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Sample records for alkali atom resonance

  1. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Pressure Broadened Alkali-Metal Atom Resonance Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindo, F.; Zhu, C.; Kirby, K.; Babb, J. F.

    2006-01-01

    We are carrying out a joint theoretical and experimental research program to study the broadening of alkali atom resonance lines due to collisions with helium and molecular hydrogen for applications to spectroscopic studies of brown dwarfs and extrasolar giant planets.

  2. Positron-alkali atom scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.; Ward, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron-alkali atom scattering was recently investigated both theoretically and experimentally in the energy range from a few eV up to 100 eV. On the theoretical side calculations of the integrated elastic and excitation cross sections as well as total cross sections for Li, Na and K were based upon either the close-coupling method or the modified Glauber approximation. These theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the total cross section for both Na and K. Resonance structures were also found in the L = 0, 1 and 2 partial waves for positron scattering from the alkalis. The structure of these resonances appears to be quite complex and, as expected, they occur in conjunction with the atomic excitation thresholds. Currently both theoretical and experimental work is in progress on positron-Rb scattering in the same energy range.

  3. Studies of Pressure-Broadening of Alkali Atom Resonance Lines for Modeling Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets and Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Kate; Babb, J.; Yoshino, K.

    2004-01-01

    In L-dwarfs and T-dwarfs the resonance lines of sodium and potassium are so profoundly pressure-broadened that their wings extend several hundred nanometers from line center. With accurate knowledge of the line profiles as a function of temperature and pressure: such lines can prove to be valuable diagnostics of the atmospheres of such objects. We have initiated a joint program of theoretical and experimental research to study the line-broadening of alkali atom resonance lines due to collisions with species such as helium and molecular hydrogen. Although potassium and sodium are the alkali species of most interest in the atmospheres of cool brown dwarfs and extrasolar giant planets, some of our theoretical focus this year has involved the calculation of pressure-broadening of lithium resonance lines by He, as a test of a newly developed suite of computer codes. In addition, theoretical calculations have been carried out to determine the leading long range van der Waals coefficients for the interactions of ground and excited alkali metal atoms with helium atoms, to within a probable error of 2%. Such data is important in determining the behavior of the resonance line profiles in the far wings. Important progress has been made on the experimental aspects of the program since the arrival of a postdoctoral fellow in September. A new absorption cell has been designed, which incorporates a number of technical improvements over the previous cell, including a larger cell diameter to enhance the signal, and fittings which allow for easier cleaning, thereby significantly reducing the instrument down-time.

  4. Sensitive determination of the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms using near-resonant light

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhichao; Long, Xingwu; Yuan, Jie; Fan, Zhenfang; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    A new method to measure the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms is demonstrated. Unlike the conventional method using far-detuned probe light, the near-resonant light with two specific frequencies was chosen. Because the Faraday rotation angle of this approach can be two orders of magnitude greater than that with the conventional method, this approach is more sensitive to the spin polarization. Based on the results of the experimental scheme, the spin polarization measurements are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical predictions, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of this approach. PMID:27595707

  5. Sensitive determination of the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms using near-resonant light.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhichao; Long, Xingwu; Yuan, Jie; Fan, Zhenfang; Luo, Hui

    2016-09-06

    A new method to measure the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms is demonstrated. Unlike the conventional method using far-detuned probe light, the near-resonant light with two specific frequencies was chosen. Because the Faraday rotation angle of this approach can be two orders of magnitude greater than that with the conventional method, this approach is more sensitive to the spin polarization. Based on the results of the experimental scheme, the spin polarization measurements are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical predictions, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of this approach.

  6. Sensitive determination of the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms using near-resonant light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhichao; Long, Xingwu; Yuan, Jie; Fan, Zhenfang; Luo, Hui

    2016-09-01

    A new method to measure the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms is demonstrated. Unlike the conventional method using far-detuned probe light, the near-resonant light with two specific frequencies was chosen. Because the Faraday rotation angle of this approach can be two orders of magnitude greater than that with the conventional method, this approach is more sensitive to the spin polarization. Based on the results of the experimental scheme, the spin polarization measurements are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical predictions, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of this approach.

  7. Atom Resonance Lines for Modeling Atmosphere: Studies of Pressure-Broadening of Alkali Atom Resonance Lines for Modeling Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets and Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, Hashima (Technical Monitor); Kirby, K.; Babb, J.; Yoshino, K.

    2005-01-01

    We report on progress made in a joint program of theoretical and experimental research to study the line-broadening of alkali atom resonance lines due to collisions with species such as helium and molecular hydrogen. Accurate knowledge of the line profiles of Na and K as a function of temperature and pressure will allow such lines to serve as valuable diagnostics of the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and extra-solar giant planets. A new experimental apparatus has been designed, built and tested over the past year, and we are poised to begin collecting data on the first system of interest, the potassium resonance lines perturbed by collisions with helium. On the theoretical front, calculations of line-broadening due to sodium collisions with helium are nearly complete, using accurate molecular potential energy curves and transition moments just recently computed for this system. In addition we have completed calculations of the three relevant potential energy curves and associated transition moments for K - He, using the MOLPRO quantum chemistry codes. Currently, calculations of the potential surfaces describing K-H2 are in progress.

  8. Double resonance fequency light shift compensation in optically oriented laser-pumped alkali atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, A. A. Ermak, S. V.; Sagitov, E. A.; Smolin, R. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2015-09-15

    The contributions of the vector and scalar components to the magnetically dependent microwave transition frequency light shift are analyzed and the compensation of these components is experimentally demonstrated for the {sup 87}Rb atoms optically oriented by a laser tuned to the D{sub 2} line of the head doublet. The Allan variance is studied as a function of the averaging time for a tandem of optically pumped quantum magnetometers (OPQMs), one of which is based on a low-frequency spin oscillator while another is based on a quantum microwave discriminator with a resonance frequency that corresponds to magnetically dependent transitions between HFS sublevels with the extremal value of the magnetic quantum number. It is shown that the compensation of the scalar and vector components of the light shift in OPQMs reduces the Allan variance at averaging times that exceed hundreds of seconds compared to a quantum discriminator based on the magnetically independent 0–0 transition. In this case, the minimal Allan variance in OPQMs at the end resonance is achieved at considerably longer averaging times than in the case of the quantum discriminator that is tuned to the 0–0 transition frequency.

  9. Measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms using nuclear magnetic resonance frequency shifts of noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. H.; Luo, H.; Qu, T. L. Yang, K. Y.; Ding, Z. C.

    2015-10-15

    We report a novel method of measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms by detecting the NMR frequency shifts of noble gases. We calculated the profile of {sup 87}Rb D1 line absorption cross sections. We then measured the absorption profile of the sample cell, from which we calculated the {sup 87}Rb number densities at different temperatures. Then we measured the frequency shifts resulted from the spin polarization of the {sup 87}Rb atoms and calculated its polarization degrees at different temperatures. The behavior of frequency shifts versus temperature in experiment was consistent with theoretical calculation, which may be used as compensative signal for the NMRG closed-loop control system.

  10. The optical pumping of alkali atoms using coherent radiation from semi-conductor injection lasers and incoherent radiation from resonance lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, G.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study for creating population differences in the ground states of alkali atoms (Cesium 133) is presented. Studies made on GaAs-junction lasers and the achievement of population inversions among the hyperfine levels in the ground state of Cs 133 by optically pumping it with radiation from a GaAs diode laser. Laser output was used to monitor the populations in the ground state hyperfine levels as well as to perform the hyperfine pumping. A GaAs laser operated at about 77 K was used to scan the 8521 A line of Cs 133. Experiments were performed both with neon-filled and with paraflint-coated cells containing the cesium vapor. Investigations were also made for the development of the triple resonance coherent pulse technique and for the detection of microwave induced hyperfine trasistions by destroying the phase relationships produced by a radio frequency pulse. A pulsed cesium resonance lamp developed, and the lamp showed clean and reproducible switching characteristics.

  11. Resonances in low-energy positron-alkali scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horbatsch, M.; Ward, S. J.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    Close-coupling calculations were performed with up to five target states at energies in the excitation threshold region for positron scattering from Li, Na and K. Resonances were discovered in the L = 0, 1 and 2 channels in the vicinity of the atomic excitation thresholds. The widths of these resonances vary between 0.2 and 130 MeV. Evidence was found for the existence of positron-alkali bound states in all cases.

  12. Nonlinear pressure shifts of alkali-metal atoms in xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuyer, Bart; Xia, Tian; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2011-05-01

    Compact, portable atomic frequency standards are based on the microwave resonance frequencies of alkali-metal atoms in inert buffer gases. The frequency shift of these resonances due to collisions with the buffer gas is known as the pressure shift. We demonstrate that the microwave resonance frequencies of ground-state 87Rb and 133Cs atoms have a nonlinear dependence on the pressure of the buffer gas Xe. Previous work has demonstrated a nonlinear dependence in Ar and Kr, but not He and N2, which is thought to be due to the loosely-bound van der Waals molecules that are known to form between alkali-metal and buffer-gas atoms in Ar, Kr, and Xe, but not He and N2. Surprisingly, we find that the nonlinearities in Xe are of the opposite sign to those in Ar and Kr, even though the overall shifts for each of these gases are negative. This discrepancy suggests that though the shifts due to the molecules in Ar and Kr are positive, the shifts due to the molecules in Xe are negative. No nonlinearities were observed in the buffer gas Ne to within our experimental accuracy, which suggests that molecules do not form in Ne. Additionally, we present improved measurements of the shifts of Rb and Cs in He and N2 and of Rb in Ar and Kr. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the Department of Defense through the NDSEG program.

  13. Intense, narrow atomic-clock resonances.

    PubMed

    Jau, Y-Y; Post, A B; Kuzma, N N; Braun, A M; Romalis, M V; Happer, W

    2004-03-19

    We present experimental and theoretical results showing that magnetic resonance transitions from the "end" sublevels of maximum or minimum spin in alkali-metal vapors are a promising alternative to the conventional 0-0 transition for small-size gas-cell atomic clocks. For these "end resonances," collisional spin-exchange broadening, which often dominates the linewidth of the 0-0 resonance, decreases with increasing spin polarization and vanishes for 100% polarization. The end resonances also have much stronger signals than the 0-0 resonance, and are readily detectable in cells with high buffer-gas pressure.

  14. Absence of neutral alkali atoms in rhodizite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnay, G.; Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Sioda, R.

    1966-01-01

    The formula CsB12Be4Al4O28 has been proposed by others for the mineral rhodizite. Electron-spin-resonance and magnetic susceptibility measurements prove the absence of neutral cesium atoms. An ionic formula CsB11Be4Al4O 26(OH)2is proposed.

  15. Improved atomic resonance gas cell for use in frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggett, G. R.

    1968-01-01

    Atomic resonance gas cell maintains a stable operating frequency in the presence of pressure fluctuations in the ambient atmosphere. The new cell includes an envelope which is transparent to radiation in the optical region and to microwave energy at the atomic resonance frequency of the alkali-metal vapor within the envelope.

  16. Elliptical polarization of near-resonant linearly polarized probe light in optically pumped alkali metal vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingying; Wang, Zhiguo; Jin, Shilong; Yuan, Jie; Luo, Hui

    2017-02-01

    Optically pumped alkali metal atoms currently provide a sensitive solution for magnetic microscopic measurements. As the most practicable plan, Faraday rotation of linearly polarized light is extensively used in spin polarization measurements of alkali metal atoms. In some cases, near-resonant Faraday rotation is applied to improve the sensitivity. However, the near-resonant linearly polarized probe light is elliptically polarized after passing through optically pumped alkali metal vapor. The ellipticity of transmitted near-resonant probe light is numerically calculated and experimentally measured. In addition, we also analyze the negative impact of elliptical polarization on Faraday rotation measurements. From our theoretical estimate and experimental results, the elliptical polarization forms an inevitable error in spin polarization measurements.

  17. Elliptical polarization of near-resonant linearly polarized probe light in optically pumped alkali metal vapor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingying; Wang, Zhiguo; Jin, Shilong; Yuan, Jie; Luo, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Optically pumped alkali metal atoms currently provide a sensitive solution for magnetic microscopic measurements. As the most practicable plan, Faraday rotation of linearly polarized light is extensively used in spin polarization measurements of alkali metal atoms. In some cases, near-resonant Faraday rotation is applied to improve the sensitivity. However, the near-resonant linearly polarized probe light is elliptically polarized after passing through optically pumped alkali metal vapor. The ellipticity of transmitted near-resonant probe light is numerically calculated and experimentally measured. In addition, we also analyze the negative impact of elliptical polarization on Faraday rotation measurements. From our theoretical estimate and experimental results, the elliptical polarization forms an inevitable error in spin polarization measurements. PMID:28216649

  18. Hall Determination of Atomic Radii of Alkali Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    I will propose here an alternative method for determining atomic radii of alkali metals based on the Hall measurements of their free electron densities and the knowledge of their crystal structure. (Contains 2 figures.)

  19. Near atomically smooth alkali antimonide photocathode thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jun; Karkare, Siddharth; Nasiatka, James; Schubert, Susanne; Smedley, John; Padmore, Howard

    2017-01-01

    Nano-roughness is one of the major factors degrading the emittance of electron beams that can be generated by high efficiency photocathodes, such as the thermally reacted alkali antimonide thin films. In this paper, we demonstrate a co-deposition based method for producing alkali antimonide cathodes that produce near atomic smoothness with high reproducibility. We calculate the effect of the surface roughness on the emittance and show that such smooth cathode surfaces are essential for operation of alkali antimonide cathodes in high field, low emittance radio frequency electron guns and to obtain ultracold electrons for ultrafast electron diffraction applications.

  20. Tune-out wavelengths of alkali-metal atoms and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, Bindiya; Safronova, M. S.; Clark, Charles W.

    2011-10-15

    Using first-principles calculations, we identify ''tune-out'' optical wavelengths, {lambda}{sub zero}, for which the ground-state frequency-dependent polarizabilities of alkali-metal atoms vanish. Our approach uses high-precision, relativistic all-order method in which all single, double, and partial triple excitations of the Dirac-Fock wave functions are included to all orders of perturbation theory. We discuss the use of tune-out wavelengths for sympathetic cooling in two-species mixtures of alkali metals with group II and other elements of interest. Special cases in which these wavelengths coincide with strong resonance transitions in a target system are identified.

  1. Two-Photon Photoemission Study of the Coverage-Dependent Electronic Structure of Chemisorbed Alkali Atoms on a Ag(111) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lei-Ming; Sametoglu, Vahit; Winkelmann, Aimo; Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje

    2011-09-01

    We report a systematic investigation of the electronic structure of chemisorbed alkali atoms (Li-Cs) on a Ag(111) surface by two-photon photoemission spectroscopy. Angle-resolved two-photon photoemission spectra are obtained for 0-0.1 monolayer coverage of alkali atoms. The interfacial electronic structure as a function of periodic properties and the coverage of alkali atoms is observed and interpreted assuming ionic adsorbate/substrate interaction. The energy of the alkali atom σ-resonance at the limit of zero coverage is primarily determined by the image charge interaction, whereas at finite alkali atom coverages, it follows the formation of a dipolar surface field. The coverage- and angle-dependent two-photon photoemission spectra provide information on the photoinduced charge-transfer excitation of adsorbates on metal surfaces. This work complements the previous work on alkali/ Cu(111) chemisorption

  2. Energy transfer from PO excited states to alkali metal atoms in the phosphorus chemiluminescence flame

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ahsan U.

    1980-01-01

    Phosphorus chemiluminescence under ambient conditions of a phosphorus oxidation flame is found to offer an efficient electronic energy transferring system to alkali metal atoms. The lowest resonance lines, 2P3 / 2,½→2S½, of potassium and sodium are excited by energy transfer when an argon stream at 80°C carrying potassium or sodium atoms intersects a phosphorus vapor stream, either at the flame or in the postflame region. The lowest electronically excited metastable 4IIi state of PO or the (PO[unk]PO)* excimer is considered to be the probable energy donor. The (PO[unk]PO)* excimer results from the interaction of the 4IIi state of one PO molecule with the ground 2IIr state of another. Metastability of the donor state is strongly indicated by the observation of intense sensitized alkali atom fluorescence in the postflame region. PMID:16592925

  3. Resonant Laser Manipulation of an Atomic Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilly, T. C.; Ketsdever, A. D.; Gimelshein, S. F.

    2011-05-01

    Theories for laser-atom interactions have been under development since the advent of laser technology. The theories have yet to be adequately integrated into kinetic flow solvers. Realizing this integration would greatly enhance the scaling of laser-species interactions beyond the realm of ultra-cold atomic physics. A representative numerical investigation was conducted using a custom collisionless gas particle trajectory code, demonstrating this goal in the present study. The investigation covered neutral atomic beam steering and collimation using near-resonant laser fields. In addition to the numerical investigation, a validating experiment was conducted. The experimental results showed good agreement with the numerical simulations when experimental parameters, such as finite laser line width, were taken into account. These simulations showed trends and some limitations associated with the use of a continuous-wave Gaussian laser fields for the steering and collimation of a geometrically skimmed cesium atomic beam using the photon scattering force and the near-resonant induced dipole gradient force. These simulations indicate possible integration of the resonant laser-atom interaction with other rarefied and collisional solvers for similar species such as alkali metals.

  4. Optical response of alkali metal atoms confined in nanoporous glass

    SciTech Connect

    Burchianti, A; Marinelli, C; Mariotti, E; Bogi, A; Marmugi, L; Giomi, S; Maccari, M; Veronesi, S; Moi, L

    2014-03-28

    We study the influence of optical radiation on adsorption and desorption processes of alkali metal atoms confined in nanoporous glass matrices. Exposure of the sample to near-IR or visible light changes the atomic distribution inside the glass nanopores, forcing the entire system to evolve towards a different state. This effect, due to both atomic photodesorption and confinement, causes the growth and evaporation of metastable nanoparticles. It is shown that, by a proper choice of light characteristics and pore size, these processes can be controlled and tailored, thus opening new perspectives for fabrication of nanostructured surfaces. (nanoobjects)

  5. Scattering of positrons and electrons by alkali atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. S.; Kauppila, W. E.; Kwan, C. K.; Lukaszew, R. A.; Parikh, S. P.; Wan, Y. J.; Zhou, S.; Dababneh, M. S.

    1990-01-01

    Absolute total scattering cross sections (Q sub T's) were measured for positrons and electrons colliding with sodium, potassium, and rubidium in the 1 to 102 eV range, using the same apparatus and experimental approach (a beam transmission technique) for both projectiles. The present results for positron-sodium and -rubidium collisions represent the first Q sub T measurements reported for these collision systems. Features which distinguish the present comparisons between positron- and electron-alkali atom Q sub T's from those for other atoms and molecules (room-temperature gases) which have been used as targets for positrons and electrons are the proximity of the corresponding positron- and electron-alkali atom Q sub T's over the entire energy range of overlap, with an indication of a merging or near-merging of the corresponding positron and electron Q sub T's near (and above) the relatively low energy of about 40 eV, and a general tendency for the positron-alkali atom Q sub T's to be higher than the corresponding electron values as the projectile energy is decreased below about 40 eV.

  6. Time-resolved photoemission study of the electronic structure and dynamics of chemisorbed alkali atoms on Ru(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengmin; Wang, Cong; Cui, Xuefeng; Wang, Yanan; Argondizzo, Adam; Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the electronic structure and photoexcitation dynamics of alkali atoms (Rb and Cs) chemisorbed on transition-metal Ru(0001) single-crystal surface by angle- and time-resolved multiphoton photoemission. Three- and four-photon photoemission (3PP and 4PP) spectroscopic features due to the σ and π resonances arising from the n s and n p states of free alkali atoms are observed from ˜2 eV below the vacuum level in the zero-coverage limit. As the alkali coverage is increased to a maximum of 0.02 monolayers, the resonances are stabilized by formation of a surface dipole layer, but in contrast to alkali chemisorption on noble metals, both resonances form dispersive bands with nearly free-electron mass. Density functional theory calculations attribute the band formation to substrate-mediated interaction involving hybridization with the unoccupied d bands of the substrate. Time-resolved measurements quantify the phase and population relaxation times in the three-photon photoemission (3PP) process via the σ and π resonances. Differences between alkali-atom chemisorption on noble and transition metals are discussed.

  7. Electron densities and alkali atoms in exoplanet atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Lavvas, P.; Koskinen, T.; Yelle, R. V.

    2014-11-20

    We describe a detailed study on the properties of alkali atoms in extrasolar giant planets, and specifically focus on their role in generating the atmospheric free electron densities, as well as their impact on the transit depth observations. We focus our study on the case of HD 209458b, and we show that photoionization produces a large electron density in the middle atmosphere that is about two orders of magnitude larger than the density anticipated from thermal ionization. Our purely photochemical calculations, though, result in a much larger transit depth for K than observed for this planet. This result does not change even if the roles of molecular chemistry and excited state chemistry are considered for the alkali atoms. In contrast, the model results for the case of exoplanet XO-2b are in good agreement with the available observations. Given these results we discuss other possible scenarios, such as changes in the elemental abundances, changes in the temperature profiles, and the possible presence of clouds, which could potentially explain the observed HD 209458b alkali properties. We find that most of these scenarios cannot explain the observations, with the exception of a heterogeneous source (i.e., clouds or aerosols) under specific conditions, but we also note the discrepancies among the available observations.

  8. New studies of optical pumping, spin resonances, and spin exchange in mixtures of inert gases and alkali-metal vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu

    In this thesis, we present new studies of alkali-hyperfine resonances, new optical pumping of alkali-metal atoms, and the new measurements of binary spin-exchange cross-section between alkali-metal atoms and xenon atoms. We report a large light narrowing effect of the hyperfine end-resonance signals, which was predicted from our theory and observed in our experiments. By increasing the intensity of the circularly polarized pumping beam, alkali-metal atoms are optically pumped into a state of static polarization, and trapped into the hyperfine end-state. Spin exchange between alkali-metal atoms has minimal effect on the end-resonance of the highly spin-polarized atoms. This new result will possibly benefit the design of atomic clocks and magnetometer. We also studied the pressure dependence of the atomic-clock resonance linewidth and pointed out that the linewidth was overestimated by people in the community of atomic clock. Next, we present a series study of coherent population trapping (CPT), which is a promising technique with the same or better performance compared to the traditional microwave spectroscopy. For miniature atomic clocks, CPT method is thought to be particularly advantages. From our studies, we invented a new optical-pumping method, push-pull optical pumping, which can pump atoms into nearly pure 0-0 superposition state, the superposition state of the two ground-state hyperfine sublevels with azimuthal quantum number m = 0. We believe this new invention will bring a big advantage to CPT frequency standards, the quantum state preparation for cold atoms or hot vapor, etc. We also investigated the pressure dependence of CPT excitation and the line shape of the CPT resonance theoretically and experimentally. These two properties are important for CPT applications. A theoretical study of "photon cost" of optical pumping is also presented. Finally, we switch our attention to the problem of spin exchange between alkali-metal atoms and xenon gas. This

  9. Radio-frequency dressed lattices for ultracold alkali atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinuco-León, German A.; Garraway, Barry M.

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold atomic gases in periodic potentials are powerful platforms for exploring quantum physics in regimes dominated by many-body effects as well as for developing applications that benefit from quantum mechanical effects. Further advances face a range of challenges including the realization of potentials with lattice constants smaller than optical wavelengths as well as creating schemes for effective addressing and manipulation of single sites. In this paper we propose a dressed-based scheme for creating periodic potential landscapes for ultracold alkali atoms with the capability of overcoming such difficulties. The dressed approach has the advantage of operating in a low-frequency regime where decoherence and heating effects due to spontaneous emission do not take place. These results highlight the possibilities of atom-chip technology in the future development of quantum simulations and quantum technologies, and provide a realistic scheme for starting such an exploration.

  10. Research Investigation Directed Toward Extending the Useful Range of the Electromagnetic Spectrum. [atomic spectra and electronic structure of alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, S. R.; Happer, W.

    1974-01-01

    The report discusses completed and proposed research in atomic and molecular physics conducted at the Columbia Radiation Laboratory from July 1972 to June 1973. Central topics described include the atomic spectra and electronic structure of alkali metals and helium, molecular microwave spectroscopy, the resonance physics of photon echoes in some solid state systems (including Raman echoes, superradiance, and two photon absorption), and liquid helium superfluidity.

  11. Atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions for surface interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Outlaw, R. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base developed from analysis of the two-body potential data, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas surfaces and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  12. Reactive scattering of electronically excited alkali atoms with molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Mestdagh, J.M.; Balko, B.A.; Covinsky, M.H.; Weiss, P.S.; Vernon, M.F.; Schmidt, H.; Lee, Y.T.

    1987-06-01

    Representative families of excited alkali atom reactions have been studied using a crossed beam apparatus. For those alkali-molecule systems in which reactions are also known for ground state alkali and involve an early electron transfer step, no large differences are observed in the reactivity as Na is excited. More interesting are the reactions with hydrogen halides (HCl): it was found that adding electronic energy into Na changes the reaction mechanism. Early electron transfer is responsible of Na(5S, 4D) reactions, but not of Na(3P) reactions. Moreover, the NaCl product scattering is dominated by the HCl/sup -/ repulsion in Na(5S, 4D) reactions, and by the NaCl-H repulsion in the case of Na(3P). The reaction of Na with O/sub 2/ is of particular interest since it was found to be state specific. Only Na(4D) reacts, and the reaction requires restrictive constraints on the impact parameter and the reactants' relative orientation. The reaction with NO/sub 2/ is even more complex since Na(4D) leads to the formation of NaO by two different pathways. It must be mentioned however, that the identification of NaO as product in these reactions has yet to be confirmed.

  13. The reaction dynamics of alkali dimer molecules and electronically excited alkali atoms with simple molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Hongtao

    1995-12-01

    This dissertation presents the results from the crossed molecular beam studies on the dynamics of bimolecular collisions in the gas phase. The primary subjects include the interactions of alkali dimer molecules with simple molecules, and the inelastic scattering of electronically excited alkali atoms with O2. The reaction of the sodium dimers with oxygen molecules is described in Chapter 2. Two reaction pathways were observed for this four-center molecule-molecule reaction, i.e. the formations of NaO2 + Na and NaO + NaO. NaO2 products exhibit a very anisotropic angular distribution, indicating a direct spectator stripping mechanism for this reaction channel. The NaO formation follows the bond breaking of O2, which is likely a result of a charge transfer from Na2 to the excited state orbital of O2-. The scattering of sodium dimers from ammonium and methanol produced novel molecules, NaNH3 and Na(CH3OH), respectively. These experimental observations, as well as the discussions on the reaction dynamics and the chemical bonding within these molecules, will be presented in Chapter 3. The lower limits for the bond dissociation energies of these molecules are also obtained. Finally, Chapter 4 describes the energy transfer between oxygen molecules and electronically excited sodium atoms.

  14. Non-Adiabatic Atomic Transitions: Computational Cross Section Calculations of Alkali Metal-Noble Gas Collisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    collisions were computationally simulated. The alkali metals were potassium, rubidium, and cesium and the noble gas partners were helium, neon, and argon...195 20. Spin-Orbit split energies of Potassium, Rubidium, and Cesium ...composed of an alkali metal typically Rubidium[26, 37] or Cesium [5, 18]. The unique character of the alkali atoms, having a single valence electron in

  15. Buffer gas-assisted four-wave mixing resonances in alkali vapor excited by a single cw laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmavonyan, Svetlana; Khanbekyan, Aleksandr; Khanbekyan, Alen; Mariotti, Emilio; Papoyan, Aram V.

    2016-12-01

    We report the observation of a fluorescence peak appearing in dilute alkali (Rb, Cs) vapor in the presence of a buffer gas when the cw laser radiation frequency is tuned between the Doppler-broadened hyperfine transition groups of an atomic D2 line. Based on steep laser radiation intensity dependence above the threshold and spectral composition of the observed features corresponding to atomic resonance transitions, we have attributed these features to the buffer gas-assisted four-wave mixing process.

  16. Impurity detection in alkali-metal vapor cells via nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Ishikawa, K.

    2016-11-01

    We use nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of alkali metals sealed in glass vapor cells to perform in situ identification of chemical contaminants. The alkali Knight shift varies with the concentration of the impurity, which in turn varies with temperature as the alloy composition changes along the liquidus curve. Intentional addition of a known impurity validates this approach and reveals that sodium is often an intrinsic contaminant in cells filled with distilled, high-purity rubidium or cesium. Measurements of the Knight shift of the binary Rb-Na alloy confirm prior measurements of the shift's linear dependence on Na concentration, but similar measurements for the Cs-Na system demonstrate an unexpected nonlinear dependence of the Knight shift on the molar ratio. This non-destructive approach allows monitoring and quantification of ongoing chemical processes within the kind of vapor cells which form the basis for precise sensors and atomic frequency standards.

  17. Precision measurements of atomic lifetimes in alkali like systems. Progress report, September 15, 1995--January 15, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, C.E.

    1998-01-01

    Precision measurements of atomic lifetimes are important to the analysis of data from many areas of physics and provide fundamental atomic structure information. Scientists in the fields of astrophysics, geophysics, and plasma fusion all depend on oscillator strengths to determine the relative abundances of elements. Assessing the operation of discharge lamps and atomic resonance line filters also depends on knowing accurately atomic oscillator strengths. Often relative values of oscillator strengths are measured precisely, but accurate atomic lifetimes are needed to obtain absolute values. In addition, the interpretation of parity nonconservation (PNC) experiments requires accurate knowledge of the atomic structure including radial matrix elements. Many of these scientific needs are addressed theoretically with sophisticated many-electron atomic structure calculations. In this program they address these needs experimentally with a precision that surpasses current theoretical accuracy. The lifetime measurements also play the important roles of assessing the accuracy of many-electron atomic structure calculations and of guiding further theoretical development. Alkali like atoms, with a single electron outside of a closed shell, provide the simplest open shell systems for detailed comparisons between experiment and theory. To date, the research has focused on measurements of excited state lifetimes in neutral alkali systems along with the development of the necessary equipment and techniques for studying alkali-like ionic systems. The accomplishments of this program are summarized in Section 2 and are supported by the reprints and preprints that appear in the Appendix.

  18. Quantum Electrodynamics of Atomic Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, Miguel; Faupin, Jérémy; Fröhlich, Jürg; Schubnel, Baptiste

    2015-07-01

    A simple model of an atom interacting with the quantized electromagnetic field is studied. The atom has a finite mass m, finitely many excited states and an electric dipole moment, , where and is proportional to the elementary electric charge. The interaction of the atom with the radiation field is described with the help of the Ritz Hamiltonian, , where is the electric field, cut off at large frequencies. A mathematical study of the Lamb shift, the decay channels and the life times of the excited states of the atom is presented. It is rigorously proven that these quantities are analytic functions of the momentum of the atom and of the coupling constant , provided and and are sufficiently small. The proof relies on a somewhat novel inductive construction involving a sequence of `smooth Feshbach-Schur maps' applied to a complex dilatation of the original Hamiltonian, which yields an algorithm for the calculation of resonance energies that converges super-exponentially fast.

  19. Collisions of alkali-metal atoms Cs and Rb in the ground state. Spin exchange cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartoshkin, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    Collisions of alkali-metal atoms 133Cs and 85Rb in the ground state are considered in the energy interval of 10-4-10-2 au. Complex cross sections of the spin exchange, which allow one to calculate the processes of polarization transfer and the relaxation times, as well as the magnetic resonance frequency shifts caused by spin exchange Cs-Rb collisions, are obtained.

  20. Spectroscopic and Kinetic Measurements of Alkali Atom-Rare Gas Excimers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-04

    vapors – Exciplex molecules absorb over much greater bandwidth • Control of inherent high optical gain to minimize ASE and optimize laser oscillation...Exciplex assisted diode Pumped Alkali Laser (XPAL) • Education of a future generation of laser scientists VG09-227-2 Physical Sciences Inc. Novel Approach...This new laser exploits the optical properties of weakly-bound alkali/rare-gas exciplexes for pumping the 2P1/2, 3/2 alkali atomic excited states 4

  1. Diode-Pumped Alkali Atom Lasers 03-LW-024 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R H; Beach, R J

    2005-02-16

    The recent work at LLNL on alkali-atom lasers has been remarkably successful and productive. Three main phases (so far) can be identified. First, the concept and demonstration of red lasers using (Ti:sapphire pumping) took place; during this time, Rubidium and Cesium resonance-line lasers were tested, and theoretical models were developed and shown to describe experimental results very reliably. Work done during this first phase has been well documented, and the models from that period are still in use for their predictions and for designing power-scaled lasers. [1 - 3] Second, attempts were made to produce a blue alkali-vapor laser using sequentially-resonant two-step pumping (again, using Ti:sapphire lasers.) Although a blue laser did not result, the physical limitations of our approach are now better-defined. Third, diode-pumped operation of a red laser (Rubidium) was attempted, and we eventually succeeded in demonstrating the world's first diode-pumped gas laser. [4] Because we have a defensible concept for producing an efficient, compact, lightweight, power-scaled laser (tens of kW,) we are in a position to secure outside funding, and would like to find a sponsor. For descriptions of work done during the ''first phase,'' see References [1 - 3] ''Phase two'' work is briefly described in the section ''Blue laser,'' and ''phase three'' work is presented in the section entitled ''Diode-pumped red laser.''

  2. Antiferromagnetic resonance in alkali-metal clusters in sodalite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Takehito; Tsugeno, Hajime; Hanazawa, Atsufumi; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Nozue, Yasuo; Hagiwara, Masayuki

    2013-11-01

    We have performed electron spin resonance (ESR) studies of K43+ and (K3Rb)3+ nanoclusters incorporated in powder specimens of aluminosilicate sodalite at several microwave frequencies between 9 and 34 GHz. The K43+ and (K3Rb)3+ clusters are arrayed in a bcc structure and are known to show antiferromagnetic ordering below the Néel temperatures of TN ≃72 and ≃80 K, respectively, due to the exchange coupling between s electrons confined in the clusters. We have found sudden broadenings of ESR spectra in both samples below TN. The line shape of the spectra below TN is analyzed by powder pattern simulations of antiferromagnetic resonance (AFMR) spectra. The calculated line shapes well reproduce the experimental ones at all the frequencies by assuming a biaxial magnetic anisotropy. We have evaluated extremely small anisotropy fields of approximately 1 Oe indicating that these materials are ideal Heisenberg antiferromagnets. We have also found that the magnetic anisotropy changes from easy-plane type to uniaxial type by changing into a heavier alkali-metal cluster and that the g value shifts to a large value beyond two below TN for K43+ and (K3Rb)3+ nanoclusters. These novel features of K43+ and (K3Rb)3+ nanoclusters incorporated in sodalite are discussed.

  3. Interactions and low-energy collisions between an alkali ion and an alkali atom of a different nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, Arpita; Ghanmi, Chedli; Berriche, Hamid; Deb, Bimalendu

    2016-05-01

    We study theoretically interaction potentials and low-energy collisions between different alkali atoms and alkali ions. Specifically, we consider systems such as X + {{{Y}}}+, where X({{{Y}}}+) is either Li(Cs+) or Cs(Li+), Na(Cs+) or Cs(Na+) and Li(Rb+) or Rb(Li+). We calculate the molecular potentials of the ground and first two excited states of these three systems using a pseudopotential method and compare our results with those obtained by others. We derive ground-state scattering wave functions and analyze the cold collisional properties of these systems for a wide range of energies. We find that, in order to get convergent results for the total scattering cross sections for energies of the order 1 K, one needs to take into account at least 60 partial waves. The low-energy scattering properties calculated in this paper may serve as a precursor for experimental exploration of quantum collisions between an alkali atom and an alkali ion of a different nucleus.

  4. Analysis of the physical atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions and halogen ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Outlaw, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The physical forces between atoms and molecules are important in a number of processes of practical importance, including line broadening in radiative processes, gas and crystal properties, adhesion, and thin films. The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base for the dispersion forces is developed from the literature based on evaluations with the harmonic oscillator dispersion model for higher order coefficients. The Zener model of the repulsive core is used in the context of the recent asymptotic wave functions of Handler and Smith; and an effective ionization potential within the Handler and Smith wave functions is defined to analyze the two body potential data of Waldman and Gordon, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  5. Giant resonances of endohedral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Baltenkov, A. S.; Chernysheva, L. V.

    2008-04-01

    It is demonstrated for the first time that the effect of a fullerene shell on the photoionization of a “caged” atom in an endohedral can result in the formation of giant endohedral resonances or GER. This is illustrated by the concrete case of the Xe@C60 photoionization cross section that, at 17 eV, exhibits a powerful resonance with total oscillator strengths of about 25. The prominent modification of the 5 p 6 electron photoionization cross section of Xe@C60 takes place due to the strong fullerene shell polarization under the action of the incoming electromagnetic wave and the oscillation of this cross section due to the reflection of the photoelectron from Xe by the C60. These two factors transform the smoothly decreasing 5 p 6 cross section of Xe into a rather complex curve with a powerful maximum for Xe@C60, with the oscillator strength of it being equal to 25. We also present the results for the dipole angular anisotropy parameter that is strongly affected by the reflection of the photoelectron waves, but not modified by C60 polarization.

  6. Giant resonances of endohedral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Baltenkov, Arkadiy; Chernysheva, Larissa

    2008-05-01

    We demonstrate for that the effect of fullerene shell upon photoionization of the ``caged'' atom in an endohedral can result in formation of Giant Endohedral Resonances or GER. This is illustrated by the concrete case of Xe@C60 photoionization cross-section that exhibits at 17 eV a powerful resonance with total oscillator strengths of about 25. The prominent modification of the 5p^6 electron photoionization cross-section of Xe@C60 takes place due to strong fullerene shell polarization under the action of the incoming electromagnetic wave and oscillation of this cross-section due to the reflection of the photoelectron from Xe by the C60. These two factors transform the smoothly decreasing 5p^6 cross-section of Xe into a rather complex curve with a powerful maximum for Xe@C60, with the oscillator strength of it being equal to 25! We present also the results for the dipole angular anisotropy parameter that is strongly affected by the reflection of the photoelectron waves but not modified by C60 polarization.

  7. [Measurement of atomic number of alkali vapor and pressure of buffer gas based on atomic absorption].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui-jie; Quan, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Chen, Yao; Lu, Ji-xi

    2015-02-01

    High sensitivitymagnetic measurementscanbe achieved by utilizing atomic spinmanipulation in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) regime, which uses an alkali cell as a sensing element. The atomic number density of the alkali vapor and the pressure of the buffer gasare among the most important parameters of the cell andrequire accurate measurement. A method has been proposed and developedto measure the atomic number density and the pressure based on absorption spectroscopy, by sweeping the absorption line and fittingthe experiment data with a Lorentzian profile to obtainboth parameters. Due to Doppler broadening and pressure broadening, which is mainly dominated by the temperature of the cell and the pressure of buffer gas respectively, this work demonstrates a simulation of the errorbetween the peaks of the Lorentzian profile and the Voigt profile caused by bothfactors. The results indicates that the Doppler broadening contribution is insignificant with an error less than 0.015% at 313-513 K for a 4He density of 2 amg, and an error of 0.1% in the presence of 0.6-5 amg at 393 K. We conclude that the Doppler broadening could be ignored under above conditions, and that the Lorentzianprofile is suitably applied to fit the absorption spectrumobtainingboth parameters simultaneously. In addition we discuss the resolution and the instability due to thelight source, wavelength and the temperature of the cell. We find that the cell temperature, whose uncertainty is two orders of magnitude larger than the instability of the light source and the wavelength, is one of the main factors which contributes to the error.

  8. Communication: Angular momentum alignment and fluorescence polarization of alkali atoms photodetached from helium nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando, Alberto; Beswick, J. Alberto; Halberstadt, Nadine

    2013-12-01

    The theory of photofragments angular momentum polarization is applied to the photodetachment of an electronically excited alkali atom from a helium nanocluster (N = 200). The alignment of the electronic angular momentum of the bare excited alkali atoms produced is calculated quantum mechanically by solving the excited states coupled equations with potentials determined by density functional theory (DFT). Pronounced oscillations as a function of excitation energy are predicted for the case of Na@(He)200, in marked contrast with the absorption cross-section and angular distribution of the ejected atoms which are smooth functions of the energy. These oscillations are due to quantum interference between different coherently excited photodetachment pathways. Experimentally, these oscillations should be reflected in the fluorescence polarization and polarization-resolved photoelectron yield of the ejected atoms, which are proportional to the electronic angular momentum alignment. In addition, this result is much more general than the test case of NaHe200 studied here. It should be observable for larger droplets, for higher excited electronic states, and for other alkali as well as for alkali-earth atoms. Detection of these oscillations would show that the widely used pseudo-diatomic model can be valid beyond the prediction of absorption spectra and could help in interpreting parts of the dynamics, as already hinted by some experimental results on angular anisotropy of bare alkali fragments.

  9. Communication: Angular momentum alignment and fluorescence polarization of alkali atoms photodetached from helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Hernando, Alberto; Beswick, J. Alberto; Halberstadt, Nadine

    2013-12-14

    The theory of photofragments angular momentum polarization is applied to the photodetachment of an electronically excited alkali atom from a helium nanocluster (N = 200). The alignment of the electronic angular momentum of the bare excited alkali atoms produced is calculated quantum mechanically by solving the excited states coupled equations with potentials determined by density functional theory (DFT). Pronounced oscillations as a function of excitation energy are predicted for the case of Na@(He){sub 200}, in marked contrast with the absorption cross-section and angular distribution of the ejected atoms which are smooth functions of the energy. These oscillations are due to quantum interference between different coherently excited photodetachment pathways. Experimentally, these oscillations should be reflected in the fluorescence polarization and polarization-resolved photoelectron yield of the ejected atoms, which are proportional to the electronic angular momentum alignment. In addition, this result is much more general than the test case of NaHe{sub 200} studied here. It should be observable for larger droplets, for higher excited electronic states, and for other alkali as well as for alkali-earth atoms. Detection of these oscillations would show that the widely used pseudo-diatomic model can be valid beyond the prediction of absorption spectra and could help in interpreting parts of the dynamics, as already hinted by some experimental results on angular anisotropy of bare alkali fragments.

  10. First-principles study of ternary graphite compounds cointercalated with alkali atoms (Li, Na, and K) and alkylamines towards alkali ion battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ri, Gum-Chol; Yu, Chol-Jun; Kim, Jin-Song; Hong, Song-Nam; Jong, Un-Gi; Ri, Mun-Hyok

    2016-08-01

    First-principles calculations were carried out to investigate the structural, energetic, and electronic properties of ternary graphite compounds cointercalated with alkali atoms (AM = Li, Na, and K) and normal alkylamine molecules (nCx; x = 1, 2, 3, 4), denoted as AM-nCx-GICs. From the optimization of the orthorhombic unit cells for the crystalline compounds, it was found that, with the increase in the atomic number of alkali atoms, the layer separations decrease in contrast to AM-GICs, while the bond lengths between alkali atoms and graphene layer, and nitrogen atom of alkylamine increase. The calculated formation energies and interlayer binding energies of AM-nC3-GICs indicate that the compounds is increasingly stabilized from Li to K, and the energy barriers for migration of alkali atoms suggest that alkali cation with larger ionic radius diffuses more smoothly in graphite, being similar to AM-GICs. Through the analysis of electronic properties, it was established that more extent of electronic charge is transferred from more electropositive alkali atom to the carbon ring of graphene layer, and the hybridization of valence electron orbitals between alkylamine molecules and graphene layer is occurred.

  11. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-03-07

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom's stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and--by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen--the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave radiation to flip the spin of the positron in antihydrogen atoms that were magnetically trapped in the ALPHA apparatus. The spin flip causes trapped anti-atoms to be ejected from the trap. We look for evidence of resonant interaction by comparing the survival rate of trapped atoms irradiated with microwaves on-resonance to that of atoms subjected to microwaves that are off-resonance. In one variant of the experiment, we detect 23 atoms that survive in 110 trapping attempts with microwaves off-resonance (0.21 per attempt), and only two atoms that survive in 103 attempts with microwaves on-resonance (0.02 per attempt). We also describe the direct detection of the annihilation of antihydrogen atoms ejected by the microwaves.

  12. Low-temperature indium-bonded alkali vapor cell for chip-scale atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straessle, R.; Pellaton, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Pétremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Mileti, G.; de Rooij, N. F.

    2013-02-01

    A low-temperature sealing technique for micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells for chip-scale atomic clock applications is developed and evaluated. A thin-film indium bonding technique was used for sealing the cells at temperatures of ≤140 °C. These sealing temperatures are much lower than those reported for other approaches, and make the technique highly interesting for future micro-fabricated cells, using anti-relaxation wall coatings. Optical and microwave spectroscopy performed on first indium-bonded cells without wall coatings are used to evaluate the cleanliness of the process as well as a potential leak rate of the cells. Both measurements confirm a stable pressure inside the cell and therefore an excellent hermeticity of the indium bonding. The double-resonance measurements performed over several months show an upper limit for the leak rate of 1.5 × 10-13 mbar.l/s. This is in agreement with additional leak-rate measurements using a membrane deflection method on indium-bonded test structures.

  13. Visualization of alkali-denatured supercoiled plasmid DNA by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Jia; Zhang Zhenfeng; Cao Kou; Huang Xitai

    2008-09-26

    To study the alkali denaturation of supercoiled DNA, plasmid pBR322 was treated with gradient concentrations of NaOH solution. The results of gel electrophoresis showed that the alkali denaturation of the supercoiled DNA occurred in a narrow range of pH value (12.88-12.90). The alkali-denatured supercoiled DNA ran, as a sharp band, faster than the supercoiled DNA. The supercoiled plasmid DNA of pBR322, pACYC184 and pJGX15A were denatured by NaOH, and then visualized by atomic force microscopy. Compared with the supercoiled DNA, the atomic force microscopy images of the alkali-denatured supercoiled DNA showed rough surface with many kinks, bulges on double strands with inhomogeneous diameters. The apparent contour lengths of the denatured DNA were shortened by 16%, 16% and 50% for pBR322, pACYC184 and pJGX15A, respectively. All evidence suggested that the alkali-denatured supercoiled DNA had a stable conformation with unregistered, topologically constrained double strands and intrastrand secondary structure.

  14. Bose-Einstein condensation in atomic alkali gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Robert J.

    1998-05-01

    I present a review of the time-independent Gross-Pitaevskii (GP), Bogoliubov, and finite-temperature Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) mean-field theories used to study trapped, Bose-Einstein condensed alkali gases. Numerical solutions of the (zero-temperature) GP equation are presented for attractive (negative scattering length) and repulsive (positive scattering length) interactions. Comparison is made with the Thomas-Fermi and (variational) trial wavefunction appr oximations that are used in the literature to study condensed gases. Numerical calculations of the (zero-temperature) Bogoliubov quasi-particle excitation frequencies are found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The finite-temperature properties of condensed gases are examined using the Popov approximation (of the HFB theory) and a simple two-gas model. Specific, quantitative comparisons are made with experimental results for finite-temperature excitation frequencies. Qualitative comparisons are made between the results of the Popov approximation, two-gas model, and other published models for condensate fraction and thermal density distribution. The time-independent mean-field theories are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental results at relatively low temperatures (high condensate fractions). However, at higher temperatures (and condensate fractions of less than 50%) there are significant discrepancies between experimental data and theoretical calculations. This work was undertaken at the University of Maryland at College Park and was supported in part by the National Science Foundation (PHY-9601261) and the U.S. Office of Naval Research.

  15. Diffusion of Rb atoms in paraffin-coated resonant vapor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atutov, Sergey N.; Benimetskiy, Fedor A.; Plekhanov, Alexander I.; Sorokin, Vladimir A.; Yakovlev, Alexander V.

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the diffusion of Rb atoms in paraffin-coated resonant vapor cells. We have modeled the Rb diffusion both in the cell and in the coating, assuming that the main loss of Rb atoms is due to the physical absorption of the atoms by the glass substrate. It is demonstrated that the equilibrium of atomic density in the cell is a monotonic function of the thickness of the paraffin coating: the density increases with an increase in the thickness of the coating. The diffusion coefficient for rubidium in paraffin thin films has been determined to be equal to 5 × 10-7 cm2/s. The results of the experiment might provide for a better understanding of the processes involved in the interaction of alkali atoms with a paraffin coating and atomic diffusion in resonant vapor cells.

  16. Dual structure of saturated absorption resonance at an open atomic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, V. V.; Velichanskii, V. L.; Zibrov, S. A.; Sivak, A. V.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.

    2011-05-01

    Experiments on open transitions of the D 1 line of alkali metals (Cs and Rb isotopes) reveal the dual structure of saturated absorption resonance in the signal of a high-intensity optical wave in the presence of a low-intensity counterpropagating wave. Theoretical analysis shows that the observed shape of the resonance is associated with the openness of the atomic transition as well as with the Doppler effect for atoms in a gas. The results are of general physical significance for nonlinear spectroscopy and can also find application in metrology (frequency and time standards on open transitions).

  17. Dual structure of saturated absorption resonance at an open atomic transition

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil'ev, V. V. Velichanskii, V. L. Zibrov, S. A.; Sivak, A. V.; Brazhnikov, D. V. Taichenachev, A. V. Yudin, V. I.

    2011-05-15

    Experiments on open transitions of the D{sub 1} line of alkali metals (Cs and Rb isotopes) reveal the dual structure of saturated absorption resonance in the signal of a high-intensity optical wave in the presence of a low-intensity counterpropagating wave. Theoretical analysis shows that the observed shape of the resonance is associated with the openness of the atomic transition as well as with the Doppler effect for atoms in a gas. The results are of general physical significance for nonlinear spectroscopy and can also find application in metrology (frequency and time standards on open transitions).

  18. Reactions between cold methyl halide molecules and alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Jesse J.; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-07

    We investigate the potential energy surfaces and activation energies for reactions between methyl halide molecules CH{sub 3}X (X = F, Cl, Br, I) and alkali-metal atoms A (A = Li, Na, K, Rb) using high-level ab initio calculations. We examine the anisotropy of each intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) and the mechanism and energetics of the only available exothermic reaction pathway, CH{sub 3}X + A → CH{sub 3} + AX. The region of the transition state is explored using two-dimensional PES cuts and estimates of the activation energies are inferred. Nearly all combinations of methyl halide and alkali-metal atom have positive barrier heights, indicating that reactions at low temperatures will be slow.

  19. Photoabsorption by ground-state alkali-metal atoms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisheit, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Principal-series oscillator strengths and ground-state photoionization cross sections are computed for sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium. The degree of polarization of the photoelectrons is also predicted for each atom. The core-polarization correction to the dipole transition moment is included in all of the calculations, and the spin-orbit perturbation of valence-p-electron orbitals is included in the calculations of the Rb and Cs oscillator strengths and of all the photoionization cross sections. The results are compared with recent measurements.

  20. An embedded-atom-method model for alkali-metal vibrations.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R B; Riffe, D M

    2012-08-22

    We present an embedded-atom-method (EAM) model that accurately describes the vibrational dynamics in the alkali metals Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs. The bulk dispersion curves, frequency-moment Debye temperatures and temperature-dependent entropy Debye temperatures are all in excellent agreement with experimental results. The model is also well suited for studying surface vibrational dynamics in these materials, as illustrated by calculations for the Na(110) surface.

  1. Measurement method for the nuclear anapole moment of laser-trapped alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, E.; Aubin, S.; Sprouse, G. D.; Orozco, L. A.; DeMille, D. P.

    2007-03-15

    Weak interactions within a nucleus generate a nuclear spin dependent, parity-violating electromagnetic moment, the anapole moment. We analyze a method to measure the nuclear anapole moment through the electric dipole transition it induces between hyperfine states of the ground level. The method requires tight confinement of the atoms to position them at the antinode of a standing wave Fabry-Perot cavity driving the anapole-induced microwave E1 transition. We explore the necessary limits in the number of atoms, excitation fields, trap type, interrogation method, and systematic tests necessary for such measurements in francium, the heaviest alkali.

  2. Relativistic Quantum Mechanical Calculations on Alkali Atoms and Dimers from Cesium to Ununennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arinze, Chukwunonso; Ermler, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Ab initio calculations using relativistic effective core potentials, and intermediate angular momentum coupling of electrons are carried out on the alkali metal atoms, and dimers from cesium through ununennium. A spin-orbit configuration interaction (SOCI) method is employed that includes a spin-orbit coupling operator and a relativistic effective core potential in the Schrodinger Hamiltonian operator. The energy levels from these calculation are found to reproduce the positions of the experimental spectral lines and predict lines not heretofore observed for both of these atoms.

  3. Green's-function approach to nonresonance multiphoton absorption in the alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    An exact Green's function is constructed for the one-electron Schrödinger equation using a central potential obtained from a piecewise linear approximation to -rV(r) of Herman and Skillman. With the Green's function two- and three-photon ionization cross sections are calculated for He(1s)(2s) 1S, 3S, and the alkali metals, and compared to other calculations and experiments. Resonances in the cross sections occur at model eigenvalues rather than experimental energy levels. It is demonstrated that the resonances can be made to occur at experimental values either by simple shifts in the wavelength scale, by adjusting the ionization energy in the calculation, or by including the eigenvalue differences in a finite sum. However, as these are perturbation-theory calculations and not applicable at very high intensities or on resonance, only the wings of the resonance structure are included in the calculation.

  4. Stochastic resonance in bistable atomic switches.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kenji; Hirakawa, Kazuhiko

    2017-03-24

    We have investigated the conductance of bistable gold atomic switches as a function of periodic input voltages mixed with a random noise. With increasing noise amplitude, the atomic switches biased below the threshold voltage for conductance switching start exhibiting switching in conductance between two stable states. Clear synchronization between the input and output signals is observed when an optimized noise amplitude is mixed with the periodic input voltage, even when the atomic switches are driven by an input voltage as low as approximately 10% of the threshold voltage. The observed behavior can be explained in terms of the stochastic resonance. The results presented here indicate that utilization of noise can dramatically reduce the operation voltage of metal atomic switches.

  5. Stochastic resonance in bistable atomic switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kenji; Hirakawa, Kazuhiko

    2017-03-01

    We have investigated the conductance of bistable gold atomic switches as a function of periodic input voltages mixed with a random noise. With increasing noise amplitude, the atomic switches biased below the threshold voltage for conductance switching start exhibiting switching in conductance between two stable states. Clear synchronization between the input and output signals is observed when an optimized noise amplitude is mixed with the periodic input voltage, even when the atomic switches are driven by an input voltage as low as approximately 10% of the threshold voltage. The observed behavior can be explained in terms of the stochastic resonance. The results presented here indicate that utilization of noise can dramatically reduce the operation voltage of metal atomic switches.

  6. Electron- and Photon-stimulated Desorption of Alkali Atoms from Lunar Sample and a Model Mineral Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakshinskiy, B. V.; Madey, T. E.

