly been described in the literature as case reports. As in the case of our patient, imaging findings can be very non-specific, and it is important for surgeons, breast imagers, and oncologists to be aware of this rare disease to ensure prompt diagnosis. PMID:27158575

  8. The therapeutic potential of p53 reactivation by nutlin-3a in ALK+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma with wild-type or mutated p53.

    PubMed

    Drakos, E; Atsaves, V; Schlette, E; Li, J; Papanastasi, I; Rassidakis, G Z; Medeiros, L J

    2009-12-01

    p53 is expressed frequently, but is rarely mutated in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) tumours. Nutlin-3a is a recently developed small molecule that targets Mdm2, a critical negative regulator of p53, and disrupts the p53-Mdm2 interaction resulting in p53 stabilization and activation. We show that nutlin-3a activates p53 in ALK+ ALCL cells carrying a wild type (wt) or mutated but partially functional p53 gene resulting in p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Cell-cycle arrest was associated with upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. Nutlin-3a-induced apoptotic cell death was accompanied by Bax and Puma upregulation, downregulation of Bcl-xl, survivin, and caspase-3 cleavage, and this was reduced when p53-dependent transactivation activity was inhibited by pifithrin-alpha, or when pifithrin-mu was used to inhibit direct p53 targeting of mitochondria. Nutlin-3a sensitized the activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in wt-p53 ALK+ ALCL cells, in part, through upregulation of DR-5 and downregulation of c-Flip(S/L), and was synergistic with TRAIL in cell death induction. In addition, nutlin-3a treatment enhanced doxorubicin cytotoxicity against ALK+ ALCL cells harbouring mt p53, and this was associated with p73 upregulation. These data suggest that disruption of the p53-mdm2 interaction by nutlin-3a offers a novel therapeutic approach for ALK+ ALCL patients. PMID:19741726

  9. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in Association with Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Basheer, Aneesh; Padhi, Somanath; Nagarajan, Ramesh; Boopathy, Vinoth; Mookkappan, Sudhagar; Iqbal, Nayyar

    2014-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) has a well known association with lymphomas, especially of T cell origin. Prognosis of lymphoma associated HLH is very poor, especially in T cell lymphomas; and, therefore, early diagnosis might alter the outcome. Though association of HLH with systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is known, its occurrence in primary cutaneous ALCL (C-ALCL) is distinctly rare. We aim to describe a case of C-ALCL (anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)−) in an elderly male who succumbed to the complication of associated HLH, which was possibly triggered by coexistent virus infection. We briefly present the literatures on lymphoma associated HLH and discuss the histopathological differentials of cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders. We do suggest that HLH may pose diagnostic challenges in the evaluation of an underlying lymphoma and hence warrants proper evaluation for the underlying etiologies and/or triggering factors. PMID:25405042

  10. Pediatric anaplastic large cell lymphoma misdiagnosed as multiple organ abscesses: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenmin; Zuo, Yunlong; Yang, Yiyu; Tao, Jianping; Hong, Jie; Wu, Zhiyuan; Chen, Feiyan; Dang, Run; Liang, Yufeng; Li, Yang; Liu, Dabo

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 6-year-old male with fever, left maxillofacial swelling, cervical and mediastinal masses, and lymphadenopathy who developed respiratory failure and shock caused by tracheal compression and superior vena cava reflux disorder. The initial diagnosis was maxillary sinus, cervical, and mediastinal abscesses. Initial treatments included maxillary sinus abscess resection, neck abscess incision drainage, and antibiotics. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) was diagnosed ultimately according to pathological and immunohistochemical examination of cervical lesion biopsy tissue. We analyze the reasons for misdiagnosis by comparing clinical and pathological features of ALCL to other systemic illnesses that cause lymphadenopathy. PMID:26770602

  11. Novel Technique for Sampling of Breast Implant–associated Seroma in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    T’Kindt, Johan; Mertens, Marianne; Colpaert, Steven D. M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We describe a novel technique for the sampling of breast implant–associated seroma. Using a blunt-tip lipofilling cannula, we have the freedom of movement to sample all fluid collections and prevent the misfortunes of damaging the implant. Also, we have demonstrated the inability of the Coleman style I lipofilling cannula to perforate a silicone breast implant. This practical and reliable technique will prove to be useful in managing the breast implant–associated seroma, especially with the rising incidence of the anaplastic large cell lymphoma, where the sampling of seroma is mandatory. PMID:27200250

  12. Pediatric anaplastic large cell lymphoma misdiagnosed as multiple organ abscesses: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenmin; Zuo, Yunlong; Yang, Yiyu; Tao, Jianping; Hong, Jie; Wu, Zhiyuan; Chen, Feiyan; Dang, Run; Liang, Yufeng; Li, Yang; Liu, Dabo

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 6-year-old male with fever, left maxillofacial swelling, cervical and mediastinal masses, and lymphadenopathy who developed respiratory failure and shock caused by tracheal compression and superior vena cava reflux disorder. The initial diagnosis was maxillary sinus, cervical, and mediastinal abscesses. Initial treatments included maxillary sinus abscess resection, neck abscess incision drainage, and antibiotics. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) was diagnosed ultimately according to pathological and immunohistochemical examination of cervical lesion biopsy tissue. We analyze the reasons for misdiagnosis by comparing clinical and pathological features of ALCL to other systemic illnesses that cause lymphadenopathy. PMID:26770602

  13. Cardiac Tamponade Associated with the Presentation of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma in a 2-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Mira-Perceval Juan, Gema; Alcalá Minagorre, Pedro J.; Huertas Sánchez, Ana M.; Segura Sánchez, Sheila; López Iniesta, Silvia; De León Marrero, Francisco J.; Costa Navarro, Estela; Niveiro de Jaime, María

    2015-01-01

    The anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a rare entity in pediatric patients. We present an unusual case of pericardial involvement, quite uncommon as extranodal presentation of this type of disorder, that provoked a life-risk situation requiring an urgent pericardiocentesis. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a child with pericardial involvement without an associated cardiac mass secondary to anaplastic large cell lymphoma in pediatric age. We report the case of a 21-month-old Caucasian male infant with cardiac tamponade associated with the presentation of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Initially, the child presented with 24-day prolonged fever syndrome, cutaneous lesions associated with hepatomegaly, inguinal adenopathies, and pneumonia. After a 21-day asymptomatic period, polypnea and tachycardia were detected in a clinical check-up. Chest X-ray revealed a remarkable increase of the cardiothoracic index. The anaplastic large cell lymphoma has a high incidence of extranodal involvement but myocardial or pericardial involvements are rare. For this reason, we recommend a close monitoring of patients with a differential diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. PMID:26435869

  14. Peptides derived from the dependence receptor ALK are proapoptotic for ALK-positive tumors

    PubMed Central

    Aubry, A; Galiacy, S; Ceccato, L; Marchand, C; Tricoire, C; Lopez, F; Bremner, R; Racaud-Sultan, C; Monsarrat, B; Malecaze, F; Allouche, M

    2015-01-01

    ALK is a receptor tyrosine kinase with an oncogenic role in various types of human malignancies. Despite constitutive activation of the kinase through gene alterations, such as chromosomal translocation, gene amplification or mutation, treatments with kinase inhibitors invariably lead to the development of resistance. Aiming to develop new tools for ALK targeting, we took advantage of our previous demonstration identifying ALK as a dependence receptor, implying that in the absence of ligand the kinase-inactive ALK triggers or enhances apoptosis. Here, we synthesized peptides mimicking the proapoptotic domain of ALK and investigated their biological effects on tumor cells. We found that an ALK-derived peptide of 36 amino acids (P36) was cytotoxic for ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma and neuroblastoma cell lines. In contrast, ALK-negative tumor cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells were insensitive to P36. The cytotoxic effect was due to caspase-dependent apoptosis and required N-myristoylation of the peptide. Two P36-derived shorter peptides as well as a cyclic peptide also induced apoptosis. Surface plasmon resonance and mass spectrometry analysis of P36-interacting proteins from two responsive cell lines, Cost lymphoma and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma, uncovered partners that could involve p53-dependent signaling and pre-mRNA splicing. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 rescued these cells from P36-induced apoptosis. Finally, we observed that a treatment combining P36 with the ALK-specific inhibitor crizotinib resulted in additive cytotoxicity. Therefore, ALK-derived peptides could represent a novel targeted therapy for ALK-positive tumors. PMID:25950466

  15. Clinical features and treatment results in children with anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ataş, Erman; Kutluk, M Tezer; Akyüz, Canan; Kale, Gülsev; Varan, Ali; Yalçın, Bilgehan; Aydın, Burça; Büyükpamukçu, Münevver

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) tends to have frequent relapse and good response to salvage chemotherapy. The frequency of ALCL among 1486 Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) cases followed-up since 1972 was 1.5%, however, the percentage was 9.3% in cases diagnosed after 2000. Event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) rates for 23 children were 32.2% and 72.8% at 3 years, respectively. Disseminated diseases, no response to first line treatment, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) negativity were found as significant predictors on survival of ALCL. The proper diagnosis and early referral is essential in these children for a better survival rate. The children with ALK negative status should be monitored carefully because of the poor prognostic factors, and treated differently. The survival rates in this study are need of further improvement since the survival rates with current protocols are achievable at a level more than 80%. This is mainly related with late referral of those children with advanced disease. PMID:27411412

  16. A novel Patient Derived Tumorgraft model with TRAF1-ALK Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma translocation

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Francesco; Todaro, Maria; van der Krogt, Jo-Anne; Boi, Michela; Landra, Indira; Machiorlatti, Rodolfo; Tabbo’, Fabrizio; Messana, Katia; Barreca, Antonella; Novero, Domenico; Gaudiano, Marcello; Aliberti, Sabrina; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Tousseyn, Thomas; Lasorsa, Elena; Crescenzo, Ramona; Bessone, Luca; Ficarra, Elisa; Acquaviva, Andrea; Rinaldi, Andrea; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Longo, Dario Livio; Aime, Silvio; Cheng, Mangeng; Ruggeri, Bruce; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Pileri, Stefano; Tiacci, Enrico; Falini, Brunangelo; Pera-Gresely, Benet; Cerchietti, Leandro; Iqbal, Javeed; Chan, Wing C; Shultz, Leonard D.; Kwee, Ivo; Piva, Roberto; Wlodarska, Iwona; Rabadan, Raul; Bertoni, Francesco; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Although Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphomas (ALCL) carrying Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) have a relatively good prognosis, aggressive forms exist. We have identified a novel translocation, causing the fusion of the TRAF1 and ALK genes, in one patient who presented with a leukemic ALK+ ALCL (ALCL-11). To uncover the mechanisms leading to high-grade ALCL, we developed a human Patient Derived Tumorgraft (hPDT) line. Molecular characterization of primary and PDT cells demonstrated the activation of ALK and of NFkB pathways. Genomic studies of ALCL-11 showed the TP53 loss and the in vivo subclonal expansion of lymphoma cells lacking PRDM1/Blimp-1 and with c-MYC gene amplification. The treatment with proteasome inhibitors of TRAF1-ALK cells led to down-regulation of p50/p52 and lymphoma growth inhibition. Moreover a NFkB gene set classifier stratified ALCL in distinct subsets with different clinical outcome. Moreover, a selective ALK inhibitor (CEP28122) resulted in a significant clinical response of hPDT mice, but the disease could not be eradicated. These data indicate that the activation of NFkB signaling contributes to the neoplastic phenotype of TRAF1-ALK ALCL. ALCL hPDTs are invaluable to validate the role of druggable molecules, predict therapeutic responses and are helpful tools for the implementation of patient specific therapies. PMID:25533804

  17. Synchronous Occurrence of Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma and Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Jae Ho; Lim, Youngkyoung; Lee, You Jin

    2016-01-01

    CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) represent a spectrum of T-cell lymphoma including lymphomatoid papulosis and anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). Epidermis overlying cutaneous CD30+ LPD often shows epidermal hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis, crusting, and ulceration and it is difficult to distinguish from carcinoma such as keratoacanthoma (KA) or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Several cases of pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia mimicking KA or SCC in CD30+ LPD have been reported. The relationship between CD30+ LPD and epithelial proliferations has not yet well understood. It was reported that a variety of mediators, including epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor-α and EGFR from CD30+ LPD could attribute to epidermal hyperplasia. However, separate and distinct SCC occurring in CD30+ LPD has rarely been reported. Herein, we present a rare case of coexistence of SCC and cutaneous ALCL located on the same region. PMID:27489433

  18. Implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the breast: Insight into a poorly understood disease

    PubMed Central

    Weathers, William M; Wolfswinkel, Erik M; Hatef, Daniel A; Lee, Edward I; Hollier, Larry H; Brown, Rodger H

    2013-01-01

    Implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is the subject of much debate in the field of plastic surgery. Only a few published cases have been reported and the rarity of the disease may make proving causality exceedingly difficult. Despite this, it is of utmost importance that full attention be devoted to this subject to ensure the safety and well-being of patients. The authors report one new case of implant-associated ALCL that recently presented to their institution. Implant-associated ALCL is a poorly understood disease. It should likely be considered its own clinical entity and categorized into two subtypes: one presenting as a seroma and the other as a distinct mass or masses. When reported, only textured implants have been associated with ALCL. The United States Food and Drug Administration and American Society of Plastic Surgeons have initiated a registry and have collected critical data to gain further understanding of this disease. PMID:24431950

  19. Isolated cutaneous involvement in a child with nodal anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mendiratta, Vibhu; Gandhi, Nikita; Rana, Shiwangi; Shukla, Shailaja

    2016-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is a common childhood T-cell and B-cell neoplasm that originates primarily from lymphoid tissue. Cutaneous involvement can be in the form of a primary extranodal lymphoma, or secondary to metastasis from a non-cutaneous location. The latter is uncommon, and isolated cutaneous involvement is rarely reported. We report a case of isolated secondary cutaneous involvement from nodal anaplastic large cell lymphoma (CD30 + and ALK +) in a 7-year-old boy who was on chemotherapy. This case is reported for its unusual clinical presentation as an acute febrile, generalized papulonodular eruption that mimicked deep fungal infection, with the absence of other foci of systemic metastasis. PMID:26728811

  20. Chemotherapy-resistant breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Muralidharan; Orrell, Julian; Mortimer, Caroline; Ball, Liz

    2013-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with a few weeks’ history of discomfort and swelling in her left breast. She had undergone bilateral breast augmentation 8 years previously. There were no risk factors for breast cancer. Clinical examination, mammography and breast ultrasound revealed a large left breast mass adjacent to the breast implant with enlarged axillary lymph nodes. Owing to diagnostic uncertainty, core biopsies were sent to a specialist unit which confirmed breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma with involved lymph nodes. Staging investigations confirmed no distant disease. The lymphoma multidisciplinary team recommended cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone chemotherapy, followed by implant removal and local radiotherapy. However, the patient's disease progressed on first-line, and then second-line chemotherapy. She therefore had a mastectomy and axillary node clearance followed by radiotherapy, with a planned delayed left breast reconstruction and removal of the right breast implant. PMID:24285813

  1. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma arises in thymocytes and requires transient TCR expression for thymic egress

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, Tim I. M.; Villarese, Patrick; Fairbairn, Camilla J.; Lamant, Laurence; Trinquand, Amélie; Hook, C. Elizabeth; Burke, G. A. Amos; Brugières, Laurence; Hughes, Katherine; Payet, Dominique; Merkel, Olaf; Schiefer, Ana-Iris; Ashankyty, Ibraheem; Mian, Shahid; Wasik, Mariusz; Turner, Martin; Kenner, Lukas; Asnafi, Vahid; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Turner, Suzanne D.

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a peripheral T-cell lymphoma presenting mostly in children and young adults. The natural progression of this disease is largely unknown as is the identity of its true cell of origin. Here we present a model of peripheral ALCL pathogenesis where the malignancy is initiated in early thymocytes, before T-cell receptor (TCR) β-rearrangement, which is bypassed in CD4/NPM–ALK transgenic mice following Notch1 expression. However, we find that a TCR is required for thymic egress and development of peripheral murine tumours, yet this TCR must be downregulated for T-cell lymphomagenesis. In keeping with this, clonal TCR rearrangements in human ALCL are predominantly in-frame, but often aberrant, with clonal TCRα but no comparable clonal TCRβ rearrangement, yielding events that would not normally be permissive for survival during thymic development. Children affected by ALCL may thus harbour thymic lymphoma-initiating cells capable of seeding relapse after chemotherapy. PMID:26753883

  2. Large cell anaplastic medulloblastoma metastatic to the scalp: tumor and derived stem-like cells features

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Extraneural metastases (ENM) rarely occur in medulloblastoma (MBL) patients and only few cases of subcutaneous localizations have been described. ENM indicate an aggressive disease associated with a worse prognosis. The characterization of metastatic tumours might be useful to understand their pathogenesis and to identify the most appropriate therapeutic strategies. Case presentation We present the case of a child with Large Cell Anaplastic (LC/A) MBL, who developed multiple subcutaneous metastases in the scalp area after a ventriculo-peritoneal shunting procedure. The disease rapidly progressed and the child died despite chemotherapy and primary tumour surgical debulking. We molecularly classified the tumour as a group 3 MBL; in addition, we derived stem-like cells (SLC) from a metastatic lesion. Primary tumour, metastases and SLC were further analysed, particularly focusing on features linked to the cutaneous dissemination. Indeed, molecules involved in angiogenesis, cell invasion and epidermal growth factor signalling resulted highly expressed. Conclusions The present report describes a very rare case of subcutaneous metastatic MBL. The tumour, metastases and SLC have been clinically, pathologically and molecularly characterized. Our case is an example of multidisciplinary approach aiming to characterize MBL aggressive behaviour. PMID:24739212

  3. Breast Implant Informed Consent Should Include the Risk of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Mark W; Miranda, Roberto N; Butler, Charles E

    2016-04-01

    Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare T-cell lymphoma arising around breast implants. Public awareness has increased following a safety communication warning of the association of breast implant-associated ALCL by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2011. Difficulty with determining an accurate assessment of risk, including diagnosis, or standardized treatment regimen has led surgeons to commonly omit preoperative discussion of this rare and frequently misunderstood cancer. Risk disclosure is a form of respect for patient autonomy, and informed consent has positive practical and moral consequences for the practice of plastic surgery. A model of breast implant-associated ALCL informed consent implementation and health care provider education are reviewed with 1-year process follow-up at a tertiary cancer center. Breast implant-associated ALCL should be included during preoperative counseling on the risks of breast implantation when obtaining informed consent. Pertinent aspects of decision-making include disease awareness, presenting symptoms, and resources for concerned patients. Education of health care professionals and provision of patient-focused materials ensures effectiveness of the informed consent process. PMID:27018666

  4. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma arises in thymocytes and requires transient TCR expression for thymic egress.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Tim I M; Villarese, Patrick; Fairbairn, Camilla J; Lamant, Laurence; Trinquand, Amélie; Hook, C Elizabeth; Burke, G A Amos; Brugières, Laurence; Hughes, Katherine; Payet, Dominique; Merkel, Olaf; Schiefer, Ana-Iris; Ashankyty, Ibraheem; Mian, Shahid; Wasik, Mariusz; Turner, Martin; Kenner, Lukas; Asnafi, Vahid; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Turner, Suzanne D

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a peripheral T-cell lymphoma presenting mostly in children and young adults. The natural progression of this disease is largely unknown as is the identity of its true cell of origin. Here we present a model of peripheral ALCL pathogenesis where the malignancy is initiated in early thymocytes, before T-cell receptor (TCR) β-rearrangement, which is bypassed in CD4/NPM-ALK transgenic mice following Notch1 expression. However, we find that a TCR is required for thymic egress and development of peripheral murine tumours, yet this TCR must be downregulated for T-cell lymphomagenesis. In keeping with this, clonal TCR rearrangements in human ALCL are predominantly in-frame, but often aberrant, with clonal TCRα but no comparable clonal TCRβ rearrangement, yielding events that would not normally be permissive for survival during thymic development. Children affected by ALCL may thus harbour thymic lymphoma-initiating cells capable of seeding relapse after chemotherapy. PMID:26753883

  5. Successful Treatment in a Child with Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma and Coexistence of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Baka, Margarita; Pourtsidis, Apostolos; Tsolia, Maria; Bouhoutsou, Despina; Varvoutsi, Maria; Strantzia, Katerina; Kosmidis, Helen

    2013-01-01

    A 13-year-old girl was admitted to our department with a history of severe pain of her left axilla and fever. On physical examination, a block of lymph nodes in her left axilla, diffuse papular rash, and red-violet swelling of her supraclavicular and subclavian region were noted. Imaging investigations revealed left axillar and supraclavicular lymphadenopathy and a small nodular shade in the upper lobe of her left lung. A biopsy from an axillary lymph node established the diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), whereas DNA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the same tissue biopsy. Patient was started on chemotherapy for ALCL and achieved remission of all initially involved fields. Nevertheless, two new nodular lesions were detected in the left lower lobe. Biopsy revealed granulomas, and PCR was positive for M. tuberculosis. Our patient received treatment with the combination of isoniazid and rifampin (12 months), pyrazinamide (the first 2 months), and maintenance chemotherapy for her ALCL for one year simultaneously. Four years later, she is disease free for both mycobacterial infection and lymphoma. We are reporting this successful management of mycobacterial infection in a patient with ALCL despite intensive chemotherapy that the patient received at the same time. PMID:23841007

  6. Successful treatment in a child with anaplastic large cell lymphoma and coexistence of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Baka, Margarita; Doganis, Dimitrios; Pourtsidis, Apostolos; Tsolia, Maria; Bouhoutsou, Despina; Varvoutsi, Maria; Strantzia, Katerina; Kosmidis, Helen

    2013-01-01

    A 13-year-old girl was admitted to our department with a history of severe pain of her left axilla and fever. On physical examination, a block of lymph nodes in her left axilla, diffuse papular rash, and red-violet swelling of her supraclavicular and subclavian region were noted. Imaging investigations revealed left axillar and supraclavicular lymphadenopathy and a small nodular shade in the upper lobe of her left lung. A biopsy from an axillary lymph node established the diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), whereas DNA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the same tissue biopsy. Patient was started on chemotherapy for ALCL and achieved remission of all initially involved fields. Nevertheless, two new nodular lesions were detected in the left lower lobe. Biopsy revealed granulomas, and PCR was positive for M. tuberculosis. Our patient received treatment with the combination of isoniazid and rifampin (12 months), pyrazinamide (the first 2 months), and maintenance chemotherapy for her ALCL for one year simultaneously. Four years later, she is disease free for both mycobacterial infection and lymphoma. We are reporting this successful management of mycobacterial infection in a patient with ALCL despite intensive chemotherapy that the patient received at the same time. PMID:23841007

  7. Infectious Mimicry Complicates Diagnosis in Hemophagocytic Syndrome Caused by Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Peluso, Michael J.; Chia, David; Sheen, Whitney; Hutchinson, Christoph; Barakat, Lydia

    2012-01-01

    Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) arises secondary to genetic, rheumatologic, neoplastic, and infectious causes. We discuss a patient whose presentation was consistent with systemic infection but was discovered to have HPS of unknown etiology. The presenting symptoms, as well as unremarkable malignancy and rheumatologic workups, led to the pursuit of an infectious cause, but the patient was ultimately discovered to have an occult anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL). This case demonstrates the diagnostic challenges that result from infectious mimicry in the context of HPS—first, in distinguishing noninfectious HPS from the systemic inflammation that can result from a widespread infectious process, second, in the identification of the precipitating cause of HPS. While evidence of these challenges has been suggested by the limited literature on HPS and ALCL, our case illustrates the diagnostic dilemma that arises when tissue biopsy does not quickly reveal an etiology. It is important that all physicians be aware that HPS can mimic infection and be prepared to redirect the workup when an infectious etiology for HPS cannot be identified. PMID:22761627

  8. Patient-reported outcomes of brentuximab vedotin in Hodgkin lymphoma and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Robert; Allibone, Suzanne; Bartlett, Nancy L; Brice, Pauline; Chen, Andy; Pose, Katrina; Rich, Lynn; Bonthapally, Vijay; Garfin, Phillip M; Fanale, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R) Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) or R/R systemic anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (sALCL) treated with brentuximab vedotin (BV) experienced high remission rates in two Phase II trials. With increased response rates and survival times, patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are becoming increasingly important and can help inform treatment decisions to enhance care of cancer patients. Objective The objective was to qualitatively assess HRQoL in long-term survivors treated with BV. Methods An eight-question survey assessing PRO-related aspects was developed and fielded to a subset of patients with HL or sALCL who remained in long-term follow-up after completing BV treatment in the two pivotal studies. Results The survey was completed by 25 of 38 patients (12 with HL, 13 with sALCL). The majority of patients reported that their energy level, outlook on life, difficulties with daily activities, ability to participate in physical activities, and overall HRQoL improved compared to those before BV treatment. Limitations Small sample size and lack of a baseline questionnaire or validated assessment instrument limit broad applicability of these findings to large populations of patients with HL or sALCL. Conclusion This is the first report of BV PRO data in R/R HL and sALCL. Given the patients’ poor prognostic outcomes before stem cell transplant, these encouraging results warrant formal evaluation of PRO end points in BV trials. PMID:27103829

  9. Treatment of Primary Cutaneous CD30+ Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, James B.; McNiff, Jennifer M.; Lund, Molly W.; Wilson, Lynn D.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Primary cutaneous CD30+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (CALCL) is a relatively rare and indolent variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). This report examines the response of localized disease to radiation alone. Methods: The Yale Cancer Center records were examined, and all patients with CTCL from January 1, 2001, to September 1, 2006, evaluated in the Department of Therapeutic Radiology were identified. Only those patients with localized or single CALCL lesions, no clinical evidence or history of lymphomatoid papulosis, no history of other CTCLs, no history of other skin disorders, lack of lymph node involvement, unambiguous pathology reports, and treatment with radiation alone were included. Results: Eight patients were identified. Median age was 67 years, and gender was split evenly. Patients received radiation ranging from 34 to 44 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Most patients (5 of 8) received 40 Gy, using 6 to 9 MeV electrons with 0.5 to 2 cm of bolus. All patients had a complete response. All patients were without evidence of disease at the most recent follow-up (median follow-up, 12 months). Radiation therapy was well tolerated, and the only recorded toxicity was Grade I to II dermatitis. Conclusions: Radiation therapy alone for localized CALCL is very well tolerated and clinical response is excellent. A dose of 40 Gy in 2-Gy fractions seems to be well tolerated and effective in inducing a complete response. Lower doses may be effective in achieving the same result, but data are not available. Longer follow-up is necessary before conclusions regarding durable disease-free survival can be made.

  10. Breast Implant–associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma: Updated Results from a Structured Expert Consultation Process

    PubMed Central

    Predmore, Zachary S.; Mattke, Soeren; van Busum, Kristin; Gidengil, Courtney A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite increased cases published on breast implant–associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL), important clinical issues remain unanswered. We conducted a second structured expert consultation process to rate statements related to the diagnosis, management, and surveillance of this disease, based on their interpretation of published evidence. Methods: A multidisciplinary panel of 12 experts was selected based on nominations from national specialty societies, academic department heads, and recognized researchers in the United States. Results: Panelists agreed that (1) this disease should be called “BIA-ALCL”; (2) late seromas occurring >1 year after breast implantation should be evaluated via ultrasound, and if a seroma is present, the fluid should be aspirated and sent for culture, cytology, flow cytometry, and cell block to an experienced hematopathologist; (3) surgical removal of the affected implant and capsule (as completely as possible) should occur, which is sufficient to eradicate capsule-confined BIA-ALCL; (4) surveillance should consist of clinical follow-up at least every 6 months for at least 5 years and breast ultrasound yearly for at least 2 years; and (5) BIA-ALCL is generally a biologically indolent disease with a good prognosis, unless it extends beyond the capsule and/or presents as a mass. They firmly disagreed with statements that chemotherapy and radiation therapy should be given to all patients with BIA-ALCL. Conclusions: Our assessment yielded consistent results on a number of key, incompletely addressed issues regarding BIA-ALCL, but additional research is needed to support these statement ratings and enhance our understanding of the biology, treatment, and outcomes associated with this disease. PMID:25674377

  11. CD13-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma of T-cell origin--a diagnostic and histogenetic problem.

    PubMed

    Popnikolov, N K; Payne, D A; Hudnall, S D; Hawkins, H K; Kumar, M; Norris, B A; Elghetany, M T

    2000-12-01

    The expression of myelomonocytic-associated antigens in anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCLs), particularly those presenting in extranodal sites, can make their distinction from extramedullary myeloid cell tumors (EMCTs) or histiocytic tumors problematic. Yet, this distinction is clinically significant because of its therapeutic and prognostic implications. Herein, we describe a case of extranodal anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive CD30-positive ALCL of T-cell origin in a 12-year-old boy, which was initially called an EMCT because of the expression of CD13 and HLA-DR detected by flow cytometry and the absence of other T-cell-related surface markers. However, the detection of cytoplasmic CD3 by flow cytometry prompted further studies. The tumor was composed of large cells with abundant slightly eosinophilic vacuolated cytoplasm and ovoid or reniform nuclei with a few small nucleoli. Using immunohistochemistry, the tumor was positive for CD45, CD30, CD45RO, and CD43 with a strong cytoplasmic and nuclear anaplastic lymphoma kinase stain. The tumor cells showed a T-cell clonal genotype. Electron microscopy revealed no ultrastructural features of myelomonocytic or histiocytic origin. The patient responded well to the chemotherapy and was in complete remission for 10 months at the time of submission of this manuscript. Review of the literature showed inconsistencies regarding the diagnosis, nomenclature, and, therefore, treatment and prognosis of these tumors. In addition, the CD13 expression in ALCL raises some histogenetic questions and may indicate origin from a pluripotent stem cell, misprogramming during malignant transformation, or a microenvironmental effect on lymphoid cell expression of surface antigens. Therefore, ALCL should be considered in the differential diagnosis of EMCTs or histiocytic tumors, particularly when surface marker lineage assignment is ambiguous. PMID:11100061

  12. Successful Chemo-Radiotherapy for Primary Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma of the Lung: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Liu, Yongmei; Chen, Huijiao; Zhang, Yan; Du, Zedong; Wang, Jin; Wang, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 39 Final Diagnosis: Primary anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the lung Symptoms: Hemoptysis • palpitation • shortness of breath Medication: Cyclophosphamide • Doxorubicin • Vincristine • Prednisone Clinical Procedure: Chemoradiotherapy Specialty: Oncology Objective: Rare disease Background: Primary anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) of the lung is an extremely rare disease. This disease is a great challenge for pneumologists due to its nonspecific clinical presentations and radiological findings. Appropriate invasive biopsy and immunohistochemistry are important for diagnosis. There is currently no standard treatment. Case Report: We report a very rare case of primary pulmonary ALCL in a 39-year-old man. The clinical features, imaging, pathological findings, treatment outcomes, and prognosis, are described. Successful treatment outcomes were achieved after 6 cycles of CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone) chemotherapy followed by involved field radiotherapy of 54Gy/27f. The patient was disease-free after follow-up for 65 months. Conclusions: Our study found that chemotherapy (such as CHOP) is recognized as the first-line regimen for primary ALCL of the lung. For patients with dyspnea caused by a mass blocking the main bronchus, chemoradiotherapy may be a reasonable therapeutic option. The prognosis is better for patients with positive ALK staining. CD56(+), age older than 60 years, Ann Arbor stage III or IV, survivin expression, PS>2, and high serum LDH level and IPI scores are the poor prognostic factors of ALCL. PMID:26852792

  13. A novel patient-derived tumorgraft model with TRAF1-ALK anaplastic large-cell lymphoma translocation.

    PubMed

    Abate, F; Todaro, M; van der Krogt, J-A; Boi, M; Landra, I; Machiorlatti, R; Tabbò, F; Messana, K; Abele, C; Barreca, A; Novero, D; Gaudiano, M; Aliberti, S; Di Giacomo, F; Tousseyn, T; Lasorsa, E; Crescenzo, R; Bessone, L; Ficarra, E; Acquaviva, A; Rinaldi, A; Ponzoni, M; Longo, D L; Aime, S; Cheng, M; Ruggeri, B; Piccaluga, P P; Pileri, S; Tiacci, E; Falini, B; Pera-Gresely, B; Cerchietti, L; Iqbal, J; Chan, W C; Shultz, L D; Kwee, I; Piva, R; Wlodarska, I; Rabadan, R; Bertoni, F; Inghirami, G

    2015-06-01

    Although anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCL) carrying anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have a relatively good prognosis, aggressive forms exist. We have identified a novel translocation, causing the fusion of the TRAF1 and ALK genes, in one patient who presented with a leukemic ALK+ ALCL (ALCL-11). To uncover the mechanisms leading to high-grade ALCL, we developed a human patient-derived tumorgraft (hPDT) line. Molecular characterization of primary and PDT cells demonstrated the activation of ALK and nuclear factor kB (NFkB) pathways. Genomic studies of ALCL-11 showed the TP53 loss and the in vivo subclonal expansion of lymphoma cells, lacking PRDM1/Blimp1 and carrying c-MYC gene amplification. The treatment with proteasome inhibitors of TRAF1-ALK cells led to the downregulation of p50/p52 and lymphoma growth inhibition. Moreover, a NFkB gene set classifier stratified ALCL in distinct subsets with different clinical outcome. Although a selective ALK inhibitor (CEP28122) resulted in a significant clinical response of hPDT mice, nevertheless the disease could not be eradicated. These data indicate that the activation of NFkB signaling contributes to the neoplastic phenotype of TRAF1-ALK ALCL. ALCL hPDTs are invaluable tools to validate the role of druggable molecules, predict therapeutic responses and implement patient specific therapies. PMID:25533804

  14. Biomarkers Provide Clues to Early Events in the Pathogenesis of Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kadin, Marshall E; Deva, Anand; Xu, Haiying; Morgan, John; Khare, Pranay; MacLeod, Roderick A F; Van Natta, Bruce W; Adams, William P; Brody, Garry S; Epstein, Alan L

    2016-07-01

    Almost 200 women worldwide have been diagnosed with breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL). The unique location and specific lymphoma type strongly suggest an etio-pathologic link between breast implants and BIA-ALCL. It is postulated that chronic inflammation via bacterial infection may be an etiological factor. BIA-ALCL resembles primary cutaneous ALCL (pcALCL) in morphology, activated T-cell phenotype, and indolent clinical course. Gene expression array analysis, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry were used to study pcALCL and BIA-ALCL cell lines. Clinical samples were also studied to characterize transcription factor and cytokine profiles of tumor cells and surrounding lymphocytes. BIA-ALCL and pcALCL were found to have common expression of transcription factors SOCS3, JunB, SATB1, and a cytokine profile suggestive of a Th1 phenotype. Similar patterns were observed in a CD30+ cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD). The patterns of cytokine and transcription factor expression suggest that BIA-ALCL is likely to arise from chronic bacterial antigen stimulation of T-cells. Further analysis of cytokine and transcription factor profiles may allow early detection and treatment of BIA-ALCL leading to better prognosis and survival. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 5: Risk. PMID:26979456

  15. Canadian consensus: inhibition of ALK-positive tumours in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Melosky, B.; Agulnik, J.; Albadine, R.; Banerji, S.; Bebb, D.G.; Bethune, D.; Blais, N.; Butts, C.; Cheema, P.; Cheung, P.; Cohen, V.; Deschenes, J.; Ionescu, D.N.; Juergens, R.; Kamel-Reid, S.; Laurie, S.A.; Liu, G.; Morzycki, W.; Tsao, M.S.; Xu, Z.; Hirsh, V.

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (alk) is an oncogenic driver in non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc). Chromosomal rearrangements involving the ALK gene occur in up to 4% of nonsquamous nsclc patients and lead to constitutive activation of the alk signalling pathway. ALK-positive nsclc is found in relatively young patients, with a median age of 50 years. Patients frequently have brain metastasis. Targeted inhibition of the alk pathway prolongs progression-free survival in patients with ALK-positive advanced nsclc. The results of several recent clinical trials confirm the efficacy and safety benefit of crizotinib and ceritinib in this population. Canadian oncologists support the following consensus statement: All patients with advanced nonsquamous nsclc (excluding pure neuroendocrine carcinoma) should be tested for the presence of an ALK rearrangement. If an ALK rearrangement is present, treatment with a targeted alk inhibitor in the first-line setting is recommended. As patients become resistant to first-generation alk inhibitors, other treatments, including second-generation alk inhibitors can be considered. PMID:27330348

  16. Clinical Utility of Circulating Tumor Cells in ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Faugeroux, Vincent; Pailler, Emma; Auger, Nathalie; Taylor, Melissa; Farace, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    The advent of rationally targeted therapies such as small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has considerably transformed the therapeutic management of a subset of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring defined molecular abnormalities. When such genetic molecular alterations are detected the use of specific TKI has demonstrated better results (overall response rate, progression free survival) compared to systemic therapy. However, the detection of such molecular abnormalities is complicated by the difficulty in obtaining sufficient tumor material, in terms of quantity and quality, from a biopsy. Here, we described how circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can have a clinical utility in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive NSCLC patients to diagnose ALK-EML4 gene rearrangement and to guide therapeutic management of these patients. The ability to detect genetic abnormalities such ALK rearrangement in CTCs shows that these cells could offer new perspectives both for the diagnosis and the monitoring of ALK-positive patients eligible for treatment with ALK inhibitors. PMID:25414829

  17. Clinical Utility of Circulating Tumor Cells in ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Faugeroux, Vincent; Pailler, Emma; Auger, Nathalie; Taylor, Melissa; Farace, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    The advent of rationally targeted therapies such as small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has considerably transformed the therapeutic management of a subset of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring defined molecular abnormalities. When such genetic molecular alterations are detected the use of specific TKI has demonstrated better results (overall response rate, progression free survival) compared to systemic therapy. However, the detection of such molecular abnormalities is complicated by the difficulty in obtaining sufficient tumor material, in terms of quantity and quality, from a biopsy. Here, we described how circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can have a clinical utility in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive NSCLC patients to diagnose ALK-EML4 gene rearrangement and to guide therapeutic management of these patients. The ability to detect genetic abnormalities such ALK rearrangement in CTCs shows that these cells could offer new perspectives both for the diagnosis and the monitoring of ALK-positive patients eligible for treatment with ALK inhibitors. PMID:25414829

  18. Canadian consensus: inhibition of ALK-positive tumours in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Melosky, B; Agulnik, J; Albadine, R; Banerji, S; Bebb, D G; Bethune, D; Blais, N; Butts, C; Cheema, P; Cheung, P; Cohen, V; Deschenes, J; Ionescu, D N; Juergens, R; Kamel-Reid, S; Laurie, S A; Liu, G; Morzycki, W; Tsao, M S; Xu, Z; Hirsh, V

    2016-06-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (alk) is an oncogenic driver in non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc). Chromosomal rearrangements involving the ALK gene occur in up to 4% of nonsquamous nsclc patients and lead to constitutive activation of the alk signalling pathway. ALK-positive nsclc is found in relatively young patients, with a median age of 50 years. Patients frequently have brain metastasis. Targeted inhibition of the alk pathway prolongs progression-free survival in patients with ALK-positive advanced nsclc. The results of several recent clinical trials confirm the efficacy and safety benefit of crizotinib and ceritinib in this population. Canadian oncologists support the following consensus statement: All patients with advanced nonsquamous nsclc (excluding pure neuroendocrine carcinoma) should be tested for the presence of an ALK rearrangement. If an ALK rearrangement is present, treatment with a targeted alk inhibitor in the first-line setting is recommended. As patients become resistant to first-generation alk inhibitors, other treatments, including second-generation alk inhibitors can be considered. PMID:27330348

  19. Oncogenic role of miR-155 in anaplastic large cell lymphoma lacking the t(2;5) translocation

    PubMed Central

    Merkel, Olaf; Hamacher, Frank; Griessl, Robert; Grabner, Lisa; Schiefer, Ana-Iris; Prutsch, Nicole; Baer, Constance; Egger, Gerda; Schlederer, Michaela; Krenn, Peter William; Hartmann, Tanja Nicole; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Plass, Christoph; Staber, Philipp Bernhard; Moriggl, Richard; Turner, Suzanne D; Greil, Richard; Kenner, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare, aggressive, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that is characterized by CD30 expression and disease onset in young patients. About half of ALCL patients bear the t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocation, which results in the formation of the nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma tyrosine kinase (NPM–ALK) fusion protein (ALCL ALK+). However, little is known about the molecular features and tumour drivers in ALK-negative ALCL (ALCL ALK−), which is characterized by a worse prognosis. We found that ALCL ALK−, in contrast to ALCL ALK+, lymphomas display high miR-155 expression. Consistent with this, we observed an inverse correlation between miR-155 promoter methylation and miR-155 expression in ALCL. However, no direct effect of the ALK kinase on miR-155 levels was observed. Ago2 immunoprecipitation revealed miR-155 as the most abundant miRNA, and enrichment of target mRNAs C/EBPβ and SOCS1. To investigate its function, we over-expressed miR-155 in ALCL ALK+ cell lines and demonstrated reduced levels of C/EBPβ and SOCS1. In murine engraftment models of ALCL ALK−, we showed that anti-miR-155 mimics are able to reduce tumour growth. This goes hand-in-hand with increased levels of cleaved caspase-3 and high SOCS1 in these tumours, which leads to suppression of STAT3 signalling. Moreover, miR-155 induces IL-22 expression and suppresses the C/EBPβ target IL-8. These data suggest that miR-155 can act as a tumour driver in ALCL ALK− and blocking miR-155 could be therapeutically relevant. Original miRNA array data are to be found in the supplementary material (Table S1). © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. PMID:25820993

  20. Complete Surgical Excision Is Essential for the Management of Patients With Breast Implant–Associated Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Mark W.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Butler, Charles E.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Fanale, Michelle A.; Horwitz, Steven; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Liu, Jun; Morgan, Elizabeth A.; Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi; Parkash, Vinita; Ning, Jing; Sohani, Aliyah R.; Ferry, Judith A.; Mehta-Shah, Neha; Dogan, Ahmed; Liu, Hui; Thormann, Nora; Di Napoli, Arianna; Lade, Stephen; Piccolini, Jorge; Reyes, Ruben; Williams, Travis; McCarthy, Colleen M.; Hanson, Summer E.; Nastoupil, Loretta J.; Gaur, Rakesh; Oki, Yasuhiro; Young, Ken H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Breast implant–associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (BI-ALCL) is a rare type of T-cell lymphoma that arises around breast implants. The optimal management of this disease has not been established. The goal of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of different therapies used in patients with BI-ALCL to determine an optimal treatment approach. Patients and Methods In this study, we applied strict criteria to pathologic findings, assessed therapies used, and conducted a clinical follow-up of 87 patients with BI-ALCL, including 50 previously reported in the literature and 37 unreported. A Prentice, Williams, and Peterson model was used to assess the rate of events for each therapeutic intervention. Results The median and mean follow-up times were 45 and 30 months, respectively (range, 3 to 217 months). The median overall survival (OS) time after diagnosis of BI-ALCL was 13 years, and the OS rate was 93% and 89% at 3 and 5 years, respectively. Patients with lymphoma confined by the fibrous capsule surrounding the implant had better event-free survival (EFS) and OS than did patients with lymphoma that had spread beyond the capsule (P = .03). Patients who underwent a complete surgical excision that consisted of total capsulectomy with breast implant removal had better OS (P = .022) and EFS (P = .014) than did patients who received partial capsulectomy, systemic chemotherapy, or radiation therapy. Conclusion Surgical management with complete surgical excision is essential to achieve optimal EFS in patients with BI-ALCL. PMID:26628470

  1. Breast Implant–Associated Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma: Long-Term Follow-Up of 60 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Roberto N.; Aladily, Tariq N.; Prince, H. Miles; Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi; de Jong, Daphne; Fayad, Luis E.; Amin, Mitual B.; Haideri, Nisreen; Bhagat, Govind; Brooks, Glen S.; Shifrin, David A.; O'Malley, Dennis P.; Cheah, Chan Y.; Bacchi, Carlos E.; Gualco, Gabriela; Li, Shiyong; Keech, John A.; Hochberg, Ephram P.; Carty, Matthew J.; Hanson, Summer E.; Mustafa, Eid; Sanchez, Steven; Manning, John T.; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y.; Miranda, Alonso R.; Fox, Patricia; Bassett, Roland L.; Castillo, Jorge J.; Beltran, Brady E.; de Boer, Jan Paul; Chakhachiro, Zaher; Ye, Dongjiu; Clark, Douglas; Young, Ken H.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Breast implant–associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a recently described clinicopathologic entity that usually presents as an effusion-associated fibrous capsule surrounding an implant. Less frequently, it presents as a mass. The natural history of this disease and long-term outcomes are unknown. Patients and Methods We reviewed the literature for all published cases of breast implant–associated ALCL from 1997 to December 2012 and contacted corresponding authors to update clinical follow-up. Results The median overall survival (OS) for 60 patients was 12 years (median follow-up, 2 years; range, 0-14 years). Capsulectomy and implant removal was performed on 56 of 60 patients (93%). Therapeutic data were available for 55 patients: 39 patients (78%) received systemic chemotherapy, and of the 16 patients (28%) who did not receive chemotherapy, 12 patients opted for watchful waiting and four patients received radiation therapy alone. Thirty-nine (93%) of 42 patients with disease confined by the fibrous capsule achieved complete remission, compared with complete remission in 13 (72%) of 18 patients with a tumor mass. Patients with a breast mass had worse OS and progression-free survival (PFS; P = .052 and P = .03, respectively). The OS or PFS were similar between patients who received and did not receive chemotherapy (P = .44 and P = .28, respectively). Conclusion Most patients with breast implant–associated ALCL who had disease confined within the fibrous capsule achieved complete remission. Proper management for these patients may be limited to capsulectomy and implant removal. Patients who present with a mass have a more aggressive clinical course that may be fatal, justifying cytotoxic chemotherapy in addition to removal of implants. PMID:24323027

  2. Breast implant-associated ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma: a case report and discussion of possible pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    George, Eva V; Pharm, John; Houston, Courtney; Al-Quran, Semar; Brian, Grey; Dong, Huijia; Hai, Wang; Reeves, Westley; Yang, Li-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Breast implant associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL) is a recently recognized clinical entity, with only 39 well-documented cases reported worldwide, including 3 fatalities. Because of its rarity, the clinical and pathologic features of this malignancy have yet to be fully defined. Moreover, the pathogenesis of ALCL in association with textured silicone gel breast implants is poorly understood. Here we report a case of BIA-ALCL arising in a 67-year-old woman with a mastectomy due to breast cancer followed by implantation of textured silicone gel breast prosthesis. The patient presented with breast enlargement and tenderness 8 years following reconstructive surgery. MRI revealed a fluid collection surrounding the affected breast implant. Pathologic examination confirmed the presence of malignant ALCL T cells that were CD30+, CD8+, CD15+, HLA-DR+, CD25+ ALK- and p53. A diagnosis of indolent BIA-ALCL was made since tumor cells were not found outside of the capsule. Interestingly, an extensive mixed lymphocytic infiltrate and ectopic lymphoid tissue (lymphoid neogenesis) adjacent to the fibrous implant capsule were present. The patient was treated with capsulectomy and implantation of new breast prostheses. Six months later, the patient was found to have BIA-ALCL involvement of an axillary lymph node with cytogenetic evolutionof the tumor. To our knowledge, this is the sixth reported case of aggressive BIA-ALCL. Unique features of this case include the association with lymphoid neogenesis and the in vivo cytogenetic progression of the tumor. This case provides insight into the potential role of chronic inflammation and genetic instability in the pathogenesis of BIA-ALCL. PMID:23923082

  3. Breast implant-associated ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma: a case report and discussion of possible pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    George, Eva V; Pharm, John; Houston, Courtney; Al-Quran, Semar; Brian, Grey; Dong, Huijia; Hai, Wang; Reeves, Westley; Yang, Li-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Breast implant associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL) is a recently recognized clinical entity, with only 39 well-documented cases reported worldwide, including 3 fatalities. Because of its rarity, the clinical and pathologic features of this malignancy have yet to be fully defined. Moreover, the pathogenesis of ALCL in association with textured silicone gel breast implants is poorly understood. Here we report a case of BIA-ALCL arising in a 67-year-old woman with a mastectomy due to breast cancer followed by implantation of textured silicone gel breast prosthesis. The patient presented with breast enlargement and tenderness 8 years following reconstructive surgery. MRI revealed a fluid collection surrounding the affected breast implant. Pathologic examination confirmed the presence of malignant ALCL T cells that were CD30+, CD8+, CD15+, HLA-DR+, CD25+ ALK- and p53. A diagnosis of indolent BIA-ALCL was made since tumor cells were not found outside of the capsule. Interestingly, an extensive mixed lymphocytic infiltrate and ectopic lymphoid tissue (lymphoid neogenesis) adjacent to the fibrous implant capsule were present. The patient was treated with capsulectomy and implantation of new breast prostheses. Six months later, the patient was found to have BIA-ALCL involvement of an axillary lymph node with cytogenetic evolution of the tumor. To our knowledge, this is the sixth reported case of aggressive BIA-ALCL. Unique features of this case include the association with lymphoid neogenesis and the in vivo cytogenetic progression of the tumor. This case provides insight into the potential role of chronic inflammation and genetic instability in the pathogenesis of BIA-ALCL. PMID:23923082

  4. High levels of p53 protein expression do not correlate with p53 gene mutations in anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Cesarman, E.; Inghirami, G.; Chadburn, A.; Knowles, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    Strong immunohistochemical reactivity for p53 tumor suppressor gene product has been reported in a variety of different human malignancies including CD30- (Ki-1) positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). Although high levels of p53 protein have been interpreted as abnormal, rapidly proliferating benign and neoplastic lymphoid cells may have increased p53 expression in the absence of structural alterations. On the other hand, mutations in the p53 gene can lead to a lack of p53 protein production. Structural alterations of the p53 gene have not been documented in cases of ALCL and the mechanism for an abnormal pattern of p53 expression in these lymphomas has not been elucidated. Therefore, to determine whether an altered pattern of p53 expression correlates with mutations in the p53 locus in ALCL, we analyzed the expression of p53 protein immunohistochemically, compared it with the proliferation index using monoclonal antibody Ki-67, and assessed the presence of mutations in exons 5 though 9 of the p53 gene using a single-strand conformation polymorphism assay in a panel of 17 ALCLs. Furthermore, we studied the presence of allelic deletions of chromosome 17p by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. We found significant levels of p53 protein expression in 12 of the 15 cases studied, but identified mutations in only one of 17 cases. An allelic deletion in chromosome 17p was identified only in the one case containing a mutated p53 gene. Whereas the case containing structural alterations in the p53 gene did have strong p53 immunoreactivity, 11 cases that lacked p53 mutations in the regions examined also had significant levels of p53. Thus, our studies indicate that strong immunohistochemical reactivity for p53 is not a reliable indicator of the presence of structural alterations of p53 gene exons 5 through 9 in ALCL. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8103295

  5. Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... called primary cutaneous ALCL and follows a less aggressive course. In almost all cases of primary cutaneous ... kinase (ALK). While both lymphomas are treated as aggressive lymphomas, the prognosis for ALCL depends on whether ...

  6. Central nervous system involvement in anaplastic large cell lymphoma in childhood: results from a multicentre European and Japanese study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Denise; Mori, Tetsuya; Reiter, Alfred; Woessman, Wilhelm; Rosolen, Angelo; Wrobel, Grazyna; Zsiros, Jozsef; Uyttebroeck, Anne; Marky, Ildiko; Le Deley, Marie-Cécile; Brugières, Laurence

    2013-10-01

    In an international study of systemic childhood ALCL, 12/463 patients had CNS involvement, three of which had isolated CNS disease. Comparative analysis of CNS positive and negative patients showed no difference in ALK positivity, immunophenotype, presence of B symptoms or other sites of disease. The lymphohistiocytic variant was over represented in the CNS positive group (36% vs. 5%). With multi-agent chemotherapy, including high dose methotrexate, Ara-C and intrathecal treatment, the event free and overall survival of the CNS positive group at 5 years were 50% (95%CI, 25-75%) and 74% (45-91%), respectively with a median follow up of 4.1 years. PMID:23720354

  7. KSHV/HHV-8 associated lymph node based lymphomas in HIV seronegative subjects. Report of two cases with anaplastic large cell morphology and plasmablastic immunophenotype

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, A; Gloghini, A; Vaccher, E; Marchetti, G; Gaidano, G; Tirelli, U

    2005-01-01

    Background: Kaposi sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV)/human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) associated lymphomas, which often develop in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients with advanced AIDS, present predominantly as primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) or, less frequently, as “solid” extracavitary based lymphomas, associated with serous effusions. These last lymphomas, also called “solid PEL”, have been reported before the development of an effusion lymphoma and after resolution of PEL. Interestingly, KSHV/HHV-8 associated lymphomas that present as solid or extracavitary based lesions in HIV seropositive patients without serous effusions have been reported recently. Methods/Results: This paper provides evidence for the existence of a previously undescribed KSHV/HHV-8 associated lymphoma in HIV seronegative patients without serous effusions. These lymphomas exhibit a predilection for the lymph nodes and display anaplastic large cell morphology. These tumours were completely devoid of common cell type specific antigens, including epithelial and melanocytic cell markers. B and T cell associated antigens and other commonly used lymphoid markers were absent or weakly demonstrable in a fraction of the tumour cells. Conversely, immunohistochemical studies showed strong immunostaining with plasma cell reactive antibodies. Conclusions: Analysis of viral infection and immunohistological studies are of primary importance to define this lymph node based KSHV/HHV-8 associated lymphoma with anaplastic large cell morphology and plasmablastic immunophenotype occurring in HIV seronegative patients without serous effusions. PMID:16189148

  8. Locally Advanced Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma: A Case Report of Successful Treatment with Radiation and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Estes, Christopher F.; Zhang, Da; Reyes, Ruben; Korentager, Richard; McGinness, Marilee; Lominska, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The development of breast implant-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare phenomenon. A typical presentation is an effusion associated with a breast implant. Less commonly, disease can be more advanced locoregionally or distantly. The optimal treatment schema is a topic of debate: localized ALCL can potentially be cured with implant removal alone, while other cases in the literature, including those that are more advanced, have been treated with varying combinations of surgery, chemotherapy, and external beam radiotherapy. This is a case report of breast implant ALCL with pathologically proven lymph node involvement, the fifth such patient reported. Our patient experienced a favorable outcome with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. PMID:25741471

  9. Locally advanced breast implant-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma: a case report of successful treatment with radiation and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Estes, Christopher F; Zhang, Da; Reyes, Ruben; Korentager, Richard; McGinness, Marilee; Lominska, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The development of breast implant-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare phenomenon. A typical presentation is an effusion associated with a breast implant. Less commonly, disease can be more advanced locoregionally or distantly. The optimal treatment schema is a topic of debate: localized ALCL can potentially be cured with implant removal alone, while other cases in the literature, including those that are more advanced, have been treated with varying combinations of surgery, chemotherapy, and external beam radiotherapy. This is a case report of breast implant ALCL with pathologically proven lymph node involvement, the fifth such patient reported. Our patient experienced a favorable outcome with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. PMID:25741471

  10. Hodgkin's disease and CD30-positive anaplastic large cell lymphomas--a continuous spectrum of malignant disorders. A quantitative morphometric and immunohistologic study.

    PubMed Central

    Leoncini, L.; Del Vecchio, M. T.; Kraft, R.; Megha, T.; Barbini, P.; Cevenini, G.; Poggi, S.; Pileri, S.; Tosi, P.; Cottier, H.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have examined cellular areas of lymphoma tissue in 28 cases of Hodgkin's disease (HD) or anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL, 'Ki-1 cell lymphoma') to evaluate the boundaries between the two entities. Methods applied included conventional histology; test point analysis; semiautomated morphometry of nuclear profile features of Reed-Sternberg and other atypical large cells (RSALCs); and immunohistochemistry of these elements on all paraffin sections and, in 15 cases, on frozen sections. Mean nuclear profile morphotypes of RSALCs per case varied independently of immunophenotype and histologic diagnosis. Conversely, immunohistochemistry demonstrated significant, although not consistent, preferential positivities of these CD30+ elements for CD15 in HD, and for epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and CD43 in ALCLs. In the latter, RSALCs also exhibited a tendency for CD45 and CD45RO positivity and for the expression of T-cell-associated antigens. However, there were considerable overlaps. This continuous spectrum of RSALC nuclear profile morphotypes and immunophenotypes, ranging from HD over questionable cases, intermediate between HD and ALCL, to ALCLs, was paralleled by differences in the reactive component of lymphomas. Lymphocytes and granulocytes were significantly deficient in ALCLs. Images Figure 1 PMID:2173409

  11. Sarcomatoid variant of ALK- anaplastic large cell lymphoma involving multiple lymph nodes and both lungs with production of proinflammatory cytokines: report of a case and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lu; Yan, Lin Li; Yang, Shou Jing

    2014-01-01

    Sarcomatoid variant of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is one of the rarest histologic variants of ALCL that consists of large, bizarre, often spindle-shaped, neoplastic cells resembling a soft tissue sarcoma. We report here such a case of ALCL with both pulmonary and multiple nodal involvement in a 47-year-old woman who initially presented with fever, cough, sputum, itching skin, and weight loss. The initial transbronchial lung biopsy showed discohesive pleomorphic malignant cells in a strong inflammatory milieu reminiscent of inflammatory malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH). Subsequent cervical lymph node biopsy revealed a spindle cell sarcoma predominantly composed of plump spindle and oval neoplastic cells in interweaving fascicles, with sparse inflammatory infiltrates, resembling pleomorphic-storiform type of MFH. However, these tumor cells in the lung and node lesions revealed essentially similar immunohistochemical features that were positive for CD30, EMA, TIA-1, granzyme B, and fascin, but negative for anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), and T- or B-lineage-specific marker. The spindled cells stains diffuse strong positive for smooth muscle actin (SMA), along with vimentin. Further studies showed that the tumor produced large quantities of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-6, and IL-8, which we believe may contribute to the pathogenesis of sarcomatoid transformation of this tumor, and was associated with the patient’s inflammatory symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of sarcomatoid variant of ALK-negative ALCL with null cell phenotype and in situ production of proinflammatory cytokines presenting as multiple nodes and pulmonary involvement. PMID:25197351

  12. Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma With 6p25.3 Rearrangement in a Cardiac Transplant Recipient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Olson, Luke C; Cheng, Esther; Mathew, Susan; Torres-Quinones, Marta; Magro, Cynthia

    2016-06-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders define an important form of lymphoproliferative disease causally linked with a state of iatrogenic immune dysregulation inherent to the posttransplant setting. Most posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders are in the context of Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disease, most notably diffuse large-cell B-cell lymphoma. A less common variant falls under the rubric of posttransplant T-cell lymphoproliferative disease, which is largely unrelated to Epstein-Barr virus infection. Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is the most recognized form of posttransplant T-cell lymphoproliferative disease. Although the 6p25.3 translocation is seen in a variety of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders, this particular translocation in the spectrum of T-cell lymphoproliferative disease is a fairly specific finding pointing toward a diagnosis of primary cutaneous ALCL and a rare subset of lymphomatoid papulosis. This translocation in the peripheral T-cell lymphoma setting serves as a favorable prognostic predictor. We report a case of an 81-year-old heart transplant recipient who developed an expansile neck mass 17 years after his heart transplant. A diagnosis of cutaneous ALCL was subsequently made with cytogenetic analysis yielding the 6p25.3 translocation. The characteristic biphasic morphology of a small-cell epidermotropic neoplastic cell populace in concert with a dermal based large-cell infiltrate characteristic for those cases of ALCL harboring this translocation was seen. After excision of the nodule, his azathioprine was withheld. He is currently alive and well without evidence of disease. PMID:26863058

  13. Galectin-1-mediated cell adhesion, invasion and cell death in human anaplastic large cell lymphoma: regulatory roles of cell surface glycans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    Galectin-1 is known to be one of the extracellular matrix proteins. To elucidate the biological roles of galectin-1 in cell adhesion and invasion of human anaplastic large cell lymphoma, we performed cell adhesion and invasion assays using the anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell line H-ALCL, which was previously established in our laboratory. From the cell surface lectin array, treatment with neuraminidase from Arthrobacter ureafaciens which cleaves all linkage types of cell surface sialic acid enhanced Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Helix pomatia (HPA) and Phaseolus vulgaris-L (L-PHA) lectin binding reactivity to cell surface of lymphoma cells suggesting that neuraminidase removes cell surface sialic acid. In cell adhesion and invasion assays treatment with neuraminidase markedly enhanced cell adhesion to galectin-1 and decreased cell invasive capacity through galectin-1. α2,6-linked sialic acid may be involved in masking the effect of the interaction between galectin-1 and cell surface glycans. H-ALCL cells expressed the β-galactoside-α2,6-sialyltransferase ST6Gal1. On resialylation assay by recombinant ST6Gal1 with CMP-Neu5Ac, α2,6-resialylation of L-PHA reactive oligosaccharide by ST6Gal1 resulted in inhibition of H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-1 compared to the desialylated H-ALCL cells. On knockdown experiments, knockdown of ST6Gal1 dramatically enhanced cell adhesion to galectin-1. N-glycosylation inhibitor swainsonine treatment resulted in enhancement of cell adhesion to galectin-1. In glycomic analysis using the lectin blocking assay treatment with PNA, Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacalin), Glycine max (SBA), Helix pomatia (HPA), Vicia villosa (VVA), Ulex europaeus (UEA-1), Triticum vulgaris (WGA), Canavalia ensiformis (ConA), Phaseolus vulgaris-L (L-PHA), Phaseolus vulgaris-E4 (E-PHA), Datura stramonium (DSA) lectins resulted in modulation of lymphoma cell to galectin-1 suggesting that several types of glycans may regulate cell adhesion to galectin-1 by

  14. Identification of C/EBPβ Target Genes in ALK+ Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) by Gene Expression Profiling and Chromatin Immunoprecipitation

    PubMed Central

    Bonzheim, Irina; Irmler, Martin; Klier-Richter, Margit; Steinhilber, Julia; Anastasov, Nataša; Schäfer, Sabine; Adam, Patrick; Beckers, Johannes; Raffeld, Mark; Fend, Falko; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia

    2013-01-01

    C/EBPβ (CCAAT enhancer binding protein) is a transcription factor that plays a crucial role in survival and transformation of ALK+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). The aim of this study was to identify the downstream targets of C/EBPβ responsible for ALK-mediated oncogenesis. C/EBPβ was knocked down in ALK+ ALCL cell lines with a C/EBPβ-shRNA, followed by gene expression profiling (GEP). GEP analysis revealed a reproducible signature of genes that were significantly regulated by C/EBPβ. Classification into biological categories revealed overrepresentation of genes involved in the immune response, apoptosis and cell proliferation. Transcriptional regulation by C/EBPβ was found in 6 of 11 (BCL2A1, G0S2, TRIB1, S100A9, DDX21 and DDIT4) genes investigated by chromatin immunoprecipitation. We demonstrated that BCL2A1, G0S2 and DDX21 play a crucial role in survival and proliferation of ALK+ ALCL cells. DDX21, a gene involved in rRNA biogenesis, was found differentially overexpressed in primary ALK+ ALCL cases. All three candidate genes were validated in primary ALCL cases by either immunohistochemistry or RT-qPCR. In conclusion, we identified and validated several key C/EBPβ-regulated genes with major impact on survival and cell growth in ALK+ ALCL, supporting the central role of C/EBPβ in ALK-mediated oncogenesis. PMID:23741337

  15. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma in childhood: analysis of 72 patients treated on The United Kingdom Children's Cancer Study Group chemotherapy regimens.

    PubMed

    Williams, Denise M; Hobson, Rachel; Imeson, John; Gerrard, Mary; McCarthy, Keith; Pinkerton, C Ross

    2002-06-01

    From June 1990 to June 1998, 72 patients with anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) were treated with short intensive multi-agent regimens [non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) 9000 and 9602]. Diagnosis was based on morphological and immunophenotypic criteria. Treatment for stage I disease consisted of eight courses (2 x vincristine, doxorubicin, prednisolone; 2 x methotrexate; 2 x cytarabine, thioguanine; and 2 x methotrexate etoposide). For stage II, III and non-central nervous system (CNS) stage IV, two COPADM (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, prednisolone, methotrexate, vincristine), two CYM (cytarabine methotrexate) and a COPADM was given. For CNS-positive disease, treatment was intensified and contained methotrexate 8 g/m(2) and cytarabine 3 g/m(2). Fifty-nine patients (82%) achieved a remission. Thirteen of these relapsed, with a median time to relapse from the start of treatment of 5 months (range 3-14). Relapse included a new site in 9/13 patients. The probabilities of overall and event free survival at 5 years were 65% (53-76%) and 59% (47-70%), respectively, with a median follow up of 4.3 years. Mediastinal and visceral involvement at presentation were found to be predictive of an increased risk of failure. PMID:12060115

  16. The dichloromethane extract of the ethnomedicinal plant Neurolaena lobata inhibits NPM/ALK expression which is causal for anaplastic large cell lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Unger, Christine; Popescu, Ruxandra; Giessrigl, Benedikt; Laimer, Daniela; Heider, Susanne; Seelinger, Mareike; Diaz, Rene; Wallnöfer, Bruno; Egger, Gerda; Hassler, Melanie; Knöfler, Martin; Saleh, Leila; Sahin, Emine; Grusch, Michael; Fritzer-Szekeres, Monika; Dolznig, Helmut; Frisch, Richard; Kenner, Lukas; Kopp, Brigitte; Krupitza, Georg

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates extracts of Neuolaena lobata, an anti-protozoan ethnomedicinal plant of the Maya, regarding its anti-neoplastic properties. Firstly, extracts of increasing polarity were tested in HL-60 cells analyzing inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis induction. Secondly, the most active extract was further tested in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) cell lines of human and mouse origin. The dichloromethane extract inhibited proliferation of HL-60, human and mouse ALCL cells with an IC50 of ~2.5, 3.7 and 2.4 µg/ml, respectively and arrested cells in the G2/M phase. The extract induced the checkpoint kinases Chk1 and Chk2 and perturbed the orchestrated expression of the Cdc25 family of cell cycle phosphatases which was paralleled by the activation of p53, p21 and downregulation of c-Myc. Importantly, the expression of NPM/ALK and its effector JunB were drastically decreased, which correlated with the activation of caspase 3. Subsequently also platelet derived growth factor receptor β was downregulated, which was recently shown to be transcriptionally controlled by JunB synergizing with ALK in ALCL development. We show that a traditional healing plant extract downregulates various oncogenes, induces tumor suppressors, inhibits cell proliferation and triggers apoptosis of malignant cells. The discovery of the 'Active Principle(s)' is warranted. PMID:23135783

  17. Unusual Presentation of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma with Clinical Course Mimicking Fever of Unknown Origin and Sepsis: Autopsy Study of Five Cases

    PubMed Central

    Mosunjac, Marina B.; Sundstrom, J. Bruce; Mosunjac, Mario I.

