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Sample records for alkali atom resonance

  1. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Pressure Broadened Alkali-Metal Atom Resonance Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindo, F.; Zhu, C.; Kirby, K.; Babb, J. F.

    2006-01-01

    We are carrying out a joint theoretical and experimental research program to study the broadening of alkali atom resonance lines due to collisions with helium and molecular hydrogen for applications to spectroscopic studies of brown dwarfs and extrasolar giant planets.

  2. Optically-Detected Magnetic Resonance of Alkali Atoms Isolated on Helium Nano-Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Markus; Callegari, Carlo; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2009-06-01

    Sharp, hyperfine-resolved, ESR spectra of alkali atoms isolated on helium nanodroplets are measured by optically-detected magnetic resonance (ODMR). A net spin polarization is created inside a magnetic field (B=0.2 to 4.2 T) by a pump laser beam. Microwave radiation in a resonant cavity at 9.4 GHz causes a spin transition which is detected by a probe laser beam. For ultimate precision the spectrum of free atoms is concurrently measured and serves as a reference. The shift of the ESR lines on the droplet with respect to free atoms directly reflects the distortion of the valence-electron wavefunction due to the He nanodroplet. While the electron g-factor remains unchanged within experimental uncertainties (<5 ppm), the increase of the hyperfine constant (typically +400 ppm) is consistent with an increase of the Fermi contact interaction. We are able to follow this change as a function of droplet size attesting the sensitivity of the method for the measurement of chemical shifts. The observation of Rabi oscillations indicates a long decoherence time and proves our ability to perform coherent manipulation of the spin.

  3. Studies of Pressure-Broadening of Alkali Atom Resonance Lines for Modeling Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets and Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Kate; Babb, J.; Yoshino, K.

    2004-01-01

    In L-dwarfs and T-dwarfs the resonance lines of sodium and potassium are so profoundly pressure-broadened that their wings extend several hundred nanometers from line center. With accurate knowledge of the line profiles as a function of temperature and pressure: such lines can prove to be valuable diagnostics of the atmospheres of such objects. We have initiated a joint program of theoretical and experimental research to study the line-broadening of alkali atom resonance lines due to collisions with species such as helium and molecular hydrogen. Although potassium and sodium are the alkali species of most interest in the atmospheres of cool brown dwarfs and extrasolar giant planets, some of our theoretical focus this year has involved the calculation of pressure-broadening of lithium resonance lines by He, as a test of a newly developed suite of computer codes. In addition, theoretical calculations have been carried out to determine the leading long range van der Waals coefficients for the interactions of ground and excited alkali metal atoms with helium atoms, to within a probable error of 2%. Such data is important in determining the behavior of the resonance line profiles in the far wings. Important progress has been made on the experimental aspects of the program since the arrival of a postdoctoral fellow in September. A new absorption cell has been designed, which incorporates a number of technical improvements over the previous cell, including a larger cell diameter to enhance the signal, and fittings which allow for easier cleaning, thereby significantly reducing the instrument down-time.

  4. Sensitive determination of the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms using near-resonant light

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhichao; Long, Xingwu; Yuan, Jie; Fan, Zhenfang; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    A new method to measure the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms is demonstrated. Unlike the conventional method using far-detuned probe light, the near-resonant light with two specific frequencies was chosen. Because the Faraday rotation angle of this approach can be two orders of magnitude greater than that with the conventional method, this approach is more sensitive to the spin polarization. Based on the results of the experimental scheme, the spin polarization measurements are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical predictions, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of this approach. PMID:27595707

  5. Sensitive determination of the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms using near-resonant light.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhichao; Long, Xingwu; Yuan, Jie; Fan, Zhenfang; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    A new method to measure the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms is demonstrated. Unlike the conventional method using far-detuned probe light, the near-resonant light with two specific frequencies was chosen. Because the Faraday rotation angle of this approach can be two orders of magnitude greater than that with the conventional method, this approach is more sensitive to the spin polarization. Based on the results of the experimental scheme, the spin polarization measurements are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical predictions, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of this approach. PMID:27595707

  6. Atom Resonance Lines for Modeling Atmosphere: Studies of Pressure-Broadening of Alkali Atom Resonance Lines for Modeling Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets and Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, Hashima (Technical Monitor); Kirby, K.; Babb, J.; Yoshino, K.

    2005-01-01

    We report on progress made in a joint program of theoretical and experimental research to study the line-broadening of alkali atom resonance lines due to collisions with species such as helium and molecular hydrogen. Accurate knowledge of the line profiles of Na and K as a function of temperature and pressure will allow such lines to serve as valuable diagnostics of the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and extra-solar giant planets. A new experimental apparatus has been designed, built and tested over the past year, and we are poised to begin collecting data on the first system of interest, the potassium resonance lines perturbed by collisions with helium. On the theoretical front, calculations of line-broadening due to sodium collisions with helium are nearly complete, using accurate molecular potential energy curves and transition moments just recently computed for this system. In addition we have completed calculations of the three relevant potential energy curves and associated transition moments for K - He, using the MOLPRO quantum chemistry codes. Currently, calculations of the potential surfaces describing K-H2 are in progress.

  7. Double resonance fequency light shift compensation in optically oriented laser-pumped alkali atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, A. A. Ermak, S. V.; Sagitov, E. A.; Smolin, R. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2015-09-15

    The contributions of the vector and scalar components to the magnetically dependent microwave transition frequency light shift are analyzed and the compensation of these components is experimentally demonstrated for the {sup 87}Rb atoms optically oriented by a laser tuned to the D{sub 2} line of the head doublet. The Allan variance is studied as a function of the averaging time for a tandem of optically pumped quantum magnetometers (OPQMs), one of which is based on a low-frequency spin oscillator while another is based on a quantum microwave discriminator with a resonance frequency that corresponds to magnetically dependent transitions between HFS sublevels with the extremal value of the magnetic quantum number. It is shown that the compensation of the scalar and vector components of the light shift in OPQMs reduces the Allan variance at averaging times that exceed hundreds of seconds compared to a quantum discriminator based on the magnetically independent 0–0 transition. In this case, the minimal Allan variance in OPQMs at the end resonance is achieved at considerably longer averaging times than in the case of the quantum discriminator that is tuned to the 0–0 transition frequency.

  8. Measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms using nuclear magnetic resonance frequency shifts of noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. H.; Luo, H.; Qu, T. L. Yang, K. Y.; Ding, Z. C.

    2015-10-15

    We report a novel method of measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms by detecting the NMR frequency shifts of noble gases. We calculated the profile of {sup 87}Rb D1 line absorption cross sections. We then measured the absorption profile of the sample cell, from which we calculated the {sup 87}Rb number densities at different temperatures. Then we measured the frequency shifts resulted from the spin polarization of the {sup 87}Rb atoms and calculated its polarization degrees at different temperatures. The behavior of frequency shifts versus temperature in experiment was consistent with theoretical calculation, which may be used as compensative signal for the NMRG closed-loop control system.

  9. The optical pumping of alkali atoms using coherent radiation from semi-conductor injection lasers and incoherent radiation from resonance lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, G.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study for creating population differences in the ground states of alkali atoms (Cesium 133) is presented. Studies made on GaAs-junction lasers and the achievement of population inversions among the hyperfine levels in the ground state of Cs 133 by optically pumping it with radiation from a GaAs diode laser. Laser output was used to monitor the populations in the ground state hyperfine levels as well as to perform the hyperfine pumping. A GaAs laser operated at about 77 K was used to scan the 8521 A line of Cs 133. Experiments were performed both with neon-filled and with paraflint-coated cells containing the cesium vapor. Investigations were also made for the development of the triple resonance coherent pulse technique and for the detection of microwave induced hyperfine trasistions by destroying the phase relationships produced by a radio frequency pulse. A pulsed cesium resonance lamp developed, and the lamp showed clean and reproducible switching characteristics.

  10. DIET of alkali atoms from mineral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakshinskiy, B. V.; Madey, T. E.

    2003-03-01

    To investigate mechanisms for the origin of alkalis in the atmosphere of the Moon, we are studying the electron- and photon-stimulated desorption (ESD and PSD) of K atoms from model mineral surfaces (SiO 2 films), and ESD and PSD of Na atoms from a lunar basalt sample. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates the existence of traces of Na in the lunar sample. To obtain an increased signal for detailed measurements of desorption parameters (appearance thresholds, yields), a fractional monolayer of Na is deposited onto the lunar sample surface. An alkali atom detector based on surface ionization and a time-of-flight technique are used for DIET measurements, together with a pulsed electron gun, and a mechanically chopped and filtered mercury arc light source. We find that bombardment of the alkali covered surfaces by UV photons or by electrons with energies E>4 eV causes desorption of "hot" alkali atoms. The results are consistent with the model based on charge transfer from the substrate to adsorbate which was developed to explain our previous measurements of sodium desorption from a silica surface and desorption of K atoms from water ice. The data support the suggestion that PSD by UV solar photons is a dominant source process for alkalis in the tenuous lunar atmosphere.

  11. Chemiluminescence from excited c 2- -alkali cation complexes formed in alkali atom-halocarbon flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, K. K.; Balling, L. C.; Wright, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Vapor phase reactions between alkali atoms and several halocarbon molecules containing C-C bonds have been observed to produce chemiluminescence which appears to originate from C 2-- (alkali) + complexes.

  12. Absence of neutral alkali atoms in rhodizite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnay, G.; Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Sioda, R.

    1966-01-01

    The formula CsB12Be4Al4O28 has been proposed by others for the mineral rhodizite. Electron-spin-resonance and magnetic susceptibility measurements prove the absence of neutral cesium atoms. An ionic formula CsB11Be4Al4O 26(OH)2is proposed.

  13. Alkali-Metal Atoms as Spin Labels on Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Markus; Ratschek, Martin; Callegari, Carlo; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2010-06-01

    We have recently achieved electron spin resonance (ESR) of single alkali-metal atoms isolated on helium (He) nanodroplets A two-laser pump/probe setup for optically detected magnetic resonance is applied, which is based on magnetic circular dichroism to selectively address spin states. The influence of the helium droplet on the alkali-metal valence-electron wave function is directly noticeable as a shift of the ESR transitions with respect to that of free atoms. This perturbation depends on the size of the droplets and can be modeled with an increase of the hyperfine constant, that is an increase of the Fermi contact interaction. After careful characterization of the Rb--He-droplet system the method is being developed into a more universal diagnostic tool to study spin dynamics. ESR silent species located inside the droplet can be investigated by utilizing the surface Rb atom as spin label, and the droplet size is a convenient handle to control the distance between the two. In case of species with a nuclear spin (e.g., 129Xe) spin exchange between the optically pumped Rb atom and the nuclear spin can be studied. We are also extending our method to study magnetically active materials of technological importance, such as Cr, Cu, and small clusters thereof, and we strive to present the first results at the meeting. M. Koch, G. Auböck, C. Callegari, and W.E. Ernst, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 035302 (2009) M. Koch, J. Lanzersdorfer, C. Callegari, J.S. Muenter, and W.E. Ernst, J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 13347 (2009) M. Koch, C. Callegari, and W.E. Ernst, Mol. Phys., in press.

  14. Intense, narrow atomic-clock resonances.

    PubMed

    Jau, Y-Y; Post, A B; Kuzma, N N; Braun, A M; Romalis, M V; Happer, W

    2004-03-19

    We present experimental and theoretical results showing that magnetic resonance transitions from the "end" sublevels of maximum or minimum spin in alkali-metal vapors are a promising alternative to the conventional 0-0 transition for small-size gas-cell atomic clocks. For these "end resonances," collisional spin-exchange broadening, which often dominates the linewidth of the 0-0 resonance, decreases with increasing spin polarization and vanishes for 100% polarization. The end resonances also have much stronger signals than the 0-0 resonance, and are readily detectable in cells with high buffer-gas pressure.

  15. Electronic and nuclear dynamics in the frustrated photodesorption of alkali atoms from metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petek, Hrvoje

    2001-03-01

    Electronic and nuclear dynamics of alkali atom covered noble metal surfaces are investigated by the interferometric time-resolved two-photon photoemission technique [1]. Photoinduced charge transfer turns on the repulsive Coulomb force between the alkali atom and the metal surface thereby initiating the expulsion of alkali atoms from the surface. The resulting nuclear motion of alkali atoms is detected through changes in the surface electronic structure. In the extreme case of Cs/Cu(111), the alkali atom motion can be observed for up to 200 fs, which according to a Newton’s law model corresponds to the stretching of the Cu-Cs bond by 0.3 Å [2]. However, wave packet spreading due to the recoil-induced phonon generation retards the desorption process. Systematic dependence of the alkali atom lifetime on the crystal face, the substrate material, and the adsorbate polarizability provides insights into factors that stabilize adsorbates with respect to decay via the resonant charge transfer and inelastic electron-electron scattering [3]. 1 S. Ogawa, H. Nagano, and H. Petek, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 1931 (1999). 2 H. Petek, H. Nagano, M. J. Weida, and S. Ogawa, Science 288, 1402 (2000). 3 J. P. Gauyacq et al., Faraday Discuss. Chem. Soc. 117 (2000).

  16. Hall Determination of Atomic Radii of Alkali Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    I will propose here an alternative method for determining atomic radii of alkali metals based on the Hall measurements of their free electron densities and the knowledge of their crystal structure. (Contains 2 figures.)

  17. Resonance Radiation and Excited Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Allan C. G.; Zemansky, Mark W.

    2009-06-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Physical and chemical effects connected with resonance radiation; 3. Absorption lines and measurements of the lifetime of the resonance state; 4. Collision processes involving excited atoms; 5. The polarization of resonance radiation; Appendix; Index.

  18. Energy transfer from PO excited states to alkali metal atoms in the phosphorus chemiluminescence flame

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ahsan U.

    1980-01-01

    Phosphorus chemiluminescence under ambient conditions of a phosphorus oxidation flame is found to offer an efficient electronic energy transferring system to alkali metal atoms. The lowest resonance lines, 2P3 / 2,½→2S½, of potassium and sodium are excited by energy transfer when an argon stream at 80°C carrying potassium or sodium atoms intersects a phosphorus vapor stream, either at the flame or in the postflame region. The lowest electronically excited metastable 4IIi state of PO or the (PO[unk]PO)* excimer is considered to be the probable energy donor. The (PO[unk]PO)* excimer results from the interaction of the 4IIi state of one PO molecule with the ground 2IIr state of another. Metastability of the donor state is strongly indicated by the observation of intense sensitized alkali atom fluorescence in the postflame region. PMID:16592925

  19. Optical response of alkali metal atoms confined in nanoporous glass

    SciTech Connect

    Burchianti, A; Marinelli, C; Mariotti, E; Bogi, A; Marmugi, L; Giomi, S; Maccari, M; Veronesi, S; Moi, L

    2014-03-28

    We study the influence of optical radiation on adsorption and desorption processes of alkali metal atoms confined in nanoporous glass matrices. Exposure of the sample to near-IR or visible light changes the atomic distribution inside the glass nanopores, forcing the entire system to evolve towards a different state. This effect, due to both atomic photodesorption and confinement, causes the growth and evaporation of metastable nanoparticles. It is shown that, by a proper choice of light characteristics and pore size, these processes can be controlled and tailored, thus opening new perspectives for fabrication of nanostructured surfaces. (nanoobjects)

  20. Scattering of positrons and electrons by alkali atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. S.; Kauppila, W. E.; Kwan, C. K.; Lukaszew, R. A.; Parikh, S. P.; Wan, Y. J.; Zhou, S.; Dababneh, M. S.

    1990-01-01

    Absolute total scattering cross sections (Q sub T's) were measured for positrons and electrons colliding with sodium, potassium, and rubidium in the 1 to 102 eV range, using the same apparatus and experimental approach (a beam transmission technique) for both projectiles. The present results for positron-sodium and -rubidium collisions represent the first Q sub T measurements reported for these collision systems. Features which distinguish the present comparisons between positron- and electron-alkali atom Q sub T's from those for other atoms and molecules (room-temperature gases) which have been used as targets for positrons and electrons are the proximity of the corresponding positron- and electron-alkali atom Q sub T's over the entire energy range of overlap, with an indication of a merging or near-merging of the corresponding positron and electron Q sub T's near (and above) the relatively low energy of about 40 eV, and a general tendency for the positron-alkali atom Q sub T's to be higher than the corresponding electron values as the projectile energy is decreased below about 40 eV.

  1. An optically trapped mixture of alkali-metal and metastable helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Adonis; Mishra, Hari Prasad; Vassen, Wim; Knoop, Steven

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold collisions between alkali-metal and metastable triplet helium (He*) atoms provide the opportunity to study Feshbach resonances in the presence of a strong loss channel, namely Penning ionization, which strongly depends on the internal spin-states of the atoms. Recently we have realized the first optically trapped alkali-metal-metastable helium mixture. To prepare the ultracold 87 Rb+4 He* mixture in a single beam optical dipole trap (ODT), we apply evaporative cooling in a strong quadrupole magnetic trap (QMT) for both species and subsequent transfer to the ODT via a hybrid trap. We will present lifetime measurements of different spin-state mixtures, testing the application of the universal loss model to this interesting multichannel collision system.

  2. Electron densities and alkali atoms in exoplanet atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Lavvas, P.; Koskinen, T.; Yelle, R. V.

    2014-11-20

    We describe a detailed study on the properties of alkali atoms in extrasolar giant planets, and specifically focus on their role in generating the atmospheric free electron densities, as well as their impact on the transit depth observations. We focus our study on the case of HD 209458b, and we show that photoionization produces a large electron density in the middle atmosphere that is about two orders of magnitude larger than the density anticipated from thermal ionization. Our purely photochemical calculations, though, result in a much larger transit depth for K than observed for this planet. This result does not change even if the roles of molecular chemistry and excited state chemistry are considered for the alkali atoms. In contrast, the model results for the case of exoplanet XO-2b are in good agreement with the available observations. Given these results we discuss other possible scenarios, such as changes in the elemental abundances, changes in the temperature profiles, and the possible presence of clouds, which could potentially explain the observed HD 209458b alkali properties. We find that most of these scenarios cannot explain the observations, with the exception of a heterogeneous source (i.e., clouds or aerosols) under specific conditions, but we also note the discrepancies among the available observations.

  3. Radio-frequency dressed lattices for ultracold alkali atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinuco-León, German A.; Garraway, Barry M.

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold atomic gases in periodic potentials are powerful platforms for exploring quantum physics in regimes dominated by many-body effects as well as for developing applications that benefit from quantum mechanical effects. Further advances face a range of challenges including the realization of potentials with lattice constants smaller than optical wavelengths as well as creating schemes for effective addressing and manipulation of single sites. In this paper we propose a dressed-based scheme for creating periodic potential landscapes for ultracold alkali atoms with the capability of overcoming such difficulties. The dressed approach has the advantage of operating in a low-frequency regime where decoherence and heating effects due to spontaneous emission do not take place. These results highlight the possibilities of atom-chip technology in the future development of quantum simulations and quantum technologies, and provide a realistic scheme for starting such an exploration.

  4. Differential cross sections for positron scattering from alkali atoms

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, K.M.; Bartschat, K.; McEachran, R.P.

    1993-05-01

    Close-coupling calculations for differential cross sections for elastic and inelastic positron-alkali scattering at incident energies between 1 eV and 100 eV will be presented. Particular emphasis is placed on excitation of the resonant (ns){sup 2}S {yields} (np){sup 2}P{sup o} and the optically forbidden (ns){sup 2}S {yields} (n{prime}d){sup 2}D transitions. The results will be compared with first order DWBA calculations to assess the importance of channel coupling in the theoretical description of these collision processes.

  5. Research Investigation Directed Toward Extending the Useful Range of the Electromagnetic Spectrum. [atomic spectra and electronic structure of alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, S. R.; Happer, W.

    1974-01-01

    The report discusses completed and proposed research in atomic and molecular physics conducted at the Columbia Radiation Laboratory from July 1972 to June 1973. Central topics described include the atomic spectra and electronic structure of alkali metals and helium, molecular microwave spectroscopy, the resonance physics of photon echoes in some solid state systems (including Raman echoes, superradiance, and two photon absorption), and liquid helium superfluidity.

  6. Atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions for surface interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Outlaw, R. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base developed from analysis of the two-body potential data, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas surfaces and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  7. Diode-Pumped Alkali Atom Lasers 03-LW-024 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R H; Beach, R J

    2005-02-16

    The recent work at LLNL on alkali-atom lasers has been remarkably successful and productive. Three main phases (so far) can be identified. First, the concept and demonstration of red lasers using (Ti:sapphire pumping) took place; during this time, Rubidium and Cesium resonance-line lasers were tested, and theoretical models were developed and shown to describe experimental results very reliably. Work done during this first phase has been well documented, and the models from that period are still in use for their predictions and for designing power-scaled lasers. [1 - 3] Second, attempts were made to produce a blue alkali-vapor laser using sequentially-resonant two-step pumping (again, using Ti:sapphire lasers.) Although a blue laser did not result, the physical limitations of our approach are now better-defined. Third, diode-pumped operation of a red laser (Rubidium) was attempted, and we eventually succeeded in demonstrating the world's first diode-pumped gas laser. [4] Because we have a defensible concept for producing an efficient, compact, lightweight, power-scaled laser (tens of kW,) we are in a position to secure outside funding, and would like to find a sponsor. For descriptions of work done during the ''first phase,'' see References [1 - 3] ''Phase two'' work is briefly described in the section ''Blue laser,'' and ''phase three'' work is presented in the section entitled ''Diode-pumped red laser.''

  8. Two-photon photoemission investigation of electronic and dynamical properties of alkali atoms adsorbed on noble metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sametoglu, Vahit

    We present a systematic time-resolved two-photon photoemission study of the electronic and dynamical properties of Li through Cs adsorbed on Cu(111) and Ag(111) surfaces. A fundamental problem in surface science is how to describe the electronic structure of a chemisorption interface based on the intrinsic properties of the interacting materials. Because of their simple s-electron structure, elements of the alkali atom group comprise paradigmatic adsorbates in many theories of chemisorption, whereas the complementary experimental studies are sparse and incomplete. Through a combination of spectroscopic and femtosecond time-resolved surface measurements, we are able to probe systematically the binding energies, symmetries, and electron and nuclear relaxation dynamics of the initially unoccupied alkali atom resonances. As a prelude, we study the two-photon photoemission process occurring at the bare Ag(111) surface. We develop a quantitative model for two-photon photoemission process, where the nonresonant and k-dependent two-photon absorption between the lower and upper sp-bands is modeled by the optical Bloch equations, and the angle-dependent intensities are described by the Fresnel equations. Our two-photon photoemission spectra of Li through Cs chemisorbed Cu(111) and Ag(111) surfaces reveal two resonances with the m = 0 and m = +/-1 symmetry ('m' is the projection of the orbital angular momentum 'l' onto the surface plane). For the m = 0 resonance, which is derived from the hybridization of the ns and npz orbitals of alkali atoms, we find a binding energy of 1.84--1.99 eV below the vacuum level, which is independent of the alkali atom period, and tunes with coverage in a universal manner. At 0.3--0.7 eV higher energy, we discover and identify the m = +/-1 resonance by its characteristic angular intensity distribution, which derives from the antisymmetry of the npx and npy orbitals. We implement a quantitative model for the alkali atom chemisorption based on the

  9. Analysis of the physical atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions and halogen ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Outlaw, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The physical forces between atoms and molecules are important in a number of processes of practical importance, including line broadening in radiative processes, gas and crystal properties, adhesion, and thin films. The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base for the dispersion forces is developed from the literature based on evaluations with the harmonic oscillator dispersion model for higher order coefficients. The Zener model of the repulsive core is used in the context of the recent asymptotic wave functions of Handler and Smith; and an effective ionization potential within the Handler and Smith wave functions is defined to analyze the two body potential data of Waldman and Gordon, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  10. Theory of magic optical traps for Zeeman-insensitive clock transitions in alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, Andrei

    2010-05-15

    Precision measurements and quantum-information processing with cold atoms may benefit from trapping atoms with specially engineered, 'magic' optical fields. At the magic trapping conditions, the relevant atomic properties remain immune to strong perturbations by the trapping fields. Here we develop a theoretical analysis of magic trapping for especially valuable Zeeman-insensitive clock transitions in alkali-metal atoms. The involved mechanism relies on applying a magic bias B field along a circularly polarized trapping laser field. We map out these B fields as a function of trapping laser wavelength for all commonly used alkalis. We also highlight a common error in evaluating Stark shifts of hyperfine manifolds.

  11. Magic wavelengths for the np-ns transitions in alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, Bindiya; Safronova, M. S.; Clark, Charles W.

    2007-11-15

    Extensive calculations of the electric-dipole matrix elements in alkali-metal atoms are conducted using the relativistic all-order method. This approach is a linearized version of the coupled-cluster method, which sums infinite sets of many-body perturbation theory terms. All allowed transitions between the lowest ns, np{sub 1/2}, np{sub 3/2} states and a large number of excited states are considered in these calculations and their accuracy is evaluated. The resulting electric-dipole matrix elements are used for the high-precision calculation of frequency-dependent polarizabilities of the excited states of alkali-metal atoms. We find 'magic' wavelengths in alkali-metal atoms for which the ns and np{sub 1/2} and np{sub 3/2} atomic levels have the same ac Stark shifts, which facilitates state-insensitive optical cooling and trapping.

  12. [Measurement of atomic number of alkali vapor and pressure of buffer gas based on atomic absorption].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui-jie; Quan, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Chen, Yao; Lu, Ji-xi

    2015-02-01

    High sensitivitymagnetic measurementscanbe achieved by utilizing atomic spinmanipulation in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) regime, which uses an alkali cell as a sensing element. The atomic number density of the alkali vapor and the pressure of the buffer gasare among the most important parameters of the cell andrequire accurate measurement. A method has been proposed and developedto measure the atomic number density and the pressure based on absorption spectroscopy, by sweeping the absorption line and fittingthe experiment data with a Lorentzian profile to obtainboth parameters. Due to Doppler broadening and pressure broadening, which is mainly dominated by the temperature of the cell and the pressure of buffer gas respectively, this work demonstrates a simulation of the errorbetween the peaks of the Lorentzian profile and the Voigt profile caused by bothfactors. The results indicates that the Doppler broadening contribution is insignificant with an error less than 0.015% at 313-513 K for a 4He density of 2 amg, and an error of 0.1% in the presence of 0.6-5 amg at 393 K. We conclude that the Doppler broadening could be ignored under above conditions, and that the Lorentzianprofile is suitably applied to fit the absorption spectrumobtainingboth parameters simultaneously. In addition we discuss the resolution and the instability due to thelight source, wavelength and the temperature of the cell. We find that the cell temperature, whose uncertainty is two orders of magnitude larger than the instability of the light source and the wavelength, is one of the main factors which contributes to the error.

  13. Communication: angular momentum alignment and fluorescence polarization of alkali atoms photodetached from helium nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Hernando, Alberto; Beswick, J Alberto; Halberstadt, Nadine

    2013-12-14

    The theory of photofragments angular momentum polarization is applied to the photodetachment of an electronically excited alkali atom from a helium nanocluster (N = 200). The alignment of the electronic angular momentum of the bare excited alkali atoms produced is calculated quantum mechanically by solving the excited states coupled equations with potentials determined by density functional theory (DFT). Pronounced oscillations as a function of excitation energy are predicted for the case of Na@(He)200, in marked contrast with the absorption cross-section and angular distribution of the ejected atoms which are smooth functions of the energy. These oscillations are due to quantum interference between different coherently excited photodetachment pathways. Experimentally, these oscillations should be reflected in the fluorescence polarization and polarization-resolved photoelectron yield of the ejected atoms, which are proportional to the electronic angular momentum alignment. In addition, this result is much more general than the test case of NaHe200 studied here. It should be observable for larger droplets, for higher excited electronic states, and for other alkali as well as for alkali-earth atoms. Detection of these oscillations would show that the widely used pseudo-diatomic model can be valid beyond the prediction of absorption spectra and could help in interpreting parts of the dynamics, as already hinted by some experimental results on angular anisotropy of bare alkali fragments.

  14. Communication: Angular momentum alignment and fluorescence polarization of alkali atoms photodetached from helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Hernando, Alberto; Beswick, J. Alberto; Halberstadt, Nadine

    2013-12-14

    The theory of photofragments angular momentum polarization is applied to the photodetachment of an electronically excited alkali atom from a helium nanocluster (N = 200). The alignment of the electronic angular momentum of the bare excited alkali atoms produced is calculated quantum mechanically by solving the excited states coupled equations with potentials determined by density functional theory (DFT). Pronounced oscillations as a function of excitation energy are predicted for the case of Na@(He){sub 200}, in marked contrast with the absorption cross-section and angular distribution of the ejected atoms which are smooth functions of the energy. These oscillations are due to quantum interference between different coherently excited photodetachment pathways. Experimentally, these oscillations should be reflected in the fluorescence polarization and polarization-resolved photoelectron yield of the ejected atoms, which are proportional to the electronic angular momentum alignment. In addition, this result is much more general than the test case of NaHe{sub 200} studied here. It should be observable for larger droplets, for higher excited electronic states, and for other alkali as well as for alkali-earth atoms. Detection of these oscillations would show that the widely used pseudo-diatomic model can be valid beyond the prediction of absorption spectra and could help in interpreting parts of the dynamics, as already hinted by some experimental results on angular anisotropy of bare alkali fragments.

  15. Multi-Atom Resonant Photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Alex; Yang, See-Hun; Garcia de Abajo, F. J.; Elke, Arenholz; Mun, Bongjin S.; Mannella, Norman; Zhao, Limin; Hussain, Zahid; van Hove, Michel; Fadley, Charles S.

    2001-03-01

    We will present experimental and theoretical results related to multi-atom resonant photoemission (MARPE) [1], in which the photoelectron intensity from a core level on one atom is influenced by a core-level absorption resonance on another. We will first point out that some prior experimental data [1-3] has been strongly influenced by non-linearities in the detector utilized [2], and that the effects seen in new corrected data are smaller, have a different form, and are strongly dependent on x-ray incidence angle. Data for the specific case of O 1s photoemission from MnO in resonance with Mn 2p excitations that are properly corrected for detector non-linearities data are found to be well described by an extension of resonant photoemission theory to the interatomic case [4], provided that interactions beyond the usual second-order Kramers-Heisenberg treatment are included. These higher-order interactions represent the equivalent of multiple resonant elastic scattering of the radiation. This microscopic theory is also found to simplify so as to yield results equivalent to a classical macroscopic x-ray optical approach, with the latter providing an alternative, although less detailed and general, physical picture of these effects. The relationship of these core-core resonant effects to similar effects seen in valence-core resonances [5-7], as well as in photoelectron angular distributions from a free molecule [8], and to x-ray fluorescence holography, will be discussed. Possible future applications of MARPE to studies of near-neighbor identities and bonding will also be suggested. [1] A. Kay, E. Arenholz, S. Mun, J. Garcia de Abajo, C.S. Fadley, R. Denecke, Z. Hussain, and M.A. Van Hove, Science 281, 679 (1998). [2] M.G. Garnier, N. Witkowski, R. Denecke, D. Nordlund, A. Nilsson, M. Nagasono, N. Mårtensson, and A. Föhlisch, Maxlab Annual Report for 1999 and private communication correcting this data for detector non-linearities. [3] A. Kikas, E. Nommiste, R. Ruus, A

  16. First-principles study of ternary graphite compounds cointercalated with alkali atoms (Li, Na, and K) and alkylamines towards alkali ion battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ri, Gum-Chol; Yu, Chol-Jun; Kim, Jin-Song; Hong, Song-Nam; Jong, Un-Gi; Ri, Mun-Hyok

    2016-08-01

    First-principles calculations were carried out to investigate the structural, energetic, and electronic properties of ternary graphite compounds cointercalated with alkali atoms (AM = Li, Na, and K) and normal alkylamine molecules (nCx; x = 1, 2, 3, 4), denoted as AM-nCx-GICs. From the optimization of the orthorhombic unit cells for the crystalline compounds, it was found that, with the increase in the atomic number of alkali atoms, the layer separations decrease in contrast to AM-GICs, while the bond lengths between alkali atoms and graphene layer, and nitrogen atom of alkylamine increase. The calculated formation energies and interlayer binding energies of AM-nC3-GICs indicate that the compounds is increasingly stabilized from Li to K, and the energy barriers for migration of alkali atoms suggest that alkali cation with larger ionic radius diffuses more smoothly in graphite, being similar to AM-GICs. Through the analysis of electronic properties, it was established that more extent of electronic charge is transferred from more electropositive alkali atom to the carbon ring of graphene layer, and the hybridization of valence electron orbitals between alkylamine molecules and graphene layer is occurred.

  17. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-03-07

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom's stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and--by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen--the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave radiation to flip the spin of the positron in antihydrogen atoms that were magnetically trapped in the ALPHA apparatus. The spin flip causes trapped anti-atoms to be ejected from the trap. We look for evidence of resonant interaction by comparing the survival rate of trapped atoms irradiated with microwaves on-resonance to that of atoms subjected to microwaves that are off-resonance. In one variant of the experiment, we detect 23 atoms that survive in 110 trapping attempts with microwaves off-resonance (0.21 per attempt), and only two atoms that survive in 103 attempts with microwaves on-resonance (0.02 per attempt). We also describe the direct detection of the annihilation of antihydrogen atoms ejected by the microwaves.

  18. 'Doubly Magic' Conditions in Magic-Wavelength Trapping of Ultracold Alkali-Metal Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, Andrei

    2010-07-16

    In experiments with trapped atoms, atomic energy levels are shifted by the trapping optical and magnetic fields. Regardless of this strong perturbation, precision spectroscopy may be still carried out using specially crafted, 'magic' trapping fields. Finding these conditions for particularly valuable microwave transitions in alkali-metal atoms has so far remained an open challenge. Here I demonstrate that the microwave transitions in alkali-metal atoms may be indeed made impervious to both trapping laser intensity and fluctuations of magnetic fields. I consider driving multiphoton transitions between the clock levels and show that these 'doubly magic' conditions are realized at special values of trapping laser wavelengths and fixed values of relatively weak magnetic fields. This finding has implications for precision measurements and quantum information processing with qubits stored in hyperfine manifolds.

  19. Electron emission in slow collisions of inert gas and reactive ions with W(110) partially covered by alkali atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, H.; Hausmann, R.; Brenten, H.; Kempter, V.

    1993-05-01

    Electron energy spectra from slow (50 to 1000 eV) collisions of inert gas (He +, He 2+ and Ar +) and reactive (H +, N +) ions colliding under grazing incidence with W(110) surfaces are reported. The surface work function is varied by the exposure of the W(110) surface to alkali atoms. For clean W(110) the sequence of electronic transitions during a slow (50 eV, typically) collision is similar as reported for other clean metals: Auger capture processes involving two electrons from the surface dominate for all projectiles. For sufficiently large coverages by alkali atoms resonant capture of one or two surface electrons by the projectiles leads to the formation of excited states of the projectiles with one or two electrons occupying valence orbitals. These states decay by Auger deexcitation (Penning ionization) and intra-atomic Auger processes (autoionization and autodetachment), respectively. For the case of Ar + ions colliding with W(110) partially covered by potassium it is demonstrated that core vacancies (Ar3p -1) are created during the collision provided the kinetic energy of the projectile surmounts about 300 eV. Contributions from both potential and kinetic emission can then be seen in the spectra of the emitted electrons.

  20. Visualization of alkali-denatured supercoiled plasmid DNA by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Jia; Zhang Zhenfeng; Cao Kou; Huang Xitai

    2008-09-26

    To study the alkali denaturation of supercoiled DNA, plasmid pBR322 was treated with gradient concentrations of NaOH solution. The results of gel electrophoresis showed that the alkali denaturation of the supercoiled DNA occurred in a narrow range of pH value (12.88-12.90). The alkali-denatured supercoiled DNA ran, as a sharp band, faster than the supercoiled DNA. The supercoiled plasmid DNA of pBR322, pACYC184 and pJGX15A were denatured by NaOH, and then visualized by atomic force microscopy. Compared with the supercoiled DNA, the atomic force microscopy images of the alkali-denatured supercoiled DNA showed rough surface with many kinks, bulges on double strands with inhomogeneous diameters. The apparent contour lengths of the denatured DNA were shortened by 16%, 16% and 50% for pBR322, pACYC184 and pJGX15A, respectively. All evidence suggested that the alkali-denatured supercoiled DNA had a stable conformation with unregistered, topologically constrained double strands and intrastrand secondary structure.

  1. Atom Microscopy via Dual Resonant Superposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Jabar, M. S.; Bakht, Amin Bacha; Jalaluddin, M.; Iftikhar, Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    An M-type Rb87 atomic system is proposed for one-dimensional atom microscopy under the condition of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency. Super-localization of the atom in the absorption spectrum while its delocalization in the dispersion spectrum is observed due to the dual superposition effect of the resonant fields. The observed minimum uncertainty peaks will find important applications in Laser cooling, creating focused atom beams, atom nanolithography, and in measurement of the center-of-mass wave function of moving atoms.

  2. Exit channels of autoionization resonances in atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, M.O.

    1985-01-01

    In many-electron atoms with open shells strong autoionization resonances occur when an electron from an inner, weakly bound subshell is excited. Usually, the resonance state lies above several ionization thresholds and, hence, will decay into more than one exit or continuum channel. Several cases are discussed in which the resonance state is induced by synchrotron radiation, and the exit channels are differentiated and characterized by the analysis of the ejected electrons.

  3. Reactions between cold methyl halide molecules and alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Jesse J.; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-07

    We investigate the potential energy surfaces and activation energies for reactions between methyl halide molecules CH{sub 3}X (X = F, Cl, Br, I) and alkali-metal atoms A (A = Li, Na, K, Rb) using high-level ab initio calculations. We examine the anisotropy of each intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) and the mechanism and energetics of the only available exothermic reaction pathway, CH{sub 3}X + A → CH{sub 3} + AX. The region of the transition state is explored using two-dimensional PES cuts and estimates of the activation energies are inferred. Nearly all combinations of methyl halide and alkali-metal atom have positive barrier heights, indicating that reactions at low temperatures will be slow.

  4. a Theory of the Metallization of Semiconductor Surfaces by Alkali Atoms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Te, Ronald Lim

    Experimental evidence suggest that alkali metal atoms adsorbed on a semiconductor substrate undergo a transition from insulating to metallic at low coverage. The electrons in the adlayer initially occupy isolated exponentially localized atomic orbitals, and become metallic with increasing coverage. Several investigations have shown that the onset of metallization occurs at less than a quarter of a monolayer. Interpretation of second-harmonic data, where the signal increases sharply at 1/6 monolayer, suggests a metallization transition due to the delocalization of surface electrons. This dissertation provides a theoretical framework for understanding the metallization of alkali overlayers. The adlayer is simulated using a rectangular lattice with more than 80,000 sites that are randomly occupied by atomic-like orbitals up to densities commensurate with the different coverages. A new computational technique called dynamic recursion was developed to handle calculations with large numbers of basis orbitals. Each alkali orbital is taken to have the same on-site energy; however, the orbital interactions involve several nearest neighbors and are an exponentially decreasing function of the orbitals' separation. This model gives a tight-binding Hamiltonian with random off-diagonal disorder. An investigation of states at the Fermi level shows a sharp transition between strongly and weakly localized states as a function of coverage. This numerically observed transition is indicative of an Anderson-type metal-insulator transition where disorder causes states of different degrees of localization to cross the Fermi level. The Hamiltonian studied exhibits a delocalization transition for states at the Fermi level, and is proposed as a model for the metallization of the alkali metal atoms adsorbed on a semiconductor substrate. These results are consistent with other work which show the existence of a mobility edge that separates exponentially localized from power-law localized

  5. Measurement method for the nuclear anapole moment of laser-trapped alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, E.; Aubin, S.; Sprouse, G. D.; Orozco, L. A.; DeMille, D. P.

    2007-03-15

    Weak interactions within a nucleus generate a nuclear spin dependent, parity-violating electromagnetic moment, the anapole moment. We analyze a method to measure the nuclear anapole moment through the electric dipole transition it induces between hyperfine states of the ground level. The method requires tight confinement of the atoms to position them at the antinode of a standing wave Fabry-Perot cavity driving the anapole-induced microwave E1 transition. We explore the necessary limits in the number of atoms, excitation fields, trap type, interrogation method, and systematic tests necessary for such measurements in francium, the heaviest alkali.

  6. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, and 3d transition metal atoms on silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, H.; Peeters, F. M.

    2013-02-01

    The adsorption characteristics of alkali, alkaline-earth, and transition metal adatoms on silicene, a graphene-like monolayer structure of silicon are analyzed by means of first-principles calculations. In contrast to graphene, interaction between the metal atoms and the silicene surface is quite strong due to its highly reactive buckled hexagonal structure. In addition to structural properties, we also calculate the electronic band dispersion, net magnetic moment, charge transfer, work function, and dipole moment of the metal adsorbed silicene sheets. Alkali metals, Li, Na, and K, adsorb to hollow sites without any lattice distortion. As a consequence of the significant charge transfer from alkalis to silicene, metalization of silicene takes place. Trends directly related to atomic size, adsorption height, work function, and dipole moment of the silicene/alkali adatom system are also revealed. We found that the adsorption of alkaline-earth metals on silicene is entirely different from their adsorption on graphene. The adsorption of Be, Mg, and Ca turns silicene into a narrow gap semiconductor. Adsorption characteristics of eight transition metals Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Mo, and W are also investigated. As a result of their partially occupied d orbital, transition metals show diverse structural, electronic, and magnetic properties. Upon the adsorption of transition metals, depending on the adatom type and atomic radius, the system can exhibit metal, half-metal, and semiconducting behavior. For all metal adsorbates, the direction of the charge transfer is from adsorbate to silicene, because of its high surface reactivity. Our results indicate that the reactive crystal structure of silicene provides a rich playground for functionalization at nanoscale.

  7. Resonant spectroscopy of the antihydrogen atom

    SciTech Connect

    Labzowsky, Leonti; Solovyev, Dmitri

    2003-07-01

    The spectra of the hydrogen and antihydrogen atoms in the presence of an external electric field are compared. It is shown that the nonresonant corrections to the transition frequency may contain terms linear in the electric field. The existence of these terms does not violate space and time parity and leads to a difference in the resonant spectroscopic measurements for the hydrogen and antihydrogen atoms in an external electric field.

  8. Alkali-vapor magnetic resonance driven by fictitious radiofrequency fields

    SciTech Connect

    Zhivun, Elena; Wickenbrock, Arne; Patton, Brian; Budker, Dmitry

    2014-11-10

    We demonstrate an all-optical {sup 133}Cs scalar magnetometer, operating in nonzero magnetic field, in which the magnetic resonance is driven by an effective oscillating magnetic field provided by the AC Stark shift of an intensity-modulated laser beam. We achieve a projected shot-noise-limited sensitivity of 1.7fT/√(Hz) and measure a technical noise floor of 40fT/√(Hz). These results are essentially identical to a coil-driven scalar magnetometer using the same setup. This all-optical scheme offers advantages over traditional coil-driven magnetometers for use in arrays and in magnetically sensitive fundamental physics experiments, e.g., searches for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  9. Electron- and Photon-stimulated Desorption of Alkali Atoms from Lunar Sample and a Model Mineral Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakshinskiy, B. V.; Madey, T. E.

    2003-01-01

    We report recent results on an investigation of source mechanisms for the origin of alkali atoms in the tenuous planetary atmospheres, with focus on non-thermal processes (photon stimulated desorption (PSD), electron stimulated desorption (ESD), and ion sputtering). Whereas alkaline earth oxides (MgO, CaO) are far more abundant in lunar samples than alkali oxides (Na2O, K2O), the atmosphere of the Moon contains easily measurable concentrations of Na and K, while Ca and Mg are undetected there; traces of Ca have recently been seen in the Moon's atmosphere (10-3 of Na). The experiments have included ESD, PSD and ion sputtering of alkali atoms from model mineral surface (amorphous SiO2) and from a lunar basalt sample obtained from NASA. The comparison is made between ESD and PSD efficiency of monovalent alkalis (Na, K) and divalent alkaline earths (Ba, Ca).The ultrahigh vacuum measurement scheme for ESD and PSD of Na atoms includes a highly sensitive alkali metal detector based on surface ionization, and a time-of-flight technique. For PSD measurements, a mercury arc light source (filtered and chopped) is used. We find that bombardment of the alkali covered surfaces by ultraviolet photons or by low energy electrons (E>4 eV) causes desorption of hot alkali atoms. This results are consistent with the model developed to explain our previous measurements of sodium desorption from a silica surface and from water ice: electron- or photon-induced charge transfer from the substrate to the ionic adsorbate causes formation of a neutral alkali atom in a repulsive configuration, from which desorption occurs. The two-electron charge transfer to cause desorption of divalent alkaline eath ions is a less likely process.The data support the suggestion that PSD by UV solar photons is a dominant source process for alkalis in the tenuous lunar atmosphere.

  10. Carrier-wave Rabi-flopping signatures in high-order harmonic generation for alkali atoms.

    PubMed

    Ciappina, M F; Pérez-Hernández, J A; Landsman, A S; Zimmermann, T; Lewenstein, M; Roso, L; Krausz, F

    2015-04-10

    We present a theoretical investigation of carrier-wave Rabi flopping in real atoms by employing numerical simulations of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in alkali species. Given the short HHG cutoff, related to the low saturation intensity, we concentrate on the features of the third harmonic of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) atoms. For pulse areas of 2π and Na atoms, a characteristic unique peak appears, which, after analyzing the ground state population, we correlate with the conventional Rabi flopping. On the other hand, for larger pulse areas, carrier-wave Rabi flopping occurs, and is associated with a more complex structure in the third harmonic. These characteristics observed in K atoms indicate the breakdown of the area theorem, as was already demonstrated under similar circumstances in narrow band gap semiconductors. PMID:25910125

  11. s-wave elastic scattering of antihydrogen off atomic alkali-metal targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Prabal K.; Ghosh, A. S.

    2006-03-15

    We have investigated the s-wave elastic scattering of antihydrogen atoms off atomic alkali-metal targets (Li, Na, K, and Rb) at thermal energies (10{sup -16}-10{sup -4} a.u.) using an atomic orbital expansion technique. The elastic cross sections of these systems at thermal energies are found to be very high compared to H-H and H-He systems. The theoretical models employed in this study are so chosen to consider long-range forces dynamically in the calculation. The mechanism of cooling suggests that Li may be considered to be a good candidate as a buffer gas for enhanced cooling of antihydrogen atoms to ultracold temperature.

  12. Carrier-wave Rabi-flopping signatures in high-order harmonic generation for alkali atoms.

    PubMed

    Ciappina, M F; Pérez-Hernández, J A; Landsman, A S; Zimmermann, T; Lewenstein, M; Roso, L; Krausz, F

    2015-04-10

    We present a theoretical investigation of carrier-wave Rabi flopping in real atoms by employing numerical simulations of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in alkali species. Given the short HHG cutoff, related to the low saturation intensity, we concentrate on the features of the third harmonic of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) atoms. For pulse areas of 2π and Na atoms, a characteristic unique peak appears, which, after analyzing the ground state population, we correlate with the conventional Rabi flopping. On the other hand, for larger pulse areas, carrier-wave Rabi flopping occurs, and is associated with a more complex structure in the third harmonic. These characteristics observed in K atoms indicate the breakdown of the area theorem, as was already demonstrated under similar circumstances in narrow band gap semiconductors.

  13. Theory of metal atom-water interactions and alkali halide dimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, K. D.; Kurtz, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the interactions of metal atoms with water and some of its isoelectronic analogs, and of the properties of alkali halides and their aggregates are discussed. Results are presented of ab initio calculations of the heats of reaction of the metal-water adducts and hydroxyhydrides of Li, Be, B, Na, Mg, and Al, and of the bond lengths and angles an; the heats of reaction for the insertion of Al into HF, H2O, NH3, H2S and CH3OH, and Be and Mg into H2O. Calculations of the electron affinities and dipole moments and polarizabilities of selected gas phase alkali halide monomers and dimers are discussed, with particular attention given to results of calculations of the polarizability of LiF taking into account electron correlation effects, and the polarizability of the dimer (LiF)2.

  14. Light absorption during alkali atom-noble gas atom interactions at thermal energies: a quantum dynamics treatment.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Alexander B; Reyes, Andrés; Micha, David A

    2006-10-21

    The absorption of light during atomic collisions is treated by coupling electronic excitations, treated quantum mechanically, to the motion of the nuclei described within a short de Broglie wavelength approximation, using a density matrix approach. The time-dependent electric dipole of the system provides the intensity of light absorption in a treatment valid for transient phenomena, and the Fourier transform of time-dependent intensities gives absorption spectra that are very sensitive to details of the interaction potentials of excited diatomic states. We consider several sets of atomic expansion functions and atomic pseudopotentials, and introduce new parametrizations to provide light absorption spectra in good agreement with experimentally measured and ab initio calculated spectra. To this end, we describe the electronic excitation of the valence electron of excited alkali atoms in collisions with noble gas atoms with a procedure that combines l-dependent atomic pseudopotentials, including two- and three-body polarization terms, and a treatment of the dynamics based on the eikonal approximation of atomic motions and time-dependent molecular orbitals. We present results for the collision induced absorption spectra in the Li-He system at 720 K, which display both atomic and molecular transition intensities.

  15. (abstract) Fundamental Mechanisms of Electrode Kinetics and Alkali Metal Atom Transport at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kisor, A.; Kikkert, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of electrode kinetics and mass transport of alkali metal oxidation and alkali metal cation reduction at the solid electrolyte/porous electrode boundary as well as alkali metal transport through porous metal electrodes has important applications in optimizing device performance in alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) cells which are high temperature, high current density electrochemical cells. Basic studies of these processes also affords the opportunity to investigate a very basic electrochemical reaction over a wide range of conditions; and a variety of mass transport modes at high temperatures via electrochemical techniques. The temperature range of these investigations covers 700K to 1240K; the alkali metal vapor pressures range from about 10(sup -2) to 10(sup 2) Pa; and electrodes studied have included Mo, W, Mo/Na(sub 2)MoO(sub 4), W/Na(sub 2)WO(sub 4), WPt(sub x), and WRh(sub x) (1.0 < x < 6.0 ) with Na at Na-beta'-alumina, and Mo with K at K-beta'-alumina. Both liquid metal/solid electrolyte/alkali metal vapor and alkali metal vapor/solid electrolyte/vapor cells have been used to characterize the reaction and transport processes. We have previously reported evidence of ionic, free molecular flow, and surface transport of sodium in several types of AMTEC electrodes.

  16. Atomic force microscopy studies of alkali halide surfaces nanostructured by DIET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryl, M.; Such, B.; Krok, F.; Meisel, K.; Kolodziej, J. J.; Szymonski, M.

    2005-11-01

    We report on surface topography modification of single crystal alkali halides due to creation of the excitonic states by keV electron irradiation. The DIET—structured surfaces have been studied with nanometer scale resolution by means of a dynamic (non-contact) atomic force microscopy (DFM) in UHV. The force microscopy studies reveal that randomly spread rectangular pits of monolayer depth in the topmost layer of the crystal are formed during irradiation. Growth and coalescence of the pits lead to almost layer-by-layer desorption mode. It is demonstrated that varying surface topography affects the yield of both the halogen and the alkali atom desorption component, as well as velocity spectrum of desorbing halogen atoms (thermal versus non-thermal ratio). We propose a model in which periodic changes of the surface topography with the increasing electron fluence (from initially flat to rough at about half monolayer desorbed, back to flat after a complete monolayer removal) are modulating the surface recombination probability for the excited F-centers. By controlling the population of traps in the bulk these surface processes are causing modulation of the diffusion range of mobile defects migrating from the bulk of the material towards its surface and the bulk recombination probabilities of F- and H-centres.

  17. Electric dipole polarizabilities of Rydberg states of alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerokhin, V. A.; Buhmann, S. Y.; Fritzsche, S.; Surzhykov, A.

    2016-09-01

    Calculations of the static electric-dipole scalar and tensor polarizabilities are presented for two alkali-metal atoms, Rb and Cs, for the n S , n P½,3 /2 , and n D3 /2 ,5 /2 states with large principal quantum numbers up to n =50 . The calculations are performed within an effective one-electron approximation, based on the Dirac-Fock Hamiltonian with a semiempirical core-polarization potential. The obtained results are compared with those from a simpler semiempirical approach and with available experimental data.

  18. Resonant effects in optical second-harmonic generation from alkali covered Si(111) 7 × 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordo, V. G.; Marowsky, G.; Zhang, J.; Rubahn, H.-G.

    2005-01-01

    Polarized second-harmonic generation (SHG) coverage dependencies for alkali (Na, Li) adsorption on Si(111) 7 × 7 both at room and at low temperatures are obtained for fundamental wavelengths of 497 nm, 570 nm and 1067 nm, showing characteristic and reproducible non-monotonic changes of SHG efficiency. At submonolayer coverage the SHG intensities are qualitatively different for visible vs. near-resonant IR radiation. In the coverage regime θ < 1/3, low-symmetry Na-Si bonds, resulting from a Na-induced surface reconstruction, are formed, which are resonant with 1067 nm radiation. By comparing parallelly and perpendicularly polarized coverage dependencies, we deduce that the resonant contribution in the parallel configuration is due to the χzzz(2)-component.

  19. Cooling trapped atoms in optical resonators.

    PubMed

    Zippilli, Stefano; Morigi, Giovanna

    2005-09-30

    We derive an equation for the cooling dynamics of the quantum motion of an atom trapped by an external potential inside an optical resonator. This equation has broad validity and allows us to identify novel regimes where the motion can be efficiently cooled to the potential ground state. Our result shows that the motion is critically affected by quantum correlations induced by the mechanical coupling with the resonator, which may lead to selective suppression of certain transitions for the appropriate parameters regimes, thereby increasing the cooling efficiency. PMID:16241649

  20. Esr Spectra of Alkali-Metal Atoms on Helium Nanodroplets: a Theoretical Model for the Prediction of Helium Induced Hyperfine Structure Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, Reas W.; Filatov, Michael; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2013-06-01

    We predict He-droplet-induced changes of the isotropic HFS constant a_{HFS} of the alkali-metal atoms M = Li, Na, K and Rb on the basis of a model description. Optically detected electron spin resonance spectroscopy has allowed high resolution measurements that show the influence of the helium droplet and its size on the unpaired electron spin density at the alkali nucleus. Our theoretical approach to describe this dependence is based on a combination of two well established techniques: Results of relativistic coupled-cluster calculations on the alkali-He dimers (energy and HFS constant as functions of the binding length) are mapped onto the doped-droplet-situation with the help of helium-density functional theory. We simulate doped droplets He_{N} with N ranging from 50 to 10000, using the diatomic alkali-He-potential energy curves as input. From the obtained density profiles we evaluate average distances between the dopant atom and its direct helium neighborhood. The distances are then set in relation to the variation of the HFS constant with binding length in the simplified alkali-He-dimer model picture. This method yields reliable relative shifts but involves a systematic absolute error. Hence, the absolute values of the shifts are tied to one experimentally determined HFS constant for ^{85}Rb-He_{N = 2000}. With this parameter choice we obtain results in good agreement with the available experimental data for Rb and K^{a,b} confirming the predicted 1/N trend of the functional dependence^{c}. M. Koch, G. Auböck, C. Callegari, and W. E. Ernst, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 035302-1-4 (2009) M. Koch, C. Callegari, and W. E. Ernst, Mol. Phys. 108 (7), 1005-1011 (2010) A. W. Hauser, T. Gruber, M. Filatov, and W. E. Ernst, ChemPhysChem (2013) online DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200697

  1. Observation of Heteronuclear Atomic Efimov Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Barontini, G.; Rabatti, F.; Thalhammer, G.; Weber, C.; Catani, J.; Inguscio, M.; Minardi, F.

    2009-07-24

    Building on the recent experimental observation with ultracold atoms, we report the first experimental evidence of Efimov physics in a heteronuclear system. A mixture of {sup 41}K and {sup 87}Rb atoms was cooled to few hundred nanokelvins and stored in an optical dipole trap. Exploiting a broad interspecies Feshbach resonance, the losses due to three-body collisions were studied as a function of the interspecies scattering length. We observe an enhancement of the three-body collisions for three distinct values of the interspecies scattering lengths, both positive and negative, where no Feshbach resonances are expected. We attribute the two features at negative scattering length to the existence of two kinds of Efimov trimers, KKRb and KRbRb.

