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Sample records for alkali basalt basanite

  1. Alkali basalts and enclosed ultramafic xenoliths near Ushuaia, Tierra Del Fuego, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Rogelio Daniel

    2016-01-01

    At the southernmost part of Tierra del Fuego a few outcrops and erratic boulders of alkali basaltic rocks with ultramafic enclaves have been studied. Alkali basalt plugs or pipes hitherto identified are scarce, and host rocks are constituted by slates that belong to Mesozoic deposition. The petrography, texture and composition of the basalt and xenoliths were investigated by petrographic microscope and electron microprobe analysis. Xenocrysts of amphibole and alkali feldspar, phenocrysts of nepheline, olivine, spinel, phlogopite and Fe-Ti minerals (10 %) and a diversity of xenoliths, mainly lherzolitic, pyroxenite and wehrlitic nodules (15 %), but also from metamorphic rocks provenance, are contained in the basalt groundmass (75 %). This finer-grained material is made up of laths or needles of plagioclase, pyroxene, opaque minerals, apatite and glass, with intersertal, hyalopilitic and pilotaxitic. Locally, rock has an even granoblastic texture. Former amygdules are filled by analcite, zeolites, sodalite and calcite. The normative classification, based on nepheline content, conclude that this rock is an alkali basalt. The chemical classification, considering immobile elements as Zr/TiO2 versus Nb/Y indicate an alkali basalt too and plots over the TAS diagram fall in the foidite (Na-rich or nephelinite) and basanite fields. The REE patterns are fractionated (La/Yb primitive mantle normalized is approximately 30). The K-Ar isotopic technique on individual macrocrysts gave ages of 146 ± 5 Ma (amphibole) and 127 ± 4 Ma (alkali feldspar); and K-Ar whole rock datum reported 8.3 ± 0.3 Ma. Nevertheless, fertile samples show geochemical features typical of deep derived material thus, based on the position in the actual tectonic setting, indicate that the basalt is older than its isotopic age. PMID:27610313

  2. Alkali basalts and enclosed ultramafic xenoliths near Ushuaia, Tierra Del Fuego, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Rogelio Daniel

    2016-01-01

    At the southernmost part of Tierra del Fuego a few outcrops and erratic boulders of alkali basaltic rocks with ultramafic enclaves have been studied. Alkali basalt plugs or pipes hitherto identified are scarce, and host rocks are constituted by slates that belong to Mesozoic deposition. The petrography, texture and composition of the basalt and xenoliths were investigated by petrographic microscope and electron microprobe analysis. Xenocrysts of amphibole and alkali feldspar, phenocrysts of nepheline, olivine, spinel, phlogopite and Fe-Ti minerals (10 %) and a diversity of xenoliths, mainly lherzolitic, pyroxenite and wehrlitic nodules (15 %), but also from metamorphic rocks provenance, are contained in the basalt groundmass (75 %). This finer-grained material is made up of laths or needles of plagioclase, pyroxene, opaque minerals, apatite and glass, with intersertal, hyalopilitic and pilotaxitic. Locally, rock has an even granoblastic texture. Former amygdules are filled by analcite, zeolites, sodalite and calcite. The normative classification, based on nepheline content, conclude that this rock is an alkali basalt. The chemical classification, considering immobile elements as Zr/TiO2 versus Nb/Y indicate an alkali basalt too and plots over the TAS diagram fall in the foidite (Na-rich or nephelinite) and basanite fields. The REE patterns are fractionated (La/Yb primitive mantle normalized is approximately 30). The K-Ar isotopic technique on individual macrocrysts gave ages of 146 ± 5 Ma (amphibole) and 127 ± 4 Ma (alkali feldspar); and K-Ar whole rock datum reported 8.3 ± 0.3 Ma. Nevertheless, fertile samples show geochemical features typical of deep derived material thus, based on the position in the actual tectonic setting, indicate that the basalt is older than its isotopic age.

  3. Complex subvolcanic magma plumbing system of an alkali basaltic maar-diatreme volcano (Elie Ness, Fife, Scotland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gernon, T. M.; Upton, B. G. J.; Ugra, R.; Yücel, C.; Taylor, R. N.; Elliott, H.

    2016-11-01

    Alkali basaltic diatremes such as Elie Ness (Fife, Scotland) expose a range of volcanic lithofacies that points to a complex, multi-stage emplacement history. Here, basanites contain phenocrysts including pyrope garnet and sub-calcic augites from depths of ~ 60 km. Volcanic rocks from all units, pyroclastic and hypabyssal, are characterised by rare earth element (REE) patterns that show continuous enrichment from heavy REE (HREE) to light REE (LREE), and high Zr/Y that are consistent with retention of garnet in the mantle source during melting of peridotite in a garnet lherzolite facies. Erupted garnets are euhedral and unresorbed, signifying rapid ascent through the lithosphere. The magmas also transported abundant pyroxenitic clasts, cognate with the basanite host, from shallower depths (~ 35-40 km). These clasts exhibit wide variation in texture, mode and mineralogy, consistent with growth from a range of compositionally diverse melts. Further, clinopyroxene phenocrysts from both the hypabyssal and pyroclastic units exhibit a very wide compositional range, indicative of polybaric fractionation and magma mixing. This is attributed to stalling of earlier magmas in the lower crust - principally from ~ 22 to 28 km - as indicated by pyroxene thermobarometry. Many clinopyroxenes display chemical zoning profiles, occasionally with mantles and rims of higher magnesium number (Mg#) suggesting the magmas were mobilised by juvenile basanite magma. The tuffs also contain alkali feldspar megacrysts together with Fe-clinopyroxene, zircon and related salic xenoliths, of the 'anorthoclasite suite' - inferred to have crystallised at upper mantle to lower crustal depths from salic magma in advance of the mafic host magmas. Despite evidence for entrainment of heterogeneous crystal mushes, the rapidly ascending melts experienced negligible crustal contamination. The complex association of phenocrysts, megacrysts and autoliths at Elie Ness indicates thorough mixing in a dynamic

  4. Assesment of Alkali Resistance of Basalt Used as Concrete Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    al-Swaidani, Aref M.; Baddoura, Mohammad K.; Aliyan, Samira D.; Choeb, Walid

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to report a part of an ongoing research on the influence of using crushed basalt as aggregates on one of durability-related properties of concrete (i.e. alkali-silica reaction which is the most common form of Alkali-Aggregate Reaction). Alkali resistance has been assessed through several methods specified in the American Standards. Results of petrographic examination, chemical test (ASTM C289) and accelerated mortar bar test (ASTM C1260) have particularly been reported. In addition, the weight change and compressive strength of 28 days cured concrete containing basaltic aggregates were also reported after 90 days of exposure to 10% NaOH solution. Dolomite aggregate were used in the latter test for comparison. The experimental results revealed that basaltic rocks quarried from As-Swaida'a region were suitable for production of aggregates for concrete. According to the test results, the studied basalt aggregates can be classified as innocuous with regard to alkali-silica reaction. Further, the 10% sodium hydroxide attack did not affect the compressive strength of concrete.

  5. Volatile degassing of basaltic achondrite parent bodies Evidence from alkali elements and phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.

    1987-01-01

    The Na, K, Rb, Cs, and P abundances in eucrites, diogenites, basaltic clasts from polymict eucrite, howardites, and mesosiderites are examined, and compared with an average of highly incompatible refractory (AHIR) elements normalized to cosmic abundances. It is observed that basaltic eucrites and basaltic clasts show a positive correlation between K, Rb, and Cs, and alkali element/AHIR ratios; the volatile loss of the alkali elements from the basalt affects the parent body inventory of volatile elements. The data reveal that for diogenites, the alkali /AHIR ratios are 1.4-2 times greater than in basaltic eucrites and are more variable; and the negative relation between K, Rb, Cs, and the alkali/AHIR ratio correlate with progressive alkali loss through volatile outgassing during crystallization of one or more magmas resulting in a greater than 90 percent loss of the volatile element inventory from the parent body. It is also detected that P displays volatile loss from the basaltic eucrites and elevated P/AHIR ratios in diogenites.

  6. Mineralogy, geochemistry and expansion testing of an alkali-reactive basalt from western Anatolia, Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Copuroglu, Oguzhan; Andic-Cakir, Ozge; Broekmans, Maarten A.T.M.; Kuehnel, Radko

    2009-07-15

    In this paper, the alkali-silica reaction performance of a basalt rock from western Anatolia, Turkey is reported. It is observed that the rock causes severe gel formation in the concrete microbar test. It appears that the main source of expansion is the reactive glassy phase of the basalt matrix having approximately 70% of SiO{sub 2}. The study presents the microstructural characteristics of unreacted and reacted basalt aggregate by optical and electron microscopy and discusses the possible reaction mechanism. Microstructural analysis revealed that the dissolution of silica is overwhelming in the matrix of the basalt and it eventually generates four consequences: (1) Formation of alkali-silica reaction gel at the aggregate perimeter, (2) increased porosity and permeability of the basalt matrix, (3) reduction of mechanical properties of the aggregate and (4) additional gel formation within the aggregate. It is concluded that the basalt rock is highly prone to alkali-silica reaction. As an aggregate, this rock is not suitable for concrete production.

  7. Thermobarometry for spinel lherzolite xenoliths in alkali basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Kazuhito; Youbi, Nasrrddine; Boumehdi, Moulay Ahmed; Nagahara, Hiroko

    2016-04-01

    geothermobarometry based on reactions with large and distinct volume changes, is necessary. Specification of mineral domains and their components representing the thermal state of the mantle just before xenolith extraction is one of the major tasks for the establishment of reliable geothermobarometry for spinel lherzolite xenoliths. Systematic variations of such mineralogical information among xenoliths transported by a single volcanic eruption guarantees proper estimation of a mantle geotherm. For the development of such geobarometry, it is important to choose appropriate xenolith locality, where previous studies provide enough information and where many xenolith samples are available for extending a range of derivation depth. Spinel lherzolite xenoliths in alkali basalts from Bou Ibalhatene maars in the Middle Atlas in Morocco are suitable study target. Geochemical, geochronological, petrological, and rheological aspects of the spinel lherzolite xenoliths have been studied (Raffone et al. 2009; El Messbahi et al., 2015; Witting et al., 2010; El Azzouzi et al., 2010), which show that they represent fragments of the lithospheric mantle formed and modified since 1.7Ga before their extraction from Miocene to recent. We have pinpointed portions of minerals in the xenolith samples and their components representing condition just before their entrapment in magmas, on which appropriate geothermobarometers are applied and detected ~0.5GPa pressure difference (1.5-2.0GPa) for ~100°C variation in temperatures (950-1050°C).

  8. The origin of pyroxene megacrysts in alkali basalts from Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntaflos, Theo; Bjerg, Ernesto; Gregoire, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Clinopyroxene and othopyroxene megacrysts have been brought to the surface together with mantle xenoliths by Neogene and Quaternary alkali basalts from the back-arc environment in Patagonia. The collected megacrysts are from Pali Aike Volcanic Field (El Ruido, maar) and the Gobernador Gregores cinder cone in southern Patagonia, and from the Laguna Fria outcrop in northern Patagonia. The most frequent pyroxene megacrysts are augites (twelve samples), one diopside and two enstatites. Enstatites were found in El Ruido and Laguna Fria. The augites are magnesian rich with MG# that vary from 73.1 to 75.3 in Gobernador Gregores, fairly constant at 76.6 in El Ruido and from 74.0 to 78.6 in Laguna Fria. The MG# of diopside is 91.1 and the two enstatites, one from Gobernador Gregores and the other from Laguna Fria, have MG#s 78.3 and 82.5 respectively. The Na2O and TiO2 contents in augites vary from 0.99 to 2.06 wt% and from 0.69 to 1.86 wt% repectively. Systematically, the Gobernador Gregores augites have the highest TiO2 and Na2O contents. The primitive mantle normalized REE abundances have concave upwards patterns. While the Gobernador Gregores augites have (La/Y)N ratios that vary from 2.4 to 3.8, the El Ruido and Laguna Fria augites have ratios that vary from 0.91 to 1.74. The enstatites from both localities have similar MREE but they differ markedly in their LREE (in GG LaN=0.04xPM and in El Ruido LAN=0.14) and in their HREE (in Gobernador Gregores YbN=0.25 and in El Ruido YBN=0.6). The AL IV/AL VI in all augites is high and vary from 0.75 to1.07 suggesting that they have been formed at - more than 30 km depth. The calculated minimum equilibrium temperatures vary between 1260 to 1320°C. Pressure estimates for augites, with exception of the El Ruido augites with a pressure of 1.65 GP, vary between 1.27 and 1.47 GPa. Especially the pressure estimates from Gobernador Gregores megacrysts vary within a small interval from 1.29 to 1.36 GPa indicating an isobaric

  9. Quantitative petrogenetic constraints on the Pliocene alkali basaltic volcanism of the SE Spain Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebriá, J. M.; López-Ruiz, J.; Carmona, J.; Doblas, M.

    2009-09-01

    Alkali basalts of Pliocene age are the last episode of volcanism in the SE Spain Volcanic Province, postdating a complex series of Miocene calc-alkaline to ultrapotassic rocks. This volcanism is represented by small outcrops and vents NW of Cartagena that has been interpreted as a volcanic episode similar to the contemporaneous monogenetic alkaline basaltic volcanism of the Iberian Peninsula and Western/Central Europe. However, their geochemical signature is characterised by relatively higher 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios as well as distinct trace element anomalies which, at different scale, are only found in the spatially related calc-alkaline to ultrapotassic volcanism. Quantitative modelling of these data demonstrate that the geochemical signature of the Pliocene alkali basalts of Cartagena can be explained by the interaction between primitive melts generated from a sublithospheric mantle source similar to that identified for other volcanic regions of Spain, and liquids derived from the overlying lithospheric mantle. This interaction implies that the alkali basalts show some geochemical features only observed in mantle lithosphere-derived melts (e.g. Sr isotope enrichment and Th-U-Pb positive anomalies), while retaining an overall geochemical signature similar to other Iberian basalts (e.g. Rb-K negative anomalies). This model also implies that beneath the SEVP, enriched (metasomatized) portions were still present within the lithospheric mantle after the Miocene magmatic episodes. Comparison of this model with those already developed for other alkaline basaltic volcanic regions of western/central Europe supports the idea that the interaction of primitive magmas derived from a common sublithospheric mantle source with liquids derived from the overlying regionally heterogeneous lithospheric mantle is a relatively frequent scenario in the European realm.

  10. Cenozoic alkali basalts from Jingpohu, NE China: The role of lithosphere asthenosphere interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jun; Zhao, Jian-Xin

    2008-06-01

    The geochemistry of Late Cenozoic volcanic rocks from Jingpohu, NE China, provides important constraints on the petrogenesis of continental alkali basalts and lithospheric evolution in the eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). Miocene-Pleistocene and Holocene basalts from Jingpohu show alkali affinities and are characterized by Ocean Island Basalt (OIB)-like REE and trace element patterns somehow resembling Holocene potassic rocks from Wudalianchi which are considered to be derived from ancient enriched lithospheric mantle. These basalts show depleted Sr-Nd isotopic compositions ( 87Sr/ 86Sr = 0.7039-0.7046, ɛNd = 1.3-6.0) and Dupal-like but unradiogenic Pb isotopic signatures ( 206Pb/ 204Pb = 17.54-17.94, 207Pb/ 204Pb = 15.45-15.54, 208Pb/ 204Pb = 37.71-38.07), comparable to the OIB. The combined geochemical and isotopic signatures are consistent with magma source mixing between a Focal Zone (FOZO)-like asthenospheric mantle component (characterized by enriched Pb and depleted Sr-Nd isotopic compositions) and an isotopically enriched EM1-type subcontinental lithospheric mantle component. Lithospheric thickness inferred from alkali basalts from different regions implies a progressive thinning from west to east in the CAOB, which may be caused by lithosphere-asthenosphere interaction. We propose that upwelling of the asthenosphere and subsequent mechanical and chemical erosion beneath lithospheric mantle induced by subduction of the Pacific plate might have been responsible for the lithospheric thinning in the eastern CAOB. The lithospheric thinning has proceeded in a dischronous way in the western North China Craton, near the Daxinganling-Taihangshan gravity lineament, but this event did not take place in the corresponding area of the CAOB. The lithospheric thinning shows different styles both spatially and temporally in the two tectonic units.

  11. Ultramafic inclusions and host alkali olivine basalts of the southern coastal plain of the Red Sea, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ghent, Edward D.; Coleman, Robert Griffin; Hadley, Donald G.

    1979-01-01

    A variety of mafic and ultramafic inclusions occur within the pyroclastic components of the Al Birk basalt, erupted on the southern Red Sea coastal plain of Saudi Arabia from Pleistocene time to the present. Depleted harzburgites are the only inclusions contained within the basalts that were erupted through Miocene oceanic crust (15 km thick) in the vicinity of Jizan, whereas to the north in the vicinity of Al Birk, alkali basalts that were erupted through a thicker Precambrian crust (48 km thick) contain mixtures of harzburgites, cumulate gabbro, and websterite inclusions accompanied by large (> 2 cm) megacrysts of glassy alumina-rich clinopyroxene, plagioclase, and spinel. Microprobe analyses of individual minerals from the harzburgites, websterites, and cumulate gabbros reveal variations in composition that can be related to a complex mantle history during the evolution of the alkali basalts. Clinopyroxene and plagioclase megacrysts may represent early phases that crystallized from the alkali olivine basalt magma at depths less than 35 km. Layered websterites and gabbros with cumulate plagioclase and clinopyroxene may represent continuing crystallization of the alkali olivine basalt magma in the lower crust when basaltic magma was not rapidly ascending. It is significant that the megacrysts and cumulate inclusions apparently form only where the magmas have traversed the Precambrian crust, whereas the harzburgite-bearing basalts that penetrated a much thinner Miocene oceanic crust reveal no evidence of mantle fractionation. These alkali olivine basalts and their contained inclusions are related in time to present-day rifting in the Red Sea axial trough. The onshore, deep-seated, undersaturated magmas are separated from the shallow Red Sea rift subalkaline basalts by only 170 km. The contemporaneity of alkaline olivine and subalkaline basalts requires that they must relate directly to the separation of the Arabian plate from the African plate.

  12. Petrological processes in mantle plume heads: Evidence from study of mantle xenoliths in the late Cenozoic alkali Fe-Ti basalts in Western Syria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkov, Evgenii

    2015-04-01

    It is consensus now that within-plate magmatism is considered with ascending of mantle plumes and adiabatic melting of their head. At the same time composition of the plumes' matter and conditions of its adiabatic melting are unclear yet. The major source of objective information about it can be mantle xenoliths in alkali basalts and basanites which represent fragments of material of the plume heads above magma-generation zone. They are not represent material in melting zone, however, carry important information about material of modern mantle plumes, its phase composition and components, involved in melting. Populations of mantle xenoliths in basalts are characterized by surprising sameness in the world and represented by two major types: (1) dominated rocks of ``green'' series, and (2) more rare rocks of ``black'' series, which formed veins in the ``green'' series matrix. It can evidence about common composition of plume material in global scale. In other words, the both series of xenoliths represent two types of material of thermochemical mantle plumes, ascended from core-mantle boundary (Maruyama, 1994; Dobretsov et al., 2001). The same types of xenoliths are found in basalts and basanites of Western Syria (Sharkov et al., 1996). Rocks of ``green'' series are represented by Sp peridotites with cataclastic and protogranular structures and vary in composition from dominated spinel lherzolites to spinel harzburgites and rare spinel pyroxenites (websterites). It is probably evidence about incomplete homogenizing of the plume head matter, where material, underwent by partial melting, adjoins with more fertile material. Such heterogeneity was survived due to quick cooling of upper rim of the plume head in contact with relatively cold lithosphere. Essential role among xenoliths of the ``black'' series play Al-Ti-augite and water-bearing phases like hornblende (kaersutute) and Ti-phlogopite. Rocks of this series are represented by wehrlite, clinopyroxenite, amphibole

  13. Eruptive history of an alkali basaltic diatreme from Elie Ness, Fife, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gernon, T. M.; Upton, B. G. J.; Hincks, T. K.

    2013-05-01

    The Elie Ness diatreme (Fife, Scotland) is an ideal place to study the internal architecture and emplacement processes of diatremes. Elie Ness is one of approximately 100 alkali basaltic diatremes and intrusions in the East Fife area, emplaced during Upper Carboniferous to Early Permian times into an extensive rift system in the northern Variscan foreland. Within the diatreme, seven lithofacies and three lithofacies associations (LFAs 1-3) are recognised. Field, petrographic and geochemical studies demonstrate that the diatreme experienced a protracted history of eruption and infill, initially driven by volatile expansion and later by magma-water interaction. Massive lapilli tuffs of LFA 1 contain abundant highly vesicular juvenile scoria and magma-coated clasts, which are best explained by a magmatic origin for the early explosive eruptions. On a large-scale, the tuffs are well mixed and locally exhibit small-scale degassing structures attributed to fluidisation processes occurring within the diatreme fill. The occurrence of abundant volcaniclastic autoliths and megablocks within LFA 1 can be explained by subsidence of volcaniclastic strata from the maar crater and upper diatreme during emplacement. Pyroclastic density current deposits of LFA 2 form a series of continuous sheets across the diatreme, some of which may have originated from phreatomagmatic explosions in a neighbouring vent. We attribute the overall bedding pattern to a combination of primary volcanic processes and post-depositional folding related to movement along an adjacent fault. Minor steeply inclined breccias and tuffs of LFA 3 cross-cut the LFA 2 succession and are interpreted as late-stage volcaniclastic dykes and conduits, signalling the final phase of eruptive activity at Elie Ness. The study offers new insights into the volcanic evolution of diatremes fed by low viscosity, alkali-rich magmas.

  14. The Origin of Alkali and Ocean Island Basalts: Contradictions and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, K.; Langmuir, C. H.; Goldstein, S. L.; Lagatta, A.

    2001-12-01

    element ratios because F is as low as D. Low F melts would transport volatiles and have them be incorporated into the source. Therefore a low F melt source solves the OIB problem in ways that recycled ocean crust cannot. There is then the geological question of where the source is created. It could be created above subduction zones where slabs are hot enough to melt subducted crust at depths greater than the volcanic front. Large contiguous volumes of melt-metasomatized mantle could be created in this way. In this environment, the fertilized mantle wedge overlying the slab could be carried to depth in the mantle where it acquires a high 3He signature and rises to form plumes. Minor amounts of volatile-depleted eclogite could also be involved directly in some cases (e,g, perhaps Hawaiian tholeiites). But what we find striking about ocean island geochemistry is the rarity of the eclogite signature. Koolau is an outlier, not a paradigm. Similar alkali basalt source compositions could be created from any eclogite that reaches shallow levels in the mantle, because the eclogite has so much lower a solidus temperature than does peridotote. Given the mantle thermal structure, this process allows alkali basalt sources to be created throughout the upper mantle as an inevitable consequence of mantle convection. The uniform character of the OIB magma type then comes from the relative partition coefficients of trace elements in garnet and pyroxene, which imparts a commonality to low F melts in diverse environments. This model accounts for the petrological and geochemical features of OIB, and also permits the ubiquity of their geographical occurrence.

  15. Investigating Mantle Sources of Basaltic Melts Using Olivine LA-ICPMS Analysis, Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, C. M.; Schmidt, M. E.; Thomas, A.; Bryce, J. G.; Fahnestock, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF), New Mexico, is located along the Jemez Lineament, a major crustal feature and a focus of post-Laramide magmatism. The MTVF comprises at least three regions containing contemporaneous (~3.7 to 1.26 Ma) Ne-normative volcanic rocks. The intermediate Mount Taylor (MT) strata-volcano contains early central and flanking mantle xenolith-bearing alkali basalts and hawaiites. The Rio Puerco (RP) volcanic necks contain mantle xenolith-bearing basanites and alkali basalts and no evolved lavas. Mesa Chivato (MC) contains an alkaline mafic to felsic suite with geochemical similarities to RP and MT lavas but no known mantle-xenoliths. The MTVF xenoliths are diverse (e.g., Thomas et al., 2012, AGU Fall Meeting, V43A-2825) and suggest varying degrees of melt enrichment/fertilization. By LA-ICPMS, we are characterizing olivine trace element chemistry from the mantle xenoliths and basaltic (sensu lato) phenocrysts to test how much can be determined about likely source rocks by phenocryst olivine alone. This is part of a continuing project to investigate spatial trends in Laramide mantle melt metasomatism and its relation to post-Laramide magma compositions. We have analyzed samples from a RP neck (lherzolite in alkali basalt); flows from the MT flank (websterite in alkali basalt) and from the MT amphitheater (wehrlite in hawaiite). Additionally, we analyzed olivine phenocrysts from three xenolith-free lavas: a MT basanite and MC alkali basalt and hawaiite. (1) As diverse as the xenoliths are, their olivine clusters together with regards to most trace elements, though the xenoliths can be discriminated from each other by Co abundances alone or in Cr-Al and Cr-Zn space. (2) Phenocrysts from xenolith-bearing alkali basalts cluster with the xenolith olivine, suggesting the melt was in equilibrium with a lithology of a similar trace element budget. (3) Phenocrysts from the xenolith-bearing MT hawaiite and most MC phenocrysts are depleted in

  16. Igneous Rocks of the East Pacific Rise: The alkali volcanic suite appear to be differentiated from a tholeiitic basalt extruded from the mantle.

    PubMed

    Engel, A E; Engel, C G

    1964-10-23

    The apical parts of large volcanoes along the East Pacific Rise (islands and seamounts) are encrusted with rocks of the alkali volcanic suite (alkali basalt, andesine- and oligoclase-andesite, and trachyte). In contrast, the more submerged parts of the Rise are largely composed of a tholeiitic basalt which has low concentrations of K, P, U, Th, Pb, and Ti. This tholeiitic basalt is either the predominant or the only magma generated in the earth's mantle under oceanic ridges and rises. It is at least 1000-fold more abundant than the alkali suite, which is probably derived from tholeiitic basalt by magmatic differentiation in and immediately below the larger volcanoes. Distinction of oceanic tholeiites from almost all continental tholeiites is possible on the simple basis of total potassium content, with the discontinuity at 0.3 to 0.5 percent K(2)O by weight. Oceanic tholeiites also are readily distinguished from some 19 out of 20 basalts of oceanic islands and seamount cappings by having less than 0.3 percent K(2)O by weight and more than 48 percent SiO(2). Deep drilling into oceanic volcanoes should, however, core basalts transitional between the oceanic tholeiites and the presumed derivative alkali basalts. The composition of the oceanic tholeiites suggests that the mantle under the East Pacific Rise contains less than 0.10 percent potassium oxide by weight; 0.1 part per million of uranium and 0.4 part of thorium; a potassium:rubidium ratio of about 1200 and a potassium: uranium ratio of about 10(4).

  17. Igneous Rocks of the East Pacific Rise: The alkali volcanic suite appear to be differentiated from a tholeiitic basalt extruded from the mantle.

    PubMed

    Engel, A E; Engel, C G

    1964-10-23

    The apical parts of large volcanoes along the East Pacific Rise (islands and seamounts) are encrusted with rocks of the alkali volcanic suite (alkali basalt, andesine- and oligoclase-andesite, and trachyte). In contrast, the more submerged parts of the Rise are largely composed of a tholeiitic basalt which has low concentrations of K, P, U, Th, Pb, and Ti. This tholeiitic basalt is either the predominant or the only magma generated in the earth's mantle under oceanic ridges and rises. It is at least 1000-fold more abundant than the alkali suite, which is probably derived from tholeiitic basalt by magmatic differentiation in and immediately below the larger volcanoes. Distinction of oceanic tholeiites from almost all continental tholeiites is possible on the simple basis of total potassium content, with the discontinuity at 0.3 to 0.5 percent K(2)O by weight. Oceanic tholeiites also are readily distinguished from some 19 out of 20 basalts of oceanic islands and seamount cappings by having less than 0.3 percent K(2)O by weight and more than 48 percent SiO(2). Deep drilling into oceanic volcanoes should, however, core basalts transitional between the oceanic tholeiites and the presumed derivative alkali basalts. The composition of the oceanic tholeiites suggests that the mantle under the East Pacific Rise contains less than 0.10 percent potassium oxide by weight; 0.1 part per million of uranium and 0.4 part of thorium; a potassium:rubidium ratio of about 1200 and a potassium: uranium ratio of about 10(4). PMID:17806796

  18. Trace-element and Sr, Nd, Pb, and O isotopic composition of Pliocene and Quaternary alkali basalts of the Patagonian Plateau lavas of southernmost South America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, C.R.; Frey, F.A.; Futa, K.; Zartman, R.E.; Peng, Z.; Kurtis, Kyser T.

    1990-01-01

    The Pliocene and Quaternary Patagonian alkali basalts of southernmost South America can be divided into two groups. The "cratonic" basalts erupted in areas of Cenozoic plateau volcanism and continental sedimentation and show considerable variation in 87Sr/86Sr (0.70316 to 0.70512), 143Nd/144Nd (e{open}Nd) and 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb ratios (18.26 to 19.38, 15.53 to 15.68, and 38.30 to 39.23, respectively). These isotopic values are within the range of oceanic island basalts, as are the Ba/La, Ba/Nb, La/Nb, K/Rb, and Cs/Rb ratios of the "cratonic" basalts. In contrast, the "transitional" basalts, erupted along the western edge of the outcrop belt of the Pliocene and Quaternary plateau lavas in areas that were the locus of earlier Cenozoic Andean orogenic arc colcanism, have a much more restricted range of isotopic composition which can be approximated by 87Sr/86Sr=0.7039??0.0004, e{open}Nd, 206Pb/204Pb=18.60??0.08, 207Pb/204Pb=15.60??0.01, and 208Pb/204Pb=38.50??0.10. These isotopic values are similar to those of Andean orogenic are basalts and, compared to the "cratonic" basalts, are displaced to higher 87Sr/86Sr at a given 143Nd/144Nd and to higher 207Pb/204Pb at a given 208Pb/204Pb. The "transitional" basalts also have Ba/La, Ba/Nb, La/Nb, and Cs/Rb ratios higher than the "cratonic" and oceanic island basalts, although not as high as Andean orogenic are basalts. In contrast to the radiogenic isotopes, ??18O values for both groups of the Patagonian alkali basalts are indistinguishable and are more restricted than the range reported for Andean orogenic are basalts. Whole rock ??18O values calculated from mineral separates for both groups range from 5.3 to 6.5, while measured whole rock ??18O values range from 5.1 to 7.8. The trace element and isotopic data suggest that decreasing degrees of partial melting in association with lessened significance of subducted slabderived components are fundamental factors in the west to east transition from arc

  19. Distinctive crystal chemistry and site configuration of the clinopyroxene from alkali basaltic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Negro, A.; Cundari, A.; Piccirillo, E. M.; Molin, G. M.; Uliana, D.

    1986-01-01

    A crystal chemical investigation of clinopyroxenes from a suite of nepheline-bearing lavas located in the Nyambeni Range of Kenya has delineated the polyhedral site configurations and related intracrystalline relationships. These are distinct from those determined for the clinopyroxene in an analogous suite of leucite-bearing lavas from the Sabatini volcanoes in the Roman Region of Italy (Dal Negro et al. 1985). The Nyambeni clinopyroxene, varying from salite to hedenbergite, preferentially accepts Na in the M2 site to balance increasing Fe2+ and Si, respectively, whereas the Sabatini clinopyroxene is confined within the salite field and preferentially accepts Aliv to balance the effect of increasing (Fe3++Ti4++Alvi+Cr3+)M1. The Fe2+/Fe3+ and K/Na ratios of the host rocks emerge as significant factors in determining the different polyhedral configurations and evolutions of the clinopyroxene from the two lava suites, respectively. The resulting Mg-Fe2+ order-disorder relationships in M1 M2 are also distinct in the two clinopyroxenes. A high degree of MgFe2+ order in M1 M2 corresponds to the largest configurational, hence energetic, difference between M1 and M2 in the Nyambeni clinopyroxene, whereas the converse applies to the Sabatini clinopyroxene. In view of the significant crystal chemical differences and distinct evolution trends, it is proposed that salites from alkali volcanic rocks may be referred to as Nyambeni-type or Sabatini-type, respectively.

  20. The Mantle and Basalt-Crust Interaction Below the Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, Christian M.; Crumpler, Larry S.; Schmidt, Marick E.

    2010-01-01

    The Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF) lies on the Jemez Lineament on the southeastern margin of the Colorado Plateau. The field is centered on the Mt. Taylor composite volcano and includes Mesa Chivato to the NE and Grants Ridge to the WSW. MTVF magmatism spans approximately 3.8-1.5 Ma (K-Ar). Magmas are dominantly alkaline with mafic compositions ranging from basanite to hy-basalt and felsic compositions ranging from ne-trachyte to rhyolite. We are investigating the state of the mantle and the spatial and temporal variation in basalt-crustal interaction below the MTVF by examining mantle xenoliths and basalts in the context of new mapping and future Ar-Ar dating. The earliest dated magmatism in the field is a basanite flow south of Mt. Taylor. Mantle xenolith-bearing alkali basalts and basanites occur on Mesa Chivato and in the region of Mt. Taylor, though most basalts are peripheral to the main cone. Xenolith-bearing magmatism persists at least into the early stages of conebuilding. Preliminary examination of the mantle xenolith suite suggests it is dominantly lherzolitic but contains likely examples of both melt-depleted (harzburgitic) and melt-enriched (clinopyroxenitic) mantle. There are aphyric and crystal-poor hawaiites, some of which are hy-normative, on and near Mt. Taylor, but many of the more evolved MTVF basalts show evidence of complex histories. Mt. Taylor basalts higher in the cone-building sequence contain >40% zoned plagioclase pheno- and megacrysts. Other basalts peripheral to Mt. Taylor and at Grants Ridge contain clinopyroxene and plagioclase megacrysts and cumulate-textured xenoliths, suggesting they interacted with lower crustal cumulates. Among the questions we are addressing: What was the chemical and thermal state of the mantle recorded by the basaltic suites and xenoliths and how did it change with time? Are multiple parental basalts (Si-saturated vs. undersaturated) represented and, if so, what changes in the mantle or in the tectonic

  1. Jun Jaegyu Volcano: A Recently Discovered Alkali Basalt Volcano in Antarctic Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, A.; Bailey, D.; Domack, E.; Brachfeld, S.; Gilbert, R.; Ishman, S.; Krahmann, G.; Leventer, A.

    2004-12-01

    Jun Jaegyu is a young volcanic construct discovered in May 2004 by researchers aboard the National Science Foundation (NSF) vessel Laurence M. Gould (LMG04-04). The volcano is located on the Antarctic continental shelf in Antarctic Sound, approximately 9 km due north of the easternmost point of Andersson Island. Swath bathymetry (NBP01-07) indicates that the volcano stands 700 meters above the seafloor, yet remains 275 meters short of the ocean surface. The seamount lies along a northwest-southeast oriented fault scarp and contains at least 1.5 km3 of volcanic rock. Video recording of the volcano's surface revealed regions nearly devoid of submarine life. These areas are associated with a thermal anomaly of up to 0.052° C higher than the surrounding ocean water. A rock dredge collected ~13 kg of material, over 80% of which was fresh volcanic rock; the remainder was glacial IRD. These observations, along with reports by mariners of discolored water in this region of Antarctic Sound, suggest that the volcano has been recently active. The basalt samples are generally angular, glassy and vesicular. Preliminary petrographic observations indicate that plagioclase, olivine, and clinopyroxene are all present as phenocryst phases, and that small (<1cm) rounded xenoliths are common. A comprehensive study of the volcano's petrography and whole-rock chemistry is currently underway. Jun Jaegyu is the northernmost volcanic center of the James Ross Island Volcanic Group (JRIVG), and the only center in this region of the Antarctic Peninsula with evidence of recent activity. It lies along the boundary between the Late Cenozoic JRIVG and the Upper Paleozoic rocks of the Trinity Peninsula Formation. While the tectonic setting of the region is complex, volcanism appears to be associated with active faults related to within-plate extension.

  2. Enriched asthenosphere melting beneath the nascent North African margin: trace element and Nd isotope evidence in middle-late Triassic alkali basalts from central Sicily (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrincione, Rosolino; Fiannacca, Patrizia; Lustrino, Michele; Romano, Vanessa; Tranchina, Annunziata; Villa, Igor M.

    2016-03-01

    During the dismembering of the Pangea supercontinent, middle-late Triassic sub-volcanic alkaline rocks were emplaced in central Sicily. These rocks have an alkali basaltic composition and show OIB-like incompatible element patterns in primitive mantle-normalized diagrams (e.g., enrichments in HFSE and LREE coupled with high HFSE/LILE ratios), as well as slightly positive \\varepsilon_{Nd} values. Only subtle effects of crustal contamination at shallow depths emerge from geochemical data. These characteristics are very different compared with the Permian calcalkaline magmas from elsewhere in SW Europe still carrying the geochemical signature of modifications related to the Variscan orogeny. The mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic compositions of the investigated samples from central Sicily are also different from the coeval shoshonitic volcano-plutonic formations of Southern Alps (Dolomites). The incompatible element composition and Nd isotopic ratios are consistent with low-degree partial melting of a moderately depleted asthenospheric mantle source, with a negligible involvement of the thinned continental crust. The studied alkaline basalts represent the only known evidence of a segment of the Triassic rift system associated with early Pangea breakup in central Sicily. The close similarity of the central Sicily Triassic alkali basalts with coeval basalts emplaced along former orogenic sutures across the peri-Mediterranean area suggests a common origin related, at least partly, to asthenospheric passive upwelling following the tectonic collapse of the Variscan Belt. These rocks provide new constraints on the spatial-temporal distribution, magma source evolution and geodynamic meaning of the widespread Permo-Triassic basic magmatism developed after the end of the Variscan Orogeny in southwestern Europe.

  3. Crystal preferred orientations of minerals from mantle xenoliths in alkali basaltic rocks form the Catalan Volcanic Zone (NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Roig, Mercè; Galán, Gumer; Mariani, Elisabetta

    2015-04-01

    Mantle xenoliths in alkali basaltic rocks from the Catalan Volcanic Zone, associated with the Neogene-Quaternary rift system in NE Spain, are formed of anhydrous spinel lherzolites and harzburgites with minor olivine websterites. Both peridotites are considered residues of variable degrees of partial melting, later affected by metasomatism, especially the harzburgites. These and the websterites display protogranular microstructures, whereas lherzolites show continuous variation between protogranular, porphyroclastic and equigranular forms. Thermometric data of new xenoliths indicate that protogranular harzburgites, lherzolites and websterites were equilibrated at higher temperatures than porphyroclastic and equigranular lherzolites. Mineral chemistry also indicates lower equilibrium pressure for porphyroclastic and equigranular lherzolites than for the protogranular ones. Crystal preferred orientations (CPOs) of olivine and pyroxenes from these new xenoliths were determined with the EBSD-SEM technique to identify the deformation stages affecting the lithospheric mantle in this zone and to assess the relationships between the deformation fabrics, processes and microstructures. Olivine CPOs in protogranular harzburgites, lherzolites and a pyroxenite display [010]-fiber patterns characterized by a strong point concentration of the [010] axis normal to the foliation and girdle distribution of [100] and [001] axes within the foliation plane. Olivine CPO symmetry in porphyroclastic and equigranular lherzolites varies continuously from [010]-fiber to orthorhombic and [100]-fiber types. The orthorhombic patterns are characterized by scattered maxima of the three axes, which are normal between them. The rare [100]-fiber patterns display strong point concentration of [100] axis, with normal girdle distribution of the other two axes, which are aligned with each other. The patterns of pyroxene CPOs are more dispersed than those of olivine, especially for clinopyroxene, but

  4. 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy of mineral assemblages in mantle spinel lherzolites from Cenozoic alkali basalt, eastern China: Petrological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xi-Luo; Li, Yi-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Mineral assemblages in spinel lherzolite xenoliths from the Cenozoic alkali basalt of eastern China were analyzed by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy for Fe3+/ΣFe and distribution of Fe2+/Fe3+ in non-equivalent crystal cites. Orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and spinel have 0.08-0.13, 0.19-0.31 and 0.13-0.23 Fe3+/ΣFe, respectively. The cation-exchange equilibrium temperatures, Fe3+ partition coefficient and oxygen fugacity of the upper mantle peridotites were calculated. The equilibrium temperatures are between 1103 K and 1405 K consistent with those reported elsewhere. The oxygen fugacities of spinel lherzolites calculated with olivine-orthopyroxene-spinel (ΔlogƒO2 from - 1.1 to 0) and clinopyroxene-olivine-orthopyroxene oxybarometers (ΔlogƒO2 from - 2.0 to 0.7) are consistent with previously reported upper mantle values.

  5. Geochemical and oxygen isotope signatures of mantle corundum megacrysts from the Mbuji-Mayi kimberlite, Democratic Republic of Congo, and the Changle alkali basalt, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Gaston; Pivin, Marjorie; Fallick, Anthony E.; Ohnenstetter, Daniel; Song, Yucai; Demaiffe, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen isotope signatures of ruby and sapphire megacrysts, combined with trace-element analysis, from the Mbuji-Mayi kimberlite, Democratic Republic of Congo, and the Changle alkali basalt, China, provide clues to specify their origin in the deep Earth. At Mbuji-Mayi, pink sapphires have δ18O values in the range 4.3 to 5.4‰ (N = 10) with a mean of 4.9 ± 0.4‰, and rubies from 5.5 to 5.6‰ (N = 3). The Ga/Mg ratio of pink sapphires is between 1.9 and 3.9, and in rubies, between 0.6 and 2.6. The blue or yellow sapphires from Changle have δ18O values from 4.6 to 5.2 ‰, with a mean of 4.9 ± 0.2‰ (N = 9). The Ga/Mg ratio is between 5.7 and 11.3. The homogenous isotopic composition of ruby suggests a derivation from upper mantle xenoliths (garnet lherzolite, pyroxenite) or metagabbros and/or lower crustal garnet clinopyroxenite eclogite-type xenoliths included in kimberlites. Data from the pink sapphires from Mbuji-Mayi suggest a mantle origin, but different probable protoliths: either subducted oceanic protolith transformed into eclogite with δ18O values buffered to the mantle value, or clinopyroxenite protoliths in peridotite. The Changle sapphires have a mantle O-isotope signature. They probably formed in syenitic magmas produced by low degree partial melting of a spinel lherzolite source. The kimberlite and the alkali basalt acted as gem conveyors from the upper mantle up to the surface.

  6. Early and Late Alkali Igneous Pulses and a High-3He Plume Origin for the Deccan Flood Basalts.

    PubMed

    Basu, A R; Renne, P R; Dasgupta, D K; Teichmann, F; Poreda, R J

    1993-08-13

    Several alkalic igneous complexes of nephelinite-carbonatite affinities occur in extensional zones around a region of high heat flow and positive gravity anomaly within the continental flood basalt (CFB) province of Deccan, India. Biotites from two of the complexes yield (40)Ar/(39)Ar dates of 68.53 +/- 0.16 and 68.57 +/- 0.08 million years. Biotite from a third complex, which intrudes the flood basalts, yields an (40)Ar/(39)Ar date of 64.96 +/- 0.1 1 million years. The complexes thus represent early and late magmatism with respect to the main pulse of CFB volcanism 65 million years ago. Rocks from the older complexes show a (3)He/(4)He ratio of 14.0 times the air ratio, an initial (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratio of 0.70483, and other geochemical characteristics similar to ocean island basalts; the later alkalic pulse shows isotopic evidence of crustal contamination. The data document 3.5 million years of incubation of a primitive, high-(3)He mantle plume before the rapid eruption of the Deccan CFB. PMID:17783739

  7. Early and Late Alkali Igneous Pulses and a High-3He Plume Origin for the Deccan Flood Basalts.

    PubMed

    Basu, A R; Renne, P R; Dasgupta, D K; Teichmann, F; Poreda, R J

    1993-08-13

    Several alkalic igneous complexes of nephelinite-carbonatite affinities occur in extensional zones around a region of high heat flow and positive gravity anomaly within the continental flood basalt (CFB) province of Deccan, India. Biotites from two of the complexes yield (40)Ar/(39)Ar dates of 68.53 +/- 0.16 and 68.57 +/- 0.08 million years. Biotite from a third complex, which intrudes the flood basalts, yields an (40)Ar/(39)Ar date of 64.96 +/- 0.1 1 million years. The complexes thus represent early and late magmatism with respect to the main pulse of CFB volcanism 65 million years ago. Rocks from the older complexes show a (3)He/(4)He ratio of 14.0 times the air ratio, an initial (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratio of 0.70483, and other geochemical characteristics similar to ocean island basalts; the later alkalic pulse shows isotopic evidence of crustal contamination. The data document 3.5 million years of incubation of a primitive, high-(3)He mantle plume before the rapid eruption of the Deccan CFB.

  8. Silica- and LREE-enriched spinel peridotite xenoliths from the Quaternary intraplate alkali basalt, Jeju Island, South Korea: Old subarc fragments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Yonghoon; Yang, Kyounghee; Kil, Youngwoo; Yun, Sung-Hyo; Arai, Shoji

    2014-11-01

    Spinel harzburgite to lherzolite xenoliths are entrapped in Quaternary intraplate alkali basalts on Jeju Island, South Korea. These xenoliths are unusual in containing late-stage secondary orthopyroxene, free of deformation and exsolution that is replacing olivine as the main pervasive metasomatic mineral. These xenoliths are characterized by high Mg# in olivine, orthopyroxene, and clinopyroxene (89-93) and variable Cr# of spinel (9-53), representing residues left after variable degrees of melt extraction (~ 25%). In contrast to their depleted major-element compositions, clinopyroxenes in the xenoliths are enriched in most incompatible trace elements. Clinopyroxenes display enrichment in light rare earth elements (LREE) or spoon-shaped REE with a general enrichment in La over Ce, and depletion in high field strength elements (HFSE; e.g., Nb-Ta, Zr-Hf, Ti). Orthopyroxenes (either primary or secondary) are characterized by low TiO2, high Al2O3, and moderate CaO contents, and resemble those of sub-continental arc peridotites from the eastern Pacific. The geochemical evidence, in addition to the formation of secondary orthopyroxene, indicates that Jeju peridotite xenoliths have been subjected to different degrees of metasomatism by subduction-related silica- and LREE-enriched fluids (or melts). However, chemical equilibrium is evident between the primary and secondary orthopyroxene, implying that the duration of post-metasomatic high temperatures enabled complete resetting/reequilibration of the mineral compositions. The metasomatic enrichment pre-dates the host Jeju Quaternary magmatism, and a genetic relationship with the host magmas is considered unlikely. We therefore propose that the Jeju peridotite xenoliths went through a two-stage evolution, with their composition primarily controlled by early fractional melt extraction, which was subsequently modified by residual slab-derived fluids (or melts). Following enrichment in the peridotite protolith in the mantle

  9. Zygomycetes in Vesicular Basanites from Vesteris Seamount, Greenland Basin--A New Type of Cryptoendolithic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Peckmann, Jörn; Tehler, Anders; Broman, Curt; Bach, Wolfgang; Behrens, Katharina; Reitner, Joachim; Böttcher, Michael E; Norbäck Ivarsson, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Fungi have been recognized as a frequent colonizer of subseafloor basalt but a substantial understanding of their abundance, diversity and ecological role in this environment is still lacking. Here we report fossilized cryptoendolithic fungal communities represented by mainly Zygomycetes and minor Ascomycetes in vesicles of dredged volcanic rocks (basanites) from the Vesteris Seamount in the Greenland Basin. Zygomycetes had not been reported from subseafloor basalt previously. Different stages in zygospore formation are documented in the studied samples, representing a reproduction cycle. Spore structures of both Zygomycetes and Ascomycetes are mineralized by romanechite-like Mn oxide phases, indicating an involvement in Mn(II) oxidation to form Mn(III,VI) oxides. Zygospores still exhibit a core of carbonaceous matter due to their resistance to degradation. The fungi are closely associated with fossiliferous marine sediments that have been introduced into the vesicles. At the contact to sediment infillings, fungi produced haustoria that penetrated and scavenged on the remains of fragmented marine organisms. It is most likely that such marine debris is the main carbon source for fungi in shallow volcanic rocks, which favored the establishment of vital colonies.

  10. Zygomycetes in Vesicular Basanites from Vesteris Seamount, Greenland Basin – A New Type of Cryptoendolithic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Peckmann, Jörn; Tehler, Anders; Broman, Curt; Bach, Wolfgang; Behrens, Katharina; Reitner, Joachim; Böttcher, Michael E.; Norbäck Ivarsson, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Fungi have been recognized as a frequent colonizer of subseafloor basalt but a substantial understanding of their abundance, diversity and ecological role in this environment is still lacking. Here we report fossilized cryptoendolithic fungal communities represented by mainly Zygomycetes and minor Ascomycetes in vesicles of dredged volcanic rocks (basanites) from the Vesteris Seamount in the Greenland Basin. Zygomycetes had not been reported from subseafloor basalt previously. Different stages in zygospore formation are documented in the studied samples, representing a reproduction cycle. Spore structures of both Zygomycetes and Ascomycetes are mineralized by romanechite-like Mn oxide phases, indicating an involvement in Mn(II) oxidation to form Mn(III,VI) oxides. Zygospores still exhibit a core of carbonaceous matter due to their resistance to degradation. The fungi are closely associated with fossiliferous marine sediments that have been introduced into the vesicles. At the contact to sediment infillings, fungi produced haustoria that penetrated and scavenged on the remains of fragmented marine organisms. It is most likely that such marine debris is the main carbon source for fungi in shallow volcanic rocks, which favored the establishment of vital colonies. PMID:26181773

  11. Zygomycetes in Vesicular Basanites from Vesteris Seamount, Greenland Basin--A New Type of Cryptoendolithic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Peckmann, Jörn; Tehler, Anders; Broman, Curt; Bach, Wolfgang; Behrens, Katharina; Reitner, Joachim; Böttcher, Michael E; Norbäck Ivarsson, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Fungi have been recognized as a frequent colonizer of subseafloor basalt but a substantial understanding of their abundance, diversity and ecological role in this environment is still lacking. Here we report fossilized cryptoendolithic fungal communities represented by mainly Zygomycetes and minor Ascomycetes in vesicles of dredged volcanic rocks (basanites) from the Vesteris Seamount in the Greenland Basin. Zygomycetes had not been reported from subseafloor basalt previously. Different stages in zygospore formation are documented in the studied samples, representing a reproduction cycle. Spore structures of both Zygomycetes and Ascomycetes are mineralized by romanechite-like Mn oxide phases, indicating an involvement in Mn(II) oxidation to form Mn(III,VI) oxides. Zygospores still exhibit a core of carbonaceous matter due to their resistance to degradation. The fungi are closely associated with fossiliferous marine sediments that have been introduced into the vesicles. At the contact to sediment infillings, fungi produced haustoria that penetrated and scavenged on the remains of fragmented marine organisms. It is most likely that such marine debris is the main carbon source for fungi in shallow volcanic rocks, which favored the establishment of vital colonies. PMID:26181773

  12. Olivine and melt inclusion chemical constraints on the source of intracontinental basalts from the eastern North China Craton: Discrimination of contributions from the subducted Pacific slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-Yan; Xu, Yi-Gang; Ryan, Jeffrey G.; Huang, Xiao-Long; Ren, Zhong-Yuan; Guo, Hua; Ning, Zhen-Guo

    2016-04-01

    Contributions from fluid and melt inputs from the subducting Pacific slab to the chemical makeup of intraplate basalts erupted on the eastern Eurasian continent have long been suggested but have not thus far been geochemically constrained. To attempt to address this question, we have investigated Cenozoic basaltic rocks from the western Shandong and Bohai Bay Basin, eastern North China Craton (NCC), which preserve coherent relationships among the chemistries of their melt inclusions, their hosting olivines and their bulk rock compositions. Three groups of samples are distinguished: (1) high-Si and (2) moderate-Si basalts (tholeiites, alkali basalts and basanites) which were erupted at ∼23-20 Ma, and (3) low-Si basalts (nephelinites) which were erupted at <9 Ma. The high-Si basalts have lower alkalies, CaO and FeOT contents, lower trace element concentrations, lower La/Yb, Sm/Yb and Ce/Pb but higher Ba/Th ratios, and lower εNd and εHf values than the low-Si basalts. The olivines in the high-Si basalts have higher Ni and lower Mn and Ca at a given Fo value than those crystallizing from peridotite melts, and their corresponding melt inclusions have lower CaO contents than peridotite melts, suggesting a garnet pyroxenitic source. The magmatic olivines from low-Si basalts have lower Ni but higher Mn at a given Fo value than that of the high-Si basalts, suggesting more olivine in its source. The olivine-hosted melt inclusions of the low-Si basalts have major elemental signatures different from melts of normal peridotitic or garnet pyroxenitic mantle sources, pointing to their derivation from a carbonated mantle source consisting of peridotite and garnet pyroxenite. We propose a model involving the differential melting of a subduction-modified mantle source to account for the generation of these three suites of basalts. Asthenospheric mantle beneath the eastern NCC, which entrains garnet pyroxenite with an EM1 isotopic signature, was metasomatized by carbonatitic

  13. Kaersutite - a product of reaction between pargasite and basanite at Dish Hill, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilshire, H.G.; Calk, L.C.; Schwarzman, E.C.

    1971-01-01

    Paragasitic amphibole, occurring interstitially and as veins in peridotite inclusions in basanite, has reacted with the host basanite to form kaersutitic amphibole. The amphibole compositions vary with respect to distance from the edge of the xenolith; iron, titanium, and potassium contents are higher and magnesium, silicon, sodium, and chromium contents are lower closer to the basanite. Pargasite was exposed to the basanite when peridotite blocks broke open along amphibole veins during transport to the surface. Small amphibole fragments isolated in the basanite show the most reaction; compositional gradients in interstitial and vein amphibole are steep into peridotite inclusions where the amphibole was shielded from reaction. The compositions of amphiboles so modified have no direct bearing on high pressure fractionation trends if the amphibole is cognate, or on the bulk composition of the upper mantle if it is accidental. ?? 1971.

  14. Flow in the shallow mantle in the westernmost Mediterranean: insights from xenoliths in Plio-Pleistocene alkali basalts from the eastern Betic Cordillera (SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konc, Zoltán; Hidas, Károly; Garrido, Carlos J.; Tommasi, Andréa; Vauchez, Alain; Padrón Navarta, José Alberto; Marchesi, Claudio; Acosta-Vigil, Antonio; Szabó, Csaba; Varas-Reus, Maria Isabel

    2016-04-01

    Peridotite mantle xenoliths in Plio-Pleistocene alkali basalts of the eastern Betic Cordillera (Cartagena area, Murcia, SE Spain) provide a snapshot of the structure and composition of the lithospheric mantle at the northern limb of the Alpine Betic-Rif arched belt in the westernmost Mediterranean. The xenoliths are spinel and plagioclase lherzolite with minor harzburgite and wehrlite, displaying porphyroclastic to equigranular textures. Regardless of composition and texture, the Crystal Preferred Orientation (CPO) of olivine shows an axial-[100] pattern characterized by a strong alignment of [100]-axes near or parallel to the peridotite lineation and a girdle distribution of [010]-axes with a maximum normal to the peridotite foliation. This CPO pattern is consistent with ductile deformation accommodated by dislocation creep with dominant activation of the high temperature {0kl}[100] olivine slip system, indicative of deformation by simple shear or combinations of simple shear and pure shear with a transtensional component. Calculated seismic properties are characterized by fast propagation of P-waves and polarization of fast S-waves parallel to olivine [100]-axis, indicating the flow direction. SKS and Pn anisotropy in the eastern Betics can be explained by a lithospheric mantle peridotite with similar fabric to the one displayed by the studied mantle xenoliths. Considering the limited thickness of the mantle lithosphere in the Betics (40-80 km), the measured azimuths and delays of SKS waves in the eastern Betics are consistent with a steeply dipping mantle foliation and a subhorizontal lineation with ENE strike. This geometry of the lithospheric fabrics implies active or frozen mantle flow with a dominantly strike-slip component subparallel to the paleo-Iberian margin. Synkinematic overprinting of mineral assemblages from the garnet-spinel to the plagioclase facies demonstrates 36-40 km uplift continuously accommodated by ductile shear thinning of the

  15. Orthopyroxene-enrichment in the lherzolite-websterite xenolith suite from Paleogene alkali basalts of the Poiana Ruscă Mountains (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nédli, Zsuzsanna; Szabó, Csaba; Dégi, Júlia

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present the petrography and geochemistry of a recently collected lherzolite-websterite xenolith series and of clinopyroxene xenocrysts, hosted in Upper Cretaceous-Paleogene basanites of Poiana Ruscă (Romania), whose xenoliths show notable orthopyroxene-enrichment. In the series a slightly deformed porphyroclastic-equigranular textured series could represent the early mantle characteristics, and in many cases notable orthopyroxene growth and poikilitic texture formation was observed. The most abundant mantle lithology, Type A xenoliths have high Al and Na-contents but low mg# of the pyroxenes and low cr# of spinel suggesting a low degree (< 10 %) of mafic melt removal. They are also generally poor in overall REE-s (rare earth elements) and have flat REY (rare earth elements+ Y) patterns with slight LREE-depletion. The geochemistry of the Type A xenoliths and calculated melt composition in equilibrium with the xenolith clinopyroxenes suggests that the percolating melt causing the poikilitization can be linked to a mafic, Al-Na-rich, volatile-poor melt and show similarity with the Late Cretaceous-Paleogene (66-72 Ma) subduction-related andesitic magmatism of Poiana Ruscă. Type B xenoliths, with their slightly different chemistry, suggest that, after the ancient depletion, the mantle went through a slight metasomatic event. A subsequent passage of mafic melts in the mantle, with similar compositions to the older andesitic magmatism of Poiana Ruscă, is recorded in the pyroxenites (Fe-rich xenoliths), whereas the megacrysts seem to be cogenetic with the host basanite. The Poiana Ruscă xenoliths differ from the orthopyroxene-enriched mantle xenoliths described previously from the Carpathian-Pannonian Region and from the Dacia block.

  16. Petrology of ultramafic, mafic, and felsic xenoliths from Ruddon's Point basanite, Fife, Scotland, UK - preliminary results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobczak, Paweł; Matusiak-Malek, Magdalena; Puziewicz, Jacek; Upton, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Numerous dykes of Carboniferous alkaline volcanic rocks occur in the county of Fife, Scotland, United Kingdom. Basanitic dyke from Ruddon's Point encloses mafic, ultramafic, and felsic xenoliths as well as megacryts of alkali feldspar and xenoliths of felsic rocks. The studied set of rocks comprises wehrlite, clinopyroxenites, gabbro, anorthosite, and anorthoclasite. Wehrlite contains pseudomorphs after biotite, the Mg# of clinopyroxene varies from 0.78 to 0.81, the Fo content in olivine is 0.68-0.71. Clinopyroxenites have cumulative textures and are typically olivine± sulfides bearing. Most of them contained biotite which is now replaced by brownish aggregates formed of chlorite with scarce biotite intergrowths. The Mg# of clinopyroxene (Al, Ti - augite) varies from 0.77 to 0.84. The Fo content in olivine is 0.81-0.85 in plagioclase-free clinopyroxenites, but in xenolith where minor amounts of plagioclase (Ab48-51An47-48) occur, the Fo content is 0.70 - 0.72. Biotite's Mg# is ~70%. Gabbro is titanite-bearing and contains trace amounts of amphibole. Diopside forming the gabbro is characterized by Mg#=0.56-0.64, plagioclase is potassium-free (Ab14-22An77-86). Anorthosite also encloses brownish post-biotitic aggregates. Plagioclase has composition of Ab35-43An54-64. Anorthoclasite (Or65-72 Ab65-72) is characterized by unusual mineral composition - it contains corundum, zircon, apatite, and niobates. Previous study on the felsic xenoliths from Scotland showed their lower crustal origin, but with possible ultramafic affinity (e.g. Upton et al., 2009, Min.Mag., 73, 943-956). Crystallization from met- and peraluminous melts was also suggested. Mantle-derived xenoliths from Scotland are from almost primitive to strongly depleted (Upton et al.; 2010, J. Geol. Soc. London, 168, 873-886), but more data from individual localities are necessary for precise description and interpretation of mantle and lower crustal processes beneath Scotland. This study was possible thanks to

  17. Rare Earth and HFSE Constraints on Basalt Source Regions and Melting Conditions in the Garibaldi Volcanic Belt, Northern Cascadia Subduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, N. L.

    2002-12-01

    Garibaldi belt (GVB) basalts were erupted above the relatively young (<24 Ma) Juan de Fuca plate, subducted oceanic lithosphere that becomes progressively younger (22-13 Ma), and presumably hotter, northward along the Cascadia convergent margin. Mafic lavas of the 15-km-wide volcanic belt range from high-alumina olivine tholeiites and magnesian andesites near Glacier Peak, northwestern Washington, through transitional basalts to alkali-olivine basalts and basanites in the Bridge River-Salal Glacier areas, southwestern British Columbia. Significant strike-parallel variations characterize REE and HFSE contents of these (GVB) basalts and provide insight into the nature of mantle source heterogeneities that may characterize subduction regimes. Lavas of more northerly volcanic suites tend to have (1) somewhat higher Ti, Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf, La, total REE, La/Yb, Sm/Yb, Nb/Y, Zr/Y, Y/Sc and Zr/Yb and (2) lower Th/U, La/Nb, and Th/Yb. The basalts have sub-chondritic to chondritic Na/Tb (6-21) and chondritic to super-chondritic Zr/Hf (up to 55.90) ratios. Only Mount Baker and Glacier Peak basalts exhibit the distinctive negative Na-Ta anomalies associated with arc lavas. REE systematics suggest that the more northerly basaltic suites formed as lower degree melts of mantle sources typically containing 1) garnet + spinel peridotite rather than spinel peridotite and 2) slightly more garnet (4% versus 2%) than in garnet-bearing source regions beneath more southerly eruptive centers. Inverse REE modeling suggests that the Bridge River-Salal Glacier lavas may have been derived from at least two distinct source regions (garnet-bearing and garnet-free). Nb/Ta exhibits slight positive correlations with Nb, Ta, La/Yb, and Th/Yb in some GVB basaltic suites, implying the role of a residual mineral, most likely rutile, in controlling extremely low HFSE partitioning into suduction-related fluids that equilibrated with basalt source regions in the mantle wedge.