    2008-01-01

    Aim To describe a subset of cases with the unusual clinical and histomorphological presentation of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) mimicking fever of unknown origin (FUO) and sepsis. Methods A pathology database was searched using full term Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine codes for ALCL to identify 23ALCL cases from the period 1999-2006. Of those, five cases that did not have a correct premortem diagnosis were further analyzed to elucidate the reasons for delayed and incorrect pre-mortem diagnosis. The analyzed data included clinical presentation, duration of symptoms, duration of hospital stay, premortem presumed cause of death, white blood cell count, platelet count, anion gap and blood pH, liver enzymes (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase), lactate, coagulation tests (prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, D-dimers), microbiology cultures, and radiology and surgical pathology reports. Autopsy reports were reviewed for description of major gross findings, initial clinical diagnosis, and cause of death. Results Five fatal and pre-mortem unrecognized ALCL cases were characterized by rapid decline, with histologic findings showing predominantly extranodal involvement, intravascular lymphomatosis, and hemophagocytosis. The cases were also characterized by unusual clinical manifestations including a FUO, sepsis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation-like picture, lactic acidosis, hepatosplenomegaly, and absence of significant peripheral adenopathy. Conclusions There is a distinct group of ALCLs with unique and specific clinical, gross autopsy, and histopathologic findings. Recognition of this clinical variant may facilitate early detection and potentially timely diagnosis and therapy. PMID:18925700

  18. The ALK inhibitor ASP3026 eradicates NPM-ALK+ T-cell anaplastic large-cell lymphoma in vitro and in a systemic xenograft lymphoma model

    PubMed Central

    Manshouri, Roxsan; Shi, Ping; Amin, Hesham M.

    2014-01-01

    NPM-ALK+ T-cell anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is an aggressive type of cancer. Standard treatment of NPM-ALK+ ALCL is CHOP polychemotherapy. Although patients initially respond favorably to CHOP, resistance, relapse, and death frequently occur. Recently, selective targeting of ALK has emerged as an alternative therapeutic strategy. ASP3026 is a second-generation ALK inhibitor that can overcome crizotinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer, and is currently being evaluated in clinical trials of patients with ALK+ solid tumors. However, NPM-ALK+ ALCL patients are not included in these trials. We studied the effects of ASP3026 on NPM-ALK+ ALCL cell lines in vitro and on systemic lymphoma growth in vivo. ASP3026 decreased the viability, proliferation, and colony formation, as well as induced apoptotic cell death of NPM-ALK+ ALCL cells. In addition, ASP3026 significantly reduced the proliferation of 293T cells transfected with NPM-ALK mutants that are resistant to crizotinib and downregulated tyrosine phosphorylation of these mutants. Moreover, ASP3026 abrogated systemic NPM-ALK+ ALCL growth in mice. Importantly, the survival of ASP3026-treated mice was superior to that of control and CHOP-treated mice. Our data suggest that ASP3026 is an effective treatment for NPM-ALK+ ALCL, and support the enrollment of patients with this lymphoma in the ongoing clinical trials. PMID:25026277

  19. Personalized treatment options for ALK-positive metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: potential role for Ceritinib

    PubMed Central

    El-Osta, Hazem; Shackelford, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    The fusion of echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 with the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) is found in 3%–7% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases and confers sensitivity to crizotinib, the first United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved ALK inhibitor drug. Although crizotinib has an excellent initial therapeutic effect, acquired resistance to this drug invariably develops within the first year of treatment. Resistance may involve secondary gatekeeper mutations within the ALK gene interfering with crizotinib–ALK interactions, or compensatory activation of aberrant bypass signaling pathways. New therapeutic strategies to overcome crizotinib resistance are needed. Ceritinib, a second-generation ALK inhibitor, overcomes several crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations and has demonstrated efficacy against tumor growth in several in vitro and in vivo preclinical models of crizotinib resistance. Notably, the dose-escalation Phase I ASCEND-1 trial has shown a marked activity of ceritinib in both crizotinib-naïve and crizotinib-resistant ALK-rearranged lung cancer. The overall response rate was 58% in a subgroup of patients with ALK-rearranged late-stage NSCLC. Drug discontinuation rate due to toxicity was 10%. The standard dose was established at 750 mg daily. This paper outlines the pathogenesis and treatment of ALK-positive lung cancer, focuses on the preclinical and clinical results surrounding the accelerated FDA approval of ceritinib for the treatment of ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC patients who have progressed on/or are crizotinib intolerant, and discusses the potential efforts seeking to maximize ceritinib efficacy and expand its usage to other indications in cancer therapy. PMID:26622190

  20. Alectinib's activity against CNS metastases from ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer: a single institution case series.

    PubMed

    Metro, Giulio; Lunardi, Gianluigi; Bennati, Chiara; Chiarini, Pietro; Sperduti, Isabella; Ricciuti, Biagio; Marcomigni, Luca; Costa, Cinzia; Crinò, Lucio; Floridi, Piero; Gori, Stefania; Chiari, Rita

    2016-09-01

    In the present study we assessed the activity of the next-generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (-TKI) alectinib, in patients with ALK-postive, advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and central nervous system (CNS) metastases. NSCLCs with ALK-positive disease, as assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and CNS metastases were treated with alectinib 600 mg BID. Included patients were followed prospectively in order to evaluate the efficacy of the drug, with particular emphasis on activity in the CNS. Eleven consecutive patients were enrolled. The majority of them were pretreated with crizotinib (n = 10, 90.9 %), and cranial radiotherapy (n = 8, 72.7 %). Six of the seven patients with measurable CNS disease experienced a CNS response, including three patients who were naïve for cranial radiation. Median duration of response was 8 months. For the whole population, median CNS-progression-free survival (-PFS), systemic-PFS, overall-PFS, overall survival, and 1-year survival were 8, 11, 8, 13 months, and 31.1 %, respectively. Two patients experiencing a CNS response were assessed for alectinib's concentrations in serum and cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), and showed a CSF-to-serum ratio ranging from 0.001 to 0.003 ng/mL. Alectinib is highly active against CNS metastases from ALK-positive NSCLCs, irrespective of prior treatment(s) with ALK-TKI(s) and/or cranial radiotherapy. The low CSF-to-serum ratio of alectinib suggests that measuring the concentrations of the drug in the CSF may not be a reliable surrogate of its distribution into the CNS. PMID:27324494

  1. The nature of Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells, their association with EBV, and their relationship to anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Stein, H; Herbst, H; Anagnostopoulos, I; Niedobitek, G; Dallenbach, F; Kratzsch, H C

    1991-02-01

    This review focuses on the cellular origin of Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells, their association with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and their relation to Ki-1+ anaplastic large-cell (ALC) lymphoma. The tingibility of HRS cells in paraffin sections for polyclonal immunoglobulin represents a staining artifact and thus can no longer serve as an argument for the histiocytic nature of HRS cells. Immunolabeling studies do not support the putative relationship of HRS cells to cell types such as macrophages or interdigitating reticulum cells, but instead suggest: a) that lymphocyte-predominant (LP) Hodgkin's disease (HD) represents a B-cell neoplasm which is distinct from non-LP HD, and b) that non-LP HD constitutes a syndrome rather than a disease entity, with the existence of T-cell types and B-cell types. HRS cells (and the tumor cells in ALC lymphomas) frequently display an immature genotype in association with late activation markers, leading to the assumption that the tumor cells in many cases of HD (and some cases of ALC lymphoma) may be derived from immature lymphoid cells that are infected by a virus that superimposes characteristics of mature activated lymphocytes on these cells. Southern blotting, in situ hybridization, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments revealed an association of EBV with HRS cells in a significant proportion of HD cases, suggesting that EBV may be responsible for the dissociation between genotype and phenotype in HRS cells, because EBV is a strong inducer of the activation antigens CD30 and CDw70.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1646624

  2. Lobatin B inhibits NPM/ALK and NF-κB attenuating anaplastic-large-cell-lymphomagenesis and lymphendothelial tumour intravasation.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Izabella; Unger, Christine; Huu, Chi Nguyen; Atanasov, Atanas Georgiev; Kramer, Nina; Chatruphonprasert, Waranya; Brenner, Stefan; McKinnon, Ruxandra; Peschel, Andrea; Vasas, Andrea; Lajter, Ildiko; Kain, Renate; Saiko, Philipp; Szekeres, Thomas; Kenner, Lukas; Hassler, Melanie R; Diaz, Rene; Frisch, Richard; Dirsch, Verena M; Jäger, Walter; de Martin, Rainer; Bochkov, Valery N; Passreiter, Claus M; Peter-Vörösmarty, Barbara; Mader, Robert M; Grusch, Michael; Dolznig, Helmut; Kopp, Brigitte; Zupko, Istvan; Hohmann, Judit; Krupitza, Georg

    2015-01-28

    An apolar extract of the traditional medicinal plant Neurolaena lobata inhibited the expression of the NPM/ALK chimera, which is causal for the majority of anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCLs). Therefore, an active principle of the extract, the furanoheliangolide sesquiterpene lactone lobatin B, was isolated and tested regarding the inhibition of ALCL expansion and tumour cell intravasation through the lymphendothelium. ALCL cell lines, HL-60 cells and PBMCs were treated with plant compounds and the ALK inhibitor TAE-684 to measure mitochondrial activity, proliferation and cell cycle progression and to correlate the results with protein- and mRNA-expression of selected gene products. Several endpoints indicative for cell death were analysed after lobatin B treatment. Tumour cell intravasation through lymphendothelial monolayers was measured and potential causal mechanisms were investigated analysing NF-κB- and cytochrome P450 activity, and 12(S)-HETE production. Lobatin B inhibited the expression of NPM/ALK, JunB and PDGF-Rβ, and attenuated proliferation of ALCL cells by arresting them in late M phase. Mitochondrial activity remained largely unaffected upon lobatin B treatment. Nevertheless, caspase 3 became activated in ALCL cells. Also HL-60 cell proliferation was attenuated whereas PBMCs of healthy donors were not affected by lobatin B. Additionally, tumour cell intravasation, which partly depends on NF-κB, was significantly suppressed by lobatin B most likely due to its NF-κB-inhibitory property. Lobatin B, which was isolated from a plant used in ethnomedicine, targets malignant cells by at least two properties: I) inhibition of NPM/ALK, thereby providing high specificity in combating this most prevalent fusion protein occurring in ALCL; II) inhibition of NF-κB, thereby not affecting normal cells with low constitutive NF-κB activity. This property also inhibits tumour cell intravasation into the lymphatic system and may provide an option to manage this

  3. A novel acquired ALK F1245C mutation confers resistance to crizotinib in ALK-positive NSCLC but is sensitive to ceritinib.

    PubMed

    Kodityal, Sandeep; Elvin, Julia A; Squillace, Rachel; Agarwal, Nikita; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M; Klempner, Samuel J; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2016-02-01

    The emergence of acquired anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) resistant mutations is a common molecular mechanism underpinning disease progression during crizotinib treatment of ALK-positive (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Identifying acquired resistance mutations in ALK is paramount for tailoring future therapy with second generation ALK inhibitors and beyond. Comprehensive genomic profiling using hybrid-capture next generation sequencing has been successful in identifying acquired ALK resistance mutations. Here we described the emergence of an ALK F1245C mutation in an advanced ALK+ NSCLC patient (EML4-ALK variant 3a/b) who developed slow disease progression after a durable response to crizotinib. The patient was eventually switched to ceritinib with on-going clinical response. This is the first patient report that ALK F1245C is an acquired resistance mutation to crizotinib that can be overcome by ceritinib. PMID:26775591

  4. Chronic reparative changes in medium-sized vessels in a case of primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma with angioinvasive features and cytotoxic phenotype: new histopathological findings in line with indolent clinical behavior.

    PubMed

    Macarenco, Ricardo S; de Oliveira, Deilson Elgui

    2015-05-01

    Angioinvasion/angiodestruction has been reported in a small subset of primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (PCALCL). Recently, PCALCL with angioinvasive features and cytotoxic phenotype has been characterized as a variant associated with good clinical outcomes despite worrisome histopathologic features. We report a case of PCALCL with angioinvasive features and cytotoxic phenotype associated with reparative changes on the wall of medium-sized vessels involved by the neoplasm, including intimal fibroblastic proliferation and luminal obliteration. This vascular pattern, although previously unreported in PCALCL, is in accordance with the indolent behavior observed in this entity and provides a further link with lymphomatoid papulosis type E. PMID:25365499

  5. Diagnostic Assays for Identification of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase–Positive Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weickhardt, Andrew J.; Aisner, Dara L.; Franklin, Wilbur A.; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Doebele, Robert C.; Camidge, D. Ross

    2014-01-01

    In series dominated by adenocarcinoma histology, approximately 5% of non–small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) harbor an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement. Crizotinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor with significant activity against ALK, has demonstrated high response rates and prolonged progression-free survival in ALK-positive patients enrolled in phase 1/2 clinical trials. In 2011, crizotinib received accelerated approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of proven ALK-positive NSCLC using an FDA-approved diagnostic test. Currently, only break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization testing is FDA approved as a companion diagnostic for crizotinib; however, many other assays are available or in development. In the current review, the authors summarize the diagnostic tests available, or likely to become available, that could be used to identify patients with ALK-positive NSCLC, highlighting the pros and cons of each. PMID:23280244

  6. Initial Diagnosis of ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Based on Analysis of ALK Status Utilizing Droplet Digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Lund, H Louise; Hughesman, Curtis B; Fakhfakh, Kareem; McNeil, Kelly; Clemens, Shahira; Hocken, Kimberly; Pettersson, Ryan; Karsan, Aly; Foster, Leonard J; Haynes, Charles

    2016-05-01

    We describe a novel droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assay capable of detecting genomic alterations associated with inversion translocations. It is applied here to detection of rearrangements in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene associated with ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). NSCLC patients may carry a nonreciprocal translocation on human chromosome 2, in which synchronized double stranded breaks (DSB) within the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) gene and ALK lead to an inversion of genetic material that forms the non-natural gene fusion EML4-ALK encoding a constitutively active tyrosine kinase that is associated with 3 to 7% of all NSCLCs. Detection of ALK rearrangements is currently achieved in clinics through direct visualization via a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assay, which can detect those rearrangements to a limit of detection (LOD) of ca. 15%. We show that the ddPCR assay presented here provides a LOD of 0.25% at lower cost and with faster turnaround times. PMID:27043019

  7. Proactive management strategies for potential gastrointestinal adverse reactions with ceritinib in patients with advanced ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Eric S; Baik, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fusions occur in 3%–7% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. Ceritinib, a once-daily, oral ALK inhibitor, has activity against crizotinib-resistant and crizotinib-naïve NSCLC, including brain metastases. Ceritinib (Zykadia™) was granted accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2014 for treating crizotinib-resistant ALK-positive NSCLC. Adverse events (AEs), particularly gastrointestinal (GI) AEs, are commonly experienced at the recommended dose of 750 mg/d and ∼38% of patients require dose interruption or reduction for GI AEs. This case study details our experience with the use of proactive GI AE management regimens in patients treated with ceritinib (750 mg/d) across two study sites. Proactive Regimens A and B were implemented in patients with metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC treated with ceritinib to manage drug-related GI AEs. Regimen A comprised ondansetron and diphenoxylate/atropine or loperamide, taken 30 minutes prior to ceritinib dose. Regimen B included dicyclomine (taken with the first ceritinib dose), ondansetron (taken 30 minutes prior to ceritinib dose for the first seven doses), and loperamide (taken as needed with the onset of diarrhea). The proactive medications were tapered off depending on patient tolerability to ceritinib. Nine patient cases are presented. Starting Regimens A or B before the first dose of ceritinib, or as soon as GI symptoms were encountered, prevented the need for dose reduction due to GI toxicity in eight of the nine patients. Using these regimens, 78% of patients were able to remain on 750 mg/d fasting. Two patients received 23 months and 16 months of therapy and remain on ceritinib 750 mg/d and 600 mg/d, respectively. Although not currently recommended or implemented in clinical studies, based on the patients evaluated here, upfront or proactive treatment plans that address AEs early on can allow the majority of patients to remain on the approved 750 mg

  8. Proactive management strategies for potential gastrointestinal adverse reactions with ceritinib in patients with advanced ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Eric S; Baik, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fusions occur in 3%-7% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. Ceritinib, a once-daily, oral ALK inhibitor, has activity against crizotinib-resistant and crizotinib-naïve NSCLC, including brain metastases. Ceritinib (Zykadia™) was granted accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2014 for treating crizotinib-resistant ALK-positive NSCLC. Adverse events (AEs), particularly gastrointestinal (GI) AEs, are commonly experienced at the recommended dose of 750 mg/d and ∼38% of patients require dose interruption or reduction for GI AEs. This case study details our experience with the use of proactive GI AE management regimens in patients treated with ceritinib (750 mg/d) across two study sites. Proactive Regimens A and B were implemented in patients with metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC treated with ceritinib to manage drug-related GI AEs. Regimen A comprised ondansetron and diphenoxylate/atropine or loperamide, taken 30 minutes prior to ceritinib dose. Regimen B included dicyclomine (taken with the first ceritinib dose), ondansetron (taken 30 minutes prior to ceritinib dose for the first seven doses), and loperamide (taken as needed with the onset of diarrhea). The proactive medications were tapered off depending on patient tolerability to ceritinib. Nine patient cases are presented. Starting Regimens A or B before the first dose of ceritinib, or as soon as GI symptoms were encountered, prevented the need for dose reduction due to GI toxicity in eight of the nine patients. Using these regimens, 78% of patients were able to remain on 750 mg/d fasting. Two patients received 23 months and 16 months of therapy and remain on ceritinib 750 mg/d and 600 mg/d, respectively. Although not currently recommended or implemented in clinical studies, based on the patients evaluated here, upfront or proactive treatment plans that address AEs early on can allow the majority of patients to remain on the approved 750 mg

  9. Cytological Diagnosis of Bilateral Breast Implant-Associated Lymphoma of the ALK-Negative Anaplastic Large-Cell Type. Clinical Implications of Peri-Implant Breast Seroma Cytological Reporting.

    PubMed

    Granados, Rosario; Lumbreras, Eva M; Delgado, Manuel; Aramburu, José A; Tardío, Juan C

    2016-07-01

    The cytological examination of peri-prosthetic breast effusions allowed the diagnosis of bilateral breast-implant ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BI-ALCL) in the case reported. Ten years after reconstructive surgery with bilateral breast implants, a large unilateral seroma developed and was cytologically analyzed. The presence of CD30 and CD4-positive large-sized atypical lymphoid cells exhibiting horseshoe-shaped nuclei and a brisk mitotic activity rendered the diagnosis of BI-ALCL. Similar cells were seen in the peri-prosthetic fluid intraoperatively collected from the contralateral breast. Although initial histological analysis of the capsulectomy specimens showed unilateral tumor, the cytological findings prompted a more thorough tissue sampling, resulting in the diagnosis of bilateral disease. BI-ALCL usually follows an indolent clinical course; however, there are reported cases with an aggressive behavior. While the presence of bilateral disease is a putative risk factor for a bad prognosis, the small number of cases reported precludes a definitive assessment of this risk. Since most BI-ALCL present with late seromas, cytologic analysis of these effusions in women with breast implants should be mandatory. Cytology is a safe tool for diagnosis and follow-up of patients with breast implant-related late seromas, sometimes proven more sensitive than histological analysis. Complete bilateral capsulectomy and a detailed histological analysis should follow a cytological diagnosis of BI-ALCL in a breast effusion in order to avoid false negative diagnoses. Our case constitutes the first published report of a bilateral BI-ALCL diagnosed by cytology. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:623-627. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27079579

  10. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase status in rhabdomyosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akihiko; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Wakai, Susumu; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Tsuta, Koji; Fukayama, Masashi; Makimoto, Atsushi; Furuta, Koh; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2013-06-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare soft tissue sarcoma that typically affects children, adolescents, and young adults. Despite treatment via a multidisciplinary approach, the prognosis of advance-stage rhabdomyosarcomas remains poor, and a new treatment strategy is needed. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is a potential target for specific inhibitors. In this study, we investigated 116 rhabdomyosarcomas using a polymer-based ALK immunostaining method and correlated the results with clinicopathological parameters. In addition, we examined ALK status using dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization, PCR, and sequencing. In immunohistochemical analysis, ALK was detected in 2 (6%) of 33 embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas, 42 (69%) of 61 alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas, and 0 (0%) of 22 other subtypes, including pleomorphic, adult-spindle-cell/sclerosing, and epithelioid variants. Compared with ALK-negative alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas, ALK-positive ones are presented with metastatic spread more frequently and showed a greater extent of myogenin reactivity. Overall survival was not associated with ALK expression. FOXO1 rearrangement was significantly associated with ALK immunoreactivity. The median ALK copy number was greater in ALK-positive tumors than in ALK-negative tumors. Most (93%) cases tested showed no selective increase in the ALK gene dosage. ALK selective amplification and low-level selective gain were noted in one and three cases, respectively. Further, a high-polysomy pattern (≥4 ALK copies in ≥40% of cells) was observed in seven cases. A significant increase in the ALK copy number was exclusive to the ALK-immunopositive cohort, but it was uncommon, accounting for only 30% of the 37 ALK-positive rhabdomyosarcomas. ALK gene rearrangement was not observed in either cohort, while an ALK somatic mutation (I1277T) was found in one ALK-negative embryonal case. Although it remains controversial whether ALK expression without gene rearrangement

  11. Rapid and dramatic response to alectinib in an anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer patient who is critically ill.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tatsuya; Hida, Toyoaki; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have shown promising clinical activity in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that harbors ALK rearrangement. The next-generation ALK-TKI, alectinib, has been reported to have potent efficacy in ALK-positive NSCLC patients including on mutations that confer resistance to crizotinib, which was the first ALK-TKI approved for ALK-positive NSCLC. The efficacy and safety of ALK-TKIs, including crizotinib and alectinib, as the first-line treatment in critically ill patients is unclear. We report one ALK-positive NSCLC patient with poor performance status (PS) and disseminated intravascular coagulation because of respiratory failure and multiple metastases, and experienced the rapid and dramatic response to alectinib without adverse events that can lead to discontinuation and dose reduction of the drug. After a couple of months of treatment with alectinib, radiological review indicated a complete response. The present case is the first reported case of rapid and marked response to alectinib in ALK-positive NSCLC patients who had poor PS and severe organ dysfunction, such as disseminated intravascular coagulation. Further investigation of the safety and efficacy of ALK-TKI for ALK-positive NSCLC patients who are critically ill is warranted. PMID:26938871

  12. Management of Brain Metastases in ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rusthoven, Chad G; Doebele, Robert C

    2016-08-20

    The Oncology Grand Rounds series is designed to place original reports published in the Journal into clinical context. A case presentation is followed by a description of diagnostic and management challenges, a review of the relevant literature, and a summary of the authors' suggested management approaches. The goal of this series is to help readers better understand how to apply the results of key studies, including those published in Journal of Clinical Oncology, to patients seen in their own clinical practice.A 54-year-old man with a former 15-pack-year smoking history presents with cough and dyspnea. Initial work-up with imaging demonstrates a right suprahilar mass measuring 4.7 cm as well as several enlarged hilar and ipsilateral mediastinal lymph nodes. Bronchoscopy with biopsy reveals adenocarcinoma consistent with a lung primary. Staging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) reidentifies the primary mass and lymph nodes and shows several PET-avid bone metastases. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrates a 1.6-cm right parietal mass with mild vasogenic edema and four additional brain metastases measuring 4 to 9 mm in size. Molecular testing is positive for an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement using fluorescence in situ hybridization and negative for EGFR, ROS1, RET, BRAF, KRAS, and other oncogenes. The patient denies any neurologic symptoms and has no significant findings on neurologic exam. He is referred to you for management options for newly diagnosed stage IV (T2aN2M1b) lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27298405

  13. Successful treatment of hepatic oligometastases with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation in an anaplastic lymphoma kinase fusion-positive lung cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Weber, Britta; Liu, Mitchell; Sobkin, Paul; Morris, Stephan W; Hout, David; van der Westhuizen, Nicholas; Tonseth, R Petter; Saltman, David L

    2016-03-01

    Local ablative therapy with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy may improve survival in oncogene-addicted lung cancer patients with extracranial oligometastatic disease treated with targeted therapies. There is limited data on the use of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in this same setting. We present a case of an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive lung cancer patient with hepatic oligometastatic progression who was successfully treated with both stereotactic ablative radiation and RFA while continuing with an ALK inhibitor. PMID:27087977

  14. Total Body Metabolic Tumor Response in ALK Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with ALK Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Koole, Michel J. B.; Bongaerts, Alphons H. H.; Pruim, Jan; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background In ALK-positive advanced NSCLC, crizotinib has a high response rate and effectively increases quality of life and survival. CT measurement of the tumor may insufficiently reflect the actual tumor load changes during targeted therapy with crizotinib. We explored whether 18F-FDG PET measured metabolic changes are different from CT based changes and studied the impact of these changes on disease progression. Methods 18F-FDG PET/CT was performed prior to and after 6 weeks of crizotinib treatment. Tumor response on CT was classified with RECIST 1.1, while 18F-FDG PET response was assessed according to the 1999 EORTC recommendations and PERCIST criteria. Agreement was assessed using McNemars test. During follow-up, patients received additional PET/CT during crizotinib treatment and second generation ALK inhibition. We assessed whether PET was able to detect progression earlier then CT. Results In this exploratory study 15 patients were analyzed who were treated with crizotinib. There was a good agreement in the applicability of CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT using the EORTC recommendations. During first line crizotinib and subsequent second line ALK inhibitors, PET was able to detect progression earlier then CT in 10/22 (45%) events of progression and in the others disease progression was detected simultaneously. Conclusion In advanced ALK positive NSCLC PET was able to detect progressive disease earlier than with CT in nearly half of the assessments while both imaging tests performed similar in the others. PMID:27137772

  15. Alectinib-Induced Alopecia in a Patient with Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Tomonobu; Fukushima, Toshirou; Gomi, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Nodoka; Sakamoto, Akiyuki; Sasaki, Shigeru; Mamiya, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Alectinib, a novel alternative anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, is highly effective against ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and is well tolerated. Molecular targeted agents generally have little contribution to alopecia. We encountered a case of alopecia that developed gradually over 2 months after initiation of alectinib administration for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC. The patient had no history of alopecia in previous treatments of cisplatin + pemetrexed and crizotinib. The present case indicates that alopecia should be taken into consideration as toxicity during alectinib treatment, which could adversely affect the psychological and emotional condition and quality of life even in patients treated with specific molecular targeted agents. PMID:27194980

  16. Anaplastic astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Sean A; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2016-07-01

    Anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) is a diffusely infiltrating, malignant, astrocytic, primary brain tumor. AA is currently defined by histology although future classification schemes will include molecular alterations. AA can be separated into subgroups, which share similar molecular profiles, age at diagnosis and median survival, based on 1p/19q co-deletion status and IDH mutation status. AA with co-deletion of chromosomes 1p and 19q and IDH mutation have the best prognosis. AA with IDH mutation and no 1p/19q co-deletion have intermediate prognosis and AA with wild-type IDH have the worst prognosis and share many molecular alterations with glioblastoma. Treatment of noncodeleted AA based on preliminary results from the CATNON clinical trial consists of maximal safe resection followed by radiotherapy with post-radiotherapy temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy. The role of concurrent TMZ and whether IDH1 subgroups benefit from TMZ is currently being evaluated in the recently completed randomized, prospective Phase III clinical trial, CATNON. PMID:27230974

  17. Design and synthesis of novel selective anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Michellys, Pierre-Yves; Chen, Bei; Jiang, Tao; Jin, Yunho; Lu, Wenshuo; Marsilje, Thomas H; Pei, Wei; Uno, Tetsuo; Zhu, Xuefeng; Wu, Baogen; Nguyen, Truc Ngoc; Bursulaya, Badry; Lee, Christian; Li, Nanxin; Kim, Sungjoon; Tuntland, Tove; Liu, Bo; Sun, Frank; Steffy, Auzon; Hood, Tami

    2016-02-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the insulin receptor superfamily. Expression of ALK in normal human tissues is only found in a subset of neural cells, however it is involved in the genesis of several cancers through genetic aberrations involving translocation of the kinase domain with multiple fusion partners (e.g., NPM-ALK in anaplastic large cell lymphoma ALCL or EML4-ALK in non-small cell lung cancer) or activating mutations in the full-length receptor resulting in ligand-independent constitutive activation (e.g., neuroblastoma). Here we are reporting the discovery of novel and selective anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors from specific modifications of the 2,4-diaminopyridine core present in TAE684 and LDK378. Synthesis, structure activity relationships (SAR), absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) profile, and in vivo efficacy in a mouse xenograft model of anaplastic large cell lymphoma are described. PMID:26750252

  18. A Study Of Oral PF-02341066, A c-Met/Hepatocyte Growth Factor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor, In Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-30

    Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (ALK-positive); Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (c-Met Dependent); Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (ROS Marker Positive); Systemic Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma; Advanced Malignancies (Except Leukemia)

  19. Moving molecularly directed therapies to the first-line in ALK-positive lung cancer: crizotinib is just the beginning.

    PubMed

    Klempner, Samuel J; Raufi, Alexander; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2015-10-01

    The increasing appreciation of oncogenic driver alterations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has resulted in a rapid expansion of therapeutic compounds. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) alterations are the prototypical examples and have driven the paradigm shift in NSCLC management. Early phase studies in previously treated ALK+ patients demonstrated activity and recently Solomon et al. confirmed the superiority of crizotinib over chemotherapy in first line treatment. The phase III PROFILE 1014 represents the culmination of the rapid development of crizotinib and provides lessons for future generation ALK inhibitors and other molecularly directed therapies in NSCLC. Important considerations for second and third generation inhibitors include the ability to overcome known resistance mechanisms, CNS activity, improvement in side effect profile, and safety in possible combination strategies. PMID:26629439

  20. Mechanisms of Acquired Resistance to ALK Inhibitors and the Rationale for Treating ALK-positive Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Isozaki, Hideko; Takigawa, Nagio; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of an echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene led to improved clinical outcomes in patients with lung cancer after the development of the first ALK-targeting agent, crizotinib. Some second-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which might be more potent than crizotinib or effective on crizotinib-resistant patients, have been developed. Although these ALK-TKIs show an excellent response initially, most patients eventually acquire resistance. Therefore, careful consideration of the resistance mechanisms might lead to superior therapeutic strategies. Here, we summarize the history of ALK-TKIs and their underlying resistance mechanisms in both the preclinical and clinical settings. In addition, we discuss potential future treatment strategies in ALK-TKI-naïve and -resistant patients with lung cancer harboring the EML4-ALK fusion gene. PMID:25941796

  1. Mechanisms of Acquired Resistance to ALK Inhibitors and the Rationale for Treating ALK-positive Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Isozaki, Hideko; Takigawa, Nagio; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of an echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene led to improved clinical outcomes in patients with lung cancer after the development of the first ALK-targeting agent, crizotinib. Some second-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which might be more potent than crizotinib or effective on crizotinib-resistant patients, have been developed. Although these ALK-TKIs show an excellent response initially, most patients eventually acquire resistance. Therefore, careful consideration of the resistance mechanisms might lead to superior therapeutic strategies. Here, we summarize the history of ALK-TKIs and their underlying resistance mechanisms in both the preclinical and clinical settings. In addition, we discuss potential future treatment strategies in ALK-TKI-naïve and -resistant patients with lung cancer harboring the EML4-ALK fusion gene. PMID:25941796

  2. Aberrant Expression of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase in Ovarian Carcinoma Independent of Gene Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shaoxian; Yang, Fei; Du, Xiang; Lu, Yongming; Zhang, Ling; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancies. The oncogenic role of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is well characterized in many hematopoietic and solid tumors. ALK expression in ovarian carcinoma has been reported but the exact status of ALK protein and its association with clinicopathologic features requires further investigation. ALK expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in 110 primary ovarian carcinomas, including 85 cases of serous carcinoma and 25 cases of mucinous carcinoma. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used for evaluating ALK translocation in ALK-positive ovarian carcinomas. Among 110 ovarian carcinomas, 23 (20.9%) cases were ALK positive by immunohistochemistry. All ALK-positive cases were ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma. ALK expression was detected in 23/85 (27.1%) ovarian serous carcinoma and 0/25 (0%) in ovarian mucinous carcinoma. None of the 23 ALK IHC-positive cases harbored ALK gene translocations by FISH or RT-PCR. ALK protein expression was associated with patient age, tumor stage, and histologic type. Specifically, the probability of ALK protein expression was significantly higher in high-grade serous carcinomas in older patients (above 50 y) with advanced disease (FIGO stage III and IV) compared with the low-grade serous and mucinous carcinomas in younger patients with relatively early disease. In conclusion, aberrant ALK expression is observed in ovarian serous carcinoma but not in mucinous carcinoma, is independent of gene translocation, and might be associated with progression and prognosis. PMID:27271776

  3. Alectinib: a novel second generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor for overcoming clinically-acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zilan; Wang, Meining; Zhang, Ao

    2015-01-01

    The development of inhibitors for the tyrosine anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has advanced rapidly, driven by biology and medicinal chemistry. The first generation ALK inhibitor crizotinib was granted US FDA approval with only four years of preclinical and clinical testing. Although this drug offers significant clinical benefit to the ALK-positive patients, resistance has been developed through a variety of mechanisms. In addition to ceritinib, alectinib is another second-generation ALK inhibitor launched in 2014 in Japan. This drug has a unique chemical structure bearing a 5H-benzo[b]carbazol-11(6H)-one structural scaffold with an IC50 value of 1.9 nmol/L, and is highly potent against ALK bearing the gatekeeper mutation L1196M with an IC50 of 1.56 nmol/L. In the clinic, alectinib is highly efficacious in treatment of ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and retains potency to combat crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations L1196M, F1174L, R1275Q and C1156Y. PMID:26579422

  4. ALK-positive inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor harboring ALK gene rearrangement, occurring after allogeneic stem cell transplant in an adult male.

    PubMed

    Vroobel, Katherine; Judson, Ian; Dainton, Melissa; McCormick, Alison; Fisher, Cyril; Thway, Khin

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor arose as a defined neoplasm from the disparate group of tumors (both neoplastic and inflammatory) originally described as inflammatory pseudotumors. The morphologic features are well described, and 50-60% of cases are associated with fusions of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene. We describe an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in the lower abdominal wall of an adult male, which occurred 88days after he received an allogeneic stem cell transplant for T-lymphoblastic lymphoma, and which was positive for ALK immunohistochemistry and showed ALK gene rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Two other cases are reported in the post-stem cell transplant setting, but both occurred in children and did not have molecular analysis performed. The etiology remains unclear, but may be due to immune dysregulation caused by any combination of prior chemotherapy, radiotherapy and immune suppression. These neoplasms should be considered as a rare consequence of allogeneic stem cell transplantation and referral to a specialist sarcoma center for further management may be required. PMID:27155927

  5. Relation of CD30 expression to survival and morphology in large cell B cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Noorduyn, L A; de Bruin, P C; van Heerde, P; van de Sandt, M M; Ossenkoppele, G J; Meijer, C J

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate whether CD30 expression is correlated with anaplastic morphology, and whether this correlated with a better survival in large cell B cell lymphomas, as has been described for T cell lymphomas. METHODS--CD30 expression was investigated using frozen sections in a series of 146 large cell B cell lymphomas. Clinical data and follow up information were collected from 25 lymphomas with strong CD30 expression, 30 lymphomas with partial CD30 expression, and a control group of 25 lymphomas which did not express CD30. RESULTS--Morphological distinction between anaplastic and non-anaplastic tumours was difficult. Of the cases with an anaplastic morphology, 50% were CD30 positive, as were 24% of the polymorphic centroblastic B cell lymphomas. Only 65% of the morphologically non-anaplastic tumours were completely CD30 negative. There was no difference in survival among patients with lymphomas expressing CD30 and those that did not. Patients with morphologically anaplastic B cell lymphomas did not differ in their survivals from those with other high grade B cell lymphomas. Clinical stage at presentation was the only variable that was significantly associated with survival. CONCLUSIONS--CD30 expression occurs frequently in large cell B cell lymphomas and is poorly related to anaplastic morphology. Morphological distinction between anaplastic and non-anaplastic tumours is difficult. In contrast to T cell lymphomas, CD30 positive B cell lymphomas do not show a relatively favourable clinical course. The results presented here raise serious doubts as to whether large cell B cell lymphoma, based on the expression of CD30 or anaplastic morphology, can really be termed a separate entity. Images PMID:8132806

  6. Closed Large Cell Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Closed Large Cell Clouds in the South Pacific     ... unperturbed by cyclonic or frontal activity. When the cell centers are cloudy and the main sinking motion is concentrated at cell ...

  7. Successful oral desensitization against skin rash induced by alectinib in a patient with anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive lung adenocarcinoma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Masayuki; Kubotaa, Masaru; Harada, Shinya; Niwa, Hideyuki; Kusuhara, Seiichiro; Kasajima, Masashi; Hiyoshi, Yasuhiro; Ishihara, Mikiko; Igawa, Satoshi; Masuda, Noriyuki

    2016-09-01

    Alectinib has been approved for the treatment of patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement-positive advanced non-small cell lung cancer. In terms of adverse effects, the occurrence of a severe skin rash induced by alectinib is reportedly rare, compared with the occurrence of skin rash induced by epithelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs). In the present case report, a 76-year-old woman with ALK-positive lung adenocarcinoma experienced disease progression after undergoing first-line chemotherapy. Subsequently, alectinib was administered as a second-line therapy. However, she discontinued alectinib therapy after 11days because of the occurrence of an alectinib-induced skin rash. Since the skin rash improved within one week, we attempted to perform oral desensitization to alectinib. The patient has not shown any recurrence of the rash or disease progression for 7 months since the successful oral desensitization to alectinib. Here, we describe the first case of successful oral desensitization against a skin rash induced by alectinib in a patient with ALK-positive lung adenocarcinoma. Desensitization to overcome adverse effects and to enable sustained treatment with alectinib should be considered in patients who develop alectinib sensitivities. PMID:27565916

  8. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase translocation is correlated with anaplastic lymphoma kinase expression and mutually exclusive with epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in Taiwanese non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Chi; Hung, Tsai-Hsien; Wang, Chih-Wei; Ng, Kwai-Fong; Chen, Tse-Ching

    2015-05-01

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) fusion gene is an important biomarker for target therapy. The aim of this study is to better understand the clinical and molecular features of the EML4-ALK fusion gene in lung cancer patients in Taiwan and therefore to generate an efficient algorithm for the detection of ALK translocation. In the first cohort, ALK translocation was identified in 1 adenocarcinoma from 100 lung cancer patients by using break apart fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Next, we detected 6 ALK translocations in another 40 EGFR wild type adenocarcinomas but not in 40 cases with EGFR mutation. Histological analysis revealed that solid growth with signet-ring cells or cribriform glands with extracellular mucin were noted in all the 7 ALK translocated cases. One ALK positive cancer with mucinous cribriform pattern had no ALK expression. ALK expression was correlated with ALK translocation (p < 0.001), but not with ALK gene copy number gain (CNG) (P = 0.838). ALK translocation was also mutually exclusive with EGFR mutation in Taiwanese non-small cell lung cancer (P = 0.033). These results indicate that screening tests for EGFR mutation status and/or ALK expression could help efficiently select ALK translocated patients for target therapy. PMID:25708242

  9. Differential expression of aurora-A kinase in T-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi; Lehman, Norman L; O’Donnell, James P; Lim, Megan S; Schultz, Daniel S; Chitale, Dhananjay A; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Inamdar, Kedar V

    2016-01-01

    Aurora-A is a mitotic kinase implicated in oncogenesis and is known to be overexpressed in B-cell lymphomas and plasma cell myeloma. The expression of Aurora-A kinase (henceforth referred to as Aurora-A) in T-cell lymphomas is not well characterized. In this study, we assessed Aurora-A expression by immunohistochemical analysis in 100 lymphomas encompassing a variety of T-cell lymphomas as categorized in the World Health Organization classification. Aurora-A expression was highest in anaplastic large-cell lymphomas and variably expressed in other types of T-cell lymphomas. In addition, the pattern of Aurora-A expression was predominantly cytoplasmic in ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma and was nuclear in ALK-negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma and other T-cell lymphomas, suggesting altered biochemical mechanisms of Aurora-A nuclear transport in ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis showed that Aurora-A is more highly expressed in ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma than in ALK-negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, and is relatively lower in peripheral T-cell lymphomas. Using western blot analysis and the DEL cell line (derived from ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma), we showed that Aurora-A expression is decreased after treatment with either MYC or MEK inhibitors, consistent with the MYC and MAP kinase signaling pathways being involved in driving Aurora-A expression; the greatest decrease was observed after MYC inhibition. These findings provide insights into the possible importance of Aurora-A overexpression in anaplastic large-cell lymphoma pathogenesis, and also suggest that Aurora-A inhibition could be a potential therapeutic approach for patients with anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. PMID:23411487

  10. Crizotinib in advanced, chemoresistant anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Gambacorti Passerini, Carlo; Farina, Francesca; Stasia, Alessandra; Redaelli, Sara; Ceccon, Monica; Mologni, Luca; Messa, Cristina; Guerra, Luca; Giudici, Giovanni; Sala, Elena; Mussolin, Lara; Deeren, Dries; King, Michael H; Steurer, Michael; Ordemann, Rainer; Cohen, Amos M; Grube, Matthias; Bernard, Lea; Chiriano, Gianpaolo; Antolini, Laura; Piazza, Rocco

    2014-02-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive lymphomas respond to chemotherapy, but relapses, which bear a poor prognosis, occur. Crizotinib inhibits ALK in vitro and in vivo and was administered as monotherapy to 11 ALK+ lymphoma patients who were resistant/refractory to cytotoxic therapy. The overall response rate was 10 of 11 (90.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 58.7% to 99.8%). Disease status at the latest follow-up is as follows: four patients are in complete response (CR) (months >21, >30, >35, >40) under continuous crizotinib administration; 4 patients had progression of disease (months 1, 2, 2, 2); 1 patient obtained CR on crizotinib, received an allogeneic bone marrow transplant, and is in CR; 2 patients (treated before and/or after allogeneic bone marrow transplant) obtained and are still in CR but they have stopped crizotinib. Overall and progression-free survival rates at 2 years are 72.7% (95% CI = 39.1% to 94.0%) and 63.7% (95% CI = 30.8% to 89.1%), respectively. ALK mutations conferring resistance to crizotinib in vitro could be identified in relapsed patients. Crizotinib exerted a potent antitumor activity with durable responses in advanced, heavily pretreated ALK+ lymphoma patients, with a benign safety profile. PMID:24491302

  11. Significance and evaluation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase by immunohistochemistry in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shuting; Liu, Nan; Zhao, Huanyu; Jiang, Guiyang; Zhang, Xiupeng; Wang, Enhua

    2016-08-01

    We used immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to evaluate anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) protein expression and gene rearrangements, respectively, in 283 cases of wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) non-small cell lung cancer biopsy specimens. Immunohistochemistry was positive for ALK in 52 cases (18.4 %), and there was no significant difference in staining between various monoclonal antibodies (Roche ALK test kit, D5F3, p-ALK, and EML4-ALK). On RT-PCR, 36 cases (12.7 %) were positive for ALK. Immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR were both positive in 35 cases and both negative in 230 cases, and both have a high consistency (265/283, 93.6 %). Including 17 cases, immunohistochemistry was positive but RT-PCR was negative, and in one case, immunohistochemistry was negative but RT-PCR was positive. On fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) testing of these 18 cases, only three cases were positive (one RT-PCR was positive; two immunohistochemistry were positive). There is a high prevalence of ALK positivity in wild-type EGFR non-small cell lung cancer. Immunohistochemistry for the detection of ALK gene rearrangements was highly consistent with RT-PCR, and thus, it is a good screening tool but produces false positive results that necessitate further screening by RT-PCR or FISH. PMID:26886284

  12. ALK-positive large B-cell lymphoma: identification of EML4-ALK and a review of the literature focusing on the ALK immunohistochemical staining pattern.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kana; Nakasone, Hideki; Togashi, Yuki; Sakata, Seiji; Tsuyama, Naoko; Baba, Satoko; Dobashi, Akito; Asaka, Reimi; Tsai, Chien-Chen; Chuang, Shih-Sung; Izutsu, Koji; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Takeuchi, Kengo

    2016-04-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive large B-cell lymphoma (ALK+LBCL) is a rare, aggressive B-cell lymphoma with ALK fusion genes. Histopathologically, the ALK immunohistochemical staining pattern is suggestive of the fusion partner of ALK. Here, we examined an ALK+LBCL case showing a unique diffuse cytoplasmic ALK staining pattern and identified EML4-ALK, which has not previously been reported in ALK+LBCL. Furthermore, to clarify whether the prognosis differs depending on the staining pattern, we reviewed 112 previously reported cases, and analyzed immunohistochemical markers and clinical data stratified by the staining pattern. We found that ALK staining can be classified into a granular cytoplasmic staining (GCS) or a non-GCS patterns. Sixty-four adult cases for which both the ALK staining pattern and survival time were reported were further analyzed for survival trends. The non-GCS pattern was significantly associated with inferior overall survival (P = 0.031). This difference remained significant after adjusting for age and clinical stage (hazard ratio 5.08, 95 % CI 1.88-13.7, P = 0.0013). Given that the ALK immunohistochemical staining pattern is associated with the ALK fusion partner, the present results suggest that the prognosis for ALK+LBCL differs depending on the ALK fusion partner. PMID:26781614

  13. Durable brain response with pulse-dose crizotinib and ceritinib in ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer compared with brain radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dudnik, Elizabeth; Siegal, Tali; Zach, Leor; Allen, Aaron M; Flex, Dov; Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Limon, Dror; Hirsch, Fred R; Peled, Nir

    2016-04-01

    Crizotinib achieves excellent systemic control in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-rearranged (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); however, central nervous system (CNS) metastases frequently occur as an early event. Whole brain irradiation, the standard treatment, results in neurocognitive impairment. We present a case series of three ALK+ NSCLC patients with progressing CNS metastases who were treated with pulse-dose crizotinib followed by ceritinib. Three ALK+ NSCLC patients treated between 2011 and 2014 (two males, two never smokers, age range 20-54years, all echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4/ALK rearrangement), were diagnosed with progressing cerebral disease while receiving crizotinib. Clinico-pathological characteristics, treatments, and outcomes were analyzed. In two patients the progression was limited to the CNS, and radiological evidence of leptomeningeal spread was present in one patient. Sequential use of crizotinib 500mg administered once daily (pulse-dose) followed by ceritinib on progression achieved control of the disease in the CNS for over 18 months and over 7 months in Patient 1 and Patient 2, respectively. This strategy provided durable CNS control after whole-brain radiotherapy failure in Patient 1, and allowed the whole-brain radiotherapy to be deferred in Patient 2. Limited CNS progression was documented in Patient 3 while he was on standard-dose/pulse-dose crizotinib for 15months; durable (over 7 months) complete remission was achieved with stereotactic radiotherapy and ceritinib. Manipulating the crizotinib schedule in ALK+ NSCLC patients with CNS metastases and using a novel ALK-inhibitor at the time of further progression may provide durable CNS control and allow brain radiotherapy to be deferred. PMID:26677785

  14. Prospective and clinical validation of ALK immunohistochemistry: results from the phase I/II study of alectinib for ALK-positive lung cancer (AF-001JP study)

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, K.; Togashi, Y.; Kamihara, Y.; Fukuyama, T.; Yoshioka, H.; Inoue, A.; Katsuki, H.; Kiura, K.; Nakagawa, K.; Seto, T.; Maemondo, M.; Hida, T.; Harada, M.; Ohe, Y.; Nogami, N.; Yamamoto, N.; Nishio, M.; Tamura, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusions need to be accurately and efficiently detected for ALK inhibitor therapy. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) remains the reference test. Although increasing data are supporting that ALK immunohistochemistry (IHC) is highly concordant with FISH, IHC screening needed to be clinically and prospectively validated. Patients and methods In the AF-001JP trial for alectinib, 436 patients were screened for ALK fusions through IHC (n = 384) confirmed with FISH (n = 181), multiplex RT-PCR (n = 68), or both (n = 16). IHC results were scored with iScore. Result ALK fusion was positive in 137 patients and negative in 250 patients. Since the presence of cancer cells in the samples for RT-PCR was not confirmed, ALK fusion negativity could not be ascertained in 49 patients. IHC interpreted with iScore showed a 99.4% (173/174) concordance with FISH. All 41 patients who had iScore 3 and were enrolled in phase II showed at least 30% tumor reduction with 92.7% overall response rate. Two IHC-positive patients with an atypical FISH pattern responded to ALK inhibitor therapy. The reduction rate was not correlated with IHC staining intensity. Conclusions Our study showed (i) that when sufficiently sensitive and appropriately interpreted, IHC can be a stand-alone diagnostic for ALK inhibitor therapies; (ii) that when atypical FISH patterns are accompanied by IHC positivity, the patients should be considered as candidates for ALK inhibitor therapies, and (iii) that the expression level of ALK fusion is not related to the level of response to ALK inhibitors and is thus not required for patient selection. Registration number JapicCTI-101264 (This study is registered with the Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center). PMID:26487585

  15. Combination Chemotherapy and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Peripheral T-cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-02

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Negative; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Positive; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage II Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Stage II Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Stage III Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma

  16. Convergent mutations and kinase fusions lead to oncogenic STAT3 activation in anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Crescenzo, Ramona; Abate, Francesco; Lasorsa, Elena; Tabbo', Fabrizio; Gaudiano, Marcello; Chiesa, Nicoletta; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Spaccarotella, Elisa; Barbarossa, Luigi; Ercole, Elisabetta; Todaro, Maria; Boi, Michela; Acquaviva, Andrea; Ficarra, Elisa; Novero, Domenico; Rinaldi, Andrea; Tousseyn, Thomas; Rosenwald, Andreas; Kenner, Lukas; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Tzankov, Alexander; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Paulli, Marco; Weisenburger, Dennis; Chan, Wing C; Iqbal, Javeed; Piris, Miguel A; Zamo', Alberto; Ciardullo, Carmela; Rossi, Davide; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pileri, Stefano; Tiacci, Enrico; Falini, Brunangelo; Shultz, Leonard D; Mevellec, Laurence; Vialard, Jorge E; Piva, Roberto; Bertoni, Francesco; Rabadan, Raul; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2015-04-13

    A systematic characterization of the genetic alterations driving ALCLs has not been performed. By integrating massive sequencing strategies, we provide a comprehensive characterization of driver genetic alterations (somatic point mutations, copy number alterations, and gene fusions) in ALK(-) ALCLs. We identified activating mutations of JAK1 and/or STAT3 genes in ∼20% of 88 [corrected] ALK(-) ALCLs and demonstrated that 38% of systemic ALK(-) ALCLs displayed double lesions. Recurrent chimeras combining a transcription factor (NFkB2 or NCOR2) with a tyrosine kinase (ROS1 or TYK2) were also discovered in WT JAK1/STAT3 ALK(-) ALCL. All these aberrations lead to the constitutive activation of the JAK/STAT3 pathway, which was proved oncogenic. Consistently, JAK/STAT3 pathway inhibition impaired cell growth in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25873174

  17. Anaplastic myeloma in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Butler, R C; Thomas, S M; Thompson, J M; Keat, A C

    1984-01-01

    We describe a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus who developed an unusual form of anaplastic myeloma. Possible relationships between the two disease, and the role played by immunosuppressive therapy, are discussed. Images PMID:6476924

  18. Anaplastic glioma: current treatment and management.

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, Emilie; Taillibert, Sophie; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2015-06-01

    Anaplastic glioma (AG) is divided into three morphology-based groups (anaplastic astrocytoma, anaplastic oligodendroglioma, anaplastic oligoastrocytoma) as well as three molecular groups (glioma-CpG island methylation phenotype [G-CIMP] negative, G-CIMP positive non-1p19q codeleted tumors and G-CIMP positive codeleted tumors). The RTOG 9402 and EORTC 26951 trials established radiotherapy plus (procarbazine, lomustine, vincristine) chemotherapy as the standard of care in 1p/19q codeleted AG. Uni- or non-codeleted AG are currently best treated with radiotherapy only or alkylator-based chemotherapy only as determined by the NOA-04 trial. Maturation of NOA-04 and results of the currently accruing studies, CODEL (for codeleted AG) and CATNON (for uni or non-codeleted AG), will likely refine current up-front treatment recommendations for AG. PMID:25936680

  19. Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma, Version 2.2015

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Robert I.; Lydiatt, William M.; Ball, Douglas W.; Busaidy, Naifa Lamki; Byrd, David; Callender, Glenda; Dickson, Paxton; Duh, Quan-Yang; Ehya, Hormoz; Haymart, Megan; Hoh, Carl; Hunt, Jason P.; Iagaru, Andrei; Kandeel, Fouad; Kopp, Peter; Lamonica, Dominick M.; McCaffrey, Judith C.; Moley, Jeffrey F.; Parks, Lee; Raeburn, Christopher D.; Ridge, John A.; Ringel, Matthew D.; Scheri, Randall P.; Shah, Jatin P.; Smallridge, Robert C.; Sturgeon, Cord; Wang, Thomas N.; Wirth, Lori J.; Hoffmann, Karin G.; Hughes, Miranda

    2016-01-01

    This selection from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Thyroid Carcinoma focuses on anaplastic carcinoma because substantial changes were made to the systemic therapy recommendations for the 2015 update. Dosages and frequency of administration are now provided, docetaxel/doxorubicin regimens were added, and single-agent cisplatin was deleted because it is not recommended for patients with advanced or metastatic anaplastic thyroid cancer. PMID:26358798

  20. Therapeutic Targeting of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase in Lung Cancer: A Paradigm for Precision Cancer Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Ryohei; Lovly, Christine M.; Shaw, Alice T.

    2015-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) receptor tyrosine kinase was initially discovered as a component of the fusion protein nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK in anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL). Genomic alterations in ALK, including rearrangements, point mutations, and genomic amplification, have now been identified in several malignancies, including lymphoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), neuroblastoma, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, and others. Importantly, ALK serves as a validated therapeutic target in these diseases. Several ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), including crizotinib, ceritinib and alectinib, have been developed, and some of them have already been approved for clinical use. These ALK inhibitors have all shown remarkable clinical outcomes in ALK-rearranged NSCLC. Unfortunately, as is the case for other kinase inhibitors in clinical use, sensitive tumors inevitably relapse due to acquired resistance. This review focuses on the discovery, function, and therapeutic targeting of ALK, with a particular focus on ALK-rearranged NSCLC. PMID:25979929

  1. Anaplastic giant cell thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wallin, G; Lundell, G; Tennvall, J

    2004-01-01

    Anaplastic (giant cell) thyroid carcinoma (ATC), is one of the most aggressive malignancies in humans with a median survival time after diagnosis of 3-6 months. Death from ATC was earlier seen because of local growth and suffocation. ATC is uncommon, accounting for less than 5 % of all thyroid carcinomas. The diagnosis can be established by means of multiple fine needle aspiration biopsies, which are neither harmful nor troublesome for the patient. The cytological diagnosis of this high-grade malignant tumour is usually not difficult for a well trained cytologist. The intention to treat patients with ATC is cure, although only few of them survive. The majority of the patients are older than 60 years and treatment must be influenced by their high age. We have by using a combined modality regimen succeeded in achieving local control in most patients. Every effort should be made to control the primary tumour and thereby improve the quality of remaining life and it is important for patients, relatives and the personnel to know that cure is not impossible. Different treatment combinations have been used since 30 years including radiotherapy, cytostatic drugs and surgery, when feasible. In our latest combined regimen, 22 patients were treated with hyper fractionated radiotherapy 1.6Gy x 2 to a total target dose of 46 Gy given preoperatively, 20 mg doxorubicin was administered intravenously once weekly and surgery was carried out 2-3 weeks after the radiotherapy. 17 of these 22 patients were operated upon and none of these 17 patients got a local recurrence. In the future we are awaiting the development of new therapeutic approaches to this aggressive type of carcinoma. Inhibitors of angiogenesis might be useful. Combretastatin has displayed cytotoxicity against ATC cell lines and has had a positive effect on ATC in a patient. Sodium iodide symporter (NIS) genetherapy is also being currently considered for dedifferentiated thyroid carcinomas with the ultimate aim of

  2. Anaplastic Transformation of Papillary Thyroid Cancer in the Retroperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, James P.; Wen, Fang; Jih, Lily J.

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is an aggressive variant of thyroid cancer that in most cases arises from anaplastic transformation of terminally differentiated thyroid carcinomas. This process usually occurs in the thyroid or cervical lymph nodes. Anaplastic transformation in distant metastatic sites is exceedingly rare, only previously documented in a few case reports. We report a rare case of anaplastic transformation of papillary thyroid carcinoma within a large retroperitoneal metastasis in a 64-year-old male 30 years after the initial diagnosis. PMID:26351607

  3. An unusual case of anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive large B-cell lymphoma in an elderly patient: A case report and discussion

    PubMed Central

    XIONG, HANZHEN; LIU, SHAO-YAN; YANG, YUE-XIN; TAN, XUE-XIAN; LUO, QIU-PING; PENG, JUAN; XIONG, ZHONG-TANG; CHEN, HUI; CHEN, JUAN; LI, ZHI; JIANG, QING-PING

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual case of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive large B-cell lymphoma, with rapid clinical progression, which occurred in a 90-year-old male patient. The patient presented with numerous enlarged lymph nodes in the neck and mediastinum. Histopathological analysis of a single lymph node detected diffuse large immunoblastic- or plasmablastic-like tumor cells, which were strongly immunoreactive for ALK in a granular cytoplasmic distribution, but negative for the expression of CD20 and CD79a. In addition, polymerase chain reaction assays were unable to detect clonal rearrangements of the T cell receptor-γ and immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in the tumor lesion, and in situ hybridization tested negative for infection with Epstein-Barr virus. The patient underwent a single cycle of chemotherapy using the cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone, and etoposide (E-CHOP) regimen; however, the patient developed pleural effusions with respiratory distress, associated with clinical deterioration. The patient succumbed to the disease within 4 months of initial presentation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the eldest patient with this type of lymphoma to be reported in the literature. PMID:27168806

  4. Bevacizumab and Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumor, Lymphoma, Intracranial Glioblastoma, Gliosarcoma or Anaplastic Astrocytoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-14

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV

  5. Supratentorial extraventricular anaplastic ependymoma with extracranial metastasis.

    PubMed

    Pachella, Laura A; Kamiya-Matsuoka, Carlos; Lee, Eva Lu T; Olar, Adriana; Yung, W K Alfred

    2015-03-01

    Ependymoma is a relatively rare malignancy accounting for 2.0% of all primary central nervous system tumors in adults. Extracranial metastasis is a very uncommon complication of gliomas, especially of anaplastic ependymomas. The objective of this paper is to show that ependymomas can metastasize to soft tissue and lymph nodes as well as to share our approach to this challenge. We report a male patient with anaplastic ependymoma that recurred, metastasizing to the neck and lymph nodes. Metastatic disease was diagnosed based on clinical presentation of a palpable nodule on the right neck and diffuse cervical lymphadenopathies. A biopsy was obtained and pathology revealed anaplastic ependymoma. Whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scan showed metastatic disease in the right mastoid region with diffuse uptake in the cervical lymph nodes. Clinical and radiologic response was achieved after three chemotherapy cycles of etoposide, cisplatin, vincristine, and cyclophosphamide. This case highlights extracranial metastasis to the soft tissue as an atypical presentation of recurrent anaplastic ependymoma. Other reported instances of extracranial metastatic ependymoma with this presentation are discussed. The possible metastatic pathways of intracranial disease are discussed. It also illustrates how extracranial disease remains stable with systemic chemotherapy. PMID:25455735

  6. Anaplastic extramedullary cervical ependymoma with leptomeningeal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Pomeraniec, I J; Dallapiazza, R F; Sumner, H M; Lopes, M B; Shaffrey, C I; Smith, J S

    2015-12-01

    We present a rare extramedullary ependymoma with diffuse spinal metastatic disease, and review the previous reports of extramedullary spinal ependymomas. Ependymomas are the most common intramedullary spinal cord tumor in adults. These tumors rarely present as extramedullary masses. We treated a 23-year-old man with a history of progressive neck, shoulder and arm pain, with sensory and motor symptoms in the C7 dermatome. MRI of the cervical spine demonstrated a ventral contrast-enhancing lesion with evidence of enhancement along the dura and spinal cord of the upper cervical spine, thoracic spine, and cauda equina. He underwent a tumor debulking procedure without complications. Following surgery, he received craniospinal radiation to treat the remaining tumor and diffuse leptomeningeal disease. The final pathology of the tumor revealed that is was a World Health Organization Grade III anaplastic ependymoma. At the 1 year follow-up, the patient had stable imaging and had returned to his preoperative functional status. Of the 19 reported patients with primary intradural, extramedullary spinal ependymomas, two had extradural components and seven had anaplastic grades. Only one tumor with an anaplastic grade resulted in metastatic disease, but without spinal recurrence. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an intradural, extramedullary spinal ependymoma with an anaplastic grade, presenting with concomitant diffuse, nodular leptomeningeal metastasis involving the upper cervical spine, thoracic spine, conus medullaris, and cauda equina. Similar to the treatment of intramedullary ependymomas with metastasis, this patient underwent an aggressive debulking procedure followed by radiation therapy to the entire neuroaxis. PMID:26601808

  7. Acquired stuttering due to recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Katherine B; Turner, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Acquired (neurogenic) stuttering is a rare phenomenon seen after cerebral infarction or brain injury. Aetiology of this symptom is unclear, but recent evidence supports that it is a disturbance in the left hemispheric neural network involving the interplay between the cortex and basal ganglia. We present the case of a patient who develops acquired stuttering after a recurrence of a right temporoparietal anaplastic astrocytoma (WHO grade III). We also review other cases of acquired stuttering and known anatomical correlates. PMID:24252834

  8. Management of Atypical and Anaplastic Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Buttrick, Simon; Shah, Ashish H; Komotar, Ricardo J; Ivan, Michael E

    2016-04-01

    Meningiomas are the most prevalent primary tumor of central nervous system origin and, although most neoplasms are benign, a small proportion exemplifies an aggressive profile characterized by high recurrence rates, pleomorphic histology, and overall resistance to standard treatment. Standard initial therapy for malignant meningiomas includes maximal safe surgical resection followed by focal radiation in certain cases. The role for chemotherapy during recurrence of these aggressive meningiomas is less clear. Prognosis is poor and recurrence of malignant meningiomas is high. This article provides an overview of atypical and anaplastic malignant meningiomas, their treatment, and ongoing research for more effective treatments. PMID:27012388

  9. h-prune affects anaplastic thyroid cancer invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Nambu, Junko; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Hashimoto, Masakazu; Tashiro, Hirotaka; Sugino, Keizo; Shimamoto, Fumio; Kikuchi, Akira; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-06-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer is one of the most aggressive human malignancies and is resistant to multimodal treatments. The expression of h-prune, the human homologue of Drosophila prune, has been reported to be correlated with progression and aggressiveness in various cancers including breast, colorectal and pancreatic cancers. We examined the role of h-prune in anaplastic thyroid cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Immunohistochemical analysis of h-prune was performed with 15 surgically resected specimens of anaplastic thyroid cancers. To investigate cell motility, Boyden chamber, wound healing and matrigel invasion assays were performed using cells from anaplastic thyroid cancer cell lines. A murine orthotopic thyroid cancer model was used to investigate metastatic ability. In the immunohistochemical analysis, only weak focal or no staining of h-prune was observed in non-tumor tissue. In contrast, diffuse staining of h-prune was observed in anaplastic thyroid cancer and lymph node metastasis samples. Both inhibition of h-prune phosphodiesterase activity with dipyridamole and small interfering RNA for h-prune suppressed 8505C and KTC-3 cell motility. In addition, treatment with dipyridamole and decreased expression of h-prune suppressed tumor invasion and pulmonary metastasis in a NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγnull (NOG) mouse orthotopic thyroid cancer model. In conclusion, h-prune is frequently expressed in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells and lymph nodes metastasis, and promotes migration and invasion of anaplastic thyroid cancer cells and metastasis in an anaplastic thyroid cancer model. Thus, h-prune shows promise as a targeting candidate against anaplastic thyroid cancer. PMID:27109060

  10. TCF12 is mutated in anaplastic oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Labreche, Karim; Simeonova, Iva; Kamoun, Aurélie; Gleize, Vincent; Chubb, Daniel; Letouzé, Eric; Riazalhosseini, Yasser; Dobbins, Sara E; Elarouci, Nabila; Ducray, Francois; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Zelenika, Diana; Wardell, Christopher P; Frampton, Mathew; Saulnier, Olivier; Pastinen, Tomi; Hallout, Sabrina; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Dehais, Caroline; Idbaih, Ahmed; Mokhtari, Karima; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Huillard, Emmanuelle; Mark Lathrop, G; Sanson, Marc; Houlston, Richard S

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO) are rare primary brain tumours that are generally incurable, with heterogeneous prognosis and few treatment targets identified. Most oligodendrogliomas have chromosomes 1p/19q co-deletion and an IDH mutation. Here we analysed 51 AO by whole-exome sequencing, identifying previously reported frequent somatic mutations in CIC and FUBP1. We also identified recurrent mutations in TCF12 and in an additional series of 83 AO. Overall, 7.5% of AO are mutated for TCF12, which encodes an oligodendrocyte-related transcription factor. Eighty percent of TCF12 mutations identified were in either the bHLH domain, which is important for TCF12 function as a transcription factor, or were frameshift mutations leading to TCF12 truncated for this domain. We show that these mutations compromise TCF12 transcriptional activity and are associated with a more aggressive tumour type. Our analysis provides further insights into the unique and shared pathways driving AO. PMID:26068201

