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Sample records for alkali atoms sims

  1. Positron-alkali atom scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.; Ward, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron-alkali atom scattering was recently investigated both theoretically and experimentally in the energy range from a few eV up to 100 eV. On the theoretical side calculations of the integrated elastic and excitation cross sections as well as total cross sections for Li, Na and K were based upon either the close-coupling method or the modified Glauber approximation. These theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the total cross section for both Na and K. Resonance structures were also found in the L = 0, 1 and 2 partial waves for positron scattering from the alkalis. The structure of these resonances appears to be quite complex and, as expected, they occur in conjunction with the atomic excitation thresholds. Currently both theoretical and experimental work is in progress on positron-Rb scattering in the same energy range.

  2. Quantum magnetism of alkali Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovskaya, Svetlana; Liu, Gengyuan

    2016-05-01

    We discuss a method to control dynamics in many-body spin states of 87Rb Rydberg atoms. The method permits excitation of cold gases and form ordered structures of alkali atoms. It makes use of a two-photon excitation scheme with circularly polarized and linearly chirped pulses. The method aims for controlled quantum state preparation in large ensembles. It is actual for experiments studding the spin hopping dynamics and realization of quantum random walks.

  3. Developments in alkali-metal atomic magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltzer, Scott Jeffrey

    Alkali-metal magnetometers use the coherent precession of polarized atomic spins to detect and measure magnetic fields. Recent advances have enabled magnetometers to become competitive with SQUIDs as the most sensitive magnetic field detectors, and they now find use in a variety of areas ranging from medicine and NMR to explosives detection and fundamental physics research. In this thesis we discuss several developments in alkali-metal atomic magnetometry for both practical and fundamental applications. We present a new method of polarizing the alkali atoms by modulating the optical pumping rate at both the linear and quadratic Zeeman resonance frequencies. We demonstrate experimentally that this method enhances the sensitivity of a potassium magnetometer operating in the Earth's field by a factor of 4, and we calculate that it can reduce the orientation-dependent heading error to less than 0.1 nT. We discuss a radio-frequency magnetometer for detection of oscillating magnetic fields with sensitivity better than 0.2 fT/ Hz , which we apply to the observation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals from polarized water, as well as nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signals from ammonium nitrate. We demonstrate that a spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer can measure all three vector components of the magnetic field in an unshielded environment with comparable sensitivity to other devices. We find that octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) acts as an anti-relaxation coating for alkali atoms at temperatures below 170°C, allowing them to collide with a glass surface up to 2,000 times before depolarizing, and we present the first demonstration of high-temperature magnetometry with a coated cell. We also describe a reusable alkali vapor cell intended for the study of interactions between alkali atoms and surface coatings. Finally, we explore the use of a cesium-xenon SERF comagnetometer for a proposed measurement of the permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs

  4. New Atomic Ion SIMS Facility at the Naval Research Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, K. S.; Fazel, K. C.; Fahey, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mass spectrometry of particulates and few micrometer regions of samples by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is a very useful analytical tool. However, there are limitations caused by interferences from molecular species, such as hydrides, oxides, and carbides. Above mass 90 u, these interferences (> 104 M/ΔM) can exceed the resolving power of SIMS. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is capable of eliminating such molecular ion interferences, but lacks spatial information and generally requires use of negative ions. This requirement limits its sensitivity, since actinide and lanthanide elements preferentially generate positive atomic ions (~104 : 1). The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has installed a hybrid SIMS-AMS system, using a Single Stage AMS as a replacement for the normal Cameca IMS 4f SIMS electron multiplier detector. The NRL design enables analysis of either positive or negative ions. Thus, this system offers the potential to provide SIMS-like particle and micro-scale analysis without a forest of signals from molecular species, and is capable of measuring important positive atomic ions. This should improve measurement sensitivity and precision to determine isotopic distributions of actinides, lanthanides, and transition metals; and elemental abundances of trace species in particles or small features. Initial measurements show that molecule intensities can be reduced by seven orders of magnitude while atomic ion intensities are only diminished ~50%. We have chosen to call this instrument an atomic ion SIMS, or ai-SIMS, for short. The effect of basic operational parameters such as ion energy, charge state, molecule destruction gas and its pressure will be described, and examples of the benefits and capabilities of ai-SIMS will be presented.

  5. Cold collisions of alkali-metal atoms and chromium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeung, G.-H.; Hagebaum-Reignier, D.; Jamieson, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    We present ab initio potentials for ground state lithium, sodium, potassium and rubidium atoms interacting with ground state chromium atoms via the 6Σ+ and 8Σ+ states of the corresponding dimers. Each potential is matched to the leading van der Waals dispersion energy -C6/R6 - C8/R8 and an exchange energy; we list the values of C6, C8 and the exchange fitting parameters. We present calculated values from quantal and semi-classical approximations for the s-wave scattering length and effective range and the p-wave scattering volume for collisions of each of the alkali-metal atoms lithium, sodium, potassium and rubidium with 52chromium atoms and comment on s-wave scattering by 53chromium atoms.

  6. Hall Determination of Atomic Radii of Alkali Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    I will propose here an alternative method for determining atomic radii of alkali metals based on the Hall measurements of their free electron densities and the knowledge of their crystal structure. (Contains 2 figures.)

  7. Static SIMS Analysis of Carbonate on Basic Alkali-bearing Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, Gary Steven; Gianotto, Anita Kay; Cortez, Marnie Michelle; Appelhans, Anthony David; Olsen, J.E.; Shaw, A. D.; Karahan, C.; Avci, R.

    2003-02-01

    Carbonate is a somewhat enigmatic anion in static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) because abundant ions containing intact CO32- are not detected when analyzing alkaline-earth carbonate minerals common to the geochemical environment. In contrast, carbonate can be observed as an adduct ion when it is bound with alkali cations. In this study, carbonate was detected as the adduct Na2CO3·Na+ in the spectra of sodium carbonate, bicarbonate, hydroxide, oxalate, formate and nitrite and to a lesser extent nitrate. The appearance of the adduct Na2CO3·Na+ on hydroxide, oxalate, formate and nitrite surfaces was interpreted in terms of these basic surfaces fixing CO2 from the ambient atmosphere. The low abundance of Na2CO3·Na+ in the static SIMS spectrum of sodium nitrate, compared with a significantly higher abundance in salts having stronger conjugate bases, suggested that the basicity of the conjugate anions correlated with aggressive CO2 fixation; however, the appearance of Na2CO3·Na+ could not be explained simply in terms of solution basicity constants. The oxide molecular ion Na2O+ and adducts NaOH·Na+ and Na2O·Na+ also constituted part of the carbonate spectral signature, and were observed in spectra from all the salts studied. In addition to the carbonate and oxide ions, a low-abundance oxalate ion series was observed that had the general formula Na2-xHxC2O4·Na+, where 0 < x < 2. Oxalate adsorption from the laboratory atmosphere was demonstrated but the oxalate ion series also was likely to be formed from reductive coupling occurring during the static SIMS bombardment event. The remarkable spectral similarity observed when comparing the sodium salts indicated that their surfaces shared common chemical speciation and that the chemistry of the surfaces was very different from the bulk of the particle. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Orbital Feshbach Resonance in Alkali-Earth Atoms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ren; Cheng, Yanting; Zhai, Hui; Zhang, Peng

    2015-09-25

    For a mixture of alkali-earth atomic gas in the long-lived excited state ^{3}P_{0} and the ground state ^{1}S_{0}, in addition to nuclear spin, another "orbital" index is introduced to distinguish these two internal states. In this Letter we propose a mechanism to induce Feshbach resonance between two atoms with different orbital and nuclear spin quantum numbers. Two essential ingredients are the interorbital spin-exchange process and orbital dependence of the Landé g factors. Here the orbital degrees of freedom plays a similar role as the electron spin degree of freedom in magnetic Feshbach resonance in alkali-metal atoms. This resonance is particularly accessible for the ^{173}Yb system. The BCS-BEC crossover in this system requires two fermion pairing order parameters, and displays a significant difference compared to that in an alkali-metal system. PMID:26451561

  9. Orbital Feshbach Resonance in Alkali-Earth Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ren; Cheng, Yanting; Zhai, Hui; Zhang, Peng

    2015-09-01

    For a mixture of alkali-earth atomic gas in the long-lived excited state 3P0 and the ground state 1S0, in addition to nuclear spin, another "orbital" index is introduced to distinguish these two internal states. In this Letter we propose a mechanism to induce Feshbach resonance between two atoms with different orbital and nuclear spin quantum numbers. Two essential ingredients are the interorbital spin-exchange process and orbital dependence of the Landé g factors. Here the orbital degrees of freedom plays a similar role as the electron spin degree of freedom in magnetic Feshbach resonance in alkali-metal atoms. This resonance is particularly accessible for the 173Yb system. The BCS-BEC crossover in this system requires two fermion pairing order parameters, and displays a significant difference compared to that in an alkali-metal system.

  10. Precision optical metrology with alkali-atom isoclinic points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Nathan; Driskell, Travis; Camparo, James

    2016-06-01

    Vapour-phase spectroscopy rarely involves transitions between well-isolated atomic states. Routinely, the spectra comprise overlapped Doppler/pressure-broadened resonances, which leads to a “pulling” of the spectral peaks from their true atomic resonance frequencies. This pulling gives the absorption resonances a temperature sensitivity, which limits their utility for precision spectroscopy when sub-Doppler techniques are not viable. Here, we discuss the use of alkali isoclinic points as a solution to this problem.

  11. Polarizability measurements of the alkalis using an atom interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hromada, Ivan; Holmgren, William; Trubko, Raisa; Ronan, Joseph; Cronin, Alexander

    2011-10-01

    We discuss our latest static DC polarizability measurements of the alkalis: Li through Cs. Our Mach-Zehnder atom interferometer uses nanogratings to diffract and recombine any atom or molecular beam. Because we use the same machine to measure polarizability of different atoms, we are able to report polarizability ratios (e.g., αNa/αLi) with 0.1% precision. To achieve this precision, we also describe a novel technique called phase chopping to measure the atom beam velocity with 0.05% precision.

  12. Absence of neutral alkali atoms in rhodizite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnay, G.; Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Sioda, R.

    1966-01-01

    The formula CsB12Be4Al4O28 has been proposed by others for the mineral rhodizite. Electron-spin-resonance and magnetic susceptibility measurements prove the absence of neutral cesium atoms. An ionic formula CsB11Be4Al4O 26(OH)2is proposed.

  13. Optical response of alkali metal atoms confined in nanoporous glass

    SciTech Connect

    Burchianti, A; Marinelli, C; Mariotti, E; Bogi, A; Marmugi, L; Giomi, S; Maccari, M; Veronesi, S; Moi, L

    2014-03-28

    We study the influence of optical radiation on adsorption and desorption processes of alkali metal atoms confined in nanoporous glass matrices. Exposure of the sample to near-IR or visible light changes the atomic distribution inside the glass nanopores, forcing the entire system to evolve towards a different state. This effect, due to both atomic photodesorption and confinement, causes the growth and evaporation of metastable nanoparticles. It is shown that, by a proper choice of light characteristics and pore size, these processes can be controlled and tailored, thus opening new perspectives for fabrication of nanostructured surfaces. (nanoobjects)

  14. Scattering of positrons and electrons by alkali atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. S.; Kauppila, W. E.; Kwan, C. K.; Lukaszew, R. A.; Parikh, S. P.; Wan, Y. J.; Zhou, S.; Dababneh, M. S.

    1990-01-01

    Absolute total scattering cross sections (Q sub T's) were measured for positrons and electrons colliding with sodium, potassium, and rubidium in the 1 to 102 eV range, using the same apparatus and experimental approach (a beam transmission technique) for both projectiles. The present results for positron-sodium and -rubidium collisions represent the first Q sub T measurements reported for these collision systems. Features which distinguish the present comparisons between positron- and electron-alkali atom Q sub T's from those for other atoms and molecules (room-temperature gases) which have been used as targets for positrons and electrons are the proximity of the corresponding positron- and electron-alkali atom Q sub T's over the entire energy range of overlap, with an indication of a merging or near-merging of the corresponding positron and electron Q sub T's near (and above) the relatively low energy of about 40 eV, and a general tendency for the positron-alkali atom Q sub T's to be higher than the corresponding electron values as the projectile energy is decreased below about 40 eV.

  15. Electron Densities and Alkali Atoms in Exoplanet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavvas, P.; Koskinen, T.; Yelle, R. V.

    2014-11-01

    We describe a detailed study on the properties of alkali atoms in extrasolar giant planets, and specifically focus on their role in generating the atmospheric free electron densities, as well as their impact on the transit depth observations. We focus our study on the case of HD 209458b, and we show that photoionization produces a large electron density in the middle atmosphere that is about two orders of magnitude larger than the density anticipated from thermal ionization. Our purely photochemical calculations, though, result in a much larger transit depth for K than observed for this planet. This result does not change even if the roles of molecular chemistry and excited state chemistry are considered for the alkali atoms. In contrast, the model results for the case of exoplanet XO-2b are in good agreement with the available observations. Given these results we discuss other possible scenarios, such as changes in the elemental abundances, changes in the temperature profiles, and the possible presence of clouds, which could potentially explain the observed HD 209458b alkali properties. We find that most of these scenarios cannot explain the observations, with the exception of a heterogeneous source (i.e., clouds or aerosols) under specific conditions, but we also note the discrepancies among the available observations.

  16. Electron densities and alkali atoms in exoplanet atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Lavvas, P.; Koskinen, T.; Yelle, R. V.

    2014-11-20

    We describe a detailed study on the properties of alkali atoms in extrasolar giant planets, and specifically focus on their role in generating the atmospheric free electron densities, as well as their impact on the transit depth observations. We focus our study on the case of HD 209458b, and we show that photoionization produces a large electron density in the middle atmosphere that is about two orders of magnitude larger than the density anticipated from thermal ionization. Our purely photochemical calculations, though, result in a much larger transit depth for K than observed for this planet. This result does not change even if the roles of molecular chemistry and excited state chemistry are considered for the alkali atoms. In contrast, the model results for the case of exoplanet XO-2b are in good agreement with the available observations. Given these results we discuss other possible scenarios, such as changes in the elemental abundances, changes in the temperature profiles, and the possible presence of clouds, which could potentially explain the observed HD 209458b alkali properties. We find that most of these scenarios cannot explain the observations, with the exception of a heterogeneous source (i.e., clouds or aerosols) under specific conditions, but we also note the discrepancies among the available observations.

  17. Coherent coupling of alkali atoms by random collisions.

    PubMed

    Katz, Or; Peleg, Or; Firstenberg, Ofer

    2015-09-11

    Random spin-exchange collisions in warm alkali vapor cause rapid decoherence and act to equilibrate the spin state of the atoms in the vapor. In contrast, here we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically a coherent coupling of one alkali species to another species, mediated by these random collisions. We show that the minor species (potassium) inherits the magnetic properties of the dominant species (rubidium), including its lifetime (T_{1}), coherence time (T_{2}), gyromagnetic ratio, and spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetic-field threshold. We further show that this coupling can be completely controlled by varying the strength of the magnetic field. Finally, we explain these phenomena analytically by mode mixing of the two species via spin-exchange collisions. PMID:26406827

  18. Nonlinear pressure shifts of alkali-metal atoms in xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuyer, Bart; Xia, Tian; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2011-05-01

    Compact, portable atomic frequency standards are based on the microwave resonance frequencies of alkali-metal atoms in inert buffer gases. The frequency shift of these resonances due to collisions with the buffer gas is known as the pressure shift. We demonstrate that the microwave resonance frequencies of ground-state 87Rb and 133Cs atoms have a nonlinear dependence on the pressure of the buffer gas Xe. Previous work has demonstrated a nonlinear dependence in Ar and Kr, but not He and N2, which is thought to be due to the loosely-bound van der Waals molecules that are known to form between alkali-metal and buffer-gas atoms in Ar, Kr, and Xe, but not He and N2. Surprisingly, we find that the nonlinearities in Xe are of the opposite sign to those in Ar and Kr, even though the overall shifts for each of these gases are negative. This discrepancy suggests that though the shifts due to the molecules in Ar and Kr are positive, the shifts due to the molecules in Xe are negative. No nonlinearities were observed in the buffer gas Ne to within our experimental accuracy, which suggests that molecules do not form in Ne. Additionally, we present improved measurements of the shifts of Rb and Cs in He and N2 and of Rb in Ar and Kr. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the Department of Defense through the NDSEG program.

  19. The reaction dynamics of alkali dimer molecules and electronically excited alkali atoms with simple molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, H.

    1995-12-01

    This dissertation presents the results from the crossed molecular beam studies on the dynamics of bimolecular collisions in the gas phase. The primary subjects include the interactions of alkali dimer molecules with simple molecules, and the inelastic scattering of electronically excited alkali atoms with O2. The reaction of the sodium dimers with oxygen molecules is described in Chapter 2. Two reaction pathways were observed for this four-center molecule-molecule reaction, i.e. the formations of NaO2 + Na and NaO + NaO. NaO2 products exhibit a very anisotropic angular distribution, indicating a direct spectator stripping mechanism for this reaction channel. The NaO formation follows the bond breaking of O2, which is likely a result of a charge transfer from Na2 to the excited state orbital of O2-. The scattering of sodium dimers from ammonium and methanol produced novel molecules, NaNH3 and Na(CH3OH), respectively. These experimental observations, as well as the discussions on the reaction dynamics and the chemical bonding within these molecules, will be presented in Chapter 3. The lower limits for the bond dissociation energies of these molecules are also obtained. Finally, Chapter 4 describes the energy transfer between oxygen molecules and electronically excited sodium atoms.

  20. Alkali--rare gas photodissociation lasers: Applications to laser physics and atom-atom interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, John Darby

    This dissertation describes several experiments in which alkali--rare gas laser systems are utilized as a simple platform with which to isolate and study atom-atom interactions and fundamental physical processes that are ill-understood or have never been investigated previously. Specifically, the minimum allowable energy separation between levels 2 and 3 in a three-level laser system has been investigated experimentally, as have two-photon absorption processes in atomic Rb and Cs.

  1. Sputter-induced erosion of alkali metal surfaces - AES, XPS and SIMS studies

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, A.R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper will discuss the manner in which the techniques of Auger-electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray-photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and ion-scattering spectroscopy (ISS) may be used to study the use of high secondary-ion-yield surfaces as a means of reducing plasma-impurity influx in magnetic-confinement fusion devices.

  2. Atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions for surface interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Outlaw, R. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base developed from analysis of the two-body potential data, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas surfaces and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  3. Generalized oscillator strengths and photoionization of alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwary, S. N.; Nicolaides, C. A.

    1984-10-01

    Calculations of the continuum generalized oscillator strengths (CGOS) for ns → kp dipole transitions as a function of the momentum transfer K and the photoionization cross sections σ nl of the light alkali-metal atoms (Li, Na and K, with n = 2, 3, 4 respectively) have been performed within the framework of the first Born approximation (FBA) and the Vainshtein approximation (VPSA) employing Hartree-Fock (HF) wave functions. Also the influence of core-polarization is examined. Our present results exhibit the existence of the minimum and the maximum in the CGOS curve, the Cooper minimum in the σ nl curves of Na and K, the important role of core-polarization and finally, the dependence of the VPSA CGOS on the incident energy.

  4. Interactions and low-energy collisions between an alkali ion and an alkali atom of a different nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, Arpita; Ghanmi, Chedli; Berriche, Hamid; Deb, Bimalendu

    2016-05-01

    We study theoretically interaction potentials and low-energy collisions between different alkali atoms and alkali ions. Specifically, we consider systems such as X + {{{Y}}}+, where X({{{Y}}}+) is either Li(Cs+) or Cs(Li+), Na(Cs+) or Cs(Na+) and Li(Rb+) or Rb(Li+). We calculate the molecular potentials of the ground and first two excited states of these three systems using a pseudopotential method and compare our results with those obtained by others. We derive ground-state scattering wave functions and analyze the cold collisional properties of these systems for a wide range of energies. We find that, in order to get convergent results for the total scattering cross sections for energies of the order 1 K, one needs to take into account at least 60 partial waves. The low-energy scattering properties calculated in this paper may serve as a precursor for experimental exploration of quantum collisions between an alkali atom and an alkali ion of a different nucleus.

  5. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Pressure Broadened Alkali-Metal Atom Resonance Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindo, F.; Zhu, C.; Kirby, K.; Babb, J. F.

    2006-01-01

    We are carrying out a joint theoretical and experimental research program to study the broadening of alkali atom resonance lines due to collisions with helium and molecular hydrogen for applications to spectroscopic studies of brown dwarfs and extrasolar giant planets.

  6. Electronic and nuclear dynamics in the frustrated photodesorption of alkali atoms from metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petek, Hrvoje

    2001-03-01

    Electronic and nuclear dynamics of alkali atom covered noble metal surfaces are investigated by the interferometric time-resolved two-photon photoemission technique [1]. Photoinduced charge transfer turns on the repulsive Coulomb force between the alkali atom and the metal surface thereby initiating the expulsion of alkali atoms from the surface. The resulting nuclear motion of alkali atoms is detected through changes in the surface electronic structure. In the extreme case of Cs/Cu(111), the alkali atom motion can be observed for up to 200 fs, which according to a Newton’s law model corresponds to the stretching of the Cu-Cs bond by 0.3 Å [2]. However, wave packet spreading due to the recoil-induced phonon generation retards the desorption process. Systematic dependence of the alkali atom lifetime on the crystal face, the substrate material, and the adsorbate polarizability provides insights into factors that stabilize adsorbates with respect to decay via the resonant charge transfer and inelastic electron-electron scattering [3]. 1 S. Ogawa, H. Nagano, and H. Petek, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 1931 (1999). 2 H. Petek, H. Nagano, M. J. Weida, and S. Ogawa, Science 288, 1402 (2000). 3 J. P. Gauyacq et al., Faraday Discuss. Chem. Soc. 117 (2000).

  7. Analysis of the physical atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions and halogen ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Outlaw, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The physical forces between atoms and molecules are important in a number of processes of practical importance, including line broadening in radiative processes, gas and crystal properties, adhesion, and thin films. The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base for the dispersion forces is developed from the literature based on evaluations with the harmonic oscillator dispersion model for higher order coefficients. The Zener model of the repulsive core is used in the context of the recent asymptotic wave functions of Handler and Smith; and an effective ionization potential within the Handler and Smith wave functions is defined to analyze the two body potential data of Waldman and Gordon, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  8. Refined potentials for rare gas atom adsorption on rare gas and alkali-halide surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Outlaw, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The utilization of models of interatomic potential for physical interaction to estimate the long range attractive potential for rare gases and ions is discussed. The long range attractive force is calculated in terms of the atomic dispersion properties. A data base of atomic dispersion parameters for rare gas atoms, alkali ion, and halogen ions is applied to the study of the repulsive core; the procedure for evaluating the repulsive core of ion interactions is described. The interaction of rare gas atoms on ideal rare gas solid and alkali-halide surfaces is analyzed; zero coverage absorption potentials are derived.

  9. Theory of magic optical traps for Zeeman-insensitive clock transitions in alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, Andrei

    2010-05-15

    Precision measurements and quantum-information processing with cold atoms may benefit from trapping atoms with specially engineered, 'magic' optical fields. At the magic trapping conditions, the relevant atomic properties remain immune to strong perturbations by the trapping fields. Here we develop a theoretical analysis of magic trapping for especially valuable Zeeman-insensitive clock transitions in alkali-metal atoms. The involved mechanism relies on applying a magic bias B field along a circularly polarized trapping laser field. We map out these B fields as a function of trapping laser wavelength for all commonly used alkalis. We also highlight a common error in evaluating Stark shifts of hyperfine manifolds.

  10. Communication: Angular momentum alignment and fluorescence polarization of alkali atoms photodetached from helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Hernando, Alberto; Beswick, J. Alberto; Halberstadt, Nadine

    2013-12-14

    The theory of photofragments angular momentum polarization is applied to the photodetachment of an electronically excited alkali atom from a helium nanocluster (N = 200). The alignment of the electronic angular momentum of the bare excited alkali atoms produced is calculated quantum mechanically by solving the excited states coupled equations with potentials determined by density functional theory (DFT). Pronounced oscillations as a function of excitation energy are predicted for the case of Na@(He){sub 200}, in marked contrast with the absorption cross-section and angular distribution of the ejected atoms which are smooth functions of the energy. These oscillations are due to quantum interference between different coherently excited photodetachment pathways. Experimentally, these oscillations should be reflected in the fluorescence polarization and polarization-resolved photoelectron yield of the ejected atoms, which are proportional to the electronic angular momentum alignment. In addition, this result is much more general than the test case of NaHe{sub 200} studied here. It should be observable for larger droplets, for higher excited electronic states, and for other alkali as well as for alkali-earth atoms. Detection of these oscillations would show that the widely used pseudo-diatomic model can be valid beyond the prediction of absorption spectra and could help in interpreting parts of the dynamics, as already hinted by some experimental results on angular anisotropy of bare alkali fragments.

  11. Communication: angular momentum alignment and fluorescence polarization of alkali atoms photodetached from helium nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Hernando, Alberto; Beswick, J Alberto; Halberstadt, Nadine

    2013-12-14

    The theory of photofragments angular momentum polarization is applied to the photodetachment of an electronically excited alkali atom from a helium nanocluster (N = 200). The alignment of the electronic angular momentum of the bare excited alkali atoms produced is calculated quantum mechanically by solving the excited states coupled equations with potentials determined by density functional theory (DFT). Pronounced oscillations as a function of excitation energy are predicted for the case of Na@(He)200, in marked contrast with the absorption cross-section and angular distribution of the ejected atoms which are smooth functions of the energy. These oscillations are due to quantum interference between different coherently excited photodetachment pathways. Experimentally, these oscillations should be reflected in the fluorescence polarization and polarization-resolved photoelectron yield of the ejected atoms, which are proportional to the electronic angular momentum alignment. In addition, this result is much more general than the test case of NaHe200 studied here. It should be observable for larger droplets, for higher excited electronic states, and for other alkali as well as for alkali-earth atoms. Detection of these oscillations would show that the widely used pseudo-diatomic model can be valid beyond the prediction of absorption spectra and could help in interpreting parts of the dynamics, as already hinted by some experimental results on angular anisotropy of bare alkali fragments. PMID:24329048

  12. First-principles study of ternary graphite compounds cointercalated with alkali atoms (Li, Na, and K) and alkylamines towards alkali ion battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ri, Gum-Chol; Yu, Chol-Jun; Kim, Jin-Song; Hong, Song-Nam; Jong, Un-Gi; Ri, Mun-Hyok

    2016-08-01

    First-principles calculations were carried out to investigate the structural, energetic, and electronic properties of ternary graphite compounds cointercalated with alkali atoms (AM = Li, Na, and K) and normal alkylamine molecules (nCx; x = 1, 2, 3, 4), denoted as AM-nCx-GICs. From the optimization of the orthorhombic unit cells for the crystalline compounds, it was found that, with the increase in the atomic number of alkali atoms, the layer separations decrease in contrast to AM-GICs, while the bond lengths between alkali atoms and graphene layer, and nitrogen atom of alkylamine increase. The calculated formation energies and interlayer binding energies of AM-nC3-GICs indicate that the compounds is increasingly stabilized from Li to K, and the energy barriers for migration of alkali atoms suggest that alkali cation with larger ionic radius diffuses more smoothly in graphite, being similar to AM-GICs. Through the analysis of electronic properties, it was established that more extent of electronic charge is transferred from more electropositive alkali atom to the carbon ring of graphene layer, and the hybridization of valence electron orbitals between alkylamine molecules and graphene layer is occurred.

  13. Magnetic Slowing Down of Spin Relaxation due to Binary Collisions of Alkali-Metal Atoms with Buffer-Gas Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, D. K.; Griffith, W. M.; Happer, W.

    2002-03-01

    We report the first studies of magnetic decoupling of the spin relaxation of alkali-metal atoms due to binary collisions with buffer gases. When binary collisions are the dominant relaxation mechanism, the relaxation and its magnetic decoupling are well described by the S-damping rate ΓSD due to the spin-rotation interaction γN˙S, the spin exchange rate ΓEX for collisions between alkali atoms, and a new ``Carver rate'' ΓC, due to the pressure-shift interaction δAİS, which can substantially broaden the magnetic decoupling curve while having no influence on the zero-field rates.

  14. Theoretical and experimental investigation of force imaging at the atomic scale on alkali halide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shluger, A. L.; Wilson, R. Mark; Williams, R. T.

    1994-02-01

    Assuming a model tip (Si4O10H10) as a reasonable representation of the surface of a Si3N4 cantilever stylus having a hydrogen-terminated asperity and a broader load-bearing base, we investigate the interaction of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with an alkali halide crystal by quantum chemical methods. Structural relaxation of the sample during engagement is allowed, and defect formation is investigated. Force curves above cation and anion positions are calculated, determining maximum sustainable loads and indicating a basis for atomic contrast. Experiments using a Si3N4 cantilever for AFM imaging of 12 alkali halide and alkaline earth fluoride crystals in air and desiccated helium are reported, in the widest AFM survey of such materials to date. Adsorbed water is shown to significantly enhance the observation of atomic periodicity on ionic halide samples, and rapid surface diffusion on alkali halide crystals is illustrated as it affects prospects for defect investigations. Observations of step edges and point-defect candidates at atomic scale are reported. The theoretical and experimental results are discussed together in the effort to provide a quantum-mechanical model for observations of alkali halide samples at atomic resolution, and to examine a possible basis for atomic resolution in the presence of long-range attractive forces.

  15. Visualization of alkali-denatured supercoiled plasmid DNA by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Jia; Zhang Zhenfeng; Cao Kou; Huang Xitai

    2008-09-26

    To study the alkali denaturation of supercoiled DNA, plasmid pBR322 was treated with gradient concentrations of NaOH solution. The results of gel electrophoresis showed that the alkali denaturation of the supercoiled DNA occurred in a narrow range of pH value (12.88-12.90). The alkali-denatured supercoiled DNA ran, as a sharp band, faster than the supercoiled DNA. The supercoiled plasmid DNA of pBR322, pACYC184 and pJGX15A were denatured by NaOH, and then visualized by atomic force microscopy. Compared with the supercoiled DNA, the atomic force microscopy images of the alkali-denatured supercoiled DNA showed rough surface with many kinks, bulges on double strands with inhomogeneous diameters. The apparent contour lengths of the denatured DNA were shortened by 16%, 16% and 50% for pBR322, pACYC184 and pJGX15A, respectively. All evidence suggested that the alkali-denatured supercoiled DNA had a stable conformation with unregistered, topologically constrained double strands and intrastrand secondary structure.

  16. 'Doubly Magic' Conditions in Magic-Wavelength Trapping of Ultracold Alkali-Metal Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, Andrei

    2010-07-16

    In experiments with trapped atoms, atomic energy levels are shifted by the trapping optical and magnetic fields. Regardless of this strong perturbation, precision spectroscopy may be still carried out using specially crafted, 'magic' trapping fields. Finding these conditions for particularly valuable microwave transitions in alkali-metal atoms has so far remained an open challenge. Here I demonstrate that the microwave transitions in alkali-metal atoms may be indeed made impervious to both trapping laser intensity and fluctuations of magnetic fields. I consider driving multiphoton transitions between the clock levels and show that these 'doubly magic' conditions are realized at special values of trapping laser wavelengths and fixed values of relatively weak magnetic fields. This finding has implications for precision measurements and quantum information processing with qubits stored in hyperfine manifolds.

  17. Electric dipole polarizabilities at imaginary frequencies for hydrogen, the alkali-metal, alkaline-earth, and noble gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, Andrei Porsev, Sergey G. Babb, James F.

    2010-05-15

    The electric dipole polarizabilities evaluated at imaginary frequencies for hydrogen, the alkali-metal atoms, the alkaline-earth atoms, and the noble gases are tabulated along with the resulting values of the atomic static polarizabilities, the atom-surface interaction constants, and the dispersion (or van der Waals) constants for the homonuclear and the heteronuclear diatomic combinations of the atoms.

  18. Hyperfine-induced quadrupole moments of alkali-metal-atom ground states and their implications for atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derevianko, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Spherically symmetric ground states of alkali-metal atoms do not posses electric quadrupole moments. However, the hyperfine interaction between nuclear moments and atomic electrons distorts the spherical symmetry of electronic clouds and leads to nonvanishing atomic quadrupole moments. We evaluate these hyperfine-induced quadrupole moments using techniques of relativistic many-body theory and compile results for Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs atoms. For heavy atoms we find that the hyperfine-induced quadrupole moments are strongly (two orders of magnitude) enhanced by correlation effects. We further apply the results of the calculation to microwave atomic clocks where the coupling of atomic quadrupole moments to gradients of electric fields leads to clock frequency uncertainties. We show that for 133Cs atomic clocks, the spatial gradients of electric fields must be smaller than 30 V /cm2 to guarantee fractional inaccuracies below 10-16.

  19. Van der Waals interactions among alkali Rydberg atoms with excitonic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoubi, Hashem

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the influence of the appearance of excitonic states on van der Waals interactions among two Rydberg atoms. The atoms are assumed to be in different Rydberg states, e.g., in the | {ns}> and | {np}> states. The resonant dipole-dipole interactions yield symmetric and antisymmetric excitons, with energy splitting that give rise to new resonances as the atoms approach each other. Only away from these resonances can the van der Waals coefficients, C6sp, be defined. We calculate the C6 coefficients for alkali atoms and present the results for lithium by applying perturbation theory. At short interatomic distances of several μ {{m}}, we show that the widely used simple model of two-level systems for excitons in Rydberg atoms breaks down, and the correct representation implies multi-level atoms. Even though, at larger distances one can keep the two-level systems but in including van der Waals interactions among the atoms .

  20. An optically trapped mixture of alkali-metal and metastable helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Adonis; Mishra, Hari Prasad; Vassen, Wim; Knoop, Steven

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold collisions between alkali-metal and metastable triplet helium (He*) atoms provide the opportunity to study Feshbach resonances in the presence of a strong loss channel, namely Penning ionization, which strongly depends on the internal spin-states of the atoms. Recently we have realized the first optically trapped alkali-metal-metastable helium mixture. To prepare the ultracold 87 Rb+4 He* mixture in a single beam optical dipole trap (ODT), we apply evaporative cooling in a strong quadrupole magnetic trap (QMT) for both species and subsequent transfer to the ODT via a hybrid trap. We will present lifetime measurements of different spin-state mixtures, testing the application of the universal loss model to this interesting multichannel collision system.

  1. Reactions between cold methyl halide molecules and alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Jesse J.; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-07

    We investigate the potential energy surfaces and activation energies for reactions between methyl halide molecules CH{sub 3}X (X = F, Cl, Br, I) and alkali-metal atoms A (A = Li, Na, K, Rb) using high-level ab initio calculations. We examine the anisotropy of each intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) and the mechanism and energetics of the only available exothermic reaction pathway, CH{sub 3}X + A → CH{sub 3} + AX. The region of the transition state is explored using two-dimensional PES cuts and estimates of the activation energies are inferred. Nearly all combinations of methyl halide and alkali-metal atom have positive barrier heights, indicating that reactions at low temperatures will be slow.

  2. Charge transfer activation energy for alkali atoms on Re and Ta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gładyszewski, Longin

    1993-09-01

    Ion and atom desorption energies for five alkali metals on Re and Ta were determined using the ion thermal emission noise method. The activation energies for the charge transfer process in the adsorbed state were calculated using a special energetic balance equation, which describes the surface ionization and thermal desorption effect. Energies for desorption of Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs from Re and Ta surfaces were determined by measuring the time autocorrelation function of the ion thermoemission current fluctuations.

  3. Measurement method for the nuclear anapole moment of laser-trapped alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, E.; Aubin, S.; Sprouse, G. D.; Orozco, L. A.; DeMille, D. P.

    2007-03-15

    Weak interactions within a nucleus generate a nuclear spin dependent, parity-violating electromagnetic moment, the anapole moment. We analyze a method to measure the nuclear anapole moment through the electric dipole transition it induces between hyperfine states of the ground level. The method requires tight confinement of the atoms to position them at the antinode of a standing wave Fabry-Perot cavity driving the anapole-induced microwave E1 transition. We explore the necessary limits in the number of atoms, excitation fields, trap type, interrogation method, and systematic tests necessary for such measurements in francium, the heaviest alkali.

  4. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, and 3d transition metal atoms on silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, H.; Peeters, F. M.

    2013-02-01

    The adsorption characteristics of alkali, alkaline-earth, and transition metal adatoms on silicene, a graphene-like monolayer structure of silicon are analyzed by means of first-principles calculations. In contrast to graphene, interaction between the metal atoms and the silicene surface is quite strong due to its highly reactive buckled hexagonal structure. In addition to structural properties, we also calculate the electronic band dispersion, net magnetic moment, charge transfer, work function, and dipole moment of the metal adsorbed silicene sheets. Alkali metals, Li, Na, and K, adsorb to hollow sites without any lattice distortion. As a consequence of the significant charge transfer from alkalis to silicene, metalization of silicene takes place. Trends directly related to atomic size, adsorption height, work function, and dipole moment of the silicene/alkali adatom system are also revealed. We found that the adsorption of alkaline-earth metals on silicene is entirely different from their adsorption on graphene. The adsorption of Be, Mg, and Ca turns silicene into a narrow gap semiconductor. Adsorption characteristics of eight transition metals Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Mo, and W are also investigated. As a result of their partially occupied d orbital, transition metals show diverse structural, electronic, and magnetic properties. Upon the adsorption of transition metals, depending on the adatom type and atomic radius, the system can exhibit metal, half-metal, and semiconducting behavior. For all metal adsorbates, the direction of the charge transfer is from adsorbate to silicene, because of its high surface reactivity. Our results indicate that the reactive crystal structure of silicene provides a rich playground for functionalization at nanoscale.

  5. Electron- and Photon-stimulated Desorption of Alkali Atoms from Lunar Sample and a Model Mineral Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakshinskiy, B. V.; Madey, T. E.

    2003-01-01

    We report recent results on an investigation of source mechanisms for the origin of alkali atoms in the tenuous planetary atmospheres, with focus on non-thermal processes (photon stimulated desorption (PSD), electron stimulated desorption (ESD), and ion sputtering). Whereas alkaline earth oxides (MgO, CaO) are far more abundant in lunar samples than alkali oxides (Na2O, K2O), the atmosphere of the Moon contains easily measurable concentrations of Na and K, while Ca and Mg are undetected there; traces of Ca have recently been seen in the Moon's atmosphere (10-3 of Na). The experiments have included ESD, PSD and ion sputtering of alkali atoms from model mineral surface (amorphous SiO2) and from a lunar basalt sample obtained from NASA. The comparison is made between ESD and PSD efficiency of monovalent alkalis (Na, K) and divalent alkaline earths (Ba, Ca).The ultrahigh vacuum measurement scheme for ESD and PSD of Na atoms includes a highly sensitive alkali metal detector based on surface ionization, and a time-of-flight technique. For PSD measurements, a mercury arc light source (filtered and chopped) is used. We find that bombardment of the alkali covered surfaces by ultraviolet photons or by low energy electrons (E>4 eV) causes desorption of hot alkali atoms. This results are consistent with the model developed to explain our previous measurements of sodium desorption from a silica surface and from water ice: electron- or photon-induced charge transfer from the substrate to the ionic adsorbate causes formation of a neutral alkali atom in a repulsive configuration, from which desorption occurs. The two-electron charge transfer to cause desorption of divalent alkaline eath ions is a less likely process.The data support the suggestion that PSD by UV solar photons is a dominant source process for alkalis in the tenuous lunar atmosphere.

  6. Theory of metal atom-water interactions and alkali halide dimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, K. D.; Kurtz, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the interactions of metal atoms with water and some of its isoelectronic analogs, and of the properties of alkali halides and their aggregates are discussed. Results are presented of ab initio calculations of the heats of reaction of the metal-water adducts and hydroxyhydrides of Li, Be, B, Na, Mg, and Al, and of the bond lengths and angles an; the heats of reaction for the insertion of Al into HF, H2O, NH3, H2S and CH3OH, and Be and Mg into H2O. Calculations of the electron affinities and dipole moments and polarizabilities of selected gas phase alkali halide monomers and dimers are discussed, with particular attention given to results of calculations of the polarizability of LiF taking into account electron correlation effects, and the polarizability of the dimer (LiF)2.

  7. Alkali-Metal-Ion-Assisted Hydrogen Atom Transfer in the Homocysteine Radical.

    PubMed

    Lesslie, Michael; Lau, Justin Kai-Chi; Lawler, John T; Siu, K W Michael; Oomens, Jos; Berden, Giel; Hopkinson, Alan C; Ryzhov, Victor

    2016-02-12

    Intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) was examined in homocysteine (Hcy) thiyl radical/alkali metal ion complexes in the gas phase by combination of experimental techniques (ion-molecule reactions and infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy) and theoretical calculations. The experimental results unequivocally show that metal ion complexation (as opposed to protonation) of the regiospecifically generated Hcy thiyl radical promotes its rapid isomerisation into an α-carbon radical via HAT. Theoretical calculations were employed to calculate the most probable HAT pathway and found that in alkali metal ion complexes the activation barrier is significantly lower, in full agreement with the experimental data. This is, to our knowledge, the first example of a gas-phase thiyl radical thermal rearrangement into an α-carbon species within the same amino acid residue and is consistent with the solution phase behaviour of Hcy radical. PMID:26836574

  8. (abstract) Fundamental Mechanisms of Electrode Kinetics and Alkali Metal Atom Transport at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kisor, A.; Kikkert, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of electrode kinetics and mass transport of alkali metal oxidation and alkali metal cation reduction at the solid electrolyte/porous electrode boundary as well as alkali metal transport through porous metal electrodes has important applications in optimizing device performance in alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) cells which are high temperature, high current density electrochemical cells. Basic studies of these processes also affords the opportunity to investigate a very basic electrochemical reaction over a wide range of conditions; and a variety of mass transport modes at high temperatures via electrochemical techniques. The temperature range of these investigations covers 700K to 1240K; the alkali metal vapor pressures range from about 10(sup -2) to 10(sup 2) Pa; and electrodes studied have included Mo, W, Mo/Na(sub 2)MoO(sub 4), W/Na(sub 2)WO(sub 4), WPt(sub x), and WRh(sub x) (1.0 < x < 6.0 ) with Na at Na-beta'-alumina, and Mo with K at K-beta'-alumina. Both liquid metal/solid electrolyte/alkali metal vapor and alkali metal vapor/solid electrolyte/vapor cells have been used to characterize the reaction and transport processes. We have previously reported evidence of ionic, free molecular flow, and surface transport of sodium in several types of AMTEC electrodes.

  9. Light absorption during alkali atom-noble gas atom interactions at thermal energies: a quantum dynamics treatment.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Alexander B; Reyes, Andrés; Micha, David A

    2006-10-21

    The absorption of light during atomic collisions is treated by coupling electronic excitations, treated quantum mechanically, to the motion of the nuclei described within a short de Broglie wavelength approximation, using a density matrix approach. The time-dependent electric dipole of the system provides the intensity of light absorption in a treatment valid for transient phenomena, and the Fourier transform of time-dependent intensities gives absorption spectra that are very sensitive to details of the interaction potentials of excited diatomic states. We consider several sets of atomic expansion functions and atomic pseudopotentials, and introduce new parametrizations to provide light absorption spectra in good agreement with experimentally measured and ab initio calculated spectra. To this end, we describe the electronic excitation of the valence electron of excited alkali atoms in collisions with noble gas atoms with a procedure that combines l-dependent atomic pseudopotentials, including two- and three-body polarization terms, and a treatment of the dynamics based on the eikonal approximation of atomic motions and time-dependent molecular orbitals. We present results for the collision induced absorption spectra in the Li-He system at 720 K, which display both atomic and molecular transition intensities. PMID:17059261

  10. Measurements of positron scattering by hydrogen, alkali metal, and other atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, T. S.; Harte, M.; Jiang, J.; Kauppila, W. E.; Kwan, C. K.; Li, H.; Zhou, S.

    1998-08-01

    Recent developments in measurements of total and positronium (Ps) formation cross sections for positrons (in the energy range of 1-300 eV) scattered by hydrogen, alkali metal, and other atoms are reviewed. Measurements and calculations of total and Ps formation cross section ( QPs's) for positrons scattered by hydrogen atoms are in very good agreement, and for the most part there is also good agreement for sodium, potassium, and rubidium atoms, but there is a puzzling discrepancy between measured and recently calculated QPs's for sodium. Preliminary measurements of QPs's for Mg show a very rapid rise to a large maximum value less than 2 eV above the Ps formation threshold energy (0.8 eV) which may be related to the proximity of that threshold to zero energy. It appears that structure observed in e +-Ar and Kr QPs measurements may be related to capture of inner-subshell electrons.

  11. Higher-order C{sub n} dispersion coefficients for the alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2005-04-01

    The van der Waals coefficients, from C{sub 11} through to C{sub 16} resulting from second-, third-, and fourth-order perturbation theory are estimated for the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, and Rb) atoms. The dispersion coefficients are also computed for all possible combinations of the alkali-metal atoms and hydrogen. The parameters are determined from sum rules after diagonalizing a semiempirical fixed core Hamiltonian in a large basis. Comparisons of the radial dependence of the C{sub n}/r{sup n} potentials give guidance as to the radial regions in which the various higher-order terms can be neglected. It is seen that including terms up to C{sub 10}/r{sup 10} results in a dispersion interaction that is accurate to better than 1% whenever the inter-nuclear spacing is larger than 20a{sub 0}. This level of accuracy is mainly achieved due to the fortuitous cancellation between the repulsive (C{sub 11},C{sub 13},C{sub 15}) and attractive (C{sub 12},C{sub 14},C{sub 16}) dispersion forces.

  12. Spin-axis relaxation in spin-exchange collisions of alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadlecek, S.; Walker, T.; Walter, D. K.; Erickson, C.; Happer, W.

    2001-05-01

    We present calculations of spin-relaxation rates of alkali-metal atoms due to the spin-axis interaction acting in binary collisions between the atoms. We show that for the high-temperature conditions of interest here, the spin-relaxation rates calculated with classical-path trajectories are nearly the same as those calculated with the distorted-wave Born approximation. We compare these calculations to recent experiments that used magnetic decoupling to isolate spin relaxation due to binary collisions from that due to the formation of triplet van der Waals molecules. The values of the spin-axis coupling coefficients deduced from measurements of binary collision rates are consistent with those deduced from molecular decoupling experiments, and follow a physically plausible scaling law for the spin-axis coupling coefficients.

  13. Basicity of the framework oxygen atom of alkali and alkaline earth-exchanged zeolites: a hard soft acid base approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Ramesh Ch; Kinkar Roy, Ram; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2000-12-01

    The basicity of framework oxygen atoms of alkali and alkaline earth-exchanged zeolites has been studied using reactivity descriptors based on a local hard-soft acid-base (HSAB) concept. We have calculated the `local softness' and the `relative nucleophilicity' values of the framework oxygen atoms of zeolite clusters as the measure of basicity. The local softness and relative nucleophilicity appear to be more reliable descriptors to predict the experimental basicity trend, compared to the negative charge on the oxygen atom.

  14. Time-resolved photoemission study of the electronic structure and dynamics of chemisorbed alkali atoms on Ru(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengmin; Wang, Cong; Cui, Xuefeng; Wang, Yanan; Argondizzo, Adam; Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the electronic structure and photoexcitation dynamics of alkali atoms (Rb and Cs) chemisorbed on transition-metal Ru(0001) single-crystal surface by angle- and time-resolved multiphoton photoemission. Three- and four-photon photoemission (3PP and 4PP) spectroscopic features due to the σ and π resonances arising from the n s and n p states of free alkali atoms are observed from ˜2 eV below the vacuum level in the zero-coverage limit. As the alkali coverage is increased to a maximum of 0.02 monolayers, the resonances are stabilized by formation of a surface dipole layer, but in contrast to alkali chemisorption on noble metals, both resonances form dispersive bands with nearly free-electron mass. Density functional theory calculations attribute the band formation to substrate-mediated interaction involving hybridization with the unoccupied d bands of the substrate. Time-resolved measurements quantify the phase and population relaxation times in the three-photon photoemission (3PP) process via the σ and π resonances. Differences between alkali-atom chemisorption on noble and transition metals are discussed.

  15. Diode-Pumped Alkali Atom Lasers 03-LW-024 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R H; Beach, R J

    2005-02-16

    The recent work at LLNL on alkali-atom lasers has been remarkably successful and productive. Three main phases (so far) can be identified. First, the concept and demonstration of red lasers using (Ti:sapphire pumping) took place; during this time, Rubidium and Cesium resonance-line lasers were tested, and theoretical models were developed and shown to describe experimental results very reliably. Work done during this first phase has been well documented, and the models from that period are still in use for their predictions and for designing power-scaled lasers. [1 - 3] Second, attempts were made to produce a blue alkali-vapor laser using sequentially-resonant two-step pumping (again, using Ti:sapphire lasers.) Although a blue laser did not result, the physical limitations of our approach are now better-defined. Third, diode-pumped operation of a red laser (Rubidium) was attempted, and we eventually succeeded in demonstrating the world's first diode-pumped gas laser. [4] Because we have a defensible concept for producing an efficient, compact, lightweight, power-scaled laser (tens of kW,) we are in a position to secure outside funding, and would like to find a sponsor. For descriptions of work done during the ''first phase,'' see References [1 - 3] ''Phase two'' work is briefly described in the section ''Blue laser,'' and ''phase three'' work is presented in the section entitled ''Diode-pumped red laser.''

  16. Precision Measurements of Atomic Lifetimes and Hyperfine Energies in Alkali Like Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Carol E.

    2005-03-04

    outside of a closed shell, provide the simplest open shell systems for detailed comparisons between experiment and theory. This program initially focused on measurements of excited state atomic lifetimes in alkali atomic systems. Our first measurements of atomic lifetimes in cesium surpassed the precision and accuracy of previous measurements and sparked renewed interest in the need for greater precision in lifetime measurements throughout the atomic physics community. After enhancing the capabilities of the laser systems built for these initial measurements, we began a study hyperfine energy splittings in cesium using a thermal atomic beam. The results surpassed previous measurements by more than an order of magnitude and lead to the first observation of the nuclear magnetic octupole moment in cesium demonstrating the inadequacy of the nuclear shell model for predicting high order nuclear moments. The laser system and atomic beam apparatus developed for these endeavors turned out to be perfectly suited for exploring the possibility of making absolute optical frequency measurements of atomic transitions. We initiated collaboration with researchers at NIST so that the desired optical frequencies could be reference with respect to the primary microwave frequency standard (Cs atomic fountain NIST-FI) via a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Our first absolute optical frequency measurement, of the cesium D2 line, surpassed the accuracy of a previous measurement by more than an order of magnitude. An absolute optical frequency measurement of the cesium D1 line, now near completion, also surpasses previous results and places us in a position to be able to report a new value for the fine structure constant which is the fundamental dimensionless constant that underlies all electromagnetic interactions.

  17. [The Measuring Method of Atomic Polarization of Alkali Metal Vapor Based on Optical Rotation and the Analysis of the Influence Factors].

    PubMed

    Shang, Hui-ning; Quan, Wei; Chen, Yao; Li, Yang; Li, Hong

    2016-02-01

    High sensitivity measurements of inertia and magnetic field could be achieved by utilizing a category of devices, which manipulate the atomic spins in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free regime. The alkali cell which contains the alkali metal vapor is used to sense magnetic field and inertia. The atomic number density of alkali vapor and the polarization of alkali metal vapor are two of the most important parameters of the cell. They play an important role in the research on atomic spins in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free regime. Besides, optical polarization plays an important role in quantum computing and atomic physics. We propose a measurement of alkali vapor polarization and alkali number density by detecting the optical rotation in one system. This method simplifies existing experimental equipment and processes. A constant bias magnetic field is applied and the Faraday rotation angle is detected by a bunch of the probe beam to deduce alkali-metal density. Then the magnetic field is closed and a bunch of the pump laser is utilized to polarize alkali-metal. Again, the probe beam is utilized to obtain the polarization of alkali metal. The alkali density obtained at first is used to deduce the polarization. This paper applies a numerical method to analyze the Faraday rotation and the polarization rotation. According to the numerical method, the optimal wavelength for the experiment is given. Finally, the fluctuation of magnetic field and wavelength on signal analysis are analyzed. PMID:27209720

  18. Development of laser optogalvanic spectroscopy as a probe of alkali atoms in an MHD environment

    SciTech Connect

    Monts, D.L.; Qian, S.; Cook, R.L.; Shepard, W.S.

    1995-02-01

    Application of Laser Optogalvanic Spectroscopy (LOGS) to MHD combustion systems requires selection of an appropriate alkali atom electronic transition to monitor. These studies suggest that in MHD combustion systems, it is desirable to use cesium, which occurs as an impurity in potassium compounds, as a surrogate for potassium rather than to directly monitor potassium in order to obtain reliable determinations of seed concentration. Studies were also performed to investigate the effect of electrode corrosion on the normalized LOGS signal intensity at a fixed wavelength (578.238 nm). During six-hour experiments in a near-stoichiometric flame, the normalized LOGS signal intensity decreased by 40-50% for a -960 V rod electrode and by 10-20% for a -500 V rod electrode. These changes are attributed to buildup of an oxide coating on the electrode, reducing the collection efficiency of the electrode.

  19. Quantum Degenerate Mixtures of Alkali and Alkaline-Earth-Like Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Hideaki; Takasu, Yosuke; Yamaoka, Yoshifumi; Doyle, John M.; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2011-05-20

    We realize simultaneous quantum degeneracy in mixtures consisting of the alkali and alkaline-earth-like atoms Li and Yb. This is accomplished within an optical trap by sympathetic cooling of the fermionic isotope {sup 6}Li with evaporatively cooled bosonic {sup 174}Yb and, separately, fermionic {sup 173}Yb. Using cross-thermalization studies, we also measure the elastic s-wave scattering lengths of both Li-Yb combinations, |a{sub {sup 6}Li-{sup 174}Yb}|=1.0{+-}0.2 nm and |a{sub {sup 6}Li-{sup 173}Yb}|=0.9{+-}0.2 nm. The equality of these lengths is found to be consistent with mass-scaling analysis. The quantum degenerate mixtures of Li and Yb, as realized here, can be the basis for creation of ultracold molecules with electron spin degrees of freedom, studies of novel Efimov trimers, and impurity probes of superfluid systems.