  18. Major, trace element, and isotopic compositions of Vietnamese basalts: Interaction of hydrous EM1-rich asthenosphere with thinned Eurasian lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoang; Flower, Martin F. J.; Carlson, Richard W.

    1996-11-01

    Intraplate magmatism affected much of Indochina following the mid-Miocene cessation of South China Sea opening. Thick basalt plateaus formed on accreted terrains of varying age as extensional fractures were reactivated following the Indo-Eurasian collision. The basalts are part of a diffuse igneous province affecting much of eastern and southeastern Asia and western Pacific marginal basins. Most Indochina basalt centers comprise two eruptive episodes, an early (lower) series of high-Si0 2, low-FeO ∗ quartz and olivine tholeiites, tapping a relatively-refractory, lithospheric mantle-type source, and a later (upper) series of low-SiO 2, high-FeO ∗ olivine tholeiites, alkali basalts, and basanites, tapping a fertile, asthenospheric source. This pattern is observed elsewhere in the region (e.g., Hainan Island) and resembles several continental flood basalt provinces. While some crustal contamination is suggested, incompatible trace element and strontium, neodymium, and lead isotopic compositions reflect secular changes from the inferred lithospheric to asthenospheric reservoirs. Lower Series basalts reflect hybrids of 206Pb/204Pb- rich EM2 and N-MORB reservoirs, with high K2O/P 2O5 and low Rb/Sr and Ba/Nb ratios, consistent with the involvement of lithospheric mantle. In contrast, Upper Series basalts show lower K2O/P 2O5 and higher Rb/Sr and Ba/Nb ratios and reflect hybrids of 206Pb/204Pb- poor EM1 and N-MORB sources. These resemble anomalous (A) -MORB compositions that are typical of eastern/southeastern Asian and western Pacific marginal basin asthenosphere. Despite its resemblance to Indian Ocean (I-) MORB, A-MORB "plum-pudding" asthenosphere may be explained in terms of an endogenous Asian model whereby EM1-rich subcratonic lithosphere was entrained by asthenosphere extruded by the Indo-Eurasian collision. This model is consistent with the restriction of diffuse regional magmatism to the late Cenozoic (i.e., following tectonic extrusion), evidence for shallow

  19. Major, trace element, and isotopic compositions of Vietnamese basalts: Interaction of hydrous EM1-rich asthenosphere with thinned Eurasian lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Nguyen; Flower, Martin F. J.; Carlson, Richard W.

    1996-11-01

    Intraplate magmatism affected much of Indochina following the mid-Miocene cessation of South China Sea opening. Thick basalt plateaus formed on accreted terrains of varying age as extensional fractures were reactivated following the Indo-Eurasian collision. The basalts are part of a diffuse igneous province affecting much of eastern and southeastern Asia and western Pacific marginal basins. Most Indochina basalt centers comprise two eruptive episodes, an early (lower) series of high-Si0 2, low-FeO * quartz and olivine tholeiites, tapping a relatively-refractory, lithospheric mantle-type source, and a later (upper) series of low-SiO 2, high-FeO * olivine tholeiites, alkali basalts, and basanites, tapping a fertile, asthenospheric source. This pattern is observed elsewhere in the region (e.g., Hainan Island) and resembles several continental flood basalt provinces. While some crustal contamination is suggested, incompatible trace element and strontium, neodymium, and lead isotopic compositions reflect secular changes from the inferred lithospheric to asthenospheric reservoirs. Lower Series basalts reflect hybrids of 206Pb/ 204Pb-rich EM2 and N-MORB reservoirs, with high K 2O/P 2O 5 and low Rb/Sr and Ba/Nb ratios, consistent with the involvement of lithospheric mantle. In contrast, Upper Series basalts show lower K 2O/P 2O 5 and higher Rb/Sr and Ba/Nb ratios and reflect hybrids of 206Pb/ 204Pb-poor EM1 and N-MORB sources. These resemble anomalous (A) -MORB compositions that are typical of eastern/southeastern Asian and western Pacific marginal basin asthenosphere. Despite its resemblance to Indian Ocean (I-) MORB, A-MORB “plum-pudding” asthenosphere may be explained in terms of an endogenous Asian model whereby EM1-rich subcratonic lithosphere was entrained by asthenosphere extruded by the Indo-Eurasian collision. This model is consistent with the restriction of diffuse regional magmatism to the late Cenozoic (i.e., following tectonic extrusion), evidence for

  20. Very high potassium (VHK) basalt - Complications in mare basalt petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, J. W.; Taylor, L. A.; Laul, J. C.; Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    The first comprehensive report on the petrology and geochemistry of Apollo 14 VHK (Very High Potassium) basalts and their implications for lunar evolution is presented. The reported data are most consistent with the hypothesis that VHK basalts formed through the partial assimilation of granite by a normal low-Ti, high-Al mare basalt magma. Assimilation was preceded by the diffusion-controlled exchange of alkalis and Ba between basalt magma and the low-temperature melt fraction of the granite. Hypotheses involving volatile/nonvolatile fractionations or long-term enrichment of the source regions in K are inconsistent with the suprachondritic Ba/La ratios and low initial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios of VHK basalt. An important implication of this conclusion is that granite should be a significant component of the lunar crust at the Apollo 14 site.

  1. Petrogenesis of basaltic volcanic rocks from the Pribilof Islands, Alaska, by melting of metasomatically enriched depleted lithosphere, crystallization differentiation, and magma mixing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, J.M.; Feeley, T.C.; Deraps, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    The Pribilof Islands, Alaska, are located in the Bering Sea in a continental intraplate setting. In this study we examine the petrology and geochemistry of volcanic rocks from St. Paul (0??54-0??003 Ma) and St. George (2??8-1??4 Ma) Islands, the two largest Pribilof Islands. Rocks from St. George can be divided into three groups: group 1 is a high-MgO, low-SiO. 2 suite composed primarily of basanites; group 2 is a high-MgO, high-SiO 2 suite consisting predominantly of alkali basalts; group 3 is an intermediate- to low-MgO suite that includes plagioclase-phyric subalkali basalts and hawaiites. Major and trace element geochemistry suggests that groups 1 and 2 formed by small-degree partial melting of amphibole-bearing to amphibole-free garnet peridotite. Group 1 rocks were the earliest melts produced from the most hydrous parts of the mantle, as they show the strongest geochemical signature of amphibole in their source. The suite of rocks from St. Paul ranges from 14??4 to 4??2 wt % MgO at relatively constant SiO 2 contents (43??1-47??3 wt %). The most primitive St. Paul rocks are modeled as mixtures between magmas with compositions similar to groups 1 and 2 from St. George Island, which subsequently fractionated olivine, clinopyroxene, and spinel to form more evolved rocks. Plagioclase-phyric group 3 rocks from St. George are modeled as mixtures between an evolved melt similar to the evolved magmas on St. Paul and a fractionated group 2 end-member from St. George. Mantle potential temperatures estimated for primitive basanites and alkali basalts are ???1400??C and are similar to those of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB). Similarly, 87Sr/. 86Sr and 143Nd/. 144Nd values for all rocks are MORB-like, in the range of 0??702704-0??703035 and 0??513026-0??513109, respectively. 208Pb/. 204Pb vs 206Pb/. 204Pb values lie near the MORB end-member but show a linear trend towards HIMU (high time-integrated 238U/. 204Pb). Despite isotopic similarities to MORB, many of the major and

  2. Megacrystic Clinopyroxene Basalts Sample A Deep Crustal Underplate To The Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. E.; Schrader, C. M.; Crumpler, L. S.; Wolff, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The alkaline and compositionally diverse (basanite to high-Si rhyolite) Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF), New Mexico comprises 4 regions that cover ~75 x 40 km2: (1) Mount Taylor, a large composite volcano and a surrounding field of basaltic vents; (2) Grants Ridge, constructed of topaz rhyolitic ignimbrite and coulees; (3) Mesa Chivato, a plateau of alkali basalts and mugearitic to trachytic domes; and (4) the Rio Puero basaltic necks. Distributed throughout its history (~3.6 to 1.26 Ma; Crumpler and Goff, 2012) and area (excepting Rio Puerco Necks) is a texturally distinct family of differentiated basalts (Mg# 43.2-53.4). These basalts contain resorbed and moth-eaten megacrysts (up to 2 cm) of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and olivine ±Ti-magnetite ±ilmenite ±rare orthopyroxene. Some megacrystic lava flows have gabbroic cumulate inclusions with mineral compositions similar to the megacrysts, suggesting a common origin. For instance, gabbroic and megacrystic clinopyroxenes form linear positive arrays in TiO2 (0.2-2.3 wt%) with respect to Al2O3 (0.7-9.3 wt%). The lowest Al clinopyroxenes are found in a gabbroic inclusion and are associated with partially melted intercumulus orthopyroxene. Megacrystic and gabbroic plagioclase (An 41-80) in 4 representative thin sections were analyzed for 87Sr/86Sr by Laser Ablation ICP-MS. 87Sr/86Sr values for the suite range from 0.7036 to 0.7047. The low 87Sr/86Sr plagioclases (0.7036 to 0.7037) are associated with high Ti-Al clinopyroxenes. Likewise, the higher 87Sr/86Sr plagioclases (0.7043 to 0.7047) are associated with the low-Al clinopyroxenes. Taken together, these megacrysts track the differentiation of an intrusive body (or related bodies) from alkaline to Si-saturated conditions by fractional crystallization and crustal assimilation. The intrusive body likely underplates portions of the MTVF that have generated silicic magmas (Mount Taylor, Grants Ridge, Mesa Chivato). Although disequilibrium is implied by resorbed

  3. Apatite intergrowths in clinopyroxene megacrysts from the Ostrzyca Proboszczowicka (SW Poland) basanite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipa, Danuta; Puziewicz, Jacek; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena

    2015-04-01

    The Cenozoic basanite from the Ostrzyca Proboszczowicka in Lower Silesia (SW Poland) belongs to numerous lavas occurring in the NE part of the Central European Volcanic Province. Basanite contains clinopyroxene megacrysts up to 3 cm in size. The clinopyroxene has the composition of aluminian-sodian diopside (mg# 0.61-0.70, 0.08-0.12 atoms Na pfu and 0.88-0.93 atoms Ca pfu). Cr is absent. The REE contents are above the primitive mantle reaching up to 18 x PM at Nd. Primitive-mantle normalized REE patterns show enrichment in LREE relative to HREE (LaN/LuN=3.81-5.01). The REE patterns of all the megacrysts show deflection in La-Nd. The trace element patterns are characterized by positive Zr, Hf and in some cases also Ta anomalies, and negative U, La, Sr, Ti and Pb ones. In some samples strong depletion (down to 0.01 x PM) in Rb and Ba is observed.The Ostrzyca megacrysts formed cumulate, which crystallized from magma similar to the host basanite, but more fractionated and enriched in REE, particularly in LREE (Lipa et al., 2014). This happened at mid-crustal depths (10-15 km) and the new pulse of basanitic magma entrained the crystals forming the non-solidified cumulate and brought them to the surface (Lipa et al., 2014). Clinopyroxene megacrysts contain large, transparent, euhedral apatite crystals up to 7 mm. The major element composition indicates the fluor-apatite with F content ranging from 0.87 to 1.93 wt.%. Chlorine content is strongly variable between grains (0.05-1.75 wt.%). Apatite is strongly enriched in LREE relative to HREE (LaN/LuN=60.39-62.23, about 1000 x PM for LREE and about 10 x PM for HREE). The REE patterns are nearly linear, with slight positive Nd and Gd anomalies. The trace element patterns are characterized by very strong negative anomalies of HFSE (Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf, Ti) and Pb, and weaker negative Sr anomaly. Concentration of Yb and Lu is on the level 10 x PM, whereas Rb, Hf and Ti are depleted relative to PM. Apatite preceded clinopyroxene

  4. Melt inclusion study of the most recent basanites from El Hierro and Lanzarote, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Ulla, Alejandra; Sigmarsson, Olgeir; Huertas, Maria Jose; Ancochea, Eumenio

    2015-04-01

    The latest eruptions of both Lanzarote (one of the oldest and easternmost of the Canary Island archipelago) and El Hierro (the youngest and westernmost) produced basanite lavas. Major, volatile and trace element concentrations of melt inclusion (MI) hosted in olivine for both eruptions have been analysed. The basanites display primitive mantle normalized trace element spectra suggesting a magma source largely composed of recycled oceanic crust. In addition, beneath Lanzarote an interaction with a carbonatitic fluid phase or metasome would explain eccentric Ba/U and other trace element ratios. Contribution of carbonatitic component would readily account for extremely volatile-rich (Cl, F, S) MI from Lanzarote (Cl=1577-2500 ppm) whereas the maximum for El Hierro is 1080 ppm. The submarine character of the 2011-12 eruption off El Hierro appears to have affected the degassing behavior, whereas estimated sulfur emission to the atmosphere during the historical Lanzarote eruptions are amongst the highest observed so far. An estimated magma volume (VDRE) of 0.02 km3 yields atmospheric mass loading of 0.2 Mt SO2 from the 1824 Lanzarote eruption. Scaling the volume of the 1824 Lanzarote eruption to that of the previous Timanfaya eruption (1730-6; 5 km3) results in estimated 12 Mt SO2, an atmospheric mass loading only outnumbered by the historical Laki and Eldgjá eruptions in Iceland. The significantly greater volatile budget of basanites from Lanzarote compared to El Hierro is thus controlled by more fertile source composition closer to the African continent.

  5. Continental Basaltic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, G. L.

    2003-12-01

    During the past few decades, geochemical studies of continental basaltic rocks and their petrologic kin have become mainstays of studies of the continental lithosphere. These igneous rocks have taken on such an important role largely because the chemical and isotopic composition of continental basaltic rocks and their mantle (see Chapter 2.05) and crustal xenoliths (see Chapter 3.01) provide the best proxy record available to earth scientists for the chemical and physical evolution of the deep continental lithosphere and underlying mantle, areas that are otherwise resistant to direct study. Keeping this in mind, the primary goal of this chapter is to illustrate how geochemical data can be used both to assess the origin of these rocks and to study the evolution of the continental lithosphere.A complete overview of continental basaltic rocks will not be attempted here, because continental "basalts" come in too wide a range of compositions, and because of the sheer volume of geochemical data available for such rocks worldwide. The scope of the chapter is limited to a discussion of a select group of ultramafic to mafic composition "intraplate" continental igneous rocks consisting primarily of kimberlites, potassic and sodic alkali basalts, and continental flood basalts. Igneous rocks forming at active continental margins, such as convergent or transform plate margins, are important examples of continental magmatism but are not directly discussed here (convergent margin magmas are discussed in Chapters 2.11, 3.11, and 3.18). The geochemistry of intraplate igneous rocks of the ocean basins are covered in Chapters 2.04 and 3.16. Although basaltic magmatism has occurred throughout the Earths history, the majority of the examples presented here are from Mesozoic and Cenozoic volcanic fields due to the more complete preservation of younger continental mafic igneous rocks. While considerable effort has been expended in studying the chemical differentiation of mafic magmas

  6. Geochemical characteristics of the Cenozoic basaltic rocks, Northwestern Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saif, S. I.; Shah, S. M. A.

    1992-02-01

    In northwestern Saudi Arabia, an area of about 15 200 km is intermittently covered by basaltic rocks representing Cenozoic, intraplate continental volcanism. The present study is focused on the geochemical characteristics of these rocks, which are distinguished on the basis of field occurrences into three suites: 1. layered basalt (LB), 2. fragmented basalt (FB), and 3. cinder-cone material (CM), with varied ages. The rocks are olivine normative, belonging to the basanite-picrite-ankaramite series, with sodic and potassic varieties. A high degree of ferromagnesian fractionation and some compositional layering in the magma chamber are concluded. Crustal contamination indicated by some trace elements, progressively decreases with age, and hence, is interpreted as time dependent.

  7. Influence of slab thermal structure on basalt source regions and melting conditions: REE and HFSE constraints from the Garibaldi volcanic belt, northern Cascadia subduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Nathan L.

    2006-03-01

    Garibaldi volcanic belt (GVB) basalts were erupted above the relatively young (≤ 24 Ma) Juan de Fuca plate, which comprises the subducted oceanic lithosphere that becomes progressively younger (22-13 Ma), and presumably hotter, northward along the northern Cascadia convergent margin. Primitive and near-primitive mafic lavas of the 15-km-wide volcanic belt change from high-alumina olivine tholeiites and magnesian andesites near Glacier Peak, northwestern Washington, through transitional basalts to alkali-olivine basalts and basanites in the Bridge River-Salal Glacier areas, southwestern British Columbia. The distribution of different basalt types is consistent with varied source conditions imposed by differences in the thermal structure of the underlying subducted plate. Significant arc-parallel variations characterize REE and HFSE contents in GVB basalts and suggest that source enrichment processes and melting conditions vary within the mantle wedge as the age and thermal state of the underlying subducted plate changes. More northerly GVB basaltic suites tend to have higher TiO 2, Nb, Ta, total REE, La, Sm / Yb, Nb / Yb, Ti / V, Y / Sc and Zr / Yb and lower Th / U, Zr / Ti and Zr / Nb than their southern counterparts. The basalts have sub-chondritic to chondritic Nb / Ta (6-21) and super-chondritic Zr / Hf (up to 55.90) ratios that exhibit positive correlation. Only Mount Baker and Glacier Peak basalts exhibit the distinctive negative Nb-Ta anomalies associated with arc lavas. Inter-HFSE and REE fractionations (including La / Yb, La / Nb and Ce / Pb) show significant correlations with the inferred age of the underlying subducted plate. Proportions of slab-derived HFSE-REE components (SC) transferred to basalt sources in the Cascadia mantle wedge appear to vary from negligible (Ti, Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf, Y, Sm, Eu and Tb: less than 15% SC) to perceptible (Nd: up to 35% SC) through moderate (La: up to 75% SC) to substantial (U, Th and Pb: up to 95% SC). Arc-parallel HFSE

  8. 87Sr 86Sr ratios for basalt from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.

    1983-01-01

    87Sr 86Sr ratios of 15 samples of basalt dredged from Loihi Seamount range from 0.70334 to 0.70368. The basalt types range from tholeiite to basanite in composition and can be divided into six groups on the basis of abundances of K2O, Na2O, Rb and Sr and 87Sr 86Sr ratio. The isotopic data require that the various basalt types be derived from source regions differing in Sr isotopic composition. The Loihi basalts may be produced by mixing of isotopically distinct sources, but the tholeiites and alkalic basalts from Loihi do not show a well-developed inverse trend between Rb/Sr and 87Sr 86Sr that is characteristic of the later stages of Hawaiian volcanoes such as Haleakala and Koolau. ?? 1983.

  9. Composition of basalts from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, A.E.J.; Engel, C.G.

    1964-01-01

    Studies of volcanic rocks in dredge hauls from the submerged parts of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge suggest that it consists largely of tholeiitic basalt with low values of K, Ti, and P. In contrast, the volcanic islands which form the elevated caps on the Ridge are built of alkali basalt with high values of Ti, Fe3+, P, Na, and K. This distinct correlation between the form of the volcanic structures, elevation above the sea floor, and composition suggests that the islands of alkali basalt are derived from a parent tholeiitic magma by differentiation in shallow reservoirs. The volume of low-potassium tholeiites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and elsewhere in the oceans appears to be many times that of the alkali basalts exposed on oceanic islands. Tholeiitic basalts with about 0.2 K2O appear to be the primary and predominant magma erupted on the oceanic floor.

  10. Petrology and geochemistry of Cenozoic intra-plate basalts in east-central China: Constraints on recycling of an oceanic slab in the source region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Qing; Ma, Chang-Qian; Robinson, Paul T.

    2016-10-01

    Cenozoic mafic rocks in Jiangsu and Anhui Provinces, east-central China are chiefly basanites and alkali olivine basalts with subordinate tholeiites, which were erupted in three stages; Paleogene, Neogene and Quaternary. The rocks become increasingly alkaline as they become younger. On a primitive mantle-normalized multi-element plot, these lavas exhibit typical OIB-like trace element patterns, including enrichment in most incompatible elements (LILE and HFSE) and negative K and Pb anomalies. The compositions of the mafic rocks indicate that they were derived from a mantle source mainly containing clinopyroxene and garnet, most probably a mixture of pyroxenite/eclogite and peridotite. A mineral equilibrium projection shows that all the mafic magmas were produced at pressures of 3-4 GPa, implying an asthenospheric origin. Their positive Ba and Sr anomalies and relatively high 87Sr/86Sr ratios suggest derivation from an EM1-type mantle source. However, poor correlations between 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd indicate an isotopically heterogeneous source for the magmas, including DMM, EM1 and EM2, representing mantle peridotite, recycled ancient oceanic crust and seafloor sedimentary rocks, respectively. Variable correlations between 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ratios, CaO-MgO contents and Eu/Eu* and Ce/Ce* anomalies with rock type imply that marine sediments (plus variable amounts of oceanic crust) and peridotites were the dominant source lithologies of the basanites, whereas recycled oceanic crust (pyroxenite/eclogite) was the main source of the weakly alkaline basalts. This hypothesis is supported by seismic tomographic images of the mantle beneath the region, which show the presence of a stagnant subducted slab in the mantle transition zone. Thus, we propose a petrological model in which a hybrid magma column originated from the mantle transition zone and assimilated some of the overlying peridotite during upwelling, to become the parental magmas of these mafic rocks

  11. Neogene to Quaternary basalts of the Jabal Eghei (Nuqay) area (south Libya): Two distinct volcanic events or continuous volcanism with gradual shift in magma composition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radivojević, Maša; Toljić, Marinko; Turki, Salah M.; Bojić, Zoran; Šarić, Kristina; Cvetković, Vladica

    2015-02-01

    This study reports and discusses a set of new K/Ar age and new petrochemical data on basalts of the Jabal Eghei (Nuqay) area (south Libya). This area is part of a > 1000 km long NNW-SSE Libyan volcanic field that stretches from the Mediterranean coastal near Tripoli to the Tibesti massif in Chad. Whole rock K/Ar ages, stratigraphy, volcanology and rock petrochemistry indicate that the Jabal Eghei developed during two volcanic events. The first occurred from the Middle Miocene to the Pliocene (K/Ar ages from ~ 16 to ~ 5 Ma) when large volumes of low aspect ratio lava flows of transitional basalts formed. The second event happened in Pliocene-mid-Pleistocene time (4-≤ 1 Ma) and it gave rise to basanite spatter to scoria pyroclastic cones and subordinate lava flow facies. The transitional basalts are less primitive and less enriched in incompatible trace elements than the basanites. Petrochemical characteristics reveal that the transitional basalts underwent weak to moderate olivine-dominated fractionation and that crustal assimilation had negligible effects. REE geochemical modeling shows that primary magmas of both transitional basalts and basanites formed by melting of a similar garnet-bearing, primitive mantle-like source with degree of melting of 3-5% and ≤ 1%, respectively. It is also demonstrated that the transitional basalts show systematic compositional changes in time because progressively younger rocks are petrochemically more similar to basanites. We argue that our data definitely prove that the age pattern along the entire Libyan volcanic field is much more complex than it was thought before.

  12. Various origins of clinopyroxene megacrysts from basanites from the eastern part of Central European Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipa, Danuta; Puziewicz, Jacek; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Kukuła, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Clinopyroxene megacrysts up to few centimetres in size occur in Cenozoic alkaline lavas forming the north-eastern part of Central European Volcanic Province in Lower Silesia (SW Poland). The megacrysts occur, among other, in the Miocene basanite from Ostrzyca Proboszczowicka (bulk rock mg# 0.65-0.66) and in that from Lutynia (Pliocene, K-Ar age: 4.56 +/- 0.2 Ma; Birkenmajer et al. 2002; bulk rock mg# 0.64). The megacrysts typically consist of homogeneous core surrounded by patchy and spongy mantle, which is covered by a thin outermost rim of composition similar to that of the groundmass clinopyroxene occurring in the host basanite. The mantles of the megacrysts have been affected by melting, whereas the cores preserve their primary composition. We compare the core parts of megacrysts in the following. The Ostrzyca clinopyroxene megacrysts contain euhedral apatite intergrowths. The clinopyroxene has the composition of Fe-rich diopside (mg# = 0.61 - 0.70), contain significant sodium (to 0.12 a pfu) and are calcium rich (0.89-0.92 a pfu). The Lutynia megacrysts have the composition of augite and diopside (mg# 0.80-0.83). The sodium content is also high (to 0.12 a pfu), but calcium varies from 0.68 to 0.77 a pfu. The REE concentrations for Lutynia (1-10 x PM) are lower relative to Ostrzyca, enriched 10-100 times relative to PM. In both sites the megacrysts are strongly enriched in LREE relative to HREE and TE are characterized by positive Th, La and Ce anomalies, slight negative Sr and Y anomalies and strong Pb anomaly in the PM normalised patterns. The megacrysts from Ostrzyca reveal slight negative Ti and strong positive Zr and Hf anomalies, whereas those Lutynia have negative Zr anomaly and Ti anomaly is absent. Major and trace element composition shows that the megacrysts from Ostrzyca formed as coarse-grained cumulate at significant depth (lower crust?) from the LREE enriched alkaline melt. That melt was very rich in phosphorous which enabled its saturation in

  13. Age and petrology of the Kalaupapa Basalt, Molokai, Hawaii ( geochemistry, Sr isotopes).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    The post-erosional Kalaupapa Basalt on East Molokai, Hawaii, erupted between 0.34 and 0.57 million years ago to form the Kalaupapa Peninsula. The Kalaupapa Basalt ranges in composition from basanite to lava transitional between alkalic and tholeiitic basalt. Rare-earth and other trace-element abundances suggest that the Kalaupapa Basalt could be generated by 11-17% partial melting of a light-REE-enriched source like that from which the post-erosional lavas of the Honolulu Group on Oahu were generated by 2-11% melting. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the lavas range from 0.70320 to 0.70332, suggesting that the variation in composition mainly reflects variation in the melting process rather than heterogeneity of sources. The length of the period of volcanic quiescence that preceded eruption of post-erosional lavas in the Hawaiian Islands decreased as volcanism progressed from Kauai toward Kilauea. - Authors

  14. Submarine basalt from the Revillagigedo Islands region, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.

    1970-01-01

    Ocean-floor dredging and submarine photography in the Revillagigedo region off the west coast of Mexico reveal that the dominant exposed rock of the submarine part of the large island-forming volcanoes (Roca Partida and San Benedicto) is a uniform alkali pillow basalt; more siliceous rocks are exposed on the upper, subaerial parts of the volcanoes. Basalts dredged from smaller seamounts along the Clarion fracture zone south of the Revillagigedo Islands are tholeiitic pillow basalts. Pillows of alkali basalts are more vesicular than Hawaiian tholeiitic pillows collected from the same depths. This difference probably reflects a higher original volatile content of the alkali basalts. Manganese-iron oxide nodules common in several dredge hauls generally contain nucleii of rhyolitic pumice or basalt pillow fragments. The pumice floated to its present site from subaerial eruptions, became waterlogged and sank, and was then coated with manganese-iron oxides. The thickness of palagonite rinds on the glassy pillow fragments is proportional to the thickness of manganese-iron oxide layers, and both are a measure of the age of the nodule. Both oldest basalts (10-100 m.y.) and youngest (less than 1 m.y.) are along the Clarion fracture zone, whereas basalts from Roca Partida and San Benedicto volcanoes are of intermediate age. ?? 1970.

  15. Petrology and isotopic composition of Quaternary basanites dredged from the Bering Sea continental margin near Navarin Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, A.S.; Gunn, S.H.; Gray, L.-B.; Marlow, M. S.; Wong, F.L.

    1993-01-01

    Quaternary basanites were recovered from the continental margin of the Bering Sea near Navarin Basin. The basanites are highly vesicular flow rock and hyaloclastites similar to other alkalic volcanic rocks erupted repeatedly during the last Cenozoic on islands in the Bering Sea region and in mainland Alaska. K-Ar ages for the basanites indicate at least two episodes of volcanism at about 1.1 and 0.4 Ma. Trace-element data indicate these alkalic lavas have been generated by small, but variable, amounts of partial melting of a metasomatized lherzolite source. The relativley primitive compositions (MgO >9%), presence of mantle-derived xenoliths in some alkalic lavas, and presence of forsteritic olivine with low CaO and high NiO suggest that magma rose rapidly from great depth without spending time in large, long-lived magma chambers. Alkalic volcanism apparently resulted from upwelling and decompressional melting of small isolated mantle diapirs in response to local lithospheric attenuation associated with jostling of blocks during adjustment to regional stresses. -from Authors

  16. Dredged trachyte and basalt from kodiak seamount and the adjacent aleutian trench, alaska.

    PubMed

    Forbes, R B; Hoskin, C M

    1969-10-24

    Blocky fragments of aegirine-augite trachyte (with accompanying icerafted gravels.) were recovered from the upper slopes of Kodiak Seamount in several dredge hauls. An alkali basalt pillow segment was also dredged from a moatlike depression, at a depth of 5000 meters, near the west base of the seamount. These retrievals confirm the volcanic origin of Kodiak Seamount and further support the view of Engel, Engel, and Havens that the higher elevations of seamounts are composed of alkali basalts or related variants.

  17. Ibitira: A basaltic achondrite from a distinct parent asteroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2004-01-01

    I have done detailed petrologic study of Ibitira, nominally classified as a basaltic eucrite. The Fe/Mn ratio of Ibitira pyroxenes with <10 mole % wollastonite component is 36.4 0.4, and is well-resolved from those of five basaltic eucrites studied for comparison; 31.2-32.2. Data for the latter completely overlap. Ibitira pyroxenes have lower Fe/Mg than the basaltic eucrite pyroxenes. Thus, the higher Fe/Mn ratio does not reflect a simple difference in oxidation state. Ibitira also has an oxygen isotopic composition, alkali element contents and a Ti/Hf ratio that distinguish it from basaltic eucrites. These differences support derivation from a distinct parent asteroid. Ibitira is the first recognized representative of the fifth known asteroidal basaltic crust.

  18. Basanite-nephelinite suite from early Kilauea: carbonated melts of phlogopite-garnet peridotite at Hawaii's leading magmatic edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisson, T. W.; Kimura, J.-I.; Coombs, M. L.

    2009-12-01

    A basanite-nephelinite glass suite from early submarine Kilauea defines a continuous compositional array marked by increasing concentrations of incompatible components with decreasing SiO2, MgO, and Al2O3. Like peripheral and post-shield strongly alkalic Hawaiian localities (Clague et al. in J Volcanol Geotherm Res 151:279-307, 2006; Dixon et al. in J Pet 38:911-939, 1997), the early Kilauea basanite-nephelinite glasses are interpreted as olivine fractionation products from primary magnesian alkalic liquids. For early Kilauea, these were saturated with a garnet-phlogopite-sulfide peridotite assemblage, with elevated dissolved CO2 contents responsible for the liquids’ distinctly low-SiO2 concentrations. Reconstructed primitive liquids for early Kilauea and other Hawaiian strongly alkalic localities are similar to experimental 3 GPa low-degree melts of moderately carbonated garnet lherzolite, and estimated parent magma temperatures of 1,350-1,400°C (olivine-liquid geothermometry) match the ambient upper mantle geotherm shortly beneath the base of the lithosphere. The ~3 GPa source regions were too hot for stable crystalline carbonate and may have consisted of ambient upper mantle peridotite containing interstitial carbonate-silicate or carbonatitic liquid, possibly (Dixon et al. in Geochem Geophys Geosyst 9(9):Q09005, 2008), although not necessarily, from the Hawaiian mantle plume. Carbonate-enriched domains were particularly susceptible to further melting upon modest decompression during upward lithospheric flexure beneath the advancing Hawaiian Arch, or by conductive heating or upward drag by the Hawaiian mantle plume. The early Kilauea basanite-nephelinite suite has a HIMU-influenced isotopic character unlike other Hawaiian magmas (Shimizu et al. in EOS Tran Amer Geophys Union 82(47): abstr V12B-0962, 2001; Shimizu et al. in Geochim Cosmochim Acta 66(15A):710, 2002) but consistent with oceanic carbonatite involvement (Hoernle et al. in Contrib Mineral Petrol

  19. Basanite-nephelinite suite from early Kilauea: Carbonated melts of phlogopite-garnet peridotite at Hawaii's leading magmatic edge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, T.W.; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Coombs, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    A basanite-nephelinite glass suite from early submarine Kilauea defines a continuous compositional array marked by increasing concentrations of incompatible components with decreasing SiO2, MgO, and Al2O3. Like peripheral and post-shield strongly alkalic Hawaiian localities (Clague et al. in J Volcanol Geotherm Res 151:279-307, 2006; Dixon et al. in J Pet 38:911-939, 1997), the early Kilauea basanite-nephelinite glasses are interpreted as olivine fractionation products from primary magnesian alkalic liquids. For early Kilauea, these were saturated with a garnet-phlogopite-sulfide peridotite assemblage, with elevated dissolved CO2 contents responsible for the liquids' distinctly low-SiO2 concentrations. Reconstructed primitive liquids for early Kilauea and other Hawaiian strongly alkalic localities are similar to experimental 3 GPa low-degree melts of moderately carbonated garnet lherzolite, and estimated parent magma temperatures of 1,350-1,400??C (olivine-liquid geothermometry) match the ambient upper mantle geotherm shortly beneath the base of the lithosphere. The ???3 GPa source regions were too hot for stable crystalline carbonate and may have consisted of ambient upper mantle peridotite containing interstitial carbonate-silicate or carbonatitic liquid, possibly (Dixon et al. in Geochem Geophys Geosyst 9(9):Q09005, 2008), although not necessarily, from the Hawaiian mantle plume. Carbonate-enriched domains were particularly susceptible to further melting upon modest decompression during upward lithospheric flexure beneath the advancing Hawaiian Arch, or by conductive heating or upward drag by the Hawaiian mantle plume. The early Kilauea basanite-nephelinite suite has a HIMU-influenced isotopic character unlike other Hawaiian magmas (Shimizu et al. in EOS Tran Amer Geophys Union 82(47): abstr V12B-0962, 2001; Shimizu et al. in Geochim Cosmochim Acta 66(15A):710, 2002) but consistent with oceanic carbonatite involvement (Hoernle et al. in Contrib Mineral Petrol

  20. Hydrogen isotope systematics of submarine basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kyser, T.K.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The D/H ratios and water contents in fresh submarine basalts from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the East Pacific Rise, and Hawaii indicate that the primary D/H ratios of many submarine lavas have been altered by processes including (1) outgassing, (2) addition of seawater at magmatic temperature, and (3) low-temperature hydration of glass. Decreases in ??D and H2O+ from exteriors to interiors of pillows are explained by outgassing of water whereas inverse relations between ??D and H2O+ in basalts from the Galapagos Rise and the FAMOUS Area are attributed to outgassing of CH4 and H2. A good correlation between ??D values and H2O is observed in a suite of submarine tholeiites dredged from the Kilauea East Rift Zone where seawater (added directly to the magma), affected only the isotopic compositions of hydrogen and argon. Analyses of some glassy rims indicate that the outer millimeter of the glass can undergo lowtemperature hydration by hydroxyl groups having ??D values as low as -100. ??D values vary with H2O contents of subaerial transitional basalts from Molokai, Hawaii, and subaerial alkali basalts from the Society Islands, indicating that the primary ??D values were similar to those of submarine lavas. Extrapolations to possible unaltered ??D values and H2O contents indicate that the primary ??D values of most thoteiite and alkali basalts are near -80 ?? 5: the weight percentages of water are variable, 0.15-0.35 for MOR tholeiites, about 0.25 for Hawaiian tholeiites, and up to 1.1 for alkali basalts. The primary ??D values of -80 for most basalts are comparable to those measured for deep-seated phlogopites. These results indicate that hydrogen, in marked contrast to other elements such as Sr, Nd, Pb, and O, has a uniform isotopic composition in the mantle. This uniformity is best explained by the presence of a homogeneous reservoir of hydrogen that has existed in the mantle since the very early history of the Earth. ?? 1984.

  1. An Assessment of the Composition of Oceanic Island Basalts and Fractionates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, B. M.; Sarbas, B.

    2002-12-01

    Oceanic islands which rise above sea-level almost invariably have a composition more enriched in LILE than the underlying MORB basalts, they also have distinctive fractionation trends terminating in some of the most LILE-enriched rocks known. A massive compilation of more than 12000 lines of analytical data for these islands, and now residing in the GEOROC database at Mainz, Germany, allows us to make much more accurate statements as to the composition of this small aggregate of the Earth's crust. Previous estimates have been made on a few hundred samples at most. Compositions for all major elements, trace elements, and REE may be little different from MORB in restricted areas of the Icelandic spreading centre, but tholeiitic members of the bulk of Iceland, the Galapagos, Reunion, Hawaii and some of the early members of other groups, e. g., of the Eaio Shield in the Marquesas and in the early members of the Canary Islands are usually enriched in LILE by factors of x20 N-MORB. They are, however, less enriched than the most enriched, very small degree partial melts occasionally found in MORBs, but have a distinctively different finger print. The bulk of oceanic islands are composed of undersaturated alkaline rocks which range from mildly alkaline alkali-basalt-hawaiite-mugearite-trachyte to lineages of basanite-phonolite. There is also a wide range in Na/K in all of these, from a ratio of 1 to 4. The series is quite continuous and may even vary in a single island group. No "Dupal Anomaly" of separate high K rocks exists. Variation diagrams show a distinctive pattern of linear, even slightly concave, distribution of alumina/MgO, terminating at a maximum of 14% Al2O3 in tholeiites, to 16-18% Al2O3 in trachytes to as high as 25% Al2O3 in phonolites. Continued fractionation of the latter leads to the sudden decrease in alumina and Ba to as low as 8% Al2O3 in the pantellerites which are unusually enriched in such elements as Zr and Nb. Certain element ratios change

  2. Genetic relations of oceanic basalts as indicated by lead isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tatsumoto, M.

    1966-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of lead and the concentrations of lead, uranium, and thorium in samples of oceanic tholeiite and alkali suites are determined, and the genetic relations of the oceanic basalts are discussed. Lead of the oceanic tholeiites has a varying lead-206 : lead-204 ratio between 17.8 and 18.8, while leads of the alkali basalt suites from Easter Island and Guadalupe Island are very radiogenic with lead-206 : lead-204 ratios between 19.3 and 20.4. It is concluded that (i) the isotopic composition of lead in oceanic tholeiite suggests that the upper mantle source region of the tholeiite was differentiated from an original mantle material more than 1 billion years ago and that the upper mantle is not homogeneous at the present time, (ii) less than 20 million years was required for the crystal differentiation within the alkali suite from Easter Island, (iii) no crustal contamination was involved in the course of differentiation of rocks from Easter Island; however, some crustal contamination may have affected Guadalupe Island rocks, and (iv) alkali basalt may be produced from the tholeiite in the oceanic region by crystal differentiation. Alternatively the difference in the isotopic composition of lead in oceanic basalts may be produced by partial melting at different depths of a differentiated upper mantle.

  3. An estimate of the juvenile sulfur content of basalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Fabbi, Brent P.

    1971-01-01

    Sulfur analyses by X-ray fluorescence give an average content of 107 ppm for 9 samples of fresh subaerially-erupted oceanic basalt and 680 ppm for 38 samples of submarine erupted basalt. This difference is the result of retention of sulfur in basalt quenched on the sea floor and loss of sulfur in basalt by degassing at the surface. The outer glassy part of submarine erupted basalt contains 800??150 ppm sulfur, and this amount is regarded as an estimate of the juvenile sulfur content of the basalt melt from the mantle. The slower cooled interiors of basalt pillows are depleted relative to the rims owing to degassing and escape through surface fractures. Available samples of deep-sea basalts do not indicate a difference in original sulfur content between low-K tholeiite, Hawaiian tholeiite, and alkali basalt. The H2O/S ratio of analyzed volcanic gases is generally lower than the H2O/S ratio of gases presumed lost from surface lavas as determined by chemical differences between pillow rims and surface lavas. This enrichment of volcanic gases in sulfur relative to water may result from a greater degassing of sulfur relative to water from shallow intrusive bodies beneath the volcano. ?? 1971 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Petrological, magnetic and chemical properties of basalt dredged from an abyssal hill in the North-east pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luyendyk, B.P.; Engel, C.G.

    1969-01-01

    OVER the years, samples of basalt from the oceanic crust have been taken mainly from seamounts, fracture zones and ridge and rise crests1-6, and rarely from the vast fields of abyssal hills which cover a large part of the deep-sea floor. The basalt sampled from the deeper regions of the oceanic crust (for example, on fault scarps) is a distinct variety of tholeiitic basalt, while alkali basalt is restricted to the volcanic edifices4. Oceanic tholeiitic basalt differs from alkali basalt and continental tholeiite chiefly in having a relatively low percentage of K2O (0.2 weight per cent)4. Some authors have speculated that this type of tholeiitic basalt is the major extrusion from the upper mantle and constitutes the predominant rock type in the upper oceanic crust. ?? 1969 Nature Publishing Group.

  5. Continental Flood Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Continental flood basalts have been receiving considerable scientific attention lately. Recent publications have focused on several particular flood-basalt provinces (Brito-Arctic, Karoo, Parana', Deccan, and Columbia Plateau), and much attention has been given to the proposed connection between flood-basalt volcanism, bolide impacts, and mass extinctions. The editor of Continental Flood Basalts, J. D. Macdougall, conceived the book to assemble in a single volume, from a vast and scattered literature, an overview of each major post-Cambrian flood-basalt province.Continental Flood Basalts has 10 chapters; nine treat individual flood-basalt provinces, and a summary chapter compares and contrasts continental flood-basalts and mid-oceanic ridge basalts. Specifically, the chapters address the Columbia River basalt, the northwest United States including the Columbia River basalt, the Ethiopian Province, the North Atlantic Tertiary Province, the Deccan Traps, the Parana' Basin, the Karoo Province, the Siberian Platform, and Cenozoic basaltic rocks in eastern China. Each chapter is written by one or more individuals with an extensive background in the province.

  6. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  7. DIET of alkali atoms from mineral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakshinskiy, B. V.; Madey, T. E.

    2003-03-01

    To investigate mechanisms for the origin of alkalis in the atmosphere of the Moon, we are studying the electron- and photon-stimulated desorption (ESD and PSD) of K atoms from model mineral surfaces (SiO 2 films), and ESD and PSD of Na atoms from a lunar basalt sample. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates the existence of traces of Na in the lunar sample. To obtain an increased signal for detailed measurements of desorption parameters (appearance thresholds, yields), a fractional monolayer of Na is deposited onto the lunar sample surface. An alkali atom detector based on surface ionization and a time-of-flight technique are used for DIET measurements, together with a pulsed electron gun, and a mechanically chopped and filtered mercury arc light source. We find that bombardment of the alkali covered surfaces by UV photons or by electrons with energies E>4 eV causes desorption of "hot" alkali atoms. The results are consistent with the model based on charge transfer from the substrate to adsorbate which was developed to explain our previous measurements of sodium desorption from a silica surface and desorption of K atoms from water ice. The data support the suggestion that PSD by UV solar photons is a dominant source process for alkalis in the tenuous lunar atmosphere.

  8. H 2O in basalt and basaltic andesite glass inclusions from four subduction-related volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisson, T. W.; Layne, G. D.

    1993-06-01

    Total dissolved H 2O and major element abundances were measured in basalt and basaltic andesite glass inclusions in olivine phenocrysts from Quaternary eruptions of four subduction-related volcanoes to test the hypothesis that low-MgO high-alumina basalts contain high H 2O at depth [1] and to reveal any petrogenetically significant correlations between arc basalt compositions and H 2O contents. Total dissolved H 2O (combined molecular H 2O and OH groups) measured by ion microprobe in mafic glass inclusions from the 1974 eruption of Fuego, Guatemala, reaches 6.2 wt.%. Dissolved H 2O contents decrease in more evolved Fuego glasses. Correlations of H 2O with MgO, Na 2O, K 2O, S and Cl indicate that aqueous fluid exsolution during magma ascent forced crystallization and differentiation of residual liquids. Low-K 2O magnesian high-alumina basalt glass inclusions from the 3 ka eruption of Black Crater (Medicine Lake volcano, California) have low H 2O contents, near 0.2 wt.%, which are consistent with the MORB-like character of these and other primitive lavas of the Medicine Lake region. Basalt and basaltic andesite glass inclusions from Copco Cone and Goosenest volcano on the Cascade volcanic front north of Mt. Shasta have H 2O contents of up to 3.3 wt.%. The range of H 2O contents in Cascade mafic magmas is too large to have resulted solely from enrichment by crystallization and indicates the participation of an H 2O-rich component in magma generation or crustal-level modification. Whereas fluid-absent melting of amphibole-bearing peridotite can account for the H 2O in most mafic arc liquids, the very high H 2O/alkali ratios of the 1974 Fuego eruptives suggest that an aqueous fluid was involved in the generation of Fuego basalts.

  9. Pliocene and Pleistocene alkalic flood basalts on the seafloor north of the Hawaiian islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Holcomb, R.T.; Sinton, J.M.; Detrick, R. S.; Torresan, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    The North Arch volcanic field is located north of Oahu on the Hawaiian Arch, a 200-m high flexural arch formed by loading of the Hawaiian Islands. These flood basalt flows cover an area of about 25,000 km2; the nearly flat-lying sheet-like flows extend about 100 km both north and south from the axis of the flexural arch. Samples from 26 locations in the volcanic field range in composition from nephelinite to alkalic basalt. Ages estimated from stratigraphy, thickness of sediment on top of the flows, and thickness of palagonite alteration rinds on the recovered lavas, range from about 0.75-0.9 Ma for the youngest lavas to somewhat older than 2.7 Ma for the oldest lavas. Most of the flow field consists of extensive sheetflows of dense basanite and alkalic basalt. Small hills consisting of pillow basalt and hyaloclastite of mainly nephelinite and alkalic basalt occur within the flow field but were not the source vents for the extensive flows. Many of the vent lavas are highly vesicular, apparently because of degassing of CO2. The lavas are geochemically similar to the rejuvenated-stage lavas of the Koloa and Honolulu Volcanics and were generated by partial melting of sources similar to those of the Koloa Volcanics. Prior to eruption, these magmas may have accumulated at or near the base of the lithosphere in a structural trap created by upbowing of the lithosphere. ?? 1990.

  10. Very low Ti /VLT/ basalts - A new mare rock type from the Apollo 17 drill core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Papike, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Phaneritic fragments, vitrophyres, and glass beads of a new very low Ti (VLT) mare basalt are found in the Apollo 17 drill core. VLT lithic fragments are characterized by TiO2 content of approximately 0.5%, Mg/(Mg + Fe) of approximately 0.52, CaO/Al2O3 of approximately 0.9, and low alkali content. Although mineral systematics and modal composition of VLT basalt are similar to Apollo 12 and 15 low Ti basalts, VLT basalts cannot be related to these mare basalts by crystal fractionation. Since VLT basalt is isochemical with some of the less mafic green glasses, fractionation of VLT magma from a liquid of green-glass composition is a possibility. Spectral reflectance studies suggest that VLT-type basalts may be relatively common in mare basins.

  11. Preliminary data on sulfides from mantle xenoliths from Wilcza Góra and Krzeniów basanites (SW Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukała, Michał; Puziewicz, Jacek; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Wojtulek, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    The basanites from Krzeniów (19.57 Ma) and Wilcza Góra (20.07 Ma; K-Ar ages by Birkenmajer et al. 2007 Ann. Soc. Geol. Polon.) in SW Poland belong to the Lower Silesian part of the Cenozoic Central European Volcanic Province (CEVP). Both basanites are rich in mantle xenoliths, predominantly of harzburgitic composition. The Krzeniów harzburgites are anhydrous, whereas those from Wilcza Góra contain small amounts of amphibole. Sulfides occur in those harzburgites as: (1) rare, small (<15 μm in diameter) singular grains, enclosed in silicate phases. They have mostly composition of pentlandite (Ni 25.2 - 32.5, Fe 20.3 - 27.0 mole %, atomic metal/sulfur ratio = 1,11). Locally, pentlandite is associated with Ni-pyrrhotite (up to 6,76 mole% of Ni) within the same grain. The grains of pentlandite/Ni-pyrrhotite are anhedral, rounded and elongated. Anhedral millerite grains (Fe ~ 2.39 mole %, metal/sulfur ratio = 0.98) are subordinate. (2) small (< 5 μm in diameter) grains enclosed in silicates, forming sulfide inclusion trails located close to grain margins. These sulfides have the composition of pentlandite (21.5 mole% Fe, 30.8 mole% Ni). Grains are anhedral, oval. Only two analyses were not contaminated due to small size of this kind of sulfides. (3) blebs associated with fine-grained intergranular aggregates of silicate minerals. The aggregates carry majority of sulfides. The sulfide blebs are relatively large (up to 300 μm across) and occur as single grains or in aggregates. Their grains are heterogeneous and consist of various phases. In Krzeniów aggregates consist of clinopyroxene+ olivine± spinel± glass± feldspar± sulfides (pentlandite and Ni-pyrrhotite). Pentlandite contains up to 1.25 mole% of Cu. Sulfides occur in the marginal parts of fine-grained aggregates. One of the pentlandite grains exhibits broad variation of Fe (4.6 to 20.3) and Ni (32.5 to 46.0 mole %). In xenoliths from Wilcza Góra,3 kinds of fine-grained intergranular aggregates occur: (A

  12. Porosity of the melting zone and variations in the solid mantle upwelling rate beneath Hawaii: Inferences from {sup 238}U-{sup 230}Th-{sup 226}Ra and {sup 235}U-{sup 231}Pa disequilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, K.W.W.; DePaolo, D.J.; Murrell, M.T.; Baldridge, W.S.; Goldstein, S.; Clague, D.; Jull, M.

    1999-12-01

    Measurements of {sup 238}U-{sup 230}Th-{sup 226}Ra and {sup 235}U-{sup 231}Pa disequilibria in a suite of tholeiitic-to-basanitic lavas provide estimates of porosity, solid mantle upwelling rate and melt transport times beneath Hawaii. The observation that ({sup 230}Th/{sup 238}U) {gt} 1 indicates that garnet is required as a residual phase in the magma sources for all of the lavas. Both chromatographic porous flow and dynamic melting of a garnet peridotite source can adequately explain the combined U-Th-Ra and U-Pa data for these Hawaiian basalts. For chromatographic porous flow, the calculated maximum porosity in the melting zone ranges from 0.3--3% for tholeiites and 0.1--1% for alkali basalts and basanites, and solid mantle upwelling rates range from 40 to 100 cm/yr for tholeiites and from 1 to 3 cm/yr for basanites. For dynamic melting, the escape or threshold porosity is 0.5--2% for tholeiites and 0.1--0.8% for alkali basalts and basanites, and solid mantle upwelling rates range from 10 to 30 cm/yr for tholeiites and from 0.1 to 1 cm/yr for basanites. Assuming a constant melt productivity, calculated total melt fractions range from 15% for the tholeiitic basalts to 3% for alkali basalts and basanites.

  13. The solubility of olivine in basaltic liquids - An ionic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzberg, C. T.

    1979-01-01

    A model is presented which enables the temperature at which olivine is in equilibrium with any alkali-depleted basaltic compound to be calculated to within + or - 30 C. It is noted that the error increases substantially when applied to terrestrial basalts which contain several weight percent alkalis. In addition the model predicts and quantifies the reduced activity of SiO4(4-) monomers due to increasing SiO2 concentrations in the melt. It is shown that the coordination of alumina in melts which precipitate olivine only appears to be dominantly octahedral, while titanium acts as a polmerizing agent by interconnecting previously isolated SiO4(4-) monomers. It is concluded that the model is sufficiently sensitive to show that there are small repulsive forces between Mg(2+) and calcium ions which are in association with normative diopside in the melt.

  14. Dredged trachyte and basalt from kodiak seamount and the adjacent aleutian trench, alaska.

    PubMed

    Forbes, R B; Hoskin, C M

    1969-10-24

    Blocky fragments of aegirine-augite trachyte (with accompanying icerafted gravels.) were recovered from the upper slopes of Kodiak Seamount in several dredge hauls. An alkali basalt pillow segment was also dredged from a moatlike depression, at a depth of 5000 meters, near the west base of the seamount. These retrievals confirm the volcanic origin of Kodiak Seamount and further support the view of Engel, Engel, and Havens that the higher elevations of seamounts are composed of alkali basalts or related variants. PMID:17731907

  15. Melt rock components in KREEPy breccia 15205: Petrography and mineral chemistry of KREEP basalts and quartz-normative mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, John W.; Vetter, Scott K.

    1993-01-01

    Many current models for the origin of lunar highland rocks feature as an essential component the assimilation of KREEPy material by primitive magmas parental to the Mg-rich suite and alkali suite plutonic rocks. Similar models have also been proposed for the origin of various mare basalt suites. However, any model which considers assimilation of KREEP an important petrologic process must sooner-or-later deal with the question: what is KREEP? Because pristine KREEP basalts are rare, and most known samples are small (e.g., 15382/15386), the geochemical variability of KREEP basalts is poorly known. Other KREEP compositions which are commonly used in these models include the hypothetical 'high-K KREEP' component of Warren and Wasson, which is derived from Apollo 14 soil data, and the 'superKREEP' quartz-monzodiorite 15405. Lunar breccia 15205 is a polymict regolith breccia that consists of approximately 20% KREEP basalt clasts and 20% quartz-normative basalt clasts in a KREEP-rich matrix. Bulk rock mixing calculations show that this sample comprises about 84% KREEP. The clasts range up to 1 cm in size, but most are considerably smaller. The primary aim is to characterize pristine KREEP basalts petrographically, to establish the range in chemical compositions of KREEP basalts, and to test models that were proposed for their origin. In addition, we may be able to extend the compositional range recognized in the quartz-normative basalt suite and cast some light on its origin as well. Preliminary whole rock geochemical data on the KREEP basalts are presented in a companion paper by M.M. Lindstrom and co-workers. Concentration is on petrography and mineral chemistry of these clasts, and the implications these data have for the origin of the different melt rock suites.

  16. Trace element partitioning between mica- and amphibole-bearing garnet lherzolite and hydrous basanitic melt: 1. Experimental results and the investigation of controls on partitioning behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, John; Green, Trevor

    2006-07-01

    Thirty five minor and trace elements (Li, Be, B, Sc, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Rb, Nb, Mo, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Tb, Ho, Tm, Lu, Hf, Ta, W, Tl, Pb, Bi, Th and U) in experimentally produced near-liquidus phases, from a primitive nelpheline basanite from Bow Hill in Tasmania (Australia), were analysed by LAM ICP-MS. A number of halogens (F, Cl and I) were also analysed by electron microprobe. The analyses were used to determine mineral/melt partition coefficients for mica, amphibole, garnet, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene and olivine for conditions close to multiple saturation of the basanite liquidus with garnet lherzolite (approximately 2.6 GPa and 1,200°C with 7.5 wt% of added H2O). A broader range of conditions was also investigated from 1.0 GPa and 1,025°C to 3.5 GPa and 1,190°C with 5-10 wt% of added H2O. The scope and comprehensiveness of the data allow them to be used for two purposes, these include the following: an investigation of some of the controlling influences on partition coefficients; and the compilation of a set partition coefficients that are directly relevant to the formation of the Bow Hill basanite magma by partial melting of mantle peridotite. Considering clinopyroxene, the mineral phase for which the most data were obtained, systematic correlations were found between pressure and temperature, mineral composition, cation radius and valence, and Δ G coulb (the coulombic potential energy produced by substituting a cation of mismatched valence into a crystallographic site). Δ G coulb is distinctly different for different crystallographic sites, including the M2 and M1 sites in clinopyroxene. These differences can be modelled as a function of variations in optimum valence (expressed as 1 sigma standard deviations) within individual M1 and M2 site populations.

  17. Cenozoic magmatism of north Victoria Land, Antarctica: an experimental study on the mantle source of a primary basanite from the McMurdo Volcanic Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienti, P.; Freda, C.; Misiti, V.; Perinelli, C.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanoes of the McMurdo Vocanic Group (MMVG) (Antarctica) dot the eastern shoulder of Ross Sea Rift System giving rise to alkaline transitional volcanic suites which in north Victoria Land are emplaced since Early Cenozoic. Geochemical geological, geophysical and geochronological data on Cenozoic volcanic activity in NVL suggest that the region is a site of passive astenospheric rise, rather than affected by a thermally active mantle plume. Furthermore the comparison of geochemical and isotopical data of basic lavas with those provided by mantle xenoliths they carry to the surface, document the compositional heterogeneity of sublithospheric mantle caused by the coupled action of partial melting and metasomatism. In particular the metasomatic episode is probably linked to the amagmatic extensional event that affected the West Antarctic Rift System in the Late Cretaceous. The astenospheric melts generated during this event, moving through the upper mantle, can have crystallized as veins or may have led to the formation of metasomatic minerals such as amphibole or phlogopite. In this scenario the mineralogical and chemical composition of sources responsible for Cenozoic magmatism, amphibole-bearing spinel-peridotite versus pyroxenite in the garnet stability field, it is still a matter of debate. To shed light on this argument a previous experimental study on a basanite of MMVG, representative of primary magma (Orlando et al., 2000) has been integrated with new experimental investigation on the same basanitic composition. The preliminary experiments were conducted to pressures of 1.0 - 2.0GPa in the presence of 0-1% of added water and indicate olivine on the liquidus at 1.0 GPa that is substitute by clinopyroxene at 2.0GPa. The addition of 1% of water induces a decrease of liquidus temperature of about 40°C shifting its value in the T range (1280-1310°C) the same that was inferred by melt inclusions hosted in the olivine phenocrysts of the studied basanite.

  18. The modal mantle metasomatism in the NE part of the Cenozoic Central European Volcanic Province: the example of the Wołek basanite (SW Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, M.; Puziewicz, J.; Grégoire, M.; Muszyński, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Cenozoic lava occurrences in SW Poland belong to the Central European Volcanic Province (CEVP). In some of them (ca.10) mantle xenoliths were recognized. Most of xenoliths show no signs of modal metasomatism (Blusztajn and Shimizu 1994, Matusiak-Małek et al. 2010, Puziewicz et al. 2011). One of the rare exposures with amphibole-bearing peridotite xenoliths in SW Poland is the Wołek Hill basanite. It is located about 100 km south-west of Wrocław (Nowak et al. 2010) in the Złotoryja volcanic field (Matusiak-Małek et al. 2010). Peridotite xenoliths from Wołek

  19. Nanoparticulate mineral matter from basalt dust wastes.

    PubMed

    Dalmora, Adilson C; Ramos, Claudete G; Querol, Xavier; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Taffarel, Silvio R; Moreno, Teresa; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-02-01

    Ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during "stonemeal" soil fertilizer application have been the subject of some concern recently around the world for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the mining district of Nova Prata in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/(Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy) EDS/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM)/EDS and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3, with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, Zn that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and could so present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle mineralogy and chemical composition in typical BDW samples highlights the need to develop cleaning procedures to minimise exposure to these natural fertilizing basalt dust wastes and is thus of direct relevance to both the industrial sector of basalt mining and to agriculture in the region.

  20. Nanoparticulate mineral matter from basalt dust wastes.

    PubMed

    Dalmora, Adilson C; Ramos, Claudete G; Querol, Xavier; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Taffarel, Silvio R; Moreno, Teresa; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-02-01

    Ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during "stonemeal" soil fertilizer application have been the subject of some concern recently around the world for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the mining district of Nova Prata in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/(Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy) EDS/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM)/EDS and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3, with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, Zn that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and could so present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle mineralogy and chemical composition in typical BDW samples highlights the need to develop cleaning procedures to minimise exposure to these natural fertilizing basalt dust wastes and is thus of direct relevance to both the industrial sector of basalt mining and to agriculture in the region. PMID:26551199

  1. Basaltic island sand provenance

    SciTech Connect

    Marsaglia, K.M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The Hawaiian Islands are an ideal location to study basaltic sand provenance in that they are a series of progressively older basaltic shield volcanoes with arid to humid microclimates. Sixty-two sand samples were collected from beaches on the islands of Hawaii, Maui, Oahu and Kauai and petrographically analyzed. The major sand components are calcareous bioclasts, volcanic lithic fragments, and monomineralic grains of dense minerals and plagioclase. Proportions of these components vary from island to island, with bioclastic end members being more prevalent on older islands exhibiting well-developed fringing reef systems and volcanic end members more prevalent on younger, volcanically active islands. Climatic variations across the island of Hawaii are reflected in the percentage of weathered detritus, which is greater on the wetter, northern side of the island. The groundmass of glassy, basaltic lithics is predominantly black tachylite, with lesser brown sideromelane; microlitic and lathwork textures are more common than holohyaline vitric textures. Other common basaltic volcanic lithic fragments are holocrystalline aggregates of silt-sized pyroxene or olivine, opaque minerals and plagioclase. Sands derived from alkalic lavas are texturally and compositionally indistinguishable from sands derived from tholeiitic lavas. Although Hawaiian basaltic sands overlap in composition with magmatic arc-derived sands in terms of their relative QFL, QmPK and LmLvLs percentages, they are dissimilar in that they lack felsic components and are more enriched in lathwork volcanic lithic fragments, holocrystalline volcanic lithic fragments, and dense minerals.

  2. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  3. Alkali content of alpine ultramafic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, W.; Mountjoy, W.