  11. TCF12 is mutated in anaplastic oligodendroglioma

    PubMed Central

    Labreche, Karim; Simeonova, Iva; Kamoun, Aurélie; Gleize, Vincent; Chubb, Daniel; Letouzé, Eric; Riazalhosseini, Yasser; Dobbins, Sara E.; Elarouci, Nabila; Ducray, Francois; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Zelenika, Diana; Wardell, Christopher P.; Frampton, Mathew; Saulnier, Olivier; Pastinen, Tomi; Hallout, Sabrina; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Dehais, Caroline; Idbaih, Ahmed; Mokhtari, Karima; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Huillard, Emmanuelle; Mark Lathrop, G.; Sanson, Marc; Houlston, Richard S.; Adam, Clovis; Andraud, Marie; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Bauchet, Luc; Beauchesne, Patrick; Blechet, Claire; Campone, Mario; Carpentier, Antoine; Carpentier, Catherine; Carpiuc, Ioana; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Chiforeanu, Danchristian; Chinot, Olivier; Cohen-Moyal, Elisabeth; Colin, Philippe; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Desenclos, Christine; Desse, Nicolas; Dhermain, Frederic; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Eimer, Sandrine; Faillot, Thierry; Fesneau, Mélanie; Fontaine, Denys; Gaillard, Stéphane; Gauchotte, Guillaume; Gaultier, Claude; Ghiringhelli, Francois; Godard, Joel; Marcel Gueye, Edouard; Sebastien Guillamo, Jean; Hamdi-Elouadhani, Selma; Honnorat, Jerome; Louis Kemeny, Jean; Khallil, Toufik; Jouvet, Anne; Labrousse, Francois; Langlois, Olivier; Laquerriere, Annie; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Le Guérinel, Caroline; Levillain, Pierre-Marie; Loiseau, Hugues; Loussouarn, Delphine; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Menei, Philippe; Janette Motsuo Fotso, Marie; Noel, Georges; Parker, Fabrice; Peoc'h, Michel; Polivka, Marc; Quintin-Roué, Isabelle; Ramirez, Carole; Ricard, Damien; Richard, Pomone; Rigau, Valérie; Rousseau, Audrey; Runavot, Gwenaelle; Sevestre, Henri; Christine Tortel, Marie; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny; Vauleon, Elodie; Viennet, Gabriel; Villa, Chiara; Wager, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO) are rare primary brain tumours that are generally incurable, with heterogeneous prognosis and few treatment targets identified. Most oligodendrogliomas have chromosomes 1p/19q co-deletion and an IDH mutation. Here we analysed 51 AO by whole-exome sequencing, identifying previously reported frequent somatic mutations in CIC and FUBP1. We also identified recurrent mutations in TCF12 and in an additional series of 83 AO. Overall, 7.5% of AO are mutated for TCF12, which encodes an oligodendrocyte-related transcription factor. Eighty percent of TCF12 mutations identified were in either the bHLH domain, which is important for TCF12 function as a transcription factor, or were frameshift mutations leading to TCF12 truncated for this domain. We show that these mutations compromise TCF12 transcriptional activity and are associated with a more aggressive tumour type. Our analysis provides further insights into the unique and shared pathways driving AO. PMID:26068201

  12. Novel Approaches in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Kun-Tai; Yu, Xiao-Min; Audhya, Anjon W.; Jaume, Juan C.; Lloyd, Ricardo V.; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Prolla, Tomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), accounting for less than 2% of all thyroid cancer, is responsible for the majority of death from all thyroid malignancies and has a median survival of 6 months. The resistance of ATC to conventional thyroid cancer therapies, including radioiodine and thyroid-stimulating hormone suppression, contributes to the very poor prognosis of this malignancy. This review will cover several cellular signaling pathways and mechanisms, including RET/PTC, RAS, BRAF, Notch, p53, and histone deacetylase, which are identified to play roles in the transformation and dedifferentiation process, and therapies that target these pathways. Lastly, novel approaches and agents involving the Notch1 pathway, nuclear factor κB, Trk-fused gene, cancer stem-like cells, mitochondrial mutation, and tumor immune microenvironment are discussed. With a better understanding of the biological process and treatment modality, the hope is to improve ATC outcome in the future. PMID:25260367

  13. Anaplastic thyroid cancer: multimodal treatment results

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Zaki Antonio Taissoun; Granados-García, Martín; Luna-Ortiz, Kuauhyama; Guerrero-Huerta, Francisco Javier; Gómez-Pedraza, Antonio; Ñamendys-Silva, Silvio A; Meneses-García, Abelardo; Ordoñez-Mosquera, Juliana María

    2014-01-01

    Background Anaplastic thyroid cancer is a rare and lethal disease. It accounts for 1–2% of thyroid malignancies, but specific mortality is higher than 90%. It is an aggressive locoregional disease with a high metastatic capacity. There is no agreement with regards to the best treatment. We analysed the results of treatment in a mestizo population treated in the National Cancer Institute (Mexico). Methods We reviewed 1,581 files of thyroid carcinomas; of these, 29 (1.83%) had anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Demographic variables, clinical manifestations, tumour characteristics, and treatments were analysed. Results The median age was 64.5 ± 13.2 years. Females were more affected (female/male ratio: 2.6:1); 21 cases occurred in women (72.4%), and eight in males (27.6%). The most common manifestations were neck enlargement (93.10%) and hoarseness (71.31%). The median tumour size was 8 cm (range: 4–20 cm). The percentage of cases which presented in clinical stage IVA was 10.3%, with 62.1% presenting in clinical stage IVb and 27.6% presenting in clinical stage VIc. Complete resection (R0) (p = 0.05), radiation doses of higher than 33.1 Gy (p = 0.04), and multimodal therapy were associated with better survival. Surgery plus radiotherapy with or without systemic treatment (p = 0.006). The median overall survival was 119 days (IC 95%, 36.3–201.6). Six-month, one-year and two-year survival was 37.9%, 21% and 13%, respectively. Conclusion Complete surgical resection is associated with better survival but is very difficult to achieve due to aggressive biological behaviour. Multimodal therapy is associated with better survival and a better quality of life. There is a need for more effective systemic treatments as extensive surgical resections have little overall benefit in highly invasive and metastatic disease. PMID:25114721

  14. Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma: a systematic review of the literature and mini-meta analysis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Philip A; Prince, H Miles

    2013-09-01

    Breast implant-associated ALCL (BIA-ALCL) is a rare, but likely under-reported entity, which most commonly presents with an effusion developing between the breast implant and the host fibrous capsule that surrounds it. It has been described in association with breast implants used for post-cancer reconstructive surgery and when implanted for purely cosmetic reasons. Two different presentations are seen; presentation with an effusion alone +/- co-existing capsular contracture, without an associated mass, and presentation with a mass lesion +/- an effusion. These two presentations are associated with very different outcomes, with women presenting with effusion alone having an excellent long-term survival, even in the absence of specific therapy other than implant removal. In these women, no further therapy other than implant removal is likely necessary. In contrast, women presenting with a mass lesion have a higher rate of relapse and may require more aggressive therapy. PMID:23765424

  15. Treatment of ALK-Rearranged Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Recent Progress and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Laird; Solomon, Benjamin

    2015-07-01

    Rearrangements of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene originally discovered nearly 20 years ago in the context of anaplastic large cell lymphoma were identified as oncogenic drivers in a subset of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) in 2007. These ALK gene rearrangements are present in 3-5 % of NSCLC patients, typically younger, never or light smokers with adenocarcinomas. Crizotinib is a first-in-class ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor with significant activity in ALK-positive NSCLC that received accelerated US Food and Drug Administration approval for treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC in 2011, just 4 years after identification of ALK rearrangements in this setting. Subsequently, two phase III trials have shown crizotinib to have a tolerable toxicity profile and to be superior to standard chemotherapy for the first- or second-line treatment of advanced ALK-positive lung cancer and numerous countries have approved its use. Despite initial responses, acquired resistance to crizotinib invariably leads to disease progression. Mechanisms of resistance have been described to include ALK tyrosine kinase mutations, activation of bypass signalling pathways and pharmacokinetic failure of crizotinib. Several next-generation ALK inhibitors, including ceritinib and alectinib, are in clinical development and show efficacy in both the crizotinib naïve and crizotinib refractory settings. Ongoing clinical trials will identify the optimal strategy to incorporate these novel agents in the treatment of patients with ALK-positive NSCLC. PMID:26076736

  16. Supratentorial extraventricular anaplastic ependymoma in a child

    PubMed Central

    Khilji, Muhammad Faisal; Hamid, Rana Shoaib; Qureshi, Asim

    2014-01-01

    A young child presented to the emergency department of a tertiary care hospital with on and off headache, focal seizures involving the left side of the body, weakness of left upper and lower limbs and vomiting for 2 weeks. Examination showed an alert child with grade 4/5 powers in left upper and lower limbs. Blood investigations were normal. An urgent CT of the brain showed intra-axial mass in the right frontal cerebral cortex, superolateral to the right lateral ventricle. MRI of the brain showed supratentorial extraventricular mass of 5.20×3.70×3.80 cm, in the right frontal cortex, emitting heterogeneous signals on T1, T2 and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences and impression of astrocytoma, ependymoma or choroid plexus papilloma was made. Complete surgical resection of mass was performed. Histopathology of the mass proved it as WHO grade III anaplastic ependymoma. The child made an uneventful postoperative recovery and radiotherapy was followed. PMID:24623545

  17. Low-grade and anaplastic oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Van Den Bent, Martin J; Bromberg, Jacolien E C; Buckner, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic oligodendrogliomas have long attracted interest because of their sensitivity to chemotherapy, in particular in the subset of 1p/19q co-deleted tumors. Recent molecular studies have shown that all 1p/19q co-deleted tumors have IDH mutations and most of them also have TERT mutations. Because of the presence of similar typical genetic alterations in astrocytoma and glioblastoma, the current trend is to diagnose these tumors on the basis of their molecular profile. Further long-term follow-up analysis of both EORTC and RTOG randomized studies on (neo)adjuvant procarbazine, lomustine, vincristine (PCV) chemotherapy have shown that adjuvant chemotherapy indeed improves outcome, and this is now standard of care. It is also equally clear that benefit to PCV chemotherapy is not limited to the 1p/19q co-deleted cases; potential other predictive factors are IDH mutations and MGMT promoter methylation. Moreover, a recent RTOG study on low-grade glioma also noted an improved outcome after adjuvant PCV chemotherapy, thus making (PCV) chemotherapy now standard of care for all 1p/19q co-deleted tumors regardless of grade. It remains unclear whether temozolomide provides the same survival benefit, as no data from well-designed clinical trials on adjuvant temozolomide in this tumor type are available. Another question that remains is whether one can safely leave out radiotherapy as part of initial treatment to avoid cognitive side-effects of radiotherapy. The current data suggest that delaying radiotherapy and treatment with chemotherapy only may be detrimental for overall survival. PMID:26948366

  18. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase is expressed in different subtypes of human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Chang, Y.; Astudillo, A.; Mortimer, J.; Deuel, T.F. . E-mail: tfdeuel@scripps.edu

    2007-06-29

    Pleiotrophin (PTN, Ptn) is an 18 kDa cytokine expressed in human breast cancers. Since inappropriate expression of Ptn stimulates progression of breast cancer in transgenic mice and a dominant negative PTN reverses the transformed phenotype of human breast cancer cells that inappropriately express Ptn, it is suggested that constitutive PTN signaling in breast cancer cells that inappropriately express Ptn activates pathways that promote a more aggressive breast cancer phenotype. Pleiotrophin signals by inactivating its receptor, the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP){beta}/{zeta}, and, recently, PTN was found to activate anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) through the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway in PTN-stimulated cells, not through a direct interaction of PTN with ALK and thus not through the PTN-enforced dimerization of ALK. Since full-length ALK is activated in different malignant cancers and activated ALK is a potent oncogenic protein, we examined human breast cancers to test the possibility that ALK may be expressed in breast cancers and potentially activated through the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway; we now demonstrate that ALK is strongly expressed in different histological subtypes of human breast cancer; furthermore, ALK is expressed in both nuclei and cytoplasm and, in the 'dotted' pattern characteristic of ALK fusion proteins in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. This study thus supports the possibility that activated ALK may be important in human breast cancers and potentially activated either through the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway, or, alternatively, as an activated fusion protein to stimulate progression of breast cancer in humans.

  19. Non-anaplastic peripheral T-cell lymphoma in children and adolescents--a retrospective analysis of the NHL-BFM study group.

    PubMed

    Kontny, Udo; Oschlies, Ilske; Woessmann, Willi; Burkhardt, Birgit; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Salzburg, Janina; Janda, Ales; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Niggli, Felix; Zimmermann, Martin; Reiter, Alfred; Klapper, Wolfram

    2015-03-01

    Mature (peripheral) T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) other than anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a heterogeneous group of diseases and exceedingly rare in children and adolescents. Survival rates range between 46% and 85%. This study reports the disease characteristics, treatment and outcome of all patients with the diagnosis of mature TCL registered in the Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster non-Hodgkin lymphoma database between 1986 and 2012. All diagnoses were centrally reviewed and revised by clinico-pathological correlation according to the criteria of the current World Health Organization classification. Of the 69 patients originally registered as having PTCL, the diagnosis was confirmed in 38 of them. Most patients were treated with an anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL)-like therapy regimen. Patients with PTCL-not otherwise specified comprised the largest group and showed a 5-year event-free survival rate of 61 ± 11%. Patients suffering from Natural Killer/T-cell- and hepatosplenic TCL had the poorest outcome. Our results suggest that the outcomes of children with mature TCL other than ALCL depend on the subtype and are worse than in all other paediatric lymphomas. The clinical experience presented in this largest study on paediatric mature TCL may serve as basis for future collaborative international prospective clinical trials. PMID:25395120

  20. Malignant Struma Ovarii With a Predominant Component of Anaplastic Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Masaharu; Ishibashi, Tomomi; Koyama, Taig; Onoue, Kaoru; Kitai, Satomi; Tanaka, Kuniji; Isonishi, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    Struma ovarii exhibiting malignant histology are uncommon, and aggressive clinical courses with initial extraovarian spread are even more rare. This report describes a case of malignant struma ovarii with a predominant anaplastic carcinoma component. A 65-yr-old, gravida 2, para 2, female presented with lower abdominal discomfort and pain. She had a 12×10×7.5 cm tumor in the right ovary. Intraoperative diagnosis was high-grade spindle cell tumor. Right salpingo-oophorectomy and hysterectomy were performed. Macroscopically, the tumor invading the right tube was a yellow-white solid mass with focal microcysts containing greenish liquid and focal calcification. The tumor was histologically characterized by a spindle cell and pleomorphic sarcomatous component, and a minor component of benign-looking thyroid tissue with ossification. Immunohistochemically, the sarcomatous component was focally positive for CAM 5.2, EMA, thyroid transcription factor-1, and thyroglobulin, indicating anaplastic carcinoma. The patient was treated with chemotherapy and is alive, yet with tumor, 25 mo after surgery. This is the first case of malignant struma ovarii with a predominant component of anaplastic carcinoma. This type of malignant struma ovarii may lead to diagnostic problems, and sampling and differential diagnosis among sarcomatous ovarian tumors are important for making the correct diagnoses. PMID:26630220

  1. Histopathological analysis of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cases with long-term survival: A report from the Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma Research Consortium of Japan.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Mitsuyoshi; Sugitani, Iwao; Kakudo, Kennichi; Sakamoto, Atsuhiko; Higashiyama, Takuya; Sugino, Kiminori; Toda, Kazuhisa; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Yoshimoto, Seiichi; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Imai, Tsuneo; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Orita, Yorihisa; Kammori, Makoto; Fujimori, Keisei; Yamada, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-31

    The aim of this study was to clarify the histopathological features of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma in patients who achieved long-term survival. We reviewed 88 anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cases in which the patient survived less than 3 months (short-term survival), and 68 anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cases in which the patient survived more than one year (long-term survival) from the database of the Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma Research Consortium of Japan. We examined these cases both histologically and immunohistochemically. Six (6.8%) short-term survival cases and 27 (39.7%) long-term survival cases were considered not to be anaplastic thyroid carcinoma after central review. Of these, 12 were revised to papillary carcinoma with squamous cell carcinoma. In cases without chemotherapy, long-term survival was significantly more common if there was a pre-existing tumor, epithelial growth, or lymphocytic infiltration, and short-term survival was more common if neutrophilic infiltration was present. In cases with chemotherapy, long-term survival was significantly more common if epithelial growth or a squamous cell carcinoma component was present, whereas short-term survival was more common in cases with rhabdoid cells. Immunohistochemical results were not related to survival. Some long-term survival cases showed histological findings other than those typically associated with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. The presence of a pre-existing tumor, epithelial growth, a squamous cell carcinoma component, no neutrophilic infiltration and lymphocytic infiltration may therefore be favorable prognostic factors in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. PMID:26842589

  2. The effect of low level laser on anaplastic thyroid cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Yun-Hee; Moon, Jeon-Hwan; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang

    2015-02-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a non-thermal phototherapy used in several medical applications, including wound healing, reduction of pain and amelioration of oral mucositis. Nevertheless, the effects of LLLT upon cancer or dysplastic cells have been so far poorly studied. Here we report that the effects of laser irradiation on anaplastic thyroid cancer cells leads to hyperplasia. 650nm of laser diode was performed with a different time interval (0, 15, 30, 60J/cm2 , 25mW) on anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line FRO in vivo. FRO was orthotopically injected into the thyroid gland of nude mice and the irradiation was performed with the same method described previously. After irradiation, the xenograft evaluation was followed for one month. The thyroid tissues from sacrificed mice were undergone to H&E staining and immunohistochemical staining with HIF-1α, Akt, TGF-β1. We found the aggressive proliferation of FRO on thyroid gland with dose dependent. In case of 60 J/ cm2 of energy density, the necrotic bodies were found in a center of the thyroid. The phosphorylation of HIF-1α and Akt was detected in the thyroid gland, which explained the survival signaling of anaplastic cancer cell was turned on the thyroid gland. Furthermore, TGF-β1 expression was decreased after irradiation. In this study, we demonstrated that insufficient energy density irradiation occurred the decreasing of TGF-β1 which corresponding to the phosphorylation of Akt/ HIF-1α. This aggressive proliferation resulted to the hypoxic condition of tissue for angiogenesis. We suggest that LLLT may influence to cancer aggressiveness associated with a decrease in TGF-β1 and increase in Akt/HIF-1α.

  3. Congenital Anaplastic Rhabdomyosarcoma Presenting As Abdominal Wall Mass

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Krishnendu; Mandal, Rupali

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma encompasses a group of malignant myogenic neoplasms expressing a multitude of clinical and pathological diversities. It is the commonest soft tissue sarcoma of childhood but neonates are rarely affected. Embryonal subtype is the most frequent. Head-neck and genitourinary tracts are predominant sites, while trunk is considered among the unusual sites of rhabdomyosarcoma. Herein we report a case of anaplastic rhabdomyosarcoma in a newborn girl presenting, at the Pediatric Surgery Outpatient Department of North Bengal Medical College and Hospital, India in 2013 with a large tumor mass in the left flank region, arising from abdominal wall muscles. PMID:26870149

  4. Response and Acquired Resistance to Everolimus in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wagle, Nikhil; Grabiner, Brian C.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Amin-Mansour, Ali; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Rosenberg, Mara; Gray, Nathanael; Barletta, Justine A.; Guo, Yanan; Swanson, Scott J.; Ruan, Daniel T.; Hanna, Glenn J.; Haddad, Robert I.; Getz, Gad; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Carter, Scott L.; Sabatini, David M.; Jänne, Pasi A.; Garraway, Levi A.; Lorch, Jochen H.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Everolimus, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is effective in treating tumors harboring alterations in the mTOR pathway. Mechanisms of resistance to everolimus remain undefined. Resistance developed in a patient with metastatic anaplastic thyroid carcinoma after an extraordinary 18-month response. Whole-exome sequencing of pretreatment and drug-resistant tumors revealed a nonsense mutation in TSC2, a negative regulator of mTOR, suggesting a mechanism for exquisite sensitivity to everolimus. The resistant tumor also harbored a mutation in MTOR that confers resistance to allosteric mTOR inhibition. The mutation remains sensitive to mTOR kinase inhibitors. PMID:25295501

  5. Anaplastic mandibular carcinoma in a meerkat (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Dadone, Liza I; Garner, Michael M; Klaphake, Eric; Johnston, Matthew S; Han, Sushan

    2014-06-01

    An 8-yr-old female slender-tailed meerkat (Suricata suricatta) presented with a necrotic sublingual mass and osteolysis of the mandible. After 1 mo of palliative care, the meerkat was euthanized. The mass was diagnosed histologically as an anaplastic carcinoma with extensive rostral mandibular destruction. Immunohistochemistry for vimentin and cytokeratin was validated in this nontypical species and showed that neoplastic cells expressed both mesenchymal and epithelial characteristics, suggestive of a primitive and poorly differentiated tumor. A review of 150 adult slender-tailed meerkat histopathology reports showed a 2% prevalence of orofacial neoplasia, suggesting that oral neoplasms are uncommon in meerkats. PMID:25000710

  6. Cortical Anaplastic Ependymoma with Significant Desmoplasia: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Elsharkawy, Alaa Eldin; Abuamona, Raid; Bergmann, Markus; Salem, Shadi; Gafumbegete, Evariste; Röttger, Ernst

    2013-01-01

    Ectopic brain anaplastic ependymomas with no connection to the ventricles are rare. We present a rare case of a 25-year-old male who presented with generalized convulsions. Computed tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) showed characters of an intra- and extra-axial lesion. Intraoperatively, the lesion was a cortical solid mass that had no connections to the dura or to the ventricle. The histological diagnosis showed an anaplastic ependymoma with WHO grade III with distinctive desmoplasia. A literature review of ectopic anaplastic ependymomas regarding their clinical presentations, management, and prognostic factors was performed. There is a need to establish a clinically based histopathological grading system for anaplastic ependymomas. Ectopic anaplastic ependymomas should be included in the preoperative differential diagnosis. PMID:24455359

  7. Approach to the Patient with Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is the least common but most lethal of thyroid cancers. All patients are classified as stage IV, with the primary lesion restricted to the thyroid gland in stage IVA; locoregional lymph nodes may exist in IVA/IVB; and IVC disease is defined by distant metastases. Prognosis is highly dependent on disease extent at presentation, and staging and establishing a plan of care must be accomplished quickly. Although almost all studies are biased due to their retrospective nature, the most important factors associated with longer survival are completeness of surgical resection (achievable in only a minority of patients) and high-dose (>40 Gy) external beam radiotherapy (preferably intensity modulated radiation therapy). Recent reports suggest that a multimodal approach (surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy) is beneficial. Given the high lethality even with apparent local disease, combination systemic therapy (cytotoxics and/or targeted agents) may improve outcomes in stage IVA/IVB patients. Newer, more effective drug combinations are urgently needed for IVC patients who want aggressive therapy. A candid discussion of the prognosis and management options, including palliative care/hospice, should be held with the patient and caregiver as soon as possible after diagnosis to clarify the patient's preference and expectations. Prospective multicenter clinical trials, incorporating molecular analyses of tumors, are required if we are to improve survival in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. PMID:22869844

  8. Use of vemurafenib in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Marten, Kristen A; Gudena, Vinay K

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is a rare, poorly differentiated type of thyroid cancer occurring in less than 5% of all thyroid cancers. Patients typically have a poor prognosis with very few options for treatment.2 With current therapy of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation, median survival is only 6 months from the time of diagnosis. Several mutations in cell cycle regulation have been discovered in ATC that contribute to its undifferentiated state, one of which is the BRAF kinase mutation. This mutation results in activation of the MAPK pathway and uncontrolled cell proliferation. In this case report, a 51 y old male presented with a 2-week history of hoarseness and was diagnosed with ATC. Genetic analysis revealed a mutation in BRAF kinase; the patient subsequently began therapy with vemurafenib, a BRAF kinase inhibitor indicated for melanoma. After an initial response, the patient quickly declined and consequently died from his disease. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is a deadly cancer without an effective treatment. Inhibiting mutated enzymes that drive the development of this cancer is a potential drug target that may improve outcomes in patients with ATC. PMID:26176686

  9. Response of differentiated but not anaplastic teratoma to interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Rustin, G. J.; Kaye, S. B.; Williams, C. J.; Newlands, E. S.; Bagshawe, K. D.; Toy, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    A Phase 2 trial was conducted using intramuscular lymphoblastoid interferon (IFN, Wellcome Research Laboratories), 4 MU per day, in 10 patients with chemotherapy-resistant teratomas. There was stabilisation of disease in 2 patients both of whom were in retrospect considered to have had differentiated teratoma at the time of IFN administration. There was progression of presumed active anaplastic germ cell tumour in 8 patients. One of these patients, a 15-year-old boy with biopsy proven differentiated teratoma has received 2 courses of lymphoblastoid IFN and 1 course of recombinant leukocyte A IFN (Roche Products Ltd.) lasting 5 1/2, 8 and 8+ months respectively. He has had a mixed response in his differentiated tumour which on each occasion has been maintained for the duration that he received IFN. Rising HCG levels during his second course of interferon required additional cytotoxic chemotherapy. Lymphoblastoid IFN does not appear to be active against anaplastic germ cell tumours but both lymphoblastoid and recombinant leukocyte A IFN may be useful in the treatment of unresectable differentiated teratoma. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:6498061

  10. Temozolomide Treatment for Pediatric Refractory Anaplastic Ependymoma with Low MGMT Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Komori, Kazutoshi; Yanagisawa, Ryu; Miyairi, Yosuke; Sakashita, Kazuo; Shiohara, Masaaki; Fujihara, Ikuko; Morita, Daisuke; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Ogiso, Yoshifumi; Sano, Kenji; Shirahata, Mitsuaki; Fukuoka, Kohei; Ichimura, Koichi; Shigeta, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    The benefit of postoperative chemotherapy for anaplastic ependymoma remains unknown. We report two pediatric patients with refractory anaplastic ependymoma treated with temozolomide (TMZ). We did not detect O(6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation in tumor samples; however, MGMT protein expression was low. With TMZ treatment, one patient had a 7-month complete remission; the other, stable disease for 15 months. Three other patients did not respond to TMZ; two had high and one low MGMT expression, and two showed no MGMT promoter methylation. These findings suggest that TMZ may be effective for pediatric refractory anaplastic ependymoma with low MGMT protein expression. PMID:26305586

  11. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: 91 patients treated by surgery and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Junor, E J; Paul, J; Reed, N S

    1992-04-01

    Ninety-one patients with histologically proven anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid were referred to the Beatson Oncology Centre between 1961 and 1986. The female:male ratio was 2.4:1 and the median age at presentation was 70 (range 38-92) years. All patients had a thyroid mass at presentation and the most common symptoms were dyspnoea, dysphagia and dysphonia. Five patients had a total thyroidectomy and 28 partial thyroidectomy. Ninety five per cent of patients received external beam radiotherapy. Results show dyspnoea to be the only symptom strongly influencing survival. Total or partial thyroidectomy is associated with increased survival. This association is most marked for patients presenting without dyspnoea. Eighty per cent of patients responded to radiotherapy. PMID:1582515

  12. Anaplastic gliomas: end-of-life care recommendations.

    PubMed

    Dirven, Linda; Sizoo, Eefje M; Taphoorn, Martin J B

    2015-01-01

    Despite multimodal antitumor treatment, all patients with an anaplastic glioma will be confronted with incurability in due course and enter the end-of-life (EOL) phase; the period when the patients' condition declines and tumor-directed treatment is no longer effective. Although palliative care is important in all stages of the disease, it is of utmost importance in the EOL phase. The main goal of palliative care is to improve or maintain the quality of life of the patients and their relatives through the prevention and relief of suffering. This review focuses on different aspects of the EOL phase (symptoms and signs, EOL decision-making, advance care planning, organization of care and caregiver burden) and will provide recommendations to optimize palliative care. PMID:26509292

  13. Initial treatment patterns over time for anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Panageas, Katherine S.; Iwamoto, Fabio M.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Rivera, Andreana L.; Eichler, April F.; Louis, David N.; Paleologos, Nina A.; Fisher, Barbara J.; Ashby, Lynn S.; Cairncross, J. Gregory; Roldán Urgoiti, Gloria B.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Ligon, Keith L.; Schiff, David; Robins, H. Ian; Rocque, Brandon G.; Chamberlain, Marc C.; Mason, Warren P.; Weaver, Susan A.; Green, Richard M.; Kamar, Francois G.; Abrey, Lauren E.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Jhanwar, Suresh C.; Rosenblum, Marc K.; Lassman, Andrew B.

    2012-01-01

    Anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors are rare neoplasms with no standard approach to treatment. We sought to determine patterns of treatment delivered over time and identify clinical correlates of specific strategies using an international retrospective cohort of 1013 patients diagnosed from 1981–2007. Prior to 1990, most patients received radiotherapy (RT) alone as initial postoperative treatment. After 1990, approximately 50% of patients received both RT and chemotherapy (CT) sequentially and/or concurrently. Treatment with RT alone became significantly less common (67% in 1980–1984 vs 5% in 2005–2007, P < .0001). CT alone was more frequently administered in later years (0% in 1980–1984 vs 38% in 2005–2007; P < .0001), especially in patients with 1p19q codeleted tumors (57% of codeleted vs 4% with no deletion in 2005–2007; P < .0001). Temozolomide replaced the combination of procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine (PCV) among patients who received CT alone or with RT (87% vs 2% in 2005–2007). In the most recent time period, patients with 1p19q codeleted tumors were significantly more likely to receive CT alone (with temozolomide), whereas RT with temozolomide was a significantly more common treatment strategy than either CT or RT alone in cases with no deletion (P < .0001). In a multivariate polytomous logistic regression model, the following were significantly associated with type of treatment delivered: date (5-year interval) of diagnosis (P < .0001), 1p19q codeletion (P < .0001), pure anaplastic oligodendroglioma histology (P < .01), and frontal lobe predominance (P < .05). Limited level 1 evidence is currently available to guide treatment decisions, and ongoing phase III trials will be critical to understanding the optimal therapy. PMID:22661585

  14. Genomic Landscape of poorly Differentiated and Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Ghossein, Ronald

    2016-09-01

    Poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma (PDTC) and anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) are aggressive thyroid tumors associated with a high mortality rate of 38-57 % and almost 100 % respectively. Several recent studies utilizing next generation sequencing techniques have shed lights on the molecular pathogenesis of these tumors, providing evidence to support a stepwise tumoral progression from well-differentiated to poorly differentiated, and finally to anaplastic thyroid carcinomas. While BRAF (V600E) and RAS mutations remain the main drivers in aggressive thyroid carcinoma, PDTC and ATC gains additional mutations, e.g., TERT promoter mutation, TP53 mutation, as well as frequent alterations in PIK3CA-PTEN-AKT-mTOR pathway, SWI-SNF complex, histomethyltransferases, and mismatch repair genes. RAS-mutated PDTCs are commonly associated with a histologic phenotype defined by Turin proposal, high frequency of distant metastasis, high thyroid differentiation score, and a RAS-like gene expression profile, whereas BRAF-mutated PDTCs are usually defined solely by the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) criteria with a propensity for nodal metastasis and are less differentiated with a BRAF-like expression signature. Such demarcation is largely lost in ATC which is characterized by genomic complexity, heavy mutation burden, and profound undifferentiation. Additionally, several molecular events, e.g., EIF1AX mutation, mutation burden, and chromosome 1q gain in PDTCs, as well as EIF1AX mutation, chromosome 13q loss, and 20q gains in ATCs, may serve as adverse prognostic markers predicting poor clinical outcome. PMID:27372303

  15. Mitochondrial Metabolism as a Treatment Target in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer M; Lai, Stephen Y; Cotzia, Paolo; Cognetti, David; Luginbuhl, Adam; Pribitkin, Edmund A; Zhan, Tingting; Mollaee, Mehri; Domingo-Vidal, Marina; Chen, Yunyun; Campling, Barbara; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Birbe, Ruth; Tuluc, Madalina; Martinez Outschoorn, Ubaldo; Curry, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human cancers. Key signal transduction pathways that regulate mitochondrial metabolism are frequently altered in ATC. Our goal was to determine the mitochondrial metabolic phenotype of ATC by studying markers of mitochondrial metabolism, specifically monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) and translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane member 20 (TOMM20). Staining patterns of MCT1 and TOMM20 in 35 human thyroid samples (15 ATC, 12 papillary thyroid cancer [PTC], and eight non-cancerous thyroid) and nine ATC mouse orthotopic xenografts were assessed by visual and Aperio digital scoring. Staining patterns of areas involved with cancer versus areas with no evidence of cancer were evaluated independently where available. MCT1 is highly expressed in human anaplastic thyroid cancer when compared to both non-cancerous thyroid tissues and papillary thyroid cancers (P<.001 for both). TOMM20 is also highly expressed in both ATC and PTC compared to non-cancerous thyroid tissue (P<.01 for both). High MCT1 and TOMM20 expression is also found in ATC mouse xenograft tumors compared to non-cancerous thyroid tissue (P<.001). These xenograft tumors have high (13)C- pyruvate uptake. ATC has metabolic features that distinguish it from PTC and non-cancerous thyroid tissue, including high expression of MCT1 and TOMM20. PTC has low expression of MCT1 and non-cancerous thyroid tissue has low expression of both MCT1 and TOMM20. This work suggests that MCT1 blockade may specifically target ATC cells presenting an opportunity for a new drug target. PMID:26615136

  16. Focused Ultrasound Surgery for the Treatment of Recurrent Anaplastic Astrocytoma: A Preliminary Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jung-Wuk; Jung, Shin; Jung, Tae-Young; Lee, Min-Cheol

    2006-05-01

    Anaplastic glioma is a highly aggressive tumor in the central nervous system. The conventional treatment for patients with anaplstic glioma consists of the combination of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, the effect of the currently available therapies is limited, and the prognosis is very poor in these patients. The purpose of this abstract is to introduce our preliminary experience of using focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) for the treatment of patients with recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma.

  17. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Signaling in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Shirai, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangement in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene was identified as an oncogenic driver in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in 2007. A multi-targeted ALK/ROS1/MET inhibitor, crizotinib, targeting this activated tyrosine kinase has led to significant clinical benefit including tumor shrinkage and prolonged survival without disease progression and has been approved by US FDA since 2011 for the treatment of advanced ALK-rearranged NSCLC (Ou et al. Oncologist 17:1351-1375, 2012). Knowledge gained from treating ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients including the presenting clinicopathologic characteristics, methods of detecting ALK-rearranged NSCLC, pattern of relapse and acquired resistance mechanisms while on crizotinib, and the clinical activities of more potent ALK inhibitors has led us to a detailed and ever expanding knowledge of the ALK signaling pathway in lung cancer but also raising many more questions that remained to be answered in the future. This book chapter will provide a concise summary of the importance of ALK signaling pathway in lung cancer. Understanding the ALK signaling pathway in lung cancer will likely provide the roadmap to the management of major epithelial malignancies driven by receptor tyrosine kinase rearrangement. PMID:26667344

  18. Carfilzomib potentiates CUDC-101-induced apoptosis in anaplastic thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lisa; Boufraqech, Myriem; Lake, Ross; Kebebew, Electron

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, with no effective treatment currently available. Previously, we identified agents active against ATC cells, both in vitro and in vivo, using quantitative high-throughput screening of 3282 clinically approved drugs and small molecules. Here, we report that combining two of these active agents, carfilzomib, a second-generation proteasome inhibitor, and CUDC-101, a histone deacetylase and multi-kinase inhibitor, results in increased, synergistic activity in ATC cells. The combination of carfilzomib and CUDC-101 synergistically inhibited cellular proliferation and caused cell death in multiple ATC cell lines harboring various driver mutations observed in human ATC tumors. This increased anti-ATC effect was associated with a synergistically enhanced G2/M cell cycle arrest and increased caspase 3/7 activity induced by the drug combination. Mechanistically, treatment with carfilzomib and CUDC-101 increased p21 expression and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase protein cleavage. Our results suggest that combining carfilzomib and CUDC-101 would offer an effective therapeutic strategy to treat ATC. PMID:26934320

  19. O-GlcNAcylation enhances anaplastic thyroid carcinoma malignancy

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, YU; LI, HONGLUN; LI, JIANLIN; LI, JISHENG; GAO, YAN; LIU, BAODONG

    2016-01-01

    O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) glycosylation (O-GlcNAcylation), a dynamic post-translational modification of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins, may have a critical role in the regulation of biological cell processes and human cancer. O-GlcNAcylation is dynamically regulated by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAc hydrolase (OGA). Accumulating evidence suggests that O-GlcNAcylation is involved in a variety of types of human cancer. However, the exact role of O-GlcNAcylation in tumor pathogenesis or progression remains to be established. Computed tomography scans of patients with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) reveal a rapid growth rate and invasion. The present study demonstrated that O-GlcNAcylation accelerates the progression of ATC. The global O-GlcNAc level of intracellular proteins was increased by overexpression of OGT or downregulation of OGA activity with the specific inhibitor Thiamet-G. By contrast, the global O-GlcNAc level was decreased by silencing of OGT. MTT assay indicated that O-GlcNAcylation significantly promotes cell proliferation. Furthermore, O-GlcNAcylation enhanced cellular biological functions, such as colony formation ability, migration and invasion, of ATC cells in vitro. The findings of the present study suggest that O-GlcNAcylation is associated with malignant properties of thyroid cancer, and may be a potential target for the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid cancer. PMID:27347182

  20. A New Aurora in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, Enke; D'Armiento, Massimino

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancers (ATC) are among the most aggressive human neoplasms with a dire prognosis and a median survival time of few months from the diagnosis. The complete absence of effective therapies for ATC renders the identification of novel therapeutic approaches sorely needed. Chromosomal instability, a feature of all human cancers, is thought to represent a major driving force in thyroid cancer progression and a number of mitotic kinases showing a deregulated expression in malignant thyroid tissues are now held responsible for thyroid tumor aneuploidy. These include the three members of the Aurora family (Aurora-A, Aurora-B, and Aurora-C), serine/threonine kinases that regulate multiple aspects of chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Over the last few years, several small molecule inhibitors targeting Aurora kinases were developed, which showed promising antitumor effects against a variety of human cancers, including ATC, in preclinical studies. Several of these molecules are now being evaluated in phase I/II clinical trials against advanced solid and hematological malignancies. In the present review we will describe the structure, expression, and mitotic functions of the Aurora kinases, their implications in human cancer progression, with particular regard to ATC, and the effects of their functional inhibition on malignant cell proliferation. PMID:25097550

  1. Carfilzomib potentiates CUDC-101-induced apoptosis in anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lisa; Boufraqech, Myriem; Lake, Ross; Kebebew, Electron

    2016-03-29

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, with no effective treatment currently available. Previously, we identified agents active against ATC cells, both in vitro and in vivo, using quantitative high-throughput screening of 3282 clinically approved drugs and small molecules. Here, we report that combining two of these active agents, carfilzomib, a second-generation proteasome inhibitor, and CUDC-101, a histone deacetylase and multi-kinase inhibitor, results in increased, synergistic activity in ATC cells. The combination of carfilzomib and CUDC-101 synergistically inhibited cellular proliferation and caused cell death in multiple ATC cell lines harboring various driver mutations observed in human ATC tumors. This increased anti-ATC effect was associated with a synergistically enhanced G2/M cell cycle arrest and increased caspase 3/7 activity induced by the drug combination. Mechanistically, treatment with carfilzomib and CUDC-101 increased p21 expression and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase protein cleavage. Our results suggest that combining carfilzomib and CUDC-101 would offer an effective therapeutic strategy to treat ATC. PMID:26934320

  2. A Novel Orthotopic Mouse Model of Human Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nucera, Carmelo; Nehs, Matthew A.; Mekel, Michal; Zhang, Xuefeng; Hodin, Richard; Lawler, Jack; Nose, Vânia

    2009-01-01

    Background Orthotopic mouse models of human cancer represent an important in vivo tool for drug testing and validation. Most of the human thyroid carcinoma cell lines used in orthotopic or subcutaneous models are likely of melanoma and colon cancer. Here, we report and characterize a novel orthotopic model of human thyroid carcinoma using a unique thyroid cancer cell line. Methods We used the cell line 8505c, originated from a thyroid tumor histologically characterized by anaplastic carcinoma cell features. We injected 8505c cells engineered using a green fluorescent protein–positive lentiviral vector orthotopically into the thyroid of severe combined immunodeficient mice. Results Orthotopic implantation with the 8505c cells produced thyroid tumors after 5 weeks, showing large neck masses, with histopathologic features of a high-grade neoplasm (anaplasia, necrosis, high mitotic and proliferative indexes, p53 positivity, extrathyroidal invasion, lymph node and distant metastases) and immunoprofile of follicular thyroid cell origin with positivity for thyroid transcription factor-1 and PAX8, and for cytokeratins. Conclusions Here we describe a novel orthotopic thyroid carcinoma model using 8505c cells. This model can prove to be a reliable and useful tool to investigate in vivo biological mechanisms determining thyroid cancer aggressiveness, and to test novel therapeutics for the treatment of refractory or advanced thyroid cancers. PMID:19772429

  3. Presence of anaplastic lymphoma kinase in inflammatory breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Fredika M; Petricoin Iii, Emanuel F; Van Laere, Steven J; Bertucci, Francois; Chu, Khoi; Fernandez, Sandra V; Mu, Zhaomei; Alpaugh, Katherine; Pei, Jianming; Circo, Rita; Wulfkuhle, Julia; Ye, Zaiming; Boley, Kimberly M; Liu, Hui; Moraes, Ricardo; Zhang, Xuejun; Demaria, Ruggero; Barsky, Sanford H; Sun, Guoxian; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Although Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) is recognized as the most metastatic variant of locally advanced breast cancer, the molecular basis for the distinct clinical presentation and accelerated program of metastasis of IBC is unknown. Reverse phase protein arrays revealed activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and biochemically-linked downstream signaling molecules including JAK1/STAT3, AKT, mTor, PDK1, and AMPKβ in pre-clinical models of IBC. To evaluate the clinical relevance of ALK in IBC, analysis of 25 IBC patient tumors using the FDA approved diagnostic test for ALK genetic abnormalities was performed. These studies revealed that 20/25 (80%) had either increased ALK copy number, low level ALK gene amplification, or ALK gene expression, with a prevalence of ALK alterations in basal-like IBC. One of 25 patients was identified as having an EML4-ALK translocation. The generality of gains in ALK copy number in basal-like breast tumors with IBC characteristics was demonstrated by analysis of 479 breast tumors using the TGCA data-base and our newly developed 79 IBC-like gene signature. The small molecule dual tyrosine kinase cMET/ALK inhibitor, Crizotinib (PF-02341066/Xalkori®, Pfizer Inc), induced both cytotoxicity (IC50 = 0.89 μM) and apoptosis, with abrogation of pALK signaling in IBC tumor cells and in FC-IBC01 tumor xenograft model, a new IBC model derived from pleural effusion cells isolated from an ALK(+) IBC patient. Based on these studies, IBC patients are currently being evaluated for the presence of ALK genetic abnormalities and when eligible, are being enrolled into clinical trials evaluating ALK targeted therapeutics. PMID:24102046

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of extraventricular anaplastic ependymoma: A report of 11 cases

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Xi; Tan, Xin; Zhang, Chi; Lin, Huan; Qiu, Shijun

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic ependymomas are rare malignant tumors of the central nervous system. Few studies are available regarding their neuroradiological characteristics. The present study aimed to retrospectively review a series of patients with extraventricular anaplastic ependymoma and to analyze the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics to distinguish anaplastic ependymoma from other intracranial tumors. The clinical and pathological images of 11 patients who presented with histologically proven anaplastic ependymoma at Nanfang Hospital (Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China) between September 2004 and March 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. MRI scans were obtained in all 11 cases. Computed tomography scans were obtained in only 3 cases. In total, 8 tumors were located at the supratentorial parenchyma, and 3 tumors were derived from the cerebellar hemisphere. Images displayed quasi-circular (4/11), irregularly-lobulated (7/11) variable-intensity masses. The masses presented with cysts or necrosis (8/11), hemorrhage (7/11), marked (9/11) or mild (2/11) enhancement, and moderate (4/11), mild (3/11) or absent (4/11) peritumoral edema. The tumors were also frequently closely associated with the lateral ventricle (6/11). Tumors appeared isointense to hypointense on T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and heterogeneously hyperintense or hypointense on T2WI, demonstrating wreath-like and ring-like characteristics, with intratumoral nodules (3/11) or marked flake-like inhomogeneous (6/11) enhancement on post-contrast MRI. Only 2 solid lesions showed mild enhancement (2/11). Although the MRI features of the extraventricular anaplastic ependymomas varied and were non-specific, these characteristic MRI findings, combined with the locations of the lesions, the age of onset and the short disease course, could be useful in differentiating anaplastic ependymomas from other intracranial neoplasms in the future. PMID:27602137

  5. Impact of histopathological transformation and overall survival in patients with progressive anaplastic glioma.

    PubMed

    Ho, Allen L; Koch, Matthew J; Tanaka, Shota; Eichler, April F; Batchelor, Tracy T; Tanboon, Jantima; Louis, David N; Cahill, Daniel P; Chi, Andrew S; Curry, William T

    2016-09-01

    Progression of anaplastic glioma (World Health Organization [WHO] grade III) is typically determined radiographically, and transformation to glioblastoma (GB) (WHO grade IV) is often presumed at that time. However, the frequency of actual histopathologic transformation of anaplastic glioma and the subsequent clinical impact is unclear. To determine these associations, we retrospectively reviewed all anaplastic glioma patients who underwent surgery at our center at first radiographic progression, and we examined the effects of histological diagnosis, clinical history, and molecular factors on transformation rate and survival. We identified 85 anaplastic glioma (39 astrocytoma, 24 oligodendroglioma, 22 oligoastrocytoma), of which 38.8% transformed to GB. Transformation was associated with shorter overall survival (OS) from the time of diagnosis (3.4 vs. 10.9years, p=0.0005) and second surgery (1.0 vs. 3.5years, p<0.0001). Original histologic subtype did not significantly impact the risk of transformation or OS. No other factors, including surgery, adjuvant therapy or molecular markers, significantly affected the risk of transformation. However, mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) was associated with longer time to progression (median 4.6 vs. 1.4years, p=0.008) and OS (median 10.0 vs. 4.2years, p=0.046). At radiographic progression, tissue diagnosis may be warranted as histologic grade may provide valuable prognostic information and affect therapeutic clinical trial selection criteria for this patient population. PMID:27279154

  6. A visual latent semantic approach for automatic analysis and interpretation of anaplastic medulloblastoma virtual slides.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Roa, Angel; González, Fabio; Galaro, Joseph; Judkins, Alexander R; Ellison, David; Baccon, Jennifer; Madabhushi, Anant; Romero, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    A method for automatic analysis and interpretation of histopathology images is presented. The method uses a representation of the image data set based on bag of features histograms built from visual dictionary of Haar-based patches and a novel visual latent semantic strategy for characterizing the visual content of a set of images. One important contribution of the method is the provision of an interpretability layer, which is able to explain a particular classification by visually mapping the most important visual patterns associated with such classification. The method was evaluated on a challenging problem involving automated discrimination of medulloblastoma tumors based on image derived attributes from whole slide images as anaplastic or non-anaplastic. The data set comprised 10 labeled histopathological patient studies, 5 for anaplastic and 5 for non-anaplastic, where 750 square images cropped randomly from cancerous region from whole slide per study. The experimental results show that the new method is competitive in terms of classification accuracy achieving 0.87 in average. PMID:23285547

  7. An integrated texton and bag of words classifier for identifying anaplastic medulloblastomas.

    PubMed

    Galaro, Joseph; Judkins, Alexander R; Ellison, David; Baccon, Jennifer; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a combined Bag of Words and texton based classifier for differentiating anaplastic and non-anaplastic medulloblastoma on digitized histopathology. The hypothesis behind this work is that histological image signatures may reflect different levels of aggressiveness of the disease and that texture based approaches can help discriminate between more aggressive and less aggressive phenotypes of medulloblastoma. The bag of words approach attempts to model the occurrence of differently expressed image features. In this work we choose to model the image features via textons which can quantitatively capture and model texture appearance in the images. The texton-based features, obtained via two methods, the Haar Wavelet responses and MR8 filter bank, provide spatial orientation and rotation invariant attributes. Applying these features to the bag of words framework yields textural representations that can be used in conjunction with a classifier (κ-nearest neighbor) or a content based image retrieval system. Over multiple runs of randomized cross validation, a κ-NN classifier in conjunction with Haar wavelets and the texton, bag of words approach yielded a mean classification accuracy of 80, an area under the precision recall curve of 87 and an area under the ROC curve of 83 in distinguishing between anaplastic and non-anaplastic medulloblastomas on a cohort of 36 patient studies. PMID:22255080

  8. Cutaneous metastasis from anaplastic thyroid carcinoma exhibiting exclusively a spindle cell morphology. A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Danialan, Richard; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Mays, Stephen R; Prieto, Victor G; Bell, Diana; Curry, Jonathan L

    2016-03-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is a highly aggressive cancer accounting for 1-2% of thyroid malignancies. Cutaneous metastases from anaplastic thyroid carcinoma are exceedingly rare. We report a 65-year-old woman with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (BRAF V600E mutation) who had lymph node metastases (pT4 N1b) treated by total thyroidectomy, postoperative radiotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy (paclitaxel and pazopanib) and targeted therapy (vemurafenib). Nine months after initial diagnosis, radiographic studies revealed multiple pulmonary metastases. A dermatologic examination showed a solitary 1.2-cm chest nodule. Skin biopsy from this nodule revealed infiltrative dermal spindle cells arranged in poorly formed fascicles. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated the tumor cells to be PAX-8 (+), pancytokeratin (+, focally), TTF-1 (-) and SOX-10 (-). Comparison with the patient's primary anaplastic thyroid carcinoma revealed focal areas of poorly differentiated spindle cells morphologically similar to the malignant spindle cells in the skin biopsy. Together, these findings confirmed the diagnosis of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma metastatic to skin. Cutaneous metastasis of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma composed exclusively of spindle cells broadens the histologic differential diagnosis of cutaneous spindle cell malignancies and presents further diagnostic challenges. PAX-8 may be useful in discerning the spindle cell component of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma from other spindle cell malignancies in the skin. PMID:26347145

  9. A novel molecular variant of the chimeric NPM-ALK transcript in Ki-1 positive large cell lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ladanyi, M.

    1994-09-01

    The breakpoints of the t(2;5)(p23;q35), reported to be present in 30-40% of Ki-1 positive large cell lymphoma (Ki-1 LCL), have recently been cloned. They involve a novel tyrosine kinase gene, ALK, at 2p23 and the nucleophosmin gene, NPM, at 5q35. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using NPM and ALK primers detects a consistent fusion product in Ki-1 cases with the translocation. We performed NPM-ALK RT-PCR on 16 cases of Ki-1 LCL, of which 13 had informative cytogenetics. Amplifiable template was confirmed in all samples by RT-PCR using {beta}-actin primers. Ten cases showed the expected 177 base pair (bp) RT-PCR product indicative of the translocation, including all 6 cases with cytogenetic evidence of the t(2;5) and 3 cases without 5q35 abnormalities. One additional case, which had uninformative cytogenetics, showed only a novel 144 bp RT-PCR product. Sequencing of this PCR product showed an in-frame junction of NPM to ALK, 20 bp distal to the usual NPM junction site and 53 bp distal to usual ALK junction site. The predicted chimeric protein is thus shorter by 11 amino acids, but the putative ALK catalytic domain remains intact. This case was a histologically typical anaplastic Ki-1 LCL which showed a clonal rearrangement of the T-cell receptor {beta} gene. The functional significance of this molecular variant and its relation to the exon structure of both genes require further study. The overall incidence of the translocation in this series, about 70%, is higher than suspected from cytogenetic analysis alone.

  10. Large-cell Monte Carlo renormalization of irreversible growth processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakanishi, H.; Family, F.

    1985-01-01

    Monte Carlo sampling is applied to a recently formulated direct-cell renormalization method for irreversible, disorderly growth processes. Large-cell Monte Carlo renormalization is carried out for various nonequilibrium problems based on the formulation dealing with relative probabilities. Specifically, the method is demonstrated by application to the 'true' self-avoiding walk and the Eden model of growing animals for d = 2, 3, and 4 and to the invasion percolation problem for d = 2 and 3. The results are asymptotically in agreement with expectations; however, unexpected complications arise, suggesting the possibility of crossovers, and in any case, demonstrating the danger of using small cells alone, because of the very slow convergence as the cell size b is extrapolated to infinity. The difficulty of applying the present method to the diffusion-limited-aggregation model, is commented on.

  11. Ovarian large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma in the youngest woman.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Y S; Im, K S; Choi, D I

    2016-01-01

    Large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNC) of the ovary is a rare tumor in gynecologic oncologic field. An 18-year-old woman presented with abdominal distention and a pelvic mass measuring ten cm in diameter, who previously underwent laparoscopic ovarian cystectomy due to large borderline mucinous ovarian neoplasm 18 months prior. A debulking operation was optimally performed, which included total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection, bilateral paraaortic lymph node dissection, omentectomy, optimal debulking of gastrohepatic mass and subdiaphragmatic mass, and pelvic peritonectomy. Despite adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel and carboplatin, the patient died of progressive disease seven months after surgery. The authors report the youngest case of LCNC of the ovary, that failed chemotherapy and had the previous history of the conservative surgical treatment due to mucinous borderline tumor. PMID:27172753

  12. Autopsy of anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas producing granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Haruna; Eguchi, Noriaki; Sumimoto, Kyoku; Matsumoto, Kenta; Azakami, Takahiro; Sumida, Tomonori; Tamura, Tadamasa; Sumii, Masaharu; Uraoka, Naohiro; Shimamoto, Fumio

    2016-08-01

    A 50-year-old man presented to a nearby hospital with high fever and anorexia. An abdominal tumor was detected, and he was referred to our hospital. A pancreatic tumor was detected by computed tomography and abdominal ultrasonography. He had high fever, leukocytosis, and high serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We performed a tumor biopsy and histological examination revealed anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas. Based on the diagnosis, we initiated chemotherapy using gemcitabine plus S-1. However, the tumor rapidly progressed and he deteriorated and died 123 days after admission. As immunohistochemical study showed positive staining for G-CSF in the tumor cell, we diagnosed the tumor producing G-CSF during autopsy. Anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas producing G-CSF is very rare, with 10 cases, including ours, reported in the literature. PMID:27498938

  13. A Rare Case of Pleomorphic Carcinoma of the Lung Harboring an Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Shiroyama, Takayuki; Tanaka, Ayako; Tamiya, Motohiro; Hamaguchi, Masanari; Osa, Akio; Takeoka, Sawa; Tani, Eriko; Azuma, Yuichiro; Morishita, Naoko; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Okamoto, Norio; Kimura, Kenji; Kadota, Yoshihisa; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Hirashima, Tomonori; Kawase, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Molecular testing for anomalies, such as epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement, is part of the current standard of care for non-small cell lung cancer, particularly adenocarcinoma. ALK rearrangement occurs most frequently in adenocarcinoma cells and rarely in non-adenocarcinoma cells. We herein report a rare case of pleomorphic lung carcinoma with ALK rearrangement in both its adenocarcinoma and spindle cell components. This case suggests the possibility of ALK rearrangement in pleomorphic carcinoma. PMID:26521903

  14. Development of anaplastic Wilms tumor and subsequent relapse in a child with diaphanospondylodysostosis.

    PubMed

    Tasian, Sarah K; Kim, Grace E; Miniati, Douglas N; DuBois, Steven G

    2012-10-01

    Diaphanospondylodysostosis (DSD) is a rare skeletal dysplasia syndrome resulting from disordered mesenchymal differentiation. Children with DSD generally die in utero or during the first month of life from severe thoracic insufficiency syndrome. An association of DSD with nephroblastomatosis has been observed, but the natural history of such nephroblastomatosis remains poorly characterized due to the rarity of the underlying condition. We describe a patient with DSD who developed bilateral hyperplastic nephroblastomatosis that ultimately evolved into therapy-resistant anaplastic Wilms tumor (nephroblastoma). PMID:22469945

  15. Development of Anaplastic Wilms Tumor and Subsequent Relapse in a Child with Diaphanospondylodysostosis

    PubMed Central

    Tasian, Sarah K.; Kim, Grace E.; Miniati, Douglas N.; DuBois, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    Diaphanospondylodysostosis (DSD) is a rare skeletal dysplasia syndrome resulting from disordered mesenchymal differentiation. Children with DSD generally die in utero or during the first month of life from severe thoracic insufficiency syndrome. An association of DSD with nephroblastomatosis has been observed, but the natural history of such nephroblastomatosis remains poorly characterized due to the rarity of the underlying condition. We describe a patient with DSD who developed bilateral hyperplastic nephroblastomatosis that ultimately evolved into therapy-resistant anaplastic Wilms tumor (nephroblastoma). PMID:22469945

  16. The molecular pattern of histopathological progression to anaplastic meningioma - A case report.

    PubMed

    Och, Waldemar; Kulbacki, Kamil; Szostak, Błażej; Sikorska, Beata; Zakrzewska, Magdalena; Szmuda, Tomasz; Liberski, Paweł P; Budzisz, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas (MGs) are the most frequent primary tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) and exhibit a large spectrum of histological types and clinical phenotypes. The WHO classification of CNS tumours established strict diagnostic criteria of the benign (Grade 1), atypical (Grade 2) and anaplastic (Grade 3) subtypes. Combined with the resection rate, WHO grading has the most crucial role as the prognostic factor. Additionally, such biomarkers as Ki-67/MIB-1, progesterone receptors and phosphor-histone H3 were correlated with MG progression. Recently, it was suggested that the aggressive behaviour of some MGs is attributed to molecular alterations, regardless of their histopathology. The analysis of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at chromosomes 1, 9, 10, 14 and 22 was performed. The presented case of WHO Grade 2 MG initially exhibited LOH at chromosomes 10, 14 and 22. In the first recurrence, the tumour genetic profiling revealed additional LOH at chromosome 1p and atypical histopathology. During the second recurrence, an aggressive phenotype was observed and tumour progressed to an anaplastic form. Considering the appearance of the tumour relapses, the set of molecular changes overtook the histopathological progression. The genetic and histopathological imbalance in the tumour progression in secondary anaplastic MGs has not been previously described. The evolution of genetic and histopathological changes was presented in the same patient. In the future, the individualised therapy of potentially more aggressive forms of MGs could be based on certain chromosome aberrations. PMID:27375146

  17. Recursive partitioning analysis of prognostic variables in newly diagnosed anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Panageas, Katherine S.; Reiner, Anne S.; Iwamoto, Fabio M.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Rivera, Andreana L.; Eichler, April F.; Louis, David N.; Paleologos, Nina A.; Fisher, Barbara J.; Ashby, Lynn S.; Cairncross, J. Gregory; Roldán Urgoiti, Gloria B.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Ligon, Keith L.; Schiff, David; Robins, H. Ian; Rocque, Brandon G.; Chamberlain, Marc C.; Mason, Warren P.; Weaver, Susan A.; Green, Richard M.; Kamar, Francois G.; Abrey, Lauren E.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Jhanwar, Suresh C.; Rosenblum, Marc K.; Lassman, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors are rare, and median survival varies widely. Analysis of 1p19q deletion is performed commonly and is an important prognostic factor. However, age and other clinical variables also carry prognostic value, and it is unclear how to incorporate them into clinical decision making or to combine them for prognostication. Methods We compiled a retrospective database of 1013 patients with newly diagnosed anaplastic oligodendrogliomas or oligoastrocytomas and performed a recursive partitioning analysis to generate independent prognostic classes among 587 patients with informative 1p19q status. Variables included for survival classification were age (continuous), history of prior low-grade glioma, 1p19q deletion status, histology (presence or absence of an astrocytic component), tumor lobe, tumor hemisphere, gender, extent of resection, postresection treatment, and performance status at diagnosis. Results Recursive partitioning analysis identified 5 prognostic groups based on hazard similarity: class I (age <60 y, 1p19q codeleted), class II (age <43 y, not codeleted), class III (age 43–59 y, not codeleted, frontal lobe tumor or age ≥60 y, codeleted), class IV (age 43–59 y, not codeleted, not frontal lobe tumor or age 60–69 y, not codeleted), and class V (age ≥70 y, not codeleted). Survival differences were highly significant (P < .0001), with medians ranging from 9.3 years (95% CI: 8.4–16.0) for class I to 0.6 years (95% CI: 0.5–0.9) for class V. Conclusions These 5 distinct classification groups were defined using prognostic factors typically obtained during routine management of patients with anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors. Validation in a prospective clinical trial may better differentiate patients with respect to treatment outcome. PMID:24997140

  18. Meningiomas with Rhabdoid or Papillary Components : Prognosis and Comparison with Anaplastic Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Kwon; Jung, Shin; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Kim, Seul-Kee; Lee, Eun Jung

    2016-01-01

    Papillary and rhabdoid meningiomas are pathologically World Health Organization (WHO) grade III. Any correlation between clinical prognosis and pathologic component is not clear. We analyzed the prognoses of patients with meningiomas with a rhabdoid or papillary component compared to those of patients with anaplastic meningiomas. From 1994 to June 2013, 14 anaplastic meningiomas, 6 meningiomas with a rhabdoid component, and 5 meningiomas with papillary component were pathologically diagnosed. We analyzed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, extent of removal, adjuvant treatment, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and pathologic features of 14 anaplastic meningiomas (group A), 5 meningiomas with a predominant (≥50%) papillary or rhabdoid component (group B1), and 6 meningiomas without a predominant (<50%) rhabdoid or papillary component (group B2). Homogeneous enhancement on MRI was associated with improved PFS compared to heterogeneous enhancement (p=0.025). Depending on pathology, the mean PFS was 134.9±31.6 months for group A, 46.6±13.4 months for group B1, and 118.7±19.2 months for group B2. The mean OS was 138.5±24.6 months for group A and 59.7±16.8 months for group B1. All recurrent tumors were of the previously diagnosed pathology, except for one tumor from group B1, which recurred as an atypical meningioma without a papillary component. Group B1 tumors showed a more aggressive behavior than group B2 tumors. In group B2 cases, the pathologic findings of non-rhabdoid/papillary portion could be considered for further adjuvant treatment. PMID:27446516

  19. Meningiomas with Rhabdoid or Papillary Components : Prognosis and Comparison with Anaplastic Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Kwon; Jung, Tae-Young; Jung, Shin; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Kim, Seul-Kee; Lee, Eun Jung

    2016-07-01

    Papillary and rhabdoid meningiomas are pathologically World Health Organization (WHO) grade III. Any correlation between clinical prognosis and pathologic component is not clear. We analyzed the prognoses of patients with meningiomas with a rhabdoid or papillary component compared to those of patients with anaplastic meningiomas. From 1994 to June 2013, 14 anaplastic meningiomas, 6 meningiomas with a rhabdoid component, and 5 meningiomas with papillary component were pathologically diagnosed. We analyzed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, extent of removal, adjuvant treatment, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and pathologic features of 14 anaplastic meningiomas (group A), 5 meningiomas with a predominant (≥50%) papillary or rhabdoid component (group B1), and 6 meningiomas without a predominant (<50%) rhabdoid or papillary component (group B2). Homogeneous enhancement on MRI was associated with improved PFS compared to heterogeneous enhancement (p=0.025). Depending on pathology, the mean PFS was 134.9±31.6 months for group A, 46.6±13.4 months for group B1, and 118.7±19.2 months for group B2. The mean OS was 138.5±24.6 months for group A and 59.7±16.8 months for group B1. All recurrent tumors were of the previously diagnosed pathology, except for one tumor from group B1, which recurred as an atypical meningioma without a papillary component. Group B1 tumors showed a more aggressive behavior than group B2 tumors. In group B2 cases, the pathologic findings of non-rhabdoid/papillary portion could be considered for further adjuvant treatment. PMID:27446516

  20. Anaplastic meningioma: octreotide therapy for a case of recurrent and progressive intracranial disease.

    PubMed

    Rammo, Richard; Rock, Adam; Transou, Andrea; Raghunathan, Aditya; Rock, Jack

    2016-02-01

    Meningiomas are common intracranial tumors categorized as Grades I-III per the current WHO guidelines. A small percentage of meningiomas are Grades II and III, which are likely to recur after initial treatment. Grade III meningiomas are considered to be malignant and warrant aggressive management. If surgery and radiation fail to produce lasting remission, effective treatment options for patients with progressive anaplastic meningiomas are elusive. The authors present the case of a patient with a meningioma that gradually progressed from Grade I to Grade III over 12 years despite repeated surgery and radiation therapy. The patient has been in remission for over 3 years following octreotide therapy. PMID:26274993

  1. Complete remission of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma after concomitant treatment with docetaxel and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Abe, Ichiro; Karasaki, Satoko; Matsuda, Yayoi; Sakamoto, Shohei; Nakashima, Torahiko; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Kawate, Hisaya; Ohnaka, Keizo; Nakashima, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Kunihisa; Oda, Yoshinao; Nomura, Masatoshi; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) although rare is the most lethal form of thyroid cancer. The mortality rate for ATC is very high, with a median survival time of only 5 months; the survival rate at 1 year after diagnosis is <20%. Management of ATC is extremely difficult and rife with uncertainties. Herein, we describe a 75-year-old woman who presented with ATC and was successfully treated using concomitant treatment with docetaxel and high-dose radiotherapy. This case appears to be the first to have been reported in the literature involving complete remission of ATC confirmed by autopsy, suggesting the therapeutic potential of this combination. PMID:25789182

  2. Complete Remission of Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma after Concomitant Treatment with Docetaxel and Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Ichiro; Karasaki, Satoko; Matsuda, Yayoi; Sakamoto, Shohei; Nakashima, Torahiko; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Kawate, Hisaya; Ohnaka, Keizo; Nakashima, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Kunihisa; Oda, Yoshinao; Nomura, Masatoshi; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) although rare is the most lethal form of thyroid cancer. The mortality rate for ATC is very high, with a median survival time of only 5 months; the survival rate at 1 year after diagnosis is <20%. Management of ATC is extremely difficult and rife with uncertainties. Herein, we describe a 75-year-old woman who presented with ATC and was successfully treated using concomitant treatment with docetaxel and high-dose radiotherapy. This case appears to be the first to have been reported in the literature involving complete remission of ATC confirmed by autopsy, suggesting the therapeutic potential of this combination. PMID:25789182

  3. Anaplastic astrocytoma in the spinal cord of an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Gibson, C J; Parry, N M A; Jakowski, R M; Eshar, D

    2008-11-01

    A 2-year-old, female hedgehog presented with an 8-month history of progressive, ascending paresis/paralysis and was tentatively diagnosed with wobbly hedgehog syndrome. She died awaiting further diagnostic tests, and the owners consented to postmortem examination. Grossly, the bladder was large and flaccid and the cervical and lumbar spinal cord were regionally enlarged, light grey, and friable with multifocal hemorrhages. The thoracic spinal cord was grossly normal. Microscopically all regions of the spinal cord had similar changes, although the cervical and lumbar sections were most severely affected. These regions were completely effaced by a moderately cellular infiltration of highly pleomorphic polygonal to spindle shaped cells, mineralization, and necrosis, which were most consistent with anaplastic astrocytoma. The thoracic spinal cord white matter was similarly infiltrated by the neoplastic cells, with perivascular extension into the otherwise normal grey matter. A diagnosis of anaplastic astrocytoma was confirmed using immunohistochemical stains that were positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100. PMID:18984799

  4. A comparative evaluation of supervised and unsupervised representation learning approaches for anaplastic medulloblastoma differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Roa, Angel; Arevalo, John; Basavanhally, Ajay; Madabhushi, Anant; González, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Learning data representations directly from the data itself is an approach that has shown great success in different pattern recognition problems, outperforming state-of-the-art feature extraction schemes for different tasks in computer vision, speech recognition and natural language processing. Representation learning applies unsupervised and supervised machine learning methods to large amounts of data to find building-blocks that better represent the information in it. Digitized histopathology images represents a very good testbed for representation learning since it involves large amounts of high complex, visual data. This paper presents a comparative evaluation of different supervised and unsupervised representation learning architectures to specifically address open questions on what type of learning architectures (deep or shallow), type of learning (unsupervised or supervised) is optimal. In this paper we limit ourselves to addressing these questions in the context of distinguishing between anaplastic and non-anaplastic medulloblastomas from routine haematoxylin and eosin stained images. The unsupervised approaches evaluated were sparse autoencoders and topographic reconstruct independent component analysis, and the supervised approach was convolutional neural networks. Experimental results show that shallow architectures with more neurons are better than deeper architectures without taking into account local space invariances and that topographic constraints provide useful invariant features in scale and rotations for efficient tumor differentiation.