  20. Aging studies on micro-fabricated alkali buffer-gas cells for miniature atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Mileti, G.

    2015-04-20

    We report an aging study on micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells using neon as a buffer gas. An experimental atomic clock setup is used to measure the cell's intrinsic frequency, by recording the clock frequency shift at different light intensities and extrapolating to zero intensity. We find a drift of the cell's intrinsic frequency of (−5.2 ± 0.6) × 10{sup −11}/day and quantify deterministic variations in sources of clock frequency shifts due to the major physical effects to identify the most probable cause of the drift. The measured drift is one order of magnitude stronger than the total frequency variations expected from clock parameter variations and corresponds to a slow reduction of buffer gas pressure inside the cell, which is compatible with the hypothesis of loss of Ne gas from the cell due to its permeation through the cell windows. A negative drift on the intrinsic cell frequency is reproducible for another cell of the same type. Based on the Ne permeation model and the measured cell frequency drift, we determine the permeation constant of Ne through borosilicate glass as (5.7 ± 0.7) × 10{sup −22} m{sup 2} s{sup −1 }Pa{sup −1} at 81 °C. We propose this method based on frequency metrology in an alkali vapor cell atomic clock setup based on coherent population trapping for measuring permeation constants of inert gases.

  1. Atomic many-body effects and Lamb shifts in alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginges, J. S. M.; Berengut, J. C.

    2016-05-01

    We present a detailed study of the radiative potential method [V. V. Flambaum and J. S. M. Ginges, Phys. Rev. A 72, 052115 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevA.72.052115], which enables the accurate inclusion of quantum electrodynamics (QED) radiative corrections in a simple manner in atoms and ions over the range 10 ≤Z ≤120 , where Z is the nuclear charge. Calculations are performed for binding energy shifts to the lowest valence s , p , and d waves over the series of alkali-metal atoms Na to E119. The high accuracy of the radiative potential method is demonstrated by comparison with rigorous QED calculations in frozen atomic potentials, with deviations on the level of 1%. The many-body effects of core relaxation and second- and higher-order perturbation theory on the interaction of the valence electron with the core are calculated. The inclusion of many-body effects tends to increase the size of the shifts, with the enhancement particularly significant for d waves; for K to E119, the self-energy shifts for d waves are only an order of magnitude smaller than the s -wave shifts. It is shown that taking into account many-body effects is essential for an accurate description of the Lamb shift.

  2. Optically-Detected Magnetic Resonance of Alkali Atoms Isolated on Helium Nano-Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Markus; Callegari, Carlo; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2009-06-01

    Sharp, hyperfine-resolved, ESR spectra of alkali atoms isolated on helium nanodroplets are measured by optically-detected magnetic resonance (ODMR). A net spin polarization is created inside a magnetic field (B=0.2 to 4.2 T) by a pump laser beam. Microwave radiation in a resonant cavity at 9.4 GHz causes a spin transition which is detected by a probe laser beam. For ultimate precision the spectrum of free atoms is concurrently measured and serves as a reference. The shift of the ESR lines on the droplet with respect to free atoms directly reflects the distortion of the valence-electron wavefunction due to the He nanodroplet. While the electron g-factor remains unchanged within experimental uncertainties (<5 ppm), the increase of the hyperfine constant (typically +400 ppm) is consistent with an increase of the Fermi contact interaction. We are able to follow this change as a function of droplet size attesting the sensitivity of the method for the measurement of chemical shifts. The observation of Rabi oscillations indicates a long decoherence time and proves our ability to perform coherent manipulation of the spin.

  3. Quantum control of d-dimensional quantum systems with application to alkali atomic spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, Seth

    In this dissertation I analyze Hamiltonian control of d-dimensional quantum systems as realized in alkali atomic spins. Alkali atoms provide an ideal platform for studies of quantum control due to the extreme precision with which the control fields are characterized as well as their isolation from their environment. In many cases, studies into the control of atomic spins restrict attention to a 2-dimesional subspace in order to consider qubit control. The geometry of quantum 2-level systems is much simpler than for any larger dimensional Hilbert space, and so control techniques for qubits often are not applicable to larger systems. In reality, atoms have many internal levels. It seems a shame to throw away most of our Hilbert space when it could in principle be used for encoding information and performing error correction. This work develops some of the tools necessary to control these large atomic spins. Quantum control theory has some very generic properties that have previously been explored in the literature, notably in the work from the Rabitz group. I provide a review of this literature, showing that while the landscape topology of quantum control problems is relatively independent of physical platform, different optimization techniques are required to find optimal controls depending on the particular control task. To this end I have developed two optimal control algorithms for finding unitary maps for the problems of: "state preparation" where we require only that a single fiducial state us taken to a particular target state and "unitary construction" where the entire map is specified. State mapping turns out to be a simple problem to solve and is amenable to a gradient search method. This protocol is not feasible for the task of finding full unitary maps, but I show how we can weave state mappings together to form full unitary maps. This construction of unitary maps is efficient in the dimension of the Hilbert space. The particular system I have used for

  4. Intrinsic differences in atomic ordering of calcium (alumino)silicate hydrates in conventional and alkali-activated cements

    SciTech Connect

    White, Claire E.; Daemen, Luke L.; Hartl, Monika; Page, Katharine

    2015-01-15

    The atomic structures of calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) and calcium (–sodium) aluminosilicate hydrate (C–(N)–A–S–H) gels, and their presence in conventional and blended cement systems, have been the topic of significant debate over recent decades. Previous investigations have revealed that synthetic C–S–H gel is nanocrystalline and due to the chemical similarities between ordinary Portland cement (OPC)-based systems and low-CO{sub 2} alkali-activated slags, researchers have inferred that the atomic ordering in alkali-activated slag is the same as in OPC–slag cements. Here, X-ray total scattering is used to determine the local bonding environment and nanostructure of C(–A)–S–H gels present in hydrated tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S), blended C{sub 3}S–slag and alkali-activated slag, revealing the large intrinsic differences in the extent of nanoscale ordering between C–S–H derived from C{sub 3}S and alkali-activated slag systems, which may have a significant influence on thermodynamic stability, and material properties at higher length scales, including long term durability of alkali-activated cements.

  5. Research Investigation Directed Toward Extending the Useful Range of the Electromagnetic Spectrum. [atomic spectra and electronic structure of alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, S. R.; Happer, W.

    1974-01-01

    The report discusses completed and proposed research in atomic and molecular physics conducted at the Columbia Radiation Laboratory from July 1972 to June 1973. Central topics described include the atomic spectra and electronic structure of alkali metals and helium, molecular microwave spectroscopy, the resonance physics of photon echoes in some solid state systems (including Raman echoes, superradiance, and two photon absorption), and liquid helium superfluidity.

  6. Collimated, single-pass atom source from a pulsed alkali metal dispenser for laser-cooling experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Kevin L.; Purdy, Thomas P.; Murch, Kater W.; Leslie, Sabrina; Gupta, Subhadeep; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M.

    2005-02-01

    We have developed an improved scheme for loading atoms into a magneto-optical trap (MOT) from a directed rubidium alkali metal dispenser in <10{sup -10} Torr ultrahigh vacuum conditions. A current-driven dispenser was surrounded with a cold absorbing 'shroud' held at {<=}0 deg. C, pumping rubidium atoms not directed into the MOT. This nearly eliminates background atoms and reduces the detrimental rise in pressure normally associated with these devices. The system can be well-described as a current-controlled, rapidly switched, two-temperature thermal beam, and was used to load a MOT with 3x10{sup 8} atoms.

  7. Tof-Sims Application for Evaluating the Atomic Structure of New Bone Substitute Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oteri, G.; Pisanom, M.; Cicciù, M.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this experimental study is to evaluate, in vitro, the chemical composition and the micromorphological structure of a bone substitute material surface. This material is based on calcium triphosphate and hydroxyapatite microgranules. Some results of a preliminary surface study of the above mentioned bioceramic materials are reported. The study has been carried out by means of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), complemented by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) measurements. Whereas XPS data supplies the average surface composition of the system, TOF-SIMS supplies laterally and depth resolved information on the sample. This preliminary study confirms the properties of osteoconduction and scaffold features of the material. Moreover, a possible osteoinductive capability could be due to the presence of surface micropores, which could help in the attraction of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), thus promoting the osteogenesis.

  8. Non-negligible collisions of alkali atoms with background gas in buffer-gas-free cells coated with paraffin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Naota; Hatakeyama, Atsushi

    2016-04-01

    We measured the rate of velocity-changing collisions (VCCs) between alkali atoms and background gas in buffer-gas-free anti-relaxation-coated cells. The average VCC rate in paraffin-coated rubidium vapor cells prepared in this work was 1× 106 hbox {s}^{-1}, which corresponds to 1 mm in the mean free path of rubidium atoms. This short mean free path indicates that the background gas is not negligible in the sense that alkali atoms do not travel freely between the cell walls. In addition, we found that a heating process known as "ripening" increases the VCC rate, and also confirmed that ripening improves the anti-relaxation performance of the coatings.

  9. Study on water-dispersible colloids in saline-alkali soils by atomic force microscopy and spectrometric methods.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiguo; Xu, Fengjie; Zu, Yuangang; Meng, Ronghua; Wang, Wenjie

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have revealed that water-dispersible colloids play an important role in the transport of nutrients and contaminants in soils. In this study, water-dispersible colloids extracted from saline-alkali soils have been characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV absorption spectra. AFM observation indicated that the water-dispersible colloids contain some large plates and many small spherical particles. XRD, XPS, and UV absorption measurement revealed that the water-dispersible colloids are composed of kaolinite, illite, calcite, quartz and humic acid. In addition, UV absorption measurement demonstrated that the humic acids are associated with clay minerals. Water-dispersible colloids in the saline-alkali soils after hydrolyzed polymaleic anhydride treatment and an agricultural soil (nonsaline-alkali soil) were also investigated for comparison. The obtained results implied that the saline-alkali condition facilitates the formation of a large quantity of colloids. The use of AFM combined with spectrometric methods in the present study provides new knowledge on the colloid characteristics of saline-alkali soils. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:525-531, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27062427

  10. Structure of the alkali-metal-atom + strontium molecular ions: Towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Aymar, M.; Dulieu, O.; Guerout, R.

    2011-08-14

    The potential energy curves, permanent and transition dipole moments, and the static dipolar polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a strontium ion are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The molecular ions are treated as effective two-electron systems and are treated using effective core potentials including core polarization, large gaussian basis sets, and full configuration interaction. In the perspective of upcoming experiments aiming at merging cold atom and cold ion traps, possible paths for radiative charge exchange, photoassociation of a cold lithium or rubidium atom and a strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions.

  11. Properties of alkali metal atoms deposited on a MgO surface: a systematic experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Finazzi, Emanuele; Di Valentin, Cristiana; Pacchioni, Gianfranco; Chiesa, Mario; Giamello, Elio; Gao, Hongjun; Lian, Jichun; Risse, Thomas; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption of small amounts of alkali metal atoms (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) on the surface of MgO powders and thin films has been studied by means of EPR spectroscopy and DFT calculations. From a comparison of the measured and computed g values and hyperfine coupling constants (hfccs), a tentative assignment of the preferred adsorption sites is proposed. All atoms bind preferentially to surface oxide anions, but the location of these anions differs as a function of the deposition temperature and alkali metal. Lithium forms relatively strong bonds with MgO and can be stabilized at low temperatures on terrace sites. Potassium interacts very weakly with MgO and is stabilized only at specific sites, such as at reverse corners where it can interact simultaneously with three surface oxygen atoms (rubidium and cesium presumably behave in the same way). Sodium forms bonds of intermediate strength and could, in principle, populate more than a single site when deposited at room temperature. In all cases, large deviations of the hfccs from the gas-phase values are observed. These reductions in the hfccs are due to polarization effects and are not connected to ionization of the alkali metal, which would lead to the formation of an adsorbed cation and a trapped electron. In this respect, hydrogen atoms behave completely differently. Under similar conditions, they form (H(+))(e(-)) pairs. The reasons for this different behavior are discussed. PMID:18381711

  12. Low-temperature indium-bonded alkali vapor cell for chip-scale atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straessle, R.; Pellaton, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Pétremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Mileti, G.; de Rooij, N. F.

    2013-02-01

    A low-temperature sealing technique for micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells for chip-scale atomic clock applications is developed and evaluated. A thin-film indium bonding technique was used for sealing the cells at temperatures of ≤140 °C. These sealing temperatures are much lower than those reported for other approaches, and make the technique highly interesting for future micro-fabricated cells, using anti-relaxation wall coatings. Optical and microwave spectroscopy performed on first indium-bonded cells without wall coatings are used to evaluate the cleanliness of the process as well as a potential leak rate of the cells. Both measurements confirm a stable pressure inside the cell and therefore an excellent hermeticity of the indium bonding. The double-resonance measurements performed over several months show an upper limit for the leak rate of 1.5 × 10-13 mbar.l/s. This is in agreement with additional leak-rate measurements using a membrane deflection method on indium-bonded test structures.

  13. Effects of dipole-dipole interaction between cigar-shaped BECs of cold alkali atoms: towards inverse-squared interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yue; Luo, Zhuxi; Wang, Ziqiang

    2014-07-01

    We show that the dipole-dipole coupling between Wannier modes in cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) is significantly enhanced while the short-range coupling is strongly suppressed. As a result, the dipole-dipole interaction can become the dominant interaction between ultracold alkali Bose atoms. In the long length limit of a cigar-shaped BEC, the resulting effective one-dimensional models possess an effective inverse squared interacting potential, the Calogero-Sutherland potential, which plays a fundamental role in many fields of contemporary physics; but its direct experimental realization has been a challenge for a long time. We propose to realize the Calogero-Sutherland model in ultracold alkali Bose atoms and study the effects of the dipole-dipole interaction.

  14. Ground state of the polar alkali-metal-atom-strontium molecules: Potential energy curve and permanent dipole moment

    SciTech Connect

    Guerout, R.; Aymar, M.; Dulieu, O.

    2010-10-15

    In this study, we investigate the structure of the polar alkali-metal-atom-strontium diatomic molecules as possible candidates for the realization of samples of ultracold polar molecular species not yet investigated experimentally. Using a quantum chemistry approach based on effective core potentials and core polarization potentials, we model these systems as effective three-valence-electron systems, allowing for calculation of electronic properties with full configuration interaction. The potential curve and the permanent dipole moment of the {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} ground state are determined as functions of the internuclear distance for LiSr, NaSr, KSr, RbSr, and CsSr molecules. These molecules are found to exhibit a significant permanent dipole moment, though smaller than those of the alkali-metal-atom-Rb molecules.

  15. Adsorption of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms on the reconstructed graphene-like BN single sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jun-Hua; Wang, Zheng-Jia; Wang, Yu-Fang; Yin, Yu-Hua; Jiang, Run; Jin, Qing-Hua

    2015-12-01

    A graphene-like BN single sheet with absorbed alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms have been investigated by using a first-principles method within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). The electronic structure of BN sheet with adsorbed metal atoms is mainly determined by the metal electronic state which is near to the Fermi level owing to the wide band gap of pure BN sheet. So, we calculated the adsorption energy, charge transfer and work function after the metal adsorbed on BN sheet. We found that the interaction between the metal atoms and BN surface was very strong, and the stable adsorption site for all the adsorbed atoms concluded was high-coordination surface site (H-center) rather than the surface dangling bond sites from the perspective of simple bond-counting arguments. Our results indicate that the interaction of BN sheet with metal atoms could help in the development of metallic nanoscale devices.

  16. Measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms using nuclear magnetic resonance frequency shifts of noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. H.; Luo, H.; Qu, T. L.; Yang, K. Y.; Ding, Z. C.

    2015-10-01

    We report a novel method of measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms by detecting the NMR frequency shifts of noble gases. We calculated the profile of 87Rb D1 line absorption cross sections. We then measured the absorption profile of the sample cell, from which we calculated the 87Rb number densities at different temperatures. Then we measured the frequency shifts resulted from the spin polarization of the 87Rb atoms and calculated its polarization degrees at different temperatures. The behavior of frequency shifts versus temperature in experiment was consistent with theoretical calculation, which may be used as compensative signal for the NMRG closed-loop control system.

  17. Transition rates for lithium-like ions, sodium-like ions, and neutral alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.R.; Liu, Z.W.; Sapirstein, J.

    1996-11-01

    Third-order many-body perturbation theory is used to obtain E1 transition amplitudes for ions of the lithium and sodium isoelectronic sequences and for the neutral alkali-metal atoms potassium, rubidium, cesium, and francium. Complete angular reductions of the first, second, and third-order amplitudes are given. Tables of transition energies and rates are given for the 2p{sub {1/2}} {yields} 2s{sub {1/2}}, 2p{sub 3/2} {yields} 2s{sub {1/2}}, 3s{sub {1/2}} {yields} 2p{sub {1/2}}, and 3s{sub {1/2}} {yields} 2p{sub 3/2} transitions in the lithium isoelectronic sequence and for the corresponding 3p{sub 1/2} {yields} 3s{sub 1/2}, 3p{sub 3/2} {yields} 3s{sub {1/2}}, 4s{sub {1/2}} {yields} 3p{sub 1/2}, and 4s{sub {1/2}} {yields} 3p{sub 3/2} transitions in the sodium sequence. For neutral alkali atoms, amplitudes of np{sub {1/2}} {yields} ns{sub {1/2}}, np{sub 3/2} {yields} ns{sub {1/2}}, (n + 1)s{sub {1/2}} {yields} np{sub {1/2}}, and (n + 1)s{sub {1/2}} {yields} np{sub 3/2} transitions are evaluated, where n is the principal quantum number of the valence electron in the atomic ground state, Semi-empirical corrections for the omitted fourth- and higher-order terms in perturbation theory are given for the neutral alkali-metal atoms. Comparisons with previous high-precision calculations and with experiment are made. 42 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.

  18. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  19. One- and two-photon spectroscopy of highly excited states of alkali-metal atoms on helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Pifrader, Alexandra; Allard, Olivier; Auboeck, Gerald; Callegari, Carlo; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Huber, Robert; Ancilotto, Francesco

    2010-10-28

    Alkali-metal atoms captured on the surface of superfluid helium droplets are excited to high energies ({approx_equal}3 eV) by means of pulsed lasers, and their laser-induced-fluorescence spectra are recorded. We report on the one-photon excitation of the (n+1)p(leftarrow)ns transition of K, Rb, and Cs (n=4, 5, and 6, respectively) and on the two-photon one-color excitation of the 5d(leftarrow)5s transition of Rb. Gated-photon-counting measurements are consistent with the relaxation rates of the bare atoms, hence consistent with the reasonable expectation that atoms quickly desorb from the droplet and droplet-induced relaxation need not be invoked.

  20. Studies of Pressure-Broadening of Alkali Atom Resonance Lines for Modeling Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets and Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Kate; Babb, J.; Yoshino, K.

    2004-01-01

    In L-dwarfs and T-dwarfs the resonance lines of sodium and potassium are so profoundly pressure-broadened that their wings extend several hundred nanometers from line center. With accurate knowledge of the line profiles as a function of temperature and pressure: such lines can prove to be valuable diagnostics of the atmospheres of such objects. We have initiated a joint program of theoretical and experimental research to study the line-broadening of alkali atom resonance lines due to collisions with species such as helium and molecular hydrogen. Although potassium and sodium are the alkali species of most interest in the atmospheres of cool brown dwarfs and extrasolar giant planets, some of our theoretical focus this year has involved the calculation of pressure-broadening of lithium resonance lines by He, as a test of a newly developed suite of computer codes. In addition, theoretical calculations have been carried out to determine the leading long range van der Waals coefficients for the interactions of ground and excited alkali metal atoms with helium atoms, to within a probable error of 2%. Such data is important in determining the behavior of the resonance line profiles in the far wings. Important progress has been made on the experimental aspects of the program since the arrival of a postdoctoral fellow in September. A new absorption cell has been designed, which incorporates a number of technical improvements over the previous cell, including a larger cell diameter to enhance the signal, and fittings which allow for easier cleaning, thereby significantly reducing the instrument down-time.

  1. Sensitive determination of the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms using near-resonant light.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhichao; Long, Xingwu; Yuan, Jie; Fan, Zhenfang; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    A new method to measure the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms is demonstrated. Unlike the conventional method using far-detuned probe light, the near-resonant light with two specific frequencies was chosen. Because the Faraday rotation angle of this approach can be two orders of magnitude greater than that with the conventional method, this approach is more sensitive to the spin polarization. Based on the results of the experimental scheme, the spin polarization measurements are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical predictions, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of this approach. PMID:27595707

  2. Sensitive determination of the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms using near-resonant light

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhichao; Long, Xingwu; Yuan, Jie; Fan, Zhenfang; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    A new method to measure the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms is demonstrated. Unlike the conventional method using far-detuned probe light, the near-resonant light with two specific frequencies was chosen. Because the Faraday rotation angle of this approach can be two orders of magnitude greater than that with the conventional method, this approach is more sensitive to the spin polarization. Based on the results of the experimental scheme, the spin polarization measurements are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical predictions, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of this approach. PMID:27595707

  3. Measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms using nuclear magnetic resonance frequency shifts of noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. H.; Luo, H.; Qu, T. L. Yang, K. Y.; Ding, Z. C.

    2015-10-15

    We report a novel method of measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms by detecting the NMR frequency shifts of noble gases. We calculated the profile of {sup 87}Rb D1 line absorption cross sections. We then measured the absorption profile of the sample cell, from which we calculated the {sup 87}Rb number densities at different temperatures. Then we measured the frequency shifts resulted from the spin polarization of the {sup 87}Rb atoms and calculated its polarization degrees at different temperatures. The behavior of frequency shifts versus temperature in experiment was consistent with theoretical calculation, which may be used as compensative signal for the NMRG closed-loop control system.

  4. The role of adiabaticity in alkali atom-fine structure mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshel, Ben; Weeks, David E.; Perram, Glen P.

    2014-02-01

    Fine-structure mixing cross-sections for the alkalis in collisions with the rare gases are reviewed. Included in the review are all the rare gases in collisions with all of the first excited state of the alkalis, the second excited state for K, Rb and Cs and the third excited state for Rb and Cs. The cross-sections are converted to probabilities for energy transfer using a quantum-defect calculated cross-section and are then presented as a function of adiabaticity. The data shows a clear decreasing trend with adiabaticity but secondary factors prevent the probabilities from decreasing as quickly as expected. Polarizability is introduced as a proxy for the secondary influences on the data as it increases with both rare gas partner and alkali excited state. The polarizability is shown to cause the probability of fine structure transition to be higher than expected. An empirical model is introduced and fit to the data. Future work will develop a model using time-independent perturbation theory in order to further develop a physical rational for the dependence of fine structure cross sections on adiabaticity and to further understand the secondary influences on the probability for fine structure transition.

  5. Alkali vapor pressure modulation on the 100 ms scale in a single-cell vacuum system for cold atom experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dugrain, Vincent; Reichel, Jakob; Rosenbusch, Peter

    2014-08-15

    We describe and characterize a device for alkali vapor pressure modulation on the 100 ms timescale in a single-cell cold atom experiment. Its mechanism is based on optimized heat conduction between a current-modulated alkali dispenser and a heat sink at room temperature. We have studied both the short-term behavior during individual pulses and the long-term pressure evolution in the cell. The device combines fast trap loading and relatively long trap lifetime, enabling high repetition rates in a very simple setup. These features make it particularly suitable for portable atomic sensors.

  6. Comparisons between adsorption and diffusion of alkali, alkaline earth metal atoms on silicene and those on silicane: Insight from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Xu; Huan-Sheng, Lu; Bo, Liu; Gang, Liu; Mu-Sheng, Wu; Chuying, Ouyang

    2016-06-01

    The adsorption and diffusion behaviors of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms on silicane and silicene are both investigated by using a first-principles method within the frame of density functional theory. Silicane is staler against the metal adatoms than silicene. Hydrogenation makes the adsorption energies of various metal atoms considered in our calculations on silicane significantly lower than those on silicene. Similar diffusion energy barriers of alkali metal atoms on silicane and silicene could be observed. However, the diffusion energy barriers of alkali-earth metal atoms on silicane are essentially lower than those on silicene due to the small structural distortion and weak interaction between metal atoms and silicane substrate. Combining the adsorption energy with the diffusion energy barriers, it is found that the clustering would occur when depositing metal atoms on perfect hydrogenated silicene with relative high coverage. In order to avoid forming a metal cluster, we need to remove the hydrogen atoms from the silicane substrate to achieve the defective silicane. Our results are helpful for understanding the interaction between metal atoms and silicene-based two-dimensional materials. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant Nos. 20152ACB21014, 20151BAB202006, and 20142BAB212002) and the Fund from the Jiangxi Provincial Educational Committee, China (Grant No. GJJ14254). Bo Xu is also supported by the Oversea Returned Project from the Ministry of Education, China.

  7. QED radiative corrections and many-body effects in atoms: vacuum polarization and binding energy shifts in alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginges, J. S. M.; Berengut, J. C.

    2016-05-01

    We calculate vacuum polarization corrections to the binding energies in neutral alkali atoms Na through to the superheavy element E119. We employ the relativistic Hartree–Fock method to demonstrate the importance of relaxation of the electronic core and the correlation potential method to study the effects of second and higher orders of perturbation theory. These many-body effects are sizeable for all orbitals, though particularly important for orbitals with angular momentum quantum number l\\gt 0. The orders of magnitude enhancement for d waves produces shifts that, for Rb and the heavier elements, are larger than those for p waves and only an order of magnitude smaller than the s-wave shifts. The many-body enhancement mechanisms that operate for vacuum polarization apply also to the larger self-energy corrections.

  8. Dispersion coefficients for H and He interactions with alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2003-12-01

    The van der Waals coefficients C{sub 6}, C{sub 8}, and C{sub 10} for H and He interactions with the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, and Rb) and alkaline-earth-metal (Be, Mg, Ca, and Sr) atoms are determined from oscillator strength sum rules. The oscillator strengths were computed using a combination of ab initio and semiempirical methods. The dispersion parameters generally agree with close to exact variational calculations for Li-H and Li-He at the 0.1% level of accuracy. For larger systems, there is agreement with relativistic many-body perturbation theory estimates of C{sub 6} at the 1% level. These validations for selected systems attest to the reliability of the present dispersion parameters. About half the present parameters lie within the recommended bounds of the Standard and Certain compilation [J. Chem. Phys. 83, 3002 (1985)].

  9. Accurate van der Waals coefficients between fullerenes and fullerene-alkali atoms and clusters: Modified single-frequency approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jianmin; Mo, Yuxiang; Tian, Guocai; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn

    2016-08-01

    Long-range van der Waals (vdW) interaction is critically important for intermolecular interactions in molecular complexes and solids. However, accurate modeling of vdW coefficients presents a great challenge for nanostructures, in particular for fullerene clusters, which have huge vdW coefficients but also display very strong nonadditivity. In this work, we calculate the coefficients between fullerenes, fullerene and sodium clusters, and fullerene and alkali atoms with the hollow-sphere model within the modified single-frequency approximation (MSFA). In the MSFA, we assume that the electron density is uniform in a molecule and that only valence electrons in the outmost subshell of atoms contribute. The input to the model is the static multipole polarizability, which provides a sharp cutoff for the plasmon contribution outside the effective vdW radius. We find that the model can generate C6 in excellent agreement with expensive wave-function-based ab initio calculations, with a mean absolute relative error of only 3 % , without suffering size-dependent error. We show that the nonadditivities of the coefficients C6 between fullerenes and C60 and sodium clusters Nan revealed by the model agree remarkably well with those based on the accurate reference values. The great flexibility, simplicity, and high accuracy make the model particularly suitable for the study of the nonadditivity of vdW coefficients between nanostructures, advancing the development of better vdW corrections to conventional density functional theory.

  10. Nonlinear Pressure Shifts of Alkali-Metal Atoms in Inert Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, F.; Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2008-06-01

    Precise measurements show that the microwave resonance frequencies of ground-state Rb or Cs atoms have a nonlinear dependence on the pressure of the buffer gases Ar and Kr. No nonlinearities were observed in the gases He or N2. These observations strongly suggest that the nonlinearities are due to the van der Waals molecules that form in Ar and Kr, but not in He or N2. The nonlinear part of the shifts is largest in the pressure range of a few tens of torr, similar to the operating pressures of gas-cell atomic clocks. The observed shifts are very well described by a simple function, parametrized by the effective three-body formation rate of molecules and by the effective product of the collisionally limited lifetime times the shift of the hyperfine coupling coefficient in the molecule.

  11. Towards high phase space density of alkali atoms by simple optical cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiazhong; Vendeiro, Zachary; Chen, Wenlan; Vuletic, Vladan

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a simple optical cooling method, which can cool down the temperature of rubidium 87 to the ground state of the vibrational levels. We only use one far-detuned laser performing both cooling and optical repumping. By tuning the laser frequency, we verify the dependence of the two-body collision loss versus the laser detuning. Combining with the retrap of the atoms in the optical dipole trap, we can make the phase space density approaching to unity.

  12. Electron collisions with cesium atoms - benchmark calculations and application to modeling an excimer-pumped alkali laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Babaeva, Natalia; Kushner, Mark

    2014-10-01

    The B-spline R-matrix (BSR) with pseudostates method was employed to describe electron collisions with cesium atoms. Over 300 states were kept in the close-coupling expansion, including a large number of pseudostates to model the effect of the Rydberg spectrum and the ionization continuum on the results for transitions between the discrete physical states of interest. Predictions for elastic scattering, excitation, and ionization for incident energies up to 200 eV are presented and compared to previous results [2,3] and experimental data. Our data were used to model plasma formation in the excimer-pumped alkali laser, XPAL, operating on the Cs (62P3 / 2 , 1 / 2 --> (62S1 / 2) (852nm and 894nm) transitions. At sufficiently high operating temperature, pump power, and repetition rate, plasma formation in excess of 1014--1015cm-3 occurs. This may reduce laser output power by electron collisional mixing of the upper and lower laser levels. Work supported by the NSF under PHY-1068140, PHY-1212450, and the XSEDE allocation PHY-090031 (OZ, KB), and by the DoD High Energy Laser Multidisciplinary Research Initiative (NYB, MJK).

  13. Esr Spectra of Alkali-Metal Atoms on Helium Nanodroplets: a Theoretical Model for the Prediction of Helium Induced Hyperfine Structure Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, Reas W.; Filatov, Michael; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2013-06-01

    We predict He-droplet-induced changes of the isotropic HFS constant a_{HFS} of the alkali-metal atoms M = Li, Na, K and Rb on the basis of a model description. Optically detected electron spin resonance spectroscopy has allowed high resolution measurements that show the influence of the helium droplet and its size on the unpaired electron spin density at the alkali nucleus. Our theoretical approach to describe this dependence is based on a combination of two well established techniques: Results of relativistic coupled-cluster calculations on the alkali-He dimers (energy and HFS constant as functions of the binding length) are mapped onto the doped-droplet-situation with the help of helium-density functional theory. We simulate doped droplets He_{N} with N ranging from 50 to 10000, using the diatomic alkali-He-potential energy curves as input. From the obtained density profiles we evaluate average distances between the dopant atom and its direct helium neighborhood. The distances are then set in relation to the variation of the HFS constant with binding length in the simplified alkali-He-dimer model picture. This method yields reliable relative shifts but involves a systematic absolute error. Hence, the absolute values of the shifts are tied to one experimentally determined HFS constant for ^{85}Rb-He_{N = 2000}. With this parameter choice we obtain results in good agreement with the available experimental data for Rb and K^{a,b} confirming the predicted 1/N trend of the functional dependence^{c}. M. Koch, G. Auböck, C. Callegari, and W. E. Ernst, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 035302-1-4 (2009) M. Koch, C. Callegari, and W. E. Ernst, Mol. Phys. 108 (7), 1005-1011 (2010) A. W. Hauser, T. Gruber, M. Filatov, and W. E. Ernst, ChemPhysChem (2013) online DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200697

  14. Double resonance fequency light shift compensation in optically oriented laser-pumped alkali atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, A. A. Ermak, S. V.; Sagitov, E. A.; Smolin, R. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2015-09-15

    The contributions of the vector and scalar components to the magnetically dependent microwave transition frequency light shift are analyzed and the compensation of these components is experimentally demonstrated for the {sup 87}Rb atoms optically oriented by a laser tuned to the D{sub 2} line of the head doublet. The Allan variance is studied as a function of the averaging time for a tandem of optically pumped quantum magnetometers (OPQMs), one of which is based on a low-frequency spin oscillator while another is based on a quantum microwave discriminator with a resonance frequency that corresponds to magnetically dependent transitions between HFS sublevels with the extremal value of the magnetic quantum number. It is shown that the compensation of the scalar and vector components of the light shift in OPQMs reduces the Allan variance at averaging times that exceed hundreds of seconds compared to a quantum discriminator based on the magnetically independent 0–0 transition. In this case, the minimal Allan variance in OPQMs at the end resonance is achieved at considerably longer averaging times than in the case of the quantum discriminator that is tuned to the 0–0 transition frequency.

  15. Atom Resonance Lines for Modeling Atmosphere: Studies of Pressure-Broadening of Alkali Atom Resonance Lines for Modeling Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets and Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, Hashima (Technical Monitor); Kirby, K.; Babb, J.; Yoshino, K.

    2005-01-01

    We report on progress made in a joint program of theoretical and experimental research to study the line-broadening of alkali atom resonance lines due to collisions with species such as helium and molecular hydrogen. Accurate knowledge of the line profiles of Na and K as a function of temperature and pressure will allow such lines to serve as valuable diagnostics of the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and extra-solar giant planets. A new experimental apparatus has been designed, built and tested over the past year, and we are poised to begin collecting data on the first system of interest, the potassium resonance lines perturbed by collisions with helium. On the theoretical front, calculations of line-broadening due to sodium collisions with helium are nearly complete, using accurate molecular potential energy curves and transition moments just recently computed for this system. In addition we have completed calculations of the three relevant potential energy curves and associated transition moments for K - He, using the MOLPRO quantum chemistry codes. Currently, calculations of the potential surfaces describing K-H2 are in progress.

  16. Quantitative imaging of atomic and molecular species in cancer cell cultures with TOF-SIMS and Laser-SNMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fartmann, M.; Kriegeskotte, C.; Dambach, S.; Wittig, A.; Sauerwein, W.; Arlinghaus, H. F.

    2004-06-01

    For boron neutron capture therapy, a promising cancer therapy under development, knowledge about the subcellular boron distribution is important. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and nonresonant laser secondary neutral mass spectrometry (NR-Laser-SNMS) have been used for examining freeze-fractured, freeze-dried human melanoma cells incubated with sodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate ( Na210B12H11SH, BSH), a 10B containing drug. With both techniques, elemental and molecular images were obtained from the cancer cells with very high sensitivity and subcellular resolution. The measurement of the K/Na ratio demonstrated that the preparation technique used was appropriate for preserving the chemical and structural integrity of living cells. The boron images showed that the intensity of intracellular and extracellular boron signals was clearly different after incubation of cells in different boron concentrations.

  17. Spectrum, radial wave functions, and hyperfine splittings of the Rydberg states in heavy alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanayei, Ali; Schopohl, Nils

    2016-07-01

    We present numerically accurate calculations of the bound-state spectrum of the highly excited valence electron in the heavy alkali-metal atoms solving the radial Schrödinger eigenvalue problem with a modern spectral collocation method that applies also for a large principal quantum number n ≫1 . As an effective single-particle potential we favor the reputable potential of Marinescu et al. [Phys. Rev. A 49, 982 (1994)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.49.982. Recent quasiclassical calculations of the quantum defect of the valence electron agree for orbital angular momentum l =0 ,1 ,2 ,... overall remarkably well with the results of the numerical calculations, but for the Rydberg states of rubidium and also cesium with l =3 this agreement is less fair. The reason for this anomaly is that in rubidium and cesium the potential acquires for l =3 deep inside the ionic core a second classical region, thus invalidating a standard Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) calculation with two widely spaced turning points. Comparing then our numerical solutions of the radial Schrödinger eigenvalue problem with the uniform analytic WKB approximation of Langer constructed around the remote turning point rn,j ,l (" close=")n -δ0)">+ we observe everywhere a remarkable agreement, apart from a tiny region around the inner turning point rn,j ,l (-). For s states the centrifugal barrier is absent and no inner turning point exists: rn,j ,0 (-)=0 . With the help of an ansatz proposed by Fock we obtain for the s states a second uniform analytic approximation to the radial wave function complementary to the WKB approximation of Langer, which is exact for r →0+ . From the patching condition, that is, for l =0 the Langer and Fock solutions should agree in the intermediate region 0

  18. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, simple and 3d transition metal, and nonmetal atoms on monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. D.; Fang, Y. M.; Wu, S. Q. E-mail: wsq@xmu.edu.cn; Zhu, Z. Z. E-mail: wsq@xmu.edu.cn

    2015-05-15

    Single adsorption of different atoms on pristine two-dimensional monolayer MoS{sub 2} have been systematically investigated by using density functional calculations with van der Waals correction. The adatoms cover alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, main group metal, 3d-transition metals, coinage metal and nonmetal atoms. Depending on the adatom type, metallic, semimetallic or semiconducting behavior can be found in direct bandgap monolayer MoS{sub 2}. Additionally, local or long-range magnetic moments of two-dimensional MoS{sub 2} sheet can also attained through the adsorption. The detailed atomic-scale knowledge of single adsorption on MoS{sub 2} monolayer is important not only for the sake of a theoretical understanding, but also device level deposition technological application.

  19. Dispersion coefficients for the interactions of the alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal ions and inert-gas atoms with a graphene layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-09-01

    Largely motivated by a number of applications, the van der Waals dispersion coefficients C3 of the alkali-metal ions Li+,Na+,K+, and Rb+, the alkaline-earth-metal ions Ca+,Sr+,Ba+, and Ra+, and the inert-gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, and Kr with a graphene layer are determined precisely within the framework of the Dirac model. For these calculations, we evaluate the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atomic systems very accurately by evaluating the transition matrix elements employing relativistic many-body methods and using the experimental values of the excitation energies. The dispersion coefficients are given as functions of the separation distance of an atomic system from the graphene layer and the ambiance temperature during the interactions. For easy extraction of these coefficients, we give a logistic fit to the functional forms of the dispersion coefficients in terms of the separation distances at room temperature.

  20. Ab initio interaction potentials and scattering lengths for ultracold mixtures of metastable helium and alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedziera, Dariusz; Mentel, Łukasz; Żuchowski, Piotr S.; Knoop, Steven

    2015-06-01

    We have obtained accurate ab initio +4Σ quartet potentials for the diatomic metastable triplet helium+alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, Rb) systems, using all-electron restricted open-shell coupled cluster singles and doubles with noniterative triples corrections CCSD(T) calculations and accurate calculations of the long-range C6 coefficients. These potentials provide accurate ab initio quartet scattering lengths, which for these many-electron systems is possible, because of the small reduced masses and shallow potentials that result in a small amount of bound states. Our results are relevant for ultracold metastable triplet helium+alkali-metal mixture experiments.

  1. Ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal atoms on the (0001) surface of the topological insulator Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabishchenkova, A. G.; Otrokov, M. M.; Kuznetsov, V. M.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2015-09-01

    Ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal adatoms on the (0001) step surface of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 has been performed for the case of low coverage. The calculations of the activation energies of diffusion of adatoms on the surface and in van der Waals gaps near steps, as well as the estimate of diffusion lengths, have shown that efficient intercalation through steps is possible only for Li and Na. Data obtained for K, Rb, and Cs atoms indicate that their thermal desorption at high temperatures can occur before intercalation. The results have been discussed in the context of existing experimental data.

  2. Data on step-by-step atomic force microscopy monitoring of changes occurring in single melanoma cells undergoing ToF SIMS specialized sample preparation protocol.

    PubMed

    Bobrowska, J; Pabijan, J; Wiltowska-Zuber, J; Jany, B R; Krok, F; Awsiuk, K; Rysz, J; Budkowski, A; Lekka, M

    2016-09-01

    Data included in this article are associated with the research article entitled 'Protocol of single cells preparation for time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry' (Bobrowska et al., 2016 in press) [1]. This data file contains topography images of single melanoma cells recorded using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Single cells cultured on glass surface were subjected to the proposed sample preparation protocol applied to prepare biological samples for time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF SIMS) measurements. AFM images were collected step-by-step for the single cell, after each step of the proposed preparation protocol. It consists of four main parts: (i) paraformaldehyde fixation, (ii) salt removal, (iii) dehydrating, and (iv) sample drying. In total 13 steps are required, starting from imaging of a living cell in a culture medium and ending up at images of a dried cell in the air. The protocol was applied to melanoma cells from two cell lines, namely, WM115 melanoma cells originated from primary melanoma site and WM266-4 ones being the metastasis of WM115 cells to skin. PMID:27570811

  3. Theoretical Study of the Properties of the Type II Clathrate A^xSn^136, (A = alkali atom; 0 <= x <= 24)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Dong; Higgins, Craig; Myles, Charley

    2012-10-01

    Motivated by recent experimental and theoretical interest in the x dependence of the properties of the Si and Ge-based Type II clathrate materials A^xSi^136 and A^xGe^136 (A = alkali atom) [1,2] we are carrying out a systematic theoretical study of the properties of the Sn-based Type II clathrate system A^xSn^136. Type II clathrates have cage-like lattices in which Si, Ge, or Sn atoms are tetrahedrally-coordinated and sp3 covalently bonded. The cages can contain ``guests''; usually alkali or alkaline earth atoms. These materials are particularly interesting because of their potential use as thermoelectrics. Recent powder X-ray diffraction experiments have found the very interesting result that, for increasing x in the range 0 <= x <= 8 a lattice contraction occurs, and that x is increased further (8 <= x <= 24), a contrasting lattice expansion results. These observations have motivated us to study the behavior of the lattice constant and other properties as a function of guest concentration in other Type II clathrates. In the present paper, we report preliminary results of a density functional based theoretical study of the properties of K^xSn^136 as a function of x. We present results for the x dependence of the lattice constant as well as for other structural and electronic properties of this material. [4pt] [1] S. Stefanoski and G. Nolas, Cryst. Growth Des. 2011, dx.doi.org/10.1021/cg200756r[0pt] [2] M. Beekman, E. Nenghabi, K. Biswas, C. Myles, M. Baitinger, Y. Grin, G.S. Nolas, Inorg. Chem. 49 2010, DOI: 10.1021/ic1005049

  4. Ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal atoms on the (0001) surface of the topological insulator Bi2 Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otrokov, Mikhail; Ryabishchenkova, Anastasia; Gosalvez, Miguel Angel; Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Chulkov, Evgueni

    We present the results of an ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal adatoms on the (0001) stepped surface of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 for the case of low coverage. The calculations of the activation energies of the adatoms diffusion on the surface and in the van der Waals gaps near the steps, as well as the estimation of diffusion lengths, show that efficient intercalation through the steps is possible only for Li and Na. Data obtained for K, Rb, and Cs atoms indicate that their thermal desorption at high temperatures can start before intercalation. These results are discussed in the context of the experimental data available.

  5. Atomic arrangement and electron band structure of Si(1 1 1)-ß-√3 x √3-Bi reconstruction modified by alkali-metal adsorption: ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Eremeev, S V; Chukurov, E N; Gruznev, D V; Zotov, A V; Saranin, A A

    2015-08-01

    Using ab initio calculations, atomic structure and electronic properties of Si(1 1 1)[Formula: see text]-Bi surface modified by adsorption of 1/3 monolayer of alkali metals, Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs, have been explored. Upon adsorption of all metals, a similar atomic structure develops at the surface where twisted chained Bi trimers are arranged into a honeycomb network and alkali metal atoms occupy the [Formula: see text] sites in the center of each honeycomb unit. Among other structural characteristics, the greatest variation concerns the relative heights at which alkali metals reside with respect to Bi-trimer layer. Except for Li, the other metals reside higher than Bi layer and their heights increase with atomic number. All adsorbed surface structures display similar electron band structures of which the most essential feature is metallic surface-state band with a giant spin splitting. This electronic property allows one to consider the Si(1 1 1)[Formula: see text]-Bi surfaces modified by alkali metal adsorption as a set of material systems showing promise for spintronic applications. PMID:26151642

  6. A simplified method for calculating the ac Stark shift of hyperfine levels of alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xia; Qing, Bo; Chen, Xuzong; Zhou, Xiaoji

    2015-07-01

    The ac Stark shift of hyperfine levels of neutral atoms can be calculated using the third order perturbation theory (TOPT), where the third order corrections are quadratic in the atom-photon interaction and linear in the hyperfine interaction. In this paper, we use Green's function to derive the E [ 2 + ɛ ] method which can give close values to those of TOPT for the differential light shift between two hyperfine levels. It comes with a simple form and easy incorporation of theoretical and experimental atomic structure data. Furthermore, we analyze the order of approximation and give the condition under which E [ 2 + ɛ ] method is valid.

  7. Spin-orbit coupling in the dissociative excitation of alkali atoms at the surface of rare gas clusters: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervais, B.; Zanuttini, D.; Douady, J.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the role of the spin-orbit (SO) coupling in the dissociative dynamics of excited alkali atoms at the surface of small rare gas clusters. The electronic structure of the whole system is deduced from a one-electron model based on core polarization pseudo-potentials. It allows us to obtain in the same footing the energy, forces, and non-adiabatic couplings used to simulate the dynamics by means of a surface hopping method. The fine structure state population is analyzed by considering the relative magnitude of the SO coupling ξ, with respect to the spin-free potential energy. We identify three regimes of ξ-values leading to different evolution of adiabatic state population after excitation of the system in the uppermost state of the lowest np 2P shell. For sufficiently small ξ, the final population of the J = /1 2 atomic states, P /1 2 , grows up linearly from P /1 2 = /1 3 at ξ = 0 after a diabatic dynamics. For large values of ξ, we observe a rather adiabatic dynamics with P /1 2 decreasing as ξ increases. For intermediate values of ξ, the coupling is extremely efficient and a complete transfer of population is observed for the set of parameters associated to NaAr3 and NaAr4 clusters.

  8. Spin-orbit coupling in the dissociative excitation of alkali atoms at the surface of rare gas clusters: A theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Gervais, B; Zanuttini, D; Douady, J

    2016-05-21

    We analyze the role of the spin-orbit (SO) coupling in the dissociative dynamics of excited alkali atoms at the surface of small rare gas clusters. The electronic structure of the whole system is deduced from a one-electron model based on core polarization pseudo-potentials. It allows us to obtain in the same footing the energy, forces, and non-adiabatic couplings used to simulate the dynamics by means of a surface hopping method. The fine structure state population is analyzed by considering the relative magnitude of the SO coupling ξ, with respect to the spin-free potential energy. We identify three regimes of ξ-values leading to different evolution of adiabatic state population after excitation of the system in the uppermost state of the lowest np (2)P shell. For sufficiently small ξ, the final population of the J=12 atomic states, P12, grows up linearly from P12=13 at ξ = 0 after a diabatic dynamics. For large values of ξ, we observe a rather adiabatic dynamics with P12 decreasing as ξ increases. For intermediate values of ξ, the coupling is extremely efficient and a complete transfer of population is observed for the set of parameters associated to NaAr3 and NaAr4 clusters. PMID:27208949

  9. SIM-Lite Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Discussion focus on: SIM-Lite Instrument Update - 6m baseline, 50cm, approximately 900M cost; Technology Update - Systematic errors and floor; SIM-Lite terrestrial planet discovery capability; Double blind multiple planet study summary; and the changing landscape of exoplanet science and the role of SIM-Lite. Slides include technology to flight component engineering; instrumental systematic errors; ultra deep search for Earth clones; double blind test, astrometric detection of Earths in multiplanet systems; the current era of exoplanet science and where SIM-Lite fits in; the next frontier and where SIM-Lite fits in, why SIM is unique in discovering Earths; imaging planet status is uncertain without masses and ages; SIM role in establishing how planetary systems form and evolve; and SIM probes of broad planet mass range around young stars.

  10. Light-induced changes in an alkali metal atomic vapor cell coating studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hibberd, A. M.; Bernasek, S. L.; Seltzer, S. J.; Balabas, M. V.; Morse, M.; Budker, D.

    2013-09-07

    The light-induced desorption of Rb atoms from a paraffin coating is studied with depth-profiling X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) using tunable synchrotron radiation. Following Rb exposure, shifts of the C1s signal to higher binding energies, as well as the appearance of lower binding energy components in the O1s region, were observed. These effects were diminished after irradiation with desorbing light. Additionally, following desorbing-light irradiation, changes in the depth-dependent concentration of carbon were observed. These observations offer an insight into the microscopic changes that occur during light-induced atomic desorption and demonstrate the utility of XPS in understanding atom-coating interactions.

  11. Alkali Bee

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alkali bee, Nomia melanderi, is native to deserts and semi-arid desert basins of the western United States. It is a very effective and manageable pollinator for the production of seed in alfalfa (=lucerne) and some other crops, such as onion. It is the world’s only intensively managed ground-n...

  12. Optimal densities of alkali metal atoms in an optically pumped K-Rb hybrid atomic magnetometer considering the spatial distribution of spin polarization.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yosuke; Sato, Daichi; Kamada, Keigo; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2016-07-11

    An optically pumped K-Rb hybrid atomic magnetometer can be a useful tool for biomagnetic measurements due to the high spatial homogeneity of its sensor property inside a cell. However, because the property varies depending on the densities of potassium and rubidium atoms, optimization of the densities is essential. In this study, by using the Bloch equations of K and Rb and considering the spatial distribution of the spin polarization, we confirmed that the calculation results of spin polarization behavior are in good agreement with the experimental data. Using our model, we calculated the spatial distribution of the spin polarization and found that the optimal density of K atoms is 3 × 1019 m-3 and the optimal density ratio is nK/nRb ~ 400 to maximize the output signal and enhance spatial homogeneity of the sensor property. PMID:27410815

  13. Complete-velocity-range description of negative-ion conversion of neutral atoms on an alkali-metal-halide surface under grazing geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hu; Zhou, Wang; Zhang, Meixiao; Zhou, Lihua; Ma, Yulong; Wang, Guangyi; Wu, Yong; Li, Bowen; Chen, Ximeng

    2016-06-01

    We propose a simple theoretical approach to consider negative-ion conversion of neutral atoms grazing on alkali-metal-halide crystal surfaces over the complete velocity range. The conversion process is viewed as a series of successive binary collisions between the projectile and the negatively charged sites on the surface along their trajectories due to localization of valence-band electrons at the anionic sites of the crystal. Conversion from F0 to F- via grazing scattering in LiF(100) and KI(100) is demonstrated with this model, which incorporates the key factors of image interaction and Mott-Littleton polarization interaction for electron capture. It also incorporates the decrease in the electron affinity due to Coulomb barrier tunneling of large-velocity negative ions to the vacuum level near surface anion sites. The pronounced differences in the efficiency of F- formation at LiF(100) and KI(100) surfaces are well explained by the proposed model. The relative efficiency and related saturation of the negative-ion formation for LiF and KI crystals compare well with experimental results.

  14. Pressure-induced phase transformations in alkali-metal hydrides calculated using an improved linear-muffin-tin-orbital-atomic-sphere-approximation energy scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, C. O.; Methfessel, M.

    1992-01-01

    A scheme for the calculation of total energies from first principles is described which is intermediate between the popular linear muffin-tin-orbital method in the atomic-sphere approximation (LMTO-ASA) and an exact full-potential treatment. The local-density total energy is evaluated accurately for the output charge density from the ASA potential. This method is applied to the study of static structural properties and the pressure-induced phase transformation from B1 (NaCl-structure) to B2 (CsCl-structure) phases for the partially ionic alkaki-metal hydrides NaH and KH and the alkali halide NaCl. Good agreement with experimental transition pressures and volumes is obtained. The series NaH, KH, and NaCl shows the observed strong cation and weak anion dependence. Charge densities and band structures are given at zero and high pressure. Calculated energy-volume curves for LiH show no transition up to 1 Mbar, in agreement with experimental data.

  15. The optical pumping of alkali atoms using coherent radiation from semi-conductor injection lasers and incoherent radiation from resonance lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, G.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study for creating population differences in the ground states of alkali atoms (Cesium 133) is presented. Studies made on GaAs-junction lasers and the achievement of population inversions among the hyperfine levels in the ground state of Cs 133 by optically pumping it with radiation from a GaAs diode laser. Laser output was used to monitor the populations in the ground state hyperfine levels as well as to perform the hyperfine pumping. A GaAs laser operated at about 77 K was used to scan the 8521 A line of Cs 133. Experiments were performed both with neon-filled and with paraflint-coated cells containing the cesium vapor. Investigations were also made for the development of the triple resonance coherent pulse technique and for the detection of microwave induced hyperfine trasistions by destroying the phase relationships produced by a radio frequency pulse. A pulsed cesium resonance lamp developed, and the lamp showed clean and reproducible switching characteristics.

  16. Assessing the potential of ToF-SIMS as a complementary approach to investigate cement-based materials — Applications related to alkali–silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Laetitia; Leemann, Andreas

    2015-02-15

    In this study, the potential of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) for the application in cement-based materials is assessed in combination and comparison with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). Mortar, concrete and samples from model systems providing products formed by the alkali–silica reaction (ASR) were studied. ToF-SIMS provides qualitative data on alkalis in cases where EDX reaches its limits in regard to detectable concentration, lateral resolution and atomic number of the elements. Due to its high in-depth resolution of a few atomic monolayers, thin layers of reaction products can be detected on the surfaces and chemically analyzed with ToF-SIMS. Additionally, it delivers information on the molecular conformation within the ASR product, its hydrogen content and its isotope ratios, information not provided by EDX. Provided the samples are carefully prepared, ToF-SIMS opens up new possibilities in the analysis of cement-based materials.

  17. Safeguards Information Management Systems (SIMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, R.J.; Sheely, K.B.; Brown, J.B.; Horton, R.D.; Strittmatter, R.; Manatt, D.R.