    1965-01-01

    The lower limit of abundance of sodium and potassium in ultramafic rocks is less than the threshold amount detectable by conventional analytical methods. By a dilutionaddition modification of the flame-spectrophotometric method, sodium and potassium have been determined in 40 specimens of alpine ultramafic rocks. Samples represent six regions in the United States and one in Australia, and include dunite, peridotite, pyroxenite, and their variably serpentinized and metamorphosed derivatives. The median value found for Na2O is 0.004 per cent, and the range of Na2O is 0.001-0.19. The median value for K2O is 0.0034 per cent and the range is 0.001-0.031 per cent. Alkali concentrations are below 0.01 per cent Na2O in 28 samples and below 0.01 per cent K2O in 35. Derivation of basalt magma from upper-mantle material similar to such ultramafic rocks, as has been postulated, is precluded by the relative amounts of sodium and potassium, which are from 200 to 600 times more abundant in basalt than in the ultramafic rocks. Similar factors apply to a number of other elements. No reasonable process could produce such concentrations in, for example, tens of thousands of cubic miles of uniform tholeiitic basalt. The ultramafic rocks might have originated either as magmatic crystal precipitates or as mantle residues left after fusion and removal of basaltic magma. Injection of ultramafic rocks to exposed positions is tectonic rather than magmatic. ?? 1965.

  4. Earliest Silicic Volcanism Associated with Mid-Miocene Flood Basalts: Tuffs Interbedded with Steens Basalt, Nevada and Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckett, M.; Mahood, G. A.; Benson, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    During the main phase of Steens and Columbia River flood basalt eruptions between ~16.7 and 15.0 Ma, spatially associated silicic volcanism was widespread, ~4,000 km3 of silicic magma erupting at calderas and smaller centers dispersed across ~25,000 km2 in eastern Oregon and northern Nevada (Coble and Mahood, 2012). The oldest flood basalts erupted from a focus at Steens Mountain in eastern Oregon, where the section of lavas is ~1 km thick. The Steens Basalt thins southward to only a few flows thick in northern Nevada, either because fewer flows were emplaced this far from the focus or because fewer dikes propagated to the surface on encountering thicker continental crust and/or were intercepted by growing bodies of silicic magma that ultimately erupted in McDermitt Caldera Field (Rytuba and McKee, 1984), High Rock Caldera Complex, and the Lone Mountain/Hawks Valley center (Wypych et al., 2011). Rhyolitic tuffs have not been recognized interbedded with the basalt lavas in the type section, but we have identified several silicic tuffs interbedded with Steens Basalt in the southern Pueblo Mountains and in the Trout Creek Mountains. Although noted by previous workers (e.g., Avent, 1965; Minor, 1986; Hart et al., 1989), they have not been studied. We identified six tuffaceous intervals 20 cm to 15 m thick in the escarpment of the southern Pueblo Mountains near the Oregon-Nevada border where the Steens basalt section is ~250 m thick, with the base unexposed. Two intervals are lithic-rich, reworked volcaniclastic sediments, but four are primary or only slightly reworked sequences of fall deposits that range from fine ash to lapilli in grain size. The heat and weight of the overlying basaltic lava flows has fused the tuffs so that the upper parts of thicker tuffaceous intervals and entire thinner ones are converted to vitrophyres, with crystals of alkali feldspar × quartz × biotite typically 1-2 mm in diameter set in a dense, black, variably hydrated, glassy matrix. We

  5. Apparatus enables accurate determination of alkali oxides in alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupraw, W. A.; Gahn, R. F.; Graab, J. W.; Maple, W. E.; Rosenblum, L.

    1966-01-01

    Evacuated apparatus determines the alkali oxide content of an alkali metal by separating the metal from the oxide by amalgamation with mercury. The apparatus prevents oxygen and moisture from inadvertently entering the system during the sampling and analytical procedure.

  6. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  7. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04

    Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

  8. Chlor-Alkali Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venkatesh, S.; Tilak, B. V.

    1983-01-01

    Chlor-alkali technology is one of the largest electrochemical industries in the world, the main products being chlorine and caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) generated simultaneously by the electrolysis of sodium chloride. This technology is reviewed in terms of electrochemical principles and manufacturing processes involved. (Author/JN)

  9. Major element chemistry of Apollo 14 mare basalt clasts and highland plutonic clasts from lunar breccia 14321: Comparison with neutron activation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, John W.; Vetter, Scott K.

    1993-01-01

    Studies of lithic components in lunar breccias have documented a wide variety of rock types and magma suites which are not found among large, discrete lunar samples. Rock types found exclusively or dominantly as clasts in breccias include KREEP basalts, VHK mare basalts, high-alumina mare basalts, olivine vitrophyres, alkali anorthosites, and magnesian anorthosites and troctolites. These miniature samples are crucial in petrogenetic studies of ancient mare basalts and the highlands crust of the western nearside, both of which have been battered by basin-forming impacts and no longer exist as distinct rock units.

  10. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Wolfs, Denise Y.; Clavenna, Le Roy R.; Eakman, James M.; Kalina, Theodore

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  11. Regional Geochemical Trends in Young Basalts Along the Central Anatolian Fault Zone, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickard, M.; Furman, T.; Hanan, B. B.; Kurkcuoglu, B.; Sayit, K.

    2009-12-01

    The regional neotectonics and volcanism along the margins of the Anatolian microplate (Turkey) are broadly well-constrained. The African and Arabian plates currently push Anatolia against the relatively stable Eurasian plate and as a result, Anatolia has had a west-southwest movement for the last 12 Ma in what is called ‘escape tectonics’. The tectonic environments and their associated volcanism include slab rollback in Western Anatolia (post-Miocene alkaline basalts and basanites) and slab detachment in Eastern Anatolia (mid-Miocene calc-alkaline to Quaternary alkaline). However, the situation in Central Anatolia is less clear: extensional forces govern the neo-tectonic environment and Pliocene-Recent basalts through basaltic andesites and dacites form large stratovolcanoes in extensional basins as well as both small and large basalt fields. The geochemistry of these basalts requires contributions from a poorly-defined mantle source lithology that has been enriched by subduction processes. However, available plate reconstructions indicate that the leading edge of the subducted African plate did not reach Central Anatolia, suggesting that the subduction environment could be related to closure of the neo-Tethyan Ocean in Paleozoic time. Geochemical compositions of mafic lavas along the Central Anatolian Fault Zone (CAFZ) provide new clarity on the question of the extent of lithospheric melting and the influence of the subducting slab. Moving southward along the CAFZ, incompatible trace element compositions of Central Anatolian basalts increase systematically in La/Nb concentrations and other incompatible trace element indicators trend from MORB and OIB signatures to more enriched values. Small negative Nb and no Ta anomalies are present in basalts from the northern CAFZ, and increase to larger negative Nb anomalies and Ta anomalies in the north. The incompatible trace element variations along the CAFZ point to an increase in lithospheric or slab involvement

  12. Geochronology and geochemistry of late Cenozoic basalts from the Leiqiong area, southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Kung-suan; Chen, Ju-chin; Juang, Wen-shing

    2000-06-01

    The Leiqiong area, which includes the Leizhou Peninsula and the northern part of the Hainan Island, is the largest province of exposed basalts in southern China. Ar-Ar and K-Ar dating indicates that incipient volcanism in the Leiqiong area may have taken place in late Oligocene time and gradually increased in tempo toward the Miocene and Pliocene Epoch. Volcanic activities were most extensive during Pleistocene, and declined and ended in Holocene. Based on radiometric age dating and geographic distribution, Pliocene and Quaternary volcanism in Hainan Island can be grouped into two stages and six eruptive regions. The early volcanism is dominated by flood type fissure eruption of quartz tholeiites and olivine tholeiites whereas the later phase is dominated by central type eruption of alkali olivine basalts and olivine tholeiites. The systematic decrease of MgO, ΣFeO and TiO 2 with increasing SiO 2 content for basalts from Hainan Island indicates that fractional crystallization of olivine, clinopyroxene and Ti-bearing opaques may have occurred during magmatic evolution. From coexisting Fe-Ti oxide minerals, it is estimated that the equilibrium temperatures range from 895-986°C and oxygen fugacities range from 10 -13.4 to 10 -10.7 atmospheres in the basaltic magmas. The incompatible element ratios and the chondrite-normalized REE patterns of basalts from the Leiqiong area are generally similar to OIB. The Nb/U ratios (less than 37) in most of the tholeiitic rocks and the negative Nb anomaly observed in the spidergram of some basalts indicated that the influence of a paleo-subduction zone derived component can not be excluded in considering the genesis of the basalts from the Leiqiong area. The tholeiites in the Leiqiong area may have mixed with a more enriched lithospheric mantle component as well as undergone relatively larger percentages of partial melting than the alkali basalts.

  13. Space-Time-Isotopic Trends of Snake River Plain Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, M. M.; Hanan, B. B.; Shervais, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    The Snake River Plain (SRP) volcanic province is an 800 km track of basalt extending from the Owyhee Plateau to its current terminus, the Yellowstone Plateau. It is one of several late-Tertiary magmatic terranes that also include the Cascades magmatic arc, the Columbia River basalts, and the Oregon Plateau basalts; all of which are adjacent to the Basin and Range Province extensional system (Hughes and McCurry, 2002). This province represents the track of the Yellowstone plume and consists of basalt that is compositionally similar to ocean-island basalt. This basalt overlies a series of rhyolitic eruptive centers (overlapping caldera complexes, ignimbrites, and caldera-filling eruptions) that signal the arrival of the plume head (Christiansen, 2001) and herald the onset of plume-related rhyolitic and basaltic volcanism (Pierce et al., 2002). Observed within the SRP are two basalt types: the dominant low-K olivine tholeiites and less common high-K alkaline basalts. We report new Sr-, Nd-, and Pb-isotopic analyses of these two basalt types from all three SRP provinces: eastern, central, and western. Low-K tholeiites are enriched in 143Nd/144Nd and 86Sr/87Sr and forms a quasi-linear array in Pb-isotope space, along with Craters of the Moon and eastern SRP basalts. High-K lavas are found largely in the western plain, and have a uniquely different isotopic signature. They are depleted in 143Nd/144Nd and 86Sr/87Sr, relative to the low-K tholeiites, and plot closer to the BSE component of Zindler and Hart (1986). They also share the same Pb-isotopic space with high-K basalts from Smith Prairie (Boise River Group 2 of Vetter and Shervais, 1992). One low-K tholeiite - Eureka North, plots with these high alkali basalts. Mass balance models have demonstrated an increasing plume component from the Yellowstone caldera in the east to the craton edge in the west. The lavas analyzed in this study conform remarkably to this model. The mass fraction of plume component in western

  14. Appraisal and evolution of hydrochemical processes from proximity basalt and granite areas of Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP) in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonkamble, Sahebrao; Sahya, Ashalata; Mondal, N. C.; Harikumar, P.

    2012-05-01

    SummaryThis paper deals with a systematic hydrochemical study carried out at proximity basalt and granite areas of Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP) in India to assess groundwater quality and evaluate the hydrochemical processes. A total of 40 groundwater samples were collected equally from these areas and analyzed. Results showed that the groundwaters rich in alkaline earth in the basalt and alkali rich element in the granite. The dominancy of cations was observed as Ca2+ > Mg2+ > Na+ > K+ in the basalt and Na+ > Mg2+ > K+ > Ca2+ in the granite, whereas anions as HCO3->Cl>SO42- and Cl>HCO3->SO42-, respectively. Hydrochemical processes were identified with the helps of ion exchange, carbonate weathering and dissolution, multiple ionic ratios, and silicate weathering, which shown the predominance of carbonate, dolomite, calcite and silicate (anorthite) weathering in basalt, but in granite, silicate (alkali feldspar) weathering was dominated. Factor analysis also showed that there were multiple processes acting on groundwaters, were separated from the main cluster. Salinity, Sodium Absorption Ratio (SAR), Soluble Sodium Percentage (SSP), Residual Sodium Carbonate (RSC), Kelley's Ratio (KR) and Permeability Index (PI) in well samples showed that groundwater in basalt was more suitable for irrigation purposes. Further, a digital elevation model (DEM) was generated using Global mapper (8.0 version) software, which aided to decipher the thickness of basalt trap, and vertical transition zone of basaltic (trap) and granitic (basement) aquifer at this DVP comprising with the well depths and groundwater chemistry.

  15. Alkali-vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.; Krupke, W. F.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the results from several of our alkali laser systems. We show highly efficient performance from an alexandrite-pumped rubidium laser. Using a laser diode stack as a pump source, we demonstrate up to 145 W of average power from a CW system. We present a design for a transversely pumped demonstration system that will show all of the required laser physics for a high power system.

  16. Petrogenesis of Late Cenozoic basalts from North Hainan Island: Constraints from melt inclusions and their host olivines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Qiang; Ren, Zhong-Yuan; Nichols, Alexander R. L.; Song, Mao-Shuang; Qian, Sheng-Ping; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Pei-Pei

    2015-03-01

    Melt inclusions and their host olivines in basaltic lavas provide important information about the nature of their mantle source. We present the first analyzed chemical data of olivine-hosted melt inclusions in Cenozoic basalts from the North Hainan Island and report the discovery of both tholeiitic and alkalic melt inclusions in a single rock sample. Cenozoic basalts from the Hainan Island are predominantly tholeiites with only small amounts of alkali basalts. There is a much broader compositional variation in melt inclusions than whole rocks. Compared to partial melts of mantle peridotite, the Hainan basalts have lower CaO, Na2O/TiO2, CaO/Al2O3 and Co/Fe, and higher TiO2, FeO∗, Fe/Mn, Zn/Fe and Zn/Mn. The olivine phenocrysts from the Hainan basalts contain lower Ca and Mn, and higher Ni and Fe/Mn than those of olivines crystallized from partial melts of peridotite. Projections from or towards olivine into the plane CS-MS-A for melt inclusions and whole rocks with MgO >7.5 wt% imply that the residual minerals in the source of the tholeiites are mainly clinopyroxene and garnet, possibly with some orthopyroxene, while in the source of the alkali basalts they are dominated by clinopyroxene and garnet. This indicates that a pyroxenite component could serve as the source lithology of the Hainan basalts. The OIB-like trace element compositions, with Ba, Sr, Nb and Ta positive anomalies, and Th and U negative anomalies, of the Hainan basalts suggest that a recycled oceanic crust component was involved in the source of the Hainan basalts. Based on a CMAS projection of primary magma compositions of the whole rocks and melt inclusions, we infer that a stage-2 silica-deficient pyroxenite derived from melt-peridotite reaction or mechanical mixing between recycled oceanic crust and peridotite can serve as the source lithology. Partial melts derived from such a source can match the overall compositions of the Hainan basalts better than those of MORB-eclogite and fertile

  17. Sulfide Stability of Planetary Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiazza, C. M.; Righter, K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Chesley, J. T.; Ruiz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The isotopic system, 187Re 187Os, can be used to determine the role of crust and mantle in magma genesis. In order to apply the system to natural samples, we must understand variations in Re/Os concentrations. It is thought that low [Os] and [Re] in basalts can be attributed to sulfide (FeS) saturation, as Re behaves incompatibly to high degrees of evolution until sulfide saturation occurs [1]. Previous work has shown that lunar basalts are sulfide under-saturated, and mid-ocean ridge, ocean-island and Martian (shergottites) basalts are saturated [2,3]. However, little is known about arc basalts. In this study, basaltic rocks were analyzed across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt.

  18. Why Hexagonal Basalt Columns?

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Martin; Anderssohn, Robert; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Weiß, Hans-Jürgen; Nellesen, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Basalt columns with their preferably hexagonal cross sections are a fascinating example of pattern formation by crack propagation. Junctions of three propagating crack faces rearrange such that the initial right angles between them tend to approach 120°, which enables the cracks to form a pattern of regular hexagons. To promote understanding of the path on which the ideal configuration can be reached, two periodically repeatable models are presented here involving linear elastic fracture mechanics and applying the principle of maximum energy release rate. They describe the evolution of the crack pattern as a transition from rectangular start configuration to the hexagonal pattern. This is done analytically and by means of three-dimensional finite element simulation. The latter technique reproduces the curved crack path involved in this transition.

  19. Why Hexagonal Basalt Columns?

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Martin; Anderssohn, Robert; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Weiß, Hans-Jürgen; Nellesen, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Basalt columns with their preferably hexagonal cross sections are a fascinating example of pattern formation by crack propagation. Junctions of three propagating crack faces rearrange such that the initial right angles between them tend to approach 120°, which enables the cracks to form a pattern of regular hexagons. To promote understanding of the path on which the ideal configuration can be reached, two periodically repeatable models are presented here involving linear elastic fracture mechanics and applying the principle of maximum energy release rate. They describe the evolution of the crack pattern as a transition from rectangular start configuration to the hexagonal pattern. This is done analytically and by means of three-dimensional finite element simulation. The latter technique reproduces the curved crack path involved in this transition. PMID:26550724

  20. Composition and origin of basaltic magma of the Hawaiian Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, H.A.

    1955-01-01

    Silica-saturated basaltic magma is the source of the voluminous lava flows, erupted frequently and rapidly in the primitive shield-building stage of activity, that form the bulk of each Hawaiian volcano. This magma may be available in batches that differ slightly in free silica content from batch to batch both at the same and at different volcanoes; differentiation by fractionation of olivine does not occur within this primitive magma. Silica-deficient basaltic magma, enriched in alkali, is the source of commonly porphyritic lava flows erupted less frequently and in relatively negligible volume during a declining and decadent stage of activity at some Hawaiian volcanoes. Differentiation by fractionation of olivine, plagioclase and augite is evident among these lavas, but does not account for the silica deficiency or the alkali enrichment. Most of the data of Hawaiian volcanism and petrology can be explained by a hypothesis that batches of magma are melted from crystalline paridotite by a recurrent process (distortion of the equatorial bulge by forced and free nutational stresses) that accomplishes the melting only of the plagioclase and pyroxene component but not the excess olivine and more refractory components within a zone of fixed and limited depth. Eruption exhausts the supply of meltable magma under a given locality and, in the absence of more violent melting processes, leaves a stratum of crystalline refractory components. ?? 1955.

  1. Cathodoluminescence Characterization of Maskelynite and Alkali Feldspar in Shergottite (Dhofar 019)

    SciTech Connect

    Kayama, M.; Nakazato, T.; Nishido, H.; Ninagawa, K.; Gucsik, A.

    2009-08-17

    Dhofar 019 is classified as an olivine-bearing basaltic shergottite and consists of subhedral grains of pyroxene, olivine, feldspar mostly converted to maskelynite and minor alkali feldspar. The CL spectrum of its maskelynite exhibits an emission band at around 380 nm. Similar UV-blue emission has been observed in the plagioclase experimentally shocked at 30 and 40 GPa, but not in terrestrial plagioclase. This UV-blue emission is a notable characteristic of maskelynite. CL spectrum of alkali feldspar in Dhofar 019 has an emission bands at around 420 nm with no red emission. Terrestrial alkali feldspar actually consists of blue and red emission at 420 and 710 nm assigned to Al-O{sup -}-Al and Fe{sup 3+} centers, respectively. Maskelynite shows weak and broad Raman spectral peaks at around 500 and 580 cm{sup -1}. The Raman spectrum of alkali feldspar has a weak peak at 520 cm{sup -1}, whereas terrestrial counterpart shows the emission bands at 280, 400, 470, 520 and 1120 cm{sup -1}. Shock pressure on this meteorite transformed plagioclase and alkali feldspar into maskelynite and almost glass phase, respectively. It eliminates their luminescence centers, responsible for disappearance of yellow and/or red emission in CL of maskelynite and alkali feldspar. The absence of the red emission band in alkali feldspar can also be due to the lack of Fe{sup 3+} in the feldspar as it was reported for some lunar feldspars.

  2. Xenoliths from Late Cretaceous seamounts in the Central Pacific: Cumulates of fractionating alkalic basalt magma chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.S.; Friesen, W.B.; Pickthorn, L.; Pringle, M.S.; Clague, D.A. )

    1990-06-01

    Abundant xenoliths in alkalic basalt were recovered from two Late Cretaceous seamounts in the Central Pacific. One seamount, located in the Phoenix archipelago (lat 0{degree}22'5, long 176{degree}05'W), is dated by {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar techniques as 65 Ma. The other seamount, located in the northern Line Islands (lat 15{degree}39'N, long 170{degree}23'W), is dated as 70 Ma. Host lavas are basanite and differentiated alkalic basalt. Mafic xenolith assemblages consist of clinopyroxene with variable amounts of amphibole and mica. Intermediate assemblages have abundant feldspar in addition to the mafic minerals. Rare felsic xenoliths consist of two or more feldspars. Variable amounts of apatite, titanite, and magnetite are poikilitically enclosed in mafic phases, and minor feldspathoids are present in some xenoliths. Most xenoliths are holocrystalline with fine- to medium-grained, equigranular cumulus texture, but two xenoliths have a seriate, interlocking crystal framework in a small amount of glassy to microcrystalline matrix. Clinopyroxene in the holocrystalline samples is partially replaced by amphibole. In a few samples, extensive replacement of clinopyroxene by rounded amphibole grains results in a nearly granoblastic texture. Clinopyroxene compositions range from diopside to ferrosalite and are essentially Cr-free but generally have high Ti and Al contents. Cr-rich diopside and Al-augite, characteristic of mantle clinopyroxene, are absent. Feldspars include plagioclase, anorthoclase, and sanidine. Mineral compositions of xenoliths are similar to those of phenocrysts in the host lavas, indicating that these xenoliths are not metasomatized mantle material, but rather are cumulates from fractionating alkalic basalt magma chambers.

  3. PROCESS OF RECOVERING ALKALI METALS

    DOEpatents

    Wolkoff, J.

    1961-08-15

    A process is described of recovering alkali metal vapor by sorption on activated alumina, activated carbon, dehydrated zeolite, activated magnesia, or Fuller's earth preheated above the vaporization temperature of the alkali metal and subsequent desorption by heating the solvent under vacuum. (AEC)

  4. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  5. Differentiation mechanism of frontal-arc basalt magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuritani, T.; Yoshida, T.; Kimura, J.; Hirahara, Y.; Takahashi, T.

    2012-04-01

    In a cooling magma chamber, magmatic differentiation can proceed both by fractionation of crystals from the main molten part of the magma body (homogeneous fractionation) and by mixing of the main magma with fractionated melt derived from low-temperature mush zones (boundary layer fractionation) (Jaupart and Tait, 1995, and references therein). The geochemical path caused by boundary layer fractionation can be fairly different from a path resulting from homogeneous fractionation (e.g., Langmuir, 1989). Therefore, it is important to understand the relative contributions of these fractionation mechanisms in magma chambers. Kuritani (2009) examined the relative roles of the two fractionation mechanisms in cooling basaltic magma chambers using a thermodynamics-based mass balance model. However, the basaltic magmas examined in the work were alkali-rich (Na2O+K2O > 4 wt.%). In this study, to explore differentiation mechanisms of frontal-arc basalt magmas that are volumetrically much more important than rear-arc alkali basalt magmas, the relative roles of the two fractionation mechanisms are examined for low-K tholetiitic basalt magma from Iwate Volcano, NE Japan arc, using the same mass balance model. First, the water content and the temperature of the Iwate magma were estimated. The Iwate lavas are moderately porphyritic, consisting of ~8 vol.% olivine and ~20 vol.% plagioclase phenocrysts. The olivine and plagioclase phenocrysts show significant compositional variations, and the Mg# of olivine phenocrysts (Mg#78-81) correlates positively with the An content of coexisting plagioclase phenocrysts (An85-92). The olivine phenocrysts with Mg# > ~82 do not form crystal aggregates with plagioclase. It is inferred from these observations that the phenocrysts with variable compositions were derived from a common magma with variable temperature in a magma chamber, and the plagioclase phenocrysts were all derived from mushy boundary layers along the walls of the magma chamber. By

  6. Hanford basalt flow mineralogy

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, L.L.

    1980-09-01

    Mineralogy of the core samples from five core wells was examined in some detail. The primary mineralogy study included an optical examination of polished mounts, photomicrographs, chemical analyses of feldspars, pyroxenes, metallic oxides and microcrystalline groundmasses and determination from the chemical analyses of the varieties of feldspars, pyroxenes and metallic oxides. From the primary mineralogy data, a firm understanding of the average Hanford basalt flow primary mineralogy emerged. The average primary feldspar was a laboradorite, the average pyroxene was an augite and the average metallic oxide was a solid solution of ilmenite and magnetite. Secondary mineralization consisted of vug filling and joint coating, chiefly with a nontronite-beidellite clay, several zeolites, quartz, calcite, and opal. Specific flow units also were examined to determine the possibility of using the mineralogy to trace flows between core wells. These included units of the Pomona, the Umatilla and a high chromium flow just below the Huntzinger. In the Umatilla, or high barium flow, the compositional variation of the feldspars was unique in range. The pyroxenes in the Pomona were relatively highly zoned and accumulated chromium. The high chromium flow contained chromium spinels that graded in chromium content into simple magnetites very low in chromium content. A study of the statistical relationships of flow unit chemical constituents showed that flow unit constituents could be roughly correlated between wells. The probable cause of the correlation was on-going physical-chemical changes in the source magma.

  7. Genesis of basalt magmas and their derivatives under the Izu Islands, Japan, inferred from Sr/Ca-Ba/Ca systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuma, Naoki; Hirano, Masataka; Isshiki, Naoki

    1983-10-01

    The Sr/Ca-Ba/Ca systematics defined for a series of volcanic rocks provided by volcanoes of the Izu Islands, Japan, have cast a new light on the origin and evolution of basalt magmas and their derivatives: (1) The mantle material in the source region of primary basalt magmas beneath the Izu Islands shows a chondritic value of Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios. (2) Both the tholeiite magma and the high-alumina/calc-alkali basalt magma are primary with higher degrees (15-20% for the former) and lower degrees (8-11% for the latter) of partial melting of a common mantle material. (3) The primary basalt magmas evolve independently via crystal fractionation process in respective magma chambers at shallower depths each providing a series of andesite and dacite magmas corresponding to respective primary basalt magmas. (4) The crystal fractionation process in magma chamber is controlled mainly by plagioclase and clinopyroxene crystallization in terms of the alkaline earth elements. The plagioclase/clinopyroxene ratio decreases during crystal fractionation process. The chemical environments of magma chambers are similar to each other in the tholeiite series and in the high-alumina basalt/calc-alkali rock series. (5) The end products provided by the crystal fractionation process lie within Bowen's petrogeny's residua system, making a thin, silicic crust under the volcanic islands near the Izu Peninsula. The calc-alkali rhyolites in these islands are derived from the thin silicic crust via melting process by the heat of intruded primary basalt magmas. (6) The regional distribution of degree of partial melting indicates variations from 15 to 20% along the volcanic front and from 8 to 11% in the region behind it. The fact suggests that an interaction between the mantle wedge under the Philippine Sea Plate and the subducting slab of the Pacific Plate beneath the Izu Islands is different from place to place, with respect to temperature distribution and/or water supply from the subducting

  8. Flood basalts and mass extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, W. Jason

    1988-01-01

    There appears to be a correlation between the times of flood basalts and mass-extinction events. There is a correlation of flood basalts and hotspot tracks--flood basalts appear to mark the beginning of a new hotspot. Perhaps there is an initial instability in the mantle that bursts forth as a flood basalt but then becomes a steady trickle that persists for many tens of millions of years. Suppose that flood basalts and not impacts cause the environmental changes that lead to mass-extinctions. This is a very testable hypothesis: it predicts that the ages of the flows should agree exactly with the times of extinctions. The Deccan and K-T ages agree with this hypothesis; An iridium anomaly at extinction boundaries apparently can be explained by a scaled-up eruption of the Hawaiian type; the occurrence of shocked-quartz is more of a problem. However if the flood basalts are all well dated and their ages indeed agree with extinction times, then surely some mechanism to appropriately produce shocked-quartz will be found.

  9. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  10. Nickel in high-alumina basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedge, C.E.

    1971-01-01

    New analyses of high-alumina basalts reveal an average nickel content higher than previously indicated. Ni in high-alumina basalts correlates with magnesium in the same way as it does in other basalt types. There is therefore no reason, based on Ni contents, to hypothesize a special origin for high-alumina basalts and it is permissible (based on Ni contents) to form andesites by fractional crystallization from high-alumina basalts. ?? 1971.

  11. Alkali hydrolysis of trinitrotoluene.

    PubMed

    Karasch, Christian; Popovic, Milan; Qasim, Mohamed; Bajpai, Rakesh K

    2002-01-01

    Data for alkali hydrolysis of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in aqueous solution at pH 12.0 under static (pH-controlled) as well as dynamic (pH-uncontrolled) conditions are reported. The experiments were conducted at two different molar ratios of TNT to hydroxyl ions at room temperature. The TNT disappeared rapidly from the solution as a first-order reaction. The complete disappearance of aromatic structure from the aqueous solution within 24 h was confirmed by the ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectra of the samples. Cuvet experiments in a UV-VIS spectrophotometer demonstrated the formation of Meisenheimer complex, which slowly disappeared via formation of aromatic compounds with fewer nitro groups. The known metabolites of TNT were found to accumulate only in very small quantities in the liquid phase.

  12. Basaltic Lava Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K. V.; Griffiths, R. W.; Kerr, R. C.

    2004-12-01

    or channel bends that exposes more core lava to cooling than simply that of the shear zones. Thus the channel geometry plays a major role in the thermal history of a flow. As lava flows rarely flow through pre-existing channels of prescribed geometry, we have performed an additional set of analog laboratory experiments to determine the relationship between flow rate, slope, and channel formation in solidifying flows. All flows develop stable uniform channels within solidified levees except when the flow rate is sufficiently low to permit flow front solidification, inflation, and tube formation. On constant slopes, increasing flow rates result in increases in both the rate of flow advance rate and the channel width, and a decrease in levee width. At constant flow rates, both channel width and levee width decrease with increasing slope while flow advance rate increases. Limited data on the geometry of basaltic lava channels indicate that experimental data are consistent with field observations, however, both additional field data and scaling relationships are required to fully utilize the laboratory experiments to predict channel development in basaltic lava flows.

  13. Mixed alkali effect in nonconventional alkali gallotitanate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Miyaji, Fumiaki; Hasegawa, Shinya; Yoko, Toshinobu; Sakka, Sumio . Inst. for Chemical Research)

    1993-02-01

    The mixed alkali effect on electrical conductivity, that is, the reduction of conductivity due to alkali mixing, was observed in Na[sub 2]O-K[sub 2]O-Ga[sub 2]O[sub 3]-TiO[sub 2] glasses, which are nonconventional in the sense that glass-forming oxides defined by Zachariasen are not involved. The magnitude of the reduction in conductivity of the present glasses due to alkali mixing was similar to that of corresponding mixed alkali silicate and phosphate glasses. The activation energy for electrical conduction showed a maximum around the composition Na/(Na + K) = 0.5, where the conductivity was at a minimum.

  14. Rates of mineral dissolution and carbonation in peridotite and basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Matter, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    used a relatively high ratio of olivine:fluid (1:4), (c) they generally used high fluid NaCl contents, and (d) they consistently used high NaHCO3 and/or KHCO3 (alkali-bicarbonate) concentrations. In agreement with the ASU group, we consider that alkali-bicarbonate is the crucial catalyst, provided PCO2 is high.This raises the question of whether alkali-carbonate could also catalyze labradorite and basalt carbonation. ARC and ASU data extrapolated to low T and low PCO2 agree with natural carbonation rates in Oman. Our geological observations suggest that higher temperature peridotite carbonation went to completion (all Mg as MgCO3, all Si as quartz), perhaps because reaction-driven cracking maintained reactive surface area and permeability despite formation of reaction products in pore space and armoring of remaining olivine reactants. We are not aware of comparable observations on present-day carbonation of basalt. (1) Kelemen & Matter, PNAS 2008 (2) O’Connor et al., DOE Final Report ARC-TR-04-002, 2004 (3) Gerdemann et al., Environ. Sci. Technol. 2007 (4) Chizmeshya et al., DOE Final Report 924162, 2007

  15. Bubble Growth in Lunar Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Although Moon is usually said to be volatile-"free", lunar basalts are often vesicular with mm-size bubbles. The vesicular nature of the lunar basalts suggests that they contained some initial gas concentration. A recent publication estimated volatile concentrations in lunar basalts (Saal et al. 2008). This report investigates bubble growth on Moon and compares with that on Earth. Under conditions relevant to lunar basalts, bubble growth in a finite melt shell (i.e., growth of multiple regularly-spaced bubbles) is calculated following Proussevitch and Sahagian (1998) and Liu and Zhang (2000). Initial H2O content of 700 ppm (Saal et al. 2008) or lower is used and the effect of other volatiles (such as carbon dioxide, halogens, and sulfur) is ignored. H2O solubility at low pressures (Liu et al. 2005), concentration-dependent diffusivity in basalt (Zhang and Stolper 1991), and lunar basalt viscosity (Murase and McBirney 1970) are used. Because lunar atmospheric pressure is essentially zero, the confining pressure on bubbles is completely supplied by the overlying magma. Due to low H2O content in lunar basaltic melt (700 ppm H2O corresponds to a saturation pressure of 75 kPa), H2O bubbles only grow in the upper 16 m of a basalt flow or lake. A depth of 20 mm corresponds to a confining pressure of 100 Pa. Hence, vesicular lunar rocks come from very shallow depth. Some findings from the modeling are as follows. (a) Due to low confining pressure as well as low viscosity, even though volatile concentration is very low, bubble growth rate is extremely high, much higher than typical bubble growth rates in terrestrial melts. Hence, mm-size bubbles in lunar basalts are not strange. (b) Because the pertinent pressures are so low, bubble pressure due to surface tension plays a main role in lunar bubble growth, contrary to terrestrial cases. (c) Time scale to reach equilibrium bubble size increases as the confining pressure increases. References: (1) Liu Y, Zhang YX (2000) Earth

  16. The Karoo igneous province — A problem area for inferring tectonic setting from basalt geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Andrew R.

    1987-06-01

    Tholeiitic basalts and associated intrusives are the major component of the Karoo igneous province. They are of Mesozoic age and constitute one of the world's classic continental flood basalt (CFB) provinces. It has been argued that most Karoo basalts have not undergone significant contamination with continental crust and that their lithospheric mantle source areas were enriched in incompatible minor and trace elements during the Proterozoic. The only exceptions to this are late-stage MORB-like dolerites near the present-day continental margins which are considered to be of asthenospheric origin. When data for the "southern" Karoo basalts are plotted on many of the geochemical discriminant diagrams which have been used to infer tectonic setting, essentially all of them would be classified as calc-alkali basalts (CAB's) or low-K tholeiites. Virtually none of them plot in the compositional fields designated as characteristic of "within-plate" basalts. There is little likelihood that the compositions of the Karoo basalts can be controlled by active subduction at the time of their eruption and no convincing evidence that a "subduction component" has been added to the subcontinental lithospheric mantle under the entire area in which the basalts crop out. It must be concluded that the mantle source areas for CAB's and the southern Karoo basalts have marked similarities. In contrast, the data for "northern" Karoo basalts largely plot in the "within-plate" field on geochemical discriminant diagrams. Available data suggest that the source composition and/or the restite mineralogy and degree of partial melting are different for southern and northern Karoo basalts. There is no evidence for any difference in tectonic setting between the southern and northern Karoo basalts at the time they were erupted. This appears to be clear evidence that specific mantle source characteristics and/or magmatic processes can vary within a single CFB province to an extent that renders at least

  17. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  18. Viscous flow behavior of tholeiitic and alkaline Fe-rich martian basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrel, Magdalena Oryaëlle; Baratoux, David; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical compositions of martian basalts are enriched in iron with respect to terrestrial basalts. Their rheology is poorly known and liquids of this chemical composition have not been experimentally investigated. Here, we determine the viscosity of five synthetic silicate liquids having compositions representative of the diversity of martian volcanic rocks including primary martian mantle melts and alkali basalts. The concentric cylinder method has been employed between 1500 °C and the respective liquidus temperatures of these liquids. The viscosity near the glass transition has been derived from calorimetric measurements of the glass transition. Although some glass heterogeneity limits the accuracy of the data near the glass transition, it was nevertheless possible to determine the parameters of the non-Arrhenian temperature-dependence of viscosity over a wide temperature range (1500 °C to the glass transition temperature). At superliquidus conditions, the martian basalt viscosities are as low as those of the Fe-Ti-rich lunar basalts, similar to the lowest viscosities recorded for terrestrial ferrobasalts, and 0.5 to 1 order of magnitude lower than terrestrial tholeiitic basalts. Comparison with empirical models reveals that Giordano et al. (2008) offers the best approximation, whereas the model proposed by Hui and Zhang (2007) is inappropriate for the compositions considered. The slightly lower viscosities exhibited by the melts produced by low degree of mantle partial melting versus melts produced at high degree of mantle partial melting (likely corresponding to the early history of Mars), is not deemed sufficient to lead to viscosity variations large enough to produce an overall shift of martian lava flow morphologies over time. Rather, the details of the crystallization sequence (and in particular the ability of some of these magmas to form spinifex texture) is proposed to be a dominant effect on the viscosity during martian lava flow emplacement and

  19. The basalts of Mare Frigoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, G. Y.; Jaiswal, B.; Hawke, B. R.; Öhman, T.; Giguere, T. A.; Johnson, K.

    2015-10-01

    This paper discusses the methodology and results of a detailed investigation of Mare Frigoris using remote sensing data from Clementine, Lunar Prospector, and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, with the objective of mapping and characterizing the compositions and eruptive history of its volcanic units. With the exception of two units in the west, Mare Frigoris and Lacus Mortis are filled with basalts having low-TiO2 to very low TiO2, low-FeO, and high-Al2O3 abundances. These compositions indicate that most of the basalts in Frigoris are high-Al basalts—a potentially undersampled, yet important group in the lunar sample collection for its clues about the heterogeneity of the lunar mantle. Thorium abundances of most of the mare basalts in Frigoris are also low, although much of the mare surface appears elevated due to contamination from impact gardening with the surrounding high-Th Imbrium ejecta. There are, however, a few regional thorium anomalies that are coincident with cryptomare units in the east, the two youngest mare basalt units, and some of the scattered pyroclastic deposits and volcanic constructs. In addition, Mare Frigoris lies directly over the northern extent of the major conduit for a magma plumbing system that fed many of the basalts that filled Oceanus Procellarum, as interpreted by Andrews-Hanna et al. (2014) using data from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory mission. The relationship between this deep-reaching magma conduit and the largest extent of high-Al basalts on the Moon makes Mare Frigoris an intriguing location for further investigation of the lunar mantle.

  20. Geochemistry of peridotite xenoliths in basalt from Hannuoba, eastern China: Implications for subcontinental mantle heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Song; Frey, F.A. )

    1989-01-01

    Based on geochemical studies of six anhydrous spinel peridotite xenoliths in basanite, the upper mantle beneath Hannuoba, eastern China is compositionally heterogeneous. These samples range in Sr and Nd isotopic ratios from MORB-like to near bulk-earth estimates. The low {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr and high {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd samples contain the largest amount of a basaltic component, but they are relatively depleted in light rare earth elements compared to chondrites. Other samples have U-shaped chondrite-normalized REE patterns. Trace element and radiogenic isotopic data require enrichment processes acting on depleted mantle. Constraints on these processes are: (a) inverse correlations between basaltic constituents, such as CaO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and La/Sm; and, (b) samples most depleted in CaO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} have the highest {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr and lowest {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd. These trends can be explained by a model whereby garnet peridotite zoned in isotopic composition undergoes partial melting. Because of a gradient in degree of melting, e.g., from the wall-rock contact to hotter interior, or as a function of depth in a diapir, melts initially segregate from regions where the degree of melting is high. Subsequently, the recently created residues are infiltrated by slower segregating incipient melts. Preferential mixing of these incipient melts with residues from high degrees of melting can explain the observed complex geochemical trends seen in Hannuoba and many other peridotite xenolith suites. Clinopyroxene-rich veins in some of the peridotites may reflect pathways of ascending melt.

  1. Diverse, Alkali-Rich Igneous and Volcaniclastic Rocks Reflect a Metasomatised Mantle Beneath Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. E.; Baker, M. B.; Berger, J. A.; Fisk, M. R.; Gellert, R.; McLennan, S. M.; Newcombe, M. E.; Stolper, E. M.; Thompson, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Although Curiosity landed in a sedimentary setting, geochemical compositions determined by Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) and ChemCam suggest that major element concentrations of some rocks were little modified by chemical weathering, and in these cases, the bulk (>70%) of the crystalline components determined by ChemMin are igneous. Gale rocks can therefore largely preserve the composition of their igneous protoliths and provide insight into the crystalline basement exposed in the north crater rim. Four end-member compositions are recognized on the basis of APXS analyses. (1) The diverse, evolved Jake M class (n=12) of inferred igneous origin includes float blocks and cobbles. Jake M rocks are phonotephritic/mugearitic to trachyandesitic and characterized by low MgO contents (3.0-5.7 wt%) and high Al and alkalis, particularly Na2O (up to 7.35 wt%). (2) The Bathurst class of siltstones to coarse sandstones (n=13) occurs as dark-toned float and bedded outcrop and is basaltic to trachybasaltic, ranging to high K2O (up to 3.8 wt%). Alteration of the protolith(s) or during diagenesis may have affected this class. (3) The Darwin class of conglomerates to coarse sandstones (n=10) has high Na and Al, likely reflecting a sodic plagioclase-rich mineralogy, but with higher Fe than Jake M class (13.0-17.1 vs. 6.0-12.5 wt%). (4) The low alkali "normal" Mars basaltic composition is typified by the Portage soils (n=6) and the John Klein class (n=13; includes the Sheepbed mudstone). Some degree of mixing and/or contamination with this low alkali basaltic compositon has affected all APXS analyses. Overall, Gale rocks are strongly enriched in total alkalis (at the same MgO) relative to basaltic shergottites and many have higher K2O than igneous rocks analyzed by Spirit and Opportunity, suggesting that the mantle beneath Gale is alkali-rich (likely as a result of a metasomatic event) and that alkalis are heterogeneously distributed in the planet's interior.

  2. Asthenosphere versus lithosphere as possible sources for basaltic magmas erupted during formation of the Red Sea: constraints from Sr, Pb and Nd isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altherr, Rainer; Henjes-Kunst, Friedhelm; Baumann, Albrecht

    1990-01-01

    Representative basalts from the axial trough of the Red Sea and from volcanic fields of the Arabian Peninsula ranging in composition from N-type MORB to basanite and in age from Early Miocene to Recent show a limited variation in their isotopic compositions: 87Sr/ 86Sr= 0.70240-0.70361 , 206Pb/ 204Pb= 18.040-19.634 , 207Pb/ 204Pb= 15.496-15.666 , 208Pb/ 204Pb= 37.808-39.710 , 143Nd/ 144Nd= 0.513194-0.512670 . There is a poorly constrained correlation between chemical composition and isotope ratios: with increasing alkalinity, Sr and Pb isotope ratios increase and the Nd isotope ratio tends to decrease. In Pb isotope variation diagrams most of the basalts plot significantly above the NHRLs, irrespective of tectonic setting, i.e. thickness of underlying crust and/or lithosphere. MORBs from the axial trough of the Red Sea have higher Pb isotope ratios for a given 87Sr/ 86Sr than MORBs from the Indian Ocean ridges, including the Carlsberg Ridge. It is therefore suggested that both spreading ridges tap different convective systems in the asthenosphere. The tectonic setting of the basalts is reflected in their Nd sbnd Sr isotope characteristics. Basalts from areas where the continental lithosphere is drastically thinned or absent (i.e. Red Sea axial trough and coastal plain, Afar) plot along a reference line defined by N-type MORB and Tristan da Cunha. Basalts erupted in areas with Pan-African crust of normal thickness and moderately thinned lithospheric mantle (i.e. rift shoulder) are characterized by relative low 143Nd/ 144Nd ratios and plot below the reference line towards an EM I component which is also found in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. These differences in the Nd sbnd Sr isotopic compositions of the basalts are independent of bulk-rock chemistry and are therefore controlled by tectonic setting alone. It is suggested that the low- 143Nd/ 144Nd trend of basalts from the Arabian rift shoulder is caused by a significant contribution of the pre

  3. Th-230 - U-238 series disequilibrium of the Olkaria basalts Gregory Rift Valley, Kenya: Petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, S.; Macdonald, R.; Kelly, M.

    1993-01-01

    Strong mixing trends on a (Th-230/Th-232) versus Th diagram show that the basalts are mixed magmas which have undergone interaction with the crust. Instantaneous Th/U ratios are less than time integrated ones but these exceed the Th/U ratios in the MORB and OIB sources. This indicates that the mantle may have undergone some metasomatic fluxing, crustal contamination of the basalts will also enhance these ratios. Early activity on the Akira plain is represented by early basalts and hawaiites. The early basalt samples are known to predate the earliest comendites. The most recent phase of activity is represented by another cinder cone 40-50 m high being feldspar and clinopyroxene phyric. Inclusions which occur in the comendites vary in size and distribution. The largest and most porphyritic are the trachytes (up to 40 cm) with alkali feldspar phases up to 6 mm and small pyroxenes in the ground mass. The second set of inclusions are smaller (up to 10 cm) and are largely aphyric. The distribution of the inclusions are not uniform, the Broad Acres (C5) lavas contain 2-5 percent. The size of the inclusions decrease from south to north, as does the abundance of the trachytic inclusions. The major element variations in the Naivasha basalts, hawaiites and magmatic inclusions are discussed.

  4. Surface chemistry associated with the cooling and subaerial weathering of recent basalt flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Hochella, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    The surface chemistry of fresh and weathered historical basalt flows was characterized using surface-sensitive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Surfaces of unweathered 1987-1990 flows from the Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, exhibited variable enrichment in Al, Mg, Ca, and F due to the formation of refractory fluoride compounds and pronounced depletion in Si and Fe from the volatilization of SiF4 and FeF3 during cooling. These reactions, as predicted from shifts in thermodynamic equilibrium with temperature, are induced by diffusion of HF from the flow interiors to the cooling surface. The lack of Si loss and solid fluoride formation for recent basalts from the Krafla Volcano, Iceland, suggest HF degassing at higher temperatures. Subsequent short-term subaerial weathering reactions are strongly influenced by the initial surface composition of the flow and therefore its cooling history. Successive samples collected from the 1987 Kilauea flow demonstrated that the fluoridated flow surfaces leached to a predominantly SiO2 composition by natural weathering within one year. These chemically depleted surfaces were also observed on Hawaiian basalt flows dating back to 1801 AD. Solubility and kinetic models, based on thermodynamic and kinetic data for crystalline AlF3, MgF2, and CaF2, support observed elemental depletion rates due to chemical weathering. Additional loss of alkalis from the Hawaiian basalt occurs from incongruent dissolution of the basalt glass substrate during weathering. ?? 1992.

  5. Radiation shielding concrete made of Basalt aggregates.

    PubMed

    Alhajali, S; Yousef, S; Kanbour, M; Naoum, B

    2013-04-01

    In spite of the fact that Basalt is a widespread type of rock, there is very little available information on using it as aggregates for concrete radiation shielding. This paper investigates the possibility of using Basalt for the aforementioned purpose. The results have shown that Basalt could be used successfully for preparing radiation shielding concrete, but some attention should be paid to the choice of the suitable types of Basalt and for the neutron activation problem that could arise in the concrete shield.

  6. Temperature dependence of basalt weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaojun; Hartmann, Jens; Derry, Louis A.; West, A. Joshua; You, Chen-Feng; Long, Xiaoyong; Zhan, Tao; Li, Laifeng; Li, Gen; Qiu, Wenhong; Li, Tao; Liu, Lianwen; Chen, Yang; Ji, Junfeng; Zhao, Liang; Chen, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The homeostatic balance of Earth's long-term carbon cycle and the equable state of Earth's climate are maintained by negative feedbacks between the levels of atmospheric CO2 and the chemical weathering rate of silicate rocks. Though clearly demonstrated by well-controlled laboratory dissolution experiments, the temperature dependence of silicate weathering rates, hypothesized to play a central role in these weathering feedbacks, has been difficult to quantify clearly in natural settings at landscape scale. By compiling data from basaltic catchments worldwide and considering only inactive volcanic fields (IVFs), here we show that the rate of CO2 consumption associated with the weathering of basaltic rocks is strongly correlated with mean annual temperature (MAT) as predicted by chemical kinetics. Relations between temperature and CO2 consumption rate for active volcanic fields (AVFs) are complicated by other factors such as eruption age, hydrothermal activity, and hydrological complexities. On the basis of this updated data compilation we are not able to distinguish whether or not there is a significant runoff control on basalt weathering rates. Nonetheless, the simple temperature control as observed in this global dataset implies that basalt weathering could be an effective mechanism for Earth to modulate long-term carbon cycle perturbations.

  7. Occurrence and mineral chemistry of high pressure phases, Portrillo basalt, southcentral New Mexico. M.S. Thesis. Final Technical Report, 1 Jun. 1978 - 31 May 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffer, J. M.; Ortiz, T. S.

    1980-01-01

    Inclusions of clinopyroxenite, kaersutiteclinopyroxenite, kaersutite-rich inclusions, wehrlite and olivine-clinopyroxenite together with megacrysts of feldspar, kaersutite and spinel are found loose on the flanks of cinder cones, as inclusions within lava flows and within the cores of volcanic bombs in the Quaternary alkali-olivine basalt of the West Potrillo Mountains, southcentral New Mexico. Based on petrological and geochemical evidence the megacysts are interpreted to be phenocrysts which formed at great depth rather that xenocrysts of larger crystal aggregates. These large crystals are believed to have formed as stable phases at high temperature and pressure and have partially reacted with the basalt to produce subhedral to anhedral crystal boundaries. It can be demonstrated that the mafic and ultramafic crystal aggregates were derived from an alkali-basalt source rock generated in the mantle. The inclusions are believed to represent a cumulus body or bodies injected within the lower crust or upper mantle.

  8. Hydrothermal alkali metal catalyst recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Eakman, James M.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.

    1979-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles primarily in the form of water soluble alkali metal formates by treating the particles with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of added carbon monoxide. During the treating process the water insoluble alkali metal compounds comprising the insoluble alkali metal residues are converted into water soluble alkali metal formates. The resultant aqueous solution containing water soluble alkali metal formates is then separated from the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment process, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal formates serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. This process permits increased recovery of alkali metal constituents, thereby decreasing the overall cost of the gasification process by reducing the amount of makeup alkali metal compounds necessary.

  9. Trace elements in ocean ridge basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, R. W.; Hubbard, N. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of the trace elements found in ocean ridge basalts. General assumptions regarding melting behavior, trace element fractionation, and alteration effects are presented. Data on the trace elements are grouped according to refractory lithophile elements, refractory siderophile elements, and volatile metals. Variations in ocean ridge basalt chemistry are noted both for regional and temporal characteristics. Ocean ridge basalts are compared to other terrestrial basalts, such as those having La/Yb ratios greater than those of chondrites, and those having La/Yb ratios less than those of chondrites. It is found that (1) as compared to solar or chondrite ratios, ocean ridge basalts have low ratios of large, highly-charged elements to smaller less highly-charged elements, (2) ocean ridge basalts exhibit low ratios of volatile to nonvolatile elements, and (3) the transition metals Cr through Zn in ocean ridge basalts are not fractionated more than a factor of 2 or 3 from the chondritic abundance ratios.

  10. Electrolytic method to make alkali alcoholates using ion conducting alkali electrolyte/separator

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Ashok V.; Balagopal, Shekar; Pendelton, Justin

    2011-12-13

    Alkali alcoholates, also called alkali alkoxides, are produced from alkali metal salt solutions and alcohol using a three-compartment electrolytic cell. The electrolytic cell includes an anolyte compartment configured with an anode, a buffer compartment, and a catholyte compartment configured with a cathode. An alkali ion conducting solid electrolyte configured to selectively transport alkali ions is positioned between the anolyte compartment and the buffer compartment. An alkali ion permeable separator is positioned between the buffer compartment and the catholyte compartment. The catholyte solution may include an alkali alcoholate and alcohol. The anolyte solution may include at least one alkali salt. The buffer compartment solution may include a soluble alkali salt and an alkali alcoholate in alcohol.

  11. Process for recovering alkali metals and sulfur from alkali metal sulfides and polysulfides

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard; Alvare, Javier

    2016-10-25

    Alkali metals and sulfur may be recovered from alkali monosulfide and polysulfides in an electrolytic process that utilizes an electrolytic cell having an alkali ion conductive membrane. An anolyte solution includes an alkali monosulfide, an alkali polysulfide, or a mixture thereof and a solvent that dissolves elemental sulfur. A catholyte includes molten alkali metal. Applying an electric current oxidizes sulfide and polysulfide in the anolyte compartment, causes alkali metal ions to pass through the alkali ion conductive membrane to the catholyte compartment, and reduces the alkali metal ions in the catholyte compartment. Liquid sulfur separates from the anolyte solution and may be recovered. The electrolytic cell is operated at a temperature where the formed alkali metal and sulfur are molten.

  12. Thermoluminescence dating of Hawaiian basalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Rodd James

    1979-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of plagioclase separates from 11 independently dated alkalic basalts 4,500 years to 3.3 million years old and 17 tholeiitic basalts 16 years to 450,000 years old from the Hawaiian Islands were investigated for the purpose of developing a TL dating method for young volcanic rocks. Ratios of natural to artificial TL intensity, when normalized for natural radiation dose rates, were used to quantify the thermoluminescence response of individual samples for age-determination purposes. The TL ratios for the alkalic basalt plagioclase were found to increase with age at a predictable exponential rate that permits the use of the equation for the best-fit line through a plot of the TL ratios relative to known age as a TL age equation. The equation is applicable to rocks ranging in composition from basaltic andesite to trachyte over the age range from about 2,000 to at least 250,000 years before present (B.P.). The TL ages for samples older than 50,000 years have a calculated precision of less than :t 10 percent and a potential estimated accuracy relative to potassium-argon ages of approximately :t 10 percent. An attempt to develop a similar dating curve for the tholeiitic basalts was not as successful, primarily because the dose rates are on the average lower than those for the alkalic basalts by a factor of 6, resulting in lower TL intensities in the tholeiitic basalts for samples of equivalent age, and also because the age distribution of dated material is inadequate. The basic TL properties of the plagioclase from the two rock types are similar, however, and TL dating of tholeiitic basalts should eventually be feasible over the age range 10,000 to at least 200,000 years B.P. The average composition of the plagioclase separates from the alkalic basalts ranges from oligoclase to andesine; compositional variations within this range have no apparent effect on the TL ratios. The average composition of the plagioclase from the tholeiitic

  13. Flood basalts and extinction events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1993-01-01

    The largest known effusive eruptions during the Cenozoic and Mesozoic Eras, the voluminous flood basalts, have long been suspected as being associated with major extinctions of biotic species. Despite the possible errors attached to the dates in both time series of events, the significance level of the suspected correlation is found here to be 1 percent to 4 percent. Statistically, extinctions lag eruptions by a mean time interval that is indistinguishable from zero, being much less than the average residual derived from the correlation analysis. Oceanic flood basalts, however, must have had a different biological impact, which is still uncertain owing to the small number of known examples and differing physical factors. Although not all continental flood basalts can have produced major extinction events, the noncorrelating eruptions may have led to smaller marine extinction events that terminated at least some of the less catastrophically ending geologic stages. Consequently, the 26 Myr quasi-periodicity seen in major marine extinctions may be only a sampling effect, rather than a manifestation of underlying periodicity.

  14. Alkali and transition metal phospholides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezkishko, I. A.; Zagidullin, A. A.; Milyukov, V. A.; Sinyashin, O. G.

    2014-06-01

    Major tendencies in modern chemistry of alkali and transition metal phospholides (phosphacyclopentadienides) are systematized, analyzed and generalized. Basic methods of synthesis of these compounds are presented. Their chemical properties are considered with a special focus on their complexing ability. Potential applications of phospholides and their derivatives are discussed. The bibliography includes 184 references.

  15. Flood Basalts and Neoproterozoic Glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, G. P.; Cox, G. M.; Kunzmann, M.; Strauss, J. V.; Macdonald, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Large igneous provinces (LIPs), which are commonly associated with supercontinental break-up, are the product of the emplacement of >106 km3 of mafic rocks in less than a few million years. LIP magmatism, in particular continental flood basalt (CFB) volcanism, perturbs global climate on shorter time scales through the radiative effects of degassed SO2 and CO2. On longer time scales, CFBs alter climate through the effect of the high weatherabilty of mafic rocks (5-10 times greater than average continental crust) on global silicate weathering. A link between flood basalt weathering, Rodinia break-up, and Neoproterozoic snowball glaciation has been postulated. Here we present a new compilation of Nd isotope data on Neoproterozoic mudstones from Laurentia, Australia, and South China along with a new seawater strontium isotope record from well preserved carbonates that support this hypothesis. These datasets are consistent with an outsized role of basalt weathering on the global silicate weathering budget during the second half of the Tonian period (~850 to 725 Ma). Along with Os isotope data, they also suggest that an additional pulse of basalt weathering at the end of the Tonian may have initiated the Sturtian snowball glaciation. CFBs have relatively high concentrations of phosphorous. Hence, the drawdown in atmospheric CO2 required to trigger the Sturtian snowball Earth was likely accomplished through a combination of increased silicate weathering rates and enhanced biological productivity driven by greater nutrient supply to the oceans. CFBs were also the likely source of the iron in Neoproterozoic iron formation (IF), all significant occurrences of which are restricted to Sturtian-aged glacial successions. Dramatic declines in ɛNd following the Cryogenian snowball glaciations are mirrored by stepwise increases in 87Sr/86Sr, reflecting the scouring of the continents by global ice sheets. This continental resurfacing removed the extensive basalt carapace as well as

  16. Electron- and Photon-stimulated Desorption of Alkali Atoms from Lunar Sample and a Model Mineral Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakshinskiy, B. V.; Madey, T. E.

    2003-01-01

    We report recent results on an investigation of source mechanisms for the origin of alkali atoms in the tenuous planetary atmospheres, with focus on non-thermal processes (photon stimulated desorption (PSD), electron stimulated desorption (ESD), and ion sputtering). Whereas alkaline earth oxides (MgO, CaO) are far more abundant in lunar samples than alkali oxides (Na2O, K2O), the atmosphere of the Moon contains easily measurable concentrations of Na and K, while Ca and Mg are undetected there; traces of Ca have recently been seen in the Moon's atmosphere (10-3 of Na). The experiments have included ESD, PSD and ion sputtering of alkali atoms from model mineral surface (amorphous SiO2) and from a lunar basalt sample obtained from NASA. The comparison is made between ESD and PSD efficiency of monovalent alkalis (Na, K) and divalent alkaline earths (Ba, Ca).The ultrahigh vacuum measurement scheme for ESD and PSD of Na atoms includes a highly sensitive alkali metal detector based on surface ionization, and a time-of-flight technique. For PSD measurements, a mercury arc light source (filtered and chopped) is used. We find that bombardment of the alkali covered surfaces by ultraviolet photons or by low energy electrons (E>4 eV) causes desorption of hot alkali atoms. This results are consistent with the model developed to explain our previous measurements of sodium desorption from a silica surface and from water ice: electron- or photon-induced charge transfer from the substrate to the ionic adsorbate causes formation of a neutral alkali atom in a repulsive configuration, from which desorption occurs. The two-electron charge transfer to cause desorption of divalent alkaline eath ions is a less likely process.The data support the suggestion that PSD by UV solar photons is a dominant source process for alkalis in the tenuous lunar atmosphere.

  17. Primitive and contaminated basalts from the Southern Rocky Mountains, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doe, B.R.; Lipman, P.W.; Hedge, C.E.; Kurasawa, H.

    1969-01-01

    Basalts in the Southern Rocky Mountains province have been analyzed to determine if any of them are primitive. Alkali plagioclase xenocrysts armored with calcic plagioclase seem to be the best petrographic indicator of contamination. The next best indicator of contamination is quartz xenocrysts armored with clinopyroxene. On the rocks and the region studied, K2O apparently is the only major element with promise of separating primitive basalt from contaminated basalt inasmuch as it constitutes more than 1 % in all the obviously contaminated basalts. K2O: lead (> 4 ppm) and thorium (> 2 ppm) contents and Rb/Sr (> 0.035) are the most indicative of the trace elements studied. Using these criteria, three basalt samples are primitive (although one contains 1.7% K2O) and are similar in traceelement contents to Hawaiian and Eastern Honshu, Japan, primitive basalts. Contamination causes lead isotope ratios, 206Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb, to become less radiogenic, but it has little or no effect on 87Sr/86Sr. We interpret the effect on lead isotopes to be due to assimilation either of lower crustal granitic rocks, which contain 5-10 times as much lead as basalt and which have been low in U/Pb and Th/Pb since Precambrian times, or of upper crustal Precambrian or Paleozoic rocks, which have lost much of their radiogenic lead because of heating prior to assimilation. The lack of definite effects on strontium isotopes may be due to the lesser strontium contents of granitic crustal rocks relative to basaltic rocks coupled with lack of a large radiogenic enrichment in the crustal rocks. Lead isotope ratios were found to be less radiogenic in plagioclase separates from an obviously contaminated basalt than in the primitive basalts. The feldspar separate that is rich in sodic plagioclase xenocrysts was found to be similar to the whole-rock composition for 206Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb whereas a more dense fraction probably enriched in more calcic plagioclase phenocrysts is more similar

  18. Petrogenesis of Luna 16 aluminous mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, M.-S.; Schmitt, R. A.; Nielsen, R. L.; Taylor, G. J.; Warner, R. D.; Keil, K.

    1979-01-01

    Bulk compositions, petrology and mineralogy of Luna 16 aluminous mare basalt particles of less than 0.5 mm are described. The data rule out any close genetic relationships between Luna 16 and other major types of lunar mare basalts. Compared to high-Ti mare basalts, the Luna 16 basalts contain lower TiO2 and Ta and higher Al2O3 and REE abundances, suggesting that the Luna 16 source rocks crystallized later than (i.e. stratigraphically above) the ilmenite-bearing high-Ti basalt cumulate source rocks. The REE pattern for the Luna 16 basalts requires that the source material from which they were derived crystallized from a light REE enriched magma.