  5. UbcH10 overexpression may represent a marker of anaplastic thyroid carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Pallante, P; Berlingieri, M T; Troncone, G; Kruhoffer, M; Orntoft, T F; Viglietto, G; Caleo, A; Migliaccio, I; Decaussin-Petrucci, M; Santoro, M; Palombini, L; Fusco, A

    2005-01-01

    The hybridisation of an Affymetrix HG_U95Av2 oligonucleotide array with RNAs extracted from six human thyroid carcinoma cell lines and a normal human thyroid primary cell culture led us to the identification of the UbcH10 gene that was upregulated by 150-fold in all of the carcinoma cell lines in comparison to the primary culture cells of human normal thyroid origin. Immunohistochemical studies performed on paraffin-embedded tissue sections showed abundant UbcH10 levels in thyroid anaplastic carcinoma samples, whereas no detectable UbcH10 expression was observed in normal thyroid tissues, in adenomas and goiters. Papillary and follicular carcinomas were only weakly positive. These results were further confirmed by RT–PCR and Western blot analyses. The block of UbcH10 protein synthesis induced by RNA interference significantly reduced the growth rate of thyroid carcinoma cell lines. Taken together, these results would indicate that UbcH10 overexpression is involved in thyroid cell proliferation, and may represent a marker of thyroid anaplastic carcinomas. PMID:16106252

  6. Anaplastic Carcinoma Arising in a Mucinous Cystic Neoplasm Masquerading as Pancreatic Pseudocyst.

    PubMed

    Aldaoud, Najla; Joudeh, Amani; Al-Momen, Sami; Alnahawi, Mamdouh; Al-Abbadi, Mousa A

    2016-06-01

    Mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCN) of the pancreas can vary from benign to premalignant and malignant. Preoperative diagnosis is essential to offer the patient appropriate treatment. Occasionally these cases may harbor anaplastic carcinoma while clinically masquerade as a pseudocyst. Here in, we report an unusual case of a 37-year old female presented with recurrent abdominal pain that was suspected clinically and by imaging studies to have a pseudocyst. EUS-FNA with internal drainage of the cyst was performed. Cytological evaluation of the cyst fluid showed numerous inflammatory cells composed mainly of many neutrophils admixed with macrophages reminiscent of the usual pseudocyst content but there were scattered rare dyscohesive malignant cells which were highly pleomorphic with multinucleation. Immunostains on the cell block showed immunoreactivity of these cells including the multinucleated cells for Cam 5.2 and AE1/AE3 and focally for Ber-Ep4, Moc -31, and CA19-9. The subsequent resection confirmed the presence of anaplastic (undifferentiated) carcinoma (AC) arising in a MCN of the pancreas. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:538-542. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27028547

  7. Lymphoma in acquired generalized lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebecca J; Chan, Jean L; Jaffe, Elaine S; Cochran, Elaine; DePaoli, Alex M; Gautier, Jean-Francois; Goujard, Cecile; Vigouroux, Corinne; Gorden, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Acquired generalized lipodystrophy (AGL) is a rare disease thought to result from autoimmune destruction of adipose tissue. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) has been reported in two AGL patients. We report five additional cases of lymphoma in AGL, and analyze the role of underlying autoimmunity and recombinant human leptin (metreleptin) replacement in lymphoma development. Three patients developed lymphoma during metreleptin treatment (two PTCL and one ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma), and two developed lymphomas (mycosis fungoides and Burkitt lymphoma) without metreleptin. AGL is associated with high risk for lymphoma, especially PTCL. Autoimmunity likely contributes to this risk. Lymphoma developed with or without metreleptin, suggesting metreleptin does not directly cause lymphoma development; a theoretical role of metreleptin in lymphoma progression remains possible. For most patients with AGL and severe metabolic complications, the proven benefits of metreleptin on metabolic disease will likely outweigh theoretical risks of metreleptin in lymphoma development or progression. PMID:25864863

  8. Brain Tumor in an In Vitro Fertilization–Facilitated Pregnancy: Fourth Ventricle Anaplastic Ependymoma in the Second Trimester

    PubMed Central

    Ryskeldiyev, Nurzhan; Olenbay, Gabit; Auezova, Raushan; Killeen, Tim; Aldiyarova, Nurgul; Akhmetzhanova, Zauresh; Cesnulis, Evaldas; Akshulakov, Serik

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of fourth ventricle anaplastic ependymoma in a pregnancy which was the first result of three rounds of in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo transfer. Whether hormonal treatment can directly or indirectly precipitate brain tumors to develop or become symptomatic is unclear. PMID:27330925

  9. Brain Tumor in an In Vitro Fertilization-Facilitated Pregnancy: Fourth Ventricle Anaplastic Ependymoma in the Second Trimester.

    PubMed

    Ryskeldiyev, Nurzhan; Olenbay, Gabit; Auezova, Raushan; Killeen, Tim; Aldiyarova, Nurgul; Akhmetzhanova, Zauresh; Cesnulis, Evaldas; Akshulakov, Serik

    2016-06-01

    We present a case of fourth ventricle anaplastic ependymoma in a pregnancy which was the first result of three rounds of in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo transfer. Whether hormonal treatment can directly or indirectly precipitate brain tumors to develop or become symptomatic is unclear. PMID:27330925

  10. Molecular analysis of anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors in a prospective randomized study: A report from EORTC study 26951.

    PubMed

    Kouwenhoven, Mathilde C M; Gorlia, Thierry; Kros, Johan M; Ibdaih, Ahmed; Brandes, Alba A; Bromberg, Jacolien E C; Mokhtari, Karima; van Duinen, Sjoerd G; Teepen, Johannes L; Wesseling, Pieter; Vandenbos, Fanny; Grisold, Wolfgang; Sipos, László; Mirimanoff, Rene; Vecht, Charles J; Allgeier, Anouk; Lacombe, Denis; van den Bent, Martin J

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that the clinical outcome of anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors is variable, but also that the histological diagnosis is subject to interobserver variation. We investigated whether the assessment of 1p/19q codeletion, polysomy of chromosome 7, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene amplification (EGFR(amp)), and loss of chromosome 10 or 10q offers additional prognostic information to the histological diagnosis and would allow molecular subtyping. For this study, we used the clinical data and tumor samples of the patients included in multicenter prospective phase III European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) study 26951 on the effects of adjuvant procarbazine, chloroethyl cyclohexylnitrosourea (lomustine), and vincristine chemotherapy in anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to assess copy number aberrations of chromosome 1p, 19q, 7, 10, and 10q and EGFR. Three different analyses were performed: on all included patients based on local pathology diagnosis, on the patients with confirmed anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors on central pathology review, and on this latter group but after excluding anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA) with necrosis. As a reference set for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), patients from the prospective randomized phase III study on GBM (EORTC 26981) were used as a benchmark. In 257 of 368 patients, central pathology review confirmed the presence of an anaplastic oligodendroglial tumor. Tumors with combined 1p and 19q loss (1p(loss)19q(loss)) were histopathologically diagnosed as anaplastic oligodendroglioma, were more frequently located in the frontal lobe, and had a better outcome. Anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors with EGFR(amp) were more frequently AOA, were more often localized outside the frontal lobe, and had a survival similar to that for GBM. Survival of patients with AOA harboring necrosis was in a similar range as for GBM, while patients

  11. Molecular analysis of anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors in a prospective randomized study: A report from EORTC study 26951

    PubMed Central

    Kouwenhoven, Mathilde C.M.; Gorlia, Thierry; Kros, Johan M.; Ibdaih, Ahmed; Brandes, Alba A.; Bromberg, Jacolien E.C.; Mokhtari, Karima; van Duinen, Sjoerd G.; Teepen, Johannes L.; Wesseling, Pieter; Vandenbos, Fanny; Grisold, Wolfgang; Sipos, László; Mirimanoff, Rene; Vecht, Charles J.; Allgeier, Anouk; Lacombe, Denis; van den Bent, Martin J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the clinical outcome of anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors is variable, but also that the histological diagnosis is subject to interobserver variation. We investigated whether the assessment of 1p/19q codeletion, polysomy of chromosome 7, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene amplification (EGFRamp), and loss of chromosome 10 or 10q offers additional prognostic information to the histological diagnosis and would allow molecular subtyping. For this study, we used the clinical data and tumor samples of the patients included in multicenter prospective phase III European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) study 26951 on the effects of adjuvant procarbazine, chloroethyl cyclohexylnitrosourea (lomustine), and vincristine chemotherapy in anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to assess copy number aberrations of chromosome 1p, 19q, 7, 10, and 10q and EGFR. Three different analyses were performed: on all included patients based on local pathology diagnosis, on the patients with confirmed anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors on central pathology review, and on this latter group but after excluding anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA) with necrosis. As a reference set for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), patients from the prospective randomized phase III study on GBM (EORTC 26981) were used as a benchmark. In 257 of 368 patients, central pathology review confirmed the presence of an anaplastic oligodendroglial tumor. Tumors with combined 1p and 19q loss (1ploss19qloss) were histopathologically diagnosed as anaplastic oligodendroglioma, were more frequently located in the frontal lobe, and had a better outcome. Anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors with EGFRamp were more frequently AOA, were more often localized outside the frontal lobe, and had a survival similar to that for GBM. Survival of patients with AOA harboring necrosis was in a similar range as for GBM, while patients with

  12. Impact of 1p/19q Codeletion and Histology on Outcomes of Anaplastic Gliomas Treated With Radiation Therapy and Temozolomide

    SciTech Connect

    Speirs, Christina K.; Simpson, Joseph R.; Robinson, Clifford G.; DeWees, Todd A.; Tran, David D.; Linette, Gerry; Chicoine, Michael R.; Dacey, Ralph G.; Rich, Keith M.; Dowling, Joshua L.; Leuthardt, Eric C.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Kim, Albert H.; Huang, Jiayi

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Anaplastic gliomas represent a heterogeneous group of primary high-grade brain tumors, and the optimal postoperative treatment remains controversial. In this report, we present our institutional data on the clinical outcomes of radiation therapy (RT) plus temozolomide (RT + TMZ) for anaplastic gliomas, stratified by histology and 1p/19q codeletion. Methods and Materials: A single-institution retrospective review was conducted of patients with supratentorial anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO), mixed anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA), and anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). After surgery, RT was delivered at a median total dose of 60 Gy (range, 31.6-63 Gy) in daily fractions. All patients received standard concurrent TMZ, with or without adjuvant TMZ. Histological/molecular subtypes were defined as codeleted AO/AOA, non-codeleted AO/AOA, and AA. Results: From 2000 to 2012, 111 cases met study criteria and were evaluable. Codeleted AO/AOA had superior overall survival (OS) to non-codeleted AO/AOA (91% vs 68% at 5 years, respectively, P=.02), whereas progression-free survival (PFS) was not significantly different (70% vs 46% at 5 years, respectively, P=.10). AA had inferior OS to non-codeleted AO/AOA (37% vs 68% at 5 years, respectively, P=.007) and inferior PFS (27% vs 46%, respectively, P=.03). On multivariate analysis, age, performance status, and histological or molecular subtype were independent predictors for both PFS and OS. Compared to historical controls, RT + TMZ provided comparable OS to RT with procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine (RT + PCV) for codeleted AO/AOA, superior OS to RT alone for non-codeleted AO/AOA, and similar OS to RT alone for AA. Conclusions: RT + TMZ may be a promising treatment for both codeleted and non-codeleted AO/AOA, but its role for AA remains unclear.

  13. An extraneural primary anaplastic ependymoma at the subcutaneous inguinal region: Report of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Sayar, Hamide; Ersen, Ayca; Kurtul, Neslihan; Yazar, Mehmet Fatih; Balakan, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Ependymomas commonly arise in the central nervous system. Extraneural presentation is quite rare. Herein, we describe a primary extraneural ependymoma in a young female. The mass was located in the right inguinal area. The cut surface of the 7.5 mm × 6.5 mm × 4.5 mm sized tumor was brownish-yellow in color. Histologically, it was hypercellular exhibiting pseudorosette or rosette formations and some papillary structures. Mitosis was counted as high as 10 per 10 high power fields. Neither necrosis nor vascular endothelial proliferation within the tumor was observed. Tumor cells showed strong glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity. On epithelial membrane antigen, intracytoplasmic dot-like immunostaining was observed. This is the first report presenting a primary extraneural anaplastic ependymoma arising in the inguinal subcutaneous region. PMID:26549094

  14. Evolution of Renal Cysts to Anaplastic Sarcoma of Kidney in a Child With DICER1 Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mona Kay; Goudie, Catherine; Druker, Harriet; Thorner, Paul; Traubici, Jeffrey; Grant, Ronald; Albrecht, Steffen; Weber, Evan; Charles, Adrian; Priest, Jack R; Fabian, Marc Robert; Foulkes, William D

    2016-07-01

    Anaplastic sarcoma of kidney (ASK) is a rare neoplasm recently associated with DICER1 mutations. We report a child with germline DICER1 mutation who developed ASK in preexisting septated renal cysts, which were likely cystic nephroma. From age 2.5 to 6 years, sonographic imaging illustrated changes in the size and number of renal cysts, followed at age 8.8 years by a mass, pathologically an ASK. Lung cysts resected in infancy were diagnosed retrospectively as pleuropulmonary blastoma. Both tumors had acquired somatic DICER1 mutations. Ultrasonographic evolution of renal cysts to ASK has not previously been documented. Children with both pulmonary and renal cysts are candidates for DICER1 mutation testing. PMID:26928971

  15. Imaging findings of anaplastic astrocytoma in a child with maple syrup urine disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Aw-Zoretic, Jessie; Wadhwani, Nitin R; Lulla, Rishi R; Rishi, Lulla R; Ryan, Maura E

    2015-09-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inborn error of branched-chain amino acid metabolism, which usually presents in childhood with encephalopathy due to cerebral edema and dysmyelination. Even with treatment, metabolic stressors may precipitate later episodes of acute decompensation. Changes related to cerebral and white matter edema have been described by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and imaging can aid in both initial diagnosis and evaluation of decompensation. To date, there are no published known reports of cancer in patients with MSUD. Here, we present the first case report of an anaplastic astrocytoma in a teenager with MSUD, with a discussion of imaging findings and the use of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to help distinguish between tumor and metabolic changes. PMID:26084772

  16. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Acts in the Drosophila Mushroom Body to Negatively Regulate Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lei; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Though evidence is mounting that a major function of sleep is to maintain brain plasticity and consolidate memory, little is known about the molecular pathways by which learning and sleep processes intercept. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk), the gene encoding a tyrosine receptor kinase whose inadvertent activation is the cause of many cancers, is implicated in synapse formation and cognitive functions. In particular, Alk genetically interacts with Neurofibromatosis 1 (Nf1) to regulate growth and associative learning in flies. We show that Alk mutants have increased sleep. Using a targeted RNAi screen we localized the negative effects of Alk on sleep to the mushroom body, a structure important for both sleep and memory. We also report that mutations in Nf1 produce a sexually dimorphic short sleep phenotype, and suppress the long sleep phenotype of Alk. Thus Alk and Nf1 interact in both learning and sleep regulation, highlighting a common pathway in these two processes. PMID:26536237

  17. Acute Hydrocephalus due to Secondary Leptomeningeal Dissemination of an Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Andreas M.; Hugo, Heinz-Herrmann; Mehdorn, H. Maximilian; Knerlich-Lukoschus, Friederike

    2009-01-01

    Secondary leptomeningeal dissemination of oligodendroglioma is very rare. We report the case of a 38-year-old Caucasian male who presented with acute hydrocephalus. 8 months before, the patient had undergone craniotomy for right frontal anaplastic oligodendroglioma, WHO grade III. By that time, there was no evidence of tumor dissemination. MRI now ruled out local tumor progression but revealed meningeal contrast enhancement along the medulla, the myelon, and the cauda equina. Repeated lumbar puncture revealed increased cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) pressure and protein content. Malignant cells were not detectable. Surgical treatment consisted in (1) placement of an ommaya reservoir for daily CSF puncture, (2) Spinal dural biopsy confirming leptomeningeal oligodendroglioma metastasis, and (3) ventriculo-peritoneal shunt placement after CSF protein has decreased to 1500–2000 mg/l. PMID:20052406

  18. Metronomic Chemotherapy in Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma: A Potentially Feasible Alternative to Therapeutic Nihilism

    PubMed Central

    Revannasiddaiah, Swaroop; Madabhavi, Irappa; Bodh, Anita; Thakur, Priyanka; Sharma, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most aggressive malignancies and prognostic outlook remains very dismal. Treatment most often is palliative in intent attempting to relieve the patients from local compressive symptoms in the neck. Radical surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and chemotherapy have not been tested in large prospective trials, and current evidence from retrospective series and small trials indicate only marginal survival benefits. Given the poor prognostic and therapeutic outlook, patients must be encouraged to be actively involved in the decision making process. We report the case of an elderly patient who had no response to palliative RT, and was treated with oral metronomic chemotherapy. The response to oral metronomic chemotherapy was dramatic, and the patient has enjoyed complete freedom from symptoms as well as radiologically exhibits a complete regression. Thus, we document the first ever use of a simple, cost-effective, and convenient oral metronomic chemotherapeutic regimen delivering a remarkable response in an elderly patient with ATC. PMID:26009682

  19. Metronomic chemotherapy in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: a potentially feasible alternative to therapeutic nihilism.

    PubMed

    Revannasiddaiah, Swaroop; Madabhavi, Irappa; Bodh, Anita; Thakur, Priyanka; Sharma, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most aggressive malignancies and prognostic outlook remains very dismal. Treatment most often is palliative in intent attempting to relieve the patients from local compressive symptoms in the neck. Radical surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and chemotherapy have not been tested in large prospective trials, and current evidence from retrospective series and small trials indicate only marginal survival benefits. Given the poor prognostic and therapeutic outlook, patients must be encouraged to be actively involved in the decision making process. We report the case of an elderly patient who had no response to palliative RT, and was treated with oral metronomic chemotherapy. The response to oral metronomic chemotherapy was dramatic, and the patient has enjoyed complete freedom from symptoms as well as radiologically exhibits a complete regression. Thus, we document the first ever use of a simple, cost-effective, and convenient oral metronomic chemotherapeutic regimen delivering a remarkable response in an elderly patient with ATC. PMID:26009682

  20. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the lung: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YAMAMOTO, YOKO; KODAMA, KEN; MANIWA, TOMOHIRO; TAKEDA, MASASHI; KISHIMA, HIROKI

    2016-01-01

    It is widely known that echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) rearrangement mostly occurs in the adenocarcinoma subtype of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with squamous cell carcinoma harboring the ALK rearrangement are extremely rare. This is a case report of a squamous cell carcinoma patient with EML4-ALK rearrangement. An elderly man with a heavy smoking history presented with a mass lesion in the right main bronchus. Bronchoscopic biopsy of the tumor confirmed a diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma, and it was proven to harbor ALK rearrangement, based on fluorescence in situ hybridization, but not epidermal growth factor receptor mutations. The patient underwent radiation therapy, with a markedly favorable response. ALK-targeted treatment may be a viable option if disease progression occurs in such a case in the future. PMID:27330767

  1. Chemoradiation for anaplastic oligodendrogliomas: clinical outcomes and prognostic value of molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Arcella, Antonella; Scaringi, Claudia; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Di Stefano, Domenica; Scarpino, Stefania; Pace, Andrea; Giangaspero, Felice; Osti, Mattia Falchetto; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2014-01-01

    Combination of procarbazine, lomustine and vincristine (PCV) with radiation therapy (RT) has been associated with longer survival in patients with anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO) and anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA), especially in those with chromosome 1p/19q codeletion. We report a multicenter retrospective study of 84 consecutive adult patients with AO and AOA treated with RT plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) between February 2004 and January 2011. Correlations between chromosome 1p/19q codeletion, isocitrate dehydrogenase1 (IDH1) mutation, and O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation with survival outcomes have been analyzed. For all 84 patients the median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival rates were 55.6 and 45.2 months, respectively. Grade 3 or 4 hematological toxicity occurred in 17 % of patients. Chromosome 1p/19q codeletion was detected in 57 %, IDH1 mutation in 63 %, and MGMT promoter methylation in 74 % of evaluable patients. In multivariate analysis the presence of chromosome 1p/19q codeletion was associated with significant survival benefit (median OS 34 months in noncodeleted tumors and not reached in codeleted tumors; HR 0.16, 95 % CI 0.03-0.45; P = 0.005). IDH1 mutation was also of prognostic significance for longer survival (P = 0.001; HR 0.20, 95 % 0.06-0.41), whereas MGMT promoter methylation was only of borderline significance. The study indicates that RT with concomitant and adjuvant TMZ is a relatively safe treatment associated with longer survival in patients with 1p/19q codeleted and IDH1 mutated tumors. Results from ongoing randomized studies will be essential to clarify if RT plus TMZ may provide survival as good as or better than RT combined with PCV for patients with AO and AOA. PMID:24162810

  2. Combined treatment of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma with surgery, chemotherapy, and hyperfractionated accelerated external radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    De Crevoisier, Renaud . E-mail: rdecrevo@mdanderson.org; Baudin, Eric; Bachelot, Anne; Leboulleux, Sophie; Travagli, Jean-Paul; Caillou, Bernard; Schlumberger, Martin

    2004-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze a prospective protocol combining surgery, chemotherapy (CT), and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Methods and materials: Thirty anaplastic thyroid carcinoma patients (mean age, 59 years) were treated during 1990-2000. Tumor extended beyond the capsule gland in 26 patients, with tracheal extension in 8. Lymph node metastases were present in 18 patients and lung metastases in 6. Surgery was performed before RT-CT in 20 patients and afterwards in 4. Two cycles of doxorubicin (60 mg/m{sup 2}) and cisplatin (120 mg/m{sup 2}) were delivered before RT and four cycles after RT. RT consisted of two daily fractions of 1.25 Gy, 5 days per week to a total dose of 40 Gy to the cervical lymph node areas and the superior mediastinum. Results: Acute toxicity (World Health Organization criteria) was Grade 3 or 4 pharyngoesophagitis in 10 patients; Grade 4 neutropenia in 21, with infection in 13; and Grade 3 or 4 anemia and thrombopenia in 8 and 4, respectively. At the end of the treatment, a complete local response was observed in 19 patients. With a median follow-up of 45 months (range, 12-78 months), 7 patients were alive in complete remission, of whom 6 had initially received a complete tumor resection. Overall survival rate at 3 years was 27% (95% confidence interval 10-44%) and median survival 10 months. In multivariate analysis, tracheal extension and macroscopic complete tumor resection were significant factors in overall survival. Death was related to local progression in 5% of patients, to distant metastases in 68%, and to both in 27%. Conclusions: Main toxicity was hematologic. High long-term survival was obtained when RT-CT was given after complete surgery. This protocol avoided local tumor progression, and death was mainly caused by distant metastases.

  3. A pilot study of combined suicide/cytokine gene therapy in two patients with end-stage anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Barzon, Luisa; Pacenti, Monia; Taccaliti, Augusto; Franchin, Elisa; Bruglia, Matteo; Boscaro, Marco; Palù, Giorgio

    2005-05-01

    This study represents the first report of gene therapy for anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, one of the most aggressive solid tumors in humans. Two patients with end-stage anaplastic thyroid carcinoma were treated by direct intratumor injection of retroviral vector producer cells followed by ganciclovir. The retroviral vector carried the human IL-2 gene and the suicide gene thymidine kinase of herpes simplex virus type 1. Treatment was safe and associated with only mild adverse events. Transduction of tumor cells and production of T helper type 1 cytokines was demonstrated in tumor biopsies. Gene therapy led also to a marked increase in T helper type 1 cytokine expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Radiological evaluation of injected tumor masses demonstrated local tumor necrosis. PMID:15713704

  4. Microfocus of Anaplastic Carcinoma Arising in Mural Nodule of Ovarian Mucinous Borderline Tumor With Very Rapid and Fatal Outcome.

    PubMed

    Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Ramzan, Amin; Walia, Saloni; Pham, Huyen Q; Yessaian, Annie

    2016-07-01

    A 36-yr-old woman presented with abdominal discomfort. A computed tomography scan revealed a large left cystic and solid pelvic mass without evidence of metastatic disease. Total hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and tumor staging was performed. Grossly, the ovarian mass measured 20×18 cm and the cut surface was multiloculated with 1 single mural nodule measuring 2×1.5 cm. The histologic diagnosis of ovarian mucinous borderline tumor with a microfocus of anaplastic carcinoma arising in sarcoma-like mural nodule, FIGO Stage IA was rendered. After 3 mo, the patient returned with symptomatic anemia. A computed tomography scan showed enlarged retroperitoneal and pelvic lymph nodes. Image-guided biopsy of the pelvic lymph node showed a metastatic anaplastic carcinoma from her primary ovarian carcinoma. Chemotherapy was initiated, but the patient developed fulminant disseminated intravascular coagulation within <1 wk of her presentation which was fatal. PMID:26598983

  5. Pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma with anaplastic features: A rare case report and review of literature with reference to current management

    PubMed Central

    Patibandla, M. R.; Nayak, Madhukar; Purohit, A. K.; Thotakura, Amit Kumar; Uppin, Megha; Challa, Sundaram

    2016-01-01

    Pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) is an uncommon tumor constitutes less than 1% of all astrocytic glial neoplasms was first reported in 1979. PXA commonly occurs in young patients and manifests itself first as seizures followed by focal neurological deficits. The role of radiotherapy or chemotherapy has not yet been established because of the relative infrequency of this disease. PXA is classified as grade II tumor in the WHO classification of tumors of the CNS. In literature 9 to 20 % PXA may undergo malignant change at recurrence or may display at the time of initial presentation. Malignant transformation is mainly associated with high mitotic activity and necrosis. The criteria for PXA with anaplastic features was five or more mitotic activity per 10 high power fields, necrosis, microvascular proliferation, marked cellular anaplasia, and high Ki-67 labeling indices. PXA with anaplastic features management is highly controversial as very sparse literature is available. We are reporting a case of PXA with anaplastic features with atypical radiology and tried to review the up to date literature regarding this rare tumor. PMID:27366280

  6. Pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma with anaplastic features: A rare case report and review of literature with reference to current management.

    PubMed

    Patibandla, M R; Nayak, Madhukar; Purohit, A K; Thotakura, Amit Kumar; Uppin, Megha; Challa, Sundaram

    2016-01-01

    Pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) is an uncommon tumor constitutes less than 1% of all astrocytic glial neoplasms was first reported in 1979. PXA commonly occurs in young patients and manifests itself first as seizures followed by focal neurological deficits. The role of radiotherapy or chemotherapy has not yet been established because of the relative infrequency of this disease. PXA is classified as grade II tumor in the WHO classification of tumors of the CNS. In literature 9 to 20 % PXA may undergo malignant change at recurrence or may display at the time of initial presentation. Malignant transformation is mainly associated with high mitotic activity and necrosis. The criteria for PXA with anaplastic features was five or more mitotic activity per 10 high power fields, necrosis, microvascular proliferation, marked cellular anaplasia, and high Ki-67 labeling indices. PXA with anaplastic features management is highly controversial as very sparse literature is available. We are reporting a case of PXA with anaplastic features with atypical radiology and tried to review the up to date literature regarding this rare tumor. PMID:27366280

  7. Phase III Trial of Chemoradiotherapy for Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma: Long-Term Results of RTOG 9402

    PubMed Central

    Cairncross, Gregory; Wang, Meihua; Shaw, Edward; Jenkins, Robert; Brachman, David; Buckner, Jan; Fink, Karen; Souhami, Luis; Laperriere, Normand; Curran, Walter; Mehta, Minesh

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, pure (AO) and mixed (anaplastic oligoastrocytoma [AOA]), are chemosensitive, especially if codeleted for 1p/19q, but whether patients live longer after chemoradiotherapy is unknown. Patients and Methods Eligible patients with AO/AOA were randomly assigned to procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine (PCV) plus radiotherapy (RT) versus RT alone. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Results Two hundred ninety-one eligible patients were randomly assigned: 148 to PCV plus RT and 143 to RT. For the entire cohort, there was no difference in median survival by treatment (4.6 years for PCV plus RT v 4.7 years for RT; hazard ratio [HR] = 0.79; 95% CI, 0.60 to 1.04; P = .1). Patients with codeleted tumors lived longer than those with noncodeleted tumors (PCV plus RT: 14.7 v 2.6 years, HR = 0.36, 95% CI, 0.23 to 0.57, P < .001; RT: 7.3 v 2.7 years, HR = 0.40, 95% CI, 0.27 to 0.60, P < .001), and the median survival of those with codeleted tumors treated with PCV plus RT was twice that of patients receiving RT (14.7 v 7.3 years; HR = 0.59; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.95; P = .03). For those with noncodeleted tumors, there was no difference in median survival by treatment arm (2.6 v 2.7 years; HR = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.58 to 1.23; P = .39). In Cox models that included codeletion status, the adjusted OS for all patients was prolonged by PCV plus RT (HR = 0.67; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.91; P = .01). Conclusion For the subset of patients with 1p/19q codeleted AO/AOA, PCV plus RT may be an especially effective treatment, although this observation was derived from an unplanned analysis. PMID:23071247

  8. Effects of BP-14, a novel cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, on anaplastic thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Allegri, Lorenzo; Baldan, Federica; Mio, Catia; Puppin, Cinzia; Russo, Diego; Kryštof, Vladimir; Damante, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is an extremely aggressive human malignancy characterized by a marked degree of invasiveness, absense of features of thyroid differentiation and resistance to current medical treatment. It is well known that ATCs are characterized by deregulation of genes related to cell cycle regulation, i.e., cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and endogenous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs). Therefore, in the present study, the effect of a novel exogenous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, BP-14, was investigated in three human ATC cell lines. The ATC-derived cell lines FRO, SW1736 and 8505C were treated with BP-14 alone or in combination with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. In all ATC cell lines, treatment with BP-14 decreased cell viability and, in two of them, BP-14 modified expression of genes involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Thus, our data indicate that BP-14 is a potential new compound effective against ATC. Combined treatment with BP-14 and the mTOR inhibitor everolimus had a strong synergistic effect on cell viability in all three cell lines, suggesting that the combined used of CDK and mTOR inhibitors may be a useful strategy for ATC treatment. PMID:26884249

  9. Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy (HART) for Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma: Toxicity and Survival Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dandekar, Prasad; Rhys-Evans, Peter; Harrington, Kevin; Nutting, Christopher; Newbold, Kate

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most aggressive cancers, and the current protocol of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy was initiated to improve survival while limiting toxicities. Methods and Materials: All patients with ATC from 1991 to 2002 were accrued and received megavoltage radiotherapy from the mastoid processes to the carina up to 60 Gy in twice-daily fractions of 1.8 and 2 Gy, 6 hours apart. Results: Thirty-one patients were accrued with a median age of 69 years, and 55% were women. Debulking was performed in 26%, and total thyroidectomy, in 6%, whereas 68% received radical radiotherapy alone. Local control data were available for 27 patients: 22% had a complete response, 26% had a partial response, 15% showed progressive disease, and 37% showed static disease. Median overall survival for all 31 patients was 70 days (95% confidence interval, 40-99). There was no significant difference in median survival between patients younger (70 days) and older than 70 years (42 days), between men (70 days) and women (49days), and between patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy (77 days) and radical radiotherapy alone (35 days). Grade III or higher skin erythema was seen in 56% patients; desquamation in 21%; dysphagia in 74%; and esophagitis in 79%. Conclusion: The current protocol failed to offer a significant survival benefit, was associated with severe toxicities, and thus was discontinued. There is a suggestion that younger patients with operable disease have longer survival, but this would require a larger study to confirm it.

  10. Radiation-induced anaplastic ependymoma mimicking a skull base meningioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    SPALLONE, ALDO; MARCHIONE, PASQUALE; DI CAPUA, MARIO; BELVISI, DANIELE

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes the case of a 63-year-old woman presenting with headache, dizziness and vomiting due to a an ovoid mass in the left pre-bulbar cistern, apparently arising from the lower clivus and the foramen magnum. The clinical history revealed the subtotal removal of a right cerebellar low-grade glioma 15 years previously and subsequent conventional 60-Gy radiotherapy. Notably, following gross total resection, histopathological examination showed microscopic features that resulted in a diagnosis of anaplastic ependymoma. The patient underwent surgery to remove the mass and post-operative chemotherapy with temozolomide. A progressive improvement of neurological signs and symptoms was observed during the postoperative course. At the 6-month follow-up, the patient was free from clinical and radiological recurrence. The unusual features of this rare secondary brain tumor were the extrassial location in the posterior fossa, the unusual age-associated location of the histological subtype and the fact that it closely mimicked a skull-base meningioma. PMID:26893630

  11. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 negatively regulates anaplastic lymphoma kinase in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Shunpei; Takatori, Atsushi; Ogura, Atsushi; Kohashi, Kenichi; Souzaki, Ryota; Kinoshita, Yoshiaki; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Hossain, Md. Shamim; Ohira, Miki; Nakamura, Yohko; Nakagawara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    In neuroblastoma (NB), one of the most common paediatric solid tumours, activation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is often associated with poor outcomes. Although genetic studies have identified copy number alteration and nonsynonymous mutations of ALK, the regulatory mechanism of ALK signalling at protein levels is largely elusive. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 (NLRR1) is a type 1 transmembrane protein that is highly expressed in unfavourable NB and potentially influences receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Here, we showed that NLRR1 and ALK exhibited a mutually exclusive expression pattern in primary NB tissues by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, dorsal root ganglia of Nlrr1+/+ and Nlrr1−/− mice displayed the opposite expression patterns of Nlrr1 and Alk. Of interest, NLRR1 physically interacted with ALK in vitro through its extracellular region. Notably, the NLRR1 ectodomain impaired ALK phosphorylation and proliferation of ALK-mutated NB cells. A newly identified cleavage of the NLRR1 ectodomain also supported NLRR1-mediated ALK signal regulation in trans. Thus, we conclude that NLRR1 appears to be an extracellular negative regulator of ALK signalling in NB and neuronal development. Our findings may be beneficial to comprehend NB heterogeneity and to develop a novel therapy against unfavourable NB. PMID:27604320

  12. Testing for anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement to target crizotinib therapy: oncology, pathology and health economic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lee, James A; Bubendorf, Lukas; Stahel, Rolf; Peters, Solange

    2013-05-01

    Crizotinib is a first-in-class oral anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor targeting ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer. The therapy was approved by the US FDA in August 2011 and received conditional marketing approval by the European Commission in October 2012 for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. A break-apart FISH-based assay was jointly approved with crizotinib by the FDA. This assay and an immunohistochemistry assay that uses a D5F3 rabbit monoclonal primary antibody were also approved for marketing in Europe in October 2012. While ALK rearrangement has relatively low prevalence, a clinical benefit is exhibited in more than 85% of patients with median progression-free survival of 8-10 months. In this article, the authors summarize the therapy and alternative test strategies for identifying patients who are likely to respond to therapy, including key issues for effective and efficient testing. The key economic considerations regarding the joint companion diagnostic and therapy are also presented. Given the observed clinical benefit and relatively high cost of crizotinib therapy, companion diagnostics should be evaluated relative to response to therapy versus correlation alone whenever possible, and both high inter-rater reliability and external quality assessment programs are warranted. PMID:23617353

  13. Mutation-Independent Activation of the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase in Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Regairaz, Marie; Munier, Fabienne; Sartelet, Hervé; Castaing, Marine; Marty, Virginie; Renauleaud, Céline; Doux, Camille; Delbé, Jean; Courty, José; Fabre, Monique; Ohta, Shigeru; Viehl, Philippe; Michiels, Stefan; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique; Vassal, Gilles

    2016-02-01

    Activating mutations of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have been identified as important players in neuroblastoma development. Our goal was to evaluate the significance of overall ALK activation in neuroblastoma. Expression of phosphorylated ALK, ALK, and its putative ligands, pleiotrophin and midkine, was screened in 289 neuroblastomas and 56 paired normal tissues. ALK was expressed in 99% of tumors and phosphorylated in 48% of cases. Pleiotrophin and midkine were expressed in 58% and 79% of tumors, respectively. ALK activation was significantly higher in tumors than in paired normal tissues, together with ALK and midkine expression. ALK activation was largely independent of mutations and correlated with midkine expression in tumors. ALK activation in tumors was associated with favorable features, including a younger age at diagnosis, hyperdiploidy, and detection by mass screening. Antitumor activity of the ALK inhibitor TAE684 was evaluated in wild-type or mutated ALK neuroblastoma cell lines and xenografts. TAE684 was cytotoxic in vitro in all cell lines, especially those harboring an ALK mutation. TAE684 efficiently inhibited ALK phosphorylation in vivo in both F1174I and R1275Q xenografts but demonstrated antitumor activity only against the R1275Q xenograft. In conclusion, ALK activation occurs frequently during neuroblastoma oncogenesis, mainly through mutation-independent mechanisms. However, ALK activation is not associated with a poor outcome and is not always a driver of cell proliferation and/or survival in neuroblastoma. PMID:26687816

  14. Identification of Oncogenic Point Mutations and Hyperphosphorylation of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase in Lung Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Wei; Tu, Pang-Hsien; Lin, Kuen-Tyng; Lin, Shu-Chen; Ko, Jenq-Yuh; Jou, Yuh-Shan

    2011-01-01

    The oncogenic property of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of various cancers and serves as an important therapeutic target. In this study, we identified frequent intragenic loss of heterozygosity and six novel driver mutations within ALK in lung adenocarcinomas. Overexpression of H694R or E1384K mutant ALK leads to hyperphosphorylation of ALK, and activation of its downstream mediators STAT3, AKT, and ERK resulted in enhanced cell proliferation, colony formation, cell migration, and tumor growth in xenograft models. Furthermore, the activated phospho-Y1604 ALK was increasingly detected in 13 human lung cancer cell lines and 263 lung cancer specimens regardless of tumor stages and types. Treatment of two different ALK inhibitors, WHI-P154 and NVP-TAE684, resulted in the down-regulation of aberrant ALK signaling, shrinkage of tumor, and suppression of metastasis and significantly improved survival of ALK mutant-bearing mice. Together, we identified that novel ALK point mutations possessed tumorigenic effects mainly through hyperphosphorylation of Y1604 and activation of downstream oncogenic signaling. The upregulated phospho-Y1604 ALK could serve as a diagnostic biomarker for lung cancer. Furthermore, targeting oncogenic mutant ALKs with inhibitors could be a promising strategy to improve the therapeutic efficacy of fatal lung cancers. PMID:21847362

  15. mRNA Expression in Papillary and Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma: Molecular Anatomy of a Killing Switch

    PubMed Central

    Hébrant, Aline; Dom, Geneviève; Dewaele, Michael; Andry, Guy; Trésallet, Christophe; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Dumont, Jacques E.; Maenhaut, Carine

    2012-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is the most lethal form of thyroid neoplasia and represents the end stage of thyroid tumor progression. No effective treatment exists so far. ATC frequently derive from papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC), which have a good prognosis. In this study, we analyzed the mRNA expression profiles of 59 thyroid tumors (11 ATC and 48 PTC) by microarrays. ATC and PTC showed largely overlapping mRNA expression profiles with most genes regulated in all ATC being also regulated in several PTC. 43% of the probes regulated in all the PTC are similarly regulated in all ATC. Many genes modulations observed in PTC are amplified in ATC. This illustrates the fact that ATC mostly derived from PTC. A molecular signature of aggressiveness composed of 9 genes clearly separates the two tumors. Moreover, this study demonstrates gene regulations corresponding to the ATC or PTC phenotypes like inflammatory reaction, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion, high proliferation rate, dedifferentiation, calcification and fibrosis processes, high glucose metabolism and glycolysis, lactate generation and chemoresistance. The main qualitative differences between the two tumor types bear on the much stronger EMT, dedifferentiation and glycolytic phenotypes showed by the ATC. PMID:23115614

  16. Identification of anaplastic lymphoma kinase as a potential therapeutic target in Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Claire Q.F.; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Gonzalez, Juana; Shah, Kejal R.; Chen, Jie; Coats, Israel; Felsen, Diane; Carucci, John A.; Krueger, James G.

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of BCC is associated with sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling. Vismodegib, a smoothened inhibitor that targets this pathway, is now in clinical use for advanced BCC patients, but its efficacy is limited. Therefore, new therapeutic options for this cancer are required. We studied gene expression profiling of BCC tumour tissues coupled with laser capture microdissection to identify tumour specific receptor tyrosine kinase expression that can be targeted by small molecule inhibitors. We found a >250 fold increase (FDR<10−4) of the oncogene, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) as well as its ligands, pleiotrophin and midkine in BCC compared to microdissected normal epidermis. qRT-PCR confirmed increased expression of ALK (p<0.05). Stronger expression of phosphorylated ALK in BCC tumour nests than normal skin was observed by immunohistochemistry. Crizotinib, an FDA-approved ALK inhibitor, reduced keratinocyte proliferation in culture, whereas a c-Met inhibitor did not. Crizotinib significantly reduced the expression of GLI1 and CCND2 (members of SHH-pathway) mRNA by approximately 60% and 20%, respectively (p<0.01). Our data suggest that ALK may increase GLI1 expression in parallel with the conventional SHH-pathway and promote keratinocyte proliferation. Hence, an ALK inhibitor alone or in combination with targeting SHH-pathway molecules may be a potential treatment for BCC patients. PMID:24163262

  17. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 negatively regulates anaplastic lymphoma kinase in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Shunpei; Takatori, Atsushi; Ogura, Atsushi; Kohashi, Kenichi; Souzaki, Ryota; Kinoshita, Yoshiaki; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Hossain, Md Shamim; Ohira, Miki; Nakamura, Yohko; Nakagawara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    In neuroblastoma (NB), one of the most common paediatric solid tumours, activation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is often associated with poor outcomes. Although genetic studies have identified copy number alteration and nonsynonymous mutations of ALK, the regulatory mechanism of ALK signalling at protein levels is largely elusive. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 (NLRR1) is a type 1 transmembrane protein that is highly expressed in unfavourable NB and potentially influences receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Here, we showed that NLRR1 and ALK exhibited a mutually exclusive expression pattern in primary NB tissues by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, dorsal root ganglia of Nlrr1+/+ and Nlrr1-/- mice displayed the opposite expression patterns of Nlrr1 and Alk. Of interest, NLRR1 physically interacted with ALK in vitro through its extracellular region. Notably, the NLRR1 ectodomain impaired ALK phosphorylation and proliferation of ALK-mutated NB cells. A newly identified cleavage of the NLRR1 ectodomain also supported NLRR1-mediated ALK signal regulation in trans. Thus, we conclude that NLRR1 appears to be an extracellular negative regulator of ALK signalling in NB and neuronal development. Our findings may be beneficial to comprehend NB heterogeneity and to develop a novel therapy against unfavourable NB. PMID:27604320

  18. Chemosensitivity of Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Based on a Histoculture Drug Response Assay

    PubMed Central

    Uruno, Takashi; Masaki, Chie; Akaishi, Junko; Matsuzu, Kenichi; Suzuki, Akifumi; Ohkuwa, Keiko; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Wataru; Nagahama, Mitsuji; Sugino, Kiminori; Ito, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    The chemosensitivity of anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) to some cytotoxic agents was investigated by the histoculture drug response assay (HDRA). Thirty specimens from 22 patients with ATC were obtained from surgically resected subjects. The drugs tested were paclitaxel (PTX), docetaxel (DOC), adriamycin (ADM), nedaplatin (254-S), cisplatin (CDDP), carboplatin (CBDCA), etoposide (VP-16), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), mitomycin C (MMC), and cyclophosphamide (CPA). PTX was the most effective agent, and 25 of 29 cases (86.2%) had high inhibition rates (IRs; over 70%), while DOC, another taxane, had lower IRs (median, 32.6%). 254-S had the second highest IR (median 68.1%), higher than other platins, CDDP (median 47.3%) and CBDCA (median 27.4%). The IR of 50% dose PTX (20 μg/mL, median 30.6%) was markedly decreased, while that of 50% dose 254-S (10 μg/mL, median 63.3%) still retained its inhibition effect compared to 100% dose. Most recurrent samples had higher IRs than primary lesions, but the IRs of different drugs differed between primary and recurrent lesions, even with samples from the same patients. PTX has a higher IR to ATC tissues in the HDRA, which suggests that it may be a key drug for the treatment of patients with ATC. PMID:25866510

  19. Chemosensitivity of anaplastic thyroid cancer based on a histoculture drug response assay.

    PubMed

    Uruno, Takashi; Masaki, Chie; Akaishi, Junko; Matsuzu, Kenichi; Suzuki, Akifumi; Ohkuwa, Keiko; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Wataru; Nagahama, Mitsuji; Sugino, Kiminori; Ito, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    The chemosensitivity of anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) to some cytotoxic agents was investigated by the histoculture drug response assay (HDRA). Thirty specimens from 22 patients with ATC were obtained from surgically resected subjects. The drugs tested were paclitaxel (PTX), docetaxel (DOC), adriamycin (ADM), nedaplatin (254-S), cisplatin (CDDP), carboplatin (CBDCA), etoposide (VP-16), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), mitomycin C (MMC), and cyclophosphamide (CPA). PTX was the most effective agent, and 25 of 29 cases (86.2%) had high inhibition rates (IRs; over 70%), while DOC, another taxane, had lower IRs (median, 32.6%). 254-S had the second highest IR (median 68.1%), higher than other platins, CDDP (median 47.3%) and CBDCA (median 27.4%). The IR of 50% dose PTX (20 μg/mL, median 30.6%) was markedly decreased, while that of 50% dose 254-S (10 μg/mL, median 63.3%) still retained its inhibition effect compared to 100% dose. Most recurrent samples had higher IRs than primary lesions, but the IRs of different drugs differed between primary and recurrent lesions, even with samples from the same patients. PTX has a higher IR to ATC tissues in the HDRA, which suggests that it may be a key drug for the treatment of patients with ATC. PMID:25866510

  20. [Polychemotherapy of large cell carcinoma of the lung: a case of complete remission].

    PubMed

    Spaghi, A; Costa, D; Gangarossa, I; Castoldi, O; Pasotti, D; Albergati, M G; Nastasi, G

    1989-01-01

    A case of a patient with large cell pulmonary carcinoma is presented. Being inoperable, the patient was treated at first with multiple drug chemotherapy and the result was the disappearance of the pulmonary lesions. The unusual favourable therapeutic response and the protocols of polychemotherapy used are discussed. PMID:2544780

  1. Epithelioid Glioblastomas and Anaplastic Epithelioid Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytomas-Same Entity or First Cousins?

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, Sanda; Korshunov, Andrey; Lai, Siang Hui; Dabiri, Salma; Patil, Sushama; Li, Rong; Shih, Chie-Schin; Bonnin, Jose M; Baker, Jonathan A; Du, Emma; Scharnhorst, David W; Samuel, David; Ellison, David W; Perry, Arie

    2016-03-01

    Epithelioid glioblastoma (eGBM) and pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) with anaplastically transformed foci (ePXA) show overlapping features. Eleven eGBMs and 5 ePXAs were reviewed and studied immunohistochemically. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for EGFR amplification, PTEN deletion and ODZ3 deletion was also performed, with Ilumina 450 methylome analysis obtained in five cases. The average age for eGBM was 30.9 (range 2-79) years, including five pediatric cases and a M : F ratio of 4.5. The ePXA patients had a M : F ratio of 4 and averaged 21.2 (range 10-38) years in age, including two pediatric cases. Six eGBMs and two ePXAs recurred (median recurrence interval of 12 and 3.3 months, respectively). All tumors were composed of solid sheets of loosely cohesive, "melanoma-like" cells with only limited infiltration. ePXAs showed lower grade foci with classic features of PXA. Both tumor types showed focal expression of epithelial and glial markers, retained INI1 and BRG1 expression, occasional CD34 positivity, and lack of mutant IDH1 (R132H) immunoreactivity. BRAF V600E mutation was present in four eGBMs and four ePXAs. ODZ3 deletion was detected in seven eGBMs and two ePXAs. EGFR amplification was absent. Methylome analysis showed that one ePXA and one eGBM clustered with PXAs, one eGBM clustered with low-grade gliomas, and two eGBMs clustered with pediatric-type glioblastomas. Common histologic, immunohistochemical, molecular and clinical features found in eGBM and ePXA suggest that they are closely related or the same entity. If the latter is true, the nomenclature and WHO grading remains to be resolved. PMID:26238627

  2. Epigenetic deregulation of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene modulates mesenchymal characteristics of oral squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tim Hui-Ming

    2013-01-01

    DNA hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands is associated with epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). We used a methyl-CpG-binding domain protein capture method coupled with next-generation sequencing (MBDCap-seq) to survey global DNA methylation patterns in OSCCs with and without nodal metastasis and normal mucosa (total n = 58). Of 1462 differentially methylated CpG islands identified in OSCCs relative to normal controls, MBDCap-seq profiling uncovered 359 loci linked to lymph node metastasis. Interactive network analysis revealed a subset of these loci (n = 23), including the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene, are potential regulators and effectors of invasiveness and metastatic progression. Promoter methylation of ALK was preferentially observed in OSCCs without node metastasis, whereas relatively lower methylation levels were present in metastatic tumors, implicating an active state of ALK transcription in the latter group. The OSCC cell line, SCC4, displayed reduced ALK expression that corresponded to extensive promoter CpG island methylation. SCC4 treatment with demethylating agents induced ALK expression and increased invasion and migration characteristics. Inhibition of ALK activity in OSCC cells with high ALK expression (CAL27, HSC3 and SCC25), decreased cell growth and resulted in changes in invasive potential and mesenchymal marker expression that were cell-line dependent. Although ALK is susceptible to epigenetic silencing during oral tumorigenesis, overwriting this default state may be necessary for modulating invasive processes involved in nodal metastases. Given the complex response of OSCC cells to ALK inhibition, future studies are required to assess the feasibility of targeting ALK to treat invasive OSCCs. PMID:23568951

  3. An integrative analysis of treatment, outcomes and prognostic factors for primary spinal anaplastic ependymomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peiqin; Sui, Mingxing; Ye, Jingliang; Wan, Zhiping; Chen, Feng; Luo, Chun

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of treatment modalities in primary spinal anaplastic ependymomas (PSAE) and identify promising prognostic factors. PSAE are rare tumors of the central nervous system with poorly understood clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes. We reviewed the literature in PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus databases to identify patients with PSAE. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis and univariate Kaplan-Meier analysis were performed on the PSAE patients and overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were assessed to evaluate the clinical outcomes. Of the 40 patients with PSAE, the tumors were mostly intramedullary (n=19; 47.5%) and frequently involved the thoracic cord (n=25; 62.5%). Eighteen patients suffered recurrence during the follow-up with a median PFS of 24 months. The 1, 2, and 5year OS rates of the PSAE patients were 91.5%, 82.1%, and 63.1%, respectively. Gross total resection (GTR) was independently associated with prolonged PFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.11; p=0.004) and OS (HR 0.11; p=0.003) in the multivariate analysis. Adjuvant radiotherapy also conferred improved PFS (HR 0.15; p=0.008) and OS (HR 0.16; p=0.022). Age, sex, tumor location and chemotherapy did not influence the outcomes in this group. The results of our study suggest that GTR and adjuvant radiotherapy are strong prognostic indicators in patients with PSAE and the role of chemotherapy is yet to be defined. PMID:25769252

  4. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Rearrangement in Digestive Tract Cancer: Implication for Targeted Therapy in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Guo, Lei; Qiu, Tian; Ling, Yun; Shan, Ling; Zhou, Haitao; Zhao, Dongbing; Wang, Jian; Liang, Jianwei; Zhao, Jianjun; Jiao, Yuchen; Lu, Ning; Zhao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements define a subgroup of lung cancer which is eligible to targeted kinase inhibition. The aim of this study is to observe the incidence rate of ALK fusion in a large cohort of Chinese digestive tract cancer patients. Patients and Methods Tissue microarray (TMA) was constructed from 808 digestive tract cancer cases, including 169 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, 182 gastric cancer and 457 colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. We tested all cases for ALK expression via a fully automated immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay. The IHC-positive cases were subjected to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), target gene enrichment and sequencing for confirmation of ALK gene rearrangement and discovery of novel fusion partner. Results Among the tested cases, 2 (0.44%) CRC cases showed positive both by IHC and FISH. By qRT-PCR, EML4–ALK fusion was found in one IHC-positive CRC case. In another IHC-positive CRC case, target gene enrichment and sequencing revealed ALK was fused to a novel partner, spectrin beta non-erythrocytic 1 (SPTBN1). One gastric cancer case showed partially positive IHC result, but no fusion was found by FISH and gene sequencing. Conclusions The incidence rate of ALK gene fusion in Chinese CRC patients was 0.44%,but not detectable in gastric and esophageal cancers. The novel SPTBN1 -ALK fusion, together with other ALK fusion genes, may become a potential target for anti-ALK therapy. PMID:26678488

  5. Single agent nanoparticle for radiotherapy and radio-photothermal therapy in anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Chen, Yunyun; Adachi, Makoto; Wen, Xiaoxia; Erwin, Bill; Mawlawi, Osama; Lai, Stephen Y; Li, Chun

    2015-07-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human malignancies. The aggressive behavior of ATC and its resistance to traditional treatment limit the efficacy of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and surgery. The purpose of this study is aimed at enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy (RT) combined with photothermal therapy (PTT) in murine orthotopic model of ATC, based on our developed single radioactive copper sulfide (CuS) nanoparticle platform. We prepare a new dual-modality therapy for ATC consisting of a single-compartment nanoplatform, polyethylene glycol-coated [(64)Cu]CuS NPs, in which the radiotherapeutic property of (64)Cu is combined with the plasmonic properties of CuS NPs. Mice with Hth83 ATC were treated with PEG-[(64)Cu]CuS NPs and/or near infrared laser. Antitumor effects were assessed by tumor growth and animal survival. We found that in mice bearing orthotopic human Hth83 ATC tumors, micro-PET/CT imaging and biodistribution studies showed that about 50% of the injected dose of PEG-[(64)Cu]CuS NPs was retained in tumor 48 h after intratumoral injection. Human absorbed doses were calculated from biodistribution data. In antitumor experiments, tumor growth was delayed by PEG-[(64)Cu]CuS NP-mediated RT, PTT, and combined RT/PTT, with combined RT/PTT being most effective. In addition, combined RT/PTT significantly prolonged the survival of Hth83 tumor-bearing mice compared to no treatment, laser treatment alone, or NP treatment alone without producing acute toxic effects. These findings indicate that this single-compartment multifunctional NPs platform merits further development as a novel therapeutic agent for ATC. PMID:25913249

  6. International retrospective study of over 1000 adults with anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lassman, Andrew B.; Iwamoto, Fabio M.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Rivera, Andreana L.; Eichler, April F.; Louis, David N.; Paleologos, Nina A.; Fisher, Barbara J.; Ashby, Lynn S.; Cairncross, J. Gregory; Roldán, Gloria B.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Ligon, Keith L.; Schiff, David; Robins, H. Ian; Rocque, Brandon G.; Chamberlain, Marc C.; Mason, Warren P.; Weaver, Susan A.; Green, Richard M.; Kamar, Francois G.; Abrey, Lauren E.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Jhanwar, Suresh C.; Rosenblum, Marc K.; Panageas, Katherine S.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment for newly diagnosed anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors is controversial. Radiotherapy (RT) alone and in combination with chemotherapy (CT) are the most well studied strategies. However, CT alone is often advocated, especially in cases with 1p19q codeletion. We retrospectively identified 1013 adults diagnosed from 1981–2007 treated initially with RT alone (n = 200), CT + RT (n = 528), CT alone (n = 201), or other strategies (n = 84). Median overall survival (OS) was 6.3 years and time to progression (TTP) was 3.1 years. 1p19q codeletion correlated with longer OS and TTP than no 1p or 19q deletion. In codeleted cases, median TTP was longer following CT + RT (7.2 y) than following CT (3.9 y, P = .003) or RT (2.5 y, P < .001) alone but without improved OS; median TTP was longer following treatment with PCV alone than temozolomide alone (7.6 vs. 3.3 y, P = .019). In cases with no deletion, median TTP was longer following CT + RT (3.1 y) than CT (0.9 y, P = .0124) or RT (1.1 y, P < .0001) alone; OS also favored CT + RT (median 5.0 y) over CT (2.2 y, P = .02) or RT (1.9 y, P < .0001) alone. In codeleted cases, CT alone did not appear to shorten OS in comparison with CT + RT, and PCV appeared to offer longer disease control than temozolomide but without a clear survival advantage. Combined CT + RT led to longer disease control and survival than did CT or RT alone in cases with no 1p19q deletion. Ongoing trials will address these issues prospectively. PMID:21636710

  7. SNP Array Analysis Reveals Novel Genomic Abnormalities Including Copy Neutral Loss of Heterozygosity in Anaplastic Oligodendrogliomas

    PubMed Central

    Idbaih, Ahmed; Ducray, François; Dehais, Caroline; Courdy, Célia; Carpentier, Catherine; de Bernard, Simon; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Mokhtari, Karima; Jouvet, Anne; Honnorat, Jérôme; Chinot, Olivier; Ramirez, Carole; Beauchesne, Patrick; Benouaich-Amiel, Alexandra; Godard, Joël; Eimer, Sandrine; Parker, Fabrice; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Colin, Philippe; Loussouarn, Delphine; Faillot, Thierry; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Elouadhani-Hamdi, Selma; Bauchet, Luc; Langlois, Olivier; Le Guerinel, Caroline; Fontaine, Denys; Vauleon, Elodie; Menei, Philippe; Fotso, Marie Janette Motsuo; Desenclos, Christine; Verelle, Pierre; Ghiringhelli, François; Noel, Georges; Labrousse, François; Carpentier, Antoine; Dhermain, Frédéric; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOD) are rare glial tumors in adults with relative homogeneous clinical, radiological and histological features at the time of diagnosis but dramatically various clinical courses. Studies have identified several molecular abnormalities with clinical or biological relevance to AOD (e.g. t(1;19)(q10;p10), IDH1, IDH2, CIC and FUBP1 mutations). To better characterize the clinical and biological behavior of this tumor type, the creation of a national multicentric network, named “Prise en charge des OLigodendrogliomes Anaplasiques (POLA),” has been supported by the Institut National du Cancer (InCA). Newly diagnosed and centrally validated AOD patients and their related biological material (tumor and blood samples) were prospectively included in the POLA clinical database and tissue bank, respectively. At the molecular level, we have conducted a high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis, which included 83 patients. Despite a careful central pathological review, AOD have been found to exhibit heterogeneous genomic features. A total of 82% of the tumors exhibited a 1p/19q-co-deletion, while 18% harbor a distinct chromosome pattern. Novel focal abnormalities, including homozygously deleted, amplified and disrupted regions, have been identified. Recurring copy neutral losses of heterozygosity (CNLOH) inducing the modulation of gene expression have also been discovered. CNLOH in the CDKN2A locus was associated with protein silencing in 1/3 of the cases. In addition, FUBP1 homozygous deletion was detected in one case suggesting a putative tumor suppressor role of FUBP1 in AOD. Our study showed that the genomic and pathological analyses of AOD are synergistic in detecting relevant clinical and biological subgroups of AOD. PMID:23071531

  8. A spindle cell anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma with rhabdoid features following curative resection

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Tomoyuki; Amano, Hironobu; Hanada, Keiji; Okazaki, Akihisa; Yonehara, Shuji; Kuranishi, Fumito; Nakahara, Masahiro; Kuroda, Yoshinori; Noriyuki, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma (ANPC) accounts for ~5% of all pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cases. Due to its rarity, its clinical features and surgical outcomes remain to be clearly understood. A 74-year-old woman was admitted to Onomichi General Hospital (Onomichi, Japan) in April 2015 without any significant past medical history. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed a 9.5×8.0 cm tumor in the body and tail of the pancreas. The patient developed acute abdominal pain 3 weeks later and the CT revealed massive abdominal bleeding caused by tumor rupture. The tumor increased in size and reached 12.0×10.0 cm in maximal diameter. The tumor doubling time was estimated to be 13 days. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT confirmed the absence of distant metastasis since FDG accumulation was detected only in the tumor lesion. Emergency distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy were performed. Histologically, the tumor was classified as a spindle cell ANPC with rhabdoid features. The patient succumbed to mortality 8 months following the surgery while undergoing systemic adjuvant chemotherapy for multiple liver metastases. ANPC is difficult to detect in the early stages due to its progressive nature and atypical radiological findings. Long-term survival can be achieved only by curative resection; therefore, surgical resection must be performed whenever possible, even if the chance of long-term survival following surgery is considered dismal. As the present case suggested, spindle cell ANPC with rhabdoid features is highly aggressive and curative-intent resection must not be delayed. PMID:27446572

  9. Anaplastic astrocytoma mimicking herpes simplex encephalitis in 13-year old girl.

    PubMed

    Talathi, Saurabh; Gupta, Neha; Reddivalla, Naresh; Prokhorov, Sergey; Gold, Menachem

    2015-11-01

    Astrocytoma is the most common childhood brain tumor. Anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) are high grade gliomas (HGG), found very rarely in pediatric patients. AA mainly results from a dedifferentiation of a low grade astrocytoma. Clinical features of supra-tentorial tumors vary according to their anatomic location, biologic aggressiveness and age of the patient. They can be either completely asymptomatic or present with signs of raised intracranial pressure, seizures (about 40% of cases), behavior changes, speech disorders, declining school performance, or hemiparesis. There have been published adult cases of brain tumor misdiagnosed as viral encephalitis. Due to variety of clinical presentations, diagnosis of AA can be challenging. Here we report a case of a 13 year old girl who presented with clinical features suggestive of viral encephalitis, such as fever, headache, dizziness, and first seizure with postictal sleep and prolonged drowsiness. However, her brain MRI findings were consistent with long standing mass effect from the underlying intracranial contents and that coupled with her history of unusual taste led to further investigations and the diagnosis of the AA. In retrospect, this presentation could have been a temporal epileptic aura. High grade astrocytomas are particularly difficult to treat with a two-year survival rates range from 10% to 30%. The treatment is multimodal with gross total surgical resection of the tumor, followed by radiotherapy with or without nitrosourea-containing chemotherapy regimen. Recent promising results seen with the use of temozolamide in adults has not been yet demonstrated in the pediatric patients. The extent of tumor resection remains the most significant indicator of survival and early recognition of this tumor is essential. This case report emphasizes the fact that mass lesions in the temporal lobe, including high-grade astrocytoma, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of suspected herpes simplex encephalitis

  10. Jelly Belly Trans-Synaptic Signaling to Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Regulates Neurotransmission Strength and Synapse Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbough, Jeffrey; Kent, Karla S.; Broadie, Kendal; Weiss, Joseph B.

    2012-01-01

    In Drosophila the secreted signaling molecule Jelly Belly (Jeb) activates Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (Alk), a receptor tyrosine kinase, in multiple developmental and adult contexts. We have shown previously that Jeb and Alk are highly enriched at Drosophila synapses within the CNS neuropil and neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and postulated a conserved intercellular signaling function. At the embryonic and larval NMJ Jeb is localized in the motor neuron presynaptic terminal whereas Alk is concentrated in the muscle postsynaptic domain surrounding boutons, consistent with anterograde trans-synaptic signaling. Here, we show by functional inhibition of Jeb-Alk signaling that neurotransmission is regulated by Jeb secretion. Jeb is a novel negative regulator of neuromuscular transmission. Reduction or inhibtion of Alk function results in enhanced synaptic transmission. Activation of Alk conversely inhibits synaptic transmission. Restoration of wildtype postsynaptic Alk expression in Alk partial loss-of-function mutants rescues NMJ transmission phenotypes and confirms that postsynaptic Alk regulates NMJ transmission. The effects of impaired Alk signaling on neurotransmission are observed in the absence of associated changes in NMJ structure. Complete removal of Jeb in motor neurons, however, disrupts both presynaptic bouton architecture and postsynaptic differentiation. Non-physiologic activation of Alk signaling also negatively regulates NMJ growth. Activation of Jeb-Alk signaling triggers the Ras-MAP kinase cascade in both pre- and postsynaptic compartments. These novel roles for Jeb-Alk signaling in the modulation of synaptic function and structure have potential implications for recently reported Alk functions in human addiction, retention of spatial memory, cognitive dysfunction in neurofibromatosis and the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:22949158

  11. Characterization of the mutational landscape of anaplastic thyroid cancer via whole-exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kunstman, John W.; Juhlin, C. Christofer; Goh, Gerald; Brown, Taylor C.; Stenman, Adam; Healy, James M.; Rubinstein, Jill C.; Choi, Murim; Kiss, Nimrod; Nelson-Williams, Carol; Mane, Shrikant; Rimm, David L.; Prasad, Manju L.; Höög, Anders; Zedenius, Jan; Larsson, Catharina; Korah, Reju; Lifton, Richard P.; Carling, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is a frequently lethal malignancy that is often unresponsive to available therapeutic strategies. The tumorigenesis of ATC and its relationship to the widely prevalent well-differentiated thyroid carcinomas are unclear. We have analyzed 22 cases of ATC as well as 4 established ATC cell lines using whole-exome sequencing. A total of 2674 somatic mutations (121/sample) were detected. Ontology analysis revealed that the majority of variants aggregated in the MAPK, ErbB and RAS signaling pathways. Mutations in genes related to malignancy not previously associated with thyroid tumorigenesis were observed, including mTOR, NF1, NF2, MLH1, MLH3, MSH5, MSH6, ERBB2, EIF1AX and USH2A; some of which were recurrent and were investigated in 24 additional ATC cases and 8 ATC cell lines. Somatic mutations in established thyroid cancer genes were detected in 14 of 22 (64%) tumors and included recurrent mutations in BRAF, TP53 and RAS-family genes (6 cases each), as well as PIK3CA (2 cases) and single cases of CDKN1B, CDKN2C, CTNNB1 and RET mutations. BRAF V600E and RAS mutations were mutually exclusive; all ATC cell lines exhibited a combination of mutations in either BRAF and TP53 or NRAS and TP53. A hypermutator phenotype in two cases with >8 times higher mutational burden than the remaining mean was identified; both cases harbored unique somatic mutations in MLH mismatch-repair genes. This first comprehensive exome-wide analysis of the mutational landscape of ATC identifies novel genes potentially associated with ATC tumorigenesis, some of which may be targets for future therapeutic intervention. PMID:25576899

  12. Primary large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma in the common bile duct: First Asian case report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Bae; Moon, Suk Bae; Ryu, Young Joon; Hong, Jeana; Kim, Yang Hee; Chae, Gi Bong; Hong, Seong Kweon

    2014-01-01

    Large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) in the biliary system is a poorly differentiated, high-grade neuroendocrine tumor. These tumors exhibit aggressive behavior and an increased tendency for early nodal and distant metastases. Herein, we report an unusual case of a pure primary LCNEC of the common bile duct (CBD). A 75-year-old female presented with nausea and jaundice. The patient underwent a CBD excision with lymph node dissection. Upon histological and immunohistochemical examination, the tumor exhibited pure large cell-type neuroendocrine features. Metastases were noted in two of the eight lymph nodes. The patient was administered adjuvant chemotherapy. The patient’s cancer recurred 7 mo after surgery, and the patient died from liver failure 5 mo after recurrence. The prognosis of LCNEC of CBD remains poor despite curative resection and adjuvant chemotherapy. The role of additional therapies, such as multimodal treatment including radiation therapy, must be further studied to improve the prognoses of patients. PMID:25548506

  13. Large-Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Esophagus: A Case from Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Kuriry, Hadi; Swied, Abdul Monem

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinomas of the esophagus are very rare, and the majority are high grade (poorly differentiated). They occur most frequently in males in their sixth and seventh decades of life. There have been no concrete data published on clinical features or on prognosis. We report a case of large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the esophagus in a 66-year-old Saudi female with progressive dysphagia and weight loss. Upper endoscopy revealed an esophageal ulcerated mass. PMID:26600769

  14. Discovery of Clinical Candidate CEP-37440, a Selective Inhibitor of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK).