  2. Higher-order C{sub n} dispersion coefficients for the alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2005-04-01

    The van der Waals coefficients, from C{sub 11} through to C{sub 16} resulting from second-, third-, and fourth-order perturbation theory are estimated for the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, and Rb) atoms. The dispersion coefficients are also computed for all possible combinations of the alkali-metal atoms and hydrogen. The parameters are determined from sum rules after diagonalizing a semiempirical fixed core Hamiltonian in a large basis. Comparisons of the radial dependence of the C{sub n}/r{sup n} potentials give guidance as to the radial regions in which the various higher-order terms can be neglected. It is seen that including terms up to C{sub 10}/r{sup 10} results in a dispersion interaction that is accurate to better than 1% whenever the inter-nuclear spacing is larger than 20a{sub 0}. This level of accuracy is mainly achieved due to the fortuitous cancellation between the repulsive (C{sub 11},C{sub 13},C{sub 15}) and attractive (C{sub 12},C{sub 14},C{sub 16}) dispersion forces.

  3. Internal Spin Control, Squeezing and Decoherence in Ensembles of Alkali Atomic Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Leigh Morgan

    Large atomic ensembles interacting with light are one of the most promising platforms for quantum information processing. In the past decade, novel applications for these systems have emerged in quantum communication, quantum computing, and metrology. Essential to all of these applications is the controllability of the atomic ensemble, which is facilitated by a strong coupling between the atoms and light. Non-classical spin squeezed states are a crucial step in attaining greater ensemble control. The degree of entanglement present in these states, furthermore, serves as a benchmark for the strength of the atom-light interaction. Outside the broader context of quantum information processing with atomic ensembles, spin squeezed states have applications in metrology, where their quantum correlations can be harnessed to improve the precision of magnetometers and atomic clocks. This dissertation focuses upon the production of spin squeezed states in large ensembles of cold trapped alkali atoms interacting with optical fields. While most treatments of spin squeezing consider only the case in which the ensemble is composed of two level systems or qubits, we utilize the entire ground manifold of an alkali atom with hyperfine spin f greater or equal to 1/2, a qudit. Spin squeezing requires non-classical correlations between the constituent atomic spins, which are generated through the atoms' collective coupling to the light. Either through measurement or multiple interactions with the atoms, the light mediates an entangling interaction that produces quantum correlations. Because the spin squeezing treated in this dissertation ultimately originates from the coupling between the light and atoms, conventional approaches of improving this squeezing have focused on increasing the optical density of the ensemble. The greater number of internal degrees of freedom and the controllability of the spin-f ground hyperfine manifold enable novel methods of enhancing squeezing. In

  4. Internal Spin Control, Squeezing and Decoherence in Ensembles of Alkali Atomic Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Leigh Morgan

    Large atomic ensembles interacting with light are one of the most promising platforms for quantum information processing. In the past decade, novel applications for these systems have emerged in quantum communication, quantum computing, and metrology. Essential to all of these applications is the controllability of the atomic ensemble, which is facilitated by a strong coupling between the atoms and light. Non-classical spin squeezed states are a crucial step in attaining greater ensemble control. The degree of entanglement present in these states, furthermore, serves as a benchmark for the strength of the atom-light interaction. Outside the broader context of quantum information processing with atomic ensembles, spin squeezed states have applications in metrology, where their quantum correlations can be harnessed to improve the precision of magnetometers and atomic clocks. This dissertation focuses upon the production of spin squeezed states in large ensembles of cold trapped alkali atoms interacting with optical fields. While most treatments of spin squeezing consider only the case in which the ensemble is composed of two level systems or qubits, we utilize the entire ground manifold of an alkali atom with hyperfine spin f greater than or equal to 1/2, a qudit. Spin squeezing requires non-classical correlations between the constituent atomic spins, which are generated through the atoms' collective coupling to the light. Either through measurement or multiple interactions with the atoms, the light mediates an entangling interaction that produces quantum correlations. Because the spin squeezing treated in this dissertation ultimately originates from the coupling between the light and atoms, conventional approaches of improving this squeezing have focused on increasing the optical density of the ensemble. The greater number of internal degrees of freedom and the controllability of the spin-f ground hyperfine manifold enable novel methods of enhancing squeezing. In

  5. [The Measuring Method of Atomic Polarization of Alkali Metal Vapor Based on Optical Rotation and the Analysis of the Influence Factors].

    PubMed

    Shang, Hui-ning; Quan, Wei; Chen, Yao; Li, Yang; Li, Hong

    2016-02-01

    High sensitivity measurements of inertia and magnetic field could be achieved by utilizing a category of devices, which manipulate the atomic spins in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free regime. The alkali cell which contains the alkali metal vapor is used to sense magnetic field and inertia. The atomic number density of alkali vapor and the polarization of alkali metal vapor are two of the most important parameters of the cell. They play an important role in the research on atomic spins in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free regime. Besides, optical polarization plays an important role in quantum computing and atomic physics. We propose a measurement of alkali vapor polarization and alkali number density by detecting the optical rotation in one system. This method simplifies existing experimental equipment and processes. A constant bias magnetic field is applied and the Faraday rotation angle is detected by a bunch of the probe beam to deduce alkali-metal density. Then the magnetic field is closed and a bunch of the pump laser is utilized to polarize alkali-metal. Again, the probe beam is utilized to obtain the polarization of alkali metal. The alkali density obtained at first is used to deduce the polarization. This paper applies a numerical method to analyze the Faraday rotation and the polarization rotation. According to the numerical method, the optimal wavelength for the experiment is given. Finally, the fluctuation of magnetic field and wavelength on signal analysis are analyzed. PMID:27209720

  6. Development of laser optogalvanic spectroscopy as a probe of alkali atoms in an MHD environment

    SciTech Connect

    Monts, D.L.; Qian, S.; Cook, R.L.; Shepard, W.S.

    1995-02-01

    Application of Laser Optogalvanic Spectroscopy (LOGS) to MHD combustion systems requires selection of an appropriate alkali atom electronic transition to monitor. These studies suggest that in MHD combustion systems, it is desirable to use cesium, which occurs as an impurity in potassium compounds, as a surrogate for potassium rather than to directly monitor potassium in order to obtain reliable determinations of seed concentration. Studies were also performed to investigate the effect of electrode corrosion on the normalized LOGS signal intensity at a fixed wavelength (578.238 nm). During six-hour experiments in a near-stoichiometric flame, the normalized LOGS signal intensity decreased by 40-50% for a -960 V rod electrode and by 10-20% for a -500 V rod electrode. These changes are attributed to buildup of an oxide coating on the electrode, reducing the collection efficiency of the electrode.

  7. Quantum Degenerate Mixtures of Alkali and Alkaline-Earth-Like Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Hideaki; Takasu, Yosuke; Yamaoka, Yoshifumi; Doyle, John M.; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2011-05-20

    We realize simultaneous quantum degeneracy in mixtures consisting of the alkali and alkaline-earth-like atoms Li and Yb. This is accomplished within an optical trap by sympathetic cooling of the fermionic isotope {sup 6}Li with evaporatively cooled bosonic {sup 174}Yb and, separately, fermionic {sup 173}Yb. Using cross-thermalization studies, we also measure the elastic s-wave scattering lengths of both Li-Yb combinations, |a{sub {sup 6}Li-{sup 174}Yb}|=1.0{+-}0.2 nm and |a{sub {sup 6}Li-{sup 173}Yb}|=0.9{+-}0.2 nm. The equality of these lengths is found to be consistent with mass-scaling analysis. The quantum degenerate mixtures of Li and Yb, as realized here, can be the basis for creation of ultracold molecules with electron spin degrees of freedom, studies of novel Efimov trimers, and impurity probes of superfluid systems.

  8. Aging studies on micro-fabricated alkali buffer-gas cells for miniature atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Mileti, G.

    2015-04-20

    We report an aging study on micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells using neon as a buffer gas. An experimental atomic clock setup is used to measure the cell's intrinsic frequency, by recording the clock frequency shift at different light intensities and extrapolating to zero intensity. We find a drift of the cell's intrinsic frequency of (−5.2 ± 0.6) × 10{sup −11}/day and quantify deterministic variations in sources of clock frequency shifts due to the major physical effects to identify the most probable cause of the drift. The measured drift is one order of magnitude stronger than the total frequency variations expected from clock parameter variations and corresponds to a slow reduction of buffer gas pressure inside the cell, which is compatible with the hypothesis of loss of Ne gas from the cell due to its permeation through the cell windows. A negative drift on the intrinsic cell frequency is reproducible for another cell of the same type. Based on the Ne permeation model and the measured cell frequency drift, we determine the permeation constant of Ne through borosilicate glass as (5.7 ± 0.7) × 10{sup −22} m{sup 2} s{sup −1 }Pa{sup −1} at 81 °C. We propose this method based on frequency metrology in an alkali vapor cell atomic clock setup based on coherent population trapping for measuring permeation constants of inert gases.

  9. Atomic many-body effects and Lamb shifts in alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginges, J. S. M.; Berengut, J. C.

    2016-05-01

    We present a detailed study of the radiative potential method [V. V. Flambaum and J. S. M. Ginges, Phys. Rev. A 72, 052115 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevA.72.052115], which enables the accurate inclusion of quantum electrodynamics (QED) radiative corrections in a simple manner in atoms and ions over the range 10 ≤Z ≤120 , where Z is the nuclear charge. Calculations are performed for binding energy shifts to the lowest valence s , p , and d waves over the series of alkali-metal atoms Na to E119. The high accuracy of the radiative potential method is demonstrated by comparison with rigorous QED calculations in frozen atomic potentials, with deviations on the level of 1%. The many-body effects of core relaxation and second- and higher-order perturbation theory on the interaction of the valence electron with the core are calculated. The inclusion of many-body effects tends to increase the size of the shifts, with the enhancement particularly significant for d waves; for K to E119, the self-energy shifts for d waves are only an order of magnitude smaller than the s -wave shifts. It is shown that taking into account many-body effects is essential for an accurate description of the Lamb shift.

  10. Intrinsic differences in atomic ordering of calcium (alumino)silicate hydrates in conventional and alkali-activated cements

    SciTech Connect

    White, Claire E.; Daemen, Luke L.; Hartl, Monika; Page, Katharine

    2015-01-15

    The atomic structures of calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) and calcium (–sodium) aluminosilicate hydrate (C–(N)–A–S–H) gels, and their presence in conventional and blended cement systems, have been the topic of significant debate over recent decades. Previous investigations have revealed that synthetic C–S–H gel is nanocrystalline and due to the chemical similarities between ordinary Portland cement (OPC)-based systems and low-CO{sub 2} alkali-activated slags, researchers have inferred that the atomic ordering in alkali-activated slag is the same as in OPC–slag cements. Here, X-ray total scattering is used to determine the local bonding environment and nanostructure of C(–A)–S–H gels present in hydrated tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S), blended C{sub 3}S–slag and alkali-activated slag, revealing the large intrinsic differences in the extent of nanoscale ordering between C–S–H derived from C{sub 3}S and alkali-activated slag systems, which may have a significant influence on thermodynamic stability, and material properties at higher length scales, including long term durability of alkali-activated cements.

  11. Collision of two atoms in laser radiation field with formation of Feshbach resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazazyan, Emil A.; Gazazyan, Alfred D.; Chaltykyan, Vigen O.

    2013-09-01

    Based on the simplest two-channel model we theoretically consider laser induced elastic and inelastic collision of two atoms with formation of Feshbach resonance. In cases of one- and two-photon resonances of laser radiation with two discrete vibrational molecular levels, we show that Feshbach resonances appear at interaction of external magnetic field with dressed states formed via Autler-Townes effect. We also study the laser-induced inelastic collision and its influence on the considered processes. In case of two-photon resonance between discrete vibrational molecular states the Feshbach resonances arise under action of magnetic field via Autler-Townes effect, while the laser-induced transition into the elastic-channel continuum is in this case absent. We obtain the cross-sections of elastic and inelastic scattering and show that quenching of resonance occurs under certain conditions. The obtained results can be employed in new studies of collisions of atoms, e.g., of alkali metal atoms, and for interpretation of new experiments in BECs.

  12. Non-negligible collisions of alkali atoms with background gas in buffer-gas-free cells coated with paraffin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Naota; Hatakeyama, Atsushi

    2016-04-01

    We measured the rate of velocity-changing collisions (VCCs) between alkali atoms and background gas in buffer-gas-free anti-relaxation-coated cells. The average VCC rate in paraffin-coated rubidium vapor cells prepared in this work was 1× 106 hbox {s}^{-1}, which corresponds to 1 mm in the mean free path of rubidium atoms. This short mean free path indicates that the background gas is not negligible in the sense that alkali atoms do not travel freely between the cell walls. In addition, we found that a heating process known as "ripening" increases the VCC rate, and also confirmed that ripening improves the anti-relaxation performance of the coatings.

  13. Study on water-dispersible colloids in saline-alkali soils by atomic force microscopy and spectrometric methods.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiguo; Xu, Fengjie; Zu, Yuangang; Meng, Ronghua; Wang, Wenjie

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have revealed that water-dispersible colloids play an important role in the transport of nutrients and contaminants in soils. In this study, water-dispersible colloids extracted from saline-alkali soils have been characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV absorption spectra. AFM observation indicated that the water-dispersible colloids contain some large plates and many small spherical particles. XRD, XPS, and UV absorption measurement revealed that the water-dispersible colloids are composed of kaolinite, illite, calcite, quartz and humic acid. In addition, UV absorption measurement demonstrated that the humic acids are associated with clay minerals. Water-dispersible colloids in the saline-alkali soils after hydrolyzed polymaleic anhydride treatment and an agricultural soil (nonsaline-alkali soil) were also investigated for comparison. The obtained results implied that the saline-alkali condition facilitates the formation of a large quantity of colloids. The use of AFM combined with spectrometric methods in the present study provides new knowledge on the colloid characteristics of saline-alkali soils. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:525-531, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Structure of the alkali-metal-atom + strontium molecular ions: Towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Aymar, M.; Dulieu, O.; Guerout, R.

    2011-08-14

    The potential energy curves, permanent and transition dipole moments, and the static dipolar polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a strontium ion are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The molecular ions are treated as effective two-electron systems and are treated using effective core potentials including core polarization, large gaussian basis sets, and full configuration interaction. In the perspective of upcoming experiments aiming at merging cold atom and cold ion traps, possible paths for radiative charge exchange, photoassociation of a cold lithium or rubidium atom and a strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions.

  15. Atom loss resonances in a Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Langmack, Christian; Smith, D Hudson; Braaten, Eric

    2013-07-12

    Atom loss resonances in ultracold trapped atoms have been observed at scattering lengths near atom-dimer resonances, at which Efimov trimers cross the atom-dimer threshold, and near two-dimer resonances, at which universal tetramers cross the dimer-dimer threshold. We propose a new mechanism for these loss resonances in a Bose-Einstein condensate of atoms. As the scattering length is ramped to the large final value at which the atom loss rate is measured, the time-dependent scattering length generates a small condensate of shallow dimers coherently from the atom condensate. The coexisting atom and dimer condensates can be described by a low-energy effective field theory with universal coefficients that are determined by matching exact results from few-body physics. The classical field equations for the atom and dimer condensates predict narrow enhancements in the atom loss rate near atom-dimer resonances and near two-dimer resonances due to inelastic dimer collisions.

  16. Light effects in the atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances in wall-coated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Breschi, E.; Schori, C.; Di Domenico, G.; Mileti, G.; Kazakov, G.; Litvinov, A.; Matisov, B.

    2010-12-15

    We report on light shift and broadening in the atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances prepared in alkali-metal vapors contained in wall-coated cells without buffer gas. The atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing is due to the free motion of the polarized atomic spins in and out of the optical interaction region before spin relaxation. As a consequence of this effect, we observe a narrowing of the dark resonance linewidth as well as a reduction of the ground states' light shift when the volume of the interaction region decreases at constant optical intensity. The results can be intuitively interpreted as a dilution of the intensity effect similar to a pulsed interrogation due to the atomic motion. Finally the influence of this effect on the performance of compact atomic clocks is discussed.

  17. Controlling interactions between highly magnetic atoms with Feshbach resonances.

    PubMed

    Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-09-01

    This paper reviews current experimental and theoretical progress in the study of dipolar quantum gases of ground and meta-stable atoms with a large magnetic moment. We emphasize the anisotropic nature of Feshbach resonances due to coupling to fast-rotating resonant molecular states in ultracold s-wave collisions between magnetic atoms in external magnetic fields. The dramatic differences in the distribution of resonances of magnetic (7)S3 chromium and magnetic lanthanide atoms with a submerged 4f shell and non-zero electron angular momentum is analyzed. We focus on dysprosium and erbium as important experimental advances have been recently made to cool and create quantum-degenerate gases for these atoms. Finally, we describe progress in locating resonances in collisions of meta-stable magnetic atoms in electronic P-states with ground-state atoms, where an interplay between collisional anisotropies and spin-orbit coupling exists.

  18. Ground state of the polar alkali-metal-atom-strontium molecules: Potential energy curve and permanent dipole moment

    SciTech Connect

    Guerout, R.; Aymar, M.; Dulieu, O.

    2010-10-15

    In this study, we investigate the structure of the polar alkali-metal-atom-strontium diatomic molecules as possible candidates for the realization of samples of ultracold polar molecular species not yet investigated experimentally. Using a quantum chemistry approach based on effective core potentials and core polarization potentials, we model these systems as effective three-valence-electron systems, allowing for calculation of electronic properties with full configuration interaction. The potential curve and the permanent dipole moment of the {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} ground state are determined as functions of the internuclear distance for LiSr, NaSr, KSr, RbSr, and CsSr molecules. These molecules are found to exhibit a significant permanent dipole moment, though smaller than those of the alkali-metal-atom-Rb molecules.

  19. Adsorption of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms on the reconstructed graphene-like BN single sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jun-Hua; Wang, Zheng-Jia; Wang, Yu-Fang; Yin, Yu-Hua; Jiang, Run; Jin, Qing-Hua

    2015-12-01

    A graphene-like BN single sheet with absorbed alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms have been investigated by using a first-principles method within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). The electronic structure of BN sheet with adsorbed metal atoms is mainly determined by the metal electronic state which is near to the Fermi level owing to the wide band gap of pure BN sheet. So, we calculated the adsorption energy, charge transfer and work function after the metal adsorbed on BN sheet. We found that the interaction between the metal atoms and BN surface was very strong, and the stable adsorption site for all the adsorbed atoms concluded was high-coordination surface site (H-center) rather than the surface dangling bond sites from the perspective of simple bond-counting arguments. Our results indicate that the interaction of BN sheet with metal atoms could help in the development of metallic nanoscale devices.

  20. Confinement-induced resonances in ultracold atom-ion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melezhik, V. S.; Negretti, A.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate confinement-induced resonances in a system composed of a tightly trapped ion and a moving atom in a waveguide. We determine the conditions for the appearance of such resonances in a broad region—from the "long-wavelength" limit to the opposite case when the typical length scale of the atom-ion polarization potential essentially exceeds the transverse waveguide width. We find considerable dependence of the resonance position on the atomic mass which, however, disappears in the "long-wavelength and zero-energy" limit, where the known result for the confined atom-atom scattering is reproduced. We also derive an analytic and a semianalytic formula for the resonance position in the long-wavelength and zero-energy limit and we investigate numerically the dependence of the resonance condition on the finite atomic colliding energy. Our results, which can be investigated experimentally in the near future, could be used to determine the atom-ion scattering length, to determine the temperature of the atomic ensemble in the presence of an ion impurity, and to control the atom-phonon coupling in a linear ion crystal in interaction with a quasi-one-dimensional atomic quantum gas.

  1. Interaction of alkali atoms with water multilayers adsorbed on TiO 2(1 1 0): a study with MIES and UPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krischok, S.; Höfft, O.; Kempter, V.

    2003-06-01

    The chemistry of alkali atoms (Li, Na, K, Cs) embedded in a multilayer aqueous environment was studied with metastable impact electron spectroscopy (MIES) and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) (HeI and II) under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions. The water multilayers were grown at 130 K on a rutile, 1×1 reconstructed, TiO 2(1 1 0) single crystal. The behavior of the multilayer system was investigated as a function of the temperature (130-500 K). Due to the relatively large escape depth of the emitted electrons UPS provides spectroscopic information about several layers in contrast to MIES which is only sensitive to the outermost layer. This allows us to discriminate between species adsorbed at the water multilayer and species, which are embedded in the solvent or at the substrate-solvent interface. Furthermore, MIES is, in contrast to UPS, very sensitive to the outermost s-states of adsorbed alkali atoms, which are considered to be responsible for the high reactivity of these metals. The present study gives insight into the complicated chemistry of alkali atoms added to an aqueous multilayer system. The chosen combination of MIES and UPS allows us to distinguish clearly between various phases depending on the amount of offered alkali atoms. For low alkali concentrations the alkali atoms penetrate the water surface whereby they dissociate some water. With increasing exposure more and more water molecules become dissociated, whereby the outermost water layer remains intact. Finally, the chemistry between water and alkali atoms takes place at the outermost surface too, which is manifested by the formation of OH-groups at the surface. With further increasing alkali concentration the atoms start to adsorb as neutral atoms; whereby the spectrum of the alkali species is then strongly influenced by the underlying solvent system. For very high exposure the observed spectra are not influenced by the underlying aqueous system anymore; the formation of an alkali

  2. Electron paramagnetic resonance of individual atoms on a surface.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Susanne; Paul, William; Choi, Taeyoung; Lutz, Christopher P; Ardavan, Arzhang; Heinrich, Andreas J

    2015-10-23

    We combined the high-energy resolution of conventional spin resonance (here ~10 nano-electron volts) with scanning tunneling microscopy to measure electron paramagnetic resonance of individual iron (Fe) atoms placed on a magnesium oxide film. We drove the spin resonance with an oscillating electric field (20 to 30 gigahertz) between tip and sample. The readout of the Fe atom's quantum state was performed by spin-polarized detection of the atomic-scale tunneling magnetoresistance. We determine an energy relaxation time of T1 ≈ 100 microseconds and a phase-coherence time of T2 ≈ 210 nanoseconds. The spin resonance signals of different Fe atoms differ by much more than their resonance linewidth; in a traditional ensemble measurement, this difference would appear as inhomogeneous broadening.

  3. Isotropically sensitive optical filter employing atomic resonance transitions

    DOEpatents

    Marling, J.B.

    An ultra-high Q isotropically sensitive optical filter or optical detector is disclosed employing atomic resonance transitions. More specifically, atomic resonance transitions utilized in conjunction with two optical bandpass filters provide an optical detector having a wide field of view (approx. 2 ..pi.. steradians) and very narrow acceptance bandwidth approaching 0.01A. A light signal to be detected is transmitted through an outer bandpass filter into a resonantly absorbing atomic vapor, the excited atomic vapor than providing a fluorescence signal at a different wavelength which is transmitted through an inner bandpass filters have no common transmission band, therby resulting in complete blockage of all optical signals that are not resonantly shifted in wavelength by the intervening atomic vapor. Two embodiments are disclosed, one in which the light signal raises atoms contained in the atomic vapor from the ground state to an excited state from which fluorescence occurs, and the other in which a pump laser is used to raise the atoms in the ground state to a first excited state from which the light signal then is resonantly absorbed, thereby raising the atoms to a second excited state from which fluorescence occurs. A specific application is described in which an optical detector according to the present invention can be located in an orbiting satellite.

  4. Isotropically sensitive optical filter employing atomic resonance transitions

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.

    1981-01-01

    An ultra-high Q isotropically sensitive optical filter or optical detector employing atomic resonance transitions. More specifically, atomic resonance transitions utilized in conjunction with two optical bandpass filters provide an optical detector having a wide field of view (.about.2.pi. steradians) and very narrow acceptance bandwidth approaching 0.01 A. A light signal to be detected is transmitted through an outer bandpass filter into a resonantly absorbing atomic vapor, the excited atomic vapor then providing a fluorescence signal at a different wavelength which is transmitted through an inner bandpass filter. The outer and inner bandpass filters have no common transmission band, thereby resulting in complete blockage of all optical signals that are not resonantly shifted in wavelength by the intervening atomic vapor. Two embodiments are disclosed, one in which the light signal raises atoms contained in the atomic vapor from the ground state to an excited state from which fluorescence occurs, and the other in which a pump laser is used to raise the atoms in the ground state to a first excited state from which the light signal then is resonantly absorbed, thereby raising the atoms to a second excited state from which fluorescence occurs. A specific application is described in which an optical detector according to the present invention can be used as an underwater detector for light from an optical transmitter which could be located in an orbiting satellite.

  5. End and central plasmon resonances in linear atomic chains.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Yuan, Zhe; Gao, Shiwu

    2007-05-25

    The existence and nature of end and central plasmon resonances in a linear atomic chain, the 1D analog to surface and bulk plasmons in 2D metals, has been predicted by ab initio time-dependent density functional theory. Length dependence of the absorption spectra shows the emergence and development of collectivity of these resonances. It converges to a single resonance in the longitudinal mode, and two transverse resonances, which are localized at the ends and center of the atom chains. These collective modes bridge the gaps, in concept and scale, between the collective excitation of atomic physics and nanoplasmonics. It also outlines a route to atomic-scale engineering of collective excitations.

  6. Optimized coplanar waveguide resonators for a superconductor-atom interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, M. A.; Isaacs, J. A.; Booth, D.; Pritchard, J. D.; Saffman, M.; McDermott, R.

    2016-08-01

    We describe the design and characterization of superconducting coplanar waveguide cavities tailored to facilitate strong coupling between superconducting quantum circuits and single trapped Rydberg atoms. For initial superconductor-atom experiments at 4.2 K, we show that resonator quality factors above 104 can be readily achieved. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the incorporation of thick-film copper electrodes at a voltage antinode of the resonator provides a route to enhance the zero-point electric fields of the resonator in a trapping region that is 40 μm above the chip surface, thereby minimizing chip heating from scattered trap light. The combination of high resonator quality factor and strong electric dipole coupling between the resonator and the atom should make it possible to achieve the strong coupling limit of cavity quantum electrodynamics with this system.

  7. Transition rates for lithium-like ions, sodium-like ions, and neutral alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.R.; Liu, Z.W.; Sapirstein, J.

    1996-11-01

    Third-order many-body perturbation theory is used to obtain E1 transition amplitudes for ions of the lithium and sodium isoelectronic sequences and for the neutral alkali-metal atoms potassium, rubidium, cesium, and francium. Complete angular reductions of the first, second, and third-order amplitudes are given. Tables of transition energies and rates are given for the 2p{sub {1/2}} {yields} 2s{sub {1/2}}, 2p{sub 3/2} {yields} 2s{sub {1/2}}, 3s{sub {1/2}} {yields} 2p{sub {1/2}}, and 3s{sub {1/2}} {yields} 2p{sub 3/2} transitions in the lithium isoelectronic sequence and for the corresponding 3p{sub 1/2} {yields} 3s{sub 1/2}, 3p{sub 3/2} {yields} 3s{sub {1/2}}, 4s{sub {1/2}} {yields} 3p{sub 1/2}, and 4s{sub {1/2}} {yields} 3p{sub 3/2} transitions in the sodium sequence. For neutral alkali atoms, amplitudes of np{sub {1/2}} {yields} ns{sub {1/2}}, np{sub 3/2} {yields} ns{sub {1/2}}, (n + 1)s{sub {1/2}} {yields} np{sub {1/2}}, and (n + 1)s{sub {1/2}} {yields} np{sub 3/2} transitions are evaluated, where n is the principal quantum number of the valence electron in the atomic ground state, Semi-empirical corrections for the omitted fourth- and higher-order terms in perturbation theory are given for the neutral alkali-metal atoms. Comparisons with previous high-precision calculations and with experiment are made. 42 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.

  8. Supercooling of Atoms in an Optical Resonator.

    PubMed

    Xu, Minghui; Jäger, Simon B; Schütz, S; Cooper, J; Morigi, Giovanna; Holland, M J

    2016-04-15

    We investigate laser cooling of an ensemble of atoms in an optical cavity. We demonstrate that when atomic dipoles are synchronized in the regime of steady-state superradiance, the motion of the atoms may be subject to a giant frictional force leading to potentially very low temperatures. The ultimate temperature limits are determined by a modified atomic linewidth, which can be orders of magnitude smaller than the cavity linewidth. The cooling rate is enhanced by the superradiant emission into the cavity mode allowing reasonable cooling rates even for dipolar transitions with ultranarrow linewidth.

  9. Supercooling of Atoms in an Optical Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Minghui; Jäger, Simon; Schütz, Stefan; Cooper, John; Morigi, Giovanna; Holland, Murray

    2016-05-01

    We investigate laser cooling of an ensemble of atoms in an optical cavity. We demonstrate that when atomic dipoles are synchronized in the regime of steady-state superradiance, the motion of the atoms may be subject to a giant frictional force leading to potentially very low temperatures. The ultimate temperature limits are determined by a modified atomic linewidth, which can be orders of magnitude smaller than the cavity linewidth. The cooling rate is enhanced by the superradiant emission into the cavity mode allowing reasonable cooling rates even for dipolar transitions with ultranarrow linewidth.

  10. Supercooling of Atoms in an Optical Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Minghui; Jäger, Simon B.; Schütz, S.; Cooper, J.; Morigi, Giovanna; Holland, M. J.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate laser cooling of an ensemble of atoms in an optical cavity. We demonstrate that when atomic dipoles are synchronized in the regime of steady-state superradiance, the motion of the atoms may be subject to a giant frictional force leading to potentially very low temperatures. The ultimate temperature limits are determined by a modified atomic linewidth, which can be orders of magnitude smaller than the cavity linewidth. The cooling rate is enhanced by the superradiant emission into the cavity mode allowing reasonable cooling rates even for dipolar transitions with ultranarrow linewidth.

  11. Shifts of a resonance line in a dense atomic sample.

    PubMed

    Javanainen, Juha; Ruostekoski, Janne; Li, Yi; Yoo, Sung-Mi

    2014-03-21

    We study the collective response of a dense atomic sample to light essentially exactly using classical-electrodynamics simulations. In a homogeneously broadened atomic sample there is no overt Lorentz-Lorenz local field shift of the resonance, nor a collective Lamb shift. However, the addition of inhomogeneous broadening restores the usual mean-field phenomenology.

  12. Detection of single atoms by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, G.S.

    1986-01-01

    Rutherford's idea for counting individual atoms can, in principle, be implemented for nearly any type of atom, whether stable or radioactive, by using methods of resonance ionization. With the RIS technique, a laser is tuned to a wavelength which will promote a valence electron in a Z-selected atom to an excited level. Additional resonance or nonresonance photoabsorption steps are used to achieve nearly 100% ionization efficiencies. Hence, the RIS process can be saturated for the Z-selected atoms; and since detectors are available for counting either single electrons or positive ions, one-atom detection is possible. Some examples are given of one-atom detection, including that of the noble gases, in order to show complementarity with AMS methods. For instance, the detection of /sup 81/Kr using RIS has interesting applications for solar neutrino research, ice-cap dating, and groundwater dating. 39 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. One- and two-photon spectroscopy of highly excited states of alkali-metal atoms on helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Pifrader, Alexandra; Allard, Olivier; Auboeck, Gerald; Callegari, Carlo; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Huber, Robert; Ancilotto, Francesco

    2010-10-28

    Alkali-metal atoms captured on the surface of superfluid helium droplets are excited to high energies ({approx_equal}3 eV) by means of pulsed lasers, and their laser-induced-fluorescence spectra are recorded. We report on the one-photon excitation of the (n+1)p(leftarrow)ns transition of K, Rb, and Cs (n=4, 5, and 6, respectively) and on the two-photon one-color excitation of the 5d(leftarrow)5s transition of Rb. Gated-photon-counting measurements are consistent with the relaxation rates of the bare atoms, hence consistent with the reasonable expectation that atoms quickly desorb from the droplet and droplet-induced relaxation need not be invoked.

  14. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  15. Observation of Raman self-focusing in an alkali-metal vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proite, N. A.; Unks, B. E.; Green, J. T.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2008-02-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of Raman self-focusing and self-defocusing in a far-off resonant alkali-metal atomic system. The key idea is to drive a hyperfine transition in an alkali-metal atom to a maximally coherent state with two laser beams. In this regime, the two-photon detuning from the Raman resonance controls the nonlinear index of the medium.

  16. Micro-resonators coupled to atoms in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraci, Andrew; Kitching, John

    2010-03-01

    Recently there has been a convergence of ideas between the fields of solid-state and atomic physics -- examples range from using atoms for quantum simulation of condensed-matter Hamiltonians to physically coupling atoms with solid-state devices such as micro-resonators. In this talk, we discuss an experimental proposal involving an array of cooled microcantilevers coupled to a sample of ultracold atoms trapped near a microfabricated surface [1]. The cantilevers allow individual lattice site addressing for atomic state control and readout, and potentially may be useful in optical lattice quantum computation schemes. Assuming resonators can be cooled to their vibrational ground state, we describe the implementation of a two-qubit controlled-NOT gate with atomic internal states and the motional states of the resonators, along with a protocol for entangling two or more cantilevers on the atom chip using the trapped atoms as an intermediary. Although similar experiments could be carried out with magnetic microchip traps, the optical confinement scheme we consider may exhibit reduced near-field magnetic noise and decoherence. Prospects for using this system for tests of quantum mechanics at macroscopic scales or quantum information processing will be discussed. [4pt] [1] A. Geraci and J. Kitching, Phys. Rev. A 80, 032317 (2009)

  17. Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of alkali metal vapor interaction with alkene-based anti-relaxation coating.

    PubMed

    Tretiak, O Yu; Blanchard, J W; Budker, D; Olshin, P K; Smirnov, S N; Balabas, M V

    2016-03-01

    The use of anti-relaxation coatings in alkali vapor cells yields substantial performance improvements compared to a bare glass surface by reducing the probability of spin relaxation in wall collisions by several orders of magnitude. Some of the most effective anti-relaxation coating materials are alpha-olefins, which (as in the case of more traditional paraffin coatings) must undergo a curing period after cell manufacturing in order to achieve the desired behavior. Until now, however, it has been unclear what physicochemical processes occur during cell curing, and how they may affect relevant cell properties. We present the results of nondestructive Raman-spectroscopy and magnetic-resonance investigations of the influence of alkali metal vapor (Cs or K) on an alpha-olefin, 1-nonadecene coating the inner surface of a glass cell. It was found that during the curing process, the alkali metal catalyzes migration of the carbon-carbon double bond, yielding a mixture of cis- and trans-2-nonadecene. PMID:26957176

  18. Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of alkali metal vapor interaction with alkene-based anti-relaxation coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiak, O. Yu.; Blanchard, J. W.; Budker, D.; Olshin, P. K.; Smirnov, S. N.; Balabas, M. V.

    2016-03-01

    The use of anti-relaxation coatings in alkali vapor cells yields substantial performance improvements compared to a bare glass surface by reducing the probability of spin relaxation in wall collisions by several orders of magnitude. Some of the most effective anti-relaxation coating materials are alpha-olefins, which (as in the case of more traditional paraffin coatings) must undergo a curing period after cell manufacturing in order to achieve the desired behavior. Until now, however, it has been unclear what physicochemical processes occur during cell curing, and how they may affect relevant cell properties. We present the results of nondestructive Raman-spectroscopy and magnetic-resonance investigations of the influence of alkali metal vapor (Cs or K) on an alpha-olefin, 1-nonadecene coating the inner surface of a glass cell. It was found that during the curing process, the alkali metal catalyzes migration of the carbon-carbon double bond, yielding a mixture of cis- and trans-2-nonadecene.

  19. Improved Tracking of an Atomic-Clock Resonance Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Chung, Sang K.; Tu, Meirong

    2010-01-01

    An improved method of making an electronic oscillator track the frequency of an atomic-clock resonance transition is based on fitting a theoretical nonlinear curve to measurements at three oscillator frequencies within the operational frequency band of the transition (in other words, at three points within the resonance peak). In the measurement process, the frequency of a microwave oscillator is repeatedly set at various offsets from the nominal resonance frequency, the oscillator signal is applied in a square pulse of the oscillator signal having a suitable duration (typically, of the order of a second), and, for each pulse at each frequency offset, fluorescence photons of the transition in question are counted. As described below, the counts are used to determine a new nominal resonance frequency. Thereafter, offsets are determined with respect to the new resonance frequency. The process as described thus far is repeated so as to repeatedly adjust the oscillator to track the most recent estimate of the nominal resonance frequency.

  20. Cavity QED with atom chips and micro-resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Benjamin; Barclay, Paul; Kerckhoff, Joseph; Painter, Oskar; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2006-05-01

    Cavity QED provides a rich experimental setting for quantum information processing, both in the implementation of quantum logic gates and in the development of quantum networks. Moreover, studies of cavity QED will help elucidate the dynamics of continuously observed open quantum systems with quantum- limited feedback. To achieve these goals in cavity QED, a neutral atom must be tightly confined inside a high-finesse cavity with small mode volume for long periods of time. Microfabricated wires on a substrate---known as an atom chip---can create sufficiently high-curvature magnetic potentials to trap atoms in the Lamb- Dicke regime. The integration of micro-resonators, such as microdisks and photonic bandgap cavities, with atom chips forms a robust and scalable system capable of probing the strong- coupling regime of cavity QED with magnetically trapped atoms. We have recently built an atom-cavity chip utilizing a fiber taper coupled microdisk resonator. This device combines laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms with magnetic microtraps and waveguides to deliver cold atoms to the small mode volume of the high-Q cavity. We will relate our progress toward detecting single atoms with this device.

  1. Resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H. (Inventor); Cantrell, Sean A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope and methodology called resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by one of the contact resonance frequencies of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever contact resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of nanoscale near-surface and subsurface features.

  2. Doubly Excited Resonance States of Helium Atom: Complex Entropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroś, Arkadiusz; Kościk, Przemysław; Saha, Jayanta K.

    2016-09-01

    We provide a diagonal form of a reduced density matrix of S-symmetry resonance states of two electron systems determined under the framework of the complex scaling method. We have employed the variational Hylleraas type wavefunction to estimate the complex entropies in doubly excited resonance states of helium atom. Our results are in good agreement with the corresponding ones determined under the framework of the stabilization method (Lin and Ho in Few-Body Syst 56:157, 2015).

  3. Theory of double resonance magnetometers based on atomic alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Weis, Antoine; Bison, Georg; Pazgalev, Anatoly S.

    2006-09-15

    We present a theoretical study of the spectra produced by optical-radio-frequency double resonance devices, in which resonant linearly polarized light is used in the optical pumping and detection processes. We extend previous work by presenting algebraic results which are valid for atomic states with arbitrary angular momenta, arbitrary rf intensities, and arbitrary geometries. The only restriction made is the assumption of low light intensity. The results are discussed in view of their use in optical magnetometers.

  4. Velocity measurements by laser resonance fluorescence. [single atom diffusional motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.; Fairbank, W. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The photonburst correlation method was used to detect single atoms in a buffer gas. Real time flow velocity measurements with laser induced resonance fluorescence from single or multiple atoms was demonstrated and this method was investigated as a tool for wind tunnel flow measurement. Investigations show that single atoms and their real time diffusional motion on a buffer gas can be measured by resonance fluorescence. By averaging over many atoms, flow velocities up to 88 m/s were measured in a time of 0.5 sec. It is expected that higher flow speeds can be measured and that the measurement time can be reduced by a factor of 10 or more by careful experimental design. The method is clearly not ready for incorporation in high speed wind tunnels because it is not yet known whether the stray light level will be higher or lower, and it is not known what detection efficiency can be obtained in a wind tunnel situation.

  5. Quantum liquid-crystal order in resonant atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzihovsky, Leo

    2012-11-01

    I review recent studies that predict a realization of quantum liquid-crystalline orders in resonant atomic gases. As examples of such putative systems I will discuss an s-wave resonant imbalanced Fermi gas and a p-wave resonant Bose gas. In the former, the liquid-crystalline smectic, nematic and rich variety of other descendant states emerge from strongly quantum- and thermally-fluctuating Fulde-Ferrell and Larkin-Ovchinnikov states, driven by a competition between resonant pairing and Fermi-surface mismatch. In the latter, at intermediate detuning the p-wave resonant interaction generically drives Bose-condensation at a finite momentum, set by a competition between atomic kinetic energy and atom-molecule hybridization. Because of the underlying rotationally-invariant environment of the atomic gas trapped isotropically, the putative striped superfluid is a realization of a quantum superfluid smectic, that can melt into a variety of interesting phases, such as a quantum nematic. I will discuss the corresponding rich phase diagrams and transitions, as well the low-energy properties of the phases and fractional topological defects generic to striped superfluids and their fluctuation-driven descendants.

  6. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation using resonance ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Comaskey, B.; Crane, J.; Erbert, G.; Haynam, C.; Johnson, M.; Morris, J.; Paisner, J.; Solarz, R.; Worden, E.

    1986-09-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power-reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985, the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for enriched uranium. Resonance photoionization is the heart of the AVLIS process. We discuss those fundamental atomic parameters that are necessary for describing isotope-selective resonant multistep photoionization along with the measurement techniques that we use. We illustrate the methodology adopted with examples of other elements that are under study in our program.

  7. Emerging Beam Resonances in Atom Diffraction from a Reflection Grating

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Bum Suk; Meijer, Gerard; Schoellkopf, Wieland

    2010-06-18

    We report on the observation of emerging beam resonances, well known as Rayleigh-Wood anomalies and threshold resonances in photon and electron diffraction, respectively, in an atom-optical diffraction experiment. Diffraction of He atom beams reflected from a blazed ruled grating at grazing incidence has been investigated. The total reflectivity of the grating as well as the intensities of the diffracted beams reveal anomalies at the Rayleigh angles of incidence, i.e., when another diffracted beam emerges parallel to the grating surface. The observed anomalies are discussed in terms of the classical wave-optical model of Rayleigh and Fano.

  8. Resonance fluorescence from an atom in a squeezed vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, H. J.; Lane, A. S.; Walls, D. F.

    1987-06-01

    The fluorescent spectrum for a two-level atom which is damped by a squeezed vacuum shows striking differences from the spectrum for ordinary resonance fluorescence. For strong coherent driving fields the Mollow triplet depends on the relative phase of the driving field and the squeezed vacuum field. The central peak may have either subnatural linewidth or supernatural linewidth depending on this phase. The mean atomic polarization also shows a phase sensitivity.

  9. Alkali vapor pressure modulation on the 100 ms scale in a single-cell vacuum system for cold atom experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dugrain, Vincent; Reichel, Jakob; Rosenbusch, Peter

    2014-08-15

    We describe and characterize a device for alkali vapor pressure modulation on the 100 ms timescale in a single-cell cold atom experiment. Its mechanism is based on optimized heat conduction between a current-modulated alkali dispenser and a heat sink at room temperature. We have studied both the short-term behavior during individual pulses and the long-term pressure evolution in the cell. The device combines fast trap loading and relatively long trap lifetime, enabling high repetition rates in a very simple setup. These features make it particularly suitable for portable atomic sensors.

  10. Microspherical photonics: Sorting resonant photonic atoms by using light

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, Alexey V.; Astratov, Vasily N.

    2014-09-22

    A method of sorting microspheres by resonant light forces in vacuum, air, or liquid is proposed. Based on a two-dimensional model, it is shown that the sorting can be realized by allowing spherical particles to traverse a focused beam. Under resonance with the whispering gallery modes, the particles acquire significant velocity along the beam direction. This opens a unique way of large-volume sorting of nearly identical photonic atoms with 1/Q accuracy, where Q is the resonance quality factor. This is an enabling technology for developing super-low-loss coupled-cavity structures and devices.

  11. Photoionization studies of the 2p resonances of atomic calcium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obst, B.; Hansen, J. E.; Sonntag, B.; Wernet, Ph.; Zimmermann, P.

    2002-06-01

    The Ca 2p resonances at 345-355 eV were studied by photoion and photoelectron spectroscopy using monochromatized synchrotron radiation and atomic-beam technique. The analysis of the excitation and decay of these resonances shows strong configuration mixing between the different subshells of the valence electrons 4s, 3d, and 4p. In the case of the 2p-13/2 resonance structure at 348 eV there are two excited states with nearly equal contributions from the configuration 2p53d4s2 and 2p53d24s, which gives rise to strong variations of the resonantly enhanced 3p4(3d,4s)3 photoelectron lines when scanning the photon energy across the resonance.

  12. Comparisons between adsorption and diffusion of alkali, alkaline earth metal atoms on silicene and those on silicane: Insight from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Xu; Huan-Sheng, Lu; Bo, Liu; Gang, Liu; Mu-Sheng, Wu; Chuying, Ouyang

    2016-06-01

    The adsorption and diffusion behaviors of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms on silicane and silicene are both investigated by using a first-principles method within the frame of density functional theory. Silicane is staler against the metal adatoms than silicene. Hydrogenation makes the adsorption energies of various metal atoms considered in our calculations on silicane significantly lower than those on silicene. Similar diffusion energy barriers of alkali metal atoms on silicane and silicene could be observed. However, the diffusion energy barriers of alkali-earth metal atoms on silicane are essentially lower than those on silicene due to the small structural distortion and weak interaction between metal atoms and silicane substrate. Combining the adsorption energy with the diffusion energy barriers, it is found that the clustering would occur when depositing metal atoms on perfect hydrogenated silicene with relative high coverage. In order to avoid forming a metal cluster, we need to remove the hydrogen atoms from the silicane substrate to achieve the defective silicane. Our results are helpful for understanding the interaction between metal atoms and silicene-based two-dimensional materials. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant Nos. 20152ACB21014, 20151BAB202006, and 20142BAB212002) and the Fund from the Jiangxi Provincial Educational Committee, China (Grant No. GJJ14254). Bo Xu is also supported by the Oversea Returned Project from the Ministry of Education, China.

  13. The combination of atomic force microscopy and sugar analysis to evaluate alkali-soluble Canna edulis Ker pectin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Cui, Junhui; Xiao, Lin; Wang, Zhengwu

    2014-08-01

    Alkali-soluble pectin, which has been extracted from Canna edulis Ker, was characterized by single sugar determination and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results indicated that the amounts of four predominant sugars including arabinose (Ara), glucose (Glc), galactose (Gal) and galacturonic acid (GalA) significantly decreased during the process of mild acid hydrolysis. The decreasing rates of these four sugars followed a sequential order of Ara>Gal>Glc>GalA. The homogalacturonan (HG) chain present in pectin, and the quantity of branched material is greater than the sample containing the main neutral sugars. The results indicated that the neutral sugar and HG side chains are attached to pectin as part of the rhamnogalacturonan I (RGI) complex. Moreover, hydrolysis leads to the reduction of mean lengths of backbone and branch, as well as the number/weight-average molecular weight. Meanwhile, the amount of short chain fractions increased during hydrolysis. Furthermore, the decrease of the polymerization degree of alkali-soluble C. edulis pectin as a function of the hydrolysis time could be described by a first-order exponential decay function.

  14. Atomic-scale confinement of resonant optical fields.

    PubMed

    Kern, Johannes; Grossmann, Swen; Tarakina, Nadezda V; Häckel, Tim; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Huang, Jer-Shing; Biagioni, Paolo; Prangsma, Jord C; Hecht, Bert

    2012-11-14

    In the presence of matter, there is no fundamental limit preventing confinement of visible light even down to atomic scales. Achieving such confinement and the corresponding resonant intensity enhancement inevitably requires simultaneous control over atomic-scale details of material structures and over the optical modes that such structures support. By means of self-assembly we have obtained side-by-side aligned gold nanorod dimers with robust atomically defined gaps reaching below 0.5 nm. The existence of atomically confined light fields in these gaps is demonstrated by observing extreme Coulomb splitting of corresponding symmetric and antisymmetric dimer eigenmodes of more than 800 meV in white-light scattering experiments. Our results open new perspectives for atomically resolved spectroscopic imaging, deeply nonlinear optics, ultrasensing, cavity optomechanics, as well as for the realization of novel quantum-optical devices. PMID:22984927

  15. Motional resonance enhanced artificial atomic spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lingna; Luo, Xinyu; Xu, Zhi-Fang; Ueda, Masahito; Wang, Ruquan; You, Li

    2015-05-01

    Atomic spin-orbit coupling (SOC) represents an important type of synthetic gauge fields actively pursued in quantum simulation studies. Recently, different schemes based on pulsed or periodic modulating gradient magnetic field (GMF) are proposed and implemented to synthesize one dimensional (1D) SOC in a spinor atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). This study provides theoretical understanding and experimental confirmation that the strength of SOC is enhanced making use of motional resonance associated with atomic center of mass in a harmonic trap. In addition to enable extra tunability and flexibility of gradient magnetic field based schemes for synthesizing atomic SOC, the findings we present also shed light on experimental efforts towards synthesizing two-dimensional (2D) atomic SOC. This work is supported by MOST 2013CB922002 and 2013CB922004 of the National Key Basic Research Program of China, and by NSFC (No. 91121005, No. 11374176, No. 11404184, and No. 11474347).

  16. Broad Feshbach resonances in collisions of Dy atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julienne, P.; Jachymski, K.; Maier, T.; Ferrier-Barbut, I.; Karan, H.; Schmitt, M.; Wenzel, M.; Wink, C.; Pfau, T.

    2016-05-01

    RF spectroscopy of weakly bound dimers of ultra cold bosonic Dy atoms gives evidence for the emergence of a universal s-wave halo state in a background of chaotic background resonance states. The halo state is associated with a broad magnetic Feshbach resonance. Using a coupled channels theory taking into account the short ranged van dear Waals interaction and a correction due to the strong dipole moment of Dy, we are able to extract the scattering length as a function of magnetic field tuning near two such broad resonances. These results offer prospects for tuning the interactions of Dy atoms in a regime where three-body losses are not too strong. Supported in part by the DFG, the Foundation for Polish Science International Ph. D Projects Programme, and an AFOSR MURI.

  17. Resonant electron-atom bremsstrahlung in an intense laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheltukhin, A. N.; Flegel, A. V.; Frolov, M. V.; Manakov, N. L.; Starace, Anthony F.

    2014-02-01

    We analyze a resonant mechanism for spontaneous laser-assisted electron bremsstrahlung (BrS) involving the resonant transition (via either laser-assisted electron-ion recombination or electron-atom attachment) into a laser-dressed intermediate quasibound state (corresponding, respectively, to either a field-free neutral atom or a negative-ion bound state) accompanied by ionization or detachment of this state by the laser field. This mechanism leads to resonant enhancement (by orders of magnitude) of the BrS spectral density for emitted photon energies corresponding to those for laser-assisted recombination or attachment. We present an accurate parametrization of the resonant BrS amplitude in terms of the amplitudes for nonresonant BrS, for recombination or attachment to the intermediate state, and for ionization or detachment of this state. The high accuracy of our general analytic parametrization of the resonant BrS cross section is shown by comparison with exact numerical results for laser-assisted BrS spectra obtained within time-dependent effective range theory. Numerical estimates of resonant BrS in electron scattering from a Coulomb potential are also presented.

  18. Dispersion coefficients for H and He interactions with alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2003-12-01

    The van der Waals coefficients C{sub 6}, C{sub 8}, and C{sub 10} for H and He interactions with the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, and Rb) and alkaline-earth-metal (Be, Mg, Ca, and Sr) atoms are determined from oscillator strength sum rules. The oscillator strengths were computed using a combination of ab initio and semiempirical methods. The dispersion parameters generally agree with close to exact variational calculations for Li-H and Li-He at the 0.1% level of accuracy. For larger systems, there is agreement with relativistic many-body perturbation theory estimates of C{sub 6} at the 1% level. These validations for selected systems attest to the reliability of the present dispersion parameters. About half the present parameters lie within the recommended bounds of the Standard and Certain compilation [J. Chem. Phys. 83, 3002 (1985)].

  19. Non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Avijit Ray, Debasis

    2015-03-15

    The non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by the bound valence electron in the ground state 3s of atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas is investigated theoretically. The incident photon energy is assumed to be much smaller than the 3s-3p excitation energy. The alkali atom sodium is first formulated as an effective one-electron problem in which the attractive interaction between the valence electron and the atomic ion core is simulated by a spherically symmetric model potential. The Shukla-Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential model is then used to mimic the effective two-body (valence-core) interaction within quantum plasmas. Non-relativistic calculations performed within the electric dipole approximation indicate that the non-resonant elastic photon scattering cross-section undergoes a dramatic growth by several orders of magnitude as the quantum wave number increases. A qualitative explanation of this phenomenon is presented. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, a similar growth is observed at larger values of the quantum wave number. Our computed relevant atomic data are in very good agreement with the experimental as well as the previous theoretical data for the zero-screening (free atom) case, and with the very limited, accurate theoretical results available for the case of exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction, without the cosine screening term.

  20. Cold atom Raman spectrography using velocity-selective resonances.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, Fredrik K; Terraciano, Matthew L; Bashkansky, Mark; Dutton, Zachary

    2009-07-20

    We have studied velocity-selective resonances in the presence of a uniform magnetic field and shown how they can be used for rapid, single-shot assessment of the ground state magnetic sublevel spectrum in a cold atomic vapor. Cold atoms are released from a magneto-optical trap in the presence of a small bias magnetic field ( approximately 300 mG) and exposed to a laser field comprised of two phase-locked counterpropagating beams connecting the two ground state hyperfine manifolds. An image of the expanded cloud shows the velocity-selected resonances as distinct features, each corresponding to specific magnetic sublevel, in a direct, intuitive manner. We demonstrate the technique with both 87Rb and 85Rb, and show the utility of the technique by optically pumping into particular magnetic sublevels. The results are shown to agree with a theoretical model, and are compared to traditional Raman spectroscopy.

  1. Resonance Fluorescence from an Artificial Atom in Squeezed Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyli, D. M.; Eddins, A. W.; Boutin, S.; Puri, S.; Hover, D.; Bolkhovsky, V.; Oliver, W. D.; Blais, A.; Siddiqi, I.

    2016-07-01

    We present an experimental realization of resonance fluorescence in squeezed vacuum. We strongly couple microwave-frequency squeezed light to a superconducting artificial atom and detect the resulting fluorescence with high resolution enabled by a broadband traveling-wave parametric amplifier. We investigate the fluorescence spectra in the weak and strong driving regimes, observing up to 3.1 dB of reduction of the fluorescence linewidth below the ordinary vacuum level and a dramatic dependence of the Mollow triplet spectrum on the relative phase of the driving and squeezed vacuum fields. Our results are in excellent agreement with predictions for spectra produced by a two-level atom in squeezed vacuum [Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 2539 (1987)], demonstrating that resonance fluorescence offers a resource-efficient means to characterize squeezing in cryogenic environments.

  2. Fidelity for kicked atoms with gravity near a quantum resonance.

    PubMed

    Dubertrand, Rémy; Guarneri, Italo; Wimberger, Sandro

    2012-03-01

    Kicked atoms under a constant Stark or gravity field are investigated for experimental setups with cold and ultracold atoms. The parametric stability of the quantum dynamics is studied using the fidelity. In the case of a quantum resonance, it is shown that the behavior of the fidelity depends on arithmetic properties of the gravity parameter. Close to a quantum resonance, the long-time asymptotics of the fidelity is studied by means of a pseudoclassical approximation introduced by Fishman et al. [J. Stat. Phys. 110, 911 (2003)]. The long-time decay of fidelity arises from the tunneling out of pseudoclassical stable islands, and a simple ansatz is proposed which satisfactorily reproduces the main features observed in numerical simulations.

  3. Accurate van der Waals coefficients between fullerenes and fullerene-alkali atoms and clusters: Modified single-frequency approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jianmin; Mo, Yuxiang; Tian, Guocai; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn

    2016-08-01

    Long-range van der Waals (vdW) interaction is critically important for intermolecular interactions in molecular complexes and solids. However, accurate modeling of vdW coefficients presents a great challenge for nanostructures, in particular for fullerene clusters, which have huge vdW coefficients but also display very strong nonadditivity. In this work, we calculate the coefficients between fullerenes, fullerene and sodium clusters, and fullerene and alkali atoms with the hollow-sphere model within the modified single-frequency approximation (MSFA). In the MSFA, we assume that the electron density is uniform in a molecule and that only valence electrons in the outmost subshell of atoms contribute. The input to the model is the static multipole polarizability, which provides a sharp cutoff for the plasmon contribution outside the effective vdW radius. We find that the model can generate C6 in excellent agreement with expensive wave-function-based ab initio calculations, with a mean absolute relative error of only 3 % , without suffering size-dependent error. We show that the nonadditivities of the coefficients C6 between fullerenes and C60 and sodium clusters Nan revealed by the model agree remarkably well with those based on the accurate reference values. The great flexibility, simplicity, and high accuracy make the model particularly suitable for the study of the nonadditivity of vdW coefficients between nanostructures, advancing the development of better vdW corrections to conventional density functional theory.

  4. Calculations of rates for strong-field ionization of alkali-metal atoms in the quasistatic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, M. Z.; Simonović, N. S.