  19. Basaltic volcanism - The importance of planet size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D.; Stolper, E. M.; Hays, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The volumetrically abundant basalts on the earth, its moon, and the eucrite parent planet all have chemical compositions that are controlled to a large extent by dry, low-pressure, crystal-liquid equilibria. Since this generalization is valid for these three planetary bodies, we infer that it may also apply to the other unsampled terrestrial planets. Other characteristics of basaltic volcanism show variations which appear to be related to planet size: the eruption temperatures, degrees of fractionation, and chemical variety of basalts and the endurance of basaltic volcanism all increase with planet size. Although the processes responsible for chemical differences between basalt suites are known, no simple systematization of the chemical differences between basalts from planet to planet has emerged.

  20. Characterization of reference Umtanum and Cohassett basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.C.; Johnston, R.G.; Strope, M.B.

    1985-02-01

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) Materials Testing Group (MTG) provides large quantities of reference basalt for testing waste package materials under repository conditions, site sorption characteristics and other experimental purposes. This document describes the reference rock materials currently used in testing, namely entablature and colonnade basalt from the Umtanum and Cohassett flows. The data include sampling locations, bulk chemical composition, modal percentages of major phases, and the chemical and mineralogical compositions of these phases. 8 refs., 17 figs., 15 tabs.

  1. The Use of Basalt, Basalt Fibers and Modified Graphite for Nuclear Waste Repository - 12150

    SciTech Connect

    Gulik, V.I.; Biland, A.B.

    2012-07-01

    New materials enhancing the isolation of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel are continuously being developed.. Our research suggests that basalt-based materials, including basalt roving chopped basalt fiber strands, basalt composite rebar and materials based on modified graphite, could be used for enhancing radioactive waste isolation during the storage and disposal phases and maintaining it during a significant portion of the post-closure phase. The basalt vitrification process of nuclear waste is a viable alternative to glass vitrification. Basalt roving, chopped basalt fiber strands and basalt composite rebars can significantly increase the strength and safety characteristics of nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel storages. Materials based on MG are optimal waterproofing materials for nuclear waste containers. (authors)

  2. Mare basalt magma source region and mare basalt magma genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, A.B.

    1982-11-15

    Given the available data, we find that the wide range of mare basaltic material characteristics can be explained by a model in which: (1) The mare basalt magma source region lies between the crust-mantle boundary and a maximum depth of 200 km and consists of a relatively uniform peridotite containing 73--80% olivine, 11--14% pyroxene, 4--8% plagioclase, 0.2--9% ilmenite and 1--1.5% chromite. (2) The source region consists of two or more density-graded rhythmic bands, whose compositions grade from that of the very low TiO/sub 2/ magma source regions (0.2% ilmenite) to that of the very high TiO/sub 2/ magma source regions (9% ilmenite). These density-graded bands are proposed to have formed as co-crystallizing olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase, ilmenite, and chromite settled out of a convecting magma (which was also parental to the crust) in which these crystals were suspended. Since the settling rates of the different minerals were governed by Stoke's law, the heavier minerals settled out more rapidly and therefore earlier than the lighter minerals. Thus the crystal assemblages deposited nearest the descending side of each convection cell were enriched in heavy ilmenite and chromite with respect to lighter olivine and pyroxene and very much lighter plagioclase. The reverse being the case for those units deposited near the ascending sides of the convection cells.

  3. Subseafloor basalts as fungal habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivarsson, M.; Bengtson, S.

    2013-12-01

    The oceanic crust makes up the largest potential habitat for life on Earth, yet next to nothing is known about the abundance, diversity and ecology of its biosphere. Our understanding of the deep biosphere of subseafloor crust is, with a few exceptions, based on a fossil record. Surprisingly, a majority of the fossilized microorganisms have been interpreted or recently re-interpreted as remnants of fungi rather than prokaryotes. Even though this might be due to a bias in fossilization the presence of fungi in these settings can not be neglected. We have examined fossilized microorganisms in drilled basalt samples collected at the Emperor Seamounts in the Pacific Ocean. Synchrotron-radiation X-ray tomography microscopy (SRXTM) studies has revealed a complex morphology and internal structure that corresponds to characteristic fungal morphology. Chitin was detected in the fossilized hyphae, which is another strong argument in favour of a fungal interpretation. Chitin is absent in prokaryotes but a substantial constituent in fungal cell walls. The fungal colonies consist of both hyphae and yeast-like growth states as well as resting structures and possible fruit bodies, thus, the fungi exist in vital colonies in subseafloor basalts. The fungi have also been involved in extensive weathering of secondary mineralisations. In terrestrial environments fungi are known as an important geobiological agent that promotes mineral weathering and decomposition of organic matter, and they occur in vital symbiosis with other microorganisms. It is probable to assume that fungi would play a similar role in subseafloor basalts and have great impact on the ecology and on biogeochemical cycles in such environments.

  4. Origin of the Grande Ronde Basalts, Columbia River Basalt Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, S. R.; Sen, G.; Reidel, S. P.

    2005-12-01

    The Columbia River basalts are generally thought to have formed by plume melting. Takahashi et al. (1998) suggested that the near-aphyric Grande Ronde Basalts (GR), which comprise ~63% of the CRBG, are essentially primary melts formed by nearly complete fusion of eclogite source rock in the plume and that such melting took place ~2.0 GPa. Durand and Sen (2002) examined phenocrysts and whole rock analyses and concluded that all the basalts are non-primary and, more importantly, that they underwent significant "processing" in shallow crustal magma chambers which erased their higher pressure geochemical signal, thus casting doubt on the validity of the eclogitic plume melting model. Here we report the results of our efforts to simulate the higher pressure histories of GR basalts using COMAGMAT and MELTS software. Our intent was to evaluate (1) whether such melts could be derived from primary melts formed by partial melting of a peridotite source as an alternative to the eclogite model, or if bulk melting of eclogite is required; and (2) at what pressure such primary melts could have been in equilibrium with the mantle. We carried out both forward and inverse modeling. In the forward models we chose different starting melt compositions, all produced in laboratory experiments, from peridotite vs. eclogitic sources. Our starting melts were produced by 6-17% partial melting of the peridotite KLB-1 (Hirose and Kushiro, 1993) and 18-40% melting of eclogites (77SL-582; CRB72-31; Keshav et al., 2004; Takahashi et al., 1998) at 1-3.0 GPa. In a second model, our starting melt composition was the most primitive GR lava with 6.5 wt. % MgO. We extrapolated a linear regression through the GR data to 8 wt. % MgO. We then assumed that such a melt was only olivine-equilibrated, and incrementally added olivine while maintaining equilibrium between olivine and melt using a Kd of 0.3, until a melt in equilibrium with the mantle olivine (Fo89) was found. This composition was fractionated

  5. Alkali metal/sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Joginder N.

    1978-01-01

    Alkali metal/sulfur batteries in which the electrolyte-separator is a relatively fragile membrane are improved by providing means for separating the molten sulfur/sulfide catholyte from contact with the membrane prior to cooling the cell to temperatures at which the catholyte will solidify. If the catholyte is permitted to solidify while in contact with the membrane, the latter may be damaged. The improvement permits such batteries to be prefilled with catholyte and shipped, at ordinary temperatures.

  6. Understanding highly explosive basaltic eruptions: Evidence from olivine-hosted melt inclusions from Sunset Crater, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, C. M.; Roggensack, K.; Clarke, A. B.; Alfano, F.

    2013-12-01

    Basaltic scoria cone volcanoes are the most abundant volcanic landform on Earth and occur in all tectonic settings. Basaltic magmas have lower viscosities, higher temperatures, and lower volatile contents than silicic magmas, and therefore generally have a lower potential for explosive activity. However, basaltic eruptions display great variability, from mild lava flows to more energetic explosions with large plumes. The mechanism controlling highly explosive basaltic eruptions, such as the ca. 1085 AD eruption of Sunset Crater, is poorly understood. Processes or conditions such as high volatile content in the source magma, injection of a compositionally distinct magma at depth, interaction with shallow magma reservoirs, or rapid crystallization and/or bubble nucleation in the shallow subsurface could increase explosivity of basaltic magmas. One method to test these hypotheses is melt inclusion analysis in order to constrain initial melt composition, volatile content and minimum storage depth. The San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) in northern Arizona, active from 6 Ma-present, consists of over 600 volcanoes - mainly alkali basalt scoria cones along with five silicic centers. The eruption of Sunset Crater in the SFVF during the Holocene was an anomalously large basaltic explosive eruption, consisting of >8 explosive phases and 3 lava flows. Typical scoria cone-forming eruptions produce <0.1 km3 DRE of material, while the Sunset Crater tephra deposit is on the order of ~0.3 km3 DRE, with each phase characterized by volumes of 0.02-0.08 km3 DRE. The phases vary in size and style; the beginning stages of explosive activity (phases 1-2) were considerably smaller than phases 3-5, classified as subplinian. Because of the young age and desert setting of the volcano, the eruptive material is fresh and the deposit is well preserved. The bulk composition is an alkali basalt with Mg# 74. We studied 40 primary melt inclusions (MIs) hosted in 36 olivine crystals 0.5-2 mm in

  7. Modeling Central American basalts using the Arc Basalt Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigenson, M.; Carr, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    We have used the Arc Basalt Simulator (ABS), developed by JI Kimura, to explore the conditions and components of melting beneath the Central American volcanic front. ABS is a comprehensive forward model that incorporates slab dehydration and melting and mantle wedge fluxing and melting using realistic P-T conditions and experimentally determined phase relations. We have applied ABS versions 3 and 4 to model representative magma types in Nicaragua, which span a broad geochemical range including proximal high- and low-Ti lavas in Nicaragua. Sr-Nd-Pb data require appropriate selection of previously identified sources, including: separate carbonate and hemipelagic sediments, DMM, an enriched mantle isotopically similar to the alkaline basalts of Yojoa, a Himu-influenced mantle derived from Galapagos material and altered oceanic crust (AOC) derived from both MORB and Galapagos seamounts. Following the dry solidus, the dominant arc basalts, exemplified by Cerro Negro lavas, can be generated at about 80-90 km where lawsonite and zoisite break down, releasing LILEs into a hydrous fluid that travels into the wedge. The fluid-triggered melting occurs just above the garnet stability field in the wedge to fit the HREEs. Below 90 Km, slab melting begins and the AOC component dominates, generating a fluid with little or no HFSE depletions, consistent with the unusual high-Ti lavas found in Nicaragua. However, the isotopic data require a much lower sediment input for the high-Ti lavas (consistent with 10Be results on the high-Ti lavas) and an enriched component for the AOC and/or mantle wedge. Following the wet solidus, fits to the Cerro Negro magma only occur in the absence of phengite in the AOC and with the presence of HFSE attracting minerals, rutile, zircon and allanite. The depth of the best fit is 135 km, consistent with current best estimates of the depth to the seismic zone beneath Cerro Negro. Below 150 km, the high-Ti lavas can be generated if the HFSE retaining

  8. Carbonate Mineralization of Volcanic Province Basalts

    SciTech Connect

    Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, B. Peter; Owen, Antionette T.

    2010-03-31

    Flood basalts are receiving increasing attention as possible host formations for geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2, with studies underway in the United States, India, Iceland, and Canada. As an extension of our previous experiments with Columbia River basalt, basalts from the eastern United States, India, and South Africa were reacted with aqueous dissolved CO2 and aqueous dissolved CO2-H2S mixtures under supercritical CO2 (scCO2) conditions to study the geochemical reactions resulting from injection of CO2 in such formations. The results of these studies are consistent with cation release behavior measured in our previous experiments (in press) for basalt samples tested in single pass flow through dissolution experiments under dilute solution and mildly acidic conditions. Despite the basalt samples having similar bulk chemistry, mineralogy and apparent dissolution kinetics, long-term static experiments show significant differences in rates of mineralization as well as compositions and morphologies of precipitates that form when the basalts are reacted with CO2-saturated water. For example, basalt from the Newark Basin in the United States was by far the most reactive of any basalt tested to date. Carbonate reaction products for the Newark Basin basalt were globular in form and contained significantly more Fe than the secondary carbonates that precipitated on the other basalt samples. In comparison, the post-reacted samples associated with the Columbia River basalts from the United States contained calcite grains with classic dogtooth spar morphology and trace cation substitution (Mg and Mn). Carbonation of the other basalts produced precipitates with compositions that varied chemically throughout the entire testing period. Examination of polished cross sections of the reacted grains by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy show precipitate overgrowths with varying chemical compositions. Compositional differences in the

  9. Volcanogenic trace element volatiles in basalts

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, S.; Reed, G.W. Jr.

    1984-03-01

    Br, Hg, As, Se, Sb, Zn, and Cu were measured in samples of mid-ocean ridge (MOR) and ocean island basalt. To assess sea-water effects glassy rinds and crystalline interiors of pillow basalts were measured as was subaerial glass from Kilauea volcano. Preliminary results are reported. 6 references, 3 figures. (ACR)

  10. A high 87Sr 86Sr mantle source for low alkali tholeiite, northern Great Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mark, R.K.; Lee, Hu C.; Bowman, H.R.; Asaro, F.; McKee, E.H.; Coats, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    Olivine tholeiites, the youngest Tertiary units (about 8-11 m.y. old) at five widely spaced localities in northeastern Nevada, are geologically related to the basalts of the Snake River Plain, Idaho, to the north and are similar in major element and alkali chemistry to mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) and island arc tholeiites. The measured K (1250-3350 ppm), Rb (1??9-6??2 ppm) and Sr (140-240 ppm) concentrations overlap the range reported for MORB. Three of the five samples have low, unfractionated rare earth element (REE) patterns, the other two show moderate light-REE enrichment. Barium concentration is high and variable (100-780 ppm) and does not correlate with the other LIL elements. The rocks have 87Sr/86Sr = 0??7052-0??7076, considerably higher than MORB (~0??702-0??703). These samples are chemically distinct (i.e. less alkalic) from the olivine tholeiites from the adjacent Snake River Plain, but their Sr isotopic compositions are similar. They contain Sr that is distinctly more radiogenic than the basalts from the adjacent Great Basin. About 10 b.y. would be required for the mean measured Rb/Sr (~ 0??02) of these samples to generate, in a closed system, the radiogenic Sr they contain. The low alkali content of these basalts makes crustal contamination an unlikely mechanism. If the magma is uncontaminated, the time-averaged Rb/Sr of the source material must have been ~0??04. A significant decrease in Rb/Sr of the source material (a factor 2??) thus most probably occurred in the relatively recent (1??09 yr) past. Such a decrease of Rb/Sr in the mantle could accompany alkali depletion produced by an episode of partial melting and magma extraction. In contrast, low 87Sr 86Sr ratios indicate that the source material of the mid-ocean ridge basalts may have been depleted early in the Earth's history. ?? 1975.

  11. The chemistry of zircon: Variations within and between large crystals from syenite and alkali basalt xenoliths

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, R.W.; Upton, B.G.J. )

    1991-11-01

    Single grains of zircon can contain zones indicating several generations of crystal growth, each of which should reflect the chemical and physical conditions occurring at the time of its formation. Trace element analyses have been made of large zircon crystals from rocks of alkaline affinities by ion microprobe. The chondrite-normalized rare earth element (REE) concentrations increase rapidly from La to Lu, as would be expected from the decrease in ionic radius and consequent easier substitution into the Zr site within the zircon lattice. Lanthanum, praseodymium, and neodymium are considerably lower than values observed in bulk analyses of zircon. The partition coefficients for the light rare earth elements (LREEs), between zircon and melt or whole rock, must therefore be significantly lower than those calculated using bulk analyses. Cerium is enriched relative to neighboring REEs due to the presence of Ce{sup 4+}. Estimates of partition coefficients of Ce{sup 3+} and Ce{sup 4+} between zircon and melt demonstrate that although the Ce anomalies are large the Ce{sup 4+}/Ce{sup 3+} ratio is very small (less than 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}). The size of the Ce anomaly is variable and should be capable of providing information on oxygen fugacity changes.

  12. Chemiluminescence from excited c 2- -alkali cation complexes formed in alkali atom-halocarbon flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, K. K.; Balling, L. C.; Wright, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Vapor phase reactions between alkali atoms and several halocarbon molecules containing C-C bonds have been observed to produce chemiluminescence which appears to originate from C 2-- (alkali) + complexes.

  13. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  14. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  15. Shock metamorphism of lunar and terrestrial basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaal, R. B.; Hoerz, F.

    1977-01-01

    Lonar Crater (India) basalt and lunar basalt 75035 were shock loaded under controlled laboratory conditions up to 1000 kbar, generally in a CO/CO2 (1:1) environment evacuated to 10 to the minus seventh power torr. The Kieffer et al. (1976) classification scheme of progressive shock metamorphism is found to apply to lunar basalts. The major shock features of the five classes that span the range 0 to 1000 kbar are described. Only three out of 152 basalt specimens show shock effects in their natural state as severe as Class 2 features. The scarcity of shocked basalt hand samples in contrast to the abundance of shock-produced agglutinates and homogeneous glass spheres in the lunar regolith indicates the dominant role of micrometeorite impact in the evolution of the lunar regolith. The overall glass content in asteroidal and Mercurian regoliths is considered.

  16. Water Content of Lunar Alkali Fedlspar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, R. D.; Simon, J. I.; Wang, J.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Hauri, E. H.

    2016-01-01

    Detection of indigenous hydrogen in a diversity of lunar materials, including volcanic glass, melt inclusions, apatite, and plagioclase suggests water may have played a role in the chemical differentiation of the Moon. Spectroscopic data from the Moon indicate a positive correlation between water and Th. Modeling of lunar magma ocean crystallization predicts a similar chemical differentiation with the highest levels of water in the K- and Th-rich melt residuum of the magma ocean (i.e. urKREEP). Until now, the only sample-based estimates of water content of KREEP-rich magmas come from measurements of OH, F, and Cl in lunar apatites, which suggest a water concentration of < 1 ppm in urKREEP. Using these data, predict that the bulk water content of the magma ocean would have <10 ppm. In contrast, estimate water contents of 320 ppm for the bulk Moon and 1.4 wt % for urKREEP from plagioclase in ferroan anorthosites. Results and interpretation: NanoSIMS data from granitic clasts from Apollo sample 15405,78 show that alkali feldspar, a common mineral in K-enriched rocks, can have approx. 20 ppm of water, which implies magmatic water contents of approx. 1 wt % in the high-silica magmas. This estimate is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that estimated from apatite in similar rocks. However, the Cl and F contents of apatite in chemically similar rocks suggest that these melts also had high Cl/F ratios, which leads to spuriously low water estimates from the apatite. We can only estimate the minimum water content of urKREEP (+ bulk Moon) from our alkali feldspar data because of the unknown amount of degassing that led to the formation of the granites. Assuming a reasonable 10 to 100 times enrichment of water from urKREEP into the granites produces an estimate of 100-1000 ppm of water for the urKREEP reservoir. Using the modeling of and the 100-1000 ppm of water in urKREEP suggests a minimum bulk silicate Moon water content between 2 and 20 ppm. However, hydrogen loss was

  17. Heterogeneity in titaniferous lunar basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D.; Longhi, J.; Hays, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    Small but real chemical differences exist between subsamples of fine-grained quench-textured titaniferous lunar basalts. The existence of different textural domains with different chemistries is thought to account for most of this variation. In addition to the textural domains, lunar sample 74275 has a population of olivine 'megacrysts' as well as dunite fragments. These materials are thought to be extraneous and to compromise the primary nature of 74275. Recognition of the small chemical variations present may aid in understanding some discrepancies in the experimental-petrology literature. However, these small variations have a distressing petrogenetic significance since they severely limit resolution in recognizing the number and depth of origin of primary magmas.

  18. Alkali-Metal Spin Maser.

    PubMed

    Chalupczak, W; Josephs-Franks, P

    2015-07-17

    Quantum measurement is a combination of a read-out and a perturbation of the quantum system. We explore the nonlinear spin dynamics generated by a linearly polarized probe beam in a continuous measurement of the collective spin state in a thermal alkali-metal atomic sample. We demonstrate that the probe-beam-driven perturbation leads, in the presence of indirect pumping, to complete polarization of the sample and macroscopic coherent spin oscillations. As a consequence of the former we report observation of spectral profiles free from collisional broadening. Nonlinear dynamics is studied through exploring its effect on radio frequency as well as spin noise spectra. PMID:26230788

  19. Alkali-Metal Spin Maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalupczak, W.; Josephs-Franks, P.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum measurement is a combination of a read-out and a perturbation of the quantum system. We explore the nonlinear spin dynamics generated by a linearly polarized probe beam in a continuous measurement of the collective spin state in a thermal alkali-metal atomic sample. We demonstrate that the probe-beam-driven perturbation leads, in the presence of indirect pumping, to complete polarization of the sample and macroscopic coherent spin oscillations. As a consequence of the former we report observation of spectral profiles free from collisional broadening. Nonlinear dynamics is studied through exploring its effect on radio frequency as well as spin noise spectra.

  20. Basalt CO2 Sequestration: Using Wireline Logs to Identify Subsurface Continental Flood Basalt Lithofacies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, E. C.; Finn, S.; Davis, K. N.; Segovia, A. I.

    2010-12-01

    The flows of the Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) of the northwest United States are an important example of reactive flood basalts that are attractive targets for sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Brecciated flow tops and dense flow interiors form layered regional aquifer systems in the Columbia Basin that have the potential to sequester gigatons of supercritical CO2 where they contain non-potable water and are at depths of greater than 800m. The demonstrated chemical reactivity of these continental flood basalts with supercritical CO2 in laboratory experiments suggests that part of the sequestered CO2 will be permanently entombed as carbonate minerals. Here we report on the use of conventional wire-line log data, along with full waveform sonic and resistivity-based image logs to identify subsurface basalt stratigraphy and lithofacies relevant to CO2 sequestration. We compare borehole data from the 2009 Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership basalt pilot well near Wallula, Washington U.S.A. with regional outcrop analogs to determine patterns for recognizing basalt lithofacies in the subsurface. We examine quick-look techniques recently proposed for hydrocarbon exploration in basalt terranes and show that rescaled shear and compressional sonic log curves, which reflect changes in bulk modulus, appear to provide a robust tool for the identification of subsurface CRBG basalt lithofacies Resistivity-based Image Log of Vesicular Basalt and Fractures From the Wallula Basalt Pilot Well

  1. Mare Basaltic Magmatism: A View from the Sample Suite With and Without a Remote-Sensing Prospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.; Gaddis, L. R.

    1999-01-01

    and will continue to bear fruit are the duration and early history of lunar volcanism and the relationship between mare basalt composition and eruptive history. Although the petrologic record has been obscured by the early catastrophic impact history of the Moon, there is abundant evidence of pre-3.9 Ga nonmare basaltic volcanism [e.g., 7-8]. Most of this record is retained in small clasts from highland soils and breccias or has been identified through remote sensing. The relationship between the samples and units identified through remote sensing is speculative. Further identification and delineation of older episodes of volcanism and their relationship to episodes of crustal plutonism (Mg and alkali suites) is critical to our interpretation of mantle evolution following magma ocean crystallization and prior to the onset of mare volcanism. Combined sample and remote sensing data sets will allow us to better distinguish among the wide range of models that have been proposed for these early periods of lunar magmatism (Mg suite, alkali suite, KREEP basalts). These models include (1) impact origin; (2) magma ocean crystallization; (3) melting and remobilization of late magma ocean cumulates and/or KREEP infiltrated lower crust; (4) melting of the lower portions of the cumulate pile followed by assimilation of KREEP or anorthositic crust; and (5) melting of deep, hybrid mixed cumulate sources. Additional information is contained in the original.

  2. The alkali metals: 200 years of surprises.

    PubMed

    Dye, James L

    2015-03-13

    Alkali metal compounds have been known since antiquity. In 1807, Sir Humphry Davy surprised everyone by electrolytically preparing (and naming) potassium and sodium metals. In 1808, he noted their interaction with ammonia, which, 100 years later, was attributed to solvated electrons. After 1960, pulse radiolysis of nearly any solvent produced solvated electrons, which became one of the most studied species in chemistry. In 1968, alkali metal solutions in amines and ethers were shown to contain alkali metal anions in addition to solvated electrons. The advent of crown ethers and cryptands as complexants for alkali cations greatly enhanced alkali metal solubilities. This permitted us to prepare a crystalline salt of Na(-) in 1974, followed by 30 other alkalides with Na(-), K(-), Rb(-) and Cs(-) anions. This firmly established the -1 oxidation state of alkali metals. The synthesis of alkalides led to the crystallization of electrides, with trapped electrons as the anions. Electrides have a variety of electronic and magnetic properties, depending on the geometries and connectivities of the trapping sites. In 2009, the final surprise was the experimental demonstration that alkali metals under high pressure lose their metallic character as the electrons are localized in voids between the alkali cations to become high-pressure electrides!

  3. The alkali metals: 200 years of surprises.

    PubMed

    Dye, James L

    2015-03-13

    Alkali metal compounds have been known since antiquity. In 1807, Sir Humphry Davy surprised everyone by electrolytically preparing (and naming) potassium and sodium metals. In 1808, he noted their interaction with ammonia, which, 100 years later, was attributed to solvated electrons. After 1960, pulse radiolysis of nearly any solvent produced solvated electrons, which became one of the most studied species in chemistry. In 1968, alkali metal solutions in amines and ethers were shown to contain alkali metal anions in addition to solvated electrons. The advent of crown ethers and cryptands as complexants for alkali cations greatly enhanced alkali metal solubilities. This permitted us to prepare a crystalline salt of Na(-) in 1974, followed by 30 other alkalides with Na(-), K(-), Rb(-) and Cs(-) anions. This firmly established the -1 oxidation state of alkali metals. The synthesis of alkalides led to the crystallization of electrides, with trapped electrons as the anions. Electrides have a variety of electronic and magnetic properties, depending on the geometries and connectivities of the trapping sites. In 2009, the final surprise was the experimental demonstration that alkali metals under high pressure lose their metallic character as the electrons are localized in voids between the alkali cations to become high-pressure electrides! PMID:25666067

  4. Process for the disposal of alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Leroy C.

    1977-01-01

    Large quantities of alkali metals may be safely reacted for ultimate disposal by contact with a hot concentrated caustic solution. The alkali metals react with water in the caustic solution in a controlled reaction while steam dilutes the hydrogen formed by the reaction to a safe level.

  5. Anaglyph: Basalt Cliffs, Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Basalt cliffs along the northwest edge of the Meseta de Somuncura plateau near Sierra Colorada, Argentina show an unusual and striking pattern of erosion. Stereoscopic observation helps to clarify the landform changing processes active here. Many of the cliffs appear to be rock staircases that have the same color as the plateau's basaltic cap rock. Are these the edges of lower layers in the basalt or are they a train of slivers that are breaking off from, then sliding downslope and away from, the cap rock. They appear to be the latter. Close inspection shows that each stair step is too laterally irregular to be a continuous sheet of bedrock like the cap rock. Also, the steps are not flat but instead are little ridges, as one might expect from broken, tilted, and sliding slices of the cap rock. Stream erosion has cut some gullies into the cliffs and vegetation (appears bright in this infrared image) shows that water springs from and flows down some channels, but land sliding is clearly a major agent of erosion here.

    This anaglyph was generated by first draping a Landsat Thematic Mapper image over a topographic map from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, then producing the two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and the right eye with a blue filter.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive. The Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image used here was provided to the SRTM project by the United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center,Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this

  6. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C.

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  7. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, Raymond D.; McPheeters, Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  8. Basaltic Crater in Color IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 6, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image near Nili Fosse in the the Isidis region of Mars. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations. In many cases craters trap sand in their topographic depressions, interrupting the sand's migration across the Martian surface. This image is particularly interesting because there appears to be more than 1 type of sand in the bottom of this crater and in the hummocky terrain near the bottom of the image. The pink/magenta areas are characteristic of a basaltic composition, but there are also orange areas that are likely caused by the presence of andesite. These two compositions, basalt and andesite, are some of the most common found on Mars.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 24, Longitude 80.7 East (297.3 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip

  9. Thermal structure and melting conditions associated with `hot' subduction: Implications from thermobarometry of Garibaldi belt basalts, northern Cascadia Subduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, N. L.

    2005-12-01

    The northern Cascadia margin of North America is the classic example of a "hot" subduction system. The downgoing Juan de Fuca plate decreases in age from ca. 10 m.y. off the central Washington coast to less than 5 m.y. off central Vancouver Island; beneath the Garibaldi volcanic belt (GVB) 250 km east of the convergent margin, inferred age of the oceanic lithosphere decreases northward from ca. 22 m.y to 13 m.y. Primitive and near-primitive mafic lavas, which primarily occur trenchward of the GVB volcanic front, range northward from high-Al olivine tholeiites, Mg-andesites and LILE- and LREE-enriched calc-alkaline basalts at Glacier Peak, through transitional basalts in the Cheakamus Valley to alkali olivine basalts and trachybasalts at Meager Mountain, Salal Glacier and Bridge River. The more northerly GVB basaltic magmas show the least evidence of slab-derived components in their source regions. Application of various olivine-melt and pyroxene-melt thermobarometers to GVB basalts indicates a general increase in magmatic temperatures from 1150-1200 C in Mount Baker and Glacier Peak basalts to 1225-1300 C in Bridge River and Salal Glacier lavas. Fe-Ti oxide thermobarometry suggests that northernmost basalts equilibrated under oxygen fugacities conditions between QFM and NNO, whereas Glacier Peak lavas equilibrated at higher oxygen fugacities (ca. 1 log unit above NNO). Estimated P and T conditions of mantle segregation suggest that GVB basalts ascended from increasingly greater depths northward along the volcanic arc. Similar variation is indicated by calculated P-T of basalt equilibrations with both Mg- and Fe-rich peridotite mineral assemblages, based on diopside and albite activity-composition relations. Estimated mantle equilibration temperatures correlate positively with some HFSE abundances (e.g., Hf), but negatively with those of fluid mobile elements (e.g., Cs and B). These relationships are considered in terms of the influence of slab thermal structure on

  10. The Origin of Noble Gas Isotopic Heterogeneity in Icelandic Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, E. T.; Honda, M.; McDougall, I.

    2001-01-01

    Two models for generation of heterogeneous He, Ne and Ar isotopic ratios in Icelandic basalts are evaluated using a mixing model and the observed noble gas elemental ratios in Icelandic basalts,Ocean island Basalt (OIBs) and Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORBs). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Shock metamorphism of granulated lunar basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaal, R. B.; Thompson, T. D.; Hoerz, F.; Bauer, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The paper deals with an extensive series of shock-recovery experiments performed on both nonporous crystalline basalt and its granulated and sieved counterpart to study the role of porosity and grain size in shock motomorphic effects under otherwise identical conditions. Shocked samples are compared with unshocked starting material in terms of textural and mineralogical modifications attributable to shock. A comparative petrographic and chemical characterization is presented of pulverized and sieved lunar basalt 75035 shocked between 6 and 75 GPa in comparison with holocrystalline disks of the same basalts shocked in 10 earlier experiments. Specifically, a petrographic classification of shock features is given, along with an estimation of relative amounts of shock glasses and a chemical characterization of shock glasses in each shocked granular basalt.

  12. Basalts Dredged from the Northeastern Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Engel, C G; Engel, A E

    1963-06-21

    Volcanic rocks dredged from seamounts, fault ridges, and other major geological features of the northeast Pacific Ocean include a wide variety of basalts. Most of these are vesicular, porphyritic types with near analogues in the Hawaiian and other oceanic islands. In addition, aluminous basalts and diabasic theoleiites impoverished in potassium also occur. There is no simple correlation of composition, degree of oxidation, vesiculation, or hydration of these basalts with texture, or depth of dredge site. Most samples appear to have been extruded at much shallower depths than those now pertaining at the dredge site. The distribution of these basalts suggests that the andesite line coincides with or lies on the continent side of the foot of the continental slope.

  13. Naming Lunar Mare Basalts: Quo Vadimus Redux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, G.

    1999-01-01

    Nearly a decade ago, I noted that the nomenclature of lunar mare basalts was inconsistent, complicated, and arcane. I suggested that this reflected both the limitations of our understanding of the basalts, and the piecemeal progression made in lunar science by the nature of the Apollo missions. Although the word "classification" is commonly attached to various schemes of mare basalt nomenclature, there is still no classification of mare basalts that has any fundamental grounding. We remain basically at a classification of the first kind in the terms of Shand; that is, things have names. Quoting John Stuart Mill, Shand discussed classification of the second kind: "The ends of scientific classification are best answered when the objects are formed into groups respecting which a greater number of propositions can be made, and those propositions more important than could be made respecting any other groups into which the same things could be distributed." Here I repeat some of the main contents of my discussion from a decade ago, and add a further discussion based on events of the last decade. A necessary first step of sample studies that aims to understand lunar mare basalt processes is to associate samples with one another as members of the same igneous event, such as a single eruption lava flow, or differentiation event. This has been fairly successful, and discrete suites have been identified at all mare sites, members that are eruptively related to each other but not to members of other suites. These eruptive members have been given site-specific labels, e.g., Luna24 VLT, Apollo 11 hi-K, A12 olivine basalts, and Apollo 15 Green Glass C. This is classification of the first kind, but is not a useful classification of any other kind. At a minimum, a classification is inclusive (all objects have a place) and exclusive (all objects have only one place). The answer to "How should rocks be classified?" is far from trivial, for it demands a fundamental choice about nature

  14. Basalts Dredged from the Northeastern Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Engel, C G; Engel, A E

    1963-06-21

    Volcanic rocks dredged from seamounts, fault ridges, and other major geological features of the northeast Pacific Ocean include a wide variety of basalts. Most of these are vesicular, porphyritic types with near analogues in the Hawaiian and other oceanic islands. In addition, aluminous basalts and diabasic theoleiites impoverished in potassium also occur. There is no simple correlation of composition, degree of oxidation, vesiculation, or hydration of these basalts with texture, or depth of dredge site. Most samples appear to have been extruded at much shallower depths than those now pertaining at the dredge site. The distribution of these basalts suggests that the andesite line coincides with or lies on the continent side of the foot of the continental slope. PMID:17802173

  15. Basalts dredged from the northeastern Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, C.G.; Engel, A.E.J.

    1963-01-01

    Volcanic rocks dredged from seamounts, fault ridges, and other major geological features of the northeast Pacific Ocean include a wide variety of basalts. Most of these are vesicular, porphyritic types with near analogues in the Hawaiian and other oceanic islands. in addition, aluminous basalts and diabasic tholeiites impoverished in potassium also occur. There is no simple correlation of composition, degree of oxidation, vesiculation, or hydration of these basalts with texture, or depth of dredge site. Most samples appear to have been extruded at much shallower depths than those now pertaining at the dredge site. the distribution of these basalts suggests that the andesite line coincides with or lies on the continent side of the foot of the continental slope.

  16. Reduction of mare basalts by sulfur loss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brett, R.

    1976-01-01

    Metallic Fe content and S abundance are inversely correlated in mare basalts. Either S volatilization from the melt results in reduction of Fe2+ to Fe0 or else high S content decreases Fe0 activity in the melt, thus explaining the correlation. All considerations favor the model that metallic iron in mare basalts is due to sulfur loss. The Apollo 11 and 17 mare basalt melts were probably saturated with S at the time of eruption; the Apollo 12 and 15 basalts were probably not saturated. Non-mare rocks show a positive correlation of S abundance with metallic Fe content; it is proposed that this is due to the addition of meteoritic material having a fairly constant Fe0/S ratio. If true, metallic Fe content or S abundance in non-mare rocks provides a measure of degree of meteoritic contamination. ?? 1976.

  17. Tracking the weathering of basalts on Mars using lithium isotope fractionation models

    PubMed Central

    Losa‐Adams, Elisabeth; Gil‐Lozano, Carolina; Gago‐Duport, Luis; Uceda, Esther R.; Squyres, Steven W.; Rodríguez, J. Alexis P.; Davila, Alfonso F.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lithium (Li), the lightest of the alkali elements, has geochemical properties that include high aqueous solubility (Li is the most fluid mobile element) and high relative abundance in basalt‐forming minerals (values ranking between 0.2 and 12 ppm). Li isotopes are particularly subject to fractionation because the two stable isotopes of lithium—7Li and 6Li—have a large relative mass difference (∼15%) that results in significant fractionation between water and solid phases. The extent of Li isotope fractionation during aqueous alteration of basalt depends on the dissolution rate of primary minerals—the source of Li—and on the precipitation kinetics, leading to formation of secondary phases. Consequently, a detailed analysis of Li isotopic ratios in both solution and secondary mineral lattices could provide clues about past Martian weathering conditions, including weathering extent, temperature, pH, supersaturation, and evaporation rate of the initial solutions in contact with basalt rocks. In this paper, we discuss ways in which Martian aqueous processes could have lead to Li isotope fractionation. We show that Li isotopic data obtained by future exploration of Mars could be relevant to highlighting different processes of Li isotopic fractionation in the past, and therefore to understanding basalt weathering and environmental conditions early in the planet's history. PMID:27642264

  18. Petrogenesis and evolution of Quaternary basaltic rocks from the Wulanhada area, North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Qi-Cheng; Chen, Sheng-Sheng; Zhao, Yong-Wei; Zou, Hai-Bo; Li, Ni; Sui, Jian-Li

    2014-10-01

    The origin of alkali basalts in eastern China has been the subject of considerable debate. Here we focus on the Wulanhada basalts located in the western block of North China Craton to provide new insights into recent deep mantle dynamics. The Wulanhada volcanic group has 30 volcanic cones with variable volumes, consisting of scoria cone (cinder cone + spatter cone) and lava. The Wulanhada volcanoes exhibit Strombolian eruption activities during late Pleistocene epoch and Holocene. The Wulanhada basalts are strongly alkaline rocks (tephrite). According to the characteristics of trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic compositions, the Wulanhada magmas were mainly derived from garnet-bearing peridotite within the asthenosphere and underwent fractional crystallization of olivine and clinopyroxene without significant crustal contamination. Their elevated values of Na, Al, Sr/Sm, Sm/Hf, Zr/Hf, and Nb/Ta, positive Ba, K, Pb, and Sr anomalies and negative Zr, Hf anomalies, combined with a negative correlation between 176Hf/177Hf and 143Nd/144Nd and relatively low 87Sr/86Sr, suggest that the magma source may be a mixture of garnet peridotites and carbonated melts. The presence of carbonated melts is likely associated with the sediments or fluids carried by the subducted or stagnant Pacific Plate.

  19. Tracking the weathering of basalts on Mars using lithium isotope fractionation models

    PubMed Central

    Losa‐Adams, Elisabeth; Gil‐Lozano, Carolina; Gago‐Duport, Luis; Uceda, Esther R.; Squyres, Steven W.; Rodríguez, J. Alexis P.; Davila, Alfonso F.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lithium (Li), the lightest of the alkali elements, has geochemical properties that include high aqueous solubility (Li is the most fluid mobile element) and high relative abundance in basalt‐forming minerals (values ranking between 0.2 and 12 ppm). Li isotopes are particularly subject to fractionation because the two stable isotopes of lithium—7Li and 6Li—have a large relative mass difference (∼15%) that results in significant fractionation between water and solid phases. The extent of Li isotope fractionation during aqueous alteration of basalt depends on the dissolution rate of primary minerals—the source of Li—and on the precipitation kinetics, leading to formation of secondary phases. Consequently, a detailed analysis of Li isotopic ratios in both solution and secondary mineral lattices could provide clues about past Martian weathering conditions, including weathering extent, temperature, pH, supersaturation, and evaporation rate of the initial solutions in contact with basalt rocks. In this paper, we discuss ways in which Martian aqueous processes could have lead to Li isotope fractionation. We show that Li isotopic data obtained by future exploration of Mars could be relevant to highlighting different processes of Li isotopic fractionation in the past, and therefore to understanding basalt weathering and environmental conditions early in the planet's history.

  20. Basaltic Soil of Gale Crater: Crystalline Component Compared to Martian Basalts and Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.; Bish, D. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Schmidt, M.; Downs, R. T.; Stolper, E. M.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Achilles, C. N.; Chipera, S. J.; Bristow, T. F.; Crisp, J. A.; Farmer, J. A.; Morookian, J. M.; Morrison, S. M.; Rampe, E. B.; Sarrazin, P.; Yen, A. S.; Anderosn, R. C.; DesMarais, D. J.; Spanovich, N.

    2013-01-01

    A significant portion of the soil of the Rocknest dune is crystalline and is consistent with derivation from unweathered basalt. Minerals and their compositions are identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) data from the CheMin instrument on MSL Curiosity. Basalt minerals in the soil include plagioclase, olivine, low- and high-calcium pyroxenes, magnetite, ilmenite, and quartz. The only minerals unlikely to have formed in an unaltered basalt are hematite and anhydrite. The mineral proportions and compositions of the Rocknest soil are nearly identical to those of the Adirondack-class basalts of Gusev Crater, Mars, inferred from their bulk composition as analyzed by the MER Spirit rover.

  1. Basaltic cannibalism at Thrihnukagigur volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudak, M. R.; Feineman, M. D.; La Femina, P. C.; Geirsson, H.

    2014-12-01

    Magmatic assimilation of felsic continental crust is a well-documented, relatively common phenomenon. The extent to which basaltic crust is assimilated by magmas, on the other hand, is not well known. Basaltic cannibalism, or the wholesale incorporation of basaltic crustal material into a basaltic magma, is thought to be uncommon because basalt requires more energy than higher silica rocks to melt. Basaltic materials that are unconsolidated, poorly crystalline, or palagonitized may be more easily ingested than fully crystallized massive basalt, thus allowing basaltic cannibalism to occur. Thrihnukagigur volcano, SW Iceland, offers a unique exposure of a buried cinder cone within its evacuated conduit, 100 m below the main vent. The unconsolidated tephra is cross-cut by a NNE-trending dike, which runs across the ceiling of this cave to a vent that produced lava and tephra during the ~4 Ka fissure eruption. Preliminary petrographic and laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses indicate that there are two populations of plagioclase present in the system - Population One is stubby (aspect ratio < 1.7) with disequilibrium textures and low Ba/Sr ratios while Population Two is elongate (aspect ratio > 2.1), subhedral to euhedral, and has much higher Ba/Sr ratios. Population One crystals are observed in the cinder cone, dike, and surface lavas, whereas Population Two crystals are observed only in the dike and surface lavas. This suggests that a magma crystallizing a single elongate population of plagioclase intruded the cinder cone and rapidly assimilated the tephra, incorporating the stubbier population of phenocrysts. This conceptual model for basaltic cannibalism is supported by field observations of large-scale erosion upward into the tephra, which is coated by magma flow-back indicating that magma was involved in the thermal etching. While the unique exposure at Thrihnukagigur makes it an exceptional place to investigate basaltic

  2. Starch columns: Analog model for basalt columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Gerhard

    1998-07-01

    Desiccation of starch-water mixtures produces tensile-crack patterns which appear to be interesting, but largely unknown study objects for fracture mechanics, structural geology, and volcanology. This paper concentrates on columnar jointing and on columns in starch. Starch columns have polygonal cross sections and are very similar to basalt columns. They are produced by lamp drying starch specimens with dimensions of several centimeters and have diameters in the millimeter range. The columns develop behind a crack front which propagates from the surface into the interior. The experiments, supported by X ray tomograms, show that polygonal regularity of the crack pattern is not present at the surface but develops during penetration. This transition is steered by a minimum-fracture-energy principle. The analogy between basalt cooling and starch desiccation is far reaching: water concentration in starch is analogous to temperature in basalt, both quantities obey diffusion equations, water loss is equivalent to heat loss, the resulting contraction stresses have similar dependences on depth and time, and in both cases the material strength is exceeded. The starch experiments show that column diameters are controlled by the depth gradient of water concentration at the crack front. High (low) gradients are connected with thin (thick) columns. By analogy, a similar relation with the temperature gradient exists for basalt columns. The (normalized) starch gradients are about 3 orders of magnitude larger than the (normalized) gradients in basalt. This explains why starch columns are much thinner than basalt columns. The gradients are so different, because the crack front speeds differ by a factor of about 10: after 3 days the speed is about 10 mm/d in starch but about 100 mm/d in basalt [Peck, 1978]. The speed difference, in turn, results from the difference of the diffusion constants: the hydraulic diffusivity of starch is 2 orders of magnitude lower than the thermal

  3. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-11-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of PFBC technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an altemative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. As shown in Fig. 1, the RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no HTHP sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-leaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6M-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite [8]. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed.

  4. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of PFBC technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an altemative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. As shown in Fig. 1, the RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no HTHP sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-leaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6M-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite [8]. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed.

  5. Petrogenetic evaluation of the Laohutai basalts from North China Craton: Melting of a two-component source during lithospheric thinning in the late Cretaceous-early Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Y. S.; Wei, X.; Hong, L. B.; Ma, J. L.; Pang, C. J.; Zhong, Y. T.; Zhao, J.-X.; Xu, Y.-G.

    2012-12-01

    While the consensus has been reached as to the lithospheric thinning beneath the North China Craton, the timing of this event remains controversial. Whether it took place during the Early Cretaceous or it extended over a period from late Triassic to early Cenozoic is a matter of hot debate. With aims of contributing to this issue, we performed geochronological and geochemical analyses on basalts of the Laohutai Formation which were emplaced in the Fushun basin at 60-70 Ma. The Laohutai Formation consists of Ne- or Hy-normative alkali basalts in the lower part and Q-normative tholeiitic basalts in the upper part. The tholeiites are characterized by positive Eu and Sr anomalies and show higher ɛNd(t) (3.2-5.3) than the co-existing alkali basalts (1.8-2.4), opposite to the common observation made in other occurrences. Depletion of highly incompatible elements, positive Nbsbnd Ta and negative Pb anomalies in the Laohutai basalts are indicative of oceanic crustal components (likely in form of pyroxenite/eclogite) in their magma source. Since Eu and Sr anomalies are not related to magmatic differentiation, the negative correlation between 87Sr/86Sri and Eu/Eu* suggests that the melting process and sampling of source heterogeneity are intrinsically related. We propose a differential melting of a two-component source in association with lithospheric thinning to account for the temporal variation of the Laohutai basalts. Specifically, earlier alkali basalts were formed by low degree of melting of a source at a greater depth, modified by melts derived from a hydrothermally altered, upper oceanic crust; whereas the later tholeiitic basalts were generated by high degree of melting of a gabbroic lower oceanic crust and minor peridotite at a shallower depth. When the lithospheric lid effect is applied, this petrogenetic model suggests the late Cretaceous-early Cenozoic as an important period of lithospheric thinning, therefore leaning support to the idea of the protracted

  6. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  7. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  8. Alkali Silicate Vehicle Forms Durable, Fireproof Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, John B.; Seindenberg, Benjamin

    1964-01-01

    The problem: To develop a paint for use on satellites or space vehicles that exhibits high resistance to cracking, peeling, or flaking when subjected to a wide range of temperatures. Organic coatings will partially meet the required specifications but have the inherent disadvantage of combustibility. Alkali-silicate binders, used in some industrial coatings and adhesives, show evidence of forming a fireproof paint, but the problem of high surface-tension, a characteristic of alkali silicates, has not been resolved. The solution: Use of a suitable non-ionic wetting agent combined with a paint incorporating alkali silicate as the binder.

  9. Advancements in flowing diode pumped alkali lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Stalnaker, Donald M.; Guild, Eric M.; Oliker, Benjamin Q.; Moran, Paul J.; Townsend, Steven W.; Hostutler, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple variants of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) have recently been demonstrated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Highlights of this ongoing research effort include: a) a 571W rubidium (Rb) based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with a gain (2α) of 0.48 cm-1, b) a rubidium-cesium (Cs) Multi-Alkali Multi-Line (MAML) laser that simultaneously lases at both 795 nm and 895 nm, and c) a 1.5 kW resonantly pumped potassium (K) DPAL with a slope efficiency of 50%. The common factor among these experiments is the use of a flowing alkali test bed.

  10. Nickel and Cobalt Partitioning Between Spinel and Basaltic Melt: Applications to Planetary Basalt Suites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.

    2002-01-01

    New experimental spinel/melt partition coefficients for Ni and Co have been measured in basalt samples with natural levels of Ni and Co, are lower than previous high doping experiments, and are applied to several planetary basalt suites. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Are flood basalt eruptions monogenetic or polygenetic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Hetu C.; Cañón-Tapia, Edgardo

    2015-11-01

    A fundamental classification of volcanoes divides them into "monogenetic" and "polygenetic." We discuss whether flood basalt fields, the largest volcanic provinces, are monogenetic or polygenetic. A polygenetic volcano, whether a shield volcano or a stratovolcano, erupts from the same dominant conduit for millions of years (excepting volumetrically small flank eruptions). A flood basalt province, built from different eruptive fissures dispersed over wide areas, can be considered a polygenetic volcano without any dominant vent. However, in the same characteristic, a flood basalt province resembles a monogenetic volcanic field, with only the difference that individual eruptions in the latter are much smaller. This leads to the question how a flood basalt province can be two very different phenomena at the same time. Individual flood basalt eruptions have previously been considered monogenetic, contrasted by only their high magma output (and lava fluidity) with typical "small-volume monogenetic" volcanoes. Field data from Hawaiian shield volcanoes, Iceland, and the Deccan Traps show that whereas many feeder dykes were single magma injections, and the eruptions can be considered "large monogenetic" eruptions, multiple dykes are equally abundant. They indicate that the same dyke fissure repeatedly transported separate magma batches, feeding an eruption which was thus polygenetic by even the restricted definition (the same magma conduit). This recognition helps in understanding the volcanological, stratigraphic, and geochemical complexity of flood basalts. The need for clear concepts and terminology is, however, strong. We give reasons for replacing "monogenetic volcanic fields" with "diffuse volcanic fields" and for dropping the term "polygenetic" and describing such volcanoes simply and specifically as "shield volcanoes," "stratovolcanoes," and "flood basalt fields."

  12. Alkali metal for ultraviolet band-pass filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, Nick (Inventor); Fraschetti, George A. (Inventor); Mccann, Timothy A. (Inventor); Mayall, Sherwood D. (Inventor); Dunn, Donald E. (Inventor); Trauger, John T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An alkali metal filter having a layer of metallic bismuth deposited onto the alkali metal is provided. The metallic bismuth acts to stabilize the surface of the alkali metal to prevent substantial surface migration from occurring on the alkali metal, which may degrade optical characteristics of the filter. To this end, a layer of metallic bismuth is deposited by vapor deposition over the alkali metal to a depth of approximately 5 to 10 A. A complete alkali metal filter is described along with a method for fabricating the alkali metal filter.

  13. Basaltic magmatism in the North Sea and its relationship to lithospheric extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latin, Dave; Waters, Frances G.

    1992-07-01

    Mesozoic magmatism in the North Sea rift system varies from mildly to strongly alkaline in character. In the 'triple-junction', which occurs at the intersection of the Viking Graben-Moray Firth-Central Graben, large volumes of alkali basalt erupted to form the Forties volcanic province. These basalts are located in the most extended region of the rift which underwent lithospheric stretching by a factor of two. Much smaller volumes of distinctive undersaturated volatile-rich ultrapotassic and nephelinitic rocks were erupted and intruded in off-axis regions in which β is generally less than 1.2. The average thickness (~ 1 km) and composition of the Forties basalts is most easily explained in terms of mixing of melt components derived from the asthenosphere and the more easily fusible volatile-enriched parts of the continental lithosphere. Using recent work by McKenzie and O'Nions (1991) we show that asthenosphere of normal potential temperature will melt if it is brought rapidly to depths of less than 80 km. The asthenosphere rose to ~ 60 km during rifting in the Forties region of the North Sea. The thickness (0.66 km) and composition of melt produced from the asthenosphere is calculated using the results of a REE inversion scheme (McKenzie and O'Nions, 1991). The composition of the lithospheric melt component appears to be some mixture of nephelinite and ultrapotassic melt. Mixing asthenospheric and lithospheric melts in approximately equal proportions appears to be able to produce ~ 1.2 km of melt whose elemental and isotopic composition is very similar to that of the Forties basalts.

  14. The relative roles of boundary layer fractionation and homogeneous fractionation in cooling basaltic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuritani, Takeshi

    2009-06-01

    In a cooling magma chamber, magmatic differentiation can proceed both by fractionation of crystals from the main molten part of the magma body (homogeneous fractionation) and by mixing of the main magma with fractionated melt derived from low-temperature mush zones (boundary layer fractionation). In this study, the relative roles of boundary layer fractionation and homogeneous fractionation in basaltic magma bodies were examined using a thermodynamics-based mass balance model. Model calculations show that boundary layer fractionation cannot be a dominant fractionation mechanism when magma chambers are located at low pressures (< ~ 50 MPa) or when magmas are less hydrous (< ~ 1 wt.%), such as mid-ocean ridge basalt and intraplate basalt, because of the low efficiency of melt transport from the mush zones to the main magma. Therefore, magmas evolve principally by homogeneous fractionation. If crystal-melt separation does not occur effectively in the main magma, the magma becomes crystal-rich in the early stages of magmatic evolution. On the other hand, boundary layer fractionation can occur effectively when magmas are hydrous (> ~ 2 wt.%), such as arc basalt, and the magma chambers are located at depth (> ~ 100 MPa). Because the melt derived from mush zones is enriched in alkalis and H 2O, crystallization from the main magma is suppressed by mixing with the mush melt as a consequence of depression of the liquidus temperature. Therefore, homogeneous fractionation is more effectively suppressed in magma chambers in which boundary layer fractionation is more active. If magmatic differentiation proceeds primarily by boundary layer fractionation, magmas can remain free of crystals for long periods during magmatic evolution.

  15. Alkali Metal Salts with Designable Aryltrifluoroborate Anions.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kazuki; Yoshii, Kazuki; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Matsumoto, Hajime; Tsuda, Tetsuya; Kuwabata, Susumu

    2016-09-01

    Aryltrifluoroborate ([ArBF3](-)) has a designable basic anion structure. Various [ArBF3](-)-based anions were synthesized to create novel alkali metal salts using a simple and safe process. Nearly 40 novel alkali metal salts were successfully obtained, and their physicochemical characteristics, particularly their thermal properties, were elucidated. These salts have lower melting points than those of simple inorganic alkali halide salts, such as KCl and LiCl, because of the weaker interactions between the alkali metal cations and the [ArBF3](-) anions and the anions' larger entropy. Moreover, interestingly, potassium cations were electrochemically reduced in the potassium (meta-ethoxyphenyl)trifluoroborate (K[m-OEtC6H4BF3]) molten salt at 433 K. These findings contribute substantially to furthering molten salt chemistry, ionic liquid chemistry, and electrochemistry. PMID:27510799

  16. Alkali Metal Handling Practices at NASA MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvail, Patrick G.; Carter, Robert R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is NASA s principle propulsion development center. Research and development is coordinated and carried out on not only the existing transportation systems, but also those that may be flown in the near future. Heat pipe cooled fast fission cores are among several concepts being considered for the Nuclear Systems Initiative. Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a capability to handle high-purity alkali metals for use in heat pipes or liquid metal heat transfer loops. This capability is a low budget prototype of an alkali metal handling system that would allow the production of flight qualified heat pipe modules or alkali metal loops. The processing approach used to introduce pure alkali metal into heat pipe modules and other test articles are described in this paper.

  17. Lu-Hf constraints on the evolution of lunar basalts

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimaki, H.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1984-02-15

    Very low Ti basalts andd green glass samples from the moon show high Lu/Hf ratios and low Hf concentrations. Low-Ti lunar basalts show high and variable Lu/Hf ratios and higher Hf concentrations, whereas high-Ti lunar basalts show low Lu/Hf ratios and high Hf concentrations. KREEP basalts have constant Lu/Hf ratios and high but variable Hf concentrations. Using the Lu-Hf behavior as a constraint, we propose a model for the mare basalts evolution. This constraint requires extensive crystallization of the primary lunar magma ocean prior to formation of the lunar mare basalt sources and the KREEP basalts. Mare basalts are produced by the melting of the cumulate rocks, and KREEP basalts represent the residual liquid of the magma ocean.

  18. Evaluating crustal contamination in continental basalts: the isotopic composition of the Picture Gorge Basalt of the Columbia River Basalt Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandon, Alan D.; Hooper, Peter R.; Goles, Gordon G.; Lambert, Richard St J.

    1993-09-01

    Crustal contamination of basalts located in the western United States has been generally under-emphasized, and much of their isotopic variation has been ascribed to multiple and heterogeneous mantle sources. Basalts of the Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group in the Pacific Northwest have passed through crust ranging from Precambrian to Tertiary in age. These flows are voluminous, homogenous, and underwent rapid effusion, all of which are disadvantages for crustal contamination while en route to the surface. The Picture Gorge Basalt of the Columbia River Basalt Group erupted through Paleozoic and Mesozoic oceanic accreted terranes in central Oregon, and earlier studies on these basalts provided no isotopic evidence for crustal contamination. New Sr, Nd, Pb, and O isotopic data presented here indicate that the isotopic variation of the Picture Gorge Basalt is very small, 87Sr/86Sr=0.70307 0.70371, ɛNd=+7.7-+4.8, δ18O=+5.6±6.1, and 206Pb/204Pb=18.80 18.91. Evaluation of the Picture Gorge compositional variation supports a model where two isotopic components contributed to Picture Gorge Basalt genesis. The first component (C1) is reflected by low 87Sr/86Sr, high ɛNd, and nonradiogenic Pb isotopic compositions. Basalts with C1 isotopic compositions have large MgO, Ni, and Cr contents and mantle-like δ18O=+5.6. C1 basalts have enrichments in Ba coupled with depletions in Nb and Ta. These characteristics are best explained by derivation from a depleted mantle source which has undergone a recent enrichment by fluids coming from a subducted slab. This C1 mantle component is prevalent throughout the Pacific Northwest. The second isotopic component has higher 87Sr/ 86Sr and δ18O, lower ɛNd, and more radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions than C1. There is a correlation in the Picture Gorge data of Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopes with differentiation indicators such as decreasing Mg#, and increasing K2O/TiO2, Ba, Ba/Zr, Rb/Sr, La/Sm, and La/Yb. Phase equilibrium and mineralogical

  19. Geochemical diversity of shergottite basalts: Mixing and fractionation, and their relation to Mars surface basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Filiberto, Justin

    2015-04-01

    The chemical compositions of shergottite meteorites, basaltic rocks from Mars, provide a broad view of the origins and differentiation of these Martian magmas. The shergottite basalts are subdivided based on their Al contents: high-Al basalts (Al > 5% wt) are distinct from low-Al basalts and olivine-phyric basalts (both with Al < 4.5% wt). Abundance ratios of highly incompatible elements (e.g., Th, La) are comparable in all the shergottites. Abundances of less incompatible elements (e.g., Ti, Lu, Hf) in olivine-phyric and low-Al basalts correlate well with each other, but the element abundance ratios are not constant; this suggests mixing between components, both depleted and enriched. High-Al shergottites deviate from these trends consistent with silicate mineral fractionation. The "depleted" component is similar to the Yamato-980459 magma; approximately, 67% crystal fractionation of this magma would yield a melt with trace element abundances like QUE 94201. The "enriched" component is like the parent magma for NWA 1068; approximately, 30% crystal fractionation from it would yield a melt with trace element abundances like the Los Angeles shergottite. This component mixing is consistent with radiogenic isotope and oxygen fugacity data. These mixing relations are consistent with the compositions of many of the Gusev crater basalts analyzed on Mars by the Spirit rover (although with only a few elements to compare). Other Mars basalts fall off the mixing relations (e.g., Wishstone at Gusev, Gale crater rocks). Their compositions imply that basalt source areas in Mars include significant complexities that are not present in the source areas for the shergottite basalts.

  20. Desulfurizing Coal With an Alkali Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravindram, M.; Kalvinskas, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental coal-desulfurization process uses alkalies and steam in fluidized-bed reactor. With highly volatile, high-sulfur bituminous coal, process removed 98 percent of pyritic sulfur and 47 percent of organic sulfur. Used in coal liquefaction and in production of clean solid fuels and synthetic liquid fuels. Nitrogen or steam flows through bed of coal in reactor. Alkalies react with sulfur, removing it from coal. Nitrogen flow fluidizes bed while heating or cooling; steam is fluidizing medium during reaction.

  1. Oxygen consumption in subseafloor basaltic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, B. N.; Wheat, C. G.; Hulme, S.; Edwards, K. J.; Bach, W.

    2012-12-01

    Oceanic crust is the largest potential habitat for life on Earth and may contain a significant fraction of Earth's total microbial biomass, yet little is known about the form and function of life in this vast subseafloor realm that covers nearly two-thirds of the Earth's surface. A deep biosphere hosted in subseafloor basalts has been suggested from several lines of evidence; yet, empirical analysis of metabolic reaction rates in basaltic crust is lacking. Here we report the first measure of oxygen consumption in young (~ 8 Ma) and cool (<25 degrees C) basaltic crust, calculated from modeling oxygen and strontium profiles in basal sediments collected during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 336 to 'North Pond', a sediment 'pond' on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), where vigorous fluid circulation within basaltic crust occurs. Dissolved oxygen concentrations increased towards the sediment-basement interface, indicating an upward diffusional supply from oxic fluids circulating within the crust. A parametric reaction-transport model suggests oxygen consumption rates on the order of 0.5-500 nmol per cubic centimeter fluid per day in young and cool basaltic crust, providing sufficient energy to support a subsurface crustal biosphere.

  2. Finding Basalt Chips from Distant Maria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2006-04-01

    The Apollo 16 landing site is in the lunar highlands, over 200 kilometers away from the nearest maria. Nevertheless, the Apollo 16 regolith contains a small percentage (<1%) of tiny fragments thrown to the site from distant maria. Ryan Zeigler, his colleagues at Washington University in St. Louis: Randy Korotev, Brad Jolliff, and the late Larry Haskin, and Jeffrey Gillis-Davis (University of Hawaii) made a detailed study of the chemical composition and mineralogy of fragments (only 2-4 millimeters across) of mare basalts. The basalts vary in composition, but are similar to other types identified previously. The team matched the compositions of the fragments to compositions of mare surfaces in the Apollo 16 region using remote sensing data from the Clementine mission. This blending of cosmochemical and remote sensing analyses allowed them to make educated guesses about where each of the basalt fragments may have originated. We now have a fuller understanding of the range of compositions of mare basalts and, because basalts record a wealth of information about planetary interiors, this research enlightens us about the diversity of rock compositions in the lunar mantle.