    1994-04-01

    The requirements for the management of information at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and its Department of Safeguards are rapidly changing. Historically, the Department of Safeguards has had the requirement to process large volumes of conventional safeguards information. An information management system is currently in place that adequately handles the IAEA`s conventional safeguards data needs. In the post-Iraq environment, however, there is a growing need to expand the IAEA information management capability to include unconventional forms of information. These data include environmental sampling results, photographs, video film, lists of machine tools, and open-source materials such as unclassified publications. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has responded to this information management need by implementing the Safeguards Information Management Systems (SIMS) initiative. SIMS was created by the DOE to anticipate and respond to IAEA information management needs through a multilaboratory initiative that will utilize an integrated approach to develop and deploy technology in a timely and cost-effective manner. The DOE will use the SIMS initiative to coordinate US information management activities that support the IAEA Department of Safeguards.

  18. The SIM Time Network.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Michael A; Novick, Andrew N; Lopez R, J Mauricio; Jimenez, Francisco; de Carlos Lopez, Eduardo; Boulanger, Jean-Simon; Pelletier, Raymond; de Carvalho, Ricardo J; Solis, Raul; Sanchez, Harold; Quevedo, Carlos Andres; Pascoe, Gregory; Perez, Daniel; Bances, Eduardo; Trigo, Leonardo; Masi, Victor; Postigo, Henry; Questelles, Anthony; Gittens, Anselm

    2011-01-01

    The Sistema Interamericano de Metrologia (SIM) is a regional metrology organization (RMO) whose members are the national metrology institutes (NMIs) located in the 34 nations of the Organization of American States (OAS). The SIM/OAS region extends throughout North, Central, and South America and the Caribbean Islands. About half of the SIM NMIs maintain national standards of time and frequency and must participate in international comparisons in order to establish metrological traceability to the International System (SI) of units. The SIM time network (SIMTN) was developed as a practical, cost effective, and technically sound way to automate these comparisons. The SIMTN continuously compares the time standards of SIM NMIs and produces measurement results in near real-time by utilizing the Internet and the Global Positioning System (GPS). Fifteen SIM NMIs have joined the network as of December 2010. This paper provides a brief overview of SIM and a technical description of the SIMTN. It presents international comparison results and examines the measurement uncertainties. It also discusses the metrological benefits that the network provides to its participants. PMID:26989584

  19. The SIM Time Network

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Michael A.; Novick, Andrew N.; Lopez R, J. Mauricio; Jimenez, Francisco; de Carlos Lopez, Eduardo; Boulanger, Jean-Simon; Pelletier, Raymond; de Carvalho, Ricardo J.; Solis, Raul; Sanchez, Harold; Quevedo, Carlos Andres; Pascoe, Gregory; Perez, Daniel; Bances, Eduardo; Trigo, Leonardo; Masi, Victor; Postigo, Henry; Questelles, Anthony; Gittens, Anselm

    2011-01-01

    The Sistema Interamericano de Metrologia (SIM) is a regional metrology organization (RMO) whose members are the national metrology institutes (NMIs) located in the 34 nations of the Organization of American States (OAS). The SIM/OAS region extends throughout North, Central, and South America and the Caribbean Islands. About half of the SIM NMIs maintain national standards of time and frequency and must participate in international comparisons in order to establish metrological traceability to the International System (SI) of units. The SIM time network (SIMTN) was developed as a practical, cost effective, and technically sound way to automate these comparisons. The SIMTN continuously compares the time standards of SIM NMIs and produces measurement results in near real-time by utilizing the Internet and the Global Positioning System (GPS). Fifteen SIM NMIs have joined the network as of December 2010. This paper provides a brief overview of SIM and a technical description of the SIMTN. It presents international comparison results and examines the measurement uncertainties. It also discusses the metrological benefits that the network provides to its participants. PMID:26989584

  20. Integrating Sphere Alkali-Metal Vapor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuyer, Bart; Ben-Kish, Amit; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2010-03-01

    An integrating sphere is an optical multi-pass cavity that uses diffuse reflection to increase the optical path length. Typically applied in photometry and radiometry, integrating spheres have previously been used to detect trace gases and to cool and trap alkali-metal atoms. Here, we investigate the potential for integrating spheres to enhance optical absorption in optically thin alkali-metal vapor cells. In particular, we consider the importance of dielectric effects due to a glass container for the alkali-metal vapor. Potential applications include miniature atomic clocks and magnetometers, where multi-passing could reduce the operating temperature and power consumption.

  1. Interaction of wide band gap single crystals with 248 nm excimer laser radiation. XII. The emission of negative atomic ions from alkali halides

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Kenichi; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.

    2007-12-01

    Many wide band gap materials yield charged and neutral emissions when exposed to sub-band-gap laser radiation at power densities below the threshold for optical breakdown and plume formation. In this work, we report the observation of negative alkali ions from several alkali halides under comparable conditions. We observe no evidence for negative halogen ions, in spite of the high electron affinities of the halogens. Significantly, the positive and negative alkali ions show a high degree of spatial and temporal overlap. A detailed study of all the relevant particle emissions from potassium chloride (KCl) suggests that K{sup -} is formed by the sequential attachment of two electrons to K{sup +}.

  2. Progress in molecular SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Borman, S.

    1987-04-15

    A review of sputtering and molecular ion emission is presented. New derivatization techniques have produced lower detection limits for molecular secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Spectra of representative organic compounds are presented.

  3. Adsorption on Alkali Halides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urzua Duran, Gilberto Antonio

    1995-01-01

    Using a variety of interionic potentials, I have computed the configurations of adsorbed alkali halides monomers on the (001) surface of selected alkali halides crystals. In the majority of cases studied it is found that the monomer adsorbs perpendicular to the surface with the cation sitting nearly on top of the surface anion. In about ten percent of the cases though the monomer adsorbs tilted from the vertical. In these cases the ion that is closer to the surface can be the cation or the anion. The effect of polarization forces is found to be important. In order to discuss the effects of surface retaxation with adsorbates, I have evaluated the surface relaxation of the alkali halide crystals, using a shell model for the interionic forces. It is found that surface relaxation and rumpling are generally small, especially when the van der Waals forces are included. A theory of the effect of substrate vibrations on the binding of an adsorbed atom is developed. At T = 0 the binding energy is D_0-E, where D_0 is the surface well depth (classical binding energy) and E is the quantum correction. For several simple models, it is found that E is surprisingly model-independent. We compare D _0-E with the binding energies to a rigid substrate, D_0-E_{rs}, and to a vibrationally averaged substrate, D _0-E_{va}. We prove that E_{va}>=q E>=q E_ {rs} and that similar relations hold at finite temperature for the free energy of binding. In most cases E_{rs} is better than E_{va} as an approximation to E.

  4. SIMS analysis for detection of contaminants in thin film photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, G. C.; Lyons, L. E.; Tandon, R. K.; Wood, B. J.

    1988-12-01

    Minor contaminants in electrodeposited thin film CdTe which produce efficient solar cells have been investigated by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) using three different primary ions and three different SIMS instruments. To obtain SIMS data which represent what is present in the sample, a number of precautions must be taken. These are illustrated and positive SIMS data from an electrodeposited film show that it has fewer impurities than commercial crystal CdTe specified as 5N pure. The impurities in the film had not been intentionally added, so their source was investigated by SIMS and found to be the starting chemicals and deposition vessels. For quantification, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy and atomic absorption spectroscopy of the deposition solutions provided upper limits for the impurity concentration.

  5. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  6. Polarization and electronic excitation in nonreactive collisions: Basic formulation for quantum calculations of collisions between /sup 2/P-state alkali-metal atoms and H/sub 2/ or D/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Baylis, W.E.; Pascale, J.; Rossi, F.

    1987-11-01

    The inelastic scattering of two structured systems: for example, an excited atom and a molecule: is considered in the case of nonreactive collisions. Explicit formulas are presented for cross sections corresponding to transitions between arbitrary eigenstates of the two isolated systems. These formulas are then used to derive cross sections for polarization transfer and multipole relaxation in one system when the other system is unpolarized. Both space-fixed and body-fixed formulations are given. Explicit matrix elements are worked out for interactions such as occur between model alkali-metal atoms and rigid-rotor diatomic molecules. An effective interaction method is also discussed and related to an adiabatic-state approach.

  7. Superconductivity in alkali-doped C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Arthur P.

    2015-07-01

    Superconductivity in alkali-doped C60 (A3C60, A = an alkali atom) is well described by an s-wave state produced by phonon mediated pairing. Moderate coupling of electrons to high-frequency shape-changing intra-molecular vibrational modes produces transition temperatures (Tc) up to 33 K in single-phase material. The good understanding of pairing in A3C60 offers a paradigm for the development of new superconducting materials.

  8. Milk-alkali syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000332.htm Milk-alkali syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Milk-alkali syndrome is a condition in which there ...

  9. Alkali metal adsorption on Al(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, J. N.; Lundgren, E.; Nyholm, R.; Qvarford, M.

    1993-06-01

    The submonolayer adsorption of Na, K, Rb, and Cs on the Al(111) surface at 100 K and at room temperature is investigated by high resolution core level spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction. It is found that the first alkali atoms on the surface adsorb at surface defects. At higher coverages, up to approximately one third of the maximum submonolayer coverage, alkali atoms adsorbed at defects coexist with a dispersed phase. At higher coverages island formation is found to occur for the majority of the systems. It is argued that all of the ordered structures formed at room temperature involve a disruption of the Al(111) surface in contrast to the situation at 100 K where the alkali atoms adsorb as adatoms.

  10. Ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal atoms on the (0001) surface of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabishchenkova, A. G. Otrokov, M. M.; Kuznetsov, V. M.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2015-09-15

    Ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal adatoms on the (0001) step surface of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has been performed for the case of low coverage. The calculations of the activation energies of diffusion of adatoms on the surface and in van der Waals gaps near steps, as well as the estimate of diffusion lengths, have shown that efficient intercalation through steps is possible only for Li and Na. Data obtained for K, Rb, and Cs atoms indicate that their thermal desorption at high temperatures can occur before intercalation. The results have been discussed in the context of existing experimental data.

  11. Fischer Tropsch synthesis : an in-situ TPR-EXAFS/XANES investigation of the influence of Group I alkali promoters on the local atomic and electronic structure of carburized iron/silica catalysts.

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, M. C.; Jacobs, G.; Davis, B. H.; Cronauer, D. C.; Kropf, A. J.; Marshall, C. L.

    2010-01-01

    The promoting impact of alkali metals (i.e., Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) on the carburization rate of Fe in Fe/Si catalysts was investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A multisample holder was used, allowing nearly simultaneous examination of the catalysts during activation in a CO/He mixture. With the white line intensity and shape as a fingerprint for oxidation state, TPR/XANES analysis enabled us to measure the relative composition of the different compounds as a function of the carburization time, temperature, and atomic number of the group 1 promoter. At the same time, TPR/EXAFS provided information on the changes in local atomic structure that accompanied the oxidation state changes. The rate of carburization increased in the following order: unpromoted < Li < Na < K = Rb = Cs. After 10 h of treatment the samples containing K, Rb, and Cs were completely carburized, and residual quantities of iron oxides were detected in both unpromoted and Li-promoted samples. The EXAFS spectra after carburization could be fitted well by considering a model containing Hagg carbide and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. After 10 h of CO/He treatment at 290 C, the main component observed was Hagg carbide. A model containing Hagg and {var_epsilon}-carbides, and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, was also investigated. However, the r-factor was not significantly impacted by including {var_epsilon}-carbide in the fitting, and the resulting contribution of {var_epsilon}-carbide in each catalyst from the model was virtually negligible. Selectivity differences are thus not likely due to changes in the carbide distribution. Rather, the alkali promoter increases the CO dissociative adsorption rate, resulting in an increase in the surface coverage of dissociated CO and an inhibition in the olefin readsorption rate. This in turn results in higher olefin selectivities, in agreement with previous catalytic tests.

  12. Self-discharge in bimetallic cells containing alkali metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, M. S.; Hesson, J. C.; Shimotake, H.

    1969-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of thermally regenerative bimetallic cells with alkali metal anodes shows a relation between the current drawn and the rate of discharge under open-circuit conditions. The self-discharge rate of the cell is due to the dissolution and ionization of alkali metal atoms in the fused-salt electrolyte

  13. SIM Configuration Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaron, Kim M.

    2000-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) is a space-based 10 m baseline Michelson interferometer. Planned for launch in 2005 aboard a Delta III launch vehicle, or equivalent, its primary objective is to measure the positions of stars and other celestial objects with an unprecedented accuracy of 4 micro arc seconds. With such an instrument, tremendous advancement can be expected in our understanding of stellar and galactic dynamics. Using triangulation from opposite sides of the orbit around the sun (i.e. by using parallax) one can measure the distance to any observable object in our galaxy. By directly measuring the orbital wobble of nearby stars, the mass and orbit of planets can be determined over a wide range of parameters. The distribution of velocity within nearby galaxies will be measurable. Observations of these and other objects will improve the calibration of distance estimators by more than an order of magnitude. This will permit a much better determination of the Hubble Constant as well as improving our overall understanding of the evolution of the universe. SIM has undergone several transformations, especially over the past year and a half since the start of Phase A. During this phase of a project, it is desirable to perform system-level trade studies, so the substantial evolution of the design that has occurred is quite appropriate. Part of the trade-off process has addressed two major underlying architectures: SIM Classic; and Son of SIM. The difference between these two architectures is related to the overall arrangement of the optical elements and the associated metrology system. Several different configurations have been developed for each architecture. Each configuration is the result of design choices that are influenced by many competing considerations. Some of the more important aspects will be discussed. The Space Interferometry Mission has some extremely challenging goals: millikelvin thermal stability, nanometer stabilization of optics

  14. Progress in Understanding Alkali-Alkali Spin Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Happer, William; Chann, Bien; Kadlecek, Stephen; Anderson, L. W.; Walker, Thad G.

    2000-06-01

    In extensive experiments we have shown that a spin interaction with a relatively long correlation time causes much of the spin relaxation in very dense alkali-metal vapors. The spin relaxation is affected by the pressure of the helium or nitrogen buffer gas, although there is little dependence at pressures above one atmosphere. There are substantial differences in the relaxation rates for different isotopes of the same element, for example ^87Rb and ^85Rb. We have completed extensive modeling of how singlet and triplet dimers and doublet trimers of the alkali-metal atoms could cause spin relaxation in dense alkali-metal vapors. In the case of doublet trimers or triplet dimers, we assume the main coupling to the nuclear spins is through the Fermi Contact interaction with the unpaired electrons. Spin loss to the rotation of the molecule is assumed to occur through the electronic spin-rotation and spin-axis (dipole-dipole) interactions for the triplet dimers. For the singlet dimers, we assume that the nuclear spins couple directly to the rotational angular momentum of the molecule through the electric quadrupole interaction. We account for all of the total nuclear spin states that occur for the dimers and trimers. We have also considered the possibility that the collisional breakup and formation rates of the dimers or trimers could saturate with increasing buffer gas pressure. Such saturation occurs in many other unimolecular reactions and is often ascribed to breakup through activated states.

  15. Alkali-Metal Spin Maser.

    PubMed

    Chalupczak, W; Josephs-Franks, P

    2015-07-17

    Quantum measurement is a combination of a read-out and a perturbation of the quantum system. We explore the nonlinear spin dynamics generated by a linearly polarized probe beam in a continuous measurement of the collective spin state in a thermal alkali-metal atomic sample. We demonstrate that the probe-beam-driven perturbation leads, in the presence of indirect pumping, to complete polarization of the sample and macroscopic coherent spin oscillations. As a consequence of the former we report observation of spectral profiles free from collisional broadening. Nonlinear dynamics is studied through exploring its effect on radio frequency as well as spin noise spectra. PMID:26230788

  16. Attaching an alkali metal atom to an alkaline earth metal oxide (BeO, MgO, or CaO) yields a triatomic metal oxide with reduced ionization potential and redirected polarity.

    PubMed

    Nowiak, Grzegorz; Skurski, Piotr; Anusiewicz, Iwona

    2016-04-01

    The existence of a series of neutral triatomic metal oxides MON and their corresponding cations MON (+) (M = Be, Mg, Ca; N = Li, Na, K) was postulated and verified theoretically using ab initio methods at the CCSD(T)/6-311+G(3df)//MP2/6-311+G(3df) level of theory. The calculations revealed that the vertical ionization potentials (IPs) of the MON radicals (calculated using the outer-valence Green's function technique (OVGF) with the 6-311+G(3df) basis set) were ca. 2-3 eV smaller than the IPs of the corresponding MO and NO systems or that of the isolated M atom. Population analysis of the neutral triatomic MON molecules and their corresponding MO counterparts indicated that the attachment of an alkali metal atom to any oxide MO (BeO, MgO, CaO) reverses its polarity, which manifests itself as the redirection of the dipole moment vector. PMID:26994021

  17. Terahertz radiation in alkali vapor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, X.-C.

    2014-05-12

    By taking advantage of low ionization potentials of alkali atoms, we demonstrate terahertz wave generation from cesium and rubidium vapor plasmas with an amplitude nearly one order of magnitude larger than that from nitrogen gas at low pressure (0.02–0.5 Torr). The observed phenomena are explained by the numerical modeling based upon electron tunneling ionization.

  18. The SIM astronmetric grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, R.

    2002-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) is fundamentally a one-dimensional instrument with a 15-degree field-of-regard. Mission objectives require a global reference grid of thousands of well-understood stars with positions known to 4 microarcseconds which will be used to establish the instrument baseline vector during scientific observations. This accuracy will be achieved by frequently observing a set of stars throughout the mission and performing a global fit of the observations to determine position, proper motion and parallax for each star. Each star will be observed approximately 200 times with about 6.5 stars per single instrument field on the sky. We describe the nature of the reference grid, the candidate objects, and the results of simulations demonstrating grid performance, including estimates of the grid robustness when including effects such as instrument drift and possible contamination of the grid star sample by undetected binaries.

  19. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  20. Draft INFL Guideline on SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Kristo, M J

    2012-04-02

    Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is used for elemental and isotopic analysis of solid samples. The greatest strength of SIMS is the ability to analyze very small areas (as small as 50 nm using the CAMECA NanoSIMS, for example) and to generate high-spatial resolution maps of the distribution of elements and isotopes within the sample. The measurement of the isotopic composition of sample is usually straightforward, only requiring the analysis of the sample and that of an isotopic reference material for determination of the mass bias of the instrument. Quantification of elements, however, involves the analysis of matrix matched standards for the determination of the relative sensitivity factor (a function of both the element to be analyzed and the matrix). SIMS is commonly used in nuclear forensics for exploring the heterogeneity of the material on fine spatial scale.

  1. Study of superconducting state parameters of alkali alkali binary alloys by a pseudopotential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Aditya M.

    2006-12-01

    A detailed study of the superconducting state parameters (SSP) viz. electron-phonon coupling strength λ, Coulomb pseudopotential μ∗, transition temperature TC, isotope effect exponent α and effective interaction strength N OV of ten alkali-alkali binary alloys i.e. Li 1- xNa x, Li 1- xK x, Li 1- xRb x, Li 1- xCs x, Na 1- xK x, Na 1- xRb x, Na 1- xCs x, K 1- xRb x, K 1- xCs x and Rb 1- xCs x are made within the framework of the model potential formalism and employing the pseudo-alloy-atom (PAA) model for the first time. We use the Ashcroft’s empty core (EMC) model potential for evaluating the superconducting properties of alkali alloys. Five different forms of local field correction functions viz. Hartree (H), Taylor (T), Ichimaru-Utsumi (IU), Farid et al. (F) and Sarkar et al. (S) are used to incorporate the exchange and correlation effects. A considerable influence of various exchange and correlation functions on λ and μ∗ is found from the present study. Reasonable agreement with the theoretical values of the SSP of pure components is found (corresponding to the concentration x = 0 or 1). It is also concluded that nature of the SSP strongly depends on the value of the atomic volume Ω0 of alkali-alkali binary alloys.

  2. Spatial dynamics of laser-induced fluorescence in an intense laser beam: An experimental and theoretical study with alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzinsh, M.; Berzins, A.; Ferber, R.; Gahbauer, F.; Kalnins, U.

    2016-03-01

    We show that it is possible to model accurately optical phenomena in intense laser fields by taking into account the intensity distribution over the laser beam. We present an extension of an earlier theoretical model that divides an intense laser beam into concentric regions, each with a Rabi frequency that corresponds to the intensity in that region, and solve a set of coupled optical Bloch equations for the density matrix in each region. Experimentally obtained magneto-optical resonance curves for the Fg=2 ⟶Fe=1 transition of the D1 line of 87Rb agree very well with the theoretical model up to a laser intensity of around 200 mW/cm2 for a transition whose saturation intensity is around 4.5 mW/cm2. We examine the spatial dependence of the fluorescence intensity in an intense laser beam experimentally and theoretically. We present and discuss the results of an experiment in which a broad, intense pump laser excites the Fg=4 ⟶Fe=4 transition of the D2 line of cesium while a narrow probe beam scans the atoms within the pump beam and excites the D1 line of cesium, whose fluorescence is recorded as a function of probe beam position. Experimentally obtained spatial profiles of the fluorescence intensity agree qualitatively with the predictions of the model.

  3. Apparatus enables accurate determination of alkali oxides in alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupraw, W. A.; Gahn, R. F.; Graab, J. W.; Maple, W. E.; Rosenblum, L.

    1966-01-01

    Evacuated apparatus determines the alkali oxide content of an alkali metal by separating the metal from the oxide by amalgamation with mercury. The apparatus prevents oxygen and moisture from inadvertently entering the system during the sampling and analytical procedure.

  4. Two dimensional profiling of ultra-shallow implants using SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, G. A.; Gibbons, R.; Dowsett, M. G.

    1998-11-24

    The lateral spread of dopant under the implant mask edge and its behavior during thermal processing is becoming increasingly important as device dimensions are reduced. Direct measurement of the distribution by high spatial resolution SIMS is not possible owing to the very few impurity atoms present in the analyte volume at junction concentrations. In this paper we describe a SIMS based technique, using a special sample structure, that may be used to access this information and discuss the instrumental requirements, resolution and detection limits, as well as presenting cross sectional dopant data.

  5. Subcellular boron and fluorine distributions with SIMS ion microscopy in BNCT and cancer research

    SciTech Connect

    Subhash Chandra

    2008-05-30

    The development of a secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based technique of Ion Microscopy in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was the main goal of this project, so that one can study the subcellular location of boron-10 atoms and their partitioning between the normal and cancerous tissue. This information is fundamental for the screening of boronated drugs appropriate for neutron capture therapy of cancer. Our studies at Cornell concentrated mainly on studies of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The early years of the grant were dedicated to the development of cryogenic methods and correlative microscopic approaches so that a reliable subcellular analysis of boron-10 atoms can be made with SIMS. In later years SIMS was applied to animal models and human tissues of GBM for studying the efficacy of potential boronated agents in BNCT. Under this grant the SIMS program at Cornell attained a new level of excellence and collaborative SIMS studies were published with leading BNCT researchers in the U.S.

  6. Alkalis and Skin.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, John E; Tan, Jin Lin; Ming, Justin Choong Tzen; Abell, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this editorial is to provide an overview of the chemical interactions occurring in the skin of our patients on contact with alkaline agents. Strongly basic alkali is highly aggressive and will readily hydrolyze (or cleave) key biological molecules such as lipids and proteins. This phenomenon is known as saponification in the case of lipids and liquefactive denaturation for peptides and proteins. A short section on current first-aid concepts is included. A better understanding of the basic science behind alkali burns will make us better teachers and provide an insight into the urgency needed in treating these common and dangerous chemical injuries. PMID:26182072

  7. SIMS image processing methods for petroleum cracking catalyst characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Leta, D.P.; Lamberti, W.A.; Disko, M.M.; Kugler, E.L.; Varady, W.A. )

    1990-08-01

    The technique of Imaging Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) has proven to be very well suited to the characterization of fluidized petroleum cracking catalysts (FCC). The ability to view elemental distributions with 0.5 micron spatial resolution at concentrations in the ppm range mates well with the submicron phases and low concentration contaminants present in commercial multi-component FCC particles. The use of ultra-low light level imaging systems with the intrinsically sensitive SIMS technique makes real time viewing of many of the elements important in FCC catalysts possible. Aluminum, silicon and the rare earth elements serve to define the major phases present within each catalyst particle, while the transition row elements and all of the alkali and alkaline elements may be seen at trace concentrations. Of particular importance is the use of the technique to study the distributions of nickel and vanadium which are the most deleterious of the contaminant metals. Modern image processing computers and software now allow the rapid quantitative analysis of SIMS elemental images in order to more clearly reveal the locations of the catalyst phases and the quantitative distributions of the contaminant metals on those phases. Although the analysis techniques discussed in this study may be applied to any of the contaminant elements, for simplicity the authors will limit their examples to the major catalyst elements, and the nickel and vanadium contaminants.

  8. Sim1 and Sim2 expression during chick and mouse limb development.

    PubMed

    Coumailleau, Pascal; Duprez, Delphine

    2009-01-01

    The Drosophila Single minded (Sim) transcription factor is a master regulator of cell fate during midline development. The homolog mouse Sim1 and Sim2 genes are important for central nervous system development. Loss of mSim1 activity leads to an absence of specific neuroendocrine lineages within the hypothalamus, while overexpression of mSim2 leads to behavioural defects. We now provide evidence that vertebrate Sim genes might be important for limb muscle formation. We have examined by in situ hybridisation the expression of the Sim1 and Sim2 genes during limb development in chick and mouse embryos. The expression of both Sim genes is mainly associated with limb muscle formation. We found that each Sim gene has a similar temporal and spatial expression pattern in chick and mouse embryonic limbs, although with some differences for the Sim2 gene between species. In chick or mouse embryonic limbs, Sim1 and Sim2 display non-overlapping expression domains, suggesting an involvement for Sim1 and Sim2 proteins at different steps of limb muscle formation. Sim1 gene expression is associated with the early step of muscle progenitor cell migration in chick and mouse, while the Sim2 gene is expressed just after the migration process. In addition, chick and mouse Sim2 gene expression is enhanced in limb ventral muscle masses versus dorsal ventral muscle masses. Our results provide a basis for further functional analysis of the Sim genes in limb muscle formation. PMID:19123137

  9. Alkali-metal azides interacting with metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Armata, Nerina; Cortese, Remedios; Duca, Dario; Triolo, Roberto

    2013-01-14

    Interactions between alkali-metal azides and metal-organic framework (MOF) derivatives, namely, the first and third members of the isoreticular MOF (IRMOF) family, IRMOF-1 and IRMOF-3, are studied within the density functional theory (DFT) paradigm. The investigations take into account different models of the selected IRMOFs. The mutual influence between the alkali-metal azides and the π rings or Zn centers of the involved MOF derivatives are studied by considering the interactions both of the alkali-metal cations with model aromatic centers and of the alkali-metal azides with distinct sites of differently sized models of IRMOF-1 and IRMOF-3. Several exchange and correlation functionals are employed to calculate the corresponding interaction energies. Remarkably, it is found that, with increasing alkali-metal atom size, the latter decrease for cations interacting with the π-ring systems and increase for the azides interacting with the MOF fragments. The opposite behavior is explained by stabilization effects on the azide moieties and determined by the Zn atoms, which constitute the inorganic vertices of the IRMOF species. Larger cations can, in fact, coordinate more efficiently to both the aromatic center and the azide anion, and thus stabilizing bridging arrangements of the azide between one alkali-metal and two Zn atoms in an η(2) coordination mode are more favored. PMID:23161861

  10. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04

    Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

  11. TOF-SIMS imaging of lipids on rat brain sections.

    PubMed

    Touboul, David; Brunelle, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Since several decades, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) coupled to time of flight (TOF) is used for atomic or small inorganic/organic fragments imaging on different materials. With the advent of polyatomic ion sources leading to a significant increase of sensitivity in combination with a reasonable spatial resolution (1-10 μm), TOF-SIMS is becoming a more and more popular analytical platform for MS imaging. Even if this technique is limited to small molecules (typically below 1,000 Da), it offers enough sensitivity to detect and locate various classes of lipids directly on the surface of tissue sections. This chapter is thus dedicated to the TOF-SIMS analysis of lipids in positive and negative ion modes on rat brain tissue sections using a bismuth cluster ion source. PMID:25361663

  12. QuakeSim Project Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, D.; Donnellan, A.; Pierce, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    QuakeSim is an online computational framework focused on using remotely sensed geodetic imaging data to model and understand earthquakes. With the rise in online social networking over the last decade, many tools and concepts have been developed that are useful to research groups. In particular, QuakeSim is interested in the ability for researchers to post, share, and annotate files generated by modeling tools in order to facilitate collaboration. To accomplish this, features were added to the preexisting QuakeSim site that include single sign-on, automated saving of output from modeling tools, and a personal user space to manage sharing permissions on these saved files. These features implement OpenID and Lightweight Data Access Protocol (LDAP) technologies to manage files across several different servers, including a web server running Drupal and other servers hosting the computational tools themselves.

  13. Chlor-Alkali Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venkatesh, S.; Tilak, B. V.

    1983-01-01

    Chlor-alkali technology is one of the largest electrochemical industries in the world, the main products being chlorine and caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) generated simultaneously by the electrolysis of sodium chloride. This technology is reviewed in terms of electrochemical principles and manufacturing processes involved. (Author/JN)

  14. [Measurement of Mole Ratio for Alkali Metal Mixture by Using Spectral Absorption Method].

    PubMed

    Zou, Sheng; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Yao; Chen, Xi-yuan

    2015-08-01

    The ratio of alkali metal mixture is one of the most important parameters in gauge head belonging to the ultra-sensitivity inertial measurement equipment, which is required to detect precisely. According to the feature that ratio of alkali metal is related to alkali metal vapor density, the theory of optical depth is used to detect the ratio of alkali metal in the present article. The result shows that the data got by the theory of optical depth compared with empirical formula differs at three orders of magnitude, which can't ensure the accuracy. By changing the data processing method, model between spectral absorption rate and temperature in cell is established. The temperature in alkali metal cell is calibrated by spectral absorption rate. The ratio of alkali metal atoms in the cell is analyzed by calculating the alkali density with empirical formula. The computational error is less than 10%. PMID:26672309

  15. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Wolfs, Denise Y.; Clavenna, Le Roy R.; Eakman, James M.; Kalina, Theodore

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  16. Positron collisions with alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gien, T. T.

    1990-01-01

    The total cross sections for positron and electron collisions with potassium, sodium, lithium and rubidium are calculated, employing the modified Glauber approximation. The Modified Glauber cross sections for positron collision with potassium and sodium at low intermediate energies are found to agree reasonably well with existing experimental data.

  17. Calculation of Radiative Corrections to E1 matrix elements in the Neutral Alkalis

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J; Cheng, K T

    2004-09-28

    Radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements for ns-np transitions in the alkali metal atoms lithium through francium are evaluated. They are found to be small for the lighter alkalis but significantly larger for the heavier alkalis, and in the case of cesium much larger than the experimental accuracy. The relation of the matrix element calculation to a recent decay rate calculation for hydrogenic ions is discussed, and application of the method to parity nonconservation in cesium is described.

  18. Astrometeric Science with SIM PlanetQuest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael; Unwin, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews Astrometry with the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) PlanetQuest. The topics include: 1) SIM PlanetQuest - the World's First Long- Baseline Optical Interferometer in Space; 2) National Academy of Sciences / NRC endorses SIM PlanetQuest; 3) SIM Planet Search; 4) Planetary System Architectures & Diversity; 5) SIM Search for 110 M(sub Earth) Planets Around Nearby Stars; 6) Deep Search of 120 nearby stars; 7) Planets around Young Stars; 8) SIM PlanetQuest Science Team; 9) Dark Halo of our Galaxy; 10) Dynamics of Galaxy Groups within 5 Mpc; 11) Probing Active Galactic Nuclei with Astrometry; 12) Snapshot Observing Mode: Astrometry for the masses; 13) SIM Technology Development is Complete; and 14) SIM Hardware, Tested for Flight.

  19. Simple model potential and model wave functions for (H-alkali)+ and (alkali-alkali)+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, S. H.; Tang, K. T.

    2000-07-01

    A simple model potential is proposed to describe the interaction of a valence electron with the alkali core, which incorporates the correct asymptotic behavior in terms of dipolar polarizabilities, and the short-range exchange effects in terms of a hard core adjusted to give the correct energy for the valence electron. Based on this potential, simple wave functions are developed to describe the (H-alkali)+ and (alkali-alkali)+ ions. These wave functions exhibit some important structures of the ions, and provide a universal description of the properties of all (H-alkali)+ and (alkali-alkali)+ ions, in particular, the equilibrium separations of the nuclei and the corresponding dissociation energies. They also allow us to calculate the dipolar polarizabilities of Li2+, Na2+, K2+, Rb2+, and Cs2+.

  20. Upgrading of petroleum oil feedstocks using alkali metals and hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A method of upgrading an oil feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the oil feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase separable from the organic oil feedstock material. The upgradant hydrocarbon bonds to the oil feedstock material and increases the number of carbon atoms in the product. This increase in the number of carbon atoms of the product increases the energy value of the resulting oil feedstock.

  1. Alkali-vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.; Krupke, W. F.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the results from several of our alkali laser systems. We show highly efficient performance from an alexandrite-pumped rubidium laser. Using a laser diode stack as a pump source, we demonstrate up to 145 W of average power from a CW system. We present a design for a transversely pumped demonstration system that will show all of the required laser physics for a high power system.

  2. Different transcriptional properties of mSim-1 and mSim-2.

    PubMed

    Moffett, P; Pelletier, J

    2000-01-21

    The mSim-1 and mSim-2 gene products are mammalian homologues of the Drosophila Sim gene. The dSim gene product transactivates through a DNA binding site known as the CNS midline enhancer (CME) element. We have investigated the transcriptional properties of mSIM-1 and mSIM-2 mediated through the CME element in concert with their dimerization partners, ARNT and ARNT-2. The mSIM-1/ARNT heterodimer transactivates reporter constructs via the ARNT carboxy-terminus. However, mSIM-2 quenches ARNT transactivation. We find that mSIM-2 competes with mSIM-1 for binding to ARNT, suggesting a possible antagonism between these transcription factors. PMID:10648817

  3. Electrospray Droplet Impact/SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraoka, Kenzo

    A new type of cluster SIMS, named as electrospray droplet impact (EDI), has been developed in our laboratory. It was found that peptides deposited on the stainless steel substrate were ionized/desorbed without the accumulation of radiation products. The organic samples with film thickness thinner than 10 monolayers are desorbed/ionized with little damage underneath the surface. In general, rather strong negative ions as well as positive ions are generated. The mechanism for the ionization/desorption in EDI is much less complicated than those for MALDI and SIMS due to the fact that only very thin sample layers take part in the shock-wave excited selvedge and higher-order side reactions are largely suppressed.

  4. Sim1 and Sim2 are required for the correct targeting of mammillary body axons.

    PubMed

    Marion, Jean-François; Yang, Chun; Caqueret, Aurore; Boucher, Francine; Michaud, Jacques L

    2005-12-01

    The mammillary body (MB), and its axonal projections to the thalamus (mammillothalamic tract, MTT) and the tegmentum (mammillotegmental tract, MTEG), are components of a circuit involved in spatial learning. The bHLH-PAS transcription factors SIM1 and SIM2 are co-expressed in the developing MB. We have found that MB neurons are generated and that they survive at least until E18.5 in embryos lacking both Sim1 and Sim2 (Sim1(-/-);Sim2(-/-)). However, the MTT and MTEG are histologically absent in Sim1(-/-);Sim2(-/-) embryos, and are reduced in embryos lacking Sim1 but bearing one or two copies of Sim2, indicating a contribution of the latter to the development of MB axons. We have generated, by homologous recombination, a null allele of Sim1 (Sim1(tlz)) in which the tau-lacZ fusion gene was introduced, allowing the staining of MB axons. Consistent with the histological studies, lacZ staining showed that the MTT/MTEG is barely detectable in Sim1(tlz/tlz);Sim2(+/-) and Sim1(tlz/tlz);Sim2(-/-) brains. Instead, MB axons are splayed and grow towards the midline. Slit1 and Slit2, which code for secreted molecules that induce the repulsion of ROBO1-producing axons, are expressed in the midline at the level of the MB, whereas Robo1 is expressed in the developing MB. The expression of Rig-1/Robo3, a negative regulator of Slit signalling, is upregulated in the prospective MB of Sim1/Sim2 double mutants, raising the possibility that the growth of mutant MB axons towards the midline is caused by a decreased sensitivity to SLIT. Finally, we found that Sim1 and Sim2 act along compensatory, but not hierarchical, pathways, suggesting that they play similar roles in vivo. PMID:16291793

  5. WEC-Sim (Wave Energy Converter - SIMulator)

    2014-11-26

    WEC-Sim (Wave Energy Converter SIMulator) is a code developed by Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to model wave energy converters (WECs) when they are subject to operational waves. The code is a time-domain modeling tool developed in MATLAB/Simulink using the multi-body dynamics solver SimMechanics. In WEC-Sim, WECs are modeled by connecting rigid bodies to one another with joint or constraint blocks from the WEC-Sim library. WEC-Sim is a publicly available, open-sourcemore » code to model WECs.« less

  6. WEC-Sim (Wave Energy Converter - SIMulator)

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-26

    WEC-Sim (Wave Energy Converter SIMulator) is a code developed by Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to model wave energy converters (WECs) when they are subject to operational waves. The code is a time-domain modeling tool developed in MATLAB/Simulink using the multi-body dynamics solver SimMechanics. In WEC-Sim, WECs are modeled by connecting rigid bodies to one another with joint or constraint blocks from the WEC-Sim library. WEC-Sim is a publicly available, open-source code to model WECs.

  7. Ratio estimation in SIMS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogliore, R. C.; Huss, G. R.; Nagashima, K.

    2011-09-01

    The determination of an isotope ratio by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) traditionally involves averaging a number of ratios collected over the course of a measurement. We show that this method leads to an additive positive bias in the expectation value of the estimated ratio that is approximately equal to the true ratio divided by the counts of the denominator isotope of an individual ratio. This bias does not decrease as the number of ratios used in the average increases. By summing all counts in the numerator isotope, then dividing by the sum of counts in the denominator isotope, the estimated ratio is less biased: the bias is approximately equal to the ratio divided by the summed counts of the denominator isotope over the entire measurement. We propose a third ratio estimator (Beale's estimator) that can be used when the bias from the summed counts is unacceptably large for the hypothesis being tested. We derive expressions for the variance of these ratio estimators as well as the conditions under which they are normally distributed. Finally, we investigate a SIMS dataset showing the effects of ratio bias, and discuss proper ratio estimation for SIMS analysis.

  8. SIM Lite Astrometric Observatory Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marr, James C., IV; Shao, Michael; Goullioud, Renaud

    2010-01-01

    The SIM Lite Astrometric Observatory (aka SIM Lite), a micro-arcsecond astrometry space mission, has been developed in response to NASA's indefinite deferral of the SIM PlanetQuest mission. The SIM Lite mission, while significantly more affordable than the SIM PlanetQuest mission concept, still addresses the full breadth of SIM science envisioned by two previous National Research Council (NRC) Astrophysics Decadal Surveys at the most stringent 'Goal' level of astrometric measurement performance envisioned in those surveys. Over the past two years, the project has completed the conceptual design of the SIM Lite mission using only the completed SIM technology; published a 250 page book describing the science and mission design (available at the SIM website: http://sim.jpl.nasa.gov); been subject to an independent cost and technical readiness assessment by the Aerospace Corporation; and submitted a number of information responses to the NRC Astro2010 Decadal Survey. The project also conducted an exoplanet-finding capability double blind study that clearly demonstrated the ability of the mission to survey 60 to 100 nearby sun-like dwarf stars for terrestrial, habitable zone planets in complex planetary systems. Additionally, the project has continued Engineering Risk Reduction activities by building brassboard (form, fit and function to flight) version of key instrument elements and subjecting them to flight qualification environmental and performance testing. This paper summarizes the progress over the last two years and the current state of the SIM Lite project.

  9. PVC flexible liners as corrosion protection for brine treatment tanks in chlor-alkali plants

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-de-Obanos, M.; Marin, S.

    1999-11-01

    Three flexible PVC sheets were evaluated to determine their suitability as liners to protect existing steel tanks handling treated brine at 55 C in a membrane technology Chlor-Alkali plants. The evaluation included: characterization of liners and plasticizers (by Soxhlet technique, Infrared Spectroscopy (IRS), Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) and Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC)); quantification of brine pollutants by Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (AES) and weight-loss/volume ratios; observation of the superficial damage produced by extended immersion in acid hot brine by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM); and the estimation of remaining properties in high temperature oxidative atmospheres (per ASTM D 3045). As a result of this evaluation, remaining property curves as a function of time and temperature are presented for high temperature atmospheric exposure. These curves are related to actual service and to changes in liner hardness. Economics of using flexible PVC liners are compared to flakeglass filled thermosetting coatings. The conclusions are that, even though flexible PVC linings are disposable, they protect steel against hot acid brine corrosion, and they are economically attractive compared to flakeglass filled coatings. In addition PVC linings may be more reliable because remaining PVC properties can be measured using nondestructive hardness measurements. PVC linings are not recommended above 65 C in corrosive service because life is notably reduced.

  10. Sim2 mutants have developmental defects not overlapping with those of Sim1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Goshu, Eleni; Jin, Hui; Fasnacht, Rachel; Sepenski, Mike; Michaud, Jacques L; Fan, Chen-Ming

    2002-06-01

    The mouse genome contains two Sim genes, Sim1 and Sim2. They are presumed to be important for central nervous system (CNS) development because they are homologous to the Drosophila single-minded (sim) gene, mutations in which cause a complete loss of CNS midline cells. In the mammalian CNS, Sim2 and Sim1 are coexpressed in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). While Sim1 is essential for the development of the PVN (J. L. Michaud, T. Rosenquist, N. R. May, and C.-M. Fan, Genes Dev. 12:3264-3275, 1998), we report here that Sim2 mutant has a normal PVN. Analyses of the Sim1 and Sim2 compound mutants did not reveal obvious genetic interaction between them in PVN histogenesis. However, Sim2 mutant mice die within 3 days of birth due to lung atelectasis and breathing failure. We attribute the diminished efficacy of lung inflation to the compromised structural components surrounding the pleural cavity, which include rib protrusions, abnormal intercostal muscle attachments, diaphragm hypoplasia, and pleural mesothelium tearing. Although each of these structures is minimally affected, we propose that their combined effects lead to the mechanical failure of lung inflation and death. Sim2 mutants also develop congenital scoliosis, reflected by the unequal sizes of the left and right vertebrae and ribs. The temporal and spatial expression patterns of Sim2 in these skeletal elements suggest that Sim2 regulates their growth and/or integrity. PMID:12024028

  11. Transport properties of alkali metal doped fullerides

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Daluram Yadav, Nishchhal

    2015-07-31

    We have studied the intercage interactions between the adjacent C{sub 60} cages and expansion of lattice due to the intercalation of alkali atoms based on the spring model to estimate phonon frequencies from the dynamical matrix for the intermolecular alkali-C{sub 60} phonons. We considered a two-peak model for the phonon density of states to investigate the nature of electron pairing mechanism for superconducting state in fullerides. Coulomb repulsive parameter and the electron phonon coupling strength are obtained within the random phase approximation. Transition temperature, T{sub c}, is obtained in a situation when the free electrons in lowest molecular orbital are coupled with alkali-C{sub 60} phonons as 5 K, which is much lower as compared to reported T{sub c} (20 K). The superconducting pairing is mainly driven by the high frequency intramolecular phonons and their effects enhance it to 22 K. The importance of the present study, the pressure effect and normal state transport properties are calculated within the same model leading superconductivity.

  12. Transport properties of alkali metal doped fullerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Daluram; Yadav, Nishchhal

    2015-07-01

    We have studied the intercage interactions between the adjacent C60 cages and expansion of lattice due to the intercalation of alkali atoms based on the spring model to estimate phonon frequencies from the dynamical matrix for the intermolecular alkali-C60 phonons. We considered a two-peak model for the phonon density of states to investigate the nature of electron pairing mechanism for superconducting state in fullerides. Coulomb repulsive parameter and the electron phonon coupling strength are obtained within the random phase approximation. Transition temperature, Tc, is obtained in a situation when the free electrons in lowest molecular orbital are coupled with alkali-C60 phonons as 5 K, which is much lower as compared to reported Tc (20 K). The superconducting pairing is mainly driven by the high frequency intramolecular phonons and their effects enhance it to 22 K. The importance of the present study, the pressure effect and normal state transport properties are calculated within the same model leading superconductivity.

  13. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  14. PROCESS OF RECOVERING ALKALI METALS

    DOEpatents

    Wolkoff, J.

    1961-08-15

    A process is described of recovering alkali metal vapor by sorption on activated alumina, activated carbon, dehydrated zeolite, activated magnesia, or Fuller's earth preheated above the vaporization temperature of the alkali metal and subsequent desorption by heating the solvent under vacuum. (AEC)

  15. Preparation of alkali metal dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Landel, R. F. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for producing alkali metal dispersions of high purity. The dispersions are prepared by varying the equilibrium solubility of the alkali metal in a suitable organic solvent in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The equilibrium variation is produced by temperature change. The size of the particles is controlled by controlling the rate of temperature change.

  16. TurbSim User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Jonkman, B. J.; Buhl, M. L., Jr.

    2005-09-01

    The TurbSim stochastic inflow turbulence code was developed to provide a numerical simulation of a full-field flow that contains coherent turbulence structures that reflect the proper spatiotemporal turbulent velocity field relationships seen in instabilities associated with nocturnal boundary layer flows that are not represented well by the IEC Normal Turbulence Models (NTM). Its purpose is to provide the wind turbine designer with the ability to drive design code (FAST or MSC.ADAMS) simulations of advanced turbine designs with simulated inflow turbulence environments that incorporate many of the important fluid dynamic features known to adversely affect turbine aeroelastic response and loading.

  17. On-chip fabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, K.; Ban, K.; Hirai, Y.; Sugano, K.; Tsuchiya, T.; Mizutani, N.; Tabata, O.

    2013-11-01

    We describe a novel on-chip microfabrication technique for the alkali-metal vapor cell of an optically pumped atomic magnetometer (OPAM), utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet (AMST). The newly proposed AMST is a millimeter-sized piece of porous alumina whose considerable surface area holds deposited alkali-metal chloride (KCl) and barium azide (BaN6), source materials that effectively produce alkali-metal vapor at less than 400 °C. Our experiments indicated that the most effective pore size of the AMST is between 60 and 170 µm. The thickness of an insulating glass spacer holding the AMST was designed to confine generated alkali metal to the interior of the vapor cell during its production, and an integrated silicon heater was designed to seal the device using a glass frit, melted at an optimum temperature range of 460-490 °C that was determined by finite element method thermal simulation. The proposed design and AMST were used to successfully fabricate a K cell that was then operated as an OPAM with a measured sensitivity of 50 pT. These results demonstrate that the proposed concept for on-chip microfabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells may lead to effective replacement of conventional glassworking approaches.

  18. Multi-photon processes in alkali metal vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Baodong; Hu, Shu; Li, Hui; Shi, Zhe; Cai, Xianglong; Guo, Jingwei; Tan, Yannan; Liu, Wanfa; Jin, Yuqi; Sang, Fengting

    2015-02-01

    Achieving population inversion through multi-photon cascade pumping is almost always difficult, and most laser medium work under 1-photon excitation mechanism. But for alkali atoms such as cesium, relatively large absorption cross sections of several low, cascading energy levels enable them properties such as up conversion. Here we carried out research on two-photon excitation alkali fluorescence. Two photons of near infrared region are used to excite alkali atoms to n 2 D5/2, n 2 D3/2 or higher energy levels, then the blue fluorescence of (n+1) 2 P3/2,(n+1) 2 P1/2-->n 2 S1/2 are observed. Different pumping paths are tried and by the recorded spectra, transition routes of cesium are deducted and concluded. Finally the possibility of two-photon style DPALs (diode pumped alkali laser) are discussed, such alkali lasers can give output wavelengths in the shorter end of visual spectroscopy (400-460 nm) and are expected to get application in underwater communication and material laser processing.

  19. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  20. The SIM PlanetQuest Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edberg, Stephen J.; Traub, Wesley A.; Unwin, Stephen C.; Marr, James C., IV

    2007-01-01

    SIM PlanetQuest (hereafter, just SIM) is a NASA mission to measure the angular positions of stars with unprecedented accuracy. We outline the main astrophysical science programs planned for SIM, and related opportunities for community participation. We focus especially on SIM's ability to detect exoplanets as small as the Earth around nearby stars. The planned synergy between SIM and other planet-finding missions including Kepler and GAIA, and planet-characterizing missions including the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), Terrestrial Planet Finder--Coronagraph (TPF-C), and Terrestrial Planet Finder--Interferometer (TPF-I), is a key element in NASA's Navigator Program to find Earth-like planets, determine their habitability, and search for signs of life in the universe. SIM's technology development is now complete and the project is proceeding towards a launch in the next decade.

  1. Field desorption microscopy of graphene on iridium in intercalation with alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatskii, D. P.; Pavlov, V. G.

    2014-12-01

    Field-desorption and field-emission electron microscopy methods have been used to study the effect of a strong electric field on the processes of potassium and cesium desorption from the graphene surface on an iridium field emitter. It was found that two phases of field desorption may exist for these alkali metals. In the low-field phase, alkali metal atoms adsorbed on the surface are desorbed. The existence of the high-field phase is attributed to the egress from under the graphene film and ionization of intercalated alkali metal atoms under the action of the electric field.

  2. Breakdown of ionic character of molecular alkali bromides in inner-valence photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Karpenko, A. Iablonskyi, D.; Kettunen, J. A.; Cao, W.; Huttula, M.; Aksela, H.; Urpelainen, S.

    2014-05-28

    The inner-valence region of alkali bromide XBr (X=Li, Na, K, Rb) vapours has been studied experimentally by means of synchrotron radiation excited photoelectron spectroscopy. Experimental spectra were analyzed by comparing them with available theoretical results and previous experiments. Ionic character of alkali bromides is seen to change in the inner-valence region with increasing atomic number of the alkali atom. A mechanism involving mixing between Br 4s and Rb 4p orbitals has been suggested to account for the fine structure observed in inner-valence ionization region of RbBr.

  3. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  4. Feasibility of supersonic diode pumped alkali lasers: Model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2013-04-08

    The feasibility of supersonic operation of diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) is studied for Cs and K atoms applying model calculations, based on a semi-analytical model previously used for studying static and subsonic flow DPALs. The operation of supersonic lasers is compared with that measured and modeled in subsonic lasers. The maximum power of supersonic Cs and K lasers is found to be higher than that of subsonic lasers with the same resonator and alkali density at the laser inlet by 25% and 70%, respectively. These results indicate that for scaling-up the power of DPALs, supersonic expansion should be considered.

  5. Structural models for alkali-metal complexes of polyacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, N. S.; Shacklette, L. W.; Baughman, R. H.

    1990-02-01

    Structural models for a stage-2 complex are proposed for polyacetylene doped with less than about 0.1 potassium or rubidium atoms per carbon. These structures utilize as a basic motif an alkali-metal column surrounded by four planar-zig-zag polyacetylene chains, a structure found at the highest dopant levels. In the new stage-2 structures, each polyacetylene chain neighbors only one alkali-metal column, so the phase contains four polymer chains per alkali-metal column. Basic structural aspects for stage-1 and stage-2 structures are now established for both potassium- and rubidium-doped polyacetylene. X-ray-diffraction and electrochemical data show that undoped and doped phases coexist at low dopant concentrations (<0.06 K atom per C). X-ray-diffraction data, down to a Bragg spacing of 1.3 Å, for polyacetylene heavily doped with potassium (0.125-0.167 K atom per C) is fully consistent with our previously proposed stage-1 tetragonal unit cell containing two polyacetylene chains per alkali-metal column. There is no evidence for our samples requiring a distortion to a monoclinic unit cell as reported by others for heavily doped samples. The nature of structural transformations and the relationship between structure and electronic properties are discussed for potassium-doped polyacetylene.