    2003-01-01

    We report recent results on an investigation of source mechanisms for the origin of alkali atoms in the tenuous planetary atmospheres, with focus on non-thermal processes (photon stimulated desorption (PSD), electron stimulated desorption (ESD), and ion sputtering). Whereas alkaline earth oxides (MgO, CaO) are far more abundant in lunar samples than alkali oxides (Na2O, K2O), the atmosphere of the Moon contains easily measurable concentrations of Na and K, while Ca and Mg are undetected there; traces of Ca have recently been seen in the Moon's atmosphere (10-3 of Na). The experiments have included ESD, PSD and ion sputtering of alkali atoms from model mineral surface (amorphous SiO2) and from a lunar basalt sample obtained from NASA. The comparison is made between ESD and PSD efficiency of monovalent alkalis (Na, K) and divalent alkaline earths (Ba, Ca).The ultrahigh vacuum measurement scheme for ESD and PSD of Na atoms includes a highly sensitive alkali metal detector based on surface ionization, and a time-of-flight technique. For PSD measurements, a mercury arc light source (filtered and chopped) is used. We find that bombardment of the alkali covered surfaces by ultraviolet photons or by low energy electrons (E>4 eV) causes desorption of hot alkali atoms. This results are consistent with the model developed to explain our previous measurements of sodium desorption from a silica surface and from water ice: electron- or photon-induced charge transfer from the substrate to the ionic adsorbate causes formation of a neutral alkali atom in a repulsive configuration, from which desorption occurs. The two-electron charge transfer to cause desorption of divalent alkaline eath ions is a less likely process.The data support the suggestion that PSD by UV solar photons is a dominant source process for alkalis in the tenuous lunar atmosphere.

  7. s-wave elastic scattering of antihydrogen off atomic alkali-metal targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Prabal K.; Ghosh, A. S.

    2006-03-15

    We have investigated the s-wave elastic scattering of antihydrogen atoms off atomic alkali-metal targets (Li, Na, K, and Rb) at thermal energies (10{sup -16}-10{sup -4} a.u.) using an atomic orbital expansion technique. The elastic cross sections of these systems at thermal energies are found to be very high compared to H-H and H-He systems. The theoretical models employed in this study are so chosen to consider long-range forces dynamically in the calculation. The mechanism of cooling suggests that Li may be considered to be a good candidate as a buffer gas for enhanced cooling of antihydrogen atoms to ultracold temperature.

  8. Feshbach resonances of harmonically trapped atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Philipp-Immanuel; Vanne, Yulian V.; Saenz, Alejandro

    2011-03-15

    Employing a short-range two-channel description, we derive an analytic model of atoms in isotropic and anisotropic harmonic traps at a Feshbach resonance. On this basis we obtain a parametrization of the energy-dependent scattering length that differs from the one previously employed. We validate the model by comparison to full numerical calculations for {sup 6}Li-{sup 87}Rb and explain quantitatively the experimental observation of a resonance shift and trap-induced molecules in exited bands. Finally, we analyze the bound state admixture and Landau-Zener transition probabilities.

  9. Alkali-vapor magnetic resonance driven by fictitious radiofrequency fields

    SciTech Connect

    Zhivun, Elena; Wickenbrock, Arne; Patton, Brian; Budker, Dmitry

    2014-11-10

    We demonstrate an all-optical {sup 133}Cs scalar magnetometer, operating in nonzero magnetic field, in which the magnetic resonance is driven by an effective oscillating magnetic field provided by the AC Stark shift of an intensity-modulated laser beam. We achieve a projected shot-noise-limited sensitivity of 1.7fT/√(Hz) and measure a technical noise floor of 40fT/√(Hz). These results are essentially identical to a coil-driven scalar magnetometer using the same setup. This all-optical scheme offers advantages over traditional coil-driven magnetometers for use in arrays and in magnetically sensitive fundamental physics experiments, e.g., searches for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  10. On the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Studies in Mixed Alkali Borate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Padmaja, G.; Reddy, T. Goverdhan; Kistaiah, P.

    2011-10-20

    Mixed alkali effect in oxide based glasses is one of the current research activity and studies on the behavior of spectroscopic parameters in these systems are quite important to understand the basic nature of this phenomenon. EPR studies of mixed alkali glasses Li{sub 2}O-K{sub 2}O-ZnO-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped with Fe{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} were carried out at room temperature. The EPR spectra show typical resonances of d{sup 5} system (Fe{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+}) in all the measured glass specimens. Evaluated hyperfine constant, number of paramagnetic centers and paramagnetic susceptibility values show deviation from the linearity with the progressive substitution of the Li ion with K in glass network.

  11. (abstract) Fundamental Mechanisms of Electrode Kinetics and Alkali Metal Atom Transport at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kisor, A.; Kikkert, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of electrode kinetics and mass transport of alkali metal oxidation and alkali metal cation reduction at the solid electrolyte/porous electrode boundary as well as alkali metal transport through porous metal electrodes has important applications in optimizing device performance in alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) cells which are high temperature, high current density electrochemical cells. Basic studies of these processes also affords the opportunity to investigate a very basic electrochemical reaction over a wide range of conditions; and a variety of mass transport modes at high temperatures via electrochemical techniques. The temperature range of these investigations covers 700K to 1240K; the alkali metal vapor pressures range from about 10(sup -2) to 10(sup 2) Pa; and electrodes studied have included Mo, W, Mo/Na(sub 2)MoO(sub 4), W/Na(sub 2)WO(sub 4), WPt(sub x), and WRh(sub x) (1.0 < x < 6.0 ) with Na at Na-beta'-alumina, and Mo with K at K-beta'-alumina. Both liquid metal/solid electrolyte/alkali metal vapor and alkali metal vapor/solid electrolyte/vapor cells have been used to characterize the reaction and transport processes. We have previously reported evidence of ionic, free molecular flow, and surface transport of sodium in several types of AMTEC electrodes.

  12. Measurements of atomic beam velocities with phase choppers and precision measurements of alkali atomic polarizabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hromada, Ivan, Jr.

    Atom interferometers, in which de Broglie waves are coherently split and recombined to make interference fringes, now serve as precision measurement tools for several quantities in physics. Examples include measurements of Newton's constant, the fine structure constant, van der Waals potentials, and atomic polarizabilities. To make next-generation measurements of static electric dipole atomic polarizabilities with an atom beam interferometer, I worked on new methods to precisely measure the velocity distribution for atom beams. I will explain how I developed and used phase choppers to measure lithium, sodium, potassium, and cesium atomic beam velocities with 0.07% accuracy. I also present new measurements of polarizability for these atoms. I classify systematic errors into two broad categories: (1) fractional errors that are similar for all different types of atoms in our experiments, and (2), errors that scale with de Broglie wavelength or inverse atomic momentum in our experiments. This distinction is important for estimating the uncertainty in our measurements of ratios of atomic polarizabilities, e.g., alpha Cs/alphaNa = 2.488(12).

  13. Aging studies on micro-fabricated alkali buffer-gas cells for miniature atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Mileti, G.

    2015-04-01

    We report an aging study on micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells using neon as a buffer gas. An experimental atomic clock setup is used to measure the cell's intrinsic frequency, by recording the clock frequency shift at different light intensities and extrapolating to zero intensity. We find a drift of the cell's intrinsic frequency of (-5.2 ± 0.6) × 10-11/day and quantify deterministic variations in sources of clock frequency shifts due to the major physical effects to identify the most probable cause of the drift. The measured drift is one order of magnitude stronger than the total frequency variations expected from clock parameter variations and corresponds to a slow reduction of buffer gas pressure inside the cell, which is compatible with the hypothesis of loss of Ne gas from the cell due to its permeation through the cell windows. A negative drift on the intrinsic cell frequency is reproducible for another cell of the same type. Based on the Ne permeation model and the measured cell frequency drift, we determine the permeation constant of Ne through borosilicate glass as (5.7 ± 0.7) × 10-22 m2 s-1 Pa-1 at 81 °C. We propose this method based on frequency metrology in an alkali vapor cell atomic clock setup based on coherent population trapping for measuring permeation constants of inert gases.

  14. Higher-order C{sub n} dispersion coefficients for the alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2005-04-01

    The van der Waals coefficients, from C{sub 11} through to C{sub 16} resulting from second-, third-, and fourth-order perturbation theory are estimated for the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, and Rb) atoms. The dispersion coefficients are also computed for all possible combinations of the alkali-metal atoms and hydrogen. The parameters are determined from sum rules after diagonalizing a semiempirical fixed core Hamiltonian in a large basis. Comparisons of the radial dependence of the C{sub n}/r{sup n} potentials give guidance as to the radial regions in which the various higher-order terms can be neglected. It is seen that including terms up to C{sub 10}/r{sup 10} results in a dispersion interaction that is accurate to better than 1% whenever the inter-nuclear spacing is larger than 20a{sub 0}. This level of accuracy is mainly achieved due to the fortuitous cancellation between the repulsive (C{sub 11},C{sub 13},C{sub 15}) and attractive (C{sub 12},C{sub 14},C{sub 16}) dispersion forces.

  15. Pump Diode Characterization for an Unstable Diode-Pumped Alkali Laser Resonator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    state, 5 2P3/2. Collisional relaxation with buffer gases cause the alkali atoms to transition to the 52P1/2 excited state. Stimulated emission occurs when...beam to exit the cavity. The 795 nm beam then exits the cavity through the output coupler H. line. The beam propagates to the gain cell heater block...the cavity. The lasing beam then exits the cavity through a dichroic output coupler with 25% transmission and a radius of curvature of 60 cm. The

  16. Near-Resonant Imaging of Trapped Cold Atomic Samples

    PubMed Central

    You, L.; Lewenstein, Maciej

    1996-01-01

    We study the formation of diffraction patterns in the near-resonant imaging of trapped cold atomic samples. We show that the spatial imaging can provide detailed information on the trapped atomic clouds. PMID:27805110

  17. Model for fast, nonadiabatic collisions between alkali atoms and diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, A. P.

    1980-11-01

    Equations for collisions involving two potential surfaces are presented in the impact parameter approximation. In this approximation, a rectilinear classical trajectory is assumed for the translational motion, leading to a time-dependent Schroedinger's equation for the remaining degrees of freedom. Model potentials are considered for collisions of alkali atoms with diatomic molecules that lead to a particularly simple form of the final equations. Using the Magnus approximation, these equations are solved for parameters chosen to model the process Cs+O2→Cs++O2-, and total cross sections for ion-pair formation are obtained as a function of energy. The results exhibit oscillations that correspond qualitatively to those seen in recent measurements. In addition, the model predicts that the oscillations will become less pronounced as the initial vibrational level of O2 is increased.

  18. Quantum Degenerate Mixtures of Alkali and Alkaline-Earth-Like Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Hideaki; Takasu, Yosuke; Yamaoka, Yoshifumi; Doyle, John M.; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2011-05-20

    We realize simultaneous quantum degeneracy in mixtures consisting of the alkali and alkaline-earth-like atoms Li and Yb. This is accomplished within an optical trap by sympathetic cooling of the fermionic isotope {sup 6}Li with evaporatively cooled bosonic {sup 174}Yb and, separately, fermionic {sup 173}Yb. Using cross-thermalization studies, we also measure the elastic s-wave scattering lengths of both Li-Yb combinations, |a{sub {sup 6}Li-{sup 174}Yb}|=1.0{+-}0.2 nm and |a{sub {sup 6}Li-{sup 173}Yb}|=0.9{+-}0.2 nm. The equality of these lengths is found to be consistent with mass-scaling analysis. The quantum degenerate mixtures of Li and Yb, as realized here, can be the basis for creation of ultracold molecules with electron spin degrees of freedom, studies of novel Efimov trimers, and impurity probes of superfluid systems.

  19. Aging studies on micro-fabricated alkali buffer-gas cells for miniature atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Mileti, G.

    2015-04-20

    We report an aging study on micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells using neon as a buffer gas. An experimental atomic clock setup is used to measure the cell's intrinsic frequency, by recording the clock frequency shift at different light intensities and extrapolating to zero intensity. We find a drift of the cell's intrinsic frequency of (−5.2 ± 0.6) × 10{sup −11}/day and quantify deterministic variations in sources of clock frequency shifts due to the major physical effects to identify the most probable cause of the drift. The measured drift is one order of magnitude stronger than the total frequency variations expected from clock parameter variations and corresponds to a slow reduction of buffer gas pressure inside the cell, which is compatible with the hypothesis of loss of Ne gas from the cell due to its permeation through the cell windows. A negative drift on the intrinsic cell frequency is reproducible for another cell of the same type. Based on the Ne permeation model and the measured cell frequency drift, we determine the permeation constant of Ne through borosilicate glass as (5.7 ± 0.7) × 10{sup −22} m{sup 2} s{sup −1 }Pa{sup −1} at 81 °C. We propose this method based on frequency metrology in an alkali vapor cell atomic clock setup based on coherent population trapping for measuring permeation constants of inert gases.

  20. Atomic many-body effects and Lamb shifts in alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginges, J. S. M.; Berengut, J. C.

    2016-05-01

    We present a detailed study of the radiative potential method [V. V. Flambaum and J. S. M. Ginges, Phys. Rev. A 72, 052115 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevA.72.052115], which enables the accurate inclusion of quantum electrodynamics (QED) radiative corrections in a simple manner in atoms and ions over the range 10 ≤Z ≤120 , where Z is the nuclear charge. Calculations are performed for binding energy shifts to the lowest valence s , p , and d waves over the series of alkali-metal atoms Na to E119. The high accuracy of the radiative potential method is demonstrated by comparison with rigorous QED calculations in frozen atomic potentials, with deviations on the level of 1%. The many-body effects of core relaxation and second- and higher-order perturbation theory on the interaction of the valence electron with the core are calculated. The inclusion of many-body effects tends to increase the size of the shifts, with the enhancement particularly significant for d waves; for K to E119, the self-energy shifts for d waves are only an order of magnitude smaller than the s -wave shifts. It is shown that taking into account many-body effects is essential for an accurate description of the Lamb shift.

  1. Positronium-dipole induced resonances in e +-H and e +-alkali systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umair, M.; Jonsell, S.

    2017-02-01

    We derive general universal scaling relations governing resonances induced by the dipole moment of excited positronium interacting with atomic ions. A single non-universal parameter, which contains all the system-dependent information, is defined. Our results are compared to numerical calculations, using complex scaling, for S, P, and D-wave resonances below the positronium n = 2 threshold in the {{e}}+-(H, Li, Na, K) systems. The energy and width ratios of the successive resonances are found to agree well with the analytically derived scaling law.

  2. Intrinsic differences in atomic ordering of calcium (alumino)silicate hydrates in conventional and alkali-activated cements

    SciTech Connect

    White, Claire E.; Daemen, Luke L.; Hartl, Monika; Page, Katharine

    2015-01-15

    The atomic structures of calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) and calcium (–sodium) aluminosilicate hydrate (C–(N)–A–S–H) gels, and their presence in conventional and blended cement systems, have been the topic of significant debate over recent decades. Previous investigations have revealed that synthetic C–S–H gel is nanocrystalline and due to the chemical similarities between ordinary Portland cement (OPC)-based systems and low-CO{sub 2} alkali-activated slags, researchers have inferred that the atomic ordering in alkali-activated slag is the same as in OPC–slag cements. Here, X-ray total scattering is used to determine the local bonding environment and nanostructure of C(–A)–S–H gels present in hydrated tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S), blended C{sub 3}S–slag and alkali-activated slag, revealing the large intrinsic differences in the extent of nanoscale ordering between C–S–H derived from C{sub 3}S and alkali-activated slag systems, which may have a significant influence on thermodynamic stability, and material properties at higher length scales, including long term durability of alkali-activated cements.

  3. Collimated, single-pass atom source from a pulsed alkali metal dispenser for laser-cooling experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Kevin L.; Purdy, Thomas P.; Murch, Kater W.; Leslie, Sabrina; Gupta, Subhadeep; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M.

    2005-02-01

    We have developed an improved scheme for loading atoms into a magneto-optical trap (MOT) from a directed rubidium alkali metal dispenser in <10{sup -10} Torr ultrahigh vacuum conditions. A current-driven dispenser was surrounded with a cold absorbing 'shroud' held at {<=}0 deg. C, pumping rubidium atoms not directed into the MOT. This nearly eliminates background atoms and reduces the detrimental rise in pressure normally associated with these devices. The system can be well-described as a current-controlled, rapidly switched, two-temperature thermal beam, and was used to load a MOT with 3x10{sup 8} atoms.

  4. Atom loss resonances in a Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Langmack, Christian; Smith, D Hudson; Braaten, Eric

    2013-07-12

    Atom loss resonances in ultracold trapped atoms have been observed at scattering lengths near atom-dimer resonances, at which Efimov trimers cross the atom-dimer threshold, and near two-dimer resonances, at which universal tetramers cross the dimer-dimer threshold. We propose a new mechanism for these loss resonances in a Bose-Einstein condensate of atoms. As the scattering length is ramped to the large final value at which the atom loss rate is measured, the time-dependent scattering length generates a small condensate of shallow dimers coherently from the atom condensate. The coexisting atom and dimer condensates can be described by a low-energy effective field theory with universal coefficients that are determined by matching exact results from few-body physics. The classical field equations for the atom and dimer condensates predict narrow enhancements in the atom loss rate near atom-dimer resonances and near two-dimer resonances due to inelastic dimer collisions.

  5. Light effects in the atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances in wall-coated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Breschi, E.; Schori, C.; Di Domenico, G.; Mileti, G.; Kazakov, G.; Litvinov, A.; Matisov, B.

    2010-12-15

    We report on light shift and broadening in the atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances prepared in alkali-metal vapors contained in wall-coated cells without buffer gas. The atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing is due to the free motion of the polarized atomic spins in and out of the optical interaction region before spin relaxation. As a consequence of this effect, we observe a narrowing of the dark resonance linewidth as well as a reduction of the ground states' light shift when the volume of the interaction region decreases at constant optical intensity. The results can be intuitively interpreted as a dilution of the intensity effect similar to a pulsed interrogation due to the atomic motion. Finally the influence of this effect on the performance of compact atomic clocks is discussed.

  6. Finite-field evaluation of the Lennard-Jones atom-wall interaction constant C{sub 3} for alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.R.; Dzuba, V.A.; Safronova, U.I.; Safronova, M.S.

    2004-02-01

    A finite-field scaling method is applied to evaluate the Lennard-Jones interaction constant C{sub 3} for alkali-metal atoms. The calculations are based on the relativistic single-double approximation in which single and double excitations of Dirac-Hartree-Fock wave functions are included to all orders in perturbation theory.

  7. Controlling interactions between highly magnetic atoms with Feshbach resonances.

    PubMed

    Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-09-01

    This paper reviews current experimental and theoretical progress in the study of dipolar quantum gases of ground and meta-stable atoms with a large magnetic moment. We emphasize the anisotropic nature of Feshbach resonances due to coupling to fast-rotating resonant molecular states in ultracold s-wave collisions between magnetic atoms in external magnetic fields. The dramatic differences in the distribution of resonances of magnetic (7)S3 chromium and magnetic lanthanide atoms with a submerged 4f shell and non-zero electron angular momentum is analyzed. We focus on dysprosium and erbium as important experimental advances have been recently made to cool and create quantum-degenerate gases for these atoms. Finally, we describe progress in locating resonances in collisions of meta-stable magnetic atoms in electronic P-states with ground-state atoms, where an interplay between collisional anisotropies and spin-orbit coupling exists.

  8. Shifts in the ESR Spectra of Alkali-Metal Atoms (Li, Na, K, Rb) on Helium Nanodroplets

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Andreas W; Gruber, Thomas; Filatov, Michael; Ernst, Wolfgang E

    2013-01-01

    He-droplet-induced changes of the hyperfine structure constants of alkali-metal atoms are investigated by a combination of relativistically corrected ab initio methods with a simulation of the helium density distribution based on He density functional theory. Starting from an accurate description of the variation of the hyperfine structure constant in the M–He diatomic systems (M=Li, Na, K, Rb) as a function of the interatomic distance we simulate the shifts induced by droplets of up to 10 000 4He atoms. All theoretical predictions for the relative shifts in the isotropic hyperfine coupling constants of the alkali-metal atoms attached to helium droplets of different size are then tied to a single, experimentally derived parameter of Rb. PMID:23125112

  9. Study on water-dispersible colloids in saline-alkali soils by atomic force microscopy and spectrometric methods.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiguo; Xu, Fengjie; Zu, Yuangang; Meng, Ronghua; Wang, Wenjie

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have revealed that water-dispersible colloids play an important role in the transport of nutrients and contaminants in soils. In this study, water-dispersible colloids extracted from saline-alkali soils have been characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV absorption spectra. AFM observation indicated that the water-dispersible colloids contain some large plates and many small spherical particles. XRD, XPS, and UV absorption measurement revealed that the water-dispersible colloids are composed of kaolinite, illite, calcite, quartz and humic acid. In addition, UV absorption measurement demonstrated that the humic acids are associated with clay minerals. Water-dispersible colloids in the saline-alkali soils after hydrolyzed polymaleic anhydride treatment and an agricultural soil (nonsaline-alkali soil) were also investigated for comparison. The obtained results implied that the saline-alkali condition facilitates the formation of a large quantity of colloids. The use of AFM combined with spectrometric methods in the present study provides new knowledge on the colloid characteristics of saline-alkali soils. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:525-531, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Structure of the alkali-metal-atom + strontium molecular ions: Towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Aymar, M.; Dulieu, O.; Guerout, R.

    2011-08-14

    The potential energy curves, permanent and transition dipole moments, and the static dipolar polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a strontium ion are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The molecular ions are treated as effective two-electron systems and are treated using effective core potentials including core polarization, large gaussian basis sets, and full configuration interaction. In the perspective of upcoming experiments aiming at merging cold atom and cold ion traps, possible paths for radiative charge exchange, photoassociation of a cold lithium or rubidium atom and a strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions.

  11. Isotropically sensitive optical filter employing atomic resonance transitions

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.

    1981-01-01

    An ultra-high Q isotropically sensitive optical filter or optical detector employing atomic resonance transitions. More specifically, atomic resonance transitions utilized in conjunction with two optical bandpass filters provide an optical detector having a wide field of view (.about.2.pi. steradians) and very narrow acceptance bandwidth approaching 0.01 A. A light signal to be detected is transmitted through an outer bandpass filter into a resonantly absorbing atomic vapor, the excited atomic vapor then providing a fluorescence signal at a different wavelength which is transmitted through an inner bandpass filter. The outer and inner bandpass filters have no common transmission band, thereby resulting in complete blockage of all optical signals that are not resonantly shifted in wavelength by the intervening atomic vapor. Two embodiments are disclosed, one in which the light signal raises atoms contained in the atomic vapor from the ground state to an excited state from which fluorescence occurs, and the other in which a pump laser is used to raise the atoms in the ground state to a first excited state from which the light signal then is resonantly absorbed, thereby raising the atoms to a second excited state from which fluorescence occurs. A specific application is described in which an optical detector according to the present invention can be used as an underwater detector for light from an optical transmitter which could be located in an orbiting satellite.

  12. Isotropically sensitive optical filter employing atomic resonance transitions

    DOEpatents

    Marling, J.B.

    An ultra-high Q isotropically sensitive optical filter or optical detector is disclosed employing atomic resonance transitions. More specifically, atomic resonance transitions utilized in conjunction with two optical bandpass filters provide an optical detector having a wide field of view (approx. 2 ..pi.. steradians) and very narrow acceptance bandwidth approaching 0.01A. A light signal to be detected is transmitted through an outer bandpass filter into a resonantly absorbing atomic vapor, the excited atomic vapor than providing a fluorescence signal at a different wavelength which is transmitted through an inner bandpass filters have no common transmission band, therby resulting in complete blockage of all optical signals that are not resonantly shifted in wavelength by the intervening atomic vapor. Two embodiments are disclosed, one in which the light signal raises atoms contained in the atomic vapor from the ground state to an excited state from which fluorescence occurs, and the other in which a pump laser is used to raise the atoms in the ground state to a first excited state from which the light signal then is resonantly absorbed, thereby raising the atoms to a second excited state from which fluorescence occurs. A specific application is described in which an optical detector according to the present invention can be located in an orbiting satellite.

  13. Shifts and widths of Feshbach resonances in atomic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeidian, Shahpoor; Melezhik, Vladimir S.; Schmelcher, Peter

    2012-12-01

    We develop and analyze a theoretical model which yields the shifts and widths of Feshbach resonances in an atomic waveguide. It is based on a multichannel approach for confinement-induced resonances (CIRs) and atomic transitions in the waveguides in the multimode regime. In this scheme we replace the single-channel scalar interatomic interaction by the four-channel tensorial potential modeling resonances of broad, narrow, and overlapping character according to the two-channel parametrization of Lange [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.79.013622 79, 013622 (2009)]. As an input the experimentally known parameters of Feshbach resonances in the absence of the waveguide are used. We calculate the shifts and widths of s-, d-, and g-wave magnetic Feshbach resonances of Cs atoms emerging in harmonic waveguides as CIRs and resonant enhancement of the transmission at zeros of the free space scattering length. We have found the linear dependence of the width of the resonance on the longitudinal atomic momentum and quadratic dependence on the waveguide width. Our model opens possibilities for quantitative studies of the scattering processes in ultracold atomic gases in waveguides beyond the framework of s-wave resonant scattering.

  14. Nonlinear pressure shifts of alkali-metal atoms in inert gases.

    PubMed

    Gong, F; Jau, Y-Y; Happer, W

    2008-06-13

    Precise measurements show that the microwave resonance frequencies of ground-state Rb or Cs atoms have a nonlinear dependence on the pressure of the buffer gases Ar and Kr. No nonlinearities were observed in the gases He or N(2). These observations strongly suggest that the nonlinearities are due to the van der Waals molecules that form in Ar and Kr, but not in He or N(2). The nonlinear part of the shifts is largest in the pressure range of a few tens of torr, similar to the operating pressures of gas-cell atomic clocks. The observed shifts are very well described by a simple function, parametrized by the effective three-body formation rate of molecules and by the effective product of the collisionally limited lifetime times the shift of the hyperfine coupling coefficient in the molecule.

  15. Optimized coplanar waveguide resonators for a superconductor-atom interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, M. A.; Isaacs, J. A.; Booth, D.; Pritchard, J. D.; Saffman, M.; McDermott, R.

    2016-08-01

    We describe the design and characterization of superconducting coplanar waveguide cavities tailored to facilitate strong coupling between superconducting quantum circuits and single trapped Rydberg atoms. For initial superconductor-atom experiments at 4.2 K, we show that resonator quality factors above 104 can be readily achieved. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the incorporation of thick-film copper electrodes at a voltage antinode of the resonator provides a route to enhance the zero-point electric fields of the resonator in a trapping region that is 40 μm above the chip surface, thereby minimizing chip heating from scattered trap light. The combination of high resonator quality factor and strong electric dipole coupling between the resonator and the atom should make it possible to achieve the strong coupling limit of cavity quantum electrodynamics with this system.

  16. Supercooling of Atoms in an Optical Resonator.

    PubMed

    Xu, Minghui; Jäger, Simon B; Schütz, S; Cooper, J; Morigi, Giovanna; Holland, M J

    2016-04-15

    We investigate laser cooling of an ensemble of atoms in an optical cavity. We demonstrate that when atomic dipoles are synchronized in the regime of steady-state superradiance, the motion of the atoms may be subject to a giant frictional force leading to potentially very low temperatures. The ultimate temperature limits are determined by a modified atomic linewidth, which can be orders of magnitude smaller than the cavity linewidth. The cooling rate is enhanced by the superradiant emission into the cavity mode allowing reasonable cooling rates even for dipolar transitions with ultranarrow linewidth.

  17. Magneto-association near an atom-dimer resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, D.; Nguyen, J. H. V.; Hulet, R. G.

    2015-05-01

    Over the past decade the universal scaling of Efimov trimers has been explored in various atomic species by measuring the three-body loss coefficient. An enhancement of the three-body loss at the atom-dimer resonance has been observed, but remains unexplained. It has been attributed to an ``avanlanche mechanism'' based on resonant atom-dimer scattering, yet the effectiveness of the hypothesis is under scrutiny. We present a new piece to the puzzle. In our work, Feshbach dimers and Efimov trimers are formed near the atom-dimer resonance by RF-association, from a Bose-Einstein condensate of 7Li atoms. The molecular binding energies are tunable by the broad Feshbach resonance of the atoms in the | 1 , 1 > state. We observe that the dimer formation rate is significantly enhanced at the atom-dimer resonance. The origin of this enhanement is unclear, but it may be closely related to the enhancement of the three-body loss rate. Work supported by the NSF, ARO, and the Welch Foundation.

  18. Detection of single atoms by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, G.S.

    1986-01-01

    Rutherford's idea for counting individual atoms can, in principle, be implemented for nearly any type of atom, whether stable or radioactive, by using methods of resonance ionization. With the RIS technique, a laser is tuned to a wavelength which will promote a valence electron in a Z-selected atom to an excited level. Additional resonance or nonresonance photoabsorption steps are used to achieve nearly 100% ionization efficiencies. Hence, the RIS process can be saturated for the Z-selected atoms; and since detectors are available for counting either single electrons or positive ions, one-atom detection is possible. Some examples are given of one-atom detection, including that of the noble gases, in order to show complementarity with AMS methods. For instance, the detection of /sup 81/Kr using RIS has interesting applications for solar neutrino research, ice-cap dating, and groundwater dating. 39 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Precursor Luminescence near the Collapse of Laser-Induced Bubbles in Alkali-Salt Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Han-Ching; Vo, Sonny; Williams, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    A precursor luminescence pulse consisting of atomic line emission is observed as much as 150 nanoseconds prior to the collapse point of laser-created bubbles in alkali-metal solutions. The timing of the emission from neutral Na, Li, and K atoms is strongly dependent on the salt concentration, which appears to result from resonant radiation trapping by the alkali atoms in the bubble. The alkali emission ends at the onset of the blackbody luminescence pulse at the bubble collapse point, and the duration of the blackbody pulse is found to be reduced by up to 30% as the alkali-salt concentration is increased. PMID:19519032

  20. Magneto-association of atoms near an atom-dimer resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Jason H. V.; Luo, De; Hulet, Randall G.

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold atomic gases provide an environment to study few body physics in a regime where universal properties, such as the scaling laws of Efimov trimers, can be explored. In our work, Efimov trimers and Feshbach dimers are created in a condensate of 7Li atoms by RF-field modulation. The molecular binding energies are tunable using the broad Feshbach resonance for atoms in the | 1 , 1 > state. We find that the rate of dimer formation is sharply peaked at the atom-dimer resonance, where the trimer merges with the dimer plus free-atom continuum. The origins of this enhancement are unclear, but may be related to our previous observation of enhanced three-body loss at the atom-dimer resonance. Work supported by NSF, ARO, and the Welch Foundation.

  1. Transition rates for lithium-like ions, sodium-like ions, and neutral alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.R.; Liu, Z.W.; Sapirstein, J.

    1996-11-01

    Third-order many-body perturbation theory is used to obtain E1 transition amplitudes for ions of the lithium and sodium isoelectronic sequences and for the neutral alkali-metal atoms potassium, rubidium, cesium, and francium. Complete angular reductions of the first, second, and third-order amplitudes are given. Tables of transition energies and rates are given for the 2p{sub {1/2}} {yields} 2s{sub {1/2}}, 2p{sub 3/2} {yields} 2s{sub {1/2}}, 3s{sub {1/2}} {yields} 2p{sub {1/2}}, and 3s{sub {1/2}} {yields} 2p{sub 3/2} transitions in the lithium isoelectronic sequence and for the corresponding 3p{sub 1/2} {yields} 3s{sub 1/2}, 3p{sub 3/2} {yields} 3s{sub {1/2}}, 4s{sub {1/2}} {yields} 3p{sub 1/2}, and 4s{sub {1/2}} {yields} 3p{sub 3/2} transitions in the sodium sequence. For neutral alkali atoms, amplitudes of np{sub {1/2}} {yields} ns{sub {1/2}}, np{sub 3/2} {yields} ns{sub {1/2}}, (n + 1)s{sub {1/2}} {yields} np{sub {1/2}}, and (n + 1)s{sub {1/2}} {yields} np{sub 3/2} transitions are evaluated, where n is the principal quantum number of the valence electron in the atomic ground state, Semi-empirical corrections for the omitted fourth- and higher-order terms in perturbation theory are given for the neutral alkali-metal atoms. Comparisons with previous high-precision calculations and with experiment are made. 42 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.

  2. Resonance fluorescence of a cold atom in a high-finesse resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Bienert, Marc; Torres, J. Mauricio; Zippilli, Stefano; Morigi, Giovanna

    2007-07-15

    We study the spectra of emission of a system composed by an atom, tightly confined inside a high-finesse resonator, when the atom is driven by a laser and is at steady state of the cooling dynamics induced by laser and cavity fields. In general, the spectrum of resonance fluorescence and the spectrum at the cavity output contain complementary information about the dynamics undergone by the system. In certain parameter regimes, quantum interference effects between the scattering processes induced by cavity and laser fields lead to the selective suppression of features of the resonance fluorescence spectrum, which are otherwise visible in the spectrum of laser-cooled atoms in free space.

  3. Resonant Laser Manipulation of an Atomic Beam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    direction, due to the photon scattering force from a near resonant laser field, is given by ( ) 1 2 0 scat 01 2 2 ks F s d -Gé ù = + + Gê ú ê úë û h (1...resonant laser field, is given by ( ) 2 2 dip sat ( )1 4 2 8 g I r F r r r I r e d d d æ ö¶ D ¶¶ W W¶W G÷ç ÷@- = - ç = - = -÷ç ÷ç¶ ¶ ¶ ¶è ø h h h (3

  4. One- and two-photon spectroscopy of highly excited states of alkali-metal atoms on helium nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pifrader, Alexandra; Allard, Olivier; Auböck, Gerald; Callegari, Carlo; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Huber, Robert; Ancilotto, Francesco

    2010-10-01

    Alkali-metal atoms captured on the surface of superfluid helium droplets are excited to high energies (≈3 eV) by means of pulsed lasers, and their laser-induced-fluorescence spectra are recorded. We report on the one-photon excitation of the (n +1)p←ns transition of K, Rb, and Cs (n =4, 5, and 6, respectively) and on the two-photon one-color excitation of the 5d←5s transition of Rb. Gated-photon-counting measurements are consistent with the relaxation rates of the bare atoms, hence consistent with the reasonable expectation that atoms quickly desorb from the droplet and droplet-induced relaxation need not be invoked.

  5. Improved Tracking of an Atomic-Clock Resonance Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Chung, Sang K.; Tu, Meirong

    2010-01-01

    An improved method of making an electronic oscillator track the frequency of an atomic-clock resonance transition is based on fitting a theoretical nonlinear curve to measurements at three oscillator frequencies within the operational frequency band of the transition (in other words, at three points within the resonance peak). In the measurement process, the frequency of a microwave oscillator is repeatedly set at various offsets from the nominal resonance frequency, the oscillator signal is applied in a square pulse of the oscillator signal having a suitable duration (typically, of the order of a second), and, for each pulse at each frequency offset, fluorescence photons of the transition in question are counted. As described below, the counts are used to determine a new nominal resonance frequency. Thereafter, offsets are determined with respect to the new resonance frequency. The process as described thus far is repeated so as to repeatedly adjust the oscillator to track the most recent estimate of the nominal resonance frequency.

  6. Localized description of surface energy gap effects in the resonant charge exchange between atoms and surfaces.

    PubMed

    Iglesias-García, A; García, Evelina A; Goldberg, E C

    2011-02-02

    The resonant charge exchange between atoms and surfaces is described by considering a localized atomistic view of the solid within the Anderson model. The presence of a surface energy gap is treated within a simplified tight-binding model of the solid, and a proper calculation of the Hamiltonian terms based on a LCAO expansion of the solid eigenstates is performed. It is found that interference terms jointly with a surface projected gap maximum at the Γ point and the Fermi level inside it, lead to hybridization widths negligible around the Fermi level. This result can explain experimental observations related to long-lived adsorbate states and anomalous neutral fractions of low energy ions in alkali/Cu(111) systems.

  7. Observation of Raman self-focusing in an alkali-metal vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proite, N. A.; Unks, B. E.; Green, J. T.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2008-02-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of Raman self-focusing and self-defocusing in a far-off resonant alkali-metal atomic system. The key idea is to drive a hyperfine transition in an alkali-metal atom to a maximally coherent state with two laser beams. In this regime, the two-photon detuning from the Raman resonance controls the nonlinear index of the medium.

  8. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    DOEpatents

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  9. Resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H. (Inventor); Cantrell, Sean A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope and methodology called resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by one of the contact resonance frequencies of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever contact resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of nanoscale near-surface and subsurface features.

  10. Velocity measurements by laser resonance fluorescence. [single atom diffusional motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.; Fairbank, W. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The photonburst correlation method was used to detect single atoms in a buffer gas. Real time flow velocity measurements with laser induced resonance fluorescence from single or multiple atoms was demonstrated and this method was investigated as a tool for wind tunnel flow measurement. Investigations show that single atoms and their real time diffusional motion on a buffer gas can be measured by resonance fluorescence. By averaging over many atoms, flow velocities up to 88 m/s were measured in a time of 0.5 sec. It is expected that higher flow speeds can be measured and that the measurement time can be reduced by a factor of 10 or more by careful experimental design. The method is clearly not ready for incorporation in high speed wind tunnels because it is not yet known whether the stray light level will be higher or lower, and it is not known what detection efficiency can be obtained in a wind tunnel situation.

  11. Emerging Beam Resonances in Atom Diffraction from a Reflection Grating

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Bum Suk; Meijer, Gerard; Schoellkopf, Wieland

    2010-06-18

    We report on the observation of emerging beam resonances, well known as Rayleigh-Wood anomalies and threshold resonances in photon and electron diffraction, respectively, in an atom-optical diffraction experiment. Diffraction of He atom beams reflected from a blazed ruled grating at grazing incidence has been investigated. The total reflectivity of the grating as well as the intensities of the diffracted beams reveal anomalies at the Rayleigh angles of incidence, i.e., when another diffracted beam emerges parallel to the grating surface. The observed anomalies are discussed in terms of the classical wave-optical model of Rayleigh and Fano.

  12. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation using resonance ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Comaskey, B.; Crane, J.; Erbert, G.; Haynam, C.; Johnson, M.; Morris, J.; Paisner, J.; Solarz, R.; Worden, E.

    1986-09-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power-reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985, the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for enriched uranium. Resonance photoionization is the heart of the AVLIS process. We discuss those fundamental atomic parameters that are necessary for describing isotope-selective resonant multistep photoionization along with the measurement techniques that we use. We illustrate the methodology adopted with examples of other elements that are under study in our program.

  13. Theory of double resonance magnetometers based on atomic alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Weis, Antoine; Bison, Georg; Pazgalev, Anatoly S.

    2006-09-15

    We present a theoretical study of the spectra produced by optical-radio-frequency double resonance devices, in which resonant linearly polarized light is used in the optical pumping and detection processes. We extend previous work by presenting algebraic results which are valid for atomic states with arbitrary angular momenta, arbitrary rf intensities, and arbitrary geometries. The only restriction made is the assumption of low light intensity. The results are discussed in view of their use in optical magnetometers.

  14. Doubly Excited Resonance States of Helium Atom: Complex Entropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroś, Arkadiusz; Kościk, Przemysław; Saha, Jayanta K.

    2016-12-01

    We provide a diagonal form of a reduced density matrix of S-symmetry resonance states of two electron systems determined under the framework of the complex scaling method. We have employed the variational Hylleraas type wavefunction to estimate the complex entropies in doubly excited resonance states of helium atom. Our results are in good agreement with the corresponding ones determined under the framework of the stabilization method (Lin and Ho in Few-Body Syst 56:157, 2015).

  15. Detecting positron-atom bound states through resonant annihilation.

    PubMed

    Dzuba, V A; Flambaum, V V; Gribakin, G F

    2010-11-12

    A method is proposed for detecting positron-atom bound states by observing enhanced positron annihilation due to electronic Feshbach resonances at electron-volt energies. The method is applicable to a range of open-shell transition-metal atoms which are likely to bind the positron: Fe, Co, Ni, Tc, Ru, Rh, Sn, Sb, Ta, W, Os, Ir, and Pt. Estimates of their binding energies are provided.

  16. Observing Atomic Collapse Resonances in Artificial Nuclei on Graphene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-07

    from the vacuum, but these results remain ambiguous due to the enormously large Zc ~ 170 that is required (6, 7). Hopes to realize atomic collapse...threshold, the resulting strong Coulomb field causes an unusual “atomic collapse” state which exhibits an electron wave function component that falls...matching the quasi-bound state resonance energy between the simulation and experi- ment. The resulting simulated dI/dV spectra from the Dirac equation are

  17. Resonance fluorescence from an atom in a squeezed vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, H. J.; Lane, A. S.; Walls, D. F.

    1987-06-01

    The fluorescent spectrum for a two-level atom which is damped by a squeezed vacuum shows striking differences from the spectrum for ordinary resonance fluorescence. For strong coherent driving fields the Mollow triplet depends on the relative phase of the driving field and the squeezed vacuum field. The central peak may have either subnatural linewidth or supernatural linewidth depending on this phase. The mean atomic polarization also shows a phase sensitivity.

  18. Quantum dynamics of an excited alkali atom in a noble gas cluster: lithium attached to a helium cluster.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Alexander B; Thorndyke, Brian; Reyes, Andrés; Micha, David A

    2007-12-28

    An alkali atom-noble gas cluster system is considered as a model for solvation effects in optical spectra, within a quantum-classical description based on the density operator of a many-atom system and its partial Wigner transform. This leads to an eikonal-time-dependent molecular orbital treatment suitable for a time-dependent description of the coupling of light emission and atom dynamics in terms of the time-dependent electric dipole of the whole system. As an application, we consider an optically excited lithium atom as the dopant in a helium cluster at 0.5 K. We describe the motions of the excited Li atom interacting with a cluster of He atoms and calculate the time-dependent electric dipole of the Li-He(99) system during the dynamics. The electronic Hamiltonian is taken as a sum of three-body Li-He diatomic potentials including electronic polarization and repulsion, with l-dependent atomic pseudopotentials for Li and He, while we use a modified pair potential for He-He. The calculations involve the coupling of 12 quantum states with 300 classical degrees of freedom. We present results for the dynamics and spectra of a Li atom interacting with a model cluster surface of He atoms and also interacting with a droplet of He. We have found that the Li atom is attracted or repulsed from the He surface, depending on the orientation of its 2p orbitals. The spectra and dynamics of Li inside and at the surface of a cluster are found to be strongly dependent on its electronic states, its velocity direction, and whether light is present during emission or not.

  19. Microspherical photonics: Sorting resonant photonic atoms by using light

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, Alexey V.; Astratov, Vasily N.

    2014-09-22

    A method of sorting microspheres by resonant light forces in vacuum, air, or liquid is proposed. Based on a two-dimensional model, it is shown that the sorting can be realized by allowing spherical particles to traverse a focused beam. Under resonance with the whispering gallery modes, the particles acquire significant velocity along the beam direction. This opens a unique way of large-volume sorting of nearly identical photonic atoms with 1/Q accuracy, where Q is the resonance quality factor. This is an enabling technology for developing super-low-loss coupled-cavity structures and devices.

  20. Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of alkali metal vapor interaction with alkene-based anti-relaxation coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiak, O. Yu.; Blanchard, J. W.; Budker, D.; Olshin, P. K.; Smirnov, S. N.; Balabas, M. V.

    2016-03-01

    The use of anti-relaxation coatings in alkali vapor cells yields substantial performance improvements compared to a bare glass surface by reducing the probability of spin relaxation in wall collisions by several orders of magnitude. Some of the most effective anti-relaxation coating materials are alpha-olefins, which (as in the case of more traditional paraffin coatings) must undergo a curing period after cell manufacturing in order to achieve the desired behavior. Until now, however, it has been unclear what physicochemical processes occur during cell curing, and how they may affect relevant cell properties. We present the results of nondestructive Raman-spectroscopy and magnetic-resonance investigations of the influence of alkali metal vapor (Cs or K) on an alpha-olefin, 1-nonadecene coating the inner surface of a glass cell. It was found that during the curing process, the alkali metal catalyzes migration of the carbon-carbon double bond, yielding a mixture of cis- and trans-2-nonadecene.

  1. Resonant mode for gravitational wave detectors based on atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Peter W.; Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2016-11-01

    We describe an atom interferometric gravitational wave detector design that can operate in a resonant mode for increased sensitivity. By oscillating the positions of the atomic wave packets, this resonant detection mode allows for coherently enhanced, narrow-band sensitivity at target frequencies. The proposed detector is flexible and can be rapidly switched between broadband and narrow-band detection modes. For instance, a binary discovered in broadband mode can subsequently be studied further as the inspiral evolves by using a tailored narrow-band detector response. In addition to functioning like a lock-in amplifier for astrophysical events, the enhanced sensitivity of the resonant approach also opens up the possibility of searching for important cosmological signals, including the stochastic gravitational wave background produced by inflation. We give an example of detector parameters which would allow detection of inflationary gravitational waves down to ΩGW˜10-14 for a two-satellite space-based detector.

  2. Coupling thermal atomic vapor to an integrated ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, R.; Gruhler, N.; Pernice, W. H. P.; Kübler, H.; Pfau, T.; Löw, R.

    2016-10-01

    Strongly interacting atom-cavity systems within a network with many nodes constitute a possible realization for a quantum internet which allows for quantum communication and computation on the same platform. To implement such large-scale quantum networks, nanophotonic resonators are promising candidates because they can be scalably fabricated and interconnected with waveguides and optical fibers. By integrating arrays of ring resonators into a vapor cell we show that thermal rubidium atoms above room temperature can be coupled to photonic cavities as building blocks for chip-scale hybrid circuits. Although strong coupling is not yet achieved in this first realization, our approach provides a key step towards miniaturization and scalability of atom-cavity systems.

  3. Imaging atoms from resonance fluorescence spectrum beyond the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zeyang; Al-Amri, Mohammad; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2014-03-01

    We calculate the resonance fluorescence spectrum of a linear chain of two-level atoms driven by a gradient coherent laser field. The result shows that we can determine the positions of atoms from the spectrum even when the atoms locate within subwavelength range and the dipole-dipole interaction is significant. This far-field resonance fluorescence localization microscopy method does not require point-by-point scanning and it may be more time-efficient. We also give a possible scheme to extract the position information in an extended region without requiring more peak power of laser. We also briefly discuss how to do a 2D imaging based on our scheme. This work is supported by grants from the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) and the Qatar National Research Fund (QNRF) under the NPRP project.

  4. Three-body recombination in cold helium-helium-alkali-metal-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Suno, Hiroya; Esry, B. D.

    2009-12-15

    Three-body recombination in helium-helium-alkali-metal collisions at cold temperatures is studied using the adiabatic hyperspherical representation. The rates for the three-body recombination processes {sup 4}He+{sup 4}He+X->{sup 4}He+{sup 4}HeX and {sup 4}He+{sup 4}He+X->{sup 4}He{sub 2}+X, with X={sup 7}Li, {sup 23}Na, {sup 39}K, {sup 85}Rb, and {sup 133}Cs, are calculated at nonzero collision energies by including not only zero total angular momentum, J=0, states but also J>0 states. The three-body recombination rates show a relatively weak dependence on the alkali-metal species, differing from each other only by about one order of magnitude, except for the {sup 4}He-{sup 4}He-{sup 23}Na system.

  5. Resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization studies of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixit, S. N.; Levin, D.; Mckoy, V.

    1987-01-01

    In resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI), an atom absorbs several photons making a transition to a resonant intermediate state and subsequently ionizing out of it. With currently available tunable narrow-band lasers, the extreme sensitivity of REMPI to the specific arrangement of levels can be used to selectively probe minute amounts of a single species (atom) in a host of background material. Determination of the number density of atoms from the observed REMPI signal requires a knowledge of the multiphoton ionization cross sections. The REMPI of atomic oxygen was investigated through various excitation schemes that are feasible with available light sources. Using quantum defect theory (QDT) to estimate the various atomic parameters, the REMPI dynamics in atomic oxygen were studied incorporating the effects of saturation and a.c. Stark shifts. Results are presented for REMPI probabilities for excitation through various 2p(3) (4S sup o) np(3)P and 2p(3) (4S sup o) nf(3)F levels.

  6. Alkali vapor pressure modulation on the 100 ms scale in a single-cell vacuum system for cold atom experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dugrain, Vincent; Reichel, Jakob; Rosenbusch, Peter

    2014-08-15

    We describe and characterize a device for alkali vapor pressure modulation on the 100 ms timescale in a single-cell cold atom experiment. Its mechanism is based on optimized heat conduction between a current-modulated alkali dispenser and a heat sink at room temperature. We have studied both the short-term behavior during individual pulses and the long-term pressure evolution in the cell. The device combines fast trap loading and relatively long trap lifetime, enabling high repetition rates in a very simple setup. These features make it particularly suitable for portable atomic sensors.

  7. The combination of atomic force microscopy and sugar analysis to evaluate alkali-soluble Canna edulis Ker pectin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Cui, Junhui; Xiao, Lin; Wang, Zhengwu

    2014-08-01

    Alkali-soluble pectin, which has been extracted from Canna edulis Ker, was characterized by single sugar determination and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results indicated that the amounts of four predominant sugars including arabinose (Ara), glucose (Glc), galactose (Gal) and galacturonic acid (GalA) significantly decreased during the process of mild acid hydrolysis. The decreasing rates of these four sugars followed a sequential order of Ara>Gal>Glc>GalA. The homogalacturonan (HG) chain present in pectin, and the quantity of branched material is greater than the sample containing the main neutral sugars. The results indicated that the neutral sugar and HG side chains are attached to pectin as part of the rhamnogalacturonan I (RGI) complex. Moreover, hydrolysis leads to the reduction of mean lengths of backbone and branch, as well as the number/weight-average molecular weight. Meanwhile, the amount of short chain fractions increased during hydrolysis. Furthermore, the decrease of the polymerization degree of alkali-soluble C. edulis pectin as a function of the hydrolysis time could be described by a first-order exponential decay function.

  8. Fast efficient Ca atomic resonance filter at 423 nm.

    PubMed

    Walther, F G

    1992-11-15

    An optically pumped active Ca atomic resonance filter is demonstrated, applicable to background-limited optical communications through scatter channels. In pump saturation, the filter should detect 50% of the incident 423-nm signal power with an internal photon gain of 6 and a response time of 10 micros, 2 orders of magnitude faster than a passive Ca filter. Response time of 100 micros has been demonstrated, limited by available pump power. The filter maintains the wide field of view and reduced solar background associated with atomic absorption at the Ca Fraunhofer line while permitting higher data rate communications.

  9. Spectroscopic study of promethiumlike bismuth with an electron-beam ion trap: Search for alkali-metal-like resonance lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yusuke; Kato, Daiji; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Murakami, Izumi; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally settle the three-decades-old question of whether or not promethiumlike heavy ions have strong resonance lines in hot plasmas. In 1980, Curtis and Ellis [Phys. Rev. Lett. 45, 2099 (1980), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.45.2099] predicted that promethiumlike heavy ions should have an alkali-metal structure with a ground-state configuration of 4f145s, and should exhibit strong 5s-5p resonance lines in hot plasmas. However, after many experimental efforts, no clear indication of the predicted resonance lines was found. The work presented herein resolves this question by clearly showing that the predicted resonance lines for bismuth are negligibly weak because of the presence of the [4f135s2]7/2 metastable state, even though the ground-state configuration is 4f145s, as predicted. To obtain these results, we used an electron-beam ion trap that made it possible to exploit a fine-tuned charge-state distribution, and analyzed the experimental spectra with collisional-radiative model calculations.

  10. Fidelity for kicked atoms with gravity near a quantum resonance.

    PubMed

    Dubertrand, Rémy; Guarneri, Italo; Wimberger, Sandro

    2012-03-01

    Kicked atoms under a constant Stark or gravity field are investigated for experimental setups with cold and ultracold atoms. The parametric stability of the quantum dynamics is studied using the fidelity. In the case of a quantum resonance, it is shown that the behavior of the fidelity depends on arithmetic properties of the gravity parameter. Close to a quantum resonance, the long-time asymptotics of the fidelity is studied by means of a pseudoclassical approximation introduced by Fishman et al. [J. Stat. Phys. 110, 911 (2003)]. The long-time decay of fidelity arises from the tunneling out of pseudoclassical stable islands, and a simple ansatz is proposed which satisfactorily reproduces the main features observed in numerical simulations.

  11. Fidelity for kicked atoms with gravity near a quantum resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubertrand, Rémy; Guarneri, Italo; Wimberger, Sandro

    2012-03-01

    Kicked atoms under a constant Stark or gravity field are investigated for experimental setups with cold and ultracold atoms. The parametric stability of the quantum dynamics is studied using the fidelity. In the case of a quantum resonance, it is shown that the behavior of the fidelity depends on arithmetic properties of the gravity parameter. Close to a quantum resonance, the long-time asymptotics of the fidelity is studied by means of a pseudoclassical approximation introduced by Fishman [J. Stat. Phys.JSTPBS0022-471510.1023/A:1022176306198 110, 911 (2003)]. The long-time decay of fidelity arises from the tunneling out of pseudoclassical stable islands, and a simple ansatz is proposed which satisfactorily reproduces the main features observed in numerical simulations.

  12. Non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Avijit; Ray, Debasis

    2015-03-01

    The non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by the bound valence electron in the ground state 3s of atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas is investigated theoretically. The incident photon energy is assumed to be much smaller than the 3s-3p excitation energy. The alkali atom sodium is first formulated as an effective one-electron problem in which the attractive interaction between the valence electron and the atomic ion core is simulated by a spherically symmetric model potential. The Shukla-Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential model is then used to mimic the effective two-body (valence-core) interaction within quantum plasmas. Non-relativistic calculations performed within the electric dipole approximation indicate that the non-resonant elastic photon scattering cross-section undergoes a dramatic growth by several orders of magnitude as the quantum wave number increases. A qualitative explanation of this phenomenon is presented. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, a similar growth is observed at larger values of the quantum wave number. Our computed relevant atomic data are in very good agreement with the experimental as well as the previous theoretical data for the zero-screening (free atom) case, and with the very limited, accurate theoretical results available for the case of exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction, without the cosine screening term.

  13. Non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Avijit Ray, Debasis

    2015-03-15

    The non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by the bound valence electron in the ground state 3s of atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas is investigated theoretically. The incident photon energy is assumed to be much smaller than the 3s-3p excitation energy. The alkali atom sodium is first formulated as an effective one-electron problem in which the attractive interaction between the valence electron and the atomic ion core is simulated by a spherically symmetric model potential. The Shukla-Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential model is then used to mimic the effective two-body (valence-core) interaction within quantum plasmas. Non-relativistic calculations performed within the electric dipole approximation indicate that the non-resonant elastic photon scattering cross-section undergoes a dramatic growth by several orders of magnitude as the quantum wave number increases. A qualitative explanation of this phenomenon is presented. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, a similar growth is observed at larger values of the quantum wave number. Our computed relevant atomic data are in very good agreement with the experimental as well as the previous theoretical data for the zero-screening (free atom) case, and with the very limited, accurate theoretical results available for the case of exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction, without the cosine screening term.

  14. Dispersion coefficients for H and He interactions with alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2003-12-01

    The van der Waals coefficients C{sub 6}, C{sub 8}, and C{sub 10} for H and He interactions with the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, and Rb) and alkaline-earth-metal (Be, Mg, Ca, and Sr) atoms are determined from oscillator strength sum rules. The oscillator strengths were computed using a combination of ab initio and semiempirical methods. The dispersion parameters generally agree with close to exact variational calculations for Li-H and Li-He at the 0.1% level of accuracy. For larger systems, there is agreement with relativistic many-body perturbation theory estimates of C{sub 6} at the 1% level. These validations for selected systems attest to the reliability of the present dispersion parameters. About half the present parameters lie within the recommended bounds of the Standard and Certain compilation [J. Chem. Phys. 83, 3002 (1985)].