    2015-02-01

    Tunneling and over-the-barrier ionization of alkali-metal atoms in strong electromagnetic fields are studied using the single-electron model (valence electron plus atomic core) and the frozen-core approximation. The lowest-state energies and widths (ionization rates) at different values of applied field, obtained using the Stark shift expansion and the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov formula, respectively, are compared with the corresponding values determined numerically by the complex rotation method. Good agreement for the energies is obtained at the field strengths corresponding to the tunneling regime. In contrast, the rates obtained by the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov formula significantly overestimate numerical results. After introducing a correction in the formula that accounts for the dependence of the binding energy on the field strength, good agreement in the tunneling regime is obtained for the rates too. A disagreement that still remains in the over-the-barrier ionization regime indicates that at stronger fields further corrections of the rate formula, such as those related to the form of the bound-state wave function, are required. Finally, it is demonstrated that numerically determined ionization rates are not too sensitive to the choice of model for the effective core potential and good results can be obtained using a simple local pseudopotential.

  5. Resonant quenching of Rydberg atomic states by highly polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narits, A. A.; Mironchuk, E. S.; Lebedev, V. S.

    2016-06-01

    The results of theoretical studies of the resonant quenching and ion-pair formation processes induced by collisions of Rydberg atoms with highly polar molecules possessing small electron affinities are reported. We elaborate an approach for describing collisional dynamics of both processes and demonstrate the predominant role of resonant quenching channel of reaction for the destruction of Rydberg states by electron-attaching molecules. The approach is based on the solution of the coupled differential equations for the transition amplitudes between the ionic and Rydberg covalent terms of a quasimolecule formed during a collision of particles. It takes into account the possibility of the dipole-bound anion decay in the Coulomb field of the positive ionic core and generalizes previous models of charge-transfer processes involving Rydberg atoms to the cases, when the multistate Landau–Zener approaches become inapplicable. Our calculations for {{Rb}}({nl}) atom perturbed by {{{C}}}2{{{H}}}4{{SO}}3, {{CH}}2{CHCN}, {{CH}}3{{NO}}2, {{CH}}3{CN}, {{{C}}}3{{{H}}}2{{{O}}}3, and {{{C}}}3{{{H}}}4{{{O}}}3 molecules show that the curves representing the dependence of the resonant quenching cross sections on the principal quantum number n are bell-shaped with the positions of maxima being shifted towards lower values of n and the peak values, {σ }{max}({{q})}, several times higher than those for the ion-pair formation, {σ }{max}({{i})}. We obtain a simple power relation between the energy of electron affinity of a molecule and the position of maximum in n-dependence of the resonant quenching cross section. It can be used as an additional means for determining small binding energies of dipole-bound anions from the experimental data on resonant quenching of Rydberg states by highly polar molecules.

  6. Resonant quenching of Rydberg atomic states by highly polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narits, A. A.; Mironchuk, E. S.; Lebedev, V. S.

    2016-06-01

    The results of theoretical studies of the resonant quenching and ion-pair formation processes induced by collisions of Rydberg atoms with highly polar molecules possessing small electron affinities are reported. We elaborate an approach for describing collisional dynamics of both processes and demonstrate the predominant role of resonant quenching channel of reaction for the destruction of Rydberg states by electron-attaching molecules. The approach is based on the solution of the coupled differential equations for the transition amplitudes between the ionic and Rydberg covalent terms of a quasimolecule formed during a collision of particles. It takes into account the possibility of the dipole-bound anion decay in the Coulomb field of the positive ionic core and generalizes previous models of charge-transfer processes involving Rydberg atoms to the cases, when the multistate Landau-Zener approaches become inapplicable. Our calculations for {{Rb}}({nl}) atom perturbed by {{{C}}}2{{{H}}}4{{SO}}3, {{CH}}2{CHCN}, {{CH}}3{{NO}}2, {{CH}}3{CN}, {{{C}}}3{{{H}}}2{{{O}}}3, and {{{C}}}3{{{H}}}4{{{O}}}3 molecules show that the curves representing the dependence of the resonant quenching cross sections on the principal quantum number n are bell-shaped with the positions of maxima being shifted towards lower values of n and the peak values, {σ }{max}({{q})}, several times higher than those for the ion-pair formation, {σ }{max}({{i})}. We obtain a simple power relation between the energy of electron affinity of a molecule and the position of maximum in n-dependence of the resonant quenching cross section. It can be used as an additional means for determining small binding energies of dipole-bound anions from the experimental data on resonant quenching of Rydberg states by highly polar molecules.

  7. Guaranteed resonance enclosures and exclosures for atoms and molecules

    PubMed Central

    Bögli, Sabine; Brown, B. Malcolm; Marletta, Marco; Tretter, Christiane; Wagenhofer, Markus

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we confirm, with absolute certainty, a conjecture on a certain oscillatory behaviour of higher auto-ionizing resonances of atoms and molecules beyond a threshold. These results not only definitely settle a more than 30 year old controversy in Rittby et al. (1981 Phys. Rev. A 24, 1636–1639 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.24.1636)) and Korsch et al. (1982 Phys. Rev. A 26, 1802–1803 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.26.1802)), but also provide new and reliable information on the threshold. Our interval-arithmetic-based method allows one, for the first time, to enclose and to exclude resonances with guaranteed certainty. The efficiency of our approach is demonstrated by the fact that we are able to show that the approximations in Rittby et al. (1981 Phys. Rev. A 24, 1636–1639 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.24.1636)) do lie near true resonances, whereas the approximations of higher resonances in Korsch et al. (1982 Phys. Rev. A 26, 1802–1803 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.26.1802)) do not, and further that there exist two new pairs of resonances as suggested in Abramov et al. (2001 J. Phys. A 34, 57–72 (doi:10.1088/0305-4470/34/1/304)). PMID:25383033

  8. Towards high phase space density of alkali atoms by simple optical cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiazhong; Vendeiro, Zachary; Chen, Wenlan; Vuletic, Vladan

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a simple optical cooling method, which can cool down the temperature of rubidium 87 to the ground state of the vibrational levels. We only use one far-detuned laser performing both cooling and optical repumping. By tuning the laser frequency, we verify the dependence of the two-body collision loss versus the laser detuning. Combining with the retrap of the atoms in the optical dipole trap, we can make the phase space density approaching to unity.

  9. Atomically precise gold nanocrystal molecules with surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Qian, Huifeng; Zhu, Yan; Jin, Rongchao

    2012-01-17

    Since Faraday's pioneering work on gold colloids, tremendous scientific research on plasmonic gold nanoparticles has been carried out, but no atomically precise Au nanocrystals have been achieved. This work reports the first example of gold nanocrystal molecules. Mass spectrometry analysis has determined its formula to be Au(333)(SR)(79) (R = CH(2)CH(2)Ph). This magic sized nanocrystal molecule exhibits fcc-crystallinity and surface plasmon resonance at approximately 520 nm, hence, a metallic nanomolecule. Simulations have revealed that atomic shell closing largely contributes to the particular robustness of Au(333)(SR)(79), albeit the number of free electrons (i.e., 333 - 79 = 254) is also consistent with electron shell closing based on calculations using a confined free electron model. Guided by the atomic shell closing growth mode, we have also found the next larger size of extraordinarily stability to be Au(~530)(SR)(~100) after a size-focusing selection--which selects the robust size available in the starting polydisperse nanoparticles. This work clearly demonstrates that atomically precise nanocrystal molecules are achievable and that the factor of atomic shell closing contributes to their extraordinary stability compared to other sizes. Overall, this work opens up new opportunities for investigating many fundamental issues of nanocrystals, such as the formation of metallic state, and will have potential impact on condensed matter physics, nanochemistry, and catalysis as well.

  10. Fe(3+) ions in alkali lead tetraborate glasses--an electron paramagnetic resonance and optical study.

    PubMed

    Chakradhar, R P Sreekanth; Sivaramaiah, G; Rao, J Lakshmana; Gopal, N O

    2005-11-01

    Glass systems of composition 90R(2)B(4)O(7)+9PbO+1Fe(2)O(3) (R=Li, Na and K) and 90Li(2)B(4)O(7)+(10-x)PbO+xFe(2)O(3) (x=0.5, 1, 3, 4, 5, 7 and 9 mol %) have been investigated by means of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optical absorption techniques. The EPR spectra exhibit three resonance signals at g approximately 6.0, 4.2 and 2.0. The resonances at g approximately 6.0 and 4.2 are attributed to Fe(3+) ions in rhombic and axial symmetry sites, respectively. The g approximately 2.0 resonance signal is due to two or more Fe(3+) ions coupled together with dipolar interaction. The EPR spectra of 1 mol % of Fe(2)O(3) doped in lithium lead tetraborate glass samples have been studied at different temperatures (123-433 K). The intensity of g approximately 4.2 resonance signal decreases and the intensity of g approximately 2.0 resonance signal increases with the increase of temperature. The line widths are found to be independent of temperature. The EPR spectra exhibit a marked concentration dependence on iron content. A decrease in intensity for the resonance signal at g approximately 4.2 with increase in iron content for more than 4 mol % has been observed in lithium lead tetraborate glass samples and this has been attributed to the formation of Fe(3+) ion clusters in the glass samples. The paramagnetic susceptibility (chi) is calculated from the EPR data at various temperatures and the Curie constant (C) has been evaluated from 1/chi versus T graph. The optical absorption spectrum of Fe(3+) ions in lithium lead tetraborate glasses exhibits three bands characteristic of Fe(3+) ions in an octahedral symmetry. The crystal field parameter D(q) and the Racah interelectronic repulsion parameters B and C have also been evaluated. The value of interelectronic repulsion parameter B (825 cm(-1)) obtained in the present work suggests that the bonding is moderately covalent.

  11. Contact resonances of U-shaped atomic force microscope probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, E.; Turner, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent approaches used to characterize the elastic or viscoelastic properties of materials with nanoscale resolution have focused on the contact resonances of atomic force microscope (CR-AFM) probes. The experiments for these CR-AFM methods involve measurement of several contact resonances from which the resonant frequency and peak width are found. The contact resonance values are then compared with the noncontact values in order for the sample properties to be evaluated. The data analysis requires vibration models associated with the probe during contact in order for the beam response to be deconvolved from the measured spectra. To date, the majority of CR-AFM research has used rectangular probes that have a relatively simple vibration response. Recently, U-shaped AFM probes have created much interest because they allow local sample heating. However, the vibration response of these probes is much more complex such that CR-AFM is still in its infancy. In this article, a simplified analytical model of U-shaped probes is evaluated for contact resonance applications relative to a more complex finite element (FE) computational model. The tip-sample contact is modeled using three orthogonal Kelvin-Voigt elements such that the resonant frequency and peak width of each mode are functions of the contact conditions. For the purely elastic case, the frequency results of the simple model are within 8% of the FE model for the lowest six modes over a wide range of contact stiffness values. Results for the viscoelastic contact problem for which the quality factor of the lowest six modes is compared show agreement to within 13%. These results suggest that this simple model can be used effectively to evaluate CR-AFM experimental results during AFM scanning such that quantitative mapping of viscoelastic properties may be possible using U-shaped probes.

  12. Hemispherical micro-resonators from atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jason M.; Houlton, John P.; Gertsch, Jonas C.; Brown, Joseph J.; Rogers, Charles T.; George, Steven M.; Bright, Victor M.

    2014-12-01

    Hemispherical shell micro-resonators may be used as gyroscopes to potentially enable precision inertial navigation and guidance at low cost and size. Such devices require a high degree of symmetry and large quality factors (Q). Fabricating the devices from atomic layer deposition (ALD) facilitates symmetry through ALD’s high conformality and low surface roughness. To maximize Q, the shells’ geometry is optimized using finite element method (FEM) studies to reduce thermoelastic dissipation and anchor loss. The shells are fabricated by etching hemispherical molds in Si (1 1 1) substrates with a 2:7:1 volumetric ratio of hydrofluoric:nitric:acetic acids, and conformally coating and patterning the molds with ALD Al2O3. The Al2O3 shells are then released from the surrounding Si substrate with an SF6 plasma. The resulting shells typically have radii around 50 µm and thicknesses close to 50 nm. The shells are highly symmetric, with radial deviations between 0.22 and 0.49%, and robust enough to be driven on resonance at amplitudes 10 × their thickness, sufficient to visualize the resonance mode shapes in an SEM. Resonance frequencies are around 60 kHz, with Q values between 1000 and 2000. This Q is lower than the 106 predicted by FEM, implying that Q is being limited by unmodeled sources of energy loss, most likely from surface effects or material defects.

  13. Image contrast reversals in contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chengfu; Chen, Yuhang; Wang, Tian

    2015-02-01

    Multiple image contrast inversions are observed along with the increase of modulation frequency for contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) imaging of a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) specimen. Analysis of the contact vibrational spectra indicates that the inversions can be attributed to structure-induced variations of tip-sample contact mechanics. Contact stiffness and damping at HOPG step edges exhibit significant increases relative to those in the flat regions. For quantitative evaluation of mechanical properties in CR-AFM, coupling effects of the surface geometry must be considered.

  14. Image contrast reversals in contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Chengfu; Chen, Yuhang Wang, Tian

    2015-02-15

    Multiple image contrast inversions are observed along with the increase of modulation frequency for contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) imaging of a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) specimen. Analysis of the contact vibrational spectra indicates that the inversions can be attributed to structure-induced variations of tip-sample contact mechanics. Contact stiffness and damping at HOPG step edges exhibit significant increases relative to those in the flat regions. For quantitative evaluation of mechanical properties in CR-AFM, coupling effects of the surface geometry must be considered.

  15. Resonantly enhanced Bragg-scattering spectroscopy of an atomic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xudong; Qiao, Cuifang; Li, Chuanliang; Chen, Fenghua

    2016-07-01

    A novel resonantly enhanced Bragg-scattering (REBS) spectroscopy from a population difference grating (PDG) is reported. The PDG is formed by a standing-wave (SW) pump field, which periodically modulates the space population distributions of two levels in the 87Rb D1 line. Then, a probe beam, having identical frequency and orthogonal polarization with the SW pump field, is Bragg-scattered by the PDG. The research achievement shows that the Bragg-scattered light is strongest at an atomic transition, and forms an REBS spectrum with a high signal-to-noise ratio and sub-natural linewidth. The observed REBS can be applied in precise frequency measurements.

  16. Measurements of optical Feshbach resonances of 174Yb atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Seok; Lee, Jeongwon; Lee, Jae Hoon; Shin, Y.; Mun, Jongchul

    2016-10-01

    We present measurements of the optical Feshbach resonances (OFRs) of 174Yb atoms for the intercombination transition. We measure the photoassociation (PA) spectra of a pure 174Yb Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) and determine the dependence of OFRs on PA laser intensities and frequencies for four least-bound vibrational levels near the intercombination transition. We confirm that our measurements are consistent with the temporal decay of a BEC subjected to a PA beam in the vicinity of the fourth vibrational level from the dissociation limit.

  17. Quantal Description of Atomic Diamagnetism: the Quasi-Landau Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiaoling

    We describe atomic hydrogen diamagnetism within the framework of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. Our theoretical studies have used three descriptions: an adiabatic description, a multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT) description using an ab initio R-matrix approach, and a model description. The analysis has conclusively demonstrated that the diamagnetic spectrum can be viewed as a perturbed Rydberg spectrum. The adiabatic analysis provides a crude but useful picture to see the overall channel structure and the nature of the perturbing configurations, where the quasi-Landau resonances are the lowest states in each Landau channel which will perturb high Rydberg states in lower Landau channels once the nonadiabatic coupling is turned on. The ab initio calculation of the photoionization spectrum in the field range 10^3 -10^4 Tesla shows that the quasi -Landau resonances are broad interlopers which perturb high Rydberg states converging to the Landau thresholds, forming complex resonances. Also in these calculations, a new partial cross section analysis has been performed to predict the relative electron populations in different Landau channels. The population is found to depend on the azimuthal quantum number and the parity of final states. For photoionization from the hydrogen ground state of final states with m = 1, the electron is predicted to escape predominantly in the higher Landau channels. In contrast, for the final states with m = 0, it escapes in the lower channels. This property is reflected in the shape of autoionizing resonances, which are more like peaks for m = 1, but are more like dips (window resonances) for m = 0. In studying the features of the complex resonances, formed by the quasi-Landau resonances perturbing the high Rydberg states, we developed an analytical description using a model based on three interacting Rydberg channels, identifying the key dynamical quantities which control the appearance of a complex resonance and its evolution

  18. Structural investigation and electron paramagnetic resonance of vanadyl doped alkali niobium borate glasses.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A; Sheoran, A; Sanghi, S; Bhatnagar, V; Gupta, S K; Arora, M

    2010-03-01

    Glasses with compositions xNb(2)O(5).(30-x)M(2)O.69B(2)O(3) (where M=Li, Na, K; x=0, 4, 8 mol%) doped with 1 mol% V(2)O(5) have been prepared using normal melt quench technique. The IR transmission spectra of the glasses have been studied over the range 400-4000 cm(-1). The changes caused by the addition of Nb(2)O(5) on the structure of these glasses have been reported. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of VO(2+) ions in these glasses have been recorded in X-band (9.14 GHz) at room temperature (300 K). The spin Hamiltonian parameters, dipolar hyperfine coupling parameter and Fermi contact interaction parameter have been calculated. It is observed that the resultant resonance spectra contain hyperfine structures (hfs) due to V(4+) ions which exist as VO(2+) ions in octahedral coordination with a tetragonal compression in the present glasses. The tetragonality of V(4+)O(6) complex decreases with increasing concentration of Nb(2)O(5). The 3d(xy) orbit contracts with increase in Nb(2)O(5):M(2)O ratio. Values of the theoretical optical basicity, Lambda(th), have also been reported.

  19. Resonant meta-atoms with nonlinearities on demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filonov, Dmitry; Kramer, Yotam; Kozlov, Vitali; Malomed, Boris A.; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2016-09-01

    Nonlinear light-matter interactions and their applications are constrained by properties of available materials. The use of metamaterials opens the way to achieve precise control over electromagnetic properties at a microscopic level, providing tools for experimental studies of complex nonlinear phenomena in photonics. Here, a doubly resonant nonlinear meta-atom is proposed, analyzed, and characterized in the GHz spectral range. The underlying structure is composed of a pair of split rings, resonant at both fundamental and nonlinear frequencies. The rings share a varactor diode, which serves as a microscopic source of nonlinearity. Flexible control over the coupling and near- and far-field patterns are reported, favoring the doubly resonant structure over other realizations. Relative efficiencies of the second and third harmonics, generated by the diode, are tailored by dint of the double-ring geometry, providing a guideline for selecting one frequency against another, using the design of the auxiliary structures. The on-demand control over the microscopic nonlinear properties enables developing a toolbox for experimental emulation of complex nonlinear phenomena.

  20. Polarization enhanced Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance with an atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Michael W.; Barrall, Geoffrey A.; Espy, Michelle A.; Monti, Mark C.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Okamitsu, Jeffrey K.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) has been demonstrated for the detection of 14-N in explosive compounds. Application of a material specific radio-frequency (RF) pulse excites a response typically detected with a wire- wound antenna. NQR is non-contact and material specific, however fields produced by NQR are typically very weak, making demonstration of practical utility challenging. For certain materials, the NQR signal can be increased by transferring polarization from hydrogen nuclei to nitrogen nuclei using external magnetic fields. This polarization enhancement (PE) can enhance the NQR signal by an order of magnitude or more. Atomic magnetometers (AM) have been shown to improve detection sensitivity beyond a conventional antenna by a similar amount. AM sensors are immune to piezo-electric effects that hamper conventional NQR, and can be combined to form a gradiometer for effective RF noise cancellation. In principle, combining polarization enhancement with atomic magnetometer detection should yield improvement in signal-to-noise ratio that is the product of the two methods, 100-fold or more over conventional NQR. However both methods are even more exotic than traditional NQR, and have never been combined due to challenges in operating a large magnetic field and ultra-sensitive magnetic field sensor in proximity. Here we present NQR with and without PE with an atomic magnetometer, demonstrating signal enhancement greater than 20-fold for ammonium nitrate. We also demonstrate PE for PETN using a traditional coil for detection with an enhancement factor of 10. Experimental methods and future applications are discussed.

  1. Doping the alkali atom: an effective strategy to improve the electronic and nonlinear optical properties of the inorganic Al12N12 nanocage.

    PubMed

    Niu, Min; Yu, Guangtao; Yang, Guanghui; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Xingang; Huang, Xuri

    2014-01-01

    Under ab initio computations, several new inorganic electride compounds with high stability, M@x-Al12N12 (M = Li, Na, and K; x = b66, b64, and r6), were achieved for the first time by doping the alkali metal atom M on the fullerene-like Al12N12 nanocage, where the alkali atom is located over the Al-N bond (b66/b64 site) or six-membered ring (r6 site). It is revealed that independent of the doping position and atomic number, doping the alkali atom can significantly narrow the wide gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) (EH-L = 6.12 eV) of the pure Al12N12 nanocage in the range of 0.49-0.71 eV, and these doped AlN nanocages can exhibit the intriguing n-type characteristic, where a high energy level containing the excess electron is introduced as the new HOMO orbital in the original gap of pure Al12N12. Further, the diffuse excess electron also brings these doped AlN nanostructures the considerable first hyperpolarizabilities (β0), which are 1.09 × 10(4) au for Li@b66-Al12N12, 1.10 × 10(4), 1.62 × 10(4), 7.58 × 10(4) au for M@b64-Al12N12 (M = Li, Na, and K), and 8.89 × 10(5), 1.36 × 10(5), 5.48 × 10(4) au for M@r6-Al12N12 (M = Li, Na, and K), respectively. Clearly, doping the heavier Na/K atom over the Al-N bond can get the larger β0 value, while the reverse trend can be observed for the series with the alkali atom over the six-membered ring, where doping the lighter Li atom can achieve the larger β0 value. These fascinating findings will be advantageous for promoting the potential applications of the inorganic AlN-based nanosystems in the new type of electronic nanodevices and high-performance nonlinear optical (NLO) materials.

  2. Collective resonance fluorescence in small and dense atom clouds: Comparison between theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, S. D.; Ruostekoski, J.; Javanainen, J.; Jennewein, S.; Bourgain, R.; Pellegrino, J.; Sortais, Y. R. P.; Browaeys, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the emergence of a collective optical response of a cold and dense 87Rb atomic cloud to a near-resonant low-intensity light when the atom number is gradually increased. Experimental observations are compared with microscopic stochastic simulations of recurrent scattering processes between the atoms that incorporate the atomic multilevel structure and the optical measurement setup. We analyze the optical response of an inhomogeneously broadened gas and find that the experimental observations of the resonance line shifts and the total collected scattered light intensity in cold atom clouds substantially deviate from those of thermal atomic ensembles, indicating strong light-induced resonant dipole-dipole interactions between the atoms. At high densities, the simulations also predict a significantly slower decay of light-induced excitations in cold than in thermal atom clouds. The role of dipole-dipole interactions is discussed in terms of resonant coupling examples and the collective radiative excitation eigenmodes of the system.

  3. The long-range non-additive three-body dispersion interactions for the rare gases, alkali, and alkaline-earth atoms.

    PubMed

    Tang, Li-Yan; Yan, Zong-Chao; Shi, Ting-Yun; Babb, James F; Mitroy, J

    2012-03-14

    The long-range non-additive three-body dispersion interaction coefficients Z(111), Z(112), Z(113), and Z(122) are computed for many atomic combinations using standard expressions. The atoms considered include hydrogen, the rare gases, the alkali atoms (up to Rb), and the alkaline-earth atoms (up to Sr). The term Z(111) arising from three mutual dipole interactions is known as the Axilrod-Teller-Muto coefficient or the DDD (dipole-dipole-dipole) coefficient. Similarly, the terms Z(112), Z(113), and Z(122) arise from the mutual combinations of dipole (1), quadrupole (2), and octupole (3) interactions between atoms and they are sometimes known, respectively, as dipole-dipole-quadrupole, dipole-dipole-octupole, and dipole-quadrupole-quadrupole coefficients. Results for the four Z coefficients are given for the homonuclear trimers, for the trimers involving two like-rare-gas atoms, and for the trimers with all combinations of the H, He, and Li atoms. An exhaustive compilation of all coefficients between all possible atomic combinations is presented as supplementary data.

  4. Dynamic range of atomically thin vibrating nanomechanical resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zenghui; Feng, Philip X.-L.

    2014-03-10

    Atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) crystals offer attractive properties for making resonant nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) operating at high frequencies. While the fundamental limits of linear operation in such systems are important, currently there is very little quantitative knowledge of the linear dynamic range (DR) and onset of nonlinearity in these devices, which are different than in conventional 1D NEMS such as nanotubes and nanowires. Here, we present theoretical analysis and quantitative models that can be directly used to predict the DR of vibrating 2D circular drumhead NEMS resonators. We show that DR has a strong dependence ∝10log(E{sub Y}{sup 3/2}ρ{sub 3D}{sup -1/2}rtε{sup 5/2}) on device parameters, in which strain ε plays a particularly important role in these 2D systems, dominating over dimensions (radius r, thickness t). This study formulizes the effects from device physical parameters upon DR and sheds light on device design rules toward achieving high DR in 2D NEMS vibrating at radio and microwave frequencies.

  5. Fast thermometry for trapped atoms using recoil-induced resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan-Ting; Su, Dian-Qiang; Ji, Zhong-Hua; Zhang, Hong-Shan; Xiao, Lian-Tuan; Jia, Suo-Tang

    2015-09-01

    We have employed recoil-induced resonance (RIR) with linewidth on the order of 10 kHz to demonstrate the fast thermometry for ultracold atoms. We theoretically calculate the absorption spectrum of RIR which agrees well with the experimental results. The temperature of the ultracold sample derived from the RIR spectrum is T = 84±4.5 μK, which is close to 85 μK that measured by the method of time-of-flight absorption imaging. To exhibit the fast measurement advantage in applying RIR to the ultracold atom thermometry, we study the dependence of ultracold sample temperature on the trapping beam frequency detuning. This method can be applied to determine the translational temperature of molecules in photoassociation dynamics. Project supported by the National Basic Research Development Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921603), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2011AA010801), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61275209, 11304189, 61378015, and 11434007), and Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in Universities of China (Grant No. IRT13076).

  6. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, simple and 3d transition metal, and nonmetal atoms on monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. D.; Fang, Y. M.; Wu, S. Q. E-mail: wsq@xmu.edu.cn; Zhu, Z. Z. E-mail: wsq@xmu.edu.cn

    2015-05-15

    Single adsorption of different atoms on pristine two-dimensional monolayer MoS{sub 2} have been systematically investigated by using density functional calculations with van der Waals correction. The adatoms cover alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, main group metal, 3d-transition metals, coinage metal and nonmetal atoms. Depending on the adatom type, metallic, semimetallic or semiconducting behavior can be found in direct bandgap monolayer MoS{sub 2}. Additionally, local or long-range magnetic moments of two-dimensional MoS{sub 2} sheet can also attained through the adsorption. The detailed atomic-scale knowledge of single adsorption on MoS{sub 2} monolayer is important not only for the sake of a theoretical understanding, but also device level deposition technological application.

  7. Spectrum, radial wave functions, and hyperfine splittings of the Rydberg states in heavy alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanayei, Ali; Schopohl, Nils

    2016-07-01

    We present numerically accurate calculations of the bound-state spectrum of the highly excited valence electron in the heavy alkali-metal atoms solving the radial Schrödinger eigenvalue problem with a modern spectral collocation method that applies also for a large principal quantum number n ≫1 . As an effective single-particle potential we favor the reputable potential of Marinescu et al. [Phys. Rev. A 49, 982 (1994)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.49.982. Recent quasiclassical calculations of the quantum defect of the valence electron agree for orbital angular momentum l =0 ,1 ,2 ,... overall remarkably well with the results of the numerical calculations, but for the Rydberg states of rubidium and also cesium with l =3 this agreement is less fair. The reason for this anomaly is that in rubidium and cesium the potential acquires for l =3 deep inside the ionic core a second classical region, thus invalidating a standard Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) calculation with two widely spaced turning points. Comparing then our numerical solutions of the radial Schrödinger eigenvalue problem with the uniform analytic WKB approximation of Langer constructed around the remote turning point rn,j ,l (" close=")n -δ0)">+ we observe everywhere a remarkable agreement, apart from a tiny region around the inner turning point rn,j ,l (-). For s states the centrifugal barrier is absent and no inner turning point exists: rn,j ,0 (-)=0 . With the help of an ansatz proposed by Fock we obtain for the s states a second uniform analytic approximation to the radial wave function complementary to the WKB approximation of Langer, which is exact for r →0+ . From the patching condition, that is, for l =0 the Langer and Fock solutions should agree in the intermediate region 0

  8. Properties of alkali-metal atoms and alkaline-earth-metal ions for an accurate estimate of their long-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Nandy, D. K.; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of interaction potentials among the alkali-metal atoms and alkaline-earth ions is very useful in the studies of cold atom physics. Here we carry out theoretical studies of the long-range interactions among the Li, Na, K, and Rb alkali-metal atoms with the Ca+, Ba+, Sr+, and Ra+ alkaline-earth ions systematically, which are largely motivated by their importance in a number of applications. These interactions are expressed as a power series in the inverse of the internuclear separation R . Both the dispersion and induction components of these interactions are determined accurately from the algebraic coefficients corresponding to each power combination in the series. Ultimately, these coefficients are expressed in terms of the electric multipole polarizabilities of the above-mentioned systems, which are calculated using the matrix elements obtained from a relativistic coupled-cluster method and core contributions to these quantities from the random-phase approximation. We also compare our estimated polarizabilities with the other available theoretical and experimental results to verify accuracies in our calculations. In addition, we also evaluate the lifetimes of the first two low-lying states of the ions using the above matrix elements. Graphical representations of the dispersion coefficients versus R are given among all the alkaline ions with Rb.

  9. Ab initio interaction potentials and scattering lengths for ultracold mixtures of metastable helium and alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedziera, Dariusz; Mentel, Łukasz; Żuchowski, Piotr S.; Knoop, Steven

    2015-06-01

    We have obtained accurate ab initio +4Σ quartet potentials for the diatomic metastable triplet helium+alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, Rb) systems, using all-electron restricted open-shell coupled cluster singles and doubles with noniterative triples corrections CCSD(T) calculations and accurate calculations of the long-range C6 coefficients. These potentials provide accurate ab initio quartet scattering lengths, which for these many-electron systems is possible, because of the small reduced masses and shallow potentials that result in a small amount of bound states. Our results are relevant for ultracold metastable triplet helium+alkali-metal mixture experiments.

  10. Optical Resonance Shifts in the Fluorescence of Thermal and Cold Atomic Gases.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, S D; Ruostekoski, J; Javanainen, J; Bourgain, R; Jennewein, S; Sortais, Y R P; Browaeys, A

    2016-05-01

    We show that the resonance shifts in the fluorescence of a cold gas of rubidium atoms substantially differ from those of thermal atomic ensembles that obey the standard continuous medium electrodynamics. The analysis is based on large-scale microscopic numerical simulations and experimental measurements of the resonance shifts in a steady-state response in light propagation. PMID:27203321

  11. Feasibility of supersonic diode pumped alkali lasers: Model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2013-04-08

    The feasibility of supersonic operation of diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) is studied for Cs and K atoms applying model calculations, based on a semi-analytical model previously used for studying static and subsonic flow DPALs. The operation of supersonic lasers is compared with that measured and modeled in subsonic lasers. The maximum power of supersonic Cs and K lasers is found to be higher than that of subsonic lasers with the same resonator and alkali density at the laser inlet by 25% and 70%, respectively. These results indicate that for scaling-up the power of DPALs, supersonic expansion should be considered.

  12. Three-photon-absorption resonance for all-optical atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zibrov, Sergei; Novikova, Irina; Phillips, David F.; Taichenachev, Aleksei V.; Yudin, Valeriy I.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Zibrov, Alexander S.

    2005-07-15

    We report an experimental study of an all-optical three-photon-absorption resonance (known as an 'N resonance') and discuss its potential application as an alternative to atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping. We present measurements of the N-resonance contrast, width and light shift for the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb with varying buffer gases, and find good agreement with an analytical model of this resonance. The results suggest that N resonances are promising for atomic clock applications.

  13. Form factor dispersion at La M5,4 edges and average density of resonant atoms.

    PubMed

    Smadici, S; Lee, J C T; Logvenov, G; Bozovic, I; Abbamonte, P

    2014-01-15

    Resonant soft x-ray scattering on complex oxide superlattices shows very large variations in the superlattice reflection position and intensity near La M5,4 edges. Resonant dispersion of the La x-ray form factor describes the observations well. We determine the average density of resonant La atoms and the thickness of superlattice layers. PMID:24318961

  14. Experimental study of laser-detected magnetic resonance based on atomic alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Di Domenico, Gianni; Bison, Georg; Groeger, Stephan; Knowles, Paul; Pazgalev, Anatoly S.; Rebetez, Martin; Saudan, Herve; Weis, Antoine

    2006-12-15

    We present an experimental study of the spectra produced by optical-radio-frequency double resonance in which resonant linearly polarized laser light is used in the optical pumping and detection processes. We show that the experimental spectra obtained for cesium are in excellent agreement with a very general theoretical model developed in our group [Weis, Bison, and Pazgalev, Phys. Rev. A 74, 033401 (2006)] and we investigate the limitations of this model. Finally, the results are discussed in view of their use in the study of relaxation processes in aligned alkali-metal vapors.

  15. Resonant interaction of trapped cold atoms with a magnetic cantilever tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Cris; Valencia, Jose; Geraci, Andrew; Eardley, Matthew; Kitching, John

    2015-05-01

    We report the resonant coupling of laser cooled trapped Rb atoms to a micro-cantilever with a magnetic tip. An atom chip is used to trap, cool, and transport the atoms to the tip of the cantilever. The capacitively-driven cantilever oscillation produces Zeeman state transitions which result in a loss of population in the trap. In a suitably scaled setup, mechanical resonators could be used to probe and manipulate atomic spins with nanometer spatial resolution and single-spin sensitivity; this technique may enable new approaches in neutral-atom quantum computation, quantum simulation, or precision sensing.

  16. Double-resonance optical pumping of Rb atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Han Seb; Lee, Lim; Kim, Jung Bog

    2007-09-15

    We have studied double-resonance optical pumping (DROP) as a function of the polarization combination of lasers, laser power, and the alignment of lasers in the 5S{sub 1/2}-5P{sub 3/2}-D{sub 3/2,5/2} ladder-type system of {sup 87}Rb atoms. By considering the two-photon transition probability and optical pumping effects, the changes in the relative magnitude of the DROP hyperfine structures as a function of the polarization combination of the lasers were analyzed theoretically. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental results. Owing to the low optical pumping effect in the cycling transition, we could see the dependence of the spectrum on the laser power in the 5P{sub 3/2}-4D{sub 5/2} transition distinctly. Also, the spectral linewidths as a function of the alignment between the lasers were measured 12.2 MHz for copropagating beams and 6.9 MHz for counterpropagating beams.

  17. (Super)alkali atoms interacting with the σ electron cloud: a novel interaction mode triggers large nonlinear optical response of M@P₄ and M@C₃H₆ (M=Li, Na, K and Li₃O).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingang; Yu, Guangtao; Huang, Xuri; Chen, Wei; Niu, Min

    2013-12-01

    Under high-level ab initio calculations, the geometrical structures and nonlinear optical properties of M@P₄ (M=Li, Na, K and Li₃O) and M@C₃H₆ (M=Li and Li₃O) were investigated; all were found to exhibit considerable first hyperpolarizabilities (18110, 1440, 22490, 50487, 2757 and 31776 au, respectively). The computational results revealed that when doping the (super)alkali atom M into the tetrahedral P₄ molecule, the original dual spherical aromaticity of the P₄ moiety is broken and new σ electron cloud is formed on the face of P₄ part interacting with the M atom. It was found that interaction of the (super)alkali atom with the σ electron cloud is a novel mode to produce diffuse excess electrons effectively to achieve a considerable β₀ value. Further, beyond the alkali atom, employing the superalkali unit can be a more effective approach to significantly enhance the first hyperpolarizability of the systems, due to the much lower vertical ionization potential. These results were further supported by the case of the (super)alkali atom interacting with the cyclopropane C₃H₆ molecule with its typical σ aromatic electron cloud. Moreover, the β₀ values of the M@P₄ series are nonmonotonic dependent on alkali atomic number, namely, 1440 au (M = Na) < 18110 au (Li) < 22490 au (K), inferring that the distance between the alkali atom and the interacting surface with the σ electron cloud in P4 is a crucial geometrical factor in determining their first hyperpolarizabilities. These intriguing findings will be advantageous for promoting the design of novel high-performance nonlinear optical materials.

  18. Superfluid Transitions in Bosonic Atom-Molecule Mixtures near a Feshbach Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzihovsky, Leo; Park, Jae; Weichman, Peter B.

    2004-04-01

    We study bosonic atoms near a Feshbach resonance and predict that, in addition to standard normal and atomic superfluid phases, this system generically exhibits a distinct phase of matter: a molecular superfluid, where molecules are superfluid while atoms are not. We explore zero- and finite-temperature properties of the molecular superfluid (a bosonic, strong-coupling analog of a BCS superconductor), and study quantum and classical phase transitions between the normal, molecular superfluid, and atomic superfluid states.

  19. Superfluid transitions in bosonic atom-molecule mixtures near a Feshbach resonance.

    PubMed

    Radzihovsky, Leo; Park, Jae; Weichman, Peter B

    2004-04-23

    We study bosonic atoms near a Feshbach resonance and predict that, in addition to standard normal and atomic superfluid phases, this system generically exhibits a distinct phase of matter: a molecular superfluid, where molecules are superfluid while atoms are not. We explore zero- and finite-temperature properties of the molecular superfluid (a bosonic, strong-coupling analog of a BCS superconductor), and study quantum and classical phase transitions between the normal, molecular superfluid, and atomic superfluid states. PMID:15169205

  20. Inducing Resonant Interactions in Ultracold Atoms with an Oscillating Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. Hudson

    2015-05-01

    In systems of ultracold atoms, two-atom interactions can be resonantly enhanced by a new mechanism which does not rely upon the presence of a Feshbach resonance. In this mechanism, interactions are controlled by tuning the frequency of an applied oscillating magnetic field near the Bohr frequency corresponding to the energy gap between a pair of low-energy atoms and a two-atom bound state. Near the resonance, the s-wave scattering length is a simple function of the oscillation frequency whose asymmetric line-shape is similar to that of Feshbach resonances. Atom pairs can absorb (emit) quanta from (to) the oscillating field leading to inelastic losses. This mechanism for inducing resonant interactions is illustrated using two simple models, from which the dependencies of the resonance parameters on the strength of oscillating field are extracted. This mechanism gives experimental access to strongly interacting systems of atoms that have no convenient Feshbach resonance. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under grant PHY-1310862.

  1. Motion-induced magnetic resonance of Rb atoms in a periodic magnetostatic field.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, A; Enomoto, Y; Komaki, K; Yamazaki, Y

    2005-12-16

    We demonstrate that transitions between Zeeman-split sublevels of Rb atoms are resonantly induced by the motion of the atoms (velocity: approximately 100 m/s) in a periodic magnetostatic field (period: 1 mm) when the Zeeman splitting corresponds to the frequency of the magnetic field experienced by the moving atoms. A circularly polarized laser beam polarizes Rb atoms with a velocity selected using the Doppler effect and detects their magnetic resonance in a thin cell, to which the periodic field is applied with the arrays of parallel current-carrying wires.

  2. Coherent Scattering of Near-Resonant Light by a Dense Microscopic Cold Atomic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennewein, S.; Besbes, M.; Schilder, N. J.; Jenkins, S. D.; Sauvan, C.; Ruostekoski, J.; Greffet, J.-J.; Sortais, Y. R. P.; Browaeys, A.

    2016-06-01

    We measure the coherent scattering of light by a cloud of laser-cooled atoms with a size comparable to the wavelength of light. By interfering a laser beam tuned near an atomic resonance with the field scattered by the atoms, we observe a resonance with a redshift, a broadening, and a saturation of the extinction for increasing atom numbers. We attribute these features to enhanced light-induced dipole-dipole interactions in a cold, dense atomic ensemble that result in a failure of standard predictions such as the "cooperative Lamb shift". The description of the atomic cloud by a mean-field model based on the Lorentz-Lorenz formula that ignores scattering events where light is scattered recurrently by the same atom and by a microscopic discrete dipole model that incorporates these effects lead to progressively closer agreement with the observations, despite remaining differences.

  3. Coherent Scattering of Near-Resonant Light by a Dense Microscopic Cold Atomic Cloud.

    PubMed

    Jennewein, S; Besbes, M; Schilder, N J; Jenkins, S D; Sauvan, C; Ruostekoski, J; Greffet, J-J; Sortais, Y R P; Browaeys, A

    2016-06-10

    We measure the coherent scattering of light by a cloud of laser-cooled atoms with a size comparable to the wavelength of light. By interfering a laser beam tuned near an atomic resonance with the field scattered by the atoms, we observe a resonance with a redshift, a broadening, and a saturation of the extinction for increasing atom numbers. We attribute these features to enhanced light-induced dipole-dipole interactions in a cold, dense atomic ensemble that result in a failure of standard predictions such as the "cooperative Lamb shift". The description of the atomic cloud by a mean-field model based on the Lorentz-Lorenz formula that ignores scattering events where light is scattered recurrently by the same atom and by a microscopic discrete dipole model that incorporates these effects lead to progressively closer agreement with the observations, despite remaining differences. PMID:27341230

  4. On- and off-resonance radiation-atom-coupling matrix elements involving extended atomic wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komninos, Yannis; Mercouris, Theodoros; Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.

    2014-01-01

    In continuation of our earlier works, we present results concerning the computation of matrix elements of the multipolar Hamiltonian (MPH) between extended wave functions that are obtained numerically. The choice of the MPH is discussed in connection with the broader issue of the form of radiation-atom (or -molecule) interaction that is appropriate for the systematic solution of various problems of matter-radiation interaction. We derive analytic formulas, in terms of the sine-integral function and spherical Bessel functions of various orders, for the cumulative radial integrals that were obtained and calculated by Komninos, Mercouris, and Nicolaides [Phys. Rev. A 71, 023410 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevA.71.023410]. This development allows the much faster and more accurate computation of such matrix elements, a fact that enhances the efficiency with which the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved nonperturbatively, in the framework of the state-specific expansion approach. The formulas are applicable to the general case where a pair of orbitals with angular parts |ℓ1,m1> and |ℓ2,m2> are coupled radiatively. As a test case, we calculate the matrix elements of the electric field and of the paramagnetic operators for on- and off-resonance transitions, between hydrogenic circular states of high angular momentum, whose quantum numbers are chosen so as to satisfy electric dipole and electric quadrupole selection rules. Because of the nature of their wave function (they are nodeless and the large centrifugal barrier keeps their overwhelming part at large distances from the nucleus), the validity of the electric dipole approximation in various applications where the off-resonance couplings must be considered becomes precarious. For example, for the transition from the circular state with n = 20 to that with n = 21, for which ≈400 a.u., the dipole approximation starts to fail already at XUV wavelengths (λ <125nm).

  5. Self-consistent Shaw optimized model potential: Application to the determination of structural and atomic transport properties of liquid alkali metals by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harchaoui, N.; Hellal, S.; Gasser, J. G.; Grosdidier, B.

    2010-03-01

    The 'first-principles' fully non-local and energy-dependent optimized model potential (OMP) derived by Shaw is developed further. In contrast to Shaw's original paper, OMP parameters are derived in a self-consistent manner that does not rely on knowledge of experimental values of the ionization and cohesive energies. To our knowledge, this is the first time that this method has been used for effective potential calculations. In an application to liquid Li, Na, and K alkali metals, we used OMP pseudopotential-based interactions between ions to carry out standard molecular dynamics simulations. In the calculations, the ionic structure for the liquid state was first checked at a temperature near the melting point. Similar accurate calculations, but for atomic transport properties, predict the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficients. The theoretical results obtained are in overall agreement with available experimental measurements. Thus, one can have some confidence in the ability of the optimized model potential to give a good representation of the physical properties of these alkali ions in the liquid environment.

  6. Research on the properties and interactions of simple atomic and ionic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novick, R.

    1972-01-01

    Simple ionic systems were studied, such as metastable autoionizing states of the negative He ion, two-photon decay spectrum of metastable He ion, optical excitation with low energy ions, and lifetime measurements of singly ionized Li and metastable He ion. Simple atomic systems were also investigated. Metastable autoionizing atomic energy levels in alkali elements were included, along with lifetime measurements of Cr-53, group 2A isotopes, and alkali metal atoms using level crossing and optical double resonance spectroscopy.

  7. Steady-state multipole moments of atoms in a resonant field with elliptical polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taichenachev, A. V.; Basalaev, M. Yu; Lazebny, D. B.; Yudin, V. I.

    2014-07-01

    Steady-state multipole moments of atoms ρK q of the rank K ⩽ 2 are analytically calculated for all closed dipole transitions Jg → Je in a resonant radiation field with arbitrary intensity and arbitrary elliptical polarization. The nonlinear propagation of a monochromatic elliptically polarized wave through a medium consisting of atoms with resonant transition Jg → Je is considered as an application.

  8. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: counting noble-gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, G.S.; Payne, M.G.; Chen, C.H.; Willis, R.D.; Lehmann, B.E.; Kramer, S.D.

    1981-06-01

    New work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions) is reported. When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. It is shown that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective.

  9. Time-of-flight detection of ultra-cold atoms using resonant frequency modulation imaging.

    PubMed

    Hardman, K S; Wigley, P B; Everitt, P J; Manju, P; Kuhn, C C N; Robins, N P

    2016-06-01

    Resonant frequency modulation imaging is used to detect free falling ultra-cold atoms. A theoretical comparison of fluorescence imaging (FI) and frequency modulation imaging (FMI) is made, indicating that for low optical depth clouds, FMI accomplished a higher signal-to-noise ratio under conditions necessary for a 200 μm spatially resolved atom interferometer. A 750 ms time-of-flight measurement reveals near atom shot-noise limited number measurements of 2×106 Bose-condensed Rb87 atoms. The detection system is applied to high precision spinor BEC based atom interferometer.

  10. Time-of-flight detection of ultra-cold atoms using resonant frequency modulation imaging.

    PubMed

    Hardman, K S; Wigley, P B; Everitt, P J; Manju, P; Kuhn, C C N; Robins, N P

    2016-06-01

    Resonant frequency modulation imaging is used to detect free falling ultra-cold atoms. A theoretical comparison of fluorescence imaging (FI) and frequency modulation imaging (FMI) is made, indicating that for low optical depth clouds, FMI accomplished a higher signal-to-noise ratio under conditions necessary for a 200 μm spatially resolved atom interferometer. A 750 ms time-of-flight measurement reveals near atom shot-noise limited number measurements of 2×106 Bose-condensed Rb87 atoms. The detection system is applied to high precision spinor BEC based atom interferometer. PMID:27244400

  11. Resonant interaction of trapped cold atoms with a magnetic cantilever tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Cris; Valencia, Jose; Geraci, Andrew A.; Eardley, Matthew; Moreland, John; Hollberg, Leo; Kitching, John

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance in an ensemble of laser-cooled trapped Rb atoms is excited using a microcantilever with a magnetic tip. The cantilever is mounted on a multilayer chip designed to capture, cool, and magnetically transport cold atoms. The coupling is observed by measuring the loss from a magnetic trap as the oscillating cantilever induces Zeeman-state transitions in the atoms. Interfacing cold atoms with mechanical devices could enable probing and manipulating atomic spins with nanometer spatial resolution and single-spin sensitivity, leading to new capabilities in quantum computation, quantum simulation, and precision sensing.

  12. Atomic arrangement and electron band structure of Si(1 1 1)-ß-√3 x √3-Bi reconstruction modified by alkali-metal adsorption: ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Eremeev, S V; Chukurov, E N; Gruznev, D V; Zotov, A V; Saranin, A A

    2015-08-01

    Using ab initio calculations, atomic structure and electronic properties of Si(1 1 1)[Formula: see text]-Bi surface modified by adsorption of 1/3 monolayer of alkali metals, Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs, have been explored. Upon adsorption of all metals, a similar atomic structure develops at the surface where twisted chained Bi trimers are arranged into a honeycomb network and alkali metal atoms occupy the [Formula: see text] sites in the center of each honeycomb unit. Among other structural characteristics, the greatest variation concerns the relative heights at which alkali metals reside with respect to Bi-trimer layer. Except for Li, the other metals reside higher than Bi layer and their heights increase with atomic number. All adsorbed surface structures display similar electron band structures of which the most essential feature is metallic surface-state band with a giant spin splitting. This electronic property allows one to consider the Si(1 1 1)[Formula: see text]-Bi surfaces modified by alkali metal adsorption as a set of material systems showing promise for spintronic applications.

  13. Resonance behavior of atomic and molecular photoionization amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepkov, N. A.; Kuznetsov, V. V.; Semenov, S. K.

    2007-07-15

    The behavior of the partial photoionization amplitudes with a given orbital angular momentum l in the complex plane in resonances is studied. In the autoionization resonances the trajectory of the amplitude in the complex plane corresponds to a circle. With increasing photoelectron energy the amplitude moves about a circle in the counterclockwise direction. The new expressions for the partial amplitudes in the resonance are proposed which are similar to the Fano form but contain the 'partial' profile parameters which are connected with the Fano parameter q by a simple relation. In the giant dipole resonances the amplitudes in the complex plane also move about a circle in the counterclockwise direction provided the Coulomb phase is excluded from the amplitude. In the correlational resonances created by channel interactions with the giant dipole resonance the trajectories of the amplitudes acquire a loop about which the amplitudes move in the counterclockwise direction. Very similar behavior of partial photoionization amplitudes in the complex plane is demonstrated also for the dipole transitions from the K shells of the N{sub 2} molecule in the {sigma}* shape resonance.

  14. Structural Role of Alkali Cations in Calcium Aluminosilicate Glasses as Examined Using Oxygen-17 Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukenaga, Sohei; Kanehashi, Koji; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Saito, Noritaka; Nakashima, Kunihiko

    2016-08-01

    The structural roles of alkali and calcium cations are important for understanding the physical and chemical properties of aluminosilicate melts and glasses. Recently, oxygen-17 nuclear magnetic resonance (17O NMR) studies of calcium-sodium aluminosilicate glasses showed that these structural roles are not randomly given, but rather each cation has its own preferential role. However, the relationship between cation type and role preference in calcium aluminosilicate glass is not completely understood. In the present study, the structural roles of lithium, sodium, and potassium cations in selected calcium aluminosilicate glasses are investigated using 17O solid-state NMR experiments. Data from these experiments clearly show that potassium cations have a notably stronger tendency to act as charge compensators within the network structure, compared to sodium and lithium cations. The result of 17O NMR experiment also showed that sodium and lithium cations in part act as network modifier alongside with calcium cations.

  15. Structure of magnetic resonance in 87Rb atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. N.; Zibrov, S. A.; Zibrov, A. A.; Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Tsygankov, E. A.; Zibrov, A. S.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Velichansky, V. L.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance at the F g = 1 rightleftarrows F e = 1 transition of the D 1 line in 87Rb has been studied with pumping and detection by linearly polarized radiation and detection at the double frequency of the radiofrequency field. The intervals of allowed values of the static and alternating magnetic fields in which magnetic resonance has a single maximum have been found. The structure appearing beyond these intervals has been explained. It has been shown that the quadratic Zeeman shift is responsible for the three-peak structure of resonance; the radiofrequency shift results in the appearance of additional extrema in resonance, which can be used to determine the relaxation constant Γ2. The possibility of application in magnetometry has been discussed.

  16. Three-dimensional sub-half-wavelength atom localization via interacting double-dark resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Cao, Dewei; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2016-11-01

    We present a new scheme for three-dimensional (3D) atom localization in a four-level atomic system based on the interference of double-dark resonances. Owing to the space-dependent atom-field interaction, the position probability distribution of the atom can be directly determined by measuring the probe absorption. It is found that, by properly varying the parameters of the system, the probability of finding the atom in 3D space can be 1/2. Our scheme opens a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-efficiency 3D atom localization, which provides some potential applications in the atom nanolithography via 3D atom localization.

  17. Anisotropy modeling of terahertz metamaterials: polarization dependent resonance manipulation by meta-atom cluster.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyunseung; In, Chihun; Choi, Hyunyong; Lee, Hojin

    2014-06-09

    Recently metamaterials have inspired worldwide researches due to their exotic properties in transmitting, reflecting, absorbing or refracting specific electromagnetic waves. Most metamaterials are known to have anisotropic properties, but existing anisotropy models are applicable only to a single meta-atom and its properties. Here we propose an anisotropy model for asymmetrical meta-atom clusters and their polarization dependency. The proposed anisotropic meta-atom clusters show a unique resonance property in which their frequencies can be altered for parallel polarization, but fixed to a single resonance frequency for perpendicular polarization. The proposed anisotropic metamaterials are expected to pave the way for novel optical systems.

  18. Anisotropy Modeling of Terahertz Metamaterials: Polarization Dependent Resonance Manipulation by Meta-Atom Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hyunseung; in, Chihun; Choi, Hyunyong; Lee, Hojin

    2014-06-01

    Recently metamaterials have inspired worldwide researches due to their exotic properties in transmitting, reflecting, absorbing or refracting specific electromagnetic waves. Most metamaterials are known to have anisotropic properties, but existing anisotropy models are applicable only to a single meta-atom and its properties. Here we propose an anisotropy model for asymmetrical meta-atom clusters and their polarization dependency. The proposed anisotropic meta-atom clusters show a unique resonance property in which their frequencies can be altered for parallel polarization, but fixed to a single resonance frequency for perpendicular polarization. The proposed anisotropic metamaterials are expected to pave the way for novel optical systems.

  19. Magnetic coupling of laser-cooled atoms to a micro-resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraci, Andrew; Wang, Ying-Ju; Eardley, Matthew; Moreland, John; Kitching, John

    2009-05-01

    The direct coupling of the spin-degrees of freedom of an atomic vapor to the vibrational motion of a magnetic cantilever tip has recently been demonstrated [1], and prospects for coupling a BEC on an atom-chip to a nano- mechanical resonator have been recently discussed [2]. Possible applications include chip-scale atomic devices, in which localized interactions with magnetic cantilever tips selectively influence or probe atomic spins. As a next step towards the realization of a strongly coupled ultra-cold atom- resonator system, we have constructed an apparatus to study the direct coupling between the spins of trapped laser-cooled Rb atoms and a magnetic tip on a micro-cantilever. The atoms will be loaded into a magnetic trap formed by the cantilever tip and external magnetic fields. The cantilever will be driven capacitively at its resonance frequency, resulting in a coherent precession of the trapped atomic spins with a matching Larmor frequency. Prospects for measuring the back-action of the ensemble of atomic spins on a cantilever beam will also be discussed. [1] Y.-J. Wang,M. Eardley, S. Knappe, J. Moreland, L. Hollberg, and J. Kitching, PRL 97, 227602 (2006). [2] P. Treutlein,D. Hunger, S. Camerer, T. W. Hansch, and J. Reichel, PRL 99, 140403 (2007).

  20. Visualization of subsurface nanoparticles in a polymer matrix using resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kei; Yao, Atsushi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2016-10-14

    A visualization technique of subsurface features with a nanometer-scale spatial resolution is strongly demanded. Some research groups have demonstrated the visualization of subsurface features using various techniques based on atomic force microscopy. However, the imaging mechanisms have not yet been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated the visualization of subsurface Au nanoparticles buried in a polymer matrix 900 nm from the surface using two techniques; i.e., resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy. It was clarified that the subsurface features were visualized by the two techniques as the area with a higher contact resonance frequency and a higher Q-factor than those in the surrounding area, which suggests that the visualization is realized by the variation of the contact stiffness and damping of the polymer matrix due to the existence of the buried nanoparticles. PMID:27607548

  1. Visualization of subsurface nanoparticles in a polymer matrix using resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kei; Yao, Atsushi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2016-10-14

    A visualization technique of subsurface features with a nanometer-scale spatial resolution is strongly demanded. Some research groups have demonstrated the visualization of subsurface features using various techniques based on atomic force microscopy. However, the imaging mechanisms have not yet been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated the visualization of subsurface Au nanoparticles buried in a polymer matrix 900 nm from the surface using two techniques; i.e., resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy. It was clarified that the subsurface features were visualized by the two techniques as the area with a higher contact resonance frequency and a higher Q-factor than those in the surrounding area, which suggests that the visualization is realized by the variation of the contact stiffness and damping of the polymer matrix due to the existence of the buried nanoparticles.

  2. Visualization of subsurface nanoparticles in a polymer matrix using resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kei; Yao, Atsushi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2016-10-01

    A visualization technique of subsurface features with a nanometer-scale spatial resolution is strongly demanded. Some research groups have demonstrated the visualization of subsurface features using various techniques based on atomic force microscopy. However, the imaging mechanisms have not yet been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated the visualization of subsurface Au nanoparticles buried in a polymer matrix 900 nm from the surface using two techniques; i.e., resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy. It was clarified that the subsurface features were visualized by the two techniques as the area with a higher contact resonance frequency and a higher Q-factor than those in the surrounding area, which suggests that the visualization is realized by the variation of the contact stiffness and damping of the polymer matrix due to the existence of the buried nanoparticles.