    PubMed

    Ott, Gregory R; Cheng, Mangeng; Learn, Keith S; Wagner, Jason; Gingrich, Diane E; Lisko, Joseph G; Curry, Matthew; Mesaros, Eugen F; Ghose, Arup K; Quail, Matthew R; Wan, Weihua; Lu, Lihui; Dobrzanski, Pawel; Albom, Mark S; Angeles, Thelma S; Wells-Knecht, Kevin; Huang, Zeqi; Aimone, Lisa D; Bruckheimer, Elizabeth; Anderson, Nathan; Friedman, Jay; Fernandez, Sandra V; Ator, Mark A; Ruggeri, Bruce A; Dorsey, Bruce D

    2016-08-25

    Analogues structurally related to anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor 1 were optimized for metabolic stability. The results from this endeavor not only led to improved metabolic stability, pharmacokinetic parameters, and in vitro activity against clinically derived resistance mutations but also led to the incorporation of activity for focal adhesion kinase (FAK). FAK activation, via amplification and/or overexpression, is characteristic of multiple invasive solid tumors and metastasis. The discovery of the clinical stage, dual FAK/ALK inhibitor 27b, including details surrounding SAR, in vitro/in vivo pharmacology, and pharmacokinetics, is reported herein. PMID:27527804

  15. Anaplastic Ependymoma in a Child With Sickle Cell Anemia: A Case Report Highlighting Treatment Challenges for Young Children With Central Nervous System Tumors and Underlying Vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Crotty, Erin E; Meier, Emily R; Wells, Elizabeth M; Hwang, Eugene I; Packer, Roger J

    2016-03-01

    A 3-year-old boy with sickle cell anemia (SCA) presented with progressive daily emesis and was found to have an anaplastic ependymoma. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy are usually employed after subtotal resections of anaplastic ependymomas, although the benefits from chemotherapy are unclear. To mitigate the risks of adjuvant treatment in this patient at risk for SCA-associated vasculopathy, renal impairment, and other end-organ damage, proton beam irradiation without chemotherapy was chosen. Scheduled packed red blood cell transfusions were instituted to maintain sickle hemoglobin levels less than 30%. This case highlights treatment complexities for malignant brain tumors in patients predisposed to treatment-related adverse effects. PMID:26488903

  16. Thyrocyte-specific inactivation of p53 and Pten results in anaplastic thyroid carcinomas faithfully recapitulating human tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dima, Mariavittoria; Kang, Kristy S.; Dasrath, Florence; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Refetoff, Samuel; Montagna, Cristina; Di Cristofano, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is the most aggressive form of thyroid cancer, and often derives from pre-existing well-differentiated tumors. Despite a relatively low prevalence, it accounts for a disproportionate number of thyroid cancer-related deaths, due to its resistance to any therapeutic approach. Here we describe the first mouse model of ATC, obtained by combining in the mouse thyroid follicular cells two molecular hallmarks of human ATC: activation of PI3K (via Pten deletion) and inactivation of p53. By 9 months of age, over 75% of the compound mutant mice develop aggressive, undifferentiated thyroid tumors that evolve from pre-existing follicular hyperplasia and carcinoma. These tumors display all the features of their human counterpart, including pleomorphism, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, aneuploidy, local invasion, and distant metastases. Expression profiling of the murine ATCs reveals a significant overlap with genes found deregulated in human ATC, including genes involved in mitosis control. Furthermore, similar to the human tumors, [Pten, p53]thyr−/− tumors and cells are highly glycolytic and remarkably sensitive to glycolysis inhibitors, which synergize with standard chemotherapy. Taken together, our results show that combined PI3K activation and p53 loss faithfully reproduce the development of thyroid anaplastic carcinomas, and provide a compelling rationale for targeting glycolysis to increase chemotherapy response in ATC patients. PMID:22190384

  17. A North American brain tumor consortium phase II study of poly-ICLC for adult patients with recurrent anaplastic gliomas.

    PubMed

    Butowski, Nicholas; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Lee, Bee L; Prados, Michael D; Cloughesy, Timothy; DeAngelis, Lisa M; Abrey, Lauren; Fink, Karen; Lieberman, Frank; Mehta, Minesh; Ian Robins, H; Junck, Larry; Salazar, Andres M; Chang, Susan M

    2009-01-01

    This phase II study was designed to determine the objective response rate and 6-month progression free survival of adult patients with recurrent supratentorial anaplastic glioma when treated with the immune modulator, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid stabilized with polylysine and carboxymethylcellulose (poly-ICLC). This was an open-labeled, single arm phase II study. Patients were treated with poly-ICLC alone. Patients may have had treatment for no more than two prior relapses. Treatment with poly-ICLC continued until tumor progression. Fifty five patients were enrolled in the study. Ten were ineligible after central review of pathology. Eleven percent of patients (5 of 45) had a radiographic response. Time to progression was known for 39 patients and 6 remain on treatment. The estimated 6-month progression free survival was 24%. The median survival time was 43 weeks. Poly-ICLC was well tolerated, but there was no improvement in 6-month progression free survival compared to historical database nor was there an encouraging objective radiographic response rate. Based on this study, poly-ICLC does not improve 6moPFS in patients with recurrent anaplastic gliomas but may be worth further study in combination with agents such as temozolomide. PMID:18850068

  18. A North American brain tumor consortium phase II study of Poly-ICLC for adult patients with recurrent anaplastic gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Butowski, Nicholas; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Lee, Bee L; Prados, Michael D.; Cloughesy, Timothy; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Abrey, Lauren; Fink, Karen; Lieberman, Frank; Mehta, Minesh; Robins, H. Ian; Junck, Larry; Salazar, Andres M.; Chang, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This phase II study was designed to determine the objective response rate and 6-month progression free survival of adult patients with recurrent supratentorial anaplastic glioma when treated with the immune modulator, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid stabilized with polylysine and carboxymethylcellulose (poly-ICLC). Methods and Materials This was an open-labeled, single arm phase II study. Patients were treated with poly-ICLC alone. Patients may have had treatment for no more than two prior relapses. Treatment with poly-ICLC continued until tumor progression. Results 55 patients were enrolled in the study. 10 were ineligible after central review of pathology. 11% of patients (5 of 45) had a radiographic response. Time to progression was known for 39 patients and 6 remain on treatment. The estimated 6-month progression free survival was 24%. The median survival time was 43 weeks. Conclusions Poly-ICLC was well tolerated, but there was no improvement in 6-month progression free survival compared to historical database nor was there an encouraging objective radiographic response rate. Based on this study, poly-ICLC does not improve 6moPFS in patients with recurrent anaplastic gliomas but may be worth further study in combination with agents such as temozolomide. PMID:18850068

  19. A model of a patient-derived IDH1 mutant anaplastic astrocytoma with alternative lengthening of telomeres.

    PubMed

    Borodovsky, Alexandra; Meeker, Alan K; Kirkness, Ewen F; Zhao, Qi; Eberhart, Charles G; Gallia, Gary L; Riggins, Gregory J

    2015-02-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) have been found in the vast majority of low grade and progressive infiltrating gliomas and are characterized by the production of 2-hydroxyglutarate from α-ketoglutarate. Recent investigations of malignant gliomas have identified additional genetic and chromosomal abnormalities which cluster with IDH1 mutations into two distinct subgroups. The astrocytic subgroup was found to have frequent mutations in ATRX, TP53 and displays alternative lengthening of telomeres. The second subgroup with oligodendrocytic morphology has frequent mutations in CIC or FUBP1, and is linked to co-deletion of the 1p/19q arms. These mutations reflect the development of two distinct molecular pathways representing the majority of IDH1 mutant gliomas. Unfortunately, due to the scarcity of endogenously derived IDH1 mutant models, there is a lack of accurate models to study mechanism and develop new therapy. Here we report the generation of an endogenous IDH1 anaplastic astrocytoma in vivo model with concurrent mutations in TP53, CDKN2A and ATRX. The model has a similar phenotype and histopathology as the original patient tumor, expresses the IDH1 (R132H) mutant protein and exhibits an alternative lengthening of telomeres phenotype. The JHH-273 model is characteristic of anaplastic astrocytoma and represents a valuable tool for investigating the pathogenesis of this distinct molecular subset of gliomas and for preclinical testing of compounds targeting IDH1 mutations or alternative lengthening of telomeres. PMID:25471051

  20. Genomic and transcriptomic hallmarks of poorly differentiated and anaplastic thyroid cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahimpasic, Tihana; Boucai, Laura; Shah, Ronak H.; Dogan, Snjezana; Ricarte-Filho, Julio C.; Krishnamoorthy, Gnana P.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Berger, Michael F.; Sander, Chris; Taylor, Barry S.; Ghossein, Ronald; Ganly, Ian; Fagin, James A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC) and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) are rare and frequently lethal tumors that so far have not been subjected to comprehensive genetic characterization. METHODS. We performed next-generation sequencing of 341 cancer genes from 117 patient-derived PDTCs and ATCs and analyzed the transcriptome of a representative subset of 37 tumors. Results were analyzed in the context of The Cancer Genome Atlas study (TCGA study) of papillary thyroid cancers (PTC). RESULTS. Compared to PDTCs, ATCs had a greater mutation burden, including a higher frequency of mutations in TP53, TERT promoter, PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway effectors, SWI/SNF subunits, and histone methyltransferases. BRAF and RAS were the predominant drivers and dictated distinct tropism for nodal versus distant metastases in PDTC. RAS and BRAF sharply distinguished between PDTCs defined by the Turin (PDTC-Turin) versus MSKCC (PDTC-MSK) criteria, respectively. Mutations of EIF1AX, a component of the translational preinitiation complex, were markedly enriched in PDTCs and ATCs and had a striking pattern of co-occurrence with RAS mutations. While TERT promoter mutations were rare and subclonal in PTCs, they were clonal and highly prevalent in advanced cancers. Application of the TCGA-derived BRAF-RAS score (a measure of MAPK transcriptional output) revealed a preserved relationship with BRAF/RAS mutation in PDTCs, whereas ATCs were BRAF-like irrespective of driver mutation. CONCLUSIONS. These data support a model of tumorigenesis whereby PDTCs and ATCs arise from well-differentiated tumors through the accumulation of key additional genetic abnormalities, many of which have prognostic and possible therapeutic relevance. The widespread genomic disruptions in ATC compared with PDTC underscore their greater virulence and higher mortality. FUNDING. This work was supported in part by NIH grants CA50706, CA72597, P50-CA72012, P30-CA008748, and 5T32-CA160001; the Lefkovsky Family

  1. Differential pattern of integrin receptor expression in differentiated and anaplastic thyroid cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, S; Maschuw, K; Hassan, I; Reckzeh, B; Wunderlich, A; Lingelbach, S; Zielke, A

    2005-09-01

    Adhesion of tumor cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a crucial step for the development of metastatic disease and is mediated by specific integrin receptor molecules (IRM). The pattern of metastatic spread differs substantially among the various histotypes of thyroid cancer (TC). However, IRM have only occasionally been characterized in TC until now. IRM expression was investigated in 10 differentiated (FTC133, 236, 238, HTC, HTC TSHr, XTC, PTC4.0/4.2, TPC1, Kat5) and two anaplastic TC cell lines (ATC, C643, Hth74), primary cultures of normal thyroid tissue (Thy1,3), and thyroid cancer specimens (TCS). Expression of 16 IRM (beta1-4, beta7, alpha1-6, alphaV, alphaIIb, alphaL, alphaM, alphaX) and of four IRM heterodimers (alpha2beta1, alpha5beta1, alphaVbeta3, alphaVbeta5), was analyzed by fluorescent-activated cell sorter (FACS) and immunohistochemical staining. Thyroid tumor cell adhesion to ECM proteins and their IRM expression in response to thyrotropin (TSH) was assessed. Follicular TC cell lines presented high levels of integrins alpha2, alpha3, alpha5, beta1, beta3 and low levels of alpha1, whereas papillary lines expressed a heterogenous pattern of IRM, dominated by alpha5 and beta1. ATC mainly displayed integrins alpha2, alpha3, alpha5, alpha6, beta1 and low levels of alpha1, alpha4 and alphaV. Integrin heterodimers correlated with monomer expression. Evaluation of TCS largely confirmed these results with few exceptions, namely alpha4, alpha6, and beta3. The ability of TC cell lines to adhere to purified ECM proteins correlated with IRM expression. TSH induced TC cell adhesion in a dose-dependent fashion, despite an unchanged array of IRM expression or level of a particular IRM. Thyroid carcinoma cell lines of different histogenetic background display profoundly different patterns of IRM expression that appear to correlate with tumor aggressiveness. In vitro adhesion to ECM proteins and IRM expression concur. Finally, TSH-stimulated adhesion of

  2. ALK-Positive Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor of the Nipple During Pregnancy-An Unusual Presentation of a Rare Disease.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Anikó; Máthé, Gyöngyvér; Mattsson, Jan; Stenman, Göran; Kindblom, Lars-Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMT) is a benign to low-grade malignant neoplasm most commonly occurring in the viscera and soft tissues of children and young adults. Involvement of the breast is very rare. This report presents the first case of IMT of the nipple and highlights the histologic features and differential diagnosis at this unusual anatomical site. The patient was a 31-years-old pregnant woman with a palpable mass at the upper half of the left nipple. The lesion appeared after breastfeeding of her first child and increased in size during her second pregnancy. A conservative, incomplete surgical excision was performed in the 24th week of the second pregnancy. The residual tumor subsequently underwent spontaneous regression. There was no evidence of disease 5 years after surgery. FISH and immunohistochemical analyses revealed rearrangement and overexpression of the ALK gene, a typical feature of both pulmonary and extrapulmonary IMT. PMID:25772857

  3. Therapeutic options in peripheral T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaping; Xu, Wei; Liu, Hong; Li, Jianyong

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL) is a rare and heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin lymphomas with a very poor prognosis. The standard first-line treatments have resulted in unsatisfactory patient outcomes. With the exception of low-risk anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), the majority of patients relapse rapidly; the current 5-year overall survival rates are only 10-30%. Novel targeted therapies and combination chemotherapies are required for the treatment of patients with PTCL. In recent years, some retrospective and prospective studies have been performed concerning PTCL. Consequently, a number of novel agents and their relevant combination therapies have been identified, including histone deacetylase inhibitors, immunoconjugates, antifolates, monoclonal antibodies, immunomodulatory agents, nucleoside analogs, proteasome inhibitors, kinase inhibitors, bendamustine, L-asparaginase, and other targeted agents. It is hoped that these innovative approaches will finally improve outcomes in patients with PTCL. This review summarizes the currently available approaches for the treatment of PTCL with an emphasis on potential new agents, including the role of stem cell transplantation. PMID:27071634

  4. Identification of a new subclass of ALK-negative ALCL expressing aberrant levels of ERBB4 transcripts.

    PubMed

    Scarfò, Irene; Pellegrino, Elisa; Mereu, Elisabetta; Kwee, Ivo; Agnelli, Luca; Bergaggio, Elisa; Garaffo, Giulia; Vitale, Nicoletta; Caputo, Manuel; Machiorlatti, Rodolfo; Circosta, Paola; Abate, Francesco; Barreca, Antonella; Novero, Domenico; Mathew, Susan; Rinaldi, Andrea; Tiacci, Enrico; Serra, Sara; Deaglio, Silvia; Neri, Antonino; Falini, Brunangelo; Rabadan, Raul; Bertoni, Francesco; Inghirami, Giorgio; Piva, Roberto

    2016-01-14

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a clinical and biological heterogeneous disease that includes systemic anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive and ALK-negative entities. To discover biomarkers and/or genes involved in ALK-negative ALCL pathogenesis, we applied the cancer outlier profile analysis algorithm to a gene expression profiling data set including 249 cases of T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and normal T cells. Ectopic coexpression of ERBB4 and COL29A1 genes was detected in 24% of ALK-negative ALCL patients. RNA sequencing and 5' RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of complementary DNA ends identified 2 novel ERBB4-truncated transcripts displaying intronic transcription start sites. By luciferase assays, we defined that the expression of ERBB4-aberrant transcripts is promoted by endogenous intronic long terminal repeats. ERBB4 expression was confirmed at the protein level by western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Lastly, we demonstrated that ERBB4-truncated forms show oncogenic potentials and that ERBB4 pharmacologic inhibition partially controls ALCL cell growth and disease progression in an ERBB4-positive patient-derived tumorgraft model. In conclusion, we identified a new subclass of ALK-negative ALCL characterized by aberrant expression of ERBB4-truncated transcripts carrying intronic 5' untranslated regions. PMID:26463425

  5. Folliculotropic mycosis fungoides with large-cell transformation presenting as dissecting cellulitis of the scalp.

    PubMed

    Gilliam, A C; Lessin, S R; Wilson, D M; Salhany, K E

    1997-03-01

    Follicular mycosis fungoides (MF) is a rare variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) in which malignant lymphocytes preferentially infiltrate hair follicles. This report describes a patient with follicular mycosis fungoides presenting in a manner similar to dissecting cellulitis of the scalp with nonhealing, draining nodular lesions. Follicular mucinosis associated with folliculotropic mycosis fungoides resulted in follicular disruption and deep dissecting cellulitis. Large-cell transformation of CTCL was present in the initial diagnostic scalp and axillary lymph node specimens. The patient died from progressive CTCL 9 months following initial diagnosis despite electron beam radiation, topical mechlorethamine, interferon-alpha, and systemic chemotherapy. This case indicates that large-cell transformation of folliculotropic mycosis fungoides is an aggressive form of CTCL, and that folliculotropic mycosis fungoides can give rise to lesions which resemble dissecting cellulitis of the scalp. Upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on follicular epithelium adjacent to lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1)-positive folliculotropic lymphoma cells in this report provides insight into lymphocyte homing mechanisms in folliculotropic MF. PMID:9085153

  6. SGN-35 in CD30-positive Lymphoproliferative Disorders (ALCL), Mycosis Fungoides (MF), and Extensive Lymphomatoid Papulosis (LyP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-14

    CD-30 Positive Anaplastic Large T-cell Cutaneous Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell; Lymphomatoid Papulosis; Mycosis Fungoides; Skin Lymphoma; Cutaneous Lymphomas; Lymphoma; Hematologic Disorder

  7. Successful palliative approach with high-intensity focused ultrasound in a patient with metastatic anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ungaro, Antonio; Orsi, Franco; Casadio, Chiara; Galdy, Salvatore; Spada, Francesca; Cella, Chiara Alessandra; Tonno, Clementina Di; Bonomo, Guido; Vigna, Paolo Della; Murgioni, Sabina; Frezza, Anna Maria; Fazio, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 74-year-old man with a metastatic anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma (APC). After an early tumour progression on first-line chemotherapy with cisplatin and gemcitabine, even though it was badly tolerated, he was treated with a combination of systemic modified FOLFIRI and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on the pancreatic mass. A tumour showing partial response with a clinical benefit was obtained. HIFU was preferred to radiotherapy because of its shorter course and minimal side effects, in order to improve the patient’s clinical conditions. The patient is currently on chemotherapy, asymptomatic with a good performance status. In referral centres, with specific expertise, HIFU could be safely and successfully combined with systemic chemotherapy for treatment of metastatic pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27170835

  8. Successful palliative approach with high-intensity focused ultrasound in a patient with metastatic anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ungaro, Antonio; Orsi, Franco; Casadio, Chiara; Galdy, Salvatore; Spada, Francesca; Cella, Chiara Alessandra; Tonno, Clementina Di; Bonomo, Guido; Vigna, Paolo Della; Murgioni, Sabina; Frezza, Anna Maria; Fazio, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 74-year-old man with a metastatic anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma (APC). After an early tumour progression on first-line chemotherapy with cisplatin and gemcitabine, even though it was badly tolerated, he was treated with a combination of systemic modified FOLFIRI and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on the pancreatic mass. A tumour showing partial response with a clinical benefit was obtained. HIFU was preferred to radiotherapy because of its shorter course and minimal side effects, in order to improve the patient's clinical conditions. The patient is currently on chemotherapy, asymptomatic with a good performance status. In referral centres, with specific expertise, HIFU could be safely and successfully combined with systemic chemotherapy for treatment of metastatic pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27170835

  9. The hsp70 inhibitor VER155008 induces paraptosis requiring de novo protein synthesis in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si Hyoung; Kang, Jun Goo; Kim, Chul Sik; Ihm, Sung-Hee; Choi, Moon Gi; Yoo, Hyung Joon; Lee, Seong Jin

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of the hsp70 inhibitor VER155008 on survival of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) cells. In ATC cells, VER155008 increased the percentages of dead cells and vacuolated cells. VER155008 did not lead to the cleavage of caspase-3 protein regardless of pretreatment with z-VAD-fmk. VER155008 increased LC3-II protein levels but the protein levels were not changed by autophagy inhibitors. VER155008 caused the dilatation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and the increased mRNA levels of Bip and CHOP, suggesting paraptosis. VER155008-induced paraptosis was attenuated by pretreatment with cycloheximide. In conclusion, VER155008 induces paraptosis characterized by cytoplasmic vacuolation, independence of caspase, dilatation of ER and induction of ER stress markers in ATC cells. Moreover, VER155008-induced paraptosis requires de novo protein synthesis in ATC cells. PMID:25450359

  10. Anaplastic plasmacytomas: relationships to normal memory B cells and plasma cell neoplasms of immunodeficient and autoimmune mice.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chen-Feng; Shin, Dong-Mi; Li, Zhaoyang; Wang, Hongsheng; Feng, Jianxum; Hartley, Janet W; Fredrickson, Torgny N; Kovalchuk, Alexander L; Morse, Herbert C

    2010-05-01

    Anaplastic plasmacytomas (APCTs) from NFS.V(+) congenic mice and pristane-induced plasmacytic PCTs from BALB/c mice were previously shown to be histologically and molecularly distinct subsets of plasma cell neoplasms (PCNs). Here we extended these comparisons, contrasting primary APCTs and PCTs by gene expression profiling in relation to the expression profiles of normal naïve, germinal centre, and memory B cells and plasma cells. We also sequenced immunoglobulin genes from APCT and APCT-derived cell lines and defined surface phenotypes and chromosomal features of the cell lines by flow cytometry and by spectral karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The results indicate that APCTs share many features with normal memory cells and the plasma cell-related neoplasms (PLs) of FASL-deficient mice, suggesting that APCTs and PLs are related and that both derive from memory B cells. Published in 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:20217872

  11. Non-anaplastic peripheral T cell lymphoma in children and adolescents-an international review of 143 cases.

    PubMed

    Mellgren, K; Attarbaschi, A; Abla, O; Alexander, S; Bomken, S; Bubanska, E; Chiang, A; Csóka, M; Fedorova, A; Kabickova, E; Kapuscinska-Kemblowska, L; Kobayashi, R; Krenova, Z; Meyer-Wentrup, F; Miakova, N; Pillon, M; Plat, G; Uyttebroeck, A; Williams, D; Wróbel, G; Kontny, U

    2016-08-01

    Peripheral T cell lymphomas (PTCL) are rare in children and adolescents, and data about outcome and treatment results are scarce. The present study is a joint, international, retrospective analysis of 143 reported cases of non-anaplastic PTCL in patients <19 years of age, with a focus on treatment and outcome features. One hundred forty-three patients, between 0.3 and 18.7 years old, diagnosed between 2000 and 2015 were included in the study. PTCL not otherwise specified was the largest subgroup, followed by extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, hepatosplenic T cell lymphoma (HS TCL), and subcutaneous panniculitis-like T cell lymphoma (SP TCL). Probability of overall survival (pOS) at 5 years for the whole group was 0.56 ± 0.05, and probability of event-free survival was (pEFS) 0.45 ± 0.05. Patients with SP TCL had a good outcome with 5-year pOS of 0.78 ± 0.1 while patients with HS TCL were reported with 5-year pOS of only 0.13 ± 0.12. Twenty-five percent of the patients were reported to have a pre-existing condition, and this group had a dismal outcome with 5-year pOS of 0.29 ± 0.09. The distribution of non-anaplastic PTCL subtypes in pediatric and adolescent patients differs from what is reported in adult patients. Overall outcome depends on the subtype with some doing better than others. Pre-existing conditions are frequent and associated with poor outcomes. There is a clear need for subtype-based treatment recommendations for children and adolescents with PTCL. PMID:27270301

  12. Progression after spontaneous regression in lung large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma: Report of a curative resection.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Kenji; Suda, Kenichi; Takemoto, Toshiki; Iwasaki, Takuya; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2015-09-01

    We present the first reported case of lung large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) with spontaneous regression followed by progression. An 85-year-old woman presented with a 2.8-cm nodule in the right upper lung lobe on chest computed tomography. After four months, the tumor decreased to 1.8 cm and remained unchanged in size for the next three months, but it grew to 8.6 cm and invaded the mediastinal fat tissue after approximately one year. Ultrasound echo-guided percutaneous biopsy revealed the tumor to be LCNEC. The patient underwent a right upper lobectomy with lymph node dissection. She had a good postoperative course with no complications. Physicians and surgeons should be aware that radiographic regression of a pulmonary nodule does not necessarily exclude the possibility of lung cancer. PMID:26443884

  13. Progression after spontaneous regression in lung large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma: Report of a curative resection

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Kenji; Suda, Kenichi; Takemoto, Toshiki; Iwasaki, Takuya; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    We present the first reported case of lung large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) with spontaneous regression followed by progression. An 85-year-old woman presented with a 2.8-cm nodule in the right upper lung lobe on chest computed tomography. After four months, the tumor decreased to 1.8 cm and remained unchanged in size for the next three months, but it grew to 8.6 cm and invaded the mediastinal fat tissue after approximately one year. Ultrasound echo-guided percutaneous biopsy revealed the tumor to be LCNEC. The patient underwent a right upper lobectomy with lymph node dissection. She had a good postoperative course with no complications. Physicians and surgeons should be aware that radiographic regression of a pulmonary nodule does not necessarily exclude the possibility of lung cancer. PMID:26443884

  14. A prospective study of the LMB regimen for diffuse large cell non Hodgkin's lymphoma in adults.

    PubMed

    Voog, E; Sebban, C; Biron, P; Philip, T; Blay, J Y

    2000-02-01

    Although the CHOP regimen remains a standard first line chemotherapy for diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL) in adults, a majority of these patients will still experience disease progression after the completion of this treatment. The LMB protocol is an intensive chemotherapy regimen which yields high survival rates in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) and diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL) in children, as well as in primary cerebral DLCL (PCL) of adults. Here, we report the long term results of this regimen in a prospective series of 22 adult patients with DLCL excluding PCL. Fifteen male and 7 female patients with a median age of 30 years (range: 20-55) were treated prospectively between 1988 and 1993. 16 (72%) patients had an age adjusted International Pronostic Index (IPI) > or = 1. The median duration of the treatment was 15 weeks (range 13-19). Nineteen of the 22 patients (87%) experienced an objective response (14 complete, and 5 partial responses) at the end of the protocol. The predominant toxicity was myelosuppression: 89% of the COPADEM courses were followed by grade IV neutropenia and 5% with grade IV infection. One patient died (4%) of treatment related toxicity. With a median follow-up of 94 months and a minimum follow-up of 65 months, 8-year overall and progression-free survival are 73% and 67% respectively. The 8 year overall survival were 100%, 78% and 42% in patients with an IPI 0, 1, and 2-3 respectively. This short intensive regimen yields promising long term survival rates in this monocentric prospective study and may deserve to be tested in a larger multicentric prospective study comparing it to the CHOP regimen. PMID:10784397

  15. Transformation to SCLC after Treatment with the ALK Inhibitor Alectinib.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Shiro; Masago, Katsuhiro; Katakami, Nobuyuki; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2016-06-01

    We report an anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase gene (ALK)-positive patient who showed a paradoxical response to the ALK inhibitor alectinib; the primary lesion increased in size, whereas other metastatic lesions decreased markedly. A biopsy of the primary lesion confirmed an ALK rearrangement; however, the tumor had transformed histologically into small cell lung cancer. The lack of reports of small cell lung cancer transformation in ALK-positive patients implies that this outcome was unusual; this patient was treated with alectinib, which is more selective and has a greater inhibitory effect than crizotinib. This case may reveal resistance mechanisms that differ according to the agent used for treatment. PMID:26751586

  16. Maintenance therapy with interferon alfa 2b in patients with diffuse large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Díaz-Maqueo, J C; García, E L; Talavera, A; Guzmán, R

    1992-11-01

    Forty-eight consecutive patients with diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL) in complete remission (CR) after conventional chemotherapy were enrolled in a prospective clinical trial. The maintenance therapy was a random either nothing or interferon alfa 2b (IFN) 5.0 MU three times a week for one year. The median duration of CR in the patients treated with IFN has not been reached. After five years 60% of patients remain in CR compared to the control group who had a median CR of 40 months (p < 0.001). Actuarial five-years survival in the IFN treated patients was 88% compared to 42% in the control group (p < 0.001). Maintenance therapy with IFN has been beneficial in patients with DLCL with improvement of duration of CR and survival without the excessive toxicity of most common third generation regimen chemotherapy. We felt that IFN could be explored in most controlled clinical trials in patients with DLCL in CR after conventional chemotherapy. PMID:1487412

  17. Heat Shield Employing Cured Thermal Protection Material Blocks Bonded in a Large-Cell Honeycomb Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A document describes a new way to integrate thermal protection materials on external surfaces of vehicles that experience the severe heating environments of atmospheric entry from space. Cured blocks of thermal protection materials are bonded into a compatible, large-cell honeycomb matrix that can be applied on the external surfaces of the vehicles. The honeycomb matrix cell size, and corresponding thermal protection material block size, is envisioned to be between 1 and 4 in. (.2.5 and 10 cm) on a side, with a depth required to protect the vehicle. The cell wall thickness is thin, between 0.01 and 0.10 in. (.0.025 and 0.25 cm). A key feature is that the honeycomb matrix is attached to the vehicle fs unprotected external surface prior to insertion of the thermal protection material blocks. The attachment integrity of the honeycomb can then be confirmed over the full range of temperature and loads that the vehicle will experience. Another key feature of the innovation is the use of uniform-sized thermal protection material blocks. This feature allows for the mass production of these blocks at a size that is convenient for quality control inspection. The honeycomb that receives the blocks must have cells with a compatible set of internal dimensions. The innovation involves the use of a faceted subsurface under the honeycomb. This provides a predictable surface with perpendicular cell walls for the majority of the blocks. Some cells will have positive tapers to accommodate mitered joints between honeycomb panels on each facet of the subsurface. These tapered cells have dimensions that may fall within the boundaries of the uniform-sized blocks.

  18. miR-4295 promotes cell proliferation and invasion in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma via CDKN1A

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Mingchen; Geng, Yiwei; Lu, Peng; Xi, Ying; Wei, Sidong; Wang, Liuxing; Fan, Qingxia; Ma, Wang

    2015-09-04

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many types of cancers by negatively regulating gene expression at posttranscriptional level. However, the role of microRNAs in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC), has remained elusive. Here, we identified that miR-4295 promotes ATC cell proliferation by negatively regulates its target gene CDKN1A. In ATC cell lines, CCK-8 proliferation assay indicated that the cell proliferation was promoted by miR-4295, while miR-4295 inhibitor significantly inhibited the cell proliferation. Transwell assay showed that miR-4295 mimics significantly promoted the migration and invasion of ATC cells, whereas miR-4295 inhibitors significantly reduced cell migration and invasion. luciferase assays confirmed that miR-4295 directly bound to the 3'untranslated region of CDKN1A, and western blotting showed that miR-4295 suppressed the expression of CDKN1A at the protein levels. This study indicated that miR-4295 negatively regulates CDKN1A and promotes proliferation and invasion of ATC cell lines. Thus, miR-4295 may represent a potential therapeutic target for ATC intervention. - Highlights: • miR-4295 mimics promote the proliferation and invasion of ATC cells. • miR-4295 inhibitors inhibit the proliferation and invasion of ATC cells. • miR-4295 targets 3′UTR of CDKN1A in ATC cells. • miR-4295 negatively regulates CDKN1A in ATC cells.

  19. IDH1 mutation and MGMT methylation status predict survival in patients with anaplastic astrocytoma treated with temozolomide-based chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Scaringi, Claudia; Arcella, Antonella; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Di Stefano, Domenica; Scarpino, Stefania; Bozzao, Alessandro; Pace, Andrea; Villani, Veronica; Salvati, Maurizio; Esposito, Vincenzo; Giangaspero, Felice; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2014-06-01

    Several molecular markers have been proposed as predictors of outcome in patients with high grade gliomas. We report a retrospective multicenter study of 97 consecutive adult patients with anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) treated with radiation therapy (RT) plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) between October 2004 and March 2012. Correlations between the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutation and O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation with survival outcomes have been analyzed. At a median follow-up time of 46 months (range 12-89 months), median and 5-year overall survival rates were 50.5 months (95 % CI, 37.8-63.2) and 38% (95 % CI, 25.7-50.7%), and median and 5-year progression-free survival rates were 36 months (95% CI, 28.5-44.0) and 22 % (95 % CI, 10-34%), respectively. IDH1 mutation and MGMT promoter methylation were present in 54 and 60% of evaluable patients, respectively. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that IDH1 mutation (P = 0.001), MGMT methylation (P = 0.01), age < 50 years (P = 0.02), and extent of resection (P = 0.04) were significantly associated with longer survival. Our study confirms the favorable prognostic value of IDH1 mutation and MGMT methylation in patients with AA treated with RT plus concomitant and adjuvant TMZ. The superiority of combined radiochemotherapy over other treatment modalities remains to be demonstrated. PMID:24748470

  20. Dysphasia and phantosmia as first presentation of multifocal cerebral anaplastic astrocytomas: case report and review of the literatures.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangyi; Wang, Yu; Liu, Shuai; Lu, Zhaohui; Wu, Huanwen; Mao, Xinxin; Cheng, Xin; Gao, Jun; Guan, Jian; Yang, Yi; Li, Yongning; Xing, Bing; Ma, Wenbin; Wang, Renzhi

    2015-05-01

    Multifocal cerebral gliomas (MCGs) represent approximately 10% of gliomas and are frequently mistaken as metastases of an unknown primary cancer site. Most MCGs are glioblastomas with <4 lesions supratentorially, and are lack of typical symptoms and special detections.Through a rare MCG case, we aim to present this rarity and emphasize the need to correctly diagnose multiple intracranial lesions using a variety of diagnostic modalities to ensure that the patient receives proper treatment.We present a case of multifocal cerebral anaplastic astrocytomas with a total of 8 lesions located in the left frontal lobe and invading the lateral ventricle, presenting with dysphasia and phantosmia. The disease course, including diagnosis and treatment, is presented and analyzed in detail. The pertinent literature is reviewed regarding this uncommon entity.After an initial impression of brain metastasis from lung cancer because of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resemblance and history of chronic bronchitis, we were able to use positron emission tomography (PET) and excisional biopsy to get the final diagnosis. After 10 months, the patient's overall condition deteriorated and succumbed to his disease.MCGs are easy to be misdiagnosed as metastatic diseases. In addition to MRI, PET adds more biochemical and molecular information and is helpful in the differentiation. Although uncommon, if multiple lesions are present in various locations in the hemispheres, MCG should be kept in mind. PMID:25997068

  1. Pediatric Radical Abdominal Trachelectomy for Anaplastic Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma of the Uterine Cervix: An Alternative to Radical Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kayton, Mark L.; Wexler, Leonard H.; Lewin, Sharyn N.; Park, Kay J.; La Quaglia, Michael P.; Abu-Rustum, Nadeem R.

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma arising in the female genital tract carries five-year survival in excess of 80%, but lifelong infertility may be a consequence of local control strategies. We present the technique and outcome for a fertility-sparing, radical abdominal trachelectomy in a 12-year-old girl with anaplastic, embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma involving the uterine cervix. The patient had presented to our center following the piecemeal resection of a uterine cervical mass; because of concern about microscopic residual disease, we classified her as group II-A according to the International Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS) system. Staging studies excluded the presence of distant disease. The patient received four cycles of multiagent chemotherapy and then underwent radical abdominal trachelectomy, with removal of the uterine cervix, parametria, vaginal cuff, and regional lymph nodes. Microscopically, the specimen showed treatment effect and no residual tumor. Regional nodes were negative. Radical abdominal trachelectomy, which has not been previously reported for rhabdomyosarcoma, has appeared to secure local disease control in this case, while preserving the patient’s future fertility potential. In properly selected cases of rhabdomyosarcoma of the uterine cervix, where involvement of the uterus proper is not present, radical abdominal trachelectomy may be an attractive fertility-sparing alternative to radical hysterectomy. PMID:19361657

  2. The sonic hedgehog signaling pathway stimulates anaplastic thyroid cancer cell motility and invasiveness by activating Akt and c-Met.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Ashley J; Doscas, Michelle E; Ye, Jin; Heiden, Katherine B; Xing, Mingzhao; Li, Yi; Prinz, Richard A; Xu, Xiulong

    2016-03-01

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway is highly activated in thyroid neoplasms and promotes thyroid cancer stem-like cell phenotype, but whether the Shh pathway regulates thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness remains unknown. Here, we report that the motility and invasiveness of two anaplastic thyroid tumor cell lines, KAT-18 and SW1736, were inhibited by two inhibitors of the Shh pathway (cyclopamine and GANT61). Consistently, the cell motility and invasiveness was decreased by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, and was increased by Gli1 overexpression in KAT-18 cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that Akt and c-Met phosphorylation was decreased by a Gli1 inhibitor and by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, but was increased by Gli1 overexpression. LY294002, a PI-3 kinase inhibitor, and a c-Met inhibitor inhibited the motility and invasiveness of Gli1-transfected KAT-18 cells more effectively than the vector-transfected cells. Knockdown of Snail, a transcription factor regulated by the Shh pathway, led to decreased cell motility and invasiveness in KAT-18 and SW1736 cells. However, key epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers including E-cadherin and vimentin as well as Slug were not affected by cyclopamine and GANT61 in either SW1736 or WRO82, a well differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma cell line. Our data suggest that the Shh pathway-stimulated thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness is largely mediated by AKT and c-Met activation with little involvement of EMT. PMID:26859575

  3. The effect of 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin alone or in combination with paclitaxel on anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si Hyoung; Kang, Jun Goo; Kim, Chul Sik; Ihm, Sung-Hee; Choi, Moon Gi; Yoo, Hyung Joon; Lee, Seong Jin

    2015-04-01

    The effect of 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), an hsp90 inhibitor, alone or in combination with paclitaxel on survival of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) was evaluated. In 8505C and CAL62 cells, after treatment of 17-AAG, cell viability decreased, and the percentage of dead cells increased. 17-AAG did not cause cleavage of caspase-3 protein, and change expression of IAPs. Pretreatment of z-VAD-fmk did not alter cell viability and the percentage of dead cells. In 17-AAG-treated cells, knockdown of p53 rescued growth inhibition, while cycloheximide attenuated cell death. When cells were treated with both 17-AAG and paclitaxel, all of the combination index values were higher than 1, indicating antagonism between 17-AAG and paclitaxel. In 17-AAG- and paclitaxel-treated cells, compared with paclitaxel alone-treated cells, the protein levels of hsp90, hsp70, and hsc70 increased. In conclusion, our results suggest that 17-AAG induces non-apoptotic cell death requiring de novo protein synthesis in ATC cells. Moreover, these results demonstrate that 17-AAG antagonizes paclitaxel with concomitant alterations in hsp90 client proteins in ATC cells. PMID:25096912

  4. P-glycoprotein Mediates Ceritinib Resistance in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-rearranged Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Ryohei; Sakashita, Takuya; Yanagitani, Noriko; Ninomiya, Hironori; Horiike, Atsushi; Friboulet, Luc; Gainor, Justin F.; Motoi, Noriko; Dobashi, Akito; Sakata, Seiji; Tambo, Yuichi; Kitazono, Satoru; Sato, Shigeo; Koike, Sumie; John Iafrate, A.; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Shaw, Alice T.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Takeuchi, Kengo; Nishio, Makoto; Fujita, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion oncogene is observed in 3%–5% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Crizotinib and ceritinib, a next-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) active against crizotinib-refractory patients, are clinically available for the treatment of ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients, and multiple next-generation ALK-TKIs are currently under clinical evaluation. These ALK-TKIs exhibit robust clinical activity in ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients; however, the emergence of ALK-TKI resistance restricts the therapeutic effect. To date, various secondary mutations or bypass pathway activation-mediated resistance have been identified, but large parts of the resistance mechanism are yet to be identified. Here, we report the discovery of p-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1) overexpression as a ceritinib resistance mechanism in ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients. P-gp exported ceritinib and its overexpression conferred ceritinib and crizotinib resistance, but not to PF-06463922 or alectinib, which are next-generation ALK inhibitors. Knockdown of ABCB1 or P-gp inhibitors sensitizes the patient-derived cancer cells to ceritinib, in vitro and in vivo. P-gp overexpression was identified in three out of 11 cases with in ALK-rearranged crizotinib or ceritinib resistant NSCLC patients. Our study suggests that alectinib, PF-06463922, or P-gp inhibitor with ceritinib could overcome the ceritinib or crizotinib resistance mediated by P-gp overexpression. PMID:26870817

  5. The sonic hedgehog signaling pathway stimulates anaplastic thyroid cancer cell motility and invasiveness by activating Akt and c-Met

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Ashley J.; Doscas, Michelle E.; Ye, Jin; Heiden, Katherine B.; Xing, Mingzhao; Li, Yi; Prinz, Richard A.; Xu, Xiulong

    2016-01-01

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway is highly activated in thyroid neoplasms and promotes thyroid cancer stem-like cell phenotype, but whether the Shh pathway regulates thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness remains unknown. Here, we report that the motility and invasiveness of two anaplastic thyroid tumor cell lines, KAT-18 and SW1736, were inhibited by two inhibitors of the Shh pathway (cyclopamine and GANT61). Consistently, the cell motility and invasiveness was decreased by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, and was increased by Gli1 overexpression in KAT-18 cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that Akt and c-Met phosphorylation was decreased by a Gli1 inhibitor and by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, but was increased by Gli1 overexpression. LY294002, a PI-3 kinase inhibitor, and a c-Met inhibitor inhibited the motility and invasiveness of Gli1-transfected KAT-18 cells more effectively than the vector-transfected cells. Knockdown of Snail, a transcription factor regulated by the Shh pathway, led to decreased cell motility and invasiveness in KAT-18 and SW1736 cells. However, key epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers including E-cadherin and vimentin as well as Slug were not affected by cyclopamine and GANT61 in either SW1736 or WRO82, a well differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma cell line. Our data suggest that the Shh pathway-stimulated thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness is largely mediated by AKT and c-Met activation with little involvement of EMT. PMID:26859575

  6. Primary CNS T-cell Lymphomas: A Clinical, Morphologic, Immunophenotypic, and Molecular Analysis.

    PubMed

    Menon, Madhu P; Nicolae, Alina; Meeker, Hillary; Raffeld, Mark; Xi, Liqiang; Jegalian, Armin G; Miller, Douglas C; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S

    2015-12-01

    Primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphomas are relatively rare with the most common subtype being diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Primary CNS T-cell lymphomas (PCNSTL) account for <5% of CNS lymphomas. We report the clinical, morphologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular characteristics of 18 PCNSTLs. Fifteen cases were classified as peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, 2 of which were of γδ T-cell derivation and 1 was TCR silent; there was 1 anaplastic large cell lymphoma, ALK-positive and 2 anaplastic large cell lymphoma, ALK-negative. Median age was 58.5 years (range, 21 to 81 y), with an M:F ratio of 11:7. Imaging results showed that 15 patients had supratentorial lesions. Regardless of subtype, necrosis and perivascular cuffing of tumor cells were frequently observed (11/18 cases). CD3 was positive in all cases but 1; 10/17 were CD8-positive, and 5/17 were CD4-positive. Most cases studied had a cytotoxic phenotype with expression of TIA1 (13/15) and granzyme-B (9/13). Polymerase chain reaction analysis of T-cell receptor γ rearrangement confirmed a T-cell clone in 14 cases with adequate DNA quality. Next-generation sequencing showed somatic mutations in 36% of cases studied; 2 had >1 mutation, and none showed overlapping mutations. These included mutations in DNMT3A, KRAS, JAK3, STAT3, STAT5B, GNB1, and TET2 genes, genes implicated previously in other T-cell neoplasms. The outcome was heterogenous; 2 patients are alive without disease, 4 are alive with disease, and 6 died of disease. In conclusion, PCNSTLs are histologically and genomically heterogenous with frequent phenotypic aberrancy and a cytotoxic phenotype in most cases. PMID:26379152

  7. Detection of novel and potentially actionable anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement in colorectal adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry screening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Kim, Sun Young; Jang, Jiryeon; Kim, Seung Tae; Park, Joon Oh; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Young Suk; Lee, Jiyun; Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Yoon Ah; Huh, Jung Wook; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Do, In-Gu; Kim, Seok Hyung; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Stephens, Philip J.; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Li, Gang Gary; Hornby, Zachary; Ali, Siraj M.; Miller, Vincent A.; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement has been detected in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) using advanced molecular diagnostics tests including exon scanning, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and next generation sequencing (NGS). We investigated if immunohistochemistry (IHC) can be used to detect ALK rearrangement in gastrointestinal malignancies. Experimental designs Tissue microarrays (TMAs) from consecutive gastric carcinoma (GC) and CRC patients who underwent surgical resection at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea were screened by IHC using ALK monoclonal antibody 5A4. IHC positive cases were confirmed by FISH, nCounter assays, and NGS-based comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP). ALK IHC was further applied to CRC patients enrolled in a pathway-directed therapeutic trial. Results Four hundred thirty-two GC and 172 CRC cases were screened by IHC. No GC sample was ALK IHC positive. One CRC (0.6%) was ALK IHC positive (3+) that was confirmed by ALK FISH and a novel CAD-ALK (C35; A20) fusion variant that resulted from a paracentric inversion event inv(2)(p22–21p23) was identified by CGP. One out of 50 CRC patients enrolled in a pathway-directed therapeutic trial was ALK IHC positive (3+) confirmed by ALK FISH and found to harbor the EML4-ALK (E21, A20) fusion variant by CGP. Growth of a tumor cell line derived from this EML4-ALK CRC patient was inhibited by ALK inhibitors crizotinib and entrectinib. Conclusions ALK IHC is a viable screening strategy for identifying ALK rearrangement in CRC. ALK rearrangement is a potential actionable driver mutation in CRC based on survival inhibition of patient tumor-derived cell line by potent ALK inhibitors. PMID:26172300

  8. Network analysis of microRNAs, transcription factors, target genes and host genes in human anaplastic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    XUE, LUCHEN; XU, ZHIWEN; WANG, KUNHAO; WANG, NING; ZHANG, XIAOXU; WANG, SHANG

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the roles played by various genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) in neoplasms, including anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). However, the specific regulatory mechanisms involving these genes and miRNAs remain unclear. In the present study, associated biological factors (miRNAs, transcription factors, target genes and host genes) from existing studies of human AA were combined methodically through the interactions between genes and miRNAs, as opposed to studying one or several. Three regulatory networks, including abnormally expressed, related and global networks were constructed with the aim of identifying significant gene and miRNA pathways. Each network is composed of three associations between miRNAs targeted at genes, transcription factors (TFs) regulating miRNAs and miRNAs located on their host genes. Among these, the abnormally expressed network, which involves the pathways of previously identified abnormally expressed genes and miRNAs, partially indicated the regulatory mechanism underlying AA. The network contains numerous abnormal regulation associations when AA emerges. By modifying the abnormally expressed network factors to a normal expression pattern, the faulty regulation may be corrected and tumorigenesis of AA may be prevented. Certain specific pathways are highlighted in AA, for example PTEN which is targeted by miR-21 and miR-106b, regulates miR-25 which in turn targets TP53. PTEN and miR-21 have been observed to form feedback loops. Furthermore, by comparing and analyzing the pathway predecessors and successors of abnormally expressed genes and miRNAs in three networks, similarities and differences of regulatory pathways may be identified and proposed. In summary, the present study aids in elucidating the occurrence, mechanism, prevention and treatment of AA. These results may aid further investigation into therapeutic approaches for this disease. PMID:27347075

  9. p21 participates in the regulation of anaplastic thyroid cancer cell proliferation by miR-146b

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiyang; Chen, Yangjing; Bai, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) originates from completely undifferentiated cells, and is the most lethal type of thyroid-derived tumor. Numerous microRNAs have significant roles in tumorigenesis by targeting relevant genes. The role of microRNA 146b (miR-146b) in ATC remains to be elucidated. In order to characterize the role of miR-146b in ATC, overexpression or interference of miR-146b was induced in ATC cell lines, and cell proliferation and migration were evaluated. The potential targets of miR-146b were searched in the Gene Expression Omnibus database for ATC and matched non-tumor control samples. The expression level of potential targets was detected following overexpression or interference of miR-146b in ATC cell lines. In the present study, cell proliferation was promoted when overexpression of miR-146b was induced in ATC, and inhibited when interference of miR-146b was induced, which indicated that miR-146b affects the proliferation of ATC cells in vitro. In addition, cell migration of ATC was also affected by miR-146b. During the search for potential targets of miR-146b in ATC, p21 (also known as p21Waf1/Cip1 or CDKN1A) was noted for its role in cell cycle progression and tumor pathogenesis. The expression level of p21 was influenced by the level of miR-146b, and the results of the present study demonstrated that the level of p21 was increased when FRO cells were transformed with miR-146b mimic, and p21 was downregulated when FRO cells transformed with anti-miR-146b. In conclusion, p21 may participate in the regulation of ATC cell proliferation by miR-146b. PMID:27602131

  10. The impact of concurrent temozolomide with adjuvant radiation and IDH mutation status among patients with anaplastic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, Caterina; Voss, Jesse S.; Decker, Paul A.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Hardie, John; Laack, Nadia N.; Parney, Ian F.; Uhm, Joon H.; Buckner, Jan C.

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses the controversial role of temozolomide (TMZ) concurrent with adjuvant radiation (RT) in patients with anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). The impact of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) status on therapy and outcomes is also examined. All adult patients diagnosed with AA from 2001 to 2011 and treated with standard doses of adjuvant RT were identified retrospectively for clinical data extraction. IDH status was determined by IDH1-R132H immunostain and sequencing for other mutations in IDH1/IDH2. Cumulative survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards regression models were fit for univariable/multivariable analyses. 136 patients had received concurrent TMZ while 29 had not. Of these, IDH status was determined on 114 and 27 patients, respectively. On univariable analysis, improved five-year survival was independently associated with concurrent TMZ (46.2 vs. 29.3 %, p = 0.02) and IDH mutation (78.9 vs. 22.0 %, p < 0.001). IDH mutation was additionally associated with a greater likelihood of extensive resection possibly secondary to a more favorable tumor location. Gross total/subtotal resections also led to improved survival when compared to biopsy alone on univariable analysis. On multivariable analysis, the association with five-year survival persisted for both concurrent TMZ and IDH mutation, but not with extent of surgery. Both IDH mutation and concurrent TMZ are associated with improved five-year survival in patients with AA who are receiving adjuvant RT. Secondarily, the association between five-year survival and extent of resection is lost on multivariable analysis. This suggests a possible association between IDH mutation, tumor location and consequent resectability. PMID:24993250

  11. Identification of high versus lower risk clinical subgroups in a group of adult patients with supratentorial anaplastic astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Decaestecker, C; Salmon, I; Camby, I; Dewitte, O; Pasteels, J L; Brotchi, J; Van Ham, P; Kiss, R

    1995-05-01

    The present work investigates whether computer-assisted techniques can contribute any significant information to the characterization of astrocytic tumor aggressiveness. Two complementary computer-assisted methods were used. The first method made use of the digital image analysis of Feulgen-stained nuclei, making it possible to compute 15 morphonuclear and 8 nuclear DNA content-related (ploidy level) parameters. The second method enabled the most discriminatory parameters to be determined. This second method is the Decision Tree technique, which forms part of the Supervised Learning Algorithms. These two techniques were applied to a series of 250 supratentorial astrocytic tumors of the adult. This series included 39 low-grade (astrocytomas, AST) and 211 high-grade (47 anaplastic astrocytomas, ANA, and 164 glioblastomas, GBM) astrocytic tumors. The results show that some AST, ANA and GBM did not fit within simple logical rules. These "complex" cases were labeled NC-AST, NC-ANA and NC-GBM because they were "non-classical" (NC) with respect to their cytological features. An analysis of survival data revealed that the patients with NC-GBM had the same survival period as patients with GBM. In sharp contrast, patients with ANA survived significantly longer than patients with NC-ANA. In fact, the patients with ANA had the same survival period as patients who died from AST, while the patients with NC-ANA had a survival period similar to those with GBM. All these data show that the computer-assisted techniques used in this study can actually provide the pathologist with significant information on the characterization of astrocytic tumor aggressiveness. PMID:7745436

  12. Theranostic near-infrared fluorescent nanoplatform for imaging and systemic siRNA delivery to metastatic anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanlan; Gunda, Viswanath; Zhu, Xi; Xu, Xiaoding; Wu, Jun; Askhatova, Diana; Farokhzad, Omid C; Parangi, Sareh; Shi, Jinjun

    2016-07-12

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), one of the most aggressive solid tumors, is characterized by rapid tumor growth and severe metastasis to other organs. Owing to the lack of effective treatment options, ATC has a mortality rate of ∼100% and median survival of less than 5 months. RNAi nanotechnology represents a promising strategy for cancer therapy through nanoparticle (NP) -mediated delivery of RNAi agents (e.g., siRNA) to solid tumors for specific silencing of target genes driving growth and/or metastasis. Nevertheless, the clinical success of RNAi cancer nanotherapies remains elusive in large part because of the suboptimal systemic siRNA NP delivery to tumors and the fact that tumor heterogeneity produces variable NP accumulation and thus, therapeutic response. To address these challenges, we here present an innovative theranostic NP platform composed of a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent polymer for effective in vivo siRNA delivery to ATC tumors and simultaneous tracking of the tumor accumulation by noninvasive NIR imaging. The NIR polymeric NPs are small (∼50 nm), show long blood circulation and high tumor accumulation, and facilitate tumor imaging. Systemic siRNA delivery using these NPs efficiently silences the expression of V-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) in tumor tissues and significantly suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in an orthotopic mouse model of ATC. These results suggest that this theranostic NP system could become an effective tool for NIR imaging-guided siRNA delivery for personalized treatment of advanced malignancies. PMID:27342857

  13. Stereotactic Radiation Therapy can Safely and Durably Control Sites of Extra-Central Nervous System Oligoprogressive Disease in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Positive Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Crizotinib

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Gregory N.; Weickhardt, Andrew J.; Scheier, Benjamin; Doebele, Robert C.; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Camidge, D. Ross

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To analyze the durability and toxicity of radiotherapeutic local ablative therapy (LAT) applied to extra-central nervous system (eCNS) disease progression in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive NSCLC patients receiving crizotinib and manifesting ≤4 discrete sites of eCNS progression were classified as having oligoprogressive disease (OPD). If subsequent progression met OPD criteria, additional courses of LAT were considered. Crizotinib was continued until eCNS progression was beyond OPD criteria or otherwise not suitable for further LAT. Results: Of 38 patients, 33 progressed while taking crizotinib. Of these, 14 had eCNS progression meeting OPD criteria suitable for radiotherapeutic LAT. Patients with eCNS OPD received 1-3 courses of LAT with radiation therapy. The 6- and 12-month actuarial local lesion control rates with radiation therapy were 100% and 86%, respectively. The 12-month local lesion control rate with single-fraction equivalent dose >25 Gy versus ≤25 Gy was 100% versus 60% (P=.01). No acute or late grade >2 radiation therapy-related toxicities were observed. Median overall time taking crizotinib among those treated with LAT versus those who progressed but were not suitable for LAT was 28 versus 10.1 months, respectively. Patients continuing to take crizotinib for >12 months versus ≤12 months had a 2-year overall survival rate of 72% versus 12%, respectively (P<.0001). Conclusions: Local ablative therapy safely and durably eradicated sites of individual lesion progression in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive NSCLC patients receiving crizotinib. A dose–response relationship for local lesion control was observed. The suppression of OPD by LAT in patients taking crizotinib allowed an extended duration of exposure to crizotinib, which was associated with longer overall survival.

  14. A headache presenting in the emergency room, a clinical manifestation of an unfortunate diagnosis (grade III left frontal anaplastic ependymoma with 1p deletion)

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Robles, B J; Hurtarte-Sandoval, A R; Harrison, R M; Cuevas, C C

    2013-01-01

    An 18-year-old girl presented with a headache and behavioural changes. She was found to have a frontal mass. Neuroimaging revealed an intra-axial mass, located at the left frontal cortical/subcortical region approximately 6×7, 5×7, 5 cm (TxApxL), having a heterogeneous density with cysts and calcification. She had total gross excision of the neoplasm. Histopathological examination revealed an anaplastic ependymoma. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation, a molecular cytogenetic test, reported deletion of 1p without deletion of 19q. The patient had a good postoperative improvement. PMID:23912654

  15. Alterations of the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A (p16(INK4a)), p14(ARF), CDKN2B (p15(INK4b)), and CDKN2C (p18(INK4c)) in atypical and anaplastic meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Boström, J; Meyer-Puttlitz, B; Wolter, M; Blaschke, B; Weber, R G; Lichter, P; Ichimura, K; Collins, V P; Reifenberger, G

    2001-08-01

    We investigated 67 meningothelial tumors (20 benign meningiomas, 34 atypical meningiomas, and 13 anaplastic meningiomas) for losses of genetic information from chromosome arms 1p and 9p, as well as for deletion, mutation, and expression of the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A (p16(INKa)/MTS1), p14(ARF), CDKN2B (p15(INK4b)/MTS2) (all located at 9p21) and CDKN2C (1p32). Comparative genomic hybridization and microsatellite analysis showed losses on 1p in 11 anaplastic meningiomas (85%), 23 atypical meningiomas (68%), and 5 benign meningiomas (25%). One atypical meningioma with loss of heterozygosity on 1p carried a somatic CDKN2C mutation (c.202C>T: R68X). Losses on 9p were found in five anaplastic meningiomas (38%), six atypical meningiomas (18%), and one benign meningioma (5%). Six anaplastic meningiomas (46%) and one atypical meningioma (3%) showed homozygous deletions of the CDKN2A, p14(ARF), and CDKN2B genes. Two anaplastic meningiomas carried somatic point mutations in CDKN2A (c.262G>T: E88X and c.262G>A: E88K) and p14(ARF) (c.305G>T: G102V and c.305G>A: G102E). One anaplastic meningioma, three atypical meningiomas, and one benign meningioma without a demonstrated homozygous deletion or mutation of CDKN2A, p14(ARF), or CDKN2B lacked detectable transcripts from at least one of these genes. Hypermethylation of CDKN2A, p14(ARF), and CDKN2B could be demonstrated in one of these cases. Taken together, our results indicate that CDKN2C is rarely altered in meningiomas. However, the majority of anaplastic meningiomas either show homozygous deletions of CDKN2A, p14(ARF), and CDKN2B, mutations in CDKN2A and p14(ARF), or lack of expression of one or more of these genes. Thus, inactivation of the G(1)/S-phase cell-cycle checkpoint is an important aberration in anaplastic meningiomas. PMID:11485924

  16. PARP inhibitor olaparib increases the oncolytic activity of dl922-947 in in vitro and in vivo model of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Passaro, Carmela; Volpe, Massimiliano; Botta, Ginevra; Scamardella, Eloise; Perruolo, Giuseppe; Gillespie, David; Libertini, Silvana; Portella, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    PARP inhibitors are mostly effective as anticancer drugs in association with DNA damaging agents. We have previously shown that the oncolytic adenovirus dl922-947 induces extensive DNA damage, therefore we hypothesized a synergistic antitumoral effect of the PARP inhibitor olaparib in association with dl922-947. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma was chosen as model since it is a particularly aggressive tumor and, because of its localized growth, it is suitable for intratumoral treatment with oncolytic viruses. Here, we show that dl922-947 infection induces PARP activation, and we confirm in vitro and in vivo that PARP inhibition increases dl922-947 replication and oncolytic activity. In vitro, the combination with olaparib exacerbates the appearance of cell death markers, such as Annexin V positivity, caspase 3 cleavage, cytochrome C release and propidium iodide permeability. In vivo, we also observed a better viral distribution upon PARP inhibition. Changes in CD31 levels suggest a direct effect of olaparib on tumor vascularization and on the viral distribution within the tumor mass. The observation that PARP inhibition enhances the effects of dl922-947 is highly promising not only for the treatment of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma but, in general, for the treatment of other tumors that could benefit from the use of oncolytic viruses. PMID:25139258

  17. A case of long-term 24-month survival in pancreatic anaplastic carcinoma (giant cell type) after S1 postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nitta, Toshikatsu; Fujii, Kensuke; Kataoka, Jun; Tominaga, Tomo; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Ishibashi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe the case of a 70-year-old female patient diagnosed with pancreatic carcinoma. An abdominal enhanced computed tomography scan revealed a poorly enhanced mass (17 mm × 15 mm in size) in the pancreatic head. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography revealed stenosis of the main pancreatic and common bile ducts caused by a mass-neighboring cyst. Based on these findings, we performed subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. The patient demonstrated a good postoperative course, and was discharged from our hospital in remission 49 days after the surgery. Pathological findings confirmed that it was anaplastic pancreas carcinoma (giant cell type). After the surgery, we performed S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy 100 mg/day for four weeks, repeated similarly every six weeks for a total of four courses. We have followed this case for over 2 years so far with adjuvant chemotherapy, and no recurrence or metastasis has been revealed. Adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 in patients with resected anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas is also recommended as a result of Japan Adjuvant Study Group of Pancreatic Cancer 01(JASPAC-01) like the ordinary pancreatic ductal carcinomas. There is a possibility to achieve long-term survival in cases in which multidisciplinary treatment such as a curative resection and adjuvant chemotherapy are performed. PMID:27111877

  18. Multiple Pluripotent Stem Cell Markers in Human Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: The Putative Upstream Role of SOX2

    PubMed Central

    Carina, Valeria; Zito, Giovanni; Pizzolanti, Giuseppe; Richiusa, Pierina; Criscimanna, Angela; Rodolico, Vito; Tomasello, Laura; Pitrone, Maria; Arancio, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Background Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is a rare and aggressive endocrine tumor with highly undifferentiated morphology. It has been suggested that cancer stem cells (CSCs) might play a central role in ATC. The objectives of this study were (i) to characterize CSCs from ex vivo ATC specimens by investigating the expression of several pluripotent stem cell markers, and (ii) to evaluate in vitro drug resistance modifications after specific CSC transcription factor switch-off. Methods In ex vivo experiments, eight formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded ATC specimens were analyzed by reverse-transcription and real-time quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry. In in vitro experiments using ATC SW1736 cells, the expression levels of OCT-4, NANOG, and ABCG2 and the sensitivity to either cisplatin or doxorubicin were evaluated after silencing. Results OCT-4, KLF4, and SOX2 transcription factors and C-KIT and THY-1 stem surface antigens showed variable up-regulation in all ATC cases. The SW1736 cell line was characterized by a high percentage of stem population (10.4±2.1% of cells were aldehyde dehydrogenase positive) and high expression of several CSC markers (SOX2, OCT4, NANOG, C-MYC, and SSEA4). SOX2 silencing down-regulated OCT-4, NANOG, and ABCG2. SOX2 silencing sensitized SW1736 cells, causing a significant cell death increase (1.8-fold) in comparison to control cells with 10 μM cisplatin (93.9±3.4% vs. 52.6±9.4%, p<0.01) and 2.7 fold with 0.5 μM doxorubicin (45.8±9.9% vs. 17.1±3.4% p<0.01). ABCG2 silencing caused increased cell death with both cisplatin (74.9±1.4%) and doxorubicin treatment (74.1±0.1%) vs. no-target–treated cells (respectively, 45.8±1.0% and 48.6±1.0%, p<0.001). Conclusions : The characterization of CSCs in ATC through the analysis of multiple pluripotent stem cell markers might be useful in identifying cells with a stem-like phenotype capable of resisting conventional chemotherapy. In addition, our data demonstrate that SOX2

  19. Rearranged Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Gene in Adult-Onset Papillary Thyroid Cancer Amongst Atomic Bomb Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Mayumi; Takahashi, Keiko; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakachi, Kei; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously noted that among atomic bomb survivors (ABS), the relative frequency of cases of adult papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) with chromosomal rearrangements (mainly RET/PTC) was significantly greater in those with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. In contrast, the frequency of PTC cases with point mutations (mainly BRAFV600E) was significantly lower in patients with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. We also found that among ABS, the frequency of PTC cases with no detectable gene alterations in RET, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1 (NTRK1), BRAF, or RAS was significantly higher in patients with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. However, in ABS with PTC, the relationship between the presence of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fused with other gene partners and radiation exposure has received little study. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the relative frequency of rearranged ALK in ABS with PTC, and with no detectable gene alterations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF, or RAS, would be greater in those having relatively higher radiation exposures. Methods The 105 subjects in the study were drawn from the Life Span Study cohort of ABS of Hiroshima and Nagasaki who were diagnosed with PTC between 1956 and 1993. Seventy-nine were exposed (>0 mGy), and 26 were not exposed to A-bomb radiation. In the 25 ABS with PTC, and with no detectable gene alterations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF, or RAS, we examined archival, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded PTC specimens for rearrangement of ALK using reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5′ RACE). Results We found rearranged ALK in 10 of 19 radiation-exposed PTC cases, but none among 6 patients with PTC with no radiation exposure. In addition, solid/trabecular-like architecture in PTC was closely associated with ALK

  20. Use of molecular studies for treatment of metastatic pleomorphic large cell pancreatic cancers—a novel strategy

    PubMed Central

    Narula, Arshjyot; Balog, Anna; Christou, Antonios

    2016-01-01

    Pleomorphic large cell pancreatic cancer is a rare and more aggressive variant with no proven treatment in the metastatic setting. It constitutes about 1% of the total pancreatic cancer cases. In the absence of any standard of care, we aim to increase awareness amongst clinical practitioners that molecular level testing, using immunohistochemistry, next-generation sequencing and chromogenic in-situ hybridization can help in making chemotherapeutic decisions for this variant of pancreatic cancer. We present a 50-year-old male who presented to our hospital complaining of persistent abdominal pain. CT scan revealed a pancreatic tail mass that was invading the splenic flexure causing high-grade obstruction. There was evidence of peritoneal studding. He underwent exploratory laparotomy with biopsy of the pancreatic mass and omentum which revealed metastatic undifferentiated pleomorphic large cell pancreatic cancer. Since there is no proven treatment for this particular entity, his specimen was sent for molecular testing. The molecular studies revealed positive mutations of TLE3 gene, EGFR, KRAS, PD1 gene, TP53 and TOP2A gene. The tumor was found to be sensitive to gemcitabine, paclitaxel, docetaxel, temozolamide, dacarbazine and doxorubicin. He was initiated on gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel. The patient was treated based on these recommendations. The patient completed 5 cycles of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel. Treatment had to be held because of gemcitabine induced hemolytic uremic syndrome. Serial CT scans have shown stable disease and currently it has been 10 months since his diagnosis. Molecular level testing can be an important instrument in not only diagnosing but also be an important aid in deciding about the chemotherapeutic agents to be used in cases of metastatic pleomorphic large cell pancreatic cancer. Availability a knowledge of the novel tools like immunohistochemistry, next-generation sequencing and chromogenic in-situ hybridization can be prudent and

  1. Use of molecular studies for treatment of metastatic pleomorphic large cell pancreatic cancers-a novel strategy.

    PubMed

    Padhi, Parikshit; Narula, Arshjyot; Balog, Anna; Christou, Antonios

    2016-04-01

    Pleomorphic large cell pancreatic cancer is a rare and more aggressive variant with no proven treatment in the metastatic setting. It constitutes about 1% of the total pancreatic cancer cases. In the absence of any standard of care, we aim to increase awareness amongst clinical practitioners that molecular level testing, using immunohistochemistry, next-generation sequencing and chromogenic in-situ hybridization can help in making chemotherapeutic decisions for this variant of pancreatic cancer. We present a 50-year-old male who presented to our hospital complaining of persistent abdominal pain. CT scan revealed a pancreatic tail mass that was invading the splenic flexure causing high-grade obstruction. There was evidence of peritoneal studding. He underwent exploratory laparotomy with biopsy of the pancreatic mass and omentum which revealed metastatic undifferentiated pleomorphic large cell pancreatic cancer. Since there is no proven treatment for this particular entity, his specimen was sent for molecular testing. The molecular studies revealed positive mutations of TLE3 gene, EGFR, KRAS, PD1 gene, TP53 and TOP2A gene. The tumor was found to be sensitive to gemcitabine, paclitaxel, docetaxel, temozolamide, dacarbazine and doxorubicin. He was initiated on gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel. The patient was treated based on these recommendations. The patient completed 5 cycles of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel. Treatment had to be held because of gemcitabine induced hemolytic uremic syndrome. Serial CT scans have shown stable disease and currently it has been 10 months since his diagnosis. Molecular level testing can be an important instrument in not only diagnosing but also be an important aid in deciding about the chemotherapeutic agents to be used in cases of metastatic pleomorphic large cell pancreatic cancer. Availability a knowledge of the novel tools like immunohistochemistry, next-generation sequencing and chromogenic in-situ hybridization can be prudent and

  2. Atypical carcinoid and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung: a proteomic dataset from formalin-fixed archival samples.