  6. AXAF SIM focus mechanism study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tananbaum, H. D.; Whitbeck, E.

    1994-02-01

    The design requirements and initial design concept for the AXAF-I Science Instrument Module (SIM) were reviewed at Ball on September 29, 1993. The concept design SIM focus mechanism utilizes a planetary gearset, with redundant motors, to drive a large ring (called 'main housing bearing') via a spur gearset. This large drive ring actuates three tangent bar links (called 'push rods'), which in turn actuate three levers (called 'pin levers'). Each of the three pin levers rotates an 'eccentric pin,' which in turn moves the base of a bipod flexure in both the radial (normal to optical axis) and axial (focus along optical axis) directions. Three bipod flexures are employed, equally spaced at 120 degrees apart, the base of each being translated in the two directions as described above. A focus adjustment is made by rotating the drive ring, which drives the push rods and therefore the pin levers, which in turn rotate the eccentric pins, finally imparting the two motions to the base of each of the bipod flexures. The axial translation (focus adjustment) of the focused structure is the sum of the direct axial motion plus axial motion which comes from uniformly squeezing the three bipod bases radially inward. SAO documented the following concerns regarding the focus mechanism in memo WAP-FY94-001, dated October 7, 1993: (1) The focus adjustment depends, in large part, on the structural properties (stiffnesses and end fixities) of the bipod flexures, push rods, pin levers and eccentric pins. If these properties are not matched very well, then lateral translations as well as unwanted rotations of the focussed structure will accompany focus motion. In addition, the stackup of linkage tolerances and any nonuniform wear in the linkages will result in the same unwanted motions. Thermal gradients will also affect these motions. At the review Ball did not present supporting analyses to support their choice of this design concept. (2) The proposed 'primary' method of measuring focus

  7. AXAF SIM focus mechanism study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, H. D.; Whitbeck, E.

    1994-01-01

    The design requirements and initial design concept for the AXAF-I Science Instrument Module (SIM) were reviewed at Ball on September 29, 1993. The concept design SIM focus mechanism utilizes a planetary gearset, with redundant motors, to drive a large ring (called 'main housing bearing') via a spur gearset. This large drive ring actuates three tangent bar links (called 'push rods'), which in turn actuate three levers (called 'pin levers'). Each of the three pin levers rotates an 'eccentric pin,' which in turn moves the base of a bipod flexure in both the radial (normal to optical axis) and axial (focus along optical axis) directions. Three bipod flexures are employed, equally spaced at 120 degrees apart, the base of each being translated in the two directions as described above. A focus adjustment is made by rotating the drive ring, which drives the push rods and therefore the pin levers, which in turn rotate the eccentric pins, finally imparting the two motions to the base of each of the bipod flexures. The axial translation (focus adjustment) of the focused structure is the sum of the direct axial motion plus axial motion which comes from uniformly squeezing the three bipod bases radially inward. SAO documented the following concerns regarding the focus mechanism in memo WAP-FY94-001, dated October 7, 1993: (1) The focus adjustment depends, in large part, on the structural properties (stiffnesses and end fixities) of the bipod flexures, push rods, pin levers and eccentric pins. If these properties are not matched very well, then lateral translations as well as unwanted rotations of the focussed structure will accompany focus motion. In addition, the stackup of linkage tolerances and any nonuniform wear in the linkages will result in the same unwanted motions. Thermal gradients will also affect these motions. At the review Ball did not present supporting analyses to support their choice of this design concept. (2) The proposed 'primary' method of measuring focus

  8. High-temperature interactions of alkali vapors with solids during coal combustion and gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Punjak, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    A temperature and concentration programmed reaction method is used to investigate the mechanism by which organically bound alkali is released from carbonaceous substrates. Vaporization of the alkali is preceded by reduction of oxygen-bearing groups during which CO is generated. A residual amount of alkali remains after complete reduction. This residual level is greater for potassium, indicating that potassium has stronger interactions with graphitic substrates that sodium. Other mineral substrates were exposed to high temperature alkali chloride vapors under both nitrogen and simulated flue gas atmospheres to investigate their potential application as sorbents for the removal of alkali from coal conversion flue gases. The compounds containing alumina and silica are found to readily adsorb alkali vapors and the minerals kaolinite, bauxite and emathlite are identified as promising alkali sorbents. The fundamentals of alkali adsorption on kaolinite, bauxite and emathlite are compared and analyzed both experimentally and through theoretical modeling. The experiments were performed in a microgravimetric reactor system; the sorbents were characterized before and after alkali adsorption using scanning Auger microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, mercury porosimetry and atomic emission spectrophotometry. The results show that the process is not a simple physical condensation, but a complex combination of several diffusion steps and reactions.

  9. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry SIMS XI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen, G.; Lareau, R.; Bennett, J.; Stevie, F.

    2003-05-01

    This volume contains 252 contributions presented as plenary, invited and contributed poster and oral presentations at the 11th International Conference on Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS XI) held at the Hilton Hotel, Walt Disney World Village, Orlando, Florida, 7 12 September, 1997. The book covers a diverse range of research, reflecting the rapid growth in advanced semiconductor characterization, ultra shallow depth profiling, TOF-SIMS and the new areas in which SIMS techniques are being used, for example in biological sciences and organic surface characterization. Papers are presented under the following categories: Isotopic SIMS Biological SIMS Semiconductor Characterization Techniques and Applications Ultra Shallow Depth Profiling Depth Profiling Fundamental/Modelling and Diffusion Sputter-Induced Topography Fundamentals of Molecular Desorption Organic Materials Practical TOF-SIMS Polyatomic Primary Ions Materials/Surface Analysis Postionization Instrumentation Geological SIMS Imaging Fundamentals of Sputtering Ion Formation and Cluster Formation Quantitative Analysis Environmental/Particle Characterization Related Techniques These proceedings provide an invaluable source of reference for both newcomers to the field and experienced SIMS users.

  10. The "Cost-Effectiveness" of Sim One

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Kaaren I.; Abrahamson, Stephen

    1975-01-01

    Sim One is a computer-controlled patient, a sophisticated simulator developed by the University of Southern California School of Medicine. This article summarizes fifteen cost-effectiveness studies conducted over a 2-year period. Savings with the use of Sim One were found to justify the cost within a short period. (JT)

  11. simSchool: The Game of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zibit, Melanie; Gibson, David

    2005-01-01

    "simSchool" is a classroom simulation program funded by the Preparing Tomorrow's Teachers to Teach with Technology (PT3) program of the U.S. Department of Education. Just as a flight-simulator immerses a player in the complexities of flying a plane, "simSchool" immerses novice teachers in some of the complexities of teaching 7th-12th grade…

  12. Modeling wildlife populations with HexSim

    EPA Science Inventory

    HexSim is a framework for constructing spatially-explicit, individual-based computer models designed for simulating terrestrial wildlife population dynamics and interactions. HexSim is useful for a broad set of modeling applications including population viability analysis for on...

  13. Space interferometer mission (SIM) instrument design concepts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, A. L.

    SIM is a 12 meter baseline interferometer to be built as part of the NASA Origins program, designed to fly in space and provide high precision astrometry measurements of astronomical objects. SIM will provide angular measurements three orders of magnitude more precise than current space or ground based sensors, allowing the indirect detection of Earth-like planets around neighboring stars. The SIM mission will also include the ability to synthesize images by varying the interferometer baseline lengths and will demonstrate a nulling beam combiner as a technology pathfinder for future missions. A team at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space (LMMS) in Sunnyvale, CA has been chosen by JPL to enter a partnership to design and build the SIM instrument. This paper describes the overall LMMS SIM instrument concept and its unique features, including the full aperture laser metrology approach for high precision metrology.

  14. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  15. Functional characterization of SIM1-associated enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mee J.; Oksenberg, Nir; Hoffmann, Thomas J.; Vaisse, Christian; Ahituv, Nadav

    2014-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency of the single-minded homology 1 (SIM1) gene in humans and mice leads to severe obesity, suggesting that altered expression of SIM1, by way of regulatory elements such as enhancers, could predispose individuals to obesity. Here, we identified transcriptional enhancers that could regulate SIM1, using comparative genomics coupled with zebrafish and mouse transgenic enhancer assays. Owing to the dual role of Sim1 in hypothalamic development and in adult energy homeostasis, the enhancer activity of these sequences was annotated from embryonic to adult age. Of the seventeen tested sequences, two SIM1 candidate enhancers (SCE2 and SCE8) were found to have brain-enhancer activity in zebrafish. Both SCE2 and SCE8 also exhibited embryonic brain-enhancer expression in mice, and time course analysis of SCE2 activity showed overlapping expression with Sim1 from embryonic to adult age, notably in the hypothalamus in adult mice. Using a deletion series, we identified the critical region in SCE2 that is needed for enhancer activity in the developing brain. Sequencing this region in obese and lean cohorts revealed a higher prevalence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were unique to obese individuals, with one variant reducing developmental-enhancer activity in zebrafish. In summary, we have characterized two brain enhancers in the SIM1 locus and identified a set of obesity-specific SNPs within one of them, which may predispose individuals to obesity. PMID:24203700

  16. Alkali ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Hrizo, John; Bauerle, James E.; Witkowski, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration filament containing a sodium-bearing compound is included in combination with the sensing filament and ion collector plate of a sodium ionization detector to permit periodic generation of sodium atoms for the in-situ calibration of the detector.

  17. Decalcification resistance of alkali-activated slag.

    PubMed

    Komljenović, Miroslav M; Baščarević, Zvezdana; Marjanović, Nataša; Nikolić, Violeta

    2012-09-30

    This paper analyses the effects of decalcification in concentrated 6M NH(4)NO(3) solution on mechanical and microstructural properties of alkali-activated slag (AAS). Portland-slag cement (CEM II/A-S 42.5 N) was used as a benchmark material. Decalcification process led to a decrease in strength, both in AAS and in CEM II, and this effect was more pronounced in CEM II. The decrease in strength was explicitly related to the decrease in Ca/Si atomic ratio of C-S-H gel. A very low ratio of Ca/Si ~0.3 in AAS was the consequence of coexistence of C-S-H(I) gel and silica gel. During decalcification of AAS almost complete leaching of sodium and tetrahedral aluminum from C-S-H(I) gel also took place. AAS showed significantly higher resistance to decalcification in relation to the benchmark CEM II due to the absence of portlandite, high level of polymerization of silicate chains, low level of aluminum for silicon substitution in the structure of C-S-H(I), and the formation of protective layer of polymerized silica gel during decalcification process. In stabilization/solidification processes alkali-activated slag represents a more promising solution than Portland-slag cement due to significantly higher resistance to decalcification. PMID:22818592

  18. Is Electronegativity a Useful Descriptor for the "Pseudo-Alkali-Metal" NH4?

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteside, Alexander; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Gutowski, Maciej S.

    2011-11-18

    Molecular ions in the form of "pseudo-atoms" are common structural motifs in chemistry, with properties that are transferrable between different compounds. We have determined the electronegativity of the "pseudo-alkali metal" ammonium (NH4) and evaluated its reliability as a descriptor in comparison to the electronegativities of the alkali metals. The computed properties of its binary complexes with astatine and of selected borohydrides confirm the similarity of NH4 to the alkali metal atoms, although the electronegativity of NH4 is relatively large in comparison to its cationic radius. We paid particular attention to the molecular properties of ammonium (angular anisotropy, geometric relaxation, and reactivity), which can cause deviations from the behaviour expected of a conceptual "true alkali metal" with this electronegativity. These deviations allow for the discrimination of effects associated with the polyatomic nature of NH4.

  19. Is electronegativity a useful descriptor for the pseudo-alkali metal NH4?

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Alexander; Xantheas, Sotiris S; Gutowski, Maciej

    2011-11-18

    Molecular ions in the form of "pseudo-atoms" are common structural motifs in chemistry, with properties that are transferrable between different compounds. We have determined one such property--the electronegativity--for the "pseudo-alkali metal" ammonium (NH(4)), and evaluated its reliability as a descriptor versus the electronegativities of the alkali metals. The computed properties of ammonium's binary complexes with astatine and of selected borohydrides confirm the similarity of NH(4) to the alkali metal atoms, although the electronegativity of NH(4) is relatively large in comparison to its cationic radius. We have paid particular attention to the molecular properties of ammonium (angular anisotropy, geometric relaxation and reactivity), which can cause deviations from the behaviour expected of a conceptual "true alkali metal" with this electronegativity. These deviations allow for the discrimination of effects associated with the molecular nature of NH(4). PMID:21928287

  20. Searching for Extrasolar Planets with SIM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.

    2000-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) will be the first spacebased long base-line Michelson interferometer designed for precision astrometry. SIM will extend the reach of astrometry to cover the entire Galaxy, and will address a wide range of problems in Galactic structure and stellar astrophysics. It will also serve as a technology precursor for future astrophysics missions using interferometers. SIM will be a powerful tool for discovering planets around nearby stars, through detection of the reflex motion, and it will directly measure masses for the planets detected this way. It will have a single-measurement precision of 1 microarcsecond in a frame defined by nearby reference stars, enabling SIM to search for planets with masses as small as a few earth masses around the nearest star. More massive planets will be detectable to much larger distances.

  1. Biomedical studies by TOF-SIMS imaging.

    PubMed

    Bich, Claudia; Touboul, David; Brunelle, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Imaging by secondary ion mass spectrometry coupled to time-of-flight mass analysis (TOF-SIMS) is a method of which the applications have greatly increased since 10 years. Taking advantage of the development of cluster ion sources, TOF-SIMS offers images of molecular ions at a micrometer lateral resolution or slightly below and does not require complex sample preparation. Although TOF-SIMS has been primarily dedicated to surface analysis of inorganic or polymeric samples, several groups have successfully demonstrated that TOF-SIMS imaging is also perfectly suited for mapping organic compounds, such as drugs or lipids, directly on tissue sections from animals or from human biopsies. This minireview will enlighten some of these developments in the field of biomedical applications. PMID:25708628

  2. G-SIMS of crystallisable organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, I. S.; Seah, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the gentle SIMS (G-SIMS) concept has been applied to the crystallisable organic materials of Irganox 1010, caffeine, cholesterol, glucose, poly- L-lysine and bovine serum albumin. These are chosen to represent as wide a range of material types as possible. For each case, the G-SIMS spectra are considerably simpler than the static SIMS, enabling direct interpretation and identification. It is demonstrated that the amount of fragmentation in the mass spectrum may be controlled numerically and this information can be used to re-assemble the parent molecule. Wherever possible, the use of dual column ion beams is recommended to eliminate alignment requirements. Additionally, the total electron beam fluence should be kept below 6×10 18 electrons/m 2 to prevent electron damage.

  3. Calculation of radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements in the neutral alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J.; Cheng, K.T.

    2005-02-01

    Radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements for ns-np transitions in the alkali-metal atoms lithium through francium are evaluated. They are found to be small for the lighter alkali metals but significantly larger for the heavier alkali metals, and in the case of cesium much larger than the experimental accuracy. The relation of the matrix element calculation to a recent decay rate calculation for hydrogenic ions is discussed, and application of the method to parity nonconservation in cesium is described.

  4. Hydrothermal alkali metal catalyst recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Eakman, James M.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.

    1979-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles primarily in the form of water soluble alkali metal formates by treating the particles with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of added carbon monoxide. During the treating process the water insoluble alkali metal compounds comprising the insoluble alkali metal residues are converted into water soluble alkali metal formates. The resultant aqueous solution containing water soluble alkali metal formates is then separated from the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment process, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal formates serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. This process permits increased recovery of alkali metal constituents, thereby decreasing the overall cost of the gasification process by reducing the amount of makeup alkali metal compounds necessary.

  5. Spill-Resistant Alkali-Metal-Vapor Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, William

    2005-01-01

    A spill-resistant vessel has been developed for dispensing an alkali-metal vapor. Vapors of alkali metals (most commonly, cesium or rubidium, both of which melt at temperatures slightly above room temperature) are needed for atomic frequency standards, experiments in spectroscopy, and experiments in laser cooling. Although the present spill-resistant alkali-metal dispenser was originally intended for use in the low-gravity environment of outer space, it can also be used in normal Earth gravitation: indeed, its utility as a vapor source was confirmed by use of cesium in a ground apparatus. The vessel is made of copper. It consists of an assembly of cylinders and flanges, shown in the figure. The uppermost cylinder is a fill tube. Initially, the vessel is evacuated, the alkali metal charge is distilled into the bottom of the vessel, and then the fill tube is pinched closed to form a vacuum seal. The innermost cylinder serves as the outlet for the vapor, yet prevents spilling by protruding above the surface of the alkali metal, no matter which way or how far the vessel is tilted. In the event (unlikely in normal Earth gravitation) that any drops of molten alkali metal have been shaken loose by vibration and are floating freely, a mesh cap on top of the inner cylinder prevents the drops from drifting out with the vapor. Liquid containment of the equivalent of 1.2 grams of cesium was confirmed for all orientations with rubbing alcohol in one of the prototypes later used with cesium.

  6. Resonances in low-energy positron-alkali scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horbatsch, M.; Ward, S. J.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    Close-coupling calculations were performed with up to five target states at energies in the excitation threshold region for positron scattering from Li, Na and K. Resonances were discovered in the L = 0, 1 and 2 channels in the vicinity of the atomic excitation thresholds. The widths of these resonances vary between 0.2 and 130 MeV. Evidence was found for the existence of positron-alkali bound states in all cases.

  7. Diode pumped alkali vapor lasers for high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.; Komashko, A.

    2008-02-01

    General Atomics has been engaged in the development of diode pumped alkali vapor lasers. We have been examining the design space looking for designs that are both efficient and easily scalable to high powers. Computationally, we have looked at the effect of pump bandwidth on laser performance. We have also looked at different lasing species. We have used an alexandrite laser to study the relative merits of different designs. We report on the results of our experimental and computational studies.

  8. Diffusion of alkali species in porous tungsten substrates used in contact ionization sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon-Golcher, E.; Kwan, J.; Morse, E. C.

    2002-01-01

    Contact ionization (doped) sources used in current Heavy Ion Fusion experiments consist of a porous tungsten substrate doped with an alkali carbonate. In the early stages of the heating cycle (T - 600 C), the carbonate breaks down and releases the alkali atoms that then diffuse through the substrate. At the emitter surface there is a balance between the fast desorption rate of the alkali atoms (mostly as neutrals) and the slower replenishment rate from the substrate by diffusion. Time-resolved measurements of neutral particle evaporation rates at the emitter surface have been used to estimate the effective diffusion coefficient (D) that characterizes the migration of alkali species in the substrate. These estimates are consistent with the observed source lifetimes (tens of hrs.) and establish the alkali migration in the bulk as a diffusion-limited process. The measurements suggest that the faster migration rates (D {approx} 10{sup -5} - 10{sup -6} cm2/s) occur early during the heating cycle when the dominant species are the neutral alkali atoms. At operating temperatures there is a slower migration rate (D x 10-7cm2/sd) ue to the dominance of ions, which difise by a slower surface diffusion process.

  9. Electrolytic method to make alkali alcoholates using ion conducting alkali electrolyte/separator

    DOEpatents

    Joshi, Ashok V.; Balagopal, Shekar; Pendelton, Justin

    2011-12-13

    Alkali alcoholates, also called alkali alkoxides, are produced from alkali metal salt solutions and alcohol using a three-compartment electrolytic cell. The electrolytic cell includes an anolyte compartment configured with an anode, a buffer compartment, and a catholyte compartment configured with a cathode. An alkali ion conducting solid electrolyte configured to selectively transport alkali ions is positioned between the anolyte compartment and the buffer compartment. An alkali ion permeable separator is positioned between the buffer compartment and the catholyte compartment. The catholyte solution may include an alkali alcoholate and alcohol. The anolyte solution may include at least one alkali salt. The buffer compartment solution may include a soluble alkali salt and an alkali alcoholate in alcohol.

  10. The calcium-alkali syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Mariangeli; Fenves, Andrew Z; Emmett, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The milk-alkali syndrome was a common cause of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and renal failure in the early 20th century. It was caused by the ingestion of large quantities of milk and absorbable alkali to treat peptic ulcer disease. The syndrome virtually vanished after introduction of histamine-2 blockers and proton pump inhibitors. More recently, a similar condition called the calcium-alkali syndrome has emerged as a common cause of hypercalcemia and alkalosis. It is usually caused by the ingestion of large amounts of calcium carbonate salts to prevent or treat osteoporosis and dyspepsia. We describe a 78-year-old woman who presented with weakness, malaise, and confusion. She was found to have hypercalcemia, acute renal failure, and metabolic alkalosis. Upon further questioning, she reported use of large amounts of calcium carbonate tablets to treat recent heartburn symptoms. Calcium supplements were discontinued, and she was treated with intravenous normal saline. After 5 days, the calcium and bicarbonate levels normalized and renal function returned to baseline. In this article, we review the pathogenesis of the calcium-alkali syndrome as well as the differences between the traditional and modern syndromes. PMID:23543983

  11. Modification of conductive properties of (10, 0) zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) by alkali metals absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamadanian, Masood; Tavangar, Zahra; Noori, Banafsheh

    2014-11-01

    We have investigated the electronic and structural properties of (10, 0) zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) which have adsorbed different alkali metals (X: Li, Na, K, and Cs) and the hydrogen atom by using Density Functional Theory (DFT). It was discovered that among the alkali elements, Li atoms form the strongest bond with SWCNT. In addition, a significant shift was observed in the electronic state of alkali-adsorbed SWCNT compared to pristine SWCNT. Finally, it was proposed that due to showing excellent electronic structure, these modified nanotubes can be applied in new electronic devices, such as transistors, and field emission displays.

  12. SealSim Version 1.1

    2005-05-16

    SealSim 1.1 is a state-of-the-art, Microsoft Windows based computer program developed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Aspen Research Corporation with Contracted support from TNO TPD. It is intended to be used by manufacturers, engineers, educators, students, architects, and others to help determine the relative durability of Insulating Glass Units (IGU). As a function of time, SealSim 1.1 simulates the behaviour of an Insulating Glass Unit, exposed to realistic or user-defined weather climates. Stressesmore » and strains in the IGU are calculated as a function of time, together with temperature distributions, gas permeation effects (gas loss, desiccant loading), dew point temperature, U-factor, etc. The current version of SealSim 1.1 supports double-glazing Units. where the spacer system is either a Thermo Plastic Spacer (TPS) or Box type spacer. For the determination of solar properties of glazing systems, SealSim 1.1 uses the Tntemational Glazing Database of LBNL, which is also used by OPTICS and WINDOW. The goal of the SealSim 1.1 simulations is to predict the IGU’s average lifetime, expressed in terms of the "Durability Index", together with the associated failure mechanisms. The Durability Index of a particular IGU and its most probable failure mechanism can be compared with other IGU’s. How the predicted Durability Index relates to the actual durability of an IGU is not known, simply because sufficient experimental data is lacking for describing the behaviour of IG Units over extended periods of time together with a lack of knowledge of the conditions it is subjected to and initial state of the CU at the time of manufacturing. In order to simulate the IGU behaviour in time, the conditions of the IGU must be defined; together with the weather and or climate that the IGU is subjected to. Using physical models of the IGU, SealSim 1.1 calculates tte response of the CU in time. These physical models are described in more detail in separate documents

  13. Oxygen isotope geospeedometry by SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonamici, C. E.; Valley, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Geospeedometry, a discipline closely related and complimentary to thermochronology, exploits the phenomenon of diffusion in order to extract rate and duration information for segments of a rock's thermal history. Geospeedometry data, when anchored in absolute time by geochronologic data, allow for the construction of detailed temperature-time paths for specific terranes and geologic processes. We highlight the developing field of SIMS-based oxygen isotope geospeedometry with an application from granulites of the Adirondack Mountains (New York) and discuss potential future applications based on a recently updated and expanded modeling tool, the Fast Grain Boundary diffusion program (FGB; Eiler et al. 1994). Equilibrium oxygen isotope ratios in minerals are a function of temperature and bulk rock composition. In dynamic systems, intragrain oxygen isotope zoning can develop in response to geologic events that affect the thermal state of a rock and/or induce recrystallization, especially tectonic deformation and fluid infiltration. As an example, titanite grains from late-Grenville shear zones in the northwestern Adirondack Mountains exhibit a range of δ18O zoning patterns that record post-peak metamorphic cooling, episodic fluid infiltration, and deformation-facilitated recrystallization. Many titanite grains preserve smooth, core-to-rim decreasing, diffusional δ18O profiles, which are amenable to diffusion modeling. FGB models that best fit the measured δ18O profiles indicate cooling from ~700-500°C in just 2-5 m.y., a rapid thermal change signaling the final gravitational collapse of the late-Grenville orogen. Titanite can also be utilized as a U-Pb chronometer, and comparison of δ18O and U-Pb age zoning patterns within the Adirondack titanites pins the episode of rapid cooling inferred from the δ18O record to some time between 1054 and 1047 Ma. The expanded capabilities of FGB also allow for evaluation of a range of heating-cooling histories for the

  14. Automated SIMS Isotopic Analysis Of Small Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittler, L.; Alexander, C.; Gyngard, F.; Morgand, A.; Zinner, E. K.

    2009-12-01

    The isotopic compositions of sub-μm to μm sized dust grains are of increasing interest in cosmochemistry, nuclear forensics and terrestrial aerosol research. Because of its high sensitivity and spatial resolution, Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is the tool of choice for measuring isotopes in such small samples. Indeed, SIMS has enabled an entirely new sub-field of astronomy: presolar grains in meteorites. In recent years, the development of the Cameca NanoSIMS ion probe has extended the reach of isotopic measurements to particles as small as 100 nm in diameter, a regime where isotopic precision is strongly limited by the total number of atoms in the sample. Many applications require obtaining isotopic data on large numbers of particles, necessitating the development of automated techniques. One such method is isotopic imaging, wherein images of multiple isotopes are acquired, each containing multiple dispersed particles, and image processing is used to determine isotopic ratios for individual particles. This method is powerful, but relatively inefficient for raster-based imaging on the NanoSIMS. Modern computerized control of instrumentation has allowed for another approach, analogous to commercial automated SEM-EDS particle analysis systems, in which images are used solely to locate particles followed by fully automated grain-by-grain analysis. The first such system was developed on the Carnegie Institution’s Cameca ims-6f, and was used to generate large databases of presolar grains. We have recently developed a similar system for the NanoSIMS, whose high sensitivity allows for smaller grains to be analyzed with less sample consumption than is possible with the 6f system. The 6f and NanoSIMS systems are functionally identical: an image of dispersed grains is obtained with sufficient statistical precision for an algorithm to identify the positions of individual particles, the primary ion beam is deflected to each particle in turn and rastered in a small

  15. Characterization of individual atmospheric aerosol particles with SIMS and laser-SNMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, R. E.; Nair, A.; Dambach, S.; Arlinghaus, H. F.; Tyler, B. J.

    2006-07-01

    The surface chemistry of atmospheric aerosol particles is important in determining how these particles will effect human health, visibility, climate and precipitation chemistry. In previous work, it has been shown that ToF-SIMS can provide significant valuable information on both organic and inorganic constituents of the aerosol. It has been found, however, that ToF-SIMS with a Ga + primary ion beam offers very low sensitivity to poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals, two important classes of pollutants. In this work the utility of laser-SNMS for detection of these pollutants has been explored. Two laser systems, a 193 nm excimer laser and a 157 nm excimer laser have been utilized. Each approach has advantages. ToF-SIMS has the highest sensitivity to alkali metals and aliphatic hydrocarbons. The 193 nm laser provides very high sensitivity to lead and other metals. The 157 nm laser greatly enhances sensitivity to PAHs which has enabled detection of PAHs on the surface of individual particles.

  16. Effect of temperature on the shape of spatial quasi-periodic oscillations of the refractive index of alkali atoms in an optically dense medium with a closed excitation contour of Δ type

    SciTech Connect

    Barantsev, K A; Litvinov, A N

    2014-10-31

    A theory of a closed excitation contour (Δ system) of a three-level atom in an optically dense medium is constructed with allowance for temperature. The spatial quasi-periodic oscillations of the refractive index in the system under study are shown to damp with increasing temperature. The range of temperatures at which these oscillations are most pronounced is found. (quantum optics)

  17. Solid-phase epitaxy of silicon amorphized by implantation of the alkali elements rubidium and cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, R.; Haeublein, V.; Ryssel, H.; Voellm, H.; Feili, D.; Seidel, H.; Frey, L.

    2012-11-06

    The redistribution of implanted Rb and Cs profiles in amorphous silicon during solid-phase epitaxial recrystallization has been investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. For the implantation dose used in these experiments, the alkali atoms segregate at the a-Si/c-Si interface during annealing resulting in concentration peaks near the interface. In this way, the alkali atoms are moved towards the surface. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy in ion channeling configuration was performed to measure average recrystallization rates of the amorphous silicon layers. Preliminary studies on the influence of the alkali atoms on the solid-phase epitaxial regrowth rate reveal a strong retardation compared to the intrinsic recrystallization rate.

  18. SimTracker, Version 5.0

    SciTech Connect

    2004-08-27

    SimTracker is a product of the Metadata Tools subproject under the ASC Scientific Data Management effort. SimTracker is an extensible web-based application that provides the capability to view and organize large volumes of simulation data. SimTracker automatically generates metadata summaries that provide a quick overview and index to the archived results of simulations. The summaries provide access to the data sets and associated data analysis tools. They include graphical snapshots, pointers to associated simulation input and output files, and assorted annotations. The ability to add personal annotations to simulation data sets is supported. All metadata is stored in XML files suitable for searching by the generator of the data or other scientists.

  19. SimTracker, Version 5.0

    2004-08-27

    SimTracker is a product of the Metadata Tools subproject under the ASC Scientific Data Management effort. SimTracker is an extensible web-based application that provides the capability to view and organize large volumes of simulation data. SimTracker automatically generates metadata summaries that provide a quick overview and index to the archived results of simulations. The summaries provide access to the data sets and associated data analysis tools. They include graphical snapshots, pointers to associated simulation inputmore » and output files, and assorted annotations. The ability to add personal annotations to simulation data sets is supported. All metadata is stored in XML files suitable for searching by the generator of the data or other scientists.« less

  20. Extreme isotopologue disequilibrium in molecular SIMS species during SHRIMP geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Charles W., Jr.; Danišík, Martin; Mernagh, Terry

    2016-04-01

    Isotopologue deficits of up to 200 ‰ below ideal mixing are observed in UO2+ species during SIMS gechronological analyses using the SHRIMP IIe instrument. These are identified by bombarding natural U-bearing minerals with an 18O2-primary beam. The large anomalies are associated with repeat analyses down a single SIMS sputtering crater (Compston et al., 1984), analysis of high-uranium, radiation damaged zircon, and analysis of baddeleyite. Analysis of zircon under routine conditions yield UO2+ isotopologue anomalies generally within a few percent of equilibrium. The conditions under which the isotopologue anomalies are observed are also conditions in which the UOx-based corrections, or calibration, for relative U vs. Pb ionization efficiencies fail. The existence of these isotopologue anomalies suggest that failure of the various UOx species to equilibrate with each other is the reason that none of them will successfully correct the U / Pb ratio. No simple isotopologue-based correction is apparent. However, isotopologue disequilibrium appears to be a more sensitive tool for detecting hi U calibration breakdowns than Raman spectroscopy, which showed sharper peaks for ~ 37 Ma high uranium 20 zircons than for reference zircons OG1 and Temora. U-Th-Sm/He ages were determined for aliquots of reference zircons OG1 (755 ± 71 Ma) and Temora (323 ± 43 Ma), suggesting that the broader Raman lines for the Temora reference zircons may be due to something other than accumulated radiation damage. Isotopologue abundances for UO+ and ThO+ and their energy spectra are consistent with most or all molecular species being 25 the product of atomic recombination when the primary beam impact energy is greater than 5.7 kV. This, in addition with the large UO2+ instrumentally generated isotopologue disequilibria, suggest any attempts to use SIMS to detect naturally occurring isotopologue deviations could be tricky.

  1. Discovery of Planetary Systems With SIM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Butler, Paul R.; Frink, Sabine; Fischer, Debra; Oppenheimer, Ben; Monet, David G.; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    2004-01-01

    We are witnessing the birth of a new observational science: the discovery and characterization of extrasolar planetary systems. In the past five years, over 70 extrasolar planets have been discovered by precision Doppler surveys, most by members of this SIM team. We are using the data base of information gleaned from our Doppler survey to choose the best targets for a new SIN planet search. In the same way that our Doppler database now serves SIM, our team will return a reconnaissance database to focus Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) into a more productive, efficient mission.

  2. Atomic transport of oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J.L.; Tomlins, G.W.

    1994-06-15

    Atomic transport of oxygen in nonstoichiometric oxides is an extremely important topic which overlaps science and technology. In many cases the diffusion of oxygen controls sintering, grain growth, and creep. High oxygen diffusivity is critical for efficient operation of many fuel cells. Additionally, oxygen diffusivities are an essential ingredient in any point defect model. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is the most accurate modern technique to measure oxygen tracer diffusion. This paper briefly reviews the principles and applications of SIMS for the measurement of oxygen transport. Case studies are taken from recent work on ZnO and some high-temperature superconductors.

  3. ToF-SIMS Applications in Microelectronics: Quantification of Organic Surface Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trouiller, C.; Signamarcheix, T.; Juhel, M.; Petitdidier, S.; Fontaine, H.; Veillerot, M.; Kwakman, L. F. Tz.; Wyon, C.

    2005-09-01

    An overview of our main Time-Of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) applications is first given that highlights the strengths but also reveals some development needs for this technique especially where it comes to contaminants quantification. In this work, as a step towards better quantified data, we have elaborated a method to quantify Airborne Molecular Contamination (AMC) on Silicon. For this a protocol using liquid nitrogen sample cooling was set up to reduce the desorption of the most volatile species under the Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) of the ToF-SIMS analysis chamber and thus to enable a more stable, reliable and representative measurement. Using this protocol for the ToF-SIMS analysis and a careful analytical sequence, good correlation between Wafer Thermal Desorption Gas Chromatography Mass Spectroscopy (W-TDGCMS) and ToF-SIMS results on wafers exposed for varying time under the clean-room air flow containing 2,2,4-trimethyl 1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate (TXIB) and Phthalates — two main organic clean-room contaminants — is obtained. Relative Sensitivity Factors (RSF) are deduced. With the used measurement setups, the ToF-SIMS low detection limits (DL) lie around 1E11 - 1E12 atoms Carbon/cm2 (atC/cm2) depending on species and are comparable to that of W-TDGCMS at 1E11 atC/cm2.

  4. An orthotropic source of thermal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dinneen, T.; Ghiorso, A.; Gould, H.

    1995-06-01

    A highly efficient source that produces a narrow beam of neutral atoms at thermal velocity with small angular divergence is described. It uses a high work function interior surface to evaporate alkali atoms as ions and a low work function neutralizer, biased to collect the ions and evaporated them as neutral atoms. The neutralizer is located opposite an exit aperture so that the beam characteristics are determined by the geometry of the neutralizer and aperture. The orthotropic source is especially well suited for atomic clocks and for efficient loading of short lived radioactive alkali atoms into an optical trap.

  5. Small diatomic alkali molecules at ultracold temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tout Taotao

    This thesis describes experimental work done with two of the smallest diatomic alkali molecules, 6Li2 and 23Na 6Li, each formed out of its constituent atoms at ultracold temperatures. The 23Na6Li molecule was formed for the first time at ultracold temperatures, after previous attempts failed due to an incorrect assignment of Feshbach resonances in the 6Li+23Na system. The experiment represents successful molecule formation around the most difficult Feshbach resonance ever used, and opens up the possibility of transferring NaLi to its spin-triplet ground state, which has both magnetic and electric dipole moments and is expected to be long-lived. For 6Li2, the experimental efforts in this thesis have solved a long-standing puzzle of apparently long lifetimes of closed-channel fermion pairs around a narrow Feshbach resonance, finding that the lifetime is in fact short, as expected in the absence of Pauli suppression of collisions. Moreover, measurements of collisions of Li2 with free Li atoms demonstrates a striking first example of collisions involving molecules at ultracold temperatures described by physics beyond universal long-range van der Waals interactions.

  6. NanoSIMS and more: New tools in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, P.

    2016-01-01

    Primitive Solar System materials contain nm- to μm-sized presolar grains that formed in the winds of evolved stars and in the ejecta of stellar explosions. These samples of stardust can be analysed in terrestrial laboratories with sophisticated analytical instrumentation in great detail. Of particular importance are coordinated studies of individual grains by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) and Focused Ion Beam/Transmission Electron Microscopy (FIB/TEM) from which detailed information on isotopic compositions and mineralogies can be obtained. A key tool is the NanoSIMS 50 ion probe which permits to do isotope measurements of light and many intermediate-mass elements with spatial resolutions of <100 nm. A new type of RIMS instrument, “CHILI”, is currently under construction and is aimed to provide <100 nm resolution for isotope studies of intermediate-mass and heavy elements. Another promising analysis technique for future studies is Atom Probe Tomography (APT) which might be useful to create 3D-elemental and isotopic maps of presolar grains at the nanometer scale.

  7. 40K-40Ca and 87Rb-86Sr Dating by SIMS: The Double-Plus Advantage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, T. M.; McKeegan, K. D.; Schmitt, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    retentivity of 40Ca* relative to 40Ar* in white micas. This approach offers the potential to develop a branched-decay thermochronometer (K-Ca-Ar) permitting simultaneous solution of temperature-time history from μm-scale isotopic variations. A further advantage is that even low resolution SIMS instruments (e.g., ims7f) can utilize the double-plus method. Initial investigations using the same double-plus approach for Rb-Sr dating show promise. While resolving 87Rb+ from 87Sr+ requires an MRP of ~290k, unattainable using any current SIMS instrument, 87Rb++ is so strongly suppressed that determination of 87Sr++ is possible with minor peak stripping. 87Rb/86Sr can be determined either from 85Rb+/88Sr+ at MRP≈ 8k or by the use of energy filtering. In addition to micas, these approaches may be applicable to any mineral systems enriched in alkali metals relative to alkaline earths, such as alkali feldspars, feldspathoids, and alkaline halides.

  8. Alkali metal/sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Joginder N.

    1978-01-01

    Alkali metal/sulfur batteries in which the electrolyte-separator is a relatively fragile membrane are improved by providing means for separating the molten sulfur/sulfide catholyte from contact with the membrane prior to cooling the cell to temperatures at which the catholyte will solidify. If the catholyte is permitted to solidify while in contact with the membrane, the latter may be damaged. The improvement permits such batteries to be prefilled with catholyte and shipped, at ordinary temperatures.

  9. Superconductivity in alkali metal fullerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, D. W.; Rosseinsky, M. J.; Haddon, R. C.; Ramirez, A. P.; Hebard, A. F.; Tycko, R.; Fleming, R. M.; Dabbagh, G.

    1991-12-01

    The recent synthesis of macroscopic quantities of spherical molecular carbon compounds, commonly called fullerenes, has stimulated a wide variety of studies of the chemical and physical properties of this novel class of compounds. We discovered that the smallest of the known fullerenes, C 60, could be made conducting and superconducting by reaction with alkali metals. In this paper, an overview of the motivation for these discoveries and some recent results are presented.

  10. A novel nuclear localization signal in the human single-minded proteins SIM1 and SIM2.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, Akiko; Kudoh, Jun; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Shimizu, Yoshiko

    2004-01-16

    Human Single-minded 1 (SIM1) and SIM2 genes were found as homologs of Drosophila sim gene which plays a key role in the midline cell lineage of the central nervous system. SIM proteins belong to a family of transcription factors, called bHLH/PAS. Here we examined the intracellular localization of SIM proteins using the expression constructs of whole SIM2 or SIM1 protein fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The transient expression analysis revealed the nuclear localization of SIM proteins in the cultured cells. To identify the nuclear localization signal, we made expression constructs of EGFP-fusion protein consisting of various portions of SIM proteins. Transfection assay showed the presence of NLS activity in the small region of 23 and 21 amino acid residues at the central part of SIM2 and SIM1 proteins, respectively. Further analysis with amino acid substitution of this small region of SIM2 protein revealed the critical role of five amino acid residues (Arg367, Lys373, Pro385, Tyr386, and Gln389) in NLS activity. The consensus sequence of RKxxKx[K/R]xxxxKxKxRxxPY was estimated as a presumptive NLS in SIM proteins from various species. Thus, the NLS consisting of a cluster of basic amino acids with Pro and Tyr at the C-terminal end is novel and well conserved in the SIM proteins during evolution. PMID:14697214

  11. Alkali metal sources for OLED devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattaneo, Lorena; Longoni, Giorgio; Bonucci, Antonio; Tominetti, Stefano

    2005-07-01

    In OLED organic layers electron injection is improved by using alkali metals as cathodes, to lower work function or, as dopants of organic layer at cathode interface. The creation of an alkali metal layer can be accomplished through conventional physical vapor deposition from a heated dispenser. However alkali metals are very reactive and must be handled in inert atmosphere all through the entire process. If a contamination takes place, it reduces the lithium deposition rate and also the lithium total yield in a not controlled way. An innovative alkali metal dispensing technology has been developed to overcome these problems and ensure OLED alkali metal cathode reliability. The alkali Metal dispenser, called Alkamax, will be able to release up to a few grams of alkali metals (in particular Li and Cs) throughout the adoption of a very stable form of the alkali metal. Lithium, for example, can be evaporated "on demand": the evaporation could be stopped and re-activated without losing alkali metal yield because the metal not yet consumed remains in its stable form. A full characterization of dispensing material, dispenser configuration and dispensing process has been carried out in order to optimize the evaporation and deposition dynamics of alkali metals layers. The study has been performed applying also inside developed simulations tools.

  12. Antioxidant Activity of Passiflora edulis Sims Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Sunitha, M.; Devaki, K.

    2009-01-01

    Ethanol extract of Passiflora edulis Sims was analyzed for its antioxidant (1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl radical reducing power methods) and phytochemical analysis. The extract was found effective against the antioxidant test models exhibiting an IC50 value of 875±87.83 μg/ml and showed strong potential antioxidant activity in both assays. PMID:20490300

  13. Phasor algorithms of the SIM fringe estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Xiaopei

    2003-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) will provide unprecedented micro-arcsecond (pas) precision to search for extra-solar planets and possible life in the universe. SIM will also revolutionize our understanding of the dynamics and evolutions of the local universe through hundred-fold improvements of inertial astrometry measurements. SIM has two so-called guide interferometers to provide stable inertial orientation knowledge of the baseline, and a science interferometer to measure target fringes. The guide and science measurements are based on the fringe phase measurements using a CCD detector. One of the key issues with SIM is to develop a new algorithm for calculation of fringe parameters. Not only astrometric results need that new algorithm, but also real-time fringe tracking requires a new method to calculate phase and visibility fast and accurately. The formulas for the phasor algorithms for fringe estimation are presented. The signal-noise ratio performances of the fringe quadratures are demonstrated. The advantages of phasor algorithms for application of fast fringe tracking and on-board data compression are discussed.

  14. Design data brochure: SIMS prototype system 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Information is provided on the design and performance of the IBM SIMS Prototype System 2, solar domestic hot water system, for single family residences. The document provides sufficient data to permit procurement, installation, operation, and maintenance by qualified architectural engineers or contractors.

  15. Caesium sputter ion source compatible with commercial SIMS instruments.

    SciTech Connect

    Belykh, S. F.; Palitsin, V. V.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Kovarsky, A. P.; Chang, R. J. H.; Adriaens, A.; Dowsett, M. G.; Adams, F.; Materials Science Division; Univ. Warwick; Ioffe Physical-Technical Inst.; Ghent Univ.; Univ. Antwerp

    2006-01-01

    A simple design for a caesium sputter cluster ion source compatible with commercially available secondary ion mass spectrometers is reported. This source has been tested with the Cameca IMS 4f instrument using the cluster Si{sub n}{sup -} and Cu{sub n}{sup -} ions, and will shortly be retrofitted to the floating low energy ion gun (FLIG) of the type used on the Cameca 4500/4550 quadruple instruments. Our experiments with surface characterization and depth profiling conducted to date demonstrate improvements of analytical capabilities of the SIMS instrument due to the non-additive enhancement of secondary ion emission and shorter ion ranges of polyatomic projectiles compared to atomic ions with the same impact energy.

  16. Chemical Imaging of the Cell Membrane by NanoSIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P K; Kraft, M L; Frisz, J F; Carpenter, K J; Hutcheon, I D

    2010-02-23

    The existence of lipid microdomains and their role in cell membrane organization are currently topics of great interest and controversy. The cell membrane is composed of a lipid bilayer with embedded proteins that can flow along the two-dimensional surface defined by the membrane. Microdomains, known as lipid rafts, are believed to play a central role in organizing this fluid system, enabling the cell membrane to carry out essential cellular processes, including protein recruitment and signal transduction. Lipid rafts are also implicated in cell invasion by pathogens, as in the case of the HIV. Therefore, understanding the role of lipid rafts in cell membrane organization not only has broad scientific implications, but also has practical implications for medical therapies. One of the major limitations on lipid organization research has been the inability to directly analyze lipid composition without introducing artifacts and at the relevant length-scales of tens to hundreds of nanometers. Fluorescence microscopy is widely used due to its sensitivity and specificity to the labeled species, but only the labeled components can be observed, fluorophores can alter the behavior of the lipids they label, and the length scales relevant to imaging cell membrane domains are between that probed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging (<10 nm) and the diffraction limit of light. Topographical features can be imaged on this length scale by atomic force microscopy (AFM), but the chemical composition of the observed structures cannot be determined. Immuno-labeling can be used to study the distribution of membrane proteins at high resolution, but not lipid composition. We are using imaging mass spectrometry by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in concert with other high resolution imaging methods to overcome these limitations. The experimental approach of this project is to combine molecule-specific stable isotope labeling with high-resolution SIMS using a

  17. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  18. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  19. Water Content of Lunar Alkali Fedlspar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, R. D.; Simon, J. I.; Wang, J.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Hauri, E. H.

    2016-01-01

    Detection of indigenous hydrogen in a diversity of lunar materials, including volcanic glass, melt inclusions, apatite, and plagioclase suggests water may have played a role in the chemical differentiation of the Moon. Spectroscopic data from the Moon indicate a positive correlation between water and Th. Modeling of lunar magma ocean crystallization predicts a similar chemical differentiation with the highest levels of water in the K- and Th-rich melt residuum of the magma ocean (i.e. urKREEP). Until now, the only sample-based estimates of water content of KREEP-rich magmas come from measurements of OH, F, and Cl in lunar apatites, which suggest a water concentration of < 1 ppm in urKREEP. Using these data, predict that the bulk water content of the magma ocean would have <10 ppm. In contrast, estimate water contents of 320 ppm for the bulk Moon and 1.4 wt % for urKREEP from plagioclase in ferroan anorthosites. Results and interpretation: NanoSIMS data from granitic clasts from Apollo sample 15405,78 show that alkali feldspar, a common mineral in K-enriched rocks, can have approx. 20 ppm of water, which implies magmatic water contents of approx. 1 wt % in the high-silica magmas. This estimate is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that estimated from apatite in similar rocks. However, the Cl and F contents of apatite in chemically similar rocks suggest that these melts also had high Cl/F ratios, which leads to spuriously low water estimates from the apatite. We can only estimate the minimum water content of urKREEP (+ bulk Moon) from our alkali feldspar data because of the unknown amount of degassing that led to the formation of the granites. Assuming a reasonable 10 to 100 times enrichment of water from urKREEP into the granites produces an estimate of 100-1000 ppm of water for the urKREEP reservoir. Using the modeling of and the 100-1000 ppm of water in urKREEP suggests a minimum bulk silicate Moon water content between 2 and 20 ppm. However, hydrogen loss was

  20. Sub-Shot-Noise Magnetometry with a Correlated Spin-Relaxation Dominated Alkali-Metal Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Kominis, I. K.

    2008-02-22

    Spin noise sets fundamental limits to the precision of measurements using spin-polarized atomic vapors, such as performed with sensitive atomic magnetometers. Spin squeezing offers the possibility to extend the measurement precision beyond the standard quantum limit of uncorrelated atoms. Contrary to current understanding, we show that, even in the presence of spin relaxation, spin squeezing can lead to a significant reduction of spin noise, and hence an increase in magnetometric sensitivity, for a long measurement time. This is the case when correlated spin relaxation due to binary alkali-atom collisions dominates independently acting decoherence processes, a situation realized in thermal high atom-density magnetometers and clocks.

  1. FoilSim: Basic Aerodynamics Software Created

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Ruth A.

    1999-01-01

    FoilSim is interactive software that simulates the airflow around various shapes of airfoils. The graphical user interface, which looks more like a video game than a learning tool, captures and holds the students interest. The software is a product of NASA Lewis Research Center s Learning Technologies Project, an educational outreach initiative within the High Performance Computing and Communications Program (HPCCP).This airfoil view panel is a simulated view of a wing being tested in a wind tunnel. As students create new wing shapes by moving slider controls that change parameters, the software calculates their lift. FoilSim also displays plots of pressure or airspeed above and below the airfoil surface.

  2. Spatial Polarization Profile in an Optically Pumped Alkali Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Ben; Patton, Brian; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, Will

    2009-05-01

    Spin-Exchange Optical Pumping (SEOP) is a technique used to polarize nuclei in gases, and more recently in solids, in excess of their equilibrium limit. SEOP is achieved by optically pumping an alkali vapor which subsequently transfers angular momentum to the nuclei of interest. The efficiency of SEOP is governed by optical pumping and relaxation of the alkali atoms, relaxation of the target nuclei, and interactions between the alkali and target substance. In this work we investigate the relationship between optical pumping and relaxation in cesium vapor with absorption spectroscopy at high magnetic field (2.7 T). Cesium vapor within a cylindrical glass vapor cell is optically pumped with a strong laser resonant with a D2 transition. The ground-state population of the vapor is measured at various positions along a diameter of the cell with a small, weak D1 laser beam which translates mechanically. The resulting polarization profile elucidates the interplay between optical pumping, diffusion in the buffer gas, and relaxation at the walls of the vapor cell. We report measurements of the spatial polarization profile in vapor cells with bare Pyrex walls and cells coated with paraffin (an anti-relaxation coating) or CsH salt (a target substance for SEOP), and compare them to numerical simulations. Further investigation might yield a new method for characterizing surface relaxation in vapor cells.

  3. Alkali Metal Variation and Twisting of the FeNNFe Core in Bridging Diiron Dinitrogen Complexes.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Sean F; Rodgers, Kenton R; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun; Mercado, Brandon Q; Grubel, Katarzyna; Holland, Patrick L

    2016-03-21

    Alkali metal cations can interact with Fe-N2 complexes, potentially enhancing back-bonding or influencing the geometry of the iron atom. These influences are relevant to large-scale N2 reduction by iron, such as in the FeMoco of nitrogenase and the alkali-promoted Haber-Bosch process. However, to our knowledge there have been no systematic studies of a large range of alkali metals regarding their influence on transition metal-dinitrogen complexes. In this work, we varied the alkali metal in [alkali cation]2[LFeNNFeL] complexes (L = bulky β-diketiminate ligand) through the size range from Na(+) to K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+). The FeNNFe cores have similar Fe-N and N-N distances and N-N stretching frequencies despite the drastic change in alkali metal cation size. The two diketiminates twist relative to one another, with larger dihedral angles accommodating the larger cations. In order to explain why the twisting has so little influence on the core, we performed density functional theory calculations on a simplified LFeNNFeL model, which show that the two metals surprisingly do not compete for back-bonding to the same π* orbital of N2, even when the ligand planes are parallel. This diiron system can tolerate distortion of the ligand planes through compensating orbital energy changes, and thus, a range of ligand orientations can give very similar energies. PMID:26925968

  4. Formation of Alkali Hydrides via Two-photon Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarros, Elizabeth; Kirby, Kate; Coté, Robin

    2006-05-01

    Alkali hydride molecules are very polar, exhibiting large ground-state dipole moments. Ultracold sources of alkali atoms and hydrogen have been created in the laboratory. We explore theoretically the feasibility of forming such molecules from a mixture of the ultracold atomic gases, employing a two-photon stimulated radiative association process -- Raman excitation. The triplet ground state for lithium hydride is of particular interest since it supports only one bound ro-vibrational level. Using accurate molecular potential energy curves and dipole transition moments, we have calculated the rate coefficients for populating the bound ro-vibrational level of the a^3&+circ; state of LiH via the excited b^3π state. We have found that significant molecule formation rates can be realized with laser intensities and atomic densities that are attainable experimentally. Also, we have calculated the rate coefficients for populating all the vibrational levels of the X^1&+circ; state of LiH via the excited B^1π state. In this case, we have found that significant formation rates into the upper vibrational levels can be realized. We examine the spontaneous emission cascade which takes place from these upper vibrational levels on a timescale of milliseconds, and calculate the resulting rotational populations in v=0. We show that photon emission in the cascade process does not contribute to trap loss.

  5. Theoretical study on the adsorption of carbon dioxide on individual and alkali-metal doped MOF-5s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Nguyen Thi Thu; Lefedova, O. V.; Ha, Nguyen Ngoc

    2016-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to investigate the adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) on metal-organic framework (MOF-5) and alkali-metal (Li, K, Na) doped MOF-5s. The adsorption energy calculation showed that metal atom adsorption is exothermic in MOF-5 system. Moreover, alkali-metal doping can significantly improve the adsorption ability of carbon dioxide on MOF-5. The best influence is observed for Li-doping.

  6. Heat capacity, glass transition temperature, size of cooperatively rearranging regions, and network connectivity of sodium silicate and alkali borate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Borisova, N.V.; Ushakov, V.M.; Shultz, M.M.

    1994-07-01

    The radius of cooperatively rearranging domains at the glass transition in sodium silicate glasses and the number of bridging oxygen atoms in these domains are assessed within the framework of the kinetic theory of thermal fluctuations. The tendencies of the heat capacity, T{sub g}, and the cooperative rearrangement scale with the alkali oxide concentration in sodium silicate and alkali borate glasses are compared. The points of similarity and distinctions between them are revealed.

  7. Note: An ion source for alkali metal implantation beneath graphene and hexagonal boron nitride monolayers on transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, L. H.; Cun, H. Y.; Hemmi, A.; Kälin, T.; Greber, T.

    2013-12-01

    The construction of an alkali-metal ion source is presented. It allows the acceleration of rubidium ions to an energy that enables the penetration through monolayers of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. Rb atoms are sublimated from an alkali-metal dispenser. The ionization is obtained by surface ionization and desorption from a hot high work function surface. The ion current is easily controlled by the temperature of ionizer. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy measurements confirm ion implantation.

  8. Note: An ion source for alkali metal implantation beneath graphene and hexagonal boron nitride monolayers on transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, L. H. de; Cun, H. Y.; Hemmi, A.; Kälin, T.; Greber, T.

    2013-12-15

    The construction of an alkali-metal ion source is presented. It allows the acceleration of rubidium ions to an energy that enables the penetration through monolayers of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. Rb atoms are sublimated from an alkali-metal dispenser. The ionization is obtained by surface ionization and desorption from a hot high work function surface. The ion current is easily controlled by the temperature of ionizer. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy measurements confirm ion implantation.

  9. Bioinorganic Chemistry of the Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsam; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien T; Churchill, David G

    2016-01-01

    The common Group 1 alkali metals are indeed ubiquitous on earth, in the oceans and in biological systems. In this introductory chapter, concepts involving aqueous chemistry and aspects of general coordination chemistry and oxygen atom donor chemistry are introduced. Also, there are nuclear isotopes of importance. A general discussion of Group 1 begins from the prevalence of the ions, and from a comparison of their ionic radii and ionization energies. While oxygen and water molecule binding have the most relevance to biology and in forming a detailed understanding between the elements, there is a wide range of basic chemistry that is potentially important, especially with respect to biological chelation and synthetic multi-dentate ligand design. The elements are widely distributed in life forms, in the terrestrial environment and in the oceans. The details about the workings in animal, as well as plant life are presented in this volume. Important biometallic aspects of human health and medicine are introduced as well. Seeing as the elements are widely present in biology, various particular endogenous molecules and enzymatic systems can be studied. Sodium and potassium are by far the most important and central elements for consideration. Aspects of lithium, rubidium, cesium and francium chemistry are also included; they help in making important comparisons related to the coordination chemistry of Na(+) and K(+). Physical methods are also introduced. PMID:26860297

  10. Magnetic Resonance Reversals in Optically Pumped Alkali-Metal Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Fei; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2007-06-01

    We report an unusual new phenomenon, peculiar sign reversals of the ground-state magnetic resonances and of the ``zero-dip" resonance (Zeeman resonance at zero field) of optically-pumped, alkali-metal vapors. These anomalies occur when a ``weak" circular polarized D1 laser light is tuned to pump atoms predominantly from the lower ground-state hyperfine multiplet. One can understand the signal reversals in simple, semi-quantitative way with reference to this distribution. uantitative computer simulations are in excellent greement with observations.