  15. Resonant quenching of Rydberg atomic states by highly polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narits, A. A.; Mironchuk, E. S.; Lebedev, V. S.

    2016-06-01

    The results of theoretical studies of the resonant quenching and ion-pair formation processes induced by collisions of Rydberg atoms with highly polar molecules possessing small electron affinities are reported. We elaborate an approach for describing collisional dynamics of both processes and demonstrate the predominant role of resonant quenching channel of reaction for the destruction of Rydberg states by electron-attaching molecules. The approach is based on the solution of the coupled differential equations for the transition amplitudes between the ionic and Rydberg covalent terms of a quasimolecule formed during a collision of particles. It takes into account the possibility of the dipole-bound anion decay in the Coulomb field of the positive ionic core and generalizes previous models of charge-transfer processes involving Rydberg atoms to the cases, when the multistate Landau-Zener approaches become inapplicable. Our calculations for {{Rb}}({nl}) atom perturbed by {{{C}}}2{{{H}}}4{{SO}}3, {{CH}}2{CHCN}, {{CH}}3{{NO}}2, {{CH}}3{CN}, {{{C}}}3{{{H}}}2{{{O}}}3, and {{{C}}}3{{{H}}}4{{{O}}}3 molecules show that the curves representing the dependence of the resonant quenching cross sections on the principal quantum number n are bell-shaped with the positions of maxima being shifted towards lower values of n and the peak values, {σ }{max}({{q})}, several times higher than those for the ion-pair formation, {σ }{max}({{i})}. We obtain a simple power relation between the energy of electron affinity of a molecule and the position of maximum in n-dependence of the resonant quenching cross section. It can be used as an additional means for determining small binding energies of dipole-bound anions from the experimental data on resonant quenching of Rydberg states by highly polar molecules.

  16. Feshbach-Resonance-Enhanced Coherent Atom-Molecule Conversion with Ultranarrow Photoassociation Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taie, Shintaro; Watanabe, Shunsuke; Ichinose, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    We reveal the existence of high-density Feshbach resonances in the collision between the ground and metastable states of 171Yb and coherently produce the associated Feshbach molecules by photoassociation. The extremely small transition rate is overcome by the enhanced Franck-Condon factor of the weakly bound Feshbach molecule, allowing us to observe Rabi oscillations with long decay time between an atom pair and a molecule in an optical lattice. We also perform the precision measurement of the binding energies, which characterizes the observed resonances. The ultranarrow photoassociation will be a basis for practical implementation of optical Feshbach resonances.

  17. Comparison of various alkali gas-cell atomic-frequency standards. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Camparo, J.C.; Frueholz, R.P.

    1988-02-12

    The present calculations indicate that a Rubidium gas cell standard shows the greatest potential for frequency stability, and in this regard nature has been uncommonly propitious. One should not, however, interpret this result as a superiority of the Rb87 standard in all regards. For example, if it is of primary importance to construct a miniature gas-cell standard, then cesium might prove to be more advantageous given the fact that its minimum-volume cavity occupies less than half the volume of a corresponding Rb87 cavity. Additionally, magnetic field sensitivities are less for Cs133 as a consequence of its greater hyperfine transition frequency. The only statement one should make regarding the present results is that, of all the possible alkali gas-cell standards that could be considered, a Rb87 standard appears to yield the best attainable short-noise-limited performance.

  18. Atomic arrangement of alkali adatoms on the Si(001)-2 × 1 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Blügel, S.; Ishida, H.; Terakura, K.

    1991-02-01

    Adsorption sites of Na and Li on the Si(001)-2 × 1 surface at the saturation coverage are determined theoretically by using the simulated annealing method proposed by Williams and Soler. For Na, the most stable configuration is the combination of the hollow site along the dimer chain and the trough site on top of the third layer Si atom in contradiction to an earlier calculation. The substrate relaxation is a crucial factor for stabilizing this configuration. On the other hand Li atoms are adsorbed at low symmetry positions. For both of Na and Li, we observe a significant movement of the substrate atoms towards the ideal surface configuration.

  19. Atomically precise gold nanocrystal molecules with surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Qian, Huifeng; Zhu, Yan; Jin, Rongchao

    2012-01-17

    Since Faraday's pioneering work on gold colloids, tremendous scientific research on plasmonic gold nanoparticles has been carried out, but no atomically precise Au nanocrystals have been achieved. This work reports the first example of gold nanocrystal molecules. Mass spectrometry analysis has determined its formula to be Au(333)(SR)(79) (R = CH(2)CH(2)Ph). This magic sized nanocrystal molecule exhibits fcc-crystallinity and surface plasmon resonance at approximately 520 nm, hence, a metallic nanomolecule. Simulations have revealed that atomic shell closing largely contributes to the particular robustness of Au(333)(SR)(79), albeit the number of free electrons (i.e., 333 - 79 = 254) is also consistent with electron shell closing based on calculations using a confined free electron model. Guided by the atomic shell closing growth mode, we have also found the next larger size of extraordinarily stability to be Au(~530)(SR)(~100) after a size-focusing selection--which selects the robust size available in the starting polydisperse nanoparticles. This work clearly demonstrates that atomically precise nanocrystal molecules are achievable and that the factor of atomic shell closing contributes to their extraordinary stability compared to other sizes. Overall, this work opens up new opportunities for investigating many fundamental issues of nanocrystals, such as the formation of metallic state, and will have potential impact on condensed matter physics, nanochemistry, and catalysis as well.

  20. Inelastic tunneling spectroscopy for magnetic atoms and the Kondo resonance.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, E C; Flores, F

    2013-06-05

    The interaction between a single magnetic atom and the metal environment (including a magnetic field) is analyzed by introducing an ionic Hamiltonian combined with an effective crystal-field term, and by using a Green-function equation of motion method. This approach describes the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy and the Kondo resonances as due to atomic spin fluctuations associated with electron co-tunneling processes between the leads and the atom. We analyze in the case of Fe on CuN the possible spin fluctuations between states with S = 2 and 3/2 or 5/2 and conclude that the experimentally found asymmetries in the conductance with respect to the applied bias, and its marked structures, are well explained by the 2↔3/2 spin fluctuations. The case of Co is also considered and shown to present, in contrast with Fe, a resonance at the Fermi energy corresponding to a Kondo temperature of 6 K.

  1. Resonance line broadening of alkali metals in pyrotechnic flames. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dillehay, D.R.

    1983-04-15

    A mathematical model of a pyrotechnic flame has been developed and validated. The model utilizes a computer program to calculate the relative radiant power of flares containing any of the alkali metals. The computation takes into consideration known system variables such as formulation, candle size, displacement along the plume axis, and atmospheric pressure. These effects were evaluated over a wide range of conditions and the computed spectra follow the established experimental spectra trends. The computer solution is a general solution requiring no ad hoc modifications to the model for any of the metals or conditions tested. The basis for the model of the flame permits calculation of the effects of mixing of the flare plume with the ambient atmosphere and takes heat loss along the plume axis into consideration.

  2. Contact resonances of U-shaped atomic force microscope probes

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaei, E.; Turner, J. A.

    2016-01-21

    Recent approaches used to characterize the elastic or viscoelastic properties of materials with nanoscale resolution have focused on the contact resonances of atomic force microscope (CR-AFM) probes. The experiments for these CR-AFM methods involve measurement of several contact resonances from which the resonant frequency and peak width are found. The contact resonance values are then compared with the noncontact values in order for the sample properties to be evaluated. The data analysis requires vibration models associated with the probe during contact in order for the beam response to be deconvolved from the measured spectra. To date, the majority of CR-AFM research has used rectangular probes that have a relatively simple vibration response. Recently, U-shaped AFM probes have created much interest because they allow local sample heating. However, the vibration response of these probes is much more complex such that CR-AFM is still in its infancy. In this article, a simplified analytical model of U-shaped probes is evaluated for contact resonance applications relative to a more complex finite element (FE) computational model. The tip-sample contact is modeled using three orthogonal Kelvin-Voigt elements such that the resonant frequency and peak width of each mode are functions of the contact conditions. For the purely elastic case, the frequency results of the simple model are within 8% of the FE model for the lowest six modes over a wide range of contact stiffness values. Results for the viscoelastic contact problem for which the quality factor of the lowest six modes is compared show agreement to within 13%. These results suggest that this simple model can be used effectively to evaluate CR-AFM experimental results during AFM scanning such that quantitative mapping of viscoelastic properties may be possible using U-shaped probes.

  3. Spin noise spectroscopy of rubidium atomic gas under resonant and non-resonant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jian; Shi, Ping; Qian, Xuan; Li, Wei; Ji, Yang

    2016-11-01

    The spin fluctuation in rubidium atom gas is studied via all-optical spin noise spectroscopy (SNS). Experimental results show that the integrated SNS signal and its full width at half maximum (FWHM) strongly depend on the frequency detuning of the probe light under resonant and non-resonant conditions. The total integrated SNS signal can be well fitted with a single squared Faraday rotation spectrum and the FWHM dependence may be related to the absorption profile of the sample. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91321310 and 11404325) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB922304).

  4. Alkali metal atoms in strong magnetic fields: "Guiding" atomic transitions foretell the characteristics of all transitions of the D1 line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, A.; Hakhumyan, G.; Papoyan, A.; Sarkisyan, D.

    2015-03-01

    It has been shown that the D1 line of atomic vapors of alkali metals excited by π-polarized radiation in a strong transverse magnetic field includes specific "guiding" (indicating) atomic transitions between the magnetic sublevels of the hyperfine structure. The dependence of the frequency shift of the guiding transitions on the magnetic field, as well as on their dipole moments, is asymptotic for all other transitions. An experiment with a nanocell with Rb vapor with a thickness of half the wavelength (λ/2 method) for ensuring a sub-Doppler spectral resolution has completely confirmed the presence of guiding transitions. Two groups of six transitions for 85Rb and two groups of four transitions for 87Rb have been detected in the absorption spectra in magnetic fields above 4 kG. A guiding transition has been identified in each of four groups. Four transitions forbidden at B = 0 have been also detected; with an increase in the magnetic field, their probabilities also approach the probabilities of the guiding transitions.

  5. Quantum chaos of atoms in a resonator driven by an external resonant field

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, G.P.; Bulgakov, E.N.; Holm, D.D. Kirensky Institute of Physics, Research Educational Center for Nonlinear Processes at Krasnoyarsk Polytechnical Institute, Theoretical Department at Krasnoyarsk State University, 660036, Krasnoyarsk Theoretical Division, MS-B284, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 )

    1994-06-01

    A system of [ital N] two-level atoms in a resonator is considered interacting with a resonant eigenmode field and with an external coherent field, with a frequency slightly different from the frequency of the atomic transition. A model Hamiltonian is constructed for describing the slow quantum dynamics of the system, and a set of closed [ital c]-number equations for time-dependent quantum expectation values is derived in the boson and spin coherent states. In the region of parameters for developed chaos in the semiclassical limit (when the radiation field is considered classically) we show that the semiclassical approximation is violated by quantum effects at the time scale [tau][sub [h bar

  6. NONLINEAR OPTICS: Stimulated resonant hyper-Raman scattering of light by polaritons in alkali metal vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galaĭchuk, Yu A.; Yashkir, Yu N.

    1989-12-01

    A theory is developed for the calculation of the gain g due to stimulated resonant hyper-Raman scattering of light by polaritons in gaseous media. It is shown that throughout the tuning range of the pump frequency (including one- and two-photon resonances) a maximum of g corresponds to a dispersion curve of polaritons plotted ignoring attenuation. Theoretical results are used to analyze characteristics of hyper-Raman scattering in sodium vapor. It is shown that under normal experimental conditions the splitting of polariton branches is considerable (amounting to tens of reciprocal centimeters on the frequency scale and several angular degrees). The value of g is estimated for two-photon resonances in the case when the pump frequency is tunable in a wide range. The optimal conditions for stimulated hyper-Raman scattering are identified.

  7. Polarization enhanced Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance with an atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Michael W.; Barrall, Geoffrey A.; Espy, Michelle A.; Monti, Mark C.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Okamitsu, Jeffrey K.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) has been demonstrated for the detection of 14-N in explosive compounds. Application of a material specific radio-frequency (RF) pulse excites a response typically detected with a wire- wound antenna. NQR is non-contact and material specific, however fields produced by NQR are typically very weak, making demonstration of practical utility challenging. For certain materials, the NQR signal can be increased by transferring polarization from hydrogen nuclei to nitrogen nuclei using external magnetic fields. This polarization enhancement (PE) can enhance the NQR signal by an order of magnitude or more. Atomic magnetometers (AM) have been shown to improve detection sensitivity beyond a conventional antenna by a similar amount. AM sensors are immune to piezo-electric effects that hamper conventional NQR, and can be combined to form a gradiometer for effective RF noise cancellation. In principle, combining polarization enhancement with atomic magnetometer detection should yield improvement in signal-to-noise ratio that is the product of the two methods, 100-fold or more over conventional NQR. However both methods are even more exotic than traditional NQR, and have never been combined due to challenges in operating a large magnetic field and ultra-sensitive magnetic field sensor in proximity. Here we present NQR with and without PE with an atomic magnetometer, demonstrating signal enhancement greater than 20-fold for ammonium nitrate. We also demonstrate PE for PETN using a traditional coil for detection with an enhancement factor of 10. Experimental methods and future applications are discussed.

  8. Two-Dimensional Double-Quantum Spectra Reveal Collective Resonances in an Atomic Vapor

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xingcan; Richter, Marten; Li, Hebin; Bristow, Alan D.; Falvo, Cyril; Mukamel, Shaul; Cundiff, Steven T.

    2013-01-01

    We report the observation of double-quantum coherence signals in a gas of potassium atoms at twice the frequency of the one-quantum coherences. Since a single atom does not have a state at the corresponding energy, this observation must be attributed to a collective resonance involving multiple atoms. These resonances are induced by weak interatomic dipole-dipole interactions, which means that the atoms cannot be treated in isolation, even at a low density of 1012 cm−3. PMID:23003037

  9. In situ measurement of osmium concentrations in iron meteorites by resonance ionization of sputtered atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, J.; Pellin, M. J.; Calaway, W. F.; Young, C. E.; Gruen, D. M.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1990-03-01

    Resonance ionization of sputtered atoms followed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used for in situ quantitative measurement of Os with a spatial resolution of about 70 microns. A linear correlation between Os(+) signal intensity and the known Os concentration was observed over a range of nearly 10,000 in Os concentration with an accuracy of about + or - 10 percent, a minimum detection limit of 7 parts per billion atomic, and a useful yield of 1 percent. Resonance ionization of sputtered atoms samples the dominant neutral-fraction of sputtered atoms and utilizes multiphoton resonance ionization to achieve high sensitivity and to eliminate atomic and molecular interferences.

  10. Resonant three-Photon Ionization Spectroscopy of Atomic Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Gottwald, T.; Havener, Charles C; Mattolat, C.; Vane, C Randy; Wendt, K.

    2013-01-01

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti:Sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63737.686 0.068 cm-1 for the ionization potential of iron.

  11. Structural investigation and electron paramagnetic resonance of vanadyl doped alkali niobium borate glasses.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A; Sheoran, A; Sanghi, S; Bhatnagar, V; Gupta, S K; Arora, M

    2010-03-01

    Glasses with compositions xNb(2)O(5).(30-x)M(2)O.69B(2)O(3) (where M=Li, Na, K; x=0, 4, 8 mol%) doped with 1 mol% V(2)O(5) have been prepared using normal melt quench technique. The IR transmission spectra of the glasses have been studied over the range 400-4000 cm(-1). The changes caused by the addition of Nb(2)O(5) on the structure of these glasses have been reported. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of VO(2+) ions in these glasses have been recorded in X-band (9.14 GHz) at room temperature (300 K). The spin Hamiltonian parameters, dipolar hyperfine coupling parameter and Fermi contact interaction parameter have been calculated. It is observed that the resultant resonance spectra contain hyperfine structures (hfs) due to V(4+) ions which exist as VO(2+) ions in octahedral coordination with a tetragonal compression in the present glasses. The tetragonality of V(4+)O(6) complex decreases with increasing concentration of Nb(2)O(5). The 3d(xy) orbit contracts with increase in Nb(2)O(5):M(2)O ratio. Values of the theoretical optical basicity, Lambda(th), have also been reported.

  12. Dynamic range of atomically thin vibrating nanomechanical resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zenghui; Feng, Philip X.-L.

    2014-03-10

    Atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) crystals offer attractive properties for making resonant nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) operating at high frequencies. While the fundamental limits of linear operation in such systems are important, currently there is very little quantitative knowledge of the linear dynamic range (DR) and onset of nonlinearity in these devices, which are different than in conventional 1D NEMS such as nanotubes and nanowires. Here, we present theoretical analysis and quantitative models that can be directly used to predict the DR of vibrating 2D circular drumhead NEMS resonators. We show that DR has a strong dependence ∝10log(E{sub Y}{sup 3/2}ρ{sub 3D}{sup -1/2}rtε{sup 5/2}) on device parameters, in which strain ε plays a particularly important role in these 2D systems, dominating over dimensions (radius r, thickness t). This study formulizes the effects from device physical parameters upon DR and sheds light on device design rules toward achieving high DR in 2D NEMS vibrating at radio and microwave frequencies.

  13. Spatially resolved resonant tunneling on single atoms in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voisin, B.; Salfi, J.; Bocquel, J.; Rahman, R.; Rogge, S.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to control single dopants in solid-state devices has opened the way towards reliable quantum computation schemes. In this perspective it is essential to understand the impact of interfaces and electric fields, inherent to address coherent electronic manipulation, on the dopants atomic scale properties. This requires both fine energetic and spatial resolution of the energy spectrum and wave-function, respectively. Here we present an experiment fulfilling both conditions: we perform transport on single donors in silicon close to a vacuum interface using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) in the single electron tunneling regime. The spatial degrees of freedom of the STM tip provide a versatility allowing a unique understanding of electrostatics. We obtain the absolute energy scale from the thermal broadening of the resonant peaks, allowing us to deduce the charging energies of the donors. Finally we use a rate equations model to derive the current in presence of an excited state, highlighting the benefits of the highly tunable vacuum tunnel rates which should be exploited in further experiments. This work provides a general framework to investigate dopant-based systems at the atomic scale.

  14. Doping the alkali atom: an effective strategy to improve the electronic and nonlinear optical properties of the inorganic Al12N12 nanocage.

    PubMed

    Niu, Min; Yu, Guangtao; Yang, Guanghui; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Xingang; Huang, Xuri

    2014-01-06

    Under ab initio computations, several new inorganic electride compounds with high stability, M@x-Al12N12 (M = Li, Na, and K; x = b66, b64, and r6), were achieved for the first time by doping the alkali metal atom M on the fullerene-like Al12N12 nanocage, where the alkali atom is located over the Al-N bond (b66/b64 site) or six-membered ring (r6 site). It is revealed that independent of the doping position and atomic number, doping the alkali atom can significantly narrow the wide gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) (EH-L = 6.12 eV) of the pure Al12N12 nanocage in the range of 0.49-0.71 eV, and these doped AlN nanocages can exhibit the intriguing n-type characteristic, where a high energy level containing the excess electron is introduced as the new HOMO orbital in the original gap of pure Al12N12. Further, the diffuse excess electron also brings these doped AlN nanostructures the considerable first hyperpolarizabilities (β0), which are 1.09 × 10(4) au for Li@b66-Al12N12, 1.10 × 10(4), 1.62 × 10(4), 7.58 × 10(4) au for M@b64-Al12N12 (M = Li, Na, and K), and 8.89 × 10(5), 1.36 × 10(5), 5.48 × 10(4) au for M@r6-Al12N12 (M = Li, Na, and K), respectively. Clearly, doping the heavier Na/K atom over the Al-N bond can get the larger β0 value, while the reverse trend can be observed for the series with the alkali atom over the six-membered ring, where doping the lighter Li atom can achieve the larger β0 value. These fascinating findings will be advantageous for promoting the potential applications of the inorganic AlN-based nanosystems in the new type of electronic nanodevices and high-performance nonlinear optical (NLO) materials.

  15. The long-range non-additive three-body dispersion interactions for the rare gases, alkali, and alkaline-earth atoms.

    PubMed

    Tang, Li-Yan; Yan, Zong-Chao; Shi, Ting-Yun; Babb, James F; Mitroy, J

    2012-03-14

    The long-range non-additive three-body dispersion interaction coefficients Z(111), Z(112), Z(113), and Z(122) are computed for many atomic combinations using standard expressions. The atoms considered include hydrogen, the rare gases, the alkali atoms (up to Rb), and the alkaline-earth atoms (up to Sr). The term Z(111) arising from three mutual dipole interactions is known as the Axilrod-Teller-Muto coefficient or the DDD (dipole-dipole-dipole) coefficient. Similarly, the terms Z(112), Z(113), and Z(122) arise from the mutual combinations of dipole (1), quadrupole (2), and octupole (3) interactions between atoms and they are sometimes known, respectively, as dipole-dipole-quadrupole, dipole-dipole-octupole, and dipole-quadrupole-quadrupole coefficients. Results for the four Z coefficients are given for the homonuclear trimers, for the trimers involving two like-rare-gas atoms, and for the trimers with all combinations of the H, He, and Li atoms. An exhaustive compilation of all coefficients between all possible atomic combinations is presented as supplementary data.

  16. Resonant and Soliton Transport of Ultracold Atoms on Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubbo, Chester Philipp

    In this thesis, we present a theoretical study of the dynamics of strongly interacting ultracold atoms in optical lattices. At ultracold temperatures, the dynamics cannot be described classically, but instead, must take into account quantum effects. Here, our focus is on transport and precision measurement. We use exact analysis of few-body systems and mean field analysis. For larger systems, we use a numerical approach called the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method which is considered an efficient computational tool for the quantum evolution of 1D systems. After introducing basic concepts, we treat the motional properties of particles in a tilted lattice in a regime where the inter-particle interactions are resonant with the linear potential. In this regime, the dynamics is described by an Ising model with a transverse field which is a basic system to study quantum magnetism and quantum phase transitions. We introduce analytical and numerical methods to draw a simple picture of the dynamics. This helps us to formulate a slinky-like transport scheme that provides full control of the motional direction of particles. After a study of transport on a tilted lattice, we treat the transport of nonlinear waves in strongly interacting systems. These nonlinear waves are called solitons, which are described as local perturbations of a medium that survive after collisions. We identify two species of classical soliton solutions in our system and study their stability under quantum evolution via DMRG. We shift focus from the dynamics related to transport and turn to precision measurements in optical lattice clocks. Here, we investigate one aspect of their limitations which is due to collisions of atoms loaded onto a single site. These collisions introduce a frequency shift in the clock measurement. We provide a microscopic description of the origin of this frequency shift. Our results have motivated improvement in the accuracy and precision of next generation

  17. Three-photon-absorption resonance for all-optical atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zibrov, Sergei; Novikova, Irina; Phillips, David F.; Taichenachev, Aleksei V.; Yudin, Valeriy I.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Zibrov, Alexander S.

    2005-07-15

    We report an experimental study of an all-optical three-photon-absorption resonance (known as an 'N resonance') and discuss its potential application as an alternative to atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping. We present measurements of the N-resonance contrast, width and light shift for the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb with varying buffer gases, and find good agreement with an analytical model of this resonance. The results suggest that N resonances are promising for atomic clock applications.

  18. Resonant interaction of trapped cold atoms with a magnetic cantilever tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Cris; Valencia, Jose; Geraci, Andrew; Eardley, Matthew; Kitching, John

    2015-05-01

    We report the resonant coupling of laser cooled trapped Rb atoms to a micro-cantilever with a magnetic tip. An atom chip is used to trap, cool, and transport the atoms to the tip of the cantilever. The capacitively-driven cantilever oscillation produces Zeeman state transitions which result in a loss of population in the trap. In a suitably scaled setup, mechanical resonators could be used to probe and manipulate atomic spins with nanometer spatial resolution and single-spin sensitivity; this technique may enable new approaches in neutral-atom quantum computation, quantum simulation, or precision sensing.

  19. Dispersion coefficients for the interactions of the alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal ions and inert-gas atoms with a graphene layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-09-01

    Largely motivated by a number of applications, the van der Waals dispersion coefficients C3 of the alkali-metal ions Li+,Na+,K+, and Rb+, the alkaline-earth-metal ions Ca+,Sr+,Ba+, and Ra+, and the inert-gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, and Kr with a graphene layer are determined precisely within the framework of the Dirac model. For these calculations, we evaluate the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atomic systems very accurately by evaluating the transition matrix elements employing relativistic many-body methods and using the experimental values of the excitation energies. The dispersion coefficients are given as functions of the separation distance of an atomic system from the graphene layer and the ambiance temperature during the interactions. For easy extraction of these coefficients, we give a logistic fit to the functional forms of the dispersion coefficients in terms of the separation distances at room temperature.

  20. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, simple and 3d transition metal, and nonmetal atoms on monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. D.; Fang, Y. M.; Wu, S. Q. E-mail: wsq@xmu.edu.cn; Zhu, Z. Z. E-mail: wsq@xmu.edu.cn

    2015-05-15

    Single adsorption of different atoms on pristine two-dimensional monolayer MoS{sub 2} have been systematically investigated by using density functional calculations with van der Waals correction. The adatoms cover alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, main group metal, 3d-transition metals, coinage metal and nonmetal atoms. Depending on the adatom type, metallic, semimetallic or semiconducting behavior can be found in direct bandgap monolayer MoS{sub 2}. Additionally, local or long-range magnetic moments of two-dimensional MoS{sub 2} sheet can also attained through the adsorption. The detailed atomic-scale knowledge of single adsorption on MoS{sub 2} monolayer is important not only for the sake of a theoretical understanding, but also device level deposition technological application.

  1. Experimental study of laser-detected magnetic resonance based on atomic alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Di Domenico, Gianni; Bison, Georg; Groeger, Stephan; Knowles, Paul; Pazgalev, Anatoly S.; Rebetez, Martin; Saudan, Herve; Weis, Antoine

    2006-12-15

    We present an experimental study of the spectra produced by optical-radio-frequency double resonance in which resonant linearly polarized laser light is used in the optical pumping and detection processes. We show that the experimental spectra obtained for cesium are in excellent agreement with a very general theoretical model developed in our group [Weis, Bison, and Pazgalev, Phys. Rev. A 74, 033401 (2006)] and we investigate the limitations of this model. Finally, the results are discussed in view of their use in the study of relaxation processes in aligned alkali-metal vapors.

  2. Spectrum, radial wave functions, and hyperfine splittings of the Rydberg states in heavy alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanayei, Ali; Schopohl, Nils

    2016-07-01

    We present numerically accurate calculations of the bound-state spectrum of the highly excited valence electron in the heavy alkali-metal atoms solving the radial Schrödinger eigenvalue problem with a modern spectral collocation method that applies also for a large principal quantum number n ≫1 . As an effective single-particle potential we favor the reputable potential of Marinescu et al. [Phys. Rev. A 49, 982 (1994)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.49.982. Recent quasiclassical calculations of the quantum defect of the valence electron agree for orbital angular momentum l =0 ,1 ,2 ,... overall remarkably well with the results of the numerical calculations, but for the Rydberg states of rubidium and also cesium with l =3 this agreement is less fair. The reason for this anomaly is that in rubidium and cesium the potential acquires for l =3 deep inside the ionic core a second classical region, thus invalidating a standard Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) calculation with two widely spaced turning points. Comparing then our numerical solutions of the radial Schrödinger eigenvalue problem with the uniform analytic WKB approximation of Langer constructed around the remote turning point rn,j ,l (" close=")n -δ0)">+ we observe everywhere a remarkable agreement, apart from a tiny region around the inner turning point rn,j ,l (-). For s states the centrifugal barrier is absent and no inner turning point exists: rn,j ,0 (-)=0 . With the help of an ansatz proposed by Fock we obtain for the s states a second uniform analytic approximation to the radial wave function complementary to the WKB approximation of Langer, which is exact for r →0+ . From the patching condition, that is, for l =0 the Langer and Fock solutions should agree in the intermediate region 0

  3. Ab initio interaction potentials and scattering lengths for ultracold mixtures of metastable helium and alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedziera, Dariusz; Mentel, Łukasz; Żuchowski, Piotr S.; Knoop, Steven

    2015-06-01

    We have obtained accurate ab initio +4Σ quartet potentials for the diatomic metastable triplet helium+alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, Rb) systems, using all-electron restricted open-shell coupled cluster singles and doubles with noniterative triples corrections CCSD(T) calculations and accurate calculations of the long-range C6 coefficients. These potentials provide accurate ab initio quartet scattering lengths, which for these many-electron systems is possible, because of the small reduced masses and shallow potentials that result in a small amount of bound states. Our results are relevant for ultracold metastable triplet helium+alkali-metal mixture experiments.

  4. Feasibility of supersonic diode pumped alkali lasers: Model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2013-04-08

    The feasibility of supersonic operation of diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) is studied for Cs and K atoms applying model calculations, based on a semi-analytical model previously used for studying static and subsonic flow DPALs. The operation of supersonic lasers is compared with that measured and modeled in subsonic lasers. The maximum power of supersonic Cs and K lasers is found to be higher than that of subsonic lasers with the same resonator and alkali density at the laser inlet by 25% and 70%, respectively. These results indicate that for scaling-up the power of DPALs, supersonic expansion should be considered.

  5. (Super)alkali atoms interacting with the σ electron cloud: a novel interaction mode triggers large nonlinear optical response of M@P₄ and M@C₃H₆ (M=Li, Na, K and Li₃O).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingang; Yu, Guangtao; Huang, Xuri; Chen, Wei; Niu, Min

    2013-12-01

    Under high-level ab initio calculations, the geometrical structures and nonlinear optical properties of M@P₄ (M=Li, Na, K and Li₃O) and M@C₃H₆ (M=Li and Li₃O) were investigated; all were found to exhibit considerable first hyperpolarizabilities (18110, 1440, 22490, 50487, 2757 and 31776 au, respectively). The computational results revealed that when doping the (super)alkali atom M into the tetrahedral P₄ molecule, the original dual spherical aromaticity of the P₄ moiety is broken and new σ electron cloud is formed on the face of P₄ part interacting with the M atom. It was found that interaction of the (super)alkali atom with the σ electron cloud is a novel mode to produce diffuse excess electrons effectively to achieve a considerable β₀ value. Further, beyond the alkali atom, employing the superalkali unit can be a more effective approach to significantly enhance the first hyperpolarizability of the systems, due to the much lower vertical ionization potential. These results were further supported by the case of the (super)alkali atom interacting with the cyclopropane C₃H₆ molecule with its typical σ aromatic electron cloud. Moreover, the β₀ values of the M@P₄ series are nonmonotonic dependent on alkali atomic number, namely, 1440 au (M = Na) < 18110 au (Li) < 22490 au (K), inferring that the distance between the alkali atom and the interacting surface with the σ electron cloud in P4 is a crucial geometrical factor in determining their first hyperpolarizabilities. These intriguing findings will be advantageous for promoting the design of novel high-performance nonlinear optical materials.

  6. Superconducting resonator and Rydberg atom hybrid system in the strong coupling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Deshui; Landra, Alessandro; Valado, María Martínez; Hufnagel, Christoph; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2016-12-01

    We propose a promising hybrid quantum system, where a highly excited atom strongly interacts with a superconducting L C oscillator via the electric field of capacitor. An external electrostatic field is applied to tune the energy spectrum of the atom. The atomic qubit is implemented by two eigenstates near an avoided-level crossing in the dc Stark map of a Rydberg atom. Varying the electrostatic field brings the atomic-qubit transition on or off resonance with respect to the microwave resonator, leading to a strong atom-resonator coupling with an extremely large cooperativity. Like the nonlinearity induced by Josephson junctions in superconducting circuits, the large atom-resonator interface disturbs the harmonic potential of the resonator, resulting in an artificial two-level particle. Different universal two-qubit logic gates can also be performed on our hybrid system within the space where an atomic qubit couples to a single photon with an interaction strength much larger than any relaxation rates, opening the door to the cavity-mediated state transmission.

  7. Coherent Scattering of Near-Resonant Light by a Dense Microscopic Cold Atomic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennewein, S.; Besbes, M.; Schilder, N. J.; Jenkins, S. D.; Sauvan, C.; Ruostekoski, J.; Greffet, J.-J.; Sortais, Y. R. P.; Browaeys, A.

    2016-06-01

    We measure the coherent scattering of light by a cloud of laser-cooled atoms with a size comparable to the wavelength of light. By interfering a laser beam tuned near an atomic resonance with the field scattered by the atoms, we observe a resonance with a redshift, a broadening, and a saturation of the extinction for increasing atom numbers. We attribute these features to enhanced light-induced dipole-dipole interactions in a cold, dense atomic ensemble that result in a failure of standard predictions such as the "cooperative Lamb shift". The description of the atomic cloud by a mean-field model based on the Lorentz-Lorenz formula that ignores scattering events where light is scattered recurrently by the same atom and by a microscopic discrete dipole model that incorporates these effects lead to progressively closer agreement with the observations, despite remaining differences.

  8. Harmonic detection of magnetic resonance for sensitivity improvement of optical atomic magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbaran, M.; Tehranchi, M. M.; Hamidi, S. M.; Khalkhali, S. M. H.

    2017-02-01

    Highly sensitive atomic magnetometers use optically detected magnetic resonance of atomic spins to measure extremely weak magnetic field changes. The magnetometer sensitivity is directly proportional to the ratio of intensity to line-shape of the resonance signal. To obtain narrower resonance signal, we implemented harmonic detection of magnetic resonance method in Mx configuration. The nonlinear spin polarization dynamics in detection of the higher harmonics were employed in phenomenological Bloch equations. The measured and simulated harmonic components of the resonance signals in frequency domain yielded significantly narrower line-width accompanying much improved sensitivity. Our results confirm the sensitivity improvement by a factor of two in optical atomic magnetometer via second harmonic signal which can open a new insight in the weak magnetic field measurement system design.

  9. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: counting noble-gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, G.S.; Payne, M.G.; Chen, C.H.; Willis, R.D.; Lehmann, B.E.; Kramer, S.D.

    1981-06-01

    New work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions) is reported. When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. It is shown that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective.

  10. Simulation of FREE→FREE Absorption Spectra and the Calculation of Interaction Potentials for Alkali-Rare Gas Atom Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, J. Darby; Spinka, Thomas M.; Readle, Jason. D.; Eden, J. Gary

    2013-06-01

    We have simulated free→free (X^2Σ^+_{1/2}→B^2Σ^+_{1/2}) absorption spectra for alkali-rare gas pairs. By comparing simulation results with experimental data, we have been able to iteratively determine the form for the B^2Σ^+_{1/2} interaction potential for the system for a range in internuclear separation of 1.5-20 Å. Simulation methods will be presented, as will our results pertaining to Cs-Ar.

  11. Optimal conversion of Bose-Einstein-condensed atoms into molecules via a Feshbach resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Jaeyoon; Search, Chris P.; Djuric, Ivana

    2006-08-15

    In many experiments involving conversion of quantum-degenerate atomic gases into molecular dimers via a Feshbach resonance, an external magnetic field is linearly swept from above resonance to below resonance. In the adiabatic limit, the fraction of atoms converted into molecules is independent of the functional form of the sweep and is predicted to be 100%. However, for nonadiabatic sweeps through resonance, Landau-Zener theory predicts that a linear sweep will result in a negligible production of molecules. Here we employ a genetic algorithm to determine the functional time dependence of the magnetic field that produces the maximum number of molecules for sweep times that are comparable to the period of resonant atom-molecule oscillations, 2{pi}{omega}{sub Rabi}{sup -1}. The optimal sweep through resonance indicates that more than 95% of the atoms can be converted into molecules for sweep times as short as 2{pi}{omega}{sub Rabi}{sup -1} while the linear sweep results in a conversion of only a few percent. We also find that the qualitative form of the optimal sweep is independent of the strength of the two-body interactions between atoms and molecules and the width of the resonance.

  12. Research on the properties and interactions of simple atomic and ionic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novick, R.

    1972-01-01

    Simple ionic systems were studied, such as metastable autoionizing states of the negative He ion, two-photon decay spectrum of metastable He ion, optical excitation with low energy ions, and lifetime measurements of singly ionized Li and metastable He ion. Simple atomic systems were also investigated. Metastable autoionizing atomic energy levels in alkali elements were included, along with lifetime measurements of Cr-53, group 2A isotopes, and alkali metal atoms using level crossing and optical double resonance spectroscopy.

  13. Resonant interaction of trapped cold atoms with a magnetic cantilever tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Cris; Valencia, Jose; Geraci, Andrew A.; Eardley, Matthew; Moreland, John; Hollberg, Leo; Kitching, John

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance in an ensemble of laser-cooled trapped Rb atoms is excited using a microcantilever with a magnetic tip. The cantilever is mounted on a multilayer chip designed to capture, cool, and magnetically transport cold atoms. The coupling is observed by measuring the loss from a magnetic trap as the oscillating cantilever induces Zeeman-state transitions in the atoms. Interfacing cold atoms with mechanical devices could enable probing and manipulating atomic spins with nanometer spatial resolution and single-spin sensitivity, leading to new capabilities in quantum computation, quantum simulation, and precision sensing.

  14. Time-of-flight detection of ultra-cold atoms using resonant frequency modulation imaging.

    PubMed

    Hardman, K S; Wigley, P B; Everitt, P J; Manju, P; Kuhn, C C N; Robins, N P

    2016-06-01

    Resonant frequency modulation imaging is used to detect free falling ultra-cold atoms. A theoretical comparison of fluorescence imaging (FI) and frequency modulation imaging (FMI) is made, indicating that for low optical depth clouds, FMI accomplished a higher signal-to-noise ratio under conditions necessary for a 200 μm spatially resolved atom interferometer. A 750 ms time-of-flight measurement reveals near atom shot-noise limited number measurements of 2×106 Bose-condensed Rb87 atoms. The detection system is applied to high precision spinor BEC based atom interferometer.

  15. Atomic arrangement and electron band structure of Si(1 1 1)-ß-\\sqrt{3}\\times \\sqrt{3} -Bi reconstruction modified by alkali-metal adsorption: ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremeev, S. V.; Chukurov, E. N.; Gruznev, D. V.; Zotov, A. V.; Saranin, A. A.

    2015-08-01

    Using ab initio calculations, atomic structure and electronic properties of Si(1 1 1)\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} -Bi surface modified by adsorption of 1/3 monolayer of alkali metals, Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs, have been explored. Upon adsorption of all metals, a similar atomic structure develops at the surface where twisted chained Bi trimers are arranged into a honeycomb network and alkali metal atoms occupy the {{T}4} sites in the center of each honeycomb unit. Among other structural characteristics, the greatest variation concerns the relative heights at which alkali metals reside with respect to Bi-trimer layer. Except for Li, the other metals reside higher than Bi layer and their heights increase with atomic number. All adsorbed surface structures display similar electron band structures of which the most essential feature is metallic surface-state band with a giant spin splitting. This electronic property allows one to consider the Si(1 1 1)\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} -Bi surfaces modified by alkali metal adsorption as a set of material systems showing promise for spintronic applications.

  16. Atomic arrangement and electron band structure of Si(1 1 1)-ß-√3 x √3-Bi reconstruction modified by alkali-metal adsorption: ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Eremeev, S V; Chukurov, E N; Gruznev, D V; Zotov, A V; Saranin, A A

    2015-08-05

    Using ab initio calculations, atomic structure and electronic properties of Si(1 1 1)[Formula: see text]-Bi surface modified by adsorption of 1/3 monolayer of alkali metals, Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs, have been explored. Upon adsorption of all metals, a similar atomic structure develops at the surface where twisted chained Bi trimers are arranged into a honeycomb network and alkali metal atoms occupy the [Formula: see text] sites in the center of each honeycomb unit. Among other structural characteristics, the greatest variation concerns the relative heights at which alkali metals reside with respect to Bi-trimer layer. Except for Li, the other metals reside higher than Bi layer and their heights increase with atomic number. All adsorbed surface structures display similar electron band structures of which the most essential feature is metallic surface-state band with a giant spin splitting. This electronic property allows one to consider the Si(1 1 1)[Formula: see text]-Bi surfaces modified by alkali metal adsorption as a set of material systems showing promise for spintronic applications.

  17. Investigation of the local structure of Cu2+ ions doped in alkali lead tetraborate glasses by their electron paramagnetic resonance and optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying; Chen, Zhi

    2014-06-01

    The local structure of the Cu2+ centers in alkali lead tetraborate glasses was theoretically studied based on the optical spectra data and high-order perturbation formulas of the spin Hamiltonian parameters (electron paramagnetic resonance g factors g∥, g⊥ and hyperfine structure constants A∥, A⊥) for a 3d9 ion in a tetragonally elongated octahedron. In these formulas, the relative axial elongation of the ligand O2- octahedron around the Cu2+ due to the Jahn-Teller effect is taken into account by considering the contributions to the g factors from the tetragonal distortion which is characterized by the tetragonal crystal-field parameters Ds and Dt. From the calculations, the ligand O2- octahedral around Cu2+ is determined to suffer about 19.2% relative elongation along the C4 axis of the alkali lead tetraborate glass system, and a negative sign for A∥ and a positive sign for A⊥ for these Cu2+ centers are suggested in the discussion.

  18. Two-band description of resonant superfluidity in atomic Fermi gases

    DOE PAGES

    He, Lianyi; Hu, Hui; Liu, Xia -Ji

    2015-02-23

    Fermionic superfluidity in atomic Fermi gases across a Feshbach resonance is normally described by the atom-molecule theory, which treats the closed channel as a noninteracting point boson. In this work we present a theoretical description of the resonant superfluidity in analogy to the two-band superconductors. We employ the underlying two-channel scattering model of Feshbach resonance where the closed channel is treated as a composite boson with binding energy ε0 and the resonance is triggered by the microscopic interchannel coupling U12. The binding energy ε0 naturally serves as an energy scale of the system, which has been sent to infinity inmore » the atom-molecule theory. We show that the atom-molecule theory can be viewed as a leading-order low-energy effective theory of the underlying fermionic theory in the limit ε0→∞ and U12→0, while keeping the phenomenological atom-molecule coupling finite. The resulting two-band description of the superfluid state is in analogy to the BCS theory of two-band superconductors. In the dilute limit ε0→∞, the two-band description recovers precisely the atom-molecule theory. The two-band theory provides a natural approach to study the corrections because of a finite binding energy ε0 in realistic experimental systems. For broad and moderate resonances, the correction is not important for current experimental densities. However, for extremely narrow resonance, we find that the correction becomes significant. Lastly, the finite binding energy correction could be important for the stability of homogeneous polarized superfluid against phase separation in imbalanced Fermi gases across a narrow Feshbach resonance.« less

  19. Two-band description of resonant superfluidity in atomic Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    He, Lianyi; Hu, Hui; Liu, Xia -Ji

    2015-02-23

    Fermionic superfluidity in atomic Fermi gases across a Feshbach resonance is normally described by the atom-molecule theory, which treats the closed channel as a noninteracting point boson. In this work we present a theoretical description of the resonant superfluidity in analogy to the two-band superconductors. We employ the underlying two-channel scattering model of Feshbach resonance where the closed channel is treated as a composite boson with binding energy ε0 and the resonance is triggered by the microscopic interchannel coupling U12. The binding energy ε0 naturally serves as an energy scale of the system, which has been sent to infinity in the atom-molecule theory. We show that the atom-molecule theory can be viewed as a leading-order low-energy effective theory of the underlying fermionic theory in the limit ε0→∞ and U12→0, while keeping the phenomenological atom-molecule coupling finite. The resulting two-band description of the superfluid state is in analogy to the BCS theory of two-band superconductors. In the dilute limit ε0→∞, the two-band description recovers precisely the atom-molecule theory. The two-band theory provides a natural approach to study the corrections because of a finite binding energy ε0 in realistic experimental systems. For broad and moderate resonances, the correction is not important for current experimental densities. However, for extremely narrow resonance, we find that the correction becomes significant. Lastly, the finite binding energy correction could be important for the stability of homogeneous polarized superfluid against phase separation in imbalanced Fermi gases across a narrow Feshbach resonance.

  20. Dual-frequency resonance-tracking atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Brian J.; Callahan, Clint; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Proksch, Roger

    2007-11-01

    A dual-excitation method for resonant-frequency tracking in scanning probe microscopy based on amplitude detection is developed. This method allows the cantilever to be operated at or near resonance for techniques where standard phase locked loops are not possible. This includes techniques with non-acoustic driving where the phase of the driving force is frequency and/or position dependent. An example of the latter is piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), where the resonant frequency of the cantilever is strongly dependent on the contact stiffness of the tip-surface junction and the local mechanical properties, but the spatial variability of the drive phase rules out the use of a phase locked loop. Combined with high-voltage switching and imaging, dual-frequency, resonance-tracking PFM allows reliable studies of electromechanical and elastic properties and polarization dynamics in a broad range of inorganic and biological systems, and is illustrated using lead zirconate-titanate, rat tail collagen, and native and switched ferroelectric domains in lithium niobate.

  1. Enhancing the low frequency THz resonances (< 1 THz) of organic molecules via electronegative atom substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Jyotirmayee; Ray, Shaumik; Pesala, Bala

    2015-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology is an active area of research with various applications in non-intrusive imaging and spectroscopy. Very few organic molecules have significant resonances below 1 THz. Understanding the origin of low frequency THz modes in these molecules and their absence in other molecules could be extremely important in design and engineering molecules with low frequency THz resonances. These engineered molecules can be used as THz tags for anti-counterfeiting applications. Studies show that low frequency THz resonances are commonly observed in molecules having higher molecular mass and weak intermolecular hydrogen bonds. In this paper, we have explored the possibility of enhancing the strength of THz resonances below 1 THz through electronegative atom substitution. Adding an electronegative atom helps in achieving higher hydrogen bond strength to enhance the resonances below 1 THz. Here acetanilide has been used as a model system. THz-Time Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) results show that acetanilide has a small peak observed below 1 THz. Acetanilide can be converted to 2-fluoroacetanilide by adding an electronegative atom, fluorine, which doesn't have any prominent peak below 1 THz. However, by optimally choosing the position of the electronegative atom as in 4-fluoroacetanilide, a significant THz resonance at 0.86 THz is observed. The origin of low frequency resonances can be understood by carrying out Density Functional Theory (DFT) simulations of full crystal structure. These studies show that adding an electronegative atom to the organic molecules at an optimized position can result in significantly enhanced resonances below 1 THz.

  2. Resonance interaction energy between two accelerated identical atoms in a coaccelerated frame and the Unruh effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenting; Passante, Roberto; Rizzuto, Lucia

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the resonance interaction energy between two uniformly accelerated identical atoms, interacting with the scalar field or the electromagnetic field in the vacuum state, in the reference frame coaccelerating with the atoms. We assume that one atom is excited and the other is in the ground state and that they are prepared in their correlated symmetric or antisymmetric state. Using perturbation theory, we separate, at the second order in the atom-field coupling, the contributions of vacuum fluctuations and a radiation reaction field to the energy shift of the interacting system. We show that only the radiation reaction term contributes to the resonance interaction between the two atoms, while Unruh thermal fluctuations, related to the vacuum fluctuations contribution, do not affect the resonance interatomic interaction. We also show that the resonance interaction between two uniformly accelerated atoms, recently investigated in the comoving (locally inertial) frame, can be recovered in the coaccelerated frame, without the additional assumption of the Fulling-Davies-Unruh temperature for the quantum fields (as necessary for the Lamb shift, for example). This indicates, in the case considered, the equivalence between the coaccelerated frame and the locally inertial frame.

  3. Spectroscopy of laser-induced autoionizing nonlinear resonances in atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, L. I.; Kovachev, V. V.

    2015-03-01

    Efficient harmonic generation at laser-induced autoionizing state in continuum, were observed for the first time by our laboratory [1,2,3]. In this paper, nonlinear frequency mixing in alkali metal vapors at induced continuum structure in Na, are studied in detail. Besides, measurement of nonlinear optical susceptibility at induced autoionizing resonance, is performed. Tunable ultraviolet radiations by four-photon processes near induced resonances are obtained. Estimations of the real and imaginary parts of the nonlinearities, are estimated. We will specially note, that the resonant photoabsorption of ions is experimentally investigated since it gives information about the autoionizing states, which is impossible to obtain on the base only of the emission spectra. We use also laser inducing for obtaining of powerful radiation source in VUV. Thus, many actual problems as the selective impact on matter, laser photochemistry and laser isotope separation are connected directly with the induced autoionizing nonlinear resonances. The main interest is to control the spectral characteristics of continuum. The discrete level from the continuum structure leads to appearance of asymmetrical autoionizing resonance onto the background of the broad-band absorption line.

  4. Superharmonic resonances in a strongly coupled cavity-atom system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buks, Eyal; Deng, Chunqing; Orgazzi, Jean-Luc F. X.; Otto, Martin; Lupascu, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    We study a system consisting of a superconducting flux qubit strongly coupled to a microwave cavity. The fundamental cavity mode is externally driven and the response is investigated in the weak nonlinear regime. We find that near the crossing point, at which the resonance frequencies of the cavity mode and qubit coincide, the sign of the Kerr coefficient changes, and consequently the type of nonlinear response changes from softening to hardening. Furthermore, the cavity response exhibits superharmonic resonances (SHR) when the ratio between the qubit frequency and the cavity fundamental mode frequency is tuned close to an integer value. The nonlinear response is characterized by the method of intermodulation and both signal and idler gains are measured. The experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions and good qualitative agreement is obtained. The SHRs have potential for applications in quantum amplification and generation of entangled states of light.

  5. Resonant optical control of the spin of a single Cr atom in a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuente-Sampietro, A.; Utsumi, H.; Boukari, H.; Kuroda, S.; Besombes, L.

    2017-01-01

    A Cr atom in a semiconductor host carries a localized spin with an intrinsic large spin to strain coupling, which is particularly promising for the development of hybrid spin-mechanical systems and coherent mechanical spin driving. We demonstrate here that the spin of an individual Cr atom inserted in a semiconductor quantum dot can be controlled optically. We first show that a Cr spin can be prepared by resonant optical pumping. Monitoring the time dependence of the intensity of the resonant fluorescence of the quantum dot during this process permits us to probe the dynamics of the optical initialization of the Cr spin. Using this initialization and readout technique we measured a Cr spin relaxation time at T =5 K in the microsecond range. We finally demonstrate that, under a resonant single-mode laser field, the energy of any spin state of an individual Cr atom can be independently tuned by using the optical Stark effect.

  6. Atomic-resolution single-spin magnetic resonance detection concept based on tunneling force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, A.; Ambal, K.; Boehme, C.; Williams, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    A study of a force detected single-spin magnetic resonance measurement concept with atomic spatial resolution is presented. The method is based upon electrostatic force detection of spin-selection rule controlled single-electron tunneling between two electrically isolated paramagnetic states. Single-spin magnetic resonance detection is possible by measuring the force detected tunneling charge noise on and off spin resonance. Simulation results of this charge noise, based upon physical models of the tunneling and spin physics, are directly compared to measured atomic force microscopy system noise. The results show that the approach could provide single-spin measurement of electrically isolated qubit states with atomic spatial resolution at room temperature.

  7. Narrow-band N-resonance formed in thin rubidium atomic layers

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, A.; Mirzoyan, R.; Sarkisyan, D.

    2012-11-15

    The narrow-band N-resonance formed in a {Lambda} system of D{sub 1}-line rubidium atoms is studied in the presence of a buffer gas (neon) and the radiations of two continuous narrow-band diode lasers. Special-purpose cells are used to investigate the dependence of the process on vapor column thickness L in millimeter, micrometer, and nanometer ranges. A comparison of the dependences of the N-resonance and the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) resonance on L demonstrates that the minimum (record) thickness at which the N-resonance can be detected is L = 50 {mu}m and that a high-contrast EIT resonance can easily be formed even at L Almost-Equal-To 800 nm. The N-resonance in a magnetic field for {sup 85}Rb atoms is shown to split into five or six components depending on the magnetic field and laser radiation directions. The results obtained indicate that levels F{sub g} = 2, 3 are initial and final in the N-resonance formation. The dependence of the N-resonance on the angle between the laser beams is analyzed, and practical applications are noted.

  8. Autoionization resonance states of two-electron atomic systems with finite spherical confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Sumana; Ho, Y. K.

    2011-09-15

    We investigate the lowest-lying S-wave resonant states of two-electron atoms confined by a spherical quantum cavity under the framework of the stabilization method. Hylleraas-type wave functions (basis length N = 444) taking the correlation effects between all the charged particles into account are used in the present paper. The finite oscillator potential is used to represent the confinement potential. We present the resonant parameters (energies and widths) of the quantum-confined two-electron atoms with different depths and various ranges of the potentials.

  9. Coherent-population-trapping resonances with linearly polarized light for all-optical miniature atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zibrov, Sergei A.; Velichansky, Vladimir L.; Novikova, Irina; Phillips, David F.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Zibrov, Alexander S.; Taichenachev, Alexey V.; Yudin, Valery I.

    2010-01-15

    We present a joint theoretical and experimental characterization of the coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance excited on the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb atoms by bichromatic linearly polarized laser light. We observe high-contrast transmission resonances (up to approx =25%), which makes this excitation scheme promising for miniature all-optical atomic clock applications. We also demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by proper choice of the frequencies and relative intensities of the two laser-field components. Our theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  10. Crossover of Feshbach Resonances to Shape-Type Resonances in Electron-Hydrogen Atom Excitation with a Screened Coulomb Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Songbin; Wang Jianguo; Janev, R. K.

    2010-01-15

    The effects of Coulomb interaction screening on electron-hydrogen atom excitation in the n=2 threshold region are investigated by using the R-matrix method with pseudostates. The interaction screening lifts the l degeneracy of n=2 Coulomb energy level, producing two distinct thresholds for 2s and 2p states. The phenomenon of transformation of {sup 1,3}P and {sup 1}D Feshbach resonances into shape-type resonances is observed when they pass across the 2s and 2p threshold, respectively, as the interaction screening increases. It is shown that this resonance transformation leads to dramatic effects in the 1s->2s and 1s->2p excitation collision strengths in the n=2 threshold collision energy region.

  11. Atomic motion of resonantly vibrating quartz crystal visualized by time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyagi, Shinobu; Osawa, Hitoshi; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Fujiwara, Akihiko

    2015-11-16

    Transient atomic displacements during a resonant thickness-shear vibration of AT-cut α-quartz are revealed by time-resolved X-ray diffraction under an alternating electric field. The lattice strain resonantly amplified by the alternating electric field is ∼10{sup 4} times larger than that induced by a static electric field. The resonantly amplified lattice strain is achieved by fast displacements of oxygen anions and collateral resilient deformation of Si−O−Si angles bridging rigid SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra, which efficiently transduce electric energy into elastic energy.

  12. Nanoscale Subsurface Imaging via Resonant Difference-Frequency Atomic Force Ultrasonic Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Sean A.; Cantrell, John H.; Lilehei, Peter T.

    2007-01-01

    A novel scanning probe microscope methodology has been developed that employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by the fundamental resonance frequency of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever fundamental resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of embedded nanoscale features.

  13. Enhanced Entanglement Between Two Mechanical Resonators in Two Optomechanical Cavities with an Atomic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, E.; Li, DanYang; Li, FengZhi; Ma, YongHong

    2017-02-01

    We propose a theoretical method to enhance the entanglement between two mechanical resonators in two optomechanical cavities, which are coupled by the photon-hopping process, and each opto-mechanical cavity are consisted of a Fabry-Perot cavity and a mechanical oscillator by applying N atomic medium. We explore the effect of the entanglement between two mechanical oscillators with two atomic mediums and without them, respectively. The results show that the introduction of atoms can effectively increase the entanglement between the two oscillator modes.