  3. Can we identify source lithology of basalt?

    PubMed

    Yang, Zong-Feng; Zhou, Jun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The nature of source rocks of basaltic magmas plays a fundamental role in understanding the composition, structure and evolution of the solid earth. However, identification of source lithology of basalts remains uncertainty. Using a parameterization of multi-decadal melting experiments on a variety of peridotite and pyroxenite, we show here that a parameter called FC3MS value (FeO/CaO-3*MgO/SiO2, all in wt%) can identify most pyroxenite-derived basalts. The continental oceanic island basalt-like volcanic rocks (MgO>7.5%) (C-OIB) in eastern China and Mongolia are too high in the FC3MS value to be derived from peridotite source. The majority of the C-OIB in phase diagrams are equilibrium with garnet and clinopyroxene, indicating that garnet pyroxenite is the dominant source lithology. Our results demonstrate that many reputed evolved low magnesian C-OIBs in fact represent primary pyroxenite melts, suggesting that many previous geological and petrological interpretations of basalts based on the single peridotite model need to be reconsidered.

  4. Can we identify source lithology of basalt?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zong-Feng; Zhou, Jun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The nature of source rocks of basaltic magmas plays a fundamental role in understanding the composition, structure and evolution of the solid earth. However, identification of source lithology of basalts remains uncertainty. Using a parameterization of multi-decadal melting experiments on a variety of peridotite and pyroxenite, we show here that a parameter called FC3MS value (FeO/CaO-3*MgO/SiO2, all in wt%) can identify most pyroxenite-derived basalts. The continental oceanic island basalt-like volcanic rocks (MgO>7.5%) (C-OIB) in eastern China and Mongolia are too high in the FC3MS value to be derived from peridotite source. The majority of the C-OIB in phase diagrams are equilibrium with garnet and clinopyroxene, indicating that garnet pyroxenite is the dominant source lithology. Our results demonstrate that many reputed evolved low magnesian C-OIBs in fact represent primary pyroxenite melts, suggesting that many previous geological and petrological interpretations of basalts based on the single peridotite model need to be reconsidered. PMID:23676779

  5. The Plumbing System of a Highly Explosive Basaltic Volcano: Sunset Crater, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, C. M.; Roggensack, K.; Clarke, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    We seek to better understand highly explosive basaltic eruptions with specific focus on magmatic volatile solubility in alkali basalts and the magma plumbing system. Sunset Crater, an alkali basalt (~3.7 wt.% alkalis) scoria cone volcano, erupted explosively in 1085 AD. We analyzed 125 primary melt inclusions (MIs) from Sunset Crater tephra deposited by 2 subplinian phases and 1 Strombolian explosion to compare magma volatiles and storage conditions. We picked rapidly quenched free olivine crystals and selected large volume MIs (50-180 μm) located toward crystal cores. MIs are faceted and exhibit little major element composition variability with minor post entrapment crystallization (2-10%). MIs are relatively dry but CO2-rich. Water content varies from 0.4 wt.% to 1.5 wt.% while carbon dioxide abundance ranges between 1,150 ppm and 3,250 ppm. Most MIs contain >1 wt.% H2O and >2,150 ppm CO2. All observed MIs contain a vapor bubble, so we are evaluating MI vapor bubbles with Raman spectroscopy and re-homogenization experiments to determine the full volatile budget. Because knowledge of volatile solubility is critical to accurately interpret results from MI analyses, we measured H2O-CO2 solubility in the Sunset Crater bulk composition. Fluid-saturated experiments at 4 and 6 kbar indicate shallower entrapment pressures for these MIs than values calculated for this composition using existing models. Assuming fluid saturation, MIs record depths from 6 km to 14 km, including groupings suggesting two pauses for longer-term storage at ~6 km and ~10.5 km. We do not observe any significant differences in MIs from phases exhibiting different eruptive styles, suggesting that while a high CO2 content may drive rapid magma ascent and be partly responsible for highly explosive eruptions, shallower processes may govern the final eruptive character. To track shallow processes during magma ascent from depth of MI-entrapment up to the surface, we are examining MI re-entrants.

  6. Chemical characterization, nano-particle mineralogy and particle size distribution of basalt dust wastes.

    PubMed

    Dalmora, Adilson C; Ramos, Claudete G; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Teixeira, Elba C; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Taffarel, Silvio R; de Brum, Irineu A S; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the geochemistry of basalt alteration is central to the study of agriculture systems. Various nano-minerals play an important role in the mobilization of contaminants and their subsequent uptake by plants. We present a new analytical experimental approach in combination with an integrated analytical protocol designed to study basalt alteration processes. Recently, throughout the world, ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during "stonemeal" soil fertilizer application have been of great concern for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the Nova Prata mining district in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS)/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3, with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition, we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn, that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and, thus, could present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle mineralogy and chemical composition in

  7. Chemical characterization, nano-particle mineralogy and particle size distribution of basalt dust wastes.

    PubMed

    Dalmora, Adilson C; Ramos, Claudete G; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Teixeira, Elba C; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Taffarel, Silvio R; de Brum, Irineu A S; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the geochemistry of basalt alteration is central to the study of agriculture systems. Various nano-minerals play an important role in the mobilization of contaminants and their subsequent uptake by plants. We present a new analytical experimental approach in combination with an integrated analytical protocol designed to study basalt alteration processes. Recently, throughout the world, ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during "stonemeal" soil fertilizer application have been of great concern for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the Nova Prata mining district in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS)/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3, with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition, we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn, that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and, thus, could present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle mineralogy and chemical composition in

  8. A Xenolith-rich, Basaltic Peperite on Earth: Analogue for Other Planets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obenholzner, J. H.

    2002-12-01

    Peperites are typically the product of wet sediment-magma/lava/hot volcaniclastic deposits interaction and are therefore indicative for the existence of frozen/liquefied or fluid water in the history of a planet. Most of the peperites on Earth are found in a paleo-near-surface environment and are exposed to alteration if burial did not protect them (Skilling et al. 2002). Sediments can be incorporated into ascending magma (Obenholzner et al. 2003). These macro- or micro-xenoliths show various degrees of metamorphism. Carbonate and evaporite xenoliths brought to the surface could include fossils or even bacteria, otherwise hidden deeply in the sedimentary record. A xenolith-rich basaltic peperite of Pliocene age is exposed in a quarry at Neuhaus/Kl./Burgenland/Austria. These alkali basalts are related to the time-equivalent volcanism of the W Pannonian Basin/Hungary. Although the peperite sequence is highly altered the primary structures are well preserved. The xenolith spectrum comprises marls, argillitic and other basement rocks showing various degrees of metamorphism. The xenoliths are white to yellow colored, egg-shaped or blocky and typically manteled by the grey basalt in peperite fragments. This encapsulation of xenoliths by the basalt protects the xenoliths against various atmospheric interaction, execpt for Earth where water easily enters the peperite fragments. This sequence could be used as a structural model for similar sequences on planets known for the occurrences of basaltic volcanism and potential water-bearing sediments. The Neuhaus peperite represents a training site for scientists working with remotely operated analyzers to differentiate between xenoliths, the peperite (basalt and sandy sediment) and alteration-related structures. Similar peperites could be encountered on Mars and would be a proof for the existence of water or other fluids in its history, even if the alteration history of peperite sequences would be different from what is known on

  9. Lithoautotrophic microbial ecosystems in deep basalt aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, T.O.; McKinley, J.P.

    1995-10-20

    Bacterial communities were detected in deep crystalline rock aquifers within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRB). CRB ground waters contained up to 60 {mu}M dissolved H{sub 2} and autotrophic microorganisms outnumbered heterotrophs. Stable carbon isotope measurements implied that autotrophic methanogenesis dominated this ecosystem and was coupled to the depletion of dissolved inorganic carbon. In laboratory experiments, H{sub 2} a potential energy source for bacteria, was produced by reactions between crushed basalt and anaerobic water. Microcosms containing only crushed basalt and ground water supported microbial growth. These results suggest that the CRB contains a lithoautotrophic microbial ecosystem that is independent of photosynthetic primary production. 38 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Basaltic Volcanism and Ancient Planetary Crusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, John W.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to decipher the origin of rocks which form the ancient lunar crust. Our goal is to better understand how the moon evolved chemically and, more generally, the processes involved in the chemical fractionation of terrestrial planetoids. This research has implications for other planetary bodies besides the Moon, especially smaller planetoids which evolved early in the history of the solar system and are now thermally stable. The three main areas focused on in our work (lunar mare basalts, KREEP basalts, and plutonic rocks of the lunar highlands) provide complementary information on the lunar interior and the processes that formed it.

  11. Equilibration of Leachants with Basalt Rock for Repository Simulation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2001-07-02

    In a nuclear waste repository in basalt, the groundwater will have a low redox potential (Eh) which may affect the leach rate of SRP waste glass. Accurate laboratory simulations of conditions in a basalt reposition must maintain low Eh values throughout the course of the experiment. In this report, important parameters affecting the ability of basalt to maintain appropriate Eh-pH conditions are examined, in particular basalt type and groundwater simulation.

  12. Basaltic injections into floored silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, R. A.

    Recent studies have provided compelling evidence that many large accumulations of silicic volcanic rocks erupted from long-lasting, floored chambers of silicic magma that were repeatedly injected by basaltic magma. These basaltic infusions are commonly thought to play an important role in the evolution of the silicic systems: they have been proposed as a cause for explosive silicic eruptions [Sparks and Sigurdsson, 1977], compositional variation in ash-flow sheets [Smith, 1979], mafic magmatic inclusions in silicic volcanic rocks [Bacon, 1986], and mixing of mafic and silicic magmas [Anderson, 1976; Eichelberger, 1978]. If, as seems likely, floored silicic magma chambers have frequently been invaded by basalt, then plutonic bodies should provide records of these events. Although plutonic evidence for mixing and commingling of mafic and silicic magmas has been recognized for many years, it has been established only recently that some intrusive complex originated through multiple basaltic injections into floored chambers of silicic magma [e.g., Wiebe, 1974; Michael, 1991; Chapman and Rhodes, 1992].

  13. Pressure grouting of fractured basalt flows

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, P.; Weidner, J.; Phillips, S.; Alexander, J.

    1996-04-01

    This report describes a field trial of pressure grouting in basalt and the results of subsequent coring and permeability measurement activities. The objective was to show that the hydraulic conductivity of fractured basalt bedrock can be significantly reduced by pressure injection of cementitious materials. The effectiveness of the pressure grout procedure was evaluated by measuring the change in the hydraulic conductivity of the bedrock. The extent of grout penetration was established by analyzing postgrout injection drilling chips for the presence of a tracer in the grout and also by examining cores of the treated basalt. Downhole radar mapping was used to establish major lava flow patterns and follow water movement during a surface infiltration test. A site called Box Canyon, which is located northwest of the INEL, was chosen for this study due to the similarity of this surface outcrop geology to that of the underlying bedrock fracture system found at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. This study showed that hydraulic conductivity of basalt can be reduced through pressure grouting of cementitious material.

  14. Thermal models for basaltic volcanism on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keszthelyil, L.; McEwen, A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a new model for the thermal emissions from active basaltic eruptions on Io. While our methodology shares many similarities with previous work, it is significantly different in that (1) it uses a field tested cooling model and (2) the model is more applicable to pahoehoe flows and lava lakes than fountain-fed, channelized, 'a'a flows. This model demonstrates the large effect lava porosity has on the surface cooling rate (with denser flows cooling more slowly) and provides a preliminary tool for examining some of the hot spots on Io. The model infrared signature of a basaltic eruption is largely controlled by a single parameter, ??, the average survival time for a lava surface. During an active eruption surfaces are quickly covered or otherwise destroyed and typical values of ?? for a basaltic eruption are expected to be on the order of 10 seconds to 10 minutes. Our model suggests that the Galileo SSI eclipse data are consistent with moderately active to quiescent basaltic lava lakes but are not diagnostic of such activity. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. The biological consequences of flood basalt volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapham, M.

    2012-12-01

    Flood basalt eruptions are among the largest environmental perturbations of the Phanerozoic. The rapid release of CO2 from a large igneous province would have triggered a chain of events that can include climate warming, ocean acidification, reduced seawater carbonate saturation, and expanded oceanic anoxia. Those stressors have widely negative impacts on marine organisms, especially on calcified taxa, by affecting their respiratory physiology and reducing energy available for growth and reproduction. Many Phanerozoic extinctions, most notably the end-Permian and end-Triassic mass extinctions, coincided with flood basalt eruptions and shared distinctive patterns of taxonomic and ecological selectivity. In these extinctions, highly active organisms were more likely to survive because they possess physiological adaptations for maintaining internal pH during activity, which also proves useful when buffering pH against ocean acidification. In contrast, species that did not move and had low metabolic rates, such as brachiopods and sponges, suffered considerable losses during these extinctions. Heavily-calcified organisms, especially corals, were particularly vulnerable; as a result, ocean acidification and saturation state changes from flood basalt eruptions often triggered crises in reef ecosystems. This characteristic pattern of selectivity during "physiological" extinctions that closely coincided with flood basalts provides a template for assessing the causes of other extinction events. Because these crises also provide deep time analogues for the ongoing anthropogenic crisis of warming, ocean acidification, and expanded anoxia, the selectivity patterns can also help constrain "winners" and "losers" over upcoming decades.

  16. Coatings on Atacama Desert Basalt: A Possible Analog for Coatings on Gusev Plains Basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Golden, D. C.; Amundson, R.; Chong-Diaz, G.; Ming, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    Surface coatings on Gusev Plains basalt have been observed and may contain hematite and nanophase Fe-oxides along with enrichments in P, S, Cl, and K relative to the underlying rock. The Gusev coatings may be derived from the dissolution of adhering soil and/or parent rock along with the addition of S and Cl from outside sources. Transient water for dissolution could be sourced from melting snow during periods of high obliquity, acid fog, and/or ground water (Haskin et al., 2005). Coatings on basalt in the hyper-arid (less than 2mm y(sup -1)) Atacama Desert may assist in understanding the chemistry, mineralogy and formation mechanisms of the Gusev basalt coatings. The Atacama Desert climate is proposed to be analogous to a paleo-Mars climate that was characterized by limited aqueous activity when the Gusev coatings could have formed. The objectives of this work are to (i) determine the chemical nature and extent of surface coatings on Atacama Desert basalt, and (ii) assess coating formation mechanisms in the Atacama Desert. Preliminary backscattered electron imaging of Atacama basalt thin-sections indicated that the coatings are as thick as 20 m. The boundary between the coating and the basalt labradorite, ilmenite, and augite grains was abrupt indicating that the basalt minerals underwent no chemical dissolution. The Atacama coatings have been added to the basalt instead of being derived from basalt chemical weathering. Semi-quantitative energy dispersive spectroscopy shows the coatings to be chemically homogeneous. The coating is depleted in Ca (0.9 wt% CaO) and enriched in K (1.3 wt.% K2O) and Si (69.1 wt.% SiO2) relative to the augite and labradorite grains. A dust source enriched in Si (e.g., poorly crystalline silica) and K and depleted in Ca appears to have been added to the basalt surface. Unlike the Gusev coatings, no P, S, and Cl enrichment was observed. However, Fe (3.2 wt.% FeO) was present in the Atacama coatings suggesting the present of Fe

  17. Sulfur isotope homogeneity of lunar mare basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Boswell A.; Farquhar, James

    2015-12-01

    We present a new set of high precision measurements of relative 33S/32S, 34S/32S, and 36S/32S values in lunar mare basalts. The measurements are referenced to the Vienna-Canyon Diablo Troilite (V-CDT) scale, on which the international reference material, IAEA-S-1, is characterized by δ33S = -0.061‰, δ34S ≡ -0.3‰ and δ36S = -1.27‰. The present dataset confirms that lunar mare basalts are characterized by a remarkable degree of sulfur isotopic homogeneity, with most new and published SF6-based sulfur isotope measurements consistent with a single mass-dependent mean isotopic composition of δ34S = 0.58 ± 0.05‰, Δ33S = 0.008 ± 0.006‰, and Δ36S = 0.2 ± 0.2‰, relative to V-CDT, where the uncertainties are quoted as 99% confidence intervals on the mean. This homogeneity allows identification of a single sample (12022, 281) with an apparent 33S enrichment, possibly reflecting cosmic-ray-induced spallation reactions. It also reveals that some mare basalts have slightly lower δ34S values than the population mean, which is consistent with sulfur loss from a reduced basaltic melt prior to eruption at the lunar surface. Both the sulfur isotope homogeneity of the lunar mare basalts and the predicted sensitivity of sulfur isotopes to vaporization-driven fractionation suggest that less than ≈1-10% of lunar sulfur was lost after a potential moon-forming impact event.

  18. Mobility and fluxes of major, minor and trace metals during basalt weathering and groundwater transport at Mt. Etna volcano (Sicily)

    SciTech Connect

    Aiuppa, A.; Allard, P.; D'Alessandro, W.; Michel, A.; Parello, F.; Treuil, M.; Valenza, M.

    2000-06-01

    The concentrations and fluxes of major, minor and trace metals were determined in 53 samples of groundwaters from around Mt. Etna, in order to evaluate the conditions and extent of alkali basalt weathering by waters enriched in magma-derived CO{sub 2} and the contribution of aqueous transport to the overall metal discharge of the volcano. The authors show that gaseous input of magmatic volatile metals into the Etnean aquifer is small or negligible, being limited by cooling of the rising fluids. Basalt leaching by weakly acidic, CO{sub 2}-charged water is the overwhelming source of metals and appears to be more extensive in two sectors of the S-SW (Paterno) and E (Zafferana) volcano flanks, where out flowing groundwaters are the richest in metals and bicarbonate of magmatic origin. Thermodynamic modeling of the results allows evaluation of the relative mobility and chemical speciation of various elements during their partitioning between solid and liquid phases through the weathering process. At Mt. Etna, poorly mobile elements (Al, Th, Fe) are preferentially retained in the solid residue of weathering, while alkalis, alkaline earth and oxo-anion-forming elements (As, Se, Sb, Mo) are more mobile and released to the aqueous system. Transition metals display an intermediate behavior and are strongly dependent on either the redox conditions (Mn, Cr, V) or solid surface-related processes (V, Zn, Cu).

  19. Refractories for high-alkali environments

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, A.W.; Cloer, F.

    1996-01-01

    There are two reliable and cost-effective tests for evaluating refractory materials. They are used to determine which refractory products allow greater variance in fuel type with respect to alkali environment for coal-fired applications. Preselection of a particular refractory is important because of down-time cost for premature failure. One test is a variation of the standard alkali cup test. The second involves reacting test specimens with the contaminant, followed by physical properties testing to determine degree of degradation and properties affected. The alkali cup test rates products using a relative numerical scale based upon visual appearance. This test indicates the presence and relative degree of chemical attack to the refractory. The physical properties test determines the specific properties affected by the given contaminant.

  20. Alkali metal vapors - Laser spectroscopy and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stwalley, W. C.; Koch, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the rapidly expanding use of lasers for spectroscopic studies of alkali metal vapors. Since the alkali metals (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium) are theoretically simple ('visible hydrogen'), readily ionized, and strongly interacting with laser light, they represent ideal systems for quantitative understanding of microscopic interconversion mechanisms between photon (e.g., solar or laser), chemical, electrical and thermal energy. The possible implications of such understanding for a wide variety of practical applications (sodium lamps, thermionic converters, magnetohydrodynamic devices, new lasers, 'lithium waterfall' inertial confinement fusion reactors, etc.) are also discussed.

  1. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, W.Y.

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased, preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  2. Additive Construction using Basalt Regolith Fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Lippitt, Thomas C.; Mantovani, James G.; Nugent, Matthew W.; Townsend, Ivan I.

    2014-01-01

    Planetary surfaces are often covered in regolith (crushed rock), whose geologic origin is largely basalt. The lunar surface is made of small-particulate regolith and areas of boulders located in the vicinity of craters. Regolith composition also varies with location, reflecting the local bedrock geology and the nature and efficiency of the micrometeorite-impact processes. In the lowland mare areas (suitable for habitation), the regolith is composed of small granules (20 - 100 microns average size) of mare basalt and volcanic glass. Impacting micrometeorites may cause local melting, and the formation of larger glassy particles, and this regolith may contain 10-80% glass. Studies of lunar regolith are traditionally conducted with lunar regolith simulant (reconstructed soil with compositions patterned after the lunar samples returned by Apollo). The NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Granular Mechanics & Regolith Operations (GMRO) lab has identified a low fidelity but economical geo-technical simulant designated as Black Point-1 (BP-1). It was found at the site of the Arizona Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) analog field test site at the Black Point lava flow in adjacent basalt quarry spoil mounds. This paper summarizes activities at KSC regarding the utilization of BP-1 basalt regolith and comparative work with lunar basalt simulant JSC-1A as a building material for robotic additive construction of large structures. In an effort to reduce the import or in-situ fabrication of binder additives, we focused this work on in-situ processing of regolith for construction in a single-step process after its excavation. High-temperature melting of regolith involves techniques used in glassmaking and casting (with melts of lower density and higher viscosity than those of metals), producing basaltic glass with high durability and low abrasive wear. Most Lunar simulants melt at temperatures above 1100 C, although melt processing of terrestrial regolith at 1500 C is not

  3. Geochemistry of apollo 15 basalt 15555 and soil 15531.

    PubMed

    Schnetzler, C C; Philpotts, J A; Nava, D F; Schuhmann, S; Thomas, H H

    1972-01-28

    Major and trace element concentrations have been determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, colorimetry, and isotope dilution in Apollo 15 mare basalt 15555 from the Hadley Rille area; trace element concentrations have also been determined in plagioclase and pyroxene separates from basalt 15555 and in soil 15531 from the same area. Basalt 15555 most closely resembles in composition the Apollo 12 olivine-rich basalts. The concentrations of lithium, potassium, rubidium, barium, rare-earth elements, and zirconium in basalt 15555 are the lowest, and the negative europium anomaly is the smallest, reported for lunar basalts; this basalt might be the least differentiated material yet returned from the moon. Crystallization and removal of about 6 percent of plagioclase similar to that contained in the basalt would account for the observed europium anomaly; if plagioclase is not on the liquidus of this basalt, a multistage origin is indicated. Mineral data indicate that plagioclase and pyroxene approached quasi-equilibrium. Most of the chemical differences between basalt 15555 and soil 15531 would be accounted for if the soil were a mixture of 88 percent basalt, 6 percent KREEP (a component, identified in other Apollo soils, rich in potassium, rare-earth elements, and phosphorus) and 6 percent plagioclase (anorthosite?). PMID:17731364

  4. Geochemistry of apollo 15 basalt 15555 and soil 15531.

    PubMed

    Schnetzler, C C; Philpotts, J A; Nava, D F; Schuhmann, S; Thomas, H H

    1972-01-28

    Major and trace element concentrations have been determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, colorimetry, and isotope dilution in Apollo 15 mare basalt 15555 from the Hadley Rille area; trace element concentrations have also been determined in plagioclase and pyroxene separates from basalt 15555 and in soil 15531 from the same area. Basalt 15555 most closely resembles in composition the Apollo 12 olivine-rich basalts. The concentrations of lithium, potassium, rubidium, barium, rare-earth elements, and zirconium in basalt 15555 are the lowest, and the negative europium anomaly is the smallest, reported for lunar basalts; this basalt might be the least differentiated material yet returned from the moon. Crystallization and removal of about 6 percent of plagioclase similar to that contained in the basalt would account for the observed europium anomaly; if plagioclase is not on the liquidus of this basalt, a multistage origin is indicated. Mineral data indicate that plagioclase and pyroxene approached quasi-equilibrium. Most of the chemical differences between basalt 15555 and soil 15531 would be accounted for if the soil were a mixture of 88 percent basalt, 6 percent KREEP (a component, identified in other Apollo soils, rich in potassium, rare-earth elements, and phosphorus) and 6 percent plagioclase (anorthosite?).

  5. Salts of alkali metal anions and process of preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Dye, James L.; Ceraso, Joseph M.; Tehan, Frederick J.; Lok, Mei Tak

    1978-01-01

    Compounds of alkali metal anion salts of alkali metal cations in bicyclic polyoxadiamines are disclosed. The salts are prepared by contacting an excess of alkali metal with an alkali metal dissolving solution consisting of a bicyclic polyoxadiamine in a suitable solvent, and recovered by precipitation. The salts have a gold-color crystalline appearance and are stable in a vacuum at -10.degree. C. and below.

  6. Carbonaceous matter in peridotites and basalts studied by XPS, SALI, and LEED

    SciTech Connect

    Tingle, T.N. SRI International, Menlo Park, CA ); Mathez, E.A. ); Hochella, M.F. Jr. )

    1991-05-01

    Carbonaceous matter in peridotite xenoliths and basalt from the Hualalai Volcano, in a basalt glass collected directly from an active lava lake on the east rift of Kilauea, in garnet and diopside megacrysts from the Jagersfontein kimberlite, and in gabbros from the Stillwater and Bushveld Complexes has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermal-desorption surface analysis by laser ionization (SALI), and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). The basalt and two of the four xenoliths from Hualalai and both Jagersfontein megacrysts yielded trace quantities ({le}10 nanomoles) of organic compounds on heating to 700C. Organics were not detected in the rocks from the layered intrusions, and neither carbonaceous matter nor organics were detected in the glass from the lava lake. Where detected, organics appear to be associated with carbonaceous films on microcrack surfaces. Carbonaceous matter exists as films less than a few nm thick and particles up to 20 {mu}m across, both of which contain elements expected to be present in significant quantities in magmatic vapors, namely Si, alkalis, halogens, N, and transition metals. LEED studies suggest that the carbonaceous films are amorphous. The data suggest two possible mechanisms for the formation of the organics. One is that they are a product of abiotic heterogeneous catalysis of volcanic gas on new, chemically active mineral surfaces formed by fracturing during cooling. Alternatively, organics may have been assimilated into the volcanic gases prior to eruption and then deposited on cracks formed during eruption and cooling. In any case, there is no evidence to suggest that the organics represent laboratory or field biogenic contamination.

  7. New Insights to the Mid Miocene Calc-alkaline Lavas of the Strawberry Volcanics, NE Oregon Surrounded by the Coeval Tholeiitic Columbia River Basalt Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, A. R.; Streck, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Strawberry Volcanics (SV) of NE Oregon were distributed over 3,400 km2 during the mid-Miocene and comprise a diverse volcanic suite, which span the range of compositions from basalt to rhyolite. The predominant composition of this volcanic suite is calc-alkaline (CA) basaltic andesite and andesite, although tholeiitic (TH) lavas of basalt to andesite occur as well. The coeval flood basalts of the Columbia River province surround the SV. Here we will discuss new ages and geochemical data, and present a new geologic map and stratigraphy of the SV. The SV are emplaced on top of pre-Tertiary accreted terranes of the Blue Mountain Province, Mesozoic plutonic rocks, and older Tertiary volcanic rocks thought to be mostly Oligocene of age. Massive rhyolites (~300 m thick) are exposed mainly along the western flank and underlie the intermediate composition lavas. In the southern portion of this study area, alkali basaltic lavas, thought to be late Miocene to early Pliocene in age, erupted and overlie the SV. In addition, several regional ignimbrites reach into the area. The 9.7 Ma Devine Canyon Tuff and the 7.1 Ma Rattlesnake Tuff also overlie the SV. The 15.9-15.4 Ma Dinner Creek Tuff is mid-Miocene, and clear stratigraphic relationships are found in areas where the tuff is intercalated between thick SV lava flows. All of the basalts of the SV are TH and are dominated by phenocryst-poor (≤2%) lithologies. These basalts have an ophitic texture dominated by plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine (often weathered to iddingsite). Basalts and basaltic andesites have olivine Fo #'s ranging from 44 at the rims (where weathered to iddingsite) and as high as 88 at cores. Pyroxene Mg #'s range from 65 to 85. Andesites of the SV are sub-alkaline, and like the basalts, are exceedingly phenocryst-poor (≤3%) with microphenocrysts of plagioclase and lesser pyroxene and olivine, which occasionally occur as crystal clots of ~1-3 mm instead of single crystals. In addition, minimal

  8. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  9. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  11. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  12. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  13. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  14. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  15. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  18. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  19. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  20. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  1. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  2. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  3. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  4. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  5. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  6. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  7. Alkali resistant optical coatings for alkali lasers and methods of production thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Soules, Thomas F; Beach, Raymond J; Mitchell, Scott C

    2014-11-18

    In one embodiment, a multilayer dielectric coating for use in an alkali laser includes two or more alternating layers of high and low refractive index materials, wherein an innermost layer includes a thicker, >500 nm, and dense, >97% of theoretical, layer of at least one of: alumina, zirconia, and hafnia for protecting subsequent layers of the two or more alternating layers of high and low index dielectric materials from alkali attack. In another embodiment, a method for forming an alkali resistant coating includes forming a first oxide material above a substrate and forming a second oxide material above the first oxide material to form a multilayer dielectric coating, wherein the second oxide material is on a side of the multilayer dielectric coating for contacting an alkali.

  8. Computational studies of solid-state alkali conduction in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, Zhi; Mo, Yifei; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-03-25

    The facile conduction of alkali ions in a crystal host is of crucial importance in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries, the dominant form of energy storage today. In this review, we provide a comprehensive survey of computational approaches to study solid-state alkali diffusion. We demonstrate how these methods have provided useful insights into the design of materials that form the main components of a rechargeable alkali-ion battery, namely the electrodes, superionic conductor solid electrolytes and interfaces. We will also provide a perspective on future challenges and directions. Here, the scope of this review includes the monovalent lithium- and sodium-ion chemistries that aremore » currently of the most commercial interest.« less

  9. Biogenic Mn-Oxides in Subseafloor Basalts

    PubMed Central

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Broman, Curt; Gustafsson, Håkan; Holm, Nils G.

    2015-01-01

    The deep biosphere of the subseafloor basalts is recognized as a major scientific frontier in disciplines like biology, geology, and oceanography. Recently, the presence of fungi in these environments has involved a change of view regarding diversity and ecology. Here, we describe fossilized fungal communities in vugs in subseafloor basalts from a depth of 936.65 metres below seafloor at the Detroit Seamount, Pacific Ocean. These fungal communities are closely associated with botryoidal Mn oxides composed of todorokite. Analyses of the Mn oxides by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy (EPR) indicate a biogenic signature. We suggest, based on mineralogical, morphological and EPR data, a biological origin of the botryoidal Mn oxides. Our results show that fungi are involved in Mn cycling at great depths in the seafloor and we introduce EPR as a means to easily identify biogenic Mn oxides in these environments. PMID:26107948

  10. Lead isotope studies of mare basalt 70017

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattinson, J. M.; Tilton, G. R.; Todt, W.; Chen, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Uranium, thorium, and isotopic lead data for components of basalt 70017 are reported, and it is found that the whole rock, pyroxene, and ilmenite points in a concordia diagram plot along a chord intersecting the curve at 3.7 and 4.33 eons. The plagioclase data do not seem to lie on this line. The data for 70017 appear to plot along a distinctly different chord in a concordia diagram than do the data for 75055 and 75035, two other Apollo 17 mare basalts. The lead data are in accord with Sm-Nd results. A 3.7 eon crystallization age for 70017 would be consistent with the same kind of parentless lead that is indicated by previous studies of soils and soil breccias from stations at Taurus-Littrow. The Th/U ratio in ilmenite is 2.2, and the concentrations of these two elements are approximately twice those in pyroxene.

  11. Biogenic Mn-Oxides in Subseafloor Basalts.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Broman, Curt; Gustafsson, Håkan; Holm, Nils G

    2015-01-01

    The deep biosphere of the subseafloor basalts is recognized as a major scientific frontier in disciplines like biology, geology, and oceanography. Recently, the presence of fungi in these environments has involved a change of view regarding diversity and ecology. Here, we describe fossilized fungal communities in vugs in subseafloor basalts from a depth of 936.65 metres below seafloor at the Detroit Seamount, Pacific Ocean. These fungal communities are closely associated with botryoidal Mn oxides composed of todorokite. Analyses of the Mn oxides by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy (EPR) indicate a biogenic signature. We suggest, based on mineralogical, morphological and EPR data, a biological origin of the botryoidal Mn oxides. Our results show that fungi are involved in Mn cycling at great depths in the seafloor and we introduce EPR as a means to easily identify biogenic Mn oxides in these environments. PMID:26107948

  12. Northwest Africa 5298: A Basaltic Shergottite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Peslier, Anne; Lapen, Thomas J.; Brandon, Alan; Shafer, John

    2009-01-01

    NWA 5298 is a single 445 g meteorite found near Bir Gandouz, Morocco in March 2008 [1]. This rock has a brown exterior weathered surface instead of a fusion crust and the interior is composed of green mineral grains with interstitial dark patches containing small vesicles and shock melts [1]. This meteorite is classified as a basaltic shergottite [2]. A petrologic study of this Martian meteorite is being carried out with electron microprobe analysis and soon trace element analyses by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Oxygen fugacity is calculated from Fe-Ti oxides pairs in the sample. The data from this study constrains the petrogenesis of basaltic shergottites.

  13. Total nitrogen content of deep sea basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, T. L.; Schaeffer, O. A.

    1982-01-01

    An estimate of the total nitrogen content of the earth's mantle, aimed at furnishing a further constraint for earth atmosphere origin and evolution models, was attempted through thermal neutron activation analysis via N-14(n,p)C-14 for the case of deep sea basalt glasses from the East Pacific Rise, the Mid-Atlantic Rift, and the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The increased nitrogen abundance of matrix material from the same samples as the glasses may be due to the incorporation of chemically-bound nitrogen from sea water, rather than dissolved molecular nitrogen. A discussion is presented of factors affecting observed basalt nitrogen content and its interpretation in terms of mantle nitrogen abundance. A 2 ppm N lower limit is estimated for the mantle.

  14. Ingestion of caustic alkali farm products.

    PubMed

    Neidich, G

    1993-01-01

    Since the Poison Prevention Packaging Act took effect, the number of ingestions of caustic alkali from household products has been significantly reduced. Commercial caustic alkalis used on farms, however, were not included in this legislation. Fourteen children over a 5 year period were seen after ingestion of commercial caustic alkalis used on farms. Seven of the children had ingested liquid pipeline cleaners and seven had ingested solid agents used for a variety of reasons. Six of seven children ingesting liquid agents did so from nonoriginal containers into which the caustic had been transferred for convenience. All seven children ingesting solid agents did so from the original container. Eight of the 14 children were found to have second-degree or worse esophageal involvement. Both solid and liquid caustic agents used commercially on farms can cause significant morbidity. Development of a child-resistant container for daily transfer of liquid pipeline agents could be helpful in preventing injuries from liquid pipeline cleaners. Pediatric gastroenterologists as well as primary care physicians in rural areas should be familiar with this type of injury and should take an active role in instructing parents of children living on farms to prevent such injuries. Extension of the Poison Prevention Packaging Act to caustic alkalis used on farms needs to be considered. PMID:8433244

  15. Terahertz radiation in alkali vapor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, X.-C.

    2014-05-12

    By taking advantage of low ionization potentials of alkali atoms, we demonstrate terahertz wave generation from cesium and rubidium vapor plasmas with an amplitude nearly one order of magnitude larger than that from nitrogen gas at low pressure (0.02–0.5 Torr). The observed phenomena are explained by the numerical modeling based upon electron tunneling ionization.

  16. Ingestion of caustic alkali farm products.

    PubMed

    Neidich, G

    1993-01-01

    Since the Poison Prevention Packaging Act took effect, the number of ingestions of caustic alkali from household products has been significantly reduced. Commercial caustic alkalis used on farms, however, were not included in this legislation. Fourteen children over a 5 year period were seen after ingestion of commercial caustic alkalis used on farms. Seven of the children had ingested liquid pipeline cleaners and seven had ingested solid agents used for a variety of reasons. Six of seven children ingesting liquid agents did so from nonoriginal containers into which the caustic had been transferred for convenience. All seven children ingesting solid agents did so from the original container. Eight of the 14 children were found to have second-degree or worse esophageal involvement. Both solid and liquid caustic agents used commercially on farms can cause significant morbidity. Development of a child-resistant container for daily transfer of liquid pipeline agents could be helpful in preventing injuries from liquid pipeline cleaners. Pediatric gastroenterologists as well as primary care physicians in rural areas should be familiar with this type of injury and should take an active role in instructing parents of children living on farms to prevent such injuries. Extension of the Poison Prevention Packaging Act to caustic alkalis used on farms needs to be considered.

  17. The Additive Coloration of Alkali Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jirgal, G. H.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an inexpensive, vacuum furnace designed to produce F-centers in alkali halide crystals by additive coloration. The method described avoids corrosion or contamination during the coloration process. Examination of the resultant crystals is discussed and several experiments using additively colored crystals are…

  18. Cohesive Energy of the Alkali Metals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a method, considered appropriate for presentation to undergraduate students in materials science and related courses, for the calculation of cohesive energies of the alkali metals. Uses a description based on the free electron model and gives results to within 0.1 eV of the experimental values. (Author/GS)

  19. Trace element and isotopic geochemistry of lavas from Haleakala Volcano, east Maui, Hawaii: Implications for the origin of Hawaiian basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chu-Yung; Frey, Frederick A.

    1985-09-01

    Haleakala volcano on East Maui, Hawaii, consists of a tholeiitic basalt shield which grades into a younger alkalic series that was followed by a posterosional alkalic series. Tholeiitic, transitional, and alkalic basalts range widely in Sr and Nd isotopic ratios (from mid-ocean ridge basalt to bulk earth ratios) and incompatible element (P, K, Rb, Sr, Zr, Nb, Ba, REE, Hf, Ta, and Th) abundances, but isotopic ratios and incompatible element abundance ratios (e.g., Ba/La, Nb/La, La/Ce, La/Sm) vary systematically with age. The youngest series (posterosional alkalic lavas) has the highest Rb/Sr, Ba/La, Nb/La, La/Ce, and 143Nd/144Nd ratios and the lowest 87sr/86sr ratios, whereas the oldest series (dominantly tholeiitic basalts) has the lowest Rb/Sr, Ba/La, Nb/La, La/Ce, and 143Nd/144Nd ratios and the highest 87sr/86sr ratios. The most striking features of the trace element and isotopic data are the inverse correlations between isotopic ratios and parent/daughter abundance ratios in the Sr and Nd systems. Although some of the geochemical variations can be explained by shallow level fractional crystallization (e.g., alkali basalt to mugearite [Chen et al., 1984, and manuscript in preparation, 1985]), the temporal geochemical trends require a major role for mixing. We propose a model in which melts from a diaper interact with incipient melts of its wall rocks, presumed to be oceanic lithosphere. Because of motion between the lithosphere and mantle hot spot the relative contribution of melts from the diapir (mantle plume) material to the lavas decreases with time; consequently, with decreasing age the basalts become more enriched in incompatible trace elements and acquire Sr and Nd isotopic ratios which overlap with mid-ocean ridge basalts. This model quantitatively explains the isotopic ratios and incompatible trace element abundances in representative samples from the three Haleakala volcanic series. On the basis of the degrees of melting inferred for the mixing

  20. Characterization of mesostasis regions in lunar basalts: Understanding late-stage melt evolution and its influence on apatite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potts, Nicola J.; TartèSe, Romain; Anand, Mahesh; Westrenen, Wim; Griffiths, Alexandra A.; Barrett, Thomas J.; Franchi, Ian A.

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies geared toward understanding the volatile abundances of the lunar interior have focused on the volatile-bearing accessory mineral apatite. Translating measurements of volatile abundances in lunar apatite into the volatile inventory of the silicate melts from which they crystallized, and ultimately of the mantle source regions of lunar magmas, however, has proved more difficult than initially thought. In this contribution, we report a detailed characterization of mesostasis regions in four Apollo mare basalts (10044, 12064, 15058, and 70035) in order to ascertain the compositions of the melts from which apatite crystallized. The texture, modal mineralogy, and reconstructed bulk composition of these mesostasis regions vary greatly within and between samples. There is no clear relationship between bulk-rock basaltic composition and that of bulk-mesostasis regions, indicating that bulk-rock composition may have little influence on mesostasis compositions. The development of individual melt pockets, combined with the occurrence of silicate liquid immiscibility, exerts greater control on the composition and texture of mesostasis regions. In general, the reconstructed late-stage lunar melts have roughly andesitic to dacitic compositions with low alkali contents, displaying much higher SiO2 abundances than the bulk compositions of their host magmatic rocks. Relevant partition coefficients for apatite-melt volatile partitioning under lunar conditions should, therefore, be derived from experiments conducted using intermediate compositions instead of compositions representing mare basalts.

  1. Characterization of mesostasis regions in lunar basalts: Understanding late-stage melt evolution and its influence on apatite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potts, Nicola J.; TartèSe, Romain; Anand, Mahesh; Westrenen, Wim; Griffiths, Alexandra A.; Barrett, Thomas J.; Franchi, Ian A.

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies geared toward understanding the volatile abundances of the lunar interior have focused on the volatile-bearing accessory mineral apatite. Translating measurements of volatile abundances in lunar apatite into the volatile inventory of the silicate melts from which they crystallized, and ultimately of the mantle source regions of lunar magmas, however, has proved more difficult than initially thought. In this contribution, we report a detailed characterization of mesostasis regions in four Apollo mare basalts (10044, 12064, 15058, and 70035) in order to ascertain the compositions of the melts from which apatite crystallized. The texture, modal mineralogy, and reconstructed bulk composition of these mesostasis regions vary greatly within and between samples. There is no clear relationship between bulk-rock basaltic composition and that of bulk-mesostasis regions, indicating that bulk-rock composition may have little influence on mesostasis compositions. The development of individual melt pockets, combined with the occurrence of silicate liquid immiscibility, exerts greater control on the composition and texture of mesostasis regions. In general, the reconstructed late-stage lunar melts have roughly andesitic to dacitic compositions with low alkali contents, displaying much higher SiO2 abundances than the bulk compositions of their host magmatic rocks. Relevant partition coefficients for apatite-melt volatile partitioning under lunar conditions should, therefore, be derived from experiments conducted using intermediate compositions instead of compositions representing mare basalts.

  2. Partitioning of V, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Ag, Sn, Sb, W, Au, Pb, and Bi between sulfide phases and hydrous basanite melt at upper mantle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Audétat, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    The partitioning of 15 major to trace metals between monosulfide solid solution (MSS), sulfide liquid (SL) and mafic silicate melt (SM) was determined in piston-cylinder experiments performed at 1175-1300 °C, 1.5-3.0 GPa and oxygen fugacities ranging from 3.1 log units below to 1.0 log units above the quartz-fayalite-magnetite fO2 buffer, which conditions are representative of partial melting in the upper mantle in different tectonic settings. The silicate melt was produced by partial melting of a natural, amphibole-rich mantle source rock, resulting in hydrous (˜5 wt% H2O) basanitic melts similar to low-degree partial melts of metasomatized mantle, whereas the major element composition of the starting sulfide (˜52 wt% Fe; 39 wt% S; 7 wt% Ni; 2 wt% Cu) was similar to the average composition of sulfides in this environment. SL/SM partition coefficients are high (≥100) for Au, Ni, Cu, Ag, Bi, intermediate (1-100) for Co, Pb, Sn, Sb (±As, Mo), and low (≤1) for the remaining elements. MSS/SM partition coefficients are generally lower than SL/SM partition coefficients and are high (≥100) for Ni, Cu, Au, intermediate (1-100) for Co, Ag (±Bi, Mo), and low (≤1) for the remaining elements. Most sulfide-silicate melt partition coefficients vary as a function of fO2, with Mo, Bi, As (±W) varying by a factor >10 over the investigated fO2 range, Sb, Ag, Sn (±V) varying by a factor of 3-10, and Pb, Cu, Ni, Co, Au, Zn, Mn varying by a factor of 3-10. The partitioning data were used to model the behavior of Cu, Au, Ag, and Bi during partial melting of upper mantle and during fractional crystallization of primitive MORB and arc magmas. Sulfide phase relationships and comparison of the modeling results with reported Cu, Au, Ag, and Bi concentrations from MORB and arc magmas suggest that: (i) MSS is the dominant sulfide in the source region of arc magmas, and thus that Au/Cu ratios in the silicate melt and residual sulfides may decrease with increasing degree of

  3. Pb isotopic heterogeneity in basaltic phenocrysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bryce, Julia G.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2002-06-01

    The Pb isotopic compositions of phenocrystic phases in young basaltic lavas have been investigated using the Getty-DePaolo method (Getty S. J. and DePaolo D. J. [1995] Quaternary geochronology by the U-Th-Pb method. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 59, 3267 3272), which allows for the resolution of small isotopic differences. Phenocryst, matrix, and whole rock analyses were made on samples from the 17 Myr-old Imnaha basalts of the Columbia River Group, a zero-age MORB from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and a ca. 260 kyr-old tholeiite from Mount Etna. Plagioclase feldspar phenocrysts have low-(U, Th)/Pb, and in each sample the plagioclase has significantly lower 206Pb/207Pb and 208Pb/207Pb values than whole rock, matrix, and magnetite-rich separates. The Pb isotopic contrast between plagioclase and matrix/whole rock is found in three samples with varying grain sizes (0.5 2 cm for the Imnaha basalt and MORB and <1 mm for the Etna sample) from different tectonic settings, suggesting that these results are not unique. The isotopic contrasts are only slightly smaller in magnitude than the variations exhibited by whole rock samples from the region. The Imnaha basalts also have Sr isotopic heterogeneity evident only in plagioclase phenocrysts, but the MORB and Etna lavas do not. The isotopic heterogeneities reflect magma mixing, and indicate that isotopically diverse magmas were mixed together just prior to eruption. The results reinforce indications from melt inclusion studies that magma source region isotopic heterogeneities have large amplitudes at short length scales, and that the isotopic variations imparted to the magmas are not entirely homogenized during segregation and transport processes.

  4. How thick are lunar mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, F.

    1978-01-01

    It is argued that De Hon's estimates of the thickness of lunar mare basalts, made by analyzing 'ghost' craters on mare surfaces, were inflated as the result of the crater morphometric data of Pike (1977) to reconstruct rim heights of degraded craters. Crater rim heights of 82 randomly selected highland craters of various states of degradation were determined, and median rim height was compared to that of corresponding fresh impact structures. Results indicate that the thickness estimates of De Hon may be reduced by a factor of 2, and that the total volume of mare basalt produced throughout lunar history could be as little as 1-2 million cubic kilometers. A survey of geochemical and petrographic evidence indicates that lateral transport of regolith components over distances of much greater than 10 km is relatively inefficient; it is suggested that vertical mixing of a highland substrate underlying the basaltic fill may have had a primordial role in generating the observed mare width distributions and high concentrations of exotic components in intrabasin regoliths.

  5. Voluminous granitic magmas from common basaltic sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, T.W.; Ratajeski, K.; Hankins, W.B.; Glazner, A.F.

    2005-01-01

    Granitic-rhyolitic liquids were produced experimentally from moderately hydrous (1.7-2.3 wt% H2O) medium-to-high K basaltic compositions at 700 MPa and f O2 controlled from Ni-NiO -1.3 to +4. Amount and composition of evolved liquids and coexisting mineral assemblages vary with fO2 and temperature, with melt being more evolved at higher fO2s, where coexisting mineral assemblages are more plagioclase- and Fe-Ti oxide-rich and amphibole-poor. At fO2 of Ni-NiO +1, typical for many silicic magmas, the samples produce 12-25 wt% granitic-rhyolitic liquid, amounts varying with bulk composition. Medium-to-high K basalts are common in subduction-related magmatic arcs, and near-solidus true granite or rhyolite liquids can form widely, and in geologically significant quantities, by advanced crystallization-differentiation or by low-degree partial remelting of mantle-derived basaltic sources. Previously differentiated or weathered materials may be involved in generating specific felsic magmas, but are not required for such magmas to be voluminous or to have the K-rich granitic compositions typical of the upper continental crust. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  6. Lunar sample studies. [breccias basalts, and anorthosites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Lunar samples discussed and the nature of their analyses are: (1) an Apollo 15 breccia which is thoroughly analyzed as to the nature of the mature regolith from which it derived and the time and nature of the lithification process, (2) two Apollo 11 and one Apollo 12 basalts analyzed in terms of chemistry, Cross-Iddings-Pirsson-Washington norms, mineralogy, and petrography, (3) eight Apollo 17 mare basalts, also analyzed in terms of chemistry, Cross-Iddings-Pirsson-Washington norms, mineralogy, and petrography. The first seven are shown to be chemically similar although of two main textural groups; the eighth is seen to be distinct in both chemistry and mineralogy, (4) a troctolitic clast from a Fra Mauro breccia, analyzed and contrasted with other high-temperature lunar mineral assemblages. Two basaltic clasts from the same breccia are shown to have affinities with rock 14053, and (5) the uranium-thorium-lead systematics of three Apollo 16 samples are determined; serious terrestrial-lead contamination of the first two samples is attributed to bandsaw cutting in the lunar curatorial facility.

  7. Identification of Mineral Phases on Basalt Surfaces by Imaging SIMS.

    PubMed

    Ingram, J C; Groenewold, G S; Olson, J E; Gianotto, A K; McCurry, M O

    1999-05-01

    A method for the identification of mineral phases on basalt surfaces utilizing secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with imaging capability is described. The goal of this work is to establish the use of imaging SIMS for characterization of the surface of basalt. The basalt surfaces were examined by interrogating the intact basalt (heterogeneous mix of mineral phases) as well as mineral phases that have been separated from the basalt samples. Mineral separates from the basalt were used to establish reference spectra for the specific mineral phases. Electron microprobe and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used as supplemental techniques for providing additional characterization of the basalt. Mineral phases that make up the composition of the basalt were identified from single-ion images which were statistically grouped. The statistical grouping is performed by utilizing a program that employs a generalized learning vector quantization technique. Identification of the mineral phases on the basalt surface is achieved by comparing the mass spectra from the statistically grouped regions of the basalt to the mass spectral results from the mineral separates. The results of this work illustrate the potential for using imaging SIMS to study adsorption chemistry at the top surface of heterogeneous mineral samples.

  8. Lithospheric mantle heterogeneity across the continental-oceanic transition, northwest Ross Sea, Antarctica: new evidence from oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krans, S. R.; Panter, K. S.; Castillo, P.; Deering, C. D.; Kitajima, K.; Valley, J. W.; Hart, S. R.; Kyle, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    Oxygen isotopes and whole rock chemistry from alkali basalt and basanite in the northwest Ross Sea, Antarctica offer new insight on source heterogeneity across the transition from continental to oceanic lithosphere in a magma-poor rifted margin. In situ SIMS analysis of olivine (Fo 79-90) from the most primitive lavas (MgO ≥ 8 wt%, Mg# 53-70, Ni= 115-338 ppm, Cr= 244-540 ppm) yield an average δ18O = 5.18 × 0.60 ‰ (2σ, n=30) for alkali basalt and 5.25 × 0.44 ‰ (2σ, n=52) for basanite (× 0.28 ‰, 2σ precision on a homogeneous olivine standard). These are similar to the range for olivine from mantle peridotite and HIMU type oceanic basalts (δ18O= 5.0 to 5.4 ‰ and 4.9 to 5.2 ‰, respectively [1]), but with greater variability. Lavas in this region experienced little differentiation, have minimal evidence of crustal contamination (87Sr/86Sr < 0.7030, 143Nd/144Nd > 0.5129), and olivine show no correlation between δ18O and Fo content, further suggesting that the δ18O values are source related. Whole-rock chemistry of alkali basalt and basanite are spatially distributed. In general, alkali basalt is found in thicker continental lithosphere with lower Sr (477-672ppm) and Nb/Y (1.2-2.4) than basanite. Basanite is found in oceanic and thinned continental lithosphere with higher Sr (642-1131 ppm) and Nb/Y (2.4-3.6). Variation in degree of silica-undersaturation and Nb/Y can be explained by varying degree of partial melting. While alkali basalt and basanite can result from varying degrees of partial melting of similar source compositions, the presence of amphibole in mantle xenoliths have lead workers in this region to propose contributions from a metasomatic source [2, 3, 4] with variable 206Pb/204Pb ratios [5]. A negative correlation between Nb/Y and δ18O in both rock types suggests that varying degrees of partial melting are tapping sources with different δ18O values; lower degree melts have δ18O ≤ 5.0 ‰ and higher degree melts have δ18O > 5.3

  9. Isotopic and REE studies of lunar basalt 12038 - Implications for petrogenesis of aluminous mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Wooden, J. L.; Shih, C.-Y.; Wiesmann, H.; Bansal, B. M.

    1981-01-01

    Sr, Nd, and Sm isotopic studies of lunar basalt 12038, one of the so-called aluminous mare basalts, are reported. The evolution of the Sr and Nd isotopic compositions and the rare earth element (REE) abundances is successfully modeled within the framework of the model developed by Nyquist et al. (1977, 1979) for Apollo 12 olivine-pigeonite and ilmenite basalts. It is pointed out that the isotopic and trace element features of 12038 can by modeled as produced by partial melting of a cumulate mantle source which crystallized from a lunar magma ocean with a chondrite-normalized REE pattern of constant negative slope. Chondrite-normalized La/Yb is equal to 2.2 for this hypothetical magma ocean pattern.

  10. Making rhyolite in a basalt crucible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, John

    2016-04-01

    Iceland has long attracted the attention of those concerned with the origin of rhyolitic magmas and indeed of granitic continental crust, because it presents no alternative for such magmas other than deriving them from a basaltic source. Hydrothermally altered basalt has been identified as the progenitor. The fact that rhyolite erupts as pure liquid requires a process of melt-crustal separation that is highly efficient despite the high viscosity of rhyolite melt. Volcanoes in Iceland are foci of basaltic magma injection along the divergent plate boundary. Repeated injection produces remelting, digestion, and sometimes expulsion or lateral withdrawal of material resulting in a caldera, a "crucible" holding down-dropped and interlayered lava flows, tephras, and injected sills. Once melting of this charge begins, a great deal of heat is absorbed in the phase change. Just 1% change in crystallinity per degree gives a melt-present body an effective heat capacity >5 times the subsolidus case. Temperature is thus buffered at the solidus and melt composition at rhyolite. Basalt inputs are episodic ("fires") so likely the resulting generation of rhyolite by melting is too. If frequent enough to offset cooling between events, rhyolite melt extractions will accumulate as a rhyolite magma reservoir rather than as discrete crystallized sills. Evidently, such magma bodies can survive multiple firings without themselves erupting, as the 1875 eruption of Askja Caldera of 0.3 km3 of rhyolite equilibrated at 2-km depth without previous leakage over a ten-millennium period and the surprise discovery of rhyolite magma at 2-km depth in Krafla suggest. Water is required for melting; otherwise melting cannot begin at a temperature lower than that of the heat source. Because the solubility of water in melt is pressure-dependent and almost zero at surface pressure, there must be a minimum depth at which basalt-induced melting can occur and a rhyolite reservoir sustained. In practice, the

  11. Alkali metal recovery from carbonaceous material conversion process

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, David W.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.; Gorbaty, Martin L.; Tsou, Joe M.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced in the gasifier or similar reaction zone, alkali metal constitutents are recovered from the particles by withdrawing and passing the particles from the reaction zone to an alkali metal recovery zone in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen and treating the particles in the recovery zone with water or an aqueous solution in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen. The solution formed by treating the particles in the recovery zone will contain water-soluble alkali metal constituents and is recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preventing contact of the particles with oxygen as they are withdrawn from the reaction zone and during treatment in the recovery zone avoids the formation of undesirable alkali metal constituents in the aqueous solution produced in the recovery zone and insures maximum recovery of water-soluble alkali metal constituents from the alkali metal residues.

  12. Preliminary data on mantle xenoliths from the Feldstein basalt (Thuringia, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukuła, Anna; Puziewicz, Jacek; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Milke, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Feldstein is an isolated outcrop of columnar basaltic rock nearby Themar, located 60 km south-west of Erfurt (Thuringia, Germany). The Feldstein alkali basalt (ca. 16.3 Ma) belongs to the Heldburger Gangschar subset of the Central European Volcanic Province (Abratis et al. 2007). The Feldstein alkali basalt contains peridotitic xenoliths, which were the subject of our study. Two groups of spinel peridotite xenoliths occur in the Feldstein basalt. Group A spinel peridotite (2 xenoliths) is characterized by protogranular texture with typical grain size of 2 - 3 mm (max 8 mm). It consists of olivine (90.28 - 91.36 % Fo, 0.35 - 0.45 wt. % NiO), orthopyroxene (mg# 0.91 - 0.92, Al 0.09 - 0.18 a pfu), clinopyroxene (mg# 0.93 - 0.95, Al 0.06 - 0.21 a pfu) and spinel (cr# 0.20 - 0.41, mg# 0.66 - 0.78). The mg# and Al content in clinopyroxene are negatively correlated following the depletion trend after variable degrees of partial melting of the same source. One of the studied samples contains clinopyroxene that does not plot on the general depletion trend but has significantly higher Al (0.15 - 0.21 a pfu) for similar mg # 0.93 - 0.94 with clinopyroxenes from this trend. However the primitive mantle normalized clinopyroxene REE patterns (concave upwards with LaN/YbN=0.11) indicate that they are the residues after elevated degrees of partial melting. The most magnesian clinopyroxene that is Ca-rich and Al-poor has REE abundances, typical for strongly depleted spinel peridotites. It has concave upwards primitive mantle normalized pattern and LaN/YbN=0.61. A slight increase of LaN and CeN with inflection point at PrN has been observed as well. The group B spinel peridotites have protogranular texture (3-4 mm, max 7 mm grains) and some of them contain several melt pockets of basaltic composition. It consists of olivine (88.95 - 91.32 % Fo, 0.34 - 0.47 wt.% NiO), orthopyroxene (mg# 0.90 - 0.93, Al 0.04 - 0.16 apfu) and clinopyroxene (mg# 0.90 - 0.93, Al 0.10 - 0.20 a pfu). The

  13. Infrared and Raman spectroscopic studies on alkali borate glasses: evidence of mixed alkali effect.

    PubMed

    Padmaja, G; Kistaiah, P

    2009-03-19

    A lithium-potassium-borate glass system containing manganese and iron cations has been thoroughly investigated in order to obtain information about the mixed alkali effect and the structural role of both the manganese and iron in such glass hosts. Mixed alkali borate glasses of the (30 - x)Li(2)O - xK(2)O - 10CdO/ZnO - 59B(2)O(3) (x = 0, 10, 15, 20, and 30) doped with 1MnO(2)/1Fe(2)O(3) system were prepared by a melt quench technique. The amorphous phase of the prepared glass samples was confirmed from their X-ray diffraction. The spectroscopic properties of glass samples were studied using infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopic techniques. The density of all the prepared glasses was measured using Archimedes principle. Molar volumes were estimated from the density data. IR spectra of these glasses revealed a dramatic variation of three- and four-coordinated boron structures as a function of mixed alkali concentration. The vibrations due to Li-O, K-O, and MnO(4)/FeO(4) arrangements are consistent in all the compositions and show a nonlinear variation in the intensity with alkali content. Raman spectra of different alkali combinations with CdO and ZnO present drastic changes in the intensity of various Raman bands. The observation of disappearance and reappearance of IR and Raman bands as a function of various alkali concentrations is an important result pertaining to the mixed alkali effect in borate glasses. Acting as complementary spectroscopic techniques, both types of measurements, IR and Raman, revealed that the network structure of the studied glasses is mainly based on BO(3) and BO(4) units placed in different structural groups, the BO(3) units being dominant. The measured IR and Raman spectra of different glasses are used to clarify the optical properties of the present glasses correlating them with their structure and composition. PMID:19235995

  14. Hotspots, basalts, and the evolution of the mantle.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D L

    1981-07-01

    The trace element concentration patterns of continental and ocean island basalts and of mid-ocean ridge basalts are complementary. The relative sizes of the source regions for these fundamentally different basalt types can be estimated from the trace element enrichment-depletion patterns. Their combined volume occupies most of the mantle above the 670 kilometer discontinuity. The source regions separated as a result of early mantle differentiation and crystal fractionation from the resulting melt. The mid-ocean ridge basalts source evolved from an eclogite cumulate that lost its late-stage enriched fluids at various times to the shallower mantle and continental crust. The mid-ocean ridge basalts source is rich in garnet and clinopyroxene, whereas the continental and ocean island basalt source is a garnet peridotite that has experienced secondary enrichment. These relationships are consistent with the evolution of a terrestrial magma ocean. PMID:17741173

  15. Trace element composition of Luna 24 Crisium VLT basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    The origins of the individual particles analyzed from the Luna 24 core and the information they provide on the trace-element composition of Mare Crisium basalt are considered. Previous analyses of several Luna 24 soil fragments are reviewed. It is concluded that: (1) the average trace-element concentrations for 12 VLT basalt fragments are the best available estimates for bulk samples of Crisium VLT basalt; (2) there is weak evidence that the average Crisium basalt might have a small positive Eu anomaly relative to chondritic matter; (3) the soils contain components from sources other than the Crisium VLT basalt; and (4) there is no convincing information in concentrations of rare-earth elements, Co, Sc, FeO, or Na2O among the analyzed fragments to indicate more than one parent basalt.

  16. Hotspots, basalts, and the evolution of the mantle.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D L

    1981-07-01

    The trace element concentration patterns of continental and ocean island basalts and of mid-ocean ridge basalts are complementary. The relative sizes of the source regions for these fundamentally different basalt types can be estimated from the trace element enrichment-depletion patterns. Their combined volume occupies most of the mantle above the 670 kilometer discontinuity. The source regions separated as a result of early mantle differentiation and crystal fractionation from the resulting melt. The mid-ocean ridge basalts source evolved from an eclogite cumulate that lost its late-stage enriched fluids at various times to the shallower mantle and continental crust. The mid-ocean ridge basalts source is rich in garnet and clinopyroxene, whereas the continental and ocean island basalt source is a garnet peridotite that has experienced secondary enrichment. These relationships are consistent with the evolution of a terrestrial magma ocean.