  11. Magnetic resonance reversals in optically pumped alkali-metal vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, F.; Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2007-05-01

    We report an unusual phenomenon, peculiar sign reversals of the ground-state magnetic resonances and of the zero-dip resonance (Zeeman resonance at zero field) of optically pumped, alkali-metal vapors. These anomalies occur when a weak circularly polarized D1 laser light is tuned to pump atoms predominantly from the lower ground-state hyperfine multiplet. One can understand the signal reversals in a simple, semiquantitative way with reference to the spin-temperature distribution. Quantitative computer simulations are in excellent agreement with observations.

  12. Determination of Alkali Ions in Biological and Environmental Samples.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the common methods for the determination of the alkali metals is given. These are drawn from all of the three principle branches of quantitative analysis and consist mainly of optical atomic spectrometric methods, ion-selective electrodes, and the separation methods of ion-chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. Their main characteristics and performance parameters are discussed. Important specific applications are also examined, namely clinical analysis, single cell analysis, the analysis of soil samples and hydroponic nutrient solutions, as well as the detection of the radioactive (137)Cs isotope. PMID:26860298

  13. Electro-optic contribution to field-induced Raman scattering in alkali halides

    SciTech Connect

    Subbaswamy, K.R.; Mahan, G.D.

    1985-10-15

    The electro-optic contribution to the field-induced first-order Raman scattering cross section in alkali halide crystals is calculated using measured values for hyperpolarizabilities. The electro-optic contribution is much larger than the previously reported atomic displacement contribution. The results cast some doubt on the accuracy of the reported hyperpolarizability values.

  14. Atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Schwindt, Peter; Johnson, Cort N.

    2012-07-03

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  15. Process for the disposal of alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Leroy C.

    1977-01-01

    Large quantities of alkali metals may be safely reacted for ultimate disposal by contact with a hot concentrated caustic solution. The alkali metals react with water in the caustic solution in a controlled reaction while steam dilutes the hydrogen formed by the reaction to a safe level.

  16. The alkali metals: 200 years of surprises.

    PubMed

    Dye, James L

    2015-03-13

    Alkali metal compounds have been known since antiquity. In 1807, Sir Humphry Davy surprised everyone by electrolytically preparing (and naming) potassium and sodium metals. In 1808, he noted their interaction with ammonia, which, 100 years later, was attributed to solvated electrons. After 1960, pulse radiolysis of nearly any solvent produced solvated electrons, which became one of the most studied species in chemistry. In 1968, alkali metal solutions in amines and ethers were shown to contain alkali metal anions in addition to solvated electrons. The advent of crown ethers and cryptands as complexants for alkali cations greatly enhanced alkali metal solubilities. This permitted us to prepare a crystalline salt of Na(-) in 1974, followed by 30 other alkalides with Na(-), K(-), Rb(-) and Cs(-) anions. This firmly established the -1 oxidation state of alkali metals. The synthesis of alkalides led to the crystallization of electrides, with trapped electrons as the anions. Electrides have a variety of electronic and magnetic properties, depending on the geometries and connectivities of the trapping sites. In 2009, the final surprise was the experimental demonstration that alkali metals under high pressure lose their metallic character as the electrons are localized in voids between the alkali cations to become high-pressure electrides! PMID:25666067

  17. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, Raymond D.; McPheeters, Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  18. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C.

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  19. Implications of SU(2)_L x U(1) Symmetry for SIM(2) Invariant Neutrino Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Dunn; Thomas Mehen

    2006-10-16

    We consider SU(2){sub L} x U(1) gauge invariant generalizations of a nonlocal, Lorentz violating mass term for neutrinos that preserves a SIM(2) subgroup. This induces Lorentz violating effects in QED as well as tree-level lepton family number violating interactions. Measurements of g{sub e} - 2 with trapped electrons severely constrain possible SIM(2) mass terms for electrons which violate C invariance. We study Lorentz violating effects in a C invariant and SIM(2) invariant extension of QED. We examine the Lorentz violating interactions of nonrelativistic electrons with electromagnetic fields to determine their impact on the spectroscopy of hydrogen-like atoms and g{sub e} - 2 measurements with trapped electrons. Generically, Lorentz violating corrections are suppressed by m{sub v}{sup 2}/m{sub e}{sup 2} and are within experimental limits. We study one-loop corrections to electron and photon self-energies and point out the need for a prescription to handle IR divergences induced by the nonlocality of the theory. We also calculate the tree level contribution to {mu} {yields} e + {gamma} from SIM(2) invariant mass terms.

  20. Equation of state for solid rare gases and alkali metals under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    This investigation is based on an atomic equation of state which takes into account the excluded volume of the atom being considered. Study of solid rare gases allows following the packing factor of the solid in equilibrium with the gas at different temperatures and of the solid and the liquid in the case of solid-liquid equilibria. The application of a pressure to the solid up to 9800 MPa allows determining the decrease in atomic volume and thus the compressibility. Such a study leads to proposing a new expression through dividing the pressure derivative (as a function of the excluded volume) by the pressure. This new coefficient is a pressure-independent constant but varies with the atom considered. Multiplied by the initial atomic volume, this coefficient has a unique value for all the rare gases. Furthermore, this is also true for the series of alkali metals with however a lower value of the coefficient. The atomic configurations of the two series are very different with one free electron for the alkali metals but closed shells for the rare gases. The alkali metals are therefore more complex than the rare gases. It is worthwhile to note that study of the equilibrium has not required the use of the principles of thermodynamics.

  1. Alkali burns from wet cement.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    When water is added to the dry materials of Portland cement calcium hydroxide is formed; the wet cement is caustic (with a pH as high as 12.9) and can produce third-degree alkali burns after 2 hours of contact. Unlike professional cement workers, amateurs are usually not aware of any danger and may stand or kneel in the cement for long periods. As illustrated in a case report, general physicians may recognize neither the seriousness of the injury in its early stages nor the significance of a history of prolonged contact with wet cement. All people working with cement should be warned about its dangers and advised to immediately wash and dry the skin if contact does occur. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6561052

  2. Rim Sim: A Role-Play Simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrett, Robert C.; Frew, Suzanne L.; Howell, David G.; Karl, Herman A.; Rudin, Emily B.

    2003-01-01

    Rim Sim is a 6-hour, eight-party negotiation that focuses on creating a framework for the long-term disaster-recovery efforts. It involves a range of players from five countries affected by two natural disasters: a typhoon about a year ago and an earthquake about 6 months ago. The players are members of an International Disaster Working Group (IDWG) that has been created by an international commission. The IDWG has been charged with drawing up a framework for managing two issues: the reconstruction of regionally significant infrastructure and the design of a mechanism for allocating funding to each country for reconstruction of local infrastructure and ongoing humanitarian needs. The first issue will involve making choices among five options (two harbor options, two airport options, and one rail-line option), each of which will have three levels at which to rebuild. The second issue will involve five starting-point options. Participants are encouraged to invent other options for both issues. The goal of Rim Sim is to raise questions about traditional approaches to disaster-preparedness planning and reconstruction efforts in an international setting, in this case the Pacific Rim. Players must confront the reverberating effects of disasters and the problems of using science and technical information in decisionmaking, and are introduced to a consensus-building approach emphasizing face-to-face dialog and multinational cooperation in dealing with humanitarian concerns, as well as long-term efforts to reconstruct local and regional infrastructure. The Rim Sim simulation raises four key points: ripple effects of disasters, role of science, multiparty negotiation, and building personal relationships.

  3. Interferometer real time control development for SIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Charles E.

    2003-02-01

    Real Time Control (RTC) for the Space Interferometry Mission will build on the real time core interferometer control technology under development at JPL since the mid 1990s, with heritage from the ground based MKII and Palomar Testbed Interferometer projects developed in the late '80s and early '90s. The core software and electronics technology for SIM interferometer real time control is successfully operating on several SIM technology demonstration testbeds, including the Real-time Interferometer Control System Testbed, System Testbed-3, and the Microarcsecond Metrology testbed. This paper provides an overview of the architecture, design, integration, and test of the SIM flight interferometer real time control to meet challenging flight system requirements for the high processor throughput, low-latency interconnect, and precise synchronization to support microarcsecond-level astrometric measurements for greater than five years at 1 AU in Earth-trailing orbit. The electronics and software architecture of the interferometer real time control core and its adaptation to a flight design concept are described. Control loops for pointing and pathlength control within each of four flight interferometers and for coordination of control and data across interferometers are illustrated. The nature of onboard data processing to fit average downlink rates while retaining post-processed astrometric measurement precision and accuracy is also addressed. Interferometer flight software will be developed using a software simulation environment incorporating models of the metrology and starlight sensors and actuators to close the real time control loops. RTC flight software and instrument flight electronics will in turn be integrated utilizing the same simulation architecture for metrology and starlight component models to close real time control loops and verify RTC functionality and performance prior to delivery to flight interferometer system integration at Lockheed Martin

  4. QuakeSim 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnellan, Andrea; Parker, Jay W.; Lyzenga, Gregory A.; Granat, Robert A.; Norton, Charles D.; Rundle, John B.; Pierce, Marlon E.; Fox, Geoffrey C.; McLeod, Dennis; Ludwig, Lisa Grant

    2012-01-01

    QuakeSim 2.0 improves understanding of earthquake processes by providing modeling tools and integrating model applications and various heterogeneous data sources within a Web services environment. QuakeSim is a multisource, synergistic, data-intensive environment for modeling the behavior of earthquake faults individually, and as part of complex interacting systems. Remotely sensed geodetic data products may be explored, compared with faults and landscape features, mined by pattern analysis applications, and integrated with models and pattern analysis applications in a rich Web-based and visualization environment. Integration of heterogeneous data products with pattern informatics tools enables efficient development of models. Federated database components and visualization tools allow rapid exploration of large datasets, while pattern informatics enables identification of subtle, but important, features in large data sets. QuakeSim is valuable for earthquake investigations and modeling in its current state, and also serves as a prototype and nucleus for broader systems under development. The framework provides access to physics-based simulation tools that model the earthquake cycle and related crustal deformation. Spaceborne GPS and Inter ferometric Synthetic Aperture (InSAR) data provide information on near-term crustal deformation, while paleoseismic geologic data provide longerterm information on earthquake fault processes. These data sources are integrated into QuakeSim's QuakeTables database system, and are accessible by users or various model applications. UAVSAR repeat pass interferometry data products are added to the QuakeTables database, and are available through a browseable map interface or Representational State Transfer (REST) interfaces. Model applications can retrieve data from Quake Tables, or from third-party GPS velocity data services; alternatively, users can manually input parameters into the models. Pattern analysis of GPS and seismicity data

  5. Is ultra shallow analysis possible using SIMS?

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, D. P.; Dowsett, M. G.; Ormsby, T. J.; Cooke, G. A.

    1998-11-24

    The use of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to analyse ultra shallow dopant profiles is now becoming routine. However, interpretation of the data is not straight forward, and the conventional method of effectively multiplying intensity and ion dose (time) axes by calibration constants to 'quantify' the data is certain to produce serious inaccuracies. We demonstrate that for oxygen primary beams, analysis of silicon at normal incidence without oxygen flooding is currently the only analytical condition which leads to quantifiable, accurate profiles, and show that depth resolution better than 1 nm can be obtained from within 0.5 nm of the surface using sub-keV primary beams.

  6. Structure and photoabsorption properties of cationic alkali dimers solvated in neon clusters.

    PubMed

    Zanuttini, D; Douady, J; Jacquet, E; Giglio, E; Gervais, B

    2010-11-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the structure and optical absorption of M(2)(+) alkali dimers (M=Li,Na,K) solvated in Ne(n) clusters for n=1 to a few tens Ne atoms. For all these alkali, the lowest-energy isomers are obtained by aggregation of the first Ne atoms at the extremity of the alkali molecule. This particular geometry, common to other M(2)(+)-rare gas clusters, is intimately related to the shape of the electronic density of the X  (2)Σ(g)(+) ground state of the bare M(2)(+) molecules. The structure of the first solvation shell presents equilateral Ne(3) and capped pentagonal Ne(6) motifs, which are characteristic of pure rare gas clusters. The size and geometry of the complete solvation shell depend on the alkali and were obtained at n=22 with a D(4h) symmetry for Li and at n=27 with a D(5h) symmetry for Na. For K, our study suggests that the closure of the first solvation shell occurs well beyond n=36. We show that the atomic arrangement of these clusters has a profound influence on their optical absorption spectrum. In particular, the XΣ transition from the X  (2)Σ(g)(+) ground state to the first excited (2)Σ(u)(+) state is strongly blueshifted in the Frank-Condon area. PMID:21054047

  7. Alkali Silicate Vehicle Forms Durable, Fireproof Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, John B.; Seindenberg, Benjamin

    1964-01-01

    The problem: To develop a paint for use on satellites or space vehicles that exhibits high resistance to cracking, peeling, or flaking when subjected to a wide range of temperatures. Organic coatings will partially meet the required specifications but have the inherent disadvantage of combustibility. Alkali-silicate binders, used in some industrial coatings and adhesives, show evidence of forming a fireproof paint, but the problem of high surface-tension, a characteristic of alkali silicates, has not been resolved. The solution: Use of a suitable non-ionic wetting agent combined with a paint incorporating alkali silicate as the binder.

  8. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  9. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  10. Advancements in flowing diode pumped alkali lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Stalnaker, Donald M.; Guild, Eric M.; Oliker, Benjamin Q.; Moran, Paul J.; Townsend, Steven W.; Hostutler, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple variants of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) have recently been demonstrated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Highlights of this ongoing research effort include: a) a 571W rubidium (Rb) based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with a gain (2α) of 0.48 cm-1, b) a rubidium-cesium (Cs) Multi-Alkali Multi-Line (MAML) laser that simultaneously lases at both 795 nm and 895 nm, and c) a 1.5 kW resonantly pumped potassium (K) DPAL with a slope efficiency of 50%. The common factor among these experiments is the use of a flowing alkali test bed.

  11. Laser-Atomic Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2008-05-01

    We report a newly developed technique, laser-atomic oscillator, for simultaneously generating stable optical and electrical modulations with a very few components. It requires only a semiconductor laser, a vapor cell, and a few optical components. No photodetector and electronic feedback are needed. In this new system, the ground-state hyperfine coherence of alkali-metal atoms is spontaneously generated. The modulated laser light with a spectrum of a small optical comb is automatically produced, and the spacing between the comb peaks is photonically locked to the hyperfine frequency. The charge carriers in the semiconductor laser are also modulated at the hyperfine frequency. Laser-atomic oscillator is purely optical. Its simple structure allows the system to be very compact. We believe this new technique will bring some advantages in the applications of atomic chronometry, atomic magnetometry, and generation of multi-coherent light.

  12. Peptide Fragmentation and Surface Structural Analysis by Means of ToF-SIMS Using Large Cluster Ion Sources.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yuta; Aoyagi, Satoka; Fujii, Makiko; Matsuo, Jiro; Fletcher, John S; Lockyer, Nicholas P; Vickerman, John C; Passarelli, Melissa K; Havelund, Rasmus; Seah, Martin P

    2016-04-01

    Peptide or protein structural analysis is crucial for the evaluation of biochips and biodevices, therefore an analytical technique with the ability to detect and identify protein and peptide species directly from surfaces with high lateral resolution is required. In this report, the efficacy of ToF-SIMS to analyze and identify proteins directly from surfaces is evaluated. Although the physics governing the SIMS bombardment process precludes the ability for researchers to detect intact protein or larger peptides of greater than a few thousand mass unit directly, it is possible to obtain information on the partial structures of peptides or proteins using low energy per atom argon cluster ion beams. Large cluster ion beams, such as Ar clusters and C60 ion beams, produce spectra similar to those generated by tandem MS. The SIMS bombardment process also produces peptide fragment ions not detected by conventional MS/MS techniques. In order to clarify appropriate measurement conditions for peptide structural analysis, peptide fragmentation dependency on the energy of a primary ion beam and ToF-SIMS specific fragment ions are evaluated. It was found that the energy range approximately 6 ≤ E/n ≤ 10 eV/atom is most effective for peptide analysis based on peptide fragments and [M + H] ions. We also observed the cleaving of side chain moieties at extremely low-energy E/n ≤ 4 eV/atom. PMID:26916620

  13. SIMS and TEM Analysis of Niobium Bicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maheshwari, P; Griffis, D P; Stevie, F A; Zhou, C; Ciovati, G; Myneni, R; Spradlin, J K

    2011-07-01

    The behaviour of interstitial impurities(C,O,N,H) on the Nb surface with respect to grain boundaries may affect cavity performance. Large grain Nb makes possible the selection of bicrystal samples with a well defined grain boundary. In this work, Dynamic SIMS was used to analyze two Nb bicrystal samples, one of them heat treated and the other non heat treated (control). H levels were found to be higher for the non heat treated sample and a difference in the H intensity and sputtering rate was also observed across the grain boundary for both the samples. TEM results showed that the bicrystal interface showed no discontinuity and the oxide layer was uniform across the grain boundary for both the samples. TOF-SIMS imaging was also performed to analyze the distribution of the impurities across the grain boundary in both the samples. C was observed to be segregated along the grain boundary for the control sample, while H and O showed a difference in signal intensity across the grain boundary. Crystal orientation appears to have an important role in the observed sputtering rate and impurity ion signal differences both across the grain boundary and between samples

  14. Experimental Results for SimFuels

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Andrew M.; Skomurski, Frances N.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Wittman, Richard S.; Mcnamara, Bruce K.

    2012-08-22

    Assessing the performance of Spent (or Used) Nuclear Fuel (UNF) in geological repository requires quantification of time-dependent phenomena that may influence its behavior on a time-scale up to millions of years. A high-level waste repository environment will be a dynamic redox system because of the time-dependent generation of radiolytic oxidants and reductants and the corrosion of Fe-bearing canister materials. One major difference between used fuel and natural analogues, including unirradiated UO2, is the intense radiolytic field. The radiation emitted by used fuel can produce radiolysis products in the presence of water vapor or a thin-film of water that may increase the waste form degradation rate and change radionuclide behavior. To study UNF, we have been working on producing synthetic UO2 ceramics, or SimFuels that can be used in testing and which will contain specific radionuclides or non-radioactive analogs so that we can test the impact of radiolysis on fuel corrosion without using actual spent fuel. Although, testing actual UNF would be ideal for understanding the long term behavior of UNF, it requires the use of hot cells and is extremely expensive. In this report, we discuss, factors influencing the preparation of SimFuels and the requirements for dopants to mimic the behavior of UNF. We have developed a reliable procedure for producing large grain UO2 at moderate temperatures. This process will be applied to a series of different formulations.

  15. The magnetic moments of vanadium impurities in alkali hosts and induced spin current in alkali films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Funing

    Thin quench-condensed films of Na, K, Rb, and Cs are covered with 1/100 of a monolayer of Vanadium. Then the V impurities are covered with several atomic layers of the host. The magnetization of the sandwiches is measured by means of the anomalous Hall effect. For V impurities on the surface of Na and K, a magnetic moment of 7 Bohr magnetons is observed. After coverage with the host, the V moment became 6.5muB for the Na host. These results contradict the favored atomic model (predicting 0.6muB) and the resonance model. The V moment on the surface and in the bulk of Rb and Cs is about 4muB and considerably smaller than the measured moments of V in Na. Furthermore, the sign of the anomalous Hall resistance changes from negative for the Na host to positive for the Cs host. This indicates a change of the electronic structure of the impurity (plus host environment) when going from Na to Cs hosts. Sandwiches of FeK and FeCs are prepared at helium temperature and under ultra-high vacuum. The mean free path within these sandwiches can exceed the film thickness by a factor of five. This implies almost perfect specular reflection of the electrons at the interfaces. Therefore, the mean free path of the film is strongly dependent on the degree of the specular reflection. Furthermore, the experiments suggest that the specular reflections for spin-up and spin-down electrons are different at the Fe interface, resulting in a spin current in the alkali films. In order to detect this current, dilute Pb impurities are condensed on top of the free surface of the alkali films. Strong spin-orbit scatterers, such as Pb, introduce an anomalous Hall effect in the presence of a spin current, which can be detected through straightforward Hall measurements. The results of the AHE experiments clearly indicate the existence of a local spin current.

  16. Alkali metal for ultraviolet band-pass filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, Nick (Inventor); Fraschetti, George A. (Inventor); Mccann, Timothy A. (Inventor); Mayall, Sherwood D. (Inventor); Dunn, Donald E. (Inventor); Trauger, John T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An alkali metal filter having a layer of metallic bismuth deposited onto the alkali metal is provided. The metallic bismuth acts to stabilize the surface of the alkali metal to prevent substantial surface migration from occurring on the alkali metal, which may degrade optical characteristics of the filter. To this end, a layer of metallic bismuth is deposited by vapor deposition over the alkali metal to a depth of approximately 5 to 10 A. A complete alkali metal filter is described along with a method for fabricating the alkali metal filter.

  17. Alkali-Stabilized Pt-OHx Species Catalyze Low-Temperature Water-Gas Shift Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Y.; Pierre, D; Si, R; Deng, W; Ferrin, P; Nilekar, A; Peng, G; Herron, J; Bell, D; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    We report that alkali ions (sodium or potassium) added in small amounts activate platinum adsorbed on alumina or silica for the low-temperature water-gas shift (WGS) reaction (H{sub 2}O + CO {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) used for producing H{sub 2}. The alkali ion-associated surface OH groups are activated by CO at low temperatures ({approx}100 C) in the presence of atomically dispersed platinum. Both experimental evidence and density functional theory calculations suggest that a partially oxidized Pt-alkali-O{sub x}(OH){sub y} species is the active site for the low-temperature Pt-catalyzed WGS reaction. These findings are useful for the design of highly active and stable WGS catalysts that contain only trace amounts of a precious metal without the need for a reducible oxide support such as ceria.

  18. Buffer-gas-induced shift and broadening of hyperfine resonances in alkali-metal vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreto, P. J.; Jau, Y.-Y.; Post, A. B.; Kuzma, N. N.; Happer, W.

    2004-04-01

    We review the shift and broadening of hyperfine resonance lines of alkali-metal atoms in buffer gases. We present a simple theory both for the shift and the broadening induced by He gas. The theory is parametrized by the scattering length of slow electrons on He atoms and by the measured hyperfine intervals and binding energies of the S states of alkali-metal atoms. The calculated shifts and their temperature dependence are in good agreement with the published experimental data. The calculated broadening is 1.6 times smaller than the recent measurements, and more than 20 times smaller than the earlier measurements. We attribute much of the linewidth in the earlier experiments to possible small temperature gradients and the resulting inhomogeneous line broadening from the temperature dependence of hyperfine frequency shift at constant buffer-gas pressure.

  19. Multireference CI study of the potential curves and properties of positronic complexes of alkali hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buenker, Robert J.; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Tachikawa, Masanori; Pichl, Lukáš; Kimura, Mineo

    2006-06-01

    Ab initio multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction (MRD-CI) calculations have been carried out to study the manner in which the electronic structure of the series of neutral alkali hydride molecules is affected by the interaction of a lone positron. Four systems have been treated: LiH, NaH, KH and RbH. A new computer program has been constructed for this purpose that makes use of the Table-Direct-CI method for molecular calculations within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The main emphasis in the present work is on internuclear geometries with relatively large bond distances near the dissociation limit. Molecular charge density contour diagrams are presented to illustrate the bonding mechanism in each case. Trends in a variety of quantities such as positron affinities at both equilibrium molecular and separated atomic geometries, dissociation energies and positronium formation energies are computed and analyzed as the atomic number of the alkali atom is increased.

  20. Structure and properties of alizarin complex formed with alkali metal hydroxides in methanol solution.

    PubMed

    Jeliński, Tomasz; Cysewski, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    Quantum chemical computations were used for prediction of the structure and color of alizarin complex with alkali metal hydroxides in methanolic solutions. The color prediction relying on the single Gaussian-like band once again proved the usefulness of the PBE0 density functional due to the observed smallest color difference between computed and experimentally derived values. It was found that the alkali metal hydroxide molecules can bind to the two oxygen atoms of both hydroxyl groups of alizarin or to one of these atoms and the oxygen atom from the keto group in a complex with three methanol molecules. This means that two electronic transitions need to be taken into account when considering the spectra of the studied complexes. The resulting bond lengths and angles are correlated with the properties of the alkali metal atoms. The molar mass, the atomic radius, and the Pauling electronegativity of studied metals are quite accurate predictors of the geometric properties of hydroxide complexes with alizarin in methanol solution. Graphical abstract The spectra of the neutral and monoanionic form of alizarin together with color changes resulting from addition of different metal hydroxides and represented in CIE color space. PMID:27178415

  1. Latest applications of 3D ToF-SIMS bio-imaging.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, John S

    2015-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is a rapidly developing technique for the characterization of a wide range of materials. Recently, advances in instrumentation and sample preparation approaches have provided the ability to perform 3D molecular imaging experiments. Polyatomic ion beams, such as C60, and gas cluster ion beams, often Arn (n = 500-4000), substantially reduce the subsurface damage accumulation associated with continued bombardment of organic samples with atomic beams. In this review, the capabilities of the technique are discussed and examples of the 3D imaging approach for the analysis of model membrane systems, plant single cell, and tissue samples are presented. Ongoing challenges for 3D ToF-SIMS imaging are also discussed along with recent developments that might offer improved 3D imaging prospects in the near future. PMID:25708631

  2. Correlating microscopy techniques and ToF-SIMS analysis of fully grown mammalian oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gulin, Alexander; Nadtochenko, Victor; Astafiev, Artyom; Pogorelova, Valentina; Rtimi, Sami; Pogorelov, Alexander

    2016-06-20

    The 2D-molecular thin film analysis protocol for fully grown mice oocytes is described using an innovative approach. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical microscopy imaging were applied to the same mice oocyte section on the same sample holder. A freeze-dried mice oocyte was infiltrated into embedding media, e.g. Epon, and then was cut with a microtome and 2 μm thick sections were transferred onto an ITO coated conductive glass. Mammalian oocytes can contain "nucleolus-like body" (NLB) units and ToF-SIMS analysis was used to investigate the NLB composition. The ion-spatial distribution in the cell components was identified and compared with the images acquired by SEM, AFM and optical microscopy. This study presents a significant advancement in cell embryology, cell physiology and cancer-cell biochemistry. PMID:27160416

  3. Alkali Metal Handling Practices at NASA MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvail, Patrick G.; Carter, Robert R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is NASA s principle propulsion development center. Research and development is coordinated and carried out on not only the existing transportation systems, but also those that may be flown in the near future. Heat pipe cooled fast fission cores are among several concepts being considered for the Nuclear Systems Initiative. Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a capability to handle high-purity alkali metals for use in heat pipes or liquid metal heat transfer loops. This capability is a low budget prototype of an alkali metal handling system that would allow the production of flight qualified heat pipe modules or alkali metal loops. The processing approach used to introduce pure alkali metal into heat pipe modules and other test articles are described in this paper.

  4. Alkali-metal intercalation in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béguin, F.; Duclaux, L.; Méténier, K.; Frackowiak, E.; Salvetat, J. P.; Conard, J.; Bonnamy, S.; Lauginie, P.

    1999-09-01

    We report on successful intercalation of multiwall (MWNT) and single wall (SWNT) carbon nanotubes with alkali metals by electrochemical and vapor phase reactions. A LiC10 compound was produced by full electrochemical reduction of MWNT. KC8 and CsC8-MWNT first stage derivatives were synthesized in conditions of alkali vapor saturation. Their identity periods and the 2×2 R 0° alkali superlattice are comparable to their parent graphite compounds. The dysonian shape of KC8 EPR line and the temperature-independent Pauli susceptibility are both characteristic of a metallic behavior, which was confirmed by 13C NMR anisotropic shifts. Exposure of SWNT bundles to alkali vapor led to an increase of the pristine triangular lattice from 1.67 nm to 1.85 nm and 1.87 nm for potassium and rubidium, respectively.

  5. Alkali metal intercalates of molybdenum disulfide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.

    1973-01-01

    Study of some of the physicochemical properties of compounds obtained by subjecting natural molybdenite and single crystals of molybdenum disulfide grown by chemical vapor transport to intercalation with the alkali group of metals (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) by means of the liquid ammonia technique. Reported data and results include: (1) the intercalation of the entire alkali metal group, (2) stoichiometries and X-ray data on all of the compounds, and (3) superconductivity data for all the intercalation compounds.

  6. Desulfurizing Coal With an Alkali Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravindram, M.; Kalvinskas, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental coal-desulfurization process uses alkalies and steam in fluidized-bed reactor. With highly volatile, high-sulfur bituminous coal, process removed 98 percent of pyritic sulfur and 47 percent of organic sulfur. Used in coal liquefaction and in production of clean solid fuels and synthetic liquid fuels. Nitrogen or steam flows through bed of coal in reactor. Alkalies react with sulfur, removing it from coal. Nitrogen flow fluidizes bed while heating or cooling; steam is fluidizing medium during reaction.

  7. NanoSIMS Imaging Alternation Layers of a Leached SON68 Glass Via A FIB-made Wedged Crater

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi-Chung; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Neeway, James J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Evans, James E.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Zhu, Zihua; Wei, Wei

    2014-11-01

    Currently, nuclear wastes are commonly immobilized into glasses because of their long-term durability. Exposure to water for long periods of time, however, will eventually corrode the waste form and is the leading potential avenue for radionuclide release into the environment. Because such slow processes cannot be experimentally tested, the prediction of release requires a thorough understanding the mechanisms governing glass corrosion. In addition, due to the exceptional durability of glass, much of the testing must be performed on high-surface-area powders. A technique that can provide accurate compositional profiles with very precise depth resolution for non-flat samples would be a major benefit to the field. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) depth profiling is an excellent tool that has long been used to examine corrosion layers of glass. The roughness of the buried corrosion layers, however, causes the corresponding SIMS depth profiles to exhibit erroneously wide interfaces. In this study, NanoSIMS was used to image the cross-section of the corrosion layers of a leached SON68 glass sample. A wedged crater was prepared by a focused ion beam (FIB) instrument to obtain a 5× improvement in depth resolution for NanoSIMS measurements. This increase in resolution allowed us to confirm that the breakdown of the silica glass network is further from the pristine glass than a second dissolution front for boron, another glass former. The existence of these two distinct interfaces, separated by only ~20 nm distance in depth, was not apparent by traditional ToF-SIMS depth profiling but has been confirmed also by atom probe tomography. This novel sample geometry will be a major benefit to efficient NanoSIMS sampling of irregular interfaces at the nanometer scale that would otherwise be obscured within ToF-SIMS depth profiles.

  8. Alkali metal crystalline polymer electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuhong; Gamble, Stephen; Ainsworth, David; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Andreev, Yuri G; Bruce, Peter G

    2009-07-01

    Polymer electrolytes have been studied extensively because uniquely they combine ionic conductivity with solid yet flexible mechanical properties, rendering them important for all-solid-state devices including batteries, electrochromic displays and smart windows. For some 30 years, ionic conductivity in polymers was considered to occur only in the amorphous state above Tg. Crystalline polymers were believed to be insulators. This changed with the discovery of Li(+) conductivity in crystalline poly(ethylene oxide)(6):LiAsF(6). However, new crystalline polymer electrolytes have proved elusive, questioning whether the 6:1 complex has particular structural features making it a unique exception to the rule that only amorphous polymers conduct. Here, we demonstrate that ionic conductivity in crystalline polymers is not unique to the 6:1 complex by reporting several new crystalline polymer electrolytes containing different alkali metal salts (Na(+), K(+) and Rb(+)), including the best conductor poly(ethylene oxide)(8):NaAsF(6) discovered so far, with a conductivity 1.5 orders of magnitude higher than poly(ethylene oxide)(6):LiAsF(6). These are the first crystalline polymer electrolytes with a different composition and structures to that of the 6:1 Li(+) complex. PMID:19543313

  9. New studies of optical pumping, spin resonances, and spin exchange in mixtures of inert gases and alkali-metal vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu

    In this thesis, we present new studies of alkali-hyperfine resonances, new optical pumping of alkali-metal atoms, and the new measurements of binary spin-exchange cross-section between alkali-metal atoms and xenon atoms. We report a large light narrowing effect of the hyperfine end-resonance signals, which was predicted from our theory and observed in our experiments. By increasing the intensity of the circularly polarized pumping beam, alkali-metal atoms are optically pumped into a state of static polarization, and trapped into the hyperfine end-state. Spin exchange between alkali-metal atoms has minimal effect on the end-resonance of the highly spin-polarized atoms. This new result will possibly benefit the design of atomic clocks and magnetometer. We also studied the pressure dependence of the atomic-clock resonance linewidth and pointed out that the linewidth was overestimated by people in the community of atomic clock. Next, we present a series study of coherent population trapping (CPT), which is a promising technique with the same or better performance compared to the traditional microwave spectroscopy. For miniature atomic clocks, CPT method is thought to be particularly advantages. From our studies, we invented a new optical-pumping method, push-pull optical pumping, which can pump atoms into nearly pure 0-0 superposition state, the superposition state of the two ground-state hyperfine sublevels with azimuthal quantum number m = 0. We believe this new invention will bring a big advantage to CPT frequency standards, the quantum state preparation for cold atoms or hot vapor, etc. We also investigated the pressure dependence of CPT excitation and the line shape of the CPT resonance theoretically and experimentally. These two properties are important for CPT applications. A theoretical study of "photon cost" of optical pumping is also presented. Finally, we switch our attention to the problem of spin exchange between alkali-metal atoms and xenon gas. This

  10. SIM Lite: ground alignment of the instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekens, Frank G.; Goullioud, Renaud; Nicaise, Fabien; Kuan, Gary; Morales, Mauricio

    2010-07-01

    We present the start of the ground alignment plan for the SIM Lite Instrument. We outline the integration and alignment of the individual benches on which all the optics are mounted, and then the alignment of the benches to form the Science and Guide interferometers. The Instrument has a guide interferometer with only a 40 arc-seconds field of regard, and 200 arc-seconds of alignment adjustability. This requires each sides of the interferometer to be aligned to a fraction of that, while at the same time be orthogonal to the baseline defined by the External Metrology Truss. The baselines of the Science and Guide interferometers must also be aligned to be parallel. The start of these alignment plans is captured in a SysML Instrument System model, in the form of activity diagrams. These activity diagrams are then related to the hardware design and requirements. We finish with future plans for the alignment and integration activities and requirements.

  11. SIM Lite: Ground Alignment of the Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekens, Frank G.; Goullioud, Renaud; Nicaise, Fabien; Kuan, Gary; Morales, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    We present the start of the ground alignment plan for the SIM Lite Instrument. We outline the integration and alignment of the individual benches on which all the optics are mounted, and then the alignment of the benches to form the Science and Guide interferometers. The Instrument has a guide interferometer with only a 40 arc-seconds field of regard, and 200 arc-seconds of alignment adjustability. This requires each sides of the interferometer to be aligned to a fraction of that, while at the same time be orthogonal to the baseline defined by the External Metrology Truss. The baselines of the Science and Guide interferometers must also be aligned to be parallel. The start of these alignment plans is captured in a SysML Instrument System model, in the form of activity diagrams. These activity diagrams are then related to the hardware design and requirements. We finish with future plans for the alignment and integration activities and requirements.

  12. RFI-SIM: RFI Simulation Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaemi, Hirad; Chen, Curtis W.

    2013-01-01

    RFI-SIM simulates the RFI environment to estimate the interference from terrestrial emitters into spacecraft, or vice versa. A high-fidelity simulation of the RFI environment has been developed by employing all antenna- related and radar system-related parameters of multiple emitters, as well as that of the desired spacecraft. In the simulation, the real-time analysis of the interference and its effects on error budgets of a desired radar system is taken into account. This provides a reliable tool for radar system design to deal with RFI issues and to evaluate the sensitivity of various parts of a radar system including antenna pattern, RF front-end and digital processing to RFI signals.

  13. Lifetime measurements in neutral alkalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diberardino, Diana

    1998-12-01

    Precision measurements of transition probabilities and energies provide a means for testing atomic structure calculations. The most accurate atomic structure calculations employ many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) and are used for the interpretation of atomic parity nonconservation (PNC) measurements and for testing of quantum electrodynamics (QED). Our group's measurement of the 6p/ 2P3/2,1/2 state lifetimes in atomic cesium provides constraints for recent MBPT calculations in cesium and electric dipole (E1) matrix elements. These E1 matrix elements contribute a large fraction to the weak-interaction-induced 6S[-]7S transition amplitude in cesium. Part of this thesis has been motivated by our desire to reduce the uncertainties in the measured 6p/ 2P3/2,1/2 state lifetimes in atomic cesium using improvements in our fast-beam apparatus. Thus, a new fiber optic detector system is designed to provide better collection efficiency and reduce beam tracking errors. Also, a new method of measuring the atomic beam velocity using a solid etalon is demonstrated to improve the velocity precision by a factor of seven. Additionally, this thesis describes measurements of the cesium 5d/ 2D5/2,/ 5d/ 2D3/2, and 11s/ 2S1/2 state lifetimes using pulsed-dye laser excitation of cesium vapor. The 5d/ 2D3/2 lifetime measurement, along with its branching ratio, provides the electric dipole reduced matrix element between the 5d/ 2D3/2 state and the 6p/ 2P1/2 state. Furthermore, a previous 5d/ 2D5/2 experimental value is compared with our new value and recent theoretical calculations.

  14. Development of Distributed Generic Simulator (GenSim) through Invention of Simulated Network (simNetwork)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Cheol-Hea; Lee, Hoon-Hee; Cheon, Yee-Jin

    2011-09-01

    A simulated network protocol provides the capability of distributed simulation to a generic simulator. Through this, full coverage of management of data and service handling among separated simulators is achieved. The distributed simulation environment is much more conducive to handling simulation load balancing and hazard treatment than a standalone computer. According to the simulated network protocol, one simulator takes on the role of server and the other simulators take on the role of client, and client is controlled by server. The purpose of the simulated network protocol is to seamlessly connect multiple simulator instances into a single simulation environment. This paper presents the development of a simulated network (simNetwork) that provides the capability of distributed simulation to a generic simulator (GenSim), which is a software simulator of satellites that has been developed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute since 2010, to use as a flight software! validation bench for future satellite development.

  15. Biochemical imaging of tissues by SIMS for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tae Geol; Park, Ji-Won; Shon, Hyun Kyong; Moon, Dae Won; Choi, Won Woo; Li, Kapsok; Chung, Jin Ho

    2008-12-01

    With the development of optimal surface cleaning techniques by cluster ion beam sputtering, certain applications of SIMS for analyzing cells and tissues have been actively investigated. For this report, we collaborated with bio-medical scientists to study bio-SIMS analyses of skin and cancer tissues for biomedical diagnostics. We pay close attention to the setting up of a routine procedure for preparing tissue specimens and treating the surface before obtaining the bio-SIMS data. Bio-SIMS was used to study two biosystems, skin tissues for understanding the effects of photoaging and colon cancer tissues for insight into the development of new cancer diagnostics for cancer. Time-of-flight SIMS imaging measurements were taken after surface cleaning with cluster ion bombardment by Bi n or C 60 under varying conditions. The imaging capability of bio-SIMS with a spatial resolution of a few microns combined with principal component analysis reveal biologically meaningful information, but the lack of high molecular weight peaks even with cluster ion bombardment was a problem. This, among other problems, shows that discourse with biologists and medical doctors are critical to glean any meaningful information from SIMS mass spectrometric and imaging data. For SIMS to be accepted as a routine, daily analysis tool in biomedical laboratories, various practical sample handling methodology such as surface matrix treatment, including nano-metal particles and metal coating, in addition to cluster sputtering, should be studied.

  16. SIM2 maintains innate host defense of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Jung; Lizaso, Analyn; Lee, Ying-Hue

    2014-12-01

    The single-minded 2 (SIM2) protein is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor regulating central nervous system (CNS) development in Drosophila. In humans, SIM2 is located within the Down syndrome critical region on chromosome 21 and may be involved in the development of mental retardation phenotype in Down syndrome. In this study, knockout of SIM2 expression in mice resulted in a gas distention phenotype in the gastrointestinal tract. We found that SIM2 is required for the expression of all cryptdins and numerous other antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) expressed in the small intestine. The mechanism underlying how SIM2 controls AMP expression involves both direct and indirect regulations. For the cryptdin genes, SIM2 regulates their expression by modulating transcription factor 7-like 2, a crucial regulator in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, while for other AMP genes, such as RegIIIγ, SIM2 directly activates their promoter activity. Our results establish that SIM2 is a crucial regulator in controlling expression of intestinal AMPs to maintain intestinal innate immunity against microbes. PMID:25277798

  17. SIM regional comparison of ac-dc current transfer difference SIM.EM-K12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lillo, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    The ac-dc current transfer difference identified as SIM.EM.K-12 began in July 2010 and was completed in September 2012. Six NMIs in the SIM region and one NMI in the AFRIMET region took part: NRC (Canada), NIST (United States of America), CENAM (Mexico), INTI (Argentina), UTE (Uruguay), INMETRO (Brazil) and NIS (Egypt). The comparisons were proposed to assess the measurement capabilities in ac-dc current transfer difference of the participants NMIs. The ac-dc current transfer differences of the travelling standard had been measured at 10 mA and 5 A at 10 Hz, 55 Hz, 1 kHz, 10 kHz, 20 kHz, 50 kHz and 100 kHz. The test points were selected to link the results with the equivalent CCEM Key Comparisons (CCEM-K12), through three NMIs participating in both SIM and CCEM key comparisons (INTI, NRC and NIST). The report shows the degree of equivalence in the SIM region and also the degree of equivalence with the corresponding CCEM reference value. The results of all participants support the values and uncertainties of the applicable CMC entries for ac-dc current transfer difference in the Key Comparison Database held at the BIPM. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  18. Surface free energy of alkali and transition metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aqra, Fathi; Ayyad, Ahmed

    2014-09-01

    This paper addresses an interesting issue on the surface free energy of metallic nanoparticles as compared to the bulk material. Starting from a previously reported equation, a theoretical model, that involves a specific term for calculating the cohesive energy of nanoparticle, is established in a view to describe the behavior of surface free energy of metallic nanoparticles (using different shapes of particle: sphere, cube and disc). The results indicate that the behavior of surface energy is very appropriate for spherical nanoparticle, and thus, it is the most realistic shape of a nanoparticle. The surface energy of copper, silver, gold, platinum, tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum, paladium and alkali metallic nanoparticles is only prominent in the nanoscale size, and it decreases with the decrease of nanoparticle size. Thus, the surface free energy plays a more important role in determining the properties of nanoparticles than in bulk materials. It differs from shape to another, and falls down as the number of atoms (nanoparticle size) decreases. In the case of spherical nanoparticles, the onset of the sharp decrease in surface energy is observed at about 110 atom. A decrease of 16% and 45% in surface energy is found by moving from bulk to 110 atom and from bulk to 5 atom, respectively. The predictions are consistent with the reported data.

  19. Combined TOF-SIMS and NanoSIMS Analysis of Gently Separated Presolar SiC Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, A.; Lyon, I. C.; Henkel, T.

    2015-07-01

    Gently separated presolar SiC grains will be analysed in order to gain further understanding of the grain surfaces and coatings. TOF-SIMS and NanoSIMS will be used to provide a detailed analysis of the elemental/isotopic composition and distribution.

  20. Effects of spin-exchange collisions in a high-density alkali-metal vapor in low magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Savukov, I.M.; Romalis, M.V.

    2005-02-01

    Spin-exchange collisions often play a dominant role in the broadening of Zeeman resonances in an alkali-metal vapor. Contrary to intuitive expectations, at high alkali-metal densities this broadening can be completely eliminated by operating in a low magnetic field, allowing construction of ultrasensitive atomic magnetometers. We describe a detailed study of the Zeeman resonance frequencies and linewidths as a function of the magnetic field, alkali-metal density, and the degree of spin polarization of the atoms. Due to the nonlinear nature of the density matrix equations describing the spin-exchange collisions both the gyromagnetic ratio and the linewidth change as a function of the polarization. The results of experimental measurements are in excellent agreement with analytical and numerical solutions of the density matrix equations.

  1. Laser cooling of nuclear spin 0 alkali 78Rb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, J. A.; Gorelov, A.; Anholm, M.

    2015-05-01

    The textbook example for sub-Doppler cooling is a J = 1/2 I = 0 alkali atom in lin ⊥ lin molasses. In the σ+ σ- configuration of a standard MOT, the main sub-Doppler cooling mechanism relies on changing alignment (MF2 population) with the summed linear polarization orientation, but there is no such variation in AC Stark shift for F = 1/2. We have nevertheless looked for signs of sub-Doppler cooling by trapping I = 0 78Rb in a standard MOT and measuring the cloud size as a function of laser detuning and intensity. The 78Rb cloud size does not change significantly with lowered intensity, and expands slightly with detuning, consistent with minimal to no sub-Doppler cooling. Our geometry does show the well-known substantially smaller cloud size with detuning and intensity for I = 3/2 87Rb. Maintaining an I = 0 alkali cloud size with lowered intensity will help our planned β- ν correlation experiments in 38mK decay by suppressing possible production of photoassisted dimers. Supported by NSERC and NRC Canada through TRIUMF.

  2. Interpretation of the IR spectra of alkali borate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Chekhovskii, V.G.

    1985-11-01

    This paper describes methods of interpretation of the IR spectra of alkali borate glasses. In view of the difficulties which are encountered in a strict interpretation of the IR spectra of crystalline oxygen-containing compounds with complex anions, semiempirical methods of interpretation are commonly used. The existence of glasses of groups with an atomic (ionic) arrangement close to that in the crystalline compounds makes it possible to a certain extent to use the spectra of crystalline compounds in the interpretation of the IR spectra of glasses. The alkali borate glass systems were chosen for this study because the information on their structure is the most detailed by comparison with other borate glasses. IR spectrospcopy showed that the spectral regions in which fundamental asymmetrical stretching vibrations in BO/sub 3/ and BO/sub 4/ polyhedra occur, in most cases, are fairly clearly defined independently of the combined or separate presence of these polyhedra. It is proposed that the bands in the IR spectra of sodium and lithium borate glasses be assigned to vibrations mostly localized on specific fragments of polyborate groups present in the glasses. The data from IR spectroscopy confirms that tetraborate groups are present in lithium borate glasses.

  3. A Three Level Analytic Model for Alkali Vapor Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, Gordon D.; Perram, Glen P.

    2010-10-08

    A three level analytic model for optically pumped alkali metal vapor lasers is developed considering the steady-state rate equations for the longitudinally averaged number densities of the ground {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} and first excited {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} and {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} states. The threshold pump intensity includes both the requirements to fully bleach the pump transition and exceed optical losses, typically about 200 W/cm{sup 2}. Slope efficiency depends critically on the fraction of incident photons absorbed and the overlap of pump and resonator modes, approaching the quantum efficiency of 0.95-0.98, depending on alkali atom. For efficient operation, the collisional relaxation between the two upper levels should be fast relative to stimulated emission. By assuming a statistical distribution between the upper levels, the limiting analytic solution for the quasi-two level system is achieved. Application of the model and comparisons to recent laser demonstrations is presented.

  4. Chemical imaging of biological materials by NanoSIMS using isotopic and elemental labels

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P K; Fallon, S J; Pett-Ridge, J; Ghosal, S; Hutcheon, I D

    2006-04-10

    The NanoSIMS 50 combines unprecedented spatial resolution (as good as 50 nm) with ultra-high sensitivity (minimum detection limit of {approx}200 atoms). The NanoSIMS 50 incorporates an array of detectors, enabling simultaneous collection of 5 species originating from the same sputtered volume of a sample. The primary ion beam (Cs{sup +} or O{sup -}) can be scanned across the sample to produce quantitative secondary ion images. This capability for multiple isotope imaging with high spatial resolution provides a novel new approach to the study of biological materials. Studies can be made of sub-regions of tissues, mammalian cells, and bacteria. Major, minor and trace element distributions can be mapped on a submicron scale, growth and metabolism can be tracked using stable isotope labels, and biogenic origin can be determined based on composition. We have applied this technique extensively to mammalian and prokaryotic cells and bacterial spores. The NanoSIMS technology enables the researcher to interrogate the fate of molecules of interest within cells and organs through elemental and isotopic labeling. Biological applications at LLNL will be discussed.

  5. Comparative SIMS and US-LSNMS analysis of Cu/Ti multilayer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalova, A.; Husinsky, W.; Bashir, S.

    2008-12-01

    Sputtering of Cu/Ti layers was performed by Ar+ions. Analysis of the atomic and molecular composition of the sputtered plume was performed by means of Ultra-short Laser Neutral Mass Spectrometry (US-LSNMS) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). Several ionic masses were observed and systematically studied with respect to the exposure time, laser fluence and target composition. The obtained data for complex layers indicate generally a good agreement between SNMS and SIMS. SIMS is more sensitive for many elements however the mass interferences can limit the analytical applicability. US-LSNMS mass spectra of Cu(Ti) sample have been acquired for different exposure times. In order to determine the effect of different laser ionization energies over the mass distribution of the elements, mass spectra of Cu(Ti) multilayers at several laser ionization energies were acquired. The elements interdiffusion was analyzed also by US-LSNMS, demonstrating the sensitivity, the limits and the future potential of the SNMS method for material characterization.

  6. Light-induced atomic desorption in a compact system for ultracold atoms

    PubMed Central

    Torralbo-Campo, Lara; Bruce, Graham D.; Smirne, Giuseppe; Cassettari, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, light-induced atomic desorption (LIAD) of alkali atoms from the inner surface of a vacuum chamber has been employed in cold atom experiments for the purpose of modulating the alkali background vapour. This is beneficial because larger trapped atom samples can be loaded from vapour at higher pressure, after which the pressure is reduced to increase the lifetime of the sample. We present an analysis, based on the case of rubidium atoms adsorbed on pyrex, of various aspects of LIAD that are useful for this application. Firstly, we study the intensity dependence of LIAD by fitting the experimental data with a rate-equation model, from which we extract a correct prediction for the increase in trapped atom number. Following this, we quantify a figure of merit for the utility of LIAD in cold atom experiments and we show how it can be optimised for realistic experimental parameters. PMID:26458325

  7. Light-induced atomic desorption in a compact system for ultracold atoms.

    PubMed

    Torralbo-Campo, Lara; Bruce, Graham D; Smirne, Giuseppe; Cassettari, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, light-induced atomic desorption (LIAD) of alkali atoms from the inner surface of a vacuum chamber has been employed in cold atom experiments for the purpose of modulating the alkali background vapour. This is beneficial because larger trapped atom samples can be loaded from vapour at higher pressure, after which the pressure is reduced to increase the lifetime of the sample. We present an analysis, based on the case of rubidium atoms adsorbed on pyrex, of various aspects of LIAD that are useful for this application. Firstly, we study the intensity dependence of LIAD by fitting the experimental data with a rate-equation model, from which we extract a correct prediction for the increase in trapped atom number. Following this, we quantify a figure of merit for the utility of LIAD in cold atom experiments and we show how it can be optimised for realistic experimental parameters. PMID:26458325

  8. SAFE Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    Alkali metal heat pipes are among the best understood and tested of components for first generation space fission reactors. A flight reactor will require production of a hundred or more heat pipes with assured reliability over a number of years. To date, alkali metal heat pipes have been built mostly in low budget development environments with little formal quality assurance. Despite this, heat pipe test samples suggest that high reliability can be achieved with the care justified for space flight qualification. Fabrication procedures have been established that, if consistently applied, ensure long-term trouble-free heat pipe operation. Alkali metal heat pipes have been successfully flight tested in micro gravity and also have been shown capable of multi-year operation with no evidence of sensitivity to fast neutron fluence up to 1023 n/cm2. This represents 50 times the fluence of the proposed Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE-100) heat pipe reactor core.

  9. SIMS analysis: Development and evaluation 1994 summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Appelhans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1994-12-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was evaluated for applicability to the characterization of salt cake and environmental samples. Salt cake is representative of waste found in radioactive waste storage tanks located at Hanford and at other DOE sites; it consists of nitrate, nitrite, hydroxide, and ferrocyanide salts, and the samples form the tanks are extremely radioactive. SIMS is an attractive technology for characterizing these samples because it has the capability for producing speciation information with little or no sample preparation, and it generates no additional waste. Experiments demonstrated that substantial speciation information could be readily generated using SIMS: metal clusters which include nitrate, nitrite, hydroxide, carbonate, cyanide, ferrocyanide and ferricyanide were observed. In addition, the mechanism of SIMS desorption of tributyl phosphate (TBP) was clearly identified, and minimum detection limit studies involving TBP were performed. Procurements leading to the construction of an ion trap SIMS instrument were initiated. Technology transfer of SIMS components to three instrument vendors was initiated. For FY-95, the SIMS evaluation program has been redirected toward identification of metal species on environmental samples.

  10. SimGraph: A Flight Simulation Data Visualization Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Joseph A.; Kenney, Patrick S.

    1997-01-01

    Today's modern flight simulation research produces vast amounts of time sensitive data, making a qualitative analysis of the data difficult while it remains in a numerical representation. Therefore, a method of merging related data together and presenting it to the user in a more comprehensible format is necessary. Simulation Graphics (SimGraph) is an object-oriented data visualization software package that presents simulation data in animated graphical displays for easy interpretation. Data produced from a flight simulation is presented by SimGraph in several different formats, including: 3-Dimensional Views, Cockpit Control Views, Heads-Up Displays, Strip Charts, and Status Indicators. SimGraph can accommodate the addition of new graphical displays to allow the software to be customized to each user s particular environment. A new display can be developed and added to SimGraph without having to design a new application, allowing the graphics programmer to focus on the development of the graphical display. The SimGraph framework can be reused for a wide variety of visualization tasks. Although it was created for the flight simulation facilities at NASA Langley Research Center, SimGraph can be reconfigured to almost any data visualization environment. This paper describes the capabilities and operations of SimGraph.