  14. Dissipative Double-Well Potential for Cold Atoms: Kramers Rate and Stochastic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroescu, Ion; Hume, David B.; Oberthaler, Markus K.

    2016-12-01

    We experimentally study particle exchange in a dissipative double-well potential using laser-cooled atoms in a hybrid trap. We measure the particle hopping rate as a function of barrier height, temperature, and atom number. Single-particle resolution allows us to measure rates over more than 4 orders of magnitude and distinguish the effects of loss and hopping. Deviations from the Arrhenius-law scaling at high barrier heights occur due to cold collisions between atoms within a well. By driving the system periodically, we characterize the phenomenon of stochastic resonance in the system response.

  15. Dissipative Double-Well Potential for Cold Atoms: Kramers Rate and Stochastic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Stroescu, Ion; Hume, David B; Oberthaler, Markus K

    2016-12-09

    We experimentally study particle exchange in a dissipative double-well potential using laser-cooled atoms in a hybrid trap. We measure the particle hopping rate as a function of barrier height, temperature, and atom number. Single-particle resolution allows us to measure rates over more than 4 orders of magnitude and distinguish the effects of loss and hopping. Deviations from the Arrhenius-law scaling at high barrier heights occur due to cold collisions between atoms within a well. By driving the system periodically, we characterize the phenomenon of stochastic resonance in the system response.

  16. The confinement induced resonance in spin-orbit coupled cold atoms with Raman coupling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Cai; Song, Shu-Wei; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The confinement induced resonance provides an indispensable tool for the realization of the low-dimensional strongly interacting quantum system. Here, we investigate the confinement induced resonance in spin-orbit coupled cold atoms with Raman coupling. We find that the quasi-bound levels induced by the spin-orbit coupling and Raman coupling result in the Feshbach-type resonances. For sufficiently large Raman coupling, the bound states in one dimension exist only for sufficiently strong attractive interaction. Furthermore, the bound states in quasi-one dimension exist only for sufficient large ratio of the length scale of confinement to three dimensional s-wave scattering length. The Raman coupling substantially changes the confinement-induced resonance position. We give a proposal to realize confinement induced resonance through increasing Raman coupling strength in experiments. PMID:24862314

  17. Charge exchange and cluster formation in an rf Paul trap: interaction of alkali atoms with C +60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, Stuart; Cameron, Douglas; Rokni, Mordechai; Hill, Winfield; Parks, J. H.

    1996-06-01

    A Paul ion trap was used to study the formation of clusters under controlled temperature and pressure conditions. Exposure of cold C +60 ions to Li flux leads to the formation of Li nC +60 clusters ( n = 1-18) occurring by the sequential association of Li atoms. Cluster formation dependence on He pressure displayed a competition between vibrational relaxation and unimolecular dissociation. Collisions with Na, K, Rb and Cs atoms resulted in dissociative charge exchange. Decay rates of C +60 ions resulting from these low-energy charge exchange collisions were consistent with Langevin capture rates.

  18. Multiple plasmon resonance in a concentric silver-atomic medium nanoshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenxiao; Wang, Xin; Chai, Yaqin; Gao, Shaoyan; Li, Fuli

    2017-03-01

    Optical properties of a concentric silver-atomic medium nanoshell are investigated based on the quasi-static and Maxwell-Garnett approximations. We consider the atomic medium as Λ-type three-level atoms driven simultaneously by a coupling field and a probe field. It is shown that the strong coupling between atoms and sphere plasmon of silver core emerges of multiple-mode and ultra narrow-band absorption spectra by controlling the permittivity of the atomic medium. In particular, coherent driving of the coupling field allows us to manipulate surface plasmon resonances, including frequency shift and bandwidth modification. Furthermore, we demonstrate that selective absorption enhancement of different modes can be achieved by tuning the radius of the core and the shell. These absorption properties yield potential applications of the nanoshells as ultracompact tunable nonlinear optical devices.

  19. Signal correlation in the tandem of a spin oscillator and microwave frequency discriminator with laser-pumped alkali atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, A. A.; Ermak, S. V.; Sagitov, E. A.; Smolin, R. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    We have studied the influence of low-frequency noise on the stability of resonance frequency of a self-oscillating magnetometer on 87Rb vapor with simultaneous monitoring of the signal of radio-optical resonance on the magnetic-field-dependent microwave transition under laser pumping at the D 2 line of the head doublet. The difference of synchronous records of detected signals reduced to the same scale in magnetic field units was processed to determine the Allan variance as a function of the averaging time. The correlation coefficient characterizing the coupling of detected signals determined by the pumping rate and intensity of radio fields generated in the region of the absorption chamber. The self-oscillating magnetometer can only operate provided that there is laser tuning to the long-wavelength component of the electric-dipole transition.

  20. 3.4 GHz composite thin film bulk acoustic wave resonator for miniaturized atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artieda, Alvaro; Muralt, Paul

    2011-06-01

    Triple layer SiO2/AlN/SiO2 composite thin film bulk acoustic wave resonators (TFBARs) were studied for applications in atomic clocks. The TFBAR's were tuned to 3.4 GHz, corresponding to half the hyperfine splitting of the ground state of rubidium 87Rb atoms. The quality factor (Q) was equal to 2300 and the temperature coefficient of the resonance frequency fr amounted to 1.5 ppm/K. A figure of merit Qfr of ˜ 0.8 × 1013 Hz and a thickness mode coupling factor of 1% were reached. Such figures are ideal for frequency sources in an oscillator circuit that tracks the optical signal in atomic clocks.

  1. Stabilization of a laser on a large-detuned atomic-reference frequency by resonant interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza, Priscila M. T.; Nascimento, Guilherme G.; Araújo, Michelle O.; da Silva, Cícero M.; Cavalcante, Hugo L. D. de S.; Oriá, Marcos; Chevrollier, Martine; Passerat de Silans, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    We report a simple technique for stabilization of a laser frequency at the wings of an atomic resonance. The reference signal used for stabilization issues from interference effects obtained in a low-quality cavity filled with a resonant atomic vapour. For a frequency detuned 2.6 GHz from the 133Cs D2 6S{}1/2 F = 4 to 6P{}3/2 F’ = 5 transition, the fractional frequency Allan deviation is 10-8 for averaging times of 300 s, corresponding to a frequency deviation of 4 MHz. Adequate choice of the atomic density and of the cell thickness allows locking the laser at detunings larger than 10 GHz. Such a simple technique does not require magnetic fields or signal modulation.

  2. Loading and compressing cesium atoms in a very far-off- resonant light trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depue, Marshall Thomas

    An experiment is described in which 3 × 107 Cs atoms are loaded into a 400 μm crossed beam far-off-resonant trap (FORT) that is only 2.5 μK deep. A high density sample is prepared in a magneto-optic trap (MOT), cooled in a 3D far-off-resonant lattice (FORL), optically pumped into the lowest energy state, adiabatically released from the FORL, magnetically levitated, and transferred to the final FORT trap with a phase space density of 10-3. Spontaneous emission in the FORT is negligible, and the atoms can be compressed in the FORT to a spatial density of higher than 1014 cm-3. Evaporative cooling under these conditions can proceed rapidly. The atoms are monitored with a high intensity fluorescent imaging technique that is well suited to providing accurate number and density measurements for optically thick samples.

  3. 3.4 GHz composite thin film bulk acoustic wave resonator for miniaturized atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Artieda, Alvaro; Muralt, Paul

    2011-06-27

    Triple layer SiO{sub 2}/AlN/SiO{sub 2} composite thin film bulk acoustic wave resonators (TFBARs) were studied for applications in atomic clocks. The TFBAR's were tuned to 3.4 GHz, corresponding to half the hyperfine splitting of the ground state of rubidium {sup 87}Rb atoms. The quality factor (Q) was equal to 2300 and the temperature coefficient of the resonance frequency f{sub r} amounted to 1.5 ppm/K. A figure of merit Qf{sub r} of {approx} 0.8 x 10{sup 13} Hz and a thickness mode coupling factor of 1% were reached. Such figures are ideal for frequency sources in an oscillator circuit that tracks the optical signal in atomic clocks.

  4. Quantum annealing with ultracold atoms in a multimode optical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torggler, Valentin; Krämer, Sebastian; Ritsch, Helmut

    2017-03-01

    A dilutely filled N -site optical lattice near zero temperature within a high-Q multimode cavity can be mapped to a spin ensemble with tailorable interactions at all length scales. The effective full site to site interaction matrix can be dynamically controlled by the application of up to N (N +1 )/2 laser beams of suitable geometry, frequency, and power, which allows for the implementation of quantum annealing dynamics relying on the all-to-all effective spin coupling controllable in real time. Via an adiabatic sweep starting from a superfluid initial state one can find the lowest-energy stationary state of this system. As the cavity modes are lossy, errors can be amended and the ground state can still be reached even from a finite temperature state via ground-state cavity cooling. The physical properties of the final atomic state can be directly and almost nondestructively read off from the cavity output fields. As an example we simulate a quantum Hopfield associative memory scheme.

  5. Changes in the shape of atomic lines of alkali metals in sonoluminescence spectra of solutions of surfactants and halogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazachek, M. V.; Gordeychuk, T. V.

    2013-11-01

    The multibubble sonoluminescence spectra of aqueous solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate, of the mixture of sodium dodecyl sulfate with lithium and potassium chlorides, and of sodium and potassium halogenides were measured near the lines of metals at an ultrasonic frequency of 20 kHz. The Na, Li, and K lines in spectra of surfactant solutions are noticeably narrower than those obtained in solutions of metal chlorides. The width of Na lines in spectra of metal fluorides, chlorides, and iodides remains constant, while that of the K line increases with increasing atomic weight of a halogen. The results are discussed in the context of the effect that the bonding strength of an atom possibly has on the formation of metal lines in sonoluminescence spectra.

  6. Nonresonant corrections for the optical resonance frequency measurements in the hydrogen atom

    SciTech Connect

    Labzowsky, Leonti; Schedrin, Gavriil; Solovyev, Dmitrii; Chernovskaya, Evgenia; Plunien, Guenter; Karshenboim, Savely

    2009-05-15

    The deviation of the natural spectral line profile from the Lorentz shape for the optical resonant frequency measurements is considered. This deviation leads to an asymmetry, which is mainly due to nonresonant correction to the resonant Lorentz profile. The nonresonant corrections are studied for the different types of the atomic resonant experiments. The most accurate recent optical resonance experiments are analyzed, i.e., the two-photon 1s-2s resonance excitation of the hydrogen atom with the delayed decay in the external electric field. The description of the nonresonant correction in the latter case requires the employment of QED with different in and out Hamiltonians. The nonresonant corrections for this experiment are investigated and found to be about 10{sup -5} Hz, while the recent experimental uncertainty is 34 Hz and in the near feature is expected to be a few hertz. The projected 1s-2s resonance excitation experiment with the three-photon ionization detection (which is now in progress) is also considered.

  7. High-sensitivity imaging with lateral resonance mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ren-Feng; Yang, Chih-Wen; Huang, Kuang-Yuh; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-11-03

    In the operation of a dynamic mode atomic force microscope, a micro-fabricated rectangular cantilever is typically oscillated at or near its mechanical resonance frequency. Lateral bending resonances of cantilevers are rarely used because the resonances are not expected to be detected by the beam-deflection method. In this work, we found that micro-cantilevers with a large tip produced an out-of-plane displacement in lateral resonance (LR), which could be detected with the beam-deflection method. Finite-element analysis indicated that the presence of a large tip is the major source of the out-of-plane coupling for the LR. We also imaged a heterogeneous sample by operating a cantilever in LR, torsional resonance, and tapping modes. LR mode yielded a small deformation and noise level in the height maps as well as a high contrast and small noise level in the phase maps. LR mode also had a resonance frequency that was orders of magnitude higher than that of tapping mode. Operation with LR mode may have the benefits of high-speed scanning, high-sensitivity imaging, and mapping of in-plane mechanical properties of the sample surface. In general, LR mode may become a powerful new atomic force microscopy technique for characterizing sample materials.

  8. TRINAT apparatus for measurements of correlations from the beta decay of magneto-optically trapped polarized alkali atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelov, Alexandre; Behr, J. A.; Kurchaninov, L.; Olchanski, K.; Smale, S.; Behling, S.; Melconian, D.; Fenker, B.; Mehlman, M.; Shilding, P. D.; Anholm, M.; Ashery, D.; Gwinner, G.; Trinat Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Measurements of correlations from beta decay of highly polarized atoms from MOT requires a fast transition between trapping and polarization/measurement cycles to reduce an unwanted expansion of decaying atoms. To achieve this, we have developed an apparatus employing AC MOT, which required placing high-current and low-inductance coils of magnetic quadrupole inside the stainless steel vacuum vessel and allowed us to reduce a time gap between trapping and measurement cycles (the quadrupole magnetic field in the trap region has to become less than 50 mG) to less than 100 μs. The nuclear detection system consists of an electrostatic spectrometer of recoiling ions and shake-off electrons with MCP based detectors in back-to-back geometry as well as two scintillator based β - telescopes, normal to the MCP-MCP axis. This system allowed us to successfully measure the beta asymmetry in the β+ decay of polarized 37K atoms with significantly reduced backgrounds. Time-varying magnetic field from the AC MOT and stationary guiding electric field allowed us to probe the energy distribution of the shakeoff electrons in the range 5 -30 eV. NSERC, NRC through TRIUMF, DOE ER40773 and ER41747, State of Texas, Israel Science Foundation.

  9. Optimal densities of alkali metal atoms in an optically pumped K-Rb hybrid atomic magnetometer considering the spatial distribution of spin polarization.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yosuke; Sato, Daichi; Kamada, Keigo; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2016-07-11

    An optically pumped K-Rb hybrid atomic magnetometer can be a useful tool for biomagnetic measurements due to the high spatial homogeneity of its sensor property inside a cell. However, because the property varies depending on the densities of potassium and rubidium atoms, optimization of the densities is essential. In this study, by using the Bloch equations of K and Rb and considering the spatial distribution of the spin polarization, we confirmed that the calculation results of spin polarization behavior are in good agreement with the experimental data. Using our model, we calculated the spatial distribution of the spin polarization and found that the optimal density of K atoms is 3 × 1019 m-3 and the optimal density ratio is nK/nRb ~ 400 to maximize the output signal and enhance spatial homogeneity of the sensor property.

  10. 420nm alkali blue laser based on two-photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yan-nan; Li, Yi-min; Liu, Tong; Gong, Fa-quan; Jia, Chun-yan; Hu, Shu; Gai, Bao-dong; Guo, Jing-wei; Liu, Wan-fa

    2015-02-01

    Based on two-photon absorption, a 420nm blue laser of alkali Rb vapor was demonstrated, and a dye laser was used as the pumping laser. Utilizing the energy level structure of Rb atom, lasering mechanism and two-photon absorption process are analyzed. Absorbing two 778.1nm photons, Rb atoms were excited from 52 S1/2 to 52 D5/2, then relaxed to 62 P3/2 with mid infrared photon radiation. 420nm blue laser was achieved by the transition 62 P3/2-->52 S1/2. To improve efficiency of the blue laser, two-photon resonant excitation pumped alkali vapor blue lasers are proposed, which will be good beam quality, high efficiency and scalable blue lasers. The development of diode pumped alkali vapor blue laser is expected.

  11. Atom-at-a-time laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of nobelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laatiaoui, Mustapha; Lauth, Werner; Backe, Hartmut; Block, Michael; Ackermann, Dieter; Cheal, Bradley; Chhetri, Premaditya; Düllmann, Christoph Emanuel; van Duppen, Piet; Even, Julia; Ferrer, Rafael; Giacoppo, Francesca; Götz, Stefan; Heßberger, Fritz Peter; Huyse, Mark; Kaleja, Oliver; Khuyagbaatar, Jadambaa; Kunz, Peter; Lautenschläger, Felix; Mistry, Andrew Kishor; Raeder, Sebastian; Ramirez, Enrique Minaya; Walther, Thomas; Wraith, Calvin; Yakushev, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Optical spectroscopy of a primordial isotope has traditionally formed the basis for understanding the atomic structure of an element. Such studies have been conducted for most elements and theoretical modelling can be performed to high precision, taking into account relativistic effects that scale approximately as the square of the atomic number. However, for the transfermium elements (those with atomic numbers greater than 100), the atomic structure is experimentally unknown. These radioactive elements are produced in nuclear fusion reactions at rates of only a few atoms per second at most and must be studied immediately following their production, which has so far precluded their optical spectroscopy. Here we report laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of nobelium (No; atomic number 102) in single-atom-at-a-time quantities, in which we identify the ground-state transition 1S0 1P1. By combining this result with data from an observed Rydberg series, we obtain an upper limit for the ionization potential of nobelium. These accurate results from direct laser excitations of outer-shell electrons cannot be achieved using state-of-the-art relativistic many-body calculations that include quantum electrodynamic effects, owing to large uncertainties in the modelled transition energies of the complex systems under consideration. Our work opens the door to high-precision measurements of various atomic and nuclear properties of elements heavier than nobelium, and motivates future theoretical work.

  12. Conversion of Laser Phase Noise to Amplitude Noise in a Resonant Atomic Vapor: The Role of Laser Linewidth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    fiber optic sensors ; atomic frequency standards, applied laser spectroscopy, laser chemistry, atmospheric propagation and beam control, LIDAR/LADAR...SMC-TR-99-11 AEROSPACE REPORT NO. TR-98(8555)-14 Conversion of Laser Phase Noise to Amplitude Noise in a Resonant Atomic Vapor: The Role of Laser ...1999 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Conversion of Laser Phase Noise to Amplitude Noise in a Resonant Atomic Vapor: The Role

  13. Sensitivity analysis of single-layer graphene resonators using atomic finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Haw-Long; Hsu, Jung-Chang; Lin, Shu-Yu; Chang, Win-Jin

    2013-09-28

    Atomic finite element simulation is applied to study the natural frequency and sensitivity of a single-layer graphene-based resonator with CCCC, SSSS, CFCF, SFSF, and CFCF boundary conditions using the commercial code ANSYS. The fundamental frequencies of the graphene sheet are compared with the results of the previous finite element study. In addition, the sensitivity of the resonator is compared with the early work based on nonlocal elasticity theory. The results of the comparison are very good in all considered cases. The sensitivities of the resonator with different boundary conditions are obtained, and the order based on the boundary condition is CCCC > SSSS > CFCF > SFSF > CFFF. The highest sensitivity is obtained when the attached mass is located at the center of the resonator. This is useful for the design of a highly sensitive graphene-based mass sensor.

  14. Contact resonance atomic force microscopy imaging in air and water using photothermal excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Kocun, Marta; Labuda, Aleksander; Gannepalli, Anil; Proksch, Roger

    2015-08-15

    Contact Resonance Force Microscopy (CR-FM) is a leading atomic force microscopy technique for measuring viscoelastic nano-mechanical properties. Conventional piezo-excited CR-FM measurements have been limited to imaging in air, since the “forest of peaks” frequency response associated with acoustic excitation methods effectively masks the true cantilever resonance. Using photothermal excitation results in clean contact, resonance spectra that closely match the ideal frequency response of the cantilever, allowing unambiguous and simple resonance frequency and quality factor measurements in air and liquids alike. This extends the capabilities of CR-FM to biologically relevant and other soft samples in liquid environments. We demonstrate CR-FM in air and water on both stiff silicon/titanium samples and softer polystyrene-polyethylene-polypropylene polymer samples with the quantitative moduli having very good agreement between expected and measured values.

  15. Contact resonance atomic force microscopy imaging in air and water using photothermal excitation.

    PubMed

    Kocun, Marta; Labuda, Aleksander; Gannepalli, Anil; Proksch, Roger

    2015-08-01

    Contact Resonance Force Microscopy (CR-FM) is a leading atomic force microscopy technique for measuring viscoelastic nano-mechanical properties. Conventional piezo-excited CR-FM measurements have been limited to imaging in air, since the "forest of peaks" frequency response associated with acoustic excitation methods effectively masks the true cantilever resonance. Using photothermal excitation results in clean contact, resonance spectra that closely match the ideal frequency response of the cantilever, allowing unambiguous and simple resonance frequency and quality factor measurements in air and liquids alike. This extends the capabilities of CR-FM to biologically relevant and other soft samples in liquid environments. We demonstrate CR-FM in air and water on both stiff silicon/titanium samples and softer polystyrene-polyethylene-polypropylene polymer samples with the quantitative moduli having very good agreement between expected and measured values.

  16. Precision measurements of cross-sections for inelastic processes in collisions of alkali metal ions with atoms of rare gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomsadze, R. A.; Gochitashvili, M. R.; Kezerashvili, R. Ya.

    2017-01-01

    A multifaceted experimental study of collisions of Na+ and K+ ions in the energy range of 0.5-10 keV with He and Ar atoms is presented. Absolute cross-sections for charge-exchange, ionization, stripping and excitation processes were measured using a refined version of the transfer electric field method, angle- and energy-dependent collection of product ions, energy loss and optical spectroscopy methods. The experimental data and the schematic correlation diagrams are employed to analyze and determine the mechanisms for these processes.

  17. Plasma formation in diode pumped alkali lasers sustained in Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markosyan, Aram H.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-11-01

    In diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs), lasing action occurs on the resonant lines of alkali atoms following pumping by broadband semiconductor lasers. The goal is to convert the efficient but usually poor optical quality of inexpensive diode lasers into the high optical quality of atomic vapor lasers. Resonant excitation of alkali vapor leads to plasma formation through the excitation transfer from the 2P states to upper lying states, which then are photoionized by the pump and intracavity radiation. A first principles global model was developed to investigate the operation of the He/Cs DPAL system and the consequences of plasma formation on the efficiency of the laser. Over a range of pump powers, cell temperatures, excitation frequency, and mole fraction of the collision mixing agent (N2 or C2H6), we found that sufficient plasma formation can occur that the Cs vapor is depleted. Although N2 is not a favored collisional mixing agent due to large rates of quenching of the 2P states, we found a range of pump parameters where laser oscillation may occur. The poor performance of N2 buffered systems may be explained in part by plasma formation. We found that during the operation of the DPAL system with N2 as the collisional mixing agent, plasma formation is in excess of 1014-1015 cm-3, which can degrade laser output intensity by both depletion of the neutral vapor and electron collisional mixing of the laser levels.

  18. Terahertz response of fractal meta-atoms based on concentric rectangular square resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Zhenyu Shi, Wangzhou; Peng, Wei

    2015-11-21

    We investigate the terahertz electromagnetic responses of fractal meta-atoms (MAs) induced by different mode coupling mechanisms. Two types of MAs based on concentric rectangular square (CRS) resonators are presented: independent CRS (I-CRS) and junctional-CRS (J-CRS). In I-CRS, each resonator works as an independent dipole so as to result in the multiple resonance modes when the fractal level is above 1. In J-CRS, however, the generated layer is rotated by π/2 radius to the adjacent CRS in one MA. The multiple resonance modes are coupled into a single mode resonance. The fractal level increasing induces resonance modes redshift in I-CRS while blueshift in J-CRS. When the fractal level is below 4, the mode Q factor of J-CRS is in between the two modes of I-CRS; when the fractal level is 4 or above, the mode Q factor of J-CRS exceeds the two modes of I-CRS. Furthermore, the modulation depth (MD) decreases in I-CRS while it increases in J-CRS with the increase in fractal levels. The surface currents analysis reveals that the capacitive coupling of modes in I-CRS results in the modes redshift, while the conductive coupling of modes in J-CRS induces the mode blueshift. A high Q mode with large MD can be achieved via conductive coupling between the resonators of different scales in a fractal MA.

  19. High-Throughput Fabrication of Resonant Metamaterials with Ultrasmall Coaxial Apertures via Atomic Layer Lithography.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Daehan; Nguyen, Ngoc-Cuong; Martin-Moreno, Luis; Mohr, Daniel A; Carretero-Palacios, Sol; Shaver, Jonah; Peraire, Jaime; Ebbesen, Thomas W; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2016-03-09

    We combine atomic layer lithography and glancing-angle ion polishing to create wafer-scale metamaterials composed of dense arrays of ultrasmall coaxial nanocavities in gold films. This new fabrication scheme makes it possible to shrink the diameter and increase the packing density of 2 nm-gap coaxial resonators, an extreme subwavelength structure first manufactured via atomic layer lithography, both by a factor of 100 with respect to previous studies. We demonstrate that the nonpropagating zeroth-order Fabry-Pérot mode, which possesses slow light-like properties at the cutoff resonance, traps infrared light inside 2 nm gaps (gap volume ∼ λ(3)/10(6)). Notably, the annular gaps cover only 3% or less of the metal surface, while open-area normalized transmission is as high as 1700% at the epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) condition. The resulting energy accumulation alongside extraordinary optical transmission can benefit applications in nonlinear optics, optical trapping, and surface-enhanced spectroscopies. Furthermore, because the resonance wavelength is independent of the cavity length and dramatically red shifts as the gap size is reduced, large-area arrays can be constructed with λresonance ≫ period, making this fabrication method ideal for manufacturing resonant metamaterials.

  20. High-Throughput Fabrication of Resonant Metamaterials with Ultrasmall Coaxial Apertures via Atomic Layer Lithography

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We combine atomic layer lithography and glancing-angle ion polishing to create wafer-scale metamaterials composed of dense arrays of ultrasmall coaxial nanocavities in gold films. This new fabrication scheme makes it possible to shrink the diameter and increase the packing density of 2 nm-gap coaxial resonators, an extreme subwavelength structure first manufactured via atomic layer lithography, both by a factor of 100 with respect to previous studies. We demonstrate that the nonpropagating zeroth-order Fabry-Pérot mode, which possesses slow light-like properties at the cutoff resonance, traps infrared light inside 2 nm gaps (gap volume ∼ λ3/106). Notably, the annular gaps cover only 3% or less of the metal surface, while open-area normalized transmission is as high as 1700% at the epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) condition. The resulting energy accumulation alongside extraordinary optical transmission can benefit applications in nonlinear optics, optical trapping, and surface-enhanced spectroscopies. Furthermore, because the resonance wavelength is independent of the cavity length and dramatically red shifts as the gap size is reduced, large-area arrays can be constructed with λresonance ≫ period, making this fabrication method ideal for manufacturing resonant metamaterials. PMID:26910363

  1. Frequency, amplitude, and phase measurements in contact resonance atomic force microscopies.

    PubMed

    Stan, Gheorghe; Solares, Santiago D

    2014-01-01

    The resonance frequency, amplitude, and phase response of the first two eigenmodes of two contact-resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) configurations, which differ in the method used to excite the system (cantilever base vs sample excitation), are analyzed in this work. Similarities and differences in the observables of the cantilever dynamics, as well as the different effect of the tip-sample contact properties on those observables in each configuration are discussed. Finally, the expected accuracy of CR-AFM using phase-locked loop detection is investigated and quantification of the typical errors incurred during measurements is provided.

  2. Atomic Resonance Radiation Energetics Investigation as a Diagnostic Method for Non-Equilibrium Hypervelocity Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott A.; Bershader, Daniel; Sharma, Surendra P.; Deiwert, George S.

    1996-01-01

    Absorption measurements with a tunable vacuum ultraviolet light source have been proposed as a concentration diagnostic for atomic oxygen, and the viability of this technique is assessed in light of recent measurements. The instrumentation, as well as initial calibration measurements, have been reported previously. We report here additional calibration measurements performed to study the resonance broadening line shape for atomic oxygen. The application of this diagnostic is evaluated by considering the range of suitable test conditions and requirements, and by identifying issues that remain to be addressed.

  3. Atomically thin resonant tunnel diodes built from synthetic van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Chuan; Ghosh, Ram Krishna; Addou, Rafik; Lu, Ning; Eichfeld, Sarah M; Zhu, Hui; Li, Ming-Yang; Peng, Xin; Kim, Moon J; Li, Lain-Jong; Wallace, Robert M; Datta, Suman; Robinson, Joshua A

    2015-06-19

    Vertical integration of two-dimensional van der Waals materials is predicted to lead to novel electronic and optical properties not found in the constituent layers. Here, we present the direct synthesis of two unique, atomically thin, multi-junction heterostructures by combining graphene with the monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides: molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) and tungsten diselenide (WSe2). The realization of MoS2-WSe2-graphene and WSe2-MoS2-graphene heterostructures leads to resonant tunnelling in an atomically thin stack with spectrally narrow, room temperature negative differential resistance characteristics.

  4. Magnetic-resonance imaging of the human brain with an atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savukov, I.; Karaulanov, T.

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is conventionally performed in very high fields, and this leads to some restrictions in applications. To remove such restrictions, the ultra-low field MRI approach has been proposed. Because of the loss of sensitivity, the detection methods based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in a shielded room were used. Atomic magnetometers have similar sensitivity as SQUIDs and can also be used for MRI, but there are some technical difficulties to overcome. We demonstrate that MRI of the human brain can be obtained with an atomic magnetometer with in-plane resolution of 3 mm in 13 min.

  5. Magnetic-resonance imaging of the human brain with an atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Savukov, I; Karaulanov, T

    2013-07-22

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is conventionally performed in very high fields, and this leads to some restrictions in applications. To remove such restrictions, the ultra-low field MRI approach has been proposed. Because of the loss of sensitivity, the detection methods based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in a shielded room were used. Atomic magnetometers have similar sensitivity as SQUIDs and can also be used for MRI, but there are some technical difficulties to overcome. We demonstrate that MRI of the human brain can be obtained with an atomic magnetometer with in-plane resolution of 3 mm in 13 min.

  6. Zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons: one-dimensional resonant channels in two-dimensional atomic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Páez, Carlos J; Pereira, Ana L C; Schulz, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate phosphorene zigzag nanoribbons as a platform for constriction engineering. In the presence of a constriction at one of the edges, quantum confinement of edge-protected states reveals conductance peaks, if the edge is uncoupled from the other edge. If the constriction is narrow enough to promote coupling between edges, it gives rise to Fano-like resonances as well as antiresonances in the transmission spectrum. These effects are shown to mimic an atomic chain like behavior in a two dimensional atomic crystal. PMID:28144546

  7. Excited atoms in the free-burning Ar arc: treatment of the resonance radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubovskii, Yu; Kalanov, D.; Gortschakow, S.; Baeva, M.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2016-11-01

    The collisional-radiative model with an emphasis on the accurate treatment of the resonance radiation transport is developed and applied to the free-burning Ar arc plasma. This model allows for analysis of the influence of resonance radiation on the spatial density profiles of the atoms in different excited states. The comparison of the radial density profiles obtained using an effective transition probability approximation with the results of the accurate solution demonstrates the distinct impact of transport on the profiles and absolute densities of the excited atoms, especially in the arc fringes. The departures from the Saha-Boltzmann equilibrium distributions, caused by different radiative transitions, are analyzed. For the case of the DC arc, the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) state holds close to the arc axis, while strong deviations from the equilibrium state on the periphery occur. In the intermediate radial positions the conditions of partial LTE are fulfilled.

  8. Imbalance of group velocities for amplitude and phase pulses propagating in a resonant atomic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basalaev, M. Yu.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of light pulses with amplitude and phase modulations is investigated for a medium of resonant two-level atoms. It is shown that the pulse-like variations of the phase can be also described in terms of group velocity. It is found that in the nonlinear regime of atom-field interaction, the group velocities of amplitude and phase pulses can have a large imbalance. Namely, amplitude pulses travel at a velocity less than c , whereas the group velocity of phase pulses is greater than the velocity of light in free space or it is even negative. The predicted imbalance of the group velocities can be important in the case of chirped pulses propagating in a resonant medium.

  9. Mechanism of Velocity Saturation of Atomic Friction Force and Dynamic Superlubricity at Torsional Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Masanori; Nakamura, Jun; Natori, Akiko

    2007-08-01

    We studied both mechanisms of the scan velocity saturation of the average friction force of friction force microscopy and the resonant reduction in the average friction force by superimposing torsional oscillation on a cantilever on the basis of the one-dimensional Tomlinson model at a finite temperature. The velocity saturation is caused by the appearance of a high degree of slip motion for a tip, which is induced by increasing the scan velocity. We proposed two possible mechanisms for the resonant reduction in the average friction force, namely, the enhanced synchronous slip motion of a tip atom with a support point and the activated slip motion of a tip atom caused by oscillation excitation at a stick point. The calculated results reproduce the experimental results well.

  10. Double radiooptical resonance in 87Rb atomic vapor in cells with antirelaxation wall coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinov, A. N.; Kazakov, G. A.; Matisov, B. G.; Mazets, I. E.

    2009-02-01

    The object of investigation is double radiooptic resonance in 87Rb atomic vapor contained in a cell covered by an antirelaxation coating. The Dicke narrowing is studied in terms of the quantum-kinetic approach. It is found that optical pumping using a laser with a “wide” radiation spectrum makes it possible to improve the short-term stability of the frequency standard by an order of magnitude compared with a narrow-spectrum laser.

  11. Dispersion engineering of thick high-Q silicon nitride ring-resonators via atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Riemensberger, Johann; Hartinger, Klaus; Herr, Tobias; Brasch, Victor; Holzwarth, Ronald; Kippenberg, Tobias J

    2012-12-03

    We demonstrate dispersion engineering of integrated silicon nitride based ring resonators through conformal coating with hafnium dioxide deposited on top of the structures via atomic layer deposition. Both, magnitude and bandwidth of anomalous dispersion can be significantly increased. The results are confirmed by high resolution frequency-comb-assisted-diode-laser spectroscopy and are in very good agreement with the simulated modification of the mode spectrum.

  12. Initial cooperative decay rate and cooperative Lamb shift of resonant atoms in an infinite cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2011-08-15

    We obtain in both the scalar and vector photon models the analytical expressions for the initial cooperative decay rate and the cooperative Lamb shift for an ensemble of resonant atoms distributed uniformly in an infinite cylindrical geometry for the case that the initial state of the system is prepared in a phased state modulated in the direction of the cylindrical axis. We find that qualitatively the scalar and vector theories give different results.

  13. Site Preference in Multimetallic Nanoclusters: Incorporation of Alkali Metal Ions or Copper Atoms into the Alkynyl-Protected Body-Centered Cubic Cluster [Au7 Ag8 (C≡C(t) Bu)12 ]().

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Su, Haifeng; Ren, Liting; Malola, Sami; Lin, Shuichao; Teo, Boon K; Häkkinen, Hannu; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-11-21

    The synthesis, structure, substitution chemistry, and optical properties of the gold-centered cubic monocationic cluster [Au@Ag8 @Au6 (C≡C(t) Bu)12 ](+) are reported. The metal framework of this cluster can be described as a fragment of a body-centered cubic (bcc) lattice with the silver and gold atoms occupying the vertices and the body center of the cube, respectively. The incorporation of alkali metal atoms gave rise to [Mn Ag8-n Au7 (C≡C(t) Bu)12 ](+) clusters (n=1 for M=Na, K, Rb, Cs and n=2 for M=K, Rb), with the alkali metal ion(s) presumably occupying the vertex site(s), whereas the incorporation of copper atoms produced [Cun Ag8 Au7-n (C≡C(t) Bu)12 ](+) clusters (n=1-6), with the Cu atom(s) presumably occupying the capping site(s). The parent cluster exhibited strong emission in the near-IR region (λmax =818 nm) with a quantum yield of 2 % upon excitation at λ=482 nm. Its photoluminescence was quenched upon substitution with a Na(+) ion. DFT calculations confirmed the superatom characteristics of the title compound and the sodium-substituted derivatives.

  14. Coherent population trapping resonances at lower atomic levels of Doppler broadened optical lines

    SciTech Connect

    Şahin, E; Hamid, R; Çelik, M; Özen, G; Izmailov, A Ch

    2014-11-30

    We have detected and analysed narrow high-contrast coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances, which are induced in absorption of a weak monochromatic probe light beam by counterpropagating two-frequency pump radiation in a cell with rarefied caesium vapour. The experimental investigations have been performed by the example of nonclosed three level Λ-systems formed by spectral components of the D{sub 2} line of caesium atoms. The applied method allows one to analyse features of the CPT phenomenon directly at a given low long-lived level of the selected Λ-system even in sufficiently complicated spectra of atomic gases with large Doppler broadening. We have established that CPT resonances in transmission of the probe beam exhibit not only a higher contrast but also a much lesser width in comparison with well- known CPT resonances in transmission of the corresponding two-frequency pump radiation. The results obtained can be used in selective photophysics, photochemistry and ultra-high resolution atomic (molecular) spectroscopy. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  15. Energy losses of nanomechanical resonators induced by atomic force microscopy-controlled mechanical impedance mismatching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Johannes; Isacsson, Andreas; Seitner, Maximilian J.; Kotthaus, Jörg P.; Weig, Eva M.

    2014-03-01

    Clamping losses are a widely discussed damping mechanism in nanoelectromechanical systems, limiting the performance of these devices. Here we present a method to investigate this dissipation channel. Using an atomic force microscope tip as a local perturbation in the clamping region of a nanoelectromechanical resonator, we increase the energy loss of its flexural modes by at least one order of magnitude. We explain this by a transfer of vibrational energy into the cantilever, which is theoretically described by a reduced mechanical impedance mismatch between the resonator and its environment. A theoretical model for this mismatch, in conjunction with finite element simulations of the evanescent strain field of the mechanical modes in the clamping region, allows us to quantitatively analyse data on position and force dependence of the tip-induced damping. Our experiments yield insights into the damping of nanoelectromechanical systems with the prospect of engineering the energy exchange in resonator networks.

  16. Energy losses of nanomechanical resonators induced by atomic force microscopy-controlled mechanical impedance mismatching

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Johannes; Isacsson, Andreas; Seitner, Maximilian J.; Kotthaus, Jörg P.; Weig, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    Clamping losses are a widely discussed damping mechanism in nanoelectromechanical systems, limiting the performance of these devices. Here we present a method to investigate this dissipation channel. Using an atomic force microscope tip as a local perturbation in the clamping region of a nanoelectromechanical resonator, we increase the energy loss of its flexural modes by at least one order of magnitude. We explain this by a transfer of vibrational energy into the cantilever, which is theoretically described by a reduced mechanical impedance mismatch between the resonator and its environment. A theoretical model for this mismatch, in conjunction with finite element simulations of the evanescent strain field of the mechanical modes in the clamping region, allows us to quantitatively analyse data on position and force dependence of the tip-induced damping. Our experiments yield insights into the damping of nanoelectromechanical systems with the prospect of engineering the energy exchange in resonator networks. PMID:24594876

  17. Liquid contact resonance atomic force microscopy via experimental reconstruction of the hydrodynamic function

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Ryan C. Killgore, Jason P.; Hurley, Donna C.

    2014-06-14

    We present a method to correct for surface-coupled inertial and viscous fluid loading forces in contact resonance (CR) atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments performed in liquid. Based on analytical hydrodynamic theory, the method relies on experimental measurements of the AFM cantilever's free resonance peaks near the sample surface. The free resonance frequencies and quality factors in both air and liquid allow reconstruction of a continuous hydrodynamic function that can be used to adjust the CR data in liquid. Validation experiments utilizing thermally excited free and in-contact spectra were performed to assess the accuracy of our approach. Results show that the method recovers the air frequency values within approximately 6%. Knowledge of fluid loading forces allows current CR analysis techniques formulated for use in air and vacuum environments to be applied to liquid environments. Our technique greatly extends the range of measurement environments available to CR-AFM.

  18. Shifts from a distant neighboring resonance for a four-level atom

    SciTech Connect

    Horbatsch, M.; Hessels, E. A.

    2011-09-15

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. A 82, 052519 (2010)], the systematic shifts of a resonance due to quantum-mechanical interference from a distant neighboring resonance were derived. In that paper, the simplest three-level closed system was used to calculate analytic expressions for shifts in the resonant line centers. Here, we extend the analysis to the more relevant four-level system, which consists of two ground states and two excited states and which incorporates the physics of dark states. The shifts are shown to depend on the type of experiment performed and can be much larger than the shifts for the three-level system. The analytic formulas obtained are applied to the {sup 23}S-to-{sup 23}P transitions in atomic helium, where significant shifts are found.

  19. Two-step pulse observation to improve resonance contrast for coherent population trapping atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Yuichiro; Goka, Shigeyoshi; Kajita, Masatoshi

    2017-03-01

    We study resonance contrast by a two-step pulse observation method to enhance the frequency stability of coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic clocks. The proposed method is a two-step Raman-Ramsey scheme with low intensity during resonance observation and high intensity after the observation. This method reduces the frequency variation in the light intensity and maintains a high signal-to-noise ratio. The resonance characteristics were calculated by density matrix analysis of a Λ-type three-level system that was modeled on the ^{133}Cs D1 line, and the characteristics were also measured using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser and a Cs vapor cell.

  20. Air damping of atomically thin MoS{sub 2} nanomechanical resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jaesung; Wang, Zenghui; Feng, Philip X.-L.; He, Keliang; Shan, Jie

    2014-07-14

    We report on experimental measurement of air damping effects in high frequency nanomembrane resonators made of atomically thin molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) drumhead structures. Circular MoS{sub 2} nanomembranes with thickness of monolayer, few-layer, and multi-layer up to ∼70 nm (∼100 layers) exhibit intriguing pressure dependence of resonance characteristics. In completely covered drumheads, where there is no immediate equilibrium between the drum cavity and environment, resonance frequencies and quality (Q) factors strongly depend on environmental pressure due to bulging of the nanomembranes. In incompletely covered drumheads, strong frequency shifts due to compressing-cavity stiffening occur above ∼200 Torr. The pressure-dependent Q factors are limited by free molecule flow (FMF) damping, and all the mono-, bi-, and tri-layer devices exhibit lower FMF damping than thicker, conventional devices do.

  1. Shifts and widths of p-wave confinement induced resonances in atomic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeidian, Shahpoor; Melezhik, Vladimir S.; Schmelcher, Peter

    2015-08-01

    We develop and analyze a theoretical model to study p-wave Feshbach resonances of identical fermions in atomic waveguides by extending the two-channel model of Lange et al (2009 Phys. Rev. A 79 013622) and Saeidian et al (2012 Phys. Rev. A 86 062713). The experimentally known parameters of Feshbach resonances in free space are used as input of the model. We calculate the shifts and widths of p-wave magnetic Feshbach resonance of 40K atoms emerging in harmonic waveguides as p-wave confinement induced resonance (CIR). Particularly, we show a possibility to control the width and shift of the p-wave CIR by the trap frequency and the applied magnetic field which could be used in corresponding experiments. Our analysis also demonstrates the importance of the inclusion of the effective range in the computational schemes for the description of the p-wave CIRs contrary to the case of s-wave CIRs where the influence of this term is negligible.

  2. Redistribution of light frequency by multiple scattering in a resonant atomic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, João Carlos de A.; Oriá, Marcos; Chevrollier, Martine; Cavalcante, Hugo L. D. de Souza; Passerat de Silans, T.

    2015-05-01

    The propagation of light in a resonant atomic vapor can a priori be thought of as a multiple scattering process, in which each scattering event redistributes both the direction and the frequency of the photons. Particularly, the frequency redistribution may result in Lévy flights of photons, directly affecting the transport properties of light in a resonant atomic vapor and turning this propagation into a superdiffusion process. Here, we report on a Monte Carlo simulation developed to study the evolution of the spectrum of the light in a resonant thermal vapor. We observe the gradual change of the spectrum and its convergence towards a regime of complete frequency redistribution as the number of scattering events increases. We also analyze the probability density function of the step length of photons between emissions and reabsorptions in the vapor, which governs the statistics of the light diffusion. We observe two different regimes in the light transport: superdiffusion when the vapor is excited near the line center and normal diffusion for excitation far from the line center. The regime of complete frequency redistribution is not reached for excitation far from resonance even after many absorption and reemission cycles due to correlations between emitted and absorbed frequencies.

  3. Resonance-mediated atomic ionization dynamics induced by ultraintense x-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Phay J.; Kanter, E. P.; Young, L.

    2015-12-31

    We describe the methodology of our recently developed Monte Carlo rate equation (MCRE) approach, which systematically incorporates bound-bound resonances to model multiphoton ionization dynamics induced by high-fluence, high-intensity x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. These resonances are responsible for ionization far beyond that predicted by the sequential single photon absorption model and are central to a quantitative understanding of atomic ionization dynamics in XFEL pulses. We also present calculated multiphoton ionization dynamics for Kr and Xe atoms in XFEL pulses for a variety of conditions, to compare the effects of bandwidth, pulse duration, pulse fluence, and photon energy. This comprehensive computational investigation reveals areas in the photon energy–pulse fluence landscape where resonances are critically important. We also uncover a mechanism, preservation of inner-shell vacancies (PIVS), whereby radiation damage is enhanced at higher XFEL intensities and identify the sequence of core-outer–Rydberg, core-valence, and core-core resonances encountered during multiphoton x-ray ionization.

  4. Nanoscale Subsurface Imaging of Nanocomposites via Resonant Difference-Frequency Atomic Force Ultrasonic Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Sean A.; Cantrell, John H.; Lillehei, Peter T.

    2007-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope methodology, called resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), has been developed. The method employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope engages the sample top surface. The cantilever is driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by one of the contact resonance frequencies of the cantilever. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave at the sample surface generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever contact resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create amplitude and phase-generated images of nanoscale near-surface and subsurface features. RDF-AFUM phase images of LaRC-CP2 polyimide polymer containing embedded nanostructures are presented. A RDF-AFUM micrograph of a 12.7 micrometer thick film of LaRC-CP2 containing a monolayer of gold nanoparticles embedded 7 micrometers below the specimen surface reveals the occurrence of contiguous amorphous and crystalline phases within the bulk of the polymer and a preferential growth of the crystalline phase in the vicinity of the gold nanoparticles. A RDF-AFUM micrograph of LaRC-CP2 film containing randomly dispersed carbon nanotubes reveals the growth of an interphase region at certain nanotube-polymer interfaces.

  5. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of an atomically thin material using a single-spin qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovchinsky, I.; Sanchez-Yamagishi, J. D.; Urbach, E. K.; Choi, S.; Fang, S.; Andersen, T. I.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Bylinskii, A.; Kaxiras, E.; Kim, P.; Park, H.; Lukin, M. D.

    2017-02-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials offer a promising platform for exploring condensed matter phenomena and developing technological applications. However, the reduction of material dimensions to the atomic scale poses a challenge for traditional measurement and interfacing techniques that typically couple to macroscopic observables. We demonstrate a method for probing the properties of 2D materials via nanometer-scale nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy using individual atomlike impurities in diamond. Coherent manipulation of shallow nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers enables the probing of nanoscale ensembles down to approximately 30 nuclear spins in atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The characterization of low-dimensional nanoscale materials could enable the development of new quantum hybrid systems, combining atomlike systems coherently coupled with individual atoms in 2D materials.

  6. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of an atomically thin material using a single-spin qubit.

    PubMed

    Lovchinsky, I; Sanchez-Yamagishi, J D; Urbach, E K; Choi, S; Fang, S; Andersen, T I; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Bylinskii, A; Kaxiras, E; Kim, P; Park, H; Lukin, M D

    2017-02-03

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials offer a promising platform for exploring condensed matter phenomena and developing technological applications. However, the reduction of material dimensions to the atomic scale poses a challenge for traditional measurement and interfacing techniques that typically couple to macroscopic observables. We demonstrate a method for probing the properties of 2D materials via nanometer-scale nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy using individual atomlike impurities in diamond. Coherent manipulation of shallow nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers enables the probing of nanoscale ensembles down to approximately 30 nuclear spins in atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The characterization of low-dimensional nanoscale materials could enable the development of new quantum hybrid systems, combining atomlike systems coherently coupled with individual atoms in 2D materials.

  7. Dynamical resonances in the fluorine atom reaction with the hydrogen molecule.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xueming; Zhang, Dong H

    2008-08-01

    [Reaction: see text]. The concept of transition state has played a crucial role in the field of chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics. Resonances in the transition state region are important in many chemical reactions at reaction energies near the thresholds. Detecting and characterizing isolated reaction resonances, however, have been a major challenge in both experiment and theory. In this Account, we review the most recent developments in the study of reaction resonances in the benchmark F + H 2 --> HF + H reaction. Crossed molecular beam scattering experiments on the F + H 2 reaction have been carried out recently using the high-resolution, highly sensitive H-atom Rydberg tagging technique with HF rovibrational states almost fully resolved. Pronounced forward scattering for the HF (nu' = 2) product has been observed at the collision energy of 0.52 kcal/mol in the F + H 2 (j = 0) reaction. Quantum dynamical calculations based on two new potential energy surfaces, the Xu-Xie-Zhang (XXZ) surface and the Fu-Xu-Zhang (FXZ) surface, show that the observed forward scattering of HF (nu' = 2) in the F + H 2 reaction is caused by two Feshbach resonances (the ground resonance and first excited resonance). More interestingly, the pronounced forward scattering of HF (nu' = 2) at 0.52 kcal/mol is enhanced considerably by the constructive interference between the two resonances. In order to probe the resonance potential more accurately, the isotope substituted F + HD --> HF + D reaction has been studied using the D-atom Rydberg tagging technique. A remarkable and fast changing dynamical picture has been mapped out in the collision energy range of 0.3-1.2 kcal/mol for this reaction. Quantum dynamical calculations based on the XXZ surface suggest that the ground resonance on this potential is too high in comparison with the experimental results of the F + HD reaction. However, quantum scattering calculations on the FXZ surface can reproduce nearly quantitatively the resonance

  8. Detection of a coherent population trapping resonance in a beam of {sup 87}Rb atoms by the Ramsey method

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, I M

    2015-10-31

    Formation of a coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance is studied in the interaction of a beam of {sup 87}Rb atoms with two spatially separated domains of the dichromatic field. Various resonance excitation schemes are compared depending on the choice of operation transitions and type of the polarisation scheme. In the case of a single-velocity atomic beam, the dependence of the CPT resonance profile is studied as a function of principal parameters of the system: beam velocity, distance between optical fields, laser beam dimensions and intensities, and applied permanent magnetic field. Influence of the atomic beam angular divergence and residual beam velocity spread on the resonance quality parameter is estimated. (atomic beams)

  9. Performance of a prototype atomic clock based on lin parallel lin coherent population trapping resonances in Rb atomic vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailov, Eugeniy E.; Horrom, Travis; Belcher, Nathan; Novikova, Irina

    2010-03-15

    We report on the performance of the first table-top prototype atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances with parallel linearly polarized optical fields (lin parallel lin configuration). Our apparatus uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) tuned to the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb with the current modulation at the {sup 87}Rb hyperfine frequency. We demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by the proper choice of rf modulation power and further improve our prototype clock stability by optimizing the parameters of the microwave lock loop. Operating in these optimal conditions, we measured a short-term fractional frequency stability (Allan deviation) 2x10{sup -11}{tau}{sup -1/2} for observation times 1 s{<=}{tau}{<=}20 s. This value is limited by large VCSEL phase noise and environmental temperature fluctuation. Further improvements in frequency stability should be possible with an apparatus designed as a dedicated lin parallel lin CPT resonance clock with environmental impacts minimized.

  10. Resonant charging and stopping power of slow channelling atoms in a crystalline metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, D. R.; Race, C. P.; Foo, M. H. F.; Horsfield, A. P.; Foulkes, W. M. C.; Sutton, A. P.

    2012-07-01

    Fast moving ions travel great distances along channels between low-index crystallographic planes, slowing through collisions with electrons, until finally they hit a host atom initiating a cascade of atomic displacements. Statistical penetration ranges of incident particles are reliably used in ion-implantation technologies, but a full, necessarily quantum-mechanical, description of the stopping of slow, heavy ions is challenging and the results of experimental investigations are not fully understood. Using a self-consistent model of the electronic structure of a metal, and explicit treatment of atomic structure, we find by direct simulation a resonant accumulation of charge on a channelling ion analogous to the Okorokov effect but originating in electronic excitation between delocalized and localized valence states on the channelling ion and its transient host neighbours, stimulated by the time-periodic potential experienced by the channelling ion. The charge resonance reduces the electronic stopping power on the channelling ion. These are surprising and interesting new chemical aspects of channelling, which cannot be predicted within the standard framework of ions travelling through homogeneous electron gases or by considering either ion or target in isolation.

  11. Resonance frequency-retuned quartz tuning fork as a force sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Sakuishi, Tatsuya; Arai, Toyoko; Nogami, Makoto; Tomitori, Masahiko

    2014-07-28

    Based on a two-prong type quartz tuning fork, a force sensor with a high Q factor, which we call a retuned fork sensor, was developed for non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) with atomic resolution. By cutting a small notch and attaching an AFM tip to one prong, its resonance frequency can be retuned to that of the other intact prong. In balancing the two prongs in this manner, a high Q factor (>50 000 in ultrahigh vacuum) is obtained for the sensor. An atomic resolution image of the Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was demonstrated using an nc-AFM with the sensor. The dependence of the Q factor on resonance frequency of the sensor and the long-range force between tip and sample were measured and analyzed in view of the various dissipation channels. Dissipation in the signal detection circuit turned out to be mainly limited by the total Q factor of the nc-AFM system.

  12. The double dark resonance in a cold gas of Cs atoms and molecules.

    PubMed

    Feng, ZhiFang; Li, WeiDong; Xiao, LianTuan; Jia, SuoTang

    2008-09-29

    We theoretically investigated the properties of the effective four-level stimulated Raman adiabatic passage scheme in a cold gas of Cs atoms and molecules, where exists the tunnelling coupling between two excited molecular states due to the 0(g)- (6S,6P(3/2)) double well structure. The double dark resonance is predicted in the absorption spectrum when the tunnelling coupling strength is large enough. The double dark resonance not only reveals the formation of the ultra-cold molecules, but also provides further evidence for the tunnelling as one effective coupling mechanism between the two excited molecular states. The effect of the various experimental conditions on this phenomena has been discussed.

  13. Orientational dependence of optically detected magnetic resonance signals in laser-driven atomic magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Simone; Dolgovskiy, Vladimir; Scholtes, Theo; Grujić, Zoran D.; Lebedev, Victor; Weis, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the dependence of lock-in-demodulated M_x-magnetometer signals on the orientation of the static magnetic field B0 of interest. Magnetic resonance spectra for 2400 discrete orientations of B0 covering a 4π solid angle have been recorded by a PC-controlled steering and data acquisition system. Off-line fits by previously derived lineshape functions allow us to extract the relevant resonance parameters (shape, amplitude, width, and phase) and to represent their dependence on the orientation of B0 with respect to the laser beam propagation direction. We have performed this study for two distinct M_x-magnetometer configurations, in which the rf-field is either parallel or perpendicular to the light propagation direction. The results confirm well the algebraic theoretical model functions. We suggest that small discrepancies are related to hitherto uninvestigated atomic alignment contributions.

  14. A comparative study of contact resonance imaging using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, S.; Gayathri, N.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K.; Raj, Baldev

    2005-05-23

    We present here a comparative study of atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging in contact mode when either the cantilever carrying the probing tip or the sample is excited at ultrasonic frequencies. The cantilever or the sample can be excited by piezoelectric transducers attached to them. When the AFM tip is in contact with the sample surface the contact resonance curve depends on the local tip-sample contact stiffness. By measuring the contact resonance as a function of position one can image the local stiffness of the sample surface. We will report here imaging carried out on piezoelectric material and thin metal film using both the modes. The comparison shows that both give similar results.