    PubMed

    Tanca, Alessandro; Addis, Maria Filippa; Pisanu, Salvatore; Abbondio, Marcello; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Eccher, Albino; Rindi, Guido; Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Uzzau, Sergio; Fanciulli, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Here we present a dataset generated using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival samples from two rare lung neuroendocrine tumor subtypes (namely, two atypical carcinoids, ACs, and two large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, LCNECs). Samples were subjected to a shotgun proteomics pipeline, comprising full-length protein extraction, SDS removal through spin columns, in solution trypsin digestion, long gradient liquid chromatography peptide separation and LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 1260 and 2436 proteins were identified in the AC and LCNEC samples, respectively, with FDR <1%. MS data are available in the PeptideAtlas repository at http://www.peptideatlas.org/PASS/PASS00375. PMID:27054153

  3. Atypical carcinoid and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung: a proteomic dataset from formalin-fixed archival samples

    PubMed Central

    Tanca, Alessandro; Addis, Maria Filippa; Pisanu, Salvatore; Abbondio, Marcello; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Eccher, Albino; Rindi, Guido; Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Uzzau, Sergio; Fanciulli, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a dataset generated using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival samples from two rare lung neuroendocrine tumor subtypes (namely, two atypical carcinoids, ACs, and two large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, LCNECs). Samples were subjected to a shotgun proteomics pipeline, comprising full-length protein extraction, SDS removal through spin columns, in solution trypsin digestion, long gradient liquid chromatography peptide separation and LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 1260 and 2436 proteins were identified in the AC and LCNEC samples, respectively, with FDR <1%. MS data are available in the PeptideAtlas repository at http://www.peptideatlas.org/PASS/PASS00375. PMID:27054153

  4. Phase II study of HCVIDD/MA in patients with newly diagnosed peripheral T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chihara, Dai; Pro, Barbara; Loghavi, Sanam; Miranda, Roberto N; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Fanale, Michelle A; Hagemeister, Fredrick B; Fayad, Luis E; Romaguera, Jorge E; Samaniego, Felipe; Neelapu, Sattva S; Younes, Anas; Fowler, Nathan H; Rodriguez, M Alma; Wang, Michael; Kwak, Larry W; McLaughlin, Peter; Dang, Nam H; Oki, Yasuhiro

    2015-11-01

    A phase II study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of hyper-fractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin and dexamethasone alternating with methotrexate/cytarabine (HCVIDD/MA) in patients with newly diagnosed peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), excluding ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Fifty-three patients were enrolled. Treatment was planned for up to 8 cycles but only 9% of patients received more than 6 cycles due primarily to disease progression (n = 13) or prolonged thrombocytopenia (n = 12). The overall response rate was 66% with a complete response rate of 57%. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 7·5 months. With a median follow-up of 7·6 years, 5-year PFS and overall survival (OS) were 21% and 48%, respectively. The patients with extranodal Natural Killer-cell lymphoma had a shorter PFS (median, 2·4 months) than other subtypes. Grade 3/4 anaemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were observed in 66%, 74% and 79% of patients, respectively. Of note, 23% of patients discontinued therapy due to prolonged thrombocytopenia. In conclusion, HCVIDD/MA for the first-line treatment of PTCL patients is associated with significant myelosuppression leading to poor treatment adherence, and the response and survival outcomes with this regimen are similar to standard CHOP. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00290433. PMID:26260306

  5. ALK-rearrangements and testing methods in non-small cell lung cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, Rodney E.; Vora, Moiz; Mayhall, Kim; Cotelingam, James

    2014-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma tyrosine kinase (ALK) gene was first described as a driver mutation in anaplastic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Dysregulated ALK expression is now an identified driver mutation in nearly twenty different human malignancies, including 4-9% of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). The tyrosine kinase inhibitor crizotinib is more effective than standard chemotherapeutic agents in treating ALK positive NSCLC, making molecular diagnostic testing for dysregulated ALK expression a necessary step in identifying optimal treatment modalities. Here we review ALKmediated signal transduction pathways and compare the molecular protocols used to identify dysregulated ALK expression in NSCLC. We also discuss the use of crizotinib and second generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of ALK positive NSCLC, and the known mechanisms of crizotinib resistance in NSCLC. PMID:24955213

  6. Anaplastic thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... or MRI of the neck may show a tumor growing from the thyroid gland. A thyroid biopsy makes the diagnosis. An examination ... the thyroid Images ... Saunders; 2016:chap 226. Lai SY, Mandel SJ, Weber RS. Management of thyroid neoplasms. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et ...

  7. O-GlcNAcylation enhances the invasion of thyroid anaplastic cancer cells partially by PI3K/Akt1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Chunli; Ma, Tao; You, Shengyi

    2015-01-01

    Background The PI3K family participates in multiple signaling pathways to regulate cellular functions. PI3K/Akt signaling pathway plays an important role in tumorigenesis and development. O-GlcNAcylation, a posttranslational modification, is thought to modulate a wide range of biological processes, such as transcription, cell growth, signal transduction, and cell motility. O-GlcNAcylation is catalyzed by the nucleocytoplasmic enzymes, OGT and OGA, which adds or removes O-GlcNAc moieties, respectively. Abnormal O-GlcNAcylation has been implicated in a variety of human diseases. However, the role of O-GlcNAcylation in tumorigenesis and progression of cancer is still under-investigated. Understanding the O-GlcNAc-associated molecular mechanism might be significant for diagnosis and therapy of cancer. Methods Human thyroid anaplastic cancer 8305C cells were used to evaluate the role of O-GlcNAcylation in tumorigenesis and progression of cancer. The global O-GlcNAc level of intracellular proteins was up-regulated by OGA inhibitor Thiamet-G treatment or OGT over-expression. Cell proliferation was assessed by MTT assay. Invasion in vitro was determined by Transwell assay, and phosphorylation of Akt1 at Ser473 was assessed by Western blot for activity of Akt1. PI3K-specific inhibitor LY294002 and RNA interference of Akt1 were used to investigate the impact of PI3K/Akt signaling on the regulation of O-GlcNAcylation during tumor progression. Results Cell models with remarkably up-regulated O-GlcNAcylation were constructed, and then cell proliferation and invasion were determined. The results indicated that the proliferation was not affected by OGA inhibition or OGT overexpression, while the invasion of 8305C cells with OGA inhibition or OGT overexpression was obviously increased. Akt1 activity was stimulated by elevated O-GlcNAcylation by mediating phosphorylation at Ser473. The enhanced invasion of thyroid cancer cells by Thiamet-G treatment or OGT overexpression was

  8. Cisplatin and Etoposide With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer or Metastatic Large Cell Neuroendocrine Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-01

    Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Origin; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Newly Diagnosed Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Origin; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  9. Upregulated Neuro-oncological Ventral Antigen 1 (NOVA1) Expression Is Specific to Mature and Immature T- and NK-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Yoon, Sun Och; Kim, Soo Hee; Yang, Woo Ick; Cho, Yoon Ah; Kim, Soo Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have revealed that the splicing factor neuro-oncological ventral antigen 1 (NOVA1) is enriched in fibroblasts and accumulated T cells of tertiary lymphoid structures. In the present study, we investigated NOVA1 expression in various subtypes of mature and immature T- and natural killer (NK)-cell lymphomas as well as in various B-cell lymphoma subtypes. Methods: NOVA1 immunoexpression was evaluated in hyperplastic palatine tonsils (n = 20), T- and NK-cell lymphomas (n = 177), diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (n = 151), and other types of B cell lymphomas (n = 31). Nuclear staining intensity and percentage of positive tumor cells were graded. NOVA1 mRNA expression was analyzed in various lymphoma cell lines. Results: Tumor cells of T- and NK-cell lymphomas showed higher expression levels of NOVA1 than did normal paracortical T cells, and 56.5% of T- and NK-cell lymphoma cases showed diffuse and strong expression. The NOVA1 expression level varied according to the subtype; it was higher in angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), and T lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-LBL), but it was lower in ALK-positive ALCL. In almost all B-cell lymphomas, NOVA1 expression was very low or negative. NOVA1 mRNA was also expressed in Jurkat, a T-LBL cell line. Conclusions: The present findings suggest that NOVA1 upregulation may be involved in certain subtypes of T- and NK-cell lymphomas, but not in B-cell lymphomas. Upregulated NOVA1 expression seems to be a specific biological feature of activated T cells such as T- and NK-cell lymphomas. PMID:26922803

  10. Autologous stem cell transplantation in first complete remission may not extend progression-free survival in patients with peripheral T cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Yam, Clinton; Landsburg, Daniel J; Nead, Kevin T; Lin, Xinyi; Mato, Anthony R; Svoboda, Jakub; Loren, Alison W; Frey, Noelle V; Stadtmauer, Edward A; Porter, David L; Schuster, Stephen J; Nasta, Sunita D

    2016-07-01

    Patients with peripheral T cell lymphomas (PTCL) generally have a poor prognosis when treated with conventional chemotherapy. Consolidation with autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has been reported to improve progression-free survival. However, these studies have not compared consolidative ASCT with active observation in patients with PTCL achieving first complete remission (CR1) following induction chemotherapy. We conducted a retrospective analysis of PTCL patients treated at the University of Pennsylvania between 1/1/2007 and 12/31/2014. Patients with cutaneous T cell lymphoma, concurrent B cell lymphomas, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALK-positive ALCL) were excluded from the study. We compared progression-free survival for patients who underwent ASCT in CR1 following CHOP-like induction regimens and patients who underwent active observation during CR1. 48 patients met all inclusion and exclusion criteria and underwent either active observation (28 patients) or consolidative ASCT (20 patients) in CR1. The 1-year cumulative incidence of relapse in the observation and ASCT groups was 50% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 30-67%) and 46% (95% CI: 23-67%), respectively (P = 0.55). Median progression-free survival in the observation and ASCT groups was 15.8 and 12.8 months, respectively (log rank, P = 0.79). Estimated 3-year progression-free survival in the observation and ASCT groups was 37 and 41%, respectively. In conclusion, for PTCL patients achieving CR1 following CHOP-like induction chemotherapy, ASCT does not appear to improve progression-free survival compared to active observation. This finding should be confirmed in a larger, prospective study. Am. J. Hematol. 91:672-676, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27012928

  11. Fragmentation scaling of percolation clusters in two and three dimensions: Large-cell Monte Carlo RG approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, M.; Chang, I.

    1999-04-01

    The scaling behavior for a binary fragmentation of critical percolation clusters is investigated by a large-cell Monte Carlo real-space renormalization group method in two and three dimensions. We obtain accurate values of critical exponents λ and phi describing the scaling of fragmentation rate and the distribution of fragments' masses produced by a binary fragmentation. Our results for λ and phi show that the fragmentation rate is proportional to the size of mother cluster, and the scaling relation σ = 1 + λ - phi conjectured by Edwards et al. to be valid for all dimensions is satisfied in two and three dimensions, where σ is the crossover exponent of the average cluster number in percolation theory, which excludes the other scaling relations.

  12. Targeting TGF-β1 inhibits invasion of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell through SMAD2-dependent S100A4-MMP-2/9 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kejun; Liu, Xiaoli; Hao, Fengyun; Dong, Anbing; Chen, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most lethal human malignancies. However, the molecular mechanisms of ATC invasion are poorly understood. The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway plays a critical role in promoting tumor metastasis. TGF-β1 was found to be overexpressed in anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC). We therefore tested our hypothesis that targeted down-regulation of TGF-β1 inhibits invasion of ATC cells. Methods: Effects of TGF-β1 stimulation or TGF-β1 sliencing by small interfering RNA (TGF-β1 siRNA) on invasion in 8505C and SW1736 cells in vitro was detected. Using siRNAs and inhibitors to examine the TGF-β1 signaling pathway. Results: TGF-β1 siRNA inhibits cell migration and invasion in vitro, followed by inactivation of pSMAD2, S100A4 and MMP-2/9. TGF-β stimulation activated pSMAD2-dependent S100A4 and MMP-2/9 expression, and increased cell migration and invasion. The depletion of pSMAD2 or S100A4 or MMP-2/9 expression inhibited TGF-β signaling pathway. Moreover, it significantly weakened the proinvasive effects of TGF-β on ATC cells. Conclusions: Therapies targeting the TGF-β1 inhibits invasion of ATC cells by impeding the SMAD2-dependent S100A4-MMP-2/9 signalling in vitro. PMID:27347327

  13. Detection of rearrangement of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and mutation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in primary pulmonary lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Lin, Yongbin; Cai, Qingqing; Long, Hao; Zhang, Yu; Rong, Tiehua

    2015-01-01

    Background Primary pulmonary lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma (LELC) is a distinct rare subtype of lung cancer. The prevalence of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation in primary pulmonary LELC had not been thoroughly investigated. Methods We investigated a cohort of 42 patients with primary pulmonary LELC and genotyped for ALK rearrangement and EGFR mutation. ALK rearrangement was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). EGFR mutational analysis of exons 18 through 21 was analyzed by TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNAs (EBERs) showed positive signals in all 42 patients. By immunohistochemistry staining, all patients demonstrated positive expression of CK5/6 and P63, but almost all patients were negative for TTF-1 (34/34, 100%) or CK7 (34/35, 97.1%). None of the 42 patients had ALK rearrangement. Of 42 patients tested, only one patient (2.4%) harbored L858R mutation and gefitinib was applied to this case, however no objective response was observed and the progression free survival (PFS) time was only 1 month. Conclusions Primary pulmonary LELC is a unique histological subtype of lung cancer. ALK rearrangement and EGFR mutation are lack and they may not be the oncogenic driver gene in pulmonary LELC. Future efforts should be made to explore other oncogenic driver gene to guide targeted therapy in this rare disease to determine the optimal treatment. Keywords Pulmonary lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma (LELC); anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK); epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR); targeted therapy; Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) PMID:26543602

  14. Large Cell Calcifying Sertoli Cell Tumor of the Testis: A Case Study and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dae Hyun; Jeong, Seong Muk; Park, Jong Tak; Yun, Gak Won; Kim, Byoung Kwon

    2014-01-01

    A 24-year-old man was admitted due to an incidentally detected mass in his left testis, which showed radiopaque calcification on plain X-ray film. Left orchiectomy was performed, and the resected testis contained a well-demarcated, hard mass measuring 1.1 cm. Histological analysis revealed that the tumor was composed of neoplastic cells, fibrotic stroma, and laminated or irregularly shaped calcific bodies. The individual cells had abundant eosinophilic or clear cytoplasm with round nuclei, each of which contained one or two conspicuous nucleoli. They were arranged in cords, trabeculae, clusters, and diffuse sheets. There were several foci of intra-tubular growth patterns, with thickening of the basal lamina. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells were positive for S-100 protein and vimentin, focally positive for inhibin alpha, and negative for cytokeratin, CD10, and Melan-A. In addition to reporting this rare case, we also review the relevant literature regarding large cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumors. PMID:24627695

  15. Mixed Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma and Adenocarcinoma with Spindle Cell and Clear Cell Features in the Extrahepatic Bile Duct

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rishi; Nguyen, Jeremy; Weidenhaft, Mandy Crause; Shores, Nathan; Kimbrell, Hillary Z.

    2014-01-01

    Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas, spindle cell carcinomas, and clear cell carcinomas are all rare tumors in the biliary tract. We present the first case, to our knowledge, of an extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma composed of all three types. A 65-year-old man with prior cholecystectomy presented with painless jaundice, vomiting, and weight loss. CA19-9 and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) were elevated. Cholangioscopy revealed a friable mass extending from the middle of the common bile duct to the common hepatic duct. A bile duct excision was performed. Gross examination revealed a 3.6 cm intraluminal polypoid tumor. Microscopically, the tumor had foci of conventional adenocarcinoma (CK7-positive and CA19-9-postive) surrounded by malignant-appearing spindle cells that were positive for cytokeratins and vimentin. Additionally, there were separate areas of large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC). Foci of clear cell carcinoma merged into both the LCNEC and the adenocarcinoma. Tumor invaded through the bile duct wall with extensive perineural and vascular invasion. Circumferential margins were positive. The patient's poor performance status precluded adjuvant therapy and he died with recurrent and metastatic disease 5 months after surgery. This is consistent with the reported poor survival rates of biliary mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas. PMID:24804133

  16. Plitidepsin (Aplidin) is a potent inhibitor of diffuse large cell and Burkitt lymphoma and is synergistic with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Barboza, Nora M; Medina, Daniel J; Budak-Alpdogan, Tulin; Aracil, Miguel; Jimeno, José M; Bertino, Joseph R; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2012-01-15

    Plitidepsin (Aplidin), an antitumor agent of marine origin, presently is undergoing phase II/III clinical trials, and has shown promise for the treatment of lymphoma. Here, we describe the antitumor effects of plitidepsin alone and in combination with rituximab and investigated the effects of each drug and the combination on the cell cycle and mechanism of cell death. Several Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma (DLCL) lines and Burkitt cell lines were tested for sensitivity to plitidepsin and rituximab. All DLCL and Burkitt lymphoma cell lines were inhibited by plitidepsin in nanomolar concentrations, while rituximab sensitivity varied among different cell lines. Ramos and the RL cell lines proved sensitive to rituximab and were used to test the effects of each of the two drugs. The two agents exhibited synergism at all tested concentrations. For in vivo studies, irradiated athymic nude mice were engrafted with the Ramos lymphoma. Treatment was initiated when the tumors were ~0.5 cm in diameter, and toxic and therapeutic effects were monitored. In the in vivo study, additive effects of the combined two drugs, was demonstrated without an increase in host toxicity. The in vitro synergy and the in vivo additive antitumor effects without an increase in host toxicity with two relatively non-marrow suppressive agents encourages further development of this combination for treatment of aggressive B-cell lymphomas. PMID:22336911

  17. The development of large-cell carcinoma in the wall of a giant bulla complicated by hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shota; Kawaguchi, Koji; Fukui, Takayuki; Fukumoto, Koichi; Okasaka, Toshiki; Yokoi, Kohei

    2016-12-01

    There were a few reports of patients with lung cancer developing at the wall of giant bullae complicated with hemorrhage. A 40-year-old male with complaints of hemoptysis was referred to our hospital, and a solitary pulmonary mass was pointed out on his chest roentgenogram. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a well-circumscribed solid mass measuring 7.0 × 6.5 × 6.0 cm in the right upper lobe of the lung. At the chest CT 1 year before, only a giant bulla without mass was found. From the interval change of CT findings with his clinical course, the mass was suspected as acute hemorrhage in the giant bulla. A right upper lobectomy of the lung was performed to control his hemoptysis. The surgical specimen showed the giant bulla filled with blood clot, and a partial wall of the bulla was irregularly thickened. Pathological examination revealed that the thickened wall was composed of large-cell carcinoma. In patients with bullous diseases complicated with hemorrhage, we should be aware of a possibility of developing lung cancer in the bullae. PMID:26964998

  18. Efficacy and patient-reported outcomes with dose-intense temozolomide in patients with newly diagnosed pure and mixed anaplastic oligodendroglioma: a phase II multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Xie, Hao; Dahiya, Saurabh; Hashemi-Sadraei, Nooshin; Schiff, David; Fisher, Paul G; Chamberlain, Marc C; Pannullo, Susan; Newton, Herbert B; Brewer, Cathy; Wood, Laura; Prayson, Richard; Elson, Paul; Peereboom, David M

    2015-03-01

    Standard initial therapy for patients with pure and mixed anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AO/MAO) includes chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Anaplastic oligodendrogliomas with 1p/19q co-deletion are more responsive to chemotherapy. There is concern for potential long-term CNS toxicity of radiation. Hence an approach using chemotherapy initially and reserving radiation for progressive disease is attractive. This multicenter phase II trial included patients with newly diagnosed AO/MAO with central pathology review and 1p/19q assay. Temozolomide was given 150 mg/m(2) days 1-7 and 15-21, every 28 days for 8 cycles. The primary endpoint was progression free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints included response rate, overall survival (OS), treatment toxicity and health-related quality of life (HRQL). Data from 62 patients enrolled between December 2001 and April 2007 at seven centers were analyzed. Among patients with measurable disease, 8 % achieved complete remission, 56 % had stable disease and 36 % had progression. The median PFS and OS were 27.2 months (95 % CI 11.9-36.3) and 105.8 months (95 % CI 51.5-N/A), respectively. Both 1p loss and 1p/19q co-deletion were positive prognostic factors for PFS (p < 0.001) and OS (p < 0.001); and there was some suggestion that 1p/19q co-deletion also predicted better response to chemotherapy (p = 0.007). Grade 3/4 toxicities were mainly hematological. Significantly improved HRQL in the future uncertainty domain of the brain cancer module was seen after cycle 4 (p < 0.001). This trial achieved outcomes similar to those reported previously. Toxicities from dose-intense temozolomide were manageable. Improvement in at least one HRQL domain increased over time. This trial supports the further study of first-line temozolomide monotherapy as an alternative to radiation therapy for patients with newly diagnosed AO/MAO with 1p 19q co-deleted tumors. PMID:25534576

  19. Metastatic large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung arising from the uterus: A pitfall in lung cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ono, Kyoko; Yokota, Naho Ruiz; Yoshioka, Emi; Noguchi, Akira; Washimi, Kota; Kawachi, Kae; Miyagi, Yohei; Kato, Hisamori; Yokose, Tomoyuki

    2016-07-01

    A 41-year-old female smoker presented with a vaginal mass. Gynecological examination showed a mass filling the uterine corpus, cervix, and vagina. A total abdominal hysterectomy was performed. Macroscopic findings included a large fragile mass involving the uterine cavity, cervix, and vagina. Histology revealed atypical ducts admixed with solid components consisting of large atypical cells. The initial pathological diagnosis was grade 3 endometrioid adenocarcinoma. The patient was designated as stage II according to the 2008 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging. Two years later, two nodules were found in the upper lobe of the left lung, and the patient underwent an upper lobectomy. The masses, which exhibited solid and organoid growth patterns of large atypical cells, had histological characteristics of large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) of the lung. However, the tumor was immunohistochemically positive for neuroendocrine markers, such as synaptophysin in addition to estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, and the tumor was negative for thyroid transcription factor-1. These immunohistochemical results were almost identical to those of the solid portions of the uterine carcinoma. The final diagnosis was LCNEC combined with endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the uterine corpus and lung metastasis of the LCNEC component of the endometrial carcinoma. LCNEC often arises in the lung, but it rarely arises in other organs. Some patients with metastatic components exhibited only a LCNEC pattern although the primary tumor was a mixed carcinoma consisting of LCNEC and other histology, like the present case. LCNEC is often poorly differentiated, especially in extrapulmonary primary organ LCNEC. Therefore, pathologists should consider metastatic carcinoma when they encounter lung LCNEC in a patient with a preceding extrapulmonary carcinoma composed of a poorly differentiated component or LCNEC component, and they should clarify tumor

  20. Gallium-67 imaging: A predictor of residual tumor viability and clinical outcome in patients with diffuse large-cell lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, W.D.; Jochelson, M.S.; Herman, T.S.; Nadler, L.M.; Stomper, P.C.; Takvorian, T.; Andersen, J.W.; Canellos, G.P. )

    1990-12-01

    Durable complete remissions (CRs) can be achieved in patients with diffuse large-cell lymphoma (DLCL) with multidrug chemotherapy. The length of time to reach CR may be predictive of treatment outcome. However, defining CR by chest radiograph or computed tomography (CT) is often difficult since residual abnormalities do not always indicate residual disease. We have prospectively evaluated the ability of gallium-67 citrate (Ga-67) imaging to define residual disease and predict outcome in 37 consecutive patients with DLCL. Patients received 296 to 370 megabecquerels (MBq) Ga-67 and were imaged prior to, following cycles 4 to 6, and at completion of intensive chemotherapy. Ga-67 scan results were correlated with radiographic studies. Seventeen of 37 patients (46%) showed persistent, abnormal Ga-67 uptake halfway through chemotherapy. Of these, four were in CR, 11 were in partial remission (PR), and two showed no change in tumor size. At follow-up, 10 (59%) have died (three who were scored as CR and seven who were in PR halfway through therapy), two are alive with active tumor, one relapsed and survives following bone marrow transplant, and four (three in PR and one in CR at the therapeutic halfway point) are without disease at a median of 28 months from presentation. Of the 20 patients who were Ga-67-negative halfway through therapy, 11 were in CR and nine were in PR. Five of 20 patients (25%) have died. Three, in radiographic CR died at 11, 26, and 28 months, and two in radiographic PR died at 15 and 17 months. One patient is alive with active tumor, and 14 patients (70%) are alive without disease at a median of 34 months from presentation. Ga-67 imaging proved to be an excellent indicator of residual viable tumor; a positive scan halfway through therapy predicted for a poor outcome and may well justify a change in treatment.

  1. Dual inhibition of HDAC and EGFR signaling with CUDC-101 induces potent suppression of tumor growth and metastasis in anaplastic thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lisa; Zhang, Yaqin; Mehta, Amit; Boufraqech, Myriem; Davis, Sean; Wang, Jing; Tian, Ze; Yu, Zhiya; Boxer, Matthew B.; Kiefer, Jeffrey A.; Copland, John A.; Smallridge, Robert C.; Li, Zhuyin; Shen, Min; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most lethal human malignancies that currently has no effective therapy. We performed quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) in three ATC cell lines using 3,282 clinically approved drugs and drug candidates, and identified 100 active agents. Enrichment analysis of active compounds showed that inhibitors of EGFR and histone deacetylase (HDAC) were most active. Of these, the first-in-class dual inhibitor of EGFR, HER2 and HDACs, CUDC-101, had the highest efficacy and lower IC50 than established drugs. We validated that CUDC-101 inhibited cellular proliferation and resulted in cell death by inducing cell cycle arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis. CUDC-101 also inhibited cellular migration in vitro. Mechanistically, CUDC-101 inhibited MAPK signaling and histone deacetylation in ATC cell lines with multiple driver mutations present in human ATC. The anticancer effect of CUDC-101 was associated with increased expression of p21 and E-cadherin, and reduced expression of survivin, XIAP, β-catenin, N-cadherin, and Vimentin. In an in vivo mouse model of metastatic ATC, CUDC-101 inhibited tumor growth and metastases, and significantly prolonged survival. Response to CUDC-101 treatment in vivo was associated with increased histone 3 acetylation and reduced survivin expression. Our findings provide a preclinical basis to evaluate CUDC-101 therapy in ATC. PMID:25940539

  2. Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: The Addition of Systemic Chemotherapy to Radiotherapy Led to an Observed Improvement in Survival—A Single Centre Experience and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Natalie M.; Loughran, Sean; Slevin, Nicholas J.; Yap, Beng K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is rare yet accounts for up to 50% of all thyroid cancer deaths. This study reviews outcomes of patients with confirmed ATC referred to a tertiary oncology centre plus reviews the literature to explore how poor outcomes may be improved. Materials and Methods. The management and outcomes of 20 patients with ATC were reviewed. Results. Median age at diagnosis was 69.5 years. 19 patients died due to ATC, 40% of whom died from asphyxiation. Median survival for all cases was 59 days. Patients who had previous surgery prior to other treatment modalities had a longer median survival overall compared to those who had not had previous surgery (142 days compared to 59 days) and produced the one long-term survivor. Chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy (without previous surgery) was associated with longer median survival (220 days). Palliative radiotherapy alone did not decrease the rate of death by asphyxiation when compared to other single modality treatments. Conclusion. Multimodality treatment including surgery when feasible remains the best strategy to improve survival and prevent death from asphyxiation in the management of ATC. The addition of chemotherapy to our institutional protocol led to improved survival but prognosis remains very poor. PMID:25184150

  3. Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma: A ceRNA Analysis Pointed to a Crosstalk between SOX2, TP53, and microRNA Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Carina, Valeria; Tomasello, Laura; Pitrone, Maria; Baiamonte, Concetta; Amato, Marco Calogero

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that cancer stem cells (CSC) may play a central role in oncogenesis, especially in undifferentiated tumours. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) has characteristics suggestive of a tumour enriched in CSC. Previous studies suggested that the stem cell factor SOX2 has a preeminent hierarchical role in determining the characteristics of stem cells in SW1736 ATC cell line. In detail, silencing SOX2 in SW1736 is able to suppress the expression of the stem markers analysed, strongly sensitizing the line to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, in order to further investigate the role of SOX2 in ATC, a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) analysis was conducted in order to isolate new functional partners of SOX2. Among the interactors, of particular interest are genes involved in the biogenesis of miRNAs (DICER1, RNASEN, and EIF2C2), in the control cell cycle (TP53, CCND1), and in mitochondrial activity (COX8A). The data suggest that stemness, microRNA biogenesis and functions, p53 regulatory network, cyclin D1, and cell cycle control, together with mitochondrial activity, might be coregulated. PMID:25705224

  4. The heat shock protein 90 inhibitor SNX5422 has a synergistic activity with histone deacetylase inhibitors in induction of death of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si Hyoung; Kang, Jun Goo; Kim, Chul Sik; Ihm, Sung-Hee; Choi, Moon Gi; Yoo, Hyung Joon; Lee, Seong Jin

    2016-02-01

    The influence of the heat shock protein 90 (hsp90) inhibitor SNX5422 alone or in combination with the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors PXD101, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), and trichostatin A (TSA) on survival of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) cells was investigated. In 8505C and CAL62 cells, SNX5422 caused cell death with concomitant changes in the expression of hsp90 client proteins. After treatment of both SNX5422 and PXD101, SAHA and TSA, compared with treatment of SNX5422 alone, cell viability was diminished, whereas inhibition rate and cytotoxic activity were enhanced. All of the combination index values were lower than 1.0, suggesting the synergism between SNX5422 and PXD101, SAHA and TSA in induction of cell death. In cells treated with both SNX5422 and PXD101, SAHA and TSA, compared with cells treated with SNX5422 alone, the protein levels of Akt, phospho-4EBP1, phospho-S6 K, and survivin were diminished, while those of γH2AX, acetyl. histone H3, acetyl. histone H4, cleaved PARP, and cleaved caspase-3 were enhanced. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that SNX5422 has a cytotoxic activity in conjunction with alterations in the expression of hsp90 client proteins in ATC cells. Moreover, SNX5422 synergizes with HDAC inhibitors in induction of cytotoxicity accompanied by the suppression of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling and survivin, and the overexpression of DNA damage-related proteins in ATC cells. PMID:26219406

  5. Involvement of cysteine-rich protein 61 in the epidermal growth factor-induced migration of human anaplastic thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chin, Li-Han; Hsu, Sung-Po; Zhong, Wen-Bin; Liang, Yu-Chih

    2016-05-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is among the most aggressive types of malignant cancer. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of ATC, and patients with thyroid carcinoma typically exhibit increased cysteine-rich protein 61 (Cyr61). In this study, we found that EGF treatment induced cell migration, stress fiber formation, Cyr61 mRNA and protein expressions, and Cyr61 protein secretion in ATC cells. The recombinant Cyr61 protein significantly induced cell migration; however, inhibition of Cyr61 activity by a Cyr61-specific antibody abrogated EGF-induced cell migration. EGF treatment also affected epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related marker protein expression, as evidenced by an increase in vimentin and a decrease in E-cadherin expression. Inhibition of Cyr61 expression by Cyr61 siRNA decreased cell migration and reversed the EMT-related marker protein expression. EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and finally activated Cyr61 promoter plasmid activity. Our results suggest that Cyr61 is induced by EGF through the ERK/CREB signal pathway and that it plays a crucial role in the migration and invasion of ATC cells; moreover, Cyr61 might be a therapeutic target for metastatic ATC. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25773758

  6. Late Intervention with anti-BRAFV600E Therapy Induces Tumor Regression in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Human Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nehs, Matthew A.; Nucera, Carmelo; Nagarkatti, Sushruta S.; Sadow, Peter M.; Morales-Garcia, Dieter; Hodin, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Human anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is a lethal disease with an advanced clinical presentation and median survival of 3 months. The BRAFV600E oncoprotein is a potent transforming factor that causes human thyroid cancer cell progression in vitro and in vivo; therefore, we sought to target this oncoprotein in a late intervention model of ATC in vivo. We used the human ATC cell line 8505c, which harbors the BRAFV600E and TP53R248G mutations. Immunocompromised mice were randomized to receive the selective anti-BRAFV600E inhibitor, PLX4720, or vehicle by oral gavage 28 d after tumor implantation, 1 wk before all animals typically die due to widespread metastatic lung disease and neck compressive symptoms in this model. Mice were euthanized weekly to evaluate tumor volume and metastases. Control mice showed progressive tumor growth and lung metastases by 35 d after tumor implantation. At that time, all control mice had large tumors, were cachectic, and were euthanized due to their tumor-related weight loss. PLX4720-treated mice, however, showed a significant decrease in tumor volume and lung metastases in addition to a reversal of tumor-related weight loss. Mouse survival was extended to 49 d in PLX4720-treated animals. PLX4720 treatment inhibited cell cycle progression from 28 d to 49 d in vivo. PLX4720 induces striking tumor regression and reversal of cachexia in an in vivo model of advanced thyroid cancer that harbors the BRAFV600E mutation. PMID:22202162

  7. Aberrant expression of anaplastic lymphoma kinase in lung adenocarcinoma: Analysis of circulating free tumor RNA using one-step reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Rossella; Giordano, Mirella; Giannini, Riccardo; Alì, Greta; Puppo, Gianfranco; Ribechini, Alessandro; Chella, Antonio; Fontanini, Gabriella

    2016-09-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma patients harboring anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements respond well to approved ALK inhibitors. However, to date, limited evidence is available regarding whether using circulating free tumor mRNA to identify aberrant ALK expression is possible, and its feasibility remains to be clearly addressed. The present study evaluated ALK expression by a one-step reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay on the circulating free tumor mRNA from 12 lung adenocarcinoma patients. Additionally, the present study tested for ALK rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry. A molecular genetic characterization was performed on tumor tissues and plasma samples. Aberrant ALK expression was detected in 2/12 patients using mRNA purified from plasma specimens and the results agreed with the FISH and immunohistochemistry findings of solid biopsy samples. The detection of aberrant ALK expression on circulating free tumor RNA may be feasible using a one‑step real‑time PCR assay and may be particularly helpful when a solid biopsy sample is not available. PMID:27430882

  8. Outcomes for patients with anaplastic astrocytoma treated with chemoradiation, radiation therapy alone or radiation therapy followed by chemotherapy: a retrospective review within the era of temozolomide.

    PubMed

    Shonka, Nicole A; Theeler, Brett; Cahill, Daniel; Yung, Alfred; Smith, Lynette; Lei, Xiudong; Gilbert, Mark R

    2013-06-01

    Treatment for anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) is controversial. To assess three primary treatment approaches, patients from a single institution were retrospectively evaluated. To represent modern treatment selection, patients diagnosed with AA from December 2003 to December 2009 were selected. Those with insufficient data, incomplete pathology, and transformation or reclassification to glioblastoma in fewer than 6 months were excluded. A total of 163 patients were included in the final analyses. Median follow-up time was 4.2 years (range 0.5-7.8 years). Median age and Karnofsky performance status at diagnosis were 39.2 years and 90, respectively. 23.6 % of patients underwent biopsy, and 72.2 % underwent resection. Approximately 31 % received concurrent chemoradiation (CRT), 26.1 % had radiation therapy alone (RT), 38.2 % had radiation therapy followed by chemotherapy (RT-C), and 3 % were treated only with chemotherapy. Temozolomide was used almost exclusively during CRT (94.2 %) and adjuvantly. A median of 9.5 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy was given. The combination of radiation and chemotherapy, either concurrent or sequential trended toward a higher rate of radiation necrosis. Median progression free survival (PFS) favored RT (not reached) over CRT (1.5 years) and RT-C (3.6 years) adjusted for pairwise comparison (p = 0.033, p = 0.050). Median overall survival (OS) was 5.7 years, and did not differ significantly by treatment group. OS for patients with AA did not vary by initial treatment selection. Although the longer PFS in those receiving RT versus CRT may be confounded by pseudoprogression, the equivalent OS among groups supports RT. PMID:23526410

  9. CLM29 and CLM24, pyrazolopyrimidine derivatives, have antitumoral activity in vitro in anaplastic thyroid cancer, with or without BRAF mutation.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Poupak; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; La Motta, Concettina; Materazzi, Gabriele; Bocci, Guido; Da Settimo, Federico; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    We have studied the antitumor activity of two new "pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine" compounds (CLM29 and CLM24) that inhibit several targets (including the RET tyrosine kinase, epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, with an antiangiogenic effect) in primary anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) cell cultures and in the human cell line 8305C (undifferentiated thyroid cancer). The antitumor effect of CLM29 and CLM24 was tested in: nine primary ATC cultures obtained from patients at the time of surgery at the concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 30, 50 µM; in 8305C cells at 1, 5, 10, 30, 50 µM for CLM29, and 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, 100 µM for CLM24. CLM29, and CLM24 significantly inhibited the proliferation of 8305C cells. A significant reduction of proliferation with CLM29 and CLM24 in ATC cells (P < 0.01, for both, ANOVA) was shown. CLM29 and CLM24 increased the percentage of apoptotic ATC cells dose-dependently (P < 0.001, ANOVA). The (V600E) BRAF mutation was observed in three ATCs; the results about the inhibition of proliferation by CLM29 and CLM24, obtained in ATC from tumors with (V600E) BRAF mutation were similar to those from tumors without BRAF mutation. CLM29 inhibited migration and invasion (P < 0.01) of primary ATC cells, while CLM24 had no significant effect. The antitumor activity of two new "pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine" compounds (CLM24, CLM29) in vitro in ATC, independent from BRAF mutation, has been shown, allowing a future clinical evaluation. PMID:26286966

  10. Phosphoproteomic analysis of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) downstream signaling pathways identifies signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 as a functional target of activated ALK in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sattu, Kamaraj; Hochgräfe, Falko; Wu, Jianmin; Umapathy, Ganesh; Schönherr, Christina; Ruuth, Kristina; Chand, Damini; Witek, Barbara; Fuchs, James; Li, Pui-Kai; Hugosson, Fredrik; Daly, Roger J; Palmer, Ruth H; Hallberg, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) receptor tyrosine kinase is a key oncogenic mechanism in a growing number of tumor types. In the majority of cases, ALK is activated by fusion with a dimerizing partner protein as a result of chromosomal translocation events, most studied in the case of the nucleophosmin–ALK and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4–ALK oncoproteins. It is now also appreciated that the full-length ALK receptor can be activated by point mutations and by deletions within the extracellular domain, such as those observed in neuroblastoma. Several studies have employed phosphoproteomics approaches to find substrates of ALK fusion proteins. In this study, we used MS-based phosphotyrosine profiling to characterize phosphotyrosine signaling events associated with the full-length ALK receptor. A number of previously identified and novel targets were identified. One of these, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), has previously been observed to be activated in response to oncogenic ALK signaling, but the significance of this in signaling from the full-length ALK receptor has not been explored further. We show here that activated ALK robustly activates STAT3 on Tyr705 in a number of independent neuroblastoma cell lines. Furthermore, knockdown of STAT3 by RNA interference resulted in a reduction in myelocytomatosis neuroblastom (MYCN) protein levels downstream of ALK signaling. These observations, together with a decreased level of MYCN and inhibition of neuroblastoma cell growth in the presence of STAT3 inhibitors, suggest that activation of STAT3 is important for ALK signaling activity in neuroblastoma. PMID:23889739

  11. Targeting Transforming Growth Factor-Beta1 (TGF-β1) Inhibits Tumorigenesis of Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma Cells Through ERK1/2-NFκkB-PUMA Signaling.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qiang; Liu, Shan; Dong, Anbing; Mi, Xiufang; Hao, Fengyun; Zhang, Kejun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway plays a critical role in promoting tumor growth. TGF-β1was found to be overexpressed in anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC). We therefore tested our hypothesis that targeting TGF-β1 inhibits tumorigenesis of ATC cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS Effects of TGF-β1 stimulation or TGF-β1 inhibition by small interfering RNA (TGF-β1siRNA) on proliferation, colony formation, and apoptosis in 8505C cells in vitro was detected using siRNAs and inhibitors to examine the TGF-β1 signaling pathway. A subcutaneously implanted tumor model of 8505C cells in nude mice was used to assess the effects of TGF-β1 inhibition on tumorigenesis development. RESULTS TGF-β1siRNAs decreased proliferation and colony formation, and increased apoptosis in 8505C cells in vitro and inhibited tumor growth in vivo. TGF-β1siRNA inhibited phosphorylation ERK1/2 (pERK1/2) and increased p65-dependant PUMA mRNA and protein expression. Knockdown of p65 or PUMA by siRNA reduced TGF-β1siRNA-induced apoptosis, as well as caspase-3 and PARP activation. Upregulation of p65 or PUMA expression by TGF-β1siRNA requires pERK1/2 inhibition. TGF-β1 shRNA inhibited tumor growth in vivo. CONCLUSIONS Therapies targeting the TGF-β1 pathway may be more effective to prevent primary tumor formation. The ability of this therapy to decrease tumorigenesis may be related to ERK1/2/NF-κB/PUMA signaling. PMID:27356491

  12. Cognition and Quality of Life After Chemotherapy Plus Radiotherapy (RT) vs. RT for Pure and Mixed Anaplastic Oligodendrogliomas: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial 9402

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Meihua; Cairncross, Gregory; Shaw, Edward

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9402 compared procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine (PCV) chemotherapy plus radiation therapy (PCV + RT) vs. RT alone for anaplastic oligodendroglioma. Here we report longitudinal changes in cognition and quality of life, effects of patient factors and treatments on cognition, quality of life and survival, and prognostic implications of cognition and quality of life. Methods and Materials: Cognition was assessed by Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) and quality of life by Brain-Quality of Life (B-QOL). Scores were analyzed for survivors and within 5 years of death. Shared parameter models evaluated MMSE/B-QOL with survival. Results: For survivors, MMSE and B-QOL scores were similar longitudinally and between treatments. For those who died, MMSE scores remained stable initially, whereas B-QOL slowly declined; both declined rapidly in the last year of life and similarly between arms. In the aggregate, scores decreased over time (p = 0.0413 for MMSE; p = 0.0016 for B-QOL) and were superior with age <50 years (p < 0.001 for MMSE; p = 0.0554 for B-QOL) and Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) 80-100 (p < 0.001). Younger age and higher KPS were associated with longer survival. After adjusting for patient factors and drop-out, survival was longer after PCV + RT (HR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.49-0.9, p = 0.0084; HR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.54-1.01, p = 0.0592) in models with MMSE and B-QOL. In addition, there were no differences in MMSE and B-QOL scores between arms (p = 0.4752 and p = 0.2767, respectively); higher scores predicted longer survival. Conclusion: MMSE and B-QOL scores held steady in the upper range in both arms for survivors. Younger, fitter patients had better MMSE and B-QOL and longer survival.

  13. The oncolytic virus dl922-947 reduces IL-8/CXCL8 and MCP-1/CCL2 expression and impairs angiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Passaro, Carmela; Borriello, Francesco; Vastolo, Viviana; Di Somma, Sarah; Scamardella, Eloise; Gigantino, Vincenzo; Franco, Renato; Marone, Gianni; Portella, Giuseppe

    2016-01-12

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human solid tumor and current treatments are ineffective in increasing patients' survival. Thus, the development of new therapeutic approaches for ATC is needed. We have previously shown that the oncolytic adenovirus dl922-947 induces ATC cell death in vitro and tumor regression in vivo. However, the impact of dl922-947 on the pro-tumorigenic ATC microenvironment is still unknown. Since viruses are able to regulate cytokine and chemokine production from infected cells, we sought to investigate whether dl922-947 virotherapy has such effect on ATC cells, thereby modulating ATC microenvironment. dl922-947 decreased IL-8/CXCL8 and MCP-1/CCL2 production by the ATC cell lines 8505-c and BHT101-5. These results correlated with dl922-947-mediated reduction of NF-κB p65 binding to IL8 promoter in 8505-c and BHT101-5 cells and CCL2 promoter in 8505-c cells. IL-8 stimulates cancer cell proliferation, survival and invasion, and also angiogenesis. dl922-947-mediated reduction of IL-8 impaired ATC cell motility in vitro and ATC-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We also show that dl922-947-mediated reduction of the monocyte-attracting chemokine CCL2 decreased monocyte chemotaxis in vitro and tumor macrophage density in vivo. Interestingly, dl922-947 treatment induced the switch of tumor macrophages toward a pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype, likely by increasing the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ. Altogether, we demonstrate that dl922-947 treatment re-shape the pro-tumorigenic ATC microenvironment by modulating cancer-cell intrinsic factors and the immune response. An in-depth knowledge of dl922-947-mediated effects on ATC microenvironment may help to refine ATC virotherapy in the context of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26625205

  14. Altered expression of mir-222 and mir-25 influences diverse gene expression changes in transformed normal and anaplastic thyroid cells, and impacts on MEK and TRAIL protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Aherne, Sinéad T.; Smyth, Paul; Freeley, Michael; Smith, Leila; Spillane, Cathy; O'leary, John; Sheils, Orla

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy and accounts for the majority of endocrine cancer-related deaths each year. Our group and others have previously demonstrated dysfunctional microRNA (miRNA or miR) expression in the context of thyroid cancer. The objective of the present study was to investigate the impact of synthetic manipulation of expression of miR-25 and miR-222 in benign and malignant thyroid cells. miR-25 and miR-222 expression was upregulated in 8505C (an anaplastic thyroid cell line) and Nthy-ori (a SV40-immortalised thyroid cell line) cells, respectively. A transcriptomics-based approach was utilised to identify targets of the two miRNAs and real-time PCR and western blotting were used to validate a subset of the targets. Almost 100 mRNAs of diverse functions were found to be either directly or indirectly targeted by both miR-222 and miR-25 [fold change ≥2, false discovery rate (FDR) ≤0.05]. Gene ontology analysis showed the miR-25 gene target list to be significantly enriched for genes involved in cell adhesion. Fluidigm real-time PCR technologies were used to validate the downregulation of 23 and 22 genes in response to miR-25 and miR-222 overexpression, respectively. The reduction of the expression of two miR-25 protein targets, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MEK4), was also validated. Manipulating the expression of both miR-222 and miR-25 influenced diverse gene expression changes in thyroid cells. Increased expression of miR-25 reduced MEK4 and TRAIL protein expression, and cell adhesion and apoptosis are important aspects of miR-25 functioning in thyroid cells. PMID:27353001

  15. Improved Correlation of the Neuropathologic Classification According to Adapted World Health Organization Classification and Outcome After Radiotherapy in Patients With Atypical and Anaplastic Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Debus, Juergen; Deimling, Andreas von; Hartmann, Christian

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between the 1993 and 2000/2007 World Health Organization (WHO) classification with the outcome in patients with high-grade meningiomas. Patients and Methods: Between 1985 and 2004, 73 patients diagnosed with atypical or anaplastic meningiomas were treated with radiotherapy. Sections from the paraffin-embedded tumor material from 66 patients (90%) from 13 different pathology departments were re-evaluated according to the first revised WHO classification from 1993 and the revised classifications from 2000/2007. In 4 cases, the initial diagnosis meningioma was not reproducible (5%). Therefore, 62 patients with meningiomas were analyzed. Results: All 62 tumors were reclassified according to the 1993 and 2000/2007 WHO classification systems. Using the 1993 system, 7 patients were diagnosed with WHO grade I meningioma (11%), 23 with WHO grade II (37%), and 32 with WHO grade III meningioma (52%). After scoring using the 2000/2007 system, we found 17 WHO grade I meningiomas (27%), 32 WHO grade II meningiomas (52%), and 13 WHO grade III meningiomas (21%). According to the 1993 classification, the difference in overall survival was not statistically significant among the histologic subgroups (p = .96). Using the 2000/2007 WHO classifications, the difference in overall survival became significant (p = .02). Of the 62 reclassified patients 29 developed tumor progression (47%). No difference in progression-free survival was observed among the histologic subgroups (p = .44). After grading according to the 2000/2007 WHO classifications, significant differences in progression-free survival were observed among the three histologic groups (p = .005). Conclusion: The new 2000/2007 WHO classification for meningiomas showed an improved correlation between the histologic grade and outcome. This classification therefore provides a useful basis to determine the postoperative indication for radiotherapy. According to our results, a comparison of the

  16. MGMT Promoter Methylation Is Prognostic but Not Predictive for Outcome to Adjuvant PCV Chemotherapy in Anaplastic Oligodendroglial Tumors: A Report From EORTC Brain Tumor Group Study 26951

    PubMed Central

    van den Bent, Martin J.; Dubbink, Hendrikus J.; Sanson, Marc; van der Lee-Haarloo, Cathleen R.; Hegi, Monika; Jeuken, Judith W.M.; Ibdaih, Ahmed; Brandes, Alba A.; Taphoorn, Martin J.B.; Frenay, Marc; Lacombe, Denis; Gorlia, Thierry; Dinjens, Winand N.M.; Kros, Johan M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose O6-methylguanine-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation has been shown to predict survival of patients with glioblastomas if temozolomide is added to radiotherapy (RT). It is unknown if MGMT promoter methylation is also predictive to outcome to RT followed by adjuvant procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine (PCV) chemotherapy in patients with anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors (AOT). Patients and Methods In the European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer study 26951, 368 patients with AOT were randomly assigned to either RT alone or to RT followed by adjuvant PCV. From 165 patients of this study, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor tissue was available for MGMT promoter methylation analysis. This was investigated with methylation specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Results In 152 cases, an MGMT result was obtained, in 121 (80%) cases MGMT promoter methylation was observed. Methylation strongly correlated with combined loss of chromosome 1p and 19q loss (P = .00043). In multivariate analysis, MGMT promoter methylation, 1p/19q codeletion, tumor necrosis, and extent of resection were independent prognostic factors. The prognostic significance of MGMT promoter methylation was equally strong in the RT arm and the RT/PCV arm for both progression-free survival and overall survival. In tumors diagnosed at central pathology review as glioblastoma, no prognostic effect of MGMT promoter methylation was observed. Conclusion In this study, on patients with AOT MGMT promoter methylation was of prognostic significance and did not have predictive significance for outcome to adjuvant PCV chemotherapy. The biologic effect of MGMT promoter methylation or pathogenetic features associated with MGMT promoter methylation may be different for AOT compared with glioblastoma. PMID:19901104

  17. O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase activity is associated with response to alkylating agent therapy and with MGMT promoter methylation in glioblastoma and anaplastic glioma

    PubMed Central

    Bobola, Michael S.; Alnoor, Mohammad; Chen, John Y.-S.; Kolstoe, Douglas D.; Silbergeld, Daniel L.; Rostomily, Robert C.; Blank, A.; Chamberlain, Marc C.; Silber, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Background CpG methylation in the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter is associated with better outcome following alkylating agent chemotherapy in glioblastoma (GBM) and anaplastic glioma (AG). To what extent improved response reflects low or absent MGMT activity in glioma tissue has not been unequivocally assessed. This information is central to developing anti-resistance therapies. Methods We examined the relationship of MGMT activity in 91 GBMs and 84 AGs with progression-free survival (PFS) following alkylator therapy and with promoter methylation status determined by methylation-specific PCR (MSP). Results Cox regression analysis revealed that GBMs with high activity had a significantly greater risk for progression in dichotomous (P ≤ 0.001) and continuous (P ≤ 0.003) models, an association observed for different alkylator regimens, including concurrent chemo-radiation with temozolomide. Analysis of MGMT promoter methylation status in 47 of the GBMs revealed that methylated tumors had significantly lower activity (P ≤ 0.005) and longer PFS (P ≤ 0.036) compared to unmethylated tumors, despite overlapping activities. PFS was also significantly greater in methylated vs. unmethylated GBMs with comparable activity (P ≤ 0.005), and among unmethylated tumors with less than median activity (P ≤ 0.026), suggesting that mechanisms in addition to MGMT promote alkylator resistance. Similar associations of MGMT activity with PFS and promoter methylation status were observed for AGs. Conclusions Our results provide strong support for the hypotheses that MGMT activity promotes alkylator resistance and reflects promoter methylation status in malignant gliomas. General significance MGMT activity is an attractive target for anti-resistance therapy regardless of methylation status. PMID:25558448

  18. Anaplastic, plasmablastic, and plasmacytic plasmacytomas of mice: relationships to human plasma cell neoplasms and late-stage differentiation of normal B cells.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chen-Feng; Zhou, Jeff X; Lee, Chang Hoon; Naghashfar, Zohreh; Xiang, Shao; Kovalchuk, Alexander L; Fredrickson, Torgny N; Hartley, Janet W; Roopenian, Derry C; Davidson, Wendy F; Janz, Siegfried; Morse, Herbert C

    2007-03-15

    We have compared histologic features and gene expression profiles of newly identified plasmacytomas from NFS.V(+) congenic mice with plasmacytomas of IL6 transgenic, Fasl mutant, and SJL-beta2M(-/-) mice. NFS.V(+) tumors comprised an overlapping morphologic spectrum of high-grade/anaplastic, intermediate-grade/plasmablastic, and low-grade/plasmacytic cases with similarities to subsets of human multiple myeloma and plasmacytoma. Microarray and immunohistochemical analyses of genes expressed by the most prevalent tumors, plasmablastic plasmacytomas, showed them to be most closely related to immunoblastic lymphomas, less so to plasmacytomas of Fasl mutant and SJL mice, and least to plasmacytic plasmacytomas of IL6 transgenic mice. Plasmablastic tumors seemed to develop in an inflammatory environment associated with gene signatures of T cells, natural killer cells, and macrophages not seen with plasmacytic plasmacytomas. Plasmablastic plasmacytomas from NFS.V(+) and SJL-beta2M(-/-) mice did not have structural alterations in Myc or T(12;15) translocations and did not express Myc at high levels, regular features of transgenic and pristane-induced plasmacytomas. These findings imply that, as for human multiple myeloma, Myc-independent routes of transformation contribute to the pathogenesis of these tumors. These findings suggest that plasma cell neoplasms of mice and humans exhibit similar degrees of complexity. Mouse plasmacytomas, previously considered to be homogeneous, may thus be as diverse as their human counterparts with respect to oncogenic mechanisms of plasma cell transformation. Selecting specific types of mouse plasmacytomas that relate most closely to subtypes of human multiple myeloma may provide new opportunities for preclinical testing of drugs for treatment of the human disease. PMID:17363561

  19. The oncolytic virus dl922-947 reduces IL-8/CXCL8 and MCP-1/CCL2 expression and impairs angiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vastolo, Viviana; Di Somma, Sarah; Scamardella, Eloise; Gigantino, Vincenzo; Franco, Renato; Marone, Gianni; Portella, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human solid tumor and current treatments are ineffective in increasing patients' survival. Thus, the development of new therapeutic approaches for ATC is needed. We have previously shown that the oncolytic adenovirus dl922-947 induces ATC cell death in vitro and tumor regression in vivo. However, the impact of dl922-947 on the pro-tumorigenic ATC microenvironment is still unknown. Since viruses are able to regulate cytokine and chemokine production from infected cells, we sought to investigate whether dl922-947 virotherapy has such effect on ATC cells, thereby modulating ATC microenvironment. dl922-947 decreased IL-8/CXCL8 and MCP-1/CCL2 production by the ATC cell lines 8505-c and BHT101-5. These results correlated with dl922-947-mediated reduction of NF-κB p65 binding to IL8 promoter in 8505-c and BHT101-5 cells and CCL2 promoter in 8505-c cells. IL-8 stimulates cancer cell proliferation, survival and invasion, and also angiogenesis. dl922-947-mediated reduction of IL-8 impaired ATC cell motility in vitro and ATC-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We also show that dl922-947-mediated reduction of the monocyte-attracting chemokine CCL2 decreased monocyte chemotaxis in vitro and tumor macrophage density in vivo. Interestingly, dl922-947 treatment induced the switch of tumor macrophages toward a pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype, likely by increasing the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ. Altogether, we demonstrate that dl922-947 treatment re-shape the pro-tumorigenic ATC microenvironment by modulating cancer-cell intrinsic factors and the immune response. An in-depth knowledge of dl922-947-mediated effects on ATC microenvironment may help to refine ATC virotherapy in the context of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26625205

  20. Contrast enhancement in 1p/19q-codeleted anaplastic oligodendrogliomas is associated with 9p loss, genomic instability, and angiogenic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Botero, German; Dehais, Caroline; Idbaih, Ahmed; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Lahutte, Marion; Carpentier, Catherine; Letouzé, Eric; Chinot, Olivier; Loiseau, Hugues; Honnorat, Jerome; Ramirez, Carole; Moyal, Elisabeth; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Ducray, François; Desenclos, Christine; Sevestre, Henri; Menei, Philippe; Michalak, Sophie; Al Nader, Edmond; Godard, Joel; Viennet, Gabriel; Carpentier, Antoine; Eimer, Sandrine; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Quintin-Roué, Isabelle; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Kemeny, Jean-Louis; Verrelle, Pierre; Faillot, Thierry; Gaultier, Claude; Tortel, Marie Christine; Christov, Christo; Le Guerinel, Caroline; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Ghiringhelli, Francois; Berger, François; Lacroix, Catherine; Parker, Fabrice; Dubois, François; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Gueye, Edouard-Marcel; Labrousse, Francois; Jouvet, Anne; Bauchet, Luc; Rigau, Valérie; Beauchesne, Patrick; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Campone, Mario; Loussouarn, Delphine; Fontaine, Denys; Vandenbos, Fanny; Campello, Chantal; Roger, Pascal; Fesneau, Melanie; Heitzmann, Anne; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Elouadhani, Selma; Mokhtari, Karima; Polivka, Marc; Ricard, Damien; Levillain, Pierre-Marie; Wager, Michel; Colin, Philippe; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Chiforeanu, Dan; Vauleon, Elodie; Langlois, Olivier; Laquerriere, Annie; Motsuo Fotso, Marie Janette; Peoc'h, Michel; Andraud, Marie; Mouton, Servane; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Noel, Georges; Desse, Nicolas; Soulard, Raoulin; Amiel-Benouaich, Alexandra; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Dhermain, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to correlate MRI features and molecular characteristics in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOs). Methods The MRI characteristics of 50 AO patients enrolled in the French national network for high-grade oligodendroglial tumors were analyzed. The genomic profiles and IDH mutational statuses were assessed using high-resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays and direct sequencing, respectively. The gene expression profiles of 25 1p/19q-codeleted AOs were studied on Affymetrix expression arrays. Results Most of the cases were frontal lobe contrast-enhanced tumors (52%), but the radiological presentations of these cases were heterogeneous, ranging from low-grade glioma-like aspects (26%) to glioblastoma-like aspects (22%). The 1p/19q codeletion (n = 39) was associated with locations in the frontal lobe (P = .001), with heterogeneous intratumoral signal intensities (P = .003) and with no or nonmeasurable contrast enhancements (P = .01). The IDH wild-type AOs (n = 7) more frequently displayed ringlike contrast enhancements (P = .03) and were more frequently located outside of the frontal lobe (P = .01). However, no specific imaging pattern could be identified for the 1p/19q-codeleted AO or the IDH-mutated AO. Within the 1p/19q-codeleted AO, the contrast enhancement was associated with larger tumor volumes (P = .001), chromosome 9p loss and CDKN2A loss (P = .006), genomic instability (P = .03), and angiogenesis-related gene expression (P < .001), particularly for vascular endothelial growth factor A and angiopoietin 2. Conclusion In AOs, the 1p/19q codeletion and the IDH mutation are associated with preferential (but not with specific) imaging characteristics. Within 1p/19q-codeleted AO, imaging heterogeneity is related to additional molecular alterations, especially chromosome 9p loss, which is associated with contrast enhancement and larger tumor volume. PMID:24353325

  1. Mitotic index, microvascular proliferation, and necrosis define 3 groups of 1p/19q codeleted anaplastic oligodendrogliomas associated with different genomic alterations

    PubMed Central

    Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Mokhtari, Karima; Dehais, Caroline; Jouvet, Anne; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Colin, Carole; Carpentier, Catherine; Forest, Fabien; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Polivka, Marc; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Eimer, Sandrine; Viennet, Gabriel; Quintin-Roué, Isabelle; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Loussouarn, Delphine; Lacroix, Catherine; Rigau, Valérie; Laquerrière, Annie; Vandenbos, Fanny; Michalak, Sophie; Sevestre, Henri; Peoch, Michel; Labrousse, François; Christov, Christo; Kemeny, Jean-Louis; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Chiforeanu, Danchristian; Ducray, François; Idbaih, Ahmed; Desenclos, Christine; Menei, Philippe; Al Nader, Edmond; Godard, Joel; Servagi-Vernat, Stéphanie; Carpentier, Antoine; Loiseau, Hugues; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Guillamo, Jean Sebastien; Emery, Evelyne; Verelle, Pierre; Durando, Xavier; Faillot, Thierry; Le Guerinel, Caroline; Ghiringhelli, François; Parker, Fabrice; Adam, Clovis; Dubois, François; Ramirez, Carole; Gueye, Edouard Marcel; Honnorat, Jerome; Chinot, Olivier; Bauchet, Luc; Beauchesne, Patrick; Campone, Mario; Frenel, Jean Sébastien; Fontaine, Denys; Campello, Chantal; Roger, Pascal; Heitzmann, Anne; Fesneau, Mélanie; Delattre, Jean Yves; Elouadhani-Hamdi, Selma; Ricard, Damien; Colin, Philippe; Vauléon, Elodie; Langlois, Olivier; Fotso, Marie Janette Motsuo; Andraud, Marie; Mouton, Servane; Noel, Georges; Desse, Nicolas; Soulard, Raoulin; Cohen-Moyal, Elisabeth; Lubrano, Vincent; Dhermain, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to correlate histological features and molecular characteristics in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOs). Methods The histological characteristics of 203 AO patients, enrolled in the French national network POLA, were analyzed. The genomic profiles of 191 cases were studied using genomic arrays. IDH mutational status was assessed by immunohistochemistry and direct sequencing. Results 1p/19q codeletion was present in 79% of cases and was associated with alpha-internexin expression (P < 10−4), IDH1/2 mutation (P < 10−4), chromosome 4 loss (P < 10−3), and better overall survival (P < 10−4). Based on mitotic index, microvascular proliferation (MVP), and necrosis, 3 groups of 1p/19q codeleted AOs were identified: (group 1) AO with more than 5 mitoses per 10-HPF, no MVP, and no necrosis; (group 2) AO with MVP and no necrosis; and (group 3) AO with MVP and necrosis. Compared with group 1, groups 2 and 3 AOs had a higher mean Ki-67 proliferation index and a higher rate of 9p and 9q losses. Compared with group 2, group 3 AOs had a higher number of chromosomal alterations including chromosome 4 loss. In the subgroup of 157 1p/19q codeleted AOs, chromosomal instability was associated with shorter progression-free survival (P = .024) and shorter overall survival (P = .023). Conclusions The present study shows that oligodendrogliomas with classic histological features remain a molecularly heterogeneous entity and should be stratified according to 1p/19q status because of its major prognostic relevance. Moreover, 1p/19q codeleted AOs are also heterogeneous. Interestingly, mitotic index, MVP, and necrosis help to classify them into 3 groups associated with distinct genomic alterations. PMID:24723566

  2. Efficacy of bronchoscopic biopsy for the detection of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene rearrangement in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pei; Pan, Qingqing; Wang, Mengzhao; Zhong, Wei; Zhao, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Background To explore the efficacy of bronchoscopic biopsy for the detection of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement in lung adenocarcinoma. Methods All patients with bronchoscopic biopsy-proven lung adenocarcinoma at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital from January 2009 to November 2011 were enrolled. Scorpion amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) was used to detect EGFR gene mutations and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to detect ALK rearrangement. The correlation of immunohistochemistry (IHC) results with standard methods for EGFR mutation status and ALK rearrangement were checked. Results Bronchoscopic specimens were successfully used to detect EGFR mutation and ALK rearrangement with success rates of 85.2% and 71.3%, respectively, in non-small cell lung cancer patients. EGFR analysis by ARMS yielded a positive result in 35.8% (33/92) and positive ALK rearrangement was detected by FISH in 7.8% (6/77) of cases. It was more likely to be unsuccessful in patients with tumor cells less than 100/high power field and the ratio tumor numbers in 0–10%. In EGFR-IHC, the sensitivity and specificity of E746-A750 deletions were 73.3% (11/15) and 93.3% (70/75), respectively, and those of L858R were 93.3% (14/15) and 93.2% (69/74), respectively. In ALK-IHC, the sensitivity and specificity were 50% (3/6) and 100% (71/71), respectively. Conclusions Small bronchoscopic specimens could achieve higher successful detection rates via EGFR mutation and ALK gene rearrangement. PMID:26557908

  3. Clinical effect of pemetrexed as the first‐line treatment in Chinese patients with advanced anaplastic lymphoma kinase‐positive non‐small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Di; Hao, Xuezhi; Wang, Yan; Xing, Puyuan

    2016-01-01

    Background The efficacy of pemetrexed‐based first‐line chemotherapy in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)‐positive non‐small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been demonstrated in several studies; however, there is a lack of data from Chinese populations. Methods The clinicopathological characteristics and treatment outcomes of 52 patients with ALK‐positive advanced NSCLC who received pemetrexed as first‐line chemotherapy at the Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences were retrospectively reviewed. The primary end points were response rate and progression‐free survival (PFS). Results The gender proportion was balanced and the median age was 51 years (range 26–76). Of the 52 patients, 46 (88.5%) had stage IV disease, predominantly adenocarcinoma (98.1%). Sixteen patients were current/former smokers and 36 were never/light smokers. The most common sites of metastasis were the pleura (36.5%), bone (30.8%), lung (26.9%), and brain (17.3%). The median PFS was 9.5 months (95% confidence interval 7.454–11.536). At the time of analysis, partial remission was achieved in 18 (34.6%) patients, stable disease in 26 (50.0%), and progressive disease in eight (15.4%); none of the patients achieved complete remission. The objective response rate was 34.6% and the disease control rate was 84.6%. Common adverse events with pemetrexed were neutropenia (53.8%), nausea and vomiting (51.9%), leukopenia (32.7%), and fatigue (25.0%), mainly at grades 1 or 2. Conclusions Pemetrexed is efficient and tolerated as first‐line treatment for ALK‐positive NSCLC in a cohort of Chinese patients and may prove to be an alternative option for the treatment of ALK‐positive NSCLC. PMID:27385988

  4. Gastric large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma with venous tumor thrombus: the value of PET/CT and contrast-enhanced computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Song, Le; Jin, Zhu; Zhang, Weifang; Zhang, Yanyan

    2015-01-01

    Venous involvement is commonly detected microscopically on gastric neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs), but related imaging studies have been rarely documented. We report a rare case of gastric large cell NEC with tumor thrombi in gastric and splenic veins, elevated serum alpha fetoprotein, and multiple hepatic nodules. In this case, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with contrast-enhanced computed tomography provided valuable information on tumor staging. PMID:25496669

  5. Mixed large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma with squamous cell carcinoma of the rectum: Report of a rare case and review of the literature☆

    PubMed Central

    Vardas, Konstantinos; Papadimitriou, Georgios; Chantziara, Maria; Papakonstantinou, Alexandros; Drakopoulos, Spiros

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Mixed large cell neuroendocrine neoplasms of the rectum are rare and aggressive neoplasms. Survival is poor due to the high rate of lymph node metastases and distant metastases at the time of diagnosis. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a case of a 50-year-old male patient with a mixed large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma with squamous cell carcinoma of the rectum located 8 cm from the anal verge, treated with low anterior resection and total mesorectal excision with free surgical margins. There were lymph nodes metastases but no distant metastases at the time of diagnosis. The patient refused to receive adjuvant chemotherapy and died 6 months later due to liver failure as a result of multiple hepatic metastases. DISCUSSION There are not known predisposing factors for the development of neuroendocrine rectal carcinoma. A neuroendocrine carcinoma of the rectum is a rare tumor with an incidence of less than 0.1% of all colorectal malignancies. The median survival ranges from 5 to 10.4 months in several studies and there are not sufficient data in bibliography about ideal adjuvant therapy after resection of mixed squamous large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the rectum. CONCLUSION Low anterior resection and total mesorectal excision with free surgical margins in the presence of lymph nodes metastasis is not a sufficient treatment for rectal neuroendocrine carcinoma. More studies should be done in order to determine the ideal adjuvant treatment of these rare and aggressive tumors. PMID:24240071

  6. Preclinical efficacy of the oncolytic measles virus expressing the sodium iodide symporter in iodine non-avid anaplastic thyroid cancer: a novel therapeutic agent allowing noninvasive imaging and radioiodine therapy.