  11. G-SIMS of biodegradable homo-polyesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogaki, R.; Green, F.; Li, S.; Vert, M.; Alexander, M. R.; Gilmore, I. S.; Davies, M. C.

    2006-07-01

    Static SIMS (SSIMS) is a powerful surface analytical technique which can provide detailed molecular information from organic surfaces. However, often much of the acquired information is too rich in detail and the data analysis relies on analysts' expertise and/or the limited number of materials in SSIMS libraries. Gilmore and Seah [Appl. Surf. Sci. 161 (2000) 465] recently developed a library independent technique, G-SIMS where extrapolation of the data to low surface plasma temperature reveals the un-degraded parent fragments from the SSIMS spectra. In this study, G-SIMS has been tested on biodegradable polyesters including: poly(glycolic acid) (PGA), poly(lactic acid) (PLA), poly(hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) and poly(caprolactone) (PCL). These materials are chosen to test G-SIMS capabilities on these structurally related compound series. The G-SIMS spectra derived from the SIMS spectra acquired from these polyesters yielded vital clues to fragmentation mechanisms as a function of molecular structure and highlight a powerful application of G-SIMS.

  12. Microfabricated Spin Polarized Atomic Magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez Martinez, Ricardo

    Spin polarized atomic magnetometers involve the preparation of atomic spins and their detection for monitoring magnetic fields. Due to the fact that magnetic fields are ubiquitous in our world, spin polarized atomic magnetometers are used in a wide range of applications from the detection of magnetic fields generated by the human heart and brain to the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance. In this thesis we developed microfabricated spin polarized atomic magnetometers. These sensors are based on optical pumping and spin-exchange collisions between alkali atoms and noble gases contained in microfabricated millimeter-scale vapor cells. In the first part of the thesis, we improved different features of current microfabricated optical magnetometers. Specifically, we improved the bandwidth of these devices, without degrading their magnetic field sensitivity, by broadening their magnetic resonance through spin-exchange collisions between alkali atoms. We also implemented all-optical excitation techniques to avoid problems, such as the magnetic perturbation of the environment, induced by the radio-frequency fields used in some of these sensors. In the second part of the thesis we demonstrated a microfluidic chip for the optical production and detection of hyperpolarized Xe gas through spin-exchange collisions with optically pumped Rb atoms. These devices are critical for the widespread use of spin polarized atomic magnetometers in applications requiring simple, compact, low-cost, and portable instrumentation.

  13. Characterization of mineral-associated organic matter: a combined approach of AFM and NanoSIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Lydia; Schurig, Christian; Eusterhues, Karin; Mueller, Carsten W.; Höschen, Carmen; Totsche, Kai-Uwe; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2016-04-01

    The heterogeneous spatial distribution and amount of organic matter (OM) in soils, especially at the micro- or submicron-scale, has major consequences for the soil microstructure and for the accessibility of OM to decomposing microbial communities. Processes occurring at the microscale control soil properties and processes at larger scales, such as macro-aggregation and carbon turnover. Since OM acts as substrate and most important driver for biogeochemical processes, particular attention should be paid to its spatial interaction with soil minerals. In contrast to bulk analysis, Nanoscale Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS) offers the possibility to examine the composition and spatial distribution of OM within the intact organo-mineral matrix. Nevertheless, the yield of secondary electrons is influenced by the individual topography of the analysed particles, which aggravated the quantitative interpretation of the data. A combination of NanoSIMS and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), enabled us to visualize and quantify the topographical features of individual particles and correct the NanoSIMS data for this effect. We performed adsorption experiments with water-soluble soil OM in 6 concentration steps, which was extracted from forest floor layer of a Podzol, and adsorbed to illite. Upon the end of the sorption experiments the liquid phase and the solid phase were separated and the carbon content was analysed with TOC- and C/N-measurement, respectively. For the spatially resolved analyses, the samples were applied as thin layers onto silicon wafers and individual particles were chosen by means of the AFM. Subsequently, the identical particles were analysed with NanoSIMS to investigate the distribution of C, N, O, Si, P and Al. The recorded data were analysed for differences in elemental distribution between the different concentration steps. Additionally, we performed a correlation of the detectable counts with the topography of the particle within one

  14. SIM PlanetQuest: Science with the Space Interferometry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, Stephen (Editor); Turyshev, Slava (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    SIM - the Space Interferometry Mission - will perform precision optical astrometry on objects as faint as R magnitude 20. It will be the first space-based astrometric interferometer, operating in the optical band with a 10-m baseline. The Project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, in close collaboration with two industry partners, Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space, and TRW Inc., Space and Electronics Group. Launch of SIM is currently planned for 2009. In its wide-angle astrometric mode, SIM will yield 4 microarcsecond absolute position and parallax measurements. Astrometric planet searches will be done in a narrow-angle mode, with an accuracy of 4 microarcseconds or better in a single measurement. As a pointed rather than a survey instrument, SIM will maintain.its astrometric accuracy down to the faintest, magnitudes, opening up the opportunity for astrometry of active galactic nuclei to better than 10 pas. SIM will define a new astrometric reference frame, using a grid of approximately 1500 stars with positions accurate to 4 microarcseconds. The SIM Science Team comprises the Principal Investigators of ten Key Projects, and five Mission Scientists contributing their expertise to specific areas of the mission. Their science programs cover a wide range of topics in Galactic and extragalactic astronomy. They include: searches for low-mass planets - including analogs to our own solar system - tlie formation and dynamics of our Galaxy, calibration of the cosmic distance scale, and fundamental stellar astrophysics. All of the science observing on SIM is competitively awarded; the Science Team programs total about 40% of the total available, and the remainder will be assigned via future NASA competitions. This report is a compilation of science summaries by members of the Science Team, and it illustrates the wealth of scientific problems that microarcsecond-precision astrometry can contribute to. More information on SIM

  15. Spectral mode changes in an alkali rf discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Camparo, J. C.; Mackay, R.

    2007-03-01

    As a result of observations made by Shaw (M.S. thesis, Cornell University, 1964) in the mid-1960s, alkali rf discharges are known to operate in two spectral modes, the so-called ring mode and the red mode. Experience has shown that the ring mode is best for discharge lamps used in quantum-electronic devices such as atomic clocks and optically pumped magnetometers and that the performance of these devices seriously degrades when the lamp operates in the red mode. Understanding the origin of these modes therefore has application to understanding and improving various quantum-electronic devices. Here we show that Shaw's model for these modes is inconsistent with observation, and we propose an alternate model based on the role of radiation trapping in multistep ionization.

  16. Direct high-spatial-resolution SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry) imaging of labeled nucleosides in human chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallegot, Philippe; Girod, C.; LeBeau, M. M.; Levi-Setti, Riccardo

    1991-03-01

    Using a scanning ion microprobe we analyzed the distribution of labelled thymidine along human chromosomes. Two labels have been used: bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU which contains one bromine atom per molecule) and 14C-thymidine (which contains either one or ten 14C atoms per molecule). Both types of labelled nucleosides can be detected with our insirument. Best results are obtained when using the uniformly labelled thymidine (U-14C-thymidine) and adding up in a KONTRON IBAS image processing system the sequential analytical maps acquired from the sample at mass 28 (14C14N ions). The distribution of thymidine is heterogeneous along the chromosomes and a banding pattern can be observed on the pictures (SIMS-bands). The spatial resolution obtained with our scanning ion microprobe (the University of Chicago Scanning Ion Microprobe: UC-SIM) surpasses the one of autoradiography which is the common direct method of localization of labelled nucleosides. 1.

  17. Infrared smoke modelling in CounterSim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walmsley, Roy; Butters, Brian

    2007-10-01

    With the ever-growing demand for increased realism in defence modelling and simulation, smoke modelling, which is computationally expensive, must be conducted on graphics hardware to enable execution at fast rates with good fidelity. Visual smoke simulation has been successfully implemented by many authors over recent years, but infrared smoke modelling adds new requirements with additional challenges. This paper discusses the introduction of a Navier-Stokes staggered grid model into CounterSim, our countermeasures simulation software, highlighting the problems and benefits of using PC commodity graphics hardware for infrared applications and detailing the methodology used to control mass loss and to model thermal cooling. Additionally, the need to use an adaptive grid is explained, with the implications for both the simulation equations and the management of data storage, particularly when mixtures of smoke products with widely differing properties may be present. The focus is then shifted to rendering, highlighting the requirements for greater accuracy than the standard eight bits per channel of visual applications. Problems with alpha blending on graphics hardware are also discussed, and examples are presented that illustrate how changes in pixel format give rise to sometimes startlingly different end results.

  18. Waveguide Harmonic Generator for the SIM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Daniel; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Mulder, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    A second-harmonic generator (SHG) serves as the source of the visible laser beam in an onboard calibration scheme for NASA's planned Space Interferometry Mission (SIM), which requires an infrared laser beam and a visible laser beam coherent with the infrared laser beam. The SHG includes quasi-phase-matched waveguides made of MgO-doped, periodically poled lithium niobate, pigtailed with polarization- maintaining optical fibers. Frequency doubling by use of such waveguides affords the required combination of coherence and sufficient conversion efficiency for the intended application. The spatial period of the poling is designed to obtain quasi-phase- matching at a nominal middle excitation wavelength of 1,319.28 nm. The SHG is designed to operate at a warm bias (ambient temperature between 20 and 25 C) that would be maintained in its cooler environment by use of electric heaters; the heater power would be adjusted to regulate the temperature precisely and thereby maintain the required precision of the spatial period. At the state of development at the time of this reporting, the SHG had been packaged and subjected to most of its planned space-qualification tests.

  19. Port-O-Sim Object Simulation Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzi, Raymond J.

    2009-01-01

    Port-O-Sim is a software application that supports engineering modeling and simulation of launch-range systems and subsystems, as well as the vehicles that operate on them. It is flexible, distributed, object-oriented, and realtime. A scripting language is used to configure an array of simulation objects and link them together. The script is contained in a text file, but executed and controlled using a graphical user interface. A set of modules is defined, each with input variables, output variables, and settings. These engineering models can be either linked to each other or run as standalone. The settings can be modified during execution. Since 2001, this application has been used for pre-mission failure mode training for many Range Safety Scenarios. It contains range asset link analysis, develops look-angle data, supports sky-screen site selection, drives GPS (Global Positioning System) and IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit) simulators, and can support conceptual design efforts for multiple flight programs with its capacity for rapid six-degrees-of-freedom model development. Due to the assembly of various object types into one application, the application is applicable across a wide variety of launch range problem domains.

  20. Deforming the Maxwell-Sim algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, G. W.; Gomis, Joaquim; Pope, C. N.

    2010-09-15

    The Maxwell algebra is a noncentral extension of the Poincare algebra, in which the momentum generators no longer commute, but satisfy [P{sub {mu}},P{sub {nu}}]=Z{sub {mu}{nu}}. The charges Z{sub {mu}{nu}} commute with the momenta, and transform tensorially under the action of the angular momentum generators. If one constructs an action for a massive particle, invariant under these symmetries, one finds that it satisfies the equations of motion of a charged particle interacting with a constant electromagnetic field via the Lorentz force. In this paper, we explore the analogous constructions where one starts instead with the ISim subalgebra of Poincare, this being the symmetry algebra of very special relativity. It admits an analogous noncentral extension, and we find that a particle action invariant under this Maxwell-Sim algebra again describes a particle subject to the ordinary Lorentz force. One can also deform the ISim algebra to DISim{sub b}, where b is a nontrivial dimensionless parameter. We find that the motion described by an action invariant under the corresponding Maxwell-DISim algebra is that of a particle interacting via a Finslerian modification of the Lorentz force. In an appendix is it shown that the DISim{sub b} algebra is isomorphic to the extended Schroedinger algebra with its standard deformation parameter z, when b=(1/1-z).

  1. NIST on a Chip: Realizing SI units with microfabricated alkali vapour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitching, J.; Donley, E. A.; Knappe, S.; Hummon, M.; Dellis, A. T.; Sherman, J.; Srinivasan, K.; Aksyuk, V. A.; Li, Q.; Westly, D.; Roxworthy, B.; Lal, A.

    2016-06-01

    We describe several ways in which microfabricated alkali atom vapour cells might potentially be used to accurately realize a variety of International System (SI) units, including the second, the meter, the kelvin, the ampere, and the volt, in a compact, low-cost “chip-scale” package. Such instruments may allow inexpensive in-situ calibrations at the user's location or widespread integration of accurate references into instrumentation and systems.

  2. Quantitative imaging of trace B in Si and SiO{sub 2} using ToF-SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Smentkowski, Vincent S.

    2015-09-15

    Changes in the oxidation state of an element can result in significant changes in the ionization efficiency and hence signal intensity during secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis; this is referred to as the SIMS matrix effect [Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry: A Practical Handbook for Depth Profiling and Bulk Impurity Analysis, edited by R. G. Wilson, F. A. Stevie, and C. W. Magee (Wiley, New York, 1990)]. The SIMS matrix effect complicates quantitative analysis. Quantification of SIMS data requires the determination of relative sensitivity factors (RSFs), which can be used to convert the as measured intensity into concentration units [Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry: A Practical Handbook for Depth Profiling and Bulk Impurity Analysis, edited by R. G. Wilson, F. A. Stevie, and C. W. Magee (Wiley, New York, 1990)]. In this manuscript, the authors report both: RSFs which were determined for quantification of B in Si and SiO{sub 2} matrices using a dual beam time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) instrument and the protocol they are using to provide quantitative ToF-SIMS images and line scan traces. The authors also compare RSF values that were determined using oxygen and Ar ion beams for erosion, discuss the problems that can be encountered when bulk calibration samples are used to determine RSFs, and remind the reader that errors in molecular details of the matrix (density, volume, etc.) that are used to convert from atoms/cm{sup 3} to other concentration units will propagate into errors in the determined concentrations.

  3. Diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs): an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupke, William F.

    2008-05-01

    The concept of power-scalable, high beam-quality diode pumped alkali lasers was introduced in 2003 [Krupke, US Patent No. 6,643,311; Opt. Letters, 28, 2336 (2003)]. Since then several laboratory DPAL devices have been reported on, confirming many of the spectroscopic, kinetic, and laser characteristics projected from literature data. This talk will present an overview of the DPAL concept, summarize key relevant properties of the cesium, rubidium, and potassium alkali vapor gain media so-far examined, outline power scaling considerations, and highlight results of published DPAL laboratory experiments.

  4. Alkali metal vapors - Laser spectroscopy and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stwalley, W. C.; Koch, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the rapidly expanding use of lasers for spectroscopic studies of alkali metal vapors. Since the alkali metals (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium) are theoretically simple ('visible hydrogen'), readily ionized, and strongly interacting with laser light, they represent ideal systems for quantitative understanding of microscopic interconversion mechanisms between photon (e.g., solar or laser), chemical, electrical and thermal energy. The possible implications of such understanding for a wide variety of practical applications (sodium lamps, thermionic converters, magnetohydrodynamic devices, new lasers, 'lithium waterfall' inertial confinement fusion reactors, etc.) are also discussed.

  5. Sub-nanometer Level Model Validation of the SIM Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korechoff, Robert P.; Hoppe, Daniel; Wang, Xu

    2004-01-01

    The Space Interferometer Mission (SIM) flight instrument will not undergo a full performance, end-to-end system test on the ground due to a number of constraints. Thus, analysis and physics-based models will play a significant role in providing confidence that SIM will meet its science goals on orbit. The various models themselves are validated against the experimental results obtained from the MicroArcsecond Metrology (MAM) testbed adn the Diffraction testbed (DTB). The metric for validation is provided by the SIM astrometric error budget.

  6. Alkali-aggregate reaction in concrete containing high-alkali cement and granite aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Owsiak, Z

    2004-01-01

    The paper discusses results of the research into the influence of high-alkali Portland cement on granite aggregate. The deformation of the concrete structure occurred after 18 months. The research was carried out by means of a scanning electron microscope equipped with a high-energy dispersive X-ray analyzer that allowed observation of unpolished sections of concrete bars exhibiting the cracking pattern typical of the alkali-silica reaction. Both the microscopic observation and the X-ray elemental analysis confirm the presence of alkali-silica gel and secondary ettringite in the cracks.

  7. Plasma Formation During Operation of a Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) in Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu.; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-10-01

    Diode pumped Alkali Lasers (DPALs) produce laser action on the resonant lines of alkali atoms. Diode lasers resonantly pump the 2P3/2 state of the alkali atom which is collisionally relaxed to the 2P3/2 state which then lases to the ground state 2S1/2. The low optical quality of high power semiconductor diode lasers is converted into high optical quality laser radiation from the alkali vapor. The Cs DPAL system using Ar/Cs/C2H6 mixtures has shown promising results. (C2H6 is the collisional relaxant.) In other studies, resonant excitation of alkali vapor by low power lasers has been used to produce highly ionized channels, initiated through associative ionization and superelastic electron heating. The issue then arises if plasma formation occurs during DPAL by similar mechanisms which would be detrimental to laser performance. In this paper, we report on results from a computational study of a DPAL using Cs vapor. The global model addresses quasi-cw pumping of the Cs(2P3/2) state by laser diodes, and includes a full accounting of the resulting electron kinetics. To enable this study, the B-spline R-matrix (BSR) with pseudostates method was employed to calculate electron impact cross sections for Cs. We found that for pump rates of many to 10 kW/cm2, plasma densities approaching 1013 cm-3 occur during laser oscillation with higher values in the absence of laser oscillation. Supported by DoD High Energy Laser Mult. Res. Initiative and NSF.

  8. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, W.Y.

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased, preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  9. Research on the properties and interactions of simple atomic and ionic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novick, R.

    1972-01-01

    Simple ionic systems were studied, such as metastable autoionizing states of the negative He ion, two-photon decay spectrum of metastable He ion, optical excitation with low energy ions, and lifetime measurements of singly ionized Li and metastable He ion. Simple atomic systems were also investigated. Metastable autoionizing atomic energy levels in alkali elements were included, along with lifetime measurements of Cr-53, group 2A isotopes, and alkali metal atoms using level crossing and optical double resonance spectroscopy.

  10. Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics of Dimerization and Clustering in Alkali Metal Vapors.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2016-06-30

    Alkali metals are known to form dimers, trimers, and tetramers in their vapors. The mechanism and regularities of this phenomenon characterize the chemical behavior of the first group elements. We report ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations of the alkali metal vapors and characterize their structural properties, including radial distribution functions and atomic cluster size distributions. AIMD confirms formation of Men, where n ranges from 2 to 4. High pressure sharply favors larger structures, whereas high temperature decreases their fraction. Heavier alkali metals maintain somewhat larger fractions of Me2, Me3, and Me4, relative to isolated atoms. A single atom is the most frequently observed structure in vapors, irrespective of the element and temperature. Due to technical difficulties of working with high temperatures and pressures in experiments, AIMD is the most affordable method of research. It provides valuable understanding of the chemical behavior of Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs, which can lead to development of new chemical reactions involving these metals. PMID:27294399

  11. Final report. SIM comparison in mass standards SIM.M.M-K4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, L. O.; Peña, L. M.; Luján, L.; Díaz, J. C.; Centeno, L. M.; Loayza, V.; Cacais, F.; Olman, Ramos; Rodriguez, S.; Garcia, Fe; Garcia, Fr; Leyton, F.; Santo, C.; Caceres, J.; Kornblit, F.; Leiblich, J.; Jacques, C.

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a SIM comparison of a 1 kg mass standard carried out by 7 NMIs. The results reported by the participants are consistent with each other and they can be linked to the comparison CCM.M-K4 with satisfactory degrees of equivalence. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  12. Salts of alkali metal anions and process of preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Dye, James L.; Ceraso, Joseph M.; Tehan, Frederick J.; Lok, Mei Tak

    1978-01-01

    Compounds of alkali metal anion salts of alkali metal cations in bicyclic polyoxadiamines are disclosed. The salts are prepared by contacting an excess of alkali metal with an alkali metal dissolving solution consisting of a bicyclic polyoxadiamine in a suitable solvent, and recovered by precipitation. The salts have a gold-color crystalline appearance and are stable in a vacuum at -10.degree. C. and below.

  13. Faraday rotation density measurements of optically thick alkali metal vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vliegen, E.; Kadlecek, S.; Anderson, L. W.; Walker, T. G.; Erickson, C. J.; Happer, William

    2001-03-01

    We investigate the measurement of alkali number densities using the Faraday rotation of linearly polarized light. We find that the alkali number density may be reliably extracted even in regimes of very high buffer gas pressure, and very high alkali number density. We have directly verified our results in potassium using absorption spectroscopy on the second resonance (4 2S→5 2P).

  14. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  15. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  16. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  17. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  18. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  20. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  1. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  3. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  4. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  5. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  6. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  7. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  8. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  9. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  10. ToF-SIMS and XPS study of ancient papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, Francesca; Marchettini, Nadia; Atrei, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The surface composition of 18th century papers was investigated by means of ToF-SIMS and XPS. The aim of the present study was to explore the possibility of using these surface sensitive methods to obtain information which can help to determine the manufacturing process, provenance and state of conservation of ancient papers. The ToF-SIMS results indicate that the analyzed papers were sized by gelatin and that alum was added as hardening agent. The paper sheets produced in near geographical areas but in different paper mills exhibit a similar surface composition and morphology of the fibers as shown by the ToF-SIMS measurements. The ToF-SIMS and the XPS results indicate that a significant fraction of the cellulose fibers is not covered by the gelatin layer. This was observed for the ancient papers and for a modern handmade paper manufactured according to the old recipes.

  11. Astrometric Planet Searches with SIM PlanetQuest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichman, Charles A.; Unwin, Stephen C.; Shao, Michael; Tanner, Angelle M.; Catanzarite, Joseph H.; March, Geoffrey W.

    2007-01-01

    SIM will search for planets with masses as small as the Earth's orbiting in the habitable zones' around more than 100 of the stars and could discover many dozen if Earth-like planets are common. With a planned 'Deep Survey' of 100-450 stars (depending on desired mass sensitivity) SIM will search for terrestrial planets around all of the candidate target stars for future direct detection missions such as Terrestrial Planet Finder and Darwin, SIM's 'Broad Survey' of 2010 stars will characterize single and multiple-planet systems around a wide variety of stellar types, including many now inaccessible with the radial velocity technique. In particular, SIM will search for planets around young stars providing insights into how planetary systems are born and evolve with time.

  12. Sim Track User's Manual (v 1.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.

    2010-01-27

    SimTrack is a simple c++ library designed for the numeric particle tracking in the high energy accelerators. It adopts the 4th order symplectic integrator for the optical transport in the magnetic elements. The 4-D and 6-D weak-strong beam-beam treatments are integrated in it for the beam-beam studies. SimTrack is written with c++ class and standard template library. It provides versatile functions to manage elements and lines. It supports a large range of types of elements. New type of element can be easily created in the library. SimTrack calculates Twiss, coupling and fits tunes, chromaticities and corrects closed orbits. AC dipole and AC multipole are available in this library. SimTrack allows change of element parameters during tracking.

  13. Computational studies of solid-state alkali conduction in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deng, Zhi; Mo, Yifei; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-03-25

    The facile conduction of alkali ions in a crystal host is of crucial importance in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries, the dominant form of energy storage today. In this review, we provide a comprehensive survey of computational approaches to study solid-state alkali diffusion. We demonstrate how these methods have provided useful insights into the design of materials that form the main components of a rechargeable alkali-ion battery, namely the electrodes, superionic conductor solid electrolytes and interfaces. We will also provide a perspective on future challenges and directions. Here, the scope of this review includes the monovalent lithium- and sodium-ion chemistries that aremore » currently of the most commercial interest.« less

  14. Alkali resistant optical coatings for alkali lasers and methods of production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Soules, Thomas F; Beach, Raymond J; Mitchell, Scott C

    2014-11-18

    In one embodiment, a multilayer dielectric coating for use in an alkali laser includes two or more alternating layers of high and low refractive index materials, wherein an innermost layer includes a thicker, >500 nm, and dense, >97% of theoretical, layer of at least one of: alumina, zirconia, and hafnia for protecting subsequent layers of the two or more alternating layers of high and low index dielectric materials from alkali attack. In another embodiment, a method for forming an alkali resistant coating includes forming a first oxide material above a substrate and forming a second oxide material above the first oxide material to form a multilayer dielectric coating, wherein the second oxide material is on a side of the multilayer dielectric coating for contacting an alkali.

  15. The Additive Coloration of Alkali Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jirgal, G. H.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an inexpensive, vacuum furnace designed to produce F-centers in alkali halide crystals by additive coloration. The method described avoids corrosion or contamination during the coloration process. Examination of the resultant crystals is discussed and several experiments using additively colored crystals are…

  16. SIMS prototype system 1 test results: Engineering analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The space and domestic water solar heating system designated SIMS Prototype Systems 1 was evaluated. The test system used 720 ft (gross) of Solar Energy Products Air Collectors, a Solar Control Corporation SAM 20 Air Handler with Model 75-175 control unit, a Jackson Solar Storage tank with Rho Sigma Mod 106 controller, and 20 tons of rack storage. The test data analysis performed evaluates the system performance and documents the suitability of SIMS Prototype System 1 hardware for field installation.

  17. Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, M.M.; Peng, M.Y.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.C.

    1996-09-24

    An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M{sub x}Z{sub y}Mn{sub (1{minus}y)}O{sub 2}, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell. 11 figs.

  18. The electronic structure of alkali aurides. A four-component Dirac-Kohn-Sham study.

    PubMed

    Belpassi, Leonardo; Tarantelli, Francesco; Sgamellotti, Antonio; Quiney, Harry M

    2006-04-01

    Spectroscopic constants, including dissociation energies, harmonic and anharmonic vibrational frequencies, and dipole moments, are calculated for the complete alkali auride series (LiAu, NaAu, KAu, RbAu, CsAu). The four-component formulation of relativistic density functional theory has been employed in this study, using the G-spinor basis sets implemented recently in the program BERTHA. The performance of four standard nonrelativistic density functionals employed is investigated by comparing the results with the best available theoretical and experimental data. The present work provides the first theoretical predictions on the molecular properties of RbAu. The intermetallic bond that occurs in the alkali auride series is highly polar and is characterized by a large charge transfer from the alkali metals to gold. The extent of this electron transfer has been investigated using several different charge analysis methods, enabling us to reach some general conclusions on their relative performance. We further report a detailed analysis of the topological properties of relativistic electron density in the bonding region, discussing the features of this approach which characterize the nature of the chemical bond. We have also computed the fully relativistic density for the alkali halides MBr and MI (M = Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs). The comparative study shows that, on the basis of several topological properties and the variation in bond lengths, the gold atom behaves similarly to a halogen intermediate between Br and I. PMID:16571062

  19. Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, Marca M.; Peng, Marcus Y.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    1996-01-01

    An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M.sub.x Z.sub.y Mn.sub.(1-y) O.sub.2, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell.

  20. Mechanical and microstructural properties of alkali-activated fly ash geopolymers.

    PubMed

    Komljenović, M; Bascarević, Z; Bradić, V

    2010-09-15

    This paper investigates the properties of geopolymer obtained by alkali-activation of fly ash (FA), i.e. the influence of characteristics of the representative group of FA (class F) from Serbia, as well as that of the nature and concentration of various activators on mechanical and microstructural properties of geopolymers. Aqueous solutions of Ca(OH)(2), NaOH, NaOH+Na(2)CO(3), KOH and sodium silicate (water glass) of various concentrations were used as alkali activators. It was established that the nature and concentration of the activator was the most dominant parameter in the alkali-activation process. In respect of physical characteristics of FA, the key parameter was fineness. The geopolymer based on FA with the highest content of fine particles (<43 microm), showed the highest compressive strength in all cases. Regardless of FA characteristics, nature and concentration of the activator, the alkali-activation products were mainly amorphous. The formation of crystalline phases (zeolites) occurred in some cases, depending on the reaction conditions. The highest compressive strength was obtained using sodium silicate. Together with the increase of sodium silicate SiO(2)/Na(2)O mass ratio, the atomic Si/Al ratio in the reaction products was also increased. Under the experimental conditions of this investigation, high strength was directly related to the high Si/Al ratio. PMID:20554110

  1. Hyaline membrane disease, alkali, and intraventricular haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Wigglesworth, J S; Keith, I H; Girling, D J; Slade, S A

    1976-01-01

    The relation between intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) and hyaline membrane disease (HMD) was studied in singletons that came to necropsy at Hammersmith Hospital over the years 1966-73. The incidence of IVH in singleton live births was 3-22/1000 and of HMD 4-44/1000. Although the high figures were partily due to the large number of low birthweight infants born at this hospital, the incidence of IVH in babies weighing 1001-1500 g was three times as great as that reported in the 1658 British Perinatal Mortality Survey. Most IVH deaths were in babies with HMD, but the higher frequency of IVH was not associated with any prolongation of survival time of babies who died with HMD as compared with the 1958 survey. IVH was seen frequently at gestations of up to 36 weeks in babies with HMD but was rare above 30 weeks' gestation in babies without HMD. This indicated that factors associated with HMD must cause most cases of IVH seen at gestations above 30 weeks. Comparison of clinical details in infants with HMD who died with or without IVH (at gestations of 30-37 weeks) showed no significant differences between the groups other than a high incidence of fits and greater use of alkali therapy in the babies with IVH. During the 12 hours when most alkali therapy was given, babies dying with IVD received a mean total alkali dosage of 10-21 mmol/kg and those dying without IVH 6-34 mmol/kg (P less than 0-001).There was no difference in severity of hypoxia or of metabolic acidosis between the 2 groups. Babies who died with HMD and germinal layer haemorrhage (GLH) without IVH had received significantly more alkali than those who died with HMD alone, whereas survivors of severe respiratory distress syndrome had received lower alkali doses than other groups. It is suggested that the greatly increased death rate from IVH in babies with HMD indicates some alteration of management of HMD (since 1958) as a causative factor. Liberal use of hypertonic alkali solutions is the common factor

  2. Combined SIMS, NanoSIMS, FTIR, and SEM Studies of OH in Nominally Anhydrous Minerals (NAMs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosenfelder, J. L.; Le Voyer, M.; Rossman, G. R.; Guan, Y.; Bell, D. R.; Asimow, P. D.; Eiler, J.

    2010-12-01

    The accurate analysis of trace concentrations of hydrogen in NAMs is a long-standing problem, with wide-ranging implications in geology and planetology. SIMS and FTIR are two powerful and complementary analytical tools capable of measuring concentrations down to levels of less than 1 ppm H2O. Both methods, however, are subject to matrix effects and rely on other techniques such as manometry or nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) for quantitative calibration. We compared FTIR and SIMS data for a wide variety of NAMs: olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, pyrope and grossular garnet, rutile, zircon, kyanite, andalusite, and sillimanite. Some samples were also characterized using high-resolution FE-SEM to assess the potential contribution of submicrocopic inclusions to the analyses. For SIMS, we use high mass resolution (≥5000 MRP) to measure 16O1H, using 30Si and/or 18O as reference isotopes. We use both primary standards, measured independently using manometry or NRA (e.g., [1]), and secondary standards, measured using polarized FTIR referenced back to calibrations developed on primary standards. Our major focus was on on olivine, for which we collected repeated calibration data with both SIMS and NanoSIMS, bracketing measurements of H diffusion profiles in both natural and experimentally annealed crystals at levels of 5-100 ppm H2O. With both instruments we establish low blanks (≤5 ppm) and high precision (typically less than 5% 2-σ errors in 16O1H/30Si), critical requirements for the low concentration levels being measured. Assessment of over 300 analyses on 11 olivines allows us to evaluate the suitability of different standards, several of which are in use in other laboratories [2,3,4]. Seven olivines, with 0-125 ppm H2O, give highly reproducible results and allow us to establish well-constrained calibration slopes with high correlation coefficients (r2 = 0.98-99), in contrast to previous studies [2,3,4]. However, four kimberlitic megacrysts with 140-243 ppm H

  3. Zintl cluster chemistry in the alkali-metal-gallium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, R.

    1998-03-27

    Previous research into the alkali-metal-gallium systems has revealed a large variety of networked gallium deltahedra. The clusters are analogues to borane clusters and follow the same electronic requirements of 2n+2 skeletal electrons for closo-deltahedra. This work has focused on compounds that do not follow the typical electron counting rules. The first isolated gallium cluster was found in Cs{sub 8}Ga{sub 11}. The geometry of the Ga{sub 11}{sup 7{minus}} unit is not deltahedral but can be described as a penta-capped trigonal prism. The reduction of the charge from a closo-Ga{sub 11}{sup 13{minus}} to Ga{sub 11}{sup 7{minus}} is believed to be the driving force of the distortion. The compound is paramagnetic because of an extra electron but incorporation of a halide atom into the structure captures the unpaired electron and forms a diamagnetic compound. A second isolated cluster has been found in Na{sub 10}Ga{sub 10}Ni where the tetra-capped trigonal prismatic gallium is centered by nickel. Stabilization of the cluster occurs through Ni-Ga bonding. A simple two-dimensional network occurs in the binary K{sub 2}Ga{sub 3} Octahedra are connected through four waist atoms to form a layered structure with the potassium atoms sitting between the layers. Na{sub 30.5}Ga{sub 60{minus}x}Ag{sub x} is nonstoichiometric and needs only a small amount of silver to form (x {approximately} 2--6). The structure is composed of three different clusters which are interconnected to form a three-dimensional structure. The RbGa{sub 3{minus}x}Au{sub x} system is also nonstoichiometric with a three-dimensional structure composed of Ga{sub 8} dodecahedra and four-bonded gallium atoms. Unlike Na{sub 30.5}Ga{sub 60{minus}x}Ag{sub x}, the RbGa{sub 3} binary is also stable. The binary is formally a Zintl phase but the ternary is not. Some chemistry in the alkali-metal-indium system also has been explored. A new potassium-indium binary is discussed but the structure has not been completely

  4. KEY COMPARISONS: Final report: SIM regional comparison of ac-dc voltage transfer difference (SIM.EM.K6a, SIM.EM-K9 and SIM.EM-K11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Sara; Filipski, Piotr; Izquierdo, Daniel; Afonso, Edson; Landim, Régis P.; Di Lillo, Lucas; Lipe, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Three comparisons of ac-dc voltage transfer difference held from January to December 2004 are reported. Six NMIs in the SIM region took part: NRC (Canada), NIST (United States of America), CENAM (Mexico), INTI (Argentina), UTE (Uruguay) and INMETRO (Brazil). The comparisons were proposed to assess the measurement capabilities in ac-dc voltage transfer difference of the NMIs in the SIM region. The test points were selected to link the results with the equivalent CCEM Key Comparisons, through three NMIs participating in both SIM and CCEM key comparisons. Additionally, a SIM.EM-Supplementary comparison was proposed, in support of the SIM NMIs' power/energy meter calibration capabilities. One technical protocol and one travelling standard were used, to economize on time and resources. The report shows the degree of equivalence in the SIM region and also the degree of equivalence with the corresponding CCEM reference value. The results of all participants support the values and uncertainties of the applicable CMC entries for ac-dc voltage transfer difference in the Key Comparison Database held at the BIPM. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  5. VCSELs for atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkland, Darwin K.; Peake, Gregory M.; Geib, Kent M.; Lutwak, Robert; Garvey, R. Michael; Varghese, Mathew; Mescher, Mark

    2006-02-01

    The spectroscopic technique of coherent population trapping (CPT) enables an all-optical interrogation of the groundstate hyperfine splitting of cesium (or rubidium), compared to the optical-microwave double resonance technique conventionally employed in atomic frequency standards. All-optical interrogation enables the reduction of the size and power consumption of an atomic clock by two orders of magnitude, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are preferred optical sources due to their low power consumption and circular output beam. Several research teams are currently using VCSELs for DARPA's chip-scale atomic clock (CSAC) program with the goal of producing an atomic clock having a volume < 1 cm^3, a power consumption < 30 mW, and an instability (Allan deviation) < 1x10^-11 during a 1-hour averaging interval. This paper describes the VCSEL requirements for CPT-based atomic clocks, which include single mode operation, single polarization operation, modulation bandwidth > 4 GHz, low power consumption (for the CSAC), narrow linewidth, and low relative intensity noise (RIN). A significant manufacturing challenge is to reproducibly obtain the required wavelength at the specified VCSEL operating temperature and drive current. Data are presented that show the advantage of operating at the D1 (rather than D2) resonance of the alkali atoms. Measurements of VCSEL linewidth will be discussed in particular, since atomic clock performance is especially sensitive to this parameter.

  6. On the difference in oscillator strengths of inner shell excitations in noble gases and their alkali neighbors

    SciTech Connect

    Amusia, M.Y.; Baltenkov, A.S.; Zhuravleva, G.I.

    1995-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the oscillator strength of resonant inner-shell excitation in a noble gas atom is considerably smaller than that in its alkali neighbor because in the latter case the effective charge acting upon excited electron is much bigger. With increase of the excitation`s principal quantum number the difference between line intensities in noble gases and their alkali neighbors rapidly disappears. The calculations are performed in the Hartree-Fock approximation and with inclusion of rearrangement effects due to inner vacancy creation and its Auger decay. A paper has been submitted for publication.

  7. Physics and chemistry of alkali-silica reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, S.; Barneyback, R.S. Jr.; Struble, L.J.

    1981-01-01

    The philosophy underlying recent research on alkali-silica reactions is reviewed and illustrations of recent results are provided. It has been possible to follow the kinetics of the chemical reaction between dissolved alkalis and opal in mortars by monitoring the rate at which alkalis are removed from the pore solutions of reacting mortars. Studies of the expansion behavior of synthetic alkali silica gels under controlled conditions were carried out and show no obvious correlation to chemical composition. The alkali reaction in mortars was found to produce changes in the appearance of opal grains documentable by the use of a scanning electron microscope.

  8. Calcium-Alkali Syndrome in the Modern Era

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ami M.; Adeseun, Gbemisola A.; Goldfarb, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    The ingestion of calcium, along with alkali, results in a well-described triad of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and renal insufficiency. Over time, the epidemiology and root cause of the syndrome have shifted, such that the disorder, originally called the milk-alkali syndrome, is now better described as the calcium-alkali syndrome. The calcium-alkali syndrome is an important cause of morbidity that may be on the rise, an unintended consequence of shifts in calcium and vitamin D intake in segments of the population. We review the pathophysiology of the calcium-alkali syndrome. PMID:24288027

  9. Chemical analysis of obsidian by a SIMS/EDX combined system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudriavtsev, Yuriy; Gallardo, Salvador; Avendaño, Miguel; Ramírez, Georgina; Asomoza, René; Manzanilla, Linda; Beramendi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    A recently built combined EDX-SIMS system was used for a quantitative standardless analysis of obsidians. By using the novel scheme of analysis described in the paper, concentrations of 47 elements were measured. The range of concentrations analyzed varied by up to 8 orders of magnitude, from 1015 atoms/cm3 to 1023 atoms/cm3, which cannot be attained by any other analytical method based on electron or X-ray irradiations. The experimentally measured concentrations were compared with the data of XRF analysis: the data proved to differ in less than a factor of two for the majority of elements. The technique we suggest can be used to analyze almost any solid material.

  10. Alkali metal recovery from carbonaceous material conversion process

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, David W.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.; Gorbaty, Martin L.; Tsou, Joe M.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced in the gasifier or similar reaction zone, alkali metal constitutents are recovered from the particles by withdrawing and passing the particles from the reaction zone to an alkali metal recovery zone in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen and treating the particles in the recovery zone with water or an aqueous solution in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen. The solution formed by treating the particles in the recovery zone will contain water-soluble alkali metal constituents and is recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preventing contact of the particles with oxygen as they are withdrawn from the reaction zone and during treatment in the recovery zone avoids the formation of undesirable alkali metal constituents in the aqueous solution produced in the recovery zone and insures maximum recovery of water-soluble alkali metal constituents from the alkali metal residues.

  11. Investigation of anti-Relaxation coatings for alkali-metal vapor cells using surface science techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Seltzer, S. J.; Michalak, D. J.; Donaldson, M. H.; Balabas, M. V.; Barber, S. K.; Bernasek, S. L.; Bouchiat, M.-A.; Hexemer, A.; Hibberd, A. M.; Jackson Kimball, D. F.; Jaye, C.; Karaulanov, T.; Narducci, F. A.; Rangwala, S. A.; Robinson, H. G.; Shmakov, A. K.; Voronov, D. L.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Pines, A.; Budker, D.

    2010-10-11

    Many technologies based on cells containing alkali-metal atomic vapor benefit from the use of antirelaxation surface coatings in order to preserve atomic spin polarization. In particular, paraffin has been used for this purpose for several decades and has been demonstrated to allow an atom to experience up to 10?000 collisions with the walls of its container without depolarizing, but the details of its operation remain poorly understood. We apply modern surface and bulk techniques to the study of paraffin coatings in order to characterize the properties that enable the effective preservation of alkali spin polarization. These methods include Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, atomic force microscopy, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We also compare the light-induced atomic desorption yields of several different paraffin materials. Experimental results include the determination that crystallinity of the coating material is unnecessary, and the detection of C=C double bonds present within a particular class of effective paraffin coatings. Further study should lead to the development of more robust paraffin antirelaxation coatings, as well as the design and synthesis of new classes of coating materials.

  12. Alkali element background reduction in laser ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, C. W., Jr.; Norris, C. A.

    2014-11-01

    Alkali backgrounds in laser ablation ICP-MS analyses can be enhanced by electron-induced ionization of alkali contamination on the skimmer cone, reducing effective detection limits for these elements. Traditionally, this problem is addressed by isolating analyses of high alkali materials onto a designated cone set, or by operating the ICP-MS in a "soft extraction" mode, which reduces the energy of electrons repelled into the potentially contaminated sampling cone by the extraction field. Here we present a novel approach, where we replace the traditional alkali glass tuning standards with synthetic low-alkali glass reference materials. Using this vitreous tuning solution, we find that this approach reduces the amount of alkali contamination produced, halving backgrounds for the heavy alkali elements without any change to analytical procedures. Using segregated cones is still the most effective method for reducing lithium backgrounds, but since the procedures are complimentary both can easily be applied to the routine operations of an analytical lab.

  13. Alkali element background reduction in laser ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, C. W., Jr.; Norris, C. A.

    2015-03-01

    Alkali backgrounds in laser ablation ICP-MS analyses can be enhanced by electron-induced ionisation of alkali contamination on the skimmer cone, reducing effective detection limits for these elements. Traditionally, this problem is addressed by isolating analyses of high-alkali materials onto a designated cone set, or by operating the ICP-MS in a "soft extraction" mode, which reduces the energy of electrons repelled into the potentially contaminated sampling cone by the extraction field. Here we present a novel approach, where we replace the traditional alkali glass tuning standards with synthetic low-alkali glass reference materials. Using this vitreous tuning solution, we find that this approach reduces the amount of alkali contamination produced, halving backgrounds for the heavy alkali elements without any change to analytical procedures. Using segregated cones is still the most effective method for reducing lithium backgrounds, but since the procedures are complimentary, both can easily be applied to the routine operations of an analytical lab.

  14. Final report. SIM comparison in mass standards SIM.M.M-K5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, L. O.; Peña, L. M.; Luján, L.; Díaz, J. C.; Centeno, L. M.; Loayza, V.; Cacais, F.; Ramos, O.; Rodriguez, S.; Garcia, Fr; Garcia, Fe; Leyton, F.; Santo, C.; Caceres, J.; Kornblit, F.; Leiblich, J.; Jacques, C.

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a SIM comparison in masss carried out between 7 NMIs. Five mass standards with nominal values 2 kg, 200 g, 50 g, 1 g and 200 mg have been circulated by the NMIs. The results reported by the participants are consistent with each other and with the key comparison reference valu of the comparison CCM.M-K5 to which the present comparison has been linked. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  15. Laboratory studies of the deposition of alkali sulfate vapors from combustion gases using a flash-evaporation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Daniel E.; Liang, Baishen

    1986-01-01

    A relatively simple experimental technique is proposed and demonstrated for making measurements of absolute dewpoints and relative deposition rates from flowing combustion gases containing condensible inorganic vapors. The method involves first accumulating condensate on a Pt ribbon target maintained below the dewpoint and then flash-evaporating the condensate into the filament wake, where its alkali content is monitored by alkali-atom emission spectroscopy. The advantages of the method over others are demonstrated; in particular, the method can detect liquid condensate inventories which are small enough to be negligibly influenced by surface runoff produced by gas-side shear stress and liquid condensate surface tension gradients. Illustrative Na2SO4 and K2SO4 deposition rate data and corresponding dewpoint data obtained in a series of alkali-seeded propane/air atmospheric flames are presented and discussed.

  16. Crystal Structures of Three Framework Alkali Metal Uranyl Phosphate Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locock, Andrew J.; Burns, Peter C.

    2002-08-01

    Three homeotypic hydrated alkali metal uranyl phosphates, A2(UO 2)[(UO 2)(PO 4)] 4(H 2O) 2, A=Cs ( CsUP), Rb ( RbUP), K ( KUP), were synthesized by hydrothermal methods. Intensity data were collected at room temperature using Mo Kα radiation and a CCD-based area detector. Their crystal structures were solved by Patterson ( CsUP) and direct ( RbUP, KUP) methods and refined by full-matrix least-squares techniques to agreement indices ( CsUP, RbUP, KUP) w R2=0.048, 0.230, 0.072 for all data, and R1=0.023, 0.078, 0.038 calculated for 5338, 4738, 4514 unique observed reflections (∣ Fo∣≥4 σF), respectively. The compound CsUP is orthorhombic, space group Cmc2 1, Z=4, a=14.854(1), b=13.879(1), c=12.987(1) Å, V=2677.5(3) Å 3. Both RbUP and KUP are monoclinic, space group Cm, but are presented in the unconventional pseudo-orthorhombic space group Fm11 to facilitate comparison with CsUP and to allow a model for RbUP that includes the effects of pseudo-merohedral twinning. RbUP is monoclinic, space group Fm11, Z=4, a=15.72(2), b=13.84(1), c=13.05(1) Å, α=90.39°(2), V=2839(5) Å 3; KUP is monoclinic, space group Fm11, Z=4, a=15.257(1), b=13.831(1), c=13.007(1) Å, α=91.760°(1), V=2743.4(3) Å 3. The structures consist of sheets of phosphate tetrahedra and uranyl pentagonal bipyramids, with composition [(UO 2)(PO 4)] -, that are topologically identical to the uranyl silicate sheets in uranophane-beta. These sheets are connected by a uranyl pentagonal bipyramid in the interlayer that shares corners with two phosphate tetrahedra on each of two adjacent sheets and whose fifth equatorial vertex is an H 2O group, resulting in an open framework with alkali metal cations in the larger cavities of the structures. Where CsUP and RbUP have two alkali metal positions and a H 2O group in these cavities, KUP has four K atoms and two H 2O groups, all of which are partially occupied, in the interstitial sites.

  17. Effect of alkali lignins with different molecular weights from alkali pretreated rice straw hydrolyzate on enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Qi, Benkun; Luo, Jianquan; Wan, Yinhua

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of alkali lignins with different molecular weights on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose. Different alkali lignins fractions, which were obtained from cascade ultrafiltration, were added into the dilute acid pretreated (DAP) and alkali pretreated (AP) rice straws respectively during enzymatic hydrolysis. The results showed that the addition of alkali lignins enhanced the hydrolysis and the enhancement for hydrolysis increased with increasing molecular weights of alkali lignins, with maximum enhancement being 28.69% for DAP and 20.05% for AP, respectively. The enhancement was partly attributed to the improved cellulase activity, and filter paper activity increased by 18.03% when adding lignin with highest molecular weight. It was found that the enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis was correlated with the adsorption affinity of cellulase on alkali lignins, and the difference in surface charge and hydrophobicity of alkali lignins were responsible for the difference in affinity between cellulase and lignins. PMID:26496216

  18. Supersonic diode pumped alkali lasers: Computational fluid dynamics modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenwaks, Salman; Yacoby, Eyal; Waichman, Karol; Sadot, Oren; Barmashenko, Boris D.

    2015-10-01

    We report on recent progress on our three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3D CFD) modeling of supersonic diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs), taking into account fluid dynamics and kinetic processes in the lasing medium. For a supersonic Cs DPAL with laser section geometry and resonator parameters similar to those of the 1-kW flowing-gas subsonic Cs DPAL [A.V. Bogachev et al., Quantum Electron. 42, 95 (2012)] the maximum achievable output power, ~ 7 kW, is 25% higher than that achievable in the subsonic case. Comparison between semi-analytical and 3D CFD models for Cs shows that the latter predicts much higher maximum achievable output power than the former. Optimization of the laser parameters using 3D CFD modeling shows that very high power and optical-to-optical efficiency, 35 kW and 82%, respectively, can be achieved in a Cs supersonic device pumped by a collimated cylindrical (0.5 cm diameter) beam. Application of end- or transverse-pumping by collimated rectangular (large cross section ~ 2 - 4 cm2) beam makes it possible to obtain even higher output power, > 250 kW, for ~ 350 kW pumping power. The main processes limiting the power of Cs supersonic DPAL are saturation of the D2 transition and large ~ 40% losses of alkali atoms due to ionization, whereas the influence of gas heating is negligibly small. For supersonic K DPAL both gas heating and ionization effects are shown to be unimportant and the maximum achievable power, ~ 40 kW and 350 kW, for pumping by ~ 100 kW cylindrical and ~ 700 kW rectangular beam, respectively, are higher than those achievable in the Cs supersonic laser. The power achieved in the supersonic K DPAL is two times higher than for the subsonic version with the same resonator and K density at the gas inlet, the maximum optical-to-optical efficiency being 82%.

  19. Highly Forbidden Transitions in Alkalis: Preparations for a Parity Violation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Claudia

    Preparatory steps for the experimental investigation of the highly forbidden 5s → 6s transition in rubidium using an atom trap and laser cooling are reported. A magneto-optical trap (MOT) has been assembled including saturation spectroscopy and a dichroic vapor laser lock. A frequency-doubled diode laser system has been installed to perform the spectroscopy of the forbidden transition with cold Rb atoms in the trap. The properties of the ns → n's transition in the presence of an external electric field have been investigated theoretically. A first measurement will be exploring the Stark-induced transition amplitude and the very faint magnetic dipole amplitude. The rubidium experiment is a precursor study for a long-term project at TRIUMF, Canada's National Laboratory for nuclear and particle physics, to measure atomic parity violation in the equivalent 7s → 8s transition in francium, the heaviest alkali atom which has no stable isotopes.

  20. Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems

    SciTech Connect

    BREHM, W.F.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

  1. Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

    2003-02-26

    This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

  2. Geopolymers and Related Alkali-Activated Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provis, John L.; Bernal, Susan A.

    2014-07-01

    The development of new, sustainable, low-CO2 construction materials is essential if the global construction industry is to reduce the environmental footprint of its activities, which is incurred particularly through the production of Portland cement. One type of non-Portland cement that is attracting particular attention is based on alkali-aluminosilicate chemistry, including the class of binders that have become known as geopolymers. These materials offer technical properties comparable to those of Portland cement, but with a much lower CO2 footprint and with the potential for performance advantages over traditional cements in certain niche applications. This review discusses the synthesis of alkali-activated binders from blast furnace slag, calcined clay (metakaolin), and fly ash, including analysis of the chemical reaction mechanisms and binder phase assemblages that control the early-age and hardened properties of these materials, in particular initial setting and long-term durability. Perspectives for future research developments are also explored.

  3. Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Life Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    One approach to space fission power system design is predicated on the use of alkali metal heat pipes, either as radiator elements, thermal management components, or as part of the core primary heat-transfer system. This synopsis characterizes long-life core heat pipes. References are included where more detailed information can be found. Specifics shown here are for demonstrational purposes and do not necessarily reflect current Project Prometheus point designs.

  4. Alkali metal protective garment and composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Ballif, J.L.; Yuan, W.W.

    1980-09-16

    A protective garment and composite material providing satisfactory heat resistance and physical protection for articles and personnel exposed to hot molten alkali metals, such as sodium are described. Physical protection is provided by a continuous layer of nickel foil. Heat resistance is provided by an underlying backing layer of thermal insulation. Overlying outer layers of fireproof woven ceramic fibers are used to protect the foil during storage and handling.

  5. Alkali metal protective garment and composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Ballif, III, John L.; Yuan, Wei W.

    1980-01-01

    A protective garment and composite material providing satisfactory heat resistance and physical protection for articles and personnel exposed to hot molten alkali metals, such as sodium. Physical protection is provided by a continuous layer of nickel foil. Heat resistance is provided by an underlying backing layer of thermal insulation. Overlying outer layers of fireproof woven ceramic fibers are used to protect the foil during storage and handling.

  6. Improved atomic resonance gas cell for use in frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggett, G. R.

    1968-01-01

    Atomic resonance gas cell maintains a stable operating frequency in the presence of pressure fluctuations in the ambient atmosphere. The new cell includes an envelope which is transparent to radiation in the optical region and to microwave energy at the atomic resonance frequency of the alkali-metal vapor within the envelope.

  7. The interactions of sorbates with gallosilicates and alkali-metal exchanged gallosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limtrakul, J.; Kuno, M.; Treesukol, P.

    1999-11-01

    Structures, energetics and vibrational frequencies of the interaction of adsorbates with H-aluminosilicates (H-AlZ), H-gallosilicates (H-GaZ), alkali-metal exchanged aluminosilicates (X-AlZ) and alkali-metal exchanged gallosilicates (X-GaZ), where X being Li, Na, or K, have been carried out at B3LYP and HF levels of theory with 6-31G(d) as the basis set. The charge compensating alkali-metal ions can affect the catalytically active site (Si-O-T where T=Al or Ga) by weakening the Si-O, Al-O, and Ga-O bonds as compared to their anionic frameworks. Comparing the net stabilization energies, Δ ENSE, of the naked alkali-metal/H 2O adducts with those of the alkali-metal exchanged zeolite/H 2O systems, the latter amounts only to about 50% of the former, which is partly due to the destabilizing role of the negative zeolitic oxygen frameworks surrounding the cations. The interaction of sorbates with the alkali-metal exchanged gallosilicates can be employed to probe the field strength inside the catalytic frameworks as indicated by the plot of the binding energy, Δ E, versus 1/ RX-O w2, with R(X-O w) being the distance between the cationic nucleus and the oxygen atom of the adsorbate. The IR spectra of H 2O adsorbed on Na-AlZ are calculated to be 3584, 3651, and 1686 cm -1. The obtained results are in excellent agreement with the very recent experimental IR spectra of water adsorbed on Na-ZSM-5 of Zecchina et al. (J. Phys. Chem., 100 (1996) 16 484). Other important features, i.e. the correlation between Δ νOH and, Δ E, R(X-O w) , and 1/ RX-O w2, cationic size, demonstrate that the interactions of sorbates with alkali-metal exchanged gallosilicates are well approximated by electrostatic contribution.