  15. Directly probing anisotropy in atom-molecule collisions through quantum scattering resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Ayelet; Shagam, Yuval; Skomorowski, Wojciech; Żuchowski, Piotr S.; Pawlak, Mariusz; Janssen, Liesbeth M. C.; Moiseyev, Nimrod; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T.; van der Avoird, Ad; Koch, Christiane P.; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2017-01-01

    Anisotropy is a fundamental property of particle interactions. It occupies a central role in cold and ultracold molecular processes, where orientation-dependent long-range forces have been studied in ultracold polar molecule collisions. In the cold collisions regime, quantization of the intermolecular degrees of freedom leads to quantum scattering resonances. Although these states have been shown to be sensitive to details of the interaction potential, the effect of anisotropy on quantum resonances has so far eluded experimental observation. Here, we directly measure the anisotropy in atom-molecule interactions via quantum resonances by changing the quantum state of the internal molecular rotor. We observe that a quantum scattering resonance at a collision energy of kB × 270 mK appears in the Penning ionization of molecular hydrogen with metastable helium only if the molecule is rotationally excited. We use state-of-the-art ab initio theory to show that control over the rotational state effectively switches the anisotropy on or off, disentangling the isotropic and anisotropic parts of the interaction.

  16. High efficiency direct detection of ions from resonance ionization of sputtered atoms

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Young, Charles E.

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for trace and other quantitative analysis with high efficiency of a component in a sample, with the analysis involving the removal by ion or other bombardment of a small quantity of ion and neutral atom groups from the sample, the conversion of selected neutral atom groups to photoions by laser initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, the selective deflection of the photoions for separation from original ion group emanating from the sample, and the detection of the photoions as a measure of the quantity of the component. In some embodiments, the original ion group is accelerated prior to the RIS step for separation purposes. Noise and other interference are reduced by shielding the detector from primary and secondary ions and deflecting the photoions sufficiently to avoid the primary and secondary ions.

  17. High efficiency direct detection of ions from resonance ionization of sputtered atoms

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Pellin, M.J.; Young, C.E.

    1985-01-16

    A method and apparatus are provided for trace and other quantitative analysis with high efficiency of a component in a sample, with the analysis involving the removal by ion or other bombardment of a small quantity of ion and neutral atom groups from the sample, the conversion of selected neutral atom groups to photoions by laser initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, the selective deflection of the photoions for separation from original ion group emanating from the sample, and the detection of the photoions as a measure of the quantity of the component. In some embodiments, the original ion group is accelerated prior to the RIS step for separation purposes. Noise and other interference are reduced by shielding the detector from primary and secondary ions and deflecting the photoions sufficiently to avoid the primary and secondary ions.

  18. Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of Al atoms and dimers solvated in helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnokutski, Serge A.; Huisken, Friedrich

    2015-02-28

    Resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectroscopy has been applied to investigate the solvation of Al atoms in helium droplets. The R2PI spectra reveal vibrational progressions that can be attributed to Al–He{sub n} vibrations. It is found that small helium droplets have very little chance to pick up an aluminum atom after collision. However, the pick-up probability increases with the size of the helium droplets. The absorption band that is measured by monitoring the ions on the mass of the Al dimer is found to be very little shifted with respect to the Al monomer band (∼400 cm{sup −1}). However, using the same laser wavelength, we were unable to detect any Al{sub n} photoion with n larger than two.

  19. Cooperative Resonances in Light Scattering from Two-Dimensional Atomic Arrays.

    PubMed

    Shahmoon, Ephraim; Wild, Dominik S; Lukin, Mikhail D; Yelin, Susanne F

    2017-03-17

    We consider light scattering off a two-dimensional (2D) dipolar array and show how it can be tailored by properly choosing the lattice constant of the order of the incident wavelength. In particular, we demonstrate that such arrays can operate as a nearly perfect mirror for a wide range of incident angles and frequencies, and shape the emission pattern from an individual quantum emitter into a well-defined, collimated beam. These results can be understood in terms of the cooperative resonances of the surface modes supported by the 2D array. Experimental realizations are discussed, using ultracold arrays of trapped atoms and excitons in 2D semiconductor materials, as well as potential applications ranging from atomically thin metasurfaces to single photon nonlinear optics and nanomechanics.

  20. Inversion of the resonance line of Sr/+/ produced by optically pumping Sr atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, W. R.; Falcone, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    A description is presented of an experiment which demonstrates the selective production of excited-state ions by an optical absorption from neutrals. An inversion on the resonance line of Sr(+) was produced by laser excitation of a two-electron transition, followed by ionization of one of the excited electrons by the same laser. A pulsed, mode-locked laser operating at 2680 A was used to excite atoms from the Sr ground level. The same laser then ionized the excited atoms. The 2680-A pump beam was generated by frequency doubling the output of a synchronously pumped mode-locked dye laser in a KDP crystal. It is pointed out that the reported results are significant for the construction of vacuum-ultraviolet and X-ray lasers. Many of the proposed methods for making such lasers depend on the selective production of excited-state ions.

  1. Cooperative Resonances in Light Scattering from Two-Dimensional Atomic Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmoon, Ephraim; Wild, Dominik S.; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Yelin, Susanne F.

    2017-03-01

    We consider light scattering off a two-dimensional (2D) dipolar array and show how it can be tailored by properly choosing the lattice constant of the order of the incident wavelength. In particular, we demonstrate that such arrays can operate as a nearly perfect mirror for a wide range of incident angles and frequencies, and shape the emission pattern from an individual quantum emitter into a well-defined, collimated beam. These results can be understood in terms of the cooperative resonances of the surface modes supported by the 2D array. Experimental realizations are discussed, using ultracold arrays of trapped atoms and excitons in 2D semiconductor materials, as well as potential applications ranging from atomically thin metasurfaces to single photon nonlinear optics and nanomechanics.

  2. Atomically thin resonant tunnel diodes built from synthetic van der Waals heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Chuan; Ghosh, Ram Krishna; Addou, Rafik; Lu, Ning; Eichfeld, Sarah M.; Zhu, Hui; Li, Ming-Yang; Peng, Xin; Kim, Moon J.; Li, Lain-Jong; Wallace, Robert M.; Datta, Suman; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Vertical integration of two-dimensional van der Waals materials is predicted to lead to novel electronic and optical properties not found in the constituent layers. Here, we present the direct synthesis of two unique, atomically thin, multi-junction heterostructures by combining graphene with the monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides: molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) and tungsten diselenide (WSe2). The realization of MoS2–WSe2–graphene and WSe2–MoS2–graphene heterostructures leads to resonant tunnelling in an atomically thin stack with spectrally narrow, room temperature negative differential resistance characteristics. PMID:26088295

  3. Repulsive Fermi Polarons in a Resonant Mixture of Ultracold ^{6}Li Atoms.

    PubMed

    Scazza, F; Valtolina, G; Massignan, P; Recati, A; Amico, A; Burchianti, A; Fort, C; Inguscio, M; Zaccanti, M; Roati, G

    2017-02-24

    We employ radio-frequency spectroscopy to investigate a polarized spin mixture of ultracold ^{6}Li atoms close to a broad Feshbach scattering resonance. Focusing on the regime of strong repulsive interactions, we observe well-defined coherent quasiparticles even for unitarity-limited interactions. We characterize the many-body system by extracting the key properties of repulsive Fermi polarons: the energy E_{+}, the effective mass m^{*}, the residue Z, and the decay rate Γ. Above a critical interaction, E_{+} is found to exceed the Fermi energy of the bath, while m^{*} diverges and even turns negative, thereby indicating that the repulsive Fermi liquid state becomes energetically and thermodynamically unstable.

  4. Repulsive Fermi Polarons in a Resonant Mixture of Ultracold 6Li Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scazza, F.; Valtolina, G.; Massignan, P.; Recati, A.; Amico, A.; Burchianti, A.; Fort, C.; Inguscio, M.; Zaccanti, M.; Roati, G.

    2017-02-01

    We employ radio-frequency spectroscopy to investigate a polarized spin mixture of ultracold 6Li atoms close to a broad Feshbach scattering resonance. Focusing on the regime of strong repulsive interactions, we observe well-defined coherent quasiparticles even for unitarity-limited interactions. We characterize the many-body system by extracting the key properties of repulsive Fermi polarons: the energy E+, the effective mass m*, the residue Z , and the decay rate Γ . Above a critical interaction, E+ is found to exceed the Fermi energy of the bath, while m* diverges and even turns negative, thereby indicating that the repulsive Fermi liquid state becomes energetically and thermodynamically unstable.

  5. Interaction of wide band gap single crystals with 248 nm excimer laser radiation. XII. The emission of negative atomic ions from alkali halides

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Kenichi; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.

    2007-12-01

    Many wide band gap materials yield charged and neutral emissions when exposed to sub-band-gap laser radiation at power densities below the threshold for optical breakdown and plume formation. In this work, we report the observation of negative alkali ions from several alkali halides under comparable conditions. We observe no evidence for negative halogen ions, in spite of the high electron affinities of the halogens. Significantly, the positive and negative alkali ions show a high degree of spatial and temporal overlap. A detailed study of all the relevant particle emissions from potassium chloride (KCl) suggests that K{sup -} is formed by the sequential attachment of two electrons to K{sup +}.

  6. Nonlinearity, resonance, charging, and motion at the atomic scale studied with scanning tunneling microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Xiuwen

    2008-10-01

    Several novel phenomena at the single-atom and single-molecule level occurring on the surfaces of single crystals were studied with home-built low temperature scanning tunneling microscopes. The results revealed intriguing properties of single atoms and single molecules, including nonlinearity, resonance, charging, and motion. First, negative differential resistance (NDR) was observed in the dI/dV spectra for single copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules adsorbed on one- and two-layer sodium bromide (NaBr), but not for single CuPc molecules adsorbed on three-layer NaBr, all grown on a NiAl(110) surface. This transition from NDR to the absence of NDR was explained as the result of competing effects in the double-barrier tunnel junction (DBTJ) and was reproduced in a calculation based on a resonant-tunneling model. Second, the nonlinearity of the STM junction due to a single manganese (Mn) atom or MnCO molecule adsorbed on a NiAl(110) surface was used to rectify microwave irradiation. The resulting rectification current was shown to be sensitive to the spin-splitting of the electronic states of the Mn atom and to the vibrations of the MnCO molecule. Next, the ordering of cesium (Cs) atoms adsorbed on a Au(111) surface and a NiAl(110) surface was imaged in real space. Because of charge transfer to the substrates, Cs adatoms were positively charged on both surfaces. Even at 12 K, Cs adatoms were able to move and adjust according to coverage. On Au(111), the Cs first layer had a quasi-hexagonal lattice and islands of the second Cs layer did not appear until the first was completed. On NiAl(110), a locally disordered Cs first layer was observed before a locally ordered layer appeared at higher coverages. The cation-pi interactions were then studied at the single molecular level. We were able to form cation-pi complexes such as Cs···DSB, Cs···DSB···Cs, Rb···DSB, and Rb···ZnEtiol controllably by manipulation with the STM tip. We could also separate these

  7. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  8. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-29

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials' functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  9. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future. PMID:26821751

  10. Utilizing intentional internal resonance to achieve multi-harmonic atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Bongwon; Pettit, Chris; Dharmasena, Sajith; Keum, Hohyun; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Jungkyu; Kim, Seok; McFarland, D Michael; Bergman, Lawrence A; Vakakis, Alexander F; Cho, Hanna

    2016-03-29

    During dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM), the deflection of a scanning cantilever generates multiple frequency terms due to the nonlinear nature of AFM tip-sample interactions. Even though each frequency term is reasonably expected to encode information about the sample, only the fundamental frequency term is typically decoded to provide topographic mapping of the measured surface. One of main reasons for discarding higher harmonic signals is their low signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we introduce a new design concept for multi-harmonic AFM, exploiting intentional nonlinear internal resonance for the enhancement of higher harmonics. The nonlinear internal resonance, triggered by the non-smooth tip-sample dynamic interactions, results in nonlinear energy transfers from the directly excited fundamental bending mode to the higher-frequency mode and, hence, enhancement of the higher harmonic of the measured response. It is verified through detailed theoretical and experimental study that this AFM design can robustly incorporate the required internal resonance and enable high-frequency AFM measurements. Measurements on an inhomogeneous polymer specimen demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed design, namely that the higher harmonic of the measured response is capable of enhanced simultaneous topography imaging and compositional mapping, exhibiting less crosstalk with an abrupt height change.

  11. Utilizing intentional internal resonance to achieve multi-harmonic atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Bongwon; Pettit, Chris; Dharmasena, Sajith; Keum, Hohyun; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Jungkyu; Kim, Seok; McFarland, D. Michael; Bergman, Lawrence A.; Vakakis, Alexander F.; Cho, Hanna

    2016-03-01

    During dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM), the deflection of a scanning cantilever generates multiple frequency terms due to the nonlinear nature of AFM tip-sample interactions. Even though each frequency term is reasonably expected to encode information about the sample, only the fundamental frequency term is typically decoded to provide topographic mapping of the measured surface. One of main reasons for discarding higher harmonic signals is their low signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we introduce a new design concept for multi-harmonic AFM, exploiting intentional nonlinear internal resonance for the enhancement of higher harmonics. The nonlinear internal resonance, triggered by the non-smooth tip-sample dynamic interactions, results in nonlinear energy transfers from the directly excited fundamental bending mode to the higher-frequency mode and, hence, enhancement of the higher harmonic of the measured response. It is verified through detailed theoretical and experimental study that this AFM design can robustly incorporate the required internal resonance and enable high-frequency AFM measurements. Measurements on an inhomogeneous polymer specimen demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed design, namely that the higher harmonic of the measured response is capable of enhanced simultaneous topography imaging and compositional mapping, exhibiting less crosstalk with an abrupt height change.

  12. Three-photon resonant atomic excitation in spatially incoherent laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Peet, Victor; Shchemeljov, Sergei

    2003-10-01

    Two-color excitation by spatially coherent and incoherent laser beams has been used to study three-photon-resonant excitation and subsequent ionization of xenon in conditions, when internally generated sum-frequency field plays an important role in excitation of atomic resonances through interfering one-photon excitation pathway. We show that the incoherence in one of the pumping fields reduces the efficiency of generated sum-frequency field, and thus suppresses the interference between the three- and the one-photon excitation channels. The degree of suppression is controlled by varying the crossing angle between coherent and incoherent laser beams. We show that ionization profiles can be analyzed on the basis of the well-studied interference of one- and three-photon transition amplitudes, but with pumping field decomposed into multiple small-scale uncorrelated domains where coherent process of four-wave mixing occurs. The gain length for a coherent process in these domains depends on the coherence degree and excitation geometry. It gives a possibility of controlling the contribution of coherent processes to the excitation of multiphoton resonances.

  13. From Cooper pairs to molecules: Effective field theories for ultra-cold atomic gases near Feshbach resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milstein, J. N.

    Feshbach resonances in dilute atomic gases are a powerful tool used to control the strength of atom-atom interactions. In practice, the tuning is accomplished by varying a magnetic field, affording experiments on dilute atomic gases a knob with which they can arbitrarily adjust the interactions. This precision control makes atomic gases an ideal place to study many-body phenomena. The resonance works by introducing a closed channel containing a bound, molecular state within the open channel of continuum scattering states. The molecular state greatly modifies the scattering responsible for the interactions, as it is tuned near resonance, introducing pair correlations throughout the sample. The size of these correlations may range from either very small, where they appear as molecules, to very large, where they resemble Cooper pairs. This leads to a "crossover" problem of connecting the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of Cooper pairing, which describes conventional superconductors, to the process of Bose-Einstein condensation of molecules. To answer this question, it is necessary to develop an appropriate field theory for both Bosons and Fermions that can account for the Feshbach processes and, therefore, properly describe resonant, ultra-cold atomic gases.

  14. Double-resonance spectroscopy in Rubidium vapour-cells for high performance and miniature atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharavipour, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Kang, S.; Mileti, G.

    2017-01-01

    We report our studies on using microwave-optical double-resonance (DR) spectroscopy for a high-performance Rb vapour-cell atomic clock in view of future industrial applications. The clock physics package is very compact with a total volume of only 0.8 dm3. It contains a recently in-house developed magnetron-type cavity and a Rb vapour cell. A homed-made frequency-stabilized laser system with an integrated acousto-optical-modulator (AOM) – for switching and controlling the light output power– is used as an optical source in a laser head (LH). The LH has the overall volume of 2.5 dm3 including the laser diode, optical elements, AOM and electronics. In our Rb atomic clock two schemes of continuous-wave DR and Ramsey-DR schemes are used, where the latter one strongly reduces the light-shift effect by separation of the interaction of light and microwave. Applications of the DR clock approach to more radically miniaturized atomic clocks are discussed.

  15. Wave-mixing interference in three-photon resonant atomic excitation with cross-polarized angled beams

    SciTech Connect

    Peet, V.

    2006-09-15

    Three-photon excitation and associated wave mixing near the 6s and 6s{sup '} resonances of xenon have been studied utilizing resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization in angled beams with different polarizations. It has been shown that a complete cancellation of three-photon resonant atomic excitation caused by the well-known destructive wave-mixing interference occurs in s and p polarization of angled beams but distinct resonance ionization enhancement is observed when pump beams have orthogonal polarization planes. Pressure-induced evolution of the resonance ionization peak in cross-polarized beams is identical to that observed with counterpropagating beams. The reason for such resonance ionization enhancement is unknown and cannot be explained within the frame work of existing theory. The effect may result from some peculiarities of wave-mixing interference in a multilevel atomic system, where different degenerate magnetic sublevels of the upper atomic state and multiple interfering excitation processes are involved. Another possibility is that the resonance ionization enhancement results from a process where weak counterpropagating light is generated within the excitation region of cross-polarized angled beams.

  16. Quantitative Subsurface Atomic Structure Fingerprint for 2D Materials and Heterostructures by First-Principles-Calibrated Contact-Resonance Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qing; Lange, Björn; Parlak, Zehra; Lopes, Joao Marcelo J; Blum, Volker; Zauscher, Stefan

    2016-07-26

    Interfaces and subsurface layers are critical for the performance of devices made of 2D materials and heterostructures. Facile, nondestructive, and quantitative ways to characterize the structure of atomically thin, layered materials are thus essential to ensure control of the resultant properties. Here, we show that contact-resonance atomic force microscopy-which is exquisitely sensitive to stiffness changes that arise from even a single atomic layer of a van der Waals-adhered material-is a powerful experimental tool to address this challenge. A combined density functional theory and continuum modeling approach is introduced that yields sub-surface-sensitive, nanomechanical fingerprints associated with specific, well-defined structure models of individual surface domains. Where such models are known, this information can be correlated with experimentally obtained contact-resonance frequency maps to reveal the (sub)surface structure of different domains on the sample.

  17. Cavitation luminescence of argon-saturated alkali-metal solutions from a conical bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ha; Jie He, Shou; Fang, Wang; Min, Song Jian

    2008-10-01

    In 1,2-propanediol solutions containing sodium chloride, spectra of luminescence from a collapsed conical bubble have been detected. Results show that the spectra consist of a broad continuum background, on which a resonance line arising from de-excitation of sodium atom at 589 nm and two satellite diffuse bands at ~554 nm and 620 nm respectively are superimposed. These are confirmed to be the emission from alkali-metal-argon exciplexes and are suggested to occur when the mixtures of alkali metal vapour and argon are rapidly compressed. The intracavity density of argon deduced from the line shift of Na resonance line data is estimated to be about 2 × 1026 m-3.

  18. Manipulating Neutral Atoms and Molecules by Strong Non-Resonant Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilensky, Mark

    Manipulating neutral particles by laser light has been of great interest during the last decade. The main effort is placed on atom cooling together with atomic beam deceleration, deflection, focusing, mirroring, and related aspects of atom optics. In the present thesis we provide indepth analytical and numerical analysis of the optical shaker approach to non-resonant laser cooling, and propose new methods for deceleration and cooling atoms/molecules in a feedback-controlled bistable cavity. Moreover, application of the latter technique to cooling of a micromechanical object is also proposed and analyzed. In the Introduction we review the current state-of-the-art cooling techniques and provide a brief history of their development. Chapter I presents in-depth analysis of the optical shaker operation; we study the issue of the detection of the dipole force in the far zone, which is the main building block of the optical shaker technique. The effects of the finite response time of the detectors and of the phase modulator are modeled numerically. The thresholds for cooling are estimated analytically and verified numerically. Minimal requirements for the stability of the laser sources are formulated. Perturbation theory analysis of the heating rate of an ensemble of particles embedded in a non-stationary sinusoidal (non-harmonic) potential is provided. In addition, a preliminary study of the adaptive cooling strategy is outlined. Chapter II presents a new method for deceleration of a single particle and cooling of an ensemble of particles in a bistable optical cavity. Optical bistability is achieved by non-linear feedback control of the field incident on the cavity. The technique realizes cavity-induced Sisyphustype cooling mechanism. This approach is rather generic because of its off-resonance nature. The bistable cavity introduces a "dry friction" stopping force, and requires a relatively "bad cavity" for its implementation. We provide an analytical estimate for the

  19. Length-extension resonator as a force sensor for high-resolution frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy in air

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Summary Frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy has turned into a well-established method to obtain atomic resolution on flat surfaces, but is often limited to ultra-high vacuum conditions and cryogenic temperatures. Measurements under ambient conditions are influenced by variations of the dew point and thin water layers present on practically every surface, complicating stable imaging with high resolution. We demonstrate high-resolution imaging in air using a length-extension resonator operating at small amplitudes. An additional slow feedback compensates for changes in the free resonance frequency, allowing stable imaging over a long period of time with changing environmental conditions. PMID:27335735

  20. Length-extension resonator as a force sensor for high-resolution frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy in air.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Hannes; Wagner, Tino; Stemmer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy has turned into a well-established method to obtain atomic resolution on flat surfaces, but is often limited to ultra-high vacuum conditions and cryogenic temperatures. Measurements under ambient conditions are influenced by variations of the dew point and thin water layers present on practically every surface, complicating stable imaging with high resolution. We demonstrate high-resolution imaging in air using a length-extension resonator operating at small amplitudes. An additional slow feedback compensates for changes in the free resonance frequency, allowing stable imaging over a long period of time with changing environmental conditions.

  1. Dynamic nano-triboelectrification using torsional resonance mode atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wei; Yao, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of charge generation, distribution, and transfer between surfaces is very important for energy harvesting applications based on triboelectric effect. Here, we demonstrate dynamic nanotriboelectrification with torsional resonance (TR) mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experiments on rubbing the sample surface using TR mode for the generation of triboelectric charges and in-situ characterization of the charge distribution using scanning Kelvin probe microcopy (SKPM) were performed. This method allows the tip to perform lateral oscillation and maintains the tip-sample interaction in the attractive region to ensure high efficiency of the charge generation during the rubbing process. The measured efficiency of generating triboelectric charges can achieve ~10.53 times higher than conventional static/contact mode in the triboelectrification experiments. In addition to the charge generation, local discharging experiments were also performed. This work would provide a new method to generate patterned charges and also be helpful in understanding the mechanism of nanotriboelectrification. PMID:27302624

  2. Note: Calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers using only their resonant frequency and quality factor

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Friend, James R.

    2014-11-15

    A simplified method for calibrating atomic force microscope cantilevers was recently proposed by Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 103705 (2012); Sec. III D] that relies solely on the resonant frequency and quality factor of the cantilever in fluid (typically air). This method eliminates the need to measure the hydrodynamic function of the cantilever, which can be time consuming given the wide range of cantilevers now available. Using laser Doppler vibrometry, we rigorously assess the accuracy of this method for a series of commercially available cantilevers and explore its performance under non-ideal conditions. This shows that the simplified method is highly accurate and can be easily implemented to perform fast, robust, and non-invasive spring constant calibration.

  3. Dynamic nano-triboelectrification using torsional resonance mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wei; Yao, Nan

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the mechanism of charge generation, distribution, and transfer between surfaces is very important for energy harvesting applications based on triboelectric effect. Here, we demonstrate dynamic nanotriboelectrification with torsional resonance (TR) mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experiments on rubbing the sample surface using TR mode for the generation of triboelectric charges and in-situ characterization of the charge distribution using scanning Kelvin probe microcopy (SKPM) were performed. This method allows the tip to perform lateral oscillation and maintains the tip-sample interaction in the attractive region to ensure high efficiency of the charge generation during the rubbing process. The measured efficiency of generating triboelectric charges can achieve ~10.53 times higher than conventional static/contact mode in the triboelectrification experiments. In addition to the charge generation, local discharging experiments were also performed. This work would provide a new method to generate patterned charges and also be helpful in understanding the mechanism of nanotriboelectrification.

  4. Advancements in flowing diode pumped alkali lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Stalnaker, Donald M.; Guild, Eric M.; Oliker, Benjamin Q.; Moran, Paul J.; Townsend, Steven W.; Hostutler, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple variants of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) have recently been demonstrated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Highlights of this ongoing research effort include: a) a 571W rubidium (Rb) based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with a gain (2α) of 0.48 cm-1, b) a rubidium-cesium (Cs) Multi-Alkali Multi-Line (MAML) laser that simultaneously lases at both 795 nm and 895 nm, and c) a 1.5 kW resonantly pumped potassium (K) DPAL with a slope efficiency of 50%. The common factor among these experiments is the use of a flowing alkali test bed.

  5. Chip Scale Atomic Resonator Frequency Stabilization System With Ultra-Low Power Consumption for Optoelectronic Oscillators.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianye; Zhang, Yaolin; Lu, Haoyuan; Hou, Dong; Zhang, Shuangyou; Wang, Zhong

    2016-07-01

    We present a long-term chip scale stabilization scheme for optoelectronic oscillators (OEOs) based on a rubidium coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic resonator. By locking a single mode of an OEO to the (85)Rb 3.035-GHz CPT resonance utilizing an improved phase-locked loop (PLL) with a PID regulator, we achieved a chip scale frequency stabilization system for the OEO. The fractional frequency stability of the stabilized OEO by overlapping Allan deviation reaches 6.2 ×10(-11) (1 s) and  ∼ 1.45 ×10 (-11) (1000 s). This scheme avoids a decrease in the extra phase noise performance induced by the electronic connection between the OEO and the microwave reference in common injection locking schemes. The total physical package of the stabilization system is [Formula: see text] and the total power consumption is 400 mW, which provides a chip scale and portable frequency stabilization approach with ultra-low power consumption for OEOs.

  6. Micromechanical contact stiffness devices and application for calibrating contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberger, Matthew R.; Chen, Sihan; Prater, Craig B.; King, William P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of micromechanical devices that can present an engineered contact stiffness to an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever tip. These devices allow the contact stiffness between the AFM tip and a substrate to be easily and accurately measured, and can be used to calibrate the cantilever for subsequent mechanical property measurements. The contact stiffness devices are rigid copper disks of diameters 2-18 μm integrated onto a soft silicone substrate. Analytical modeling and finite element simulations predict the elastic response of the devices. Measurements of tip-sample interactions during quasi-static force measurements compare well with modeling simulation, confirming the expected elastic response of the devices, which are shown to have contact stiffness 32-156 N m-1. To demonstrate one application, we use the disk sample to calibrate three resonant modes of a U-shaped AFM cantilever actuated via Lorentz force, at approximately 220, 450, and 1200 kHz. We then use the calibrated cantilever to determine the contact stiffness and elastic modulus of three polymer samples at these modes. The overall approach allows cantilever calibration without prior knowledge of the cantilever geometry or its resonance modes, and could be broadly applied to both static and dynamic measurements that require AFM calibration against a known contact stiffness.

  7. Soluble renormalised model of atom-molecular Feshbach resonance: comparison to experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Peter; Kheruntsyan, Karen

    2003-05-01

    We consider an effective quantum field Hamiltonian [1] as a generic model of molecule formation from pairs of atoms in a Bose-Einstein condensate near a Feshbach resonance. This point-contact model can be renormalised exactly and non-perturbatively [2]. It also has an exact analytic solution for the two-particle ground state. In this case the ground state is a coherent quantum superposition of a molecule with a pair of atoms. We find that the resulting molecular binding energy is in remarkable agreement with inferred binding energies observed in the recent Ramsey-fringe style interference measurement of Donley et al. [3]. The exact solubility of this universal and simple field-theoretic model means that one can obtain analytic expressions for all relevant quantities including the binding energy and the fraction of molecules involved. Our conclusion is that, provided they are renormalised, the use of field theoretic models can allow a quantitative picture of Feshbach molecule formation experiments without requiring a detailed molecular calculation for each specific molecule. [1] P.D.Drummond, K.V.Kheruntsyan, and H.He, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 3055 (1998). [2] S.J.J.M.F.Kokkelmans and M.J.Holland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 18, 180401 (2002). [3] E.A.Donley et al., Nature 417, 529 (2002).

  8. Drifts and Environmental Disturbances in Atomic Clock Subsystems: Quantifying Local Oscillator, Control Loop, & Ion Resonance Interactions.

    PubMed

    Enzer, Daphna G; Diener, William A; Murphy, David W; Rao, Shanti R; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2016-12-19

    Linear ion trap frequency standards are among the most stable continuously-operating frequency references and clocks. Depending on the application, they have been operated with a variety of Local Oscillators (LO) including quartz Ultra-Stable Oscillators (USO), Hydrogen-masers, and Cryogenic Sapphire Oscillators. The short, intermediate, and long term stability of the frequency output is a complicated function of the fundamental performances, the time dependence of environmental disturbances, the atomic interrogation algorithm, the implemented control loop, and the environmental sensitivity of the LO and atomic system components. For applications that require moving these references out of controlled lab-spaces and into less stable environments such as field-work or space-flight, a deeper understanding is needed of how disturbances at different time-scales impact the various subsystems of the clock and ultimately the output stability. In this paper, we analyze which perturbations have an impact and to what degree. We also report on a computational model of a control loop which keeps the microwave source locked to the ion resonance. This model is shown to agree with laboratory measurements of how well the feedback removes various disturbances and also with a useful analytic approach we developed for predicting these impacts.

  9. Excitation of the {sup 229m}Th nuclear isomer via resonance conversion in ionized atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Karpeshin, F. F.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

    2015-09-15

    Pressing problems concerning the optical pumping of the 7.6-eV {sup 229m}Th nuclear isomer, which is a candidate for a new nuclear optical reference point for frequencies, are examined. Physics behind the mechanism of the two-photon optical pumping of the isomer is considered. It is shown that, irrespective of the pumping scheme, a dominant contribution comes, in accord with what was proven earlier for the 3.5-eV isomer, from the resonance 8s–7s transition. Details of an optimum experimental scheme are discussed. It is shown that, after isomer excitation, the atom involved remains with a high probability in an excited state at an energy of about 0.5 eV rather than in the ground state, the required energy of the two photons being equal to the energy of the nuclear level plus the energy of the lowest 7s state of the atom. The estimated pumping time is about 1.5 s in the case where the field strength of each laser is 1 V/cm.

  10. Near-resonant versus nonresonant chemiluminescent charge-transfer reactions of atomic ions with HCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenewinkel-Meyer, Th.; Ottinger, Ch.

    1994-01-01

    Charge-transfer reactions of C+, O+, F+, Ar+ and some other atomic ions with hydrogen chloride were investigated at collision energies between <1 eV and 1 keV. The electronically excited products HCl+ (A 2Σ+) were detected by means of the A 2Σ+→X 2Πi optical emission. In some cases the spectra showed, at low collision energies, an enhanced excitation of specific vibrational HCl+(A,v') levels: for C+, v'=1; for O+, v'=3 as well as v'=1; and for F+, v'=6. These levels are populated in near-resonant, slightly exothermic processes. Their rotational temperature was on the order of 600-700 K. For the other vibrational levels the excitation is off-resonance, mostly endothermic, and here the rotational temperature was 1000-4000 K. Corresponding data are also given for DCl. The selectivity for certain vibrational states is explained by crossings between the vibronic entrance and exit state energy surfaces, calculated from classical electrostatic multipole potentials. The cross sections for the near-resonant reactions decrease monotonically with increasing collision energy, while for the endothermic channels they rise steeply from threshold to a plateau. With argon ions the excitation function exhibits an unusual shape. Here the charge-transfer cross sections for all vibrational levels go through a maximum just above threshold, which is followed by a distinct minimum at about 10 eVc.m.. This may be due to formation of a long-lived collision complex (Ar-HCl)+.

  11. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  12. A Simple Model for Fine Structure Transitions in Alkali-Metal Noble-Gas Collisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    fine- structure transition rates of the alkali atoms . The integration of this integral is primarily performed nu- merically, using an adaptive Romberg...Previous work on the fine structure transitions of alkali atoms as they collide with noble gas atoms includes a full quantum mechanical calculation of...adiabaticity in alkali atom fine structure mixing”. SPIE LASE, 896207–896207. International Society for Optics and Photonics, 2014. 4. Griffiths, David J

  13. Effect of photoions on the line shape of the Foerster resonance lines and microwave transitions in cold rubidium Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Tretyakov, D. B.; Beterov, I. I.; Entin, V. M.; Yakshina, E. A.; Ryabtsev, I. I.; Dyubko, S. F.; Alekseev, E. A.; Pogrebnyak, N. L.; Bezuglov, N. N.; Arimondo, E.

    2012-01-15

    Experiments are carried out on the spectroscopy of the Foerster resonance lines Rb(37P) + Rb(37P) {yields} Rb(37S) + Rb(38S) and microwave transitions nP {yields} n Prime S, n Prime D between Rydberg states of cold rubidium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Under ordinary conditions, all spectra exhibit a linewidth of 2-3 MHz irrespective of the interaction time between atoms or between atoms and microwave radiation, although the limit resonance width should be determined by the inverse interaction time. The analysis of experimental conditions has shown that the main source of line broadening is the inhomogeneous electric field of cold photoions that are generated under the excitation of initial nP Rydberg states by broadband pulsed laser radiation. The application of an additional electric-field pulse that rapidly extracts photoions produced by a laser pulse leads to a considerable narrowing of lines of microwave resonances and the Foerster resonance. Various sources of line broadening in cold Rydberg atoms are analyzed.

  14. Milk-alkali syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000332.htm Milk-alkali syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Milk-alkali syndrome is a condition in which there ...

  15. The role of the alkali and chalcogen atoms on the stability of the layered chalcogenide \\mathbf{{{A}_{2}}{{M}^{II}}M_{3}^{\\,IV}{{Q}_{8}}} (A  =  alkali-metal M  =  metal-cations Q  =  chalcogen) compounds: a density functional theory investigation within van der Waals corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besse, Rafael; Da Silva, Juarez L. F.

    2017-01-01

    There is a great interest to design two-dimensional (2D) chalcogenide materials, however, our atomistic understanding of the major physical parameters that drive the formation of 2D or three-dimensional (3D) chalcogenides is far from satisfactory, in particular, for complex quaternary systems. To address this problem, we selected a set of quaternary 2D and 3D chalcogenide compounds, namely, {{\\text{A}}2}\\text{ZnS}{{\\text{n}}3}{{\\text{Q}}8} (A  =  Li, K, Cs; Q  =  S, Se, Te), which were investigated by density functional theory calculations within van der Waals (vdW) corrections. Employing experimental crystal structures and well designed crystal modifications, we found that the average atomic radius of the alkali-metal, A, and chalcogen, Q, species play a crucial role in the stability of the 2D structures. For example, the 2D structures are energetically favored for smaller (R<1.5~{\\mathring{\\text{A}}}) and larger (R>1.8~{\\mathring{\\text{A}}}) average atomic radius, while 3D structures are favored at intermediate average atomic radius. Those results are explained in terms of strain minimization and Coulomb repulsion of the anionic species in the structure framework. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice parameters are in excellent agreement with experimental results. Thus, the present insights can help in the design of stable quartenary 2D chalcogenide compounds.

  16. Ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal atoms on the (0001) surface of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabishchenkova, A. G. Otrokov, M. M.; Kuznetsov, V. M.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2015-09-15

    Ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal adatoms on the (0001) step surface of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has been performed for the case of low coverage. The calculations of the activation energies of diffusion of adatoms on the surface and in van der Waals gaps near steps, as well as the estimate of diffusion lengths, have shown that efficient intercalation through steps is possible only for Li and Na. Data obtained for K, Rb, and Cs atoms indicate that their thermal desorption at high temperatures can occur before intercalation. The results have been discussed in the context of existing experimental data.

  17. Pairwise additivity in the nuclear magnetic resonance interactions of atomic xenon.

    PubMed

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Vaara, Juha

    2009-04-14

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of atomic (129/131)Xe is used as a versatile probe of the structure and dynamics of various host materials, due to the sensitivity of the Xe NMR parameters to intermolecular interactions. The principles governing this sensitivity can be investigated using the prototypic system of interacting Xe atoms. In the pairwise additive approximation (PAA), the binary NMR chemical shift, nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC), and spin-rotation (SR) curves for the xenon dimer are utilized for fast and efficient evaluation of the corresponding NMR tensors in small xenon clusters Xe(n) (n = 2-12). If accurate, the preparametrized PAA enables the analysis of the NMR properties of xenon clusters, condensed xenon phases, and xenon gas without having to resort to electronic structure calculations of instantaneous configurations for n > 2. The binary parameters for Xe(2) at different internuclear distances were obtained at the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock level of theory. Quantum-chemical (QC) calculations at the corresponding level were used to obtain the NMR parameters of the Xe(n) (n = 2-12) clusters at the equilibrium geometries. Comparison of PAA and QC data indicates that the direct use of the binary property curves of Xe(2) can be expected to be well-suited for the analysis of Xe NMR in the gaseous phase dominated by binary collisions. For use in condensed phases where many-body effects should be considered, effective binary property functions were fitted using the principal components of QC tensors from Xe(n) clusters. Particularly, the chemical shift in Xe(n) is strikingly well-described by the effective PAA. The coordination number Z of the Xe site is found to be the most important factor determining the chemical shift, with the largest shifts being found for high-symmetry sites with the largest Z. This is rationalized in terms of the density of virtual electronic states available for response to magnetic perturbations.

  18. Structural and dynamical aspects of avoided-crossing resonances in a three-level {Lambda} system

    SciTech Connect

    Lizuain, I.; Echanobe, J.; Ruschhaupt, A.; Muga, J. G.; Steck, D. A.

    2010-12-15

    In a recent publication [Phys. Rev. A 79, 065602 (2009)], it was shown that an avoided-crossing resonance can be defined according to level-structural or dynamical criteria. We propose an experiment to observe the difference between the two definitions in a three-level {Lambda} system using microwave fields coupling hyperfine magnetic sublevels in alkali-metal atoms.

  19. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Schmalzer, D.K.; Steindler, M.J.; Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-12-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of Pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an alternative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no high temperature/high pressure (HTHP) sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-reaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial-grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6{und M}-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed in the following.

  20. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Schmalzer, D.K.; Steindler, M.J.; Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of Pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an alternative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no high temperature/high pressure (HTHP) sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-reaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial-grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6[und M]-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed in the following.

  1. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of PFBC technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an altemative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. As shown in Fig. 1, the RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no HTHP sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-leaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6M-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite [8]. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed.

  2. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-11-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of PFBC technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an altemative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. As shown in Fig. 1, the RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no HTHP sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-leaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6M-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite [8]. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed.

  3. Atomic physics with vapor-cell clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuyer, Bart Hunter

    The most widely used atomic frequency standards (or clocks) are based on the microwave resonant frequencies of optically pumped vapors of alkali-metal atoms in glass cells filled with buffer gas. These vapor-cell clocks are secondary, not primary frequency standards mainly because of the light and pressure shifts, which alter the resonant frequencies of the alkali-metal atoms. This dissertation presents studies of atomic physics important to vapor-cell clocks and, in particular, their accuracy. First, we report a simple method to suppress the light shift in optical pumping systems. This method uses only frequency modulation of a radio frequency or microwave source, which excites an atomic resonance, to simultaneously lock the source frequency to the atomic resonance and lock the pumping light frequency to suppress the light shift. This technique can be applied to many optical pumping systems that experience light shifts. It is especially useful for atomic clocks because it improves the long-term performance, reduces the influence of a pumping laser, and requires less equipment than previous methods. Next, we present three studies of the pressure shift, starting with an estimation of the hyperfine-shift potential that is responsible for most of the pressure shift. We then show that the microwave resonant frequencies of ground-state Rb and Cs atoms in Xe buffer gas have a relatively large nonlinear dependence on the Xe pressure, presumably because of short-lived RbXe and CsXe van der Waals molecules. The Xe data show striking discrepancies with the previous theory for nonlinear shifts, most of which is eliminated by accounting for the spin-rotation interaction in addition to the hyperfine-shift interaction in the molecules. To the limit of our experimental accuracy, the shifts of Rb and Cs in He, Ne, and N2 were linear with pressure. We then consider the prospects for suppressing the pressure shift with buffer-gas mixtures and feedback. Finally, we report an

  4. A photon-photon quantum gate based on a single atom in an optical resonator.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Bastian; Welte, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2016-08-11

    That two photons pass each other undisturbed in free space is ideal for the faithful transmission of information, but prohibits an interaction between the photons. Such an interaction is, however, required for a plethora of applications in optical quantum information processing. The long-standing challenge here is to realize a deterministic photon-photon gate, that is, a mutually controlled logic operation on the quantum states of the photons. This requires an interaction so strong that each of the two photons can shift the other's phase by π radians. For polarization qubits, this amounts to the conditional flipping of one photon's polarization to an orthogonal state. So far, only probabilistic gates based on linear optics and photon detectors have been realized, because "no known or foreseen material has an optical nonlinearity strong enough to implement this conditional phase shift''. Meanwhile, tremendous progress in the development of quantum-nonlinear systems has opened up new possibilities for single-photon experiments. Platforms range from Rydberg blockade in atomic ensembles to single-atom cavity quantum electrodynamics. Applications such as single-photon switches and transistors, two-photon gateways, nondestructive photon detectors, photon routers and nonlinear phase shifters have been demonstrated, but none of them with the ideal information carriers: optical qubits in discriminable modes. Here we use the strong light-matter coupling provided by a single atom in a high-finesse optical resonator to realize the Duan-Kimble protocol of a universal controlled phase flip (π phase shift) photon-photon quantum gate. We achieve an average gate fidelity of (76.2 ± 3.6) per cent and specifically demonstrate the capability of conditional polarization flipping as well as entanglement generation between independent input photons. This photon-photon quantum gate is a universal quantum logic element, and therefore could perform most existing two-photon operations

  5. A photon-photon quantum gate based on a single atom in an optical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Bastian; Welte, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2016-08-01

    That two photons pass each other undisturbed in free space is ideal for the faithful transmission of information, but prohibits an interaction between the photons. Such an interaction is, however, required for a plethora of applications in optical quantum information processing. The long-standing challenge here is to realize a deterministic photon-photon gate, that is, a mutually controlled logic operation on the quantum states of the photons. This requires an interaction so strong that each of the two photons can shift the other’s phase by π radians. For polarization qubits, this amounts to the conditional flipping of one photon’s polarization to an orthogonal state. So far, only probabilistic gates based on linear optics and photon detectors have been realized, because “no known or foreseen material has an optical nonlinearity strong enough to implement this conditional phase shift”. Meanwhile, tremendous progress in the development of quantum-nonlinear systems has opened up new possibilities for single-photon experiments. Platforms range from Rydberg blockade in atomic ensembles to single-atom cavity quantum electrodynamics. Applications such as single-photon switches and transistors, two-photon gateways, nondestructive photon detectors, photon routers and nonlinear phase shifters have been demonstrated, but none of them with the ideal information carriers: optical qubits in discriminable modes. Here we use the strong light-matter coupling provided by a single atom in a high-finesse optical resonator to realize the Duan-Kimble protocol of a universal controlled phase flip (π phase shift) photon-photon quantum gate. We achieve an average gate fidelity of (76.2 ± 3.6) per cent and specifically demonstrate the capability of conditional polarization flipping as well as entanglement generation between independent input photons. This photon-photon quantum gate is a universal quantum logic element, and therefore could perform most existing two

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of atomic xenon dissolved in Gay-Berne model liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Lintuvuori, Juho; Straka, Michal; Vaara, Juha

    2007-03-01

    We present constant-pressure Monte Carlo simulations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral parameters, nuclear magnetic shielding relative to the free atom as well as nuclear quadrupole coupling, for atomic xenon dissolved in a model thermotropic liquid crystal. The solvent is described by Gay-Berne (GB) molecules with parametrization kappa=4.4, kappa{'}=20.0 , and mu=nu=1 . The reduced pressure of P{*}=2.0 is used. Previous simulations of a pure GB system with this parametrization have shown that upon lowering the temperature, the model exhibits isotropic, nematic, smectic- A , and smectic- B /molecular crystal phases. We introduce spherical xenon solutes and adjust the energy and length scales of the GB-Xe interaction to those of the GB-GB interaction. This is done through first principles quantum chemical calculations carried out for a dimer of model mesogens as well as the mesogen-xenon complex. We preparametrize quantum chemically the Xe nuclear shielding and quadrupole coupling tensors when interacting with the model mesogen, and use the parametrization in a pairwise additive fashion in the analysis of the simulation. We present the temperature evolution of {129/131}Xe shielding and 131Xe quadrupole coupling in the different phases of the GB model. From the simulations, separate isotropic and anisotropic contributions to the experimentally available total shielding can be obtained. At the experimentally relevant concentration, the presence of the xenon atoms does not significantly affect the phase behavior as compared to the pure GB model. The simulations reproduce many of the characteristic experimental features of Xe NMR in real thermotropic LCs: Discontinuity in the value or trends of the shielding and quadrupole coupling at the nematic-isotropic and smectic-A-nematic phase transitions, nonlinear shift evolution in the nematic phase reflecting the behavior of the orientational order parameter, and decreasing shift in the smectic-A phase. The last

  7. MDM2-MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Teveroni, Emanuela; Moretti, Fabiola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and 4 (MDM4) are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2-MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD ) in the micromolar range for the MDM2-MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2-MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation.

  8. Elastic-properties measurement at high temperatures through contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Marinello, Francesco Pezzuolo, Andrea; Sartori, Luigi; Cavalli, Raffaele; Carmignato, Simone; Savio, Enrico; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2015-06-23

    Miniaturization of products and need for further improvement of machines performance introduce new serious challenges in materials characterization. In particular non-destructive mechanical testing in the sub-micrometer scale is needed to better understand and improve micro-manufacturing operations. To this regard, some open issues are of particular interest: low depth of penetration, high lateral resolution and measurements at elevated temperatures. An interesting solution is given by acoustic microscopy techniques, which can be successfully implemented for advanced research in surface elasticity, allowing fast direct and non-destructive measurement of Young’s modulus and related surface parameters. In this work an instrument set up for Contact Resonance Atomic Force Microscopy is proposed, where the sample with is coupled to a heating stage and a piezoelectric transducer directly vibrate the cantilever during scanning, in order to allow exploitation of high resolution measurements at relatively high temperatures. Such instrument set up was undergone a set of calibration experiments in order to allow not only qualitative but also quantitative characterization of surfaces. The work was completed with a feasibility study with mechanical and topography measurements at temperatures as high as 150°C, with lateral resolution lower than 100 nm.

  9. Transmission resonances in above-barrier reflection of ultra-cold atoms by the Rosen-Morse potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishkhanyan, H. A.; Krainov, V. P.; Ishkhanyan, A. M.

    2010-04-01

    Quantum above-barrier reflection of ultra-cold atoms by the Rosen-Morse potential is analytically considered within the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii approximation. Reformulating the problem of reflectionless transmission as a quasi-linear eigenvalue problem for the potential depth, an approximation for the specific height of the potential that supports reflectionless transmission of the incoming matter wave is derived via modification of the Rayleigh-Schrödinger time-independent perturbation theory. The approximation provides a highly accurate description of the resonance position for all the resonance orders if the nonlinearity parameter is small compared with the incoming particle's chemical potential. Notably, the result for the first transmission resonance turns out to be exact, i.e. the derived formula for the resonant potential height gives the exact value of the first nonlinear resonance's position for all the allowed variation range of the involved parameters, the nonlinearity parameter and chemical potential. This has been demonstrated by constructing the exact solution of the problem for the first resonance. Furthermore, the presented approximation reveals that, in contrast to the linear case, in the nonlinear case reflectionless transmission may occur not only for potential wells but also for potential barriers with positive potential height. It also shows that the nonlinear shift of the resonance position from the position of the corresponding linear resonance is approximately described as a linear function of the resonance order. Finally, a compact (yet, highly accurate) analytic formula for the nth-order resonance position is constructed via combination of analytical and numerical methods.

  10. Self-discharge in bimetallic cells containing alkali metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, M. S.; Hesson, J. C.; Shimotake, H.

    1969-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of thermally regenerative bimetallic cells with alkali metal anodes shows a relation between the current drawn and the rate of discharge under open-circuit conditions. The self-discharge rate of the cell is due to the dissolution and ionization of alkali metal atoms in the fused-salt electrolyte

  11. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Rabi oscillations in a two-level atom moving in an open resonator with spherical mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskii, Andrei V.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamics of interaction of an electromagnetic field with a two-level atom uniformly moving in an open resonator is analysed. The probability of the radiative transition of an excited atom to a lower state is studied as a function of the slope of its trajectory relative to the resonator axis and of the detuning of the atomic transition frequency from the resonator mode frequency. The study was performed in the case of strong coupling by the method of dressed states. The complicated dependences of the transition probability on the detuning and the slope of the atomic trajectory are analysed for small angles (~1°) for typical experimental conditions. It is shown that under certain conditions, a field can be efficiently excited in the resonator by atoms whose transition frequency considerably differs from the field-mode frequency when the detuning is not close to the Doppler shift.

  12. Off-resonant squeezed vacuum effects on a driven two-level atom: absorption and intensity harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, S. S.; Frege, O. M.; Nayak, N.

    1995-07-01

    The resonance fluorescence system of a coherently driven two-level atom in the presence of a broadband squeezed vacuum field whose central frequency is not in resonance with either the driving field frequency or the atomic transition frequency is analyzed. Solutions of the Bloch equations of the system are presented in terms of continued fractions for arbitrary strength of the coherent driving field. Numerical results are presented for the first-harmonic quadrature components of the absorption spectrum and the fluorescent intensity. The effects of the squeezed vacuum field detuning on the absorption spectrum result in hole burning or a dip structure in the weak-field case and two absorption-amplification peaks in the strong-field case. Results are sensitive to the relative phase of the squeezed vacuum.

  13. Hyperfine frequency shift and Zeeman relaxation in alkali-metal-vapor cells with antirelaxation alkene coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, Eric P.; Karaulanov, Todor; Balabas, Mikhail; Budker, Dmitry

    2013-02-01

    An alkene-based antirelaxation coating for alkali-metal vapor cells exhibiting Zeeman relaxation times up to 77 s was recently identified by Balabas The long relaxation times, two orders of magnitude longer than in paraffin- (alkane-) coated cells, motivate revisiting the question of what the mechanism is underlying wall-collision-induced relaxation and renew interest in applications of alkali-metal vapor cells to secondary frequency standards. We measure the width and frequency shift of the ground-state hyperfine mF=0→mF'=0 transition (clock resonance) in vapor cells with 85Rb and 87Rb atoms, with an alkene antirelaxation coating. We find that the frequency shift is slightly larger than for paraffin-coated cells and that the Zeeman linewidth scales linearly with the hyperfine frequency shift.

  14. Binding to Redox-Inactive Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metal Ions Strongly Deactivates the C-H Bonds of Tertiary Amides toward Hydrogen Atom Transfer to Reactive Oxygen Centered Radicals.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; Carboni, Giulia; Mangiacapra, Livia; Bietti, Massimo

    2015-09-18

    The effect of alkali and alkaline earth metal ions on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) with N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) was studied by laser flash photolysis. In acetonitrile, a >2 order of magnitude decrease in the rate constant for hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from the C-H bonds of these substrates (kH) was measured after addition of Li(+). This behavior was explained in terms of a strong interaction between Li(+) and the oxygen atom of both DMF and DMA that increases the extent of positive charge on the amide, leading to C-H bond deactivation toward HAT to the electrophilic radical CumO(•). Similar effects were observed after addition of Ca(2+), which was shown to strongly bind up to four equivalents of the amide substrates. With Mg(2+), weak C-H deactivation was observed for the first two substrate equivalents followed by stronger deactivation for two additional equivalents. No C-H deactivation was observed in DMSO after addition of Li(+) and Mg(2+). These results point toward the important role played by metal ion Lewis acidity and solvent Lewis basicity, indicating that C-H deactivation can be modulated by varying the nature of the metal cation and solvent and allowing for careful control over the HAT reactivity of amide substrates.

  15. Cold interactions between an Yb+ ion and a Li atom: Prospects for sympathetic cooling, radiative association, and Feshbach resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomza, Michał; Koch, Christiane P.; Moszynski, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The electronic structure of the (LiYb )+ molecular ion is investigated with two variants of the coupled cluster method restricted to single, double, and noniterative or linear triple excitations. Potential-energy curves for the ground and excited states, permanent and transition electric dipole moments, and long-range interaction coefficients C4 and C6 are reported. The data are subsequently employed in scattering calculations and photoassociation studies. Feshbach resonances are shown to be measurable, despite the ion's micromotion in the Paul trap. Molecular ions can be formed in their singlet electronic ground state by one-photon photoassociation and in triplet states by two-photon photoassociation; and control of cold atom-ion chemistry based on Feshbach resonances should be feasible. Conditions for sympathetic cooling of an Yb+ ion by an ultracold gas of Li atoms are found to be favorable in the temperature range 10 nK -10 mK , and further improvements using Feshbach resonances should be possible. Overall, these results suggest excellent prospects for building a quantum simulator with ultracold Yb+ ions and Li atoms.

  16. Generation and characterization of alkali metal clusters in Y-FAU zeolites. An ESR and MAS NMR spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannus, István; Béres, Attila; Nagy, János B.; Halász, János; Kiricsi, Imre

    1997-06-01

    Charged and neutral metal clusters of various compositions and sizes can be prepared by controlling the alkali metal content by the decomposition of alkali azides and the composition of the host zeolite by ion-exchange. ESR signals show that electron transfer from alkali metal atoms to alkali metal cations does occur, but in a direction opposite to that predicted by the gas-phase thermochemistry. Alkali metal clusters proved to be very active basic catalytic centers.

  17. Tunable dipolar resonances and Einstein-de Haas effect in a {sup 87}Rb-atom condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Swislocki, Tomasz; Sowinski, Tomasz; Pietraszewicz, Joanna; Gajda, Mariusz; Lewenstein, Maciej; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2011-06-15

    We theoretically study a spinor condensate of {sup 87}Rb atoms in a F=1 hyperfine state confined in an optical dipole trap. Putting initially all atoms in an m{sub F}=1, component we observe a significant transfer of atoms to other, initially empty Zeeman states exclusively due to dipolar forces. Because of conservation of a total angular momentum the atoms going to other Zeeman components acquire an orbital angular momentum and circulate around the center of the trap. This is a realization of the Einstein-de Haas effect in a system of cold gases. We show that the transfer of atoms via dipolar interactions is possible only when the energies of the initial and the final sates are equal. This condition can be fulfilled utilizing a resonant external magnetic field, which tunes energies of involved states via the linear Zeeman effect. We found that there are many final states of different spatial density, which can be tuned selectively to the initial state. We show a simple model explaining high selectivity and controllability of weak dipolar interactions in the condensate of {sup 87}Rb atoms.