  3. Resonant control of cold-atom transport through two optical lattices with a constant relative speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenaway, M. T.; Balanov, A. G.; Fromhold, T. M.

    2013-01-01

    We show theoretically that the dynamics of cold atoms in the lowest-energy band of a stationary optical lattice can be transformed and controlled by a second, weaker, periodic potential moving at a constant speed along the axis of the stationary lattice. The atom trajectories exhibit complex behavior, which depends sensitively on the amplitude and speed of the propagating lattice. When the speed and amplitude of the moving potential are low, the atoms are dragged through the static lattice and perform drifting orbits with frequencies an order of magnitude higher than that corresponding to the moving potential. Increasing either the speed or amplitude of the moving lattice induces Bloch-like oscillations within the energy band of the static lattice, which exhibit complex resonances at critical values of the system parameters. In some cases, a very small change in these parameters can reverse the atom's direction of motion. In order to understand these dynamics we present an analytical model, which describes the key features of the atom transport and also accurately predicts the positions of the resonant features in the atom's phase space. The abrupt controllable transitions between dynamical regimes, as well as the associated set of resonances, provide a mechanism for transporting atoms between precise locations in a lattice, as required for using cold atoms to simulate condensed matter or as a stepping stone to quantum information processing. The system also provides a direct quantum simulator of acoustic waves propagating through semiconductor nanostructures in sound analogs of the optical laser (saser).

  4. Spin-orbit coupling in the dissociative excitation of alkali atoms at the surface of rare gas clusters: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervais, B.; Zanuttini, D.; Douady, J.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the role of the spin-orbit (SO) coupling in the dissociative dynamics of excited alkali atoms at the surface of small rare gas clusters. The electronic structure of the whole system is deduced from a one-electron model based on core polarization pseudo-potentials. It allows us to obtain in the same footing the energy, forces, and non-adiabatic couplings used to simulate the dynamics by means of a surface hopping method. The fine structure state population is analyzed by considering the relative magnitude of the SO coupling ξ, with respect to the spin-free potential energy. We identify three regimes of ξ-values leading to different evolution of adiabatic state population after excitation of the system in the uppermost state of the lowest np 2P shell. For sufficiently small ξ, the final population of the J = /1 2 atomic states, P /1 2 , grows up linearly from P /1 2 = /1 3 at ξ = 0 after a diabatic dynamics. For large values of ξ, we observe a rather adiabatic dynamics with P /1 2 decreasing as ξ increases. For intermediate values of ξ, the coupling is extremely efficient and a complete transfer of population is observed for the set of parameters associated to NaAr3 and NaAr4 clusters.

  5. Two-band description of resonant superfluidity in atomic Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    He, Lianyi; Hu, Hui; Liu, Xia -Ji

    2015-02-23

    Fermionic superfluidity in atomic Fermi gases across a Feshbach resonance is normally described by the atom-molecule theory, which treats the closed channel as a noninteracting point boson. In this work we present a theoretical description of the resonant superfluidity in analogy to the two-band superconductors. We employ the underlying two-channel scattering model of Feshbach resonance where the closed channel is treated as a composite boson with binding energy ε0 and the resonance is triggered by the microscopic interchannel coupling U12. The binding energy ε0 naturally serves as an energy scale of the system, which has been sent to infinity in the atom-molecule theory. We show that the atom-molecule theory can be viewed as a leading-order low-energy effective theory of the underlying fermionic theory in the limit ε0→∞ and U12→0, while keeping the phenomenological atom-molecule coupling finite. The resulting two-band description of the superfluid state is in analogy to the BCS theory of two-band superconductors. In the dilute limit ε0→∞, the two-band description recovers precisely the atom-molecule theory. The two-band theory provides a natural approach to study the corrections because of a finite binding energy ε0 in realistic experimental systems. For broad and moderate resonances, the correction is not important for current experimental densities. However, for extremely narrow resonance, we find that the correction becomes significant. Lastly, the finite binding energy correction could be important for the stability of homogeneous polarized superfluid against phase separation in imbalanced Fermi gases across a narrow Feshbach resonance.

  6. Two-band description of resonant superfluidity in atomic Fermi gases

    DOE PAGES

    He, Lianyi; Hu, Hui; Liu, Xia -Ji

    2015-02-23

    Fermionic superfluidity in atomic Fermi gases across a Feshbach resonance is normally described by the atom-molecule theory, which treats the closed channel as a noninteracting point boson. In this work we present a theoretical description of the resonant superfluidity in analogy to the two-band superconductors. We employ the underlying two-channel scattering model of Feshbach resonance where the closed channel is treated as a composite boson with binding energy ε0 and the resonance is triggered by the microscopic interchannel coupling U12. The binding energy ε0 naturally serves as an energy scale of the system, which has been sent to infinity inmore » the atom-molecule theory. We show that the atom-molecule theory can be viewed as a leading-order low-energy effective theory of the underlying fermionic theory in the limit ε0→∞ and U12→0, while keeping the phenomenological atom-molecule coupling finite. The resulting two-band description of the superfluid state is in analogy to the BCS theory of two-band superconductors. In the dilute limit ε0→∞, the two-band description recovers precisely the atom-molecule theory. The two-band theory provides a natural approach to study the corrections because of a finite binding energy ε0 in realistic experimental systems. For broad and moderate resonances, the correction is not important for current experimental densities. However, for extremely narrow resonance, we find that the correction becomes significant. Lastly, the finite binding energy correction could be important for the stability of homogeneous polarized superfluid against phase separation in imbalanced Fermi gases across a narrow Feshbach resonance.« less

  7. Entanglement on macroscopic scales in a resonant-laser-field-excited atomic ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camalet, S.

    2015-03-01

    We show that two groups of slow two-level atoms in a weak resonant laser field are entangled. The considered groups can be separated by a macroscopic distance, and be parts of a larger atomic ensemble. In a dilute regime, for two very distant groups of atoms, in a plane-wave laser beam, we determine the maximum attainable entanglement negativity, and a laser intensity below which they are certainly entangled. They both decrease with increasing distance between the two groups, but increase with enlarging groups sizes. As a consequence, for given laser intensity, far separated groups of atoms are necessarily entangled if they are big enough.

  8. Enhancing the low frequency THz resonances (< 1 THz) of organic molecules via electronegative atom substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Jyotirmayee; Ray, Shaumik; Pesala, Bala

    2015-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology is an active area of research with various applications in non-intrusive imaging and spectroscopy. Very few organic molecules have significant resonances below 1 THz. Understanding the origin of low frequency THz modes in these molecules and their absence in other molecules could be extremely important in design and engineering molecules with low frequency THz resonances. These engineered molecules can be used as THz tags for anti-counterfeiting applications. Studies show that low frequency THz resonances are commonly observed in molecules having higher molecular mass and weak intermolecular hydrogen bonds. In this paper, we have explored the possibility of enhancing the strength of THz resonances below 1 THz through electronegative atom substitution. Adding an electronegative atom helps in achieving higher hydrogen bond strength to enhance the resonances below 1 THz. Here acetanilide has been used as a model system. THz-Time Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) results show that acetanilide has a small peak observed below 1 THz. Acetanilide can be converted to 2-fluoroacetanilide by adding an electronegative atom, fluorine, which doesn't have any prominent peak below 1 THz. However, by optimally choosing the position of the electronegative atom as in 4-fluoroacetanilide, a significant THz resonance at 0.86 THz is observed. The origin of low frequency resonances can be understood by carrying out Density Functional Theory (DFT) simulations of full crystal structure. These studies show that adding an electronegative atom to the organic molecules at an optimized position can result in significantly enhanced resonances below 1 THz.

  9. Superharmonic resonances in a strongly coupled cavity-atom system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buks, Eyal; Deng, Chunqing; Orgazzi, Jean-Luc F. X.; Otto, Martin; Lupascu, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    We study a system consisting of a superconducting flux qubit strongly coupled to a microwave cavity. The fundamental cavity mode is externally driven and the response is investigated in the weak nonlinear regime. We find that near the crossing point, at which the resonance frequencies of the cavity mode and qubit coincide, the sign of the Kerr coefficient changes, and consequently the type of nonlinear response changes from softening to hardening. Furthermore, the cavity response exhibits superharmonic resonances (SHR) when the ratio between the qubit frequency and the cavity fundamental mode frequency is tuned close to an integer value. The nonlinear response is characterized by the method of intermodulation and both signal and idler gains are measured. The experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions and good qualitative agreement is obtained. The SHRs have potential for applications in quantum amplification and generation of entangled states of light.

  10. Few-cycle attosecond pulses via periodic resonance interaction with hydrogenlike atoms.

    PubMed

    Polovinkin, V A; Radeonychev, Y V; Kocharovskaya, Olga

    2011-06-15

    We show that it is possible to produce nearly bandwidth-limited few-cycle attosecond pulses based on periodic resonance interaction of a quasi-monochromatic radiation with the bound states of hydrogenlike atoms. A periodic resonance is provided by a far-off-resonant laser field with intensity much below the atomic ionization threshold via periodic tunnel ionization from the excited states and adiabatic Stark splitting of the excited energy levels. Without external synchronization of the spectral components, it is possible to produce 135 as pulses at 13.5 nm in Li²⁺-plasma controlled by radiation of a mode-locked Nd:YAG laser, as well as 1.25 fs pulses at 122 nm in atomic hydrogen controlled by radiation of a CO₂ laser.

  11. Narrow-band N-resonance formed in thin rubidium atomic layers

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, A.; Mirzoyan, R.; Sarkisyan, D.

    2012-11-15

    The narrow-band N-resonance formed in a {Lambda} system of D{sub 1}-line rubidium atoms is studied in the presence of a buffer gas (neon) and the radiations of two continuous narrow-band diode lasers. Special-purpose cells are used to investigate the dependence of the process on vapor column thickness L in millimeter, micrometer, and nanometer ranges. A comparison of the dependences of the N-resonance and the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) resonance on L demonstrates that the minimum (record) thickness at which the N-resonance can be detected is L = 50 {mu}m and that a high-contrast EIT resonance can easily be formed even at L Almost-Equal-To 800 nm. The N-resonance in a magnetic field for {sup 85}Rb atoms is shown to split into five or six components depending on the magnetic field and laser radiation directions. The results obtained indicate that levels F{sub g} = 2, 3 are initial and final in the N-resonance formation. The dependence of the N-resonance on the angle between the laser beams is analyzed, and practical applications are noted.

  12. Observing random walks of atoms in buffer gas through resonant light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Kenichiro; Mitsui, Takahisa

    2016-07-01

    Using resonant light absorption, random-walk motions of rubidium atoms in nitrogen buffer gas are observed directly. The transmitted light intensity through atomic vapor is measured, and its spectrum is obtained, down to orders of magnitude below the shot-noise level to detect fluctuations caused by atomic motions. To understand the measured spectra, the spectrum for atoms performing random walks in a Gaussian light beam is computed, and its analytical form is obtained. The spectrum has 1 /f2 (f is frequency) behavior at higher frequencies, crossing over to a different, but well-defined, behavior at lower frequencies. The properties of this theoretical spectrum agree excellently with the measured spectrum. This understanding also enables us to obtain the diffusion constant, the photon cross section of atoms in buffer gas, and the atomic number density from a single spectral measurement. We further discuss other possible applications of our experimental method and analysis.

  13. Resonant Rydberg Dressing of Alkaline-Earth Atoms via Electromagnetically Induced Transparency.

    PubMed

    Gaul, C; DeSalvo, B J; Aman, J A; Dunning, F B; Killian, T C; Pohl, T

    2016-06-17

    We develop an approach to generate finite-range atomic interactions via optical Rydberg-state excitation and study the underlying excitation dynamics in theory and experiment. In contrast to previous work, the proposed scheme is based on resonant optical driving and the establishment of a dark state under conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). Analyzing the driven dissipative dynamics of the atomic gas, we show that the interplay between coherent light coupling, radiative decay, and strong Rydberg-Rydberg atom interactions leads to the emergence of sizable effective interactions while providing remarkably long coherence times. The latter are studied experimentally in a cold gas of strontium atoms for which the proposed scheme is most efficient. Our measured atom loss is in agreement with the theoretical prediction based on binary effective interactions between the driven atoms. PMID:27367387

  14. Coherent-population-trapping resonances with linearly polarized light for all-optical miniature atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zibrov, Sergei A.; Velichansky, Vladimir L.; Novikova, Irina; Phillips, David F.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Zibrov, Alexander S.; Taichenachev, Alexey V.; Yudin, Valery I.

    2010-01-15

    We present a joint theoretical and experimental characterization of the coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance excited on the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb atoms by bichromatic linearly polarized laser light. We observe high-contrast transmission resonances (up to approx =25%), which makes this excitation scheme promising for miniature all-optical atomic clock applications. We also demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by proper choice of the frequencies and relative intensities of the two laser-field components. Our theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  15. The stationary resonance fluorescence of a two-level atom in a cat-state field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomilin, V. A.; Il'ichov, L. V.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the resonance fluorescence of a two-level atom placed in non-classical field which is a superposition of Glauber coherent states. The source of this superposition known under the common name of 'Schrödinger cat'-states is explicitly incorporated into the model. This let us to explore the stationary regime. In the strong (multiphoton) field limit the steady-state of the atom+photons system is found. We evaluated the spectrum of the resonance fluorescence. It appears to be one-component in contrast to the case with the classical external field.

  16. Changes in the shape of atomic lines of alkali metals in sonoluminescence spectra of solutions of surfactants and halogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazachek, M. V.; Gordeychuk, T. V.

    2013-11-01

    The multibubble sonoluminescence spectra of aqueous solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate, of the mixture of sodium dodecyl sulfate with lithium and potassium chlorides, and of sodium and potassium halogenides were measured near the lines of metals at an ultrasonic frequency of 20 kHz. The Na, Li, and K lines in spectra of surfactant solutions are noticeably narrower than those obtained in solutions of metal chlorides. The width of Na lines in spectra of metal fluorides, chlorides, and iodides remains constant, while that of the K line increases with increasing atomic weight of a halogen. The results are discussed in the context of the effect that the bonding strength of an atom possibly has on the formation of metal lines in sonoluminescence spectra.

  17. Resonant energy transfer from argon dimers to atomic oxygen in microhollow cathode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moselhy, M.; Stark, R. H.; Schoenbach, K. H.; Kogelschatz, U.

    2001-02-01

    The emission of atomic oxygen lines at 130.2 and 130.5 nm from a microhollow cathode discharge in argon with oxygen added indicates resonant energy transfer from argon dimers to oxygen atoms. The internal efficiency of the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) radiation was measured as 0.7% for a discharge in 1100 Torr argon with 0.1% oxygen added. The direct current VUV point source operates at voltages below 300 V and at current levels of milliamperes.

  18. Real-Time Cavity QED with Single Atoms and a Microtoroidal Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, N. P.; Alton, D. J.; Lee, H.; Vahala, K. J.; Kimble, H. J.

    2010-03-01

    Strong coupling in cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED) with atoms and microtoroid resonators allows coherent interactions between matter and light to dominate irreversible dissipation in a scalable quantum node with high photonic coupling efficiency. Previous microtoroid cQED experiments use post-selection of atom transits from the photon record, imposing limitations on experimental complexity and necessitating an indirect measure of strong coupling.^2 Using fast logic electronics, we achieve real-time detection of falling atom transit events of duration 2-4 μs in 250 ns followed by conditional switching of the input beam while the atom is coupled to the cavity. Laser detuning and intensity switching after atom detection enables measurement of Rabi splitting, directly confirming strong coupling. Monte Carlo simulations of atom trajectories and spectra reveal that transits detected in real-time serve as a probe of dipole and van der Waals forces between resonator and atom, here in a regime of strong atom-cavity coupling. T. Aoki, et al., Nature 443, 671 (2006). B. Dayan, et al., Science 319, 1062 (2008). T. Aoki, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 083601 (2009).

  19. Optimal densities of alkali metal atoms in an optically pumped K-Rb hybrid atomic magnetometer considering the spatial distribution of spin polarization.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yosuke; Sato, Daichi; Kamada, Keigo; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2016-07-11

    An optically pumped K-Rb hybrid atomic magnetometer can be a useful tool for biomagnetic measurements due to the high spatial homogeneity of its sensor property inside a cell. However, because the property varies depending on the densities of potassium and rubidium atoms, optimization of the densities is essential. In this study, by using the Bloch equations of K and Rb and considering the spatial distribution of the spin polarization, we confirmed that the calculation results of spin polarization behavior are in good agreement with the experimental data. Using our model, we calculated the spatial distribution of the spin polarization and found that the optimal density of K atoms is 3 × 1019 m-3 and the optimal density ratio is nK/nRb ~ 400 to maximize the output signal and enhance spatial homogeneity of the sensor property. PMID:27410815

  20. Optimal densities of alkali metal atoms in an optically pumped K-Rb hybrid atomic magnetometer considering the spatial distribution of spin polarization.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yosuke; Sato, Daichi; Kamada, Keigo; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2016-07-11

    An optically pumped K-Rb hybrid atomic magnetometer can be a useful tool for biomagnetic measurements due to the high spatial homogeneity of its sensor property inside a cell. However, because the property varies depending on the densities of potassium and rubidium atoms, optimization of the densities is essential. In this study, by using the Bloch equations of K and Rb and considering the spatial distribution of the spin polarization, we confirmed that the calculation results of spin polarization behavior are in good agreement with the experimental data. Using our model, we calculated the spatial distribution of the spin polarization and found that the optimal density of K atoms is 3 × 1019 m-3 and the optimal density ratio is nK/nRb ~ 400 to maximize the output signal and enhance spatial homogeneity of the sensor property.

  1. Spin-flip induction of Fano resonance upon electron tunneling through atomic-scale spin structures

    SciTech Connect

    Val'kov, V. V. Aksenov, S. V.; Ulanov, E. A.

    2013-05-15

    The inclusion of inelastic spin-dependent electron scatterings by the potential profiles of a single magnetic impurity and a spin dimer is shown to induce resonance features due to the Fano effect in the transport characteristics of such atomic-scale spin structures. The spin-flip processes leading to a configuration interaction of the system's states play a fundamental role for the realization of Fano resonance and antiresonance. It has been established that applying an external magnetic field and a gate electric field allows the conductive properties of spin structures to be changed radically through the Fano resonance mechanism.

  2. Population of the three major exit channels in the 3d resonance region of atomic gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, M.O.; Cerrina, F.; Fahlman, A.

    1983-04-11

    The exit channels in the region of the 3d..-->..4p resonance of atomic gallium were determined in a photoemission experiment. The population of the three major channels involving 4p and 4s electrons was measured by the constant-ionic-state method for twenty resonant states between 18.8 and 21.7 eV, and the angular distribution of the emitted electrons was obtained. As a result, an autoionization case in which many resonances and many continua are coupled has been characterized in the most comprehensive experiment to date.

  3. Nanoscale Subsurface Imaging via Resonant Difference-Frequency Atomic Force Ultrasonic Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Sean A.; Cantrell, John H.; Lilehei, Peter T.

    2007-01-01

    A novel scanning probe microscope methodology has been developed that employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by the fundamental resonance frequency of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever fundamental resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of embedded nanoscale features.

  4. Atomic motion of resonantly vibrating quartz crystal visualized by time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyagi, Shinobu; Osawa, Hitoshi; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Fujiwara, Akihiko

    2015-11-16

    Transient atomic displacements during a resonant thickness-shear vibration of AT-cut α-quartz are revealed by time-resolved X-ray diffraction under an alternating electric field. The lattice strain resonantly amplified by the alternating electric field is ∼10{sup 4} times larger than that induced by a static electric field. The resonantly amplified lattice strain is achieved by fast displacements of oxygen anions and collateral resilient deformation of Si−O−Si angles bridging rigid SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra, which efficiently transduce electric energy into elastic energy.

  5. The confinement induced resonance in spin-orbit coupled cold atoms with Raman coupling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Cai; Song, Shu-Wei; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The confinement induced resonance provides an indispensable tool for the realization of the low-dimensional strongly interacting quantum system. Here, we investigate the confinement induced resonance in spin-orbit coupled cold atoms with Raman coupling. We find that the quasi-bound levels induced by the spin-orbit coupling and Raman coupling result in the Feshbach-type resonances. For sufficiently large Raman coupling, the bound states in one dimension exist only for sufficiently strong attractive interaction. Furthermore, the bound states in quasi-one dimension exist only for sufficient large ratio of the length scale of confinement to three dimensional s-wave scattering length. The Raman coupling substantially changes the confinement-induced resonance position. We give a proposal to realize confinement induced resonance through increasing Raman coupling strength in experiments. PMID:24862314

  6. Complete-velocity-range description of negative-ion conversion of neutral atoms on an alkali-metal-halide surface under grazing geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hu; Zhou, Wang; Zhang, Meixiao; Zhou, Lihua; Ma, Yulong; Wang, Guangyi; Wu, Yong; Li, Bowen; Chen, Ximeng

    2016-06-01

    We propose a simple theoretical approach to consider negative-ion conversion of neutral atoms grazing on alkali-metal-halide crystal surfaces over the complete velocity range. The conversion process is viewed as a series of successive binary collisions between the projectile and the negatively charged sites on the surface along their trajectories due to localization of valence-band electrons at the anionic sites of the crystal. Conversion from F0 to F- via grazing scattering in LiF(100) and KI(100) is demonstrated with this model, which incorporates the key factors of image interaction and Mott-Littleton polarization interaction for electron capture. It also incorporates the decrease in the electron affinity due to Coulomb barrier tunneling of large-velocity negative ions to the vacuum level near surface anion sites. The pronounced differences in the efficiency of F- formation at LiF(100) and KI(100) surfaces are well explained by the proposed model. The relative efficiency and related saturation of the negative-ion formation for LiF and KI crystals compare well with experimental results.

  7. Charge transfer between alkali cluster ions and atoms in the 1 to 10 keV collisional energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bréchignac, C.; Cahuzac, Ph.; Concina, B.; Leygnier, J.; Tignères, I.

    The cross-sections for collisional charge transfer between singly charged free clusters Mn+ (M = Li, Na; n=1...50) and atomic targets A (cesium, potassium) have been measured as a function of collisional relative velocity in laboratory energy range 1-10 keV. For each cluster size, the experimental values of the charge transfer cross-section are fitted with an universal parametric curve with two independent parameters and vm, the maximum cross-section and the corresponding velocity. For small size clusters ( ), the characteristic parameters show strong variations with the number of atoms in the cluster. Abrupt dips observed for n=10 and n=22 are attributed to electronic properties. Charge transfer patterns observed for various collisional systems present similarities, which appear more sensitive to cluster quantum size effects than to collision energy defects. In their whole, the and vm parameters show differences in both their size evolution and their absolute values discussed in term of projectile and target electronic structures.

  8. Temperature measurement of cold atoms using transient absorption of a resonant probe through an optical nanofibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ravi; Gokhroo, Vandna; Bhushan Tiwari, Vibhuti; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2016-11-01

    Optical nanofibres are ultrathin optical fibres with a waist diameter typically less than the wavelength of light being guided through them. Cold atoms can couple to the evanescent field of the nanofibre-guided modes and such systems are emerging as promising technologies for the development of atom-photon hybrid quantum devices. Atoms within the evanescent field region of an optical nanofibre can be probed by sending near or on-resonant light through the fibre; however, the probe light can detrimentally affect the properties of the atoms. In this paper, we report on the modification of the local temperature of laser-cooled 87Rb atoms in a magneto-optical trap centred around an optical nanofibre when near-resonant probe light propagates through it. A transient absorption technique has been used to measure the temperature of the affected atoms and temperature variations from 160 μk to 850 μk, for a probe power ranging from 0 to 50 nW, have been observed. This effect could have implications in relation to using optical nanofibres for probing and manipulating cold or ultracold atoms.

  9. Nanophotonic hybridization of narrow atomic cesium resonances and photonic stop gaps of opaline nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Philip J.; Pinkse, Pepijn W. H.; Mosk, Allard P.; Vos, Willem L.

    2015-01-01

    We study a hybrid system consisting of a narrow-band atomic optical resonance and the long-range periodic order of an opaline photonic nanostructure. To this end, we have infiltrated atomic cesium vapor in a thin silica opal photonic crystal. With increasing temperature, the frequencies of the opal's reflectivity peaks shift down by >20 % due to chemical reduction of the silica. Simultaneously, the photonic bands and gaps shift relative to the fixed near-infrared cesium D1 transitions. As a result the narrow atomic resonances with high finesse (ω /Δ ω =8 ×105 ) dramatically change shape from a usual dispersive shape at the blue edge of a stop gap, to an inverted dispersion line shape at the red edge of a stop gap. The line shape, amplitude, and off-resonance reflectivity are well modeled with a transfer-matrix model that includes the dispersion and absorption of Cs hyperfine transitions and the chemically reduced opal. An ensemble of atoms in a photonic crystal is an intriguing hybrid system that features narrow defectlike resonances with a strong dispersion, with potential applications in slow light, sensing, and optical memory.

  10. Nonthermal effects of acceleration in the resonance interaction between two uniformly accelerated atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzuto, Lucia; Lattuca, Margherita; Marino, Jamir; Noto, Antonio; Spagnolo, Salvatore; Zhou, Wenting; Passante, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    We study the resonance interaction between two uniformly accelerated identical atoms, one excited and the other in the ground state, prepared in a correlated (symmetric or antisymmetric) state and interacting with the scalar field or the electromagnetic field in the vacuum state. In this case (resonance interaction), the interatomic interaction is a second-order effect in the atom-field coupling. We separate the contributions of vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction to the resonance energy shift of the system, and show that only radiation reaction contributes, while Unruh thermal fluctuations do not affect the resonance interaction. We also find that beyond a characteristic length scale related to the atomic acceleration, nonthermal effects in the radiation-reaction contribution change the distance dependence of the resonance interaction. Finally, we find that previously unidentified features appear, compared with the scalar field case, when the interaction with the electromagnetic field is considered, as a consequence of the peculiar nature of the vacuum quantum noise of the electromagnetic field in a relativistically accelerated background.

  11. Dressed-atom approach to strong-field double-resonance fluorescence with laser phase fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, T. A. B.; Swain, S.

    1987-08-01

    We discuss analytically the resonance fluorescence of a three-level ladder system whose two transitions are simultaneously saturated by the fields from two lasers. The laser fields have fluctuating phases, which may be correlated to some extent. We generalize the dressed-atom approach of Cohen-Tannoudji and Reynaud [J. Phys. B 10, 345 (1977)] to deal with phase fluctuations under conditions of overall two-photon resonance, but not single-photon resonance on the individual transitions. In this respect we also generalize the master-equation approach of Lawande, Puri, and D'Souza [Phys. Rev. A 33, 2504 (1986)]. The effect of spontaneous emission and laser fluctuations on the resonance fluorescence quintet is discussed in detail, and shown to marked effects. We also investigate the effect of these quantities on the steady-state dressed-atom occupation probabilities, and point out that the double-resonance experiment can be used to prepare the atom in a given dressed state with high probability.

  12. Resonant charge transfer of hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a metallic sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbard, J. A.; Softley, T. P.

    2016-06-01

    A wavepacket propagation study is reported for the charge transfer of low principal quantum number (n = 2) hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at an isolated metallic sphere. Such a sphere acts as a model for a nanoparticle. The three-dimensional confinement of the sphere yields discrete surface-localized ‘well-image’ states, the energies of which vary with sphere radius. When the Rydberg atom energy is degenerate with one of the quantized nanoparticle states, charge transfer is enhanced, whereas for off-resonant cases little to no charge transfer is observed. Greater variation in charge-transfer probability is seen between the resonant and off-resonant examples in this system than for any other Rydberg-surface system theoretically investigated thus far. The results presented here indicate that it may be possible to use Rydberg-surface ionization as a probe of the surface electronic structure of a nanoparticle, and nanostructures in general.

  13. Autoionization resonance states of two-electron atomic systems with finite spherical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Yew Kam; Chakraborty, Sumana

    2010-03-01

    We investigate the lowest-lying S-wave resonant states of two-electron atoms confined by spherical quantum dots under the framework of the stabilization method. Extensive Hylleraas type wave functions taking into account of the correlation effects between all the charged particles are used in the present investigation. A finite oscillator potential is used to represent the spherical quantum dot confinement potential. We have obtained resonance energies and widths for the quantum confined two-electron atoms with different depths and various ranges of the quantum dot potentials. Oscillation in the resonance width as the dot size changes is observed, a result of quantum dot size effect similar to the phenomenon of the electric-field effect on hydrogenic impurity in a spherical quantum dot [1]. [4pt] [1] S. Sahoo, Y. K. Ho, Phys. Rev. B 69, 165323 (2004); S. Sahoo, Y.C. Lin, Y. K. Ho, Physica E 40, 3107 (2008)

  14. Near resonance charge exchange in ion-atom collisions of lithium isotopes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Bodo, Enrico; Dalgarno, Alexander

    2009-12-31

    Collisions of ions and atoms of (6)Li and (7)Li are explored theoretically over a wide range of energy from 10(-14) to 1 eV. Accurate ab initio calculations are carried out of the Born-Oppenheimer potentials and the nonadiabatic couplings that are responsible for the near resonance charge exchange. Scattering studies show that the calculated charge exchange cross section follows Wigner's law for inelastic processes for energies below 10(-10) eV and that the zero temperature rate constant for it is 2.1 x 10(-9) cm(3) s(-1). At collision energies much larger than the isotope shift of the ionization potentials of the atoms, we show that the near resonance charge exchange process is equivalent to the resonance charge exchange with cross sections having a logarithmic dependence on energy. A comparison with the Langevin model at intermediate energies is also presented.

  15. Magnetic dipole-dipole sensing at atomic scale using electron spin resonance STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, T.; Paul, W.; Rolf-Pissarczyk, S.; MacDonald, A.; Yang, K.; Natterer, F. D.; Lutz, C. P.; Heinrich, A. J.

    Magnetometry having both high magnetic field sensitivity and atomic resolution has been an important goal for applications in diverse fields covering physics, material science, and biomedical science. Recent development of electron spin resonance STM (ESR-STM) promises coherent manipulation of spins and studies on magnetic interaction of artificially built nanostructures, leading toward quantum computation, simulation, and sensors In ESR-STM experiments, we find that the ESR signal from an Fe atom underneath a STM tip splits into two different frequencies when we position an additional Fe atom nearby. We measure an ESR energy splitting that decays as 1/r3 (r is the separation of the two Fe atoms), indicating that the atoms are coupled through magnetic dipole-dipole interaction. This energy and distance relation enables us to determine magnetic moments of atoms and molecules on a surface with high precision in energy. Unique and advantageous aspects of ESR-STM are the atom manipulation capabilities, which allow us to build atomically precise nanostructures and examine their interactions. For instance, we construct a dice cinque arrangement of five Fe atoms, and probe their interaction and energy degeneracy. We demonstrate the ESR-STM technique can be utilized for quantum magnetic sensors.

  16. 3.4 GHz composite thin film bulk acoustic wave resonator for miniaturized atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Artieda, Alvaro; Muralt, Paul

    2011-06-27

    Triple layer SiO{sub 2}/AlN/SiO{sub 2} composite thin film bulk acoustic wave resonators (TFBARs) were studied for applications in atomic clocks. The TFBAR's were tuned to 3.4 GHz, corresponding to half the hyperfine splitting of the ground state of rubidium {sup 87}Rb atoms. The quality factor (Q) was equal to 2300 and the temperature coefficient of the resonance frequency f{sub r} amounted to 1.5 ppm/K. A figure of merit Qf{sub r} of {approx} 0.8 x 10{sup 13} Hz and a thickness mode coupling factor of 1% were reached. Such figures are ideal for frequency sources in an oscillator circuit that tracks the optical signal in atomic clocks.

  17. Nonresonant corrections for the optical resonance frequency measurements in the hydrogen atom

    SciTech Connect

    Labzowsky, Leonti; Schedrin, Gavriil; Solovyev, Dmitrii; Chernovskaya, Evgenia; Plunien, Guenter; Karshenboim, Savely

    2009-05-15

    The deviation of the natural spectral line profile from the Lorentz shape for the optical resonant frequency measurements is considered. This deviation leads to an asymmetry, which is mainly due to nonresonant correction to the resonant Lorentz profile. The nonresonant corrections are studied for the different types of the atomic resonant experiments. The most accurate recent optical resonance experiments are analyzed, i.e., the two-photon 1s-2s resonance excitation of the hydrogen atom with the delayed decay in the external electric field. The description of the nonresonant correction in the latter case requires the employment of QED with different in and out Hamiltonians. The nonresonant corrections for this experiment are investigated and found to be about 10{sup -5} Hz, while the recent experimental uncertainty is 34 Hz and in the near feature is expected to be a few hertz. The projected 1s-2s resonance excitation experiment with the three-photon ionization detection (which is now in progress) is also considered.

  18. Contact resonance atomic force microscopy imaging in air and water using photothermal excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Kocun, Marta; Labuda, Aleksander; Gannepalli, Anil; Proksch, Roger

    2015-08-15

    Contact Resonance Force Microscopy (CR-FM) is a leading atomic force microscopy technique for measuring viscoelastic nano-mechanical properties. Conventional piezo-excited CR-FM measurements have been limited to imaging in air, since the “forest of peaks” frequency response associated with acoustic excitation methods effectively masks the true cantilever resonance. Using photothermal excitation results in clean contact, resonance spectra that closely match the ideal frequency response of the cantilever, allowing unambiguous and simple resonance frequency and quality factor measurements in air and liquids alike. This extends the capabilities of CR-FM to biologically relevant and other soft samples in liquid environments. We demonstrate CR-FM in air and water on both stiff silicon/titanium samples and softer polystyrene-polyethylene-polypropylene polymer samples with the quantitative moduli having very good agreement between expected and measured values.

  19. Terahertz response of fractal meta-atoms based on concentric rectangular square resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Zhenyu Shi, Wangzhou; Peng, Wei

    2015-11-21

    We investigate the terahertz electromagnetic responses of fractal meta-atoms (MAs) induced by different mode coupling mechanisms. Two types of MAs based on concentric rectangular square (CRS) resonators are presented: independent CRS (I-CRS) and junctional-CRS (J-CRS). In I-CRS, each resonator works as an independent dipole so as to result in the multiple resonance modes when the fractal level is above 1. In J-CRS, however, the generated layer is rotated by π/2 radius to the adjacent CRS in one MA. The multiple resonance modes are coupled into a single mode resonance. The fractal level increasing induces resonance modes redshift in I-CRS while blueshift in J-CRS. When the fractal level is below 4, the mode Q factor of J-CRS is in between the two modes of I-CRS; when the fractal level is 4 or above, the mode Q factor of J-CRS exceeds the two modes of I-CRS. Furthermore, the modulation depth (MD) decreases in I-CRS while it increases in J-CRS with the increase in fractal levels. The surface currents analysis reveals that the capacitive coupling of modes in I-CRS results in the modes redshift, while the conductive coupling of modes in J-CRS induces the mode blueshift. A high Q mode with large MD can be achieved via conductive coupling between the resonators of different scales in a fractal MA.

  20. High-Throughput Fabrication of Resonant Metamaterials with Ultrasmall Coaxial Apertures via Atomic Layer Lithography

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We combine atomic layer lithography and glancing-angle ion polishing to create wafer-scale metamaterials composed of dense arrays of ultrasmall coaxial nanocavities in gold films. This new fabrication scheme makes it possible to shrink the diameter and increase the packing density of 2 nm-gap coaxial resonators, an extreme subwavelength structure first manufactured via atomic layer lithography, both by a factor of 100 with respect to previous studies. We demonstrate that the nonpropagating zeroth-order Fabry-Pérot mode, which possesses slow light-like properties at the cutoff resonance, traps infrared light inside 2 nm gaps (gap volume ∼ λ3/106). Notably, the annular gaps cover only 3% or less of the metal surface, while open-area normalized transmission is as high as 1700% at the epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) condition. The resulting energy accumulation alongside extraordinary optical transmission can benefit applications in nonlinear optics, optical trapping, and surface-enhanced spectroscopies. Furthermore, because the resonance wavelength is independent of the cavity length and dramatically red shifts as the gap size is reduced, large-area arrays can be constructed with λresonance ≫ period, making this fabrication method ideal for manufacturing resonant metamaterials. PMID:26910363

  1. High-Throughput Fabrication of Resonant Metamaterials with Ultrasmall Coaxial Apertures via Atomic Layer Lithography.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Daehan; Nguyen, Ngoc-Cuong; Martin-Moreno, Luis; Mohr, Daniel A; Carretero-Palacios, Sol; Shaver, Jonah; Peraire, Jaime; Ebbesen, Thomas W; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2016-03-01

    We combine atomic layer lithography and glancing-angle ion polishing to create wafer-scale metamaterials composed of dense arrays of ultrasmall coaxial nanocavities in gold films. This new fabrication scheme makes it possible to shrink the diameter and increase the packing density of 2 nm-gap coaxial resonators, an extreme subwavelength structure first manufactured via atomic layer lithography, both by a factor of 100 with respect to previous studies. We demonstrate that the nonpropagating zeroth-order Fabry-Pérot mode, which possesses slow light-like properties at the cutoff resonance, traps infrared light inside 2 nm gaps (gap volume ∼ λ(3)/10(6)). Notably, the annular gaps cover only 3% or less of the metal surface, while open-area normalized transmission is as high as 1700% at the epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) condition. The resulting energy accumulation alongside extraordinary optical transmission can benefit applications in nonlinear optics, optical trapping, and surface-enhanced spectroscopies. Furthermore, because the resonance wavelength is independent of the cavity length and dramatically red shifts as the gap size is reduced, large-area arrays can be constructed with λresonance ≫ period, making this fabrication method ideal for manufacturing resonant metamaterials.

  2. Measuring stiffness and residual stress of thin films by contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chengfu; Chen, Yuhang; Chen, Jianfeng; Chu, Jiaru

    2016-11-01

    A method based on contact resonance atomic force microscopy (AFM) was proposed to determine the mechanical properties of thin films. By analyzing the contact resonance frequencies of an AFM probe while the tip was in contact with the sample, the stiffness and residual stress of a freestanding circular SiN x membrane were evaluated quantitatively. The obtained magnitude of residual stress was in reasonable agreement with that determined by wafer curvature measurement. The method was verified to have much better mechanical sensitivity than the popular AFM bending test method. Its promising application to fast, nondestructive mechanical mapping of thin-film-type structures at the nanoscale was also demonstrated.

  3. Resonant Coherent Excitation of Fast Hydrogen Atoms in Front of a LiF(001) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Auth, C.; Mertens, A.; Winter, H.; Borisov, A.G.; Garcia de Abajo, F.J.

    1997-12-01

    We have scattered protons and hydrogen atoms with energies of some keV from a LiF(001) surface under a grazing angle of incidence. From the intensity of Lyman-{alpha} radiation (transition from n=2 to n=1, {lambda}=121.6 nm ) as a function of projectile energy for different azimuthal orientations of the crystal surface, we find clear evidence for a resonant coherent excitation of n=2 states of hydrogen atoms in the oscillating electric field in front of the insulator surface. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Atomically thin resonant tunnel diodes built from synthetic van der Waals heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Chuan; Ghosh, Ram Krishna; Addou, Rafik; Lu, Ning; Eichfeld, Sarah M.; Zhu, Hui; Li, Ming-Yang; Peng, Xin; Kim, Moon J.; Li, Lain-Jong; Wallace, Robert M.; Datta, Suman; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2015-06-01

    Vertical integration of two-dimensional van der Waals materials is predicted to lead to novel electronic and optical properties not found in the constituent layers. Here, we present the direct synthesis of two unique, atomically thin, multi-junction heterostructures by combining graphene with the monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides: molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) and tungsten diselenide (WSe2). The realization of MoS2-WSe2-graphene and WSe2-MoS2-graphene heterostructures leads to resonant tunnelling in an atomically thin stack with spectrally narrow, room temperature negative differential resistance characteristics.

  5. Atomic Resonance Radiation Energetics Investigation as a Diagnostic Method for Non-Equilibrium Hypervelocity Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott A.; Bershader, Daniel; Sharma, Surendra P.; Deiwert, George S.

    1996-01-01

    Absorption measurements with a tunable vacuum ultraviolet light source have been proposed as a concentration diagnostic for atomic oxygen, and the viability of this technique is assessed in light of recent measurements. The instrumentation, as well as initial calibration measurements, have been reported previously. We report here additional calibration measurements performed to study the resonance broadening line shape for atomic oxygen. The application of this diagnostic is evaluated by considering the range of suitable test conditions and requirements, and by identifying issues that remain to be addressed.

  6. Magnetic-resonance imaging of the human brain with an atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Savukov, I; Karaulanov, T

    2013-07-22

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is conventionally performed in very high fields, and this leads to some restrictions in applications. To remove such restrictions, the ultra-low field MRI approach has been proposed. Because of the loss of sensitivity, the detection methods based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in a shielded room were used. Atomic magnetometers have similar sensitivity as SQUIDs and can also be used for MRI, but there are some technical difficulties to overcome. We demonstrate that MRI of the human brain can be obtained with an atomic magnetometer with in-plane resolution of 3 mm in 13 min.

  7. Magnetic-resonance imaging of the human brain with an atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savukov, I.; Karaulanov, T.

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is conventionally performed in very high fields, and this leads to some restrictions in applications. To remove such restrictions, the ultra-low field MRI approach has been proposed. Because of the loss of sensitivity, the detection methods based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in a shielded room were used. Atomic magnetometers have similar sensitivity as SQUIDs and can also be used for MRI, but there are some technical difficulties to overcome. We demonstrate that MRI of the human brain can be obtained with an atomic magnetometer with in-plane resolution of 3 mm in 13 min.

  8. Biodosimetry: chromosome aberration in lymphocytes and electron paramagnetic resonance in tooth enamel from atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, N; Miyazawa, C; Akiyama, M; Sawada, S; Awa, A A

    1996-01-01

    One hundred enamel samples isolated from extracted teeth donated by atomic bomb survivors were subjected to free radical measurement by means of electron paramagnetic resonance (ESR). Results comparing ESR with the chromosome aberration frequency in lymphocytes of the tooth donors, and with the physically estimated DS86 dose suggested that ESR data correlated more closely with chromosome data than with the estimated DS86 doses, probably because DS86 may depend on erroneous memory in some cases.

  9. Dispersion engineering of thick high-Q silicon nitride ring-resonators via atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Riemensberger, Johann; Hartinger, Klaus; Herr, Tobias; Brasch, Victor; Holzwarth, Ronald; Kippenberg, Tobias J

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate dispersion engineering of integrated silicon nitride based ring resonators through conformal coating with hafnium dioxide deposited on top of the structures via atomic layer deposition. Both, magnitude and bandwidth of anomalous dispersion can be significantly increased. The results are confirmed by high resolution frequency-comb-assisted-diode-laser spectroscopy and are in very good agreement with the simulated modification of the mode spectrum.

  10. Dark-line atomic resonances in a submicron-thin Rb vapor layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, A.; Sarkisyan, D.; Papoyan, A.

    2006-03-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) using bichromatic laser radiation and an extremely thin cell filled with pure Rb with smoothly controllable thickness L of the atomic vapor layer in the range ˜780-1600nm , for which L is comparable to the laser wavelength λ resonant with the D2 line (780nm) . It is revealed that the transmission spectrum of the probe laser contains two sub-Doppler peaks that have different linewidths. The narrow peak corresponds to EIT, whereas the broader one results from velocity-selective optical pumping (VSOP) and repumping processes. It is demonstrated that in the case of nonzero detuning of the coupling laser, the EIT resonance and VSOP are shifted with respect to each other on the frequency scale, which makes it possible to observe a competition between the two effects (this is not possible to realize in an ordinary cell). Also, the Dicke-type coherent narrowing effect depending on the ratio L/λ influences the absorption spectrum of the probe laser. Formation of an EIT resonance is substantially favored for the atoms with slow normal velocity, caused by their longer interaction time with the bichromatic laser field. As a result of the predominant contribution of these atoms, the observed linewidth of the EIT resonance is only ˜9MHz , which is more than ten times narrower than the inverse window-to-window flight time. In an external magnetic field, three and five EIT resonances have been observed for the vapor thickness of L=2λ , on Rb87 and Rb85 , respectively.

  11. Coherent population trapping resonances at lower atomic levels of Doppler broadened optical lines

    SciTech Connect

    Şahin, E; Hamid, R; Çelik, M; Özen, G; Izmailov, A Ch

    2014-11-30

    We have detected and analysed narrow high-contrast coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances, which are induced in absorption of a weak monochromatic probe light beam by counterpropagating two-frequency pump radiation in a cell with rarefied caesium vapour. The experimental investigations have been performed by the example of nonclosed three level Λ-systems formed by spectral components of the D{sub 2} line of caesium atoms. The applied method allows one to analyse features of the CPT phenomenon directly at a given low long-lived level of the selected Λ-system even in sufficiently complicated spectra of atomic gases with large Doppler broadening. We have established that CPT resonances in transmission of the probe beam exhibit not only a higher contrast but also a much lesser width in comparison with well- known CPT resonances in transmission of the corresponding two-frequency pump radiation. The results obtained can be used in selective photophysics, photochemistry and ultra-high resolution atomic (molecular) spectroscopy. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  12. A Experimental Determination of the Resonant Frequency of Atoms Moving in a Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beary, Daniel Andrew

    The theory of the Doppler-Recoil effect is described. In contrast to previous theories, the theory proposed by Haugan and Kowalski suggests that the frequency of the electromagnetic wave that excites a transition in an atom is a function of the velocity of that atom and the index of refraction of the medium. Following the path of Haugan and Kowalski, the Doppler Recoil equation is derived under the conditions of a rarefied gas acting as a continuous medium. Next, the theory of saturation spectroscopy is revised. This method of spectroscopy uses a pump and probe beam traveling collinearly in opposite directions. Beams of equal frequency in the lab frame interact with the zero axial velocity population within the gas when the beams are on resonance. For pump and probe beams of different frequencies, the atoms that they interact with will have an axial velocity component such that the Doppler shift leads to resonance with both beams. The purpose of this work is to verify the Doppler -Recoil formula proposed by Haugan and Kowalski. In the experiment performed, the resonant frequency of the stationary and moving velocity groups is determined using saturation spectroscopy. The theory predicts an average frequency shift of 307 Hz/^circC. The data show a shift of 94 kHz/^circ C. Because of the unexpected result, possible sources of errors such as pressure broadening, power broadening, and potential for systematic errors were examined. No explanation was found for these shifts.

  13. Air damping of atomically thin MoS{sub 2} nanomechanical resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jaesung; Wang, Zenghui; Feng, Philip X.-L.; He, Keliang; Shan, Jie

    2014-07-14

    We report on experimental measurement of air damping effects in high frequency nanomembrane resonators made of atomically thin molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) drumhead structures. Circular MoS{sub 2} nanomembranes with thickness of monolayer, few-layer, and multi-layer up to ∼70 nm (∼100 layers) exhibit intriguing pressure dependence of resonance characteristics. In completely covered drumheads, where there is no immediate equilibrium between the drum cavity and environment, resonance frequencies and quality (Q) factors strongly depend on environmental pressure due to bulging of the nanomembranes. In incompletely covered drumheads, strong frequency shifts due to compressing-cavity stiffening occur above ∼200 Torr. The pressure-dependent Q factors are limited by free molecule flow (FMF) damping, and all the mono-, bi-, and tri-layer devices exhibit lower FMF damping than thicker, conventional devices do.

  14. Hydrodynamic corrections to contact resonance atomic force microscopy measurements of viscoelastic loss tangenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Ryan C.; Killgore, Jason P.; Hurley, Donna C.

    2013-07-01

    We present a method to improve accuracy in measurements of nanoscale viscoelastic material properties with contact resonance atomic force microscope methods. Through the use of the two-dimensional hydrodynamic function, we obtain a more precise estimate of the fluid damping experienced by the cantilever-sample system in contact resonance experiments, leading to more accurate values for the tip-sample damping and related material properties. Specifically, we consider the damping and added mass effects generated by both the proximity of the cantilever to the sample surface and the frequency dependence on the hydrodynamic loading of the system. The theoretical correction method is implemented on experimental contact resonance measurements. The measurements are taken on a thin polystyrene film and are used to determine the viscoelastic loss tangent, tan δ, of the material. The magnitude of the corrections become significant on materials with low tan δ (<0.1) and are especially important for measurements made with the first flexural mode of vibration.

  15. Liquid contact resonance atomic force microscopy via experimental reconstruction of the hydrodynamic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Ryan C.; Killgore, Jason P.; Hurley, Donna C.

    2014-06-01

    We present a method to correct for surface-coupled inertial and viscous fluid loading forces in contact resonance (CR) atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments performed in liquid. Based on analytical hydrodynamic theory, the method relies on experimental measurements of the AFM cantilever's free resonance peaks near the sample surface. The free resonance frequencies and quality factors in both air and liquid allow reconstruction of a continuous hydrodynamic function that can be used to adjust the CR data in liquid. Validation experiments utilizing thermally excited free and in-contact spectra were performed to assess the accuracy of our approach. Results show that the method recovers the air frequency values within approximately 6%. Knowledge of fluid loading forces allows current CR analysis techniques formulated for use in air and vacuum environments to be applied to liquid environments. Our technique greatly extends the range of measurement environments available to CR-AFM.

  16. Nanoscale Subsurface Imaging of Nanocomposites via Resonant Difference-Frequency Atomic Force Ultrasonic Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Sean A.; Cantrell, John H.; Lillehei, Peter T.

    2007-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope methodology, called resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), has been developed. The method employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope engages the sample top surface. The cantilever is driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by one of the contact resonance frequencies of the cantilever. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave at the sample surface generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever contact resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create amplitude and phase-generated images of nanoscale near-surface and subsurface features. RDF-AFUM phase images of LaRC-CP2 polyimide polymer containing embedded nanostructures are presented. A RDF-AFUM micrograph of a 12.7 micrometer thick film of LaRC-CP2 containing a monolayer of gold nanoparticles embedded 7 micrometers below the specimen surface reveals the occurrence of contiguous amorphous and crystalline phases within the bulk of the polymer and a preferential growth of the crystalline phase in the vicinity of the gold nanoparticles. A RDF-AFUM micrograph of LaRC-CP2 film containing randomly dispersed carbon nanotubes reveals the growth of an interphase region at certain nanotube-polymer interfaces.

  17. Resonance-mediated atomic ionization dynamics induced by ultraintense x-ray pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Phay J.; Kanter, E. P.; Young, L.

    2015-12-01

    We describe the methodology of our recently developed Monte Carlo rate equation (MCRE) approach, which systematically incorporates bound-bound resonances to model multiphoton ionization dynamics induced by high-fluence, high-intensity x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. These resonances are responsible for ionization far beyond that predicted by the sequential single photon absorption model and are central to a quantitative understanding of atomic ionization dynamics in XFEL pulses. We also present calculated multiphoton ionization dynamics for Kr and Xe atoms in XFEL pulses for a variety of conditions, to compare the effects of bandwidth, pulse duration, pulse fluence, and photon energy. This comprehensive computational investigation reveals areas in the photon energy-pulse fluence landscape where resonances are critically important. We also uncover a mechanism, preservation of inner-shell vacancies (PIVS), whereby radiation damage is enhanced at higher XFEL intensities and identify the sequence of core-outer-Rydberg, core-valence, and core-core resonances encountered during multiphoton x-ray ionization.

  18. Dynamical resonances in the fluorine atom reaction with the hydrogen molecule.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xueming; Zhang, Dong H

    2008-08-01

    [Reaction: see text]. The concept of transition state has played a crucial role in the field of chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics. Resonances in the transition state region are important in many chemical reactions at reaction energies near the thresholds. Detecting and characterizing isolated reaction resonances, however, have been a major challenge in both experiment and theory. In this Account, we review the most recent developments in the study of reaction resonances in the benchmark F + H 2 --> HF + H reaction. Crossed molecular beam scattering experiments on the F + H 2 reaction have been carried out recently using the high-resolution, highly sensitive H-atom Rydberg tagging technique with HF rovibrational states almost fully resolved. Pronounced forward scattering for the HF (nu' = 2) product has been observed at the collision energy of 0.52 kcal/mol in the F + H 2 (j = 0) reaction. Quantum dynamical calculations based on two new potential energy surfaces, the Xu-Xie-Zhang (XXZ) surface and the Fu-Xu-Zhang (FXZ) surface, show that the observed forward scattering of HF (nu' = 2) in the F + H 2 reaction is caused by two Feshbach resonances (the ground resonance and first excited resonance). More interestingly, the pronounced forward scattering of HF (nu' = 2) at 0.52 kcal/mol is enhanced considerably by the constructive interference between the two resonances. In order to probe the resonance potential more accurately, the isotope substituted F + HD --> HF + D reaction has been studied using the D-atom Rydberg tagging technique. A remarkable and fast changing dynamical picture has been mapped out in the collision energy range of 0.3-1.2 kcal/mol for this reaction. Quantum dynamical calculations based on the XXZ surface suggest that the ground resonance on this potential is too high in comparison with the experimental results of the F + HD reaction. However, quantum scattering calculations on the FXZ surface can reproduce nearly quantitatively the resonance

  19. Microfabricated Spin Polarized Atomic Magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez Martinez, Ricardo

    Spin polarized atomic magnetometers involve the preparation of atomic spins and their detection for monitoring magnetic fields. Due to the fact that magnetic fields are ubiquitous in our world, spin polarized atomic magnetometers are used in a wide range of applications from the detection of magnetic fields generated by the human heart and brain to the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance. In this thesis we developed microfabricated spin polarized atomic magnetometers. These sensors are based on optical pumping and spin-exchange collisions between alkali atoms and noble gases contained in microfabricated millimeter-scale vapor cells. In the first part of the thesis, we improved different features of current microfabricated optical magnetometers. Specifically, we improved the bandwidth of these devices, without degrading their magnetic field sensitivity, by broadening their magnetic resonance through spin-exchange collisions between alkali atoms. We also implemented all-optical excitation techniques to avoid problems, such as the magnetic perturbation of the environment, induced by the radio-frequency fields used in some of these sensors. In the second part of the thesis we demonstrated a microfluidic chip for the optical production and detection of hyperpolarized Xe gas through spin-exchange collisions with optically pumped Rb atoms. These devices are critical for the widespread use of spin polarized atomic magnetometers in applications requiring simple, compact, low-cost, and portable instrumentation.

  20. Interaction of wide band gap single crystals with 248 nm excimer laser radiation. XII. The emission of negative atomic ions from alkali halides

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Kenichi; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.

    2007-12-01

    Many wide band gap materials yield charged and neutral emissions when exposed to sub-band-gap laser radiation at power densities below the threshold for optical breakdown and plume formation. In this work, we report the observation of negative alkali ions from several alkali halides under comparable conditions. We observe no evidence for negative halogen ions, in spite of the high electron affinities of the halogens. Significantly, the positive and negative alkali ions show a high degree of spatial and temporal overlap. A detailed study of all the relevant particle emissions from potassium chloride (KCl) suggests that K{sup -} is formed by the sequential attachment of two electrons to K{sup +}.

  1. Performance of a prototype atomic clock based on lin parallel lin coherent population trapping resonances in Rb atomic vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailov, Eugeniy E.; Horrom, Travis; Belcher, Nathan; Novikova, Irina

    2010-03-15

    We report on the performance of the first table-top prototype atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances with parallel linearly polarized optical fields (lin parallel lin configuration). Our apparatus uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) tuned to the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb with the current modulation at the {sup 87}Rb hyperfine frequency. We demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by the proper choice of rf modulation power and further improve our prototype clock stability by optimizing the parameters of the microwave lock loop. Operating in these optimal conditions, we measured a short-term fractional frequency stability (Allan deviation) 2x10{sup -11}{tau}{sup -1/2} for observation times 1 s{<=}{tau}{<=}20 s. This value is limited by large VCSEL phase noise and environmental temperature fluctuation. Further improvements in frequency stability should be possible with an apparatus designed as a dedicated lin parallel lin CPT resonance clock with environmental impacts minimized.

  2. Resonant atom-field interaction in large-size coupled-cavity arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Ciccarello, Francesco

    2011-04-15

    We consider an array of coupled cavities with staggered intercavity couplings, where each cavity mode interacts with an atom. In contrast to large-size arrays with uniform hopping rates where the atomic dynamics is known to be frozen in the strong-hopping regime, we show that resonant atom-field dynamics with significant energy exchange can occur in the case of staggered hopping rates even in the thermodynamic limit. This effect arises from the joint emergence of an energy gap in the free photonic dispersion relation and a discrete frequency at the gap's center. The latter corresponds to a bound normal mode stemming solely from the finiteness of the array length. Depending on which cavity is excited, either the atomic dynamics is frozen or a Jaynes-Cummings-like energy exchange is triggered between the bound photonic mode and its atomic analog. As these phenomena are effective with any number of cavities, they are prone to be experimentally observed even in small-size arrays.