  8. Effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Jiang, Long; Wang, Yi; Su, Sheng; Sun, Lushi; Xu, Boyang; He, Limo; Xiang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to investigate effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs) on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures. The yield of CO, H2 and C2H4 was increased and that of CO2 was suppressed with increasing temperature. Increasing temperature could also promote depolymerization and aromatization reactions of active tars, forming heavier polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, leading to decrease of tar yields and species diversity. Diverse performance of inherent AAEMs at different temperatures significantly affected the distribution of pyrolysis products. The presence of inherent AAEMs promoted water-gas shift reaction, and enhanced the yield of H2 and CO2. Additionally, inherent AAEMs not only promoted breakage and decarboxylation/decarbonylation reaction of thermally labile hetero atoms of the tar but also enhanced thermal decomposing of heavier aromatics. Inherent AAEMs could also significantly enhance the decomposition of levoglucosan, and alkaline earth metals showed greater effect than alkali metals. PMID:26005925

  9. Influence of energy pooling and ionization on physical features of a diode-pumped alkali laser.

    PubMed

    An, Guofei; Wang, You; Han, Juhong; Cai, He; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Wei; Xue, Liangping; Wang, Hongyuan; Gao, Ming; Jiang, Zhigang

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, a diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL) has become one of the most hopeful candidates to achieve the high power performance. A series of models have been established to analyze the DPAL's kinetic process and most of them were based on the algorithms in which only the ideal 3-level system was considered. In this paper, we developed a systematic model by taking into account the influence of excitation of neutral alkali atoms to even-higher levels and their ionization on the physical features of a static DPAL. The procedures of heat transfer and laser kinetics were combined together in our theoretical model. By using such a theme, the continuous temperature and number density distribution have been evaluated in the transverse section of a cesium vapor cell. The calculated results indicate that both energy pooling and ionization play important roles during the lasing process. The conclusions might deepen the understanding of the kinetic mechanism of a DPAL. PMID:26480154

  10. Calculation of radiative corrections to hyperfine splittings in the neutral alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J.; Cheng, K.T.

    2003-02-01

    The radiative correction to hyperfine splitting in hydrogen is dominated by the Schwinger term, {alpha}/2{pi} E{sub F}, where E{sub F} is the lowest-order hyperfine splitting. Binding corrections to this term, which enter as powers and logarithms of Z{alpha}, can be expected to be increasingly important in atoms with higher nuclear charge Z. Methods that include all orders of Z{alpha}, developed first to study highly charged ions, are adapted to the study of the neutral alkali metals, lithium through francium. It is shown that the use of the Schwinger term alone to account for radiative corrections to hyperfine splittings becomes qualitatively incorrect for the heavier alkali metals.0.

  11. Computation of three-dimensional temperature distribution in diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Binglin; Xu, Xingqi; Xia, Chunsheng; Pan, Bailiang

    2016-06-01

    Combining the kinetic and fluid dynamic processes in static and flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers, a comprehensive physical model with a cyclic iterative approach for calculating the three-dimensional temperature distribution of the vapor cell is established. Taking into account heat generation, thermal conductivity and convection, the excitation of the alkali atoms to high electronic levels, and their losses due to ionization in the gain medium, the thermal features and output characteristics have been simultaneously obtained. The results are in good agreement with those of the measurement in a static rubidium vapor amplifier. Influences of gas velocity on radial and axial temperature profiles are simulated and analyzed. The results have demonstrated that thermal problems in gaseous gain medium can be significantly reduced by flowing the gain medium with sufficiently high velocity.

  12. Coherent correlation enhancement of outer shell photoionization cross sections of alkali-like ions

    SciTech Connect

    Amusia, M.Y.; Avdonina, B.; Pratt, R.H.

    1995-08-01

    An alkali-like ion interaction with inner electrons of an alkali-like ion leads to a significant increase in the photoionization cross section of the outer s electron. This occurs not only for ground-state ions with one s electron in the outer shell, but also when the outer s electron is in an excited state. The reason for this amplification, in addition to coherent enhancement in summing of the correlation amplitudes, is that the zero in the direct amplitude occurs below threshold. This leads to a constructive interference with the correlation amplitude above the photoionization threshold, in contrast to a destructive interference in the case of a neutral atom with the same electronic configuration, for which the zero occurs above threshold. Results of this research were published.

  13. Ion Pairing in Alkali Nitrate Electrolyte Solutions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen Jun; Zhang, Zhen; Gao, Yi Qin

    2016-03-10

    In this study, we investigate the thermodynamics of alkali nitrate salt solutions, especially the formation of contact ion pairs between alkali cation and nitrate anion. The ion-pairing propensity shows an order of LiNO3 < NaNO3 < KNO3. Such results explain the salt activity coefficients and suggest that the empirical "law of matching water affinity" is followed by these alkali nitrate salt solutions. The spatial patterns of contact ion pairs are different in the three salt solutions studied here: Li(+) forms the contact ion pair with only one oxygen of the nitrate while Na(+) and K(+) can also be shared by two oxygens of the nitrate. In reproducing the salt activity coefficient using Kirkwood-Buff theory, we find that it is essential to include electronic polarization for Li(+) which has a high charge density. The electronic continuum correction for nonpolarizable force field significantly improves the agreement between the calculated activity coefficients and their experimental values. This approach also improves the performance of the force field on salt solubility. From these two aspects, this study suggests that electronic continuum correction can be a promising approach to force-field development for ions with high charge densities. PMID:26901167

  14. Self Focusing SIMS: Probing thin film composition in very confined volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franquet, Alexis; Douhard, Bastien; Melkonyan, Davit; Favia, Paola; Conard, Thierry; Vandervorst, Wilfried

    2016-03-01

    The continued downscaling of micro and nanoelectronics devices has increased the importance of novel materials and their interfaces very strongly thereby necessitating the availability of adequate metrology and very tight process control as well. For instance, the introduction of materials like SiGe or III-V compounds leads to the need for the determination of the exact composition and thickness of the resulting thin films. Concurrent with this trend, one is faced with layer growth concepts such as aspect ratio trapping, which exploit the reduced dimensionality of the devices. As this leads to films with very different characteristics as compared to their blanket counterparts, characterization now has to be performed on thin films grown in very confined volumes (with dimensions ranging down to less than 10-20 nm) and standard analysis methods like X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry, no longer seem applicable due to a lack of spatial resolution. On the other hand, techniques with appropriate spatial resolution like Atom Probe Tomography or Transmission Electron Microscopy are time consuming and suffer from a lack of sensitivity due to their highly localized analysis volume. In this paper, a novel concept termed Self Focusing SIMS, is presented which overcomes the spatial resolution limitations of SIMS without sacrificing the sensitivity. The concept is based on determining the composition of a specific compound using cluster ions which contain the constituents of the compound. Their formation mechanism implies that all cluster constituents originate from the same collision cascade and are emitted in close proximity (<0.5 nm). As such, the composition information becomes confined (i.e. self focused) to the areas where all constituents are simultaneously present. The examples shown in this work are based on SiGe compounds and demonstrate that it becomes feasible to determine the

  15. SIMS analysis of extended impact features on LDEF experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amari, S.; Foote, J.; Jessberger, E. K.; Simon, C.; Stadermann, F. J.; Swan, P.; Walker, R.; Zinner, E.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed here are the first Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis of projectile material deposited in extended impact features on Ge wafers from the trailing edge. Although most capture cells lost their plastic film covers, they contain extended impact features that apparently were produced by high velocity impacts when the plastic foils were still intact. Detailed optical scanning of all bare capture cells from the trailing edge revealed more than 100 impacts. Fifty-eight were selected by scanning electron microscope (SEM) inspection as prime candidates for SIMS analysis. Preliminary SIMS measurements were made on 15 impacts. More than half showed substantial enhancements of Mg, Al, Si, Ca, and Fe in the impact region, indicating micrometeorites as the projectiles.

  16. VentSim: a simulation model of cardiopulmonary physiology.

    PubMed Central

    Rutledge, G. W.

    1994-01-01

    VentSim is a quantitative model that predicts the effects of alternative ventilator settings on the cardiopulmonary physiology of critically ill patients. VentSim is an expanded version of the physiologic model in VentPlan, an application that provides ventilator-setting recommendations for patients in the intensive care unit. VentSim includes a ventilator component, an airway component, and a circulation component. The ventilator component predicts the pressures and airflows that are generated by a volume-cycled, constant-flow ventilator. The airway component has anatomic and physiologic deadspace compartments, and two alveolar compartments that participate in gas exchange with two pulmonary blood-flow compartments in the circulatory component. The circulatory component also has a shunt compartment that allows a fraction of blood flow to bypass gas exchange in the lungs, and a tissue compartment that consumes oxygen and generates carbon dioxide. The VentSim model is a set of linked first-order difference equations, with control variables that correspond to the ventilator settings, dependent variables that correspond to the physiologic state, and one independent variable, time. Because the model has no steady state solution, VentSim solves the equations by numeric integration, which is computation intensive. Simulation results demonstrate that VentSim predicts the effects of a variety of physiologic abnormalities that cannot be represented in less complex models such as the VentPlan model. For a ventilator-management application, the time-critical nature of ventilator-setting decisions limits the use of complex models. Advanced ventilator-management applications may include a mechanism to select patient-specific models that balance the trade-off of benefit of model detail and cost of computation delay. PMID:7950050

  17. Cluster SIMS and the Temperature Dependence of Molecular Depth Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Dan; Wucher, Andreas; Brenes, Daniel A; Lu, Caiyan; Winograd, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    The quality of molecular depth profiles created by erosion of organic materials by cluster ion beams exhibits a strong dependence upon temperature. To elucidate the fundamental nature of this dependence, we employ the Irganox 3114/1010 organic delta layer reference material as a model system. This delta-layer system is interrogated using a 40 keV C60+ primary ion beam. Parameters associated with the depth profile such as depth resolution, uniformity of sputtering yield and topography are evaluated between 90 K and 300 K using a unique wedge-crater beveling strategy that allows these parameters to be determined as a function of erosion depth from atomic force microscope measurements. The results show that the erosion rate calibration performed using the known Δ-layer depth in connection with the fluence needed to reach the peak of the corresponding SIMS signal response is misleading. Moreover, we show that the degradation of depth resolution is linked to a decrease of the average erosion rate and the buildup of surface topography in a thermally activated manner. This underlying process starts to influence the depth profile above a threshold temperature between 210 and 250 K for the system studied here. Below that threshold, the process is inhibited and steady-state conditions are reached with constant erosion rate, depth resolution and molecular secondary ion signals from both the matrix and the Δ-layers. In particular, the results indicate that further reduction of the temperature below 90 K does not lead to further improvement of the depth profile. Above the threshold, the process becomes stronger at higher temperature, leading to an immediate decrease of the molecular secondary ion signals. This signal decay is most pronounced for the highest m/z ions but is less for the smaller m/z ions, indicating a shift toward small fragments by accumulation of chemical damage. The erosion rate decay and surface roughness buildup, on the other hand, exhibit a rather sudden

  18. Virus and Bacterial Cell Chemical Analysis by NanoSIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P; Holt, J

    2008-07-28

    In past work for the Department of Homeland Security, the LLNL NanoSIMS team has succeeded in extracting quantitative elemental composition at sub-micron resolution from bacterial spores using nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). The purpose of this task is to test our NanoSIMS capabilities on viruses and bacterial cells. This initial work has proven successful. We imaged Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) and Bacillus anthracis Sterne cells using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and then analyzed those samples by NanoSIMS. We were able resolve individual viral particles ({approx}18 nm by 300 nm) in the SEM and extract correlated elemental composition in the NanoSIMS. The phosphorous/carbon ratio observed in TMV is comparable to that seen in bacterial spores (0.033), as was the chlorine/carbon ratio (0.11). TMV elemental composition is consistent from spot to spot, and TMV is readily distinguished from debris by NanoSIMS analysis. Bacterial cells were readily identified in the SEM and relocated in the NanoSIMS for elemental analysis. The Ba Sterne cells were observed to have a measurably lower phosphorous/carbon ratio (0.005), as compared to the spores produced in the same run (0.02). The chlorine/carbon ratio was approximately 2.5X larger in the cells (0.2) versus the spores (0.08), while the fluorine/carbon ratio was approximately 10X lower in the cells (0.008) than the spores (0.08). Silicon/carbon ratios for both cells and spores encompassed a comparable range. The initial data in this study suggest that high resolution analysis is useful because it allows the target agent to be analyzed separate from particulates and other debris. High resolution analysis would also be useful for trace sample analysis. The next step in this work is to determine the potential utility of elemental signatures in these kinds of samples. We recommend bulk analyses of media and agent samples to determine the range of media compositions in use, and to determine how

  19. and 3D TOF-SIMS Imaging for Biological Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, John S.

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is an established technique in the field of surface analysis but until recently has played only a very small role in the area of biological analysis. This chapter provides an overview of the application of secondary ion mass spectrometry to the analysis of biological samples including single cells, bacteria and tissue sections. The chapter will discuss how the challenges of biological analysis by SIMS have created an impetus for the development of new technology and methodology giving improved mass resolution, spatial resolution and sensitivity.

  20. NetSim Project contributions to ns-3

    2012-05-01

    ns-3 is an external (non-LLNL) open-source framework for modeling computer networks. The LLNL NetSim project uses the ns-3 framework to address specific questions in computer network design, operation, and security. As part of the NetSim work, we develop bug fixes, deature enhancements, and new capabilities for the ns-3 framework. The virtual package referenced here, ns-3-contrib, consists of those developments we have (or will) contribute back to the ns-3 project in source code form, for inclusionmore » in future releases of ns-3.« less

  1. Verification of RRA and CMC in OpenSim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ieshiro, Yuma; Itoh, Toshiaki

    2013-10-01

    OpenSim is the free software that can handle various analysis and simulation of skeletal muscle dynamics with PC. This study treated RRA and CMC tools in OpenSim. It is remarkable that we can simulate human motion with respect to nerve signal of muscles using these tools. However, these tools seem to still in developmental stages. In order to verify applicability of these tools, we analyze bending and stretching motion data which are obtained from motion capture device using these tools. In this study, we checked the consistency between real muscle behavior and numerical results from these tools.

  2. Contributions to the mixed-alkali effect in molecular dynamics simulations of alkali silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, Heiko; Heuer, Andreas

    2005-12-01

    The mixed-alkali effect in the cation dynamics in silicate glasses is analyzed via molecular dynamics simulations. Observations suggest a description of the dynamics in terms of stable sites mostly specific to one ionic species. As main contributions to the mixed-alkali slow down longer residence times and an increased probability of correlated backjumps are identified. The slow down is related to the limited accessibility of foreign sites. The mismatch experienced in a foreign site is stronger and more retarding for the larger ions, the smaller ions can be temporarily accommodated. Also correlations between unlike as well as like cations are demonstrated that support cooperative behavior.

  3. Method for the safe disposal of alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Terry R.

    1977-01-01

    Alkali metals such as those employed in liquid metal coolant systems can be safely reacted to form hydroxides by first dissolving the alkali metal in relatively inert metals such as lead or bismuth. The alloy thus formed is contacted with a molten salt including the alkali metal hydroxide and possibly the alkali metal carbonate in the presence of oxygen. This oxidizes the alkali metal to an oxide which is soluble within the molten salt. The salt is separated and contacted with steam or steam-CO.sub.2 mixture to convert the alkali metal oxide to the hydroxide. These reactions can be conducted with minimal hydrogen evolution and with the heat of reaction distributed between the several reaction steps.

  4. Structural and electronic properties of alkali-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemes, Norbert Marcel

    In this thesis, we study the properties of alkali doped single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). SWNT are crystallized into ropes, which display the one-dimensional electronic properties of the constituent nanotubes. Using x-ray diffraction, we show that the alkali atoms invade the channels in the triangular rope lattice and determine the structure of the doped ropes. We show that the diffraction profile of the doped SWNT is best described by a model where the alkali ions surround each tube in an ordered fashion by dilating the channels. Alkali doped SWNT exhibit colors similar to alkali doped graphite (GIC). We study their electronic structure with IR reflectivity; the alkali dopants donate their valence electron to the SWNT host, so the free carrier concentration increases, shifting the Drude-edge into the visible spectral range. This is accompanied by a large shift of the Fermi-level, so the characteristic transitions between the 1D van Hove singularities of the undoped SWNT diminish. The presence of the alkali ions around the SWNT breaks the translational symmetry and increases coupling between parallel tubes within ropes. We find that the momentum relaxation time shortens as the ropes become more three dimensional. We also find that alkali disorder contributes to the scattering. In p-type, HNO3 doped SWNT, the charge transfer is smaller; only the first subband of the semiconducting tubes gets depleted, shown by the disappearance of the first van Hove transition. This indicates a Fermi-level shift of ˜0.3 eV. The reflectivity has structure at low energy, which moves the Drude-peak to a sharp, intense peak at 0.1 eV in the optical conductivity, reminiscent of quasi-1D TTF-TCNQ. The DC conductivity also increases ˜80-fold during doping. The low temperature divergence of undoped SWNT disappears in alkali doped SWNT. However, we find that oxygen can modulate the low-T divergence. After outgassing, the divergence becomes ˜10 times stronger. We interpret the low

  5. Determination of the common and rare alkalies in mineral analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.C.; Stevens, R.E.

    1934-01-01

    Methods are described which afford a determination of each member of the alkali group and are successful in dealing with the quantities of the rare alkalies found in rocks and minerals. The procedures are relatively rapid and based chiefly on the use of chloroplatinic acid, absolute alcohol and ether, and ammonium sulfate. The percentages of all the alkalies found in a number of minerals are given.

  6. Environmental mercury contamination around a chlor-alkali plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lodenius, M.; Tulisalo, E.

    1984-04-01

    The chlor-alkali industry is one of the most important emitters of mercury. This metal is effectively spread from chlor-alkali plants into the atmosphere and it has been reported that only a few percent of the mercury emissions are deposited locally the major part spreading over very large areas. The purpose of this investigation was to study the spreading of mercury up to 100 km from a chlor-alkali plant using three different biological indicators.

  7. Unified mechanism of alkali and alkaline earth catalyzed gasification reactions of carbon by CO2 and H2O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, S.G.; Yang, R.T.

    1997-01-01

    From molecular orbital calculations, a unified mechanism is proposed for the gasification reactions of graphite by CO2 and H2O, both uncatalyzed and catalyzed by alkali and alkaline earth catalysts. In this mechanism, there are two types of oxygen intermediates that are bonded to the active edge carbon atoms: an in-plane semiquinone type, Cf(O), and an off-plane oxygen bonded to two saturated carbon atoms that are adjacent to the semiquinone species, C(O)Cf(O). The rate-limiting step is the decomposition of these intermediates by breaking the C-C bonds that are connected to Cf(O). A new rate equation is derived for the uncatalyzed reactions, and that for the catalyzed reactions is readily available from the proposed mechanism. The proposed mechanism can account for several unresolved experimental observations: TPD and TK (transient kinetics) desorption results of the catalyzed systems, the similar activation energies for the uncatalyzed and catalyzed reactions, and the relative activities of the alkali and alkaline earth elements. The net charge of the edge carbon active site is substantially changed by gaining electron density from the alkali or alkaline earth element (by forming C-O-M, where M stands for metal). The relative catalytic activities of these elements can be correlated with their abilities of donating electrons and changing the net charge of the edge carbon atom. As shown previously (Chen, S. G.; Yang, R. T. J. Catal. 1993, 141, 102), only clusters of the alkali compounds are active. This derives from the ability of the clusters to dissociate CO2 and H2O to form O atoms and the mobility of the dissociated O atoms facilitated by the clusters.

  8. Application of SIMS nano-analysis to the development of new metallurgical solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, N.; Drillet, J.; Perlade, A.; Migeon, H.-N.

    2008-12-01

    One of the reasons for brittleness of Fe-Al-Mn-C alloys developed at ArcelorMittal is the content of carbon in ferrite. The carbon in solid solution is detrimental to ductility because the C atoms are assumed to reduce the mobility of the edge dislocations. This dislocation pinning produces a twinning mechanism and leads to fracture. In order to reduce the brittleness of these materials which is due to the reduction of the carbon in solid solution in the ferrite, experimental measurements of the low carbon level (below 0.05 wt%) was done using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). To this end, the carbon distribution has been investigated on a Fe-Al-Mn-C grade after different thermal treatments (water quench and slow cooling rate). This paper shows that the SIMS nano-analysis is a well-suited tool to analyse the carbon in solid solution in the ferrite. On the basis of these analyses, it is possible to define thermal treatment conditions necessary to improve the ductility of the material.

  9. Subcellular imaging of freeze-fractured cell cultures by TOF-SIMS and Laser-SNMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fartmann, M.; Dambach, S.; Kriegeskotte, C.; Lipinsky, D.; Wiesmann, H. P.; Wittig, A.; Sauerwein, W.; Arlinghaus, H. F.

    2003-01-01

    We have examined atomic and molecular distributions in freeze-fractured freeze-dried primary osteoblasts and cancer cells using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and non-resonant laser secondary neutral mass spectrometry (NR-Laser-SNMS). A pulsed Ga primary ion beam with a diameter of approximately 200 nm was employed to bombard the sample. Ion-induced electron-images were used to identify individual cells. High resolution elemental and molecular images were obtained from cell cultures. From these data the K/Na ratio was determined. It shows a higher K-concentration inside individual cells demonstrating that the chemical and structural integrity of living cells were preserved by the applied preparation technique. Consecutive presputtering of the sample with different primary ion dose densities was used to move the analysis plane toward the inside of the cell. It can be concluded that TOF-SIMS and Laser-SNMS are well suited for imaging trace element and molecule concentrations in biological samples.

  10. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Hitchcock, D.C.; Mailhe, C.C.; De Jonghe, L.C.

    1985-07-10

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  11. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Hitchcock, David C.; Mailhe, Catherine C.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    1986-01-01

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  12. Evaporative cooling of potassium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inouye, Shin; Kishimoto, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Jun; Aikawa, Kiyotaka; Noda, Kai; Arae, Takuto; Ueda, Masahito

    2007-06-01

    Recent advances in manipulating interactions between ultracold atoms opened up various new possibilities. One of the major goal of the field is to produce ultracold polar molecules. By utilizing a magnetic field induced Feshbach resonance, it is possible to produce heteronuclear molecules from a degenerate gas mixture. We are setting up an experiment to produce a degenerate gas mixture of fermionic alkali atoms, lithium-6 and potassium-40. Fermionic atoms are good candidate for minimizing the expected inelastic loss at the Feshbach resonance. For keeping the system as simple as possible, we decided to use bosonic potassium (potassium-41) as a coolant, and sympathetically cool the fermionic species. We will present our experimental setup and initial results for evaporatively cooling bosonic potassium atoms.

  13. Atom probe microscopy of three-dimensional distribution of silicon isotopes in {sup 28}Si/{sup 30}Si isotope superlattices with sub-nanometer spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Yasuo; Kawamura, Yoko; Uematsu, Masashi; Itoh, Kohei M.; Tomita, Mitsuhiro; Sasaki, Mikio; Uchida, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Mamoru

    2009-10-01

    Laser-assisted atom probe microscopy of 2 nm period {sup 28}Si/{sup 30}Si isotope superlattices (SLs) is reported. Three-dimensional distributions of {sup 28}Si and {sup 30}Si stable isotopes are obtained with sub-nanometer spatial resolution. The depth resolution of the present atom probe analysis is much higher than that of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) even when SIMS is performed with a great care to reduce the artifact due to atomic mixing. Outlook of Si isotope SLs as ideal depth scales for SIMS and three-dimensional position standards for atom probe microscopy is discussed.

  14. Matrix Effects in SIMS Analysis of Hydrogen in Nominally Anhydrous Minerals (NAMs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosenfelder, J. L.; Rossman, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate analysis of trace H in NAMs has become important with recognition that even small amounts of H influence geochemical and geophysical processes. FTIR and SIMS can measure concentrations down to ~1 ppmw H2O. However, a major limitation is that they rely on standards calibrated with other methods. SIMS matrix effects for H in NAMs are poorly constrained, but are likely dominated by differences in mean atomic mass. Here we use volatile-free molar weight (VFMW) normalized to one O/mol as a proxy for this parameter [cf. 1]. Our goal is to constrain SIMS matrix effects by combining our work on olivine [2], pyroxene [3], and feldspar [4] with new data on kyanite, zircon, and 37 garnets (pyropes, grossulars, spessartines, and andradites), while critically evaluating absolute calibrations of IR absorption coefficients (ɛi) for H in NAMs. All of these NAMs taken together span a wider range in VFMW (~32-45) than in previous comparisons [5, 6] concentrating only on olivine, pyroxene, and pyrope-rich garnet (VFMW ~ 34-37). Our results and conclusions include the following: 1) SIMS-FTIR comparisons demonstrate that ɛi is wavenumber dependent for feldspar, zircon, grossular, and clinopyroxene, in accord with theory and empirical calibrations on hydrous materials. On the other hand, a factor of 3 difference in ɛi for H defects in olivine [7] is unsupported by our data [2]. 2) Calibration slopes (for plots of ppmw H2O vs. 16OH/30Si × SiO2) correlate positively with VFMW, an effect not discerned in previous work [6]. This result is also opposite to a study demonstrating a negative correlation for hydrous phases and glasses [1]. This discrepancy may be related to differences in analytical methods (e.g., Cs+ vs. O- primary beam, collection of OH- versus H+). 3) Scatter in the trend of calibration slopes vs. VFMW is likely due to uncertainties in ɛi. Another possible factor is the structure of the matrix, which can affect the kinetic energy of cascade collisions leading to

  15. Differential activities of murine single minded 1 (SIM1) and SIM2 on a hypoxic response element. Cross-talk between basic helix-loop-helix/per-Arnt-Sim homology transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Woods, Susan L; Whitelaw, Murray L

    2002-03-22

    The basic helix-loop-helix/Per-Arnt-Sim homology (bHLH/PAS) protein family comprises a group of transcriptional regulators that often respond to a variety of developmental and environmental stimuli. Two murine members of this family, Single Minded 1 (SIM1) and Single Minded 2 (SIM2), are essential for postnatal survival but differ from other prototypical family members such as the dioxin receptor (DR) and hypoxia-inducible factors, in that they behave as transcriptional repressors in mammalian one-hybrid experiments and have yet to be ascribed a regulating signal. In cell lines engineered to stably express SIM1 and SIM2, we show that both are nuclear proteins that constitutively complex with the general bHLH/PAS partner factor, ARNT. We report that the murine SIM factors, in combination with ARNT, attenuate transcription from the hypoxia-inducible erythropoietin (EPO) enhancer during hypoxia. Such cross-talk between coexpressed bHLH/PAS factors can occur through competition for ARNT, which we find evident in SIM repression of DR-induced transcription from a xenobiotic response element reporter gene. However, SIM1/ARNT, but not SIM2/ARNT, can activate transcription from the EPO enhancer at normoxia, implying that the SIM proteins have the ability to bind hypoxia response elements and affect either activation or repression of transcription. This notion is supported by co-immunoprecipitation of EPO enhancer sequences with the SIM2 protein. SIM protein levels decrease with hypoxia treatment in our stable cell lines, although levels of the transcripts encoding SIM1 and SIM2 and the approximately 2-h half-lives of each protein are unchanged during hypoxia. Inhibition of protein synthesis, known to occur in cells during hypoxic stress in order to decrease ATP utilization, appears to account for the fall in SIM levels. Our data suggest the existence of a hypoxic switch mechanism in cells that coexpress hypoxia-inducible factor and SIM proteins, where up-regulation and

  16. ToF-SIMS PCA analysis of Myrtus communis L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piras, F. M.; Dettori, M. F.; Magnani, A.

    2009-06-01

    Nowadays there is a growing interest of researchers for the application of sophisticated analytical techniques in conjunction with statistical data analysis methods to the characterization of natural products to assure their authenticity and quality, and for the possibility of direct analysis of food to obtain maximum information. In this work, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) in conjunction with principal components analysis (PCA) are applied to study the chemical composition and variability of Sardinian myrtle ( Myrtus communis L.) through the analysis of both berries alcoholic extracts and berries epicarp. ToF-SIMS spectra of berries epicarp show that the epicuticular waxes consist mainly of carboxylic acids with chain length ranging from C20 to C30, or identical species formed from fragmentation of long-chain esters. PCA of ToF-SIMS data from myrtle berries epicarp distinguishes two groups characterized by a different surface concentration of triacontanoic acid. Variability in antocyanins, flavonols, α-tocopherol, and myrtucommulone contents is showed by ToF-SIMS PCA analysis of myrtle berries alcoholic extracts.

  17. Kite: Status of the External Metrology Testbed for SIM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekens, Frank G.; Alvarez-Salazar, Oscar; Azizi, Alireza; Moser, Steven; Nemati, Bijan; Negron, John; Neville, Timothy; Ryan, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Kite is a system level testbed for the External Metrology system of the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM). The External Metrology System is used to track the fiducial that are located at the centers of the interferometer's siderostats. The relative changes in their positions needs to be tracked to tens of picometers in order to correct for thermal measurements, the Kite testbed was build to test both the metrology gauges and out ability to optically model the system at these levels. The Kite testbed is an over-constraint system where 6 lengths are measured, but only 5 are needed to determine the system. The agreement in the over-constrained length needs to be on the order of 140 pm for the SIM Wide-Angle observing scenario and 8 pm for the Narrow-Angle observing scenario. We demonstrate that we have met the Wide-Angle goal with our current setup. For the Narrow-Angle case, we have only reached the goal for on-axis observations. We describe the testbed improvements that have been made since our initial results, and outline the future Kite changes that will add further effects that SIM faces in order to make the testbed more SIM like.

  18. Ambient analysis of liquid materials with Wet-SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Toshio; Kusakari, Masakazu; Fujii, Makiko; Aoki, Takaaki; Matsuo, Jiro

    2016-03-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a method with high surface sensitivity that allows both elemental and molecular analysis. However, volatile liquid (wet) samples are difficult to measure using conventional SIMS, because samples must be dried and introduced into a high vacuum chamber. The mean free path of ions with energy in the keV range is very short in low vacuum and these ions cannot penetrate the surface. In contrast, ions in the MeV-energy range have high transmission capability in low vacuum and wet samples can be measured using heavy ions without dry sample preparation. Ion beams in the MeV-energy range also excite electrons near the surface and enhance the ionization of high-mass molecules and thus fragment-suppressed SIMS spectra of ionized molecules can be obtained. We have developed an ambient analysis system with secondary ion mass spectrometry for wet samples (Wet-SIMS) that operates from low vacuum to 30 kPa using MeV-energy heavy ion beams. The system is equipped with fine apertures that avoid vacuum degradation at both the primary beam incidence and the secondary ion measurement sides, even when the target chamber is filled with He gas at 30 kPa. Water evaporation was suppressed in a He atmosphere of 16.5 kPa and a solution of benzoic acid could be measured using MeV-energy heavy ions.

  19. Using SimCPU in Cooperative Learning Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Janet Mei-Chuen; Wu, Cheng-Chih; Liu, Hsi-Jen

    1999-01-01

    Reports research findings of an experimental design in which cooperative-learning strategies were applied to closed-lab instruction of computing concepts. SimCPU, a software package specially designed for closed-lab usage was used by 171 high school students of four classes. Results showed that collaboration enhanced learning and that blending…

  20. SIMS prototype system 3 test results: Engineering analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The results obtained during testing of a closed hydronic drain down solar system designed for space and hot water heating is presented. Data analysis is included which documents the system performance and verifies the suitability of SIMS Prototype System 3 for field installation.

  1. Effect of mouse Sim2 gene on the cell cycle of PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianfang; Shi, Jing; Peng, Bin; Zou, Xiaojing; Zhang, Chun

    2006-04-01

    Sim2 gene plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Down syndrome (DS). To observe the effect of mouse Sim2 (mSim2) on the cell cycle of PC12 cells in vitro and explore the role of Sim2 in the pathogenesis of DS, we cloned the full open reading frame of mSim2 into the pcDNA3 vector and transfected it into PC12 cells, before analysing the effect of mSim2 on the cell cycle. A eukaryotic expression vector of mSim2 (pcDNA3-mSim2) was successfully constructed. There was notable expression of mSim2 mRNA in the cells transfected with pcDNA3-Sim2. Flow cytometry showed that there were more cells in G(0)/G(1) phase in the Sim2-transfected cells than that in the controls (P < 0.01), and significantly fewer in G(2)/M phase (P < 0.01). The mRNA and protein expressions of cyclin E decreased in the Sim2-transfected cells, while p27 expression increased significantly (P < 0.01). It is concluded that Sim2 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of DS by inhibiting the cell cycle, which is related to the decreased expression of cyclin E and increased expression of p27. PMID:16530433

  2. Electrodes For Alkali-Metal Thermoelectric Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Wheeler, Bob L.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Lamb, James L.; Bankston, C. Perry; Cole, Terry

    1989-01-01

    Combination of thin, porous electrode and overlying collector grid reduces internal resistance of alkali-metal thermoelectric converter cell. Low resistance of new electrode and grid boosts power density nearly to 1 W/cm2 of electrode area at typical operating temperatures of 1,000 to 1,300 K. Conductive grid encircles electrode film on alumina tube. Bus wire runs along tube to collect electrical current from grid. Such converters used to transform solar, nuclear, and waste heat into electric power.

  3. Cathode architectures for alkali metal / oxygen batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Steven J; Nimon, Vitaliy; De Jonghe, Lutgard C; Volfkovich, Yury; Bograchev, Daniil

    2015-01-13

    Electrochemical energy storage devices, such as alkali metal-oxygen battery cells (e.g., non-aqueous lithium-air cells), have a cathode architecture with a porous structure and pore composition that is tailored to improve cell performance, especially as it pertains to one or more of the discharge/charge rate, cycle life, and delivered ampere-hour capacity. A porous cathode architecture having a pore volume that is derived from pores of varying radii wherein the pore size distribution is tailored as a function of the architecture thickness is one way to achieve one or more of the aforementioned cell performance improvements.

  4. Development practices and lessons learned in developing SimPEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockett, R.; Heagy, L. J.; Kang, S.; Rosenkjaer, G. K.

    2015-12-01

    Inverse modelling provides a mathematical framework for constructing a model of physical property distributions in the subsurface that are consistent with the data collected in geophysical surveys. The geosciences are increasingly moving towards the integration of geological, geophysical, and hydrological information to better characterize the subsurface. This integration must span disciplines and is not only challenging scientifically, but additionally the inconsistencies between conventions often makes implementations complicated, non­ reproducible, or inefficient. SimPEG is an open-source, multi-university effort aimed at providing a generalized framework for solving forward and inverse problems. SimPEG includes finite volume discretizations on structured and unstructured meshes, interfaces to standard numerical solver packages, convex optimization algorithms, model parameterizations, and visualization routines. The SimPEG package (http://simpeg.xyz) supports an ecosystem of forward and inverse modelling applications, including electromagnetics, vadose zone flow, seismic, and potential­ fields, that are all written with a common interface and toolbox. The goal of SimPEG is to support a community of researchers with well-tested, extensible tools, and encourage transparency and reproducibility both of the SimPEG software and the geoscientific research it is applied to. In this presentation, we will share some of the lessons we have learned in designing the modular infrastructure, testing and development practices of SimPEG. We will discuss our use of version control, extensive unit-testing, continuous integration, documentation, issue tracking, and resources that facilitate communication between existing team members and allows new researchers to get involved. These practices have enabled the use of SimPEG in research, industry, and education as well as the ability to support a growing number of dependent repositories and applications. We hope that sharing our

  5. Elucidation of transport mechanism and enhanced alkali ion transference numbers in mixed alkali metal-organic ionic molten salts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangfang; Forsyth, Maria

    2016-07-28

    Mixed salts of Ionic Liquids (ILs) and alkali metal salts, developed as electrolytes for lithium and sodium batteries, have shown a remarkable ability to facilitate high rate capability for lithium and sodium electrochemical cycling. It has been suggested that this may be due to a high alkali metal ion transference number at concentrations approaching 50 mol% Li(+) or Na(+), relative to lower concentrations. Computational investigations for two IL systems illustrate the formation of extended alkali-anion aggregates as the alkali metal ion concentration increases. This tends to favor the diffusion of alkali metal ions compared with other ionic species in electrolyte solutions; behavior that has recently been reported for Li(+) in a phosphonium ionic liquid, thus an increasing alkali transference number. The mechanism of alkali metal ion diffusion via this extended coordination environment present at high concentrations is explained and compared to the dynamics at lower concentrations. Heterogeneous alkali metal ion dynamics are also evident and, somewhat counter-intuitively, it appears that the faster ions are those that are generally found clustered with the anions. Furthermore these fast alkali metal ions appear to correlate with fastest ionic liquid solvent ions. PMID:27375042

  6. Analysis of Polarizability Measurements Made with Atom Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoire, Maxwell; Brooks, Nathan; Trubko, Raisa; Cronin, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    We present revised measurements of the static electric dipole polarizabilities of K, Rb, and Cs based on atom interferometer experiments presented in [Phys. Rev. A 2015, 92, 052513] but now re-analyzed with new calibrations for the magnitude and geometry of the applied electric field gradient. The resulting polarizability values did not change, but the uncertainties were significantly reduced. Then we interpret several measurements of alkali metal atomic polarizabilities in terms of atomic oscillator strengths $f_{ik}$, Einstein coefficients $A_{ik}$, state lifetimes $\\tau_{k}$, transition dipole matrix elements $D_{ik}$, line strengths $S_{ik}$, and van der Waals $C_6$ coefficients. Finally, we combine atom interferometer measurements of polarizabilities with independent measurements of lifetimes and $C_6$ values in order to quantify the residual contribution to polarizability due to all atomic transitions other than the principal $ns$-$np_J$ transitions for alkali metal atoms.

  7. Structure of the ambient temperature alkali metal molten salt AlCl3/LiSCN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yi-Chia; Price, David L.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Ratner, Mark A.; Shriver, Duward F.

    2001-03-01

    The structure of the ambient temperature alkali metal molten salt system LiSCN/AlCl3 1:1 adduct was investigated by neutron diffraction, which demonstrates that the aluminum atom is surrounded by three chlorine atoms and one nitrogen atom, indicating the existence of the AlCl3NCS- anion, in which the NCS- coordinates to the Al center through nitrogen. Molecular orbital calculations using ab initio methods are also performed to study the optimized structures of the AlCl3NCS- and its isomer, AlCl3SCN-. The results are consistent with the neutron diffraction data and indicate that AlCl3NCS- is the major anionic complex in the 1:1 LiSCN/AlCl3 adduct.

  8. SIMS: computation of a smooth invariant molecular surface.

    PubMed

    Vorobjev, Y N; Hermans, J

    1997-08-01

    SIMS, a new method of calculating a smooth invariant molecular dot surface, is presented. The SIMS method generates the smooth molecular surface by rolling two probe spheres. A solvent probe sphere is rolled over the molecule and produces a Richards-Connolly molecular surface (MS), which envelops the solvent-excluded volume of the molecule. In deep crevices, Connolly's method of calculating the MS has two deficiencies. First, it produces self-intersecting parts of the molecular surface, which must be removed to obtain the correct MS. Second, the correct MS is not smooth, i.e., the direction of the normal vector of the MS is not continuous, and some points of the MS are singular. We present an exact method for removing self-intersecting parts and smoothing the singular regions of the MS. The singular MS is smoothed by rolling a smoothing probe sphere over the inward side of the singular MS. The MS in the vicinity of singularities is replaced with the reentrant surface of the smoothing probe sphere. The smoothing method does not disturb the topology of a singular MS, and the smooth MS is a better approximation of the dielectric border between high dielectric solvent and the low dielectric molecular interior. The SIMS method generates a smooth molecular dot surface, which has a quasi-uniform dot distribution in two orthogonal directions on the molecular surface, which is invariant with molecular rotation and stable under changes in the molecular conformation, and which can be used in a variety of implicit methods of modeling solvent effects. The SIMS program is faster than the Connolly MS program, and in a matter of seconds generates a smooth dot MS of a 200-residue protein. The program is available from the authors on request (see http:@femto.med.unc.edu/SIMS). PMID:9251789

  9. SIMS: computation of a smooth invariant molecular surface.

    PubMed Central

    Vorobjev, Y N; Hermans, J

    1997-01-01

    SIMS, a new method of calculating a smooth invariant molecular dot surface, is presented. The SIMS method generates the smooth molecular surface by rolling two probe spheres. A solvent probe sphere is rolled over the molecule and produces a Richards-Connolly molecular surface (MS), which envelops the solvent-excluded volume of the molecule. In deep crevices, Connolly's method of calculating the MS has two deficiencies. First, it produces self-intersecting parts of the molecular surface, which must be removed to obtain the correct MS. Second, the correct MS is not smooth, i.e., the direction of the normal vector of the MS is not continuous, and some points of the MS are singular. We present an exact method for removing self-intersecting parts and smoothing the singular regions of the MS. The singular MS is smoothed by rolling a smoothing probe sphere over the inward side of the singular MS. The MS in the vicinity of singularities is replaced with the reentrant surface of the smoothing probe sphere. The smoothing method does not disturb the topology of a singular MS, and the smooth MS is a better approximation of the dielectric border between high dielectric solvent and the low dielectric molecular interior. The SIMS method generates a smooth molecular dot surface, which has a quasi-uniform dot distribution in two orthogonal directions on the molecular surface, which is invariant with molecular rotation and stable under changes in the molecular conformation, and which can be used in a variety of implicit methods of modeling solvent effects. The SIMS program is faster than the Connolly MS program, and in a matter of seconds generates a smooth dot MS of a 200-residue protein. The program is available from the authors on request (see http:@femto.med.unc.edu/SIMS). PMID:9251789

  10. A hexagonal structure for alkali-metal doped poly (p-phenylene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, N. S.; Baughman, R. H.; Shacklette, L. W.; Fark, H.; Fink, J.

    1991-05-01

    An hexagonal structure (space group p overline62m, a = 8.6 Å) is proposed for sodium-doped poly(p-phenylene), PPP. The diffraction pattern calculated using only one freely adjustable parameter (the distance between the alkali-metal column and the polymer backbone) is in good agreement with the observed electron diffraction patterns. A similar structure ( a = 9.2 Å) is also suggested by diffraction data for potassium-doped PPP. This hexagonal structure is analogous to that reported for sodium-doped poly(p-phenylene vinylene), lithium-doped polyacetylene, and sodium-doped polyacetylene. The three chain per column arrangement provides a fundamental structural motif which maximizes the coordination of the negatively charged carbon atoms with both the alkali metal ions and the hydrogens, and maximizes interchain, intercolumn, and hydrogen to alkali-metal separations. The size of the dopant-ion relative to the cross-sectional dimensions of the host polymer determines whether the dopant-ion columns are formed in triangular (three chain per column) or tetragonal (four chain per column) channels.

  11. Design of low work function materials using alkali metal-doped transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sol; Lee, Man Young; Lee, Seong; Jhi, Seung-Hoon

    Engineering the work function is a key issue in surface science. Particularly, discovering the materials that have work functions less than 1eV is essential for efficient thermionic energy conversion. The lowest work function of materials, reported so far, is in a range of about 1eV. To design low work function materials, we chose MX2 (M =Mo and W; X =S, Se and Te) as substrates and alkali metals (Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs) as dopants, and studied their electronic structures, charge transfer, induced surface dipole moment, and work function using first-principles calculations. We found that the charge transfer from alkali metals to MX2 substrates decreases as the atomic radius of alkali metals increases. Regardless of the amount of the charge transfer, K on WTe2 exhibits the biggest surface dipole moment, which consequently makes the surface work function the lowest. Also, we found a correlation between the binding distance and the work function.

  12. Push-Pull Laser-Atomic Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2007-11-01

    A vapor of alkali-metal atoms in the external cavity of a semiconductor laser, pumped with a time-independent injection current, can cause the laser to self-modulate at the “field-independent 0-0 frequency” of the atoms. Push-pull optical pumping by the modulated light drives most of the atoms into a coherent superposition of the two atomic sublevels with an azimuthal quantum number m=0. The atoms modulate the optical loss of the cavity at the sharply defined 0-0 hyperfine frequency. As in a maser, the system is not driven by an external source of microwaves, but a very stable microwave signal can be recovered from the modulated light or from the modulated voltage drop across the laser diode. Potential applications for this new phenomenon include atomic clocks, the production of long-lived coherent atomic states, and the generation of coherent optical combs.

  13. Push-Pull Laser-Atomic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2007-11-30

    A vapor of alkali-metal atoms in the external cavity of a semiconductor laser, pumped with a time-independent injection current, can cause the laser to self-modulate at the 'field-independent 0-0 frequency' of the atoms. Push-pull optical pumping by the modulated light drives most of the atoms into a coherent superposition of the two atomic sublevels with an azimuthal quantum number m=0. The atoms modulate the optical loss of the cavity at the sharply defined 0-0 hyperfine frequency. As in a maser, the system is not driven by an external source of microwaves, but a very stable microwave signal can be recovered from the modulated light or from the modulated voltage drop across the laser diode. Potential applications for this new phenomenon include atomic clocks, the production of long-lived coherent atomic states, and the generation of coherent optical combs.

  14. Alkali metal control over N-N cleavage in iron complexes.

    PubMed

    Grubel, Katarzyna; Brennessel, William W; Mercado, Brandon Q; Holland, Patrick L

    2014-12-01

    Though N2 cleavage on K-promoted Fe surfaces is important in the large-scale Haber-Bosch process, there is still ambiguity about the number of Fe atoms involved during the N-N cleaving step and the interactions responsible for the promoting ability of K. This work explores a molecular Fe system for N2 reduction, particularly focusing on the differences in the results obtained using different alkali metals as reductants (Na, K, Rb, Cs). The products of these reactions feature new types of Fe-N2 and Fe-nitride cores. Surprisingly, adding more equivalents of reductant to the system gives a product in which the N-N bond is not cleaved, indicating that the reducing power is not the most important factor that determines the extent of N2 activation. On the other hand, the results suggest that the size of the alkali metal cation can control the number of Fe atoms that can approach N2, which in turn controls the ability to achieve N2 cleavage. The accumulated results indicate that cleaving the triple N-N bond to nitrides is facilitated by simultaneous approach of least three low-valent Fe atoms to a single molecule of N2. PMID:25412468

  15. Alkali Metal Control over N–N Cleavage in Iron Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Though N2 cleavage on K-promoted Fe surfaces is important in the large-scale Haber–Bosch process, there is still ambiguity about the number of Fe atoms involved during the N–N cleaving step and the interactions responsible for the promoting ability of K. This work explores a molecular Fe system for N2 reduction, particularly focusing on the differences in the results obtained using different alkali metals as reductants (Na, K, Rb, Cs). The products of these reactions feature new types of Fe–N2 and Fe-nitride cores. Surprisingly, adding more equivalents of reductant to the system gives a product in which the N–N bond is not cleaved, indicating that the reducing power is not the most important factor that determines the extent of N2 activation. On the other hand, the results suggest that the size of the alkali metal cation can control the number of Fe atoms that can approach N2, which in turn controls the ability to achieve N2 cleavage. The accumulated results indicate that cleaving the triple N–N bond to nitrides is facilitated by simultaneous approach of least three low-valent Fe atoms to a single molecule of N2. PMID:25412468

  16. Microfabricated alkali vapor cell with anti-relaxation wall coating

    SciTech Connect

    Straessle, R.; Pétremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Rooij, N. F. de; Pellaton, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G.

    2014-07-28

    We present a microfabricated alkali vapor cell equipped with an anti-relaxation wall coating. The anti-relaxation coating used is octadecyltrichlorosilane and the cell was sealed by thin-film indium-bonding at a low temperature of 140 °C. The cell body is made of silicon and Pyrex and features a double-chamber design. Depolarizing properties due to liquid Rb droplets are avoided by confining the Rb droplets to one chamber only. Optical and microwave spectroscopy performed on this wall-coated cell are used to evaluate the cell's relaxation properties and a potential gas contamination. Double-resonance signals obtained from the cell show an intrinsic linewidth that is significantly lower than the linewidth that would be expected in case the cell had no wall coating but only contained a buffer-gas contamination on the level measured by optical spectroscopy. Combined with further experimental evidence this proves the presence of a working anti-relaxation wall coating in the cell. Such cells are of interest for applications in miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and other quantum sensors.

  17. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides.

    PubMed

    Krzton-Maziopa, A; Svitlyk, V; Pomjakushina, E; Puzniak, R; Conder, K

    2016-07-27

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2-y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations. PMID:27248118

  18. Durability of Alkali Activated Blast Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, K.; Alharbi, N.; Matheu, P. S.; Varela, B.; Hailstone, R.

    2015-11-01

    The alkali activation of blast furnace slag has the potential to reduce the environmental impact of cementitious materials and to be applied in geographic zones where weather is a factor that negatively affects performance of materials based on Ordinary Portland Cement. The scientific literature provides many examples of alkali activated slag with high compressive strengths; however research into the durability and resistance to aggressive environments is still necessary for applications in harsh weather conditions. In this study two design mixes of blast furnace slag with mine tailings were activated with a potassium based solution. The design mixes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, BET analysis and compressive strength testing. Freeze-thaw testing up to 100 freeze-thaw cycles was performed in 10% road salt solution. Our findings included compressive strength of up to 100 MPa after 28 days of curing and 120 MPa after freeze-thaw testing. The relationship between pore size, compressive strength, and compressive strength after freeze-thaw was explored.

  19. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzton-Maziopa, A.; Svitlyk, V.; Pomjakushina, E.; Puzniak, R.; Conder, K.

    2016-07-01

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2‑y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations.

  20. Unconventional Superconductivity of Alkali-doped Fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potocnik, Anton; Krajnc, Andraz; Jeglic, Peter; Prassides, Kosmas; Rosseinsky, Matthew J.; Arcon, Denis

    2014-03-01

    The superconductivity of the alkali-doped fullerenes (A3C60, A = alkali metal) has been so far discussed within the standard theory of superconductivity developed by Bardeen, Cooper and Shrieffer (BCS), even thought, they exhibit relatively high critical temperatures (up to Tc = 32 K). However, after our recent high-pressure measurements on Cs3C60 such description became questionable. We have shown that the superconducting phase of A3C60, in fact, borders the antiferromagnetic insulating phase (AFI), commonly observed for high-temperature superconductors like cuprates or pnictides. In addition, we also increased the maximal Tc to 38 K. To investigate this peculiar superconductivity close to the border with AFI state we employed nuclear magnetic resonance technique on Cs3-xRbxC60 and on Cs3C60 at various high pressures. Our results could not be correctly explained either by the standard BCS or the extended BCS that includes electron-electron repulsion interaction - the Migdal-Eliashberg theory. Far better agreement is obtained by the Dynamical Mean Field Theory. Due to similarity with other unconventional superconductors these results could also be relevant to other unconventional high-temperature superconductors.

  1. Dynamics of reactive ultracold alkali polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quéméner, Goulven; Bohn, John; Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2011-05-01

    Recently, ultracold polar molecules of KRb have been created. These molecules are chemically reactive and their lifetime in a trap is limited. However, their lifetime increases when they are loaded into a 1D optical lattice in the presence of an electric field. These results naturally raise the question of manipulating ultracold collisions of other species of alkali dimer molecules, with an eye toward both novel stereochemistry, as well as suppressing unwanted reactions, to enable condensed matter applications. In this talk, we report on a comparative study between the bi-alkali polar molecules of LiNa, LiK, LiRb, LiCs which have been predicted to be reactive. We compute the isotropic C6 coefficients of these systems and we predict the elastic and reactive rate coefficients when an electric field is applied in a 1D optical lattice. We will discuss the efficacy of evaporative cooling for each species. This work was supported by a MURI-AFOSR grant.

  2. The mixed alkali effect in zinc-compensated (K,Na)-β-gallate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrashekhar, G. V.; Foster, L. M.

    1982-03-01

    The "mixed alkali effect" was investigated in a Zn-doped K-β-gallate fast ion conductor with partial replacement of the K by Na. A minimum in conductivity occurs at about 0.8 atom fraction Na. A model is proposed in which the site occupancies are determined by the interstitial pair concept, and the conductivity minimum occurs when Beevers-Ross sites are occupied by K + only. A knee in the Arrhenius plots of samples containing potassium is explained as the onset of activation of K + away from interstitial complexes bound coulombically to the zinc charge-compensating centers.

  3. Threshold behavior of positronium formation in positron-alkali-metal scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugovskoy, A. V.; Utamuratov, R.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Stelbovics, A. T.; Bray, I.

    2013-04-01

    We consider positron scattering on the alkali-metal atoms of Li, Na, and K at very low energies, where only the elastic scattering and positronium formation in the ground state are the two open channels. Utilizing the recently developed two-center convergent close-coupling method [Lugovskoy, Kadyrov, Bray, and Stelbovics, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.82.062708 82, 062708 (2010)] we investigate the behavior of the cross sections as the impact energy goes to zero and demonstrate their convergence. The study sets quantitative benchmarks for any rigorous theoretical treatment of the collision problems.

  4. Diffusion with chemical reaction: An attempt to explain number density anomalies in experiments involving alkali vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    The mutual diffusion of two reacting gases is examined which takes place in a bath of inert gas atoms. Solutions are obtained between concentric spheres, each sphere acting as a source for one of the reactants. The calculational model is used to illustrate severe number density gradients observed in absorption experiments with alkali vapor. Severe gradients result when sq root k/D R is approximately 5 where k, D, and R are respectively the second order rate constant, the multicomponent diffusion constant, and the geometrical dimension of the experiment.