  17. Infrared spectra of FHF - in alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunnilall, C. J.; Sherman, W. F.

    1982-03-01

    The bifluoride ion, FHF -, has been substitutionally isolated within single crystal samples of several different alkali halides. Infrared spectra of these crystals have been studied for sample temperatures down to 8K when half-bandwidths of less than 1 cm -1 have been observed. (Note that at room temperature ν 3 is observed to have a half-bandwidth of about 40 cm -1). The frequency shifts and half-bandwidth changes caused by cooling are considered together with the frequency shifts caused by pressures up to 10 k bar. The low temperature spectra clearly indicate that FHF - is a linear symmetrical ion when substitutionally isolated within alkali halides of either the NaCl or CsCl structure.

  18. Geopolymers and Related Alkali-Activated Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provis, John L.; Bernal, Susan A.

    2014-07-01

    The development of new, sustainable, low-CO2 construction materials is essential if the global construction industry is to reduce the environmental footprint of its activities, which is incurred particularly through the production of Portland cement. One type of non-Portland cement that is attracting particular attention is based on alkali-aluminosilicate chemistry, including the class of binders that have become known as geopolymers. These materials offer technical properties comparable to those of Portland cement, but with a much lower CO2 footprint and with the potential for performance advantages over traditional cements in certain niche applications. This review discusses the synthesis of alkali-activated binders from blast furnace slag, calcined clay (metakaolin), and fly ash, including analysis of the chemical reaction mechanisms and binder phase assemblages that control the early-age and hardened properties of these materials, in particular initial setting and long-term durability. Perspectives for future research developments are also explored.

  19. Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

    2003-02-26

    This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

  20. The mean composition of ocean ridge basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gale, Allison; Dalton, Colleen A.; Langmuir, Charles H.; Su, Yongjun; Schilling, Jean-Guy

    2013-03-01

    mean composition of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) is determined using a global data set of major elements, trace elements, and isotopes compiled from new and previously published data. A global catalog of 771 ridge segments, including their mean depth, length, and spreading rate enables calculation of average compositions for each segment. Segment averages allow weighting by segment length and spreading rate and reduce the bias introduced by uneven sampling. A bootstrapping statistical technique provides rigorous error estimates. Based on the characteristics of the data, we suggest a revised nomenclature for MORB. "ALL MORB" is the total composition of the crust apart from back-arc basins, N-MORB the most likely basalt composition encountered along the ridge >500 km from hot spots, and D-MORB the depleted end-member. ALL MORB and N-MORB are substantially more enriched than early estimates of normal ridge basalts. The mean composition of back-arc spreading centers requires higher extents of melting and greater concentrations of fluid-mobile elements, reflecting the influence of water on back-arc petrogenesis. The average data permit a re-evaluation of several problems of global geochemistry. The K/U ratio reported here (12,340 ± 840) is in accord with previous estimates, much lower than the estimate of Arevalo et al. (2009). The low Sm/Nd and 143Nd/144Nd ratio of ALL MORB and N-MORB provide constraints on the hypothesis that Earth has a non-chondritic primitive mantle. Either Earth is chondritic in Sm/Nd and the hypothesis is incorrect or MORB preferentially sample an enriched reservoir, requiring a large depleted reservoir in the deep mantle.

  1. Nontronite Mineralization in Columbia River Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, L.

    2015-12-01

    The ferric smectite nontronite is one of the first minerals formed by secondary weathering of Columbia River Basalts (CRB). Although nontronite is a common weathering product of CRB, it is not ubiquitous; field relations in near-surface flows suggest it only forms where sufficient water is available. In near-surface flows that are above the water table, nontronite is found filling cracks or vesicles, or in association with paleosols now preserved between flows in many localities. Field relations strongly suggest that porosity and permeability at the millimeter to meter scale control the supply of water for weathering and are key to the chemical composition of secondary clays and to the overall abundance of individual secondary weathering minerals. Weathering in the basalts initiates in void spaces that hold water, where high-Fe nontronite forms radiating acicular sprays. Small void spaces fill completely with nontronite of uniform composition, which penetrates the walls and replaces surrounding glass and ferromagnesian minerals. This process produces a relatively limited quantity of high-purity ferric nontronite. In large void spaces where water is limiting, nontronite lines the interior of vesicles but does not fill them; vermicular clay strands grow into the space from nucleation sites at the vesicle wall. Nontronitic cores are coated by layers of Mg- and Al-rich clays, and Mn oxides coat the exteriors. Thus, weathering under water-limited conditions appears to produce more compositionally complex mineral assemblages. In more extensively weathered basalts, nontronite is not present except in isolated, enclosed spaces. Results of this study may be useful in interpreting remotely sensed mineralogical data on Mars. The compositions of ferromagnesian smectites and spatial relationships between different clays on Mars may hold clues to the original conditions of water-rock interaction.

  2. Products of a Subglacial Flood Basalt Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorny, C. F.; White, J. D. L.; Gudmundsson, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Snæbýlisheiði unit, SE Iceland, is a ca. 26 km³ elongate, flat-topped ridge of volcaniclastic debris coupled with and intruded by coherent basalt stretching over 34 km from the eruption site perpendicular to the rift fissure source. It formed from a single subglacial flood basalt eruption during a recent glaciation, and its elongation reflects glacial control on dispersal via the hydraulic potential gradient at the glacier's base, which drove towards the glacier terminus the meltwater+debris formed during the eruption by quenching and fragmentation. High magma discharge and outgassing drove segregation of magma into down-flow propagating intrusions. Edifice growth was mediated by the extent of ice melting, extent and efficiency of meltwater+debris drainage, and hydraulic gradients locally favoring meltwater accumulation. Eruption style reflected magma flux, edifice stability, and accessibility of water to the vent area via flooding or infiltration. Deposits reflect these competing factors in their chaotic internal organization and stratigraphy, limited lithofacies continuity, and diverse particle populations from multiple source vents. Linear growth of the ridge down-gradient from the eruption site was driven primarily by propagation and continuous fragmentation of shoaling intrusions that formed an interconnected intrusive complex with extensive peperites. Advance was along gently meandering and locally bifurcating sub-ice conduits within hyaloclastite with sheet-lobe levees and lobate fingered intrusions. Irregular dikes, apophyses, horns, and tendrils extended from the main body and generated voluminous lapilli tuff and contorticlasts while providing additional heat to the system. Prolonged transport and deposition of debris produced complexly bedded volcaniclastic deposits derived from and intruded by the basalt sheet. The bedding and depositional features of volcaniclastic debris and relationship to their adjacent intrusions suggest transport and

  3. Trace Element Diffusion in Basaltic Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holycross, M.; Watson, E. B.

    2015-12-01

    We conducted high pressure, high temperature experiments to determine simultaneously the diffusivities of 24 trace elements (Sc, V, Rb, Y, Zr, Nb, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb, Lu, Hf, Ta, Th, U) in liquids of basaltic composition. Pre-synthesis runs were conducted in graphite capsules in a piston-cylinder apparatus to create two glasses having relatively high and low trace element contents. These glasses were then powdered and paired in diffusion couples by repacking in graphite capsules. All diffusion experiments were executed in a piston cylinder apparatus at 1 GPa pressure and temperatures ranging from 1250-1500º C. Concentration gradients that developed in the glasses were characterized using a laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (LA-ICP-MS). Diffusion coefficients were determined from concentration profiles and show Arrhenian behavior within experimental error. Errors were assigned based on the linear fit of five time series experiments conducted over 500-9000 s to accurately represent the total experimental reproducibility of our results. Data show the highest activation energies are obtained for high field strength elements. Values for the pre-exponential factor, D0, also peak for the high field strength elements. We suggest that trace element diffusion in basaltic melts follows the compensation law (Winchell, 1969), with log D0 exhibiting linear dependence on activation energy. Calculated diffusivities indicate that transport through basaltic melt could be an effective mechanism for fractionating high field strength elements over geologically relevant time scales. Winchell (1969) High Temp. Sci. 1: 200-215

  4. Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Life Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    One approach to space fission power system design is predicated on the use of alkali metal heat pipes, either as radiator elements, thermal management components, or as part of the core primary heat-transfer system. This synopsis characterizes long-life core heat pipes. References are included where more detailed information can be found. Specifics shown here are for demonstrational purposes and do not necessarily reflect current Project Prometheus point designs.

  5. Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Life Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Robert S.

    2004-07-01

    One approach to fission power system design uses alkali metal heat pipes for the core primary heat-transfer system. Heat pipes may also be used as radiator elements or auxiliary thermal control elements. This synopsis characterizes long-life core heat pipes. References are included where information that is more detailed can be found. Specifics shown here are for demonstration purposes and do not necessarily reflect current Nasa Project Prometheus point designs. (author)

  6. Mare basalt genesis - Modeling trace elements and isotopic ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, A. B.

    1985-11-01

    Various types of mare basalt data have been synthesized, leading to the production of an internally consistent model of the mare basalt source region and mare basalt genesis. The model accounts for the mineralogical, major oxide, compatible siderophile trace element, incompatible trace element, and isotopic characteristics of most of the mare basalt units and of all the pyroclastic glass units for which reliable data are available. Initial tests of the model show that it also reproduces the mineralogy and incompatible trace element characteristics of the complementary highland anorthosite suite of rocks and, in a general way, those of the lunar granite suite of rocks.

  7. Quantifying glassy and crystalline basalt partitioning in the oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Rachael; Ménez, Bénédicte

    2016-04-01

    The upper layers of the oceanic crust are predominately basaltic rock, some of which hosts microbial life. Current studies of microbial life within the ocean crust mainly focus on the sedimentary rock fraction, or those organisms found within glassy basalts while the potential habitability of crystalline basalts are poorly explored. Recently, there has been recognition that microbial life develops within fractures and grain boundaries of crystalline basalts, therefore estimations of total biomass within the oceanic crust may be largely under evaluated. A deeper understanding of the bulk composition and fractionation of rocks within the oceanic crust is required before more accurate estimations of biomass can be made. To augment our understanding of glassy and crystalline basalts within the oceanic crust we created two end-member models describing basalt fractionation: a pillow basalt with massive, or sheet, flows crust and a pillow basalt with sheeted dike crust. Using known measurements of massive flow thickness, dike thickness, chilled margin thickness, pillow lava size, and pillow lava glass thickness, we have calculated the percentage of glassy versus crystalline basalts within the oceanic crust for each model. These models aid our understanding of textural fractionation within the oceanic crust, and can be applied with bioenergetics models to better constrain deep biomass estimates.

  8. Study on basalt fiber parameters affecting fiber-reinforced mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. A.; Chernykh, T. N.; Sashina, A. V.; Bogusevich, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the effect of different dosages and diameters of basalt fibers on tensile strength increase during bending of fiberboard-reinforced mortar samples. The optimal dosages of fiber, providing maximum strength in bending are revealed. The durability of basalt fiber in an environment of cement, by means of microscopic analysis of samples of fibers and fiberboard-reinforced mortar long-term tests is examined. The article also compares the behavior of basalt fiber in the cement stone environment to a glass one and reveals that the basalt fiber is not subject to destruction.

  9. Microbial colonization and alteration of basaltic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einen, J.; Kruber, C.; Øvreås, L.; Thorseth, I. H.; Torsvik, T.

    2006-03-01

    Microorganisms have been reported to be associated with the alteration of the glassy margin of seafloor pillow basalts (Thorseth et al., 2001, 2003; Lysnes et al., 2004). The amount of iron and other biological important elements present in basalts and the vast abundance of basaltic glass in the earth's crust, make glass alteration an important process in global element cycling. To gain further insight into microbial communities associated with glass alteration, five microcosm experiments mimicking seafloor conditions were inoculated with seafloor basalt and incubated for one year. Mineral precipitations, microbial attachment to the glass and glass alteration were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the bacterial community composition was fingerprinted by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) in combination with sequencing. SEM analysis revealed a microbial community with low morphological diversity of mainly biofilm associated and prosthecate microorganisms. Approximately 30 nm thick alteration rims developed on the glass in all microcosms after one year of incubation; this however was also seen in non inoculated controls. Calcium carbonate precipitates showed parallel, columnar and filamentous crystallization habits in the microcosms as well as in the sterile controls. DGGE analysis showed an alteration in bacterial community profiles in the five different microcosms, as a response to the different energy and redox regimes and time. In all microcosms a reduction in number of DGGE bands, in combination with an increase in cell abundance were recorded during the experiment. Sequence analysis showed that the microcosms were dominated by four groups of organisms with phylogenetic affiliation to four taxa: The Rhodospirillaceae, a family containing phototrophic marine organisms, in which some members are capable of heterotrophic growth in darkness and N2 fixation; the family Hyphomicrobiaceae, a group of prosthecate oligotrophic

  10. The nomenclature of polymict basaltic achondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delaney, J. S.; Prinz, M.; Harlow, G. E.; Takeda, H.; Nehru, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    The system of nomenclature for basaltic achondrite meteorites is discussed, and new classification criteria are proposed. Under the new system, all achondrites are divided intno the broad groupings 'monomict' and 'polymict' by the number of lithologies present. The monomicts are classified structurally as brecciated or unbreccciated and as eucrites, diogenites, or cumulate eucrites. The polymicts are classified using an arbitrary mineral-chemical standard based on the percentage content of diogenite (magnesium orthopyroxenite): diogenites have more than 90 percent, eucrites have less than 10 percent, and all other polymicts area howardites. Tables listing all known achondrites by classification are provided.

  11. Plagioclase mineralogy of olivine alkaline basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffer, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    A geological and mineralogical study of the Potrillo volcanics is reported. The investigation consisted first of field mapping to establish and identify the different rock types and volcanic features in order to determine the geological history. Next, samples were collected and analyzed petrographically to determine suitable rocks from the various stratigraphic units for study of plagioclase. Samples selected for further study were crushed and the plagioclase extracted for the determination of composition and structural state. These results were then related to the petrology and crystallization of the basalt.

  12. Thermal Infrared Spectra of Experimentally Shocked Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Horz, F.

    2003-12-01

    We acquired thermal infrared (3-40 microns) emissivity and hemispherical reflectance spectra of experimentally shocked samples of a fine-grained basalt from Grand Falls, AZ to document the spectral effects of shock as a function of increasing shock pressures (17-57 GPa). This sample contains 25% pyroxene, 20% olivine, and 45% feldspar, making it a suitable analog to the Surface Type 1 (basalt) observed in Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data of Mars. Reflectance data (3-14 microns) were acquired using a Nexus 470 FTIR spectrometer at the HIGP, University of Hawaii, and emission spectra (5-40 microns) were acquired using a Nicolet Nexus 670 emission spectrometer at Arizona State University. These data complement similar previous measurements of experimentally shocked plagioclase and pyroxene relevant to interpreting spectra provided by TES. The samples were shocked using the 25-mm barrel gun at Johnson Space Center and provided ~400 mg per sample. Large (2-10 mm) chips of recovered material were separated from the samples and washed to remove clinging fines, and the residual was powdered to provide a consistent grain size ( ˜20 microns). Spectra were obtained of both the chips and the powder samples. Results for the chips show a shift in band positions in the 900-1200 wavenumber (wn) region compared to unshocked samples, consistent with the structural degradation of feldspar and subsequent formation of maskelynite and glass. The development of a band near 460 wn at high pressures is also consistent with glass formation in feldspars. Conversely, absorptions related to pyroxene remain present even at high pressures, consistent with previous work. Results for the powders show little variations with increasing pressure except for the loss of minor transparency features in the 800-900 wn region. Additional visible/near-infrared (0.35-2.50 microns) measurements of the powdered basalt samples also will be acquired at the RELAB facility. Future work will include

  13. Vesiculation of basaltic magma during eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangan, M.T.; Cashman, K.V.; Newman, S.

    1993-01-01

    Vesicle size distributions in vent lavas from the Pu'u "O'o-Kupaianaha eruption of Kilauea volcano are used to estimate nucleation and growth rates of H2O-rich gas bubbles in basaltic magma nearing the earth's surface (???120 m depth). By using well-constrained estimates for the depth of volatile exsolution and magma ascent rate, nucleation rates of 35.9 events.cm-3.s-1 and growth rates of 3.2 ?? 10-4cm/s are determined directly from size-distribution data. The results are consistent with diffusion-controlled growth as predicted by a parabolic growth law. -from Authors

  14. Ion Pairing in Alkali Nitrate Electrolyte Solutions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen Jun; Zhang, Zhen; Gao, Yi Qin

    2016-03-10

    In this study, we investigate the thermodynamics of alkali nitrate salt solutions, especially the formation of contact ion pairs between alkali cation and nitrate anion. The ion-pairing propensity shows an order of LiNO3 < NaNO3 < KNO3. Such results explain the salt activity coefficients and suggest that the empirical "law of matching water affinity" is followed by these alkali nitrate salt solutions. The spatial patterns of contact ion pairs are different in the three salt solutions studied here: Li(+) forms the contact ion pair with only one oxygen of the nitrate while Na(+) and K(+) can also be shared by two oxygens of the nitrate. In reproducing the salt activity coefficient using Kirkwood-Buff theory, we find that it is essential to include electronic polarization for Li(+) which has a high charge density. The electronic continuum correction for nonpolarizable force field significantly improves the agreement between the calculated activity coefficients and their experimental values. This approach also improves the performance of the force field on salt solubility. From these two aspects, this study suggests that electronic continuum correction can be a promising approach to force-field development for ions with high charge densities. PMID:26901167

  15. Ion Pairing in Alkali Nitrate Electrolyte Solutions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen Jun; Zhang, Zhen; Gao, Yi Qin

    2016-03-10

    In this study, we investigate the thermodynamics of alkali nitrate salt solutions, especially the formation of contact ion pairs between alkali cation and nitrate anion. The ion-pairing propensity shows an order of LiNO3 < NaNO3 < KNO3. Such results explain the salt activity coefficients and suggest that the empirical "law of matching water affinity" is followed by these alkali nitrate salt solutions. The spatial patterns of contact ion pairs are different in the three salt solutions studied here: Li(+) forms the contact ion pair with only one oxygen of the nitrate while Na(+) and K(+) can also be shared by two oxygens of the nitrate. In reproducing the salt activity coefficient using Kirkwood-Buff theory, we find that it is essential to include electronic polarization for Li(+) which has a high charge density. The electronic continuum correction for nonpolarizable force field significantly improves the agreement between the calculated activity coefficients and their experimental values. This approach also improves the performance of the force field on salt solubility. From these two aspects, this study suggests that electronic continuum correction can be a promising approach to force-field development for ions with high charge densities.

  16. Transport properties of alkali metal doped fullerides

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Daluram Yadav, Nishchhal

    2015-07-31

    We have studied the intercage interactions between the adjacent C{sub 60} cages and expansion of lattice due to the intercalation of alkali atoms based on the spring model to estimate phonon frequencies from the dynamical matrix for the intermolecular alkali-C{sub 60} phonons. We considered a two-peak model for the phonon density of states to investigate the nature of electron pairing mechanism for superconducting state in fullerides. Coulomb repulsive parameter and the electron phonon coupling strength are obtained within the random phase approximation. Transition temperature, T{sub c}, is obtained in a situation when the free electrons in lowest molecular orbital are coupled with alkali-C{sub 60} phonons as 5 K, which is much lower as compared to reported T{sub c} (20 K). The superconducting pairing is mainly driven by the high frequency intramolecular phonons and their effects enhance it to 22 K. The importance of the present study, the pressure effect and normal state transport properties are calculated within the same model leading superconductivity.

  17. Water in Basaltic Melts: an Experimental and Thermodynamic Study of the Effect of H2O on Liquidus Temperatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medard, E.; Grove, T. L.

    2006-12-01

    We present a thermodynamic model for the influence of H2O on liquidus temperatures of olivine-saturated primitive basaltic and andesitic melts. The thermodynamic model has been fitted to a suite of H2O-saturated liquidus experiments carried out on a primitive high-alumina basalt from Medicine Lake Volcano (82-72f) over a pressure range of 10 to 1000 MPa. The model of Silver and Stolper (S+S, 1985, J.Geol. 93:161) has been applied to the experimental data. This model uses the assumption of simple ideal mixing between water species and the anionic matrix in the melt. Water in the melt dissolves as molecular H2O, or dissociates to hydroxyl groups and an oxygen atomic network. For 82-72f, the liquidus olivine shows little compositional variability (Fo87.4 to Fo88.4) over the broad range of pressures and temperatures investigated that is not correlated with H2O content of the melt. This observation supports our assumption that major effect of H2O is on the anionic species in the melt and not on the cation equilibria (e.g. Mg and Si). The model reproduces the experimental data well. We find that there is a large influence of H2O addition on melting point for small amounts of H2O, resulting in a concave-down curvature when liquidus depression is plotted against the amount of H2O added. For addition of 0.8 and 5 wt% H2O to 82-72f, the liquidus is depressed by 35 K and 130 K, respectively. The best fits are obtained by assuming partial water dissociation to OH and H2O species, using the equilibrium constant measured by Stolper (1982). S+S applied their model to simple systems (diopside/H2O, albite/H2O, silica/H2O), and recovered the melting behavior extremely well. They also suggested that melt structure/composition influences the amount of liquidus depression caused by H2O addition. We have investigated the influence of bulk composition by performing complementary experiments on a high-magnesian andesite from Mount Shasta, and on a K, Na, and P rich alkali basalt from

  18. East Mariana Basin tholeiites: Cretaceous intraplate basalts or rift basalts related to the Ontong Java plume?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castillo, P.R.; Pringle, M.S.; Carlson, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    Studies of seafloor magnetic anomaly patterns suggest the presence of Jurassic oceanic crust in a large area in the western Pacific that includes the East Mariana, Nauru and Pigafetta Basins. Sampling of the igneous crust in this area by the Deep Sea Drilling Program (DSDP) and the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) allows direct evaluation of the age and petrogenesis of this crust. ODP Leg 129 drilled a 51 m sequence of basalt pillows and massive flows in the central East Mariana Basin. 40Ar 39Ar ages determined in this study for two Leg 129 basalts average 114.6 ?? 3.2 Ma. This age is in agreement with the Albian-late Aptian paleontologic age of the overlying sediments, but is distinctively younger than the Jurassic age predicted by magnetic anomaly patterns in the basin. Compositionally, the East Mariana Basin basalts are uniformly low-K tholeiites that are depleted in highly incompatible elements compared to moderately incompatible ones, which is typical of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) erupted near hotspots. The Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of the tholeiites ( 87Sr 86Srinit = 0.70360-0.70374; 143Nd 144Ndinit = 0.512769-0.512790; 206Pb 204Pbmeas = 18.355-18.386) also overlap with some Indian Ocean Ridge MORB, although they are distinct from the isotopic compositions of Jurassic basalts drilled in the Pigafetta Basin, the oldest Pacific MORB. The isotopic compositions of the East Mariana Basin tholeiites are also similar to those of intraplate basalts, and in particular, to the isotopic signature of basalts from the nearby Ontong Java and Manihiki Plateaus. The East Mariana Basin tholeiites also share many petrologic and isotopic characteristics with the oceanic basement drilled in the Nauru Basin at DSDP Site 462. In addition, the new 110.8 ?? 1.0 Ma 40Ar 39Ar age for two flows from the bottom of Site 462 in the Nauru Basin is indistinguishable from the age of the East Mariana Basin flows. Thus, while magnetic anomaly patterns predict that the igneous

  19. Crystal Stratigraphy of Two Basalts from Apollo 16: Unique Crystallization of Picritic Basalt 606063,10-16 and Very-Low-Titanium Basalt 65703,9-13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, P. H.; Neal, C. R.; Stevens, R. E.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    A geochemical survey of Apollo 16 regolith fragments found five basaltic samples from among hundreds of 2-4 mm regolith fragments of the Apollo 16 site. These included a high-Ti vitrophyric basalt (60603,10-16) and one very-low-titanium (VLT) crystalline basalt (65703,9-13). Apollo 16 was the only highlands sample return mission distant from the maria (approx. 200 km). Identification of basaltic samples at the site not from the ancient regolith breccia indicates input of material via lateral transport by post-basin impacts. The presence of basaltic rocklets and glass at the site is not unprecedented and is required to satisfy mass-balance constraints of regolith compositions. However, preliminary characterization of olivine and plagioclase crystal size distributions indicated the sample textures were distinct from other known mare basalts, and instead had affinities to impact melt textures. Impact melt textures can appear qualitatively similar to pristine basalts, and quantitative analysis is required to distinguish between the two in thin section. The crystal stratigraphy method is a powerful tool in studying of igneous systems, utilizing geochemical analyses across minerals and textural analyses of phases. In particular, trace element signatures can aid in determining the ultimate origin of these samples and variations document subtle changes occurring during their petrogenesis.

  20. Alteration of alkali reactive aggregates autoclaved in different alkali solutions and application to alkali-aggregate reaction in concrete (II) expansion and microstructure of concrete microbar

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Duyou . E-mail: duyoulu@njut.edu.cn; Mei Laibao; Xu Zhongzi; Tang Mingshu; Mo Xiangyin; Fournier, Benoit

    2006-06-15

    The effect of the type of alkalis on the expansion behavior of concrete microbars containing typical aggregate with alkali-silica reactivity and alkali-carbonate reactivity was studied. The results verified that: (1) at the same molar concentration, sodium has the strongest contribution to expansion due to both ASR and ACR, followed by potassium and lithium; (2) sufficient LiOH can completely suppress expansion due to ASR whereas it can induce expansion due to ACR. It is possible to use the duplex effect of LiOH on ASR and ACR to clarify the ACR contribution when ASR and ACR may coexist. It has been shown that a small amount of dolomite in the fine-grained siliceous Spratt limestone, which has always been used as a reference aggregate for high alkali-silica reactivity, might dedolomitize in alkaline environment and contribute to the expansion. That is to say, Spratt limestone may exhibit both alkali-silica and alkali-carbonate reactivity, although alkali-silica reactivity is predominant. Microstructural study suggested that the mechanism in which lithium controls ASR expansion is mainly due to the favorable formation of lithium-containing less-expansive product around aggregate particles and the protection of the reactive aggregate from further attack by alkalis by the lithium-containing product layer.

  1. Is Ishtar Terra a thickened basaltic crust?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkani-Hamed, Jafar

    1992-01-01

    The mountain belts of Ishtar Terra and the surrounding tesserae are interpreted as compressional regions. The gravity and surface topography of western Ishtar Terra suggest a thick crust of 60-110 km that results from crustal thickening through tectonic processes. Underthrusting was proposed for the regions along Danu Montes and Itzpapalotl Tessera. Crustal thickening was suggested for the entire Ishtar Terra. In this study, three lithospheric models with total thicknesses of 40.75 and 120 km and initial crustal thicknesses of 3.9 and 18 km are examined. These models could be produced by partial melting and chemical differentiation in the upper mantle of a colder, an Earth-like, and a hotter Venus having temperatures of respectively 1300 C, 1400 C, and 1500 C at the base of their thermal boundary layers associated with mantle convection. The effects of basalt-granulite-eclogite transformation (BGET) on the surface topography of a thickening basaltic crust is investigated adopting the experimental phase diagram and density variations through the phase transformation.

  2. Degassing of reduced carbon from planetary basalts

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel, Diane T.; Rutherford, Malcolm J.; Jacobsen, Steven D.; Hauri, Erik H.; Saal, Alberto E.

    2013-01-01

    Degassing of planetary interiors through surface volcanism plays an important role in the evolution of planetary bodies and atmospheres. On Earth, carbon dioxide and water are the primary volatile species in magmas. However, little is known about the speciation and degassing of carbon in magmas formed on other planets (i.e., Moon, Mars, Mercury), where the mantle oxidation state [oxygen fugacity (fO2)] is different from that of the Earth. Using experiments on a lunar basalt composition, we confirm that carbon dissolves as carbonate at an fO2 higher than -0.55 relative to the iron wustite oxygen buffer (IW-0.55), whereas at a lower fO2, we discover that carbon is present mainly as iron pentacarbonyl and in smaller amounts as methane in the melt. The transition of carbon speciation in mantle-derived melts at fO2 less than IW-0.55 is associated with a decrease in carbon solubility by a factor of 2. Thus, the fO2 controls carbon speciation and solubility in mantle-derived melts even more than previous data indicate, and the degassing of reduced carbon from Fe-rich basalts on planetary bodies would produce methane-bearing, CO-rich early atmospheres with a strong greenhouse potential. PMID:23569260

  3. Identifying recycled ash in basaltic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oriano, Claudia; Bertagnini, Antonella; Cioni, Raffaello; Pompilio, Massimo

    2014-07-01

    Deposits of mid-intensity basaltic explosive eruptions are characterized by the coexistence of different types of juvenile clasts, which show a large variability of external properties and texture, reflecting alternatively the effects of primary processes related to magma storage or ascent, or of syn-eruptive modifications occurred during or immediately after their ejection. If fragments fall back within the crater area before being re-ejected during the ensuing activity, they are subject to thermally- and chemically-induced alterations. These `recycled' clasts can be considered as cognate lithic for the eruption/explosion they derive. Their exact identification has consequences for a correct interpretation of eruption dynamics, with important implications for hazard assessment. On ash erupted during selected basaltic eruptions (at Stromboli, Etna, Vesuvius, Gaua-Vanuatu), we have identified a set of characteristics that can be associated with the occurrence of intra-crater recycling processes, based also on the comparison with results of reheating experiments performed on primary juvenile material, at variable temperature and under different redox conditions.

  4. Emplacement of Columbia River flood basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, Stephen P. )

    1997-11-01

    Evidence is examined for the emplacement of the Umatilla, Wilbur Creek, and the Asotin Members of Columbia River Basalt Group. These flows erupted in the eastern part of the Columbia Plateau during the waning phases of volcanism. The Umatilla Member consists of two flows in the Lewiston basin area and southwestern Columbia Plateau. These flows mixed to form one flow in the central Columbia Plateau. The composition of the younger flow is preserved in the center and the composition of the older flow is at the top and bottom. There is a complete gradation between the two. Flows of the Wilbur Creek and Asotin Members erupted individually in the eastern Columbia Plateau and also mixed together in the central Columbia Plateau. Comparison of the emplacement patterns to intraflow structures and textures of the flows suggests that very little time elapsed between eruptions. In addition, the amount of crust that formed on the earlier flows prior to mixing also suggests rapid emplacement. Calculations of volumetric flow rates through constrictions in channels suggest emplacement times of weeks to months under fast laminar flow for all three members. A new model for the emplacement of Columbia River Basalt Group flows is proposed that suggests rapid eruption and emplacement for the main part of the flow and slower emplacement along the margins as the of the flow margin expands.

  5. Hafnium isotope variations in oceanic basalts.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patchett, P.J.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1980-01-01

    Routine low-blank chemistry and 0.01-0.04% precision on the ratio 176Hf/177Hf allows study of Hf isotopic variations, generated by beta --decay of 176Lu, in volcanic rocks derived from the suboceanic mantle. Normalized to 176Hf/177Hf = 0.7325, 176Hf/177Hf ranges 0.2828-0.2835, based on 24 basalt samples. 176Hf/177Hf is positively correlated with 143Nd/144Nd, and negatively correlated with 87Sr/86Sr and 206Pb/204Pb. Along the Iceland-Reykjanes ridge traverse, 176Hf/177Hf increases southwards. The coherence of Hf, Nd and Sr isotopes in the oceanic mantle allows an approximate bulk Earth 176Hf/177Hf of 0.28295 to be inferred from the bulk Earth 143Nd/144Nd. This requires the bulk Earth Lu/Hf to be 0.25, similar to that of the Juvinas eucrite. 60% of the Hf isotopic variation in oceanic basalts occurs among mid-ocean ridge samples. Lu-Hf fractionation probably decouples from Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr fractionation in very depleted source regions, with high Lu/Hf, and consequent high 176Hf/177Hf ratios developing in mantle residual from partial melting. (Authors' abstract) -T.R.

  6. Identifying recycled ash in basaltic eruptions.

    PubMed

    D'Oriano, Claudia; Bertagnini, Antonella; Cioni, Raffaello; Pompilio, Massimo

    2014-07-28

    Deposits of mid-intensity basaltic explosive eruptions are characterized by the coexistence of different types of juvenile clasts, which show a large variability of external properties and texture, reflecting alternatively the effects of primary processes related to magma storage or ascent, or of syn-eruptive modifications occurred during or immediately after their ejection. If fragments fall back within the crater area before being re-ejected during the ensuing activity, they are subject to thermally- and chemically-induced alterations. These 'recycled' clasts can be considered as cognate lithic for the eruption/explosion they derive. Their exact identification has consequences for a correct interpretation of eruption dynamics, with important implications for hazard assessment. On ash erupted during selected basaltic eruptions (at Stromboli, Etna, Vesuvius, Gaua-Vanuatu), we have identified a set of characteristics that can be associated with the occurrence of intra-crater recycling processes, based also on the comparison with results of reheating experiments performed on primary juvenile material, at variable temperature and under different redox conditions.

  7. Degassing of reduced carbon from planetary basalts.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Diane T; Rutherford, Malcolm J; Jacobsen, Steven D; Hauri, Erik H; Saal, Alberto E

    2013-05-14

    Degassing of planetary interiors through surface volcanism plays an important role in the evolution of planetary bodies and atmospheres. On Earth, carbon dioxide and water are the primary volatile species in magmas. However, little is known about the speciation and degassing of carbon in magmas formed on other planets (i.e., Moon, Mars, Mercury), where the mantle oxidation state [oxygen fugacity (fO2)] is different from that of the Earth. Using experiments on a lunar basalt composition, we confirm that carbon dissolves as carbonate at an fO2 higher than -0.55 relative to the iron wustite oxygen buffer (IW-0.55), whereas at a lower fO2, we discover that carbon is present mainly as iron pentacarbonyl and in smaller amounts as methane in the melt. The transition of carbon speciation in mantle-derived melts at fO2 less than IW-0.55 is associated with a decrease in carbon solubility by a factor of 2. Thus, the fO2 controls carbon speciation and solubility in mantle-derived melts even more than previous data indicate, and the degassing of reduced carbon from Fe-rich basalts on planetary bodies would produce methane-bearing, CO-rich early atmospheres with a strong greenhouse potential. PMID:23569260

  8. Method for the safe disposal of alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Terry R.

    1977-01-01

    Alkali metals such as those employed in liquid metal coolant systems can be safely reacted to form hydroxides by first dissolving the alkali metal in relatively inert metals such as lead or bismuth. The alloy thus formed is contacted with a molten salt including the alkali metal hydroxide and possibly the alkali metal carbonate in the presence of oxygen. This oxidizes the alkali metal to an oxide which is soluble within the molten salt. The salt is separated and contacted with steam or steam-CO.sub.2 mixture to convert the alkali metal oxide to the hydroxide. These reactions can be conducted with minimal hydrogen evolution and with the heat of reaction distributed between the several reaction steps.

  9. Determination of the common and rare alkalies in mineral analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.C.; Stevens, R.E.

    1934-01-01

    Methods are described which afford a determination of each member of the alkali group and are successful in dealing with the quantities of the rare alkalies found in rocks and minerals. The procedures are relatively rapid and based chiefly on the use of chloroplatinic acid, absolute alcohol and ether, and ammonium sulfate. The percentages of all the alkalies found in a number of minerals are given.

  10. Environmental mercury contamination around a chlor-alkali plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lodenius, M.; Tulisalo, E.

    1984-04-01

    The chlor-alkali industry is one of the most important emitters of mercury. This metal is effectively spread from chlor-alkali plants into the atmosphere and it has been reported that only a few percent of the mercury emissions are deposited locally the major part spreading over very large areas. The purpose of this investigation was to study the spreading of mercury up to 100 km from a chlor-alkali plant using three different biological indicators.

  11. Solvation at nanoscale: Alkali-halides in water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Partanen, Leena; Mikkelae, Mikko-Heikki; Huttula, Marko; Tchaplyguine, Maxim; Zhang Chaofan; Andersson, Tomas; Bjoerneholm, Olle

    2013-01-28

    The solvation of alkali-halides in water clusters at nanoscale is studied by photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The Na 2p, K 3p, Cl 2p, Br 3d, and I 4d core level binding energies have been measured for salt-containing water clusters. The results have been compared to those of alkali halide clusters and the dilute aqueous salt solutions. It is found that the alkali halides dissolve in small water clusters as ions.

  12. Geochemistry of middle Tertiary volcanic rocks in the northern Aquarius Mountains, west-central Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, A.M.; Haxel, G.B.

    1993-04-01

    The northern Aquarius Mountains volcanic field ([approximately]50km east of Kingman) covers an area of 400 km[sup 2], bounded by upper Trout Creek (S), the Truxton Valley (N), the Big Sandy Valley (W), and Cross Mountain (E). The volcanic sequence rests upon a pre-middle Eocene erosional surface. The lowest units is a 250 m-thick unit of rhyolitic pyroclastic breccias and airfall tuffs. Successively younger units are: basanite flows and cinder cones; hornblende latite flows and domes; porphyritic dacite flows, domes, and breccias; alkali basalt intrusions; and low-silica rhyolite domes and small high=silica rhyolite flows. Dacite is volumetrically dominant, and erupted primarily from vents in and around Cedar Basin (Penitentiary Mtn 7.5[prime] quad.). Other geologists have obtained K-Ar dates [approximately]24--20 Ma for the basanites and latites. The alkali basalts, latites, dacites, and rhyolites evidently constitute a genetically-related high-K to shoshonitic calcalkaline suite with chemistry typical of subduction-related magmatism: enrichment in LILE and LREE, and depletion of Nb and Ta relative to K and La and of Ti relative to Hf and Yb. Each rock type is unique and distinguishable in K/Rb and Rb/Sr. The basanites are primitive (mg=0.75--0.78), have intraplate affinities (La/Nb[<=]1), and show consistent and distinctive depletion of K relative to the other LILE. The presence of these basanites in an early Miocene volcanic sequence is unusual or unexpected, as they predate (by [approximately]10 m.y.) the regional eruption of asthenosphere-derived basalts associated with Basin-and-Range extension.

  13. Basalt-Trachybasalt Fractionation in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, J. C.; Edwards, P. H.; Filiberto, J.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Gasda, P.; Wiens, R.

    2016-08-01

    A set of igneous float rocks in Gale Crater have been analysed by ChemCam. They are basalt-trachybasalts, 47 to 53 ± 5 wt% SiO2 and formed by ol-dominated crystal fractionation from an Adirondack type basalt, in magmatism with tholeiitic affinities.

  14. Constructibility issues associated with a nuclear waste repository in basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.A.

    1981-12-04

    This report contains the text and slide reproductions of a speech on nuclear waste disposal in basalt. The presentation addresses the layout of repository access shafts and subsurface facilities resulting from the conceptual design of a nuclear repository in basalt. The constructibility issues that must be resolved prior to construction are described. (DMC)

  15. Germanium abundances in lunar basalts: Evidence of mantle metasomatism

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, T.; Taylor, G.J.; Keil, T.K.; Bild, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    To fill in gaps in the present Ge data base, mare basalts were analyzed for Ge and other elements by RNAA and INAA. Mare basalts from Apollo 11, 12, 15, 17 landing sites are rather uniform in Ge abundance, but Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalts and KREEP are enriched in Ge by factors of up to 300 compared to typical mare basalts. These Ge enrichments are not associated with other siderophile element enrichments and, thus, are not due to differences in the amount of metal segregated during core formation. Based on crystal-chemical and inter-element variations, it does not appear that the observed Ge enrichments are due to silicate liquid immiscibility. Elemental ratios in Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalts, green and orange glass, average basalts and KREEP suggest that incorporation of late accreting material into the source regions or interaction of the magmas with primitive undifferentiated material is not a likely cause for the observed Ge enrichments. We speculate that the most plausible explanation for these Ge enrichments is complexing and concentration of Ge by F, Cl or S in volatile phases. In this manner, the KREEP basalt source regions may have been metasomatized and Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalt magmas may have become enriched in Ge by interacting with these metasomatized areas. The presence of volatile- and Ge-rich regions in the Moon suggests that the Moon was never totally molten. 71 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  16. Lithospheric influences on magma compositions of late Mesozoic and Cenozoic intraplate basalts (the Older Volcanics) of Victoria, south-eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Richard C.; Nicholls, Ian A.; Day, Arthur

    2014-10-01

    Basaltic volcanism, ranging in age from Late Cretaceous to Holocene and extending across the southern part of the state of Victoria in south-eastern Australia was initiated during the earliest stages of rifting associated with opening of the Tasman Sea and Southern Ocean. Volcanism has continued sporadically since that time with major breaks in activity occurring between 77 and 62 Ma and 18 and 7 Ma. Basaltic rocks with ages in the range 95 to 18 Ma occur in small lava fields scattered across eastern and south-eastern Victoria and they have also been recovered from bore holes in the west of the state. They have been referred to as the “Older Volcanics” to differentiate them from more volumetrically extensive and younger (mainly < 4.6 Ma) lava fields comprising the “Newer Volcanics” of the Western District Province to the west. Older Volcanics vary in composition from SiO2-undersaturated nephelinites, basanites, basalts and hawaiites through transitional basalts to hypersthene and quartz normative tholeiites. Strontium, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions lie between depleted (DM) and enriched (EM1 and EM2) end member mantle components in Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic space. Trace element compositions are generally characterised by enrichment of Cs, Ba, Rb, Th, U, Nb, K and light REE over heavy REE, Ti, Zr and Y and the overall patterns of major and trace element behaviour can be explained in general terms by petrogenetic models involving partial melting of a complex spectrum of mantle compositions with subsequent but limited additional modification by fractional crystallisation with or without assimilation of crust. Among basalts with relatively high Mg# [100 ∗ Mol. MgO/(MgO + FeO) > 65], two distinct end member compositions can be differentiated using primitive mantle normalised extended element patterns. Group 1 basalts have convex upward patterns with enrichment of light over heavy REE and depletion of Rb, Ba, Th and U relative to Nb. Group 2 basalts also have

  17. Hydrothermal interactions of cesium and strontium phases from spent unreprocessed fuel with basalt phases and basalts

    SciTech Connect

    Komarneni, S.; Scheetz, B.E.; McCarthy, G.J.; Coons, W.E.

    1980-03-01

    This investigation is a segment of an extensive research program aimed at investigating the feasibility of long-term, subsurface storage of commercial nuclear waste. Specifically, it is anticipated that the waste will be housed in a repository mined from the basalt formations which lie beneath the Hanford Site. The elements monitored during the present experiments were Cs and Sr. These two elements represent significant biohazards if released from a repository and are the major heat producing radionuclides present in commercial radioactive waste. Several Cs phases and/or solutions were reacted with either isolated basalt phases or bulk-rock basalt, and the resulting solids and solutions were analyzed. The hydrothermal reactivity of SrZrO/sub 3/, which is believed to be a probable host for Sr in SFE was investigated. While so far no evidence exists which indicates that Sr is present in a water soluble phase in spent fuel elements (SFE), detailed investigation of a potential hazard is warranted. This investigation has determined that some Cs compounds likely to be stable components of spent fuel (i.e., CsOH, Cs/sub 2/MoO/sub 4/, Cs/sub 2/U/sub 2/O/sub 7/) have significant hydrothermal solubilities. These solubilities are greatly decreased in the presence of basalt and/or basalt minerals. The decrease in the amount of Cs in solution results from reactions which form pollucite and/or CsAlSiO/sub 4/, with the production of pollucite exceeding that of CsAlSiO/sub 4/. Dissolution of ..beta..-Cs/sub 2/U/sub 2/O/sub 7/ implies solubilizing a uranium species to an undetermined extent. The production of schoepite (UO/sub 3/.3H/sub 2/O) during some experiments containing basalt phases, indicates a tendency to oxidize U/sup 4 +/ to U/sup 6 +/. When diopside (nominally CaMgSi/sub 2/O/sub 6/) and ..beta..-Cs/sub 2/U/sub 2/O/sub 7/ were hydrothermally reacted, at 300/sup 0/C both UO/sub 2/ and UO/sub 3/.3H/sub 2/O were produced. Results of experiments on SrZrO/sub 3/ show it to be

  18. Alkali cation specific adsorption onto fcc(111) transition metal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Mills, J N; McCrum, I T; Janik, M J

    2014-07-21

    The presence of alkali cations in electrolyte solutions is known to impact the rate of electrocatalytic reactions, though the mechanism of such impact is not conclusively determined. We use density functional theory (DFT) to examine the specific adsorption of alkali cations to fcc(111) electrode surfaces, as specific adsorption may block catalyst sites or otherwise impact surface catalytic chemistry. Solvation of the cation-metal surface structure was investigated using explicit water models. Computed equilibrium potentials for alkali cation adsorption suggest that alkali and alkaline earth cations will specifically adsorb onto Pt(111) and Pd(111) surfaces in the potential range of hydrogen oxidation and hydrogen evolution catalysis in alkaline solutions.

  19. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

    1992-05-27

    High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and high efficiency heat engines. The objective of this research is to systematically evaluate the alkali corrosion resistance of the most commonly used structural ceramics including silicon carbide, silicon nitride, cordierite, mullite, alumina, aluminum titanate, zirconia, and fireclay glass. The study consists of identification of the alkali reaction products (phase equilibria) and the kinetics of the alkali reactions as a function of temperature and time.

  20. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

    1991-11-30

    High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and high efficiency heat engines. The objective of this program is to systematically evaluate the alkali corrosion resistance of the most commonly used structural ceramics including silicon carbide, silicon nitride, cordierite, mullite, alumina, aluminum titanate, zirconia, and fireclay glass. The study consists of identification of the alkali reaction products (phase equilibria) and the kinetics of the alkali reactions as a function of temperature and time.

  1. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

    1992-08-29

    High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and high efficiency heat engines. The objective of this research is to systematically evaluate the alkali corrosion resistance of the most commonly used structural ceramics including silicon carbide, silicon nitride, cordierite, mullite, alumina, aluminum titanate, zirconia, and fireclay glass. The study consists of identification of the alkali reaction products (phase equilibria) and the kinetics of the alkali reactions as a function of temperature and time.

  2. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Hitchcock, D.C.; Mailhe, C.C.; De Jonghe, L.C.

    1985-07-10

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  3. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Hitchcock, David C.; Mailhe, Catherine C.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    1986-01-01

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  4. Differences between oceanic basalts by multitrace element ratio topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegre, Claude J.; Schiano, Pierre; Lewin, Eric

    1995-01-01

    Trace element multidimensional analysis of ocean island basalts defines a structure delimited by the same four end members (Hawaiian Islands, St. Helena-Tubuai-Mangaia Islands, Kerguelen-Gough-Tristan da Cunha and the Society Islands) as determined by isotope ratios. In contrast to the results obtained for the distribution of isotopic ratios, the dispersions of trace element concentrations in mid-ocean ridge basalts are greater than those for ocean island basalts. This can be accounted for by a two-component mantle source composed of pyroxenite layers embedded in a peridotitic matrix, which melts to varying degrees; ocean island basalts are produced by a relatively uniform low degree of melting of the pyroxenite and limited isotopic exchange with the surrounding matrix, whereas mid-ocean ridge basalts are melts of both components with higher and more variable extents of melting and complete isotopic exchange between the pyroxenite strips and the peridotitic matrix.

  5. Origin of High-Alumina Basalt, Andesite, and Dacite Magmas.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, W

    1964-10-30

    The typical volcanic rocks of most island arcs and eugeosynclines, and of some continental environments, are basalt, andesite, and dacite, of high alumina content. The high-alumina basalt differs from tholeiitic basalt primarily in having a greater content of the components of calcic plagioclase. Laboratory data indicate that in the upper mantle, below the level at which the basaltic component of mantle rock is transformed by pressure to eclogite or pyroxenite, the entire basaltic portion probably is melted within a narrow temperature range, but that above the level of that transformation plagioclase is melted selectively before pyroxene over a wide temperature range. The broad spectrum of high-alumina magmas may represent widely varying degrees of partial melting above the transformation level, whereas narrow-spectrum tholeiite magma may represent more complete melting beneath it.

  6. [Determination of Total Iron and Fe2+ in Basalt].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-xun; Chen, Mei-rong; Jian, Zheng-guo; Wu, Gang; Wu, Zhi-shen

    2015-08-01

    Basalt is the raw material of basalt fiber. The content of FeO and Fe2O3 has a great impact on the properties of basalt fibers. ICP-OES and dichromate method were used to test total Fe and Fe(2+) in basalt. Suitable instrument parameters and analysis lines of Fe were chosen for ICP-OES. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of ICP-OES is 2.2%, and the recovery is in the range of 98%~101%. The method shows simple, rapid and highly accurate for determination of total Fe and Fe(2+) in basalt. The RSD of ICP-OES and dichromate method is 0.42% and 1.4%, respectively.

  7. Use and Features of Basalt Formations for Geologic Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B. Peter; Ho, Anita M.; Reidel, Steve P.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2003-01-01

    Extrusive lava flows of basalt are a potential host medium for geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2. Flood basalts and other large igneous provinces occur worldwide near population and power-producing centers and could securely sequester a significant fraction of global CO2 emissions. We describe the location, extent, and general physical and chemical characteristics of large igneous provinces that satisfy requirements as a good host medium for CO2 sequestration. Most lava flows have vesicular flow tops and bottoms as well as interflow zones that are porous and permeable and serve as regional aquifers. Additionally, basalt is iron-rich, and, under the proper conditions of groundwater pH, temperature, and pressure, injected CO2 will react with iron released from dissolution of primary minerals in the basalt to form stable ferrous carbonate minerals. Conversion of CO2 gas into a solid form was confirmed in laboratory experiments with supercritical CO2 in contact with basalt samples from Washington state.

  8. [Determination of Total Iron and Fe2+ in Basalt].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-xun; Chen, Mei-rong; Jian, Zheng-guo; Wu, Gang; Wu, Zhi-shen

    2015-08-01

    Basalt is the raw material of basalt fiber. The content of FeO and Fe2O3 has a great impact on the properties of basalt fibers. ICP-OES and dichromate method were used to test total Fe and Fe(2+) in basalt. Suitable instrument parameters and analysis lines of Fe were chosen for ICP-OES. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of ICP-OES is 2.2%, and the recovery is in the range of 98%~101%. The method shows simple, rapid and highly accurate for determination of total Fe and Fe(2+) in basalt. The RSD of ICP-OES and dichromate method is 0.42% and 1.4%, respectively. PMID:26672315

  9. Origin of High-Alumina Basalt, Andesite, and Dacite Magmas.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, W

    1964-10-30

    The typical volcanic rocks of most island arcs and eugeosynclines, and of some continental environments, are basalt, andesite, and dacite, of high alumina content. The high-alumina basalt differs from tholeiitic basalt primarily in having a greater content of the components of calcic plagioclase. Laboratory data indicate that in the upper mantle, below the level at which the basaltic component of mantle rock is transformed by pressure to eclogite or pyroxenite, the entire basaltic portion probably is melted within a narrow temperature range, but that above the level of that transformation plagioclase is melted selectively before pyroxene over a wide temperature range. The broad spectrum of high-alumina magmas may represent widely varying degrees of partial melting above the transformation level, whereas narrow-spectrum tholeiite magma may represent more complete melting beneath it. PMID:17794034

  10. Lu-Hf constraints on the evolution of lunar basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimaki, H.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that a cumulate-remelting model best explains the recently acquired data on the Lu-Hf systematics of lunar mare basalts. The model is constructed using Lu and Hf concentration data and is strengthened by Hf isotopic evidence of Unruh et al. (1984). It is shown that the similarity in MgO/FeO ratios and Cr2O3 content in high-Ti and low-Ti basalts are not important constraints on lunar basalt petrogenesis. The model demonstrates that even the very low Ti or green glass samples are remelting products of a cumulate formed after at least 80-90 percent of the lunar magma ocean had solidified. In the model, all the mare basalts and green glasses were derived from 100-150 km depth in the lunar mantle. The Lu-Hf systematics of KREEP basalts clearly indicate that they would be the final residual liquid of the lunar magma ocean.

  11. Origin of high-alumina basalt, andesite, and dacite magmas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, W.

    1964-01-01

    The typical volcanic rocks of most island arcs and eugeosynclines, and of some continental environments, are basalt, andesite, and dacite, of high alumina content. The high-alumina basalt differs from tholeiitic basalt primarily in having a greater content of the components of calcic plagioclase. Laboratory data indicate that in the upper mantle, below the level at which the basaltic component of mantle rock is transformed by pressure to eclogite or pyroxenite, the entire basaltic portion probably is melted within a narrow temperature range, but that above the level of that transformation plagioclase is melted selectively before pyroxene over a wide temperature range. The broad spectrum of high-alumina magmas may represent widely varying degrees of partial melting above the transformation level, whereas narrow-spectrum tholeiite magma may represent more complete melting beneath it.

  12. Decompression-Induced Crystallization of Hydrous Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teasdale, R.; Brooker, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    Decompression-induced crystallization of hydrous basalt during magma ascent from 1.5 kb (150 MPa) is quantified using isothermal decompression TZM experiments. The starting composition is a synthetic glass based on the 1921 Kilauea basalt, with 1% H2O added. In all cases, the liquidus phase is aluminous spinel, followed by clinopyroxene, then plagioclase. The plagioclase liquidus temperatures for isobaric (equilibrium) experiments range from 1175°C (at 1.5 kb) to 1217°C (at 200b), which are 35-75°C hotter than predicted by MELTS (Ghiorso & Sack 1995). Experiments were decompressed at 1kb/hr and quenched at 800, 400, 200, or 100b for three temperatures (1160°, 1150°, and 1140°C). Plagioclase crystals formed during decompression have long axes that range from less than 1 micron to 20 microns. Increasing decompression yields larger plagioclase crystal sizes and aspect ratios for experiments at equal temperatures. However, the number of crystals does not vary systematically, indicating that crystallization is dominated by growth rather than nucleation during decompression. Plagioclase compositions for experiments were measured with University of Bristol's Electron Microprobe and the Hyperprobe with Field Emission Gun. Plagioclase compositions from equilibrium experiments (An60-An80) span the range of those from decompression experiments (An60-An73). Equilibrium experiments generated higher An compositions at lower pressures (500b) than at higher pressure (1.5kb) but do not systematically vary with temperature. Variations in plagioclase compositions are minimal above H2O saturation (100-200°C, based on Papale et al., 2006). Below H2O saturation, An content decreases slightly, by approximately 4% An. One application of this work is better characterization of groundmass crystallization in hydrous basalt as it traverses the conduit during eruption. This work also provides a means of distinguishing groundmass plagioclase related to decompression from crystals

  13. Geo-engineering evaluation of Termaber basalt rock mass for crushed stone aggregate and building stone from Central Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engidasew, Tesfaye Asresahagne; Barbieri, Giulio

    2014-11-01

    The geology of the central part of Ethiopia exhibits a variety of rock types that can potentially be developed for construction stone production, of which the most wide spread and important one is the Termaber basalt. Even though some preliminary work is done on these rocks towards construction material application, it remains largely that this resource is untouched and needs further scientific characterization for the use in large scale industrial application. Basaltic rocks have been widely used in many parts of the world as concrete aggregate and dimension stone for various civil structures. The present research study was carried out for Geo-engineering evaluation of Termaber basalt rock mass for crushed stone aggregate and building stone from Central Ethiopia (around Debre Birhan). The main objective of the present research study was to assess the general suitability of the Termaber basalt to be used as coarse aggregate for concrete mix and/or to utilize it as cut stone at industrial level. Only choice made with full knowledge of the basic characteristics of the material, of its performance and durability against the foreseen solicitations will ensure the necessary quality of the stone work and thereby a possibility to reach its intended service life. In order to meet out the objective of the present study, data from both field and laboratory were collected and analyzed. The field data included geological investigations based on different methods and sample collection while the laboratory work included, uniaxial compressive strength, ultrasonic pulse velocity, dynamic elasticity modulus, bulk density, water absorption, specific gravity, open porosity, aggregate impact value, petrographic examination and XRF, aggregate crushing value, Los Angeles abrasion value, sodium sulfate soundness, X-ray diffraction and alkali silica reactivity tests. The field and laboratory data were compiled and compared together to reveal the engineering performance of the rock mass in

  14. Geochemistry, Petrology, and Provenance of Magnetite-Rich Ortaklar Cu Deposit Hosting Basalts from Koçali Complex, Gaziantep, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, E.; Lee, I.; Kang, J.; Dönmez, C.; Yildirim, N.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetite-rich Cyprus type VMS deposit has been recently discovered from the Ortaklar-Gaziantep region within Koçali complex, SE Turkey. Magnetite rich sulfide ore bodies are in close contact with underlying footwall spilitic basalts. These basalts are part of Koçali mélange, which represents an accreted oceanic complex during closing of southern Neotethys. These extrusives are low-K, low alkali tholeiites with Ca rich, partially sericitized plagioclase subophitically enclosed by augite with disseminated Fe-Ti oxides and pyrite. Mineral crystallization sequence of plagioclase followed by augite and opaque is typical of MORB. Major and trace element analyses for least altered basalts based on LOI (1.5~3.6 wt%), Ce/Ce* (0.9~1.1) exhibit limited range of element abundances. Low Mg# (59~60) suggests that basalts were derived from moderately evolved magma with fractional crystallization. HFSE (Th, Nb, Hf, Zr) were used for tectonic discrimination and basalts were plotted within MORB end spectrum, near MORB-IAT boundary. N-MORB normalized La to Lu ranges from 0.4 to 0.9 times N-MORB with LREE depletion [(La/Sm)N = 0.58~0.67] and flat HREE [(Tb/Lu)N = 0.95~1.05]. Chondrite normalized REE patterns resemble those of N-MORB but characterized by severe LREE depletion [(La/Sm)CN = 0.35~0.45]. LREE depletion coupled with high Sm/Nd (0.36~0.43), high CaO/Na2O (5.0~6.2) and low Nb/Yb (0.23~0.39) suggest depleted N-MORB composition derived from the refractory mantle source. Analyzed basalts are similar to those found from other rift (Costa Rica Rift Hole 504b) and intra-transform fault (Siqueiros transform). Magnetite emplacement occurring close to the ore-host boundary and lack of pyrrhotite from hosting basalts imply an involvement of oxidized hydrothermal fluids. Basalts probably have formed by late stage, partial melting of the refractory mantle at low pressure, shallow depth, and H2O rich environment. Possible source of mantle heterogeneity can be identified by isotope

  15. Flood basalt eruptions, comet showers, and mass extinction events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampino, Michael R.; Stothers, Richard B.

    1988-01-01

    A chronology of initiation dates of the major continental flood basalt episodes has been established from compilation of published K-Ar and Ar-Ar ages of basaltic flows and related basic intrusions. The dating is therefore independent of the biostratigraphic and paleomagnetic time scales, and the estimated errors of the inititation dates are approximately + or - 4 pct. There are 11 distinct episodes of continental flood basalts known during the past 250 Myr. The data show that flood basalt episodes are generally relatively brief geologic events, with intermittent eruptions during peak output periods lasting ony 2 to 3 Myr or less. Statistical analyses suggest that these episodes may have occurred quasi-periodically with a mean cycle time of 32 + or - 1 Myr. The initiation dates of the flood basalts are close to the estimated dates of marine mass extinctions and impact-crater clusters. Although a purely internal forcing might be argued for the flood basalt volcanism, quasi-periodic comet impacts may be the trigger for both the flood basalts and the extinctions. Impact cratering models suggest that large-body impactors lead to deep initial cratering, and therefore may cause mantle disturbances and initiate mantle plume activity. The flood basalt episodes commonly mark the initiation or jump of a mantle hotspot, and are often followed by continental rifting and separation. Evidence from dynamical studies of impacts, occurrences of craters and hotspots, and the geochemistry of boundary layers is synthesized to provide a possible model of impact-generated volcanism. Flood basalt eruptions may themselves have severe effects on climate, and possibly on life. Impacts might, as a result, have led to mass extinctions through direct atmospheric disturbances, and/or indirectly through prolonged flood basalt volcanism.

  16. Depositional processes of the basaltic Elie Ness diatreme, East Fife, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gernon, Thomas; Hincks, Thea

    2010-05-01

    cross-cuts an anticlinal fold to the NE, and that the vent-fill is folded with a similar NE-SW fold axis orientation. This suggests that the Elie Ness diatreme was probably emplaced during the Variscan deformation, analogous with the Black Ball Head diatreme, SW Ireland. The Elie Ness diatreme offers new insights into the volcanism of low viscosity, alkali-rich silica under-saturated magmas, and provides empirical constraints on the architecture and internal workings of other types of volcanic conduit and maar-crater systems. The processes elucidated for alkali basaltic tuff diatremes are general and can also be applied to other deep volcanic conduits.

  17. Aubrite basalt vitrophyres: High sulfur silicate melts and a snapshot of aubrite formation. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogel, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Two aubrite basalt vitrophyre clasts have been found within AMNH thin sections from the Parsa EH3 chondrite and the Khor Temiki aubrite. Polished sections of the Parsa Aubrite Inclusion (PAI) and the Khor Temiki Inclusion (KTI) were studied by optical, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques with broad-beam and low absorbed EPMA currents used to minimize glass volatile loss. Some data have previously been reported for PAI and KTI may possibly correlate to a previously reported inclusion in Khor Tiimiki. In polished sections, PAI and KTI are approximately equal 4 mm in diameter and contain a large volume of glass. The clasts have similar textural characteristics and are akin to lunar vitrophyre textures. The glasses have high alkali rhyodacitic compositions Al-though PAI is peraluminous, KTI is significantly peralkaline. Additionally, the glasses have elevated sulfur concentrations that are extremely high by geochemical standards. SEM examination for beam overlap of microscopic CaS, FeS, and (Mg, Mn, Fe) S inclusions showed no such contamination. Furthermore, homogeneity of glass S content and low FeO contents help rule out contamination. Materials research data show that under reducing conditions alumino-silicate melts can dissolve up to several weight percent sulfur in the absence of Fe. The high S and alkali contents, the lack of associated high shock features, and the rationalized phase equilibria suggest that PAI and KTI are igneous melting products of an E-chondrite-like source material. Although large-scale impact melting cannot totally be ruled out, the above observations eliminate the possibility of in-situ shock melting.