  18. Single-resonance optical pumping spectroscopy and application in dressed-state measurement with atomic vapor cell at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qiangbing; Yang, Baodong; Zhang, Tiancai; Wang, Junmin

    2010-06-21

    By monitoring the transmission of probe laser beam (also served as coupling laser beam) which is locked to a cycling hyperfine transition of cesium D(2) line, while pumping laser is scanned across cesium D(1) or D(2) lines, the single-resonance optical pumping (SROP) spectra are obtained with atomic vapor cell. The SROP spectra indicate the variation of the zero-velocity atoms population of one hyperfine fold of ground state, which is optically pumped into another hyperfine fold of ground state by pumping laser. With the virtue of Doppler-free linewidth, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), flat background and elimination of crossover resonance lines (CRLs), the SROP spectra with atomic vapor cell around room temperature can be employed to measure dressed-state splitting of ground state, which is normally detected with laser-cooled atomic sample only, even if the dressed-state splitting is much smaller than the Doppler-broaden linewidth at room temperature.

  19. Terahertz radiation in alkali vapor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, X.-C.

    2014-05-12

    By taking advantage of low ionization potentials of alkali atoms, we demonstrate terahertz wave generation from cesium and rubidium vapor plasmas with an amplitude nearly one order of magnitude larger than that from nitrogen gas at low pressure (0.02–0.5 Torr). The observed phenomena are explained by the numerical modeling based upon electron tunneling ionization.

  20. Probing the resonance potential in the F atom reaction with hydrogen deuteride with spectroscopic accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zefeng; Che, Li; Qiu, Minghui; Wang, Xingan; Dong, Wenrui; Dai, Dongxu; Wang, Xiuyan; Yang, Xueming; Sun, Zhigang; Fu, Bina; Lee, Soo-Y.; Xu, Xin; Zhang, Dong H.

    2008-01-01

    Reaction resonances are transiently trapped quantum states along the reaction coordinate in the transition state region of a chemical reaction that could have profound effects on the dynamics of the reaction. Obtaining an accurate reaction potential that holds these reaction resonance states and eventually modeling quantitatively the reaction resonance dynamics is still a great challenge. Up to now, the only viable way to obtain a resonance potential is through high-level ab initio calculations. Through highly accurate crossed-beam reactive scattering studies on isotope-substituted reactions, the accuracy of the resonance potential could be rigorously tested. Here we report a combined experimental and theoretical study on the resonance-mediated F + HD → HF + D reaction at the full quantum state resolved level, to probe the resonance potential in this benchmark system. The experimental result shows that isotope substitution has a dramatic effect on the resonance picture of this important system. Theoretical analyses suggest that the full-dimensional FH2 ground potential surface, which was believed to be accurate in describing the resonance picture of the F + H2 reaction, is found to be insufficiently accurate in predicting quantitatively the resonance picture for the F + HD → HF + D reaction. We constructed a global potential energy surface by using the CCSD(T) method that could predict the correct resonance peak positions as well as the dynamics for both F + H2 → HF + H and F + HD → HF + D, providing an accurate resonance potential for this benchmark system with spectroscopic accuracy. PMID:18687888

  1. Conversion of bright magneto-optical resonances into dark resonances at fixed laser frequency for D2 excitation of atomic rubidium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzinsh, M.; Berzins, A.; Ferber, R.; Gahbauer, F.; Kalvans, L.; Mozers, A.; Opalevs, D.

    2012-03-01

    Nonlinear magneto-optical resonances on the hyperfine transitions belonging to the D2 line of rubidium were changed from bright to dark resonances by changing the laser power density of the single exciting laser field or by changing the vapor temperature in the cell. In one set of experiments atoms were excited by linearly polarized light from an extended cavity diode laser with polarization vector perpendicular to the light's propagation direction and magnetic field, and laser-induced fluorescence was observed along the direction of the magnetic field, which was scanned. A low-contrast bright resonance was observed at low laser power densities when the laser was tuned to the Fg=2→Fe=3 transition of 87Rb and near to the Fg=3→Fe=4 transition of 85Rb. The bright resonance became dark as the laser power density was increased above 0.6 mW/cm2 or 0.8 mW/cm2, respectively. When the Fg=2→Fe=3 transition of 87Rb was excited with circularly polarized light in a second set of experiments, a bright resonance was observed, which became dark when the temperature was increased to around 50∘C. The experimental observations at room temperature could be reproduced with good agreement by calculations based on a theoretical model, although the theoretical model was not able to describe measurements at elevated temperatures, where reabsorption was thought to play a decisive role. The model was derived from the optical Bloch equations and included all nearby hyperfine components, averaging over the Doppler profile, mixing of magnetic sublevels in the external magnetic field, and a treatment of the coherence properties of the exciting radiation field.

  2. Probing quantum confinement at the atomic scale with optically detected nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, James G.

    2001-09-01

    Near-band-gap circularly polarized excitation in III-V semiconductors provides spin-polarized electrons that transfer spin order to lattice nuclei via fluctuations in the contact hyperfine interaction. This process of optical nuclear polarization and the complementary technique of optical detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provide extreme sensitivity enhancement and spatial selectivity in structured samples, enabling collection of NMR spectra from samples such as single quantum wells or dots containing as few as ˜105 nuclei. Combining these advances with novel techniques for high spectral resolution, we have probed quantum-confined electronic states near the interface of a single epitaxially grown Al1-x As/GaAs (x = 0.36) heterojunction. Using a novel strategy that we refer to as POWER (p&barbelow;erturbations o&barbelow;bserved w&barbelow;ith e&barbelow;nhanced ṟesolution) NMR, multiple-pulse time suspension is synchronized with bandgap optical irradiation to reveal spectra of effective spin Hamiltonians that are differences between those of the occupied and unoccupied photoexcited electronic state. The underlying NMR linewidth is reduced by three orders of magnitude in these experiments, enabling resolution of an asymmetric line shape due to light-induced hyperfine interactions. The results are successfully fit with the coherent nuclear spin evolution and relaxation theoretically expected for sites distributed over the volume of an electronic excitation weakly localized at a point defect. This analysis establishes a one-to-one relationship, which can be used to follow nuclear spin diffusion, between optical Knight shift and the radial position of lattice nuclei. We have also introduced POWER NMR techniques to characterize the change in electric field associated with cycling from light-on to light-off states via a linear quadrupole Stark effect (LQSE) of the nuclear spins. Simulations of these NMR spectra in terms of the radial electric fields of

  3. Alkali-metal electron spin density shift induced by a helium nanodroplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Markus; Callegari, Carlo; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2010-04-01

    Helium (He) nanodroplets provide a cold and virtually unperturbing environment for the study of weakly bound molecules and van der Waals aggregates. High resolution microwave spectroscopy and the detection of electron spin transitions in doped He droplets have recently become possible. Measurements of hyperfine-resolved electron spin resonance in potassium (39K) and rubidium (85Rb) atoms on the surface of He droplets show small line shifts relative to the bare atoms. These shifts were recorded for all 2I + 1 components (I is the nuclear spin) of a transition at high accuracy for He droplets ranging in size from 1000 to 15,000 He atoms. Evaluation of the spectra yields the influence of the He environment on the electron spin density at the alkali-metal nucleus. A semi-empirical model is presented that shows good qualitative agreement with the measured droplet size dependent increase of Fermi contact interaction at the nuclei of dopant K and Rb.

  4. Line shapes and time dynamics of the Förster resonances between two Rydberg atoms in a time-varying electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakshina, E. A.; Tretyakov, D. B.; Beterov, I. I.; Entin, V. M.; Andreeva, C.; Cinins, A.; Markovski, A.; Iftikhar, Z.; Ekers, A.; Ryabtsev, I. I.

    2016-10-01

    The observation of the Stark-tuned Förster resonances between Rydberg atoms excited by narrowband cw laser radiation requires usage of a Stark-switching technique in order to excite the atoms first in a fixed electric field and then to induce the interactions in a varied electric field, which is scanned across the Förster resonance. In our experiments with a few cold Rb Rydberg atoms, we have found that the transients at the edges of the electric pulses strongly affect the line shapes of the Förster resonances, since the population transfer at the resonances occurs on a time scale of ˜100 ns, which is comparable with the duration of the transients. For example, a short-term ringing at a certain frequency causes additional radio-frequency-assisted Förster resonances, while nonsharp edges lead to asymmetry. The intentional application of the radio-frequency field induces transitions between collective states, whose line shape depends on the interaction strengths and time. Spatial averaging over the atom positions in a single interaction volume yields a cusped line shape of the Förster resonance. We present a detailed experimental and theoretical analysis of the line shape and time dynamics of the Stark-tuned Förster resonances Rb (n P3 /2) +Rb (n P3 /2) →Rb (n S1 /2) +Rb ([n +1 ] S1 /2) for two Rb Rydberg atoms interacting in a time-varying electric field.

  5. A Separable Insertion Method to Calculate Atomic and Molecular Resonances on a FE-DVR Grid using Exterior Complex Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeln, Brant Anthony

    The study of metastable electronic resonances, anion or neutral states of finite lifetime, in molecules is an important area of research where currently no theoretical technique is generally applicable. The role of theory is to calculate both the position and width, which is proportional to the inverse of the lifetime, of these resonances and how they vary with respect to nuclear geometry in order to generate potential energy surfaces. These surfaces are the basis of time-dependent models of the molecular dynamics where the system moves towards vibrational excitation or fragmentation. Three fundamental electronic processes that can be modeled this way are dissociative electronic attachment, vibrational excitation through electronic impact and autoionization. Currently, experimental investigation into these processes is being preformed on polyatomic molecules while theoreticians continue their fifty-year-old search for robust methods to calculate them. The separable insertion method, investigated in this thesis, seeks to tackle the problem of calculating metastable resonances by using existing quantum chemistry tools along with a grid-based method employing exterior complex scaling (ECS). Modern quantum chemistry methods are extremely efficient at calculating ground and (bound) excited electronic states of atoms and molecules by utilizing Gaussian basis functions. These functions provide both a numerically fast and analytic solution to the necessary two-electron, six-dimensional integrals required in structure calculations. However, these computer programs, based on analytic Gaussian basis sets, cannot construct solutions that are not square-integrable, such as resonance wavefunctions. ECS, on the other hand, can formally calculate resonance solutions by rotating the asymptotic electronic coordinates into the complex plane. The complex Siegert energies for resonances, Eres = ER - iGamma/2 where ER is the real-valued position of the resonance and Gamma is the width

  6. Resonance-theoretic calculation of the ground state spin density of the pπ-system of edge atoms on graphene nanodots and nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Jerry Ray

    2008-12-01

    By the resonance-theoretic method zigzag graphene nanoribbons are predicted to have an antiferromagnetic ground state with a Mulliken spin density of 0.33 on the edge atoms and the armchair graphene nanoribbons are predicted to have a nonmagnetic ground state. Similar calculations predict that sawtooth graphene nanoribbons have a weakly antiferromagnetic ground state with edge atoms having a Mulliken spin density of 0.16 on the edge atoms.

  7. Alkali Metal Cluster Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. In this thesis, we apply the tight-binding Hubbard model to alkali metal clusters with Hartree-Fock self-consistent methods and perturbation methods for the numerical calculations. We have studied the relation between the equilibrium structures and the range of the hopping matrix elements in the Hubbard Hamiltonian. The results show that the structures are not sensitive to the interaction range but are determined by the number of valence electrons each atom has. Inertia tensors are used to analyse the symmetries of the clusters. The principal axes of the clusters are determined and they are the axes of rotational symmetries of clusters if the clusters have any. The eigenvalues of inertia tensors which are the indication of the deformation of clusters are compared between our model and the ellipsoidal jellium model. The agreement is good for large clusters. At a finite temperature, the thermal motion fluctuates the structures. We defined a fluctuation function with the distance matrix of a cluster. The fluctuation has been studied with the Monte-Carlo simulation method. Our studies show that the clusters remain in the solid state when temperature is low. The small values of fluctuation functions indicates the thermal vibration of atoms around their equilibrium positions. If the temperature is high, the atoms are delocalized. The cluster melts and enters the liquid region. The cluster melting is simulated by the Monte-Carlo simulation with the fluctuation function we defined. Energy levels of clusters are calculated from the Hubbard model. Ionization potentials and magic numbers are also obtained from these energy levels. The results confirm that the Hubbard model is a good approximation for a small cluster. The excitation energy is presented by the difference between the original level and excited level, and the electron-hole interactions. We also have studied cooling of clusters

  8. Cavity-Q aging observed via an atomic-candle signal.

    PubMed

    Coffer, John G; Sickmiller, Brett; Camparo, James C

    2004-02-01

    Slow variations in cavity-Q and microwave power are thought to play a role in the long-term frequency stability of gas-cell atomic clocks. Here, we use an atomic-candle method to study the aging of a TE011 microwave cavity's resonant frequency and quality factor when a glass resonance cell containing Rb87 loads the cavity. Our results suggest that the alkali vapor coats the inside glass surface of the resonance cell with a thin metallic film; and that, as this film evolves, the quality factor degrades. (In our experiments the quality factor changed by approximately 30% over a timescale of months.) More generally, the present work demonstrates the efficacy of the atomic-candle method for investigating cavity resonances. In particular, we show that, when used in conjunction with more traditional methods, the atomic-candle method has the potential to reveal information on a cavity mode's spatial profile.

  9. Flash photolysis resonance fluorescence investigation of the reaction of Cl/2P/ atoms with ClONO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurylo, M. J.; Manning, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    Rate constants for the removal of Cl(2P) atoms by homogeneous gas phase reaction with ClONO2 were measured using the flash photolysis resonance fluorescence technique at 224, 250, and 273 K. The values obtained have been used to derive the above Arrhenius equation. The uncertainties expressed are 95% confidence limits obtained using the statistical standard deviation of the individual rate constants plus a 15% additional estimated uncertainty attributed to difficulties in chlorine nitrate concentration measurements. The results indicate that destruction of chlorine nitrate by reaction with chlorine atoms is perhaps the least important of the atmospheric reactive channels, and is at least three orders of magnitude slower than calculated photodissociation rates at all stratospheric altitudes.

  10. Resonant laser ablation of metals detected by atomic emission in a microwave plasma and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Danielle; Stchur, Peter; Hou, Xiandeng; Yang, Karl X; Zhou, Jack; Michel, Robert G

    2005-12-01

    It has been shown that an increase in sensitivity and selectivity of detection of an analyte can be achieved by tuning the ablation laser wavelength to match that of a resonant gas-phase transition of that analyte. This has been termed resonant laser ablation (RLA). For a pulsed tunable nanosecond laser, the data presented here illustrate the resonant enhancement effect in pure copper and aluminum samples, chromium oxide thin films, and for trace molybdenum in stainless steel samples, and indicate two main characteristics of the RLA phenomenon. The first is that there is an increase in the number of atoms ablated from the surface. The second is that the bandwidth of the wavelength dependence of the ablation is on the order of 1 nm. The effect was found to be virtually identical whether the atoms were detected by use of a microwave-induced plasma with atomic emission detection, by an inductively coupled plasma with mass spectrometric detection, or by observation of the number of laser pulses required to penetrate through thin films. The data indicate that a distinct ablation laser wavelength dependence exists, probably initiated via resonant radiation trapping, and accompanied by collisional broadening. Desorption contributions through radiation trapping are substantiated by changes in crater morphology as a function of wavelength and by the relatively broad linewidth of the ablation laser wavelength scans, compared to gas-phase excitation spectra. Also, other experiments with thin films demonstrate the existence of a distinct laser-material interaction and suggest that a combination of desorption induced by electronic transition (DIET) with resonant radiation trapping could assist in the enhancement of desorption yields. These results were obtained by a detailed inspection of the effect of the wavelength of the ablation laser over a narrow range of energy densities that lie between the threshold of laser-induced desorption of species and the usual analytical

  11. Interacting double dark resonances in a hot atomic vapor of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Ghosh, R.; Laupretre, T.; Bretenaker, F.; Goldfarb, F.

    2011-08-15

    We experimentally and theoretically study two different tripod configurations using metastable helium ({sup 4}He*), with the probe field polarization perpendicular and parallel to the quantization axis, defined by an applied weak magnetic field. In the first case, the two dark resonances interact incoherently and merge together into a single electromagnetically induced transparency peak with increasing coupling power. In the second case, we observe destructive interference between the two dark resonances inducing an extra absorption peak at the line center.

  12. One-photon scattering by an atomic chain in a two-mode resonator: cyclic conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a chain of N identical two-level atoms coupled with a quantized electromagnetic field, initially prepared via a single-photon Fock state, is investigated. The N-particle state amplitude of the system is calculated for several space configurations of the atoms in the Weisskopf-Wigner approximation. It was shown that the space configuration of an atomic chain, the total number of atoms, and even the available volume for the field modes define the behavior of the system state amplitude with time. Applying the condition of ‘cyclic bonds’, presented in this work, to the elaborated theory allows to describe the system time evolution, practically, for any space configuration. PMID:24860278

  13. The influence of atomic dipole-dipole interaction on the dynamics of the population inversion and entanglement of two atoms interacting non-resonantly with two coupled modes field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraji, Elham; Baghshahi, Hamid Reza; Tavassoly, Mohammad Kazem

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the non-resonant interaction of two two-level atoms with two quantized cavity fields is studied by considering the dipole-dipole interaction between the two atoms. The correlation between the fields has been taken into account and the parametric down conversion is considered. Under certain initial conditions which is determined for the atoms and the fields, the analytical solution for the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is obtained. Employing this solution, we are able to discuss about some physical properties such as atomic population inversion and entanglement between various subsystems, i.e. “atoms-fields” and “atom-atom” by using respectively von Neumann entropy and negativity. It is deduced from the numerical results that, the mentioned quantities can be controlled by the atomic dipole-dipole interaction and detuning parameter, appropriately. The results show that the degree of entanglement between the two atoms is increased due to the presence of dipole-dipole coupling of the atoms at the beginning of atom-field interaction. Furthermore, it is found that, in the non-resonance condition, the so-called entanglement sudden death occurs in the presence of dipole-dipole interaction.

  14. Gallium phosphide as a new material for anodically bonded atomic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Dural, Nezih; Romalis, Michael V.

    2014-08-01

    Miniaturized atomic sensors are often fabricated using anodic bonding of silicon and borosilicate glass. Here we describe a technique for fabricating anodically bonded alkali-metal cells using GaP and Pyrex. GaP is a non-birefringent semiconductor that is transparent at alkali-metal resonance wavelengths, allowing new sensor geometries. GaP also has a higher thermal conductivity and lower He permeability than borosilicate glass and can be anodically bonded below 200 °C, which can also be advantageous in other vacuum sealing applications.

  15. Resonant Compton Scattering of Photons by Helium Atoms in Lorentzian Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Sabyasachi; Wang, Yang; Ho, Y. K.; Jiang, Zishi

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the effects of Lorentzian astrophysical plasmas on resonant Compton scattering of photons by the helium ground and excited states. The bound-excited states energies in the plasma environments are obtained by using highly correlated exponential wave functions in the framework of Ritz variational method. The resonance Compton scattering cross sections in Lorentzian plasmas between the 1s2{ }1S and 1s2p 1P, 1s2s 1S and 1s3p 1P, 1s3s 1S and 1s3d 1D states are reported as a function of the spectral index and plasma parameter. The nonthermal character of the Lorentzian plasmas shows interesting features on the resonant Compton scattering cross sections.

  16. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  17. Statistics of resonance fluorescence of a pair of atoms in a feedback loop

    SciTech Connect

    Tomilin, V. A. Il'ichev, L. V.

    2013-02-15

    The statistics of photoemission events of a pair of closely spaced two-level atoms is calculated in a classical light field whose phase is changed by {pi} after the detection of each spontaneous photon. This statistics is compared with the statistics in the case when the feedback is missing. In both cases, one can observe noticeable antibunching of photons in the range of parameters where no antibunching is observed in a single-atom system. The feedback substantially increases the antibunching. This effect manifests itself more strongly in relatively weak fields and for considerable frequency detunings.

  18. Interactions of hydrogen with alkali promoted Ru/SiO2 catalysts: A proton NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Uner, Denis Ozbay

    1994-05-10

    Role of H spillover to the silica support was studied using chemisorption; a strongly bound component of spilled over H was found in the silica support which interfered with accurate measurements of active metal sites via volumetric strong H chemisorption. The volumetric chemisorption technique was modified so that measurement times were reduced from 12--36 h to 1 h. The active Ru surface was characterized means of changes in proton spin counts and NMR Knight shifts vs alkali loading. Na, K blocked the active surface of Ru metal, but Cs was pushed off by H chemisorption. The alkali promoters restricted H mobility on both metal surface and at the metal support interfaces; this is consistent with effects on Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. 1H NMR was used to study the effect of the active metal and promoter on support hydroxyl groups. The OH group density in the silica support decreased with metal and/or promoter loading, but not on a one-to-one basis; the exchange efficiency of the hydroxyls decreased with atomic size of the alkali metal. An additional downfield proton resonance was detected which was assigned to the alkali hydroxide species in the support.

  19. Probing local bias-induced transitions using photothermal excitation contact resonance atomic force microscopy and voltage spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qian; Jesse, Stephen; Tselev, Alexander; Collins, Liam; Yu, Pu; Kravchenko, Ivan; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Balke, Nina

    2015-01-05

    In this paper, nanomechanical properties are closely related to the states of matter, including chemical composition, crystal structure, mesoscopic domain configuration, etc. Investigation of these properties at the nanoscale requires not only static imaging methods, e.g., contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM), but also spectroscopic methods capable of revealing their dependence on various external stimuli. Here we demonstrate the voltage spectroscopy of CR-AFM, which was realized by combining photothermal excitation (as opposed to the conventional piezoacoustic excitation method) with the band excitation technique. We applied this spectroscopy to explore local bias-induced phenomena ranging from purely physical to surface electromechanical and electrochemical processes. Our measurements show that the changes in the surface properties associated with these bias-induced transitions can be accurately assessed in a fast and dynamic manner, using resonance frequency as a signature. Finally, with many of the advantages offered by photothermal excitation, contact resonance voltage spectroscopy not only is expected to find applications in a broader field of nanoscience but also will provide a basis for future development of other nanoscale elastic spectroscopies.

  20. Probing local bias-induced transitions using photothermal excitation contact resonance atomic force microscopy and voltage spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Qian; Jesse, Stephen; Tselev, Alexander; ...

    2015-01-05

    In this paper, nanomechanical properties are closely related to the states of matter, including chemical composition, crystal structure, mesoscopic domain configuration, etc. Investigation of these properties at the nanoscale requires not only static imaging methods, e.g., contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM), but also spectroscopic methods capable of revealing their dependence on various external stimuli. Here we demonstrate the voltage spectroscopy of CR-AFM, which was realized by combining photothermal excitation (as opposed to the conventional piezoacoustic excitation method) with the band excitation technique. We applied this spectroscopy to explore local bias-induced phenomena ranging from purely physical to surface electromechanical andmore » electrochemical processes. Our measurements show that the changes in the surface properties associated with these bias-induced transitions can be accurately assessed in a fast and dynamic manner, using resonance frequency as a signature. Finally, with many of the advantages offered by photothermal excitation, contact resonance voltage spectroscopy not only is expected to find applications in a broader field of nanoscience but also will provide a basis for future development of other nanoscale elastic spectroscopies.« less

  1. Repumping ground-state population in a coherently driven atomic resonance.

    PubMed

    Sinay, Asif; Shuker, Moshe; Firstenberg, Ofer; Fisher, Amnon; Ben-Kish, Amit; Steinhauer, Jeff

    2010-08-30

    We experimentally demonstrate an optical pumping technique to pump a dilute rubidium vapor into the m(F) = 0 ground states. The technique utilizes selection rules that forbid the excitation of the m(F) = 0 states by linearly-polarized light. A substantial increase in the transparency contrast of the coherent-population-trapping resonance used for frequency standards is demonstrated.

  2. Influence of shape resonances on minima in cross sections for photoionization of excited atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Felfli, Z.; Manson, S.T. Department of Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 )

    1990-02-01

    A relationship between the location of Cooper minima and the difference between the quantum defect of the initial state and the threshold phase shift (in units of {pi}) of the final state in excited photoionization has been suggested earlier (Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 473 (1982)). The existence of a shape resonance in the final state is shown to modify this relationship.

  3. Detection of ultrahigh resonance contrast in vapor-cell atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinda; Deng, Jianliao; Ma, Yisheng; He, Huijuan; Wang, Yuzhu

    2012-12-15

    We propose and demonstrate a novel detection scheme of clock signals and obtain an ultrahigh resonance contrast up to 90%, which leads to the remarkable improvement of the precision of the signal-to-noise ratio. The frequency stability in terms of Allan deviation of the proposed detection scheme is improved by an order of magnitude under equivalent conditions.

  4. New generation polyphase resonant converter-modulators for the Korean atomic energy research institute

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, William A; Baca, David M; Gribble, Robert F

    2009-01-01

    This paper will present operational data and performance parameters of the newest generation polyphase resonant high voltage converter modulator (HVCM) as developed and delivered to the KAERI 100 MeV ''PEFP'' accelerator [1]. The KAERI design realizes improvements from the SNS and SLAC designs [2]. To improve the IGBT switching performance at 20 kHz for the KAERI system, the HVCM utilizes the typical zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) at turn on and as well as artificial zero-current-switching (ZCS) at turn-off. The new technique of artificial ZCS technique should result in a 6 fold reduction of IGBT switching losses (3). This improves the HCVM conversion efficiency to better than 95% at full average power, which is 500 kW for the KAERI two klystron 105 kV, 50 A application. The artificial ZCS is accomplished by placing a resonant RLC circuit across the input busswork to the resonant boost transformer. This secondary resonant circuit provides a damped ''kick-back'' to assist in IGBT commutation. As the transformer input busswork is extremely low inductance (< 10 nH), the single RLC network acts like it is across each of the four IGBT collector-emitter terminals of the H-bridge switching network. We will review these topological improvements and the overall system as delivered to the KAERI accelerator and provide details of the operational results.

  5. An ion cyclotron resonance study of reactions of some atomic and simple polyatomic ions with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpas, Z.; Anicich, V. G.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Reactions of various positive ions with water vapor were studied by ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric techniques. Rate constants and product distributions were determined for reactions of the ions: Ar(+), Co(+), N2(+), and CO2(+), CH2(+), and CH4(+), CH2Cl(+), HCO(+), H2CO(+), H2COH(+), H2S(+) and HS(+). The results obtained in this work are compared with earlier reported data where available.

  6. Comparison of force sensors for atomic force microscopy based on quartz tuning forks and length-extensional resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, Franz J.; Pielmeier, Florian; Eguchi, Toyoaki; An, Toshu; Hasegawa, Yukio

    2011-09-01

    The force sensor is key to the performance of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Nowadays, most atomic force microscopes use micromachined force sensors made from silicon, but piezoelectric quartz sensors are being applied at an increasing rate, mainly in vacuum. These self-sensing force sensors allow a relatively easy upgrade of a scanning tunneling microscope to a combined scanning tunneling/atomic force microscope. Two fundamentally different types of quartz sensors have achieved atomic resolution: the “needle sensor,” which is based on a length-extensional resonator, and the “qPlus sensor,” which is based on a tuning fork. Here, we calculate and measure the noise characteristics of these sensors. We find four noise sources: deflection detector noise, thermal noise, oscillator noise, and thermal drift noise. We calculate the effect of these noise sources as a factor of sensor stiffness, bandwidth, and oscillation amplitude. We find that for self-sensing quartz sensors, the deflection detector noise is independent of sensor stiffness, while the remaining three noise sources increase strongly with sensor stiffness. Deflection detector noise increases with bandwidth to the power of 1.5, while thermal noise and oscillator noise are proportional to the square root of the bandwidth. Thermal drift noise, however, is inversely proportional to bandwidth. The first three noise sources are inversely proportional to amplitude while thermal drift noise is independent of the amplitude. Thus, we show that the earlier finding that quoted an optimal signal-to-noise ratio for oscillation amplitudes similar to the range of the forces is still correct when considering all four frequency noise contributions. Finally, we suggest how the signal-to-noise ratio of the sensors can be improved further, we briefly discuss the challenges of mounting tips, and we compare the noise performance of self-sensing quartz sensors and optically detected Si cantilevers.

  7. Resonance and intercombination lines in Mg-like ions of atomic numbers Z=13–92

    DOE PAGES

    Santana, Juan A.; Trabert, Elmar

    2015-02-05

    While prominent lines of various Na-like ions have been measured with an accuracy of better than 100 ppm and corroborate equally accurate calculations, there have been remarkably large discrepancies between calculations for Mg-like ions of high atomic number. We present ab initio calculations using the multireference Moller-Plesset approach for Mg-like ions of atomic numbers Z = 13-92 and compare the results with other calculations of this isoelectronic sequence as well as with experimental data. Our results come very close to experiment (typically 100 ppm) over a wide range. Furthermore, data at high values of Z are sparse, which calls formore » further accurate measurements in this range where relativistic and QED effects are large.« less

  8. Vibrations of alkali metal overlayers on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusina, G. G.; Eremeev, S. V.; Echenique, P. M.; Benedek, G.; Borisova, S. D.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2008-06-01

    We review the current progress in the understanding of vibrations of alkalis adsorbed on metal surfaces. The analysis of alkali vibrations was made on the basis of available theoretical and experimental results. We also include in this discussion our recent calculations of vibrations in K/Pt(111) and Li(Na)/Cu(001) systems. The dependence of alkali adlayer localized modes on atomic mass, adsorption position and coverage as well as the dependence of vertical vibration frequency on the substrate orientation is discussed. The square root of atomic mass dependence of the vertical vibration energy has been confirmed by using computational data for alkalis on the Al(111) and Cu(001) substrates. We have confirmed that in a wide range of submonolayer coverages the stretch mode energy remains nearly constant while the energy of in-plane polarized modes increases with the increase of alkali coverage. It was shown that the spectrum of both stretch and in-plane vibrations can be very sensitive to the adsorption position of alkali atoms and substrate orientation.

  9. Apparatus enables accurate determination of alkali oxides in alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupraw, W. A.; Gahn, R. F.; Graab, J. W.; Maple, W. E.; Rosenblum, L.

    1966-01-01

    Evacuated apparatus determines the alkali oxide content of an alkali metal by separating the metal from the oxide by amalgamation with mercury. The apparatus prevents oxygen and moisture from inadvertently entering the system during the sampling and analytical procedure.

  10. Atomic Resolution Structure of the Orotidine 5′-Monophosphate Decarboxylase Product Complex Combined with Surface Plasmon Resonance Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fujihashi, Masahiro; Mito, Kazuya; Pai, Emil F.; Miki, Kunio

    2013-01-01

    Orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase) accelerates the decarboxylation of its substrate by 17 orders of magnitude. One argument brought forward against steric/electrostatic repulsion causing substrate distortion at the carboxylate substituent as part of the catalysis has been the weak binding affinity of the decarboxylated product (UMP). The crystal structure of the UMP complex of ODCase at atomic resolution (1.03 Å) shows steric competition between the product UMP and the side chain of a catalytic lysine residue. Surface plasmon resonance analysis indicates that UMP binds 5 orders of magnitude more tightly to a mutant in which the interfering side chain has been removed than to wild-type ODCase. These results explain the low affinity of UMP and counter a seemingly very strong argument against a contribution of substrate distortion to the catalytic reaction mechanism of ODCase. PMID:23395822

  11. Most Typical 1∶2 Resonant Perturbation of the Hydrogen Atom by Weak Electric and Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstathiou, K.; Lukina, O. V.; Sadovskií, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    We study a perturbation of the hydrogen atom by small homogeneous static electric and magnetic fields in a specific mutual alignment with angle approximately π/3 which results in the 1∶2 resonance of the linearized Keplerian n-shell approximation. The bifurcation diagram of the classical integrable approximation has for most such field configurations the same typical structure that we describe. The structure of the corresponding quantum energy spectrum, which we describe in detail, is in certain ways an analogue of the well-known degeneracy found by Herrick [Phys. Rev. A 26, 323 (1982)PLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.26.323] for the quadratic Zeeman effect.

  12. Frequency shift in three-photon resonant four-wave mixing by internal atom-field interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo, Natalia R.; Vianna, Sandra S.

    2015-11-01

    We report on experimental results of four-wave mixing processes in rubidium vapor where coherence is induced on the three-photon resonant transition from 5 s to 6 p states via intermediate Rydberg levels. It is shown that the use of two beams in a noncollinear configuration, i.e., θ ≠0 , and high atomic density unveil new features. First, the θ =0 (collinear configuration) odd-photon destructive interference between the incident and generated fields is strongly inhibited for θ ≠0 . Second, most importantly, the observed cooperative frequency shift of the three-photon transition is strongly enhanced for small, but nonzero, values of θ due to the factor (1-cosθ ) -1, which is not present if the generated radiation field is not considered self-consistently in the Maxwell-Bloch equations.

  13. EIT resonance features in strong magnetic fields in rubidium atomic columns with length varying by 4 orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoyan, R.; Sargsyan, A.; Sarkisyan, D.; Wojciechowski, A.; Stabrawa, A.; Gawlik, W.

    2016-06-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) resonances are investigated with the 85Rb D 1 line (795 nm) in strong magnetic fields (up to 2 kG) with three different types of spectroscopic vapor cells: the nano-cell with a thickness along the direction of laser light L ≈ 795 nm, the micro-cell with L = 30 μm with the addition of a neon buffer gas, and the centimeter-long glass cell. These cells allowed us to observe systematic changes of the EIT spectra when the increasing magnetic field systematically decoupled the total atomic electron and nuclear angular moments (the Paschen-Back/Back-Goudsmit effects). The observations agree well with a theoretical model. The advantages and disadvantages of a particular type of cell are discussed along with the possible practical applications.

  14. Universal one-dimensional atomic gases near odd-wave resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiaoling

    2016-10-01

    We show the renormalization of the contact interaction for odd-wave scattering in one-dimension (1D). Based on the renormalized interaction, we exactly solve the two-body problem in a harmonic trap and further explore the universal properties of spin-polarized fermions near odd-wave resonance by using the operator-product-expansion method. It is found that the high-momentum distribution behaves as C /k2 , with C being the odd-wave contact. Various universal relations are derived. Our work suggests a universal system emergent in 1D with large odd-wave scattering length.

  15. Quenching of the resonance 5s({sup 3}P{sub 1}) state of krypton atoms in collisions with krypton and helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zayarnyi, D A; L'dov, A Yu; Kholin, I V

    2014-11-30

    The processes of collision quenching of the resonance 5s[3/2]{sub 1}{sup o}({sup 3}P{sub 1}) state of the krypton atom are studied by the absorption probe method in electron-beam-excited high-pressure He – Kr mixtures with a low content of krypton. The rate constants of plasmochemical reactions Kr* + Kr + He → Kr*{sub 2} + He [(4.21 ± 0.42) × 10{sup -33} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1}], Kr* + 2He → HeKr* + He [(4.5 ± 1.2) × 10{sup -36} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1}] and Kr* + He → products + He [(2.21 ± 0.22) × 10{sup -15} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}] are measured for the first time. The rate constants of similar reactions are refined for krypton in the metastable 5s[3/2]{sub 2}{sup o} ({sup 3}P{sub 2}) state. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  16. H{sup −} formation by neutral resonant ionization of H(n=2) atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, John S.

    2015-04-08

    A mechanism for producing hydrogen anions in a low density, low energy hydrogen plasma is proposed. The observation in a plasma ion source that the anion output is quadratically related to the Lyman-α radiation suggests that anions could be formed in collisions between atoms in the first excited state. A potential energy plot for the hydrogen molecule is developed that includes a high energy ionic state, comprising a proton and the weakly bound H{sup −}(2p{sup 2} {sup 3}P{sup e}) ion, revealing a path to stable anion formation.

  17. Resonantly enhanced tunneling and transport of ultracold atoms on tilted optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Rubbo, Chester P.; Manmana, Salvatore R.; Peden, Brandon M.; Holland, Murray J.; Rey, Ana Maria

    2011-09-15

    We investigate the resonantly enhanced tunneling dynamics of ultracold bosons loaded on a tilted one-dimensional optical lattice, which can be used to simulate a chain of Ising spins and associated quantum phase transitions. The center-of-mass motion after a sudden tilt both at commensurate and incommensurate fillings is obtained via analytic, time-dependent exact diagonalization and density-matrix renormalization-group methods. We identify a maximum in the amplitude of the center-of-mass oscillations at the quantum critical point of the effective spin system. For the dynamics of incommensurate systems, which cannot be mapped to a spin model, we develop an analytical approach in which the time evolution is obtained by projecting onto resonant families of small clusters. We compare the results of this approach at low fillings to the exact time evolution and find good agreement even at filling factors as large as 2/3. Using this projection onto small clusters, we propose a controllable transport scheme applicable in the context of Atomtronic devices on optical lattices (''slinky scheme'').

  18. Photon Devil’s staircase: photon long-range repulsive interaction in lattices of coupled resonators with Rydberg atoms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanwei; Fan, Jingtao; Liang, J.-Q.; Ma, Jie; Chen, Gang; Jia, Suotang; Nori, Franco

    2015-01-01

    The realization of strong coherent interactions between individual photons is a long-standing goal in science and engineering. In this report, based on recent experimental setups, we derive a strong photon long-range repulsive interaction, by controlling the van der Waals repulsive force between Cesium Rydberg atoms located inside different cavities in extended Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard lattices. We also find novel quantum phases induced by this photon long-range repulsive interaction. For example, without photon hopping, a photon Devil’s staircase, induced by the breaking of long-range translation symmetry, can emerge. If photon hopping occurs, we predict a photon-floating solid phase, due to the motion of particle- and hole-like defects. More importantly, for a large chemical potential in the resonant case, the photon hopping can be frozen even if the hopping term exists. We call this new phase the photon-frozen solid phase. In experiments, these predicted phases could be detected by measuring the number of polaritons via resonance fluorescence. PMID:26108705

  19. Transfer of a weakly bound electron in collisions of Rydberg atoms with neutral particles. II. Ion-pair formation and resonant quenching of the Rb(nl) and Ne(nl) States by Ca, Sr, and Ba atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Narits, A. A.; Mironchuk, E. S.; Lebedev, V. S.

    2013-10-15

    Electron-transfer processes are studied in thermal collisions of Rydberg atoms with alkaline-earth Ca(4s{sup 2}), Sr(5s{sup 2}), and Ba(6s{sup 2}) atoms capable of forming negative ions with a weakly bound outermost p-electron. We consider the ion-pair formation and resonant quenching of highly excited atomic states caused by transitions between Rydberg covalent and ionic terms of a quasi-molecule produced in collisions of particles. The contributions of these reaction channels to the total depopulation cross section of Rydberg states of Rb(nl) and Ne(nl) atoms as functions of the principal quantum number n are compared for selectively excited nl-levels with l Much-Less-Than n and for states with large orbital quantum numbers l = n - 1, n - 2. It is shown that the contribution from resonant quenching dominates at small values of n, and the ion-pair formation process begins to dominate with increasing n. The values and positions of the maxima of cross sections for both processes strongly depend on the electron affinity of an alkaline-earth atom and on the orbital angular momentum l of a highly excited atom. It is shown that in the case of Rydberg atoms in states with large l {approx} n - 1, the rate constants of ion-pair formation and collisional quenching are considerably lower than those for nl-levels with l Much-Less-Than n.

  20. Ideas about Acids and Alkalis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toplis, Rob

    1998-01-01

    Investigates students' ideas, conceptions, and misconceptions about acids and alkalis before and after a teaching sequence in a small-scale research project. Concludes that student understanding of acids and alkalis is lacking. (DDR)

  1. Electronic properties of atomic layer deposition films, anatase and rutile TiO2 studied by resonant photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, C.; Richter, M.; Tallarida, M.; Schmeisser, D.

    2016-07-01

    The TiO2 films are prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) method using titanium isopropoxide precursors at 250 °C and analyzed using resonant photoemission spectroscopy (resPES). We report on the Ti2p and O1s core levels, on the valence band (VB) spectra and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data, and on the resonant photoelectron spectroscopy (resPES) profiles at the O1s and the Ti3p absorption edges. We determine the elemental abundance, the position of the VB maxima, the partial density of states (PDOS) in the VB and in the conduction band (CB) and collect these data in a band scheme. In addition, we analyze the band-gap states as well as the intrinsic states due to polarons and charge-transfer excitations. These states are found to cause multiple Auger decay processes upon resonant excitation. We identify several of these processes and determine their relative contribution to the Auger signal quantitatively. As our resPES data allow a quantitative analysis of these defect states, we determine the relative abundance of the PDOS in the VB and in CB and also the charge neutrality level. The anatase and rutile polymorphs of TiO2 are analyzed in the same way as the TiO2 ALD layer. The electronic properties of the TiO2 ALD layer are compared with the anatase and rutile polymorphs of TiO2. In our comparative study, we find that ALD has its own characteristic electronic structure that is distinct from that of anatase and rutile. However, many details of the electronic structure are comparable and we benefit from our spectroscopic data and our careful analysis to find these differences. These can be attributed to a stronger hybridization of the O2p and Ti3d4s states for the ALD films when compared to the anatase and rutile polymorphs.

  2. Intensity Scaling for Diode Pumped Alkali Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    unphased diode lasers is absorbed in the near IR by atomic potassium, rubidium , or cesium. The gain cell for a DPAL system using a heat pipe design is...demonstrated linear scaling of a rubidium laser to 32 times threshold.3 In our present work, we explore scaling to pump in- tensities of >100kW/cm2. The...of output power. Each alkali atom in the laser medium may be required to cycle as many as 1010 pump photons per second. We demonstrated a rubidium

  3. Ion-Atom Cold Collisions and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lute; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Collisions between ultracold neutral atoms have for some time been the subject of investigation, initially with hydrogen and more recently with laser cooled alkali atoms. Advances in laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms in a Magneto-Optic Trap (MOT) have made cold atoms available as the starting point for many laser cooled atomic physics investigations. The most spectacularly successful of these, the observation of Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) in a dilute ultra-cold spin polarized atomic vapor, has accelerated the study of cold collisions. Experimental and theoretical studies of BEC and the long range interaction between cold alkali atoms is at the boundary of atomic and low temperature physics. Such studies have been difficult and would not have been possible without the development and advancement of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms. By contrast, ion-atom interactions at low temperature, also very difficult to study prior to modern day laser cooling, have remained largely unexplored. But now, many laboratories worldwide have almost routine access to cold neutral atoms. The combined technologies of ion trapping, together with laser cooling of neutrals has made these studies experimentally feasible and several very important, novel applications might come out of such investigations . This paper is an investigation of ion-atom interactions in the cold and ultra-cold temperature regime. Some of the collisional ion-atom interactions present at room temperature are very much reduced in the low temperature regime. Reaction rates for charge transfer between unlike atoms, A + B(+) approaches A(+) + B, are expected to fall rapidly with temperature, approximately as T(sup 5/2). Thus, cold mixtures of atoms and ions are expected to coexist for very long times, unlike room temperature mixtures of the same ion-atom combination. Thus, it seems feasible to cool ions via collisions with laser cooled atoms. Many of the conventional collisional interactions

  4. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04

    Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

  5. Atomic Magnetometer Multisensor Array for rf Interference Mitigation and Unshielded Detection of Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Robert J.; Prescott, David W.; Matz, Peter; Sauer, Karen L.; Dural, Nezih; Romalis, Michael V.; Foley, Elizabeth L.; Kornack, Thomas W.; Monti, Mark; Okamitsu, Jeffrey

    2016-12-01

    An array of four 87Rb vector magnetometers is used to detect nuclear quadrupole resonance signals in an unshielded environment at 1 MHz. With a baseline of 25 cm, the length of the array, radio-frequency interference mitigation is also demonstrated; a radio-station signal is suppressed by a factor of 20 without degradation to the signal of interest. With these compact sensors, in which the probe beam passes through twice, the fundamental limit to detection sensitivity is found to be photon-shot noise. More passes of the probe beam overcome this limitation. With a sensor of similar effective volume, 0.25 cm3 , but 25 × more passes, the sensitivity is improved by an order of magnitude to 1.7 ±0.2 fT /√{Hz } .

  6. Coherent control of atomic excitation using off-resonant strong few-cycle pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Pankaj K.; Eleuch, Hichem; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.

    2010-10-15

    We study the dynamics of a two-level system driven by an off-resonance few-cycle pulse which has a phase jump {phi} at t=t{sub 0}, in contrast to many-cycle pulses, under the nonrotating-wave approximation (NRWA). We give a closed form analytical solution for the evolution of the probability amplitude |C{sub a}(t)| for the upper level. Using the appropriate pulse parameters like the phase jump {phi}, jump time t{sub 0}, pulse width {tau}, frequency {nu}, and Rabi frequency {Omega}{sub 0} the population transfer after the pulse is gone can be optimized and, for the pulse considered here, an enhancement factor of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} was obtained.

  7. Formation and stability of high-spin alkali clusters.

    PubMed

    Schulz, C P; Claas, P; Schumacher, D; Stienkemeier, F

    2004-01-09

    Helium nanodroplet isolation has been applied to agglomerate alkali clusters at temperatures of 380 mK. The very weak binding to the surface of the droplets allows a selection of only weakly bound, high-spin states. Here we show that larger clusters of alkali atoms in high-spin states can be formed. The lack of strong bonds from pairing electrons makes these systems nonmetallic, van der Waals-like complexes of metal atoms. We find that sodium and potassium readily form such clusters containing up to 25 atoms. In contrast, this process is suppressed for rubidium and cesium. Apparently, for these heavy alkalis, larger high-spin aggregates are not stable and depolarize spontaneously upon cluster formation.

  8. Formation and Stability of High-Spin Alkali Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, C. P.; Claas, P.; Schumacher, D.; Stienkemeier, F.

    2004-01-01

    Helium nanodroplet isolation has been applied to agglomerate alkali clusters at temperatures of 380mK. The very weak binding to the surface of the droplets allows a selection of only weakly bound, high-spin states. Here we show that larger clusters of alkali atoms in high-spin states can be formed. The lack of strong bonds from pairing electrons makes these systems nonmetallic, vanderWaals like complexes of metal atoms. We find that sodium and potassium readily form such clusters containing up to 25atoms. In contrast, this process is suppressed for rubidium and cesium. Apparently, for these heavy alkalis, larger high-spin aggregates are not stable and depolarize spontaneously upon cluster formation.

  9. Spectroscopic and theoretical study on alkali metal phenylacetates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regulska, E.; Świsłocka, R.; Samsonowicz, M.; Lewandowski, W.

    2013-07-01

    The influence of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium cations on the electronic system of phenylacetic acid was studied. The FT-IR, FT-Raman and 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded for studied compounds. Characteristic shifts in IR and NMR spectra along alkali metal phenylacetates were observed. Good correlations between the wavenumbers of the vibrational bands in the IR spectra of phenylacetates and some alkali metal parameters such as ionic potential, electronegativity, inverse of atomic mass, atomic radius and ionization energy were found. The density functional hybrid method B3LYP with 6-311++G** basis set was used to calculate optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds. Aromaticity indices, atomic charges, dipole moments and energies were calculated as well as the wavenumbers and intensities of IR spectra and chemical shifts in NMR spectra. The theoretical parameters were compared to experimental characteristic of alkali metal phenylacetates.

  10. Positron collisions with alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gien, T. T.

    1990-01-01

    The total cross sections for positron and electron collisions with potassium, sodium, lithium and rubidium are calculated, employing the modified Glauber approximation. The Modified Glauber cross sections for positron collision with potassium and sodium at low intermediate energies are found to agree reasonably well with existing experimental data.

  11. The Inhomogeneous Light Shift in Alkali Atoms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-24

    could be easily confused with this effect. It is our contention that this was exactly the case with the asymmetries observed by Arditi and Picque for the...Goodwin, ed., Advances in Quantum Electronics, (Academic Press, New York, 1975). 21. M. Arditi and J. L. Picqug, J. Phys. B. 8 (14), L331 (1975). 38 0

  12. Quantum degenerate mixture of ytterbium and lithium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Anders H.; Khramov, Alexander; Dowd, William H.; Jamison, Alan O.; Ivanov, Vladyslav V.; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2011-07-15

    We have produced a quantum degenerate mixture of fermionic alkali-metal {sup 6}Li and bosonic spin-singlet {sup 174}Yb gases. This was achieved using sympathetic cooling of lithium atoms by evaporatively cooled ytterbium atoms in a far-off-resonant optical dipole trap. We observe the coexistence of Bose-condensed (T/T{sub c}{approx_equal}0.8) {sup 174}Yb with 2.3x10{sup 4} atoms and Fermi degenerate (T/T{sub F}{approx_equal}0.3) {sup 6}Li with 1.2x10{sup 4} atoms. Quasipure Bose-Einstein condensates of up to 3x10{sup 4} {sup 174}Yb atoms can be produced in single-species experiments. Our results mark a significant step toward studies of few- and many-body physics with mixtures of alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal-like atoms, and for the production of paramagnetic polar molecules in the quantum regime. Our methods also establish a convenient scheme for producing quantum degenerate ytterbium atoms in a 1064 nm optical dipole trap.

  13. Fingerprints of exceptional points in the survival probability of resonances in atomic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Cartarius, Holger; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2011-07-15

    The unique time signature of the survival probability exactly at the exceptional point parameters is studied here for the hydrogen atom in strong static magnetic and electric fields. We show that indeed the survival probability S(t)=|<{psi}(0)|{psi}(t)>|{sup 2} decays exactly as |1-at|{sup 2}e{sup -{Gamma}{sub E}{sub P}t/({Dirac_h}/2{pi})}, where {Gamma}{sub EP} is associated with the decay rate at the exceptional point and a is a complex constant depending solely on the initial wave packet that populates exclusively the two almost degenerate states of the non-Hermitian Hamiltonian. This may open the possibility for a first experimental detection of exceptional points in a quantum system.

  14. Spin resonance transport properties of a single Au atom in S-Au-S junction and Au-Au-Au junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fangyuan, Wang; Guiqin, Li

    2016-07-01

    The spin transport properties of S-Au-S junction and Au-Au-Au junction between Au nanowires are investigated with density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function. We mainly focus on the spin resonance transport properties of the center Au atom. The breaking of chemical bonds between anchor atoms and center Au atom significantly influences their spin transmission characteristics. We find the 0.8 eV orbital energy shift between anchor S atoms and the center Au atom can well protect the spin state stored in the S-Au-S junction and efficiently extract its spin state to the current by spin resonance mechanism, while the spin interaction of itinerant electrons and the valence electron of the center Au atom in the Au-Au-Au junction can extract the current spin information into the center Au atom. Fermi energy drift and bias-dependent spin filtering properties of the Au-Au-Au junction may transform information between distance, bias, and electron spin. Those unique properties make them potential candidates for a logical nanocircuit. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grants No. 2011CB921602) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants No. 20121318158).

  15. Calculation of Radiative Corrections to E1 matrix elements in the Neutral Alkalis

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J; Cheng, K T

    2004-09-28

    Radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements for ns-np transitions in the alkali metal atoms lithium through francium are evaluated. They are found to be small for the lighter alkalis but significantly larger for the heavier alkalis, and in the case of cesium much larger than the experimental accuracy. The relation of the matrix element calculation to a recent decay rate calculation for hydrogenic ions is discussed, and application of the method to parity nonconservation in cesium is described.

  16. Surface conformations of anti-ricin aptamer and its affinity to ricin determined by atomic force microscopy and surface plasmon resonance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The specific interactions between ricin and anti-ricin aptamer were measured with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectrometry and the results were compared. In AFM, a single-molecule experiment with ricin functionalized AFM tip was used for scanning the aptamer mol...

  17. Chlor-Alkali Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venkatesh, S.; Tilak, B. V.

    1983-01-01

    Chlor-alkali technology is one of the largest electrochemical industries in the world, the main products being chlorine and caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) generated simultaneously by the electrolysis of sodium chloride. This technology is reviewed in terms of electrochemical principles and manufacturing processes involved. (Author/JN)

  18. Diode Pumped Alkali Vapor Lasers - A New Pathway to High Beam Quality at High Average Power

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R H; Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M; Beach, R J

    2005-05-06

    Resonance-transition alkali-vapor lasers have only recently been demonstrated [1] but are already attracting considerable attention. Alkali-atom-vapor gain media are among the simplest possible systems known, so there is much laboratory data upon which to base performance predictions. Therefore, accurate modeling is possible, as shown by the zero- free-parameter fits [2] to experimental data on alkali-vapor lasers pumped with Ti:sapphire lasers. The practical advantages of two of the alkali systems--Rb and Cs--are enormous, since they are amenable to diode-pumping [3,4]. Even without circulating the gas mixture, these lasers can have adequate cooling built-in owing to the presence of He in their vapor cells. The high predicted (up to 70%) optical-to-optical efficiency of the alkali laser, the superb (potentially 70% or better) wall-plug efficiency of the diode pumps, and the ability to exhaust heat at high temperature (100 C) combine to give a power-scalable architecture that is lightweight. A recent design exercise [5] at LLNL estimated that the system ''weight-to-power ratio'' figure of merit could be on the order of 7 kg/kW, an unprecedented value for a laser of the 100 kW class. Beam quality is expected to be excellent, owing to the small dn/dT value of the gain medium. There is obviously a long way to go, to get from a small laser pumped with a Ti:sapphire or injection-seeded diode system (of near-perfect beam quality, and narrow linewidth) [1, 4] to a large system pumped with broadband, multimode diode- laser arrays. We have a vision for this technology-development program, and have already built diode-array-pumped Rb lasers at the 1 Watt level. A setup for demonstrating Diode-array-Pumped Alkali vapor Lasers (DPALs) is shown in Figure 1. In general, use of a highly-multimode, broadband pump source renders diode-array-based experiments much more difficult than the previous ones done with Ti:sapphire pumping. High-NA optics, short focal distances, and short

  19. Upgrading of petroleum oil feedstocks using alkali metals and hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A method of upgrading an oil feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the oil feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase separable from the organic oil feedstock material. The upgradant hydrocarbon bonds to the oil feedstock material and increases the number of carbon atoms in the product. This increase in the number of carbon atoms of the product increases the energy value of the resulting oil feedstock.

  20. Inner-shell promotions in low-energy Li+-Al collisions at clean and alkali-covered Al(100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, K. A. H.; Weare, C. B.; Yarmoff, J. A.

    1994-11-01

    Spectra of scattered ions and ion-induced electron emissions are used to investigate the electronic processes that occur during 0.4-5.0-keV Li+ bombardment of clean and alkali-atom-covered Al(100). The results show that Li 1s electrons are promoted during hard Li-Al collisions, but not during Li-K or Li-Na collisions. Consequences of the inner-shell electron promotions are evident in the inelastic loss, neutralization behavior, and electron emissions of the scattered Li particles. Spectra of scattered Li+ ions exhibit discrete-loss features, which are resistant to the usual increase in resonant neutralization that accompanies the deposition of alkali atoms on the surface. The loss features are due to Li 1s excitation via electron promotion, while the production of ions away from the surface via autoionization is responsible for their lack of response to alkali-atom adsorption. Spectra of ion-induced electron emissions confirm that Li*(1s2s2) is produced and that it undergoes autoionization.