  5. Study on the surface chemical properties of UV excimer laser irradiated polyamide by XPS, ToF-SIMS and CFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Joanne; Chan, Kwong; Sin, Kwan Moon; Lau, Kai Shui

    2003-01-01

    Polyamide (nylon 6) was irradiated by a pulsed ultraviolet (UV) excimer laser with a fluence below its ablation threshold. Chemical modifications on laser treated nylon were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (Tof-SIMS) and chemical force microscopy (CFM). XPS study provides information about changes in chemical composition and the chemical-state of atom types on the fiber surface. The high sensitivity of ToF-SIMS to the topmost layers was used to detect crosslinking after the laser treatment. Gold-coated AFM tips modified with COOH terminated self-assembled alkanethiol monolayers (SAMs) were used to measure adhesion forces on the untreated and laser treated samples. XPS results revealed that the irradiated samples have higher oxygen content than prior to laser irradiation. Tof-SIMS analysis illustrated that carbonyl groups in nylon 6 decrease significantly but hydroxyl groups increase after low-fluence laser irradiation. The adhesion force measurements by CFM showed spatial distribution of hydroxyl groups on nylon 6 after the laser treatment.

  6. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical..., chemical destruction and carbon adsorption. (iv) Release to water. Requirements as specified in § 721.90...

  7. Formation of lysinoalanine in egg white under alkali treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Luo, Xuying; Li, Jianke; Xu, Mingsheng; Tu, Yonggang

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the formation mechanism of lysinoalanine (LAL) in eggs during the alkali treatment process, NaOH was used for the direct alkali treatment of egg white, ovalbumin, and amino acids; in addition, the amount of LAL formed during the alkali treatment process was measured. The results showed that the alkali treatment resulted in the formation of LAL in the egg white. The LAL content increased with increasing pH and temperature, with the LAL content first increasing and then leveling off with increasing time. The amount of LAL formed in the ovalbumin under the alkali treatment condition accounted for approximately 50.51% to 58.68% of the amount of LAL formed in the egg white. Thus, the LAL formed in the ovalbumin was the main source for the LAL in the egg white during the alkali treatment process. Under the alkali treatment condition, free L-serine, L-cysteine, and L-cystine reacted with L-lysine to form LAL; therefore, they are the precursor amino acids of LAL formed in eggs during the alkali treatment process. PMID:26772660

  8. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, Wen Y.

    1984-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them (46, 53, 61, 69) with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide (63) to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased (81), preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated (84) to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process (86, 18, 17) where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  9. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  10. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  11. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  12. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  13. COMPLEX FLUORIDES OF PLUTONIUM AND AN ALKALI METAL

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1960-08-01

    A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides. such as KPuF/sub 5/, KPu/sub 2/F/sub 9/, NaPuF/sub 5/, and RbPuF/sub 5/, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal- fluoride.

  14. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in...

  15. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl...

  16. Excimer-pumped alkali vapor lasers: a new class of photoassociation lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Readle, J. D.; Wagner, C. J.; Verdeyen, J. T.; Spinka, T. M.; Carroll, D. L.; Eden, J. G.

    2010-02-01

    Excimer-pumped alkali vapor lasers (XPALs) are a new class of photoassociation lasers which take advantage of the spectrally broad absorption profiles of alkali-rare gas collision pairs. In these systems, transient alkali-rare gas molecules are photopumped from the thermal continuum to a dissociative X2Σ+ 1/2 interaction potential, subsequently populating the n2P3/2 state of the alkali. The absorption profiles >=5 nm and quantum efficiencies >98% have been observed in oscillator experiments, indicating XPAL compatibility with conventional high power laser diode arrays. An alternative technique for populating the n2P3/2 state is direct photoexcitation on the n2P3/2<--n2S1/2 atomic transition. However, because the XPAL scheme employs an off-resonant optical pump, the strengths of resonantly-enhanced nonlinear processes are minimized. Additionally, the absorption coefficient may be adjusted by altering the number densities of the lasing species and/or perturbers, a valuable asset in the design of large volume, high power lasers. We present an overview of XPAL lasers and their operation, including the characteristics of recently demonstrated systems photopumped with a pulsed dye laser. Lasing has been observed in Cs at both 894 nm and 852 nm by pumping CsAr or CsKr pairs as well as in Rb at 795 nm by pumping RbKr. These results highlight the important role of the perturbing species in determining the strength and position of the excimer absorption profile. It is expected that similar results may be obtained in other gas mixtures as similar collision pair characteristics have historically been observed in a wide variety of transient diatomic species.

  17. Effects of alkali treatments on Ag nanowire transparent conductive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunho; Kang, Jun-gu; Eom, Tae-yil; Moon, Bongjin; Lee, Hoo-Jeong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we employ various alkali materials (alkali metals with different base strengths, and ammonia gas and solution) to improve the conductivity of silver nanowire (Ag NW)-networked films. The alkali treatment appears to remove the surface oxide and improve the conductivity. When applied with TiO2 nanoparticles, the treatment appears more effective as the alkalis gather around wire junctions and help them weld to each other via heat emitted from the reduction reaction. The ammonia solution treatment is found to be quick and aggressive, damaging the wires severely in the case of excessive treatment. On the other hand, the ammonia gas treatment seems much less aggressive and does not damage the wires even after a long exposure. The results of this study highlight the effectiveness of the alkali treatment in improving of the conductivity of Ag NW-networked transparent conductive films.

  18. Performance of Straight Steel Fibres Reinforced Alkali Activated Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faris, Meor Ahmad; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Nizar Ismail, Khairul; Muniandy, Ratnasamy; Putra Jaya, Ramadhansyah

    2016-06-01

    This paper focus on the performance of alkali activated concrete produced by using fly ash activated by sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. These alkali activated concrete were reinforced with straight steel fibres with different weight percentage starting from 0 % up to 5 %. Chemical composition of raw material in the production alkali activated concrete which is fly ash was first identified by using X-ray fluorescence. Results reveal there have an effect of straight steel fibres inclusion to the alkali activated concrete. Highest compressive strength of alkali activated concrete which is 67.72 MPa was obtained when 3 % of straight fibres were added. As well as flexural strength, highest flexural strength which is 6.78 MPa was obtained at 3 % of straight steel fibres inclusions.

  19. Teaching the Teacher: Tutoring SimStudent Leads to More Effective Cognitive Tutor Authoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuda, Noboru; Cohen, William W.; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    SimStudent is a machine-learning agent initially developed to help novice authors to create cognitive tutors without heavy programming. Integrated into an existing suite of software tools called Cognitive Tutor Authoring Tools (CTAT), SimStudent helps authors to create an expert model for a cognitive tutor by tutoring SimStudent on how to solve…

  20. Structural analysis of poly-SUMO chain recognition by the RNF4-SIMs domain.

    PubMed

    Kung, Camy C-H; Naik, Mandar T; Wang, Szu-Huan; Shih, Hsiu-Ming; Chang, Che-Chang; Lin, Li-Ying; Chen, Chia-Lin; Ma, Che; Chang, Chi-Fon; Huang, Tai-Huang

    2014-08-15

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF4 (RING finger protein 4) contains four tandem SIM [SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier)-interaction motif] repeats for selective interaction with poly-SUMO-modified proteins, which it targets for degradation. We employed a multi-faceted approach to characterize the structure of the RNF4-SIMs domain and the tetra-SUMO2 chain to elucidate the interaction between them. In solution, the SIM domain was intrinsically disordered and the linkers of the tetra-SUMO2 were highly flexible. Individual SIMs of the RNF4-SIMs domains bind to SUMO2 in the groove between the β2-strand and the α1-helix parallel to the β2-strand. SIM2 and SIM3 bound to SUMO with a high affinity and together constituted the recognition module necessary for SUMO binding. SIM4 alone bound to SUMO with low affinity; however, its contribution to tetra-SUMO2 binding avidity is comparable with that of SIM3 when in the RNF4-SIMs domain. The SAXS data of the tetra-SUMO2-RNF4-SIMs domain complex indicate that it exists as an ordered structure. The HADDOCK model showed that the tandem RNF4-SIMs domain bound antiparallel to the tetra-SUMO2 chain orientation and wrapped around the SUMO protamers in a superhelical turn without imposing steric hindrance on either molecule. PMID:24844634

  1. Sim2 contributes to neuroendocrine hormone gene expression in the anterior hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Goshu, Eleni; Jin, Hui; Lovejoy, John; Marion, Jean-François; Michaud, Jacques L; Fan, Chen-Ming

    2004-05-01

    Paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus maintain homeostasis by modulating pituitary hormonal output. PVN and supraoptic nuclei contain five major cell types: oxytocin-, vasopressin-, CRH-, somatostatin-, and TRH-secreting neurons. Sim1, Arnt2, and Otp genes are essential for terminal differentiation of these neurons. One of their common downstream genes, Brn2, is necessary for oxytocin, vasopressin, and CRH cell differentiation. Here we show that Sim2, a paralog of Sim1, contributes to the expression of Trh and Ss genes in the dorsal preoptic area, anterior-periventricular nucleus, and PVN. Sim2 expression overlaps with Trh- and Ss-expressing cells, and Sim2 mutants contain reduced numbers of Trh and Ss cells. Genetically, Sim1 acts upstream of Sim2 and partially compensates for the loss of Sim2. Comparative expression studies at the anterior hypothalamus at early stages reveal that there are separate pools of Trh cells with distinctive molecular codes defined by Sim1 and Sim2 expression. Together with previous reports, our results demonstrate that Sim1 and Otp utilize two common downstream genes, Brn2 and Sim2, to mediate distinctive sets of neuroendocrine hormone gene expression. PMID:14988428

  2. New Science from New Technology: NanoSIMS and RIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, P.

    2006-08-01

    Introduction: Primitive meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) contain small amounts (ppb-ppm) of nm- to μm-sized presolar dust grains that formed in the winds of evolved stars or in the ejecta of stellar explosions. The first presolar minerals, diamond and silicon carbide (SiC), were found in 1987, followed by graphite, silicon nitride, and refractory oxides in the 1990s. Isotopic measurements on individual presolar grains, most of which were made by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), allowed to obtain a wealth of astrophysical information. Until the end of the last century, the isotope studies of individual grains were restricted to the light to intermediate-mass elements in grains > 1 μm. The presolar grain research received a new push in recent years with the application of laser ablation and resonant ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) and with the invention of the NanoSIMS ion microprobe. RIMS: This analysis technique has been successfully applied to measure the isotopic compositions of the heavy elements Sr, Zr, Mo, and Ba in individual, μm-sized presolar SiC and graphite grains. These measurements have substantiated the view that the majority of presolar SiC originates from low-mass AGB stars and have provided detailed insights into neutron-capture reactions in AGB stars (s-process) and supernova explosions (neutron burst). NanoSIMS: The merit of the NanoSIMS is that it allows to extend isotopic studies to much smaller scales than was previously possible (< 100 nm compared to 1 μm with conventional SIMS). This led to the identification of presolar silicate grains, first in IDPs and later also in primitive meteorites. Because also the majority of other presolar minerals are submicrometer in size, use of the NanoSIMS allows to access this important reservoir of presolar matter on a single grain basis. And, finally, isotopic heterogeneities within μm-sized presolar SiC and graphite could be detected.

  3. Cloning of two human homologs of the Drosophila single-minded gene SIM1 on chromosome 6q and SIM2 on 21q within the Down syndrome chromosomal region.

    PubMed

    Chrast, R; Scott, H S; Chen, H; Kudoh, J; Rossier, C; Minoshima, S; Wang, Y; Shimizu, N; Antonarakis, S E

    1997-06-01

    As part of our effort to clone genes of human chromosome 21 that may contribute to Down syndrome, we have previously isolated four exons with homology to Drosophila single-minded (sim) gene, which encodes a transcription factor that is a master regulator of fruit fly neurogenesis. These exons were used to clone and characterize two human homologs of the Drosophila sim gene, SIM1 and SIM2, which map to chromosomes 6q16.3-q21 and 21q22.2, respectively; SIM2 maps within the so-called Down syndrome chromosomal region. Recently, two mouse homologs, Sim1 and Sim2, also have been identified. There is a high level of homology among human, mouse, and Drosophila sim genes in their amino-terminal half where the conserved bHLH, PAS1, PAS2, and HST domains are present. In contrast, the carboxy-terminal parts are only homologous between SIM1 and Sim1 and SIM2 and Sim2. Two isoforms (SIM2 and SIM2s) of human SIM2 have been detected that differ in their 3' ends. Northern blot analysis revealed one mRNA SIM1 species of approximately 9.5 kb and four different mRNA SIM2 species of 2.7, 3, 4.4, and 6 kb in human fetal kidney. The function of both human SIM1 and SIM2 is unknown. However, three copies of SIM2 may contribute to some specific Down syndrome phenotypes because of (1) mapping position, (2) potential function as transcriptional repressor, (3) likely dimerization with other transcription factors, (4) the temporal and spatial expression pattern of mouse Sim2, and (5) the potentially analogous role of human SIM2 to that of Drosophila sim during neurogenesis. PMID:9199934

  4. An electrostatic quadrupole doublet focusing system for MeV heavy ions in MeV-SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, T.; Shitomoto, S.; Nakagawa, S.; Aoki, T.; Matsuo, J.

    2013-11-01

    The importance of imaging mass spectrometry (MS) for visualizing the spatial distribution of molecular species in biological tissues and cells is growing. In conventional SIMS with keV-energy ion beams, elastic collisions occur between projectiles and atoms in constituent molecules. The collisions produce fragments, making acquisition of molecular information difficult. In contrast, MeV-energy ion beams excite electrons near the surface and enhance the ionization of high-mass molecules, hence, fragment suppressed SIMS spectrum of ionized molecules can be obtained. This work is a further step on our previous report on the successful development of a MeV secondary ion mass spectrometry (MeV-SIMS) for biological samples. We have developed an electrostatic quadrupole doublet (EQ doublet) focusing system, made of two separate lenses, Q1 and Q2, to focus the MeV heavy ion beam and reduce measurement time. A primary beam of 6 MeV Cu4+ was focused with this EQ doublet. We applied 1120 V to the Q1 lens and 1430 V to the Q2 lens, and the current density increased by a factor of about 60. Using this arrangement, we obtained an MeV-SIMS image of 100 × 100 pixels of cholesterol-OH+ of cerebellum (m/z = 369.3) over a 4 mm × 4 mm field of view, with a pixel size of 40 μm within 5 min, showing that our EQ doublet reduces the measurement time of current imaging by a factor of about 30.

  5. Diversity and Mechanisms of Alkali Tolerance in Lactobacilli▿

    PubMed Central

    Sawatari, Yuki; Yokota, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    We determined the maximum pH that allows growth (pHmax) for 34 strains of lactobacilli. High alkali tolerance was exhibited by strains of Lactobacillus casei, L. paracasei subsp. tolerans, L. paracasei subsp. paracasei, L. curvatus, L. pentosus, and L. plantarum that originated from plant material, with pHmax values between 8.5 and 8.9. Among these, L. casei NRIC 1917 and L. paracasei subsp. tolerans NRIC 1940 showed the highest pHmax, at 8.9. Digestive tract isolates of L. gasseri, L. johnsonii, L. reuteri, L. salivarius subsp. salicinius, and L. salivarius subsp. salivarius exhibited moderate alkali tolerance, with pHmax values between 8.1 and 8.5. Dairy isolates of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis, and L. helveticus exhibited no alkali tolerance, with pHmax values between 6.7 and 7.1. Measurement of the internal pH of representative strains revealed the formation of transmembrane proton gradients (ΔpH) in a reversed direction (i.e., acidic interior) at alkaline external-pH ranges, regardless of their degrees of alkali tolerance. Thus, the reversed ΔpH did not determine alkali tolerance diversity. However, the ΔpH contributed to alkali tolerance, as the pHmax values of several strains decreased with the addition of nigericin, which dissipates ΔpH. Although neutral external-pH values resulted in the highest glycolysis activity in the presence of nigericin regardless of alkali tolerance, substantial glucose utilization was still detected in the alkali-tolerant strains, even in a pH range of between 8.0 and 8.5, at which the remaining strains lost most activity. Therefore, the alkali tolerance of glycolysis reactions contributes greatly to the determination of alkali tolerance diversity. PMID:17449704

  6. NanoSIMS analyses of zircons synthesized from Ti-enriched granitic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, A. E.; Baker, M. B.; Eiler, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    Zircon is often the most abundant host of important trace elements (e.g., U, Th, Y, REEs) in felsic rocks. In addition, its robustness against physical and chemical alteration and diffusive re-equilibration, makes zircon an important repository of primary petrogenetic information. Ti thermometry [1,2] is a relatively new use of zircon geochemistry. However, recent work (e.g., [3]) has questioned the calibration of the thermometer and its applicability. We examine whether the published calibration [2] is independent of parental liquid composition: zircons were grown from synthetic oxide mixes and natural granitic powders; bulk TiO2 contents were varied so starting compositions would be either rutile over- or undersaturated at each run temperature. Attempts to synthesize zircons have previously been constrained by the need to grow crystals large enough for SIMS and electron microprobe analysis (i.e., at least 20 µm, [1]). The growth of large zircons, however, is inhibited by the low diffusivities of viscous felsic melts. Such constraints have necessitated the use of non-geological fluxes [4] and disproportionately high alkali contents [1] in order to produce large zircons. The spatial resolution of the NanoSIMS (~600 nm diameter beam during these sessions) allows for sub-micron resolution ion imaging of smaller zircons (from 4-20 µm). To help address the issue of slow kinetics, zircon seeds of known composition were added to starting powders as sites for nucleation and growth. A subset of our experiments were analyzed by both electron microprobe and NanoSIMS. Ti concentrations ([Ti]) in zircon centers were observed to be greater than initial seed [Ti], suggesting that the zircon seeds may have experienced a combination of dissolution, reprecipitation, and diffusive exchange with their host melt in addition to new growth. Although care was taken to minimize contributions of the glass to the zircon rim composition, rim [Ti] should be taken as an upper limit

  7. Elastic properties of alkali-feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waeselmann, N.; Brown, J.; Angel, R. J.; Ross, N.; Kaminsky, W.

    2013-12-01

    New measurements of single crystal elastic moduli for a suite of the alkali feldspars are reported. In order to interpret Earth's seismic structure, knowledge of the elastic properties of constituent minerals is essential. The elasticity of feldspar minerals, despite being the most abundant phase in Earth's crust (estimated to be more than 60%), were previously poorly characterized. All prior seismic and petrologic studies have utilized 50-year-old results, of questionable quality, based on 1-bar measurements on pseudo-single crystals. Alkali-feldspars present a large experimental challenge associated with their structural complexity. In the K-end member (KAlSi3O8) the symmetry is governed by Al/Si ordering, in the Na-end member (NaAlSi3O8) the symmetry is governed by whether or not there is a displacive collapse of the framework independent of the Al/Si ordering. K-feldspars exhibit monoclinic (C2/m) symmetry (necessitating determination of 13 elastic moduli) if disordered and triclinic (C-1) symmetry (21 elastic moduli) if ordered. Exsolution of Na-rich and K-rich phases is ubiquitous in natural samples, making it difficult to find suitable single phase and untwinned samples for study. The small single domain samples selected for this study were previously characterized by x-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis to ensure adequate sample quality. Surface wave velocities were measured on oriented surfaces of natural and synthetic single crystals using impulsively stimulated light scattering. A surface corrugation with a spacing of about 2 microns was impulsively created by the overlap of 100 ps infrared light pulses. The time evolution of the stimulated standing elastic waves was detected by measuring the intensity of diffraction from the surface corrugation of a variably delayed probe pulse. This method allows accurate (better than 0.2%) determination of velocities on samples smaller than 100 microns. The combination of measured surface wave velocities and

  8. The bHLH/Per-Arnt-Sim transcription factor SIM2 regulates muscle transcript myomesin2 via a novel, non-canonical E-box sequence.

    PubMed

    Woods, Susan; Farrall, Alexandra; Procko, Carl; Whitelaw, Murray L

    2008-06-01

    Despite a growing number of descriptive studies that show Single-minded 2 (Sim2) is not only essential for murine survival, but also upregulated in colon, prostate and pancreatic tumours, there is a lack of direct target genes identified for this basic helix-loop-helix/PAS transcription factor. We have performed a set of microarray experiments aimed at identifying genes that are differentially regulated by SIM2, and successfully verified that the Myomesin2 (Myom2) gene is SIM2-responsive. Although SIM2 has been reported to be a transcription repressor, we find that SIM2 induces transcription of Myom2 and activates the Myom2 promoter sequence when co-expressed with the heterodimeric partner protein, ARNT1, in human embryonic kidney cells. Truncation and mutation of the Myom2 promoter sequence, combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation studies in cells, has lead to the delineation of a non-canonical E-box sequence 5'-AACGTG-3' that is bound by SIM2/ARNT1 heterodimers. Interestingly, in immortalized human myoblasts knock down of Sim2 results in increased levels of Myom2 RNA, suggesting that SIM2 is acting as a repressor in these cells and so its activity is likely to be highly context dependent. This is the first report of a direct SIM2/ARNT1 target gene with accompanying analysis of a functional response element. PMID:18480125

  9. Bevel Depth Profiling SIMS for Analysis of Layer Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen, Greg; Wight, Scott; Chi, Peter; Fahey, Albert; Verkouteren, Jennifer; Windsor, Eric; Fenner, D. B.

    2003-09-01

    We are evaluating the use of bevel depth profiling Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) for the characterization of layered semiconductor materials. In this procedure, a sub-degree angle bevel is cut into the analytical sample with an oxygen or cesium primary ion beam in a commercial SIMS instrument. The elemental distribution of the resulting bevel surface is then imaged with a focused ion beam in the same instrument. This approach offers maximum flexibility for depth profiling analysis. The primary beam energy, incident angle and species used to cut the bevel can be optimized to minimize ion beam mixing and surface topography independent of the conditions used for secondary ion analysis. In some cases, depth resolution can be greater than available from conventional depth profiling. Removal of residual surface damage/topography created during beveling has also been investigated by the cleaning of the bevel surfaces using gas-cluster ion beam sputtering before imaging analysis.

  10. SIM Interferometer Testbed (SCDU) Status and Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemati, Bijan; An, Xin; Goullioud, Renaud; Shao, Michael; Shen, Tsae-Pyng; Wehmeier, Udo J.; Weilert, Mark A.; Wang, Xu; Werne, Thomas A.; Wu, Janet P.; Zhai, Chengxing

    2010-01-01

    SIM Lite is a space-borne stellar interferometer capable of searching for Earth-size planets in the habitable zones of nearby stars. This search will require measurement of astrometric angles with sub micro-arcsecond accuracy and optical pathlength differences to 1 picometer by the end of the five-year mission. One of the most significant technical risks in achieving this level of accuracy is from systematic errors that arise from spectral differences between candidate stars and nearby reference stars. The Spectral Calibration Development Unit (SCDU), in operation since 2007, has been used to explore this effect and demonstrate performance meeting SIM goals. In this paper we present the status of this testbed and recent results.

  11. BioFET-SIM Web Interface: Implementation and Two Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hediger, Martin R.; Jensen, Jan H.; De Vico, Luca

    2012-01-01

    We present a web interface which allows us to conveniently set up calculations based on the BioFET-SIM model. With the interface, the signal of a BioFET sensor can be calculated depending on its parameters, as well as the signal dependence on pH. As an illustration, two case studies are presented. In the first case, a generic peptide with opposite charges on both ends is inverted in orientation on a semiconducting nanowire surface leading to a corresponding change in sign of the computed sensitivity of the device. In the second case, the binding of an antibody/antigen complex on the nanowire surface is studied in terms of orientation and analyte/nanowire surface distance. We demonstrate how the BioFET-SIM web interface can aid in the understanding of experimental data and postulate alternative ways of antibody/antigen orientation on the nanowire surface. PMID:23056201

  12. Analysis of TOF-SIMS spectra from fullerene compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, N.; Yamashita, Y.; Iida, S.; Sanada, N.; Kudo, M.

    2008-12-01

    We analyzed TOF-SIMS spectra obtained from three different size of fullerenes (C 60, C 70 and C 84) by using Ga +, Au + and Au 3+ primary ion beams and investigated the fragmentation patterns, the enhancement of secondary ion yields and the restraint of fragmentation by using cluster primary ion beams compared with monoatomic primary ion beams. In the TOS-SIMS spectra from C 70 and C 84, it was found that a fragment ion, identified as C 60+ ( m/ z = 720), showed a relatively high intensity compared with that of other fragment ions related to C 2 depletion. It was also found that the Au 3+ bombardment caused intensity enhancement of intact molecules (C 60+, C 70+ and C 84+) and restrained the fragmentation due to C 2 depletion.

  13. Search for Terrestrial Planets with SIM Planet Quest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael; Tanner, Angelle M.; Catanzarite, Joseph H.

    2006-01-01

    SIM is an astrometric mission that will be capable of 1 microarcsec relative astrometric accuracy in a single measurement of approx.1000 sec. The search for terrestrial planets in the habitable zone around nearby stars is one of the main science goals of the project. In 2001, NASA through the peer review process selected 10 key projects, two of which had as its goal, the search for terrestrial planets around nearby stars. The two teams, one led by G. Marcy (UC Berkeley) and one lead by M. Shao (JPL), have an extensive preparatory science program underway. This paper describes the status of this activity as well as the technology status of SIM's narrow angle astrometry capability, to reach 1 uas in a single epoch measure and its ability to average multiple epoch measurements to well below 1 uas.

  14. Solvent-averaged potentials for alkali-, earth alkali-, and alkylammonium halide aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Berk; van der Vegt, Nico F. A.

    2007-12-01

    We derive effective, solvent-free ion-ion potentials for alkali-, earth alkali-, and alkylammonium halide aqueous solutions. The implicit solvent potentials are parametrized to reproduce experimental osmotic coefficients. The modeling approach minimizes the amount of input required from atomistic (force field) models, which usually predict large variations in the effective ion-ion potentials at short distances. For the smaller ion species, the reported potentials are composed of a Coulomb and a Weeks-Chandler-Andersen term. For larger ions, we find that an additional, attractive potential is required at the contact minimum, which is related to solvent degrees of freedom that are usually not accounted for in standard electrostatics models. The reported potentials provide a simple and accurate force field for use in molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations of (poly-)electrolyte systems.

  15. Alkali oxide-tantalum oxide and alkali oxide-niobium oxide ionic conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, R. S.; Parker, H. S.; Brower, W. S.; Minor, D.

    1974-01-01

    A search was made for new cationic conducting phases in alkali-tantalate and niobate systems. The phase equilibrium diagrams were constructed for the six binary systems Nb2O5-LiNbO3, Nb2O5-NaNbO3, Nb2O5-KNbO3, Ta2O5-NaTaO3, Ta2O5-LiTaO3, and Ta2O5-KTaO3. Various other binary and ternary systems were also examined. Pellets of nineteen phases were evaluated (by the sponsoring agency) by dielectric loss measurements. Attempts were made to grow large crystals of eight different phases. The system Ta2O5-KTaO3 contains at least three phases which showed peaks in dielectric loss vs. temperature. All three contain structures related to the tungsten bronzes with alkali ions in non-stoichiometric crystallographic positions.

  16. Interactions of hydrogen with alkali promoted Ru/SiO{sub 2} catalysts: A proton NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Ozbay, U.D.

    1994-05-10

    Role of H spillover to the silica support was studied using chemisorption; a strongly bound component of spilled over H was found in the silica support which interfered with accurate measurements of active metal sites via volumetric strong H chemisorption. The volumetric chemisorption technique was modified so that measurement times were reduced from 12--36 h to 1 h. The active Ru surface was characterized means of changes in proton spin counts and NMR Knight shifts vs alkali loading. Na, K blocked the active surface of Ru metal, but Cs was pushed off by H chemisorption. The alkali promoters restricted H mobility on both metal surface and at the metal support interfaces; this is consistent with effects on Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. {sup 1}H NMR was used to study the effect of the active metal and promoter on support hydroxyl groups. The OH group density in the silica support decreased with metal and/or promoter loading, but not on a one-to-one basis; the exchange efficiency of the hydroxyls decreased with atomic size of the alkali metal. An additional downfield proton resonance was detected which was assigned to the alkali hydroxide species in the support.

  17. Theoretical study of the electronic structure of binary and ternary first-stage alkali intercalation compounds of graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Tatar, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    Despite the tremendous number of theoretical and experimental studies of the electronic properties of the first-stage heavy alkali intercalation compounds of graphite - KC8, RbC8, and CsC8 - there is still a great deal of uncertainty in the electronic structures of these materials. The electronic structures of these materials - required for the interpretation of experimental results - were calculated previously by several techniques. Because of the inability of these calculations to satisfactorily resolve the interpretation of experiments, and questions concerning the approximations used in the previous calculations, an attempt is made to estimate the electronic structure in these materials using a state-of-the-art, self consistent pseudopotential technique with a mixed basis of plane waves and localized atomic orbitals. The goal is to provide a detailed first principles model of the electronic interactions in these materials that can form the basis for a variety of additional, model calculations that address the experimental issues. In addition, and attempt is made to elucidate more fully the microscopic basis for differences between the heavy-alkali compounds as well as the difference between the heavy-alkali compounds as a class and the compounds formed from the light alkali, lithium.

  18. GUM Analysis for TIMS and SIMS Isotopic Ratios in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, Patrick G.; Gerlach, David C.; Cliff, John B.; Petersen, Steven L.

    2007-04-01

    This report describes GUM calculations for TIMS and SIMS isotopic ratio measurements of reactor graphite samples. These isotopic ratios are used to estimate reactor burn-up, and currently consist of various ratios of U, Pu, and Boron impurities in the graphite samples. The GUM calculation is a propagation of error methodology that assigns uncertainties (in the form of standard error and confidence bound) to the final estimates.

  19. SIM Planetquest Science and Technology: A Status Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edberg, Stephen J.; Laskin, Robert A.; Marr, James C., IV; Unwin, Stephen C.; Shao, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Optical interferometry will open new vistas for astronomy over the next decade. The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM-PlanetQuest), operating unfettered by the Earth's atmosphere, will offer unprecedented astrometric precision that promises the discovery of Earth-analog extra-solar planets as well as a wealth of important astrophysics. Results from SIM will permit the determination of stellar masses to accuracies of 2% or better for objects ranging from brown dwarfs through main sequence stars to evolved white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes. Studies of star clusters will yield age determinations and internal dynamics. Microlensing measurements will present the mass spectrum of the Milky Way internal to the Sun while proper motion surveys will show the Sun's orbital radius and speed. Studies of the Galaxy's halo component and companion dwarf galaxies permit the determination of the Milky Way's mass distribution, including its Dark Matter component and the mass distribution and Dark Matter component of the Local Group. Cosmology benefits from precision (1-2%) determination of distances to Cepheid and RR Lyrae standard candles. The emission mechanism of supermassive black holes will be investigated. Finally, radio and optical celestial reference frames will be tied together by an improvement of two orders of magnitude. Optical interferometers present severe technological challenges. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with the support of Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center (LM ATC) and Northrop Grumman Space Technology (NGST), has addressed these challenges with a technology development program that is now complete. The requirements for SIM have been satisfied, based on outside peer review, using a series of laboratory tests and appropriate computer simulations: laser metrology systems perform with 10 picometer precision; mechanical vibrations have been controlled to nanometers, demonstrating orders of magnitude disturbance rejection; and knowledge of

  20. Volcanic Origin of Alkali Halides on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, L.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The recent observation of NaCl (gas) on Io confirms our earlier prediction that NaCl is produced volcanically. Here we extend our calculations by modeling thermochemical equilibrium of O, S, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, F, Cl, Br, and I as a function of temperature and pressure in a Pele-like volcanic gas with O/S/Na/Cl/K = 1.518/1/0.05/0.04/0.005 and CI chondritic ratios of the other (as yet unobserved) alkalis and halogens. For reference, the nominal temperature and pressure for Pele is 1760 plus or minus 210 K and 0.01 bars based on Galileo data and modeling.

  1. Alkali differentiation in LL-chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlotzka, F.; Palme, H.; Spettel, B.; Wanke, H.; Fredriksson, K.; Noonan, A. F.

    1983-04-01

    The Kraehenberg and Bhola LL-group chondrites are heterogeneous agglomerates which contain a variety of lithic fragments and chondrules as well as crystal fragments. Both meteorites contain large, cm-sized fragments with high K enrichments. The K-rich inclusions are fragments of larger rock bodies which crystallized from melts of chondritic parent material that had previously been enriched in K and in heavier alkalies,while also being depleted in Na and metal. It is suggested that the K enrichment occurred as an exchange for Na in feldspars via a vapor phase, whose presence on the chondrite parent body (or bodies) is supported by the recent finding of fluid inclusions in chondritic silicates. Cooling rate considerations indicate that the K-rich rock units could not have been very large, implying that the K-rich materials were locally molten by, for example, impact.

  2. Heat pipes containing alkali metal working fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A technique for improving high temperature evaporation-condensation heat-transfer devices which have important and unique advantage in terrestrial and space energy processing is described. The device is in the form of a heat pipe comprising a sealed container or envelope which contains a capillary wick. The temperature of one end of the heat pipe is raised by the input of heat from an external heat source which is extremely hot and corrosive. A working fluid of a corrosive alkali metal, such as lithium, sodium, or potassium transfers this heat to a heat receiver remote from the heat source. The container and wick are fabricated from a superalloy containing a small percentage of a corrosion inhibiting or gettering element. Lanthanum, scandium, yttrium, thorium, and hafnium are utilized as the alloying metal.

  3. Comparative alkali washing of simulated radioactive sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Fugate, G.A.; Ensor, D.D.; Egan, B.Z.

    1996-10-01

    The treatment of large volumes of radioactive sludge generated from uranium and plutonium recovery processes is a pressing problem in the environmental restoration currently planned at various U.S. Department of Energy sites. This sludge, commonly stored in underground tanks, is mainly in the form of metal oxides or precipitated metal hydroxides and the bulk of this material is nonradioactive. One method being developed to pretreat this waste takes advantage of the amphoteric character of aluminum and other nonradioactive elements. Previous studies have reported on the dissolution of eleven elements from simulated sludge using NaOH solutions up to 6M. This work provides a comparative study using KOH. The effectiveness of the alkali washing as a treatment method to reduce the bulk of radioactive sludge requiring long term isolation will be discussed.

  4. Exploratory analysis of TOF-SIMS data from biological surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidyanathan, Seetharaman; Fletcher, John S.; Henderson, Alex; Lockyer, Nicholas P.; Vickerman, John C.

    2008-12-01

    The application of multivariate analytical tools enables simplification of TOF-SIMS datasets so that useful information can be extracted from complex spectra and images, especially those that do not give readily interpretable results. There is however a challenge in understanding the outputs from such analyses. The problem is complicated when analysing images, given the additional dimensions in the dataset. Here we demonstrate how the application of simple pre-processing routines can enable the interpretation of TOF-SIMS spectra and images. For the spectral data, TOF-SIMS spectra used to discriminate bacterial isolates associated with urinary tract infection were studied. Using different criteria for picking peaks before carrying out PC-DFA enabled identification of the discriminatory information with greater certainty. For the image data, an air-dried salt stressed bacterial sample, discussed in another paper by us in this issue, was studied. Exploration of the image datasets with and without normalisation prior to multivariate analysis by PCA or MAF resulted in different regions of the image being highlighted by the techniques.

  5. Hanford Soil Inventory Model (SIM) Rev. 1 Users Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Brett C.; Corbin, Rob A.; Anderson, Michael J.; Kincaid, Charles T.

    2006-09-25

    The focus of the development and application of a soil inventory model as part of the Remediation and Closure Science (RCS) Project managed by PNNL was to develop a probabilistic approach to estimate comprehensive, mass balanced-based contaminant inventories for the Hanford Site post-closure setting. The outcome of this effort was the Hanford Soil Inventory Model (SIM). This document is a user's guide for the Hanford SIM. The principal project requirement for the SIM was to provide comprehensive quantitative estimates of contaminant inventory and its uncertainty for the various liquid waste sites, unplanned releases, and past tank farm leaks as a function of time and location at Hanford. The majority, but not all of these waste sites are in the 200 Areas of Hanford where chemical processing of spent fuel occurred. A computer model capable of performing these calculations and providing satisfactory quantitative output representing a robust description of contaminant inventory and uncertainty for use in other subsequent models was determined to be satisfactory to address the needs of the RCS Project. The ability to use familiar, commercially available software on high-performance personal computers for data input, modeling, and analysis, rather than custom software on a workstation or mainframe computer for modeling, was desired.

  6. Chemical characterization of combustion deposits by TOF-SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjövall, P.; Lausmaa, J.; Tullin, C.; Högberg, J.

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the potential usefulness of TOF-SIMS for chemical analysis of deposits formed in combustion reactors. By using TOF-SIMS, it was possible to (i) identify inorganic chemical compounds in the deposits, (ii) semi-quantitatively estimate the relative concentrations of the main constituents and (iii) obtain images showing the lateral distribution of the main constituents, on the surface and in cross-sections of deposit samples. It was found that the main components in the deposit samples were KCl and K 2SO 4, while K 2CO 3, NaCl, Na 2SO 4, Ca(OH) 2 and CaCl 2 were present in smaller concentrations. In addition, deposits from combustion of recycled wood chips contained considerable amounts of ZnCl 2, PbCl 2, ZnO and PbO. Large variations in the chemical composition were observed for different samples and throughout the cross-section of a single sample. The chlorides, in particular NaCl, were present mainly as particles, while the sulfates were more homogeneously distributed in the deposit. The results from this study show that TOF-SIMS analysis of combustion deposits can contribute significantly to an increased understanding of the formation and growth of deposits in combustion reactors.

  7. SIMS analysis: Development and evaluation 1995 summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Appelhans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1995-10-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was evaluated for characterizing Hg salts. It was found that sulfate and chloride species could be identified directly without sample preparation. Mercuric oxide could be identified by complexation with formic acid. Hg nitrates could be identified by complexation with cyclohexylamine (CHA). Laser desorption ion trap MS was evaluated for characterizing EDTA on environmental samples. No intact EDTA ions were observed, but a series of EDTA fragment ions were visible, particularly on basalt and soil. An ion trap SIMS was developed: a perrhenate ion gun was interfaced to a Teledyne ion trap spectrometer, and the entire device was mounted on a cart. The technology was demonstrated using a prototype ion trap SIMS instrument for detecting Hg{center_dot}CHA complexes formed from nitrate salts. Intensity of the ion gun was improved, and the surface damage of the particle was small, and ion gun technology transfer to Phi-Evans, Inc. is being considered. Two technology end users are at INEL`s Central Facilities Area 674 pond and acid pit of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex; target problem at both sites is the need for Hg speciation on soil samples.

  8. Investigations of corrosion phenomena on gold coins with SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayerhofer, K. E.; Piplits, K.; Traum, R.; Griesser, M.; Hutter, H.

    2005-09-01

    In order to establish a new handling procedure for contaminated coins, the Coin Cabinet and the Conservation Science Department of the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna, initiated a research project on corrosion effects of gold coins. By now, investigations on historic and contemporary coins included optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron microscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS), and electrochemical methods showing the distribution of pollutants. This work focuses on secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) investigations merely showing the distribution of electronegative elements, such as sulfur, oxygen, and chlorine on the surface. Sulfur is highly suspected of causing the observed corrosion phenomena, and is indeed enriched near polluting splints. Since SIMS is a destructive method, the investigated samples are test coins with intentionally added impurities. These coins were manufactured in cooperation with the Austrian Mint. They were treated with potassium polysulfide (K 2S x) for 8 h gaining a rapid corrosion of the surface. SIMS mass spectra, depth profiles, and images were done (a) at non-polluted areas, (b) near polluted areas with slight coloring, and (c) directly at polluting stains showing enrichments of sulfur and chlorine. Due to the success of these investigations further studies on historic coins are intended.

  9. SIM-Lite Mission Spectral Calibration Sensitivities and Refinements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhai, C.; An, X.; Goullioud, R.; Nemati, B.; Shao, M.; Shen, J.; Wehmeier, U.; Wang, X.; Weiler, M.; Werne, T.; Wu, J.

    2010-01-01

    SIM-Lite missions will perform astrometry at microarcsecond accuracy using star light interferometry. For typical baselines that are shorter than 10 meters, this requires to measure optical path difference (OPD) accurate to tens of picometers calling for highly accurate calibration. A major challenge is to calibrate the star spectral dependency in fringe measurements -- the spectral calibration. Previously, we have developed a spectral calibration and estimation scheme achieving picometer level accuracy. In this paper, we present the improvements regarding the application of this scheme from sensitivity studies. Data from the SIM Spectral Calibration Development Unit (SCDU) test facility shows that the fringe OPD is very sensitive to pointings of both beams from the two arms of the interferometer. This sensitivity coupled with a systematic pointing error provides a mechanism to explain the bias changes in 2007. Improving system alignment can effectively reduce this sensitivity and thus errors due to pointing errors. Modeling this sensitivity can lead to further improvement in data processing. We then investigate the sensitivity to a model parameter, the bandwidth used in the fringe model, which presents an interesting trade between systematic and random errors. Finally we show the mitigation of calibration errors due to system drifts by interpolating instrument calibrations. These improvements enable us to use SCDU data to demonstrate that SIM-Lite missions can meet the 1pm noise floor requirement for detecting earth-like exoplanets.

  10. TankSIM: A Cryogenic Tank Performance Prediction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolshinskiy, L. G.; Hedayat, A.; Hastings, L. J.; Moder, J. P.; Schnell, A. R.; Sutherlin, S. G.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the thermodynamic state of the cryogenic propellants in launch vehicle tanks is necessary for mission planning and successful execution. Cryogenic propellant storage and transfer in space environments requires that tank pressure be controlled. The pressure rise rate is determined by the complex interaction of external heat leak, fluid temperature stratification, and interfacial heat and mass transfer. If the required storage duration of a space mission is longer than the period in which the tank pressure reaches its allowable maximum, an appropriate pressure control method must be applied. Therefore, predictions of the pressurization rate and performance of pressure control techniques in cryogenic tanks are required for development of cryogenic fluid long-duration storage technology and planning of future space exploration missions. This paper describes an analytical tool, Tank System Integrated Model (TankSIM), which can be used for modeling pressure control and predicting the behavior of cryogenic propellant for long-term storage for future space missions. It is written in the FORTRAN 90 language and can be compiled with any Visual FORTRAN compiler. A thermodynamic vent system (TVS) is used to achieve tank pressure control. Utilizing TankSIM, the following processes can be modeled: tank self-pressurization, boiloff, ullage venting, and mixing. Details of the TankSIM program and comparisons of its predictions with test data for liquid hydrogen and liquid methane will be presented in the final paper.

  11. SimScience: Interactive educational modules based on large simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Simeon; Catterall, Simon; Gregory, Eric; Lipson, Edward

    2000-05-01

    SimScience is a collaboration between Cornell University and Syracuse University. It comprises four interactive educational modules on crack propagation, crackling noise, fluid flow, and membranes. Computer simulations are at the forefront of current research in all of these topics. Our aim is explain some elements of each subject and to show the relevance of computer simulations. The crack propagation module explores the mechanisms of dam failure. The crackling noise module uses everyday sounds to illustrate types of noise, and links this to noise created by jumps in magnetization processes. The fluid flow module describes various properties of flows and explains phenomena such as a curve ball in baseball. The membranes module leverages everyday experience with membranes such as soap bubbles to help explain biological membranes and the relevance of membranes to theories of gravity. We have used Java not only to produce small-scale versions of research simulations but also to provide models illustrating simpler concepts underlying the main subject matter. Web technology allows us to deliver SimScience both over the Internet and on CD-ROM. To accommodate a target audience spanning K-12 and university general science students, we have created three levels for each module. Efforts are underway to assess the SimScience modules with the help of teachers and students.

  12. The Effect of Companions on the SIM Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Turyshev, Slava G.

    2000-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) is a 10-m Michelson space-based optical interferometer designed for precision astrometry (4 microarcseconds, 3 microarcseconds/year) with better accuracy than before over a narrow field of view. One of the primary objectives of the SIM instrument is to determine accurately the directions to a grid of stars, together with their proper motions and parallax, improving a priori knowledge by nearly three orders of magnitude over Hipparcos and one order of magnitude over FAME's planned accuracy (Johnston, 2000). The instrument does not measure directly the angular separation between stars, but rather it measures the projection of each star's direction vector onto the interferometer baseline vector by measuring the pathlength delay of starlight as it passes through the two arms of the interferometer. The accuracy and stability of SIM's celestial reference frame is subject to degradation over the 5-year mission from the reflex motion induced by massive companions of the objects used to construct the celestial reference frame. The authors present the results of simulations that show the sensitivity of reference frame accuracy to companions as a function of mass and period. They assume that pre-launch ground surveys will eliminate all objects with RMS radial velocity greater than 10 m/s. They further assume that the standard astrometric parameters of position, parallax, and proper motion plus acceleration terms in right ascension and declination will be allowed to absorb reflex motion.

  13. Solid state cell with alkali metal halo-alkali thiocyanate electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, B. M.; Silbernagel, B. G.

    1980-02-26

    A novel electrochemical cell is disclosed utilizing: (A) an anode which contains an alkali metal as an anode-active material; (B) a cathode and (C) an electrolyte comprising an electrolytically effective amount of one or more compounds having the formula: (Ax)ma'scn wherein a is an alkali metal, X is a halogen, a' is an alkali metal and 0.1 < or = N < or = 10. Preferred systems include lithium-containing anodes, lithium-containing electrolytes and cathodes which contain cathode-active material selected from the group consisting of cathode-active sulfurs, halogens, halides, chromates, phosphates, oxides and chalcogenides, especially those chalcogenides of the empirical formula mzm wherein M is one or more metals selected from the group consisting of iron, titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum and vanadium, Z is one or more chalcogens selected from the group consisting of oxygen, sulfur, selenium and tellurium, and M is a numerical value between about 1.8 and about 3.2.

  14. Ionic alkali halide XUV laser feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.T.; Gylys, V.T.; Bower, R.D.; Harris, D.G.; Blauer, J.A.; Turner, C.E.; Hindy, R.N.

    1989-11-10

    The objective of this work is to assess the feasibility of a select set of ionic alkali halide XUV laser concepts by obtaining the relevant kinetic and spectroscopic parameters required for a proof-of-principle and conceptual design. The proposed lasers operate in the 80--200 nm spectral region and do not require input from outside radiation sources for their operation. Frequency up-conversion and frequency mixing techniques and therefore not considered in the work to be described. An experimental and theoretical study of a new type of laser operating in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength region has been conducted. The lasing species are singly ionized alkali halide molecules such as Rb{sup 2+}F{sub {minus}}, Rb{sup 2+}Br{sup {minus}} and Cs{sup 2+}F{sup {minus}}. These species are similar in electronic structure to the rare gas halide excimers, such as XeF and Krf, except that the ionic molecules emit at wavelengths of 80--200 nm, much shorter than the conventional rare-gas halide excimer laser. The radiative lifetime of these molecules are typically near 1 ns, which is about an order of magnitude shorter than that for rare-gas halide systems. The values of the cross section for stimulated emission are on the order of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}16}cm{sup 2}. Because of the fundamental similarity to existing UV lasers, these systems show promise as a high power, efficient XUV lasers. 55 refs., 50 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Inductively guided circuits for ultracold dressed atoms.

    PubMed

    Sinuco-León, German A; Burrows, Kathryn A; Arnold, Aidan S; Garraway, Barry M

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in optics, atomic physics and material science has paved the way to study quantum effects in ultracold atomic alkali gases confined to non-trivial geometries. Multiply connected traps for cold atoms can be prepared by combining inhomogeneous distributions of DC and radio-frequency electromagnetic fields with optical fields that require complex systems for frequency control and stabilization. Here we propose a flexible and robust scheme that creates closed quasi-one-dimensional guides for ultracold atoms through the 'dressing' of hyperfine sublevels of the atomic ground state, where the dressing field is spatially modulated by inductive effects over a micro-engineered conducting loop. Remarkably, for commonly used atomic species (for example, (7)Li and (87)Rb), the guide operation relies entirely on controlling static and low-frequency fields in the regimes of radio-frequency and microwave frequencies. This novel trapping scheme can be implemented with current technology for micro-fabrication and electronic control. PMID:25348163

  16. Surface Analysis of Stratospheric Particles with TOF-SIMS: Bromine Enrichments Due to Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, T.; Rost, D.; Jessberger, E. K.

    1995-09-01

    Volatile element enrichments compared to CI abundances in stratospheric interplanetary dust particles especially for Br have been interpreted as due to atmospheric contamination processes [1] or, less substantiated, as being indicative for a new type of chondritic material [2, 3]. Although only little is known about the actual Br concentration in the stratosphere, it is well accepted that halogens play an important role in stratospheric chemistry and therefore contamination processes have to be excluded before a Br-rich chondritic parent body can be speculated on. The analysis of the lateral distribution of halogens in IDPs with high-resolution imaging TOF-SIMS (time-of-flight secondary-ion-mass-spectrometry) [4] may help to solve the controversy about the ubiquity of Br in stratospheric IDPs. Besides controversially discussed theoretical models which try to test correlations between Br-content and stratospheric residence time or surface areas [5, 6, 7], first observational hints for halogen contamination of at least two chondritic IDPs were found for W7029E5, where Br- salt nanocrystals of presumably atmospheric origin were observed [5], and for L2006G1, which showed a halogen-rich exterior rim [8]. TOF-SIMS with its extremely high surface sensitivity -- the information depth is in the order of a few atomic monolayers -- seems to be suitable for a systematic search for surface correlated halogens in IDPs. Although, in general, plane surfaces are required for TOF-SIMS measurements, particle analysis is possible with this technique [9], though quantification is highly complicated due to topographic effects on secondary ion production and detection probability. We analyzed five stratospheric particles from small area collector U2071 which were previously investigated with SEM-EDX [10]. Silicone oil on the surfaces of some particles could still be detected with TOF-SIMS, even after extensive hexane rinsing. In three cases (chondritic particles U2071B7a, F3, and H1a

  17. Laser spectroscopy of atoms in superfluid helium for the measurement of nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of radioactive atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, T.; Furukawa, T.; Imamura, K.; Yang, X. F.; Hatakeyama, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Ueno, H.; Asahi, K.; Shimoda, T.; Matsuo, Y.

    2015-11-01

    A new laser spectroscopic method named "OROCHI (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion catcher)" has been developed for deriving the nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of low-yield exotic nuclei. In this method, we observe atomic Zeeman and hyperfine structures using laser-radio-frequency/microwave double-resonance spectroscopy. In our previous works, double-resonance spectroscopy was performed successfully with laser-sputtered stable atoms including non-alkali Au atoms as well as alkali Rb and Cs atoms. Following these works, measurements with 84-87Rb energetic ion beams were carried out in the RIKEN projectile fragment separator (RIPS). In this paper, we report the present status of OROCHI and discuss its feasibility, especially for low-yield nuclei such as unstable Au isotopes.

  18. Controlled in-situ dissolution of an alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jeffrey Donald; Dooley, Kirk John; Tolman, David Donald

    2012-09-11

    A method for the controllable dissolution of one or more alkali metals from a vessel containing a one or more alkali metals and/or one or more partially passivated alkali metals. The vessel preferably comprising a sodium, NaK or other alkali metal-cooled nuclear reactor that has been used. The alkali metal, preferably sodium, potassium or a combination thereof, in the vessel is exposed to a treatment liquid, preferably an acidic liquid, more preferably citric acid. Preferably, the treatment liquid is maintained in continuous motion relative to any surface of unreacted alkali metal with which the treatment liquid is in contact. The treatment liquid is preferably pumped into the vessel containing the one or more alkali metals and the resulting fluid is extracted and optionally further processed. Preferably, the resulting off-gases are processed by an off-gas treatment system and the resulting liquids are processed by a liquid disposal system. In one preferred embodiment, an inert gas is pumped into the vessel along with the treatment liquid.

  19. Ultrasonic coal washing to leach alkali elements from coals.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, S; Reddy, V Midhun; Nagarajan, R

    2015-11-01

    Deposition of fly ash particles onto heat-transfer surfaces is often one of the reasons for unscheduled shut-downs of coal-fired boilers. Fouling deposits encountered in convective sections of a boiler are characterized by arrival of ash particles in solidified (solid) state. Fouling is most frequently caused by condensation and chemical reaction of alkali vapors with the deposited ash particles creating a wet surface conducive to collect impacting ash particles. Hence, the amount of alkali elements present in coals, which, in turn, is available in the flue gas as condensable vapors, determines the formation and growth of fouling deposits. In this context, removal of alkali elements becomes vital when inferior coals having high-ash content are utilized for power generation. With the concept of reducing alkali elements present in a coal entering the combustor, whereby the fouling deposits can either be minimized or be weakened due to absence of alkali gluing effect, the ultrasonic leaching of alkali elements from coals is investigated in this study. Ultrasonic water-washing and chemical-washing, in comparison with agitation, are studied in order to estimate the intensification of the alkali removal process by sonication. PMID:26186840

  20. Alkali elemental and potassium isotopic compositions of Semarkona chondrules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, C.M. O'D.; Grossman, J.N.

    2005-01-01

    We report measurements of K isotope ratios in 28 Semarkona chondrules with a wide range of petrologic types and bulk compositions as well as the compositions of CPX-mesostasis pairs in 17 type I Semarkona chondrules, including two chondrules with radial alkali zonation and 19 type II chondrules. Despite the wide range in K/Al ratios, no systematic variations in K isotopic compositions were found. Semarkona chondrules do not record a simple history of Rayleigh-type loss of K. Experimentally determined evaporation rates suggest that considerable alkali evaporation would have occurred during chondrule formation. Nevertheless, based on Na CPX-mesostasis distribution coefficients, the alkali contents of the cores of most chondrules in Semarkona were probably established at the time of final crystallization. However, Na CPX-mesostasis distribution coefficients also show that alkali zonation in type I Semarkona chondrules was produced by entry of alkalis after solidification, probably during parent body alteration. This alkali metasomatism may have gone to completion in some chondrules. Our preferred explanation for the lack of systematic isotopic enrichments, even in alkali depleted type I chondrule cores, is that they exchanged with the ambient gas as they cooled. ?? The Meteoritical Society, 2005.