  3. Microplasmas as vacuum ultraviolet source for Cl-atom density measurements by resonance absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Virginie; Bauville, Gérard; Sadeghi, Nader; Puech, Vincent

    2011-11-01

    A micro-hollow cathode discharge was used to generate radiation on the chlorine atom resonance lines. Such radiation could be used to measure, by resonance absorption spectroscopy, the density of chlorine atoms in either ground state (3p5 2P3/2) or in the fine structure metastable state (3p5 2P1/2), which is located at 882.35 cm-1. Among the nine analysed lines in the 132-142 nm spectral region, only those at 137.953 and 139.653 nm, which are strong enough and are not affected by the self-absorption, can be used for the resonance absorption diagnostic of the ground state and the metastable state, respectively. The best operating conditions of the lamp source are 0.5% of Cl2 in argon at 150 mbar and 4 mA discharge current. The measured 800 ± 30 K gas temperature of the microplasma, indicates that under these specific conditions, these two lines are dominantly Doppler broadened. So their profile is Gaussian shaped with full widths at half maximum of (4.7 ± 0.1) × 10-4 nm.

  4. Resonance frequency-retuned quartz tuning fork as a force sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Sakuishi, Tatsuya; Arai, Toyoko; Nogami, Makoto; Tomitori, Masahiko

    2014-07-28

    Based on a two-prong type quartz tuning fork, a force sensor with a high Q factor, which we call a retuned fork sensor, was developed for non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) with atomic resolution. By cutting a small notch and attaching an AFM tip to one prong, its resonance frequency can be retuned to that of the other intact prong. In balancing the two prongs in this manner, a high Q factor (>50 000 in ultrahigh vacuum) is obtained for the sensor. An atomic resolution image of the Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was demonstrated using an nc-AFM with the sensor. The dependence of the Q factor on resonance frequency of the sensor and the long-range force between tip and sample were measured and analyzed in view of the various dissipation channels. Dissipation in the signal detection circuit turned out to be mainly limited by the total Q factor of the nc-AFM system.

  5. Resonance frequency-retuned quartz tuning fork as a force sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Sakuishi, Tatsuya; Nogami, Makoto; Tomitori, Masahiko; Arai, Toyoko

    2014-07-01

    Based on a two-prong type quartz tuning fork, a force sensor with a high Q factor, which we call a retuned fork sensor, was developed for non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) with atomic resolution. By cutting a small notch and attaching an AFM tip to one prong, its resonance frequency can be retuned to that of the other intact prong. In balancing the two prongs in this manner, a high Q factor (>50 000 in ultrahigh vacuum) is obtained for the sensor. An atomic resolution image of the Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was demonstrated using an nc-AFM with the sensor. The dependence of the Q factor on resonance frequency of the sensor and the long-range force between tip and sample were measured and analyzed in view of the various dissipation channels. Dissipation in the signal detection circuit turned out to be mainly limited by the total Q factor of the nc-AFM system.

  6. DIET of metastable Kr ∗ atoms via electron resonances in Kr/Ar alloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, A. D.; Vichnevetski, E.; Sanche, L.

    2000-04-01

    We report the electron-stimulated desorption of metastable Kr ∗ atoms from films containing both argon and krypton. When Ar/Kr alloy films are deposited on a platinum surface, a narrow resonance feature is seen in the desorption yield at an incident electron energy of 10 eV; i.e., about 0.5 eV below the energy of the lowest bulk exciton states of the alloy. Desorption at 10 eV requires that krypton atoms be in close proximity to the platinum substrate since the resonance disappears when alloy films are deposited on a crystalline n-hexane film. Time-of-flight measurements show that the kinetic energies of desorbed krypton atoms are similar at incident electron energies of 10.1 eV and 15 eV, and indicate a similar mechanism for desorption at these energies. We attribute the new desorption feature to formation of a Kr - anionic state of the film (electron-exciton complex) which is transformed into a Kr ∗ exciton by electron transfer into the metal. Desorption proceeds following exciton trapping at the film/vacuum interface.

  7. Plasma Formation During Operation of a Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) in Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu.; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-10-01

    Diode pumped Alkali Lasers (DPALs) produce laser action on the resonant lines of alkali atoms. Diode lasers resonantly pump the 2P3/2 state of the alkali atom which is collisionally relaxed to the 2P3/2 state which then lases to the ground state 2S1/2. The low optical quality of high power semiconductor diode lasers is converted into high optical quality laser radiation from the alkali vapor. The Cs DPAL system using Ar/Cs/C2H6 mixtures has shown promising results. (C2H6 is the collisional relaxant.) In other studies, resonant excitation of alkali vapor by low power lasers has been used to produce highly ionized channels, initiated through associative ionization and superelastic electron heating. The issue then arises if plasma formation occurs during DPAL by similar mechanisms which would be detrimental to laser performance. In this paper, we report on results from a computational study of a DPAL using Cs vapor. The global model addresses quasi-cw pumping of the Cs(2P3/2) state by laser diodes, and includes a full accounting of the resulting electron kinetics. To enable this study, the B-spline R-matrix (BSR) with pseudostates method was employed to calculate electron impact cross sections for Cs. We found that for pump rates of many to 10 kW/cm2, plasma densities approaching 1013 cm-3 occur during laser oscillation with higher values in the absence of laser oscillation. Supported by DoD High Energy Laser Mult. Res. Initiative and NSF.

  8. Effects of free-electron-laser field fluctuations on the frequency response of driven atomic resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolopoulos, G. M.; Lambropoulos, P.

    2012-09-01

    We study the effects of field fluctuations on the total yields of Auger electrons, obtained in the excitation of neutral atoms to a core-excited state by means of short-wavelength free-electron-laser pulses. Beginning with a self-contained analysis of the statistical properties of fluctuating free-electron-laser pulses, we analyze separately and in detail the cases of single and double Auger resonances, focusing on fundamental phenomena such as power broadening and ac Stark (Autler-Townes) splitting. In certain cases, field fluctuations are shown to influence dramatically the frequency response of the resonances, whereas in other cases the signal obtained may convey information about the bandwidth of the radiation as well as the dipole moment between Auger states.

  9. Atomically thin resonant tunnel diodes built from synthetic van der Waals heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Chuan; Ghosh, Ram Krishna; Addou, Rafik; Lu, Ning; Eichfeld, Sarah M.; Zhu, Hui; Li, Ming-Yang; Peng, Xin; Kim, Moon J.; Li, Lain-Jong; Wallace, Robert M.; Datta, Suman; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Vertical integration of two-dimensional van der Waals materials is predicted to lead to novel electronic and optical properties not found in the constituent layers. Here, we present the direct synthesis of two unique, atomically thin, multi-junction heterostructures by combining graphene with the monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides: molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) and tungsten diselenide (WSe2). The realization of MoS2–WSe2–graphene and WSe2–MoS2–graphene heterostructures leads to resonant tunnelling in an atomically thin stack with spectrally narrow, room temperature negative differential resistance characteristics. PMID:26088295

  10. High efficiency direct detection of ions from resonance ionization of sputtered atoms

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Pellin, M.J.; Young, C.E.

    1985-01-16

    A method and apparatus are provided for trace and other quantitative analysis with high efficiency of a component in a sample, with the analysis involving the removal by ion or other bombardment of a small quantity of ion and neutral atom groups from the sample, the conversion of selected neutral atom groups to photoions by laser initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, the selective deflection of the photoions for separation from original ion group emanating from the sample, and the detection of the photoions as a measure of the quantity of the component. In some embodiments, the original ion group is accelerated prior to the RIS step for separation purposes. Noise and other interference are reduced by shielding the detector from primary and secondary ions and deflecting the photoions sufficiently to avoid the primary and secondary ions.

  11. High efficiency direct detection of ions from resonance ionization of sputtered atoms

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Young, Charles E.

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for trace and other quantitative analysis with high efficiency of a component in a sample, with the analysis involving the removal by ion or other bombardment of a small quantity of ion and neutral atom groups from the sample, the conversion of selected neutral atom groups to photoions by laser initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, the selective deflection of the photoions for separation from original ion group emanating from the sample, and the detection of the photoions as a measure of the quantity of the component. In some embodiments, the original ion group is accelerated prior to the RIS step for separation purposes. Noise and other interference are reduced by shielding the detector from primary and secondary ions and deflecting the photoions sufficiently to avoid the primary and secondary ions.

  12. Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of Al atoms and dimers solvated in helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnokutski, Serge A.; Huisken, Friedrich

    2015-02-28

    Resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectroscopy has been applied to investigate the solvation of Al atoms in helium droplets. The R2PI spectra reveal vibrational progressions that can be attributed to Al–He{sub n} vibrations. It is found that small helium droplets have very little chance to pick up an aluminum atom after collision. However, the pick-up probability increases with the size of the helium droplets. The absorption band that is measured by monitoring the ions on the mass of the Al dimer is found to be very little shifted with respect to the Al monomer band (∼400 cm{sup −1}). However, using the same laser wavelength, we were unable to detect any Al{sub n} photoion with n larger than two.

  13. Protein folding at atomic resolution: analysis of autonomously folding supersecondary structure motifs by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Sborgi, Lorenzo; Verma, Abhinav; Sadqi, Mourad; de Alba, Eva; Muñoz, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The study of protein folding has been conventionally hampered by the assumption that all single-domain proteins fold by an all-or-none process (two-state folding) that makes it impossible to resolve folding mechanisms experimentally. Here we describe an experimental method for the thermodynamic analysis of protein folding at atomic resolution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The method is specifically developed for the study of small proteins that fold autonomously into basic supersecondary structure motifs, and that do so in the sub-millisecond timescale (folding archetypes). From the NMR experiments we obtain hundreds of atomic unfolding curves that are subsequently analyzed leading to the determination of the characteristic network of folding interactions. The application of this approach to a comprehensive catalog of elementary folding archetypes holds the promise of becoming the first experimental approach capable of unraveling the basic rules connecting protein structure and folding mechanism. PMID:22987355

  14. Resonance overlap criterion for H atom ionization by circularly polarized microwave fields

    SciTech Connect

    Sacha, K.; Zakrzewski, J.

    1997-01-01

    The threshold for H atom ionization by circularly polarized microwave fields is discussed within the classical mechanics framework for high microwave frequencies. The Chirikov resonance overlap criterion predictions are compared with estimates obtained adopting the renormalization method. It is shown that the ionization threshold is highly sensitive to the helicity of microwaves. Among all possible initial electronic orbits, those of medium eccentricity are the first to ionize. The results obtained indicate that collisions with the nucleus play a negligible role for the onset of ionization. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Solar background rejection by a pressure-broadened atomic resonance filter operating at a Fraunhofer wavelength.

    PubMed

    Gelbwachs, J A; Tabat, M D

    1989-02-15

    We have calculated the solar background rejection of the Mg atomic resonance filter operating at the b(1) Fraunhofer wavelength (518.4 nm) as a function of the pressure-broadened filter linewidth. For pressure broadening induced by the noble gases the solar background rejection decreases from 93% at a 0.002-nm bandwidth to 82-84% at a 0.02-nm bandwidth. Solar background rejection was insensitive to buffer gas and was optimum for the noble gas with the smallest shift-to-broadening ratio.

  16. Kondo Resonance of a Co Atom Exchange Coupled to a Ferromagnetic Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, D.-J.; Guissart, S.; Ormaza, M.; Bachellier, N.; Bengone, O.; Simon, P.; Limot, L.

    2016-10-01

    The Kondo effect of a Co atom on Cu(100) was investigated with a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope using a monoatomically sharp nickel tip. Upon a tip-Co contact, the differential conductance spectra exhibit a spin-split asymmetric Kondo resonance. The computed ab initio value of the exchange coupling is too small to suppress the Kondo effect, but sufficiently large to produce the splitting observed. A quantitative analysis of the line shape using the numerical renormalization group technique indicates that the junction spin polarization is weak.

  17. Advancements in flowing diode pumped alkali lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Stalnaker, Donald M.; Guild, Eric M.; Oliker, Benjamin Q.; Moran, Paul J.; Townsend, Steven W.; Hostutler, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple variants of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) have recently been demonstrated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Highlights of this ongoing research effort include: a) a 571W rubidium (Rb) based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with a gain (2α) of 0.48 cm-1, b) a rubidium-cesium (Cs) Multi-Alkali Multi-Line (MAML) laser that simultaneously lases at both 795 nm and 895 nm, and c) a 1.5 kW resonantly pumped potassium (K) DPAL with a slope efficiency of 50%. The common factor among these experiments is the use of a flowing alkali test bed.

  18. [Laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect in laser resonance ionization process of lead atom].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Shun; Li, Ying; Dai, Lin; Zheng, Rong-Er

    2008-07-01

    Isotope ratio measurements have been increasingly used in geochemistry, geochronology, cosmos chemistry and environmental science. Precise and accurate isotope ratio measurements are an important task in many applications such as the determination of isotope variations in geological and cosmic samples. Due to its high sensitivity, high ionization efficiency and high element selectivity, laser resonance ionization spectroscopy has nowadays become one of the key techniques, including isotope ratio measurements and trace amount analyses. Because of the isotope shifts and hyperfine structure, there is laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect in the process of laser resonance ionization. The different isotope ionization efficiency can affect precise and accurate measurement of isotope ratios. In the present paper, the dependences of the laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect on some of the laser parameters were studied by theoretical methods. Based on the numerical simulation of the population rate equations, laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect of lead isotopes was studied, by calculating laser resonance ionization transition "6s2 6p23 P0-6s2 6p7 s3 P1(0) --> ionization". The population rate equations was approximated considering some factors which affect the probability of laser resonance transition such as spectral lines width of laser and atom, isotope shifts and hyperfine structure. According to the approximated population rate equations, "1+1" laser resonant ionization process was employed to calculate the ionization probability of lead isotopes by means of computer simulation. The dependences of laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect on the laser parameters, such as laser central wavelength, bandwidth and intensity were investigated. The calculated results show that the laser-induced isotopic discrimination effect of lead isotopes could be almost eliminated by operating at optimized wavelength and could be lessened by using wide band laser

  19. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  20. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  1. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future. PMID:26821751

  2. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials' functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  3. Nonlinearity, resonance, charging, and motion at the atomic scale studied with scanning tunneling microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Xiuwen

    2008-10-01

    Several novel phenomena at the single-atom and single-molecule level occurring on the surfaces of single crystals were studied with home-built low temperature scanning tunneling microscopes. The results revealed intriguing properties of single atoms and single molecules, including nonlinearity, resonance, charging, and motion. First, negative differential resistance (NDR) was observed in the dI/dV spectra for single copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules adsorbed on one- and two-layer sodium bromide (NaBr), but not for single CuPc molecules adsorbed on three-layer NaBr, all grown on a NiAl(110) surface. This transition from NDR to the absence of NDR was explained as the result of competing effects in the double-barrier tunnel junction (DBTJ) and was reproduced in a calculation based on a resonant-tunneling model. Second, the nonlinearity of the STM junction due to a single manganese (Mn) atom or MnCO molecule adsorbed on a NiAl(110) surface was used to rectify microwave irradiation. The resulting rectification current was shown to be sensitive to the spin-splitting of the electronic states of the Mn atom and to the vibrations of the MnCO molecule. Next, the ordering of cesium (Cs) atoms adsorbed on a Au(111) surface and a NiAl(110) surface was imaged in real space. Because of charge transfer to the substrates, Cs adatoms were positively charged on both surfaces. Even at 12 K, Cs adatoms were able to move and adjust according to coverage. On Au(111), the Cs first layer had a quasi-hexagonal lattice and islands of the second Cs layer did not appear until the first was completed. On NiAl(110), a locally disordered Cs first layer was observed before a locally ordered layer appeared at higher coverages. The cation-pi interactions were then studied at the single molecular level. We were able to form cation-pi complexes such as Cs···DSB, Cs···DSB···Cs, Rb···DSB, and Rb···ZnEtiol controllably by manipulation with the STM tip. We could also separate these

  4. Utilizing intentional internal resonance to achieve multi-harmonic atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Bongwon; Pettit, Chris; Dharmasena, Sajith; Keum, Hohyun; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Jungkyu; Kim, Seok; McFarland, D. Michael; Bergman, Lawrence A.; Vakakis, Alexander F.; Cho, Hanna

    2016-03-01

    During dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM), the deflection of a scanning cantilever generates multiple frequency terms due to the nonlinear nature of AFM tip–sample interactions. Even though each frequency term is reasonably expected to encode information about the sample, only the fundamental frequency term is typically decoded to provide topographic mapping of the measured surface. One of main reasons for discarding higher harmonic signals is their low signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we introduce a new design concept for multi-harmonic AFM, exploiting intentional nonlinear internal resonance for the enhancement of higher harmonics. The nonlinear internal resonance, triggered by the non-smooth tip–sample dynamic interactions, results in nonlinear energy transfers from the directly excited fundamental bending mode to the higher-frequency mode and, hence, enhancement of the higher harmonic of the measured response. It is verified through detailed theoretical and experimental study that this AFM design can robustly incorporate the required internal resonance and enable high-frequency AFM measurements. Measurements on an inhomogeneous polymer specimen demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed design, namely that the higher harmonic of the measured response is capable of enhanced simultaneous topography imaging and compositional mapping, exhibiting less crosstalk with an abrupt height change.

  5. Quantitative Subsurface Atomic Structure Fingerprint for 2D Materials and Heterostructures by First-Principles-Calibrated Contact-Resonance Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qing; Lange, Björn; Parlak, Zehra; Lopes, Joao Marcelo J; Blum, Volker; Zauscher, Stefan

    2016-07-26

    Interfaces and subsurface layers are critical for the performance of devices made of 2D materials and heterostructures. Facile, nondestructive, and quantitative ways to characterize the structure of atomically thin, layered materials are thus essential to ensure control of the resultant properties. Here, we show that contact-resonance atomic force microscopy-which is exquisitely sensitive to stiffness changes that arise from even a single atomic layer of a van der Waals-adhered material-is a powerful experimental tool to address this challenge. A combined density functional theory and continuum modeling approach is introduced that yields sub-surface-sensitive, nanomechanical fingerprints associated with specific, well-defined structure models of individual surface domains. Where such models are known, this information can be correlated with experimentally obtained contact-resonance frequency maps to reveal the (sub)surface structure of different domains on the sample. PMID:27263541

  6. Quantitative Subsurface Atomic Structure Fingerprint for 2D Materials and Heterostructures by First-Principles-Calibrated Contact-Resonance Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qing; Lange, Björn; Parlak, Zehra; Lopes, Joao Marcelo J; Blum, Volker; Zauscher, Stefan

    2016-07-26

    Interfaces and subsurface layers are critical for the performance of devices made of 2D materials and heterostructures. Facile, nondestructive, and quantitative ways to characterize the structure of atomically thin, layered materials are thus essential to ensure control of the resultant properties. Here, we show that contact-resonance atomic force microscopy-which is exquisitely sensitive to stiffness changes that arise from even a single atomic layer of a van der Waals-adhered material-is a powerful experimental tool to address this challenge. A combined density functional theory and continuum modeling approach is introduced that yields sub-surface-sensitive, nanomechanical fingerprints associated with specific, well-defined structure models of individual surface domains. Where such models are known, this information can be correlated with experimentally obtained contact-resonance frequency maps to reveal the (sub)surface structure of different domains on the sample.

  7. Photon-number statistics from resonance fluorescence of a two-level atom near a plasmonic nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastukhov, Vladimir M.; Vladimirova, Yulia V.; Zadkov, Victor N.

    2014-12-01

    The photon-number statistics from resonance fluorescence of a two-level atom near a metal nanosphere driven by a laser field with finite bandwidth is studied theoretically. Our analysis shows that all interesting physics here takes place in a small area around the nanosphere where the near field and the atom-nanosphere coupling essentially affect the radiative properties of the atom. Computer modeling estimates this area roughly as r ≤2 a (r is the distance from the center of the nanosphere to the atom), with a being the radius of the nanosphere. At the larger distances, the influence of the nanoparticle vanishes and the atom tends to behave similarly to that in free space. It is shown that the distribution function p (n ,T ) of the emission probability of n photons in a given time interval T in steady-state resonance fluorescence drastically depends on the atom location around the nanosphere for r ≤2 a , featuring a characteristic twist in the ridgelike dependence and a convergence time of up to 9 μ s, two orders of magnitude slower than for the atom in free space. At large distances, the distribution converges to a Gaussian one, as for the atom in free space. The typical convergence time scale at large distances r >2 a tends to the convergence time of the atom in free space. There are also two areas symmetrical around the nanosphere in which Ω ˜γ and the convergence time goes to zero. This behavior is determined by the interplay of the radiative and nonradiative decay rates of the atom due to the coupling with the metal nanosphere and by the near-field intensity. Additional parameters are the normalized laser frequency detuning from the atomic resonance and the bandwidth of the incoming laser field.

  8. Development and Deployment of a Field Instrument for the Detection of Iodine Atoms Using Resonance Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale, C. S.; Ingham, T.; Commane, R.; Heard, D. E.; Bloss, W. J.

    2007-12-01

    Recently there have been several measurements of I2, alkyl iodides (CH3I, CH2I2), iodine monoxide (IO) and OIO at sites including coastal, polar and open ocean environments. I2 and the alkyl iodides are rapidly photolysed in the atmosphere to liberate iodine atoms which may then react with ozone to form iodine monoxide (IO) radicals. Subsequent reactions of IO lead to the catalytic depletion of tropospheric ozone, affect OH:HO2 and NO:NO2 ratios, oxidise dimethyl sulphide and result in the formation of new particles. While the IO radical and its stable precursors have previously been detected and measured in the marine boundary layer, little is known about the levels of reactive inorganic halogen species, or the local distribution of iodine activity at coastal sites such as Mace Head (Ireland). We have developed an instrument which employs vacuum UV resonance-fluorescence using a microwave discharge lamp to detect atomic iodine via the (5p5) \\ 2P3/2 ← \\ 2P3/2 \\ (6s1) transition near 178 nm. The instrument is calibrated by generating a known concentration of iodine atoms from the photolysis of I2 at 185 nm. The system can be operated in two modes; either to measure ambient iodine atoms (in photochemical steady state with their precursors and IO), or to measure the total photolabile iodine loading, through broadband visible photolysis of ambient air, with detection of the iodine atoms formed. This technique allows for the in-situ measurement of the species detected, which is advantageous for gathering information about their local distribution and source. The instrument was deployed for the first time in August 2007 at Mace Head on the west coast of Ireland. We present initial results from this field trial, which represent the first observation of ambient iodine atoms in the marine atmosphere. The results will be compared with the measurements of IO obtained from the University of Leeds laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instrument.

  9. Manipulating Neutral Atoms and Molecules by Strong Non-Resonant Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilensky, Mark

    Manipulating neutral particles by laser light has been of great interest during the last decade. The main effort is placed on atom cooling together with atomic beam deceleration, deflection, focusing, mirroring, and related aspects of atom optics. In the present thesis we provide indepth analytical and numerical analysis of the optical shaker approach to non-resonant laser cooling, and propose new methods for deceleration and cooling atoms/molecules in a feedback-controlled bistable cavity. Moreover, application of the latter technique to cooling of a micromechanical object is also proposed and analyzed. In the Introduction we review the current state-of-the-art cooling techniques and provide a brief history of their development. Chapter I presents in-depth analysis of the optical shaker operation; we study the issue of the detection of the dipole force in the far zone, which is the main building block of the optical shaker technique. The effects of the finite response time of the detectors and of the phase modulator are modeled numerically. The thresholds for cooling are estimated analytically and verified numerically. Minimal requirements for the stability of the laser sources are formulated. Perturbation theory analysis of the heating rate of an ensemble of particles embedded in a non-stationary sinusoidal (non-harmonic) potential is provided. In addition, a preliminary study of the adaptive cooling strategy is outlined. Chapter II presents a new method for deceleration of a single particle and cooling of an ensemble of particles in a bistable optical cavity. Optical bistability is achieved by non-linear feedback control of the field incident on the cavity. The technique realizes cavity-induced Sisyphustype cooling mechanism. This approach is rather generic because of its off-resonance nature. The bistable cavity introduces a "dry friction" stopping force, and requires a relatively "bad cavity" for its implementation. We provide an analytical estimate for the

  10. Length-extension resonator as a force sensor for high-resolution frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy in air

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Summary Frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy has turned into a well-established method to obtain atomic resolution on flat surfaces, but is often limited to ultra-high vacuum conditions and cryogenic temperatures. Measurements under ambient conditions are influenced by variations of the dew point and thin water layers present on practically every surface, complicating stable imaging with high resolution. We demonstrate high-resolution imaging in air using a length-extension resonator operating at small amplitudes. An additional slow feedback compensates for changes in the free resonance frequency, allowing stable imaging over a long period of time with changing environmental conditions. PMID:27335735

  11. Resonant tunneling through discrete quantum states in stacked atomic-layered MoS2.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Linh-Nam; Lan, Yann-Wen; Chen, Jyun-Hong; Chang, Tay-Rong; Zhong, Yuan-Liang; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Li, Lain-Jong; Chen, Chii-Dong

    2014-05-14

    Two-dimensional crystals can be assembled into three-dimensional stacks with atomic layer precision, which have already shown plenty of fascinating physical phenomena and been used for prototype vertical-field-effect-transistors.1,2 In this work, interlayer electron tunneling in stacked high-quality crystalline MoS2 films were investigated. A trilayered MoS2 film was sandwiched between top and bottom electrodes with an adjacent bottom gate, and the discrete energy levels in each layer could be tuned by bias and gate voltages. When the discrete energy levels aligned, a resonant tunneling peak appeared in the current-voltage characteristics. The peak position shifts linearly with perpendicular magnetic field, indicating formation of Landau levels. From this linear dependence, the effective mass and Fermi velocity are determined and are confirmed by electronic structure calculations. These fundamental parameters are useful for exploitation of its unique properties.

  12. Dynamic nano-triboelectrification using torsional resonance mode atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wei; Yao, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of charge generation, distribution, and transfer between surfaces is very important for energy harvesting applications based on triboelectric effect. Here, we demonstrate dynamic nanotriboelectrification with torsional resonance (TR) mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experiments on rubbing the sample surface using TR mode for the generation of triboelectric charges and in-situ characterization of the charge distribution using scanning Kelvin probe microcopy (SKPM) were performed. This method allows the tip to perform lateral oscillation and maintains the tip-sample interaction in the attractive region to ensure high efficiency of the charge generation during the rubbing process. The measured efficiency of generating triboelectric charges can achieve ~10.53 times higher than conventional static/contact mode in the triboelectrification experiments. In addition to the charge generation, local discharging experiments were also performed. This work would provide a new method to generate patterned charges and also be helpful in understanding the mechanism of nanotriboelectrification. PMID:27302624

  13. Observation of resonant symmetry lifting by an effective bias field in a parametrically modulated atomic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yonghee; Heo, Myoung-Sun; Moon, Geol; Kim, Ji-Hyoun; Jhe, Wonho; Noh, Heung-Ryoul

    2010-12-15

    We experimentally demonstrate resonant symmetry lifting in a parametrically modulated magneto-optical trap of cold {sup 85}Rb atoms. This is achieved by applying a weak additional modulation at half the frequency of the strong parametric modulation, which acts as an effective static bias field to the system. We measure the system response by varying the amplitude of the additional fictitious bias as well as the relative phase between the bias and the parametric drive, and the results are in good agreement with theory. The additional modulation provides an additional degree of freedom to control the system, which is useful for investigating system properties such as susceptibility, dynamic response, and related critical phenomena. We also have measured the amplitude of the response to higher harmonics of the additional modulation frequency, which allows more precise understanding of the system dynamics.

  14. Dynamic nano-triboelectrification using torsional resonance mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wei; Yao, Nan

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the mechanism of charge generation, distribution, and transfer between surfaces is very important for energy harvesting applications based on triboelectric effect. Here, we demonstrate dynamic nanotriboelectrification with torsional resonance (TR) mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experiments on rubbing the sample surface using TR mode for the generation of triboelectric charges and in-situ characterization of the charge distribution using scanning Kelvin probe microcopy (SKPM) were performed. This method allows the tip to perform lateral oscillation and maintains the tip-sample interaction in the attractive region to ensure high efficiency of the charge generation during the rubbing process. The measured efficiency of generating triboelectric charges can achieve ~10.53 times higher than conventional static/contact mode in the triboelectrification experiments. In addition to the charge generation, local discharging experiments were also performed. This work would provide a new method to generate patterned charges and also be helpful in understanding the mechanism of nanotriboelectrification.

  15. Theory and calculation of resonances and autoionization of two-electron atoms and ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temkin, A.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques for calculating the electron scattering from one-electron hydrogen-like targets on the basis of the Feshback formalism, are discussed. The principal similarities between resonance parameters in the Feshbach formalism and the corresponding Breit-Wigner quantities, are described in detail. Special attention is devoted to a description of the Fano line shape parameter q, and a technique for formulating it in terms of a projector operator is proposed. The theoretical methods are illustrated by numerical calculations for 1S, 3P, and 1D states of H(-) below the first excited threshold of the target atom. Calculations of 1,3S 1,3P, 1,3D states for He are also presented.

  16. Note: Calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers using only their resonant frequency and quality factor

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Friend, James R.

    2014-11-15

    A simplified method for calibrating atomic force microscope cantilevers was recently proposed by Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 103705 (2012); Sec. III D] that relies solely on the resonant frequency and quality factor of the cantilever in fluid (typically air). This method eliminates the need to measure the hydrodynamic function of the cantilever, which can be time consuming given the wide range of cantilevers now available. Using laser Doppler vibrometry, we rigorously assess the accuracy of this method for a series of commercially available cantilevers and explore its performance under non-ideal conditions. This shows that the simplified method is highly accurate and can be easily implemented to perform fast, robust, and non-invasive spring constant calibration.

  17. On the tip calibration for accurate modulus measurement by contact resonance atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Passeri, D; Rossi, M; Vlassak, J J

    2013-05-01

    Accurate quantitative elastic modulus measurements using contact resonance atomic force microscopy require the calibration of geometrical and mechanical properties of the tip as well as the choice of a suitable model for describing the cantilever-tip-sample system. In this work, we demonstrate with both simulations and experiments that the choice of the model influences the results of the calibration. Neglecting lateral force results in the underestimation of the tip indentation modulus and in the overestimation of the tip-sample contact radius. We propose a new approach to the calibration and data analysis, where lateral forces and cantilever inclination are neglected (which simplifies the calculations) and the tip parameters are assumed as fictitious.

  18. Contact resonance atomic force microscopy for viscoelastic characterization of polymer-based nanocomposites at variable temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natali, Marco; Passeri, Daniele; Reggente, Melania; Tamburri, Emanuela; Terranova, Maria Letizia; Rossi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Characterization of mechanical properties at the nanometer scale at variable temperature is one of the main challenges in the development of polymer-based nanocomposites for application in high temperature environments. Contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) is a powerful technique to characterize viscoelastic properties of materials at the nanoscale. In this work, we demonstrate the capability of CR-AFM of characterizing viscoelastic properties (i.e., storage and loss moduli, as well as loss tangent) of polymer-based nanocomposites at variable temperature. CR-AFM is first illustrated on two polymeric reference samples, i.e., low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and polycarbonate (PC). Then, temperature-dependent viscoelastic properties (in terms of loss tangent) of a nanocomposite sample constituted by a epoxy resin reinforced with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are investigated.

  19. Multi-atom entanglement engineering and phase-covariant quantum cloning with a single resonant interaction assisted by external driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xian-Peng; Shen, Li-Tuo; Yang, Zhen-Biao

    2014-12-01

    We propose a scheme to realize multi-atom entanglement and phase-covariant quantum cloning in a short-time manner possessing the advantage of its robustness with respect to parameter fluctuations. The process is achieved by externally driving the atoms to resonantly couple to the cavity mode. Compared to other strategies, such as the adiabatic or virtual-photon techniques, it provides a method which allows the relatively fast coherent manipulation.

  20. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Single atoms transferring between a magneto-optical trap and a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun; Wang, Jing; Yang, Bao-Dong; Zhang, Tian-Cai; Wang, Jun-Min

    2009-08-01

    Based on our work on single cesium atoms trapped in a large-magnetic-gradient vapour-cell magneto-optical trap (MOT), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is remarkably improved. Also a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap (FORT) formed by a strongly-focused 1064 nm single frequency Nd:YVO4 laser beam is introduced. One cesium atom is prepared in the MOT, and then it can transfer successfully between the MOT and the FORT which is overlapped with the MOT. Utilizing the effective transfer, the lifetime of single atoms trapped in the FORT is measured to be 6.9 ± 0.3 s. Thus we provide a system where the atomic qubit can be coherently manipulated.

  1. Ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal atoms on the (0001) surface of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabishchenkova, A. G. Otrokov, M. M.; Kuznetsov, V. M.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2015-09-15

    Ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal adatoms on the (0001) step surface of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has been performed for the case of low coverage. The calculations of the activation energies of diffusion of adatoms on the surface and in van der Waals gaps near steps, as well as the estimate of diffusion lengths, have shown that efficient intercalation through steps is possible only for Li and Na. Data obtained for K, Rb, and Cs atoms indicate that their thermal desorption at high temperatures can occur before intercalation. The results have been discussed in the context of existing experimental data.

  2. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-11-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of PFBC technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an altemative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. As shown in Fig. 1, the RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no HTHP sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-leaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6M-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite [8]. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed.

  3. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of PFBC technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an altemative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. As shown in Fig. 1, the RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no HTHP sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-leaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6M-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite [8]. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed.

  4. Chip Scale Atomic Resonator Frequency Stabilization System With Ultra-Low Power Consumption for Optoelectronic Oscillators.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianye; Zhang, Yaolin; Lu, Haoyuan; Hou, Dong; Zhang, Shuangyou; Wang, Zhong

    2016-07-01

    We present a long-term chip scale stabilization scheme for optoelectronic oscillators (OEOs) based on a rubidium coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic resonator. By locking a single mode of an OEO to the (85)Rb 3.035-GHz CPT resonance utilizing an improved phase-locked loop (PLL) with a PID regulator, we achieved a chip scale frequency stabilization system for the OEO. The fractional frequency stability of the stabilized OEO by overlapping Allan deviation reaches 6.2 ×10(-11) (1 s) and  ∼ 1.45 ×10 (-11) (1000 s). This scheme avoids a decrease in the extra phase noise performance induced by the electronic connection between the OEO and the microwave reference in common injection locking schemes. The total physical package of the stabilization system is [Formula: see text] and the total power consumption is 400 mW, which provides a chip scale and portable frequency stabilization approach with ultra-low power consumption for OEOs. PMID:26529751

  5. Excitation of the {sup 229m}Th nuclear isomer via resonance conversion in ionized atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Karpeshin, F. F.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

    2015-09-15

    Pressing problems concerning the optical pumping of the 7.6-eV {sup 229m}Th nuclear isomer, which is a candidate for a new nuclear optical reference point for frequencies, are examined. Physics behind the mechanism of the two-photon optical pumping of the isomer is considered. It is shown that, irrespective of the pumping scheme, a dominant contribution comes, in accord with what was proven earlier for the 3.5-eV isomer, from the resonance 8s–7s transition. Details of an optimum experimental scheme are discussed. It is shown that, after isomer excitation, the atom involved remains with a high probability in an excited state at an energy of about 0.5 eV rather than in the ground state, the required energy of the two photons being equal to the energy of the nuclear level plus the energy of the lowest 7s state of the atom. The estimated pumping time is about 1.5 s in the case where the field strength of each laser is 1 V/cm.

  6. Effect of photoions on the line shape of the Foerster resonance lines and microwave transitions in cold rubidium Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Tretyakov, D. B.; Beterov, I. I.; Entin, V. M.; Yakshina, E. A.; Ryabtsev, I. I.; Dyubko, S. F.; Alekseev, E. A.; Pogrebnyak, N. L.; Bezuglov, N. N.; Arimondo, E.

    2012-01-15

    Experiments are carried out on the spectroscopy of the Foerster resonance lines Rb(37P) + Rb(37P) {yields} Rb(37S) + Rb(38S) and microwave transitions nP {yields} n Prime S, n Prime D between Rydberg states of cold rubidium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Under ordinary conditions, all spectra exhibit a linewidth of 2-3 MHz irrespective of the interaction time between atoms or between atoms and microwave radiation, although the limit resonance width should be determined by the inverse interaction time. The analysis of experimental conditions has shown that the main source of line broadening is the inhomogeneous electric field of cold photoions that are generated under the excitation of initial nP Rydberg states by broadband pulsed laser radiation. The application of an additional electric-field pulse that rapidly extracts photoions produced by a laser pulse leads to a considerable narrowing of lines of microwave resonances and the Foerster resonance. Various sources of line broadening in cold Rydberg atoms are analyzed.

  7. Creating Feshbach resonances for ultracold molecule formation with radio-frequency fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Daniel J.; Xie, Ting; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2016-08-01

    We show that radio-frequency (rf) radiation may be used to create Feshbach resonances in ultracold gases of alkali-metal atoms at desired magnetic fields that are convenient for atomic cooling and degeneracy. For the case of 39K+133Cs , where there are no rf-free resonances in regions where Cs may be cooled to degeneracy, we show that a resonance may be created near 21 G with 69.2 MHz rf radiation. This resonance is almost lossless with circularly polarized rf, and the molecules created are long-lived even with plane-polarized rf.

  8. Self-discharge in bimetallic cells containing alkali metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, M. S.; Hesson, J. C.; Shimotake, H.

    1969-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of thermally regenerative bimetallic cells with alkali metal anodes shows a relation between the current drawn and the rate of discharge under open-circuit conditions. The self-discharge rate of the cell is due to the dissolution and ionization of alkali metal atoms in the fused-salt electrolyte

  9. Feshbach resonances and transition rates for cold homonuclear collisions between {sup 39}K and {sup 41}K atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lysebo, M.; Veseth, L.

    2010-03-15

    We report results from close-coupling calculations for homonuclear ultracold collisions between potassium atoms, using the most up-to-date Born-Oppenheimer potential curves. The present study includes both of the bosonic isotopes {sup 39}K and {sup 41}K. The s-wave scattering lengths as functions of the magnetic field strength for collisions between atoms in identical and different hyperfine states are obtained. Several Feshbach resonances are located and characterized for both isotopes. Comparison with experiments, where such data are available, show excellent agreement. We also study weakly bound molecular states of the K{sub 2} molecule in close relation to the calculated Feshbach resonances. Another objective of the present work is to study inelastic collisions in which the hyperfine states of the colliding atoms are changed. From this type of calculation we obtain transition rates as functions of the magnetic field strength. Finally, we discuss how such transition rates might be of importance for experimental work.

  10. Structural and dynamical aspects of avoided-crossing resonances in a three-level {Lambda} system

    SciTech Connect

    Lizuain, I.; Echanobe, J.; Ruschhaupt, A.; Muga, J. G.; Steck, D. A.

    2010-12-15

    In a recent publication [Phys. Rev. A 79, 065602 (2009)], it was shown that an avoided-crossing resonance can be defined according to level-structural or dynamical criteria. We propose an experiment to observe the difference between the two definitions in a three-level {Lambda} system using microwave fields coupling hyperfine magnetic sublevels in alkali-metal atoms.

  11. Attaching an alkali metal atom to an alkaline earth metal oxide (BeO, MgO, or CaO) yields a triatomic metal oxide with reduced ionization potential and redirected polarity.

    PubMed

    Nowiak, Grzegorz; Skurski, Piotr; Anusiewicz, Iwona

    2016-04-01

    The existence of a series of neutral triatomic metal oxides MON and their corresponding cations MON (+) (M = Be, Mg, Ca; N = Li, Na, K) was postulated and verified theoretically using ab initio methods at the CCSD(T)/6-311+G(3df)//MP2/6-311+G(3df) level of theory. The calculations revealed that the vertical ionization potentials (IPs) of the MON radicals (calculated using the outer-valence Green's function technique (OVGF) with the 6-311+G(3df) basis set) were ca. 2-3 eV smaller than the IPs of the corresponding MO and NO systems or that of the isolated M atom. Population analysis of the neutral triatomic MON molecules and their corresponding MO counterparts indicated that the attachment of an alkali metal atom to any oxide MO (BeO, MgO, CaO) reverses its polarity, which manifests itself as the redirection of the dipole moment vector. PMID:26994021

  12. A photon-photon quantum gate based on a single atom in an optical resonator.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Bastian; Welte, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2016-08-11

    That two photons pass each other undisturbed in free space is ideal for the faithful transmission of information, but prohibits an interaction between the photons. Such an interaction is, however, required for a plethora of applications in optical quantum information processing. The long-standing challenge here is to realize a deterministic photon-photon gate, that is, a mutually controlled logic operation on the quantum states of the photons. This requires an interaction so strong that each of the two photons can shift the other's phase by π radians. For polarization qubits, this amounts to the conditional flipping of one photon's polarization to an orthogonal state. So far, only probabilistic gates based on linear optics and photon detectors have been realized, because "no known or foreseen material has an optical nonlinearity strong enough to implement this conditional phase shift''. Meanwhile, tremendous progress in the development of quantum-nonlinear systems has opened up new possibilities for single-photon experiments. Platforms range from Rydberg blockade in atomic ensembles to single-atom cavity quantum electrodynamics. Applications such as single-photon switches and transistors, two-photon gateways, nondestructive photon detectors, photon routers and nonlinear phase shifters have been demonstrated, but none of them with the ideal information carriers: optical qubits in discriminable modes. Here we use the strong light-matter coupling provided by a single atom in a high-finesse optical resonator to realize the Duan-Kimble protocol of a universal controlled phase flip (π phase shift) photon-photon quantum gate. We achieve an average gate fidelity of (76.2 ± 3.6) per cent and specifically demonstrate the capability of conditional polarization flipping as well as entanglement generation between independent input photons. This photon-photon quantum gate is a universal quantum logic element, and therefore could perform most existing two-photon operations

  13. A photon-photon quantum gate based on a single atom in an optical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Bastian; Welte, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2016-08-01

    That two photons pass each other undisturbed in free space is ideal for the faithful transmission of information, but prohibits an interaction between the photons. Such an interaction is, however, required for a plethora of applications in optical quantum information processing. The long-standing challenge here is to realize a deterministic photon-photon gate, that is, a mutually controlled logic operation on the quantum states of the photons. This requires an interaction so strong that each of the two photons can shift the other’s phase by π radians. For polarization qubits, this amounts to the conditional flipping of one photon’s polarization to an orthogonal state. So far, only probabilistic gates based on linear optics and photon detectors have been realized, because “no known or foreseen material has an optical nonlinearity strong enough to implement this conditional phase shift”. Meanwhile, tremendous progress in the development of quantum-nonlinear systems has opened up new possibilities for single-photon experiments. Platforms range from Rydberg blockade in atomic ensembles to single-atom cavity quantum electrodynamics. Applications such as single-photon switches and transistors, two-photon gateways, nondestructive photon detectors, photon routers and nonlinear phase shifters have been demonstrated, but none of them with the ideal information carriers: optical qubits in discriminable modes. Here we use the strong light-matter coupling provided by a single atom in a high-finesse optical resonator to realize the Duan-Kimble protocol of a universal controlled phase flip (π phase shift) photon-photon quantum gate. We achieve an average gate fidelity of (76.2 ± 3.6) per cent and specifically demonstrate the capability of conditional polarization flipping as well as entanglement generation between independent input photons. This photon-photon quantum gate is a universal quantum logic element, and therefore could perform most existing two

  14. A photon-photon quantum gate based on a single atom in an optical resonator.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Bastian; Welte, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2016-08-11

    That two photons pass each other undisturbed in free space is ideal for the faithful transmission of information, but prohibits an interaction between the photons. Such an interaction is, however, required for a plethora of applications in optical quantum information processing. The long-standing challenge here is to realize a deterministic photon-photon gate, that is, a mutually controlled logic operation on the quantum states of the photons. This requires an interaction so strong that each of the two photons can shift the other's phase by π radians. For polarization qubits, this amounts to the conditional flipping of one photon's polarization to an orthogonal state. So far, only probabilistic gates based on linear optics and photon detectors have been realized, because "no known or foreseen material has an optical nonlinearity strong enough to implement this conditional phase shift''. Meanwhile, tremendous progress in the development of quantum-nonlinear systems has opened up new possibilities for single-photon experiments. Platforms range from Rydberg blockade in atomic ensembles to single-atom cavity quantum electrodynamics. Applications such as single-photon switches and transistors, two-photon gateways, nondestructive photon detectors, photon routers and nonlinear phase shifters have been demonstrated, but none of them with the ideal information carriers: optical qubits in discriminable modes. Here we use the strong light-matter coupling provided by a single atom in a high-finesse optical resonator to realize the Duan-Kimble protocol of a universal controlled phase flip (π phase shift) photon-photon quantum gate. We achieve an average gate fidelity of (76.2 ± 3.6) per cent and specifically demonstrate the capability of conditional polarization flipping as well as entanglement generation between independent input photons. This photon-photon quantum gate is a universal quantum logic element, and therefore could perform most existing two-photon operations

  15. MDM2-MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Teveroni, Emanuela; Moretti, Fabiola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and 4 (MDM4) are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2-MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD ) in the micromolar range for the MDM2-MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2-MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation. PMID:27621617

  16. Elastic-properties measurement at high temperatures through contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Marinello, Francesco Pezzuolo, Andrea; Sartori, Luigi; Cavalli, Raffaele; Carmignato, Simone; Savio, Enrico; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2015-06-23

    Miniaturization of products and need for further improvement of machines performance introduce new serious challenges in materials characterization. In particular non-destructive mechanical testing in the sub-micrometer scale is needed to better understand and improve micro-manufacturing operations. To this regard, some open issues are of particular interest: low depth of penetration, high lateral resolution and measurements at elevated temperatures. An interesting solution is given by acoustic microscopy techniques, which can be successfully implemented for advanced research in surface elasticity, allowing fast direct and non-destructive measurement of Young’s modulus and related surface parameters. In this work an instrument set up for Contact Resonance Atomic Force Microscopy is proposed, where the sample with is coupled to a heating stage and a piezoelectric transducer directly vibrate the cantilever during scanning, in order to allow exploitation of high resolution measurements at relatively high temperatures. Such instrument set up was undergone a set of calibration experiments in order to allow not only qualitative but also quantitative characterization of surfaces. The work was completed with a feasibility study with mechanical and topography measurements at temperatures as high as 150°C, with lateral resolution lower than 100 nm.

  17. Terahertz radiation in alkali vapor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, X.-C.

    2014-05-12

    By taking advantage of low ionization potentials of alkali atoms, we demonstrate terahertz wave generation from cesium and rubidium vapor plasmas with an amplitude nearly one order of magnitude larger than that from nitrogen gas at low pressure (0.02–0.5 Torr). The observed phenomena are explained by the numerical modeling based upon electron tunneling ionization.

  18. Alkali-Metal Spin Maser.

    PubMed

    Chalupczak, W; Josephs-Franks, P

    2015-07-17

    Quantum measurement is a combination of a read-out and a perturbation of the quantum system. We explore the nonlinear spin dynamics generated by a linearly polarized probe beam in a continuous measurement of the collective spin state in a thermal alkali-metal atomic sample. We demonstrate that the probe-beam-driven perturbation leads, in the presence of indirect pumping, to complete polarization of the sample and macroscopic coherent spin oscillations. As a consequence of the former we report observation of spectral profiles free from collisional broadening. Nonlinear dynamics is studied through exploring its effect on radio frequency as well as spin noise spectra. PMID:26230788

  19. Alkali-Metal Spin Maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalupczak, W.; Josephs-Franks, P.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum measurement is a combination of a read-out and a perturbation of the quantum system. We explore the nonlinear spin dynamics generated by a linearly polarized probe beam in a continuous measurement of the collective spin state in a thermal alkali-metal atomic sample. We demonstrate that the probe-beam-driven perturbation leads, in the presence of indirect pumping, to complete polarization of the sample and macroscopic coherent spin oscillations. As a consequence of the former we report observation of spectral profiles free from collisional broadening. Nonlinear dynamics is studied through exploring its effect on radio frequency as well as spin noise spectra.

  20. Shortcuts for understanding rovibronic spectroscopy of ultracold alkali metal diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stwalley, William C.; Bellos, Michael; Carollo, Ryan; Banerjee, Jayita; Bermudez, Matthew

    2012-08-01

    The high-resolution rovibronic spectroscopies of cold and ultracold molecules (e.g. supersonic molecular beam excitation spectra (MB), photoassociation spectra of ultracold atoms (PA), resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra (REMPI), stimulated Raman transfer (SRT) spectra) are of major current interest. This manuscript summarizes the significant level of understanding of these various spectroscopies, enabled by using simple graphical and semiclassical ideas and shortcuts. Physical realizations of these spectroscopies will be illustrated using the alkali metal diatomic molecules, both homonuclear (e.g. Rb2) and heteronuclear (e.g. KRb).

  1. Coherent dipole-dipole coupling between two single Rydberg atoms at an electrically-tuned Förster resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravets, Sylvain; Labuhn, Henning; Barredo, Daniel; Béguin, Lucas; Lahaye, Thierry; Browaeys, Antoine

    2014-12-01

    Resonant energy transfers, the non-radiative redistribution of an electronic excitation between two particles coupled by the dipole-dipole interaction, lie at the heart of a variety of phenomena, notably photosynthesis. In 1948, Förster established the theory of fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) between broadband, nearly-resonant donors and acceptors. The 1/R6 scaling of the energy transfer rate, where R is the distance between particles, enabled widespread use of FRET as a `spectroscopic ruler’ for determining nanometric distances in biomolecules. The underlying mechanism is a coherent dipolar coupling between particles, as recognized in the early days of quantum mechanics, but this coherence has not been directly observed so far. Here we study, spectroscopically and in the time domain, the coherent, dipolar-induced exchange of excitations between two Rydberg atoms separated by up to 15 μm, and brought into resonance by applying an electric field. Coherent oscillation of the system between two degenerate pair states then occurs at a frequency scaling as 1/R3, the hallmark of resonant dipole-dipole interactions. Our results not only demonstrate, at the fundamental level of two atoms, the basic mechanism underlying FRET, but also open exciting prospects for active tuning of strong, coherent interactions in quantum many-body systems.

  2. Narrowband tunable filter based on velocity-selective optical pumping in an atomic vapor.

    PubMed

    Cerè, Alessandro; Parigi, Valentina; Abad, Marta; Wolfgramm, Florian; Predojević, Ana; Mitchell, Morgan W

    2009-04-01

    We demonstrate a tunable narrowband filter based on optical-pumping-induced circular dichroism in rubidium vapor. The filter achieves a peak transmission of 14.6%, a linewidth of 80 MHz, and an out-of-band extinction of >or=35 dB. The transmission peak can be tuned within the range of the Doppler linewidth of the D1 line of atomic rubidium at 795 nm. While other atomic filters work at frequencies far from absorption, the presented technique provides light resonant with atomic media, useful for atom-photon interaction experiments. The technique could readily be extended to other alkali atoms.

  3. Atomic orientation driven by broadly-frequency-modulated radiation: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevilacqua, G.; Biancalana, V.; Dancheva, Y.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate magnetic resonances driven in thermal vapor of alkali-metal atoms by laser radiation broadly modulated at a frequency resonant with the Zeeman splitting. A model accounting for both hyperfine and Zeeman pumping is developed, and its results are compared with experimental measurements performed at relatively weak pump irradiance. The interplay between the two pumping processes generates intriguing interaction conditions, often overlooked by simplified models.

  4. Entanglement Preparation and Quantum Information Processing with Atoms Trapped in Separated Cavities Through a Single Resonant Atom-Field Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li-Hua

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a scheme is presented for generation of W-type entangled states for n atoms trapped in separated cavities connected by optical fibers. The scheme only requires a single atom-cavity-fiber interaction and no classical field is needed. Due to these features, the scheme is simpler and more robust against decoherence than the previous ones. The scheme can also be used to realize quantum state transfer and controlled phase gates between qubits located at distant nodes of a quantum network.

  5. Tunable plasmon-induced transparency effect based on self-asymmetric H-shaped resonators meta-atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhaoxiang; Chen, Lin; Zang, Xiaofei; Cai, Bin; Peng, Yan; Zhu, Yiming

    2015-03-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a tunable plasmon-induced transparency (PIT) effect from two ways, based on self-asymmetric H-shaped resonators (AHR) meta-atoms. The tunable PIT effect is realized via varying polarization angles and coupling distances. First, by proper design, transition from PIT mode to dipole mode is theoretically and experimentally demonstrated by simply adjusting the polarization angle. Also, the manipulation of ‘dark-mode’ resonance intensity from strong to weak is achieved by varying coupling strength with different distances, which provided insight into the magnetic coupling hybridization mechanism. Prospectively, due to its special tunable characteristics, the AHR meta-atoms may be widely used in slow light, filters and switch devices.

  6. Doubly resonant three-photon double ionization of Ar atoms induced by an EUV free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Gryzlova, E. V.; Ma, Ri; Fukuzawa, H.; Motomura, K.; Yamada, A.; Ueda, K.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.; Strakhova, S. I.; Kabachnik, N. M.; Rouzee, A.; Hundermark, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Johnsson, P.; Nagaya, K.; Yase, S.; Mizoguchi, Y.; Yao, M.; Nagasono, M.; Tono, K.; Yabashi, M.; and others

    2011-12-15

    A mechanism for three-photon double ionization of atoms by extreme-ultraviolet free-electron laser pulses is revealed, where in a sequential process the second ionization step, proceeding via resonant two-photon ionization of ions, is strongly enhanced by the excitation of ionic autoionizing states. In contrast to the conventional model, the mechanism explains the observed relative intensities of photoelectron peaks and their angular dependence in three-photon double ionization of argon.

  7. Development of a high-Q superconducting microwave resonator for coupling to trapped laser-cooled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Jared; Voigt, Kristen; Kim, Zaeill; Hoffman, Jonathan; Grover, Jeff; Lee, Jongmin; Solano, Pablo; Budoyo, Rangga; Ballard, Cody; Anderson, James; Lobb, Chris; Orozco, Luis; Rolston, Steven; Wellstood, Frederick

    2014-03-01

    We present progress towards a hybrid quantum system in which microwave quanta may be exchanged between a superconducting qubit and laser-trapped atoms via a magnetic dipole interaction. In initial experiments, we seek to couple a thin-film superconducting LC resonator cooled to 20 mK to the 6.835 GHz hyperfine splitting in an ensemble of optically trapped 87Rb atoms. The atoms will be trapped in the evanescent optical field on the waist of a tapered 500-nm-diameter optical fiber which is moved to within a few microns of the inductor in the LC resonator. Rayleigh scattered light from defects in the optical fiber will impinge on the superconducting device. We describe the resulting effects of absorbed photons and how to minimize optical effects as well as results on positioning the resonator relative to the optical fiber within a dilution refrigerator. Work supported by NSF through the Physics Frontier Center at the Joint Quantum Institute, Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Maryland.

  8. Size-Dependent Resonant Frequency and Flexural Sensitivity of Atomic Force Microscope Microcantilevers Based on the Modified Strain Gradient Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Pourashraf, T.; Gholami, R.; Sahmani, S.; Ashrafi, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, the resonant frequency and flexural sensitivity of atomic force microscope (AFM) microcantilevers are predicted incorporating size effects. To this end, the modified strain gradient elasticity theory is applied to the classical Euler-Bernoulli beam theory to develop a non-classical beam model which has the capability to capture size-dependent behavior of microcantilevers. On the basis of Hamilton's principle, the size-dependent analytical expressions corresponding to the frequency response and sensitivity of AFM cantilevers are derived. It is observed that by increasing the contact stiffness, the resonant frequencies of AFM cantilevers firstly increase and then tend to remain constant at an especial value. Moreover, the resonant frequencies of AFM cantilevers obtained via the developed non-classical model is higher than those of the classical beam theory, especially for the values of beam thickness close to the internal material length scale parameter.

  9. Tunable dipolar resonances and Einstein-de Haas effect in a {sup 87}Rb-atom condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Swislocki, Tomasz; Sowinski, Tomasz; Pietraszewicz, Joanna; Gajda, Mariusz; Lewenstein, Maciej; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2011-06-15

    We theoretically study a spinor condensate of {sup 87}Rb atoms in a F=1 hyperfine state confined in an optical dipole trap. Putting initially all atoms in an m{sub F}=1, component we observe a significant transfer of atoms to other, initially empty Zeeman states exclusively due to dipolar forces. Because of conservation of a total angular momentum the atoms going to other Zeeman components acquire an orbital angular momentum and circulate around the center of the trap. This is a realization of the Einstein-de Haas effect in a system of cold gases. We show that the transfer of atoms via dipolar interactions is possible only when the energies of the initial and the final sates are equal. This condition can be fulfilled utilizing a resonant external magnetic field, which tunes energies of involved states via the linear Zeeman effect. We found that there are many final states of different spatial density, which can be tuned selectively to the initial state. We show a simple model explaining high selectivity and controllability of weak dipolar interactions in the condensate of {sup 87}Rb atoms.