  18. Cathode architectures for alkali metal / oxygen batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Steven J; Nimon, Vitaliy; De Jonghe, Lutgard C; Volfkovich, Yury; Bograchev, Daniil

    2015-01-13

    Electrochemical energy storage devices, such as alkali metal-oxygen battery cells (e.g., non-aqueous lithium-air cells), have a cathode architecture with a porous structure and pore composition that is tailored to improve cell performance, especially as it pertains to one or more of the discharge/charge rate, cycle life, and delivered ampere-hour capacity. A porous cathode architecture having a pore volume that is derived from pores of varying radii wherein the pore size distribution is tailored as a function of the architecture thickness is one way to achieve one or more of the aforementioned cell performance improvements.

  19. Electrodes For Alkali-Metal Thermoelectric Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Wheeler, Bob L.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Lamb, James L.; Bankston, C. Perry; Cole, Terry

    1989-01-01

    Combination of thin, porous electrode and overlying collector grid reduces internal resistance of alkali-metal thermoelectric converter cell. Low resistance of new electrode and grid boosts power density nearly to 1 W/cm2 of electrode area at typical operating temperatures of 1,000 to 1,300 K. Conductive grid encircles electrode film on alumina tube. Bus wire runs along tube to collect electrical current from grid. Such converters used to transform solar, nuclear, and waste heat into electric power.

  20. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  1. Molybdenum Valence in Basaltic Silicate Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S.; Pando, K.

    2010-01-01

    The moderately siderophile element molybdenum has been used as an indicator in planetary differentiation processes, and is particularly relevant to core formation [for example, 1-6]. However, models that apply experimental data to an equilibrium differentiation scenario infer the oxidation state of molybdenum from solubility data or from multivariable coefficients from metal-silicate partitioning data [1,3,7]. Partitioning behavior of molybdenum, a multivalent element with a transition near the J02 of interest for core formation (IW-2) will be sensitive to changes in JO2 of the system and silicate melt structure. In a silicate melt, Mo can occur in either 4+ or 6+ valence state, and Mo6+ can be either octahedrally or tetrahedrally coordinated. Here we present first XANES measurements of Mo valence in basaltic run products at a range of P, T, and JO2 and further quantify the valence transition of Mo.

  2. Chemical Weathering Kinetics of Basalt on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to experimentally measure the kinetics for chemical weathering reactions involving basalt on Venus. The thermochemical reactions being studied are important for the CO2 atmosphere-lithosphere cycle on Venus and for the atmosphere-surface reactions controlling the oxidation state of the surface of Venus. These reactions include the formation of carbonate and scapolite minerals, and the oxidation of Fe-bearing minerals. These experiments and calculations are important for interpreting results from the Pioneer Venus, Magellan, Galileo flyby, Venera, and Vega missions to Venus, for interpreting results from Earth-based telescopic observations, and for the design of new Discovery class (e.g., VESAT) and New Millennium missions to Venus such as geochemical landers making in situ elemental and mineralogical analyses, and orbiters, probes and balloons making spectroscopic observations of the sub-cloud atmosphere of Venus.

  3. (abstract) Fundamental Mechanisms of Electrode Kinetics and Alkali Metal Atom Transport at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kisor, A.; Kikkert, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of electrode kinetics and mass transport of alkali metal oxidation and alkali metal cation reduction at the solid electrolyte/porous electrode boundary as well as alkali metal transport through porous metal electrodes has important applications in optimizing device performance in alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) cells which are high temperature, high current density electrochemical cells. Basic studies of these processes also affords the opportunity to investigate a very basic electrochemical reaction over a wide range of conditions; and a variety of mass transport modes at high temperatures via electrochemical techniques. The temperature range of these investigations covers 700K to 1240K; the alkali metal vapor pressures range from about 10(sup -2) to 10(sup 2) Pa; and electrodes studied have included Mo, W, Mo/Na(sub 2)MoO(sub 4), W/Na(sub 2)WO(sub 4), WPt(sub x), and WRh(sub x) (1.0 < x < 6.0 ) with Na at Na-beta'-alumina, and Mo with K at K-beta'-alumina. Both liquid metal/solid electrolyte/alkali metal vapor and alkali metal vapor/solid electrolyte/vapor cells have been used to characterize the reaction and transport processes. We have previously reported evidence of ionic, free molecular flow, and surface transport of sodium in several types of AMTEC electrodes.

  4. Elucidation of transport mechanism and enhanced alkali ion transference numbers in mixed alkali metal-organic ionic molten salts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangfang; Forsyth, Maria

    2016-07-28

    Mixed salts of Ionic Liquids (ILs) and alkali metal salts, developed as electrolytes for lithium and sodium batteries, have shown a remarkable ability to facilitate high rate capability for lithium and sodium electrochemical cycling. It has been suggested that this may be due to a high alkali metal ion transference number at concentrations approaching 50 mol% Li(+) or Na(+), relative to lower concentrations. Computational investigations for two IL systems illustrate the formation of extended alkali-anion aggregates as the alkali metal ion concentration increases. This tends to favor the diffusion of alkali metal ions compared with other ionic species in electrolyte solutions; behavior that has recently been reported for Li(+) in a phosphonium ionic liquid, thus an increasing alkali transference number. The mechanism of alkali metal ion diffusion via this extended coordination environment present at high concentrations is explained and compared to the dynamics at lower concentrations. Heterogeneous alkali metal ion dynamics are also evident and, somewhat counter-intuitively, it appears that the faster ions are those that are generally found clustered with the anions. Furthermore these fast alkali metal ions appear to correlate with fastest ionic liquid solvent ions. PMID:27375042

  5. Giant Plagioclase "Mosaicrysts" and Other Textures in the Steens Basalt, Columbia River Flood Basalt Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunder, A.; Moore, N. E.; Bohrson, W. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Steens Basalts (~16.7 Ma), the oldest and most mafic stage of Columbia River flood basalt volcanism, are known for lavas with conspicuous giant plagioclase laths (2 - 5 cm in diameter). Such flows are intercalated with ones that are nearly aphyric or that bear plagioclase (plag) phenocrysts of 0.5-2 cm. Addition textures are distinctive radial, snowflake plag clusters and sandwich glomerocrysts of plag, with olivine trapped between laths. These clusters and glomerocrysts are typically 1, but as large as 3 cm in diameter. Plag composition of all textural types is limited (An76-60). Plag dominates the phenocryst mode; rare flows, mainly low in the section, have olivine > plag and phenocrystic clinopyroxene occurs rarely, and mainly high in the section. Unlike the flows, dikes have few phenocrysts; giant laths are rare and the snowflake texture has not been observed. Giant plag laths are euhedral and make up a few percent to more than 50% of the rock. Many plag megacrysts are made of several plag crystals that form a mosaic, where the constituent crystals are crystallographically distinct and are overgrown with feldspar to make the crystal euhedral. We describe these composite megacrysts as "mosaicrysts". We are exploring magmatic conditions that would trigger oversaturation to spawn rapid growth yielding clusters and overgrowths that form mosaicrysts. Giant plagioclase basalts (so-called GPB) are also described for the Deccan and Emeishan flood basalt provinces attesting to similar magmatic processes. Plag laths typically define strong flow foliation at the flow base, have a swirled distribution in the flow core, and are sparse in the top. Some particularly crystal-rich flows (or sills) have an abrupt transition to a crystal-poor upper few decimeters of the several-m- thick flow. We interpret the crystal-poor top to be the expelled melt from crystal accumulation in the flow, which locally reinjects and is entrained in lower crystal mush.

  6. Isotope geochemistry of caliche developed on basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauth, L. Paul; Brilli, Mauro; Klonowski, Stan

    2003-01-01

    Enormous variations in oxygen and carbon isotopes occur in caliche developed on < 3 Ma basalts in 3 volcanic fields in Arizona, significantly extending the range of δ 18O and δ 13C observed in terrestrial caliche. Within each volcanic field, δ 18O is broadly co-variant with δ 13C and increases as δ 13C increases. The most 18O and 13C enriched samples are for subaerial calcite developed on pinnacles, knobs, and flow lobes that protrude above tephra and soil. The most 18O and 13C depleted samples are for pedogenic carbonate developed in soil atmospheres. The pedogenic caliche has δ 18O fixed by normal precipitation in local meteoric waters at ambient temperatures and has low δ 13C characteristic of microbial soil CO 2. Subaerial caliche has formed from 18O-rich evapoconcentrated meteoric waters that dried out on surfaces after local rains. The associated 13C enrichment is due either to removal of 12C by photosynthesizers in the evaporating drops or to kinetic isotope effects associated with evaporation. Caliche on basalt lava flows thus initially forms with the isotopic signature of evaporation and is subsequently over-layered during burial by calcite carrying the isotopic signature of the soil environment. The large change in carbon isotope composition in subsequent soil calcite defines an isotopic biosignature that should have developed in martian examples if Mars had a "warm, wet" early period and photosynthesizing microbes were present in the early soils. The approach can be similarly applied to terrestrial Precambrian paleocaliche in the search for the earliest record of life on land. Large variations reported for δ 18O of carbonate in Martian meteorite ALH84001 do not necessarily require high temperatures, playa lakes, or flood runoff if the carbonate is an example of altered martian caliche.

  7. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides.

    PubMed

    Krzton-Maziopa, A; Svitlyk, V; Pomjakushina, E; Puzniak, R; Conder, K

    2016-07-27

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2-y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations. PMID:27248118

  8. Durability of Alkali Activated Blast Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, K.; Alharbi, N.; Matheu, P. S.; Varela, B.; Hailstone, R.

    2015-11-01

    The alkali activation of blast furnace slag has the potential to reduce the environmental impact of cementitious materials and to be applied in geographic zones where weather is a factor that negatively affects performance of materials based on Ordinary Portland Cement. The scientific literature provides many examples of alkali activated slag with high compressive strengths; however research into the durability and resistance to aggressive environments is still necessary for applications in harsh weather conditions. In this study two design mixes of blast furnace slag with mine tailings were activated with a potassium based solution. The design mixes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, BET analysis and compressive strength testing. Freeze-thaw testing up to 100 freeze-thaw cycles was performed in 10% road salt solution. Our findings included compressive strength of up to 100 MPa after 28 days of curing and 120 MPa after freeze-thaw testing. The relationship between pore size, compressive strength, and compressive strength after freeze-thaw was explored.

  9. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides.

    PubMed

    Krzton-Maziopa, A; Svitlyk, V; Pomjakushina, E; Puzniak, R; Conder, K

    2016-07-27

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2-y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations.

  10. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzton-Maziopa, A.; Svitlyk, V.; Pomjakushina, E.; Puzniak, R.; Conder, K.

    2016-07-01

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2-y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations.

  11. Packing transition in alkali metallic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, R.; Sung, Ming Wen; Weare, John H.

    1996-03-01

    Small metallic clusters form a local geometric configuration quite different from the bulk crystals. As the cluster size increases, several transitions in the local coordination take place before the bulk structure appears. These transitions involve change in the nature of chemical bonds. We have systematically investigated the structural transition of various alkali metal clusters including binary compounds using an ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. Among them, Li clusters exhibit unusual transition in their packing pattern. Small lithium clusters (N <= 21) form open structures based on a ``solvation shell''.(M. Sung, R. Kawai, and J. Weare, Phys. Rev. Lett. 73) (1994) 3552., which is quite different from other alkali metal clusters. The bonding of these small clusters is partially ionic. Above N=25, a close-packed structure is established. However, the local configuration still differ from that of the bulk crystal. As the size further increases, the ionic nature decreases and the system reaches another close-packed structure based on the Mackay icosahedron, which is similar to the bulk crystal structure.

  12. Decalcification resistance of alkali-activated slag.

    PubMed

    Komljenović, Miroslav M; Baščarević, Zvezdana; Marjanović, Nataša; Nikolić, Violeta

    2012-09-30

    This paper analyses the effects of decalcification in concentrated 6M NH(4)NO(3) solution on mechanical and microstructural properties of alkali-activated slag (AAS). Portland-slag cement (CEM II/A-S 42.5 N) was used as a benchmark material. Decalcification process led to a decrease in strength, both in AAS and in CEM II, and this effect was more pronounced in CEM II. The decrease in strength was explicitly related to the decrease in Ca/Si atomic ratio of C-S-H gel. A very low ratio of Ca/Si ~0.3 in AAS was the consequence of coexistence of C-S-H(I) gel and silica gel. During decalcification of AAS almost complete leaching of sodium and tetrahedral aluminum from C-S-H(I) gel also took place. AAS showed significantly higher resistance to decalcification in relation to the benchmark CEM II due to the absence of portlandite, high level of polymerization of silicate chains, low level of aluminum for silicon substitution in the structure of C-S-H(I), and the formation of protective layer of polymerized silica gel during decalcification process. In stabilization/solidification processes alkali-activated slag represents a more promising solution than Portland-slag cement due to significantly higher resistance to decalcification. PMID:22818592

  13. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzton-Maziopa, A.; Svitlyk, V.; Pomjakushina, E.; Puzniak, R.; Conder, K.

    2016-07-01

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2‑y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations.

  14. The phylogeny of endolithic microbes associated with marine basalts.

    PubMed

    Mason, Olivia U; Stingl, Ulrich; Wilhelm, Larry J; Moeseneder, Markus M; Di Meo-Savoie, Carol A; Fisk, Martin R; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2007-10-01

    We examined the phylogenetic diversity of microbial communities associated with marine basalts, using over 300 publicly available 16S rDNA sequences and new sequence data from basalt enrichment cultures. Phylogenetic analysis provided support for 11 monophyletic clades originating from ocean crust (sediment, basalt and gabbro). Seven of the ocean crust clades (OCC) are bacterial, while the remaining four OCC are in the Marine Group I (MGI) Crenarchaeota. Most of the OCC were found at diverse geographic sites, suggesting that these microorganisms have cosmopolitan distributions. One OCC in the Crenarchaeota consisted of sequences derived entirely from basalts. The remaining OCC were found in both basalts and sediments. The MGI Crenarchaeota were observed in all studies where archaeal diversity was evaluated. These results demonstrate that basalts are occupied by cosmopolitan clades of microorganisms that are also found in marine sediments but are distinct from microorganisms found in other marine habitats, and that one OCC in the ubiquitous MGI Crenarchaeota clade may be an ecotype specifically adapted to basalt.

  15. Deep degassing and the eruptibility of flood basalt magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, B. A.; Manga, M.

    2015-12-01

    Individual flood basalt lavas often exceed 103 km3 in volume, and many such lavas erupt during emplacement of flood basalt provinces. The large volume of individual flood basalt lavas demands correspondingly large magma reservoirs within or at the base of the crust. To erupt, some fraction of this magma must become buoyant and overpressure must be sufficient to encourage failure and dike propagation. Because the overpressure associated with a new injection of magma is inversely proportional to the total reservoir volume, buoyancy overpressure has been proposed as a trigger for flood basalt eruptions. To test this hypothesis, we develop a new one-dimensional model for buoyancy overpressure-driven eruptions that combines volatile exsolution, bubble growth and rise, assimilation, and permeable fluid escape through the surrounding country rocks. Degassing during emplacement of flood basalt provinces may have major environmental repercussions. We investigate the temporal evolution of permeable degassing through the crust and degassing during eruptive episodes. We find that assimilation of volatile-rich country rocks strongly enhances flood basalt eruptibility, implying that the eruptive dynamics of flood basalts may be intertwined with their climatic consequences.

  16. The phylogeny of endolithic microbes associated with marine basalts.

    PubMed

    Mason, Olivia U; Stingl, Ulrich; Wilhelm, Larry J; Moeseneder, Markus M; Di Meo-Savoie, Carol A; Fisk, Martin R; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2007-10-01

    We examined the phylogenetic diversity of microbial communities associated with marine basalts, using over 300 publicly available 16S rDNA sequences and new sequence data from basalt enrichment cultures. Phylogenetic analysis provided support for 11 monophyletic clades originating from ocean crust (sediment, basalt and gabbro). Seven of the ocean crust clades (OCC) are bacterial, while the remaining four OCC are in the Marine Group I (MGI) Crenarchaeota. Most of the OCC were found at diverse geographic sites, suggesting that these microorganisms have cosmopolitan distributions. One OCC in the Crenarchaeota consisted of sequences derived entirely from basalts. The remaining OCC were found in both basalts and sediments. The MGI Crenarchaeota were observed in all studies where archaeal diversity was evaluated. These results demonstrate that basalts are occupied by cosmopolitan clades of microorganisms that are also found in marine sediments but are distinct from microorganisms found in other marine habitats, and that one OCC in the ubiquitous MGI Crenarchaeota clade may be an ecotype specifically adapted to basalt. PMID:17803778

  17. Petrologic models of 15388, a unique Apollo 15 mare basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, S. S.; Dasch, E. J.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1993-01-01

    Mare basalt 15388, a feldspathic microgabbro from the Apennine Front, is chemically and petrographically distinct from Apollo 15 picritic, olivine-normative (ON), and quartz-normative basalts. The evolved chemistry, coarse texture, lack of olivine, and occurrence of cristobalite in 15388 argue for derivation by a late-stage magmatic process that is significantly removed from parental magma. It either crystallized from a magma evolved from the more mafic Apollo 15 basalts, or it crystallized from a currently unrepresented magma. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic systematics yield isochron ages of 3.391 plus or minus 0.036 and 3.42 plus or minus 0.07 Ga, respectively, and epsilon(sub Nd) = 8.6 plus or minus 2.4, which is relatively high for Apollo 15 mare basalts. In contrast to chemical patterns of average Apollo 15 ON basalts and Apollo 15 picritic basalt, 15388 has a strongly positive LREE slope, high Ti, shallower HREE slope and a slightly positive Eu anomaly. These features argue against 15388 evolution by simple olivine fractionation of a parental ON or picritic basalt magma, although olivine is a dominant liquidus phase in both potential parents.

  18. Patterns and origin of igneous activity around the Tanzanian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, S. F.; Link, K.; Tiberindwa, J. V.; Barifaijo, E.

    2012-01-01

    Tertiary and later igneous activity is common on and around the Tanzanian craton, with primitive magma compositions ranging from kimberlites and varieties of picrites through nephelinites, basanites and alkali basalts. This review focuses on elucidating the conditions of origin of the melts, addressing the question of the state and involvement of the Tanzanian cratonic lithosphere in magma genesis. The Tanzanian craton is anomalous with a surface elevation of >1100 m reflecting buoyancy supported by a subcratonic plume whose effects are seen in the volcanics of both western and eastern rift branches. Magmatism on the craton and at its edge has high K/Na and primitive melts show fractionation dominated by olivine. Slightly further from the craton pyroxene fractionation dominates and K/Na ratios in the magmas are lower. Off-craton melts are nephelinites, basanites and alkali basalts with low K/Na. Potassium enrichment in the melts correlates with the occurrence of phlogopite in mantle-derived xenoliths, and also with carbonate in the magmas. This is attributed to melting at >140 km depths of mixed source regions containing phlogopite pyroxenite and peridotite, whereby the carbonate is derived from oxidation of diamonds concentrated near the base of the cratonic lithosphere. Mixed source regions are required by arrays of radiogenic isotopes such as Os and Sr in the volcanic rocks. The temporal progression of lamproites to phlogopite + carbonate-rich rocks to melilitites, nephelinites and alkali basalts seen during the erosion of the North Atlantic craton are seen around the Tanzanian craton as the coeval occurrence kimberlites, kamafugites and related rocks, nephelinites and alkali basalts showing spatial instead of temporal variation. This is due to the different stages of development of rifting around the craton: in northwestern Uganda and northern Tanzania, K-rich volcanism occurs at the craton edge, whereas nephelinites, basanites and alkali basalts occur where

  19. Formation of lysinoalanine in egg white under alkali treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Luo, Xuying; Li, Jianke; Xu, Mingsheng; Tu, Yonggang

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the formation mechanism of lysinoalanine (LAL) in eggs during the alkali treatment process, NaOH was used for the direct alkali treatment of egg white, ovalbumin, and amino acids; in addition, the amount of LAL formed during the alkali treatment process was measured. The results showed that the alkali treatment resulted in the formation of LAL in the egg white. The LAL content increased with increasing pH and temperature, with the LAL content first increasing and then leveling off with increasing time. The amount of LAL formed in the ovalbumin under the alkali treatment condition accounted for approximately 50.51% to 58.68% of the amount of LAL formed in the egg white. Thus, the LAL formed in the ovalbumin was the main source for the LAL in the egg white during the alkali treatment process. Under the alkali treatment condition, free L-serine, L-cysteine, and L-cystine reacted with L-lysine to form LAL; therefore, they are the precursor amino acids of LAL formed in eggs during the alkali treatment process. PMID:26772660

  20. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  1. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  3. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  4. Self-discharge in bimetallic cells containing alkali metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, M. S.; Hesson, J. C.; Shimotake, H.

    1969-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of thermally regenerative bimetallic cells with alkali metal anodes shows a relation between the current drawn and the rate of discharge under open-circuit conditions. The self-discharge rate of the cell is due to the dissolution and ionization of alkali metal atoms in the fused-salt electrolyte

  5. COMPLEX FLUORIDES OF PLUTONIUM AND AN ALKALI METAL

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1960-08-01

    A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides. such as KPuF/sub 5/, KPu/sub 2/F/sub 9/, NaPuF/sub 5/, and RbPuF/sub 5/, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal- fluoride.

  6. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, Wen Y.

    1984-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them (46, 53, 61, 69) with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide (63) to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased (81), preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated (84) to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process (86, 18, 17) where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  7. Mid-Tertiary magmatism in western Big Bend National Park, Texas, U.S.A.: Evolution of basaltic source regions and generation of peralkaline rhyolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Don F.; Ren, Minghua; Adams, David T.; Tsai, Heng; Long, Leon E.

    2012-07-01

    then descended as magmatism died out. Variation within Burro Mesa Rhyolite is best explained by fractional crystallization of a mix of alkali feldspar, fayalite and Fe-Ti oxide. Comendite of the Burro Mesa Rhyolite evolved from trachyte as batches in relatively small independent magma systems, as suggested by widespread occurrence of trachytic magma enclaves within Burro Mesa lava and results of fractionation modeling. Trachyte may have been derived by fractional crystallization of intermediate magma similar to that erupted as part of Bee Mountain Basalt. ɛNdt values of trachyte lava (0.745) and two samples of Burro Mesa Rhyolite (- 0.52 and 1.52) are consistent with the above models. In all, ~ 5 wt.% comendite may be produced from 100 parts of parental trachybasalt. Negative Nb anomalies in some Bee Mountain, Tule Mountain Trachyte and Burro Mesa incompatible element plots may have been inherited from lithospheric mantle rather than from a descending plate associated with subduction. Late phase basalts lack such a Nb anomaly, as do all of our Alamo Creek analyses but one. Even if some slab fluids partially metasomatized lithospheric mantle, these igneous rocks are much more typical of continental rifts than continental arcs. We relate Big Bend magmatism to asthenospheric mantle upwelling accompanying foundering of the subducted Farallon slab as the convergence rate between the North American and the Farallon plates decreased beginning about 50 Ma. Upwelling asthenosphere heated the base of the continental lithosphere, producing the Alamo Creek series; magmatism climaxed with main phase magmatism generated within middle continental lithosphere, and then, accompanying regional extension, gradually died out by 18 Ma.

  8. Performance of Straight Steel Fibres Reinforced Alkali Activated Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faris, Meor Ahmad; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Nizar Ismail, Khairul; Muniandy, Ratnasamy; Putra Jaya, Ramadhansyah

    2016-06-01

    This paper focus on the performance of alkali activated concrete produced by using fly ash activated by sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. These alkali activated concrete were reinforced with straight steel fibres with different weight percentage starting from 0 % up to 5 %. Chemical composition of raw material in the production alkali activated concrete which is fly ash was first identified by using X-ray fluorescence. Results reveal there have an effect of straight steel fibres inclusion to the alkali activated concrete. Highest compressive strength of alkali activated concrete which is 67.72 MPa was obtained when 3 % of straight fibres were added. As well as flexural strength, highest flexural strength which is 6.78 MPa was obtained at 3 % of straight steel fibres inclusions.

  9. Effects of alkali treatments on Ag nanowire transparent conductive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunho; Kang, Jun-gu; Eom, Tae-yil; Moon, Bongjin; Lee, Hoo-Jeong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we employ various alkali materials (alkali metals with different base strengths, and ammonia gas and solution) to improve the conductivity of silver nanowire (Ag NW)-networked films. The alkali treatment appears to remove the surface oxide and improve the conductivity. When applied with TiO2 nanoparticles, the treatment appears more effective as the alkalis gather around wire junctions and help them weld to each other via heat emitted from the reduction reaction. The ammonia solution treatment is found to be quick and aggressive, damaging the wires severely in the case of excessive treatment. On the other hand, the ammonia gas treatment seems much less aggressive and does not damage the wires even after a long exposure. The results of this study highlight the effectiveness of the alkali treatment in improving of the conductivity of Ag NW-networked transparent conductive films.

  10. Modeling Cooling Rates of Martian Flood Basalt Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, D. K.; Jackson, B.; Milazzo, M. P.; Barnes, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Columnar jointing in large basalt flows have been extensively studied and can provide important clues about the emplacement conditions and cooling history of a basalt flow. The recent discovery of basalt columns on Mars in crater walls near Marte Vallis provides an opportunity to infer conditions on early Mars when the Martian basalt flows were laid down. Comparison of the Martian columns to Earth analogs allows us to gain further insight into the early Martian climate, and among the best terrestrial analogs are the basalt columns in the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) in eastern Washington. The CRBG is one of the youngest (< 17 Myrs old) and most extensively studied basalt provinces in the world, extending over 163,700 square km with total thickness exceeding 1 km in some places. The morphologies and textures of CRBG basalt columns suggest that in many places flows ~100 m thick cooled at uniform rates, even deep in the flow interior. Such cooling seems to require the presence of water in the column joints since the flow interiors should have cooled much more slowly than the flow margins if conductive cooling dominated. Secondary features, such pillow basalts, likewise suggest the basalt flows were in direct contact with standing water in many places. At the resolution provided by the orbiting HiRISE camera (0.9 m), the Martian basalt columns resemble the CRBG columns in many respects, and so, subject to important caveats, inferences linking the morphologies of the CRBG columns to their thermal histories can be extended in some respects to the Martian columns. In this presentation, we will describe our analysis of the HiRISE images of the Martian columns and what can be reasonably inferred about their thermal histories and the conditions under which they were emplaced. We will also report on a field expedition to the CRBG in eastern Washington State. During that expedition, we surveyed basalt column outcrops on the ground and from the air using Unmanned Aerial

  11. Mineral chemistry of Pangidi basalt flows from Andhra Pradesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nageswara Rao, P. V.; Swaroop, P. C.; Karimulla, Syed

    2012-04-01

    This paper elucidates the compositional studies on clinopyroxene, plagioclase, titaniferous magnetite and ilmenite of basalts of Pangidi area to understand the geothermometry and oxybarometry conditions. Petrographic evidence and anorthite content (up to 85%) of plagioclase and temperature estimates of clinopyroxene indicate that the clinopyroxene is crystallized later than or together with plagioclase. The higher An content indicates that the parent magma is tholeiitic composition. The equilibration temperatures of clinopyroxene (1110-1190°C) and titaniferous magnetite and ilmenite coexisting mineral phases (1063-1103°C) are almost similar in lower basalt flow and it is higher for clinopyroxene (900-1110°C) when compared to titaniferous magnetite and ilmenite coexisting mineral phases (748-898°C) in middle and upper basalt flows. From this it can be inferred that the clinopyroxene is crystallized earlier than Fe-Ti oxide phases reequilibration, which indicates that the clinopyroxene temperature is the approximate eruption temperature of the present lava flows. The wide range of temperatures (900-1190°C) attained by clinopyroxene may point out that the equilibration of clinopyroxene crystals initiated from depth till closer to the surface before the melt erupted. Pangidi basalts follow the QFM buffer curve which indicates the more evolved tholeiitic composition. This suggests the parent tholeiitic magma suffered limited fractionation at high temperature under increasing oxygen fugacity in lower basalt flow and more fractionation at medium to lower temperatures under decreasing oxygen fugacity conditions during cooling of middle and upper basalt flows. The variation of oxygen fugacity indicates the oxidizing conditions for lower basalt flow (9.48-10.3) and extremely reducing conditions for middle (12.1-15.5) and upper basalt (12.4-15.54) flows prevailed at the time of cooling. Temperature vs. (FeO+Fe2O3)/(FeO+Fe2O3 +MgO) data plots for present basalts suggested

  12. An Apollo 15 Mare Basalt Fragment and Lunar Mare Provinces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Graham; Burling, Trina Cox

    1996-01-01

    Lunar sample 15474,4 is a tiny fragment of olivine-augite vitrophyre that is a mare basalt. Although petroraphically distinct from all other Apollo 15 samples, it has been ignored since its first brief description. Our new petrographic and mineral chemical data show that the olivines and pyroxenes are distinct from those in other basalts. The basalt cooled and solidified extremely rapidly; some of the olivine might be cumulate or crystallized prior to extrusion. Bulk-chemical data show that the sample is probably similar to an evolved Apollo 15 olivine-normative basalt in major elements but is distinct in its rare earth element pattern. Its chemical composition and petrography both show that 15474,4 cannot be derived from other Apollo 15 mare basalts by shallow-level crystal fractionation. It represents a distinct extrusion of magma. Nonetheless, the chemical features that 15474,4 has in common with other Apollo 15 mare basalts, including the high FeO/Sc, the general similarity of the rare earth element pattern, and the common (and chondritic) TiO2/Sm ratio, emphasize the concept of a geochemical province at the Apollo 15 site that is distinct from basalts and provinces elsewhere. In making a consistent picture for the derivation of all of the Apollo 15 basalts, both the commonalities and the differences among the basalts must be explained. The Apollo 15 commonalities and differences suggest that the sources must have consisted of major silicate phases with the same composition but with varied amounts of a magma trapped from a contemporary magma ocean. They probably had a high olivine/pyroxene ratio and underwent small and reasonably consistent degrees of partial melting to produce the basalts. These inferences may be inconsistent with models that suggest greatly different depths of melting among basalts, primitive sources for the green glasses, or extensive olivine fractionation during ascent. An integrated approach to lunar mare provinces, of which the Apollo 15

  13. Pliocene Basaltic Volcanism in The East Anatolia Region (EAR), Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyan, Vural; Özdemir, Yavuz; Keskin, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    East Anatolia Region (EAR) is one of the high Plateau which is occurred with north-south compressional regime formed depending on continent-continent collision between Eurasia and Arabia plates (Şengör and Kidd, 1979). Recent studies have revealed that last oceanic lithosphere in the EAR have completely depleted to 20 million years ago based on fission track ages (Okay et al. 2010). Our initial studies suggest that extensively volcanic activity in the EAR peaked in the Pliocene and continued in the same productivity throughout Quaternary. Voluminous basaltic lava plateaus and basaltic lavas from local eruption centers occurred as a result of high production level of volcanism during the Pliocene time interval. In order to better understand the spatial and temporal variations in Pliocene basaltic volcanism and to reveal isotopic composition, age and petrologic evolution of the basaltic volcanism, we have started to study basaltic volcanism in the East Anatolia within the framework of a TUBITAK project (project number:113Y406). Petrologic and geochemical studies carried out on the Pliocene basaltic lavas indicate the presence of subduction component in the mantle source, changing the character of basaltic volcanism from alkaline to subalkaline and increasing the amount of spinel peridotitic melts (contributions of lithospheric mantle?) in the mantle source between 5.5-3.5 Ma. FC, AFC and EC-AFC modelings reveal that the while basaltic lavas were no or slightly influenced by crustal contamination and fractional crystallization, to more evolved lavas such as bazaltictrachyandesite, basalticandesite, trachybasalt might have been important processes. Results of our melting models and isotopic analysis data (Sr, Nd, Pb, Hf, 18O) indicate that the Pliocene basaltic rocks were derived from both shallow and deep mantle sources with different melting degrees ranging between 0.1 - 4 %. The percentage of spinel seems to have increased in the mantle source of the basaltic

  14. Iron-induced hydroxyl radical generation from basaltic volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwell, C. J.; Fenoglio, I.; Fubini, B.

    2007-09-01

    Iron-induced hydroxyl radical generation from the surface of volcanic ash particles is a possible mechanism of respiratory toxicity in addition to crystalline silica induced pathogenicity. Here we show that volcanic ash generates hydroxyl radicals, with greater reactivity in iron-rich, silica-poor samples, such as basaltic ash. Basaltic particles expose at the surface high levels of poorly-coordinated iron ions in both Fe(II) and Fe(III) oxidation states which are likely to be the cause of such reactivity. Hitherto, basaltic ash has been disregarded as a hazard due to the lack of crystalline silica particulate but future hazard assessment should consider its toxic potential.

  15. Basaltic volcanic episodes of the Yucca Mountain region

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.M.

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize briefly the distribution and geologic characteristics of basaltic volcanism in the Yucca Mountain region during the last 10--12 Ma. This interval largely postdates the major period of silicic volcanism and coincides with and postdates the timing of major extensional faulting in the region. Field and geochronologic data for the basaltic rocks define two distinct episodes. The patterns in the volume and spatial distribution of these basaltic volcanic episodes in the central and southern part of the SNVF are used as a basis for forecasting potential future volcanic activity in vicinity of Yucca Mountain. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Stereo Pair: Basalt Cliffs, Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Basalt cliffs along the northwest edge of the Meseta de Somuncura plateau near Sierra Colorada, Argentina show an unusual and striking pattern of erosion. Stereoscopic observation helps to clarify the landform changing processes active here. Many of the cliffs appear to be rock staircases that have the same color as the plateau's basaltic cap rock. Are these the edges of lower layers in the basalt or are they a train of slivers that are breaking off from, then sliding downslope and away from, the cap rock. They appear to be the latter. Close inspection shows that each stair step is too laterally irregular to be a continuous sheet of bedrock like the cap rock. Also, the steps are not flat but instead are little ridges, as one might expect from broken, tilted, and sliding slices of the cap rock. Stream erosion has cut some gullies into the cliffs and green vegetation shows that water springs from and flows down some channels, but landsliding is clearly a major agent of erosion here.

    This cross-eyed stereoscopic image pair was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, combined with an enhanced Landsat 7satellite color image. The topography data are used to create two differing perspectives of a single image, one perspective for each eye. In doing so, each point in the image is shifted slightly, depending on its elevation. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive. The Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image used here was provided to the SRTM project by the United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center,Sioux Falls, South

  17. Calcium Sulfate in Atacama Desert Basalt: A Possible Analog for Bright Material in Adirondack Basalt, Gusev Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Golden, D. C.; Amundson, R.; Chong-Diaz, G.; Ming, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    The Atacama Desert in northern Chile is one of the driest deserts on Earth (< 2mm/y). The hyper-arid conditions allow extraordinary accumulations of sulfates, chlorides, and nitrates in Atacama soils. Examining salt accumulations in the Atacama may assist understanding salt accumulations on Mars. Recent work examining sulfate soils on basalt parent material observed white material in the interior vesicles of surface basalt. This is strikingly similar to the bright-white material present in veins and vesicles of the Adirondack basalt rocks at Gusev Crater which are presumed to consist of S, Cl, and/or Br. The abundance of soil gypsum/anhydrite in the area of the Atacama basalt suggested that the white material consisted of calcium sulfate (Ca-SO4) which was later confirmed by SEM/EDS analysis. This work examines the Ca-SO4 of Atacama basalt in an effort to provide insight into the possible nature of the bright material in the Adirondack basalt of Gusev Crater. The objectives of this work are to (i) discuss variations in Ca-SO4 crystal morphology in the vesicles and (ii) examine the Ca-SO4 interaction(s) with the basalt interior.

  18. Experimental constraints on depths of fractionation of mildly alkalic basalts and associated felsic rocks: Pantelleria, Strait of Sicily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahood, Gail A.; Baker, Don R.

    1986-06-01

    Pantelleria, Italy, is a continental rift volcano consisting of alkalic basalt, trachyte, and pantellerite. At 1 atm along the FMQ buffer, the least-evolved basalt (Mg #= 58.5% norm ne) yields olivine on the liquidus at ˜1,180° C, followed by plagioclase, then by clinopyroxene, and by titanomagnetite and ilmenite at ˜ 1,075°. After ˜70% crystallization, the residual liquid at ˜1,025° is still basaltic and also contains apatite and possibly kaersutite. A less alkalic basalt shows the same order of phase appearance. Glass compositions define an Fe-enrichment trend and a density maximum for anhydrous liquids that coincides with a minimum in Mg#. During the initial stages of crystallization at 1 atm, liquids remain near the critical plane of silica-undersaturation until, at lower temperatures, Fe-Ti oxide precipitation drives the composition toward silica saturation. Thus the qtz-normative trachytes and pantellerites typically associated with mildly ne-normative basalts in continental rifts could be produced by low-pressure fractional crystallization or by shallow-level partial melting of alkali gabbro. At 8 kbar, clinopyroxene is the liquidus phase at ˜1,170° C, followed by both olivine and plagioclase at ˜1,135°. Because clinopyroxene dominates the crystallizing assemblage and plagioclase is more albitic than at 1 atm, liquids at 8 kbar are driven toward increasingly ne-normative compositions, suggesting that higher-pressure fractionation favors production of phonolitic derivatives. Natural basaltic samples at Pantelleria are aphyric or contain 1 10% phenocrysts of plag≥ ol≥cpx or ol>cpx, with groundmass Fe-Ti oxides and apatite. The lack of phenocrystic plagioclase in two of the lavas suggests that crystallization at slightly higher PH2O may have destabilized plagioclase relative to the 1-atm results, but there is no preserved evidence for significant fractionation at mantle depths as clinopyroxene is the least abundant phenocryst phase in all samples

  19. Spreading and collapse of big basaltic volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe; Bonforte, Alessandro; Guglielmino, Francesco; Peltier, Aline; Poland, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Among the different types of volcanoes, basaltic ones usually form the most voluminous edifices. Because volcanoes are growing on a pre-existing landscape, the geologic and structural framework of the basement (and earlier volcanic landforms) influences the stress regime, seismicity, and volcanic activity. Conversely, the masses of these volcanoes introduce a morphological anomaly that affects neighboring areas. Growth of a volcano disturbs the tectonic framework of the region, clamps and unclamps existing faults (some of which may be reactivated by the new stress field), and deforms the substratum. A volcano's weight on its basement can trigger edifice spreading and collapse that can affect populated areas even at significant distance. Volcano instability can also be driven by slow tectonic deformation and magmatic intrusion. The manifestations of instability span a range of temporal and spatial scales, ranging from slow creep on individual faults to large earthquakes affecting a broad area. In the frame of MED-SVU project, our work aims to investigate the relation between basement setting and volcanic activity and stability at three Supersite volcanoes: Etna (Sicily, Italy), Kilauea (Island of Hawaii, USA) and Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island, France). These volcanoes host frequent eruptive activity (effusive and explosive) and share common features indicating lateral spreading and collapse, yet they are characterized by different morphologies, dimensions, and tectonic frameworks. For instance, the basaltic ocean island volcanoes of Kilauea and Piton de la Fournaise are near the active ends of long hotspot chains while Mt. Etna has developed at junction along a convergent margin between the African and Eurasian plates and a passive margin separating the oceanic Ionian crust from the African continental crust. Magma supply and plate velocity also differ in the three settings, as to the sizes of the edifices and the extents of their rift zones. These

  20. Elastic properties of alkali-feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waeselmann, N.; Brown, J.; Angel, R. J.; Ross, N.; Kaminsky, W.

    2013-12-01

    New measurements of single crystal elastic moduli for a suite of the alkali feldspars are reported. In order to interpret Earth's seismic structure, knowledge of the elastic properties of constituent minerals is essential. The elasticity of feldspar minerals, despite being the most abundant phase in Earth's crust (estimated to be more than 60%), were previously poorly characterized. All prior seismic and petrologic studies have utilized 50-year-old results, of questionable quality, based on 1-bar measurements on pseudo-single crystals. Alkali-feldspars present a large experimental challenge associated with their structural complexity. In the K-end member (KAlSi3O8) the symmetry is governed by Al/Si ordering, in the Na-end member (NaAlSi3O8) the symmetry is governed by whether or not there is a displacive collapse of the framework independent of the Al/Si ordering. K-feldspars exhibit monoclinic (C2/m) symmetry (necessitating determination of 13 elastic moduli) if disordered and triclinic (C-1) symmetry (21 elastic moduli) if ordered. Exsolution of Na-rich and K-rich phases is ubiquitous in natural samples, making it difficult to find suitable single phase and untwinned samples for study. The small single domain samples selected for this study were previously characterized by x-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis to ensure adequate sample quality. Surface wave velocities were measured on oriented surfaces of natural and synthetic single crystals using impulsively stimulated light scattering. A surface corrugation with a spacing of about 2 microns was impulsively created by the overlap of 100 ps infrared light pulses. The time evolution of the stimulated standing elastic waves was detected by measuring the intensity of diffraction from the surface corrugation of a variably delayed probe pulse. This method allows accurate (better than 0.2%) determination of velocities on samples smaller than 100 microns. The combination of measured surface wave velocities and

  1. The Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain: Hotspot volcanism with mid-ocean ridge basalt affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Desonie, D.L.; Duncan, R.A. )

    1990-08-10

    Cobb hotspot, currently located beneath Axial seamount on the Juan de Fuca ridge, has the temporal but not the isotopic characteristics usually attributed to a mantle plume. The earlier volcanic products of the hotspot, form eight volcanoes in the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount (CES) chain, show a westward age progression away from the hotspot and a westward increase in the age difference between the seamounts and the crust on which they formed. These results are consistent with movement of the Pacific plate over a fixed Cobb hotspot and eventual encroachment by the westwardly migrating Juan de Fuca ridge. CES lavas are slightly enriched in alkalies and incompatible elements relative to those of the Juan de Fuca ridge but they have Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions virtually identical to those found along the ridge. Therefore, Cobb hotspot is a stationary, upper mantle melting anomaly whose volcanic products show strong mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) affinity. These observations can be explained by low degrees of partial melting of entrained heterogeneous upper mantle MORB source material within a thermally driven lower mantle diapir or by an intrinsic MORB-like composition of the deeper mantle source region from which northeast Pacific plumes rise.

  2. Alkali oxide-tantalum oxide and alkali oxide-niobium oxide ionic conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, R. S.; Parker, H. S.; Brower, W. S.; Minor, D.

    1974-01-01

    A search was made for new cationic conducting phases in alkali-tantalate and niobate systems. The phase equilibrium diagrams were constructed for the six binary systems Nb2O5-LiNbO3, Nb2O5-NaNbO3, Nb2O5-KNbO3, Ta2O5-NaTaO3, Ta2O5-LiTaO3, and Ta2O5-KTaO3. Various other binary and ternary systems were also examined. Pellets of nineteen phases were evaluated (by the sponsoring agency) by dielectric loss measurements. Attempts were made to grow large crystals of eight different phases. The system Ta2O5-KTaO3 contains at least three phases which showed peaks in dielectric loss vs. temperature. All three contain structures related to the tungsten bronzes with alkali ions in non-stoichiometric crystallographic positions.

  3. Computation of EABF and EBF for basalt rock samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabul, Yaşar; Amon Susam, Lidya; İçelli, Orhan; Eyecioğlu, Önder

    2015-10-01

    In this study, certain photon absorption parameters including the energy absorption buildup factor (EABF) and exposure buildup factor (EBF) have been investigated for three different basalt samples collected from different parts of Van city. Radiation shielding properties of the basalt samples indicated a strong correlation between photon energy absorption parameters and values of EABF and EBF of basalt samples. It was found that EABF and EBF parameters are related to radiation shielding properties of basalt samples. A new method and algorithm based on ZXCOM was used. Instead of calculating G-P fitting parameters for every effective atomic number (Zeff), EABF and EBF were calculated for Zeff by interpolation, using ANSI/ANS 6.4.3 standard data available for Zeff.

  4. Mineralogy of Silica Polymorphs in Basaltic Clasts in Eucrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, H.; Takenouchi, A.; Mikouchi, T.

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed silica polymorphs in basaltic clasts in Y-75011, Pasamonte and Stannern eucrites. Cristobalite and quartz have been found, which suggests wide occurrence of hydrothermal activity throughout the crust of Vesta.

  5. A Modified CIPW Norm Calculation for Lunar Mare Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milliken, R. E.; Basu, A.

    2000-01-01

    CIPW norms of lunar mare basalts are anomalously low in pyroxene. A modified norm calculation allowing higher Ca, Ti, Al, Cr, and Mn in di' and hy' obtains closer matches between normative and modal mineralogy.

  6. Systematics of Vanadium in Olivine from Planetary Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karner, J. M.; Papike, J. J.; Shearer, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    The systematics of vanadium in olivines from the Earth, Moon and Mars allows for the comparison of planetary basalt origin and igneous setting and process. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Basaltic Cone Suggests Constructional Origin of Some Guyots.

    PubMed

    Christensen, M N; Gilbert, C M

    1964-01-17

    A basaltic cinder cone was built beneath the waters of Mono Lake in Pleistocene time. This cone is now exposed. Its internal structure, external form, and petrography suggest that it was constructed with a flat top.

  8. Basaltic Cone Suggests Constructional Origin of Some Guyots.

    PubMed

    Christensen, M N; Gilbert, C M

    1964-01-17

    A basaltic cinder cone was built beneath the waters of Mono Lake in Pleistocene time. This cone is now exposed. Its internal structure, external form, and petrography suggest that it was constructed with a flat top. PMID:17753148

  9. Potential for Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Flood Basalts

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B. PETER; Schaef, Herbert T.; Ho, Anita M.; Chien, Yi-Ju; Dooley, James J.; Davidson, Casie L.

    2006-12-01

    Flood basalts are a potentially important host medium for geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2. Most lava flows have flow tops that are porous, permeable, and have enormous capacity for storage of CO2. Interbedded sediment layers and dense low-permeability basalt rock overlying sequential flows may act as effective seals allowing time for mineralization reactions to occur. Laboratory experiments confirm relatively rapid chemical reaction of CO2-saturated pore water with basalts to form stable carbonate minerals. Calculations suggest a sufficiently short time frame for onset of carbonate precipitation after CO2 injection that verification of in situ mineralization rates appears feasible in field pilot studies. If proven viable, major flood basalts in the U.S. and India would provide significant additional CO2 storage capacity and additional geologic sequestration options in certain regions where more conventional storage options are limited.

  10. Experimental Confirmation of the Volatility of Germanium in Martian Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humayun, M.; DiFrancesco, N.; Ustunisik, G.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental degassing of a synthetic martian basalt doped with Ge and Zn resulted in nearly total loss of both elements after 6 hours of heating, implying that the Ge depletion in shergottites is complemented by Ge excesses in sedimentary rocks.

  11. [Comparative carcinogenic properties of basalt fiber and chrysotile-asbestos].

    PubMed

    Nikitina, O V; Kogan, F M; Vanchugova, N N; Frash, V N

    1989-01-01

    In order to eliminate asbestos adverse effect on workers' health it was necessary to use mineral rayon, primarily basalt fibre, instead of asbestos. During a chronic experiment on animals the oncogenicity of 2 kinds of basalt fibre was studied compared to chrysotile asbestos. The dust dose of 25 mg was twice administered by intraperitonial route. All types of dust induced the onset of intraperitonial mesotheliomas but neoplasm rates were significantly lower in the groups exposed to basalt fibre. There was no credible data on the differences between the groups exposed to various types of basalt fibre. Since the latter produced some oncogenic effect, it was necessary to develop a complex of antidust measures, fully corresponding to the measures adopted for carcinogenic dusts.

  12. Heat pipes containing alkali metal working fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A technique for improving high temperature evaporation-condensation heat-transfer devices which have important and unique advantage in terrestrial and space energy processing is described. The device is in the form of a heat pipe comprising a sealed container or envelope which contains a capillary wick. The temperature of one end of the heat pipe is raised by the input of heat from an external heat source which is extremely hot and corrosive. A working fluid of a corrosive alkali metal, such as lithium, sodium, or potassium transfers this heat to a heat receiver remote from the heat source. The container and wick are fabricated from a superalloy containing a small percentage of a corrosion inhibiting or gettering element. Lanthanum, scandium, yttrium, thorium, and hafnium are utilized as the alloying metal.

  13. Volcanic Origin of Alkali Halides on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, L.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The recent observation of NaCl (gas) on Io confirms our earlier prediction that NaCl is produced volcanically. Here we extend our calculations by modeling thermochemical equilibrium of O, S, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, F, Cl, Br, and I as a function of temperature and pressure in a Pele-like volcanic gas with O/S/Na/Cl/K = 1.518/1/0.05/0.04/0.005 and CI chondritic ratios of the other (as yet unobserved) alkalis and halogens. For reference, the nominal temperature and pressure for Pele is 1760 plus or minus 210 K and 0.01 bars based on Galileo data and modeling.

  14. Mobility and fluxes of major, minor and trace metals during basalt weathering and groundwater transport at Mt. Etna volcano (Sicily)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiuppa, Alessandro; Allard, Patrick; D'Alessandro, Walter; Michel, Agnes; Parello, Francesco; Treuil, Michel; Valenza, Mariano

    2000-06-01

    The concentrations and fluxes of major, minor and trace metals were determined in 53 samples of groundwaters from around Mt Etna, in order to evaluate the conditions and extent of alkali basalt weathering by waters enriched in magma-derived CO 2 and the contribution of aqueous transport to the overall metal discharge of the volcano. We show that gaseous input of magmatic volatile metals into the Etnean aquifer is small or negligible, being limited by cooling of the rising fluids. Basalt leaching by weakly acidic, CO 2-charged water is the overwhelming source of metals and appears to be more extensive in two sectors of the S-SW (Paternò) and E (Zafferana) volcano flanks, where out flowing groundwaters are the richest in metals and bicarbonate of magmatic origin. Thermodynamic modeling of the results allows to evaluate the relative mobility and chemical speciation of various elements during their partitioning between solid and liquid phases through the weathering process. The facts that rock-forming minerals and groundmass dissolve at different rates and secondary minerals are formed are taken into account. At Mt. Etna, poorly mobile elements (Al, Th, Fe) are preferentially retained in the solid residue of weathering, while alkalis, alkaline earth and oxo-anion-forming elements (As, Se, Sb, Mo) are more mobile and released to the aqueous system. Transition metals display an intermediate behavior and are strongly dependent on either the redox conditions (Mn, Cr, V) or solid surface-related processes (V, Zn, Cu). The fluxes of metals discharged by the volcanic aquifer of Etna range from 7.0 × 10 -3 t/a (Th) to 7.3 × 10 4 t/a (Na). They are comparable in magnitude to the summit crater plume emissions for a series of elements (Na, K, Ca, Mg, U, V, Li) with lithophile affinity, but are minor for volatile elements. Basalt weathering at Mt Etna also consumes about 2.1 × 10 5 t/a of magma-derived carbon dioxide, equivalent to ca. 7% of contemporaneous crater plume

  15. Lead isotope relations in oceanic Ridge basalts from the Juan de Fuca-Gorda Ridge area N.E. Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, S.E.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1975-01-01

    Lead isotopic analyses of a suite of basaltic rocks from the Juan de Fuca-Gorda Ridge and nearby seamounts confirm an isotopically heterogeneous mantle known since 1966. The process of mixing during partial melting of a heterogeneous mantle necessarily produces linear data arrays that can be interpreted as secondary isochrons. Moreover, the position of the entire lead isotope array, with respect to the geochron, requires that U/Pb and Th/Pb values are progressively increased over the age of the earth. Partial melting theory also dictates analogous behavior for the other incompatible trace elements. This process explains not only the LIL element character of MOR basalts, but also duplicates the spread of radiogenic lead data collected from alkali-rich oceanic basalts. This dynamic, open-system model of lead isotopic and chemical evolution of the mantle is believed to be the direct result of tectonic flow and convective overturn within the mantle and is compatible with geophysical models of a dynamic earth. ?? 1975 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Low temperature aqueous alteration of basalt: Mineral assemblages of Deccan basalts and implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberger, R. N.; Mustard, J. F.; Kumar, P. S.; Dyar, M. D.; Breves, E. A.; Sklute, E. C.

    2012-09-01

    Al-rich phyllosilicates (kaolinite, montmorillonite) have been found in layers overlying Fe/Mg-smectites on Mars, and it has been suggested that this stratigraphy formed through in situ leaching at the surface, similar to terrestrial weathering profiles. We are investigating the remotely sensed signatures of this type of weathering using ten samples from a vertical section of altered Deccan basalts and four samples collected nearby as an analog for leaching resulting in Al-rich phyllosilicate over Fe/Mg-smectite stratigraphies. Samples were analyzed with reflectance spectroscopy from 0.28 to 25.0 μm, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry for 10 major element concentrations (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Si, Ti), loss on ignition for volatiles, x-ray diffraction (XRD) for mineralogies, and Mössbauer spectroscopy for Fe redox state. Spectra of basalt samples were dominated by Fe2+ crystal field transitions with weak alteration bands near 1.4 and/or 1.9 μm. Reststrahlen bands in mid-infrared showed the convolution of plagioclase and pyroxene features typical of basalts. Saprolite samples were incompletely leached, and their spectra were dominated by complex Al- and Fe/Mg-bearing smectite clays and retained no original mafic signatures. XRD and Mössbauer detected pyroxene and plagioclase not visible by reflectance spectroscopy in some saprolite samples. Zeolites were present throughout the saprolite. The laterite was the most leached horizon, and all analyses showed kaolinite and iron oxide assemblages. This kaolinite and hematite association would be expected if kaolinite on Mars formed through leaching under conditions similar to those on Earth and has implications for abundant freshwater on the Martian surface.

  17. Basalt Waste Isolation Project Reclamation Support Project:

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Cadoret, N.A.

    1992-06-01

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) Reclamation Support Project began in the spring of 1988 by categorizing sites distributed during operations of the BWIP into those requiring revegetation and those to be abandoned or transferred to other programs. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory's role in this project was to develop plans for reestablishing native vegetation on the first category of sites, to monitor the implementation of these plans, to evaluate the effectiveness of these efforts, and to identify remediation methods where necessary. The Reclamation Support Project focused on three major areas: geologic hydrologic boreholes, the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF), and the Near-Surface Test Facility (NSTF). A number of BWIP reclamation sites seeded between 1989 and 1990 were found to be far below reclamation objectives. These sites were remediated in 1991 using various seedbed treatments designed to rectify problems with water-holding capacity, herbicide activity, surficial crust formation, and nutrient imbalances. Remediation was conducted during November and early December 1991. Sites were examined on a monthly basis thereafter to evaluate plant growth responses to these treatments. At all remediation sites early plant growth responses to these treatments. At all remediation sites, early plant growth far exceeded any previously obtained using other methods and seedbed treatments. Seeded plants did best where amendments consisted of soil-plus-compost or fertilizer-only. Vegetation growth on Gable Mountain was less than that found on other areas nearby, but this difference is attributed primarily to the site's altitude and north-facing orientation.

  18. Hafnium isotope variations in oceanic basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patchett, P. J.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1980-01-01

    Hafnium isotope ratios generated by the beta(-) decay of Lu-176 are investigated in volcanic rocks derived from the suboceanic mantle. Hf-176/Hf-177 and Lu/Hf ratios were determined to precisions of 0.01-0.04% and 0.5%, respectively, by routine, low-blank chemistry. The Hf-176/Hf-177 ratio is found to be positively correlated with the Nd-143/Nd-144 ratio and negatively correlated with the Sr-87/Sr-86 and Pb-206/Pb-204 ratios, and to increase southwards along the Iceland-Reykjanes ridge traverse. An approximate bulk earth Hf-176/Hf-177 ratio of 0.28295 is inferred from the bulk earth Nd-143/Nd-144 ratio, which requires a bulk earth Lu/Hf ratio of 0.25, similar to the Juvinas eucrite. Midocean ridge basalts are shown to account for 60% of the range of Hf isotope ratios, and it is suggested that Lu-Hf fractionation is decoupled from Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr fractionation in very trace-element-depleted source regions as a result of partial melting.

  19. Diversity of life in ocean floor basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorseth, I. H.; Torsvik, T.; Torsvik, V.; Daae, F. L.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2001-12-01

    Electron microscopy and biomolecular methods have been used to describe and identify microbial communities inhabiting the glassy margins of ocean floor basalts. The investigated samples were collected from a neovolcanic ridge and from older, sediment-covered lava flows in the rift valley of the Knipovich Ridge at a water depth around 3500 m and an ambient seawater temperature of -0.7°C. Successive stages from incipient microbial colonisation, to well-developed biofilms occur on fracture surfaces in the glassy margins. Observed microbial morphologies are various filamentous, coccoidal, oval, rod-shaped and stalked forms. Etch marks in the fresh glass, with form and size resembling the attached microbes, are common. Precipitation of alteration products around microbes has developed hollow subspherical and filamentous structures. These precipitates are often enriched in Fe and Mn. The presence of branching and twisted stalks that resemble those of the iron-oxidising Gallionella, indicate that reduced iron may be utilised in an energy metabolic process. Analysis of 16S-rRNA gene sequences from microbes present in the rock samples, show that the bacterial population inhabiting these samples cluster within the γ- and ɛ-Proteobacteria and the Cytophaga/Flexibacter/Bacteroides subdivision of the Bacteria, while the Archaea all belong to the Crenarchaeota kingdom. This microbial population appears to be characteristic for the rock and their closest relatives have previously been reported from cold marine waters in the Arctic and Antarctic, deep-sea sediments and hydrothermal environments.

  20. Lead isotope systematics of mare basalt 75075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.; Tilton, G. R.; Mattinson, J. M.; Vidal, P.

    1978-01-01

    Uranium, thorium and isotopic lead data are reported for two bulk samples and separated pyroxene, ilmenite and plagioclase from basalt 75075. In a concordia diagram the whole rock, ilmenite and four pyroxene samples define a chord intersecting the concordia curve at approximately 4.25 and 2.8 AE. Three plagioclase samples plot distinctly off the chord. The crystallization age of 75075 is accurately determined at 3.74 AE by Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd and K-Ar measurements from other laboratories. It is not possible to adjust the isotopic composition of initial lead so as to reconcile the U-Pb data with a crystallization age of 3.74 AE. The data therefore indicate some type of post-crystallization disturbance of the U-Pb system that is not detected by the other systems. The 75075 data are one of the few examples of this type of age pattern found on the moon. If the disturbance was a single event, it probably occurred around 2.8 AE ago, the time indicated by the pyroxene, whole rock and ilmenite data.

  1. Ionic alkali halide XUV laser feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.T.; Gylys, V.T.; Bower, R.D.; Harris, D.G.; Blauer, J.A.; Turner, C.E.; Hindy, R.N.

    1989-11-10

    The objective of this work is to assess the feasibility of a select set of ionic alkali halide XUV laser concepts by obtaining the relevant kinetic and spectroscopic parameters required for a proof-of-principle and conceptual design. The proposed lasers operate in the 80--200 nm spectral region and do not require input from outside radiation sources for their operation. Frequency up-conversion and frequency mixing techniques and therefore not considered in the work to be described. An experimental and theoretical study of a new type of laser operating in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength region has been conducted. The lasing species are singly ionized alkali halide molecules such as Rb{sup 2+}F{sub {minus}}, Rb{sup 2+}Br{sup {minus}} and Cs{sup 2+}F{sup {minus}}. These species are similar in electronic structure to the rare gas halide excimers, such as XeF and Krf, except that the ionic molecules emit at wavelengths of 80--200 nm, much shorter than the conventional rare-gas halide excimer laser. The radiative lifetime of these molecules are typically near 1 ns, which is about an order of magnitude shorter than that for rare-gas halide systems. The values of the cross section for stimulated emission are on the order of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}16}cm{sup 2}. Because of the fundamental similarity to existing UV lasers, these systems show promise as a high power, efficient XUV lasers. 55 refs., 50 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Radiolytic Hydrogen Production in the Subseafloor Basaltic Aquifer.