  1. Quantum defect theory for the orbital Feshbach resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yanting; Zhang, Ren; Zhang, Peng

    2017-01-01

    In the ultracold gases of alkali-earth-metal-like atoms, a new type of Feshbach resonance, i.e., the orbital Feshbach resonance (OFR), has been proposed and experimentally observed in ultracold 173Yb atoms [R. Zhang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 135301 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.135301]. When the OFR of the 173Yb atoms occurs, the energy gap between the open and closed channels is smaller by two orders of magnitude than the van der Waals energy. As a result, quantitative accurate results for the low-energy two-body problems can be obtained via multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT), which is based on the exact solution of the Schrödinger equation with the van der Waals potential. In this paper we use MQDT to calculate the two-atom scattering length, effective range, and binding energy of two-body bound states for the systems with OFR. With these results we further study the clock-transition spectrum for the two-body bound states, which can be used to experimentally measure the binding energy. Our results are helpful for the quantitative theoretical and experimental research for the ultracold gases of alkali-earth-metal-like atoms with OFR.

  2. Communication: Dopant-induced solvation of alkalis in liquid helium nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renzler, Michael; Daxner, Matthias; Kranabetter, Lorenz; Kaiser, Alexander; Hauser, Andreas W.; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Lindinger, Albrecht; Zillich, Robert; Scheier, Paul; Ellis, Andrew M.

    2016-11-01

    Alkali metal atoms and small alkali clusters are classic heliophobes and when in contact with liquid helium they reside in a dimple on the surface. Here we show that alkalis can be induced to submerge into liquid helium when a highly polarizable co-solute, C60, is added to a helium nanodroplet. Evidence is presented that shows that all sodium clusters, and probably single Na atoms, enter the helium droplet in the presence of C60. Even clusters of cesium, an extreme heliophobe, dissolve in liquid helium when C60 is added. The sole exception is atomic Cs, which remains at the surface.

  3. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Wolfs, Denise Y.; Clavenna, Le Roy R.; Eakman, James M.; Kalina, Theodore

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  4. The role of two body interaction on the broadening of a Förster resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Jorge; Goncalves, Luis; Tallant, Jonathan; Booth, Donald; Shaffer, James; Marcassa, Luis

    2015-05-01

    Since the early days of ultracold Rydberg atom physics, many-body effects in ultracold trapped alkali gases has been of central interest. The first experiments in this field involved the study of Förster resonances as a function of atomic density. We present a study of a dc electric field tuned Förster resonance involving 37D state Rb atoms in a high density atomic sample held in an optical dipole trap. Our results show that as the atomic density increases, the resonance linewidth increases until the resonance peaks merge. Simultaneously, we measure the 39P state population which is produced through interactions between 37D atoms. It is shown that the 39P population depends quadratically on the total Rydberg 37D atomic population. A theoretical model that takes into account the multilevel character of the interaction and Rydberg atom blockade process using only pair interactions was implemented to explain the results. The comparison between the experimental data and the model is very good, suggesting that the Föster resonance process is dominate by two-body interaction. This work was supported by Fapesp, NSF and INCT-IQ.

  5. Alkalis in alternative biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr.; Bryers, R.W.; Baxter, L.L.; Jenkins, B.M.; Oden, L.L.

    1994-12-31

    The alkali content and behavior of inorganic material of annually produced biofuels severely limits their use for generating electrical power in conventional furnaces. A recent eighteen-month investigation of the chemistry and firing characteristics of 26 different biofuels has been conducted. Firing conditions were simulated in the laboratory for eleven biofuels. This paper describes some results from the investigation including fuel properties, deposits, deposition mechanisms, and implications for biomass boiler design, fuel sampling and characterizations. Urban wood fuel, agricultural residues, energy crops, and other potential alternate fuels are included in the study. Conventional methods for establishing fuel alkali content and determining ash sticky temperatures were deceptive. The crux of the problem was found to be the high concentration of potassium in biofuels and its reactions with other fuel constituents which lower the ``sticky temperature`` of the ash to the 650 C to 760 C (1,200 F-1,400 F).

  6. Alkali-vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.; Krupke, W. F.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the results from several of our alkali laser systems. We show highly efficient performance from an alexandrite-pumped rubidium laser. Using a laser diode stack as a pump source, we demonstrate up to 145 W of average power from a CW system. We present a design for a transversely pumped demonstration system that will show all of the required laser physics for a high power system.

  7. ɛ -pseudoclassical model for quantum resonances in a cold dilute atomic gas periodically driven by finite-duration standing-wave laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beswick, Benjamin T.; Hughes, Ifan G.; Gardiner, Simon A.; Astier, Hippolyte P. A. G.; Andersen, Mikkel F.; Daszuta, Boris

    2016-12-01

    Atom interferometers are a useful tool for precision measurements of fundamental physical phenomena, ranging from the local gravitational-field strength to the atomic fine-structure constant. In such experiments, it is desirable to implement a high-momentum-transfer "beam splitter," which may be achieved by inducing quantum resonance in a finite-temperature laser-driven atomic gas. We use Monte Carlo simulations to investigate these quantum resonances in the regime where the gas receives laser pulses of finite duration and derive an ɛ -classical model for the dynamics of the gas atoms which is capable of reproducing quantum resonant behavior for both zero-temperature and finite-temperature noninteracting gases. We show that this model agrees well with the fully quantum treatment of the system over a time scale set by the choice of experimental parameters. We also show that this model is capable of correctly treating the time-reversal mechanism necessary for implementing an interferometer with this physical configuration and that it explains an unexpected universality in the dynamics.

  8. In Situ Investigation of Electrochemically Mediated Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization by Electrochemical Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daqun; Hu, Weihua

    2017-03-28

    Electrochemically mediated atom transfer radical polymerization (eATRP) initiates/controls the controlled/living ATRP chain propagation process by electrochemically generating (regenerating) the activator (lower-oxidation-state metal complex) from deactivator (higher-oxidation-state metal complex). Despite successful demonstrations in both of homogeneous polymerization and heterogeneous system (namely, surface-initiated ATRP, SI-ATRP), the eATRP process itself has never been in situ investigated, and important information regarding this process remains unrevealed. In this work, we report the first investigation of the electrochemically mediated SI-ATRP (eSI-ATRP) by rationally combining electrochemical technique with real-time surface plasmon resonance (SPR). In the experiment, the potential of a SPR gold chip modified by self-assembled monolayer of ATRP initiator was controlled to electrochemically reduce the deactivator to activator to initiate the SI-ATRP, and the whole process was simultaneously monitored by SPR with a high time resolution of 0.1 s. It is found that it is feasible to electrochemically trigger/control the SI-ATRP and the polymerization rate is correlated to the potential applied to the gold chip. This work reveals important kinetic information on eSI-ATRP, and offers a powerful platform for in situ investigation of such complicated processes.

  9. Metal atom and ion layers observed by a frequency-tunable resonance scattering lidar in the midlatitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, Mitsumu K.; Nakamura, Takuji; Kawahara, Takuya D.; Tsuno, Katsuhiko; Abo, Makoto; Nishiyama, Takanori; Tsuda, Takuo; Wada, Satoshi; Ogawa, Takayo

    2016-07-01

    The National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) is leading a six year prioritized project of the Antarctic research observations since 2010. One of the sub-project is entitled the global environmental change revealed through the Antarctic middle and upper atmosphere. Profiling dynamical parameters such as temperature and wind, as well as minor constituents is the key component of observations in this project, together with a long term observations using existent various instruments in Syowa, the Antarctica (69S). As a part of the sub-project, we are developing a new resonance lidar system with multiple wavelengths and plan to install and operate it at Syowa, Antarctica. The lidar will observe temperature profiles and variations of minor constituents such as Fe, K, Ca+, and aurorally excited N2+. The lidar system is being developed with trial and error in test observations of the metal atom and ion density and the MLT temperature profiles. The lidar will be installed at Syowa in Antarctica by the 58th Japan Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE 58). In this presentation, we will report current status of the system developments and discuss results of the test observations.

  10. Manipulation of Goos-Hänchen shifts in the atomic configuration of mercury via interacting dark-state resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamedi, H. R.; Radmehr, Arash; Sahrai, M.

    2014-11-01

    We study the manipulation of Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts for the reflected and transmitted probe light pulses injected into a cavity containing four-level configuration mercury atoms where the probe transition is in the ultraviolet (UV) region with a wavelength of 253.7 nm . Different behaviors of the GH shifts can be observed in the absence, or presence, of two driving fields as well as an incoherent pump field. When neither coherent driving fields nor incoherent pumping is turned on, we realize negative reflected GH shifts for anomalous dispersion. Including only one driving field leads to subluminal-based light propagation with positive lateral shifts at certain incident angles. Taking into account the impact of both driving fields, negative GH shifts reappear in the reflected part of the incident light. The origin of this defect is attributed to interacting double dark resonances due to a high-resolution absorption peaks with a very steep negative slope of dispersion in the susceptibility profile. We then show that one can surpass this defect by applying a weak incoherent pumping field to obtain positive GH shifts for both reflected and transmitted light beams. Finally, using the 6 1P1↔6 1S0 transition of Hg, we generalize our study to the case where the wavelength of the probe transition is 185 nm which is in the vacuum-ultraviolet domain. Although the number of oscillations is now increased, however, similar results are reported with respect to the case of UV transition.

  11. Development of Laser Light Sources for Trapping Radioactive Francium Atoms Toward Tests of Fundamental Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Ken-ichi; Ezure, Saki; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Kato, Ko; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Inoue, Takeshi; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Aoki, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Aiko; Itoh, Masatoshi; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takatoshi; Hatakeyama, Atsushi; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Imai, Kenichi; Murakami, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Sato, Tomoya; Wakasa, Tomotsugu; Yoshida, Hidetomo P.; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    We have developed laser light sources and a magneto-optical trap system for cooling and trapping radioactive francium (Fr) atoms. Because Fr is the heaviest alkali element, a Fr atom exhibits high sensitivity to symmetry violation effects such as atomic parity nonconservation (APNC) and the electron electric dipole moment (eEDM). A laser cooling and trapping technique reduces the systematic errors due to the Doppler effect and the motion-induced magnetic field effect caused by the velocity of atoms. Thus, optically cooled and trapped Fr atoms are among a few promising candidates considered for APNC and eEDM measurements. Frequency stabilization of laser light is required for any stable measurement involving trapped radioactive atoms, including Fr. Since the hyperfine splitting in iodine molecules (127I2) is close to the resonance frequency of the Fr D2 line, we performed frequency modulation spectroscopy of hyperfine structures of I2.

  12. Dipole-dipole induced global motion of Rydberg-dressed atom clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genkin, M.; Wüster, S.; Möbius, S.; Eisfeld, A.; Rost, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    We consider two clouds of ground-state alkali atoms in two distinct hyperfine ground states. Each level is far off-resonantly coupled to a Rydberg state, which leads to dressed ground states with a weak admixture of the Rydberg state properties. Due to this admixture, for a proper choice of the Rydberg states, the atoms experience resonant dipole-dipole interactions that induce mechanical forces acting on all atoms within both clouds. This behaviour is in contrast to the dynamics predicted for bare dipole-dipole interactions between Rydberg superatoms, where only a single atom per cloud is subject to dipole-dipole induced motion (Möbius et al 2013 Phys. Rev. A 88 012716).

  13. Reaction of aromatic compounds with nucleophilic reagents in liquid ammonia. VIII. The origin of the oxygen atom of the hydroxy group in the products from the hydroxylation of 1-nitronaphthalene with alkali and molecular oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Malykhin, E.V.; Shteingarts, V.D.

    1987-10-20

    In the reaction of 1-nitronaphthalene with K/sup 18/OH and /sup 16/O/sub 2/ in liquid ammonia 1-nitro-2- and 4-nitro-1-naphthols labeled with the /sup 18/O isotope in the hydroxyl group are formed. The ratio of the isomers and the content of the /sup 18/O isotope depend on the ratio of 1-nitronaphthalene and alkali, on the temperature, and on the presence of moisture in the ammonia. The amount of the /sup 18/O isotope in the hydroxylation products indicates that in contrast to the analogous reaction of nitrobenzene and its derivatives the hydroxy function of the products in this case is formed not only from the alkali but also to a significant degree form the oxygen of the O/sub 2/.

  14. Microfabricated alkali vapor cell with anti-relaxation wall coating

    SciTech Connect

    Straessle, R.; Pétremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Rooij, N. F. de; Pellaton, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G.

    2014-07-28

    We present a microfabricated alkali vapor cell equipped with an anti-relaxation wall coating. The anti-relaxation coating used is octadecyltrichlorosilane and the cell was sealed by thin-film indium-bonding at a low temperature of 140 °C. The cell body is made of silicon and Pyrex and features a double-chamber design. Depolarizing properties due to liquid Rb droplets are avoided by confining the Rb droplets to one chamber only. Optical and microwave spectroscopy performed on this wall-coated cell are used to evaluate the cell's relaxation properties and a potential gas contamination. Double-resonance signals obtained from the cell show an intrinsic linewidth that is significantly lower than the linewidth that would be expected in case the cell had no wall coating but only contained a buffer-gas contamination on the level measured by optical spectroscopy. Combined with further experimental evidence this proves the presence of a working anti-relaxation wall coating in the cell. Such cells are of interest for applications in miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and other quantum sensors.

  15. Transport properties of alkali metal doped fullerides

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Daluram Yadav, Nishchhal

    2015-07-31

    We have studied the intercage interactions between the adjacent C{sub 60} cages and expansion of lattice due to the intercalation of alkali atoms based on the spring model to estimate phonon frequencies from the dynamical matrix for the intermolecular alkali-C{sub 60} phonons. We considered a two-peak model for the phonon density of states to investigate the nature of electron pairing mechanism for superconducting state in fullerides. Coulomb repulsive parameter and the electron phonon coupling strength are obtained within the random phase approximation. Transition temperature, T{sub c}, is obtained in a situation when the free electrons in lowest molecular orbital are coupled with alkali-C{sub 60} phonons as 5 K, which is much lower as compared to reported T{sub c} (20 K). The superconducting pairing is mainly driven by the high frequency intramolecular phonons and their effects enhance it to 22 K. The importance of the present study, the pressure effect and normal state transport properties are calculated within the same model leading superconductivity.

  16. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  17. Atomic sulfur: Frequency measurement of the J = 0 left arrow 1 fine-structure transition at 56.3 microns by laser magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John M.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Zink, Lyndon R.

    1994-01-01

    The J = 0 left arrow 1 fine-structure transition in atomic sulfur (S I) in its ground (3)P state has been detected in the laboratory by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance. The fine-structure interval has been measured accurately as 5,322,492.9 +/- 2.8 MHz which corresponds to a wavelength of 56.325572 +/- 0.000030 micrometers.

  18. Lithium and Sodium Resistance of Alkali Metal Vapor Resistant Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishinevski, Anatoly; Hall, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    A common challenge in atomic physics is that of containing an alkali metal vapor at an elevated temperature and concurrently being able to excite and probe atomic transitions within. Typically glass is used as the material to construct the container, as it is easy to manipulate into any geometry and offers thermal, mechanical, and optical properties that no other material is capable. Unfortunately it has been well established that alkali metal gasses/vapors react readily with silica containing glass and results in a progressive darkening of the material. As the darkening reaction progresses, the optical transmission properties of the glass progressively degrade to an eventual point of uselessness. Alkali metals have been used extensively in frequency standards and magnetometers. The finite life of these alkali metal vapor-containing devices has been accepted despite varying attempts by different teams to solve this problem. As a viable solution, it has been identified there exist a family of glass compositions that contain a marginal amount of silica, may be lampworked using traditional glassblowing techniques, and that offer substantially better alkali vapor resistance. The evaluation of these glasses and their resistance to sodium and lithium vapor at varying pressures and temperatures are discussed.

  19. Surface chemistry of group 11 atomic layer deposition precursors on silica using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pallister, Peter J; Barry, Seán T

    2017-02-07

    The use of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) as thin film deposition techniques has had a major impact on a number of fields. The deposition of pure, uniform, conformal thin films requires very specific vapour-solid reactivity that is largely unknown for the majority of ALD and CVD precursors. This work examines the initial chemisorption of several thin film vapour deposition precursors on high surface area silica (HSAS) using (13)C, (31)P, and quantitative (29)Si nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Two copper metal precursors, 1,3-diisopropyl-imidazolin-2-ylidene copper (I) hexamethyldisilazide (1) and 1,3-diethyl-imidazolin-2-ylidene copper(I) hexamethyldisilazide (2), and one gold metal precursor, trimethylphosphine gold(III) trimethyl (3), are examined. Compounds 1 and 2 were found to chemisorb at the hydroxyl surface-reactive sites to form a ||-O-Cu-NHC surface species and fully methylated silicon (||-SiMe3, due to reactivity of the hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) ligand on the precursor) at 150 °C and 250 °C. From quantitative (29)Si solid-state NMR (SS-NMR) spectroscopy measurements, it was found that HMDS preferentially reacts at geminal disilanol surface sites while the copper surface species preferentially chemisorbed to lone silanol surface species. Additionally, the overall coverage was strongly dependent on temperature, with higher overall coverage of 1 at higher temperature but lower overall coverage of 2 at higher temperature. The chemisorption of 3 was found to produce a number of interesting surface species on HSAS. Gold(III) trimethylphosphine, reduced gold phosphine, methylated phosphoxides, and graphitic carbon were all observed as surface species. The overall coverage of 3 on HSAS was only about 10% at 100 °C and, like the copper compounds, had a preference for lone silanol surface reactive sites. The overall coverage and chemisorbed surface species have implications to the overall growth rate and

  20. Surface chemistry of group 11 atomic layer deposition precursors on silica using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallister, Peter J.; Barry, Seán T.

    2017-02-01

    The use of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) as thin film deposition techniques has had a major impact on a number of fields. The deposition of pure, uniform, conformal thin films requires very specific vapour-solid reactivity that is largely unknown for the majority of ALD and CVD precursors. This work examines the initial chemisorption of several thin film vapour deposition precursors on high surface area silica (HSAS) using 13C, 31P, and quantitative 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Two copper metal precursors, 1,3-diisopropyl-imidazolin-2-ylidene copper (I) hexamethyldisilazide (1) and 1,3-diethyl-imidazolin-2-ylidene copper(I) hexamethyldisilazide (2), and one gold metal precursor, trimethylphosphine gold(III) trimethyl (3), are examined. Compounds 1 and 2 were found to chemisorb at the hydroxyl surface-reactive sites to form a ||-O-Cu-NHC surface species and fully methylated silicon (||-SiMe3, due to reactivity of the hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) ligand on the precursor) at 150 °C and 250 °C. From quantitative 29Si solid-state NMR (SS-NMR) spectroscopy measurements, it was found that HMDS preferentially reacts at geminal disilanol surface sites while the copper surface species preferentially chemisorbed to lone silanol surface species. Additionally, the overall coverage was strongly dependent on temperature, with higher overall coverage of 1 at higher temperature but lower overall coverage of 2 at higher temperature. The chemisorption of 3 was found to produce a number of interesting surface species on HSAS. Gold(III) trimethylphosphine, reduced gold phosphine, methylated phosphoxides, and graphitic carbon were all observed as surface species. The overall coverage of 3 on HSAS was only about 10% at 100 °C and, like the copper compounds, had a preference for lone silanol surface reactive sites. The overall coverage and chemisorbed surface species have implications to the overall growth rate and purity of

  1. Enhanced optical nonlinearity and fiber-optical frequency comb controlled by a single atom in a whispering-gallery-mode microtoroid resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiahua; Zhang, Suzhen; Yu, Rong; Zhang, Duo; Wu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    Based on a single atom coupled to a fiber-coupled, chip-based microresonator [B. Dayan et al., Science 319, 1062 (2008), 10.1126/science.1152261], we put forward a scheme to generate optical frequency combs at driving laser powers as low as a few nanowatts. Using state-of-the-art experimental parameters, we investigate in detail the influences of different atomic positions and taper-resonator coupling regimes on optical-frequency-comb generation. In addition to numerical simulations demonstrating this effect, a physical explanation of the underlying mechanism is presented. We find that the combination of the atom and the resonator can induce a large third-order nonlinearity which is significantly stronger than Kerr nonlinearity in Kerr frequency combs. Such enhanced nonlinearity can be used to generate optical frequency combs if driven with two continuous-wave control and probe lasers and significantly reduce the threshold of nonlinear optical processes. The comb spacing can be well tuned by changing the frequency beating between the driving control and probe lasers. The proposed method is versatile and can be adopted to different types of resonators, such as microdisks, microspheres, microtoroids or microrings.

  2. Inventing a co-axial atomic resolution patch clamp to study a single resonating protein complex and ultra-low power communication deep inside a living neuron cell.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subrata; Sahu, Satyajit; Agrawal, Lokesh; Shiga, Takashi; Bandyopadhyay, Anirban

    2016-12-01

    To read the signals of single molecules in vitro on a surface, or inside a living cell or organ, we introduce a coaxial atom tip (coat) and a coaxial atomic patch clamp (COAPAP). The metal-insulator-metal cavity of these probes extends to the atomic scale (0.1[Formula: see text]nm), it eliminates the cellular or environmental noise with a S/N ratio 10(5). Five ac signals are simultaneously applied during a measurement by COAT and COAPAP to shield a true signal under environmental noise in five unique ways. The electromagnetic drive in the triaxial atomic tips is specifically designed to sense anharmonic vibrational and transmission signals for any system between 0.1[Formula: see text]nm and 50[Formula: see text]nm where the smallest nanopatch clamp cannot reach. COAT and COAPAP reliably pick up the atomic scale vibrations under the extreme noise of a living cell. Each protein's distinct electromagnetic, mechanical, electrical and ionic vibrational signature studied in vitro in a protected environment is found to match with the ones studied inside a live neuron. Thus, we could confirm that by using our probe blindly we could hold on to a single molecule or its complex in the invisible domain of a living cell. Our decade long investigations on perfecting the tools to measure bio-resonance of all forms and simultaneously in all frequency domains are summarized. It shows that the ratio of emission to absorption resonance frequencies of a biomaterial is around [Formula: see text], only a few in the entire em spectrum are active that regulates all other resonances, like mechanical, ionic, etc.

  3. On-chip fabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, K.; Ban, K.; Hirai, Y.; Sugano, K.; Tsuchiya, T.; Mizutani, N.; Tabata, O.

    2013-11-01

    We describe a novel on-chip microfabrication technique for the alkali-metal vapor cell of an optically pumped atomic magnetometer (OPAM), utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet (AMST). The newly proposed AMST is a millimeter-sized piece of porous alumina whose considerable surface area holds deposited alkali-metal chloride (KCl) and barium azide (BaN6), source materials that effectively produce alkali-metal vapor at less than 400 °C. Our experiments indicated that the most effective pore size of the AMST is between 60 and 170 µm. The thickness of an insulating glass spacer holding the AMST was designed to confine generated alkali metal to the interior of the vapor cell during its production, and an integrated silicon heater was designed to seal the device using a glass frit, melted at an optimum temperature range of 460-490 °C that was determined by finite element method thermal simulation. The proposed design and AMST were used to successfully fabricate a K cell that was then operated as an OPAM with a measured sensitivity of 50 pT. These results demonstrate that the proposed concept for on-chip microfabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells may lead to effective replacement of conventional glassworking approaches.

  4. Breakdown of ionic character of molecular alkali bromides in inner-valence photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Karpenko, A. Iablonskyi, D.; Kettunen, J. A.; Cao, W.; Huttula, M.; Aksela, H.; Urpelainen, S.

    2014-05-28

    The inner-valence region of alkali bromide XBr (X=Li, Na, K, Rb) vapours has been studied experimentally by means of synchrotron radiation excited photoelectron spectroscopy. Experimental spectra were analyzed by comparing them with available theoretical results and previous experiments. Ionic character of alkali bromides is seen to change in the inner-valence region with increasing atomic number of the alkali atom. A mechanism involving mixing between Br 4s and Rb 4p orbitals has been suggested to account for the fine structure observed in inner-valence ionization region of RbBr.

  5. Uncertainty in least-squares fits to the thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators with applications to the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Yousefi, Morteza; Friend, James R.

    2014-02-15

    Thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators are used widely to characterize their physical properties. These spectra typically exhibit a Lorentzian response, with additional white noise due to extraneous processes. Least-squares fits of these measurements enable extraction of key parameters of the resonator, including its resonant frequency, quality factor, and stiffness. Here, we present general formulas for the uncertainties in these fit parameters due to sampling noise inherent in all thermal noise spectra. Good agreement with Monte Carlo simulation of synthetic data and measurements of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilever is demonstrated. These formulas enable robust interpretation of thermal noise spectra measurements commonly performed in the AFM and adaptive control of fitting procedures with specified tolerances.

  6. The identification of autoionizing states of atomic chromium for the resonance ionization laser ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day Goodacre, T.; Chrysalidis, K.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Marsh, B. A.; Molkanov, P. L.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Seiffert, C.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into autoionizing states of atomic chromium, in the service of the resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS): the principal ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility based at CERN. The multi-step resonance photo-ionization process enables element selective ionization which, in combination with mass separation, allows isotope specific selectivity in the production of radioactive ion beams at ISOLDE. The element selective nature of the process requires a multi-step "ionization scheme" to be developed for each element. Using the method of in-source resonance ionization spectroscopy, an optimal three-step, three-resonance photo-ionization scheme originating from the 3d5(6S)4s a7S3 atomic ground state has been developed for chromium. The scheme uses an ionizing transition to one of the 15 newly observed autoionizing states reported here. Details of the spectroscopic studies are described and the new ionization scheme is summarized.

  7. Study on Mass Discrimination Effect of Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using an Inductively Coupled Plasma as an Atomic Source (ICP-RIMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Tomita, H.; Kawarabayashi, J.; Iguchi, T.

    2009-03-17

    We have proposed a novel concept of Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry using an Inductively Coupled Plasma as an Atomic Source (ICP-RIMS). Isotope ratio analysis using ICP-RIMS is expected to be a convenient and precise technique with high throughput. However, the mass discrimination effect caused from difference in kinetic energy of neutral atoms in ICP-RIMS is crucial for precise isotope analysis. We, therefore, investigated the atom kinetic energy distribution introduced into the laser ionization region. The mass-dependent kinetic energy was confirmed in the initial kinetic energy distributions. We preliminary estimated a mass discrimination effect caused by mass-dependent kinetic energy in ICP-RIMS for various detector sizes. We proposed that this effect can be suppressed by selecting the appropriate detector size and adopting the scanning mode of the deflecting voltage.

  8. Preparation of alkali metal dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Landel, R. F. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for producing alkali metal dispersions of high purity. The dispersions are prepared by varying the equilibrium solubility of the alkali metal in a suitable organic solvent in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The equilibrium variation is produced by temperature change. The size of the particles is controlled by controlling the rate of temperature change.

  9. PROCESS OF RECOVERING ALKALI METALS

    DOEpatents

    Wolkoff, J.

    1961-08-15

    A process is described of recovering alkali metal vapor by sorption on activated alumina, activated carbon, dehydrated zeolite, activated magnesia, or Fuller's earth preheated above the vaporization temperature of the alkali metal and subsequent desorption by heating the solvent under vacuum. (AEC)

  10. Synergistic capture mechanisms for alkali and sulphur species from combustion. Quarterly report No. 10, December 1992--February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.W.; Shadman, F.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Wu, Baochun

    1993-07-26

    A number of sorbents with alumina-silicate base and sulfur capturing active sites have been developed for simultaneous removal of alkali metal compounds and sulfur dioxide. Current report will focus on bauxite sorbents, which includes experiments on sulfur dioxide absorption, alkali capturing and alkali/sulfur absorption simultaneously by bauxite-based sorbents. The alkali compound used here is sodium chloride. Experiments show an effective adsorption of sulfur or alkali separately, and the combined adsorption of alkali/sulfur. Atomic absorption analysis of reaction products shows that there is a much higher sodium content in the combined reaction products than that of the single reaction of alkali absorption by bauxite. Further X-ray diffraction analysis shows that there is sodium sulfate in the final products of simultaneous reaction, which indicates the formation and then condensation of sodium sulfate in the reaction system.

  11. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  12. Towards coherent manipulation of the ground states of single cesium atom confined in a microscopic far-off-resonance optical dipole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Wenting; He, Jun; Liu, Bei; Wang, Junmin

    2012-11-01

    This work deals with the cooling and trapping of single cesium (Cs) atoms in a large-magnetic-gradient magneto-optical trap (MOT) and the confinement of single Cs atoms in a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap (FORT). The experiment setup is based on two large-numerical-aperture lens assemblies which allow us to strongly focus a 1064-nm TEM00-mode Gaussian laser beam to a 1/e2 radius of ~ 2.3 μm to form a microscopic FORT for isolating single atom with environment and to efficiently collect the laser-induced-fluorescence photons emitted by single atoms for detecting and recognizing single atom's internal state. We have tried both of "bottom-up" and "top-down" loading schemes to confine single atoms in the microscopic FORT. In the "bottom-up" scheme, we have successfully prepared single Cs atoms in the MOT and transferred it into FORT with a probability of almost 100%. In the "top-down" scheme, we have achieved ~ 74% of single atom loading probability in the FORT using light-assisted collisions induced by blue detuning laser and with prepared many Cs atoms in the MOT. The relaxation time in hyperfine level of ground state of trapped single Cs atom is measured to be ~5.4 s. To coherently manipulate atomic quantum bits (qubit) encoded in the clock states (mF = 0 states in Fg = 3 and 4 hyperfine levels) of single Cs atom via the two-photon simulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP), we have prepared two phase-locked laser beams with a frequency difference of ~ 9.192 GHz by optically injecting an 852-nm master laser to lock the +1-order sideband of a 9-GHz current-modulated slave diode laser. The two phase-locked laser beams are used to drive STIRAP process in the Λ-type three-level system consists of Cs |6S1/2 Fg = 4, mF = 0> and |6S1/2 Fg = 3, mF = 0< long-lived clock states and Cs |6S1/2 Fe = 4, mF = +1 > excited state with the single-photon detuning of ~ -20 GHz. Rabi flopping experiments are in progress.

  13. Formation of alkali-metal nanoparticles in alkali-silicate glasses under electron irradiation and thermal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkareva, E. S.; Sidorov, A. I.; Ignat'ev, A. I.; Nikonorov, N. V.; Podsvirov, O. A.

    2017-02-01

    Experiments and numerical simulation show that the irradiation of alkali-containing glasses using electrons at an energy of 35 keV and the subsequent thermal processing at a temperature above the vitrification point lead to the formation of spherical metal (lithium, sodium, and potassium) nanoparticles with oxide sheaths that exhibit plasmon resonances in the visible spectral range. Glasses containing two alkali metals exhibit mutual effect of metals on the formation of nanoparticles with two compositions due to the difference of ion radii and mobilities of metal ions.

  14. Noise suppression in coherent population-trapping atomic clock by differential magneto-optic rotation detection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bozhong; Tian, Yuan; Lin, Huifang; Chen, Jiehua; Gu, Sihong

    2015-08-15

    We propose and investigate a scheme for differential detection of the magneto-optic rotation (MOR) effect, where a linearly polarized bichromatic laser field is coherent population-trapping (CPT)-resonant with alkali atoms, and discuss the application of this effect to CPT-based atomic clocks. The results of our study indicate that laser noise in a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser-based CPT atomic clock can be effectively suppressed by the proposed scheme. The proposed scheme promises to realize a packaged MOR-CPT atomic clock that has significantly better frequency stability coupled with similar power consumption, volume, and cost when compared with currently available packaged CPT atomic clocks.

  15. Generalized Rashba-Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling for cold atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Juzeliunas, Gediminas; Ruseckas, Julius; Dalibard, Jean

    2010-05-15

    We study the possibility for generating a new type of spin-orbit coupling for the center-of-mass motion of cold atoms, using laser beams that resonantly couple N atomic internal ground states to an extra state. After a general analysis of the scheme, we concentrate on the tetrapod setup (N=4) where the atomic state can be described by a three-component spinor, evolving under the action of a Rashba-Dresselhaus-type spin-orbit coupling for a spin 1 particle. We illustrate a consequence of this coupling by studying the negative refraction of atoms at a potential step and show that the amplitude of the refracted beam is significantly increased in comparison to the known case of spin 1/2 Rashba-Dresselhaus coupling. Finally, we explore a possible implementation of this tetrapod setup, using stimulated Raman couplings between Zeeman sublevels of the ground state of alkali-metal atoms.

  16. Relativistic Quantum Chemistry of Heavy Elements: Interatomic potentials and Lines Shift for Systems 'Alkali Elements-Inert Gases'

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, A. V.; Khetselius, O.; Gurnitskaya, E.; Loboda, A.; Mischenko, E.

    2009-03-09

    New relativistic approach, based on the gauge-invariant perturbation theory (PT) with using the optimized wave functions basis's, is applied to calculating the inter atomic potentials, hyper fine structure (hfs) collision shift for alkali atoms in atmosphere of inert gases. Data for inter atomic potentials, collision shifts of the Rb and Cs atoms in atmosphere of the inert gas He are presented.

  17. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  18. High-temperature interactions of alkali vapors with solids during coal combustion and gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Punjak, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    A temperature and concentration programmed reaction method is used to investigate the mechanism by which organically bound alkali is released from carbonaceous substrates. Vaporization of the alkali is preceded by reduction of oxygen-bearing groups during which CO is generated. A residual amount of alkali remains after complete reduction. This residual level is greater for potassium, indicating that potassium has stronger interactions with graphitic substrates that sodium. Other mineral substrates were exposed to high temperature alkali chloride vapors under both nitrogen and simulated flue gas atmospheres to investigate their potential application as sorbents for the removal of alkali from coal conversion flue gases. The compounds containing alumina and silica are found to readily adsorb alkali vapors and the minerals kaolinite, bauxite and emathlite are identified as promising alkali sorbents. The fundamentals of alkali adsorption on kaolinite, bauxite and emathlite are compared and analyzed both experimentally and through theoretical modeling. The experiments were performed in a microgravimetric reactor system; the sorbents were characterized before and after alkali adsorption using scanning Auger microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, mercury porosimetry and atomic emission spectrophotometry. The results show that the process is not a simple physical condensation, but a complex combination of several diffusion steps and reactions.

  19. Role of laser-driven electron multi-scattering in resonance-enhanced below-threshold harmonic generation of He atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng-Cheng; Chu, Shih-I.

    2014-05-01

    We perform an ab initio study of the resonance-enhanced harmonic generation of He atoms below the ionization threshold by solving the time-dependent Schr ∖''odinger equation and Maxwell's equation simultaneously. An accurate angular-momentum-dependent model potential is constructed for the description of the He atoms low-lying and Rydberg states. We find that the process of laser-driven electron multi-scattering can play a crucial role in resonance-enhanced below-threshold harmonic generation. This result is confirmed by simulations with an extended semiclassical model and time-frequency analysis of macroscopic harmonic spectra by means of the synchrosqueezed transform based on short time Fourier transform. Our results emphasize that the laser-driven electron multi-scattering must be taken into account to fully understand the quantum path contribution related to resonance-enhanced below-threshold harmonic spectra. This work was partially supported by DOE and by MOE-NSC-NTU-Taiwan.

  20. Ab initio studies of the nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of a rare gas atom in a zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Cynthia J.; Lim, Hyung-Mi

    1995-09-01

    The intermolecular chemical shift of a rare gas atom inside a zeolite cavity is calculated by ab initio analytical derivative theory using gauge-including atomic orbitals (GIAO) at the Ar atom and the atoms of selected neutral clusters each of which is a 4-, 6-, or 8-ring fragment of the zeolite cage. The Si, Al, O atoms and the charge-balancing counterions (Na+, K+, Ca2+) of the clusters (from 24 to 52 atoms) are at coordinates taken from the refined single crystal x-ray structure of the NaA, KA, and CaA zeolites. Terminating OH groups place the H atom at an appropriate O-H distance along the bond to the next Si or Al atom in the crystal. The chemical shift of the Ar atom located at various positions relative to the cluster is calculated using Boys-Bernardi counterpoise correction at each position. The dependence of the rare gas atom chemical shift on the Al/Si ratio of the clusters is investigated. The resulting shielding values are fitted to a pairwise additive form to elicit effective individual Ar-O, Ar-Na, Ar-K, Ar-Ca intermolecular shielding functions of the form σ(39Ar, Ar...Ozeol)= a6r-6+a8r-8+a10r-10+a12r -12, where r is the distance between the Ar and the O atom. A similar form is used for the counterions. The dependence of the Ar shielding on the Al/Si ratio is established (the greater the Al content, the higher the Ar chemical shift), which is in agreement with the few experimental cases where the dependence of the 129Xe chemical shift on the Al/Si ratio of the zeolite has been observed.

  1. Adsorption of alkali metals and their effect on electronic properties of grain boundaries in bulk of polycrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Olimov, L. O.

    2010-05-15

    The adsorption of alkali metals and their effect on the electronic properties of grain boundaries in bulk of polycrystalline silicon has been studied experimentally. The results obtained show that the potential barrier grows during diffusion and adsorption of alkali metal atoms along grain boundaries.

  2. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-11-01

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2-4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be -23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is -105 dB rad2/Hz at 1 kHz offset and -150 dB rad2/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10-9 at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10-11 τ-1/2 up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  3. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-11-15

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2–4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be −23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is −105 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 1 kHz offset and −150 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10{sup −9} at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10{sup −11} τ{sup −1/2} up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  4. Inner-shell resonant absorption effects on evolution dynamics of the charge state distribution in a neon atom interacting with ultraintense x-ray pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Wenjun; Gao, Cheng; Fu, Yongsheng; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2012-12-01

    Inner-shell resonant absorption (IRA) effects were investigated on evolution dynamics of charge state distribution (CSD) in the interaction of ultraintense x-ray pulses with a neon atom. IRA is the physical origin of the large discrepancies found between theory and experiment at a photon energy of 1050 eV [L. Young , Nature (London)NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature09177 466, 56 (2010)], where the rates of K-shell resonant absorption 1s→4p of Ne6+ and 1s→3p of Ne7+ are larger than the direct single-photon ionization rates by more than one order of magnitude, and hence IRA becomes the dominant absorption mechanism. Only when the IRA effects are properly taken into account can we correctly explain the observed CSD.

  5. Inhomogeneous broadening of optically detected magnetic resonance of the ensembles of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond by interstitial carbon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Levchenko, A. O. Vasil'ev, V. V.; Zibrov, S. A.; Zibrov, A. S.; Sivak, A. V.; Fedotov, I. V.

    2015-03-09

    We study the impact of the negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV{sup –}) center density on the lattice strain resulting in the splitting of the optically detected magnetic resonance of HPHT diamond. A simple model, taking into account the presence of the interstitial carbon atoms, acting like a wedge force on the crystal lattice, explains the broadening and splitting of the optically detected magnetic resonance of the ensemble of NV{sup –} centers at densities within the range of 10{sup 13} ÷ 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −3}. This model uses a complete generalized spin Hamiltonian, takes into account the strain-effect of each center in the ensemble and gives good agreement with experimental data.

  6. Inventing atomic resolution scanning dielectric microscopy to see a single protein complex operation live at resonance in a neuron without touching or adulterating the cell.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Lokesh; Sahu, Satyajit; Ghosh, Subrata; Shiga, Takashi; Fujita, Daisuke; Bandyopadhyay, Anirban

    2016-12-01

    A substantial ion flow in a normally wet protein masks any other forms of signal transmission. We use hysteresis and linear conduction (both are artifacts) as a marker to precisely wet a protein, which restricts the ionic conduction (hysteresis disappears), and at the same time, it is not denatured (quantized conductance and Raman spectra are intact). Pure electric visualization of proteins at work by eliminating the screening of ions, electrons, would change the way we study biology. Here we discuss the technical challenges resolved for imaging a protein or live cell using nonlinear dielectric response (spatial distribution of conductance, capacitance and phase, GCP trio). We electromagnetically triggered electrical, mechanical, thermal and ionic resonant vibrations in a protein. During resonant oscillations, we imaged the protein using resonant scanning tunneling microscopy of biomaterials (Brestum) and during ionic firing we imaged live what happens inside an axon core of a neuron by using our atomic scale scanning dielectric microscopy (Asadim). Both Asadim and Brestum are housed in a homebuilt scanning tunneling microscope (bio-STM) and a special micro-grid developed by us (patent JP-5187804) for fractal supercomputing. We found the trick to turn a membrane transparent and see inside without making any physical contact. We image live that a protein molecule adopts a unique configuration for each resonance frequency, - thus far unknown to biology. "Membrane alone fires" is found to be wrong after a century, micro-neuro-filaments communicate prior to firing to decide its necessity and then regulate it suitably. We introduce a series of technologies e.g., fractal grid, point contact, micro THz antenna, to discover that from atomic structure to a living cell, the biomaterials vibrate collectively.

  7. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard

    2017-01-17

    A method for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock. The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  8. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  9. Quantum dynamics of finite atomic and molecular systems through density matrix methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorndyke, Brian

    We develop a mixed quantum-classical formulation to describe the dynamics of few- and many-body atomic systems by applying a partial Wigner transform over the quantum Liouville equation of motion. In this approach, the density operator becomes a function in quasiclassical phase space, while remaining an operator over a subset of quantal variables. By taking appropriate limits and introducing an effective potential, we derive equations of motion describing quasiclassical nuclear trajectories coupled to quantal electronic evolution. We also introduce a variable timestep procedure to account for the disparity between slow nuclear motion and fast electronic fluctuations. Our mixed quantum-classical method is applied to the study of three simple one-dimensional two-state models. The first model represents the photoinduced desorption of an alkali atom from a metal surface, where near-resonant electron transfer is important. A second model explores a binary collision under conditions where two avoided crossings are present. The third model follows the photoinduced dissociation of the sodium iodide complex, whose long-range attractive surface results in oscillations of internuclear distance. Quantities such as state populations and quantum coherence are computed, and found to be in excellent agreement with precise quantal results obtained through fast Fourier transform grid methods. Having validated our approach, we turn to the study of alkali atoms embedded in rare gas clusters, treating the alkali atom-rare gas interactions with l-dependent semi-local pseudopotentials. Light emission from the electronic motion of the alkali atom is derived in the semiclassical limit, and computational methods to render the simulation feasible for a many-atom cluster are discussed. The formalism is applied to lithium atoms in helium clusters, where the cluster configuration and the electronic population dynamics of the lithium atom are monitored over time. We study both the ground and

  10. Is Electronegativity a Useful Descriptor for the "Pseudo-Alkali-Metal" NH4?

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteside, Alexander; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Gutowski, Maciej S.

    2011-11-18

    Molecular ions in the form of "pseudo-atoms" are common structural motifs in chemistry, with properties that are transferrable between different compounds. We have determined the electronegativity of the "pseudo-alkali metal" ammonium (NH4) and evaluated its reliability as a descriptor in comparison to the electronegativities of the alkali metals. The computed properties of its binary complexes with astatine and of selected borohydrides confirm the similarity of NH4 to the alkali metal atoms, although the electronegativity of NH4 is relatively large in comparison to its cationic radius. We paid particular attention to the molecular properties of ammonium (angular anisotropy, geometric relaxation, and reactivity), which can cause deviations from the behaviour expected of a conceptual "true alkali metal" with this electronegativity. These deviations allow for the discrimination of effects associated with the polyatomic nature of NH4.

  11. Calculation of radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements in the neutral alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J.; Cheng, K.T.

    2005-02-01

    Radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements for ns-np transitions in the alkali-metal atoms lithium through francium are evaluated. They are found to be small for the lighter alkali metals but significantly larger for the heavier alkali metals, and in the case of cesium much larger than the experimental accuracy. The relation of the matrix element calculation to a recent decay rate calculation for hydrogenic ions is discussed, and application of the method to parity nonconservation in cesium is described.

  12. Charge-density analysis using multipolar atom and spherical charge models: 2-methyl-1,3-cyclopentanedione, a compound displaying a resonance-assisted hydrogen bond.

    PubMed

    Nassour, Ayoub; Kubicki, Maciej; Wright, Jonathan; Borowiak, Teresa; Dutkiewicz, Grzegorz; Lecomte, Claude; Jelsch, Christian

    2014-04-01

    The experimental charge-density distribution in 2-methyl-1,3-cyclopentanedione in the crystal state was analyzed by synchrotron X-ray diffraction data collection at 0.33 Å resolution. The molecule in the crystal is in the enol form. The experimental electron density was refined using the Hansen-Coppens multipolar model and an alternative modeling, based on spherical atoms and additional charges on the covalent bonds and electron lone-pair sites. The crystallographic refinements, charge-density distributions, molecular electrostatic potentials, dipole moments and intermolecular interaction energies obtained from the different charge-density models were compared. The experimental results are also compared with the theoretical charge densities using theoretical structure factors obtained from periodic quantum calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. A strong intermolecular O-H···O hydrogen bond connects molecules along the [001] direction. The deformation density maps show the resonance within the O=C-C=C-OH fragment and merged lone pair lobes on the hydroxyl O atom. This resonance is further confirmed by the analysis of charges and topology of the electron density.

  13. Alkali ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Hrizo, John; Bauerle, James E.; Witkowski, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration filament containing a sodium-bearing compound is included in combination with the sensing filament and ion collector plate of a sodium ionization detector to permit periodic generation of sodium atoms for the in-situ calibration of the detector.

  14. Study of Rb-vapor coated cells — Atomic diffusion and cell curing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atutov, S. N.; Benimetskiy, F. A.; Plekhanov, A. I.; Sorokin, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of a study on an optical-resonant cell filled by a vapor of the Rb atoms and coated with a non-stick polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer. We show that it is possible to define correctly the diffusion coefficient of the atoms in the coating using the geometric parameters of the cell and the vapor density in the cell volume only. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the cell curing time is presented. It is shown that the mysterious cell curing process can be explained in terms of the polymerization of the polymer coating by alkali atoms. The anomalous long dwell time of the Rb atoms on the PDMS coating is discussed as well.

  15. An orthotropic source of thermal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dinneen, T.; Ghiorso, A.; Gould, H.

    1995-06-01

    A highly efficient source that produces a narrow beam of neutral atoms at thermal velocity with small angular divergence is described. It uses a high work function interior surface to evaporate alkali atoms as ions and a low work function neutralizer, biased to collect the ions and evaporated them as neutral atoms. The neutralizer is located opposite an exit aperture so that the beam characteristics are determined by the geometry of the neutralizer and aperture. The orthotropic source is especially well suited for atomic clocks and for efficient loading of short lived radioactive alkali atoms into an optical trap.

  16. Superradiant effects on pulse propagation in resonant media. [atomic excitations/coherent radiation - operators (mathematics)/matrices (mathematics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C.

    1975-01-01

    Adopting the so-called genealogical construction, the eigenstates of collective operators can be expressed corresponding to a specified mode for an N-atom system in terms of those for an (N-1)-atom system. Matrix element of a collective operator of an arbitrary mode is presented which can be written as the product of an m-dependent factor and an m-independent reduced matrix element (RME). A set of recursion formulas for the RME was obtained. A graphical representation of the RME on the branching diagram for binary irreducible representations of permutation groups was then introduced. This gave a simple and systematic way of calculating the RME. Results show explicitly the geometry dependence of superradiance and the relative importance of r-conserving and r-nonconserving processes and clears up the chief difficulty encounted in the problem of N two-level atoms, spread over large regions, interacting with a multimode radiation field.

  17. Diode pumped alkali vapor lasers for high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.; Komashko, A.

    2008-02-01

    General Atomics has been engaged in the development of diode pumped alkali vapor lasers. We have been examining the design space looking for designs that are both efficient and easily scalable to high powers. Computationally, we have looked at the effect of pump bandwidth on laser performance. We have also looked at different lasing species. We have used an alexandrite laser to study the relative merits of different designs. We report on the results of our experimental and computational studies.

  18. Spill-Resistant Alkali-Metal-Vapor Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, William

    2005-01-01

    A spill-resistant vessel has been developed for dispensing an alkali-metal vapor. Vapors of alkali metals (most commonly, cesium or rubidium, both of which melt at temperatures slightly above room temperature) are needed for atomic frequency standards, experiments in spectroscopy, and experiments in laser cooling. Although the present spill-resistant alkali-metal dispenser was originally intended for use in the low-gravity environment of outer space, it can also be used in normal Earth gravitation: indeed, its utility as a vapor source was confirmed by use of cesium in a ground apparatus. The vessel is made of copper. It consists of an assembly of cylinders and flanges, shown in the figure. The uppermost cylinder is a fill tube. Initially, the vessel is evacuated, the alkali metal charge is distilled into the bottom of the vessel, and then the fill tube is pinched closed to form a vacuum seal. The innermost cylinder serves as the outlet for the vapor, yet prevents spilling by protruding above the surface of the alkali metal, no matter which way or how far the vessel is tilted. In the event (unlikely in normal Earth gravitation) that any drops of molten alkali metal have been shaken loose by vibration and are floating freely, a mesh cap on top of the inner cylinder prevents the drops from drifting out with the vapor. Liquid containment of the equivalent of 1.2 grams of cesium was confirmed for all orientations with rubbing alcohol in one of the prototypes later used with cesium.

  19. Resonances in the Photoionization Cross Sections of Atomic Nitrogen Shape the Far-ultraviolet Spectrum of the Bright Star in 47 Tucanae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, William V.; Chayer, Pierre

    2013-08-01

    The far-ultraviolet spectrum of the Bright Star (B8 III) in 47 Tuc (NGC 104) shows a remarkable pattern: it is well fit by local thermodynamic equilibrium models at wavelengths longer than Lyβ, but at shorter wavelengths it is fainter than the models by a factor of two. A spectrum of this star obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer shows broad absorption troughs with sharp edges at 995 and 1010 Å and a deep absorption feature at 1072 Å none of which are predicted by the models. We find that these features are caused by resonances in the photoionization cross sections of the first and second excited states of atomic nitrogen (2s 2 2p 3 2 D 0 and 2 P 0). Using cross sections from the Opacity Project, we can reproduce these features, but only if we use the cross sections at their full resolution, rather than the resonance-averaged cross sections usually employed to model stellar atmospheres. These resonances are strongest in stellar atmospheres with enhanced nitrogen and depleted carbon abundances, a pattern typical of post-asymptotic giant branch stars.

  20. RESONANCES IN THE PHOTOIONIZATION CROSS SECTIONS OF ATOMIC NITROGEN SHAPE THE FAR-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM OF THE BRIGHT STAR IN 47 TUCANAE

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, William V.; Chayer, Pierre E-mail: chayer@stsci.edu

    2013-08-10

    The far-ultraviolet spectrum of the Bright Star (B8 III) in 47 Tuc (NGC 104) shows a remarkable pattern: it is well fit by local thermodynamic equilibrium models at wavelengths longer than Ly{beta}, but at shorter wavelengths it is fainter than the models by a factor of two. A spectrum of this star obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer shows broad absorption troughs with sharp edges at 995 and 1010 A and a deep absorption feature at 1072 A; none of which are predicted by the models. We find that these features are caused by resonances in the photoionization cross sections of the first and second excited states of atomic nitrogen (2s {sup 2} 2p {sup 3} {sup 2} D {sup 0} and {sup 2} P {sup 0}). Using cross sections from the Opacity Project, we can reproduce these features, but only if we use the cross sections at their full resolution, rather than the resonance-averaged cross sections usually employed to model stellar atmospheres. These resonances are strongest in stellar atmospheres with enhanced nitrogen and depleted carbon abundances, a pattern typical of post-asymptotic giant branch stars.

  1. Near-threshold resonances in electron elastic scattering cross sections for Au and Pt atoms: identification of electron affinities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msezane, A. Z.; Felfli, Z.; Sokolovski, D.

    2008-05-01

    The recent Regge-pole methodology has been employed together with a Thomas-Fermi type potential which incorporates the vital core-polarization interaction to investigate the near-threshold electron attachment in Au and Pt as Regge resonances. The resultant stable negative ion states are found to have the discernible characteristic of very small imaginary parts of the Regge poles, which translate into long-lived resonances. The near-threshold electron elastic total cross sections are characterized by multiple resonances from which we extract the electron affinity (EA) values through the scrutiny of the imaginary part of the relevant complex angular momentum. For the Au- and Pt- negative ions the extracted binding energies of 2.262 eV and 2.163 eV, respectively are in excellent agreement with the most recently measured EA values for Au and Pt. Ramsauer-Townsend minima, shape resonances and the Wigner threshold behaviour are identified in both Au- and Pt- ions.

  2. Subpicotesla atomic magnetometry with a microfabricated vapour cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Vishal; Knappe, Svenja; Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Kitching, John

    2007-11-01

    Highly sensitive magnetometers capable of measuring magnetic fields below 1 pT have an impact on areas as diverse as geophysical surveying, the detection of unexploded ordinance, space science, nuclear magnetic resonance, health care and perimeter and remote monitoring. Recently, it has been shown that laboratory optical magnetometers, based on the precession of the spins of alkali atoms in the vapour phase, could achieve sensitivities in the femtotesla range, comparable to, or even exceeding, those of superconducting quantum interference devices. We demonstrate here an atomic magnetometer based on a millimetre-scale microfabricated alkali vapour cell with sensitivity below 70 fT Hz-1/2. Additionally, we use a simplified optical configuration that requires only a single low-power laser. This result suggests that millimetre-scale, low-power femtotesla magnetometers are feasible, and we support this proposition with a simple sensitivity scaling analysis. Such an instrument would greatly expand the range of applications in which atomic magnetometers could be used.

  3. Hydrothermal alkali metal catalyst recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Eakman, James M.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.

    1979-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles primarily in the form of water soluble alkali metal formates by treating the particles with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of added carbon monoxide. During the treating process the water insoluble alkali metal compounds comprising the insoluble alkali metal residues are converted into water soluble alkali metal formates. The resultant aqueous solution containing water soluble alkali metal formates is then separated from the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment process, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal formates serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. This process permits increased recovery of alkali metal constituents, thereby decreasing the overall cost of the gasification process by reducing the amount of makeup alkali metal compounds necessary.

  4. Quantum chaos in ultracold collisions of gas-phase erbium atoms.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Albert; Mark, Michael; Aikawa, Kiyotaka; Ferlaino, Francesca; Bohn, John L; Makrides, Constantinos; Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-03-27

    Atomic and molecular samples reduced to temperatures below one microkelvin, yet still in the gas phase, afford unprecedented energy resolution in probing and manipulating the interactions between their constituent particles. As a result of this resolution, atoms can be made to scatter resonantly on demand, through the precise control of a magnetic field. For simple atoms, such as alkalis, scattering resonances are extremely well characterized. However, ultracold physics is now poised to enter a new regime, where much more complex species can be cooled and studied, including magnetic lanthanide atoms and even molecules. For molecules, it has been speculated that a dense set of resonances in ultracold collision cross-sections will probably exhibit essentially random fluctuations, much as the observed energy spectra of nuclear scattering do. According to the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture, such fluctuations would imply chaotic dynamics of the underlying classical motion driving the collision. This would necessitate new ways of looking at the fundamental interactions in ultracold atomic and molecular systems, as well as perhaps new chaos-driven states of ultracold matter. Here we describe the experimental demonstration that random spectra are indeed found at ultralow temperatures. In the experiment, an ultracold gas of erbium atoms is shown to exhibit many Fano-Feshbach resonances, of the order of three per gauss for bosons. Analysis of their statistics verifies that their distribution of nearest-neighbour spacings is what one would expect from random matrix theory. The density and statistics of these resonances are explained by fully quantum mechanical scattering calculations that locate their origin in the anisotropy of the atoms' potential energy surface. Our results therefore reveal chaotic behaviour in the native interaction between ultracold atoms.