    PubMed

    Reddi, H V; Madde, P; McDonough, S J; Trujillo, M A; Morris, J C; Myers, R M; Peng, K W; Russell, S J; McIver, B; Eberhardt, N L

    2012-09-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer is an extremely aggressive disease resistant to radioiodine treatment because of loss of sodium iodide symporter (NIS) expression. To enhance prognosis of this fatal cancer, we validated the preclinical efficacy of measles virus (MV)-NIS, the vaccine strain of the oncolytic MV (MV-Edm), modified to include the NIS gene. Western blotting analysis confirmed that a panel of eight anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC)-derived cell lines do not express NIS protein, but do express CD46, the MV receptor. In vitro cell death assays and in vivo xenograft studies demonstrate the oncolytic efficacy of MV-NIS in BHT-101 and KTC-3, ATC-derived cell lines. Radioactive iodine uptake along with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-computed tomography imaging of KTC-3 xenografts after (99)Tc(m) administration confirmed NIS expression in vitro and in vivo, respectively, after virus treatment. Adjuvant administration of RAI, to MV-NIS-treated KTC-3 tumors showed a trend for increased tumor cell killing. As current treatment for ATC is only palliative, and MV-NIS is currently Food and Drug Administration approved for human clinical trials in myeloma, our data indicate that targeting ATC with MV-NIS could prove to be a novel therapeutic strategy for effective treatment of iodine-resistant ATC and will expedite its testing in clinical trials for this aggressive disease. PMID:22790962

  7. Homozygous deletion of TNFRSF4, TP73, PPAP2B and DPYD at 1p and PDCD5 at 19q identified by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis in pediatric anaplastic glioma with questionable oligodendroglial component

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pediatric oligodendrogliomas are rare and appear to show a different molecular profile from adult tumors. Some gliomas display allelic losses at 1p/19q in pediatric patients, although less frequently than in adult patients, but this is rare in tumors with an oligodendroglial component. The molecular basis of this genomic abnormality is unknown in pediatric gliomas, but it represents a relatively common finding in pediatric oligodendroglioma-like neoplasms with leptomeningeal dissemination. Results Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis using SALSA P088-B1 for the analysis of the 1p/19q allelic constitution in a pediatric anaplastic (oligodendro)-glioma showed homozygous co-deletion for markers: TNFRSF4 (located at 1p36.33), TP73 (1p36.32), PPAP2B (1pter-p22.1), DPYD (1p21.3), and PDCD5 (19q13.12), and hemizygous deletion of BAX (19q13.3-q13.4). No sequence changes for R132 and R172 of the IDH1/2 genes were identified. Conclusions The molecular findings in this pediatric anaplastic glioma do not allow for a clearly definitive pathological diagnosis. However, the findings provide data on a number of 1p/19q genomic regions that, because of homozygotic deletion, might be the location of genes that are important for the development and clinical evolution of some malignant gliomas in children. PMID:24387276

  8. Large cell neuroendocrine – Adenocarcinona mixed tumour of colon: Collision tumour with peculiar behaviour. What do we know about these tumours?

    PubMed Central

    Minaya-Bravo, Ana María; Garcia Mahillo, Julio Cesar; Mendoza Moreno, Fernando; Noguelares Fraguas, Fernando; Granell, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mixed glandular-endocrine carcinomas are rare tumours of gastrointestinal tract (MANEC). They are more frequent in stomach and hardly one hundred cases have been described in colon. According to Lewis, they are classified into collision (side by side pattern), composite (intermingled) or amphicrine (neuroendocrine and glandular features inside a same cell). Collision tumours are related to biclonal theory: two simultaneous cancerogenic events. Conversely, multidirectional differentiation from a stem cell is accepted as origin of composite tumours. The aim of this paper is to analyse the behaviour of these tumours, with an especial concern about how these tumours metastasise, and the different theories about carcinogenesis. Presentation of case We report a rare case of collision adenocarcinoma-large cell neuroendocrine tumour of colon that after a three-year period of follow-up has presented a retroperitoneal recurrence that features adenocarcinoma and large cell neuroendocrine components. Discussion After an exhaustive review of the English literature, we found that only two cases of collision tumour of colon with metastases showing glandular and endocrine components have been described up to date, so we report the third case, and the first happening in transverse colon. Conclusion We conclude that not all collision tumours follow the biclonal theory and more studies are needed to clarify the origin of these neoplasms, and consequently, to reach an adequate treatment. PMID:26635955

  9. 76 FR 35451 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ... refractory (resistant to previous standard treatments) Hodgkin's lymphoma. During the afternoon session, the... relapsed or refractory systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma. FDA intends to make background...

  10. Thrombospondin-1 Silencing Down-Regulates Integrin Expression Levels in Human Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Cells with BRAFV600E: New Insights in the Host Tissue Adaptation and Homeostasis of Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Duquette, Mark; Sadow, Peter M.; Lawler, Jack; Nucera, Carmelo

    2013-01-01

    Background and Rationale: Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is characterized by pleomorphic cells, has a poor prognosis, is highly devastating disease, and is not curable. No reliable biomarkers of metastatic potential, helpful for early diagnosis of ATC and therapeutic response have been found yet. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) plays a fundamental role in cancer progression by regulating cell stromal cross-talk in the tumor microenvironment. Goals: Our goal was to understand whether TSP-1 could affect protein levels of its integrin receptors (e.g., ITGα3, α6, and β1) and cell morphology in BRAFV600E-ATC cells in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design: Anaplastic thyroid cancer-derived cell cultures and western blotting were used to assess integrin protein expression upon TSP-1 silencing. Immunohistochemistry was performed on orthotopic primary human ATC and metastatic ATC in lung tissue to compare TSP-1 and integrin protein expression levels. Results: TSP-1 knock-down down-regulates ITGα3, α6, and β1 in BRAFV600E-human ATC cells. BRAFV600E-ATC cells with TSP-1 knock-down were rounded compared to control cells, which displayed a spread morphology. TSP-1 knock-down also reduced TSP-1, ITGα3, α6, and β1 protein expression levels in vivo in the ATC microenvironment, which is enriched in stromal and inflammatory cells. Conclusion: TSP-1 silencing causes changes in ITG levels and ATC cell morphology. The assessment of TSP-1 and ITG levels might contribute to earlier metastatic potential of BRAFV600E-positive aggressive thyroid cancers, and allow improved patient selection for clinical trials. PMID:24348463

  11. Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: A Clinicopathologic Series of 10 Cases With an Emphasis on HPV Status.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Elizabeth D; Stelow, Edward B; Mills, Stacey E; Westra, William H; Bishop, Justin A

    2016-04-01

    Large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) is a high-grade neuroendocrine neoplasm first described in the lung and subsequently well documented in many other anatomic sites. It has only recently been recognized that LCNEC can also occasionally arise in the head and neck. The role of human papillomavirus (HPV), which is associated with some small cell carcinomas of the head and neck, has not been investigated for LCNEC. We sought to further characterize the histologic, immunophenotypic, and clinical features of LCNEC and also investigate the role of HPV in this newly described group of tumors. The surgical pathology archives of 2 large academic institutions were searched for cases of LCNEC arising in the head and neck. p16 immunohistochemistry and HPV in situ hybridization were performed, and clinical information was obtained from electronic medical records. Ten cases of head and neck LCNEC were identified. The tumors arose in 6 men and 4 women ranging in age from 14 to 70 years (median, 63.5 y). The primary tumor sites were the oropharynx (n=4), the sinonasal tract (n=3), and the larynx (n=3). The LCNECs consisted of nests and trabeculae of medium-large cells with abundant cytoplasm, coarse chromatin, and prominent nucleoli with very high mitotic rates. The tumor nests were often associated with necrosis, peripheral palisading, and rosette formations. The LCNECs were positive for pan-cytokeratin and at least 1 neuroendocrine marker (most often synaptophysin) and were largely negative for p63 (focal staining in 2/10) and CK5/6 (staining in 1/10). The LCNECs demonstrated aggressive clinical behavior: 8 of 10 presented with advanced disease, 5 of 10 died, with 4 more living but with persistent tumor. Three of 10 LCNECs were HPV-related (HPV-LCNEC); they arose in the oropharynx (n=2) and sinonasal tract (n=1). The HPV-LCNECs did not differ from the HPV-negative tumors in histologic appearance or behavior: 2 patients with HPV-LCNEC have died because of their disease

  12. Ixabepilone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  13. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma with large cell transformation on the background of Hashimoto's thyroiditis: a case report and review literature.

    PubMed

    Hengjeerajarus, Natavuth; Klaisuwan, Teerada; Norasetthada, Lalita; Kosachunhanun, Natapong

    2015-05-01

    Primary thyroid lymphoma (PTL) is a rare cause of malignancy that occurs in 0.5% of cases with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The most common subtype is diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), followed by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. We described the case of a 70-year-old man who was diagnosed with MALT lymphoma in the background of autoimmune thyroiditis with focal area of DLBCL transformation. The patient was a 70-year-old man with rapidly growing mass of the thyroid gland with compressive symptom over two months. The laboratory data revealed primary hypothyroidism with positively anti-thyroid antibodies. The computerized tomography scan showed right thyroid mass extended to anterior mediastinum and compressed adjacent airway with multiple cervical and mediastinal lymphadenopathies. The pathology from incisional biopsy showed extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of MALT lymphoma with large cell transformation. The patient received four courses of systemic chemotherapy combined with involved field radiation therapy. The mass was dramatically decreased in size after treatment, leading to a complete resolution of compressive symptoms. Thyroid lymphoma is quite rare; however the incidence may be higher in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. A rapidly growing thyroid gland should be considered as PTL. Chemotherapy and radiation are the mainstays of treatment. PMID:26058282

  14. Differential DNA sequence deletions from chromosomes 3, 11, 13, and 17 in squamous-cell carcinoma, large-cell carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma of the human lung

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, A.; Willey, J.C.; Modali, R.; Sugimura, H.; McDowell, E.M.; Resau, J.; Light, B.; Haugen, A.; Mann, D.L.; Trump, B.F.; Harris, C.C. )

    1989-07-01

    Activation of protooncogens and inactivation of putative tumor suppressor genes are genetic lesions considered to be important in lung carcinogenesis. Fifty-four cases of non-small-cell lung cancer (23 adenocarcinomas, 23 squamous-cell carcinomas, and 8 large-cell carcinomas) were examined for loss of DNA sequences at 13 polymorphic genetic loci. Loss of heterozygosity was seen more frequently in squamous-cell carcinoma than in adenocarcinoma. The loss of DNA sequences from the short arm of chromosome 17 (D17S1 locus) was detected in 8 of 9 heterozygous cases of squamous-cell carcinoma and in only 2 of 11 heterozygous cases of adenocarcinomas. Loss of DNA sequences from chromosome 3 was seen in 16 of 31 cases where the constitutive DNA was heterozygous-i.e., informative. Loss of heterozygosity at the chromosome 13q locus, D13S3, was seen in 9 of 21 informative cases, and in 2 cases, both adenocarcinomas, duplication of the intact DNA sequences suggested the possibility that mitotic recombination had occurred. Frequent DNA sequence deletions, including those from chromosome 17, in squamous-cell carcinomas may reflect the extensive mutagenic and clastogenic effects of tobacco smoke that may lead to inactivation of putative tumor-suppressor genes.

  15. High grade neuroendocrine carcinoma of the urinary bladder treated by radical cystectomy: a series of small cell, mixed neuroendocrine and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sounak; Thompson, R Houston; Boorjian, Stephen A; Thapa, Prabin; Hernandez, Loren P Herrera; Jimenez, Rafael E; Costello, Brian A; Frank, Igor; Cheville, John C

    2015-10-01

    High grade neuroendocrine carcinomas (HGNEC) treated by cystectomy often carry an original diagnosis of typical urothelial carcinoma (UC). The correct diagnosis of HGNEC is critical in influencing the decision for early chemotherapy, potentially followed by cystectomy. The objective of this study was to characterise the features of HGNEC treated by radical cystectomy. The study consisted of 79 patients with HGNEC including small cell (68 patients), large cell neuroendocrine (LCNEC) (5 patients) and mixed neuroendocrine (mixed-NEC) carcinoma (6 patients) matched with 122 patients with UC, treated at our institution between 1987 and 2014. Morphometric analysis for cell and nuclear size as well as immunophenotyping for neuroendocrine markers and cell-cycle regulators were applied to tissue microarrays. Small cell, LCNEC and mixed-NEC are a morphological spectrum of high grade neuroendocrine carcinoma with overlapping histological features, identical immunophenotype, Ki-67 proliferative rate and patient outcomes. Finally, the nuclear size criteria is misleading as HGNEC, particularly cases of LCNEC and mixed-NEC, may have enlarged nuclei compared to small cell carcinomas and are more prone to be misdiagnosed as UC, thereby preventing appropriate management. PMID:26308137

  16. The role of the ALK receptor in cancer biology.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, B; Palmer, R H

    2016-09-01

    A vast array of oncogenic variants has been identified for anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). Therefore, there is a need to better understand the role of ALK in cancer biology in order to optimise treatment strategies. This review summarises the latest research on the receptor tyrosine kinase ALK, and how this information can guide the management of patients with cancer that is ALK-positive. A variety of ALK gene alterations have been described across a range of tumour types, including point mutations, deletions and rearrangements. A wide variety of ALK fusions, in which the kinase domain of ALK and the amino-terminal portion of various protein partners are fused, occur in cancer, with echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK being the most prevalent in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Different ALK fusion proteins can mediate different signalling outputs, depending on properties such as subcellular localisation and protein stability. The ALK fusions found in tumours lack spatial and temporal regulation, which can also affect dimerisation and substrate specificity. Two ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), crizotinib and ceritinib, are currently approved in Europe for use in ALK-positive NSCLC and several others are in development. These ALK TKIs bind slightly differently within the ATP-binding pocket of the ALK kinase domain and are associated with the emergence of different resistance mutation patterns during therapy. This emphasises the need to tailor the sequence of ALK TKIs according to the ALK signature of each patient. Research into the oncogenic functions of ALK, and fast paced development of ALK inhibitors, has substantially improved outcomes for patients with ALK-positive NSCLC. Limited data are available surrounding the physiological ligand-stimulated activation of ALK signalling and further research is needed. Understanding the role of ALK in tumour biology is key to further optimising therapeutic strategies for ALK-positive

  17. Primary and Metastatic Cutaneous Melanomas Express ALK Through Alternative Transcriptional Initiation.

    PubMed

    Busam, Klaus J; Vilain, Ricardo E; Lum, Trina; Busam, Jonathan A; Hollmann, Travis J; Saw, Robyn P M; Coit, Daniel C; Scolyer, Richard A; Wiesner, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    A number of common driver mutations have been identified in melanoma, but other genetic or epigenetic aberrations are also likely to play a role in the pathogenesis of melanoma and present potential therapeutic targets. Translocations of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), for example, have been reported in spitzoid melanocytic neoplasms leading to kinase-fusion proteins that result in immunohistochemically detectable ALK expression. In this study, we sought to determine whether ALK was also expressed in nonspitzoid primary and metastatic cutaneous melanomas. ALK immunohistochemistry was performed on 603 melanomas (303 primary and 300 metastatic tumors) from 600 patients. ALK immunohistochemistry expression was identified in 7 primary and 9 metastatic tumors. In 5 of 7 primary tumors and in 6 of 9 metastatic lesions, the majority of tumor cells were immunoreactive for ALK. In the other 2 primary and 3 metastatic lesions, positive staining was identified in less than half of the tumor cells. ALK positivity was found in the presence or absence of BRAF or NRAS mutations. In contrast to prior observations with ALK-positive Spitz tumors, none of the ALK-positive melanomas harbored a translocation. Instead, the ALK-positive melanomas predominantly expressed the recently described ALK isoform, ALK, which lacks the extracellular and transmembrane domains of wild-type ALK, consists primarily of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain, and originates from an alternative transcriptional initiation site within the ALK gene. The findings are clinically relevant as patients with metastatic melanoma who have ALK expression may potentially benefit from treatment with ALK kinase inhibitors. PMID:26872010

  18. P17.01CHROMOSOME ARM 9P LOSS OF HETEROZYGOSITY IS A MARKER OF SHORTER SURVIVAL IN 1P/19Q CO-DELETED ANAPLASTIC OLIGODENDROGLIOMA. A POLA NETWORK STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Alentorn, A.; Dehais, C.; Carpentier, C.; Mokhtari, K.; Ducray, F.; Figarella-Branger, D.; Delattre, J.; Idbaih, A.; (POLA)”, POLA Network “Prise en charge des OLigodendrogliomes Anaplasiques

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic or WHO grade III oligodendrogliomas (AO) are a heterogeneous subgroup of diffuse glial tumors in adults. Three major histomolecular subtypes with clinical relevance have been individualized: (i) 1p/19q co-deleted AO -80% of cases-, (ii) non 1p/19q co-deleted and IDH mutated AO -10% of cases- and (iii) non 1p/19q co-deleted and IDH wild-typeAO -10% of cases-. 1p/19q co-deleted AO, and to a lesser extent IDH mutated AO, have better prognosis and better response to treatment with a median survival of more than 10 years, as shown in two phase III international trials. We have recently shown that loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in chromosome arm 9p, with copy number loss -CL LOH- or without -Copy Neutral LOH- is a frequent event in AO. Interestingly, 9p CN LOH, inducing gene under-expression, has biological significance. In the present study, we address the prognostic value of 9p loss in 1p/19q co-deleted AO. In the present study, 228 AO exhibiting 1p/19q co-deletion were included. All tumors were centrally reviewed in the setting of the French national network for high-grade oligodendroglial tumors (POLA network) that recruits prospectively newly diagnosed anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors. Tumor DNA was analyzed using high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis. In the entire series, 70/228 (1/3) harbored 9p loss including CN-LOH, homozygous loss or CL-LOH. 9p loss was associated with a worse prognosis in 1p19q co-deleted AO in univariate analysis (3-years OS of 98% vs. 74%, p < 0.001) whereas PFS at three years was not significantly different (3-years PFS of 88% vs. 66% p = 0.1). After adjustment for age, KPS, and treatment, multivariate analysis demonstrated 9p loss to be an independent prognostic factor for OS, p-value = 0.03, HR = 4.9 [1.2-16], but not for PFS. 1p19q co-deleted AO harboring 9p loss have shorter overall survival compared to their non 9p-lost counterparts in this prospective cohort. Further studies are needed to validate

  19. Next-Generation Sequencing of Pulmonary Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma Reveals Small Cell Carcinoma–like and Non–Small Cell Carcinoma–like Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Rekhtman, Natasha; Pietanza, Maria C.; Hellmann, Matthew D.; Naidoo, Jarushka; Arora, Arshi; Won, Helen; Halpenny, Darragh F.; Wang, Hangjun; Tian, Shaozhou K.; Litvak, Anya M.; Paik, Paul K.; Drilon, Alexander E.; Socci, Nicholas; Poirier, John T.; Shen, Ronglai; Berger, Michael F.; Moreira, Andre L.; Travis, William D.; Rudin, Charles M.; Ladanyi, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pulmonary large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) is a highly aggressive neoplasm, whose biologic relationship to small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) versus non-SCLC (NSCLC) remains unclear, contributing to uncertainty regarding optimal clinical management. To clarify these relationships, we analyzed genomic alterations in LCNEC compared with other major lung carcinoma types. Experimental Design LCNEC (n = 45) tumor/normal pairs underwent targeted next-generation sequencing of 241 cancer genes by Memorial Sloan Kettering-Integrated Mutation Profiling of Actionable Cancer Targets (MSK-IMPACT) platform and comprehensive histologic, immunohistochemical, and clinical analysis. Genomic data were compared with MSK-IMPACT analysis of other lung carcinoma histologies (n = 242). Results Commonly altered genes in LCNEC included TP53 (78%), RB1 (38%), STK11 (33%), KEAP1 (31%), and KRAS (22%). Genomic profiles segregated LCNEC into 2 major and 1 minor subsets: SCLC-like (n = 18), characterized by TP53+RB1 co-mutation/loss and other SCLC-type alterations, including MYCL amplification; NSCLC-like (n = 25), characterized by the lack of coaltered TP53+RB1 and nearly universal occurrence of NSCLC-type mutations (STK11, KRAS, and KEAP1); and carcinoid-like (n = 2), characterized by MEN1 mutations and low mutation burden. SCLC-like and NSCLC-like subsets revealed several clinicopathologic differences, including higher proliferative activity in SCLC-like tumors (P < 0.0001) and exclusive adenocarcinoma-type differentiation marker expression in NSCLC-like tumors (P = 0.005). While exhibiting predominant similarity with lung adenocarcinoma, NSCLC-like LCNEC harbored several distinctive genomic alterations, including more frequent mutations in NOTCH family genes (28%), implicated as key regulators of neuroendocrine differentiation. Conclusions LCNEC is a biologically heterogeneous group of tumors, comprising distinct subsets with genomic signatures of SCLC, NSCLC (predominantly

  20. Frequent loss of the expression of multiple subunits of the SWI/SNF complex in large cell carcinoma and pleomorphic carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Taichiro; Matsubara, Daisuke; Nakano, Tomoyuki; Tamura, Tomoko; Endo, Shunsuke; Sugiyama, Yukihiko; Niki, Toshiro

    2015-11-01

    The switch/sucrose non-fermenting (SWI/SNF) complex has recently emerged as a novel tumor suppressor in various human cancers. In the present study, we analyzed the expression of multiple SWI/SNF subunits in primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 133 NSCLC, consisting of 25 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), 70 adenocarcinomas (AD), 16 large cell carcinomas (LC), and 22 pleomorphic carcinomas (PL), were immunohistochemically examined for the expression of BRG1, BRM, BAF47, ARID1A, and ARID1B. The frequency at which reductions in the expression of BRG1 were observed was significantly higher in the LC-PL group (13/38, 34.2%) than in the SCC-AD group (7/95, 7.4%). Similarly, the frequency at which reductions in the expression of BRM were observed was significantly higher in the LC-PL group (17/38, 44.7%) than in the SCC-AD group (14/95, 14.7%). The loss of the expression of ARID1A, ARID1B, and BAF47 was observed only in a fraction of NSCLC cases. Furthermore, the frequency at which the concurrent loss of multiple subunits of the SWI/SNF complex was observed was significantly higher in the LC-PL group (10/38, 26.3%) than in the SCC-AD group (8/95, 8.4%). Collectively, these results indicate that the loss of the SWI/SNF complex was related to dedifferentiation in NSCLC. PMID:26345631

  1. Role of Evaluating MGMT Status and 1p36 Deletion in Radiosurgery-Induced Anaplastic Ependymoma That Rapidly and Completely Resolved by Temozolomide Alone: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hirono, Seiichiro; Iwadate, Yasuo; Kambe, Michiyo; Hiwasa, Takaki; Takiguchi, Masaki; Nakatani, Yukio; Saeki, Naokatsu

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic gamma knife surgery (GKS)-induced brain tumors are extremely rare, and no ependymal tumors induced by GKS have been reported. Therefore, little is known about their clinical, pathologic, and genetic features. In addition, a regimen of adjuvant chemotherapy for anaplastic ependymoma (AE) has not been established. A 77-year-old man presented with a gait disturbance and left-side cerebellar ataxia more than 19 years after GKS performed for a cerebellar arteriovenous malformation. Imaging studies demonstrated an enhancing mass in the irradiated field with signs of intraventricular dissemination. Surgical resection confirmed the diagnosis of AE. Temozolomide (TMZ) was administrated postoperatively because the methylated promoter region of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and 1p36 deletion were observed. Surprisingly, images 16 days after TMZ initiation demonstrated a complete resolution of the residual tumor that was maintained after three cycles of TMZ. This first case report of GKS-induced AE emphasizes the importance of genetic evaluation of MGMT and chromosomal deletion of 1p36 that are not commonly performed in primary ependymal tumors. In addition, it is speculated that a GKS-induced tumor may have a different genetic background compared with the primary tumor because the pathogenesis of the tumors differed. PMID:26251808

  2. Role of Evaluating MGMT Status and 1p36 Deletion in Radiosurgery-Induced Anaplastic Ependymoma That Rapidly and Completely Resolved by Temozolomide Alone: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Hirono, Seiichiro; Iwadate, Yasuo; Kambe, Michiyo; Hiwasa, Takaki; Takiguchi, Masaki; Nakatani, Yukio; Saeki, Naokatsu

    2015-07-01

    Stereotactic gamma knife surgery (GKS)-induced brain tumors are extremely rare, and no ependymal tumors induced by GKS have been reported. Therefore, little is known about their clinical, pathologic, and genetic features. In addition, a regimen of adjuvant chemotherapy for anaplastic ependymoma (AE) has not been established. A 77-year-old man presented with a gait disturbance and left-side cerebellar ataxia more than 19 years after GKS performed for a cerebellar arteriovenous malformation. Imaging studies demonstrated an enhancing mass in the irradiated field with signs of intraventricular dissemination. Surgical resection confirmed the diagnosis of AE. Temozolomide (TMZ) was administrated postoperatively because the methylated promoter region of O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and 1p36 deletion were observed. Surprisingly, images 16 days after TMZ initiation demonstrated a complete resolution of the residual tumor that was maintained after three cycles of TMZ. This first case report of GKS-induced AE emphasizes the importance of genetic evaluation of MGMT and chromosomal deletion of 1p36 that are not commonly performed in primary ependymal tumors. In addition, it is speculated that a GKS-induced tumor may have a different genetic background compared with the primary tumor because the pathogenesis of the tumors differed. PMID:26251808

  3. Redifferentiation and induction of tumor suppressors miR-122 and miR-375 by the PAX8/PPARγ fusion protein inhibits anaplastic thyroid cancer: a novel therapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Reddi, H V; Driscoll, C B; Madde, P; Milosevic, D; Hurley, R M; McDonough, S J; Hallanger-Johnson, J; McIver, B; Eberhardt, N L

    2013-05-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is an aggressive, fatal disease unresponsive to traditional therapies, generating a need to develop effective therapies. The PAX8/PPARγ fusion protein (PPFP) has been shown to favorably modulate tumor growth in follicular thyroid cancer, prompting our evaluation of its efficacy to inhibit ATC cell and tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. PPFP was constitutively expressed in five ATC cell lines: BHT-101, FRO, C-643, KTC-2 and KTC-3, and inhibited cell growth in four of five cell lines and xenograft tumor growth in four of four cell lines. PPFP-mediated growth inhibition involved multiple mechanisms, including upregulation of miR-122 and miR-375, associated with decreased angiogenesis and AKT pathway inactivation, respectively. Also, PPFP expression resulted in marked increase of thyroid-specific marker transcripts, including PAX8, thyroid peroxidase (TPO), sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and thyroglobulin, to varying degrees by activating their respective promoters, suggesting that PPFP induced cellular redifferentiation. Functional studies demonstrate that increased NIS messenger RNA is not associated with increased 125I uptake. However, ectopic expression of wild-type NIS-induced perchlorate-sensitive iodine uptake, suggesting that endogenous NIS in ATC cell lines is defective. As current treatment for ATC is only palliative, overexpression of PPFP may offer a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of ATC. PMID:23598436

  4. Targeting Transforming Growth Factor-Beta1 (TGF-β1) Inhibits Tumorigenesis of Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma Cells Through ERK1/2-NF-κB-PUMA Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Qiang; Liu, Shan; Dong, Anbing; Mi, Xiufang; Hao, Fengyun; Zhang, Kejun

    2016-01-01

    Background The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway plays a critical role in promoting tumor growth. TGF-β1was found to be overexpressed in anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC). We therefore tested our hypothesis that targeting TGF-β1 inhibits tumorigenesis of ATC cells. Material/Methods Effects of TGF-β1 stimulation or TGF-β1 inhibition by small interfering RNA (TGF-β1siRNA) on proliferation, colony formation, and apoptosis in 8505C cells in vitro was detected using siRNAs and inhibitors to examine the TGF-β1 signaling pathway. A subcutaneously implanted tumor model of 8505C cells in nude mice was used to assess the effects of TGF-β1 inhibition on tumorigenesis development. Results TGF-β1siRNAs decreased proliferation and colony formation, and increased apoptosis in 8505C cells in vitro and inhibited tumor growth in vivo. TGF-β1siRNA inhibited phosphorylation ERK1/2 (pERK1/2) and increased p65-dependant PUMA mRNA and protein expression. Knockdown of p65 or PUMA by siRNA reduced TGF-β1siRNA-induced apoptosis, as well as caspase-3 and PARP activation. Upregulation of p65 or PUMA expression by TGF-β1siRNA requires pERK1/2 inhibition. TGF-β1 shRNA inhibited tumor growth in vivo. Conclusions Therapies targeting the TGF-β1 pathway may be more effective to prevent primary tumor formation. The ability of this therapy to decrease tumorigenesis may be related to ERK1/2/NF-κB/PUMA signaling. PMID:27356491

  5. Altered expression of mir-222 and mir-25 influences diverse gene expression changes in transformed normal and anaplastic thyroid cells, and impacts on MEK and TRAIL protein expression.

    PubMed

    Aherne, Sinéad T; Smyth, Paul; Freeley, Michael; Smith, Leila; Spillane, Cathy; O'Leary, John; Sheils, Orla

    2016-08-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy and accounts for the majority of endocrine cancer-related deaths each year. Our group and others have previously demonstrated dysfunctional microRNA (miRNA or miR) expression in the context of thyroid cancer. The objective of the present study was to investigate the impact of synthetic manipulation of expression of miR-25 and miR-222 in benign and malignant thyroid cells. miR-25 and miR-222 expression was upregulated in 8505C (an anaplastic thyroid cell line) and Nthy-ori (a SV40-immortalised thyroid cell line) cells, respectively. A transcriptomics-based approach was utilised to identify targets of the two miRNAs and real-time PCR and western blotting were used to validate a subset of the targets. Almost 100 mRNAs of diverse functions were found to be either directly or indirectly targeted by both miR-222 and miR-25 [fold change ≥2, false discovery rate (FDR) ≤0.05]. Gene ontology analysis showed the miR-25 gene target list to be significantly enriched for genes involved in cell adhesion. Fluidigm real-time PCR technologies were used to validate the downregulation of 23 and 22 genes in response to miR-25 and miR-222 overexpression, respectively. The reduction of the expression of two miR-25 protein targets, TNF-related apoptosis‑inducing ligand (TRAIL) and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MEK4), was also validated. Manipulating the expression of both miR-222 and miR-25 influenced diverse gene expression changes in thyroid cells. Increased expression of miR-25 reduced MEK4 and TRAIL protein expression, and cell adhesion and apoptosis are important aspects of miR-25 functioning in thyroid cells. PMID:27353001

  6. Nuclear Localization Signal-Enhanced Polyurethane-Short Branch Polyethylenimine-Mediated Delivery of Let-7a Inhibited Cancer Stem-Like Properties by Targeting the 3'-UTR of HMGA2 in Anaplastic Astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng-Yin; Chen, Ming-Teh; Huang, Pin-I; Wang, Chien-Ying; Chang, Yun-Chin; Yang, Yi-Ping; Lo, Wen-Liang; Sung, Wen-Hsing; Liao, Yi-Wen; Lee, Yi-Yen; Chang, Yuh-Lih; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Chen, Yi-Wei; Ma, Hsin-I

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) is a grade III glioma that often occurs in middle-aged patients and presents a uniformly poor prognosis. A small subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs) possessing a self-renewing capacity is reported to be responsible for tumor recurrence and therapeutic resistance. An accumulating amount of microRNAs (miRNA) were found aberrantly expressed in human cancers and regulate CSCs. Efforts have been made to couple miRNAs with nonviral gene delivery approaches to target specific genes in cancer cells. However, the efficiency of delivery of miRNAs to AA-derived CSCs is still an applicability hurdle. The present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness and applicability of nonviral vector-mediated delivery of Let-7a with regard to eradication of AA and AA-derived CSC cells. Herein, our miRNA/mRNA microarray and RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of Let-7a, a tumor-suppressive miRNA, is inversely correlated with the levels of HMGA2 and Sox2 in the AA side population (SP(+)) cells. Luciferase reporter assay showed that Let-7a directly targets the 3'-UTRs of HMGA2 in AA-SP(+) cells. Knockdown of HMGA2 significantly suppressed the protein expression of Sox2 in AA-SP(+) cells, whereas overexpression of HMGA2 upregulated Sox2 expression in AA-SP(-). Nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptides can facilitate nuclear targeting of DNA and are used to improve gene delivery. Using polyurethane-short branch polyethylenimine (PU-PEI) as a therapeutic delivery vehicle, we conjugated NLS with Let-7 and successfully delivered it to AA-SP(+) cells, resulting in significantly suppressed expression of HMGA2 and Sox2, tumorigenicity, and CSC-like abilities. This treatment facilitated the differentiation of AA-SP(+) cells into non-SP CSCs. Furthermore, PU-PEI-mediated delivery of NLS-conjugated Let-7a in AA-SP(+) cells suppressed the expression of drug-resistant and antiapoptotic genes, and increased cell sensitivity to radiation. Finally, the in vivo

  7. Deregulation of PAX-5 by translocation of the Emu enhancer of the IgH locus adjacent to two alternative PAX-5 promoters in a diffuse large-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Busslinger, M; Klix, N; Pfeffer, P; Graninger, P G; Kozmik, Z

    1996-06-11

    Analyses of the human PAX-5 locus and of the 5' region of the mouse Pax-5 gene revealed that transcription from two distinct promoters results in splicing of two alternative 5' exons to the common coding sequences of exons 2-10. Transcription from the upstream promoter initiates downstream of a TATA box and occurs predominantly in B-lymphocytes, whereas the TATA-less downstream promoter is active in all Pax-5-expressing tissues. The human PAX-5 gene is located on chromosome 9 in region p13, which is involved in t(9;14)(pl3;q32) translocations recurring in small lymphocytic lymphomas of the plasmacytoid subtype and in derived large-cell lymphomas. A previous molecular analysis of a t(9;14) breakpoint from a diffuse large-cell lymphoma (KIS-1) demonstrated that the immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IgH) locus on 14q32 was juxtaposed to chromosome 9p13 sequences of unknown function [Ohno, H., Furukawa, T., Fukuhara, S., Zong, S. Q., Kamesaki, H., Shows, T. B., Le Beau, M. M., McKeithan, T. W., Kawakami, T. & Honjo, T. (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87,628-632]. Here we show that the KIS-1 translocation breakpoint is located 1807 base pairs upstream of exon 1A of PAX-5, thus bringing the potent Emu enhancer of the IgH gene into close proximity of the PAX-5 promoters. These data suggest that deregulation of PAX-5 gene transcription by the t(9;14)(pl3;q32) translocation contributes to the pathogenesis of small lymphocytic lymphomas with plasmacytoid differentiation. PMID:8650231

  8. CTOP/ITE/MTX Compared With CHOP as the First-line Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Young Patients With T Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-24

    ALK-negative Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Peripherial T Cell Lymphoma,Not Otherwise Specified; Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T Cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T Cell Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis Like T Cell Lymphoma

  9. CEOP/IVE/GDP Compared With CEOP as the First-line Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Adult Patients With PTCL

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma; ALK-negative Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T Cell Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis Like T Cell Lymphoma; Acute Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  10. Insight into drug resistance mechanisms and discovery of potential inhibitors against wild-type and L1196M mutant ALK from FDA-approved drugs.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzong; Liu, Wei; Luo, Hao; Bao, Jinku

    2016-09-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) plays a crucial role in multiple malignant cancers. It is known as a well-established target for the treatment of ALK-dependent cancers. Even though substantial efforts have been made to develop ALK inhibitors, only crizotinib, ceritinib, and alectinib had been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for patients with ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The secondary mutations with drug-resistance bring up difficulties to develop effective drugs for ALK-positive cancers. To give a comprehensive understanding of molecular mechanism underlying inhibitor response to ALK tyrosine kinase mutations, we established an accurate assessment for the extensive profile of drug against ALK mutations by means of computational approaches. The molecular mechanics-generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) method based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was carried out to calculate relative binding free energies for receptor-drug systems. In addition, the structure-based virtual screening was utilized to screen effective inhibitors targeting wild-type ALK and the gatekeeper mutation L1196M from 3180 approved drugs. Finally, the mechanism of drug resistance was discussed, several novel potential wild-type and L1196M mutant ALK inhibitors were successfully identified. PMID:27585676

  11. Alectinib induced CNS radiation necrosis in an ALK+NSCLC patient with a remote (7 years) history of brain radiation.

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Weitz, Michael; Jalas, John R; Kelly, Daniel F; Wong, Vanessa; Azada, Michele C; Quines, Oliver; Klempner, Samuel J

    2016-06-01

    Alectinib is a second generation ALK inhibitor that has significant clinical activity in central nervous system (CNS) metastases in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Pseudoprogression (PsP) due to radiation necrosis during alecitnib treatment of central nervous system (CNS) metastases from ALK-rearranged NSCLC as been reported. Hence, distinguishing radiation-related PsP from alectinib-induced radiographic changes is important to avoid erroneous early trial discontinuation and abandonment of an effective treatment. However, it remains difficult to assess casuality of radiation necrosis is related to recent direct radiation or induced by alectinib treatment or both. It is also unknown how long from previous radiation can alectinib still induce radiation necrosis. Here we reported a crizotinib-refractory ALK-positive NSCLC patient who develop radiation necrosis in one of his metastatic CNS lesions after approximately 12 months of alectinib treatment who otherwise had on-going CNS response on alectinib. His most recent radiation to his CNS metastases was 7 years prior to the start of alectinib. This case illustrates that in the setting of pror CNS radiation, given the significant clinical activity of alectinib in CNS metastases in ALK-positive NSCLC patients the risk of CNS radiation necrosis remains long after previous radiation to the CNS metastases has been completed and can occur after durable response of treatment. PMID:27133743

  12. Effects of meal type on the oral bioavailability of the ALK inhibitor ceritinib in healthy adult subjects.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yvonne Y; Gu, Wen; Lin, Tiffany; Song, Dongweon; Yu, Richard; Scott, Jeffrey W

    2016-05-01

    Ceritinib is a potent inhibitor of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), which has shown acceptable safety and substantial antitumor activity in ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Two food-effect studies were conducted in healthy adults to investigate the influence of food on the oral bioavailability of ceritinib: a study with low- or high-fat meals at 500 mg and a study with a light snack at 750 mg. Compared with the fasted state, AUC0-∞ (90%CI) of ceritinib was increased by 58% (34%, 86%) after the intake of a low-fat meal, by 73% (46%, 105%) after the intake of a high-fat meal, and by 54% (19%, 99%) after the intake of a light snack. Safety assessments also suggested that food may improve gastrointestinal (GI) tolerability after a single ceritinib dose. Based on the pharmacokinetic results, it is essential to avoid any type of meal during dosing of ceritinib because the intake of food may increase the occurrence of exposure-dependent, non-GI toxicities at the labeled dose of 750 mg daily during fasting. A randomized trial is ongoing to determine an alternative way to give ceritinib (450 mg or 600 mg with food) that may enhance GI tolerability in ALK-positive NSCLC patients. PMID:26272586

  13. Establishment of a human cell line (SKI-DLCL-1) with a t(1;14)(q21;q32) translocation from the ascites of a patient with diffuse large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Goy, A; Gilles, F; Remache, Y; Filippa, D; Portlock, C S; Jhanwar, S C; Zelenetz, A D

    2001-01-01

    Cytogenetic abnormalities at chromosome 1q21 are among the most common second genetic events observed in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas and have prognostic significance. Recently, BCL9 has been cloned from a pre-B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, which carried a t(1:14)(q21;q32). However, among a panel of 39 B-cell malignancies with 1q21 translocation, only two cases showed rearrangement for the BCL9 gene. We report the establishment of a new lymphoma cell line from a patient with relapsed diffuse large cell lymphoma. This cell line SKI-DLCL-1 showed cell surface antigens identical to the original tumor and demonstrated the profile of a mature B-cell phenotype: CD19 and CD20 positive, CD5 and C10 negative. It carried a t(1;14)(q21;q32) translocation identical to the original tumor. Although the clinical presentation was an isolated effusion lymphoma, studies for HIV-1, HHV8 and EBV were all negative. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that BCL9 was not rearranged in the SKI-DLCL-1 cell line. In addition, the BCL9 gene was not over-expressed in SKI-DLCL-1 cell line. The identification of a new locus at 1q21 will help clarify the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies with a translocation involving this locus. PMID:11426565

  14. ESHAP + fixed dose G-CSF as autologous peripheral blood stem cell mobilization regimen in patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large cell and Hodgkin's lymphoma: a single institution result of 127 patients.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, S; Tbakhi, A; Humaidan, H; El Weshi, A; Rahal, M; Maghfoor, I

    2006-02-01

    From 1996 to November 2004, 131 consecutive patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL) and Hodgkin's lymphoma (HD) received ESHAP as mobilization chemotherapy before autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplant (ASCT). Patients received fixed dose G-CSF 300 microg SC bid starting 24-36 h after finishing mobilizing ESHAP. In all, four patients failed mobilization and are excluded. Characteristics of 127 patients: 68 males: 59 females. DLCL 49: HD 78. Initial stage I:II:III:IV:unknown was 15:34:33:42:3. Median age at ASCT 26 years. Median prior chemotherapy cycles were six [<6 (17 patients), 6-8 (90 patients), >8 (20 patients)]. Median ESHAP cycle used as mobilizer was third. Patients required 1, 2, 3, 4 apheresis were 93:25:8:1. Median total CD34+ cells/kg collected were 6.9 x 10(6) (DLCL 5.17 x 10(6) and HD 7.6 x 10(6)), patients weighing < or = 70 kg (93 patients) 6.54 x 10(6) and >70 kg (34 patients) 7.44 x 10(6) (P = 0.59), one apheresis (93 patients) 8.6 x 10(6)/kg and >1 apheresis (34 patients) 4.5 x 10(6) (P = 0.001). We conclude that ESHAP and G-CSF 300 microg SC bid is an effective mobilizing regimen even in patients >70 kg and most patients require only 1-2 apheresis. PMID:16400345

  15. Complex renal cysts associated with crizotinib treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Patrick; Bartlett, Cynthia H; Solomon, Benjamin J; Tassell, Vanessa; Shaw, Alice T; de Pas, Tommaso; Lee, Soo-Hyun; Lee, Geon Kook; Tanaka, Kaoru; Tan, Weiwei; Tang, Yiyun; Wilner, Keith D; Safferman, Allan; Han, Ji-Youn

    2015-01-01

    An apparent causal association between crizotinib treatment and renal cyst development emerged during clinical trials in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Serious adverse event (SAE) reports of renal cysts from a safety database of 1375 patients from four clinical trials were reviewed. A blinded, retrospective, independent radiologic review (IRR) was performed using scans from patients on study for ≥6 months in three clinical trials; risk factors for renal cyst development were assessed. Among 17 patients with renal cysts reported as SAEs, evidence of invasion into adjacent structures was noted in seven patients, with no evidence of malignancy found. These patients generally did not require dose reductions, none required permanent crizotinib discontinuation due to this AE, and most continued treatment with clinical benefit. In the blinded IRR, among 255 crizotinib-treated patients, 22%, 3%, and 2% had preexisting simple cysts, complex cysts, or both, respectively. At the 6-month tumor assessment, 9% of all patients had acquired new cysts, and 2% of patients with preexisting cysts had developed new cysts and enlargements (>50%) of preexisting simple cysts. Asians appeared to have an increased risk of developing new cysts on treatment; Koreans in particular had 5.18 times higher odds of developing cysts than non-Asians (95% confidence interval, 1.51–17.78; P = 0.05). Crizotinib treatment appears to be associated with an increased risk of development and progression of renal cysts in patients with ALK-positive NSCLC. While close monitoring is recommended, dosing modification was not generally necessary, allowing patients to remain on crizotinib treatment. PMID:25756473

  16. Juvenile Granulosa Cell Tumour: Anaplastic Variant with Omental Deposits

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Anuradha C.K.; Monappa, Vidya

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile Granulosa Cell Tumour (JGCT) of ovary represents a small fraction of all primary ovarian malignancies. It is a subtype of granulosa cell tumour that is almost always found during the first three decades of life. Histologically, it differs from the typical adult type of granulosa cell tumour. It accounts for 5-15% of all granulosa cell tumours, majority being unilateral. Herein, we describe an unusual histopathological variant of JGCT with numerous large cystic spaces, anaplasia and focal syncytiotrophoblast like giant cells. PMID:27042471

  17. Fast-growing large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Lukina, Olga; Gorbunkov, Stanislav; Dvorakovskaja, Ivetta; Varlamov, Vladimir; Akopov, Andrey

    2011-05-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinomas combine a heterogeneous group of tumors occurring in lungs on a rare occasion, and in some cases, they appear to have extraordinary quick growth and extrapulmonary localization. In this case we present a 42-year-old patient who underwent a right upper lobectomy for emphysema, and 6 months later, the tumor developed again into a giant neuroendocrine carcinoma of the mediastinum. PMID:21524479

  18. An Uncommon Presentation of Breast Implant Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Watson, David I.; Dean, Nicola R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Late periprosthetic seroma has lately been concerning for breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The authors present an uncommon presentation of breast implant rupture with a seroma and skin rash forming 2 years after insertion of the implant. PMID:27579243

  19. Alisertib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  20. CREATE: Cross-tumoral Phase 2 With Crizotinib

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor; Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma Type 1; Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Clear Cell Sarcoma; Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma

  1. Basket Study of Entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the Treatment of Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring NTRK1/2/3, ROS1, or ALK Gene Rearrangements (Fusions)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-13

    Breast Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma; Colorectal Cancer; Head and Neck Neoplasms; Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic; Melanoma; Neuroendocrine Tumors; Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Primary Brain Tumors; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Sarcomas; Salivary Gland Cancers; Adult Solid Tumor

  2. Study of Bortezomib and Panobinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma or NK/T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-26

    Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma (Not Otherwise Specified); Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma Nasal Type; Enteropathy- Type T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) (ALK-1 Negative); Relapsed ALCL (ALK-1 Positive) Post Autologous Transplant

  3. Lenalidomide Therapy for Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory, Peripheral T-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-04-18

    Peripheral T-cell Lymphomas; Adult T-cell Leukemia; Adult T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma Unspecified; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; T/Null Cell Systemic Type; Cutaneous t-Cell Lymphoma With Nodal/Visceral Disease

  4. Oral Clofarabine for Relapsed/Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-16

    Follicular Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Low Grade B-cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large-cell Lymphoma

  5. An Uncommon Presentation of Breast Implant Rupture.

    PubMed

    Koh, Eugene; Watson, David I; Dean, Nicola R

    2016-05-01

    Late periprosthetic seroma has lately been concerning for breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The authors present an uncommon presentation of breast implant rupture with a seroma and skin rash forming 2 years after insertion of the implant. PMID:27579243

  6. Phase II Pediatric Study With Dabrafenib in HGG Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-09

    Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Glioblastoma; Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Gliosarcoma; Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Anaplastic Ependymoma; Choroid Plexus Carcinoma; Anaplastic Ganglioglioma; Pineal Parenchymal Tumor; Pineoblastoma; Medulloblastoma; PNET; Rhabdoid Tumor; Perineurioma; MPNST; Malignant Meningloma; Anaplastic Hemangiopericytoma

  7. CD30-positive peripheral T-cell lymphomas share molecular and phenotypic features

    PubMed Central

    Bisig, Bettina; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Bonnet, Christophe; Sujobert, Pierre; Rickman, David S.; Marafioti, Teresa; Delsol, Georges; Lamant, Laurence; Gaulard, Philippe; de Leval, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified is a heterogeneous group of aggressive neoplasms with indistinct borders. By gene expression profiling we previously reported unsupervised clusters of peripheral T-cell lymphomas, not otherwise specified correlating with CD30 expression. In this work we extended the analysis of peripheral T-cell lymphoma molecular profiles to prototypical CD30+ peripheral T-cell lymphomas (anaplastic large cell lymphomas), and validated mRNA expression profiles at the protein level. Existing transcriptomic datasets from peripheral T-cell lymphomas, not otherwise specified and anaplastic large cell lymphomas were reanalyzed. Twenty-one markers were selected for immunohistochemical validation on 80 peripheral T-cell lymphoma samples (not otherwise specified, CD30+ and CD30−; anaplastic large cell lymphomas, ALK+ and ALK−), and differences between subgroups were assessed. Clinical follow-up was recorded. Compared to CD30− tumors, CD30+ peripheral T-cell lymphomas, not otherwise specified were significantly enriched in ALK− anaplastic large cell lymphoma-related genes. By immunohistochemistry, CD30+ peripheral T-cell lymphomas, not otherwise specified differed significantly from CD30− samples [down-regulated expression of T-cell receptor-associated proximal tyrosine kinases (Lck, Fyn, Itk) and of proteins involved in T-cell differentiation/activation (CD69, ICOS, CD52, NFATc2); upregulation of JunB and MUM1], while overlapping with anaplastic large cell lymphomas. CD30− peripheral T-cell lymphomas, not otherwise specified tended to have an inferior clinical outcome compared to the CD30+ subgroups. In conclusion, we show molecular and phenotypic features common to CD30+ peripheral T-cell lymphomas, and significant differences between CD30− and CD30+ peripheral T-cell lymphomas, not otherwise specified, suggesting that CD30 expression might delineate two biologically distinct subgroups. PMID:23716562

  8. Mesenteric inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Poras

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMTs), also known as inflammatory pseudotumors and inflammatory fibrosarcomas, are uncommon mesenchymal tumors composed of myofibroblastic spindle cells admixed with lymphocytes, plasma cells and eosinophils. Once thought to be reactive, these lesions are now considered to be neoplastic. These tumors can occur throughout the body, most commonly in the lung, mesentery and omentum. Patients commonly present with painless abdominal mass or with intestinal obstruction. IMTs may be multicentric, have a high local recurrence rate and may metastasize in rare cases. The lesions show wide variability in their histologic features and cellularity, and marked inflammatory infiltration, predominantly of plasmatocytes and lymphocytes, and occasionally neutrophils and eosinophils. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements and/or ALK1 and p80 immunoreactivity are reported in 33-67% of the tumors. Owing to the rarity of these lesions, there are no specific imaging findings that distinguish IMTs from other mesenteric masses. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice. Local recurrence rates are high, and re-excision is the preferred therapy for local recurrences. ALK-positive tumors show good response to ALK inhibitors. Current knowledge and comprehensive review of the available literature on IMTs is herein presented. PMID:25608706

  9. Assessment of cytology based molecular analysis to guide targeted therapy in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lei; Qiu, Tian; Ling, Yun; Cao, Jian; Guo, Huiqin; Zhao, Huan; Li, Lin; Ying, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the use of molecular testing on cytological specimens in selecting advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who are adequate for targeted treatment, a total of 137 NSCLC cases were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements, and Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) platform combining amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) primers and TaqMan probes. Cytological specimens included 91 fine-needle aspirates, 5 fibreoptic bronchoscopic derived samples and 41 pleural effusions. Among 137 NSCLCs analyzed for ALK FISH, 16 (11.7%, of 137) were detected to harbor ALK rearrangement. FISH positive cases were all defined as adenocarcinoma (ADC) histologic subtype and the FNA samples showed the highest ALK positive rate (13.2%, 12/91). Of the 9 ALK FISH positive patients who received crizotinib treatment, 8 (88.9%) patients exhibited tumor regression. In addition, 60 (44.8%, of 134) cases were found to harbor EGFR mutations and 22 patients with EGFR sensitive mutations who received gefitinib or erlotinib treatment showed a median PFS of 16.0 months. Mutations of KRAS occurred in 8 (6.0%, of 134) cases and this was mutually exclusive from EGFR mutation. Our results demonstrated that ALK FISH and EGFR, KRAS mutational analysis on cytological specimens are sensitive methods for screening advanced stage NSCLC patients who are adequate for targeted treatment. PMID:26789109

  10. Emerging Biomarkers in Personalized Therapy of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cagle, Philip T; Raparia, Kirtee; Portier, Bryce P

    2016-01-01

    The two clinically validated and Food and Drug Administration approved lung cancer predictive biomarkers (epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocations) occur in only about 20 % of lung adenocarcinomas and acquired resistance develops to first generation drugs. Several other oncogenic drivers for lung adenocarcinoma have emerged as potentially druggable targets with new predictive biomarkers. Oncologists are requesting testing for ROS1 translocations which predict susceptibility to crizotinib, already approved for ALK positive lung cancers. Other potential biomarkers which are currently undergoing clinical trials are RET, MET, HER2 and BRAF. Detection of these biomarkers includes fluorescent in situ hybridization and/or reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (ROS1, RET, HER2), mutation analysis (BRAF) and immunohistochemistry (MET). Screening by immunohistochemistry may be useful for some biomarkers (ROS1, BRAF). Targeted next generation sequencing techniques may be useful as well. These five biomarkers are under consideration for inclusion in revised lung cancer biomarker guidelines by the College of American Pathologists, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer and Association for Molecular Pathology. PMID:26703797

  11. Novel CAD-ALK gene rearrangement is drugable by entrectinib in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Amatu, Alessio; Somaschini, Alessio; Cerea, Giulio; Bosotti, Roberta; Valtorta, Emanuele; Buonandi, Pasquale; Marrapese, Giovanna; Veronese, Silvio; Luo, David; Hornby, Zachary; Multani, Pratik; Murphy, Danielle; Shoemaker, Robert; Lauricella, Calogero; Giannetta, Laura; Maiolani, Martina; Vanzulli, Angelo; Ardini, Elena; Galvani, Arturo; Isacchi, Antonella; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Siena, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Background: Activated anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fusions are recurrent events in a small fraction of colorectal cancers (CRCs), although these events have not yet been exploited as in other malignancies. Methods: We detected ALK protein expression by immunohistochemistry and gene rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridisation in the ALKA-372-001 phase I study of the pan-Trk, ROS1, and ALK inhibitor entrectinib. One out of 487 CRCs showed ALK positivity with a peculiar pattern that prompted further characterisation by targeted sequencing using anchored multiplex PCR. Results: A novel ALK fusion with the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamylase, and dihydroorotase (CAD) gene (CAD-ALK fusion gene) was identified. It resulted from inversion within chromosome 2 and the fusion of exons 1–35 of CAD with exons 20–29 of ALK. After failure of previous standard therapies, treatment of this patient with the ALK inhibitor entrectinib resulted in a durable objective tumour response. Conclusions: We describe the novel CAD-ALK rearrangement as an oncogene and provide the first evidence of its drugability as a new molecular target in CRC. PMID:26633560

  12. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells Acquire Resistance to the ALK Inhibitor Alectinib by Activating Alternative Receptor Tyrosine Kinases.

    PubMed

    Isozaki, Hideko; Ichihara, Eiki; Takigawa, Nagio; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Ochi, Nobuaki; Yasugi, Masayuki; Ninomiya, Takashi; Yamane, Hiromichi; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Sakai, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Kunio; Hosokawa, Shinobu; Bessho, Akihiro; Sendo, Toshiaki; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2016-03-15

    Crizotinib is the standard of care for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene, but resistance invariably develops. Unlike crizotinib, alectinib is a selective ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) with more potent antitumor effects and a favorable toxicity profile, even in crizotinib-resistant cases. However, acquired resistance to alectinib, as for other TKIs, remains a limitation of its efficacy. Therefore, we investigated the mechanisms by which human NSCLC cells acquire resistance to alectinib. We established two alectinib-resistant cell lines that did not harbor the secondary ALK mutations frequently occurring in crizotinib-resistant cells. One cell line lost the EML4-ALK fusion gene, but exhibited increased activation of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3), and overexpressed the HER3 ligand neuregulin 1. Accordingly, pharmacologic inhibition of IGF1R and HER3 signaling overcame resistance to alectinib in this cell line. The second alectinib-resistant cell line displayed stimulated HGF autocrine signaling that promoted MET activation and remained sensitive to crizotinib treatment. Taken together, our findings reveal two novel mechanisms underlying alectinib resistance that are caused by the activation of alternative tyrosine kinase receptors rather than by secondary ALK mutations. These studies may guide the development of comprehensive treatment strategies that take into consideration the various approaches ALK-positive lung tumors use to withstand therapeutic insult. PMID:26719536

  13. Alemtuzumab, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Low-Dose Total Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Hematological Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-05

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute

  14. Iodine I 131 Tositumomab, Etoposide and Cyclophosphamide Followed by Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-04

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  15. MORAb-004 in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  16. A Case of Mycosis Fungoides and Lymphomatoid Papulosis Occurring Simultaneously in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Bognet, Rachel A.; Kozic, Heidi; Lee, Jason B.; Sahu, Joya; Hyde, Patrice M.

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have reported an association between lymphomatoid papulosis and other lymphomas, such as mycosis fungoides, Hodgkin’s disease, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The association between lymphomatoid papulosis and mycosis fungoides has been reported to be between seven and 39 percent. Although a relationship is acknowledged between lymphomatoid papulosis and mycosis fungoides, our understanding is limited. The authors report a case of mycosis fungoides and lymphomatoid papulosis in a child. PMID:23198014

  17. Clear cell carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, C; Carlile, A

    1985-01-01

    Six tumours of the lung initially classified as clear cell carcinoma, were studied. Examination of further material by light and electron microscopy showed adenocarcinomatous differentiation in three cases and squamous differentiation in two. One case showed the features of a large cell anaplastic carcinoma. The clear appearance of the cytoplasm in paraffin sections was due to accumulations of glycogen that were partially removed during processing. It is concluded that clear cell carcinoma is not a single and separate entity. Images PMID:4031101

  18. Bortezomib and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  19. Study of MLN8237 in Patients With Advanced Hematological Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-17

    B-cell Follicular Lymphoma; B-cell Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Mantle Cell Lymphoma; B-cell Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma (SLL); B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (B-CLL); Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia; Noncutaneous Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma Not Otherwise Specified (PTCL-NOS); Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma (AITL); Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T-cell Lymphoma (EATCL); NK Lymphoma (NKL)

  20. Fusion Protein Cytokine Therapy After Rituximab in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  1. Salvia Hispanica Seed in Reducing Risk of Disease Recurrence in Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-26

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; B Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Burkitt Leukemia; Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Mycosis Fungoides; Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis-Like T-Cell Lymphoma; Systemic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Transformed Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  2. Panobinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  3. Everolimus and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  4. Management of anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive orbito-conjunctival inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor with crizotinib.

    PubMed

    Kiratli, Hayyam; Uzun, Salih; Varan, Ali; Akyüz, Canan; Orhan, Diclehan

    2016-06-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a distinct mesenchymal neoplasm of myofibroblastic spindle cells associated with an inflammatory infiltrate formed by lymphocytes, eosinophils, and plasma cells in a myxoid or collagenous stroma. This tumor has a predilection for children and young adults and most commonly occurs in the lungs, retroperitoneum, abdomen, and pelvis. Ocular and orbital involvement is exceedingly rare. We describe a case of IMT in a 7-year-old girl involving the cornea, conjunctiva, and the anterior orbit treated with crizotinib, resulting in complete tumor remission. PMID:27312965

  5. Calcitonin-negative neuroendocrine tumor of thyroid gland mimicking anaplastic carcinoma: an unusual entity

    PubMed Central

    Arpaci, Rabia Bozdogan; Berkesoglu, Mustafa; Dag, Ahmet; Sezer, Emel; Bal, Kemal Koray; Vayısoğlu, Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer is the neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of thyroid with mostly both secreting calcitonin and immunohistochemically showing calcitonin positivity. Occasionally; NETs of thyroid may have little or no calcitonin expression. We present a case of serum calcitonin negative and immunohistochemically calcitonin-negative staining tumor with positive reaction to neuroendocrine markers synaptophysin and chromogranin-A. The patient’s right vocal cord was paralytic and thyroid mass was huge with descending to thorax till hilar region. We discussed diagnostic difficulties and way of treatment about NETs of thyroid with the light of current literature with this case. PMID:26312221

  6. Intracoelomic anaplastic sarcoma in an intersex Madagascar tree boa (Sanzinia madagascariensis).

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Sam; Lamm, Catherine G; Killick, Rowena

    2013-01-01

    An adult Madagascar tree boa (Sanzinia madagascariensis) underwent coeliotomy for investigation of a coelomic mass. At surgery, a large mass originating from the peri-pancreatic adipose tissue and involving the gall bladder was removed. The snake did not recover from general anesthesia. A complete postmortem was performed, and samples were submitted to the University of Glasgow for histopathology. On histological examination, the mass was composed of adipose tissue infiltrated with a poorly demarcated spindle cell neoplasm. The neoplastic cells were highly pleomorphic with abundant cytoplasm and frequent clear cytoplasmic vacuoles, suggestive of adipocyte origin. Immunohistochemical characterization of the mass was inconclusive. Metastatic neoplastic cells were present within vessels in the liver, lungs, and brain. As an incidental finding, the gonads contained both maturing ovarian follicles and seminiferous tubules with intact germinal epithelium and evidence of spermatogenesis, along with other features of male and female gonad anatomy. The current report describes a rare neoplasm in snakes within an intersex Madagascar tree boa. PMID:23345276

  7. Quantification and pharmacokinetics of crizotinib in rats by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Feng; Gu, Yanan; Wang, Tingting; Gao, Yingying; Li, Xiao; Gao, Xiangyu; Cheng, Shan

    2016-06-01

    Crizotinib is a small molecule inhibitor of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and can be used to treat ALK-positive nonsmall-cell lung cancer. A rapid and simple high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the quantification of crizotinib in rat plasma using a chemical synthetic compound buspirone as the internal standard (IS). The plasma samples were pretreated by a simple protein precipitation with methanol-acetonitrile (1:1, v/v). Chromatographic separation was successfully achieved on an Agilent Zorbax XDB C18 column (2.1 × 50 mm, 3.5 µm). The gradient elution system was composed of 0.1% formic acid aqueous solution and 0.1% formic acid in methanol solution. The flow rate was set at 0.50 mL/min. The multiple reaction monitoring was based on the transitions of m/z = 450.3 → 177.1 for crizotinib and 386.2 → 122.2 for buspirone (IS). The assay was successfully validated to demonstrate the selectivity, matrix effect, linearity, lower limit of quantification, accuracy, precision, recovery and stability according to the international guidelines. The lower limit of quantification was 1.00 ng/mL in 50 μL of rat plasma. This LC-MS/MS assay was successfully applied to the quantification and pharmacokinetic study of crizotinib in rats after intravenous and oral administration of crizotinib. The oral absolute bioavailability of crizotinib in rats was 68.6 ± 9.63%. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26467669

  8. Factors associated with sinus bradycardia during crizotinib treatment: a retrospective analysis of two large-scale multinational trials (PROFILE 1005 and 1007).