  10. Storage and conversion of quantum-statistical properties of light in resonant quantum memory on a tripod atomic configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losev, A. S.; Tikhonov, K. S.; Golubeva, T. Yu; Golubev, Yu M.

    2016-10-01

    We have considered theoretically the feasibility of broadband quantum memory based on the resonant tripod-type atomic configuration. In this case, the writing of a signal field is carried out simultaneously into two channels, and characterized by an excitation of two spin waves of the atomic ensemble. With simultaneous read out from both channels, quantum properties of the original signal are mapped onto the retrieval pulse no worse than in the case of memory based on a Λ-type atomic configuration. At the same time new possibilities are opened up for the manipulation of quantum states associated with sequential reading out (and/or sequential writing) of signal pulses. For example, a pulse in the squeezed state is converted into two partially entangled pulses with partially squeezed quadratures. Alternatively, two independent signal pulses with orthogonally squeezed quadratures can be converted into two entangled pulses.

  11. Coherence in Rydberg Atoms: Measurement and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutteruf, Mary

    We demonstrate a variety of techniques for measuring and controlling dephasing and decoherence in alkali metal Rydberg atom systems. Specifically, we investigate the coherence of the spin-orbit interaction in individual atoms and of dipole-dipole resonant energy exchange between pairs of atoms. Rydberg atoms are a good model system for exploring decoherence because they are sensitive to noise in their environments. The phase coherence of wave packets encoded on the fine-structure Rydberg states of lithium atoms is measured using a population echo and preserved using pulsed and continuous dynamic decoupling techniques. Pulsed electric fields toggle the spin-orbit coupling, repeatedly flipping the state vector, and preventing the slow acquisition of phase noise in a bang-bang scheme. Continuous dynamic decoupling is implemented by driving population between the relevant electronic states with a resonant rf field. The energy spacing between the levels is locked to the rf frequency as long as the Rabi rate is much greater than the dephasing rate. We demonstrate a technique which reduces the average relative velocity between interacting potassium Rydberg atoms, extending the atom transit time and allowing us to control when all resonant energy exchange interactions in the ensemble begin and end. Velocity reduction is achieved without the use of a chopper wheel by exciting a small cylinder of atoms and allowing them to thermally expand prior to tuning them into resonance. Resonant energy transfer is explored further in a nearly frozen rubidium Rydberg gas. We observe enhancement in the transition signal when the probability amplitudes acquired on opposite sides of the resonance interfere constructively compared to the population transferred when remaining on either side of the resonance. This enhancement reflects the coherence of the energy exchange interaction and decays over 10 us microseconds. The observed coherence time is much longer than previously measured

  12. Probing the resonance potential in the F atom reaction with hydrogen deuteride with spectroscopic accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zefeng; Che, Li; Qiu, Minghui; Wang, Xingan; Dong, Wenrui; Dai, Dongxu; Wang, Xiuyan; Yang, Xueming; Sun, Zhigang; Fu, Bina; Lee, Soo-Y.; Xu, Xin; Zhang, Dong H.

    2008-01-01

    Reaction resonances are transiently trapped quantum states along the reaction coordinate in the transition state region of a chemical reaction that could have profound effects on the dynamics of the reaction. Obtaining an accurate reaction potential that holds these reaction resonance states and eventually modeling quantitatively the reaction resonance dynamics is still a great challenge. Up to now, the only viable way to obtain a resonance potential is through high-level ab initio calculations. Through highly accurate crossed-beam reactive scattering studies on isotope-substituted reactions, the accuracy of the resonance potential could be rigorously tested. Here we report a combined experimental and theoretical study on the resonance-mediated F + HD → HF + D reaction at the full quantum state resolved level, to probe the resonance potential in this benchmark system. The experimental result shows that isotope substitution has a dramatic effect on the resonance picture of this important system. Theoretical analyses suggest that the full-dimensional FH2 ground potential surface, which was believed to be accurate in describing the resonance picture of the F + H2 reaction, is found to be insufficiently accurate in predicting quantitatively the resonance picture for the F + HD → HF + D reaction. We constructed a global potential energy surface by using the CCSD(T) method that could predict the correct resonance peak positions as well as the dynamics for both F + H2 → HF + H and F + HD → HF + D, providing an accurate resonance potential for this benchmark system with spectroscopic accuracy. PMID:18687888

  13. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  14. Stokes parameters of resonance lines scattered by a moving, magnetic medium. Theory of the two-level atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raouafi, N.-E.

    2002-05-01

    The aim of the present work is to present theoretical results on the Stokes parameters of a resonance spectral line, scattered by moving atoms (or ions) in the presence of a local magnetic field. We assume that the scattered line is sensitive to the Hanle effect due to the magnetic field and also to Doppler redistribution due to the atomic motions. The present theory is developed for a two-level atom, in the framework of the density matrix formalism Blum (1981). Analogous results given in Sahal-Bréchot et al. (1986) for the magnetic-field effect alone, and in Sahal-Bréchot et al. (\\cite{Sahal98}) for the velocity-field effect alone, can be obtained from our theory by cancelling in the equations, respectively, the velocity field or the magnetic field. The results of our theory are general and can be used for astrophysical studies concerning the Hanle effect and the Doppler redistribution effect on the linear polarization parameters of the scattered radiation. They can be used particularly to interpret linear polarization of coronal spectral lines to get a complete determination of vectorial quantities such as the coronal magnetic field and the solar wind velocity field vectors. As an application, the atomic velocity field distribution is supposed to be Maxwellian with a drift velocity field vector. This latter describes the macroscopic motion of the scattering atoms. In the solar corona, it can be assimilated into the solar wind velocity field vector.

  15. Bose-Einstein Condensate Coupled to a Nanomechanical Resonator on an Atom Chip

    SciTech Connect

    Treutlein, Philipp; Hunger, David; Camerer, Stephan; Haensch, Theodor W.; Reichel, Jakob

    2007-10-05

    We theoretically study the coupling of Bose-Einstein condensed atoms to the mechanical oscillations of a nanoscale cantilever with a magnetic tip. This is an experimentally viable hybrid quantum system which allows one to explore the interface of quantum optics and condensed matter physics. We propose an experiment where easily detectable atomic spin flips are induced by the cantilever motion. This can be used to probe thermal oscillations of the cantilever with the atoms. At low cantilever temperatures, as realized in recent experiments, the backaction of the atoms onto the cantilever is significant and the system represents a mechanical analog of cavity quantum electrodynamics. With high but realistic cantilever quality factors, the strong coupling regime can be reached, either with single atoms or collectively with Bose-Einstein condensates. We discuss an implementation on an atom chip.

  16. Momentum-transfer, differential and spin-exchange cross sections in the elastic scattering of low-energy electrons by heavy alkali-metal atoms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrim, Cristian; Thumm, Uwe; Fabrikant, Ilya I.

    2000-06-01

    Based on the relativistic Dirac R-matrix method, we analyze various angle-dependent cross sections for electron scattering by Rb, Cs and Fr targets at energies below 3 eV. We show our angle-dependent and total spin-exchange cross sections for scattering of non-polarized (or polarized) electrons by polarized (or non-polarized) Rb, Cs and Fr targets, and we compare them with available experimental data (B. Jaduszliwer, N.D. Bhaskar, and B. Bederson Phys.Rev. A 14), 162 (1976).. The influence of relativistic effects is discussed. From the energy and angular dependence analysis of the differential cross section, we obtain clear evidence of the Cs^-(^3F^o) shape resonance at 1.528 eV, in excellent agreement with accurate experiments (W. Gehenn and E. Reichert, J.Phys. B 10), 3105 (1977).. We compare our electron momentum-transfer cross section with available data obtained in swarm experiments for Rb (Y. Nakamura, Trans. IEE of Japan 102-A), 23 (1982). and Cs (H.T. Saelee and J. Lucas, J.Phys. D 12), 1275 (1979)..

  17. Atomic resolution protein structure determination by three-dimensional transferred echo double resonance solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Wylie, Benjamin J.; Franks, W. Trent; Shah, Gautam J.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2009-09-01

    We show that quantitative internuclear N15-C13 distances can be obtained in sufficient quantity to determine a complete, high-resolution structure of a moderately sized protein by magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The three-dimensional ZF-TEDOR pulse sequence is employed in combination with sparse labeling of C13 sites in the β1 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G (GB1), as obtained by bacterial expression with 1,3-C13 or 2-C13-glycerol as the C13 source. Quantitative dipolar trajectories are extracted from two-dimensional N15-C13 planes, in which ˜750 cross peaks are resolved. The experimental data are fit to exact theoretical trajectories for spin clusters (consisting of one C13 and several N15 each), yielding quantitative precision as good as 0.1 Å for ˜350 sites, better than 0.3 Å for another 150, and ˜1.0 Å for 150 distances in the range of 5-8 Å. Along with isotropic chemical shift-based (TALOS) dihedral angle restraints, the distance restraints are incorporated into simulated annealing calculations to yield a highly precise structure (backbone RMSD of 0.25±0.09 Å), which also demonstrates excellent agreement with the most closely related crystal structure of GB1 (2QMT, bbRMSD 0.79±0.03 Å). Moreover, side chain heavy atoms are well restrained (0.76±0.06 Å total heavy atom RMSD). These results demonstrate for the first time that quantitative internuclear distances can be measured throughout an entire solid protein to yield an atomic-resolution structure.

  18. Cavity-Q aging observed via an atomic-candle signal.

    PubMed

    Coffer, John G; Sickmiller, Brett; Camparo, James C

    2004-02-01

    Slow variations in cavity-Q and microwave power are thought to play a role in the long-term frequency stability of gas-cell atomic clocks. Here, we use an atomic-candle method to study the aging of a TE011 microwave cavity's resonant frequency and quality factor when a glass resonance cell containing Rb87 loads the cavity. Our results suggest that the alkali vapor coats the inside glass surface of the resonance cell with a thin metallic film; and that, as this film evolves, the quality factor degrades. (In our experiments the quality factor changed by approximately 30% over a timescale of months.) More generally, the present work demonstrates the efficacy of the atomic-candle method for investigating cavity resonances. In particular, we show that, when used in conjunction with more traditional methods, the atomic-candle method has the potential to reveal information on a cavity mode's spatial profile.

  19. The role of the partner atom and resonant excitation energy in ICD in rare gas dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, Patrick; Ripani, Enrico; Bolognesi, Paola; Coreno, Marcello; Avaldi, Lorenzo; Devetta, Michele; Callegari, Carlo; Di Praia, Michele; Prince, Kevin; Richter, Robert; Alagial, Michele; Kivimäkil, Antti

    2014-04-01

    We show experimental evidence for Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD) in mixed rare gas dimers following resonant Auger decay. A velocity map imaging apparatus together with a cooled supersonic beam containing Ar2, ArNe and ArKr dimers was used to record electron VMI images in coincidence with two mass selected ions following excitation on five resonances converging to the Ar+ 2p-11/2 and 2p-13/2 thresholds using the synchrotron radiation. The results show that the kinetic energy distribution of the ICD electrons observed in coincidence with the ions from Coulomb explosion of the dimers depends on the partner ion and resonant photon energy.

  20. Interacting double dark resonances in a hot atomic vapor of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Ghosh, R.; Laupretre, T.; Bretenaker, F.; Goldfarb, F.

    2011-08-15

    We experimentally and theoretically study two different tripod configurations using metastable helium ({sup 4}He*), with the probe field polarization perpendicular and parallel to the quantization axis, defined by an applied weak magnetic field. In the first case, the two dark resonances interact incoherently and merge together into a single electromagnetically induced transparency peak with increasing coupling power. In the second case, we observe destructive interference between the two dark resonances inducing an extra absorption peak at the line center.

  1. Study of field shifts of Ramsey resonances on ultracold atoms and ions

    SciTech Connect

    Tabatchikova, K. S.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Dmitriev, A. K.; Yudin, V. I.

    2015-02-15

    The effect of the finite laser radiation line width and spontaneous relaxation of levels on the efficiency of the suppression of the field shift of the central resonance for the generalized Ramsey scheme with pulses of different lengths and with a phase jump in the second pulse has been considered. The optimal parameters of the scheme corresponding to the minimum frequency shift and maximum amplitude of the resonance have been determined.

  2. Dynamical resonant electron capture in atom surface collisions: H- formation in H-Al(111) collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, A. G.; Teillet-Billy, D.; Gauyacq, J. P.

    1992-05-01

    The formation of H- ion by grazing-angle collisions of hydrogen on an Al(111) surface is investigated with the newly developed coupled angular mode method. The capture process involves a dynamical resonant process induced by the collision velocity. All the resonance properties of the H- level in front of an Al(111) surface are determined: position, width, and angular distribution of ejected electrons. The results are shown to account for the recent observations on H- formation by Wyputta, Zimny, and Winter.

  3. Atomic and Molecular Complex Resonances from Real Eigenvalues Using Standard (Hermitian) Electronic Structure Calculations.

    PubMed

    Landau, Arie; Haritan, Idan; Kaprálová-Žd'ánská, Petra Ruth; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2016-05-19

    Complex eigenvalues, resonances, play an important role in a large variety of fields in physics and chemistry. For example, in cold molecular collision experiments and electron scattering experiments, autoionizing and predissociative metastable resonances are generated. However, the computation of complex resonance requires modifications of standard electronic structure codes and methods, which are not always straightforward, in addition, application of complex codes requires more computational efforts. Here we show how resonance eigenvalues, positions and widths, can be calculated using the standard, widely used, electronic-structure packages. Our method enables the calculations of the complex resonance eigenvalues by using analytical continuation procedures (such as Padé). The key point in our approach is the existence of narrow analytical passages from the real axis to the complex energy plane. In fact, the existence of these analytical passages relies on using finite basis sets. These passages become narrower as the basis set becomes more complete, whereas in the exact limit, these passages to the complex plane are closed. As illustrative numerical examples we calculated the autoionization Feshbach resonances of helium, hydrogen anion, and hydrogen molecule. We show that our results are in an excellent agreement with the results obtained by other theoretical methods and with available experimental results.

  4. 3D Atomic Arrangement at Functional Interfaces Inside Nanoparticles by Resonant High-Energy X-ray Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Valeri; Prasai, Binay; Shastri, Sarvjit; Chen, Tsan-Yao

    2015-10-21

    With current science and technology moving rapidly into smaller scales, nanometer-sized materials, often referred to as NPs, are produced in increasing numbers and explored for numerous useful applications. Evidence is mounting, however, that useful properties of NPs can be improved further and even new NP functionality achieved by not only controlling the NP size and shape but also interfacing chemically or structurally distinct entities into single, so-called "composite" NPs. A typical example is core-shell NPs wherein the synergy of distinct atoms at the core\\shell interface endows the NPs with otherwise unachievable functionality. However, though advantageous, the concept of functional interfaces inside NPs is still pursued largely by trial-and-error. That is because it is difficut to assess the interfaces precisely at the atomic level using traditional experimental techniques and, hence, difficult to take control of. Using the core\\shell interface in less than 10 nm in size Ru core-Pt shells NPs as an example, we demonstrate that precise knowledge of the 3D atomic arrangement at functional interfaces inside NPs can be obtained by resonant high-energy X-ray diffraction (XRD) coupled to element-specific atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. On the basis of the unique structure knowledge obtained, we scrutinize the still-debatable influence of core\\shell interface on the catalytic functionality of Ru core-Pt shell NPs, thus evidencing the usefulness of this nontraditional technique for practical applications.

  5. Optical and electron spin resonance studies of xenon-nitrogen-helium condensates containing nitrogen and oxygen atoms.

    PubMed

    Boltnev, Roman E; Bykhalo, Igor B; Krushinskaya, Irina N; Pelmenev, Alexander A; Khmelenko, Vladimir V; Mao, Shun; Meraki, Adil; Wilde, Scott C; McColgan, Patrick T; Lee, David M

    2015-03-19

    We present the first observations of excimer XeO* molecules in molecular nitrogen films surrounding xenon cores of nanoclusters. Multishell nanoclusters form upon the fast cooling of a helium jet containing small admixtures of nitrogen and xenon by cold helium vapor (T = 1.5 K). Such nanoclusters injected into superfluid helium aggregate into porous impurity-helium condensates. Passage of helium gas with admixtures through a radio frequency discharge allows the storage of high densities of radicals stabilized in impurity-helium condensates. Intense recombination of the radicals occurs during destruction of such condensates and generates excited species observable because of optical emission. Rich spectra of xenon-oxygen complexes have been detected upon destruction of xenon-nitrogen-helium condensates. A xenon environment quenches metastable N((2)D) atoms but has a much weaker effect on the luminescence of N((2)P) atoms. Electron spin resonance spectra of N((4)S) atoms trapped in xenon-nitrogen-helium condensates have been studied. High local concentrations of nitrogen atoms (up to 10(21) cm(-3)) stabilized in xenon-nitrogen nanoclusters have been revealed.

  6. Apparatus enables accurate determination of alkali oxides in alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupraw, W. A.; Gahn, R. F.; Graab, J. W.; Maple, W. E.; Rosenblum, L.

    1966-01-01

    Evacuated apparatus determines the alkali oxide content of an alkali metal by separating the metal from the oxide by amalgamation with mercury. The apparatus prevents oxygen and moisture from inadvertently entering the system during the sampling and analytical procedure.

  7. Gallium phosphide as a new material for anodically bonded atomic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Dural, Nezih; Romalis, Michael V.

    2014-08-01

    Miniaturized atomic sensors are often fabricated using anodic bonding of silicon and borosilicate glass. Here we describe a technique for fabricating anodically bonded alkali-metal cells using GaP and Pyrex. GaP is a non-birefringent semiconductor that is transparent at alkali-metal resonance wavelengths, allowing new sensor geometries. GaP also has a higher thermal conductivity and lower He permeability than borosilicate glass and can be anodically bonded below 200 °C, which can also be advantageous in other vacuum sealing applications.

  8. Investigation of electron-atom/molecule scattering resonances: Two complex multiconfigurational self-consistent field approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, Kousik; Yeager, Danny L.

    2015-01-22

    Resonances are temporarily bound states which lie in the continuum part of the Hamiltonian. If the electronic coordinates of the Hamiltonian are scaled (“dilated”) by a complex parameter, η = αe{sup iθ} (α, θ real), then its complex eigenvalues represent the scattering states (resonant and non-resonant) while the eigenvalues corresponding to the bound states and the ionization and the excitation thresholds remain real and unmodified. These make the study of these transient species amenable to the bound state methods. We developed a quadratically convergent multiconfigurational self-consistent field method (MCSCF), a well-established bound-state technique, combined with a dilated Hamiltonian to investigate resonances. This is made possible by the adoption of a second quantization algebra suitable for a set of “complex conjugate biorthonormal” spin orbitals and a modified step-length constraining algorithm to control the walk on the complex energy hypersurface while searching for the stationary point using a multidimensional Newton-Raphson scheme. We present our computational results for the {sup 2}PBe{sup −} shape resonances using two different computationally efficient methods that utilize complex scaled MCSCF (i.e., CMCSCF). These two methods are to straightforwardly use CMCSCF energy differences and to obtain energy differences using an approximation to the complex multiconfigurational electron propagator. It is found that, differing from previous computational studies by others, there are actually two {sup 2}PBe{sup −} shape resonances very close in energy. In addition, N{sub 2} resonances are examined using one of these methods.

  9. Discriminating between the Role of Phase Matching and that of the Single-Atom Response in Resonance Plasma-Plume High-Order Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, Noa; Marcus, Gilad

    2015-09-01

    Resonance enhancement of high-order harmonic generation has recently been found in the interaction of intense ultrashort laser pulses with laser ablated plasma plumes. It is a promising route towards the production of an intense and coherent extreme ultraviolet radiation source. However, the mechanism of this resonance enhancement is still not clear. There are two possible explanations; one relies on a better recombination cross section through an autoionization state in the single-atom response. The other relies on improved phase matching conditions around the resonance. Here, we try to discriminate between these two conjectures by measuring coherence lengths of the harmonics, both on resonance and off resonance. Our findings support the single-atom response hypothesis.

  10. Resonance frequency shifts due to quantized electronic states in atomically thin NEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changyao; Deshpande, Vikram; Koshino, Mikito; Lee, Sunwoo; Gondarenko, Alexander; MacDonald, Allan; Kim, Philip; Hone, James

    The classic picture of the force exerted on a parallel plate capacitor assumes infinite density of states (DOS), which implies identical electrochemical and electrostatic potential. However, such assumption can breakdown in low-dimensional devices where the DOS is finite or quantized. Here we consider the mechanical resonance shift of a nanoelectromechanical (NEMS) resonator with small DOS, actuated and detected capacitively at fixed electrochemical potential. We found three leading correction terms to the classical picture: the first term leads to the modulation of static force due to the variation in chemical potential, and the second and third terms are related to the static and dynamic changes in spring constants, caused by quantum capacitance. The theory agrees well with recent experimental findings from graphene resonator in quantum Hall regimes, where the chemical potential and quantum capacitance are tuned by magnetic field, while the gate voltage is kept constant.

  11. In-Situ Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in the MALT Region: The ATOX Resonance Fluorescence/Absorption sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, P.; Swenson, C. M.

    2005-12-01

    The Utah State University Atomic Oxygen (ATOX) sensor was launched aboard the Coupling of Dynamics and Aurora (CODA) payloads on January 22, 1999 from Poker Flat, Alaska and again on February 21, 2001, both into diffuse auroras. Atomic oxygen profiles were measured in-situ by a combination of resonance and florescence techniques. While the resonant fluorescence technique appears well suited for the measurement of O in the MALT, the dynamics of the sounding rockets which carry the sensor system create challenges that the system and data analysts must overcome. Primary challenges include density flow field disturbances, Doppler shift of the source lamp emission, and contamination. It has been well documented that these challenges, especially the flow field disturbances, make it difficult to accurately measure O concentration profiles. Our research has quantified the effect of the three major disturbances, seen as errors, and attempts to correct for each. Computations show that the largest errors are introduced by flow field disturbances. With a strong dependence upon measurement attitude and mission geometry, errors in the ram direction are often in excess of 300%. Errors as large as 100% are introduced by Doppler shift of the lamp output, and errors upwards of 40% are introduced into the absorption measurements due to contamination. An approach will be discussed that can potentially reduce errors in both the fluorescence and absorption measurements to within 15 - 20% of undisturbed values. Furthermore, since the corrections are applied across the entire measurement region, direct comparison of upleg and downleg measurements is now possible.

  12. Generation of a fast atomic-oxygen beam from O - ions by resonant cavity radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, T. M.; Van Zyl, B.; Amme, R. C.

    1996-04-01

    An apparatus has been developed for producing a beam of ground-electronic-state oxygen atoms with energies variable from 4 to 1000 eV with a 1.5 eV FWHM energy distribution. The technique involves extraction of negative ions from a low-voltage gas-discharge source, mass selection of the extracted O- with a Wien-type velocity filter, O- acceleration or deceleration and focusing by electrostatic ion optics, and electron detachment from O- by intracavity laser radiation. A 25 W argon-ion-laser cavity has been extended to include the ion-beam vacuum chamber so that the intracavity radiation intersects the O- ion trajectories normally. Depending on the laser configuration in use, ion-neutralization efficiencies between 5% and 25% have been achieved at 5 eV O- energy. Thus, 5 eV O-atom fluxes of ˜1011 atoms/s (˜1012 atoms/cm2 s) have been achieved for O- currents of ˜10-7 A. The advantages and limitations of the technique are discussed, and preliminary measurements of the secondary-negative-charge production from low-energy O-atom impact on copper and stainless-steel surfaces are presented.

  13. Simulating narrow nonlinear resonance features for magnetometry in compact cold atom systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, David; Robinson, Jenn; Kunz, Paul; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2015-05-01

    We are investigating cold atom magnetometry applications and have developed a numeric model of Electromagnetically Induced Absorption (EIA) and Nonlinear Magneto-Optical Rotation (NMOR) for degenerate two-level systems. While most EIA and NMOR research is done in warm vapors, cold atoms avoid Doppler broadening and better isolate the various optical pumping mechanisms involved. Our model focuses on the effect of transverse magnetic fields on both EIA and NMOR features and shows that critical points of both yield quantitative measures of the magnitude and direction of the transverse field. This dependence reveals the underlying optical pumping mechanisms and makes possible a single, in-situ measurement of the background magnetic field zero to the sub-milligauss level, reducing background fields to enhance sub-Doppler cooling and collectively-enhanced neutral-atom quantum memory lifetimes. Separately, we are pursuing experimental measurements on the relationship between EIA and NMOR in a compact cold atom apparatus. To improve the system's capabilities we are designing our next-generation atom chip to reduce system size and employ versatile geometries enabling multi-site trapping.

  14. Intramolecular resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds: a theoretical description by means of atomic charges and charge fluxes.

    PubMed

    Baranović, Goran

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of intramolecular H-bonds in terms of atomic charges and charge fluxes (at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory) has been extended to the case of the so called resonance-assisted (RA) H-bonds. A quadratic correlation between the charge fluxes φH and the molecular IR absorption coefficients E that includes the entire family of the studied systems (31 of them) containing both intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds (O-H···O/N) confirmed the critical importance of the charge fluxes on the IR intensity enhancements. Since they reflect changing of the atomic charge distribution during the normal modes of vibrations, the dynamic nature of hydrogen bonding properties has been re-emphasized. The changes of the charge flux of the hydroxyl hydrogen in an RA intramolecular H-bond are between those for "free" OH bonds and the values calculated for intermolecular H-bonds. The transition "free"→intramolecular→intermolecular is gradual and therefore the hydrogen charge flux can be considered as practically sufficient to give quantitative measure to the intuitively obvious statement that "intramolecular H-bonding is somehow in between no H-bonding situation and intermolecular H-bonding" and thus provide a quantitative and yet simple parameterization of H-bond strength. In strictly planar molecules, the difference of the sums of charges of atoms participating in the 6-membered H-bond ring ΔΣ can serve as a measure of the charge delocalization after the H-bond is formed. The electronic charge is withdrawn from the group of six atoms when the H-bond is formed in nitrophenol (ΔΣ=-0.07), while the opposite is true (ΔΣ=+0.03) for 2-hydroxy benzylidene amine. The corresponding values of the geometrical resonance parameter Δ are 0.39 and 0.37, respectively, similar to those found for 2-hydroxy acetophenone and 2-hydroxy benzaldehyde. The extent of the π-electron delocalization as measured by the resonance parameter Δ does not follow the strength of H

  15. Intramolecular resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds: A theoretical description by means of atomic charges and charge fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranović, Goran

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of intramolecular H-bonds in terms of atomic charges and charge fluxes (at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory) has been extended to the case of the so called resonance-assisted (RA) H-bonds. A quadratic correlation between the charge fluxes ϕH and the molecular IR absorption coefficients E that includes the entire family of the studied systems (31 of them) containing both intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds (O-H⋯O/N) confirmed the critical importance of the charge fluxes on the IR intensity enhancements. Since they reflect changing of the atomic charge distribution during the normal modes of vibrations, the dynamic nature of hydrogen bonding properties has been re-emphasized. The changes of the charge flux of the hydroxyl hydrogen in an RA intramolecular H-bond are between those for “free” OH bonds and the values calculated for intermolecular H-bonds. The transition “free” → intramolecular → intermolecular is gradual and therefore the hydrogen charge flux can be considered as practically sufficient to give quantitative measure to the intuitively obvious statement that “intramolecular H-bonding is somehow in between no H-bonding situation and intermolecular H-bonding” and thus provide a quantitative and yet simple parameterization of H-bond strength. In strictly planar molecules, the difference of the sums of charges of atoms participating in the 6-membered H-bond ring ΔΣ can serve as a measure of the charge delocalization after the H-bond is formed. The electronic charge is withdrawn from the group of six atoms when the H-bond is formed in nitrophenol (ΔΣ = -0.07), while the opposite is true (ΔΣ = +0.03) for 2-hydroxy benzylidene amine. The corresponding values of the geometrical resonance parameter Δ are 0.39 and 0.37, respectively, similar to those found for 2-hydroxy acetophenone and 2-hydroxy benzaldehyde. The extent of the π-electron delocalization as measured by the resonance parameter Δ does not follow

  16. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04

    Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

  17. Propagation of quantum optical fields under the conditions of multi-photon resonances in a coherent atomic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, Gleb; Horrom, Travis; Novikova, Irina; Mikhailov, Eugeniy E.

    2013-03-01

    We investigate weak optical probe pulse propagation in a resonant Lambda and N-interaction schemes, and investigate the role of the four-wave mixing on classical and quantum properties of the probe field. In particular, we focus our attention on two configurations. In the first case we take into account the off-resonant coupling of the strong field to the signal field ground state. Such configuration is relevant for EIT-based slow light and quantum memory. In the second configuration the additional control field is derived from an independent laser, and it is tuned to a different optical resonance from the ones forming an original Lambda system. Such interaction scheme allows realization of tunable slow and fast light, and was considered with regards to enhancement of optical gyroscopes performance. We demonstrate that in both cases the four-wave mixing (FWM) has a profound effect on signal field group velocity and absorption profile, and may even lead to gain. We present both semi-classical and fully quantum treatments for propagation of both signal and newly generated Stokes fields that include accurate description of their quantum noise. In particular, we analyze the case of a quadrature-squeezed signal field, and demonstrate that vacuum fluctuations of the Stokes field couple into the signal field through the FWM process and degrades the squeezing. The severity of this degradation grows with optical depths of an atomic medium, setting an additional practical limits for the experiments.

  18. Probing local bias-induced transitions using photothermal excitation contact resonance atomic force microscopy and voltage spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Qian; Jesse, Stephen; Tselev, Alexander; Collins, Liam; Yu, Pu; Kravchenko, Ivan; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Balke, Nina

    2015-01-05

    In this paper, nanomechanical properties are closely related to the states of matter, including chemical composition, crystal structure, mesoscopic domain configuration, etc. Investigation of these properties at the nanoscale requires not only static imaging methods, e.g., contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM), but also spectroscopic methods capable of revealing their dependence on various external stimuli. Here we demonstrate the voltage spectroscopy of CR-AFM, which was realized by combining photothermal excitation (as opposed to the conventional piezoacoustic excitation method) with the band excitation technique. We applied this spectroscopy to explore local bias-induced phenomena ranging from purely physical to surface electromechanical andmore » electrochemical processes. Our measurements show that the changes in the surface properties associated with these bias-induced transitions can be accurately assessed in a fast and dynamic manner, using resonance frequency as a signature. Finally, with many of the advantages offered by photothermal excitation, contact resonance voltage spectroscopy not only is expected to find applications in a broader field of nanoscience but also will provide a basis for future development of other nanoscale elastic spectroscopies.« less

  19. Probing local bias-induced transitions using photothermal excitation contact resonance atomic force microscopy and voltage spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qian; Jesse, Stephen; Tselev, Alexander; Collins, Liam; Yu, Pu; Kravchenko, Ivan; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Balke, Nina

    2015-01-05

    In this paper, nanomechanical properties are closely related to the states of matter, including chemical composition, crystal structure, mesoscopic domain configuration, etc. Investigation of these properties at the nanoscale requires not only static imaging methods, e.g., contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM), but also spectroscopic methods capable of revealing their dependence on various external stimuli. Here we demonstrate the voltage spectroscopy of CR-AFM, which was realized by combining photothermal excitation (as opposed to the conventional piezoacoustic excitation method) with the band excitation technique. We applied this spectroscopy to explore local bias-induced phenomena ranging from purely physical to surface electromechanical and electrochemical processes. Our measurements show that the changes in the surface properties associated with these bias-induced transitions can be accurately assessed in a fast and dynamic manner, using resonance frequency as a signature. Finally, with many of the advantages offered by photothermal excitation, contact resonance voltage spectroscopy not only is expected to find applications in a broader field of nanoscience but also will provide a basis for future development of other nanoscale elastic spectroscopies.

  20. Influence of shape resonances on minima in cross sections for photoionization of excited atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Felfli, Z.; Manson, S.T. Department of Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 )

    1990-02-01

    A relationship between the location of Cooper minima and the difference between the quantum defect of the initial state and the threshold phase shift (in units of {pi}) of the final state in excited photoionization has been suggested earlier (Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 473 (1982)). The existence of a shape resonance in the final state is shown to modify this relationship.

  1. New generation polyphase resonant converter-modulators for the Korean atomic energy research institute

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, William A; Baca, David M; Gribble, Robert F

    2009-01-01

    This paper will present operational data and performance parameters of the newest generation polyphase resonant high voltage converter modulator (HVCM) as developed and delivered to the KAERI 100 MeV ''PEFP'' accelerator [1]. The KAERI design realizes improvements from the SNS and SLAC designs [2]. To improve the IGBT switching performance at 20 kHz for the KAERI system, the HVCM utilizes the typical zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) at turn on and as well as artificial zero-current-switching (ZCS) at turn-off. The new technique of artificial ZCS technique should result in a 6 fold reduction of IGBT switching losses (3). This improves the HCVM conversion efficiency to better than 95% at full average power, which is 500 kW for the KAERI two klystron 105 kV, 50 A application. The artificial ZCS is accomplished by placing a resonant RLC circuit across the input busswork to the resonant boost transformer. This secondary resonant circuit provides a damped ''kick-back'' to assist in IGBT commutation. As the transformer input busswork is extremely low inductance (< 10 nH), the single RLC network acts like it is across each of the four IGBT collector-emitter terminals of the H-bridge switching network. We will review these topological improvements and the overall system as delivered to the KAERI accelerator and provide details of the operational results.

  2. Detection of ultrahigh resonance contrast in vapor-cell atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinda; Deng, Jianliao; Ma, Yisheng; He, Huijuan; Wang, Yuzhu

    2012-12-15

    We propose and demonstrate a novel detection scheme of clock signals and obtain an ultrahigh resonance contrast up to 90%, which leads to the remarkable improvement of the precision of the signal-to-noise ratio. The frequency stability in terms of Allan deviation of the proposed detection scheme is improved by an order of magnitude under equivalent conditions.

  3. Detection of ultrahigh resonance contrast in vapor-cell atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinda; Deng, Jianliao; Ma, Yisheng; He, Huijuan; Wang, Yuzhu

    2012-12-15

    We propose and demonstrate a novel detection scheme of clock signals and obtain an ultrahigh resonance contrast up to 90%, which leads to the remarkable improvement of the precision of the signal-to-noise ratio. The frequency stability in terms of Allan deviation of the proposed detection scheme is improved by an order of magnitude under equivalent conditions. PMID:23257996

  4. Time-domain response of atomically thin MoS{sub 2} nanomechanical resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Leeuwen, R. van; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Steele, G. A.; Zant, H. S. J. van der; Venstra, W. J.

    2014-07-28

    We measure the energy relaxation rate of single- and few-layer molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub 2}) nanomechanical resonators by detecting the resonator ring-down. Recent experiments on these devices show a remarkably low quality (Q)-factor when taking spectrum measurements at room temperature. The origin of the low spectral Q-factor is an open question, and it has been proposed that besides dissipative processes, frequency fluctuations contribute significantly to the resonance line-width. The spectral measurements performed thus far however, do not allow one to distinguish these two processes. Here, we use time-domain measurements to quantify the dissipation. We compare the Q-factor obtained from the ring-down measurements to those obtained from the thermal noise spectrum and from the frequency response of the driven device. In few-layer and single-layer MoS{sub 2} resonators, the two are in close agreement, which demonstrates that the spectral line-width in MoS{sub 2} membranes at room temperature is limited by dissipation, and that excess spectral broadening plays a negligible role.

  5. Role of transient processes in resonance line spectroscopy of caesium atoms in cells with antirelaxation coating

    SciTech Connect

    Sevost'yanov, D I; Yakovlev, V P; Kozlov, A N; Vasil'ev, V V; Zibrov, S A; Velichansky, Vladimir L

    2013-07-31

    We study the peculiarities of the absorption spectra in D{sub 1,2}-lines of Cs, caused by optical pumping in cells with antirelaxation coating. In these cells the internal state of the atom, which arose under optical pumping by a monochromatic laser field, is preserved with a high probability in a collision with the wall. As a result, the optical pumping action extends to the entire volume of the cell and to all the velocities of the atoms. This leads to the speed-dependent scanning distortions of the absorption line profile. The detected features should be considered when using laserpumped quantum magnetometers with antirelaxation-coated cells. (laser spectroscopy)

  6. Dead-zone-free atomic magnetometry with simultaneous excitation of orientation and alignment resonances.

    PubMed

    Ben-Kish, A; Romalis, M V

    2010-11-01

    Atomic magnetometers have very high absolute precision and sensitivity to magnetic fields but suffer from a fundamental problem: the vectorial or tensorial interaction of light with atoms leads to "dead zones," certain orientations of the magnetic field where the magnetometer loses its sensitivity. We demonstrate a simple polarization modulation scheme that simultaneously creates coherent population trapping (CPT) in orientation and alignment, thereby eliminating dead zones. Using 87Rb in a 10 Torr buffer gas cell we measure narrow, high-contrast CPT transparency peaks for all orientations and also show the absence of systematic effects associated with nonlinear Zeeman splitting.

  7. Dead-zone-free atomic magnetometry with simultaneous excitation of orientation and alignment resonances.

    PubMed

    Ben-Kish, A; Romalis, M V

    2010-11-01

    Atomic magnetometers have very high absolute precision and sensitivity to magnetic fields but suffer from a fundamental problem: the vectorial or tensorial interaction of light with atoms leads to "dead zones," certain orientations of the magnetic field where the magnetometer loses its sensitivity. We demonstrate a simple polarization modulation scheme that simultaneously creates coherent population trapping (CPT) in orientation and alignment, thereby eliminating dead zones. Using 87Rb in a 10 Torr buffer gas cell we measure narrow, high-contrast CPT transparency peaks for all orientations and also show the absence of systematic effects associated with nonlinear Zeeman splitting. PMID:21231166

  8. Statistics of resonance fluorescence of a pair of atoms in a feedback loop

    SciTech Connect

    Tomilin, V. A. Il'ichev, L. V.

    2013-02-15

    The statistics of photoemission events of a pair of closely spaced two-level atoms is calculated in a classical light field whose phase is changed by {pi} after the detection of each spontaneous photon. This statistics is compared with the statistics in the case when the feedback is missing. In both cases, one can observe noticeable antibunching of photons in the range of parameters where no antibunching is observed in a single-atom system. The feedback substantially increases the antibunching. This effect manifests itself more strongly in relatively weak fields and for considerable frequency detunings.

  9. Chlor-Alkali Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venkatesh, S.; Tilak, B. V.

    1983-01-01

    Chlor-alkali technology is one of the largest electrochemical industries in the world, the main products being chlorine and caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) generated simultaneously by the electrolysis of sodium chloride. This technology is reviewed in terms of electrochemical principles and manufacturing processes involved. (Author/JN)

  10. Infrared Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Alkali Metal Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ei; Hommerich, Uwe; Yang, Clayton; Trivedi, Sudhir; Samuels, Alan; Snyder, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a powerful diagnostic tool for detection of trace elements by monitoring the atomic and ionic emission from laser-induced plasmas. LIBS is a relatively simple technique and has been successfully employed in applications such as environmental monitoring, materials analysis, medical diagnostics, industrial process control, and homeland security. Most LIBS applications are limited to emission features in the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-VIS-NIR) region arising from atoms and simple molecular fragments. In the present work, we report on the observation of mid- infrared emission lines from alkali metal halides due to laser-induced breakdown processes. The studied alkali metal halides included LiCl, NaCl, NaBr, KCl, KBr, KF, RbCl, and RbBr. The laser-induced plasma was produced by focusing a 16 mJ pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) on the target. The LIBS infrared emission from alkali halides showed intense and narrow bands located in the region from 2-8 μm. The observed emission features were assigned to atomic transitions between higher-lying Rydberg states of neutral alkali atoms. More detailed results of the performed IR LIBS studies on alkali metal halides will be discussed at the conference.

  11. Three-body bound states in atomic mixtures with resonant p-wave interaction.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Maxim A; Plimak, Lev; Ivanov, Misha Yu; Schleich, Wolfgang P

    2013-09-13

    We employ the Born-Oppenheimer approximation to find the effective potential in a three-body system consisting of a light particle and two heavy ones when the heavy-light short-range interaction potential has a resonance corresponding to a nonzero orbital angular momentum. In the case of an exact resonance in the p-wave scattering amplitude, the effective potential is attractive and long range; namely, it decreases as the third power of the interatomic distance. Moreover, we show that the range and power of the potential, as well as the number of bound states, are determined by the mass ratio of the particles and the parameters of the heavy-light short-range potential. PMID:24074084

  12. Photoionization of Xe inside C{sub 60}: Atom-fullerene hybridization, giant cross-section enhancement, and correlation confinement resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Madjet, Mohamed E.; Renger, Thomas; Hopper, Dale E.; McCune, Matthew A.; Chakraborty, Himadri S.; Rost, Jan-M.; Manson, Steven T.

    2010-01-15

    A theoretical study of the subshell photoionization of the Xe atom endohedrally confined in C{sub 60} is presented. Powerful hybridization of the Xe 5s state with the bottom edge of C{sub 60} pi band is found that induces strong structures in the 5s ionization, causing the cross section to differ significantly from earlier results that omit this hybridization. The hybridization also affects the angular distribution asymmetry parameter of Xe 5p ionization near the Cooper minimum. The 5p cross section, on the other hand, is greatly enhanced by borrowing considerable oscillator strength from the C{sub 60} giant plasmon resonance via the atom-fullerene dynamical interchannel coupling. Beyond the C{sub 60} plasmon energy range the atomic subshell cross sections display confinement-induced oscillations in which, over the large 4d shape resonance region, the dominant 4d oscillations induce their 'clones' in all degenerate weaker channels known as correlation confinement resonances.

  13. An ion cyclotron resonance study of reactions of some atomic and simple polyatomic ions with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpas, Z.; Anicich, V. G.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Reactions of various positive ions with water vapor were studied by ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric techniques. Rate constants and product distributions were determined for reactions of the ions: Ar(+), Co(+), N2(+), and CO2(+), CH2(+), and CH4(+), CH2Cl(+), HCO(+), H2CO(+), H2COH(+), H2S(+) and HS(+). The results obtained in this work are compared with earlier reported data where available.

  14. Comparison of force sensors for atomic force microscopy based on quartz tuning forks and length-extensional resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, Franz J.; Pielmeier, Florian; Eguchi, Toyoaki; An, Toshu; Hasegawa, Yukio

    2011-09-01

    The force sensor is key to the performance of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Nowadays, most atomic force microscopes use micromachined force sensors made from silicon, but piezoelectric quartz sensors are being applied at an increasing rate, mainly in vacuum. These self-sensing force sensors allow a relatively easy upgrade of a scanning tunneling microscope to a combined scanning tunneling/atomic force microscope. Two fundamentally different types of quartz sensors have achieved atomic resolution: the “needle sensor,” which is based on a length-extensional resonator, and the “qPlus sensor,” which is based on a tuning fork. Here, we calculate and measure the noise characteristics of these sensors. We find four noise sources: deflection detector noise, thermal noise, oscillator noise, and thermal drift noise. We calculate the effect of these noise sources as a factor of sensor stiffness, bandwidth, and oscillation amplitude. We find that for self-sensing quartz sensors, the deflection detector noise is independent of sensor stiffness, while the remaining three noise sources increase strongly with sensor stiffness. Deflection detector noise increases with bandwidth to the power of 1.5, while thermal noise and oscillator noise are proportional to the square root of the bandwidth. Thermal drift noise, however, is inversely proportional to bandwidth. The first three noise sources are inversely proportional to amplitude while thermal drift noise is independent of the amplitude. Thus, we show that the earlier finding that quoted an optimal signal-to-noise ratio for oscillation amplitudes similar to the range of the forces is still correct when considering all four frequency noise contributions. Finally, we suggest how the signal-to-noise ratio of the sensors can be improved further, we briefly discuss the challenges of mounting tips, and we compare the noise performance of self-sensing quartz sensors and optically detected Si cantilevers.

  15. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Wolfs, Denise Y.; Clavenna, Le Roy R.; Eakman, James M.; Kalina, Theodore

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  16. Calculation of Radiative Corrections to E1 matrix elements in the Neutral Alkalis

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J; Cheng, K T

    2004-09-28

    Radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements for ns-np transitions in the alkali metal atoms lithium through francium are evaluated. They are found to be small for the lighter alkalis but significantly larger for the heavier alkalis, and in the case of cesium much larger than the experimental accuracy. The relation of the matrix element calculation to a recent decay rate calculation for hydrogenic ions is discussed, and application of the method to parity nonconservation in cesium is described.

  17. Upgrading of petroleum oil feedstocks using alkali metals and hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A method of upgrading an oil feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the oil feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase separable from the organic oil feedstock material. The upgradant hydrocarbon bonds to the oil feedstock material and increases the number of carbon atoms in the product. This increase in the number of carbon atoms of the product increases the energy value of the resulting oil feedstock.

  18. EIT resonance features in strong magnetic fields in rubidium atomic columns with length varying by 4 orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoyan, R.; Sargsyan, A.; Sarkisyan, D.; Wojciechowski, A.; Stabrawa, A.; Gawlik, W.

    2016-06-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) resonances are investigated with the 85Rb D 1 line (795 nm) in strong magnetic fields (up to 2 kG) with three different types of spectroscopic vapor cells: the nano-cell with a thickness along the direction of laser light L ≈ 795 nm, the micro-cell with L = 30 μm with the addition of a neon buffer gas, and the centimeter-long glass cell. These cells allowed us to observe systematic changes of the EIT spectra when the increasing magnetic field systematically decoupled the total atomic electron and nuclear angular moments (the Paschen-Back/Back-Goudsmit effects). The observations agree well with a theoretical model. The advantages and disadvantages of a particular type of cell are discussed along with the possible practical applications.

  19. New odd-parity high-lying energy levels of the europium atom by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhate, S. G.; Razvi, M. A. N.; Bhale, G. L.; Ahmad, S. A.

    1996-04-01

    Odd-parity energy levels of the neutral europium atom (Eu I) have been investigated by employing both single-colour and two-colour stepwise laser excitation using the technique of resonance ionization spectroscopy in a heat-pipe thermionic diode system. Fifty-two new odd-parity energy levels of Eu I have been found in the energy region 40 575 - 43 410 0953-4075/29/8/009/img1. The J values for most of these new energy levels have been assigned unambiguously. In addition to this, 19 odd levels which were reported earlier, in the region of our present study, have also been investigated; the assignments of J values to nine of these levels have been confirmed and four levels, which had no unique J assignments, have been assigned definite J values.

  20. Correlation spectroscopy in cold atoms: Light sideband resonances in electromagnetically-induced-transparency condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez, H. M.; Kumar, A.; Theophilo, K.; Nussenzveig, P.; Martinelli, M.

    2016-07-01

    The correlation spectroscopy has been successfully employed in the measurement of the intrinsic linewidth of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in time and frequency domain. We study the role of the sidebands of the intense fields in the measured spectra, analyzing the information that can be recovered working with different analysis frequencies. In this case, the nonzero one-photon detuning appears as a necessary condition for spectrally resolving the sideband resonances in the correlation coefficient. Our experimental findings are supported by the perturbative model defined in the frequency domain.

  1. Quenching of the resonance 5s({sup 3}P{sub 1}) state of krypton atoms in collisions with krypton and helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zayarnyi, D A; L'dov, A Yu; Kholin, I V

    2014-11-30

    The processes of collision quenching of the resonance 5s[3/2]{sub 1}{sup o}({sup 3}P{sub 1}) state of the krypton atom are studied by the absorption probe method in electron-beam-excited high-pressure He – Kr mixtures with a low content of krypton. The rate constants of plasmochemical reactions Kr* + Kr + He → Kr*{sub 2} + He [(4.21 ± 0.42) × 10{sup -33} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1}], Kr* + 2He → HeKr* + He [(4.5 ± 1.2) × 10{sup -36} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1}] and Kr* + He → products + He [(2.21 ± 0.22) × 10{sup -15} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}] are measured for the first time. The rate constants of similar reactions are refined for krypton in the metastable 5s[3/2]{sub 2}{sup o} ({sup 3}P{sub 2}) state. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  2. Alkali-vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.; Krupke, W. F.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the results from several of our alkali laser systems. We show highly efficient performance from an alexandrite-pumped rubidium laser. Using a laser diode stack as a pump source, we demonstrate up to 145 W of average power from a CW system. We present a design for a transversely pumped demonstration system that will show all of the required laser physics for a high power system.

  3. Spin diffusion in trapped clouds of cold atoms with resonant interactions.

    PubMed

    Bruun, G M; Pethick, C J

    2011-12-16

    We show that puzzling recent experimental results on spin diffusion in a strongly interacting atomic gas may be understood in terms of the predicted spin diffusion coefficient for a generic strongly interacting system. Three important features play a central role: (a) Fick's law for diffusion must be modified to allow for the trapping potential; (b) the diffusion coefficient is inhomogeneous, due to the density variations in the cloud; and (c) the diffusion approximation fails in the outer parts of the cloud, where the mean free path is long.

  4. H{sup −} formation by neutral resonant ionization of H(n=2) atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, John S.

    2015-04-08

    A mechanism for producing hydrogen anions in a low density, low energy hydrogen plasma is proposed. The observation in a plasma ion source that the anion output is quadratically related to the Lyman-α radiation suggests that anions could be formed in collisions between atoms in the first excited state. A potential energy plot for the hydrogen molecule is developed that includes a high energy ionic state, comprising a proton and the weakly bound H{sup −}(2p{sup 2} {sup 3}P{sup e}) ion, revealing a path to stable anion formation.

  5. Electronic properties of atomic layer deposition films, anatase and rutile TiO2 studied by resonant photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, C.; Richter, M.; Tallarida, M.; Schmeisser, D.

    2016-07-01

    The TiO2 films are prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) method using titanium isopropoxide precursors at 250 °C and analyzed using resonant photoemission spectroscopy (resPES). We report on the Ti2p and O1s core levels, on the valence band (VB) spectra and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data, and on the resonant photoelectron spectroscopy (resPES) profiles at the O1s and the Ti3p absorption edges. We determine the elemental abundance, the position of the VB maxima, the partial density of states (PDOS) in the VB and in the conduction band (CB) and collect these data in a band scheme. In addition, we analyze the band-gap states as well as the intrinsic states due to polarons and charge-transfer excitations. These states are found to cause multiple Auger decay processes upon resonant excitation. We identify several of these processes and determine their relative contribution to the Auger signal quantitatively. As our resPES data allow a quantitative analysis of these defect states, we determine the relative abundance of the PDOS in the VB and in CB and also the charge neutrality level. The anatase and rutile polymorphs of TiO2 are analyzed in the same way as the TiO2 ALD layer. The electronic properties of the TiO2 ALD layer are compared with the anatase and rutile polymorphs of TiO2. In our comparative study, we find that ALD has its own characteristic electronic structure that is distinct from that of anatase and rutile. However, many details of the electronic structure are comparable and we benefit from our spectroscopic data and our careful analysis to find these differences. These can be attributed to a stronger hybridization of the O2p and Ti3d4s states for the ALD films when compared to the anatase and rutile polymorphs.

  6. Transfer of a weakly bound electron in collisions of Rydberg atoms with neutral particles. II. Ion-pair formation and resonant quenching of the Rb(nl) and Ne(nl) States by Ca, Sr, and Ba atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Narits, A. A.; Mironchuk, E. S.; Lebedev, V. S.

    2013-10-15

    Electron-transfer processes are studied in thermal collisions of Rydberg atoms with alkaline-earth Ca(4s{sup 2}), Sr(5s{sup 2}), and Ba(6s{sup 2}) atoms capable of forming negative ions with a weakly bound outermost p-electron. We consider the ion-pair formation and resonant quenching of highly excited atomic states caused by transitions between Rydberg covalent and ionic terms of a quasi-molecule produced in collisions of particles. The contributions of these reaction channels to the total depopulation cross section of Rydberg states of Rb(nl) and Ne(nl) atoms as functions of the principal quantum number n are compared for selectively excited nl-levels with l Much-Less-Than n and for states with large orbital quantum numbers l = n - 1, n - 2. It is shown that the contribution from resonant quenching dominates at small values of n, and the ion-pair formation process begins to dominate with increasing n. The values and positions of the maxima of cross sections for both processes strongly depend on the electron affinity of an alkaline-earth atom and on the orbital angular momentum l of a highly excited atom. It is shown that in the case of Rydberg atoms in states with large l {approx} n - 1, the rate constants of ion-pair formation and collisional quenching are considerably lower than those for nl-levels with l Much-Less-Than n.

  7. Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma-Assisted Atomic Layer Deposition of Amorphous Al2O3 Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yuqing; Sang, Lijun; Chen, Qiang; Yang, Lizhen; Wang, Zhengduo; Liu, Zhongwei

    2013-01-01

    Without extra heating, Al2O3 thin films were deposited on a hydrogen-terminated Si substrate etched in hydrofluoric acid by using a self-built electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) device with Al(CH3)3 (trimethylaluminum; TMA) and O2 used as precursor and oxidant, respectively. During the deposition process, Ar was introduced as a carrier and purging gas. The chemical composition and microstructure of the as-deposited Al2O3 films were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), an X-ray photoelectric spectroscope (XPS), a scanning electron microscope (SEM), an atomic force microscope (AFM) and a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). It achieved a growth rate of 0.24 nm/cycle, which is much higher than that deposited by thermal ALD. It was found that the smooth surface thin film was amorphous alumina, and an interfacial layer formed with a thickness of ca. 2 nm was observed between the Al2O3 film and substrate Si by HRTEM. We conclude that ECR plasma-assisted ALD can grow Al2O3 films with an excellent quality at a high growth rate at ambient temperature.

  8. Ion-Atom Cold Collisions and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lute; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Collisions between ultracold neutral atoms have for some time been the subject of investigation, initially with hydrogen and more recently with laser cooled alkali atoms. Advances in laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms in a Magneto-Optic Trap (MOT) have made cold atoms available as the starting point for many laser cooled atomic physics investigations. The most spectacularly successful of these, the observation of Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) in a dilute ultra-cold spin polarized atomic vapor, has accelerated the study of cold collisions. Experimental and theoretical studies of BEC and the long range interaction between cold alkali atoms is at the boundary of atomic and low temperature physics. Such studies have been difficult and would not have been possible without the development and advancement of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms. By contrast, ion-atom interactions at low temperature, also very difficult to study prior to modern day laser cooling, have remained largely unexplored. But now, many laboratories worldwide have almost routine access to cold neutral atoms. The combined technologies of ion trapping, together with laser cooling of neutrals has made these studies experimentally feasible and several very important, novel applications might come out of such investigations . This paper is an investigation of ion-atom interactions in the cold and ultra-cold temperature regime. Some of the collisional ion-atom interactions present at room temperature are very much reduced in the low temperature regime. Reaction rates for charge transfer between unlike atoms, A + B(+) approaches A(+) + B, are expected to fall rapidly with temperature, approximately as T(sup 5/2). Thus, cold mixtures of atoms and ions are expected to coexist for very long times, unlike room temperature mixtures of the same ion-atom combination. Thus, it seems feasible to cool ions via collisions with laser cooled atoms. Many of the conventional collisional interactions

  9. Quantum degenerate mixture of ytterbium and lithium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Anders H.; Khramov, Alexander; Dowd, William H.; Jamison, Alan O.; Ivanov, Vladyslav V.; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2011-07-15

    We have produced a quantum degenerate mixture of fermionic alkali-metal {sup 6}Li and bosonic spin-singlet {sup 174}Yb gases. This was achieved using sympathetic cooling of lithium atoms by evaporatively cooled ytterbium atoms in a far-off-resonant optical dipole trap. We observe the coexistence of Bose-condensed (T/T{sub c}{approx_equal}0.8) {sup 174}Yb with 2.3x10{sup 4} atoms and Fermi degenerate (T/T{sub F}{approx_equal}0.3) {sup 6}Li with 1.2x10{sup 4} atoms. Quasipure Bose-Einstein condensates of up to 3x10{sup 4} {sup 174}Yb atoms can be produced in single-species experiments. Our results mark a significant step toward studies of few- and many-body physics with mixtures of alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal-like atoms, and for the production of paramagnetic polar molecules in the quantum regime. Our methods also establish a convenient scheme for producing quantum degenerate ytterbium atoms in a 1064 nm optical dipole trap.

  10. Coherent control of atomic excitation using off-resonant strong few-cycle pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Pankaj K.; Eleuch, Hichem; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.