  5. Effect of temperature on the shape of spatial quasi-periodic oscillations of the refractive index of alkali atoms in an optically dense medium with a closed excitation contour of Δ type

    SciTech Connect

    Barantsev, K A; Litvinov, A N

    2014-10-31

    A theory of a closed excitation contour (Δ system) of a three-level atom in an optically dense medium is constructed with allowance for temperature. The spatial quasi-periodic oscillations of the refractive index in the system under study are shown to damp with increasing temperature. The range of temperatures at which these oscillations are most pronounced is found. (quantum optics)

  6. A Potential Remote-Sensing Technique for Thermospheric Temperature with Ground-Based Resonant Atomic Oxygen Raman Lidar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Journal of Atmospheric and Solar - Terrestrial Physics I (l111) Ill-Ill...2005.10.001 -T UTIO, STATEMENT A Approved for Public Release Distribution Unlimited 2 RD. Sharma, P.D. Dao / Journal of Atmospheric and Solar - Terrestrial Physics I...differential cross section (Measures, 1984). because it is not involved in the resonant Raman excitation. R.D. Sharma, P.D. Dao / Journal of Atmospheric and

  7. Dynamic Control over the Optical Transmission of Nanoscale Dielectric Metasurface by Alkali Vapors.

    PubMed

    Bar-David, Jonathan; Stern, Liron; Levy, Uriel

    2017-02-08

    In recent years, dielectric and metallic nanoscale metasurfaces are attracting growing attention and are being used for variety of applications. Resulting from the ability to introduce abrupt changes in optical properties at nanoscale dimensions, metasurfaces enable unprecedented control over light's different degrees of freedom, in an essentially two-dimensional configuration. Yet, the dynamic control over metasurface properties still remains one of the ultimate goals of this field. Here, we demonstrate the optical resonant interaction between a form birefringent dielectric metasurface made of silicon and alkali atomic vapor to control and effectively tune the optical transmission pattern initially generated by the nanoscale dielectric metasurface. By doing so, we present a controllable metasurface system, the output of which may be altered by applying magnetic fields, changing input polarization, or shifting the optical frequency. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the nonlinear behavior of our system taking advantage of the saturation effect of atomic transition. The demonstrated approach paves the way for using metasurfaces in applications where dynamic tunability of the metasurface is in need, for example, for scanning systems, tunable focusing, real time displays, and more.

  8. A copper(II) complex with a Cu-S₈ bond. Attenuated total reflectance, electron paramagnetic resonance, resonance Raman and atoms-in-molecule calculations.

    PubMed

    Shee, Nirmal K; Adekunle, Florence A O; Verma, Ravi; Kumar, Devesh; Datta, Dipankar

    2015-12-05

    Green [Cu(1,10-phenanthroline)2OH2](ClO4)2 (1) reacts with yellow elemental sulfur at room temperature in methanol to yield turquoise blue [Cu(1,10-phenanthro-line)2(S8)](ClO4)2 (2). A comparative study of the EPR spectra of 1 and 2 in solid state and in methanol glass indicates that the S8 unit in 2 is bound to the metal. High level DFT calculations show that the cation in 2 is five coordinate, distorted square pyramidal with S8 occupying the apical position. The crucial Cu(II)-S bond is around 2.9Å. Such long Cu(II)-S bonds occur in oxidized plastocyanin where it is considered to be bonding. Presence of a weak Cu-S8 bond is revealed in the resonance Raman spectra of 2. Satisfactory matching of the calculated and experimental IR spectra vindicates the theoretically derived structure of the cation in 2.

  9. Surface phonons on Al(111) surface covered by alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusina, G. G.; Eremeev, S. V.; Borisova, S. D.; Sklyadneva, I. Yu.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2005-06-01

    We investigated the vibrational and structural properties of the Al(111)-(3×3)R30°-AM (AM=Na,K,Li) adsorbed systems using interaction potentials from the embedded-atom method. The surface relaxation, surface phonon dispersion, and polarization of vibrational modes for the alkali adatoms and the substrate atoms as well as the local density of states are discussed. Our calculated structural parameters are in close agreement with experimental and ab initio results. The obtained vibrational frequencies compare fairly well with the available experimental data.

  10. Measuring the relaxation time of the xenon atoms and the rubidium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Peng; Wang, Zhi-Guo; Li, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Qi-Yuan; Luo, Hui

    2016-11-01

    In a nuclear-magnetic-resonance gyroscope (NMRG), the polarization of nuclear spins and the detection of motional information are usually achieved by utilizing the atomic spins of alkali atoms. The parameters of the atomic spins are mainly evaluated by the relaxation time. Relaxation time is very important and can influence signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, start time, and other gyroscope parameters. Therefore, its accurate measurement is critical in the study of NMRG performance. In this study, we evaluate a variety of methods to measure the transverse and longitudinal relaxation times. First we examine the free-induction-decay method, which is the industry standard for measuring spin relaxation time. Second we investigate the improved free-induction-decay, fitting-ratio, and magnetic-resonance-broadening- fitting methods for measuring the transverse relaxation time, and the flipped polarization method for measuring the longitudinal relaxation time. By changing the experimental conditions, we obtain the longitudinal relaxation time using the flipped polarization method under a variety of conditions. Finally, by comparing these measurement methods, we propose the best measurement methods under different conditions.

  11. Outer-core emission spectra of heavy alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, R. L.; First, P. N.; Flynn, C. P.

    1988-09-01

    We report np5(n+1)s2-->np6(n+1)s emission spectra of K (n=3), Rb (n=4), and Cs (n=5), and compare emission-band characteristics through the series Na-Cs using earlier data for Na. The normalized band profiles of the different alkali metals are remarkably similar when scaled by the Fermi energy EF. However, the spin-orbit partner intensity ratios are far from the ideal value 2, reaching approximately 60 for Rb and above 65 for Cs, mainly owing to Coster-Kronig decays from higher levels. We confirm that the Mahan-Nozières-De Dominicis ``anomaly'' at EF is generally weaker in emission than in absorption. It decreases through the series to become undetectable for emission from Cs. A systematic increase of the core-hole-lifetime width occurs through the column of alkali metals from a reported estimate of 10 meV for Na to a value of 50 meV for Cs. A study of the Fermi-edge shape between 20 and 300 K reveals temperature-dependent phonon broadening in generally good agreement with theoretical predictions. Incomplete relaxation plays only a minor role in the edge processes of the heavy alkali metals. Additional Fermi-edge broadening and the shifted emission edges of surface atoms are observed for alkali-metal films 10-100 Å thick.

  12. Multi-atom resonant photoemission and the development of next-generation software and high-speed detectors for electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, Alexander William

    2000-09-01

    This dissertation has involved the exploration of a new effect in photoelectron emission, multi-atom resonant photoemission (MARPE), as well as the development of new software, data analysis techniques, and detectors of general use in such research. We present experimental and theoretical results related to MARPE, in which the photoelectron intensity from a core level on one atom is influenced by a core-level absorption resonance on another. We point out that some of our and others prior experimental data has been strongly influenced by detector non-linearity and that the effects seen in new corrected data are smaller and of different form. Corrected data for the MnO(001) system with resonance between the O 1s and Mn 2p energy levels are found to be well described by an extension of well-known intraatomic resonant photoemission theory to the interatomic case, provided that interactions beyond the usual second-order Kramers-Heisenberg treatment are included. This theory is also found to simplify under certain conditions so as to yield results equivalent to a classical x-ray optical approach, with the latter providing an accurate and alternative, although less detailed and general, physical picture of these effects. Possible future applications of MARPE as a new probe of near-neighbor identities and bonding and its relationship to other known effects are also discussed. We also consider in detail specially written data acquisition software that has been used for most of the measurements reported here. This software has been used with an existing experimental system to develop the method of detector characterization and then data correction required for the work described above. The development of a next generation one-dimensional, high-speed, electron detector is also discussed. Our goal has been to design, build and test a prototype high-performance, one-dimensional pulse-counting detector that represents a significant advancement in detector technology and is well

  13. Multi-atom resonant photoemission and the development of next-generation software and high-speed detectors for electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Alexander William

    2000-10-01

    This dissertation has involved the exploration of a new effect in photoelectron emission, multi-atom resonant photoemission (MARPE), as well as the development of new software, data analysis techniques, and detectors of general use in such research. We present experimental and theoretical results related to MARPE, in which the photoelectron intensity from a core level on one atom is influenced by a core-level absorption resonance on another. We point out that some of our and others prior experimental data has been strongly influenced by detector non-linearity and that the effects seen in new corrected data are smaller and of different form. Corrected data for the MnO(001) system with resonance between the O 1s and Mn 2p energy levels are found to be well described by an extension of well-known intraatomic resonant photoemission theory to the interatomic case, provided that interactions beyond the usual second-order Kramers-Heisenberg treatment are included. This theory is also found to simplify under certain conditions so as to yield results equivalent to a classical x-ray optical approach, with the latter providing an accurate and alternative, although less detailed and general, physical picture of these effects. Possible future applications of MARPE as a new probe of near-neighbor identities and bonding and its relationship to other known effects are also discussed. We also consider in detail specially written data acquisition software that has been used for most of the measurements reported here. This software has been used with an existing experimental system to develop the method of detector characterization and then data correction required for the work described above. The development of a next generation one-dimensional, high-speed, electron detector is also discussed. Our goal has been to design, build and test a prototype high-performance, one-dimensional pulse-counting detector that represents a significant advancement in detector technology and is well

  14. Photo association and optical Feshbach resonances in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate: Treatment of correlation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Naidon, Pascal; Masnou-Seeuws, Francoise

    2006-04-15

    In this paper we formulate the time-dependent many-body theory of photo association in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate with realistic interatomic interactions, using and comparing two approximations: the first-order cumulant approximation [Phys. Rev. A 65, 033601 (2002)], and the reduced pair wave approximation [Phys. Rev. A 68, 033612 (2003)]. The two approximations differ only by the way a pair of condensate atoms is influenced by the mean field at short interatomic separations. In both cases we identify two different regimes of photo association: the adiabatic regime and the coherent regime. The threshold for the so-called 'rogue dissociation' [Phys. Rev. Let t. 88, 090403 (2002)] (where the Gross-Pitaevskii model breaks down) is found to be different in each regime, shedding new light on the experiment of McKenzie et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 120403 (2002)]. Comparing numerical solutions for the two approximations with the Gross-Pitaevskii predictions, we find two different effects: reduction of the photoassociation rate at short times, and creation of correlated pairs of atoms when the laser intensity is switched on rapidly. We also observe effects on the symmetry of the photoassociation line shapes, giving the possibility to experimentally distinguish between the two approximations.

  15. Solid-phase epitaxy of silicon amorphized by implantation of the alkali elements rubidium and cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, R.; Haeublein, V.; Ryssel, H.; Voellm, H.; Feili, D.; Seidel, H.; Frey, L.

    2012-11-06

    The redistribution of implanted Rb and Cs profiles in amorphous silicon during solid-phase epitaxial recrystallization has been investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. For the implantation dose used in these experiments, the alkali atoms segregate at the a-Si/c-Si interface during annealing resulting in concentration peaks near the interface. In this way, the alkali atoms are moved towards the surface. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy in ion channeling configuration was performed to measure average recrystallization rates of the amorphous silicon layers. Preliminary studies on the influence of the alkali atoms on the solid-phase epitaxial regrowth rate reveal a strong retardation compared to the intrinsic recrystallization rate.

  16. Electrolytic method to make alkali alcoholates using ion conducting alkali electrolyte/separator

    DOEpatents

    Joshi, Ashok V [Salt Lake City, UT; Balagopal, Shekar [Sandy, UT; Pendelton, Justin [Salt Lake City, UT

    2011-12-13

    Alkali alcoholates, also called alkali alkoxides, are produced from alkali metal salt solutions and alcohol using a three-compartment electrolytic cell. The electrolytic cell includes an anolyte compartment configured with an anode, a buffer compartment, and a catholyte compartment configured with a cathode. An alkali ion conducting solid electrolyte configured to selectively transport alkali ions is positioned between the anolyte compartment and the buffer compartment. An alkali ion permeable separator is positioned between the buffer compartment and the catholyte compartment. The catholyte solution may include an alkali alcoholate and alcohol. The anolyte solution may include at least one alkali salt. The buffer compartment solution may include a soluble alkali salt and an alkali alcoholate in alcohol.

  17. Process for recovering alkali metals and sulfur from alkali metal sulfides and polysulfides

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard; Alvare, Javier

    2016-10-25

    Alkali metals and sulfur may be recovered from alkali monosulfide and polysulfides in an electrolytic process that utilizes an electrolytic cell having an alkali ion conductive membrane. An anolyte solution includes an alkali monosulfide, an alkali polysulfide, or a mixture thereof and a solvent that dissolves elemental sulfur. A catholyte includes molten alkali metal. Applying an electric current oxidizes sulfide and polysulfide in the anolyte compartment, causes alkali metal ions to pass through the alkali ion conductive membrane to the catholyte compartment, and reduces the alkali metal ions in the catholyte compartment. Liquid sulfur separates from the anolyte solution and may be recovered. The electrolytic cell is operated at a temperature where the formed alkali metal and sulfur are molten.

  18. Atomic magnetic gradiometer for room temperature high sensitivity magnetic field detection

    DOEpatents

    Xu,Shoujun; Lowery, Thomas L.; Budker, Dmitry; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Wemmer, David E.; Pines, Alexander

    2009-08-11

    A laser-based atomic magnetometer (LBAM) apparatus measures magnetic fields, comprising: a plurality of polarization detector cells to detect magnetic fields; a laser source optically coupled to the polarization detector cells; and a signal detector that measures the laser source after being coupled to the polarization detector cells, which may be alkali cells. A single polarization cell may be used for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by prepolarizing the nuclear spins of an analyte, encoding spectroscopic and/or spatial information, and detecting NMR signals from the analyte with a laser-based atomic magnetometer to form NMR spectra and/or magnetic resonance images (MRI). There is no need of a magnetic field or cryogenics in the detection step, as it is detected through the LBAM.

  19. IRMPD Spectroscopy of Metalated Flavins: Structure and Bonding of Lumiflavin Complexes with Alkali and Coinage Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Pablo; Günther, Alan; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; Dopfer, Otto

    2016-10-01

    Flavins are a fundamental class of biomolecules, whose photochemical properties strongly depend on their environment and their redox and metalation state. Infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) spectra of mass selected isolated metal-lumiflavin ionic complexes (M+LF) are analyzed in the fingerprint range (800-1830 cm-1) to determine the bonding of lumiflavin with alkali (M=Li, Na, K, Cs) and coinage (M=Cu, Ag) metal ions. The complexes are generated in an electrospray ionization source coupled to an ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer and the IR free electron laser FELIX. Vibrational and isomer assignments of the IRMPD spectra are accomplished by comparison to quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP/cc-pVDZ level, yielding structure, binding energy, bonding mechanism, and spectral properties of the complexes. The most stable binding sites identified in the experiments involve metal bonding to the oxygen atoms of the two available CO groups of LF. Hence, CO stretching frequencies are a sensitive indicator of both the metal binding site and the metal bond strength. More than one isomer is observed for M=Li, Na, and K, and the preferred CO binding site changes with the size of the alkali ion. For Cs+LF only one isomer is identified although the energies of the two most stable structures differ by less than 7 kJ/mol. While the M+-LF bonds for alkali ions are mainly based on electrostatic forces, substantial covalent contributions lead to stronger bonds for the coinage metal ions. Comparison between lumiflavin and lumichrome reveals substantial differences in the metal binding motifs and interactions due to the different flavin structures.

  20. Enzymatic degradation of polyester films by a cutinase-like enzyme from Pseudozyma antarctica: surface plasmon resonance and atomic force microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, Yukiko; Kikkawa, Yoshihiro; Sato, Shun; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Watanabe, Takashi; Yoshida, Shigenobu; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Kitamoto, Hiroko K

    2013-10-01

    Enzymatic degradation of polyester films by a cutinase-like enzyme from Pseudozyma antarctica JCM10317 (PaE) was analyzed by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The adsorption of PaE and the degradation rate for polyester films were quantitatively monitored by a positive and negative SPR signal shifts, respectively. The decrease in SPR signal and the erosion depth of amorphous poly(L-lactide) (a-PLLA) film measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) had a linear relationship, and the weight loss was estimated from the AFM data combined with a density of a-PLLA film. Furthermore, SPR sensorgrams for various polyester films showed that degradation rate of poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(butylene succinate-co-adipate) which contain C6 units was higher than that of other polyesters such as poly(butylene succinate) and a-PLLA. These results suggest that C6 is the preferred chain length as substrates for PaE.

  1. Refractive index sensitivity of optical fiber lossy-mode resonance sensors based on atomic layer deposited TiOx thin overlay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnat, Dariusz; Koba, Marcin; Wachnicki, Łukasz; Gierałtowska, Sylwia; Godlewski, Marek; Śmietana, Mateusz

    2016-05-01

    This work presents an optical fiber refractive index sensors based on lossy-mode resonance (LMR) effect supported by titanium oxide (TiOx) thin overlay. The TiOx overlays of different thickness were deposited on core of polymer-clad silica (PCS) fibers using atomic layer deposition (ALD) method. Based on numerical simulations, a number of structures differing in the location of exposed core area and the thickness of TiOx coatings were designed. For fabricated structures the spectral response to external refractive index (next) was measured. The maximum sensitivity reaches 634.2 nm/RIU (next range: 1.357 - 1.402 RIU; TiOx coating thickness: 260.9 nm; investigated spectral range: 500-800 nm) and it highly depends on the thin-film thickness.

  2. Conduction electrons as dissipation channel in friction experiments at the metal-metal transition of LSMO measured by contact-resonance atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfahl, V.; Phani, M. K.; Büchsenschütz-Göbeler, M.; Kumar, A.; Moshnyaga, V.; Arnold, W.; Samwer, K.

    2017-01-01

    We report on friction measurements on a La0.6Sr0.4MnO3 (LSMO) thin film using atomic force microscopy cantilever contact-resonances. There is a contribution to the damping of the cantilever oscillations, which is caused by micro-sliding of the cantilever tip on the surface of the thin film. This frictional part decreases with temperature parallel to the increase in the resistivity of the thin film. The LSMO is well-known for a ferromagnetic to paramagnetic phase transition that occurs without changes in the rhombohedral (R-3c) crystalline structure. The magnetic transition at the Curie temperature TC ˜ 360 K is accompanied by a metal-to-metal transition with a large increase in electrical resistivity. The behavior of the cantilever damping constant demonstrates that there is a direct coupling between mechanical friction and the mobility of the electrons in the LSMO film.

  3. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, Ultraviolet Resonance Raman (UVRR) Spectroscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for Study of the Kinetics of Formation and Structural Characterization of Tau Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Gayathri

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic studies of tau fibril formation in vitro most commonly employ spectroscopic probes such as thioflavinT fluorescence and laser light scattering or negative stain transmission electron microscopy. Here, I describe the use of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as complementary probes for studies of tau aggregation. The sensitivity of vibrational spectroscopic techniques (FTIR and UVRR) to secondary structure content allows for measurement of conformational changes that occur when the intrinsically disordered protein tau transforms into cross-β-core containing fibrils. AFM imaging serves as a gentle probe of structures populated over the time course of tau fibrillization. Together, these assays help further elucidate the structural and mechanistic complexity inherent in tau fibril formation.

  4. APPLICATIONS OF LASERS AND OTHER TOPICS IN LASER PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY: Investigation of the properties of resonance holograms in a beam of sodium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, Igor'S.; Likhanskiĭ, V. V.; Semerok, A. F.; Firsov, Valerii A.; Chankin, A. V.

    1987-10-01

    Experimental and theoretical (using a two-level approximation) investigations were made of the properties of resonance holograms (excited-state gratings) created by monochromatic linearly polarized radiation from a cw dye laser in a beam of sodium atoms as a result of the 32P3/2- 32S1/2(F=2) transition. A good qualitative agreement was observed between the theory and experimental results. It was established that the maximum diffraction efficiency was attained when the intensity of the radiation used to form the hologram was of the order of the intensity needed to saturate the transition and the optical thickness of the beam was ~1.1. The sensitivity of the medium was ~1 nJ/cm2 for 1% diffraction efficiency.

  5. Electrical Resistivity of Alkali Elements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    rubidium, cesium, and francium ) and contains recommended reference values (or provisional or typical values). The compiled data include all the...and information on the electrical resistivity of alkali elements (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, and francium ) and contains...107Ic. Magnetic Flux Density Dependence o.. .. ... .... 112 4.6. Francium ..........................115j a. Temperature Dependence

  6. Three-photon resonance ionization of atomic Mn in a hot-cavity laser ion source using Ti:sapphire lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Mattolat, C.; ...

    2015-05-08

    We have demonstrated three-photon resonance ionization of atomic manganese (Mn) in a hot-cavity ion source using Ti: sapphire lasers. Three-step ionization schemes employing different intermediate levels and Rydberg or autoionizing (AI) states in the final ionization step are established. Strong AI resonances were observed via the 3d54s5s f6S5/2 level at 49 415.35 cm-1, while Rydberg transitions were reached from the 3d54s4d e 6D9/2,7/2,5/2) levels at around 47 210 cm-1. Analyses of the strong Rydberg transitions associated with the 3d54s4d e 6D7/2 lower level indicate that they belong to the dipole-allowed 4d → nf6F°9/2,7/2,5/2 series converging to the 3d54s 7S3 groundmore » state of Mn II. From this series, an ionization potential of 59 959.56 ± 0.01 cm-1 is obtained for Mn. At high ion source temperatures the semi-forbidden 4d → nf8F°9/2,7/2,5/2 series was also observed. The overall ionization efficiency for Mn has been measured to be about 0.9% when using the strong AI transition in the third excitation step and 0.3% when employing an intense Rydberg transition. Experimental data indicate that the ionization efficiency was limited by the interaction of Mn atoms with ion source materials at high temperatures.« less

  7. Three-photon resonance ionization of atomic Mn in a hot-cavity laser ion source using Ti:sapphire lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Mattolat, C.; Wendt, K.

    2015-05-08

    We have demonstrated three-photon resonance ionization of atomic manganese (Mn) in a hot-cavity ion source using Ti: sapphire lasers. Three-step ionization schemes employing different intermediate levels and Rydberg or autoionizing (AI) states in the final ionization step are established. Strong AI resonances were observed via the 3d54s5s f6S5/2 level at 49 415.35 cm-1, while Rydberg transitions were reached from the 3d54s4d e 6D9/2,7/2,5/2) levels at around 47 210 cm-1. Analyses of the strong Rydberg transitions associated with the 3d54s4d e 6D7/2 lower level indicate that they belong to the dipole-allowed 4d → nf69/2,7/2,5/2 series converging to the 3d54s 7S3 ground state of Mn II. From this series, an ionization potential of 59 959.56 ± 0.01 cm-1 is obtained for Mn. At high ion source temperatures the semi-forbidden 4d → nf8F°9/2,7/2,5/2 series was also observed. The overall ionization efficiency for Mn has been measured to be about 0.9% when using the strong AI transition in the third excitation step and 0.3% when employing an intense Rydberg transition. Experimental data indicate that the ionization efficiency was limited by the interaction of Mn atoms with ion source materials at high temperatures.

  8. Ab Initio Based 2D Continuum Mechanics - Sensitivity Prediction for Contact Resonance Atomic Force Microscopy Based Structure Fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Qing; Lange, Björn; Lopes, J. Marcelo J.; Zauscher, Stefan; Blum, Volker

    Contact resonance AFM is demonstrated as a powerful tool for mapping differences in the mechanical properties of 2D materials and heterostructures, permitting to resolve surface and subsurface structural differences of different domains. Measured contact resonance frequencies are related to the contact stiffness of the combined tip-sample system. Based on first principles predicted elastic properties and a continuum approach to model the mechanical impedance, we find contact stiffness ratios between different domains of few-layer graphene on 3C-SiC(111) in excellent agreement with experiment. We next demonstrate that the approach is able to quantitatively resolve differences between other 2D materials domains, e.g., for h-BN, MoS2 and MoO3 on graphene on SiC. We show that the combined effect of several materials parameters, especially the in-plane elastic properties and the layer thickness, determines the contact stiffness, therefore boosting the sensitivity even if the out-of-plane elastic properties are similar.

  9. A Geant4-based Simulation to Evaluate the Feasibility of Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) in Determining Atomic Compositions of Body Tissue in Cancer Diagnostics and Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbo, Yekaterina; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Liyanage, Nilanga

    2017-01-01

    Customarily applied in homeland security for identifying concealed explosives and chemical weapons, NRF (Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence) may have high potential in determining atomic compositions of body tissue. High energy photons incident on a target excite the target nuclei causing characteristic re-emission of resonance photons. As the nuclei of each isotope have well-defined excitation energies, NRF uniquely indicates the isotopic content of the target. NRF radiation corresponding to nuclear isotopes present in the human body is emitted during radiotherapy based on Bremsstrahlung photons generated in a linear electron accelerator. We have developed a Geant4 simulation in order to help assess NRF capabilities in detecting, mapping, and characterizing tumors. We have imported a digital phantom into the simulation using anatomical data linked to known chemical compositions of various tissues. Work is ongoing to implement the University of Virginia's cancer center treatment setup and patient geometry, and to collect and analyze the simulation's physics quantities to evaluate the potential of NRF for medical imaging applications. Preliminary results will be presented.

  10. Characterization of the phosphatic mineral of the barnacle Ibla cumingi at atomic level by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance: comparison with other phosphatic biominerals

    PubMed Central

    Reid, David G.; Mason, Matthew J.; Chan, Benny K. K.; Duer, Melinda J.

    2012-01-01

    Ibliform barnacles are among the few invertebrate animals harnessing calcium phosphate to construct hard tissue. The 31P solid-state NMR (SSNMR) signal from the shell plates of Ibla cumingi (Iblidae) is broader than that of bone, and shifted by ca 1 ppm to low frequency. 1H–31P heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) experiments show a continuum of different phosphorus/phosphate atomic environments, close to hydrogen populations with resonance frequencies between ca 10 and 20 ppm. Associated 1H and 31P chemical shifts argue the coexistence of weakly (high 31P frequency, low 1H frequency) to more strongly (lower 31P frequency, higher 1H frequency) hydrogen-bonded hydrogen phosphate-like molecular/ionic species. There is no resolved signal from discrete OH− ions. 13C SSNMR shows chitin, protein and other organic biomolecules but, unlike bone, there are no significant atomic scale organic matrix–mineral contacts. The poorly ordered hydrogen phosphate-like iblid mineral is strikingly different, structurally and compositionally, from both vertebrate bone mineral and the more crystalline fluoroapatite of the linguliform brachiopods. It probably represents a previously poorly characterized calcium phosphate biomineral, the evolution of which may have reflected either the chemical conditions of ancestral seas or the mechanical advantages of phosphatic biomineralization over a calcium carbonate equivalent. PMID:22298816

  11. Quantitative Determination of Density of Ground State Atomic Oxygen from Both TALIF and Emission Spectroscopy in Hot Air Plasma Generated by Microwave Resonant Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, F.; Yousfi, M.; Merbahi, N.; Wattieaux, G.; Piquemal, A.

    2016-03-01

    Two experimental techniques have been used to quantify the atomic oxygen density in the case of hot air plasma generated by a microwave (MW) resonant cavity. The latter operates at a frequency of 2.45 GHz inside a cell of gas conditioning at a pressure of 600 mbar, an injected air flow of 12 L/min and an input MW power of 1 kW. The first technique is based on the standard two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) using xenon for calibration but applied for the first time in the present post discharge hot air plasma column having a temperature of about 4500 K near the axis of the nozzle. The second diagnostic technique is an actinometry method based on optical emission spectroscopy (OES). In this case, we compared the spectra intensities of a specific atomic oxygen line (844 nm) and the closest wavelength xenon line (823 nm). The two lines need to be collected under absolutely the same spectroscopic parameters. The xenon emission is due to the addition of a small proportion of xenon (1% Xe) of this chemically inert gas inside the air while a further small quantity of H2 (2%) is also added in the mixture in order to collect OH(A-X) and NH(A-X) spectra without noise. The latter molecular spectra are required to estimate gas and excitation temperatures. Optical emission spectroscopy measurements, at for instance the position z=12 mm on the axis plasma column that leads to a gas measured temperature equal to 3500 K, an excitation temperature of about 9500 K and an atomic oxygen density 2.09×1017±0.2×1017 cm-3. This is in very good agreement with the TALIF measurement, which is equal to 2.0×1017 cm-3.

  12. Evaluation and optimization of quartz resonant-frequency retuned fork force sensors with high Q factors, and the associated electric circuits, for non-contact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Fujii, Mikihiro; Tomitori, Masahiko; Arai, Toyoko

    2016-02-01

    High-Q factor retuned fork (RTF) force sensors made from quartz tuning forks, and the electric circuits for the sensors, were evaluated and optimized to improve the performance of non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) performed under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. To exploit the high Q factor of the RTF sensor, the oscillation of the RTF sensor was excited at its resonant frequency, using a stray capacitance compensation circuit to cancel the excitation signal leaked through the stray capacitor of the sensor. To improve the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio in the detected signal, a small capacitor was inserted before the input of an operational (OP) amplifier placed in an UHV chamber, which reduced the output noise from the amplifier. A low-noise, wideband OP amplifier produced a superior S/N ratio, compared with a precision OP amplifier. The thermal vibrational density spectra of the RTF sensors were evaluated using the circuit. The RTF sensor with an effective spring constant value as low as 1000 N/m provided a lower minimum detection limit for force differentiation. A nc-AFM image of a Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was produced with atomic resolution using the RTF sensor in a constant frequency shift mode; tunneling current and energy dissipation images with atomic resolution were also simultaneously produced. The high-Q factor RTF sensor showed potential for the high sensitivity of energy dissipation as small as 1 meV/cycle and the high-resolution analysis of non-conservative force interactions.

  13. Atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Schwindt, Peter [Albuquerque, NM; Johnson, Cort N [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-07-03

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  14. Experimental evidence of resonant energy collisional transfers between argon 1s and 2p states and ground state H atoms by laser collisional induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Emile; van Dijk, Jan; Kroesen, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, laser collisional induced fluorescence (LCIF) is used to probe resonant excitation transfers in an argon/hydrogen plasma resulting from heavy particle collisions. Different radiative transitions between the 1s and 2p states (in Paschen's notation) of argon are optically pumped by a nanosecond laser pulse. The spontaneous fluorescence and collisional responses of the argon and hydrogen systems are monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. A surfatron plasma source is used to generate an argon plasma with a few per cent hydrogen addition at pressures between 0.65 and 20 mbar. The electron density is measured independently by means of Thomson scattering. The overall response of the plasma due to optical pumping of argon is briefly discussed and an overview of the known heteronuclear excitation transfers in an argon/hydrogen plasma is given. The propagation of the shortcut in the Ar(1s) to H(n = 2) excitation transfer due to the optical pumping of the Ar(1s) states is seen in the atomic hydrogen LCIF responses. For the first time, we give direct experimental evidence of the existence of an efficient excitation transfer: Additionally, measurements are performed in order to estimate the resonant energy transfer between the resonant argon 1s states and hydrogen atoms: for which no previously measured cross sections could be found in the literature. These are extra quenching channels of argon 1s and 2p states that should be included in collisional-radiative modeling of argon-hydrogen discharges. The high repetition rate of the dye laser allows us to obtain a high sensitivity in the measurements. LCIF is shown to be a powerful tool for unraveling electron and also heavy particle excitation channels in situ in the plasma phase. The technique was previously developed for measuring electron or species densities locally in the plasma, but we show that it can be advantageously used to probe collisional transfers between very short-lived species which exist

  15. Double radio-optical resonance in 87RB atomic vapour in a finite-size bufferless cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinov, Andrey; Kazakov, Georgy; Matisov, Boris; Mazets, Igor

    2008-06-01

    We study theoretically the formation of a double radio-optical resonance (DROR) in 87Rb vapour in a cell with an anti-relaxation coating. We develop a quantum-kinetic approach to the study of the Dicke narrowing. We examine various DROR schemes for different polarizations of the laser radiation. We find that the short-term stability σy of a DROR-based frequency standard improves significantly (by an order of magnitude) if a laser with a broad spectrum is used, in comparison to the case of excitation by a narrow-band laser radiation, and reaches ultimately the value σy ~ 1 × 10-14 τ-1/2, where τ is the integration time (in seconds).

  16. Mixed alkali effect on the spectroscopic properties of alkali-alkaline earth oxide borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, G.; Ramesh, B.; Shareefuddin, Md.; Chary, M. N.; Sayanna, R.

    2016-05-01

    The mixed alkali and alkaline earth oxide borate glass with the composition xK2O - (25-x) Li2O-12.5BaO-12.5MgO-50B2O3 (x = 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25mol %) and doped with 1mol% CuO were prepared by the melt quenching technique. From the optical absorption spectra the optical band gap, electronic polarizability(α02-), interaction parameter (A), theoretical and experimental optical basicity (Λ) values were evaluated. From the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectral data the number of spins (N) and susceptibility (χ) were evaluated. The values of (α02-), and (Λ) increases with increasing of K2O content and electronic polarizability and interaction parameter show opposite behaviuor which may be due to the creation of non-bridging oxygens and expansion of borate network. The reciprocal of susceptibility (1/χ) and spin concentration (N) as a function of K2O content, varied nonlinearly which may be due to creation of non-bridging oxygens in the present glass system. This may be attributed to mixed alkali effect (MAE).

  17. Absorption Spectra of Broadened Sodium Resonance Lines in Presence of Rare Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H-K; Shurgalin, M; Babb, J F

    2002-09-11

    The pressure broadening of alkali-metal lines is a fundamental problem with numerous applications. For example, the sodium resonance lines broadened by xenon are important in the production of broad spectra emitted in the HPS (High-Pressure Sodium) lamp and they potentially can be used for gas condition diagnostics. Broadened absorption lines of alkali-metal atoms are prominent in the optical spectra of brown dwarfs and understanding the broadening mechanism will help elucidate the chemical composition and atmospheric properties of those stars. The far-line wing spectra of sodium resonance lines broadened by rare gases are found to exhibit molecular characteristics such as satellites and hence the total absorption coefficients for vapors of Na atoms and perturbing rare gas atoms can be modeled as Na-RG (rare gas) molecular absorption spectra. In this work, using carefully chosen interatomic potentials for Na-RG molecules we carry out quantum-mechanical calculations for reduced absorption coefficients for vapors composed of Na-He, Na-Ar, and Na-Xe. Calculated spectra are compared to available experimental results and the agreement is good in the measured satellite positions and shapes.

  18. Sub-Shot-Noise Magnetometry with a Correlated Spin-Relaxation Dominated Alkali-Metal Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Kominis, I. K.

    2008-02-22

    Spin noise sets fundamental limits to the precision of measurements using spin-polarized atomic vapors, such as performed with sensitive atomic magnetometers. Spin squeezing offers the possibility to extend the measurement precision beyond the standard quantum limit of uncorrelated atoms. Contrary to current understanding, we show that, even in the presence of spin relaxation, spin squeezing can lead to a significant reduction of spin noise, and hence an increase in magnetometric sensitivity, for a long measurement time. This is the case when correlated spin relaxation due to binary alkali-atom collisions dominates independently acting decoherence processes, a situation realized in thermal high atom-density magnetometers and clocks.

  19. Anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering for atom specific and excited state selective dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Josefsson, Ida; Rajkovic, Ivan; ...

    2016-10-07

    Here, ultrafast electronic and structural dynamics of matter govern rate and selectivity of chemical reactions, as well as phase transitions and efficient switching in functional materials. Since x-rays determine electronic and structural properties with elemental, chemical, orbital and magnetic selectivity, short pulse x-ray sources have become central enablers of ultrafast science. Despite of these strengths, ultrafast x-rays have been poor at picking up excited state moieties from the unexcited ones. With time-resolved anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering (AS-RXRS) performed at the LCLS, and ab initio theory we establish background free excited state selectivity in addition to the elemental, chemical, orbitalmore » and magnetic selectivity of x-rays. This unparalleled selectivity extracts low concentration excited state species along the pathway of photo induced ligand exchange of Fe(CO)5 in ethanol. Conceptually a full theoretical treatment of all accessible insights to excited state dynamics with AS-RXRS with transform-limited x-ray pulses is given—which will be covered experimentally by upcoming transform-limited x-ray sources.« less

  20. Anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering for atom specific and excited state selective dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Josefsson, Ida; Rajkovic, Ivan; Schreck, Simon; Quevedo, Wilson; Beye, Martin; Grübel, Sebastian; Scholz, Mirko; Nordlund, Dennis; Zhang, Wenkai; Hartsock, Robert W.; Gaffney, Kelly J.; Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J.; Kennedy, Brian; Hennies, Franz; Techert, Simone; Wernet, Philippe; Odelius, Michael; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-10-07

    Here, ultrafast electronic and structural dynamics of matter govern rate and selectivity of chemical reactions, as well as phase transitions and efficient switching in functional materials. Since x-rays determine electronic and structural properties with elemental, chemical, orbital and magnetic selectivity, short pulse x-ray sources have become central enablers of ultrafast science. Despite of these strengths, ultrafast x-rays have been poor at picking up excited state moieties from the unexcited ones. With time-resolved anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering (AS-RXRS) performed at the LCLS, and ab initio theory we establish background free excited state selectivity in addition to the elemental, chemical, orbital and magnetic selectivity of x-rays. This unparalleled selectivity extracts low concentration excited state species along the pathway of photo induced ligand exchange of Fe(CO)5 in ethanol. Conceptually a full theoretical treatment of all accessible insights to excited state dynamics with AS-RXRS with transform-limited x-ray pulses is given—which will be covered experimentally by upcoming transform-limited x-ray sources.

  1. Anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering for atom specific and excited state selective dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Josefsson, Ida; Rajkovic, Ivan; Schreck, Simon; Quevedo, Wilson; Beye, Martin; Grübel, Sebastian; Scholz, Mirko; Nordlund, Dennis; Zhang, Wenkai; Hartsock, Robert W.; Gaffney, Kelly J.; Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J.; Kennedy, Brian; Hennies, Franz; Techert, Simone; Wernet, Philippe; Odelius, Michael; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Ultrafast electronic and structural dynamics of matter govern rate and selectivity of chemical reactions, as well as phase transitions and efficient switching in functional materials. Since x-rays determine electronic and structural properties with elemental, chemical, orbital and magnetic selectivity, short pulse x-ray sources have become central enablers of ultrafast science. Despite of these strengths, ultrafast x-rays have been poor at picking up excited state moieties from the unexcited ones. With time-resolved anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering (AS-RXRS) performed at the LCLS, and ab initio theory we establish background free excited state selectivity in addition to the elemental, chemical, orbital and magnetic selectivity of x-rays. This unparalleled selectivity extracts low concentration excited state species along the pathway of photo induced ligand exchange of Fe(CO)5 in ethanol. Conceptually a full theoretical treatment of all accessible insights to excited state dynamics with AS-RXRS with transform-limited x-ray pulses is given—which will be covered experimentally by upcoming transform-limited x-ray sources.

  2. Alkali metal/sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Joginder N.

    1978-01-01

    Alkali metal/sulfur batteries in which the electrolyte-separator is a relatively fragile membrane are improved by providing means for separating the molten sulfur/sulfide catholyte from contact with the membrane prior to cooling the cell to temperatures at which the catholyte will solidify. If the catholyte is permitted to solidify while in contact with the membrane, the latter may be damaged. The improvement permits such batteries to be prefilled with catholyte and shipped, at ordinary temperatures.

  3. Classical dynamics and localization of resonances in the high-energy region of the hydrogen atom in crossed fields.

    PubMed

    Schweiner, Frank; Main, Jörg; Cartarius, Holger; Wunner, Günter

    2015-01-01

    When superimposing the potentials of external fields on the Coulomb potential of the hydrogen atom, a saddle point (called the Stark saddle point) appears. For energies slightly above the saddle point energy, one can find classical orbits that are located in the vicinity of this point. We follow those so-called quasi-Penning orbits to high energies and field strengths, observing structural changes and uncovering their bifurcation behavior. By plotting the stability behavior of those orbits against energy and field strength, the appearance of a stability apex is reported. A cusp bifurcation, located in the vicinity of the apex, will be investigated in detail. In this cusp bifurcation, another orbit of similar shape is found. This orbit becomes completely stable in the observed region of positive energy, i.e., in a region of parameter space, where the Kepler-like orbits located around the nucleus are already unstable. By quantum mechanically exact calculations, we prove the existence of signatures in quantum spectra belonging to those orbits. Husimi distributions are used to compare quantum-Poincaré sections with the extension of the classical torus structure around the orbits. Since periodic orbit theory predicts that each classical periodic orbit contributes an oscillating term to photoabsorption spectra, we finally give an estimation for future experiments, which could verify the existence of the stable orbits.

  4. Alkali metal cation-hexacyclen complexes: effects of alkali metal cation size on the structure and binding energy.

    PubMed

    Austin, C A; Rodgers, M T

    2014-07-24

    Threshold collision-induced dissociation (CID) of alkali metal cation-hexacyclen (ha18C6) complexes, M(+)(ha18C6), with xenon is studied using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry techniques. The alkali metal cations examined here include: Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+). In all cases, M(+) is the only product observed, corresponding to endothermic loss of the intact ha18C6 ligand. The cross-section thresholds are analyzed to extract zero and 298 K M(+)-ha18C6 bond dissociation energies (BDEs) after properly accounting for the effects of multiple M(+)(ha18C6)-Xe collisions, the kinetic and internal energy distributions of the M(+)(ha18C6) and Xe reactants, and the lifetimes for dissociation of the activated M(+)(ha18C6) complexes. Ab initio and density functional theory calculations are used to determine the structures of ha18C6 and the M(+)(ha18C6) complexes, provide molecular constants necessary for the thermodynamic analysis of the energy-resolved CID data, and theoretical estimates for the M(+)-ha18C6 BDEs. Calculations using a polarizable continuum model are also performed to examine solvent effects on the binding. In the absence of solvent, the M(+)-ha18C6 BDEs decrease as the size of the alkali metal cation increases, consistent with the noncovalent nature of the binding in these complexes. However, in the presence of solvent, the ha18C6 ligand exhibits selectivity for K(+) over the other alkali metal cations. The M(+)(ha18C6) structures and BDEs are compared to those previously reported for the analogous M(+)(18-crown-6) and M(+)(cyclen) complexes to examine the effects of the nature of the donor atom (N versus O) and the number donor atoms (six vs four) on the nature and strength of binding.

  5. Atomic vapor cells for chip-scale atomic clocks with improved long-term frequency stability.

    PubMed

    Knappe, S; Gerginov, V; Schwindt, P D D; Shah, V; Robinson, H G; Hollberg, L; Kitching, J

    2005-09-15

    A novel technique for microfabricating alkali atom vapor cells is described in which alkali atoms are evaporated into a micromachined cell cavity through a glass nozzle. A cell of interior volume 1 mm3, containing 87Rb and a buffer gas, was made in this way and integrated into an atomic clock based on coherent population trapping. A fractional frequency instability of 6 x 10(-12) at 1000 s of integration was measured. The long-term drift of the F=1, mF=0-->F=2, mF=0 hyperfine frequency of atoms in these cells is below 5 x 10(-11)/day.

  6. Rydberg States of rb and cs Atoms on Helium Nanodroplets: a Rydberg-Ritz Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackner, Florian; Krois, Gunter; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2013-06-01

    Rydberg series of Rb and Cs atoms on the surface of helium nanodroplets (He_{N}) have been studied by resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The recorded excitation spectra are analyzed by using a Rydberg-Ritz approach. The dependence of the quantum defects on the principal quantum number within a Rydberg series gives insight into the interaction between the alkali atom's valence electron and the superfluid helium droplet. For higher excited states a screening of the valence electron from the alkali atom core by the helium droplet is observed. For lower states the strength of the screening effect decreases and the quantum defects are found to lie closer to free atom values. In addition, the large spin-orbit (SO) constant of the Cs-He_{N} nP(^{2}Π) states allows a detailed study of the influence of the helium droplet on the SO splitting as function of the principal quantum number. Within the pseudo-diatomic picture the alkali-He_{N} system represents a diatomic molecule. The coupling of the Cs valence electrons spin and the orbital angular momentum with the intermolecular axis, which is defined by the connection between the droplet center and the alkali nucleus, depends on the strength of the atomic SO interaction. While the splitting of the 6^{2}P_{1/2}(^{2}Π_{1/2}) and 6^{2}P_{3/2}(^{2}Π_{3/2}) components has an atom-like character (Hund's case (c) coupling), the SO splitting of higher n states is lower than the atomic value (Hund's case (a) coupling). C. Callegari and W. E. Ernst, Helium Droplets as Nanocryostats for Molecular Spectroscopy - from the Vacuum Ultraviolet to the Microwave Regime, in: Handbook of High-Resolution Spectroscopy, eds. M. Quack and F. Merkt, John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, (2011) F. Lackner, G. Krois, M. Theisen, M. Koch, and W.E. Ernst, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 13, 18781-18788 (2011) F. Lackner, G. Krois, and W.E. Ernst, J. Phys. Chem. Lett., 3, 1404-1408 (2012)

  7. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  8. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1991-01-22

    This invention relates to a regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor 5 concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC 10 exhaust gases.

  9. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  10. Solvation structure and transport properties of alkali cations in dimethyl sulfoxide under exogenous static electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien; Vijayakumar, M. E-mail: karl.mueller@pnnl.gov; Han, Kee Sung; Mueller, Karl T. E-mail: karl.mueller@pnnl.gov

    2015-06-14

    A combination of molecular dynamics simulations and pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to investigate the role of exogenous electric fields on the solvation structure and dynamics of alkali ions in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and as a function of temperature. Good agreement was obtained, for select alkali ions in the absence of an electric field, between calculated and experimentally determined diffusion coefficients normalized to that of pure DMSO. Our results indicate that temperatures of up to 400 K and external electric fields of up to 1 V nm{sup −1} have minimal effects on the solvation structure of the smaller alkali cations (Li{sup +} and Na{sup +}) due to their relatively strong ion-solvent interactions, whereas the solvation structures of the larger alkali cations (K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, and Cs{sup +}) are significantly affected. In addition, although the DMSO exchange dynamics in the first solvation shell differ markedly for the two groups, the drift velocities and mobilities are not significantly affected by the nature of the alkali ion. Overall, although exogenous electric fields induce a drift displacement, their presence does not significantly affect the random diffusive displacement of the alkali ions in DMSO. System temperature is found to have generally a stronger influence on dynamical properties, such as the DMSO exchange dynamics and the ion mobilities, than the presence of electric fields.

  11. Note: An ion source for alkali metal implantation beneath graphene and hexagonal boron nitride monolayers on transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, L. H. de; Cun, H. Y.; Hemmi, A.; Kälin, T.; Greber, T.

    2013-12-15

    The construction of an alkali-metal ion source is presented. It allows the acceleration of rubidium ions to an energy that enables the penetration through monolayers of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. Rb atoms are sublimated from an alkali-metal dispenser. The ionization is obtained by surface ionization and desorption from a hot high work function surface. The ion current is easily controlled by the temperature of ionizer. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy measurements confirm ion implantation.

  12. Alkali Metal Variation and Twisting of the FeNNFe Core in Bridging Diiron Dinitrogen Complexes.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Sean F; Rodgers, Kenton R; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun; Mercado, Brandon Q; Grubel, Katarzyna; Holland, Patrick L

    2016-03-21

    Alkali metal cations can interact with Fe-N2 complexes, potentially enhancing back-bonding or influencing the geometry of the iron atom. These influences are relevant to large-scale N2 reduction by iron, such as in the FeMoco of nitrogenase and the alkali-promoted Haber-Bosch process. However, to our knowledge there have been no systematic studies of a large range of alkali metals regarding their influence on transition metal-dinitrogen complexes. In this work, we varied the alkali metal in [alkali cation]2[LFeNNFeL] complexes (L = bulky β-diketiminate ligand) through the size range from Na(+) to K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+). The FeNNFe cores have similar Fe-N and N-N distances and N-N stretching frequencies despite the drastic change in alkali metal cation size. The two diketiminates twist relative to one another, with larger dihedral angles accommodating the larger cations. In order to explain why the twisting has so little influence on the core, we performed density functional theory calculations on a simplified LFeNNFeL model, which show that the two metals surprisingly do not compete for back-bonding to the same π* orbital of N2, even when the ligand planes are parallel. This diiron system can tolerate distortion of the ligand planes through compensating orbital energy changes, and thus, a range of ligand orientations can give very similar energies.

  13. Design strategies for development of SCR catalyst: improvement of alkali poisoning resistance and novel regeneration method.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yue; Li, Junhua; Shi, Wenbo; Xu, Jiayu; Hao, Jiming

    2012-11-20

    Based on the ideas of the additives modification and regeneration method update, two different strategies were designed to deal with the traditional SCR catalyst poisoned by alkali metals. First, ceria doping on the V(2)O(5)-WO(3)/TiO(2) catalyst could promote the SCR performance even reducing the V loading, which resulted in the enhancement of the catalyst's alkali poisoning resistance. Then, a novel method, electrophoresis treatment, was employed to regenerate the alkali poisoned V(2)O(5)-WO(3)/TiO(2) catalyst. This novel technique could dramatically enhance the SCR activities of the alkali poisoned catalysts by removing approximately 95% K or Na ions from the catalyst and showed less hazardous to the environment. Finally, the deactivation mechanisms by the alkali metals were extensively studied by employing both the experimental and DFT theoretical approaches. Alkali atom mainly influences the active site V species rather than W oxides. The decrease of catalyst surface acidity might directly reduce the catalytic activity, while the reducibility of catalysts could be another important factor.

  14. Alkali Metal Variation and Twisting of the FeNNFe Core in Bridging Diiron Dinitrogen Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Alkali metal cations can interact with Fe–N2 complexes, potentially enhancing back-bonding or influencing the geometry of the iron atom. These influences are relevant to large-scale N2 reduction by iron, such as in the FeMoco of nitrogenase and the alkali-promoted Haber–Bosch process. However, to our knowledge there have been no systematic studies of a large range of alkali metals regarding their influence on transition metal–dinitrogen complexes. In this work, we varied the alkali metal in [alkali cation]2[LFeNNFeL] complexes (L = bulky β-diketiminate ligand) through the size range from Na+ to K+, Rb+, and Cs+. The FeNNFe cores have similar Fe–N and N–N distances and N–N stretching frequencies despite the drastic change in alkali metal cation size. The two diketiminates twist relative to one another, with larger dihedral angles accommodating the larger cations. In order to explain why the twisting has so little influence on the core, we performed density functional theory calculations on a simplified LFeNNFeL model, which show that the two metals surprisingly do not compete for back-bonding to the same π* orbital of N2, even when the ligand planes are parallel. This diiron system can tolerate distortion of the ligand planes through compensating orbital energy changes, and thus, a range of ligand orientations can give very similar energies. PMID:26925968

  15. Linear-scaling method for calculating nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts using gauge-including atomic orbitals within Hartree-Fock and density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Kussmann, Jörg; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2007-08-07

    Details of a new density matrix-based formulation for calculating nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts at both Hartree-Fock and density functional theory levels are presented. For systems with a nonvanishing highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital gap, the method allows us to reduce the asymptotic scaling order of the computational effort from cubic to linear, so that molecular systems with 1000 and more atoms can be tackled with today's computers. The key feature is a reformulation of the coupled-perturbed self-consistent field (CPSCF) theory in terms of the one-particle density matrix (D-CPSCF), which avoids entirely the use of canonical MOs. By means of a direct solution for the required perturbed density matrices and the adaptation of linear-scaling integral contraction schemes, the overall scaling of the computational effort is reduced to linear. A particular focus of our formulation is to ensure numerical stability when sparse-algebra routines are used to obtain an overall linear-scaling behavior.

  16. Observation of the 5 p3 /2→6 p3 /2 electric-dipole-forbidden transition in atomic rubidium using optical-optical double-resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponciano-Ojeda, F.; Hernández-Gómez, S.; López-Hernández, O.; Mojica-Casique, C.; Colín-Rodríguez, R.; Ramírez-Martínez, F.; Flores-Mijangos, J.; Sahagún, D.; Jáuregui, R.; Jiménez-Mier, J.

    2015-10-01

    Direct evidence of excitation of the 5 p3 /2→6 p3 /2 electric-dipole-forbidden transition in atomic rubidium is presented. The experiments were performed in a room-temperature rubidium cell with continuous-wave external cavity diode lasers. Optical-optical double-resonance spectroscopy with counterpropagating beams allows the detection of the nondipole transition free of Doppler broadening. The 5 p3 /2 state is prepared by excitation with a laser locked to the maximum F cyclic transition of the D2 line, and the forbidden transition is produced by excitation with a 911 nm laser. Production of the forbidden transition is monitored by detection of the 420 nm fluorescence that results from decay of the 6 p3 /2 state. Spectra with three narrow lines (≈13 MHz FWHM) with the characteristic F -1 , F , and F +1 splitting of the 6 p3 /2 hyperfine structure in both rubidium isotopes were obtained. The results are in very good agreement with a direct calculation that takes into account the 5 s →5 p3 /2 preparation dynamics, the 5 p3 /2→6 p3 /2 nondipole excitation geometry, and the 6 p3 /2→5 s1 /2 decay. The comparison also shows that the electric-dipole-forbidden transition is a very sensitive probe of the preparation dynamics.

  17. Phonon spectra of alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeković, S.; Vukajlović, F.; Veljković, V.

    1982-10-01

    In this work we used a simple local model pseudopotential which includes screening for the phonon spectra calculations of alkali metals. The results obtained are in very good agreement with experimental data. In some branches of phonon spectra the differences between theoretical and experimental results are within 1-2%, while the maximum error is about 6%. The suggested form of the pseudopotential allows us to describe the phonon spectra of Na, K and Rb with only one, and, at the same time, a unique, parameter. In this case, the maximum disagreements from experiment are 9% for Na, 8% for K and 7% for Rb.

  18. Bioinorganic Chemistry of the Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsam; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien T; Churchill, David G

    2016-01-01

    The common Group 1 alkali metals are indeed ubiquitous on earth, in the oceans and in biological systems. In this introductory chapter, concepts involving aqueous chemistry and aspects of general coordination chemistry and oxygen atom donor chemistry are introduced. Also, there are nuclear isotopes of importance. A general discussion of Group 1 begins from the prevalence of the ions, and from a comparison of their ionic radii and ionization energies. While oxygen and water molecule binding have the most relevance to biology and in forming a detailed understanding between the elements, there is a wide range of basic chemistry that is potentially important, especially with respect to biological chelation and synthetic multi-dentate ligand design. The elements are widely distributed in life forms, in the terrestrial environment and in the oceans. The details about the workings in animal, as well as plant life are presented in this volume. Important biometallic aspects of human health and medicine are introduced as well. Seeing as the elements are widely present in biology, various particular endogenous molecules and enzymatic systems can be studied. Sodium and potassium are by far the most important and central elements for consideration. Aspects of lithium, rubidium, cesium and francium chemistry are also included; they help in making important comparisons related to the coordination chemistry of Na(+) and K(+). Physical methods are also introduced.

  19. Process for the disposal of alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Leroy C.

    1977-01-01

    Large quantities of alkali metals may be safely reacted for ultimate disposal by contact with a hot concentrated caustic solution. The alkali metals react with water in the caustic solution in a controlled reaction while steam dilutes the hydrogen formed by the reaction to a safe level.

  20. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C.

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.