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Tang, Yiyun; Polli, Anna; Wilner, Keith D; Schnell, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Decreases in heart rate (HR) have been described in patients receiving crizotinib. We performed a large retrospective analysis of HR changes during crizotinib therapy. HRs from vital-sign data for patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive nonsmall cell lung cancer enrolled in PROFILE 1005 and the crizotinib arm of PROFILE 1007 were analyzed. Sinus bradycardia (SB) was defined as HR <60 beats per minute (bpm). Magnitude and timing of HR changes were assessed. Potential risk factors for SB were investigated by logistic regression analysis. Progression-free survival (PFS) was evaluated according to HR decrease by <20 versus ≥20 bpm within the first 50 days of starting treatment. For the 1053 patients analyzed, the mean maximum postbaseline HR decrease was 25 bpm (standard deviation 15.8). Overall, 441 patients (41.9%) had at least one episode of postbaseline SB. The mean precrizotinib treatment HR was significantly lower among patients with versus without postbaseline SB (82.2 bpm vs. 92.6 bpm). The likelihood of experiencing SB was statistically significantly higher among patients with a precrizotinib treatment HR <70 bpm. PFS was comparable among patients with or without HR decrease of ≥20 bpm within the first 50 days of starting crizotinib. Decrease in HR is very common among patients on crizotinib. The likelihood of experiencing SB was statistically significantly higher among patients with a precrizotinib treatment HR <70 bpm. This is the first large-scale report investigating the association between treatment with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor and the development of bradycardia. HRs should be closely monitored during crizotinib treatment. PMID:26823131

  9. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the ALK gene in 2,045 non-small cell lung cancer patients from North-Western Spain (Galicia)

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Ares, María; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José M.; Vázquez-Estévez, Sergio; Lázaro-Quintela, Martín; Vázquez-Boquete, Ángel; Afonso-Afonso, Francisco J.; Casal-Rubio, Joaquín; González-Piñeiro, Ana L.; Rico-Rodríguez, Yolanda; Fírvida-Pérez, José L.; Ruíz-Bañobre, Juan; Couso, Elena; Santomé, Lucía; Pérez-Becerra, Raquel; García-Campelo, Rosario; Amenedo, Margarita; Azpitarte-Raposeiras, Cristina; Antúnez, José; Abdulkader, Ihab

    2016-01-01

    Identification of anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements is a standard diagnostic test in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The current study describes the experience of ALK rearrangement detection of a referral center in the public health care system of Galicia in North-Western Spain. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) patterns of the ALK gene and the clinical and pathological features of these patients are reported. This study is also of interest for comparative purposes due to the relative geographical isolation of the area, which could have contributed to particular genetic features. A total of 2,045 tissue samples from NSCLC patients were collected between October 2010 and July 2015 and tested for ALK rearrangements by FISH. Examination of 1,686 paraffin-embedded tissue specimens and 395 cytological samples (306 cell block preparations and 53 cytological smears) was conducted, and any associations between the FISH results and clinicopathological features were assessed. The rate of successful evaluation was marginally higher in tissue samples than in cytological samples (92.9% vs. 84.1%); this difference was not significant. ALK rearrangements were identified in 82 patients(4%): 65 (79.3%) in tissue specimens, 15 (18.3%) in cell block samples and 2 (2.4%) in cytological smears. This genetic translocation appeared to be associated with a non-smoking history, younger age, female gender, stage IV and adenocarcinoma histological type. The findings demonstrate that ALK evaluation by FISH is feasible in tissue and cytological samples. The clinical and pathological features of the ALK-positive series of patients are similar to those previously reported in the literature. PMID:27446444

  10. Obatoclax Mesylate, Vincristine Sulfate, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Dexrazoxane Hydrochloride in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-30

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  11. Oxaliplatin, Ifosfamide and Etoposide in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  12. Oncolytic HSV-1716 in Treating Younger Patients With Refractory or Recurrent High Grade Glioma That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-26

    Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Recurrent Childhood Gliosarcoma

  13. Dose Monitoring of Busulfan and Combination Chemotherapy in Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-12

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult

  14. Mycophenolate Mofetil and Cyclosporine in Reducing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies or Metastatic Kidney Cancer Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Renal Cell Carcinoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell

  15. Genomic profiling of high-grade large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the colon

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, William A.; Crozier, Jennifer A.; Nakhleh, Raouf E.

    2016-01-01

    High-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma (HGNEC) of the colon is a rare and aggressive cancer that has a poor prognosis. Currently no standard treatment exists, and published case series report an overall survival of approximately one year with treatment. Typically patients receive treatment similar to that recommended for small-cell lung cancer, extrapolating from the similarity in cancer biology. Here we report a case of HGNEC of the colon with genomic profiling that identified a KRAS G12D mutation and a PI3K mutation that has not yet been reported in the literature for this tumor type. PMID:27034803

  16. Identification of flubendazole as potential anti-neuroblastoma compound in a large cell line screen.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Martin; Agha, Bishr; Rothweiler, Florian; Löschmann, Nadine; Voges, Yvonne; Mittelbronn, Michel; Starzetz, Tatjana; Harter, Patrick N; Abhari, Behnaz A; Fulda, Simone; Westermann, Frank; Riecken, Kristoffer; Spek, Silvia; Langer, Klaus; Wiese, Michael; Dirks, Wilhelm G; Zehner, Richard; Cinatl, Jaroslav; Wass, Mark N; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2015-01-01

    Flubendazole was shown to exert anti-leukaemia and anti-myeloma activity through inhibition of microtubule function. Here, flubendazole was tested for its effects on the viability of in total 461 cancer cell lines. Neuroblastoma was identified as highly flubendazole-sensitive cancer entity in a screen of 321 cell lines from 26 cancer entities. Flubendazole also reduced the viability of five primary neuroblastoma samples in nanomolar concentrations thought to be achievable in humans and inhibited vessel formation and neuroblastoma tumour growth in the chick chorioallantoic membrane assay. Resistance acquisition is a major problem in high-risk neuroblastoma. 119 cell lines from a panel of 140 neuroblastoma cell lines with acquired resistance to various anti-cancer drugs were sensitive to flubendazole in nanomolar concentrations. Tubulin-binding agent-resistant cell lines displayed the highest flubendazole IC50 and IC90 values but differences between drug classes did not reach statistical significance. Flubendazole induced p53-mediated apoptosis. The siRNA-mediated depletion of the p53 targets p21, BAX, or PUMA reduced the neuroblastoma cell sensitivity to flubendazole with PUMA depletion resulting in the most pronounced effects. The MDM2 inhibitor and p53 activator nutlin-3 increased flubendazole efficacy while RNAi-mediated p53-depletion reduced its activity. In conclusion, flubendazole represents a potential treatment option for neuroblastoma including therapy-refractory cells. PMID:25644037

  17. Microtubule nucleation remote from centrosomes may explain how asters span large cells.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Keisuke; Nguyen, Phuong A; Groen, Aaron C; Field, Christine M; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-12-16

    A major challenge in cell biology is to understand how nanometer-sized molecules can organize micrometer-sized cells in space and time. One solution in many animal cells is a radial array of microtubules called an aster, which is nucleated by a central organizing center and spans the entire cytoplasm. Frog (here Xenopus laevis) embryos are more than 1 mm in diameter and divide with a defined geometry every 30 min. Like smaller cells, they are organized by asters, which grow, interact, and move to precisely position the cleavage planes. It has been unclear whether asters grow to fill the enormous egg by the same mechanism used in smaller somatic cells, or whether special mechanisms are required. We addressed this question by imaging growing asters in a cell-free system derived from eggs, where asters grew to hundreds of microns in diameter. By tracking marks on the lattice, we found that microtubules could slide outward, but this was not essential for rapid aster growth. Polymer treadmilling did not occur. By measuring the number and positions of microtubule ends over time, we found that most microtubules were nucleated away from the centrosome and that interphase egg cytoplasm supported spontaneous nucleation after a time lag. We propose that aster growth is initiated by centrosomes but that asters grow by propagating a wave of microtubule nucleation stimulated by the presence of preexisting microtubules. PMID:25468969

  18. Using a Module-Based Laboratory to Incorporate Inquiry into a Large Cell Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, David R.; Miskowski, Jennifer A.

    2005-01-01

    Because cell biology has rapidly increased in breadth and depth, instructors are challenged not only to provide undergraduate science students with a strong, up-to-date foundation of knowledge, but also to engage them in the scientific process. To these ends, revision of the Cell Biology Lab course at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse was…

  19. Identification of flubendazole as potential anti-neuroblastoma compound in a large cell line screen

    PubMed Central

    Michaelis, Martin; Agha, Bishr; Rothweiler, Florian; Löschmann, Nadine; Voges, Yvonne; Mittelbronn, Michel; Starzetz, Tatjana; Harter, Patrick N.; Abhari, Behnaz A.; Fulda, Simone; Westermann, Frank; Riecken, Kristoffer; Spek, Silvia; Langer, Klaus; Wiese, Michael; Dirks, Wilhelm G.; Zehner, Richard; Cinatl, Jaroslav; Wass, Mark N.; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2015-01-01

    Flubendazole was shown to exert anti-leukaemia and anti-myeloma activity through inhibition of microtubule function. Here, flubendazole was tested for its effects on the viability of in total 461 cancer cell lines. Neuroblastoma was identified as highly flubendazole-sensitive cancer entity in a screen of 321 cell lines from 26 cancer entities. Flubendazole also reduced the viability of five primary neuroblastoma samples in nanomolar concentrations thought to be achievable in humans and inhibited vessel formation and neuroblastoma tumour growth in the chick chorioallantoic membrane assay. Resistance acquisition is a major problem in high-risk neuroblastoma. 119 cell lines from a panel of 140 neuroblastoma cell lines with acquired resistance to various anti-cancer drugs were sensitive to flubendazole in nanomolar concentrations. Tubulin-binding agent-resistant cell lines displayed the highest flubendazole IC50 and IC90 values but differences between drug classes did not reach statistical significance. Flubendazole induced p53-mediated apoptosis. The siRNA-mediated depletion of the p53 targets p21, BAX, or PUMA reduced the neuroblastoma cell sensitivity to flubendazole with PUMA depletion resulting in the most pronounced effects. The MDM2 inhibitor and p53 activator nutlin-3 increased flubendazole efficacy while RNAi-mediated p53-depletion reduced its activity. In conclusion, flubendazole represents a potential treatment option for neuroblastoma including therapy-refractory cells. PMID:25644037

  20. Massage Therapy Given by Caregiver in Treating Quality of Life of Young Patients Undergoing Treatment for Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Polycythemia Vera; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Myelofibrosis; Primary Systemic Amyloidosis; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell

  1. Bone Marrow Transplantation for Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkins' Lymphoma in First Remission.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manish; Pro, Barbara

    2015-07-01

    Opinion statement: Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are rare and heterogeneous diseases that carry, with the exception of anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive (ALK+) anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a poor prognosis when treated with conventional chemotherapy. Historically, PTCL was treated like aggressive B-cell lymphomas, and to date cyclophosphamide, prednisone, vincristine, and doxorubicin (CHOP) remains the most commonly used regimen, despite disappointing results. Given the poor outcomes of PTCL patients, a number of studies have investigated the role of high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) in the upfront setting, with different results. However, there are no prospective randomized trials, and the clinical benefit appears to be restricted to patients who achieve an objective response after induction chemotherapy. Nevertheless, with the exception of low-risk ALK+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma, in light of the available data, HDT/ASCT for consolidation should be recommended for patients deemed eligible. The results of phase II trials showed that allogeneic stem cell transplantation can cure some relapsed/refractory patients, and few studies have evaluated this strategy in the frontline setting. With the availability of recently approved new drugs as well as new targeted agents under investigation, a number of ongoing studies are testing novel combinations aiming to improve rate and durability of responses to induction chemotherapy. PMID:26076798

  2. Presumed primary muscular lymphoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Thuilliez, Céline; Watrelot-Virieux, Dorothée; Chanut, Franck; Fournel-Fleury, Corinne; Ponce, Frédérique; Marchal, Thierry

    2008-11-01

    A case of presumed primary muscular lymphoma in an 8-year-old, intact, male Newfoundland dog is reported. The dog was presented for evaluation of an infiltrating ventral cervical mass, respiratory distress, and anorexia of 1-month duration. Fine-needle aspiration of the mass revealed anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Despite chemotherapy, health status declined and the animal was euthanized a few weeks later. At necropsy, the mass infiltrated the cervical muscles and extended ventrally to the left forelimb and cranially to the tongue and laryngeal musculature. Other muscles were infiltrated by the same neoplasm (diaphragm and intercostal, abdominal, and gluteal muscles) indicating a probable multicentric origin. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma, which showed a strong muscular tropism. Immunohistochemical staining revealed neoplastic cell reactivity for cluster of differentiation 3 (CD3) and Ki-67 antigens (70% and 90%, respectively). The neoplastic cells were negative for CD79a. The presumed histological diagnosis in this dog was primary muscular anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma. PMID:18987239

  3. Bafetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent High-Grade Glioma or Brain Metastases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-18

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Tumors Metastatic to Brain; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma

  4. Phase I Study of Cellular Immunotherapy for Recurrent/Refractory Malignant Glioma Using Intratumoral Infusions of GRm13Z40-2, An Allogeneic CD8+ Cytolitic T-Cell Line Genetically Modified to Express the IL 13-Zetakine and HyTK and to be Resistant to Glucocorticoids, in Combination With Interleukin-2

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Anaplastic Ependymoma; Anaplastic Meningioma; Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Brain Stem Glioma; Ependymoblastoma; Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Glioblastoma; Gliosarcoma; Grade III Meningioma; Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Mixed Glioma; Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Brain Tumor

  5. Alemtuzumab, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-13

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T

  6. Fludarabine Phosphate, Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Cyclosporine, Mycophenolate Mofetil, Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Hematopoietic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-01

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Systemic Amyloidosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  7. Oncogene Overdose: Too Much of a Bad Thing for Oncogene-Addicted Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Amit Dipak; Rajan, Soumya S.; Groysman, Matthew J.; Pongtornpipat, Praechompoo; Schatz, Jonathan H.

    2015-01-01

    Acquired resistance to targeted inhibitors remains a major, and inevitable, obstacle in the treatment of oncogene-addicted cancers. Newer-generation inhibitors may help overcome resistance mutations, and inhibitor combinations can target parallel pathways, but durable benefit to patients remains elusive in most clinical scenarios. Now, recent studies suggest a third approach may be available in some cases—exploitation of oncogene overexpression that may arise to promote resistance. Here, we discuss the importance of maintaining oncogenic signaling at “just-right” levels in cells, with too much signaling, or oncogene overdose, being potentially as detrimental as too little. This is highlighted in particular by recent studies of mutant-BRAF in melanoma and the fusion kinase nucleophosmin–anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM–ALK) in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Oncogene overdose may be exploitable to prolong tumor control through intermittent dosing in some cases, and studies of acute lymphoid leukemias suggest that it may be specifically pharmacologically inducible. PMID:26688666

  8. Bendamustine Hydrochloride, Etoposide, Dexamethasone, and Filgrastim For Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Mobilization in Treating Patients With Refractory or Recurrent Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-08

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  9. Blood Sample Markers of Reproductive Hormones in Assessing Ovarian Reserve in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-06

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone

  10. Pediatric Extranodal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ellen M; Pavio, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoma is the third most common pediatric neoplasm. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) accounts for nearly half of cases and commonly involves extranodal sites. Compared with adults, this histologic spectrum of pediatric NHL is very narrow and consists of aggressive tumors. Patients typically present with widespread disease. Generally, NHL occurring in children includes Burkitt lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Staging and assessment of therapeutic response are usually based on FDG-PET/CT. Due to the increased susceptibility of young patients to the effects of ionizing radiation, alternative methods of imaging are being explored. PMID:27265605

  11. CPI-613 and Bendamustine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  12. 506U78 in Treating Patients With Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  13. Plastic bronchitis caused by neoplastic infiltrates in a child.

    PubMed

    Kuperman, Tamar; Wexler, Isaiah D; Shoseyov, David; Weintraub, Michael; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Kerem, Eitan

    2006-09-01

    We report on a case of a 7-year-old girl admitted for pneumonia not responding to oral antibiotics. During hospitalization, her pulmonary status deteriorated as a result of significant atelectasis. An extensive workup revealed an anaplastic large-cell lymphoma with neoplastic cells, found in both a biopsied lymph node and pleural fluid aspirate. Bronchoscopic examination showed nearly complete obstruction of the left side by bronchial casts composed of tumor cells, fibrin, and necrotic material, consistent with plastic bronchitis. Neoplastic infiltration of the bronchi should be considered in the differential diagnosis of disease entities causing plastic bronchitis in children. PMID:16779857

  14. The management of adult aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Couderc, B; Dujols, J P; Mokhtari, F; Norkowski, J L; Slawinski, J C; Schlaifer, D

    2000-07-01

    Aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphona include diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, anaplastic large cell lymphona, and different peripheral T-cell lymphomas. An international prognostic index has been developed including age, serum LDH, performance status, and extranodal involvement. For localized aggressive lymphoma, the preferred treatment is 3-4 CHOP and radiation therapy, with a cure rate of 70-80%. For disseminated aggressive lymphoma, current regimens have a cure rate of less than 40%. Innovative strategies, including dose escalation, autologus stem cell support, new drugs, and immunotherapy are being explored to improve these results. PMID:10863150

  15. (68)Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT detection of multiple extracranial localizations in a patient with anaplastic meningioma.

    PubMed

    Golemi, A; Ambrosini, A; Cecchi, P; Ruiu, A; Chondrogiannis, S; Farsad, M; Rubello, D

    2015-01-01

    We report herein a case of a 65-year-old male with intracranial recurrence of atypical meningioma initially treated with a combination of surgical resection and gamma knife radiotherapy. Afterwards, he underwent a (68)Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT scan in order to evaluate the feasibility of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). The scan identified multiple pulmonary, pleural and lymph node localizations. Histological diagnosis was consistent with intracranial atypical meningioma with diffuse metastatic spread. In our case, we have shown that meningioma with extracranial locations may present high uptake of somatostatin receptor analogues. Among other radionuclides, we believe that (68)Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT may be particularly useful for staging, detection of recurrence, evaluation of disease extension and alternative therapeutic approaches. PMID:25890891

  16. A Pilot Study to Evaluate the Co-Infusion of Ex Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Cells With an Unmanipulated Cord Blood Unit in Patients Undergoing Cord Blood Transplant for Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-10

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma

  17. Is ALK-gene rearrangement overlooked in primary gastrointestinal T-cell lymphomas? About two cases.

    PubMed

    Mneimneh, Wadad S; Vyas, Shikhar Gautam; Cheng, Liang; Cummings, Oscar W; Czader, Magdalena

    2015-12-01

    A 41-year-old male patient with a history of ankylosing spondylitis and Crohn disease, treated with immunomodulators and disease-modifying drugs, was diagnosed with a primary intestinal T-cell lymphoma that followed a 7.5-year-course. This transmural proliferation lacked cytological characteristics of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), and was CD8-positive, and CD30- and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-negative by immunohistochemistry (IHC). However, ALK-gene rearrangement (ALK-gr) was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in both initial and persistent disease. The possibility of indolent T-cell lymphoproliferative disease of the gastrointestinal tract with atypical features (transmural involvement) related to ALK-gr was suggested. A previous case of aggressive 'enteropathy-associated ALCL' in the context of celiac disease was recently reported, which also lacked anaplastic morphology, and where CD30 and ALK expression was incidentally demonstrated by IHC, and ALK-gr subsequently confirmed by FISH. These two recent cases represent two distinct rare entities pertaining to the group of primary intestinal T-cell lymphomas, and they both show unexpected ALK-gr. This suggests that ALK-gr has been overlooked in the group of primary intestinal T-cell lymphomas. Performing IHC and FISH tests for ALK-gr in primary gastrointestinal T-cell lymphomas might be of importance, particularly with the advancement of targeted therapy that could impact treatment and prognosis. PMID:26531107

  18. Maintenance therapy with interferon-alpha 2b, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone in aggressive diffuse large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, Agustin; Neri, Natividad; Nambo, M Jesús; Castañeda, Claudia; Talavera, Alejandra; Huerta-Guzmán, Judith; Murillo, Edgar

    2004-04-01

    Maintenance therapy in patients with aggressive malignant lymphoma using biological modifiers remains uncertain. We conducted a controlled clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of interferon-alpha 2b, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone as maintenance therapy in patients with aggressive diffuse large B cell lymphomas in complete remission after aggressive chemotherapy. In an intent-to-treat analysis, 169 patients were eligible for this study; the end points were event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS). With a median follow-up of 49.3 months, no statistical differences were observed and actuarial curves at 5 years showed that EFS was 71% (95% confidence interval [CI], 63-79%) for patients who received maintenance compared to 63% (95% CI, 59-71%) for patients in control group (p = 0.05). No statistical differences were observed in OS between maintenance arm: 84% (95% CI, 78-89%) and control group 83% (95% CI, 77-88%) in control group (p = 0.2). All patients received the maintenance therapy as planned and in time, thus dose intensity was considered 1.0 in all cases. Acute toxicity was mild, and no delay or suspension of treatment was necessary. Late toxicity was not evident until now. We conclude that use of maintenance therapy combining interferon-alpha 2b, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone is not useful in patients with aggressive lymphoma if they had been treated with aggressive combined chemotherapy. PMID:15186737

  19. Anti-Yo Associated Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration in a Man with Large Cell Cancer of the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James; Wang, Bonnie H.; Yekkirala, Lalitha

    2013-01-01

    Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody type 1 (PCA-1), or anti-Yo, is the most frequently detected autoantibody in paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD). The vast majority of cases of anti-Yo PCD, however, occur in females over 60 years old and are associated with gynecologic tumors. Only 10 cases have been reported in males, and only 2 were associated with cancer of the lung. Here we describe the youngest known case of PCA-1 positive PCD in a male, whose lung tumor was undetectable even on FDG-PET. PMID:24167748

  20. Single-cell analysis and stochastic modelling unveil large cell-to-cell variability in influenza A virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Heldt, Frank S.; Kupke, Sascha Y.; Dorl, Sebastian; Reichl, Udo; Frensing, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical reactions are subject to stochastic fluctuations that can give rise to cell-to-cell variability. Yet, how this variability affects viral infections, which themselves involve noisy reactions, remains largely elusive. Here we present single-cell experiments and stochastic simulations that reveal a large heterogeneity between influenza A virus (IAV)-infected cells. In particular, experimental data show that progeny virus titres range from 1 to 970 plaque-forming units and intracellular viral RNA (vRNA) levels span three orders of magnitude. Moreover, the segmentation of IAV genomes seems to increase the susceptibility of their replication to noise, since the level of different genome segments can vary substantially within a cell. In addition, simulations suggest that the abortion of virus entry and random degradation of vRNAs can result in a large fraction of non-productive cells after single-hit infection. These results challenge current beliefs that cell population measurements and deterministic simulations are an accurate representation of viral infections. PMID:26586423

  1. Genetically Modified Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-06

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage II AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  2. Panobinostat and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Multiple Myeloma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  3. Prognostic analyses on anatomical and morphological classification of feline lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hirofumi; Fujino, Yasuhito; Chino, Junko; Takahashi, Masashi; Fukushima, Kenjiro; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2014-06-01

    The present study was carried out to analyze the prognosis of 163 cats with lymphoma classified anatomically and cytomorphologically. Anatomically, alimentary lymphoma was the most common form and showed significantly shorter survival than mediastinal and nasal lymphomas in cats. Cytomorphologically, there was no predominant subtype in feline lymphomas. Immunoblastic type (18%), centroblastic type (16%), globule leukocyte type (15%), lymphocytic type (12%), lymphoblastic type (12%), pleomorphic medium and large cell type (10%) and anaplastic large cell type (7%) were relatively common subtypes. Most of the cats with globule leukocyte lymphoma had the alimentary form. Comparing median survival time among classifications, cats with globule leukocyte lymphoma showed significantly shorter survival than those with high-grade and other low-grade lymphomas. Furthermore, cats with high-grade lymphomas showed significantly shorter survival than cats with other low-grade lymphomas. The present study indicated the clinical significance of anatomical and cytomorphological evaluation in feline lymphomas. PMID:24521793

  4. Tacrolimus and Mycophenolate Mofetil With or Without Sirolimus in Preventing Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-14

    II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell

  5. Clinical roundtable monograph: CD30 in lymphoma: its role in biology, diagnostic testing, and targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Sotomayor, Eduardo M; Young, Ken H; Younes, Anas

    2014-04-01

    CD30, a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, is a transmembrane glycoprotein receptor consisting of an extracellular domain, a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular domain. CD30 has emerged as an important molecule in the field of targeted therapy because its expression is generally restricted to specific disease types and states. The major cancers with elevated CD30 expression include Hodgkin lymphoma and anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma, and CD30 expression is considered essential to the differential diagnosis of these malignancies. Most commonly, CD30 expression is detected and performed by immunohistochemical staining of biopsy samples. Alternatively, flow cytometry analysis has also been developed for fresh tissue and cell aspiration specimens, including peripheral blood and bone marrow aspirate. Over the past several years, several therapeutic agents were developed to target CD30, with varying success in clinical trials. A major advance in the targeting of CD30 was seen with the development of the antibody-drug conjugate brentuximab vedotin, which consists of the naked anti-CD30 antibody SGN-30 conjugated to the synthetic antitubulin agent monomethyl auristatin E. In 2011, brentuximab vedotin was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in Hodgkin lymphoma and anaplastic large cell lymphoma based on clinical trial data showing high response rates in these indications. Ongoing trials are examining brentuximab vedotin after autologous stem cell transplantation, as part of chemotherapy combination regimens, and in other CD30-expressing malignancies, including primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphomas, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, lymphoma positive for Epstein-Barr virus, peripheral T-cell lymphoma not otherwise specified, and cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma. PMID:24870054

  6. [Radiological trap and oncological precautions in a patient who has undergone a permanent withdrawal of PIP breast implants].

    PubMed

    Koutsomanis, A; Bruant-Rodier, C; Roedlich, M-N; Bretz-Grenier, M-F; Perrot, P; Bodin, F

    2015-12-01

    We report the case of a 57-year-old patient who presented radiological images similar to ruptured breast implants one year after the supposed withdrawal of the latter. This woman had benefited for the first time from cosmetic PIP breast implants in 2000. Early in 2014, she requested the removal of the implants without renewal because she was feeling pain and functional discomfort. A few months after the operation, she consulted for breast swelling in the upper pole of the breast. Radiological assessment showed liquid formations compatible with the presence of implants. At our request, the rereading of the MRI by the radiologist definitively concluded on a bilateral seroma within the persistent fibrous capsule. In the absence of symptoms, clinical monitoring had been decided. But at the recrudescence of anaplastic large cell lymphoma cases associated with breast implants, a cytological sampling was intended. In case of cytological abnormality or recurrence of the seroma, a surgical procedure should be performed. In conclusion, the removal of a breast implant without capsulectomy may result in the formation of a seroma whose images resemble those of an implant. It is always worthwhile to provide precise clinical data to the radiologist in order to help him to make informed interpretations. Every serous effusion in a breast lodge having contained a silicone implant must evoke the diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. PMID:26232069

  7. HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION FOR REFRACTORY OR RECURRENT NON-HODGKIN LYMPHOMA IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Thomas G.; Hale, Gregory A.; He, Wensheng; Camitta, Bruce M.; Sanders, Jean E.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Hayashi, Robert J.; Termuhlen, Amanda M.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Davies, Stella M.; Eapen, Mary

    2010-01-01

    We examined the role of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HSCT) for patients aged ≤18 years with refractory or recurrent Burkitt (n=41), lymphoblastic (n=53), diffuse large B cell (n=52) and anaplastic large cell lymphoma (n=36), receiving autologous (n=90) or allogeneic (n=92 – 43 matched sibling and 49 unrelated donor) HSCT in 1990–2005. Risk factors affecting event-free survival (EFS) were evaluated using stratified Cox regression. Characteristics of allogeneic and autologous HSCT recipients were similar. Allogeneic donor HSCT was more likely to use irradiation-containing conditioning regimens, marrow stem cells, be performed in more recent years, and for lymphoblastic lymphoma. EFS rates were lower for patients not in complete remission at HSCT, regardless of donor type. After adjusting for disease status, 5-year EFS were similar after allogeneic and autologous HSCT for diffuse large B cell (50% vs. 52%), Burkitt (31% vs. 27%) and anaplastic large cell lymphoma (46% vs. 35%). However, EFS was higher for lymphoblastic lymphoma, after allogeneic HSCT (40% vs. 4%, p<0.01). Predictors of EFS for progressive or recurrent disease after HSCT included disease status at HSCT and use of allogeneic donor for lymphoblastic lymphoma. These data were unable to demonstrate a difference in outcome by donor type for the other histologic sub-types. PMID:19800015

  8. Primary and Secondary T-cell Lymphomas of the Breast: Clinico-pathologic Features of 11 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Chioato, Lucimara; Harrington, William J.; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    Breast involvement by non-Hodgkin lymphomas is rare, and exceptional for T-cell lymphomas; we studied the morphologic, immunophenotypic, and clinical features of 11 patients with T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas involving the breast. Four cases fulfilled the definition criteria for primary breast lymphomas, 3 females and 1 male, with a median age of 51 years. One primary breast lymphomas was T-cell lymphoma unspecified, other was subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma, and 2 cases were anaplastic large cell lymphomas. One of the anaplastic large cell lymphoma cases was found surrounding a silicone breast implant and presented as clinically as mastitis; whereas the other case occurred in a man. T-cell lymphoma secondarily involved the breast in 7 patients, all women and 1 bilateral, with a median age of 29 years. These secondary breast lymphomas occurred as part of widespread nodal or leukemic disease. Three patients had adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, including the patient with bilateral lesions, 3 others had precursor T-lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia, and the other presented with a peripheral-T-cell lymphoma nonotherwise specified type. Breast T-cell lymphomas are very infrequent and are morphologically and clinically heterogeneous. PMID:19318917

  9. Peripheral T-cell lymphomas: diagnosis and treatment options. Proceedings from a live roundtable, August 17, 2011, Kauai, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Cheson, Bruce D; Horwitz, Steven M; Weisenburger, Dennis D

    2011-11-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas are a collection of rare diseases, most of which have a poor prognosis. The basic categories include precursor lymphoid neoplasms (eg, lymphoblastic lymphoma); mature natural killer/T-cell neoplasms and extranodal lymphomas, including enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma; hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma; and subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma. The most common varieties are the nodal types, which include peripheral T-cell lymphoma not otherwise specified, anaplastic large cell lymphomas, and angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas. Each of the subtypes has characteristic clinical manifestations. The frequencies of the subtypes vary by geographic region. The diagnosis can be difficult, and the World Health Organization classification system was recently evaluated to assess its clinical applicability and reproducibility for peripheral T-cell lymphomas and natural killer/T-cell lymphomas. At least 10% of patients are incorrectly diagnosed by local laboratories, and many subtypes need better diagnostic markers and criteria. Currently, an increasing number of effective and tolerable therapies are becoming available, including pralatrexate, brentuximab vedotin, romidepsin, and bendamustine. Accurate diagnosis is necessary to allow appropriate treatment, as exemplified by patients with anaplastic large cell lymphoma that expresses high levels of CD30, who have high response rates to brentuximab vedotin. Patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma should be enrolled in clinical trials when possible. New medications should be incorporated into therapies in well-designed clinical trials to develop appropriate safety and efficacy data. PMID:22362328

  10. Use of EF5 to Measure the Oxygen Level in Tumor Cells of Patients Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Newly Diagnosed Supratentorial Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma

  11. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Oral 5-Fluorocytosine and Genetically-Modified Neural Stem Cells Expressing E.Coli Cytosine Deaminase for Treatment of Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Grade III Glioma; Recurrent Grade IV Glioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent High Grade Glioma

  12. New treatment options for ALK+ advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: critical appraisal of ceritinib

    PubMed Central

    Rothschild, Sacha I

    2016-01-01

    Rearrangements in ALK gene and EML4 gene were first described in 2007. This genomic aberration is found in about 2%–8% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Crizotinib was the first ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor licensed for the treatment of metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC based on a randomized Phase III trial. Despite the initial treatment response of crizotinib, disease progression inevitably develops after approximately 10 months of therapy. Different resistance mechanisms have recently been described. One relevant mechanism of resistance is the development of mutations in ALK. Novel ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been developed to overcome these mutations. Ceritinib is an oral second-generation ALK inhibitor showing clinical activity not only in crizotinib-resistant ALK-positive NSCLC but also in treatment-naïve ALK-positive disease. In this paper, preclinical and clinical data of ceritinib are reviewed, and its role in the clinical setting is put into perspective. PMID:27217763

  13. Donor T Cells After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood

  14. Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-11

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Polycythemia Vera; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non

  15. Cyclophosphamide for Prevention of Graft-Versus-Host Disease After Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Hematological Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell

  16. Fludarabine Phosphate, Melphalan, and Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-28

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Aplastic Anemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Congenital Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Polycythemia Vera; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell

  17. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Radiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Immunosuppression in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Systemic Amyloidosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T

  18. Cilengitide (EMD 121974) in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2

  19. Lenalidomide as Maintenance Therapy After Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Rituximab and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma That is Resistant to Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  20. Vorinostat and Radiation Therapy Followed by Maintenance Therapy With Vorinostat in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    Childhood Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Untreated Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Gliosarcoma

  1. Temsirolimus and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Progressive Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm

  2. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  3. WEE1 Inhibitor MK-1775 and Local Radiation Therapy in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Untreated Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Untreated Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Gliosarcoma

  4. p28 in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Progressive Central Nervous System Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-19

    Teratoid Tumor, Atypical; Choroid Plexus Neoplasms; Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Brainstem Tumors; Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Glioblastoma; Gliosarcoma; Medulloblastoma; Neuroectodermal Tumor, Primitive

  5. Fludarabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating HIV-Positive Patients With or Without Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-28

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Aggressive NK-cell Leukemia; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2

  6. MK2206 in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-28

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Aggressive NK-cell Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood

  7. Vorinostat and Bortezomib in Treating Young Patients With Refractory or Recurrent Solid Tumors, Including Central Nervous System Tumors and Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Choriocarcinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Germinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Teratoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Yolk Sac Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Medulloepithelioma; Childhood Meningioma; Childhood Mixed Glioma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Pineoblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  8. Fludarabine Phosphate, Melphalan, Total-Body Irradiation, Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer or Bone Marrow Failure Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Aplastic Anemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Fanconi Anemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  9. Tacrolimus and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Who Have Undergone Total-Body Irradiation With or Without Fludarabine Phosphate Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-25

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous

  10. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Systemic Mature T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sonali M.; Burns, Linda J.; van Besien, Koen; LeRademacher, Jennifer; He, Wensheng; Fenske, Timothy S.; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Hsu, Jack W.; Schouten, Harry C.; Hale, Gregory A.; Holmberg, Leona A.; Sureda, Anna; Freytes, Cesar O.; Maziarz, Richard Thomas; Inwards, David J.; Gale, Robert Peter; Gross, Thomas G.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Costa, Luciano J.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Wiernik, Peter H.; Maharaj, Dipnarine; Laport, Ginna G.; Montoto, Silvia; Hari, Parameswaran N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To analyze outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients and Methods Outcomes of 241 patients (112 anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, 102 peripheral T-cell lymphoma not otherwise specified, 27 angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma) undergoing autologous HCT (autoHCT; n = 115; median age, 43 years) or allogeneic HCT (alloHCT; n = 126; median age, 38 years) were analyzed. Primary outcomes were nonrelapse mortality (NRM), relapse/progression, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Patient, disease, and HCT-related variables were analyzed in multivariate Cox proportional hazard models to determine association with outcomes. Results AutoHCT recipients were more likely in first complete remission (CR1; 35% v 14%; P = .001) and with chemotherapy-sensitive disease (86% v 60%; P < .001), anaplastic large-cell histology (53% v 40%; P = .04), and two or fewer lines of prior therapy (65% v 44%; P < .001) compared with alloHCT recipients. Three-year PFS and OS of autoHCT recipients beyond CR1 were 42% and 53%, respectively. Among alloHCT recipients who received transplantations beyond CR1, 31% remained progression-free at 3 years, despite being more heavily pretreated and with more refractory disease. NRM was 3.5-fold higher (95% CI, 1.80 to 6.99; P < .001) for alloHCT. In multivariate analysis, chemotherapy sensitivity (hazard ratio [HR], 1.8; 95% CI, 1.16 to 2.87) and two or fewer lines of pretransplantation therapy (HR, 5.02; 95% CI, 2.15 to 11.72) were prognostic of survival. Conclusion These data describe the roles of autoHCT and alloHCT in T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and suggest greater effectiveness earlier in the disease course, and limited utility in multiply relapsed disease. Notably, autoHCT at relapse may be a potential option for select patients, particularly those with anaplastic large-cell lymphoma histology. PMID:23897963

  11. Imaging Characteristics of Driver Mutations in EGFR, KRAS, and ALK among Treatment-Naïve Patients with Advanced Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jangchul; Kobayashi, Yoshihisa; Urayama, Kevin Y.; Yamaura, Hidekazu; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hida, Toyoaki

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the computed tomography characteristics of treatment-naïve patients with lung adenocarcinoma and known driver mutations in EGFR, KRAS, or ALK. Patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma (stage IIIB–IV) and known mutations in EGFR, KRAS, or ALK were assessed. The radiological findings for the main tumor and intra-thoracic status were retrospectively analyzed in each group, and the groups’ characteristics were compared. We identified 265 treatment-naïve patients with non-small-cell carcinoma, who had EGFR mutations (n = 159), KRAS mutations (n = 55), or ALK rearrangements (n = 51). Among the three groups, we evaluated only patients with stage IIIB–IV lung adenocarcinoma who had EGFR mutations (n = 126), KRAS mutations (n = 35), or ALK rearrangements (n = 47). We found that ground-glass opacity at the main tumor was significantly more common among EGFR-positive patients, compared to ALK-positive patients (p = 0.009). Lymphadenopathy was significantly more common among ALK-positive patients, compared to EGFR-positive patients (p = 0.003). Extranodal invasion was significantly more common among ALK-positive patients, compared to EGFR-positive patients and KRAS-positive patients (p = 0.001 and p = 0.049, respectively). Lymphangitis was significantly more common among ALK-positive patients, compared to EGFR-positive patients (p = 0.049). Pleural effusion was significantly less common among KRAS-positive patients, compared to EGFR-positive patients and ALK-positive patients (p = 0.046 and p = 0.026, respectively). Lung metastases were significantly more common among EGFR-positive patients, compared to KRAS-positive patients and ALK-positive patients (p = 0.007 and p = 0.04, respectively). In conclusion, EGFR mutations were associated with ground-glass opacity, KRAS-positive tumors were generally solid and less likely to metastasize to the lung and pleura, and ALK-positive tumors tended to present with lymphadenopathy, extranodal

  12. Primary Meningeal Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma With Anaplastic Features: A Report of 2 Cases, One With BRAFV600E Mutation and Clinical Response to the BRAF Inhibitor Dabrafenib

    PubMed Central

    Usubalieva, Aisulu; Pierson, Christopher R.; Kavran, Christina A.; Huntoon, Kristin; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N.; Mayer, Theodore G.; Zhao, Weiqiang; Rock, Jack; Ammirati, Mario; Puduvalli, Vinay K.; Lehman, Norman L.

    2016-01-01

    Primary meningeal gliomas are rare tumors composed of a heterogeneous group of neoplasms. We present 2 clinically aggressive cases of primary meningeal pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma that clinically mimicked meningioma. One case presented in the posterior fossa of a 56-year-old woman; the other centered on the left operculum of a 35-year-old woman. These cases showed many of the classic features of pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma, except that xanthomatous cells were rare and eosinophilic granular bodies were inconspicuous. Both cases exhibited high proliferative indices and superficially invaded the brain. One case harboring a BRAFV600E mutation disseminated to the thecal sac and showed a clinical response to the targeted BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib. These cases seem to represent an unusual primarily extra-axial presentation of pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma and may account for at least some of the previously reported cases of primary meningeal glioma and/or glial fibrillary acidic protein–immunoreactive meningioma variants. We suggest that BRAF mutation analysis be considered in all meningeal lesions showing atypical histologic or immunohistochemical profiles, particularly those exhibiting glial differentiation, as a diagnostic aid and possible indication for targeted therapy. PMID:26352988

  13. Assessing Biological Response to Bevacizumab Using 18F-Fluoromisonidazole PET/MR Imaging in a Patient with Recurrent Anaplastic Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Ramon F.; Pampaloni, Miguel H.; Clarke, Jennifer L.; Seo, Youngho; Savic, Dragana; Hawkins, Randall A.; Behr, Spencer C.; Chang, Susan M.; Berger, Mitchel; Dillon, William P.; Cha, Soonmee

    2015-01-01

    We present our initial experience in using single modality fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) PET/MR imaging to noninvasively evaluate the biological effects induced by bevacizumab therapy in a patient treated for recurrent high grade glioma. In this index patient, bevacizumab therapy resulted in the development of nonenhancing tumor characterized by reduced diffusion and markedly decreased FMISO uptake in the setting of maintained CBF and CBV. These observations suggest that the dynamic biological interplay between tissue hypoxia and vascular normalization occurring within treated recurrent high grade glioma can be captured utilizing FMISO PET/MR imaging. PMID:25793136

  14. Follicular lymphoma transforming into anaplastic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of oral cavity: A case report with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Megha; Puri, Abhiney; Nangia, Rajat; Sachdeva, Alisha

    2015-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is a common form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) with the ability to transform into a more aggressive disease, frequently to B cell-lymphoblastic lymphoma. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a subtype of NHL, which is characterized by diffuse proliferation of large neoplastic B-lymphocytes. It accounts for 30% of all NHL and its occurrence in the mandible is very rare. It is often seen in young adults, but in the present case, a 50-year-old male patient presented with painless swelling in left lower jaw since 25 days following extraction of left lower molar teeth. There was a history of fever and submandibular lymph nodes were enlarged. On incisional biopsy, features of NHL-like lesion were observed and confirmed by immunohistochemistry using CD20, bcl-2, CD10, CD3, CD5, Ki67 markers to be FL (3A) lymphoma transforming into DLBCL. This is a very uncommon presentation. PMID:26980969

  15. Combining BRAF inhibitor and anti PD-L1 antibody dramatically improves tumor regression and anti tumor immunity in an immunocompetent murine model of anaplastic thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Borre, Pierre Vanden; Zurakowski, David; Kim, Yon Seon; Dennett, Kate Virginia; Amin, Salma; Freeman, Gordon James; Parangi, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of programmed cell death-1 and its ligand is widely studied in cancer. Monoclonal antibodies blocking these molecules have had great success but little is known about them in thyroid cancer. We investigated the role of PD-L1 in thyroid cancer with respect to BRAF mutation and MAP kinase pathway activity and the effect of anti PD-L1 antibody therapy on tumor regression and intra-tumoral immune response alone or in combination with BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi). BRAFV600E cells showed significantly higher baseline expression of PD-L1 at mRNA and protein levels compared to BRAFWT cells. MEK inhibitor treatment resulted in a decrease of PD-L1 expression across all cell lines. BRAFi treatment decreased PD-L1 expression in BRAFV600E cells, but paradoxically increased its expression in BRAFWT cells. BRAFV600E mutated patients samples had a higher level of PD-L1 mRNA compared to BRAFWT (p=0.015). Immunocompetent mice (B6129SF1/J) implanted with syngeneic 3747 BRAFV600E/WT P53−/− murine tumor cells were randomized to control, PLX4720, anti PD-L1 antibody and their combination. In this model of aggressive thyroid cancer, control tumor volume reached 782.3±174.6mm3 at two weeks. The combination dramatically reduced tumor volume to 147.3±60.8, compared to PLX4720 (439.3±188.4 mm3, P=0.023) or PD-L1 antibody (716.7±62.1, P<0.001) alone. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed intense CD8+ CTL infiltration and cytotoxicity and favorable CD8+:Treg ratio compared to each individual treatment. Our results show anti PD-L1 treatment potentiates the effect of BRAFi on tumor regression and intensifies anti tumor immune response in an immunocompetent model of ATC. Clinical trials of this therapeutic combination may be of benefit in patients with ATC. PMID:26943572

  16. Functional Characterization of the Kinase Activation Loop in Nucleophosmin (NPM)-Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Using Tandem Affinity Purification and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Wu, Fang; Ma, Yupo; Li, Liang; Lai, Raymond; Young, Leah C.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the kinase activation loop (KAL) of the oncogenic fusion protein NPM-ALK regulates its overall tyrosine phosphorylation status and tumorigenicity. Using tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, we assessed how the KAL of NPM-ALK regulates the phosphorylation status of its individual tyrosines. Using the lysates of GP293 cells transfected with NPM-ALK, our highly reproducible results showed evidence of phosphorylation in all 3 tyrosines in KAL and 8 tyrosines outside KAL. We created 7 KAL mutants, each of which carried a Tyr-to-Phe mutation of ≥1 of the 3 tyrosines in KAL. A complete loss of the 8 phosphotyrosines outside KAL was found in 3 KAL mutants, and their oncogenicity (assessed by cell viability, colony formation, and the ability to phosphorylate effector proteins) was abrogated. A partial loss of the 8 phosphotyrosines was found in 4 KAL mutants, but their oncogenicity did not show simple correlation with the number of residual phosphotyrosines. Tyr-to-Phe mutations of each of the 8 phosphotyrosines outside KAL did not result in a significant decrease in the oncogenicity. In conclusion, we have provided details of how the KAL in NPM-ALK regulates its tyrosine phosphorylation pattern. Our results challenge some of the current concepts regarding the relationship between the tyrosine phosphorylation and oncogenicity of NPM-ALK. PMID:19887368

  17. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation and Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Gene Fusion: Detection in Malignant Pleural Effusion by RNA or PNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Lin; Lee, Chung-Ta; Lu, Cheng-Chan; Yang, Shu-Ching; Chen, Wan-Li; Lee, Yang-Cheng; Yang, Chung-Hsien; Peng, Shu-Ling; Su, Wu-Chou; Chow, Nan-Haw; Ho, Chung-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing EGFR mutations and detecting ALK gene fusion are indispensable when planning to treat pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is a devastating complication of lung cancer and sometimes the only source for mutation analysis. The percentage of tumor cells in the pleural effusion may be low; therefore, mutant enrichment is required for a successful analysis. The EGFR mutation status in MPE was determined using three methods: (1) PCR sequencing of genomic DNA (direct sequencing), (2) mutant-enriched PCR sequencing of genomic DNA using peptide nucleic acid (PNA-sequencing), and (3) PCR sequencing of cDNA after reverse transcription for cellular RNA (RNA-sequencing). RT-PCR was also used to test cases for ALK gene fusion. PNA-sequencing and RNA-sequencing had similar analytical sensitivities (< 1%), which indicates similar enrichment capabilities. The clinical sensitivity in 133 cases when detecting the common EGFR exon 19 and exon 21 mutations was 56.4% (75/133) for direct sequencing, 63.2% (84/133) for PNA-sequencing, and 65.4% (87/133) for RNA-sequencing. RT-PCR and sequencing showed 5 cases (3.8%) with ALK gene fusion. All had wild-type EGFR. For EGFR analysis of MPE, RNA-sequencing is at least as sensitive as PNA-sequencing but not limited to specific mutations. Detecting ALK fusion can be incorporated in the same RNA workflow. Therefore, RNA is a better source for comprehensive molecular diagnoses in MPE. PMID:27352172

  18. Mucosal CD30-Positive T-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder Arising in the Oral Cavity Following Dental Implants: Report of the First Case.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hye-Jung; Choe, Ji-Young; Jeon, Yoon Kyung

    2015-12-01

    Mucosal CD30-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (CD30+ T-cell LPD) is a novel entity with unique clinicopathological features and an indolent behavior. Here we report the first case of mucosal CD30+ T-cell LPD arising in the oral cavity following dental implant. A 70-year-old woman presented with swelling and redness of the oral mucosa of right maxilla and left mandible surrounding dental implants that had been placed 8 years previously. Radiological examination revealed enhancing oral lesions and multiple cervical lymph nodes. Microscopic examination showed diffuse infiltration of large anaplastic cells with characteristic morphology of hallmark cells described in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. These cells were diffusely positive for CD30, CD3, CD4, CD2, CD5, CD7, TIA-1, and TCRβF1, but negative for CD20, CD8, CD45, EMA, ALK, and Epstein-Barr virus. T-cell monoclonality was detected in a TCRγ gene rearrangement study. This a unique case of mucosal CD30+ T-cell LPD with unusual presentation following dental implant. PMID:26261101

  19. A novel role for IL-22R1 as a driver of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Adelle P.; Reynolds, Della A.; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Ramakrishnan, Karthika; Karwan, Megan; Shirota, Hidekazu; Klinman, Dennis M.; Dunleavy, Kieron; Pittaluga, Stefania; Anderson, Stephen K.; Donnelly, Raymond P.; Wilson, Wyndham H.

    2011-01-01

    The interleukin (IL)–22R1 chain of the heterodimeric IL-22 receptor is not expressed on normal leukocytes, but this receptor is expressed on T cells from anaplastic lymphoma kinase–positive (ALK+) anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) patients. To investigate the consequences of aberrant expression of this receptor on lymphocytes, we generated transgenic mice that express IL-22R1 on lymphocytes. The health of these animals progressively deteriorated at 8 to 12 weeks of age, as they displayed respiratory distress, rough coat and sluggish movement, and subsequent lethality due to multiorgan inflammation. The IL-22R1 transgenic animals developed neutrophilia that correlated with increased levels of circulating IL-17 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. In addition, these mice had increased serum IL-22 levels, suggesting that T cells expressing IL-22R1 generate IL-22 in a positive autoregulatory loop. As a result of the mouse model findings, we analyzed circulating cytokine levels in ALK+ALCL patients and detected elevated levels of IL-22, IL-17, and IL-8 in untreated patient samples. Importantly, IL-22 and IL-17 were undetectable in all patients who were in complete remission after chemotherapy. This study documents a previously unknown role of IL-22R1 in inflammation and identifies the involvement of IL-22R1/IL-22 in ALK+ALCL. PMID:20971950

  20. A Primary Cutaneous CD30-Positive T-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder Arising in a Patient With Multiple Myeloma and Cutaneous Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ryan C; Cohen, Daniel N; Howard, Matthew T; Wieland, Carilyn N

    2016-05-01

    CD30-positive cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders, a group of T-cell neoplasms, including lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP) and cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma, require careful clinicopathologic correlation for diagnosis. An association between LyP and the development of a second hematolymphoid malignancy has been established in the literature. LyP has also been reported with systemic amyloidosis, but no such reports have documented coexisting cutaneous amyloid deposition with LyP to our knowledge. A 66-year-old woman with cutaneous amyloidosis, secondary to multiple myeloma, in remission, presented with erythematous and dark-brown papules involving the right arm, scalp, and torso. Punch biopsy of the arm showed a dermal infiltrate of intermediate-sized lymphocytes, some of which displayed a plasmacytoid morphology and prominent nodular subepidermal amyloid deposition. Punch biopsy of the scalp similarly showed a nonepidermotropic dense dermal infiltrate of intermediate-sized plasmacytoid lymphocytes and multifocal amyloid deposition. Both infiltrates were immunophenotypically CD30-positive, anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative T-cell lymphoproliferative processes. Subsequent studies showed no systemic involvement, and clinical correlation suggested a final diagnosis of LyP. We present this case of LyP, which histologically mimics a B-cell proliferation with a plasmacytoid morphology arising in association with cutaneous amyloidosis to highlight the importance of clinicopathologic correlation, a thorough battery of immunohistochemical studies, and consideration for a second hematologic malignancy arising in the setting of LyP. PMID:26981738

  1. Transfection of shRNA-encoding Minivector DNA of a few hundred base pairs to regulate gene expression in lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, N; Fogg, J M; Zechiedrich, L; Zu, Y

    2011-01-01

    This work illustrates the utility of Minivector DNA, a non-viral, supercoiled gene therapy vector incorporating short hairpin RNA from an H1 promoter. Minivector DNA is superior to both plasmid DNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA) in that it has improved biostability while maintaining high cell transfection efficiency and gene silencing capacity. Minivector DNAs were stable for over 48 h in human serum, as compared with only 0.5 and 2 h for siRNA and plasmid, respectively. Although all three nucleic acids exhibited similar transfection efficiencies in easily transfected adhesion fibroblasts cells, only Minivector DNAs and siRNA were capable of transfecting difficult-to-transfect suspension lymphoma cells. Minivector DNA and siRNA were capable of silencing the gene encoding anaplastic lymphoma kinase, a key pathogenic factor of human anaplastic large cell lymphoma, and this silencing caused inhibition of the lymphoma cells. Based on these results, Minivector DNAs are a promising new gene therapy tool. PMID:20962872

  2. UVA-activated 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA) causes G2/M cell cycle arrest in Karpas 299 T-lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bartosová, Jitka; Kuzelová, Katerina; Pluskalová, Michaela; Marinov, Iuri; Halada, Petr; Gasová, Zdenka

    2006-10-01

    We investigated the effect of UVA-activated 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA) on the cell line Karpas 299 derived from anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) expressing chimeric fusion protein nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM/ALK). NPM/ALK activates phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway responsible for the cell protection from apoptosis. We found that PUVA treatment first induced G2/M cell cycle arrest resulting in a decrease in the cell proliferation rate. The mitochondrial apoptosis was triggered immediately following PUVA treatment, as we judged from the unmasking of mitochondrial membrane antigen 7A6. However, the mitochondrial membrane depolarization was not observed and caspase-3 was only slightly activated. The late apoptotic events were lacking: neither translocation of phosphatidylserine to the outer side of plasma membrane nor DNA fragmentation occurred. We revealed that PUVA enhanced the expression of peroxiredoxin, stress protein endoplasmin and galectin-3. Galectin-3 has been shown to protect mitochondrial membrane integrity and prevent cytochrome c release thereby blocking the effector stage of apoptosis. We suggest that the elevated level of this protein following PUVA treatment acts in synergy with the constitutively expressed chimeric kinase NPM/ALK to block the apoptosis. PMID:16735125

  3. Brentuximab Vedotin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory CD30+ Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-01

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. Ipilimumab and Local Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Melanoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Colon, or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-19

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  5. Low-Dose Total Body Irradiation and Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-30

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  6. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy Before Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoid Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-07

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  7. Etoposide, Filgrastim, and Plerixafor in Improving Stem Cell Mobilization in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-02

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  8. Vorinostat and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-12-08

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  9. Methoxyamine and Fludarabine Phosphate in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-12

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  10. Vorinostat, Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Previously Untreated T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  11. Lenalidomide With or Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Progressive or Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Prolymphocytic Leukemia, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  12. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, Carboplatin, Dexamethasone, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Lymphoid Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-25

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  13. 17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Patients With Advanced Epithelial Cancer, Malignant Lymphoma, or Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-06

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Chondrosarcoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small

  14. MS-275 and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  15. Strikingly high false positivity of surveillance FDG-PET/CT scanning among patients with diffuse large cell lymphoma in the rituximab era.

    PubMed

    Avivi, Irit; Zilberlicht, Ariel; Dann, Eldad J; Leiba, Ronit; Faibish, Tal; Rowe, Jacob M; Bar-Shalom, Rachel

    2013-05-01

    Predictive value (PV) of surveillance fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) treated with chemotherapy-rituximab (R) versus chemotherapy only, remains unclear. The aim of the current study was to compare the performance of surveillance PET in DLBCL patients receiving CHOP (cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine, and prednisone) alone versus CHOP-R. Institutional database was retrospectively searched for adults with newly diagnosed DLBCL, receiving CHOP or CHOP-R, who achieved complete remission and underwent surveillance PETs. Follow-up (FU) PET was considered positive for recurrence in case of an uptake unrelated to physiological or known benign process. Results were confirmed by biopsy, imaging and clinical FU. One hundred nineteen patients, 35 receiving CHOP and 84 CHOP-R, who underwent 422 FU-PETs, were analyzed. At a median PET-FU of 3.4 years, 31 patients relapsed (17 vs. 14, respectively; P = 0.02). PET detected all relapses, with no false-negative studies. Specificity and positive PV (PPV) were significantly lower for patients receiving CHOP-R vs. CHOP (84% vs. 87%, P = 0.023; 23% vs. 74%, P < 0.0001), reflecting a higher false-positive (FP) rate in subjects receiving CHOP-R (77% vs. 26%, P < 0.001). In the latter group, FP-rate remained persistently high up to 3 years post-therapy. Multivariate analysis confirmed rituximab to be the most significant predictor for FP-PET. In conclusion, routine surveillance FDG-PET is not recommended in DLBCL treated with rituximab; strict criteria identifying patients in whom FU-PET is beneficial are required. PMID:23423884

  16. Unveiling Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lakhtakia, Ritu; Burney, Ikram; Qureshi, Asim; Al-Azawi, Sinan; Al-Badi, Hamid; Al-Hajri, Shaikha

    2015-08-01

    This article narrates a multifaceted educational journey undertaken by a medical student through a weekly SCRAPS (surgery, clinical disciplines, radiology, anatomy, psychiatry and laboratory sciences) clinico-pathological meeting held in the College of Medicine & Health Sciences at Sultan Qaboos University in Muscat, Oman. Through a presentation titled 'Unveiling Cancer', the multidisciplinary and interprofessional audience witnessed a simulated interaction between a medical student, a technologist peer and tutors in medicine, pathology and radiology. The presentation was based on the complexities of presentation, diagnosis and management of a patient with anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, in the aftermath of a bone marrow transplantation. After describing the case, the student shared with the audience a spectrum of learning objectives, which included integration in the complex world of contemporary medicine, insight into the triumphs and travails of technology (immunohistochemistry) and peer collaboration, communication and mentorship. PMID:26355844

  17. Targeted agents in non-small cell lung cancer therapy: What is there on the horizon?

    PubMed Central

    Villaflor, Victoria M.; Salgia, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is a heterogeneous group of diseases. There has been much research in lung cancer over the past decade which has advanced our ability to treat these patients with a more personalized approach. The scope of this paper is to review the literature and give a broad understanding of the current molecular targets for which we currently have therapies as well as other targets for which we may soon have therapies. Additionally, we will cover some of the issues of resistance with these targeted therapies. The molecular targets we intend to discuss are epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), anaplastic large-cell lymphoma kinase (ALK), KRAS, C-MET/RON, PIK3CA. ROS-1, RET Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). Ephrins and their receptors, BRAF, and immunotherapies/vaccines. This manuscript only summarizes the work which has been done to date and in no way is meant to be comprehensive. PMID:23599689

  18. Romidepsin and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  19. Third annual forum on T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tobinai, Kensei

    2011-05-01

    The Third Annual T-cell Lymphoma Forum, held on 27-29 January 2011 in San Francisco (CA, USA), continued in the spirit of the two earlier conferences and provided a collegial venue for clinicians and scientists to discuss advances in the science and treatment of T-cell lymphomas. More than 40 experts from around the world presented updates on classification, epidemiology and prognosis; rare and T-cell lymphomas of unspecified origin, CD30(+) T-cell lymphomas; new treatment strategies; new agents and rational combinations; and transplantation. Of particular interest this year was a discussion on the link between breast implants and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, which coincided with the US FDA announcement of this rare but noteworthy relationship. Submitted abstracts and poster presentations rounded off each of the sessions. PMID:21554042

  20. Unveiling Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lakhtakia, Ritu; Burney, Ikram; Qureshi, Asim; Al-Azawi, Sinan; Al-Badi, Hamid; Al-Hajri, Shaikha

    2015-01-01

    This article narrates a multifaceted educational journey undertaken by a medical student through a weekly SCRAPS (surgery, clinical disciplines, radiology, anatomy, psychiatry and laboratory sciences) clinico-pathological meeting held in the College of Medicine & Health Sciences at Sultan Qaboos University in Muscat, Oman. Through a presentation titled ‘Unveiling Cancer’, the multidisciplinary and interprofessional audience witnessed a simulated interaction between a medical student, a technologist peer and tutors in medicine, pathology and radiology. The presentation was based on the complexities of presentation, diagnosis and management of a patient with anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, in the aftermath of a bone marrow transplantation. After describing the case, the student shared with the audience a spectrum of learning objectives, which included integration in the complex world of contemporary medicine, insight into the triumphs and travails of technology (immunohistochemistry) and peer collaboration, communication and mentorship. PMID:26355844

  1. Advances in therapies for non-Hodgkin lymphoma in children.

    PubMed

    Kobos, Rachel; Terry, William

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric patients with newly diagnosed, non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) have an excellent overall survival. However, therapy regimens are associated with acute toxicity and late effects. Furthermore, patients with relapsed or refractory disease have relatively few options with proven clinical benefit. Both histologic and molecular differences exist between adult and pediatric NHL preventing simple translation of adult NHL successes into improvements in pediatric NHL treatment. This review summarizes the introduction of targeted therapies into frontline treatments for patients with anaplastic large-cell lymphoma and CD20-positive tumors, with the goal of improving overall survival while limiting both short- and long-term toxicities. In addition, newer approaches that have limited data in children but may have a significant role in how we treat pediatric NHL in the future are reviewed, which include CD19 directed therapy, Notch inhibition, the tri-functional antibody, FBTA05, and EZH2 inhibition. PMID:26637768

  2. CD30: from basic research to cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Muta, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    The FDA recently approved an agonistic anti-CD30 drug conjugate, Brentuximab vedotin, for the treatment for CD30-positive lymphomas. The potent clinical activity of Brentuximab vedotin in Hodgkin’s lymphoma and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma was greeted with great enthusiasm by oncologists as it provided a new treatment modality for these diseases. In this review, we will describe how we obtained the hybridoma by pursuing a basic research experiment unrelated to CD30. I will also review what we know about the normal biological functions of CD30 that were studied primarily in murine models of disease but also in patients. The picture emerging is that one of the primary functions of CD30 is the control of memory cells providing costimulation and trafficking information or inducing apoptosis in a microenvironment and cytokine milieu-dependent manner. PMID:24233555

  3. Adolescent and young adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Jessica; El-Mallawany, Nader Kim; Abla, Oussama

    2016-05-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a heterogeneous group of lymphoid malignancies accounting for a significant portion of cancers occurring in children, adolescents and young adults with an increasing incidence with age. The adolescent and young adult (AYA) population presents a specific set of characteristics and challenges. The most common diseases occurring in adolescents and young adults include Burkitt lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, anaplastic large cell lymphoma and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma. There is also a higher incidence of primary central nervous system lymphoma in AYA patients. Cure rates largely depend on risk-stratification, and are generally superior to outcomes in comparison to older adult data but less than in younger children. Here, we review the unique clinical and biological characteristics of NHL occurring in the AYA population with a focus on how to achieve similar curative outcomes in AYA that have been established in younger cohorts. PMID:27071675

  4. Childhood, adolescent and young adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma: state of the science.

    PubMed

    Cairo, Mitchell S; Pinkerton, Ross

    2016-05-01

    The 5th International Symposium on Childhood, Adolescent and Young Adult (CAYA) Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) was held in Varese, Italy, from 21-25 October 2015. This review represents a summary of the scientific sessions of this international symposium including childhood, adolescent and young adult (AYA) NHL in countries with limited socio-economic resources, AYA NHL, anaplastic large cell lymphoma, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, B-cell NHL, lymphoblastic lymphoma, T/natural killer cell NHL and immunological therapies in NHL. Most importantly, the new International Paediatric NHL Staging System (IPNHLSS) and International Paediatric NHL Response Criteria (IPNHLRC) were introduced during the symposium. The symposium brought together a multinational and multidisciplinary group of clinicians and basic scientists focused in this field of haematological malignancies. PMID:27133800

  5. [Specifics of histopathological and genetical diagnosis and classification of lymphomas in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Klapper, W; Oschlies, I

    2012-04-01

    Malignant lymphoma along with leukemias account for nearly half of all malignancies arising in childhood and adolescence. The correct tissue-based histopathological diagnosis of lymphomas results from a close interdisciplinary exchange between pediatric oncologists and hematopathologists. We describe here relevant features of lymphoma subtypes arising in the young age group, Burkitt lymphoma, precursor/lymphoblastic lymphomas, anaplastic large cell lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma as well as primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma and the rare pediatric follicular lymphomas. Special focus is put on specific diagnostic difficulties as well as new insights into biological features of pediatric lymphomas in comparison with their adult counterpart. In addition the relevance of newly defined lymphoma entities of the WHO-classification 2008, e.g. greyzone lymphomas, will be discussed for the young age group. PMID:22513791

  6. Methotrexate-associated primary cutaneous CD30-positive cutaneous T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder: a case illustration and a brief review

    PubMed Central

    Claudino, Wederson M; Gibson, Bradley; Tse, William; Krem, Maxwell; Grewal, Jaspreet

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is a commonly used anti-metabolite agent. Increased risk of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been documented with the prolonged use of immunosuppressive medications such as MTX. This is thought to be the result of immune dysregulation and/or chronic immune stimulation. Most cases of LPDs regress following withdrawal of the offending immunosuppressive agent. We present an interesting and rare case of CD30 and EBV positive CD8 primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (PC-ALCL) in a 66-year-old African American woman. Patient had been on MTX for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) which was stopped after the patient was evaluated at our institution. Patient had an incredible response to stopping immunosuppression with spontaneous regression of skin lesions and disappearance of clonal malignant cell population as evidenced on serial biopsy specimens. Primary cutaneous CD30+ LPDs constitute about 30% of the primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTLs) and includes entities such as lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP), primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (PC-ALCL) and other CD30+ borderline LPDs. Histopathological criteria in addition to CD30 positivity is important for identification of these conditions. Treatment options include “wait and see”, phototherapy, radiotherapy, topical agents, systemic therapy and surgical resection. Prognosis is excellent and most cases resolve spontaneously on withdrawal of immunosuppression. Refractory cases may require aggressive local treatment or systemic therapy. Brentuximab Vedontin, an anti-CD30 antibody drug conjugate (ADC), may provide additional therapeutic option in refractory cases. PMID:27335685

  7. Methotrexate-associated primary cutaneous CD30-positive cutaneous T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder: a case illustration and a brief review.

    PubMed

    Claudino, Wederson M; Gibson, Bradley; Tse, William; Krem, Maxwell; Grewal, Jaspreet

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is a commonly used anti-metabolite agent. Increased risk of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been documented with the prolonged use of immunosuppressive medications such as MTX. This is thought to be the result of immune dysregulation and/or chronic immune stimulation. Most cases of LPDs regress following withdrawal of the offending immunosuppressive