    2010-10-15

    We study the dynamics of a two-level system driven by an off-resonance few-cycle pulse which has a phase jump {phi} at t=t{sub 0}, in contrast to many-cycle pulses, under the nonrotating-wave approximation (NRWA). We give a closed form analytical solution for the evolution of the probability amplitude |C{sub a}(t)| for the upper level. Using the appropriate pulse parameters like the phase jump {phi}, jump time t{sub 0}, pulse width {tau}, frequency {nu}, and Rabi frequency {Omega}{sub 0} the population transfer after the pulse is gone can be optimized and, for the pulse considered here, an enhancement factor of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} was obtained.

  11. Charge transfer during alkali-surface adsorbate collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ye

    The study of charge transfer process between atomic particles and surface adsorbates is important, from both fundamental and practical points of view. Resonant charge transfer (RCT) process during the scattering of low-energy alkali ions from surfaces is proven to depend on the surface local electrostatic potential (LEP). This dissertation investigates the surface electronic environment around halogen and hydrogen adatoms on transition metal and silicon surfaces by using alkali ion scattering. Charge transfer in 7Li+ scattering from clean Si surfaces was shown to involve RCT between the Li 2s level and the Si dangling bonds. Hydrogen adsorption decreases the neutralization because it ties up the dangling bonds. The neutral fractions in 7Li + scattering from Cs/Si are also determined primarily by the dangling bond states, so that the surface LEP cannot be directly probed. Hydrogen adsorption on Cs/Si ties up the dangling bonds, thereby revealing the local potentials. The neutralization probabilities of Li+ backscattered from the hydrogen- and iodine-covered Ni(100) surface were measured. The neutral fraction does not change significantly on H-adsorbed surface. For iodine adsorption, however, unexpected high neutralization probabilities were found for Li scattered directly from iodine sites. Similar behavior were observed for Li+ scattering from I- and Br-covered Fe(100) and Fe(110). The neutralization of Li+ was measured as a function of the incident energy, adatom charge and coverage, and exit angle. It was found that the larger neutral fractions of Li scattered from the halogen sites are caused by a lower potential directly above the adatoms due to internal polarization. As the exit beam moves off-normal, the neutral fraction of Li scattered from iodine decreases. This is in contrast to Cs and Ag adsorbates where the neutral fractions increase for glancing exit trajectories. These angular-dependences are verified by a semi-quantitative theoretical analysis. To

  12. Fingerprints of exceptional points in the survival probability of resonances in atomic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Cartarius, Holger; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2011-07-15

    The unique time signature of the survival probability exactly at the exceptional point parameters is studied here for the hydrogen atom in strong static magnetic and electric fields. We show that indeed the survival probability S(t)=|<{psi}(0)|{psi}(t)>|{sup 2} decays exactly as |1-at|{sup 2}e{sup -{Gamma}{sub E}{sub P}t/({Dirac_h}/2{pi})}, where {Gamma}{sub EP} is associated with the decay rate at the exceptional point and a is a complex constant depending solely on the initial wave packet that populates exclusively the two almost degenerate states of the non-Hermitian Hamiltonian. This may open the possibility for a first experimental detection of exceptional points in a quantum system.

  13. Spin resonance transport properties of a single Au atom in S–Au–S junction and Au–Au–Au junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fangyuan, Wang; Guiqin, Li

    2016-07-01

    The spin transport properties of S–Au–S junction and Au–Au–Au junction between Au nanowires are investigated with density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function. We mainly focus on the spin resonance transport properties of the center Au atom. The breaking of chemical bonds between anchor atoms and center Au atom significantly influences their spin transmission characteristics. We find the 0.8 eV orbital energy shift between anchor S atoms and the center Au atom can well protect the spin state stored in the S–Au–S junction and efficiently extract its spin state to the current by spin resonance mechanism, while the spin interaction of itinerant electrons and the valence electron of the center Au atom in the Au–Au–Au junction can extract the current spin information into the center Au atom. Fermi energy drift and bias-dependent spin filtering properties of the Au–Au–Au junction may transform information between distance, bias, and electron spin. Those unique properties make them potential candidates for a logical nanocircuit. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grants No. 2011CB921602) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants No. 20121318158).

  14. Spin resonance transport properties of a single Au atom in S-Au-S junction and Au-Au-Au junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fangyuan, Wang; Guiqin, Li

    2016-07-01

    The spin transport properties of S-Au-S junction and Au-Au-Au junction between Au nanowires are investigated with density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function. We mainly focus on the spin resonance transport properties of the center Au atom. The breaking of chemical bonds between anchor atoms and center Au atom significantly influences their spin transmission characteristics. We find the 0.8 eV orbital energy shift between anchor S atoms and the center Au atom can well protect the spin state stored in the S-Au-S junction and efficiently extract its spin state to the current by spin resonance mechanism, while the spin interaction of itinerant electrons and the valence electron of the center Au atom in the Au-Au-Au junction can extract the current spin information into the center Au atom. Fermi energy drift and bias-dependent spin filtering properties of the Au-Au-Au junction may transform information between distance, bias, and electron spin. Those unique properties make them potential candidates for a logical nanocircuit. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grants No. 2011CB921602) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants No. 20121318158).

  15. Surface conformations of anti-ricin aptamer and its affinity to ricin determined by atomic force microscopy and surface plasmon resonance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The specific interactions between ricin and anti-ricin aptamer were measured with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectrometry and the results were compared. In AFM, a single-molecule experiment with ricin functionalized AFM tip was used for scanning the aptamer mol...

  16. Transport properties of alkali metal doped fullerides

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Daluram Yadav, Nishchhal

    2015-07-31

    We have studied the intercage interactions between the adjacent C{sub 60} cages and expansion of lattice due to the intercalation of alkali atoms based on the spring model to estimate phonon frequencies from the dynamical matrix for the intermolecular alkali-C{sub 60} phonons. We considered a two-peak model for the phonon density of states to investigate the nature of electron pairing mechanism for superconducting state in fullerides. Coulomb repulsive parameter and the electron phonon coupling strength are obtained within the random phase approximation. Transition temperature, T{sub c}, is obtained in a situation when the free electrons in lowest molecular orbital are coupled with alkali-C{sub 60} phonons as 5 K, which is much lower as compared to reported T{sub c} (20 K). The superconducting pairing is mainly driven by the high frequency intramolecular phonons and their effects enhance it to 22 K. The importance of the present study, the pressure effect and normal state transport properties are calculated within the same model leading superconductivity.

  17. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  18. Microfabricated alkali vapor cell with anti-relaxation wall coating

    SciTech Connect

    Straessle, R.; Pétremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Rooij, N. F. de; Pellaton, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G.

    2014-07-28

    We present a microfabricated alkali vapor cell equipped with an anti-relaxation wall coating. The anti-relaxation coating used is octadecyltrichlorosilane and the cell was sealed by thin-film indium-bonding at a low temperature of 140 °C. The cell body is made of silicon and Pyrex and features a double-chamber design. Depolarizing properties due to liquid Rb droplets are avoided by confining the Rb droplets to one chamber only. Optical and microwave spectroscopy performed on this wall-coated cell are used to evaluate the cell's relaxation properties and a potential gas contamination. Double-resonance signals obtained from the cell show an intrinsic linewidth that is significantly lower than the linewidth that would be expected in case the cell had no wall coating but only contained a buffer-gas contamination on the level measured by optical spectroscopy. Combined with further experimental evidence this proves the presence of a working anti-relaxation wall coating in the cell. Such cells are of interest for applications in miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and other quantum sensors.

  19. Multi-photon processes in alkali metal vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Baodong; Hu, Shu; Li, Hui; Shi, Zhe; Cai, Xianglong; Guo, Jingwei; Tan, Yannan; Liu, Wanfa; Jin, Yuqi; Sang, Fengting

    2015-02-01

    Achieving population inversion through multi-photon cascade pumping is almost always difficult, and most laser medium work under 1-photon excitation mechanism. But for alkali atoms such as cesium, relatively large absorption cross sections of several low, cascading energy levels enable them properties such as up conversion. Here we carried out research on two-photon excitation alkali fluorescence. Two photons of near infrared region are used to excite alkali atoms to n 2 D5/2, n 2 D3/2 or higher energy levels, then the blue fluorescence of (n+1) 2 P3/2,(n+1) 2 P1/2-->n 2 S1/2 are observed. Different pumping paths are tried and by the recorded spectra, transition routes of cesium are deducted and concluded. Finally the possibility of two-photon style DPALs (diode pumped alkali laser) are discussed, such alkali lasers can give output wavelengths in the shorter end of visual spectroscopy (400-460 nm) and are expected to get application in underwater communication and material laser processing.

  20. PROCESS OF RECOVERING ALKALI METALS

    DOEpatents

    Wolkoff, J.

    1961-08-15

    A process is described of recovering alkali metal vapor by sorption on activated alumina, activated carbon, dehydrated zeolite, activated magnesia, or Fuller's earth preheated above the vaporization temperature of the alkali metal and subsequent desorption by heating the solvent under vacuum. (AEC)

  1. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  2. The effect of the partner atom on the spectra of interatomic Coulombic decay triggered by resonant Auger processes

    SciTech Connect

    Miteva, T. Chiang, Y.-C.; Kuleff, A. I.; Cederbaum, L. S.; Gokhberg, K.; Kolorenč, P.

    2014-10-28

    The resonant-Auger – interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) cascade was recently suggested as an efficient means of controlling the course of the ICD process. Recent theoretical and experimental works show that control over the energies of the emitted ICD electrons can be achieved either by varying the photon energy to produce different initial core excitations or by changing the neighboring species. This work presents a theoretical investigation on the role of the rare-gas neighbor and clarifies how the latter influences the ICD process. For this purpose, we compare fully ab initio computed ICD-electron and kinetic energy release spectra following the 2p{sub 3/2} → 4s, 2p{sub 1/2} → 4s and 2p{sub 3/2} → 3d of Ar in ArKr and Ar{sub 2}. We demonstrate that the presence of the chemically “softer” partner atom results in an increase in the energies of the emitted ICD electrons, and also in the appearance of additional ICD-active states. The latter leads to a threefold increase in the ICD yield for the case of the 2p{sub 3/2,} {sub 1/2} → 4s parent core excitations.

  3. MDM2–MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Teveroni, Emanuela; Moretti, Fabiola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and 4 (MDM4) are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2–MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) in the micromolar range for the MDM2–MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2–MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation. PMID:27621617

  4. MDM2–MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Teveroni, Emanuela; Moretti, Fabiola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and 4 (MDM4) are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2–MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) in the micromolar range for the MDM2–MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2–MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation.

  5. Metal atom and ion layers observed by a frequency-tunable resonance scattering lidar in the midlatitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, Mitsumu K.; Nakamura, Takuji; Kawahara, Takuya D.; Tsuno, Katsuhiko; Abo, Makoto; Nishiyama, Takanori; Tsuda, Takuo; Wada, Satoshi; Ogawa, Takayo

    2016-07-01

    The National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) is leading a six year prioritized project of the Antarctic research observations since 2010. One of the sub-project is entitled the global environmental change revealed through the Antarctic middle and upper atmosphere. Profiling dynamical parameters such as temperature and wind, as well as minor constituents is the key component of observations in this project, together with a long term observations using existent various instruments in Syowa, the Antarctica (69S). As a part of the sub-project, we are developing a new resonance lidar system with multiple wavelengths and plan to install and operate it at Syowa, Antarctica. The lidar will observe temperature profiles and variations of minor constituents such as Fe, K, Ca+, and aurorally excited N2+. The lidar system is being developed with trial and error in test observations of the metal atom and ion density and the MLT temperature profiles. The lidar will be installed at Syowa in Antarctica by the 58th Japan Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE 58). In this presentation, we will report current status of the system developments and discuss results of the test observations.

  6. Breakdown of ionic character of molecular alkali bromides in inner-valence photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Karpenko, A. Iablonskyi, D.; Kettunen, J. A.; Cao, W.; Huttula, M.; Aksela, H.; Urpelainen, S.

    2014-05-28

    The inner-valence region of alkali bromide XBr (X=Li, Na, K, Rb) vapours has been studied experimentally by means of synchrotron radiation excited photoelectron spectroscopy. Experimental spectra were analyzed by comparing them with available theoretical results and previous experiments. Ionic character of alkali bromides is seen to change in the inner-valence region with increasing atomic number of the alkali atom. A mechanism involving mixing between Br 4s and Rb 4p orbitals has been suggested to account for the fine structure observed in inner-valence ionization region of RbBr.

  7. Development of Laser Light Sources for Trapping Radioactive Francium Atoms Toward Tests of Fundamental Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Ken-ichi; Ezure, Saki; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Kato, Ko; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Inoue, Takeshi; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Aoki, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Aiko; Itoh, Masatoshi; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takatoshi; Hatakeyama, Atsushi; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Imai, Kenichi; Murakami, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Sato, Tomoya; Wakasa, Tomotsugu; Yoshida, Hidetomo P.; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    We have developed laser light sources and a magneto-optical trap system for cooling and trapping radioactive francium (Fr) atoms. Because Fr is the heaviest alkali element, a Fr atom exhibits high sensitivity to symmetry violation effects such as atomic parity nonconservation (APNC) and the electron electric dipole moment (eEDM). A laser cooling and trapping technique reduces the systematic errors due to the Doppler effect and the motion-induced magnetic field effect caused by the velocity of atoms. Thus, optically cooled and trapped Fr atoms are among a few promising candidates considered for APNC and eEDM measurements. Frequency stabilization of laser light is required for any stable measurement involving trapped radioactive atoms, including Fr. Since the hyperfine splitting in iodine molecules (127I2) is close to the resonance frequency of the Fr D2 line, we performed frequency modulation spectroscopy of hyperfine structures of I2.

  8. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  9. Alkali hydrolysis of trinitrotoluene.

    PubMed

    Karasch, Christian; Popovic, Milan; Qasim, Mohamed; Bajpai, Rakesh K

    2002-01-01

    Data for alkali hydrolysis of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in aqueous solution at pH 12.0 under static (pH-controlled) as well as dynamic (pH-uncontrolled) conditions are reported. The experiments were conducted at two different molar ratios of TNT to hydroxyl ions at room temperature. The TNT disappeared rapidly from the solution as a first-order reaction. The complete disappearance of aromatic structure from the aqueous solution within 24 h was confirmed by the ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectra of the samples. Cuvet experiments in a UV-VIS spectrophotometer demonstrated the formation of Meisenheimer complex, which slowly disappeared via formation of aromatic compounds with fewer nitro groups. The known metabolites of TNT were found to accumulate only in very small quantities in the liquid phase.

  10. Synergistic capture mechanisms for alkali and sulphur species from combustion. Quarterly report No. 10, December 1992--February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.W.; Shadman, F.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Wu, Baochun

    1993-07-26

    A number of sorbents with alumina-silicate base and sulfur capturing active sites have been developed for simultaneous removal of alkali metal compounds and sulfur dioxide. Current report will focus on bauxite sorbents, which includes experiments on sulfur dioxide absorption, alkali capturing and alkali/sulfur absorption simultaneously by bauxite-based sorbents. The alkali compound used here is sodium chloride. Experiments show an effective adsorption of sulfur or alkali separately, and the combined adsorption of alkali/sulfur. Atomic absorption analysis of reaction products shows that there is a much higher sodium content in the combined reaction products than that of the single reaction of alkali absorption by bauxite. Further X-ray diffraction analysis shows that there is sodium sulfate in the final products of simultaneous reaction, which indicates the formation and then condensation of sodium sulfate in the reaction system.

  11. Ultracold few fermionic atoms in needle-shaped double wells: spin chains and resonating spin clusters from microscopic Hamiltonians emulated via antiferromagnetic Heisenberg and t–J models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yannouleas, Constantine; Brandt, Benedikt B.; Landman, Uzi

    2016-07-01

    Advances with trapped ultracold atoms intensified interest in simulating complex physical phenomena, including quantum magnetism and transitions from itinerant to non-itinerant behavior. Here we show formation of antiferromagnetic ground states of few ultracold fermionic atoms in single and double well (DW) traps, through microscopic Hamiltonian exact diagonalization for two DW arrangements: (i) two linearly oriented one-dimensional, 1D, wells, and (ii) two coupled parallel wells, forming a trap of two-dimensional, 2D, nature. The spectra and spin-resolved conditional probabilities reveal for both cases, under strong repulsion, atomic spatial localization at extemporaneously created sites, forming quantum molecular magnetic structures with non-itinerant character. These findings usher future theoretical and experimental explorations into the highly correlated behavior of ultracold strongly repelling fermionic atoms in higher dimensions, beyond the fermionization physics that is strictly applicable only in the 1D case. The results for four atoms are well described with finite Heisenberg spin-chain and cluster models. The numerical simulations of three fermionic atoms in symmetric DWs reveal the emergent appearance of coupled resonating 2D Heisenberg clusters, whose emulation requires the use of a t–J-like model, akin to that used in investigations of high T c superconductivity. The highly entangled states discovered in the microscopic and model calculations of controllably detuned, asymmetric, DWs suggest three-cold-atom DW quantum computing qubits.

  12. Ultracold few fermionic atoms in needle-shaped double wells: spin chains and resonating spin clusters from microscopic Hamiltonians emulated via antiferromagnetic Heisenberg and t-J models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yannouleas, Constantine; Brandt, Benedikt B.; Landman, Uzi

    2016-07-01

    Advances with trapped ultracold atoms intensified interest in simulating complex physical phenomena, including quantum magnetism and transitions from itinerant to non-itinerant behavior. Here we show formation of antiferromagnetic ground states of few ultracold fermionic atoms in single and double well (DW) traps, through microscopic Hamiltonian exact diagonalization for two DW arrangements: (i) two linearly oriented one-dimensional, 1D, wells, and (ii) two coupled parallel wells, forming a trap of two-dimensional, 2D, nature. The spectra and spin-resolved conditional probabilities reveal for both cases, under strong repulsion, atomic spatial localization at extemporaneously created sites, forming quantum molecular magnetic structures with non-itinerant character. These findings usher future theoretical and experimental explorations into the highly correlated behavior of ultracold strongly repelling fermionic atoms in higher dimensions, beyond the fermionization physics that is strictly applicable only in the 1D case. The results for four atoms are well described with finite Heisenberg spin-chain and cluster models. The numerical simulations of three fermionic atoms in symmetric DWs reveal the emergent appearance of coupled resonating 2D Heisenberg clusters, whose emulation requires the use of a t-J-like model, akin to that used in investigations of high T c superconductivity. The highly entangled states discovered in the microscopic and model calculations of controllably detuned, asymmetric, DWs suggest three-cold-atom DW quantum computing qubits.

  13. Quasiclassical calculations of blackbody-radiation-induced depopulation rates and effective lifetimes of Rydberg nS, nP, and nD alkali-metal atoms with n{<=}80

    SciTech Connect

    Beterov, I. I.; Ryabtsev, I. I.; Tretyakov, D. B.; Entin, V. M.

    2009-05-15

    Rates of depopulation by blackbody radiation (BBR) and effective lifetimes of alkali-metal nS, nP, and nD Rydberg states have been calculated in a wide range of principal quantum numbers n{<=}80 at the ambient temperatures of 77, 300, and 600 K. Quasiclassical formulas were used to calculate the radial matrix elements of the dipole transitions from Rydberg states. Good agreement of our numerical results with the available theoretical and experimental data has been found. We have also obtained simple analytical formulas for estimates of effective lifetimes and BBR-induced depopulation rates, which well agree with the numerical data.

  14. Mixed alkali effect in nonconventional alkali gallotitanate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Miyaji, Fumiaki; Hasegawa, Shinya; Yoko, Toshinobu; Sakka, Sumio . Inst. for Chemical Research)

    1993-02-01

    The mixed alkali effect on electrical conductivity, that is, the reduction of conductivity due to alkali mixing, was observed in Na[sub 2]O-K[sub 2]O-Ga[sub 2]O[sub 3]-TiO[sub 2] glasses, which are nonconventional in the sense that glass-forming oxides defined by Zachariasen are not involved. The magnitude of the reduction in conductivity of the present glasses due to alkali mixing was similar to that of corresponding mixed alkali silicate and phosphate glasses. The activation energy for electrical conduction showed a maximum around the composition Na/(Na + K) = 0.5, where the conductivity was at a minimum.

  15. Atomic sulfur: Frequency measurement of the J = 0 left arrow 1 fine-structure transition at 56.3 microns by laser magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John M.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Zink, Lyndon R.

    1994-01-01

    The J = 0 left arrow 1 fine-structure transition in atomic sulfur (S I) in its ground (3)P state has been detected in the laboratory by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance. The fine-structure interval has been measured accurately as 5,322,492.9 +/- 2.8 MHz which corresponds to a wavelength of 56.325572 +/- 0.000030 micrometers.

  16. High-temperature interactions of alkali vapors with solids during coal combustion and gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Punjak, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    A temperature and concentration programmed reaction method is used to investigate the mechanism by which organically bound alkali is released from carbonaceous substrates. Vaporization of the alkali is preceded by reduction of oxygen-bearing groups during which CO is generated. A residual amount of alkali remains after complete reduction. This residual level is greater for potassium, indicating that potassium has stronger interactions with graphitic substrates that sodium. Other mineral substrates were exposed to high temperature alkali chloride vapors under both nitrogen and simulated flue gas atmospheres to investigate their potential application as sorbents for the removal of alkali from coal conversion flue gases. The compounds containing alumina and silica are found to readily adsorb alkali vapors and the minerals kaolinite, bauxite and emathlite are identified as promising alkali sorbents. The fundamentals of alkali adsorption on kaolinite, bauxite and emathlite are compared and analyzed both experimentally and through theoretical modeling. The experiments were performed in a microgravimetric reactor system; the sorbents were characterized before and after alkali adsorption using scanning Auger microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, mercury porosimetry and atomic emission spectrophotometry. The results show that the process is not a simple physical condensation, but a complex combination of several diffusion steps and reactions.

  17. Enhanced optical nonlinearity and fiber-optical frequency comb controlled by a single atom in a whispering-gallery-mode microtoroid resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiahua; Zhang, Suzhen; Yu, Rong; Zhang, Duo; Wu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    Based on a single atom coupled to a fiber-coupled, chip-based microresonator [B. Dayan et al., Science 319, 1062 (2008), 10.1126/science.1152261], we put forward a scheme to generate optical frequency combs at driving laser powers as low as a few nanowatts. Using state-of-the-art experimental parameters, we investigate in detail the influences of different atomic positions and taper-resonator coupling regimes on optical-frequency-comb generation. In addition to numerical simulations demonstrating this effect, a physical explanation of the underlying mechanism is presented. We find that the combination of the atom and the resonator can induce a large third-order nonlinearity which is significantly stronger than Kerr nonlinearity in Kerr frequency combs. Such enhanced nonlinearity can be used to generate optical frequency combs if driven with two continuous-wave control and probe lasers and significantly reduce the threshold of nonlinear optical processes. The comb spacing can be well tuned by changing the frequency beating between the driving control and probe lasers. The proposed method is versatile and can be adopted to different types of resonators, such as microdisks, microspheres, microtoroids or microrings.

  18. Uncertainty in least-squares fits to the thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators with applications to the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Sader, John E; Yousefi, Morteza; Friend, James R

    2014-02-01

    Thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators are used widely to characterize their physical properties. These spectra typically exhibit a Lorentzian response, with additional white noise due to extraneous processes. Least-squares fits of these measurements enable extraction of key parameters of the resonator, including its resonant frequency, quality factor, and stiffness. Here, we present general formulas for the uncertainties in these fit parameters due to sampling noise inherent in all thermal noise spectra. Good agreement with Monte Carlo simulation of synthetic data and measurements of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilever is demonstrated. These formulas enable robust interpretation of thermal noise spectra measurements commonly performed in the AFM and adaptive control of fitting procedures with specified tolerances.

  19. Uncertainty in least-squares fits to the thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators with applications to the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Yousefi, Morteza; Friend, James R.

    2014-02-15

    Thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators are used widely to characterize their physical properties. These spectra typically exhibit a Lorentzian response, with additional white noise due to extraneous processes. Least-squares fits of these measurements enable extraction of key parameters of the resonator, including its resonant frequency, quality factor, and stiffness. Here, we present general formulas for the uncertainties in these fit parameters due to sampling noise inherent in all thermal noise spectra. Good agreement with Monte Carlo simulation of synthetic data and measurements of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilever is demonstrated. These formulas enable robust interpretation of thermal noise spectra measurements commonly performed in the AFM and adaptive control of fitting procedures with specified tolerances.

  20. In-situ scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy Young's modulus determination of indium oxide microrods for micromechanical resonator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolomé, Javier; Hidalgo, Pedro; Maestre, David; Cremades, Ana Piqueras, Javier

    2014-04-21

    Electric field induced mechanical resonances of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} microrods are studied by in-situ measurements in the chamber of a scanning electron microscope. Young's moduli of rods with different cross-sectional shapes are calculated from the resonance frequency, and a range of values between 131 and 152 GPa are obtained. A quality factor of 1180–3780 is measured from the amplitude-frequency curves, revealing the suitability of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} microrods as micromechanical resonators. The Young's modulus, E, of one of the rods is also measured from the elastic response in the force-displacement curve recorded in an atomic force microscope. E values obtained by in-situ scanning electron microscopy and by atomic force microscopy are found to differ in about 8%. The results provide data on Young's modulus of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and confirm the suitability of in-situ scanning electron microscopy mechanical resonance measurements to investigate the elastic behavior of semiconductor microrods.

  1. Relativistic Quantum Chemistry of Heavy Elements: Interatomic potentials and Lines Shift for Systems 'Alkali Elements-Inert Gases'

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, A. V.; Khetselius, O.; Gurnitskaya, E.; Loboda, A.; Mischenko, E.

    2009-03-09

    New relativistic approach, based on the gauge-invariant perturbation theory (PT) with using the optimized wave functions basis's, is applied to calculating the inter atomic potentials, hyper fine structure (hfs) collision shift for alkali atoms in atmosphere of inert gases. Data for inter atomic potentials, collision shifts of the Rb and Cs atoms in atmosphere of the inert gas He are presented.

  2. Multi-state charge transfer dynamics and trapping of hyperthermal and low energy alkali ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Eric Brian

    Experimental and theoretical studies were performed of the scattering of hyperthermal and keV energy Lisp+ and Nasp+ ions from Cu(001) surfaces. Chapter one presents measurements of relative total Li(2p) and Na(3p) yields, for 400 eV Lisp+ and 1320 eV Nasp+ scattering from clean and alkali-covered Cu(001). These excited-state yields were measured because they provide a sensitive test of multi-state models of resonant charge transfer, that is, models that are capable of treating more than two atomic states. Chapter two presents a detailed conceptual analysis of two multi-state models: a rate-equation model and the Marston model. The rate-equation model fails to reproduce the measured Li(2p) and Na(3p) yields, whereas the Marston model reproduces the primary trends in the yields. The different behaviors of these models are explained by physical reasoning. The rate-equation model is a fundamentally flawed description of resonant charge transfer, because it includes neither hybridization nor non-adiabatic excitations. Both aspects of resonant charge transfer are required to explain the Li(2p) and Na(3p) yields. These aspects are included in the Marston model, which describes the atom-metal system quantum-mechanically. The quantum mechanics of the atom-metal system can be understood from a physical viewpoint by the use of a few basic principles-principles which are broadly applicable to resonant charge transfer. A key principle is the tendency of the atom-metal system to electronically equilibrate throughout the scattering trajectory of an atom. Additional principles follow from an examination of the many-electron basis states of the atom-metal system. Chapter three presents measurements of the probability that 5 to 600 eV Nasp+ ions incident on Cu(001) become trapped on top of the surface. At a near-normal incident geometry the on-top trapping probability decreased monotonically as the incident energy was decreased. At 45sp° incidence along the < 100> azimuth, a

  3. Fission and dipole resonances in metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T. P.; Billas, I. M. L.; Branz, W.; Heinebrodt, M.; Tast, F.; Malinowski, N.

    1997-06-20

    It is not obvious that metal clusters should behave like atomic nuclei--but they do. Of course the energy and distance scales are quite different. But aside from this, the properties of these two forms of condensed matter are amazingly similar. The shell model developed by nuclear physicists describes very nicely the electronic properties of alkali metal clusters. The giant dipole resonances in the excitation spectra of nuclei have their analogue in the plasmon resonances of metal clusters. Finally, the droplet model describing the fission of unstable nuclei can be successively applied to the fragmentation of highly charged metal clusters. The similarity between clusters and nuclei is not accidental. Both systems consist of fermions moving, nearly freely, in a confined space.

  4. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  5. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of van der Waals molecules: Studies of spectroscopic shifts of phenyl acetylene clustered with molecules and atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, P. D.; Morgan, S.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1984-10-01

    Van der Waals molecules comprised of phenyl acetylene (PA) clustered with rare-gas atoms, R (R = Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) and other molecules, M (M = N 2, O 2, N 2O, CO 2), H 2O, CCl 4, and NH 3) were formed via adiabatic expansion from a pulsed nozzle, subjected to resonance-erhanced MPI, and analyzed in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Studies of the perturbed L b( 1B 2) states reveal spectral shifts with respect to the aromatic molecule monomer. In the case of the rare-gas atoms the shift in frequency, which is red, linearly increases with the polarizability of the atom. Red-shifts were also seen for all other molecules except CO 2 and H 2O, where an appreciable blue-shift was observed in the case of the latter.

  6. A pulsed source for Xe(6s[3/2]1) and Xe(6s'[1/2]1) resonance state atoms using two-photon driven amplified spontaneous emission from the Xe(6p) and Xe(6p') states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, V. A.; Setser, D. W.

    1996-09-01

    A new, simple method for the generation of Xe(6s[3/2]1) and Xe(6s'[1/2]1) atoms is described. The method involves resonant two-photon excitation of Xe(6p[1/2]0 and 6p'[3/2]2) states followed by amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) to the Xe(6s[3/2]1 and 6s'[1/2]1) states. The vacuum ultraviolet transitions, Xe(6s[3/2]1→5p6(1S0)) at 147 nm and Xe(6s'[1/2]1→5p6(1S0)) at 129.6 nm, were used to monitor the time dependence of the resonance state atom concentrations. The quenching rate constants of these resonance atoms with ten molecules were measured at 300 K. The quenching cross-sections of the Xe(6s and 6s') resonance atoms are compared to the cross-sections of the metastable Xe(6s[3/2]2) atoms and Xe(6p[3/2]2) atoms. The correlation between quenching cross-sections and photoabsorption cross-section of the molecules predicted by the resonance dipole-dipole energy transfer model is discussed. The applicability of the two-photon driven ASE method for the generation of other resonance state atoms is considered.

  7. Suppression of Spin-Exchange Relaxation Using Pulsed Parametric Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korver, A.; Wyllie, R.; Lancor, B.; Walker, T. G.

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate that spin-exchange dephasing of Larmor precession at near-Earth-scale fields is effectively eliminated by dressing the alkali-metal atom spins in a sequence of ac-coupled 2π pulses, repeated at the Larmor precession frequency. The contribution of spin-exchange collisions to the spectroscopic linewidth is reduced by a factor of the duty cycle of the pulses. We experimentally demonstrate resonant transverse pumping in magnetic fields as high as 0.1 G, present experimental measurements of the suppressed spin-exchange relaxation, and show enhanced magnetometer response relative to a light-narrowed scalar magnetometer.

  8. Noise suppression in coherent population-trapping atomic clock by differential magneto-optic rotation detection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bozhong; Tian, Yuan; Lin, Huifang; Chen, Jiehua; Gu, Sihong

    2015-08-15

    We propose and investigate a scheme for differential detection of the magneto-optic rotation (MOR) effect, where a linearly polarized bichromatic laser field is coherent population-trapping (CPT)-resonant with alkali atoms, and discuss the application of this effect to CPT-based atomic clocks. The results of our study indicate that laser noise in a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser-based CPT atomic clock can be effectively suppressed by the proposed scheme. The proposed scheme promises to realize a packaged MOR-CPT atomic clock that has significantly better frequency stability coupled with similar power consumption, volume, and cost when compared with currently available packaged CPT atomic clocks.

  9. Noise suppression in coherent population-trapping atomic clock by differential magneto-optic rotation detection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bozhong; Tian, Yuan; Lin, Huifang; Chen, Jiehua; Gu, Sihong

    2015-08-15

    We propose and investigate a scheme for differential detection of the magneto-optic rotation (MOR) effect, where a linearly polarized bichromatic laser field is coherent population-trapping (CPT)-resonant with alkali atoms, and discuss the application of this effect to CPT-based atomic clocks. The results of our study indicate that laser noise in a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser-based CPT atomic clock can be effectively suppressed by the proposed scheme. The proposed scheme promises to realize a packaged MOR-CPT atomic clock that has significantly better frequency stability coupled with similar power consumption, volume, and cost when compared with currently available packaged CPT atomic clocks. PMID:26274639

  10. Towards coherent manipulation of the ground states of single cesium atom confined in a microscopic far-off-resonance optical dipole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Wenting; He, Jun; Liu, Bei; Wang, Junmin

    2012-11-01

    This work deals with the cooling and trapping of single cesium (Cs) atoms in a large-magnetic-gradient magneto-optical trap (MOT) and the confinement of single Cs atoms in a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap (FORT). The experiment setup is based on two large-numerical-aperture lens assemblies which allow us to strongly focus a 1064-nm TEM00-mode Gaussian laser beam to a 1/e2 radius of ~ 2.3 μm to form a microscopic FORT for isolating single atom with environment and to efficiently collect the laser-induced-fluorescence photons emitted by single atoms for detecting and recognizing single atom's internal state. We have tried both of "bottom-up" and "top-down" loading schemes to confine single atoms in the microscopic FORT. In the "bottom-up" scheme, we have successfully prepared single Cs atoms in the MOT and transferred it into FORT with a probability of almost 100%. In the "top-down" scheme, we have achieved ~ 74% of single atom loading probability in the FORT using light-assisted collisions induced by blue detuning laser and with prepared many Cs atoms in the MOT. The relaxation time in hyperfine level of ground state of trapped single Cs atom is measured to be ~5.4 s. To coherently manipulate atomic quantum bits (qubit) encoded in the clock states (mF = 0 states in Fg = 3 and 4 hyperfine levels) of single Cs atom via the two-photon simulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP), we have prepared two phase-locked laser beams with a frequency difference of ~ 9.192 GHz by optically injecting an 852-nm master laser to lock the +1-order sideband of a 9-GHz current-modulated slave diode laser. The two phase-locked laser beams are used to drive STIRAP process in the Λ-type three-level system consists of Cs |6S1/2 Fg = 4, mF = 0> and |6S1/2 Fg = 3, mF = 0< long-lived clock states and Cs |6S1/2 Fe = 4, mF = +1 > excited state with the single-photon detuning of ~ -20 GHz. Rabi flopping experiments are in progress.

  11. Light-induced ejection of calcium atoms from polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mango, F.; Maccioni, E.

    2008-12-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of calcium atoms at room temperature has been observed in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coated cell when the walls are illuminated with non resonant visible light. Ca atomic density in the gas phase, monitored by the LIF, is much higher than normal room-temperature vapour pressure of calcium. In past years photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) was observed for several alkali metals that adsorbed to solid films of PDMS polymers. High yields of photo-desorbed atoms (and molecules in the case of sodium) can be induced, at room temperature and below, by weak intensity radiation. The desorption is characterised by a frequency threshold, whereas any power threshold is undetectable. The calcium photo-ejection is characterised both by a frequency threshold (about 18 500 cm-1) and by an observable power threshold (whose value becomes lower when the photo-ejecting light wavelength decreases).

  12. Alkali ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Hrizo, John; Bauerle, James E.; Witkowski, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration filament containing a sodium-bearing compound is included in combination with the sensing filament and ion collector plate of a sodium ionization detector to permit periodic generation of sodium atoms for the in-situ calibration of the detector.

  13. Plasma assisted spectroscopic monitoring of alkali metals in pressurised combustion and gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Haeyrinen, V.T.; Hernberg, R.G.

    1995-07-01

    The paper describes an instrument for on-line concentration measurement of vaporised alkali compounds in pressurised industrial combustion and gasification processes. The measurement is based on Plasma Excited Alkali Resonance Line Spectroscopy (PEARLS) at the elevated pressure (1-3 MPa) of the process. Results are presented from laboratory calibration measurements and test measurements of sodium and potassium vapours resulting from the combustion of coal powder in a pressurised entrained flow reactor.

  14. Decalcification resistance of alkali-activated slag.

    PubMed

    Komljenović, Miroslav M; Baščarević, Zvezdana; Marjanović, Nataša; Nikolić, Violeta

    2012-09-30

    This paper analyses the effects of decalcification in concentrated 6M NH(4)NO(3) solution on mechanical and microstructural properties of alkali-activated slag (AAS). Portland-slag cement (CEM II/A-S 42.5 N) was used as a benchmark material. Decalcification process led to a decrease in strength, both in AAS and in CEM II, and this effect was more pronounced in CEM II. The decrease in strength was explicitly related to the decrease in Ca/Si atomic ratio of C-S-H gel. A very low ratio of Ca/Si ~0.3 in AAS was the consequence of coexistence of C-S-H(I) gel and silica gel. During decalcification of AAS almost complete leaching of sodium and tetrahedral aluminum from C-S-H(I) gel also took place. AAS showed significantly higher resistance to decalcification in relation to the benchmark CEM II due to the absence of portlandite, high level of polymerization of silicate chains, low level of aluminum for silicon substitution in the structure of C-S-H(I), and the formation of protective layer of polymerized silica gel during decalcification process. In stabilization/solidification processes alkali-activated slag represents a more promising solution than Portland-slag cement due to significantly higher resistance to decalcification. PMID:22818592

  15. Is electronegativity a useful descriptor for the pseudo-alkali metal NH4?

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Alexander; Xantheas, Sotiris S; Gutowski, Maciej

    2011-11-18

    Molecular ions in the form of "pseudo-atoms" are common structural motifs in chemistry, with properties that are transferrable between different compounds. We have determined one such property--the electronegativity--for the "pseudo-alkali metal" ammonium (NH(4)), and evaluated its reliability as a descriptor versus the electronegativities of the alkali metals. The computed properties of ammonium's binary complexes with astatine and of selected borohydrides confirm the similarity of NH(4) to the alkali metal atoms, although the electronegativity of NH(4) is relatively large in comparison to its cationic radius. We have paid particular attention to the molecular properties of ammonium (angular anisotropy, geometric relaxation and reactivity), which can cause deviations from the behaviour expected of a conceptual "true alkali metal" with this electronegativity. These deviations allow for the discrimination of effects associated with the molecular nature of NH(4). PMID:21928287

  16. Is Electronegativity a Useful Descriptor for the "Pseudo-Alkali-Metal" NH4?

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteside, Alexander; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Gutowski, Maciej S.

    2011-11-18

    Molecular ions in the form of "pseudo-atoms" are common structural motifs in chemistry, with properties that are transferrable between different compounds. We have determined the electronegativity of the "pseudo-alkali metal" ammonium (NH4) and evaluated its reliability as a descriptor in comparison to the electronegativities of the alkali metals. The computed properties of its binary complexes with astatine and of selected borohydrides confirm the similarity of NH4 to the alkali metal atoms, although the electronegativity of NH4 is relatively large in comparison to its cationic radius. We paid particular attention to the molecular properties of ammonium (angular anisotropy, geometric relaxation, and reactivity), which can cause deviations from the behaviour expected of a conceptual "true alkali metal" with this electronegativity. These deviations allow for the discrimination of effects associated with the polyatomic nature of NH4.

  17. Calculation of radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements in the neutral alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J.; Cheng, K.T.

    2005-02-01

    Radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements for ns-np transitions in the alkali-metal atoms lithium through francium are evaluated. They are found to be small for the lighter alkali metals but significantly larger for the heavier alkali metals, and in the case of cesium much larger than the experimental accuracy. The relation of the matrix element calculation to a recent decay rate calculation for hydrogenic ions is discussed, and application of the method to parity nonconservation in cesium is described.

  18. Spill-Resistant Alkali-Metal-Vapor Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, William

    2005-01-01

    A spill-resistant vessel has been developed for dispensing an alkali-metal vapor. Vapors of alkali metals (most commonly, cesium or rubidium, both of which melt at temperatures slightly above room temperature) are needed for atomic frequency standards, experiments in spectroscopy, and experiments in laser cooling. Although the present spill-resistant alkali-metal dispenser was originally intended for use in the low-gravity environment of outer space, it can also be used in normal Earth gravitation: indeed, its utility as a vapor source was confirmed by use of cesium in a ground apparatus. The vessel is made of copper. It consists of an assembly of cylinders and flanges, shown in the figure. The uppermost cylinder is a fill tube. Initially, the vessel is evacuated, the alkali metal charge is distilled into the bottom of the vessel, and then the fill tube is pinched closed to form a vacuum seal. The innermost cylinder serves as the outlet for the vapor, yet prevents spilling by protruding above the surface of the alkali metal, no matter which way or how far the vessel is tilted. In the event (unlikely in normal Earth gravitation) that any drops of molten alkali metal have been shaken loose by vibration and are floating freely, a mesh cap on top of the inner cylinder prevents the drops from drifting out with the vapor. Liquid containment of the equivalent of 1.2 grams of cesium was confirmed for all orientations with rubbing alcohol in one of the prototypes later used with cesium.

  19. Diode pumped alkali vapor lasers for high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.; Komashko, A.

    2008-02-01

    General Atomics has been engaged in the development of diode pumped alkali vapor lasers. We have been examining the design space looking for designs that are both efficient and easily scalable to high powers. Computationally, we have looked at the effect of pump bandwidth on laser performance. We have also looked at different lasing species. We have used an alexandrite laser to study the relative merits of different designs. We report on the results of our experimental and computational studies.

  20. Hydrothermal alkali metal catalyst recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Eakman, James M.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.

    1979-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles primarily in the form of water soluble alkali metal formates by treating the particles with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of added carbon monoxide. During the treating process the water insoluble alkali metal compounds comprising the insoluble alkali metal residues are converted into water soluble alkali metal formates. The resultant aqueous solution containing water soluble alkali metal formates is then separated from the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment process, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal formates serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. This process permits increased recovery of alkali metal constituents, thereby decreasing the overall cost of the gasification process by reducing the amount of makeup alkali metal compounds necessary.

  1. Inhomogeneous broadening of optically detected magnetic resonance of the ensembles of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond by interstitial carbon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Levchenko, A. O. Vasil'ev, V. V.; Zibrov, S. A.; Zibrov, A. S.; Sivak, A. V.; Fedotov, I. V.

    2015-03-09

    We study the impact of the negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV{sup –}) center density on the lattice strain resulting in the splitting of the optically detected magnetic resonance of HPHT diamond. A simple model, taking into account the presence of the interstitial carbon atoms, acting like a wedge force on the crystal lattice, explains the broadening and splitting of the optically detected magnetic resonance of the ensemble of NV{sup –} centers at densities within the range of 10{sup 13} ÷ 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −3}. This model uses a complete generalized spin Hamiltonian, takes into account the strain-effect of each center in the ensemble and gives good agreement with experimental data.

  2. Populations of metastable and resonant argon atoms in radio frequency magnetron plasmas used for deposition of indium-zinc-oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Maaloul, L.; Morel, S.; Stafford, L.

    2012-03-15

    This work reports optical absorption spectroscopy measurements of the number density of Ar atoms in resonant ({sup 3}P{sub 1}, {sup 1}P{sub 1}) and metastable ({sup 3}P{sub 2}, {sup 3}P{sub 0}) states in rf magnetron sputtering plasmas used for the deposition of ZnO-based thin films. While the density of Ar {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} was fairly independent of pressure in the range of experimental conditions investigated, the density of Ar {sup 3}P{sub 1} and {sup 1}P{sub 1} first sharply increased with pressure and then reached a plateau at values close to those of the {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} levels at pressures above about 50 mTorr. At such pressures, ultraviolet radiation from resonant states becomes trapped such that these levels behave as metastable states. For a self-bias voltage of -115 V and pressures in the 5-100 mTorr range, similar number densities of Ar resonant and metastable atoms were obtained for Zn, ZnO, and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} targets, suggesting that, over the range of experimental conditions investigated, collisions between these excited species and sputtered Zn, In, and O atoms played only a minor role on the discharge kinetics. The metastable-to-ground state number density ratios were also fitted to the predictions of a global model using the average electron temperature, T{sub e}, as the only adjustable parameter. For all targets examined, the values of T{sub e} deduced from this method were in excellent agreement with those obtained from Langmuir probe measurements.

  3. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-11-01

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2-4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be -23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is -105 dB rad2/Hz at 1 kHz offset and -150 dB rad2/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10-9 at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10-11 τ-1/2 up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  4. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock.

    PubMed

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-11-01

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24,000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2-4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be -23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is -105 dB rad(2)/Hz at 1 kHz offset and -150 dB rad(2)/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10(-9) at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10(-11) τ(-1/2) up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  5. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-11-15

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2–4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be −23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is −105 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 1 kHz offset and −150 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10{sup −9} at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10{sup −11} τ{sup −1/2} up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  6. Generation of undamped stokes radiation under resonant pumping of the dipole-forbidden transition in a {Xi}-atom

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanov, V. P.

    2009-12-15

    We have developed a theory of the nonlinear ring interaction of three intense fields in the scheme of resonant Raman scattering on the dipole-allowed transition from the ground state to the first excited state of a cascade three-level quantum system. We show that the backward Stokes radiation generated by a pump resonant to the dipole-forbidden transition can be used in remote laser sensing of metal vapors.

  7. Effect of temperature on the shape of spatial quasi-periodic oscillations of the refractive index of alkali atoms in an optically dense medium with a closed excitation contour of Δ type

    SciTech Connect

    Barantsev, K A; Litvinov, A N

    2014-10-31

    A theory of a closed excitation contour (Δ system) of a three-level atom in an optically dense medium is constructed with allowance for temperature. The spatial quasi-periodic oscillations of the refractive index in the system under study are shown to damp with increasing temperature. The range of temperatures at which these oscillations are most pronounced is found. (quantum optics)

  8. Electrolytic method to make alkali alcoholates using ion conducting alkali electrolyte/separator

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Ashok V.; Balagopal, Shekar; Pendelton, Justin

    2011-12-13

    Alkali alcoholates, also called alkali alkoxides, are produced from alkali metal salt solutions and alcohol using a three-compartment electrolytic cell. The electrolytic cell includes an anolyte compartment configured with an anode, a buffer compartment, and a catholyte compartment configured with a cathode. An alkali ion conducting solid electrolyte configured to selectively transport alkali ions is positioned between the anolyte compartment and the buffer compartment. An alkali ion permeable separator is positioned between the buffer compartment and the catholyte compartment. The catholyte solution may include an alkali alcoholate and alcohol. The anolyte solution may include at least one alkali salt. The buffer compartment solution may include a soluble alkali salt and an alkali alcoholate in alcohol.

  9. Process for recovering alkali metals and sulfur from alkali metal sulfides and polysulfides

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard; Alvare, Javier

    2016-10-25

    Alkali metals and sulfur may be recovered from alkali monosulfide and polysulfides in an electrolytic process that utilizes an electrolytic cell having an alkali ion conductive membrane. An anolyte solution includes an alkali monosulfide, an alkali polysulfide, or a mixture thereof and a solvent that dissolves elemental sulfur. A catholyte includes molten alkali metal. Applying an electric current oxidizes sulfide and polysulfide in the anolyte compartment, causes alkali metal ions to pass through the alkali ion conductive membrane to the catholyte compartment, and reduces the alkali metal ions in the catholyte compartment. Liquid sulfur separates from the anolyte solution and may be recovered. The electrolytic cell is operated at a temperature where the formed alkali metal and sulfur are molten.

  10. Alkali and transition metal phospholides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezkishko, I. A.; Zagidullin, A. A.; Milyukov, V. A.; Sinyashin, O. G.

    2014-06-01

    Major tendencies in modern chemistry of alkali and transition metal phospholides (phosphacyclopentadienides) are systematized, analyzed and generalized. Basic methods of synthesis of these compounds are presented. Their chemical properties are considered with a special focus on their complexing ability. Potential applications of phospholides and their derivatives are discussed. The bibliography includes 184 references.

  11. Study of Rb-vapor coated cells — Atomic diffusion and cell curing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atutov, S. N.; Benimetskiy, F. A.; Plekhanov, A. I.; Sorokin, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of a study on an optical-resonant cell filled by a vapor of the Rb atoms and coated with a non-stick polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer. We show that it is possible to define correctly the diffusion coefficient of the atoms in the coating using the geometric parameters of the cell and the vapor density in the cell volume only. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the cell curing time is presented. It is shown that the mysterious cell curing process can be explained in terms of the polymerization of the polymer coating by alkali atoms. The anomalous long dwell time of the Rb atoms on the PDMS coating is discussed as well.

  12. Robust control in ultracold alkali metals using a single linearly chirped pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, T. A.; Malinovskaya, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the population dynamics of the valence electron of elements of the alkali series induced by nanosecond linearly chirped (LC) pulses having kW cm-2 beam intensity and examine two different shapes of the pulse envelope. We demonstrate the possibility of controllable population transfer between hyperfine (HpF) levels of the S orbital through Raman transitions. We assume that the atoms are in the state of an ultracold vapor and Doppler free. Detuning slightly below the one-photon resonance condition with the lowest of the HpF states of the corresponding P orbital avoids interaction of the pulse with the other HpF levels of the P orbital and allows us to enter the adiabatic region of population transfer at very low field intensities, such that the corresponding Rabi frequencies are on the order of the hyperfine splitting of the S orbital. This methodology provides a robust way to create a specially designed superposition state in such atoms in the basis of the HpF levels and perform state manipulation controllable on the picosecond-to-nanosecond timescale.

  13. An orthotropic source of thermal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dinneen, T.; Ghiorso, A.; Gould, H.

    1995-06-01

    A highly efficient source that produces a narrow beam of neutral atoms at thermal velocity with small angular divergence is described. It uses a high work function interior surface to evaporate alkali atoms as ions and a low work function neutralizer, biased to collect the ions and evaporated them as neutral atoms. The neutralizer is located opposite an exit aperture so that the beam characteristics are determined by the geometry of the neutralizer and aperture. The orthotropic source is especially well suited for atomic clocks and for efficient loading of short lived radioactive alkali atoms into an optical trap.

  14. Solid-phase epitaxy of silicon amorphized by implantation of the alkali elements rubidium and cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, R.; Haeublein, V.; Ryssel, H.; Voellm, H.; Feili, D.; Seidel, H.; Frey, L.

    2012-11-06

    The redistribution of implanted Rb and Cs profiles in amorphous silicon during solid-phase epitaxial recrystallization has been investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. For the implantation dose used in these experiments, the alkali atoms segregate at the a-Si/c-Si interface during annealing resulting in concentration peaks near the interface. In this way, the alkali atoms are moved towards the surface. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy in ion channeling configuration was performed to measure average recrystallization rates of the amorphous silicon layers. Preliminary studies on the influence of the alkali atoms on the solid-phase epitaxial regrowth rate reveal a strong retardation compared to the intrinsic recrystallization rate.

  15. Production and detection of atomic hexadecapole at Earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, V. M.; Auzinsh, M.; Gawlik, W.; Grisins, P.; Higbie, J. M.; Jackson Kimball, D. F.; Krzemien, L.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Pustelny, S.; Rochester, S. M.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Budker, D.

    2008-07-01

    Anisotropy of atomic states is characterized by population differences and coherences between Zeeman sublevels. It can be efficiently created and probed via resonant interactions with light, the technique which is at the heart of modern atomic clocks and magnetometers. Recently, nonlinear magneto-optical techniques have been developed for selective production and detection of higher polarization moments, hexadecapole and hexacontatetrapole, in the ground states of the alkali atoms. Extension of these techniques into the range of geomagnetic fields is important for practical applications. This is because hexadecapole polarization corresponding to the $\\Delta M=4$ Zeeman coherence, with maximum possible $\\Delta M$ for electronic angular momentum $J=1/2$ and nuclear spin $I=3/2$, is insensitive to the nonlinear Zeeman effect (NLZ). This is of particular interest because NLZ normally leads to resonance splitting and systematic errors in atomic magnetometers. However, optical signals due to the hexadecapole moment decline sharply as a function of magnetic field. We report a novel method that allows selective creation of a macroscopic long-lived ground-state hexadecapole polarization. The immunity of the hexadecapole signal to NLZ is demonstrated with F=2 $^{87}$Rb atoms at Earth's field.

  16. Superradiant effects on pulse propagation in resonant media. [atomic excitations/coherent radiation - operators (mathematics)/matrices (mathematics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C.

    1975-01-01

    Adopting the so-called genealogical construction, the eigenstates of collective operators can be expressed corresponding to a specified mode for an N-atom system in terms of those for an (N-1)-atom system. Matrix element of a collective operator of an arbitrary mode is presented which can be written as the product of an m-dependent factor and an m-independent reduced matrix element (RME). A set of recursion formulas for the RME was obtained. A graphical representation of the RME on the branching diagram for binary irreducible representations of permutation groups was then introduced. This gave a simple and systematic way of calculating the RME. Results show explicitly the geometry dependence of superradiance and the relative importance of r-conserving and r-nonconserving processes and clears up the chief difficulty encounted in the problem of N two-level atoms, spread over large regions, interacting with a multimode radiation field.

  17. Spectroscopy of the D1 transition of cesium by dressed-state resonance fluorescence from a single (In,Ga)As/GaAs quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, S. M.; Weiler, S.; Oster, M.; Jetter, M.; Urvoy, A.; Löw, R.; Michler, P.

    2014-09-01

    We use a laser-driven single (In,Ga)As quantum dot (QD) in the dressed-state regime of resonance fluorescence (T =4K) to observe the four D1-transition lines of alkali atomic cesium (Cs) vapor at room temperature. We tune the frequency of the dressing continuous-wave laser in the vicinity of the bare QD resonance ˜335.116THz (˜894.592nm) at constant excitation power and thereby controllably tune the center and side channel frequencies of the probe light, i.e., the Mollow triplet. Resonances between individual QD Mollow triplet lines and the atomic hyperfine-split transitions are clearly identified in the Cs absorption spectrum. Our results show that narrow-band (In,Ga)As QD resonance fluorescence (RF) is suitable to optically address individual transitions of the D1 quadruplet without applying magnetic field or electric field tuning.

  18. RESONANCES IN THE PHOTOIONIZATION CROSS SECTIONS OF ATOMIC NITROGEN SHAPE THE FAR-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM OF THE BRIGHT STAR IN 47 TUCANAE

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, William V.; Chayer, Pierre E-mail: chayer@stsci.edu

    2013-08-10

    The far-ultraviolet spectrum of the Bright Star (B8 III) in 47 Tuc (NGC 104) shows a remarkable pattern: it is well fit by local thermodynamic equilibrium models at wavelengths longer than Ly{beta}, but at shorter wavelengths it is fainter than the models by a factor of two. A spectrum of this star obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer shows broad absorption troughs with sharp edges at 995 and 1010 A and a deep absorption feature at 1072 A; none of which are predicted by the models. We find that these features are caused by resonances in the photoionization cross sections of the first and second excited states of atomic nitrogen (2s {sup 2} 2p {sup 3} {sup 2} D {sup 0} and {sup 2} P {sup 0}). Using cross sections from the Opacity Project, we can reproduce these features, but only if we use the cross sections at their full resolution, rather than the resonance-averaged cross sections usually employed to model stellar atmospheres. These resonances are strongest in stellar atmospheres with enhanced nitrogen and depleted carbon abundances, a pattern typical of post-asymptotic giant branch stars.

  19. Resonances in the Photoionization Cross Sections of Atomic Nitrogen Shape the Far-ultraviolet Spectrum of the Bright Star in 47 Tucanae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, William V.; Chayer, Pierre

    2013-08-01

    The far-ultraviolet spectrum of the Bright Star (B8 III) in 47 Tuc (NGC 104) shows a remarkable pattern: it is well fit by local thermodynamic equilibrium models at wavelengths longer than Lyβ, but at shorter wavelengths it is fainter than the models by a factor of two. A spectrum of this star obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer shows broad absorption troughs with sharp edges at 995 and 1010 Å and a deep absorption feature at 1072 Å none of which are predicted by the models. We find that these features are caused by resonances in the photoionization cross sections of the first and second excited states of atomic nitrogen (2s 2 2p 3 2 D 0 and 2 P 0). Using cross sections from the Opacity Project, we can reproduce these features, but only if we use the cross sections at their full resolution, rather than the resonance-averaged cross sections usually employed to model stellar atmospheres. These resonances are strongest in stellar atmospheres with enhanced nitrogen and depleted carbon abundances, a pattern typical of post-asymptotic giant branch stars.

  20. Near-threshold resonances in electron elastic scattering cross sections for Au and Pt atoms: identification of electron affinities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msezane, A. Z.; Felfli, Z.; Sokolovski, D.

    2008-05-01

    The recent Regge-pole methodology has been employed together with a Thomas-Fermi type potential which incorporates the vital core-polarization interaction to investigate the near-threshold electron attachment in Au and Pt as Regge resonances. The resultant stable negative ion states are found to have the discernible characteristic of very small imaginary parts of the Regge poles, which translate into long-lived resonances. The near-threshold electron elastic total cross sections are characterized by multiple resonances from which we extract the electron affinity (EA) values through the scrutiny of the imaginary part of the relevant complex angular momentum. For the Au- and Pt- negative ions the extracted binding energies of 2.262 eV and 2.163 eV, respectively are in excellent agreement with the most recently measured EA values for Au and Pt. Ramsauer-Townsend minima, shape resonances and the Wigner threshold behaviour are identified in both Au- and Pt- ions.

  1. Repeated appearance and disappearance of localized surface plasmon resonance in 1.2 nm gold clusters induced by adsorption and desorption of hydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Ryo; Yamazoe, Seiji; Koyasu, Kiichirou; Tsukuda, Tatsuya

    2016-02-01

    Addition of an aqueous solution of NaBH4 to a dispersion of small (∼1.2 nm) gold clusters stabilized by poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (Au:PVP) induced a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption for a certain period of time while maintaining the cluster size. The duration of the LSPR band could be lengthened by increasing the NaBH4 concentration and shortened by increasing the concentration of dissolved O2, and the LSPR band could be made to appear and reappear repeatedly. The appearance of the LSPR band is explained by the electron donation to the Au core from the adsorbed H atoms that originate from NaBH4, whereas its disappearance is ascribed to the removal of H atoms by their reaction with O2. These results suggest that the transition between the metallic and non-metallic electronic structures of the Au clusters can be reversibly induced by the adsorption and desorption of H atoms, which are electronically equivalent to Au.

  2. Absorption by ground-state lead atoms of the 283. 3-nm resonant line from a lead hollow cathode lamp. An absolute number density calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, J.W. ); Oldenborg, R.C.; Baughcum, S.L. )

    1989-10-19

    An accurate absolute number density calibration curve for absorption by gaseous lead atoms of the 283.3-nm resonant line from a typical lead hollow cathode lamp is reported. This calibration shows the usual curvature in the Beer-Lambert plot for atomic absorption at moderate to high absorbances that is commonly attributed to self-absorption leading to line reversal in the source and/or preferential absorption at the line center when the absorber temperature is not much greater than the source Doppler temperature. A theoretical calculation utilizing a Doppler-limited Fourier transform spectrum of the 283.3-nm emission from the lamp and a tabulated value of the absorption cross section and accounting for the isotopic and nuclear hyperfine components in both the emission and absorption due to naturally occurring lead quantitatively reproduces the experimental calibration curve without any parameter adjustments. It is found that the curvature in the Beer-Lambert plot has more to do with the fact that the absorbing and emitting atoms are a mixture of isotopes giving several isotopic and nuclear hyperfine transitions at slightly different frequencies than it does with preferential absorption at line centers.

  3. Mixed alkali effect on the spectroscopic properties of alkali-alkaline earth oxide borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, G.; Ramesh, B.; Shareefuddin, Md.; Chary, M. N.; Sayanna, R.

    2016-05-01

    The mixed alkali and alkaline earth oxide borate glass with the composition xK2O - (25-x) Li2O-12.5BaO-12.5MgO-50B2O3 (x = 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25mol %) and doped with 1mol% CuO were prepared by the melt quenching technique. From the optical absorption spectra the optical band gap, electronic polarizability(α02-), interaction parameter (A), theoretical and experimental optical basicity (Λ) values were evaluated. From the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectral data the number of spins (N) and susceptibility (χ) were evaluated. The values of (α02-), and (Λ) increases with increasing of K2O content and electronic polarizability and interaction parameter show opposite behaviuor which may be due to the creation of non-bridging oxygens and expansion of borate network. The reciprocal of susceptibility (1/χ) and spin concentration (N) as a function of K2O content, varied nonlinearly which may be due to creation of non-bridging oxygens in the present glass system. This may be attributed to mixed alkali effect (MAE).

  4. Quantum chaos in ultracold collisions of gas-phase erbium atoms.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Albert; Mark, Michael; Aikawa, Kiyotaka; Ferlaino, Francesca; Bohn, John L; Makrides, Constantinos; Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-03-27

    Atomic and molecular samples reduced to temperatures below one microkelvin, yet still in the gas phase, afford unprecedented energy resolution in probing and manipulating the interactions between their constituent particles. As a result of this resolution, atoms can be made to scatter resonantly on demand, through the precise control of a magnetic field. For simple atoms, such as alkalis, scattering resonances are extremely well characterized. However, ultracold physics is now poised to enter a new regime, where much more complex species can be cooled and studied, including magnetic lanthanide atoms and even molecules. For molecules, it has been speculated that a dense set of resonances in ultracold collision cross-sections will probably exhibit essentially random fluctuations, much as the observed energy spectra of nuclear scattering do. According to the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture, such fluctuations would imply chaotic dynamics of the underlying classical motion driving the collision. This would necessitate new ways of looking at the fundamental interactions in ultracold atomic and molecular systems, as well as perhaps new chaos-driven states of ultracold matter. Here we describe the experimental demonstration that random spectra are indeed found at ultralow temperatures. In the experiment, an ultracold gas of erbium atoms is shown to exhibit many Fano-Feshbach resonances, of the order of three per gauss for bosons. Analysis of their statistics verifies that their distribution of nearest-neighbour spacings is what one would expect from random matrix theory. The density and statistics of these resonances are explained by fully quantum mechanical scattering calculations that locate their origin in the anisotropy of the atoms' potential energy surface. Our results therefore reveal chaotic behaviour in the native interaction between ultracold atoms.

  5. Quantum chaos in ultracold collisions of gas-phase erbium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Albert; Mark, Michael; Aikawa, Kiyotaka; Ferlaino, Francesca; Bohn, John L.; Makrides, Constantinos; Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-03-01

    Atomic and molecular samples reduced to temperatures below one microkelvin, yet still in the gas phase, afford unprecedented energy resolution in probing and manipulating the interactions between their constituent particles. As a result of this resolution, atoms can be made to scatter resonantly on demand, through the precise control of a magnetic field. For simple atoms, such as alkalis, scattering resonances are extremely well characterized. However, ultracold physics is now poised to enter a new regime, where much more complex species can be cooled and studied, including magnetic lanthanide atoms and even molecules. For molecules, it has been speculated that a dense set of resonances in ultracold collision cross-sections will probably exhibit essentially random fluctuations, much as the observed energy spectra of nuclear scattering do. According to the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture, such fluctuations would imply chaotic dynamics of the underlying classical motion driving the collision. This would necessitate new ways of looking at the fundamental interactions in ultracold atomic and molecular systems, as well as perhaps new chaos-driven states of ultracold matter. Here we describe the experimental demonstration that random spectra are indeed found at ultralow temperatures. In the experiment, an ultracold gas of erbium atoms is shown to exhibit many Fano-Feshbach resonances, of the order of three per gauss for bosons. Analysis of their statistics verifies that their distribution of nearest-neighbour spacings is what one would expect from random matrix theory. The density and statistics of these resonances are explained by fully quantum mechanical scattering calculations that locate their origin in the anisotropy of the atoms' potential energy surface. Our results therefore reveal chaotic behaviour in the native interaction between ultracold atoms.

  6. Comparison of reactive nucleation of silver and alkali clusters in the presence of oxygen and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bréchignac, C.; Cahuzac, Ph.; Leygnier, J.; Tignères, I.

    The nucleation of silver-atom vapor in the presence of O2 and H2O molecules has been investigated by photoionization mass spectrometry and compared to the case of alkali-atom vapor. Relative intensities in mass spectra show that silver vapor does not react with H2O molecules, in contrast with sodium vapor. When O2 and H2O are simultaneously present, hydroxided products are observed. Results emphasize the role of stable units, (NaOH)2 or (KOH)2, for alkalies, and more complex hydrated or hydroxided systems, involving trimers, for silver. Similarities are found with water dissociative adsorption on an oxygen-predosed silver surface.

  7. Alkali dimers on the surface of liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Peter B.; Cole, Milton W.; Cheng, E.

    1995-09-01

    A recent paper by Ancilotto et al. (Zeitschrift für Physik B, in press), presented calculations of adsorption energies and the geometry of a surface dimple for alkali atoms bound to the surfaces of quantum liquids (4He,3He, H2). Here we present a study of the adsorption of two alkali dimers (Li2, Na2) on the surface of liquid helium. The calculations employ a model of an abrupt interface formulated by Ancilotto et al. as well as one using a diffuse interface. Our conclusion its that the dimers are bound to the surface more strongly than their respective monomers. In the case of dimers there is an additional degree of freedom-the orientation of the molecular axis relative to the surface. We study the influence of molecular anisotropy on adsorption by comparing the cases of “erect” and “spinning flat” orientations and conclude that the latter is energetically favored.

  8. Atomic magnetic gradiometer for room temperature high sensitivity magnetic field detection

    DOEpatents

    Xu,Shoujun; Lowery, Thomas L.; Budker, Dmitry; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Wemmer, David E.; Pines, Alexander

    2009-08-11

    A laser-based atomic magnetometer (LBAM) apparatus measures magnetic fields, comprising: a plurality of polarization detector cells to detect magnetic fields; a laser source optically coupled to the polarization detector cells; and a signal detector that measures the laser source after being coupled to the polarization detector cells, which may be alkali cells. A single polarization cell may be used for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by prepolarizing the nuclear spins of an analyte, encoding spectroscopic and/or spatial information, and detecting NMR signals from the analyte with a laser-based atomic magnetometer to form NMR spectra and/or magnetic resonance images (MRI). There is no need of a magnetic field or cryogenics in the detection step, as it is detected through the LBAM.

  9. A copper(II) complex with a Cu-S₈ bond. Attenuated total reflectance, electron paramagnetic resonance, resonance Raman and atoms-in-molecule calculations.

    PubMed

    Shee, Nirmal K; Adekunle, Florence A O; Verma, Ravi; Kumar, Devesh; Datta, Dipankar

    2015-12-01

    Green [Cu(1,10-phenanthroline)2OH2](ClO4)2 (1) reacts with yellow elemental sulfur at room temperature in methanol to yield turquoise blue [Cu(1,10-phenanthro-line)2(S8)](ClO4)2 (2). A comparative study of the EPR spectra of 1 and 2 in solid state and in methanol glass indicates that the S8 unit in 2 is bound to the metal. High level DFT calculations show that the cation in 2 is five coordinate, distorted square pyramidal with S8 occupying the apical position. The crucial Cu(II)-S bond is around 2.9Å. Such long Cu(II)-S bonds occur in oxidized plastocyanin where it is considered to be bonding. Presence of a weak Cu-S8 bond is revealed in the resonance Raman spectra of 2. Satisfactory matching of the calculated and experimental IR spectra vindicates the theoretically derived structure of the cation in 2.

  10. A copper(II) complex with a Cu-S₈ bond. Attenuated total reflectance, electron paramagnetic resonance, resonance Raman and atoms-in-molecule calculations.

    PubMed

    Shee, Nirmal K; Adekunle, Florence A O; Verma, Ravi; Kumar, Devesh; Datta, Dipankar

    2015-12-01

    Green [Cu(1,10-phenanthroline)2OH2](ClO4)2 (1) reacts with yellow elemental sulfur at room temperature in methanol to yield turquoise blue [Cu(1,10-phenanthro-line)2(S8)](ClO4)2 (2). A comparative study of the EPR spectra of 1 and 2 in solid state and in methanol glass indicates that the S8 unit in 2 is bound to the metal. High level DFT calculations show that the cation in 2 is five coordinate, distorted square pyramidal with S8 occupying the apical position. The crucial Cu(II)-S bond is around 2.9Å. Such long Cu(II)-S bonds occur in oxidized plastocyanin where it is considered to be bonding. Presence of a weak Cu-S8 bond is revealed in the resonance Raman spectra of 2. Satisfactory matching of the calculated and experimental IR spectra vindicates the theoretically derived structure of the cation in 2. PMID:26125988

  11. Alkali metal/sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Joginder N.

    1978-01-01

    Alkali metal/sulfur batteries in which the electrolyte-separator is a relatively fragile membrane are improved by providing means for separating the molten sulfur/sulfide catholyte from contact with the membrane prior to cooling the cell to temperatures at which the catholyte will solidify. If the catholyte is permitted to solidify while in contact with the membrane, the latter may be damaged. The improvement permits such batteries to be prefilled with catholyte and shipped, at ordinary temperatures.

  12. Multi-atom resonant photoemission and the development of next-generation software and high-speed detectors for electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, Alexander William

    2000-09-01

    This dissertation has involved the exploration of a new effect in photoelectron emission, multi-atom resonant photoemission (MARPE), as well as the development of new software, data analysis techniques, and detectors of general use in such research. We present experimental and theoretical results related to MARPE, in which the photoelectron intensity from a core level on one atom is influenced by a core-level absorption resonance on another. We point out that some of our and others prior experimental data has been strongly influenced by detector non-linearity and that the effects seen in new corrected data are smaller and of different form. Corrected data for the MnO(001) system with resonance between the O 1s and Mn 2p energy levels are found to be well described by an extension of well-known intraatomic resonant photoemission theory to the interatomic case, provided that interactions beyond the usual second-order Kramers-Heisenberg treatment are included. This theory is also found to simplify under certain conditions so as to yield results equivalent to a classical x-ray optical approach, with the latter providing an accurate and alternative, although less detailed and general, physical picture of these effects. Possible future applications of MARPE as a new probe of near-neighbor identities and bonding and its relationship to other known effects are also discussed. We also consider in detail specially written data acquisition software that has been used for most of the measurements reported here. This software has been used with an existing experimental system to develop the method of detector characterization and then data correction required for the work described above. The development of a next generation one-dimensional, high-speed, electron detector is also discussed. Our goal has been to design, build and test a prototype high-performance, one-dimensional pulse-counting detector that represents a significant advancement in detector technology and is well

  13. Sub-Shot-Noise Magnetometry with a Correlated Spin-Relaxation Dominated Alkali-Metal Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Kominis, I. K.

    2008-02-22

    Spin noise sets fundamental limits to the precision of measurements using spin-polarized atomic vapors, such as performed with sensitive atomic magnetometers. Spin squeezing offers the possibility to extend the measurement precision beyond the standard quantum limit of uncorrelated atoms. Contrary to current understanding, we show that, even in the presence of spin relaxation, spin squeezing can lead to a significant reduction of spin noise, and hence an increase in magnetometric sensitivity, for a long measurement time. This is the case when correlated spin relaxation due to binary alkali-atom collisions dominates independently acting decoherence processes, a situation realized in thermal high atom-density magnetometers and clocks.

  14. Refractive index sensitivity of optical fiber lossy-mode resonance sensors based on atomic layer deposited TiOx thin overlay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnat, Dariusz; Koba, Marcin; Wachnicki, Łukasz; Gierałtowska, Sylwia; Godlewski, Marek; Śmietana, Mateusz

    2016-05-01

    This work presents an optical fiber refractive index sensors based on lossy-mode resonance (LMR) effect supported by titanium oxide (TiOx) thin overlay. The TiOx overlays of different thickness were deposited on core of polymer-clad silica (PCS) fibers using atomic layer deposition (ALD) method. Based on numerical simulations, a number of structures differing in the location of exposed core area and the thickness of TiOx coatings were designed. For fabricated structures the spectral response to external refractive index (next) was measured. The maximum sensitivity reaches 634.2 nm/RIU (next range: 1.357 - 1.402 RIU; TiOx coating thickness: 260.9 nm; investigated spectral range: 500-800 nm) and it highly depends on the thin-film thickness.

  15. High-precision hyperfine structure measurement in slow atomic ion beams by collinear laser-rf double resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Amarjit Sen, Childs, W.J.; Goodman, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    A new collinear laser-ion beam apparatus for slow ions (1 to 1.5 keV) has been built for measuring the hyperfine structure of metastable levels of ions with laser-rf double resonance technique. Narrow linewidths of approx.60 kHz (FWHM) have been observed for the first time in such systems. As a first application the hyperfine structure of the 4f/sup 7/(/sup 8/S/sup 0/)5d /sup 9/D/sub J//sup 0/ metastable levels of /sup 151,153/Eu/sup +/ has been measured with high precision. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Three-photon resonance ionization of atomic Mn in a hot-cavity laser ion source using Ti:sapphire lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Mattolat, C.; Wendt, K.

    2015-05-08

    We have demonstrated three-photon resonance ionization of atomic manganese (Mn) in a hot-cavity ion source using Ti: sapphire lasers. Three-step ionization schemes employing different intermediate levels and Rydberg or autoionizing (AI) states in the final ionization step are established. Strong AI resonances were observed via the 3d54s5s f6S5/2 level at 49 415.35 cm-1, while Rydberg transitions were reached from the 3d54s4d e 6D9/2,7/2,5/2) levels at around 47 210 cm-1. Analyses of the strong Rydberg transitions associated with the 3d54s4d e 6D7/2 lower level indicate that they belong to the dipole-allowed 4d → nf69/2,7/2,5/2 series converging to the 3d54s 7S3 ground state of Mn II. From this series, an ionization potential of 59 959.56 ± 0.01 cm-1 is obtained for Mn. At high ion source temperatures the semi-forbidden 4d → nf8F°9/2,7/2,5/2 series was also observed. The overall ionization efficiency for Mn has been measured to be about 0.9% when using the strong AI transition in the third excitation step and 0.3% when employing an intense Rydberg transition. Experimental data indicate that the ionization efficiency was limited by the interaction of Mn atoms with ion source materials at high temperatures.

  17. Three-photon resonance ionization of atomic Mn in a hot-cavity laser ion source using Ti:sapphire lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Mattolat, C.; Wendt, K.

    2015-05-08

    We have demonstrated three-photon resonance ionization of atomic manganese (Mn) in a hot-cavity ion source using Ti: sapphire lasers. Three-step ionization schemes employing different intermediate levels and Rydberg or autoionizing (AI) states in the final ionization step are established. Strong AI resonances were observed via the 3d54s5s f6S5/2 level at 49 415.35 cm-1, while Rydberg transitions were reached from the 3d54s4d e 6D9/2,7/2,5/2) levels at around 47 210 cm-1. Analyses of the strong Rydberg transitions associated with the 3d54s4d e 6D7/2 lower level indicate that they belong to the dipole-allowed 4d → nf6F°9/2,7/2,5/2 series converging to the 3d54s 7S3 groundmore » state of Mn II. From this series, an ionization potential of 59 959.56 ± 0.01 cm-1 is obtained for Mn. At high ion source temperatures the semi-forbidden 4d → nf8F°9/2,7/2,5/2 series was also observed. The overall ionization efficiency for Mn has been measured to be about 0.9% when using the strong AI transition in the third excitation step and 0.3% when employing an intense Rydberg transition. Experimental data indicate that the ionization efficiency was limited by the interaction of Mn atoms with ion source materials at high temperatures.« less

  18. Resonant nonstationary amplification of polychromatic laser pulses and conical emission in an optically dense ensemble of neon metastable atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagayev, S. N.; Egorov, V. S.; Mekhov, I. B.; Moroshkin, P. V.; Chekhonin, I. A.; Davliatchine, E. M.; Kindel, E.

    2003-10-01

    Experimental and numerical investigation of single-beam and pump-probe interaction with a resonantly absorbing dense extended medium under strong and weak field-matter coupling is presented. Significant probe beam amplification and conical emission were observed. Under relatively weak pumping and high medium density, when the condition of strong coupling between field and resonant matter is fulfilled, the probe amplification spectrum has a form of spectral doublet. Stronger pumping leads to the appearance of a single peak of the probe beam amplification at the transition frequency. The greater probe intensity results in an asymmetrical transmission spectrum with amplification at the blue wing of the absorption line and attenuation at the red one. Under high medium density, a broadband of amplification appears. The theoretical model is based on the solution of the Maxwell-Bloch equations for a two-level system. Different types of probe transmission spectra obtained are attributed to complex dynamics of a coherent medium response to broadband polychromatic radiation of a multimode dye laser.

  19. The development of the high intensity electron cyclotron resonance ion source at China Institute of Atomic Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, B.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y.; Chen, L.; Huang, Q.; Liang, H.; Cui, B.; Jiang, W.

    2014-02-01

    High-current microwave ion source has been under development over 15 years for accelerator driven sub-critical system research at China Institute of Atomic Energy, and the beam intensity higher than 140 mA proton beam is produced by this ion source with long lifetime and high reliability. The emittance of high intensity continue-wave and pulse beam is measured on a test-bench in the laboratory. Based on the good performance of this proton ion source, a new 120 mA deuterium ion source is proposed for a high intensity neutron generator. The ion source details and status will be presented.

  20. Determination of thermo-optic properties of atomic layer deposited thin TiO2 films for athermal resonant waveguide gratings by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Muhammad Rizwan; Ali, Rizwan; Honkanen, Seppo; Turunen, Jari

    2014-05-01

    We report on variation in the refractive index of amorphous and isotropic TiO2 thin films grown by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) in nano optical devices. ALD-TiO2 films of thicknesses <= 200 nm exhibiting negative thermo-optic coefficient (TOC) due to decrease in refractive index with temperature, owing to inherent hydrophilic nature. While ALD-TiO2 films with thicknesses > 200 nm show positive TOC due to the predominance of TiO2 thickness over the very thin surface porosity region. The negative TOC of thin TiO2 films was controlled by depositing thin ALD-Al2O3 diffusion barrier films that showed impermeable behavior to block the evaporation of adsorbed water molecules on TiO2 surfaces in thermal environments. This approach turns negative sign of TOC of TiO2 thin films to positive one which is necessary to stabilize the central resonance peak of a guided mode resonance filter (GMRF). The ALD-TiO2 and ALDAl2O3 bi-layer stack was modeled by VASE analysis of spectroscopic ellipsometry using Cauchy Model to extract refractive indices at various temperatures, measured at two different angle of incidence (65° and 75°), covering a wide spectral range 380 <= λ <= 1800. The temperature dependent index and density of TiO2 films were calculated from ellipsometric measured data using Lorentz-Lorenz relation.

  1. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  2. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  3. Characterization of the phosphatic mineral of the barnacle Ibla cumingi at atomic level by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance: comparison with other phosphatic biominerals.

    PubMed

    Reid, David G; Mason, Matthew J; Chan, Benny K K; Duer, Melinda J

    2012-07-01

    Ibliform barnacles are among the few invertebrate animals harnessing calcium phosphate to construct hard tissue. The (31)P solid-state NMR (SSNMR) signal from the shell plates of Ibla cumingi (Iblidae) is broader than that of bone, and shifted by ca 1 ppm to low frequency. (1)H-(31)P heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) experiments show a continuum of different phosphorus/phosphate atomic environments, close to hydrogen populations with resonance frequencies between ca 10 and 20 ppm. Associated (1)H and (31)P chemical shifts argue the coexistence of weakly (high (31)P frequency, low (1)H frequency) to more strongly (lower (31)P frequency, higher (1)H frequency) hydrogen-bonded hydrogen phosphate-like molecular/ionic species. There is no resolved signal from discrete OH(-) ions. (13)C SSNMR shows chitin, protein and other organic biomolecules but, unlike bone, there are no significant atomic scale organic matrix-mineral contacts. The poorly ordered hydrogen phosphate-like iblid mineral is strikingly different, structurally and compositionally, from both vertebrate bone mineral and the more crystalline fluoroapatite of the linguliform brachiopods. It probably represents a previously poorly characterized calcium phosphate biomineral, the evolution of which may have reflected either the chemical conditions of ancestral seas or the mechanical advantages of phosphatic biomineralization over a calcium carbonate equivalent.

  4. Atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Schwindt, Peter; Johnson, Cort N.

    2012-07-03

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  5. Antiferromagnetism and phase diagram in ammoniated alkali fulleride salts

    PubMed

    Takenobu; Muro; Iwasa; Mitani

    2000-07-10

    Intercalation of neutral ammonia molecules into trivalent face-centered-cubic (fcc) fulleride superconductors induces a dramatic change in electronic states. Monoammoniated alkali fulleride salts (NH3)K3-xRbxC60, forming an isostructural orthorhombic series, undergo an antiferromagnetic transition, which was found by the electron spin resonance experiment. The Neel temperature first increases with the interfullerene spacing and then decreases for (NH3)Rb3C60, forming a maximum at 76 K. This feature is explained by the generalized phase diagram of Mott-Hubbard transition with an antiferromagnetic ground state.

  6. Evaluation and optimization of quartz resonant-frequency retuned fork force sensors with high Q factors, and the associated electric circuits, for non-contact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Fujii, Mikihiro; Tomitori, Masahiko; Arai, Toyoko

    2016-02-01

    High-Q factor retuned fork (RTF) force sensors made from quartz tuning forks, and the electric circuits for the sensors, were evaluated and optimized to improve the performance of non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) performed under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. To exploit the high Q factor of the RTF sensor, the oscillation of the RTF sensor was excited at its resonant frequency, using a stray capacitance compensation circuit to cancel the excitation signal leaked through the stray capacitor of the sensor. To improve the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio in the detected signal, a small capacitor was inserted before the input of an operational (OP) amplifier placed in an UHV chamber, which reduced the output noise from the amplifier. A low-noise, wideband OP amplifier produced a superior S/N ratio, compared with a precision OP amplifier. The thermal vibrational density spectra of the RTF sensors were evaluated using the circuit. The RTF sensor with an effective spring constant value as low as 1000 N/m provided a lower minimum detection limit for force differentiation. A nc-AFM image of a Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was produced with atomic resolution using the RTF sensor in a constant frequency shift mode; tunneling current and energy dissipation images with atomic resolution were also simultaneously produced. The high-Q factor RTF sensor showed potential for the high sensitivity of energy dissipation as small as 1 meV/cycle and the high-resolution analysis of non-conservative force interactions. PMID:26931855

  7. Evaluation and optimization of quartz resonant-frequency retuned fork force sensors with high Q factors, and the associated electric circuits, for non-contact atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Fujii, Mikihiro; Tomitori, Masahiko; Arai, Toyoko

    2016-02-01

    High-Q factor retuned fork (RTF) force sensors made from quartz tuning forks, and the electric circuits for the sensors, were evaluated and optimized to improve the performance of non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) performed under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. To exploit the high Q factor of the RTF sensor, the oscillation of the RTF sensor was excited at its resonant frequency, using a stray capacitance compensation circuit to cancel the excitation signal leaked through the stray capacitor of the sensor. To improve the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio in the detected signal, a small capacitor was inserted before the input of an operational (OP) amplifier placed in an UHV chamber, which reduced the output noise from the amplifier. A low-noise, wideband OP amplifier produced a superior S/N ratio, compared with a precision OP amplifier. The thermal vibrational density spectra of the RTF sensors were evaluated using the circuit. The RTF sensor with an effective spring constant value as low as 1000 N/m provided a lower minimum detection limit for force differentiation. A nc-AFM image of a Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was produced with atomic resolution using the RTF sensor in a constant frequency shift mode; tunneling current and energy dissipation images with atomic resolution were also simultaneously produced. The high-Q factor RTF sensor showed potential for the high sensitivity of energy dissipation as small as 1 meV/cycle and the high-resolution analysis of non-conservative force interactions.

  8. Evaluation and optimization of quartz resonant-frequency retuned fork force sensors with high Q factors, and the associated electric circuits, for non-contact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Fujii, Mikihiro; Tomitori, Masahiko; Arai, Toyoko

    2016-02-01

    High-Q factor retuned fork (RTF) force sensors made from quartz tuning forks, and the electric circuits for the sensors, were evaluated and optimized to improve the performance of non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) performed under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. To exploit the high Q factor of the RTF sensor, the oscillation of the RTF sensor was excited at its resonant frequency, using a stray capacitance compensation circuit to cancel the excitation signal leaked through the stray capacitor of the sensor. To improve the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio in the detected signal, a small capacitor was inserted before the input of an operational (OP) amplifier placed in an UHV chamber, which reduced the output noise from the amplifier. A low-noise, wideband OP amplifier produced a superior S/N ratio, compared with a precision OP amplifier. The thermal vibrational density spectra of the RTF sensors were evaluated using the circuit. The RTF sensor with an effective spring constant value as low as 1000 N/m provided a lower minimum detection limit for force differentiation. A nc-AFM image of a Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was produced with atomic resolution using the RTF sensor in a constant frequency shift mode; tunneling current and energy dissipation images with atomic resolution were also simultaneously produced. The high-Q factor RTF sensor showed potential for the high sensitivity of energy dissipation as small as 1 meV/cycle and the high-resolution analysis of non-conservative force interactions.

  9. Quantitative Determination of Density of Ground State Atomic Oxygen from Both TALIF and Emission Spectroscopy in Hot Air Plasma Generated by Microwave Resonant Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, F.; Yousfi, M.; Merbahi, N.; Wattieaux, G.; Piquemal, A.

    2016-03-01

    Two experimental techniques have been used to quantify the atomic oxygen density in the case of hot air plasma generated by a microwave (MW) resonant cavity. The latter operates at a frequency of 2.45 GHz inside a cell of gas conditioning at a pressure of 600 mbar, an injected air flow of 12 L/min and an input MW power of 1 kW. The first technique is based on the standard two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) using xenon for calibration but applied for the first time in the present post discharge hot air plasma column having a temperature of about 4500 K near the axis of the nozzle. The second diagnostic technique is an actinometry method based on optical emission spectroscopy (OES). In this case, we compared the spectra intensities of a specific atomic oxygen line (844 nm) and the closest wavelength xenon line (823 nm). The two lines need to be collected under absolutely the same spectroscopic parameters. The xenon emission is due to the addition of a small proportion of xenon (1% Xe) of this chemically inert gas inside the air while a further small quantity of H2 (2%) is also added in the mixture in order to collect OH(A-X) and NH(A-X) spectra without noise. The latter molecular spectra are required to estimate gas and excitation temperatures. Optical emission spectroscopy measurements, at for instance the position z=12 mm on the axis plasma column that leads to a gas measured temperature equal to 3500 K, an excitation temperature of about 9500 K and an atomic oxygen density 2.09×1017±0.2×1017 cm-3. This is in very good agreement with the TALIF measurement, which is equal to 2.0×1017 cm-3.

  10. Hofmeister series and ionic effects of alkali metal ions on DNA conformation transition in normal and less polarised water solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jing; Shen, Xin; Shen, Hao; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2014-10-01

    Normal and less polarised water models are used as the solvent to investigate Hofmeister effects and alkali metal ionic effects on dodecamer d(CGCGAATTCGCG) B-DNA with atomic dynamics simulations. As normal water solvent is replaced by less polarised water, the Hofmeister series of alkali metal ions is changed from Li+ > Na+ ≃ K+ ≃ Cs+ ≃ Rb+ to Li+ > Na+ > K+ > Rb+ > Cs+. In less polarised water, DNA experiences the B→A conformational transition for the lighter alkali metal counterions (Li+, Na+ and K+). However, it keeps B form for the heavier ions (Rb+ and Cs+). We find that the underlying cause of the conformation transition for these alkali metal ions except K+ is the competition between water molecules and counterions coupling to the free oxygen atoms of the phosphate groups. For K+ ions, the 'economics' of phosphate hydration and 'spine of hydration' are both concerned with the DNA helixes changing.

  11. Solvation structure and transport properties of alkali cations in dimethyl sulfoxide under exogenous static electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien; Vijayakumar, M. E-mail: karl.mueller@pnnl.gov; Han, Kee Sung; Mueller, Karl T. E-mail: karl.mueller@pnnl.gov

    2015-06-14

    A combination of molecular dynamics simulations and pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to investigate the role of exogenous electric fields on the solvation structure and dynamics of alkali ions in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and as a function of temperature. Good agreement was obtained, for select alkali ions in the absence of an electric field, between calculated and experimentally determined diffusion coefficients normalized to that of pure DMSO. Our results indicate that temperatures of up to 400 K and external electric fields of up to 1 V nm{sup −1} have minimal effects on the solvation structure of the smaller alkali cations (Li{sup +} and Na{sup +}) due to their relatively strong ion-solvent interactions, whereas the solvation structures of the larger alkali cations (K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, and Cs{sup +}) are significantly affected. In addition, although the DMSO exchange dynamics in the first solvation shell differ markedly for the two groups, the drift velocities and mobilities are not significantly affected by the nature of the alkali ion. Overall, although exogenous electric fields induce a drift displacement, their presence does not significantly affect the random diffusive displacement of the alkali ions in DMSO. System temperature is found to have generally a stronger influence on dynamical properties, such as the DMSO exchange dynamics and the ion mobilities, than the presence of electric fields.

  12. Sum rules and other properties involving resonance projection operators. [for optical potential description of electron scattering from atoms and ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berk, A.; Temkin, A.

    1985-01-01

    A sum rule is derived for the auxiliary eigenvalues of an equation whose eigenspectrum pertains to projection operators which describe electron scattering from multielectron atoms and ions. The sum rule's right-hand side depends on an integral involving the target system eigenfunctions. The sum rule is checked for several approximations of the two-electron target. It is shown that target functions which have a unit eigenvalue in their auxiliary eigenspectrum do not give rise to well-defined projection operators except through a limiting process. For Hylleraas target approximations, the auxiliary equations are shown to contain an infinite spectrum. However, using a Rayleigh-Ritz variational principle, it is shown that a comparatively simple aproximation can exhaust the sum rule to better than five significant figures. The auxiliary Hylleraas equation is greatly simplified by conversion to a square root equation containing the same eigenfunction spectrum and from which the required eigenvalues are trivially recovered by squaring.

  13. Design strategies for development of SCR catalyst: improvement of alkali poisoning resistance and novel regeneration method.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yue; Li, Junhua; Shi, Wenbo; Xu, Jiayu; Hao, Jiming

    2012-11-20

    Based on the ideas of the additives modification and regeneration method update, two different strategies were designed to deal with the traditional SCR catalyst poisoned by alkali metals. First, ceria doping on the V(2)O(5)-WO(3)/TiO(2) catalyst could promote the SCR performance even reducing the V loading, which resulted in the enhancement of the catalyst's alkali poisoning resistance. Then, a novel method, electrophoresis treatment, was employed to regenerate the alkali poisoned V(2)O(5)-WO(3)/TiO(2) catalyst. This novel technique could dramatically enhance the SCR activities of the alkali poisoned catalysts by removing approximately 95% K or Na ions from the catalyst and showed less hazardous to the environment. Finally, the deactivation mechanisms by the alkali metals were extensively studied by employing both the experimental and DFT theoretical approaches. Alkali atom mainly influences the active site V species rather than W oxides. The decrease of catalyst surface acidity might directly reduce the catalytic activity, while the reducibility of catalysts could be another important factor.

  14. Alkali Metal Variation and Twisting of the FeNNFe Core in Bridging Diiron Dinitrogen Complexes.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Sean F; Rodgers, Kenton R; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun; Mercado, Brandon Q; Grubel, Katarzyna; Holland, Patrick L

    2016-03-21

    Alkali metal cations can interact with Fe-N2 complexes, potentially enhancing back-bonding or influencing the geometry of the iron atom. These influences are relevant to large-scale N2 reduction by iron, such as in the FeMoco of nitrogenase and the alkali-promoted Haber-Bosch process. However, to our knowledge there have been no systematic studies of a large range of alkali metals regarding their influence on transition metal-dinitrogen complexes. In this work, we varied the alkali metal in [alkali cation]2[LFeNNFeL] complexes (L = bulky β-diketiminate ligand) through the size range from Na(+) to K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+). The FeNNFe cores have similar Fe-N and N-N distances and N-N stretching frequencies despite the drastic change in alkali metal cation size. The two diketiminates twist relative to one another, with larger dihedral angles accommodating the larger cations. In order to explain why the twisting has so little influence on the core, we performed density functional theory calculations on a simplified LFeNNFeL model, which show that the two metals surprisingly do not compete for back-bonding to the same π* orbital of N2, even when the ligand planes are parallel. This diiron system can tolerate distortion of the ligand planes through compensating orbital energy changes, and thus, a range of ligand orientations can give very similar energies. PMID:26925968

  15. Note: An ion source for alkali metal implantation beneath graphene and hexagonal boron nitride monolayers on transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, L. H. de; Cun, H. Y.; Hemmi, A.; Kälin, T.; Greber, T.

    2013-12-15

    The construction of an alkali-metal ion source is presented. It allows the acceleration of rubidium ions to an energy that enables the penetration through monolayers of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. Rb atoms are sublimated from an alkali-metal dispenser. The ionization is obtained by surface ionization and desorption from a hot high work function surface. The ion current is easily controlled by the temperature of ionizer. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy measurements confirm ion implantation.

  16. Theoretical study on the adsorption of carbon dioxide on individual and alkali-metal doped MOF-5s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Nguyen Thi Thu; Lefedova, O. V.; Ha, Nguyen Ngoc

    2016-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to investigate the adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) on metal-organic framework (MOF-5) and alkali-metal (Li, K, Na) doped MOF-5s. The adsorption energy calculation showed that metal atom adsorption is exothermic in MOF-5 system. Moreover, alkali-metal doping can significantly improve the adsorption ability of carbon dioxide on MOF-5. The best influence is observed for Li-doping.

  17. Determination of Alkali Ions in Biological and Environmental Samples.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the common methods for the determination of the alkali metals is given. These are drawn from all of the three principle branches of quantitative analysis and consist mainly of optical atomic spectrometric methods, ion-selective electrodes, and the separation methods of ion-chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. Their main characteristics and performance parameters are discussed. Important specific applications are also examined, namely clinical analysis, single cell analysis, the analysis of soil samples and hydroponic nutrient solutions, as well as the detection of the radioactive (137)Cs isotope. PMID:26860298

  18. Determination of Alkali Ions in Biological and Environmental Samples.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the common methods for the determination of the alkali metals is given. These are drawn from all of the three principle branches of quantitative analysis and consist mainly of optical atomic spectrometric methods, ion-selective electrodes, and the separation methods of ion-chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. Their main characteristics and performance parameters are discussed. Important specific applications are also examined, namely clinical analysis, single cell analysis, the analysis of soil samples and hydroponic nutrient solutions, as well as the detection of the radioactive (137)Cs isotope.

  19. Bioinorganic Chemistry of the Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsam; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien T; Churchill, David G

    2016-01-01

    The common Group 1 alkali metals are indeed ubiquitous on earth, in the oceans and in biological systems. In this introductory chapter, concepts involving aqueous chemistry and aspects of general coordination chemistry and oxygen atom donor chemistry are introduced. Also, there are nuclear isotopes of importance. A general discussion of Group 1 begins from the prevalence of the ions, and from a comparison of their ionic radii and ionization energies. While oxygen and water molecule binding have the most relevance to biology and in forming a detailed understanding between the elements, there is a wide range of basic chemistry that is potentially important, especially with respect to biological chelation and synthetic multi-dentate ligand design. The elements are widely distributed in life forms, in the terrestrial environment and in the oceans. The details about the workings in animal, as well as plant life are presented in this volume. Important biometallic aspects of human health and medicine are introduced as well. Seeing as the elements are widely present in biology, various particular endogenous molecules and enzymatic systems can be studied. Sodium and potassium are by far the most important and central elements for consideration. Aspects of lithium, rubidium, cesium and francium chemistry are also included; they help in making important comparisons related to the coordination chemistry of Na(+) and K(+). Physical methods are also introduced. PMID:26860297

  20. Bioinorganic Chemistry of the Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsam; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien T; Churchill, David G

    2016-01-01

    The common Group 1 alkali metals are indeed ubiquitous on earth, in the oceans and in biological systems. In this introductory chapter, concepts involving aqueous chemistry and aspects of general coordination chemistry and oxygen atom donor chemistry are introduced. Also, there are nuclear isotopes of importance. A general discussion of Group 1 begins from the prevalence of the ions, and from a comparison of their ionic radii and ionization energies. While oxygen and water molecule binding have the most relevance to biology and in forming a detailed understanding between the elements, there is a wide range of basic chemistry that is potentially important, especially with respect to biological chelation and synthetic multi-dentate ligand design. The elements are widely distributed in life forms, in the terrestrial environment and in the oceans. The details about the workings in animal, as well as plant life are presented in this volume. Important biometallic aspects of human health and medicine are introduced as well. Seeing as the elements are widely present in biology, various particular endogenous molecules and enzymatic systems can be studied. Sodium and potassium are by far the most important and central elements for consideration. Aspects of lithium, rubidium, cesium and francium chemistry are also included; they help in making important comparisons related to the coordination chemistry of Na(+) and K(+). Physical methods are also introduced.

  1. Anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering for atom specific and excited state selective dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Josefsson, Ida; Rajkovic, Ivan; Schreck, Simon; Quevedo, Wilson; Beye, Martin; Grübel, Sebastian; Scholz, Mirko; Nordlund, Dennis; Zhang, Wenkai; Hartsock, Robert W.; Gaffney, Kelly J.; Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J.; Kennedy, Brian; Hennies, Franz; Techert, Simone; Wernet, Philippe; Odelius, Michael; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Ultrafast electronic and structural dynamics of matter govern rate and selectivity of chemical reactions, as well as phase transitions and efficient switching in functional materials. Since x-rays determine electronic and structural properties with elemental, chemical, orbital and magnetic selectivity, short pulse x-ray sources have become central enablers of ultrafast science. Despite of these strengths, ultrafast x-rays have been poor at picking up excited state moieties from the unexcited ones. With time-resolved anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering (AS-RXRS) performed at the LCLS, and ab initio theory we establish background free excited state selectivity in addition to the elemental, chemical, orbital and magnetic selectivity of x-rays. This unparalleled selectivity extracts low concentration excited state species along the pathway of photo induced ligand exchange of Fe(CO)5 in ethanol. Conceptually a full theoretical treatment of all accessible insights to excited state dynamics with AS-RXRS with transform-limited x-ray pulses is given—which will be covered experimentally by upcoming transform-limited x-ray sources.

  2. Carbon beam extraction with 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Oh, Byung-Hoon; Chang, Dae-Sik; Jeong, Sun-Chan

    2014-02-01

    A 14.5 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source (ECRIS) has been made to produce C4+ beam for using a carbon therapy facility and recently tested at KAERI. Highly charged carbon ions have been successfully extracted. When using only CO2 gas, the beam current of C4+ was almost 14 μA at 15 kV extraction voltage. To get higher current of the C4+ beam, while optimizing confinement magnetic field configuration (e.g., axial strengths at minimum and extraction side), gas-mixing (CO2/He), and biased disk were introduced. When the gas mixing ratio of the CO2/He gas is 1:8 at an operational pressure of 5 × 10-7 mbar and the disk was biased to -150 V relative to the ion source body, the highest current of the C4+ beam was achieved to be 50 μA, more than three times higher than previously observed only with CO2 gas. Some details on the operating conditions of the ECRIS were discussed.

  3. Carbon beam extraction with 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Oh, Byung-Hoon; Chang, Dae-Sik; Jeong, Sun-Chan

    2014-02-01

    A 14.5 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source (ECRIS) has been made to produce C(4+) beam for using a carbon therapy facility and recently tested at KAERI. Highly charged carbon ions have been successfully extracted. When using only CO2 gas, the beam current of C(4+) was almost 14 μA at 15 kV extraction voltage. To get higher current of the C(4+) beam, while optimizing confinement magnetic field configuration (e.g., axial strengths at minimum and extraction side), gas-mixing (CO2/He), and biased disk were introduced. When the gas mixing ratio of the CO2/He gas is 1:8 at an operational pressure of 5 × 10(-7) mbar and the disk was biased to -150 V relative to the ion source body, the highest current of the C(4+) beam was achieved to be 50 μA, more than three times higher than previously observed only with CO2 gas. Some details on the operating conditions of the ECRIS were discussed. PMID:24593482

  4. The alkali metals: 200 years of surprises.

    PubMed

    Dye, James L

    2015-03-13

    Alkali metal compounds have been known since antiquity. In 1807, Sir Humphry Davy surprised everyone by electrolytically preparing (and naming) potassium and sodium metals. In 1808, he noted their interaction with ammonia, which, 100 years later, was attributed to solvated electrons. After 1960, pulse radiolysis of nearly any solvent produced solvated electrons, which became one of the most studied species in chemistry. In 1968, alkali metal solutions in amines and ethers were shown to contain alkali metal anions in addition to solvated electrons. The advent of crown ethers and cryptands as complexants for alkali cations greatly enhanced alkali metal solubilities. This permitted us to prepare a crystalline salt of Na(-) in 1974, followed by 30 other alkalides with Na(-), K(-), Rb(-) and Cs(-) anions. This firmly established the -1 oxidation state of alkali metals. The synthesis of alkalides led to the crystallization of electrides, with trapped electrons as the anions. Electrides have a variety of electronic and magnetic properties, depending on the geometries and connectivities of the trapping sites. In 2009, the final surprise was the experimental demonstration that alkali metals under high pressure lose their metallic character as the electrons are localized in voids between the alkali cations to become high-pressure electrides!

  5. The alkali metals: 200 years of surprises.

    PubMed

    Dye, James L

    2015-03-13

    Alkali metal compounds have been known since antiquity. In 1807, Sir Humphry Davy surprised everyone by electrolytically preparing (and naming) potassium and sodium metals. In 1808, he noted their interaction with ammonia, which, 100 years later, was attributed to solvated electrons. After 1960, pulse radiolysis of nearly any solvent produced solvated electrons, which became one of the most studied species in chemistry. In 1968, alkali metal solutions in amines and ethers were shown to contain alkali metal anions in addition to solvated electrons. The advent of crown ethers and cryptands as complexants for alkali cations greatly enhanced alkali metal solubilities. This permitted us to prepare a crystalline salt of Na(-) in 1974, followed by 30 other alkalides with Na(-), K(-), Rb(-) and Cs(-) anions. This firmly established the -1 oxidation state of alkali metals. The synthesis of alkalides led to the crystallization of electrides, with trapped electrons as the anions. Electrides have a variety of electronic and magnetic properties, depending on the geometries and connectivities of the trapping sites. In 2009, the final surprise was the experimental demonstration that alkali metals under high pressure lose their metallic character as the electrons are localized in voids between the alkali cations to become high-pressure electrides! PMID:25666067

  6. Process for the disposal of alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Leroy C.

    1977-01-01

    Large quantities of alkali metals may be safely reacted for ultimate disposal by contact with a hot concentrated caustic solution. The alkali metals react with water in the caustic solution in a controlled reaction while steam dilutes the hydrogen formed by the reaction to a safe level.

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW: Breathing mode excitation in near-harmonic systems: resonant mass capture, desorption and atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadzuk, J. W.

    1998-09-01

    The phenomenon of breathing mode excitation or bound-state wavepacket squeezing and spreading driven by a time-dependent oscillator frequency (due to either a transient force constant or mass) is considered here. An easily implemented theory of stimulated wavepacket dynamics for near-harmonic systems is presented which describes a variety of generic time dependences such as single sudden excitation, double switching (excitation/time delay/de-excitation) and decaying initially excited states which characterize many processes in spectroscopy, pump-probe control in intramolecular dynamics, and femtochemistry. The model is used as the theoretical basis for understanding such diverse phenomena as quantum excitation due to temporary neutron capture, stimulated bond-breaking resulting in delocalization, desorption, or dissociation, and breathing mode excitation of ultracold atoms trapped in optical lattices. Whilst the first two examples are speculative, results for transient wavepacket dynamics of the occupied excited optical lattice are in accord with recent experimental observations reported by the NIST Laser Cooling Group. Emphasis on the inherent theoretical simplicity and the multidisciplinary aspects of near-harmonic breathing mode excitation, as exemplified by the specific realizations considered here, has been a major intent of this topical review.

  8. Atomic vapor cells for chip-scale atomic clocks with improved long-term frequency stability.

    PubMed

    Knappe, S; Gerginov, V; Schwindt, P D D; Shah, V; Robinson, H G; Hollberg, L; Kitching, J

    2005-09-15

    A novel technique for microfabricating alkali atom vapor cells is described in which alkali atoms are evaporated into a micromachined cell cavity through a glass nozzle. A cell of interior volume 1 mm3, containing 87Rb and a buffer gas, was made in this way and integrated into an atomic clock based on coherent population trapping. A fractional frequency instability of 6 x 10(-12) at 1000 s of integration was measured. The long-term drift of the F=1, mF=0-->F=2, mF=0 hyperfine frequency of atoms in these cells is below 5 x 10(-11)/day.

  9. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C.

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  10. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, Raymond D.; McPheeters, Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  11. Equation of state for solid rare gases and alkali metals under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    This investigation is based on an atomic equation of state which takes into account the excluded volume of the atom being considered. Study of solid rare gases allows following the packing factor of the solid in equilibrium with the gas at different temperatures and of the solid and the liquid in the case of solid-liquid equilibria. The application of a pressure to the solid up to 9800 MPa allows determining the decrease in atomic volume and thus the compressibility. Such a study leads to proposing a new expression through dividing the pressure derivative (as a function of the excluded volume) by the pressure. This new coefficient is a pressure-independent constant but varies with the atom considered. Multiplied by the initial atomic volume, this coefficient has a unique value for all the rare gases. Furthermore, this is also true for the series of alkali metals with however a lower value of the coefficient. The atomic configurations of the two series are very different with one free electron for the alkali metals but closed shells for the rare gases. The alkali metals are therefore more complex than the rare gases. It is worthwhile to note that study of the equilibrium has not required the use of the principles of thermodynamics.

  12. Ground-state properties of artificial bosonic atoms, Bose interaction blockade, and the single-atom pipette

    SciTech Connect

    Kolomeisky, Eugene B.; Kalas, Ryan M.; Straley, Joseph P.

    2004-06-01

    We analyze the ground-state properties of an artificial atom made out of repulsive bosons attracted to a center for the case that all the interactions are short ranged. Such bosonic atoms could be created by optically trapping ultracold particles of alkali-metal vapors; we present the theory describing how their properties depend on experimentally adjustable strength of 'nuclear' attraction and interparticle repulsion. The binding ability of the short-range potential increases with space dimensionality, only a limited number of particles can be bound in one dimension, while in two and three dimensions the number of bound bosons can be chosen at will. Particularly in three dimensions we find an unusual effect of enhanced resonant binding: for not very strong interparticle repulsion the equilibrium number of bosons bound to a nuclear potential having a sufficiently shallow single-particle state increases without bound as the nuclear potential becomes less attractive. As a consequence of the competing nuclear attraction enhanced by the Bose statistics and interparticle repulsions, the dependence of the ground-state energy of the atom on the number of particles has a minimum whose position is experimentally tunable. This implies a staircase dependence of the equilibrium number of bound bosons on external parameters which may be used to create a single-atom pipette--an arrangement which allows the transport of atoms into and out of a reservoir, one at a time.

  13. Structure and photoabsorption properties of cationic alkali dimers solvated in neon clusters.

    PubMed

    Zanuttini, D; Douady, J; Jacquet, E; Giglio, E; Gervais, B

    2010-11-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the structure and optical absorption of M(2)(+) alkali dimers (M=Li,Na,K) solvated in Ne(n) clusters for n=1 to a few tens Ne atoms. For all these alkali, the lowest-energy isomers are obtained by aggregation of the first Ne atoms at the extremity of the alkali molecule. This particular geometry, common to other M(2)(+)-rare gas clusters, is intimately related to the shape of the electronic density of the X  (2)Σ(g)(+) ground state of the bare M(2)(+) molecules. The structure of the first solvation shell presents equilateral Ne(3) and capped pentagonal Ne(6) motifs, which are characteristic of pure rare gas clusters. The size and geometry of the complete solvation shell depend on the alkali and were obtained at n=22 with a D(4h) symmetry for Li and at n=27 with a D(5h) symmetry for Na. For K, our study suggests that the closure of the first solvation shell occurs well beyond n=36. We show that the atomic arrangement of these clusters has a profound influence on their optical absorption spectrum. In particular, the XΣ transition from the X  (2)Σ(g)(+) ground state to the first excited (2)Σ(u)(+) state is strongly blueshifted in the Frank-Condon area.

  14. Work function of alkali metal-adsorbed molybdenium dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sol; Jhi, Seung-Hoon

    2015-03-01

    The lowest work function of materials, reported so far over the last few decades, is an order of 1eV experimentally and theoretically. Designing materials that has work-function less than 1eV is essential in the thermionic energy conversion. To explore new low work function materials, we study MoX2(X =S, Se, Te) adsorbed with alkali metals (Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs), and investigate the charge transfer, the formation of surface dipole, and the change in work function using first-principles calculations. It is found that the charge transfer from alkali metals to MoX2substrates decreases as the atomic number of adsorbates increases. Regardless of the amount of the charge transfer, K on MoTe2 exhibits the biggest surface dipole moment, which consequently makes the surface work function the lowest. We show that the formation of the surface dipole is a key in changing the work function. We find the trimerization of Mo atoms in the substrate with the lowest work-function, which may contribute to enhancement of the surface dipole.

  15. Laser-magnetic-resonance detection of magnesium atoms in the metastable /sup 3/P/sub 0,ts1,ts2/ states

    SciTech Connect

    Inguscio, M.; Leopold, K.R.; Murray, J.S.; Evenson, K.M.

    1985-09-01

    Transitions between fine-structure levels of the metastable (3s3p/sup 3/P) state of magnesium have been observed by means of the highly sensitive technique of far-infrared laser-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy. The g factors for the /sup 3/P/sub 1/ and /sup 3/P/sub 2/ levels are 1.50111(16) and 1.50102(16), respectively, and the /sup 3/P/sub 1/--/sup 3/P/sub 2/ energy separation is1 220575.1(33) MHz. The observed g factors show good agreement with the predicted values. This stands in marked contrast to similar results for atomic silicon (/sup 3/P) and aluminum (/sup 2/P), for which the theoretical and experimental g factors differ substantially. The value of the /sup 3/P/sub 1/--/sup 3/P/sub 2/ energy separation is improved by nearly 2 orders of magnitude over the optical value and is of sufficient accuracy to permit possible extraterrestrial identification.

  16. Human immunoglobulin adsorption investigated by means of quartz crystal microbalance dissipation, atomic force microscopy, surface acoustic wave, and surface plasmon resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cheng; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Angelova, Angelina; Choi, Kang-Hoon; Laureyn, Wim; Frederix, Filip; Francis, Laurent A; Campitelli, Andrew; Engelborghs, Yves; Borghs, Gustaaf

    2004-07-01

    Time-resolved adsorption behavior of a human immunoglobin G (hIgG) protein on a hydrophobized gold surface is investigated using multitechniques: quartz crystal microbalance/dissipation (QCM-D) technique; combined surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and Love mode surface acoustic wave (SAW) technique; combined QCM-D and atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique. The adsorbed hIgG forms interfacial structures varying in organization from a submonolayer to a multilayer. An "end-on" IgG orientation in the monolayer film, associated with the surface coverage results, does not corroborate with the effective protein thickness determined from SPR/SAW measurements. This inconsistence is interpreted by a deformation effect induced by conformation change. This conformation change is confirmed by QCM-D measurement. Combined SPR/SAW measurements suggest that the adsorbed protein barely contains water after extended contact with the hydrophobic surface. This limited interfacial hydration also contributed to a continuous conformation change in the adsorbed protein layer. The viscoelastic variation associated with interfacial conformation changes induces about 1.5 times overestimation of the mass uptake in the QCM-D measurements. The merit of combined multitechnique measurements is demonstrated.

  17. Facile Precursor for Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Alkali Treated Maize Starch

    PubMed Central

    El-Rafie, M. H.; Ahmed, Hanan B.; Zahran, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles were prepared by using alkali treated maize starch which plays a dual role as reducer for AgNO3 and stabilizer for the produced AgNPs. The redox reaction which takes a place between AgNO3 and alkali treated starch was followed up and controlled in order to obtain spherical shaped silver nanoparticles with mean size 4–6 nm. The redox potentials confirmed the principle role of alkali treatment in increasing the reducibility of starch macromolecules. The measurements of reducing sugars at the end of reaction using dinitrosalicylic acid reagent (DNS) were carried out in order to control the chemical reduction reaction. The UV/Vis spectra show that an absorption peak, occurring due to surface plasmon resonance (SPR), exists at 410 nm, which is characteristic to yellow color of silver nanoparticles solution. The samples have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which reveal the nanonature of the particles. PMID:27433508

  18. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  19. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  20. Alkali Silicate Vehicle Forms Durable, Fireproof Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, John B.; Seindenberg, Benjamin

    1964-01-01

    The problem: To develop a paint for use on satellites or space vehicles that exhibits high resistance to cracking, peeling, or flaking when subjected to a wide range of temperatures. Organic coatings will partially meet the required specifications but have the inherent disadvantage of combustibility. Alkali-silicate binders, used in some industrial coatings and adhesives, show evidence of forming a fireproof paint, but the problem of high surface-tension, a characteristic of alkali silicates, has not been resolved. The solution: Use of a suitable non-ionic wetting agent combined with a paint incorporating alkali silicate as the binder.