    PubMed

    Dzaugis, Mary E; Spivack, Arthur J; Dunlea, Ann G; Murray, Richard W; D'Hondt, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2) is produced in geological settings by dissociation of water due to radiation from radioactive decay of naturally occurring uranium ((238)U, (235)U), thorium ((232)Th) and potassium ((40)K). To quantify the potential significance of radiolytic H2 as an electron donor for microbes within the South Pacific subseafloor basaltic aquifer, we use radionuclide concentrations of 43 basalt samples from IODP Expedition 329 to calculate radiolytic H2 production rates in basement fractures. The samples are from three sites with very different basement ages and a wide range of alteration types. U, Th, and K concentrations vary by up to an order of magnitude from sample to sample at each site. Comparison of our samples to each other and to the results of previous studies of unaltered East Pacific Rise basalt suggests that significant variations in radionuclide concentrations are due to differences in initial (unaltered basalt) concentrations (which can vary between eruptive events) and post-emplacement alteration. However, there is no clear relationship between alteration type and calculated radiolytic yields. Local maxima in U, Th, and K produce hotspots of H2 production, causing calculated radiolytic rates to differ by up to a factor of 80 from sample to sample. Fracture width also greatly influences H2 production, where microfractures are hotspots for radiolytic H2 production. For example, H2 production rates normalized to water volume are 190 times higher in 1 μm wide fractures than in fractures that are 10 cm wide. To assess the importance of water radiolysis for microbial communities in subseafloor basaltic aquifers, we compare electron transfer rates from radiolysis to rates from iron oxidation in subseafloor basalt. Radiolysis appears likely to be a more important electron donor source than iron oxidation in old (>10 Ma) basement basalt. Radiolytic H2 production in the volume of water adjacent to a square cm of the most radioactive SPG basalt may support as

  3. Basalt: Biologic Analog Science Associated with Lava Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, D. S. S.; Abercromby, A.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.; Kobayashi, L.; Hughes, S. S.; Chappell, S.; Bramall, N. E.; Deans, M. C.; Heldmann, J. L.; Downs, M.; Cockell, C. S.; Stevens, A. H.; Caldwell, B.; Hoffman, J.; Vadhavk, N.; Marquez, J.; Miller, M.; Squyres, S. W.; Lees, D. S.; Fong, T.; Cohen, T.; Smith, T.; Lee, G.; Frank, J.; Colaprete, A.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the BASALT (Biologic Analog Science Associated with Lava Terrains) program. BASALT research addresses Science, Science Operations, and Technology. Specifically, BASALT is focused on the investigation of terrestrial volcanic terrains and their habitability as analog environments for early and present-day Mars. Our scientific fieldwork is conducted under simulated Mars mission constraints to evaluate strategically selected concepts of operations (ConOps) and capabilities with respect to their anticipated value for the joint human and robotic exploration of Mars. a) Science: The BASALT science program is focused on understanding habitability conditions of early and present-day Mars in two relevant Mars-analog locations (the Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ) and the East Rift Zone (ERZ) flows on the Big Island of Hawai'i and the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) in Idaho) to characterize and compare the physical and geochemical conditions of life in these environments and to learn how to seek, identify, and characterize life and life-related chemistry in basaltic environments representing these two epochs of martian history. b) Science Operations: The BASALT team will conduct real (non-simulated) biological and geological science at two high-fidelity Mars analogs, all within simulated Mars mission conditions (including communication latencies and bandwidth constraints) that are based on current architectural assumptions for Mars exploration missions. We will identify which human-robotic ConOps and supporting capabilities enable science return and discovery. c) Technology: BASALT will incorporate and evaluate technologies in to our field operations that are directly relevant to conducting the scientific investigations regarding life and life-related chemistry in Mars-analogous terrestrial environments. BASALT technologies include the use of mobile science platforms, extravehicular informatics, display technologies, communication

  4. Genesis of highland basalt breccias - A view from 66095

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, J. R., Jr.; Taylor, L. A.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microprobe and defocused beam analyses of the lunar highland breccia sample 66095 show it consists of a fine-grained subophitic matrix containing a variety of mineral and lithic clasts, such as intergranular and cataclastic ANT, shocked and unshocked plagioclase, and basalts. Consideration of the chemistries of both matrix and clasts provides a basis for a qualitative three-component mixing model consisting of an ANT plutonic complex, a Fra Mauro basalt, and minor meteoric material.

  5. Radiolytic Hydrogen Production in the Subseafloor Basaltic Aquifer.

    PubMed

    Dzaugis, Mary E; Spivack, Arthur J; Dunlea, Ann G; Murray, Richard W; D'Hondt, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2) is produced in geological settings by dissociation of water due to radiation from radioactive decay of naturally occurring uranium ((238)U, (235)U), thorium ((232)Th) and potassium ((40)K). To quantify the potential significance of radiolytic H2 as an electron donor for microbes within the South Pacific subseafloor basaltic aquifer, we use radionuclide concentrations of 43 basalt samples from IODP Expedition 329 to calculate radiolytic H2 production rates in basement fractures. The samples are from three sites with very different basement ages and a wide range of alteration types. U, Th, and K concentrations vary by up to an order of magnitude from sample to sample at each site. Comparison of our samples to each other and to the results of previous studies of unaltered East Pacific Rise basalt suggests that significant variations in radionuclide concentrations are due to differences in initial (unaltered basalt) concentrations (which can vary between eruptive events) and post-emplacement alteration. However, there is no clear relationship between alteration type and calculated radiolytic yields. Local maxima in U, Th, and K produce hotspots of H2 production, causing calculated radiolytic rates to differ by up to a factor of 80 from sample to sample. Fracture width also greatly influences H2 production, where microfractures are hotspots for radiolytic H2 production. For example, H2 production rates normalized to water volume are 190 times higher in 1 μm wide fractures than in fractures that are 10 cm wide. To assess the importance of water radiolysis for microbial communities in subseafloor basaltic aquifers, we compare electron transfer rates from radiolysis to rates from iron oxidation in subseafloor basalt. Radiolysis appears likely to be a more important electron donor source than iron oxidation in old (>10 Ma) basement basalt. Radiolytic H2 production in the volume of water adjacent to a square cm of the most radioactive SPG basalt may support as

  6. Radiolytic Hydrogen Production in the Subseafloor Basaltic Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Dzaugis, Mary E.; Spivack, Arthur J.; Dunlea, Ann G.; Murray, Richard W.; D’Hondt, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2) is produced in geological settings by dissociation of water due to radiation from radioactive decay of naturally occurring uranium (238U, 235U), thorium (232Th) and potassium (40K). To quantify the potential significance of radiolytic H2 as an electron donor for microbes within the South Pacific subseafloor basaltic aquifer, we use radionuclide concentrations of 43 basalt samples from IODP Expedition 329 to calculate radiolytic H2 production rates in basement fractures. The samples are from three sites with very different basement ages and a wide range of alteration types. U, Th, and K concentrations vary by up to an order of magnitude from sample to sample at each site. Comparison of our samples to each other and to the results of previous studies of unaltered East Pacific Rise basalt suggests that significant variations in radionuclide concentrations are due to differences in initial (unaltered basalt) concentrations (which can vary between eruptive events) and post-emplacement alteration. However, there is no clear relationship between alteration type and calculated radiolytic yields. Local maxima in U, Th, and K produce hotspots of H2 production, causing calculated radiolytic rates to differ by up to a factor of 80 from sample to sample. Fracture width also greatly influences H2 production, where microfractures are hotspots for radiolytic H2 production. For example, H2 production rates normalized to water volume are 190 times higher in 1 μm wide fractures than in fractures that are 10 cm wide. To assess the importance of water radiolysis for microbial communities in subseafloor basaltic aquifers, we compare electron transfer rates from radiolysis to rates from iron oxidation in subseafloor basalt. Radiolysis appears likely to be a more important electron donor source than iron oxidation in old (>10 Ma) basement basalt. Radiolytic H2 production in the volume of water adjacent to a square cm of the most radioactive SPG basalt may support as many as

  7. Shocked basalt from Lonar Impact Crater, India, and experimental analogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieffer, S. W.; Schaal, R. B.; Gibbons, R.; Horz, F.; Milton, D. J.; Dube, A.

    1976-01-01

    Samples of Lonar basalts were experimentally shocked in vacuum to pressures between 200 and 650 kbar by a 20 mm, high-velocity gun. Plagioclase and palagonite in experimentally shocked samples show deformation similar to that in the naturally shocked rocks, but pyroxene does not show optically resolvable edge melting. It is estimated that pressures in excess of 800-1000 kbar are required for the formation of totally shock-melted rocks from nonporous basalt.

  8. Modes of emplacement of basalt terrains and an analysis of mare volcanism in the Orientale Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.

    1976-01-01

    Three distinctive types of basalt terrains can be recognized on earth on the basis of surface morphology: flood basalts, shield basalts, and plains basalts, each of which reflects unique styles of eruption and modes of emplacement. Two of these, flood basalts and plains basalts, appear to be important in the emplacement of mare basalts on the moon. Using surface features as identifying criteria, mare units in the Orientale Basin were examined and the following emplacement sequence was derived: (1) initial emplacement of impact melt in the basin center, (2) eruption of flood-type basalts in the basin center and approximately concurrent emplacement of plains type basalts in Lacus Veris, and (3) emplacement of plains type basalts in Lacus Autumni

  9. Ultrasonic coal washing to leach alkali elements from coals.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, S; Reddy, V Midhun; Nagarajan, R

    2015-11-01

    Deposition of fly ash particles onto heat-transfer surfaces is often one of the reasons for unscheduled shut-downs of coal-fired boilers. Fouling deposits encountered in convective sections of a boiler are characterized by arrival of ash particles in solidified (solid) state. Fouling is most frequently caused by condensation and chemical reaction of alkali vapors with the deposited ash particles creating a wet surface conducive to collect impacting ash particles. Hence, the amount of alkali elements present in coals, which, in turn, is available in the flue gas as condensable vapors, determines the formation and growth of fouling deposits. In this context, removal of alkali elements becomes vital when inferior coals having high-ash content are utilized for power generation. With the concept of reducing alkali elements present in a coal entering the combustor, whereby the fouling deposits can either be minimized or be weakened due to absence of alkali gluing effect, the ultrasonic leaching of alkali elements from coals is investigated in this study. Ultrasonic water-washing and chemical-washing, in comparison with agitation, are studied in order to estimate the intensification of the alkali removal process by sonication. PMID:26186840

  10. Alkali-activated cementitious materials: Mechanisms, microstructure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weimin

    The goal of this study was to examine the activation reaction, microstructure, properties, identify the mechanisms of activation, and achieve an enhanced understanding of activation processes occurring during the synthesis of alkali activated cementitious materials (AAC). The discussions classify the following categories. (1) alkali activated slag cement; (2) alkali activated portland-slag cement; (3) alkali activated fly ash-slag cement; (4) alkali activated pozzolana-lime cement; (5) alkali activated pozzolana cement. The activators involved are NaOH, KOH; Nasb2SOsb4;\\ Nasb2COsb3;\\ CaSOsb4, and soluble silicate of sodium and potassium. The effect of alkali activation on the microstructure of these materials were analyzed at the micro-nanometer scale by SEM, EDS, ESEM, and TEM. Also sp{29}Si and sp{27}Al MAS-NMR, IR, Raman, TGA, and DTA were performed to characterize the phase in these systems. Slag, fly ash, silica fume, as well as blended cements containing mixtures of these and other components were characterized. A set of ordinary portland cement paste samples served as a control. This study confirmed that AAC materials have great potential because they could generate very early high strength, greater durability and high performance. Among the benefits to be derived from this research is a better understanding of the factors that control concrete properties when using AAC materials, and by controlling the chemistry and processing to produce desired microstructures and properties, as well as their durability.

  11. Controlled in-situ dissolution of an alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jeffrey Donald; Dooley, Kirk John; Tolman, David Donald

    2012-09-11

    A method for the controllable dissolution of one or more alkali metals from a vessel containing a one or more alkali metals and/or one or more partially passivated alkali metals. The vessel preferably comprising a sodium, NaK or other alkali metal-cooled nuclear reactor that has been used. The alkali metal, preferably sodium, potassium or a combination thereof, in the vessel is exposed to a treatment liquid, preferably an acidic liquid, more preferably citric acid. Preferably, the treatment liquid is maintained in continuous motion relative to any surface of unreacted alkali metal with which the treatment liquid is in contact. The treatment liquid is preferably pumped into the vessel containing the one or more alkali metals and the resulting fluid is extracted and optionally further processed. Preferably, the resulting off-gases are processed by an off-gas treatment system and the resulting liquids are processed by a liquid disposal system. In one preferred embodiment, an inert gas is pumped into the vessel along with the treatment liquid.

  12. Alkali elemental and potassium isotopic compositions of Semarkona chondrules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, C.M. O'D.; Grossman, J.N.

    2005-01-01

    We report measurements of K isotope ratios in 28 Semarkona chondrules with a wide range of petrologic types and bulk compositions as well as the compositions of CPX-mesostasis pairs in 17 type I Semarkona chondrules, including two chondrules with radial alkali zonation and 19 type II chondrules. Despite the wide range in K/Al ratios, no systematic variations in K isotopic compositions were found. Semarkona chondrules do not record a simple history of Rayleigh-type loss of K. Experimentally determined evaporation rates suggest that considerable alkali evaporation would have occurred during chondrule formation. Nevertheless, based on Na CPX-mesostasis distribution coefficients, the alkali contents of the cores of most chondrules in Semarkona were probably established at the time of final crystallization. However, Na CPX-mesostasis distribution coefficients also show that alkali zonation in type I Semarkona chondrules was produced by entry of alkalis after solidification, probably during parent body alteration. This alkali metasomatism may have gone to completion in some chondrules. Our preferred explanation for the lack of systematic isotopic enrichments, even in alkali depleted type I chondrule cores, is that they exchanged with the ambient gas as they cooled. ?? The Meteoritical Society, 2005.

  13. Quality of the ground water in basalt of the Columbia River group, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newcomb, Reuben Clair

    1972-01-01

    The ground water within the 50,000-square-mile area of the layered basalt of the Columbia River Group is a generally uniform bicarbonate water having calcium and sodium in nearly equal amounts as the principal cations. water contains a relatively large amount of silica. The 525 chemical analyses indicate that the prevalent ground water is of two related kinds--a calcium and a sodium water. The sodium water is more common beneath the floors of the main synclinal valleys; the calcium water, elsewhere. In addition to the prevalent type, five special types form a small part of the ground water; four of these are natural and one is artificial. The four natural special types are: (1) calcium sodium chloride waters that rise from underlying sedimentary rocks west of the Cascade Range, (2) mineralized water at or near warm or hot springs, (3) water having unusual ion concentrations, especially of chloride, near sedimentary rocks intercalated at the edges of the basalt, and (4) more mineralized water near one locality of excess carbon dioxide. The one artificial kind of special ground water has resulted from unintentional artificial recharge incidental to irrigation in parts of central Washington. The solids dissolved in the ground water have been picked up on the surface, within the overburden, and from minerals and glasses within the basalt. Evidence for the removal of ions from solution is confined to calcium and magnesium, only small amounts of which are present in some of the sodium-rich water. Minor constituents, such as the heavy metals, alkali metals, and alkali earths, occur in the ground water in trace, or small, amounts. The natural radioactivity of the ground waters is very low. Except for a few of the saline calcium sodium chloride waters and a few occurrences of excessive nitrate, the ground water generally meets the common standards of water good for most ordinary uses, but some of it can be improved by treatment. The water is clear and colorless and has a

  14. Testing the Origins of Basalt Fragments fro Apollo 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, P. H.; Stevens, R. E.; Neal, C. R.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    Several 2-4 mm regolith fragments of basalt from the Apollo 16 site were recently described by [1]. These included a high-Ti vitrophyric basalts (60603,10-16) and one very-low-titanium (VLT) crystalline basalt (65703,9-13). As Apollo 16 was the only highlands sample return mission distant from the maria, identification of basaltic samples at the site indicates input from remote sites via impact processes [1]. However, distinguishing between impact melt and pristine basalt can be notoriously difficult and requires significant sample material [2-6]. The crystal stratigraphy method utilizes essentially non-destructive methods to make these distinctions [7,8]. Crystal stratigraphy combines quantitative petrography in the form of crystal size distributions (CSDs) coupled with mineral geochemistry to reveal the petrogenetic history of samples. The classic CSD plot of crystal size versus population density can reveal insights on growth/cooling rates, residence times, and magma history which in turn can be used to evaluate basaltic vs impact melt origin [7-9]. Electron microprobe (EMP) and laser ablation (LA)-ICP-MS analyses of mineral phases complement textural investigations. Trace element variations document subtle changes occurring during the formation of the samples, and are key in the interpretation and preservation of this rare lunar sample collection.

  15. Thermal infrared spectroscopy and modeling of experimentally shocked basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Staid, M.I.; Kraft, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    New measurements of thermal infrared emission spectra (250-1400 cm-1; ???7-40 ??m) of experimentally shocked basalt and basaltic andesite (17-56 GPa) exhibit changes in spectral features with increasing pressure consistent with changes in the structure of plagioclase feldspars. Major spectral absorptions in unshocked rocks between 350-700 cm-1 (due to Si-O-Si octahedral bending vibrations) and between 1000-1250 cm-1 (due to Si-O antisymmetric stretch motions of the silica tetrahedra) transform at pressures >20-25 GPa to two broad spectral features centered near 950-1050 and 400-450 cm-1. Linear deconvolution models using spectral libraries composed of common mineral and glass spectra replicate the spectra of shocked basalt relatively well up to shock pressures of 20-25 GPa, above which model errors increase substantially, coincident with the onset of diaplectic glass formation in plagioclase. Inclusion of shocked feldspar spectra in the libraries improves fits for more highly shocked basalt. However, deconvolution models of the basaltic andesite select shocked feldspar end-members even for unshocked samples, likely caused by the higher primary glass content in the basaltic andesite sample.

  16. Hotspots, basalts, and the evolution of the mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    It is noted that the trace element concentration patterns of continental and ocean island basalts and of mid-ocean ridge basalts are complementary. Estimates of the relative sizes of the source regions for these fundamentally different basalt types can be arrived at from the trace element enrichment-depletion patterns. Their combined volume occupies the greater part of the mantle above the 670 km discontinuity. It is pointed out that the source regions separated as a result of early mantle differentiation and crystal fractionation from the resulting melt. The mid-ocean ridge basalts source evolved from an eclogite cumulate that gave up its late-stage enriched fluids at various times to the shallower mantle and continental crust. The mid-ocean ridge basalts source is rich in garnet and clinopyroxene, while the continental and ocean island basalt source is a garnet peridotite that has experienced secondary enrichment. These relationships are found to be consistent with the evolution of a terrestrial magma ocean.

  17. Insulation from basaltic stamp sand. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, F. D.

    1981-04-01

    A Midwest Appropriate Technology Grant was awarded to determine the technical and economic feasibility of producing mineral-fiber insulation directly from extensive deposits of basaltic sand produced during former mining and milling operations in the Keweenaw Peninsula region of Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The amounts of local basaltic sands available and representative chemical compositions were determined. The variation of viscosity with temperature and chemical composition was estimated. Samples were melted and either pulled or blown into fiber. In all cases fiber could be made with a reasonable tensile strength to ensure usefulness. It was concluded that it was technically feasible to produce fibers from basaltic stamp sands of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. A technical feasibility study using published data, a cost and design analysis of a basalt fiber production plant, a market survey of fiber needs, and an economic analysis for investing in a basalt fiber venture was undertaken. These studies concluded that the local production of basaltic insulation was both feasible and economically reasonable. It was suggested that the plant be located in a region of greater population density with lower utility costs. A representative one-third of these studies is included as appendices A, B, C, and D.

  18. A basalt trigger for the 1991 eruptions of Pinatubo volcano?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pallister, J.S.; Hoblitt, R.P.; Reyes, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    THE eruptive products of calc-alkaline volcanos often show evidence for the mixing of basaltic and acid magmas before eruption (see, for example, refs 1, 2). These observations have led to the suggestion3 that the injection of basaltic magma into the base of a magma chamber (or the catastrophic overturn of a stably stratified chamber containing basaltic magma at its base) might trigger an eruption. Here we report evidence for the mixing of basaltic and dacitic magmas shortly before the paroxysmal eruptions of Pinatubo volcano on 15 June 1991. Andesitic scoriae erupted on 12 June contain minerals and glass with disequilibrium compositions, and are considerably more mafic than the dacitic pumices erupted on 15 June. Differences in crystal abundance and glass composition among the pumices may arise from pre-heating of the dacite magma by the underlying basaltic liquid before mixing. Degassing of this basaltic magma may also have contributed to the climatologically important sulphur dioxide emissions that accompanied the Pinatubo eruptions.

  19. 87Sr/86Sr ratios in basalts from islands in the Indian Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedge, C.E.; Watkins, N.D.; Hildreth, R.A.; Doering, W.P.

    1973-01-01

    87Sr/86Sr ratios of basalts from islands in the Indian Ocean (0.7040) are higher than those of basalts dredged from the Mid-Indian Ocean Ridge (0.7034). The sources of the island basalts have apparently not been in equilibrium with the source of the ridge basalts for roughly 109 years. Both ridge and island basalts in the Indian Ocean are higher in 87Sr/86Sr than are rocks from similar settings in the eastern Pacific. ?? 1973.

  20. Importance of lunar granite and KREEP in very high potassium (VHK) basalt petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Clive R.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of five very high potassium (VHK) basalts from Apollo 14 breccia 14303 shows the presence of a KREEP component. An assimilation and fractional crystallization model is presented to describe the basalt evolution. The influence of granite assimilation on the basalt evolution is discussed. The presence of VHK basalts containing only a granite signature and those with both granite and KREEP signatures suggests that there are at least two different VHK basalt flows at the Apollo 14 site.

  1. Electrochemical cell utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Virkar, Anil V.; Miller, Gerald R.

    1983-11-04

    An improved electrochemical cell comprising an additive-modified molten alkali metal electrode-reactant and/or electrolyte is disclosed. Various electrochemical cells employing a molten alkali metal, e.g., sodium, electrode in contact with a cationically conductive ceramic membrane experience a lower resistance and a lower temperature coefficient of resistance whenever small amounts of selenium are present at the interface of the electrolyte and the molten alkali metal. Further, cells having small amounts of selenium present at the electrolyte-molten metal interface exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte under long term cycling conditions.

  2. Bilayer resist system utilizing alkali-developable organosilicon positive photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nate, Kazuo; Mizushima, Akiko; Sugiyama, Hisashi

    1991-06-01

    A bi-layer resist system utilizing an alkali-developable organosilicon positive photoresist (OSPR) has been developed. The composite prepared from an alkali-soluble organosilicon polymer, poly(p- hydroxybenzylsilsesquioxane) and naphthoquinone diazide becomes a alkali-developable positive photoresist which is sensitive to UV (i line - g line) region, and exhibited high oxygen reactive ion etching (O2 RIE) resistance. The sensitivity and the resolution of OSPR are almost the same as those of conventional novolac-based positive photoresists. The bi-layer resist system utilizing OSPR as the top imaging layer gave fine patterns of underlayers with high aspect ratio easily.

  3. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

    1992-02-24

    The high temperature alkali corrosion kinetics of SiC have been systematically investigated from 950 to 1100[degrees]C at 0.63 vol % alkali vapor concentration. The corrosion rate in the presence of alkaliis approximately 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 5] times faster than the oxidation rate of SiC in air. The activation energy associated with the alkali corrosion is 406 kJ/mol, indicating a highly temperature-dependent reaction rate. The rate-controlling step of the overall reaction is likely to be the dissolution of silica in the sodium silicate liquid, based on the oxygen diffusivity data.

  4. Increasing Class C fly ash reduces alkali silica reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, J.K.

    2007-07-01

    Contrary to earlier studies, it has been found that incremental additions of Class C fly ash do reduce alkali silica reactivity (ASR), in highly reactive, high alkali concrete mixes. AST can be further reduced by substituting 5% metakaolin or silica fume for the aggregate in concrete mixes with high (more than 30%) Class C fly ash substitution. The paper reports results of studies using Class C fly ash from the Labadie Station plant in Missouri which typically has between 1.3 and 1.45% available alkalis by ASTM C311. 7 figs.

  5. Icelandic basaltic geothermal field: A natural analog for nuclear waste isolation in basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmer, G.C.; Grandstaff, D.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1984-11-21

    Analog studies of Icelandic geothermal fields have shown that the design of nuclear waste repositories in basalt can benefit by comparison to the data base already available from the development of these geothermal fields. A high degree of similarity exists between these two systems: their petrology, groundwater geochemistry, mineral solubilities, hydrologic parameters, temperature ranges, water-rock redox equilibria, hydrothermal pH values, and secondary mineralogies all show considerable overlap in the range of values. The experimentally-simulated hydrothermal studies of the basaltic nuclear waste repository rocks have, at this time, produced a data base that receives a strong confirmation from the Icelandic analog. Furthermore, the Icelandic analog should eventually be employed to extrapolate into higher and lower temperatures, into longer time-base chemical comparisons, and into more realistic mineral deposition studies, than have been possible in the laboratory evaluations of the nuclear waste repository designs. This eventual use of the Icelandic analog will require cooperative work with the Icelandic Geological Survey. 46 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Strength and durability of basalt fiber and basalt-fiber cement composites

    SciTech Connect

    Vedagiri, V.

    1987-01-01

    Basalt fibers melt drawn from naturally occurring igneous rock in an inert atmosphere of helium, argon or nitrogen show significantly improved mean strength (3.7 GPa). Weibull analysis of fiber strengths at different gage lengths indicates a high-strength population governing strength below 6.5-mm gage and a low-strength population at higher gage lengths. The durability of the basalt-cement composites was studied by conducting tensile and flexural tests, after water immersion at different temperatures for different times. By measuring the mirror-zone radius on the fiber surfaces in fractured composite specimens, the retention of fiber strength within the composite was also measured. The chemical and microstructural changes in the fiber-matrix interphase region were investigated by using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The fiber-matrix bond strength was evaluated by investigating multiple crack failure modes of composite specimens. The results indicate that although the strength values are comparable to other fiber systems, the precipitation of calcium hydroxide at the interface and the degradation of the fiber in the alkaline matrix decrease the strength of the composites, over extended period of time.

  7. Vapor segregation and loss in basaltic melts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edmonds, M.; Gerlach, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of volcanic gases at Pu'u'O??'o??, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, reveal distinct degassing regimes with respect to vapor segregation and loss during effusive activity in 2004-2005. Three styles of vapor loss are distinguished by the chemical character of the emitted volcanic gases, measured by open path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: 1 persistent continuous gas emission, 2 gas piston events, and 3 lava spattering. Persistent continuous gas emission is associated with magma ascent and degassing beneath the crater vents, then eruption of the degassed magma from flank vents. Gas piston events are the result of static gas accumulation at depths of 400-900 m beneath Pu'u'O??'o??. A CO2-rich gas slug travels up the conduit at a few meters per second, displacing magma as it expands. Lava spattering occurs due to dynamic bubble coalescence in a column of relatively stagnant magma. The Large gas bubbles are H2O rich and are generated by open-system degassing at depths of <150 m. Static gas accumulation and dynamic bubble coalescence are both manifestations of vapor segregation in basaltic melts, but their implications differ. Accumulation and segregation of CO2-rich vapor at depth does not deplete the melt of H2O (required to drive lava fountains near to the surface) and therefore gas piston events can occur interspersed with lava fountaining activity. Lava spattering, however, efficiently strips H2O-rich vapor from magma beneath the crater vents; the magma must then erupt effusively from vents on the flank of the cone. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  8. Geomechanical rock properties of a basaltic volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Lauren; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallée, Yan; Oommen, Thomas; Chigna, Gustavo

    2015-06-01

    In volcanic regions, reliable estimates of mechanical properties for specific volcanic events such as cyclic inflation-deflation cycles by magmatic intrusions, thermal stressing, and high temperatures are crucial for building accurate models of volcanic phenomena. This study focuses on the challenge of characterizing volcanic materials for the numerical analyses of such events. To do this, we evaluated the physical (porosity, permeability) and mechanical (strength) properties of basaltic rocks at Pacaya Volcano (Guatemala) through a variety of laboratory experiments, including: room temperature, high temperature (935 °C), and cyclically-loaded uniaxial compressive strength tests on as-collected and thermally-treated rock samples. Knowledge of the material response to such varied stressing conditions is necessary to analyze potential hazards at Pacaya, whose persistent activity has led to 13 evacuations of towns near the volcano since 1987. The rocks show a non-linear relationship between permeability and porosity, which relates to the importance of the crack network connecting the vesicles in these rocks. Here we show that strength not only decreases with porosity and permeability, but also with prolonged stressing (i.e., at lower strain rates) and upon cooling. Complimentary tests in which cyclic episodes of thermal or load stressing showed no systematic weakening of the material on the scale of our experiments. Most importantly, we show the extremely heterogeneous nature of volcanic edifices that arise from differences in porosity and permeability of the local lithologies, the limited lateral extent of lava flows, and the scars of previous collapse events. Input of these process-specific rock behaviors into slope stability and deformation models can change the resultant hazard analysis. We anticipate that an increased parameterization of rock properties will improve mitigation power.

  9. Alkali element enrichments on the BABBs at the IODP Expedition 333 Site C0012 in the northern Shikoku Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haraguchi, S.; Nakamura, K.; Fujinaga, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Shikoku Basin is a back arc basin located westside of the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin) arc, spreading was from 25 to 15 Ma. The drilling of the DSDP, ODP and IODP recovered the backarc basin basalt (BABB) of the Shikoku Basin. Site C0012, south of the Kii Peninsula, was operated during the IODP Exp 333, and BABB was recovered 100m thickness under the 520m of sediment. This BABB is divided into upper aphyric pillow (Unit 1) and lower massive flow (Unit 2) divided at the 560 mbsf, and show variable degree of alteration, clay mineral and zeolite depositions. SiO2 and MgO contents of these basalts are 47-55 and 5-8 wt%. These basalts show wide variation of enrichment of alkali elements, 2.3-7.5 and 0.4-4.2 wt% of Na2O and K2O. Na2O+K2O contents show 3.2-8.0 wt%, and 2 wt% higher trends than other BABBs in the Shikoku Basin at the same SiO2 contents. Na2O and K2O show proportional and anti-proportional trends with increasing LOI. Therefore, both alkali element enrichments in these rocks are caused by secondary mineralization, and host phase of Na2O is hydrous and that of K2O is anhydrous minerals. Secondary mineral phases was mainly identified by XRD. The identified host phases of Na are analcime and thomsonite. Analcime is observed in rocks of more than 4 wt% of Na2O. Chlorite and smectite are identified to clay minerals. This mineral assemblage indicates the high-temperature zeolite facies alteration. The host phases of K are mainly identified into K-feldspar. We assume that secondary mineralization of K-fd is associated with low-temperature albitization. Compared to the lithostratigraphy, the Na enrichment is prominent in the Unit 1 and upper 20 m of the Unit 2, and the K enrichment is prominent in lower part of the Unit 2. We consider that the Na enrichment associated with zeolite depositions occurred under high water/rock ratio with active hydrothermal circulation because of high water permeability of pillow lava, and K enrichment associated with albitization occurred

  10. A new lunar high-Ti basalt type defined from clasts in Apollo 16 breccia 60639

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, A. L.; Neal, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the detailed examination of three basalt clasts from Apollo 16 breccia 60639 that represent a new variant of high-Ti basalt returned from the Moon by the Apollo 16 mission. Mineral chemistry and whole-rock analyses were conducted on aliquots from three clasts (breccia matrix, basalt, and basalt + breccia matrix). The basalt clasts, which are not overtly porphyritic, contain compositionally zoned pyroxene, olivine, and plagioclase crystals that represent the evolution of the magma during crystallization; ilmenite does not exhibit major-element compositional zoning within individual crystals. Mineral compositions are distinct between the basalt and breccia matrix lithologies. In addition, whole-rock analyses identify clear compositional differences between the basalt and breccia matrix lithologies in both major and trace element concentrations. The composition of the mixed lithology aliquots (i.e., basalt + breccia matrix) do not indicate simple two component mixing (i.e., compositions are not intermediate to the basalt and breccia end-members); this apparent incongruity can be accounted for by adding ∼19-40% plagioclase to an amalgamation of the average basalt and individual breccia clast compositions via impact mixing. Whole-rock analyses are consistent with previous analyses of one 60639 basalt clast, which were interpreted to indicate chemical similarity with Apollo 11 and 17 basalts. However, both major and trace elements suggest that the 60639 basalt clasts examined here have compositions that are distinct from Apollo 11 and 17 high-Ti basalts. Although the 60639 basalt clasts have similar characteristics to a variety of previously identified basalt types, the more extensive whole-rock analyses reported here indicate that they represent a type of Apollo high-Ti basalt heretofore unrecognized in the Apollo and lunar meteorite collections. By placing these new analyses in the context of other mare basalt compositions, a petrogenetic model for

  11. Electric field-induced softening of alkali silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, C.; Heffner, W.; Jain, H.; Tessarollo, R.; Raj, R.

    2015-11-02

    Motivated by the advantages of two-electrode flash sintering over normal sintering, we have investigated the effect of an external electric field on the viscosity of glass. The results show remarkable electric field-induced softening (EFIS), as application of DC field significantly lowers the softening temperature of glass. To establish the origin of EFIS, the effect is compared for single vs. mixed-alkali silicate glasses with fixed mole percentage of the alkali ions such that the mobility of alkali ions is greatly reduced while the basic network structure does not change much. The sodium silicate and lithium-sodium mixed alkali silicate glasses were tested mechanically in situ under compression in external electric field ranging from 0 to 250 V/cm in specially designed equipment. A comparison of data for different compositions indicates a complex mechanical response, which is observed as field-induced viscous flow due to a combination of Joule heating, electrolysis and dielectric breakdown.

  12. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, M.M.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.

    1995-08-22

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  13. Alkali activation of halloysite for adsorption and release of ofloxacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Junping; Wang, Aiqin

    2013-12-01

    Halloysite nanotubes are promising vehicles for the controlled release of drug molecules. Here, we systematically investigated the effects of alkali activation on the physicochemical properties, structure and morphology of halloysite nanotubes by XRD, FTIR, SEM and TEM, etc. Afterwards, the adsorption and in vitro release properties of halloysite for cationic ofloxacin (OFL) were evaluated. The results indicate that alkali activation dissolves amorphous aluminosilicate, free silica and alumina, which results in the increase in pore volume and pore size. OFL is adsorbed onto halloysite via electrostatic interaction and complexation. Alkali activation could increase the adsorption capacity of halloysite for OFL and prolong release of the adsorbed OFL compared with the natural halloysite. Thus, alkali activation of halloysite is an effective protocol to improve the adsorption and prolong release for cationic drug molecules.

  14. Hall Determination of Atomic Radii of Alkali Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    I will propose here an alternative method for determining atomic radii of alkali metals based on the Hall measurements of their free electron densities and the knowledge of their crystal structure. (Contains 2 figures.)

  15. Effect of cavitation on removal of alkali elements from coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivalli, H.; Nirmal, L.; Nagarajan, R.

    2015-12-01

    The main impurities in coal are sulphur, ash and alkali. On combustion, the volatile forms of these impurities are either condensed on the boilers, or emitted in the form of potentially hazardous gases. The alkali elements present in coal help the fly ash particles adhere to boiler surfaces by providing a wet surface on which collection of these particles can take place. Use of ultrasonic techniques in cleaning of coal has stirred interest among researchers in recent times. Extraction of alkali elements by cavitation effect using low-frequency ultrasound, in the presence of reagents (HNO3 and H2O2) is reported in this paper. Powdered coal was dissolved with the reagent and exposed to ultrasonic fields of various frequencies at different time intervals. The treated solution is filtered and tested for alkali levels.

  16. The 4843 Alkali Metal Storage Facility Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The 4843 AMSF has been used primarily to provide a centralized building to receive and store dangerous and mixed alkali metal waste, including sodium and lithium, which has been generated at the Fast Flux Test Facility and at various other Hanford Site operations that used alkali metals. Most of the dangerous and mixed alkali metal waste received consists of retired equipment from liquid sodium processes. The unit continues to store material. In general, only solid alkali metal waste that is water reactive is stored at the 4843 AMSF. The 4843 AMSF will be closed in a manner consistent with Ecology guidelines and regulations (WAC 173-303-610). The general closure procedure is detailed as follows.

  17. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, Marca M.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard

    1995-01-01

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  18. Extensive mixing features at 27-41 Ka postcaldera trachytes at Long Valley caldera, CA: Mixing/mingling of basalt with trachyte and mobilization of young granitic material to form kspar megacrysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagmann, I. J.; Mahood, G.

    2014-12-01

    Five small lava domes erupted at the NW margin of Long Valley caldera from 41 to 27 Ka. They range from trachyte (66% SiO2) to trachyandesite (60%), with the youngest lava being the most mafic. Mixing features are pervasive, with enclaves, kspar megacrysts, crystal clots of various grain sizes, compositions, and degrees of resorption indicating multiple episodes of mafic injection, mobilization of young granitic material, and mixing/mingling of alkali basalt with trachyte to alkali rhyolite magmas similar to those at Mammoth Mountain. Enclaves range from 49 to 57% SiO2 and form a mixing line with a felsic end member at 67% SiO2. In order to quantify the distribution of enclaves and large (1-4 cm), resorbed, kspar megacrysts, outcrop-scale point counting was performed at >200 locations on the lavas. Contour maps show that kspar content is highest at the vent, but mafic-intermediate enclaves are irregularly distributed. Fe-Ti oxide temperatures for the host trachytic magmas are 915-1080°C, with the coolest temperatures at flow termini. Enclave temperatures are similar, 950-1120°C, with cooler temperatures in more felsic enclaves that are typically located near flow termini, indicating prolonged thermal and chemical interaction with the host magma. Calculated pressures are 2-4 kbar for host magmas, but some mafic crystal clots yield pressures up to 12 kbar, near the Moho at Long Valley. The kspar megacrysts match the composition of phenocrysts in late-erupted Bishop Tuff, suggesting that the megacrysts originated from solidified equivalents of magma remaining after eruption of the Bishop Tuff at 760 Ka. These data suggest a model in which alkali basalts are generated in the uppermost mantle and, through AFC, evolve into trachytes. Repeated basaltic injections keep the trachyte hot and partially melt young granites, resulting in entrainment of kspar megacrysts. The most mafic enclaves in the NW domes match the alkali basalt compositions of the most mafic enclaves in

  19. Alkali absorption and citrate excretion in calcium nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakhaee, K.; Williams, R. H.; Oh, M. S.; Padalino, P.; Adams-Huet, B.; Whitson, P.; Pak, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The role of net gastrointestinal (GI) alkali absorption in the development of hypocitraturia was investigated. The net GI absorption of alkali was estimated from the difference between simple urinary cations (Ca, Mg, Na, and K) and anions (Cl and P). In 131 normal subjects, the 24 h urinary citrate was positively correlated with the net GI absorption of alkali (r = 0.49, p < 0.001). In 11 patients with distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA), urinary citrate excretion was subnormal relative to net GI alkali absorption, with data from most patients residing outside the 95% confidence ellipse described for normal subjects. However, the normal relationship between urinary citrate and net absorbed alkali was maintained in 11 patients with chronic diarrheal syndrome (CDS) and in 124 stone-forming patients devoid of RTA or CDS, half of whom had "idiopathic" hypocitraturia. The 18 stone-forming patients without RTA or CDS received potassium citrate (30-60 mEq/day). Both urinary citrate and net GI alkali absorption increased, yielding a significantly positive correlation (r = 0.62, p < 0.0001), with the slope indistinguishable from that of normal subjects. Thus, urinary citrate was normally dependent on the net GI absorption of alkali. This dependence was less marked in RTA, confirming the renal origin of hypocitraturia. However, the normal dependence was maintained in CDS and in idiopathic hypocitraturia, suggesting that reduced citrate excretion was largely dietary in origin as a result of low net alkali absorption (from a probable relative deficiency of vegetables and fruits or a relative excess of animal proteins).

  20. Electrochemical cell having an alkali-metal-nitrate electrode

    DOEpatents

    Roche, M.F.; Preto, S.K.

    1982-06-04

    A power-producing secondary electrochemical cell includes a molten alkali metal as the negative-electrode material and a molten-nitrate salt as the positive-electrode material. The molten material in the respective electrodes are separated by a solid barrier of alkali-metal-ion conducting material. A typical cell includes active materials of molten sodium separated from molten sodium nitrate and other nitrates in mixture by a layer of sodium ..beta..'' alumina.

  1. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd whole rock analyses of basalts of the Grao Para Group, Serra dos Carajas, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Olszewski, W.J. Jr.; Gibbs, A.K.; Wirth, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Grao Para Group at Serra dos Carajas in the Guapore Shield of Brazil is a 6 km thick sequence of bimodal metavolcanic rock with interbedded iron formations. Rhyolites are a minor part of the low grade meta-volcanic section, with the bulk consisting of subalkaline basalt, basaltic andesite, and shoshonite. Rb-Sr whole rock analyses of 7 basalts yield an age of 2687 +/- 54 Ma. This agrees well with an age of 2758 +/- 39 Ma from zircon U-Pb analyses of the interbedded rhyolites. Except for the allocthonous Imataca Complex of Venezuela, these dates for the Grao Para Group are the first well-constrained Archean ages from the Amazonian Craton. An even older age for the basement to the Grao Para Group is also implied. Sm-Nd whole-rock analyses of four of these basalts did not yield an isochron because of the limited range of /sup 147/Sm//sup 144/Nd values, but element of/sub Nd/ values relative to CHUR were calculated using the Rb-Sr age. The typical LREE-enrichment, lack of Ce depletion or spilitic alteration of alkalies, and the high Sr initial ratios, may indicate that these isotopic patterns were derived by incorporation of some older continental crust in the mafic melts. These data together with an element of/sub Sr/ of +63.6 might indicate significant seawater exchange with volcanic rocks derived from mantle with chondritic REE patterns. This demonstrates the presence of significant continental crust in the Archean and seawater-volcanic rock interaction in a rifting environment similar to modern analogs.

  2. Paleosecular variation, geochemistry, correlation, and timing of Grande Ronde Basalt lava flows, Columbia River Basalt Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagstrum, J. T.; Sawlan, M. G.

    2013-12-01

    Co-located paleomagnetic and geochemical sampling of lava flows at eight sections within the Grande Ronde Basalt (GRB) was undertaken across the Columbia Plateau in WA and OR. The GRB represents roughly 87% (151,000 km3) of the Miocene Columbia River flood basalt province (174,000 km3) by volume (exclusive of the Steens Mountain Basalt), and recently published 40Ar/39Ar age estimates indicate that it was most likely emplaced within a time interval of less than 400 ka [Barry et al., Lithos 118(3), 213-222, 2010]. GRB flows include four stratigraphic magnetozones within the formation (R1, N1, R2, N2), and the sections currently sampled are mostly within the upper two magnetozones. Because Plateau GRB flows have undergone pervasive low-temperature alteration to varying degrees [see M. Sawlan's abstract, this meeting], particular care has been taken to collect the freshest available rock. Several new flow units have been identified, and similar, but unusual, paleomagnetic directions in stratigraphically adjacent flows of different chemical composition indicate, with high probability, that these flows were emplaced contemporaneously relative to the rate of geomagnetic paleosecular variation (PSV). Thus, several magma sources and their vent systems apparently operated nearly simultaneously and produced a stratigraphic framework in which compositionally distinct flows are intercalated. In addition, transitional directions have been found in flows near the N1/R2 and R2/N2 geomagnetic reversal boundaries, and an excursion to low inclinations occurred during emplacement of the Winter Water member (N2) flows. The detail and sequential nature of the PSV curve recovered from the upper GRB lava flows (R2 & N2) so far indicate extraordinarily rapid eruption of these flows. Comparison of the rate of change shown by our nascent PSV curve for the upper GRB with a recently published one for the Holocene of western North America [Hagstrum and Blinman, G3 11(6), 2010], which covers in

  3. Basalt here, basalt there: Constraining the basaltic nature of eight Vp-type asteroids in the inner and outer main asteroid belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardersen, Paul Scott; Reddy, Vishnu

    2016-10-01

    The distribution and abundance of basaltic material in the main asteroid belt has multiple implications that impact our understanding of the physical and thermal conditions that existed in the inner solar system during the formation epoch about 4.6 Gyr ago. Subjects impacted by a more accurate basaltic asteroid inventory include the efficacy of current inner solar system heating model predictions (Al-26 and T Tauri induction heating), the existence of differentiated parent bodies other than (4) Vesta, the dispersion efficiency of Vestoids by YORP forces, and the predictive ability of the V-taxonomy in predicting a basaltic surface composition. This work reports on a continuation of an effort to better constrain the basaltic asteroid population in the main asteroid belt with the goal of observing about 650 Vp-type asteroids. This work focuses on two populations: a) those Vp-classified asteroids (Carvano et al., 2010) in the spatial vicinity of (4) Vesta (candidate Vestoids) in the inner main belt, and b) Vp-classified asteroids in the outer main belt beyond 2.5 AU. Thus far, 23 Vp-type asteroids and candidate Vestoids have been observed and analyzed, which are all strongly suggestive of a basaltic surface composition (Hardersen et al., 2014, 2015, 2016 (in preparation)). However, unpublished work is beginning to show that the Vp taxonomic class is less accurate in its ability to identify basaltic surface compositions in outer-belt Vp-type asteroids. We report here on an additional set of Vp-type asteroids that were observed at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) in December 2015 and January 2016. All observations were obtained with the SpeX spectrograph in prism mode with spectral range from 0.7 to 2.5 microns. They include (4900) Maymelou, (7302) 1993 CQ, (9064) Johndavies, (9531) Jean-Luc, (11341) Babbage, (17480) 1991 PE10, (20171) 1996 WC2, and (25849) 2000 ET107. We present average near-infrared (NIR) reflectance spectra of each asteroid, determine the

  4. Alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide double alkoxide precursors to alkali metal yttrium oxide nanomaterials

    DOE PAGES

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Neville, Michael L.; Sears, Jeremiah Matthew; Cramer, Roger

    2016-03-15

    In this study, a series of alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide ([AY(ONep)4]) compounds were developed as precursors to alkali yttrium oxide (AYO2) nanomaterials. The reaction of yttrium amide ([Y(NR2)3] where R=Si(CH3)3) with four equivalents of H-ONep followed by addition of [A(NR2)] (A=Li, Na, K) or Ao (Ao=Rb, Cs) led to the formation of a complex series of AnY(ONep)3+n species, crystallographically identified as [Y2Li3(μ3-ONep)(μ3-HONep)(μ-ONep)5(ONep)3(HONep)2] (1), [YNa2(μ3-ONep)4(ONep)]2 (2), {[Y2K3(μ3-ONep)3(μ-ONep)4(ONep)2(ηξ-tol)2][Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4]•ηx-tol]} (3), [Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4] (3a), [Y2Rb3(μ4-ONep)3(μ-ONep)6] (4), and [Y2Cs4(μ6-O)(μ3-ONep)6(μ3-HONep)2(ONep)2(ηx-tol)4]•tol (5). Compounds 1–5 were investigated as single source precursors to AYOx nanomaterials following solvothermal routes (pyridine, 185 °C for 24h). The final products after thermal processing weremore » found by powder X-ray diffraction experiments to be Y2O3 with variable sized particles based on transmission electron diffraction. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy studies indicated that the heavier alkali metal species were present in the isolated nanomaterials.« less

  5. Hydrothermal Alteration in Submarine Basaltic Rocks from the Reykjanes Geothermal Field, Iceland. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierenberg, R. A.; Schiffman, P.; Fowler, A. P.; Marks, N.; Fridleifsson, G.; Elders, W. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP) is preparing to drill to 4-5 km in the Reykjanes Geothermal Field to sample geothermal fluids at supercritical temperature and pressure for power generation. The Reykjanes geothermal field is the on-land extension of the Reykjanes Ridge spreading center. The upper 1-2 kilometers drilled at Reykjanes are submarine basalts and basaltic sediments, hyalloclastites, and breccias, with an increasing proportion of basaltic intrusive rocks below 2 km depth. Geothermal fluids are evolved seawater with a composition similar to mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems. Zn- and Cu-rich sulfide scale, locally enriched in Au and Ag, are deposited in production pipes. The sulfide deposits are compositionally and isotopically similar to seafloor massive sulfides. In anticipation of deeper drilling, we have investigated the mineralogy and geochemistry of drill cuttings from a 3 km deep well (RN-17). The depth zoning of alteration minerals is similar to that described from other Icelandic geothermal fields, and is comparable to observed seafloor metamorphic gradients in ODP drill holes and ophiolites. Chlorite-epidote alteration occurs at depths >400 m and passes downhole through epidote-actinolite alteration and into amphibole facies (hornblende-calcic plagioclase) alteration below 2.5 km. Local zones of high temperature (>800°C), granoblastic-textured, pyroxene hornfels, are interpreted to form by contact metamorphism during dike/sill emplacement. Similar granoblasically altered basalts were recovered from the base of the sheeted dikes in IODP Hole 1256D. Downhole compositional variations of drill cuttings, collected every 50 m, suggest that rocks below ~ 2 km are little altered. Whole-rock oxygen isotope profiles are consistent with low water/rock ratios, but suggest that early stages of hydrothermal alteration included meteoric water-derived fluids. Strontium isotope profiles indicate more extensive exchange with seawater-derived fluids

  6. Reduction of phosphorus and alkali levels in coking coals

    SciTech Connect

    Hoare, I.C.; Waugh, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    A number of coals, though exhibiting desirable coking properties, can have undesirable levels of alkalis and phosphorus. All the phosphorus in the coal will report to the coke, eventually to the iron and thence to the steel, with adverse effects on its metallurgical properties. Alkalis have damaging effects on the blast furnace operation and can be responsible for loss of heat, loss of production, efficiency loss and reduced furnace life. Buyers of coking coal commonly specify such parameters as phosphorus in coal and alkalis in ash, with penalties and rejection over certain limits. With the introduction of new direct reduction technologies such as COREX and HISMELT, and others such as PCI, it is anticipated that coal producers will have even tighter phosphorus and alkali specifications imposed on their products. Phosphorus is predominantly inorganic in origin occurring in a wide variety of minerals in coal, but its main source is apatite. It can be found mainly in the lower density fractions of the coal and intimately bound, so that conventional physical beneficiation techniques are relatively ineffective. CSIRO has developed a cost effective, selective chemical demineralization treatment, which can be applied to the problem of high alkali, high phosphorus coals. This particular technique makes use of unrefined organic acid, which also has the advantage of being low in cost and environmentally benign. In this paper, the effectiveness of acid demineralization of a number of coals is discussed, within the context of their phosphorus and alkali distributions throughout various size/density fractions.

  7. Two-phase alkali-metal experiments in reduced gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1986-06-01

    Future space missions envision the use of large nuclear reactors utilizing either a single or a two-phase alkali-metal working fluid. The design and analysis of such reactors require state-of-the-art computer codes that can properly treat alkali-metal flow and heat transfer in a reduced-gravity environment. A literature search of relevant experiments in reduced gravity is reported on here, and reveals a paucity of data for such correlations. The few ongoing experiments in reduced gravity are noted. General plans are put forth for the reduced-gravity experiments which will have to be performed, at NASA facilities, with benign fluids. A similar situation exists regarding two-phase alkali-metal flow and heat transfer, even in normal gravity. Existing data are conflicting and indequate for the task of modeling a space reactor using a two-phase alkali-metal coolant. The major features of past experiments are described here. Data from the reduced-gravity experiments with innocuous fluids are to be combined with normal gravity data from the two-phase alkali-metal experiments. Analyses undertaken here give every expectation that the correlations developed from this data base will provide a valid representation of alkali-metal heat transfer and pressure drop in reduced gravity.

  8. Breakthroughs in Seismic and Borehole Characterization of Basalt Sequestration Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, E. C.; Hardage, Bob A.; McGrail, B. Peter; Davis, Klarissa N.

    2011-04-01

    Mafic continental flood basalts form a globally important, but under-characterized CO2 sequestration target. The Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) in the northwestern U.S. is up to 5 km thick and covers over 168,000 km2. In India, flood basalts are 3 km thick and cover greater than 500,000 km2. Laboratory experiments demonstrate that the CRBG and other basalts react with formation water and super critical (sc) CO2 to precipitate carbonates, thus adding a potential mineral trapping mechanism to the standard trapping mechanisms of most other types of CO2 sequestration reservoirs. Brecciated tops of individual basalt flows in the CRBG form regional aquifers that locally have greater than 30% porosity and three Darcies of permeability. Porous flow tops are potential sites for sequestration of gigatons of scCO2 in areas where the basalts contain unpotable water and are at depths greater than 800 m. In this paper we report on the U.S. DOE Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership surface seismic and borehole geophysical characterization that supports a field test of capacity, integrity, and geochemical reactivity of CRBG reservoirs in eastern Washington, U.S.A. Traditional surface seismic methods have had little success in imaging basalt features in on-shore areas where the basalt is thinly covered by sediment. Processing of the experimental 6.5 km, 5 line 3C seismic swath included constructing an elastic wavefield model, identifying and separating seismic wave modes, and processing the swath as a single 2D line. Important findings include: (1) a wide variety of shear wave energy modes swamp the P-wave seismic records; (2) except at very short geophone offsets, ground roll overprints P-wave signal; and (3) because of extreme velocity contrasts, P-wave events are refracted at incidence angles greater than 7-15 degrees. Subsequent removal of S-wave and other noise during processing resulted in tremendous improvement in image quality. The application of wireline

  9. Petrogenesis of pillow basalts from Baolai in southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Chun; Yang, Huai-Jen

    2016-04-01

    The pillow basalts from Baolai in southwestern Taiwan have been inferred to bear Dupal signautres based on their Th/Ce ratio, linking the Baolai basalts to the South China Sea (SCS) seamounts that are characterized by Dupal Pb isotope signatures (Smith and Lewis, 2007). In this study, thirty-two Baolai basalt samples were analyzed for abundances of major and trace elements as well as Pb and Nd isotope ratios to verify their Dupal characters and to constrain their petrogenesis significance. The Baolai basalts contain 4-10 % L.O.I.. Three stages of alteration are inferred from plots of L.O.I. abundance versus concentrations major oxides as well as mineral textures and compositions. The first alteration stage was characterized by albitization that converted Ca-rich plagioclase to albite. The second alteration stage was dominated by chloritization of olivine and augite, resulting in increases in L.O.I. abundance. The last alteration stage is represented by formation of secondary calcite in vesicles and cracks. These alteration processes reflect interaction with seawater and apparently did not affect the magmatic Pb isotope composition for the low Pb concentration in seawater. Relative to the North Hemisphere Reference Line (NHRL), the Baolai pillow basalts have higher 208Pb/204Pb ratios at a given 206Pb/204Pb value, showing Dupal anomaly. For their relatively higher 208Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 206Pb/204Pb ratios, the Baolai basalts are distinct from majority of the Cenozoic basalts in the Hainan-Leizhou peninsula, the Indochina peninsula, and the SCS seamounts, for which derivation from the Hainan mantle plume has been recently proposed (Wang et al., 2013). In contrast, the Baolai basalts and the Cenozoic basalts from eastern Guangdong at southeastern China have similar Pb and Nd isotope compositions, indicating derivation from similar mantle sources. However, the Baolai basalts have lower abundance ratios of Zr/Hf (40.3-45.6 versus 46.5-50.5), La/Yb (12

  10. Effect of carbon nanotube addition on the wear behavior of basalt/epoxy woven composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, M T; Rhee, K Y; Lee, B H; Kim, C J

    2013-08-01

    The effect of acid-treated carbon nanotube (CNT) addition on the wear and dynamic mechanical thermal properties of basalt/epoxy woven composites was investigated in this study. Basalt/CNT/epoxy composites were fabricated by impregnating woven basalt fibers into epoxy resin mixed with 1 wt% CNTs which were acid-treated. Wear and DMA (dynamic mechanical analyzer) tests were performed on basalt/epoxy composites and basalt/CNT/epoxy composites. The results showed that the addition of the acid-treated CNTs improved the wear properties of basalt/epoxy woven composites. Specifically, the friction coefficient of the basalt/epoxy composite was stabilized in the range of 0.5-0.6 while it fell in the range of 0.3-0.4 for basalt/CNT/epoxy composites. The wear volume loss of the basalt/CNT/epoxy composites was approximately 68% lower than that of the basalt/epoxy composites. The results also showed that the glass transition temperature of basalt/CNT/epoxy composites was higher than that of basalt/epoxy composites. The improvement of wear properties of basalt/epoxy composites by the addition of acid-treated CNTs was caused by the homogeneous load transfer between basalt fibers and epoxy matrix due to the reinforcement of CNTs.

  11. Basalt-radionuclide distribution coefficient determinations. FY-1979 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, L.L.; McGarrah, J.E.

    1980-09-01

    Experimental radionuclide distribution coefficients (Kd') were determined for Pomona, Flow E, Umtanum basalts, and secondary mineralization associated with Pomona basalt at 23/sup 0/, 60/sup 0/ and 150/sup 0/C. Radionuclides used were /sup 75/Se, /sup 85/Sr, /sup 99/Tc, /sup 125/I, /sup 135/Cs, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 237/Np, /sup 238/U, /sup 241/Am, and /sup 241/Pu. Solution oxygen contents were controlled by the basalt/groundwater system (Eh = 600 to 700 mV), and were high (8.2 to 8.4 mg/l) at 23/sup 0/C. Oxygen contents and pH changed little in contact with basalt. The effects of temperature changes on radionuclide Kd' results varied depending upon the radionuclide involved, solution-solid reactions, and the relationship of the radionuclide to these reactions. For example, cesium Kd' values decreased from 3100 ml/g for Umtanum basalt at 23/sup 0/C to 120 ml/g at 150/sup 0/C. At the same time, strontium Kd' values increased for Umtanum basalt from 105 ml/g at 23/sup 0/C to complete removal at 150/sup 0/C and 40 days. Radionuclide adsorption coefficient measurements at higher temperatures and pressures were made in addition to the 23/sup 0/C, solution-solid contact time-conditional Kd (Kd') measurements. These include Kd' measurements with Umtanum basalt, Pomona basalt, Flow E basalt and secondary mineralization and radioisotopes of americium, cesium, iodine, neptunium, plutonium, radium, selenium, strontium, technetium and uranium. The additional temperatures involved were 60/sup 0/C, 150/sup 0/C, and 300/sup 0/C. At 150/sup 0/C, argon pressures of 6.9, 13.8, 20.7, and 27.6 MPa will be used to ascertain the effects of pressure changes on Kd' values. So far only the 6.9 MPa argon pressure has been investigated. The upper temperature of 250/sup 0/C is where thermal breakdown of dioctahedral smectites (secondary mineralization) begins.

  12. Preliminary Hydrogeologic Characterization Results from the Wallula Basalt Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    B.P. McGrail; E. C. Sullivan; F. A. Spane; D. H. Bacon; G. Hund; P. D. Thorne; C. J. Thompson; S. P. Reidel; F. S. Colwell

    2009-12-01

    The DOE's Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership has completed drilling the first continental flood basalt sequestration pilot borehole to a total depth (TD) of 4,110 feet on the Boise White Paper Mill property at Wallula, Washington. Site suitability was assessed prior to drilling by the 2007-2008 acquisition, processing and analysis of a four-mile, five-line three component seismic swath, which was processed as a single data-dense line. Analysis of the seismic survey data indicated a composite basalt formation thickness of {approx}8,000 feet and absence of major geologic structures (i.e., faults) along the line imaged by the seismic swath. Drilling of Wallula pilot borehole was initiated on January 13, 2009 and reached TD on April 6, 2009. Based on characterization results obtained during drilling, three basalt breccia zones were identified between the depth interval of 2,716 and 2,910 feet, as being suitable injection reservoir for a subsequent CO2 injection pilot study. The targeted injection reservoir lies stratigraphically below the massive Umtanum Member of the Grande Ronde Basalt, whose flow-interior section possesses regionally recognized low-permeability characteristics. The identified composite injection zone reservoir provides a unique and attractive opportunity to scientifically study the reservoir behavior of three inter-connected reservoir intervals below primary and secondary caprock confining zones. Drill cuttings, wireline geophysical logs, and 31one-inch diameter rotary sidewall cores provided geologic data for characterization of rock properties. XRF analyses of selected rock samples provided geochemical characterizations of the rocks and stratigraphic control for the basalt flows encountered by the Wallula pilot borehole. Based on the geochemical results, the pilot borehole was terminated in the Wapshilla Ridge 1 flow of the Grande Ronde Basalt Formation. Detailed hydrologic test characterizations of 12 basalt interflow reservoir

  13. Bioinorganic Chemistry of the Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsam; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien T; Churchill, David G

    2016-01-01

    The common Group 1 alkali metals are indeed ubiquitous on earth, in the oceans and in biological systems. In this introductory chapter, concepts involving aqueous chemistry and aspects of general coordination chemistry and oxygen atom donor chemistry are introduced. Also, there are nuclear isotopes of importance. A general discussion of Group 1 begins from the prevalence of the ions, and from a comparison of their ionic radii and ionization energies. While oxygen and water molecule binding have the most relevance to biology and in forming a detailed understanding between the elements, there is a wide range of basic chemistry that is potentially important, especially with respect to biological chelation and synthetic multi-dentate ligand design. The elements are widely distributed in life forms, in the terrestrial environment and in the oceans. The details about the workings in animal, as well as plant life are presented in this volume. Important biometallic aspects of human health and medicine are introduced as well. Seeing as the elements are widely present in biology, various particular endogenous molecules and enzymatic systems can be studied. Sodium and potassium are by far the most important and central elements for consideration. Aspects of lithium, rubidium, cesium and francium chemistry are also included; they help in making important comparisons related to the coordination chemistry of Na(+) and K(+). Physical methods are also introduced. PMID:26860297

  14. Superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerene nanowhiskers.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Hiroyuki; Konno, Toshio; Hirata, Chika; Wakahara, Takatsugu; Miyazawa, Kun'ichi; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Tanaka, Masashi; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2016-09-01

    Superconductivity in alkali metal-doped fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs) was observed in K3.3C60NWs, Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs with transition temperatures at 17, 25 and 26 K, respectively. Almost full shielding volume fraction (~80%) was observed in K3.3C60NWs when subjected to thermal treatment at 200 °C for a duration of 24 h. In contrast, the shielding fraction of Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs were calculated to be 8% and 6%, respectively. Here we report on an extensive investigation of the superconducting properties of these AC60NWs (A  =  K3.3, Rb3.0 and Cs2.0Rb1.0). These properties are compared to the ones reported on the corresponding conventional (single-crystal or powder) K-doped fullerene. We also evaluated the critical current densities of these C60NWs using the Bean model under an applied magnetic field up to 50 kOe. PMID:27385220

  15. Superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerene nanowhiskers.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Hiroyuki; Konno, Toshio; Hirata, Chika; Wakahara, Takatsugu; Miyazawa, Kun'ichi; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Tanaka, Masashi; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2016-09-01

    Superconductivity in alkali metal-doped fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs) was observed in K3.3C60NWs, Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs with transition temperatures at 17, 25 and 26 K, respectively. Almost full shielding volume fraction (~80%) was observed in K3.3C60NWs when subjected to thermal treatment at 200 °C for a duration of 24 h. In contrast, the shielding fraction of Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs were calculated to be 8% and 6%, respectively. Here we report on an extensive investigation of the superconducting properties of these AC60NWs (A  =  K3.3, Rb3.0 and Cs2.0Rb1.0). These properties are compared to the ones reported on the corresponding conventional (single-crystal or powder) K-doped fullerene. We also evaluated the critical current densities of these C60NWs using the Bean model under an applied magnetic field up to 50 kOe.

  16. Bioinorganic Chemistry of the Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsam; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien T; Churchill, David G

    2016-01-01

    The common Group 1 alkali metals are indeed ubiquitous on earth, in the oceans and in biological systems. In this introductory chapter, concepts involving aqueous chemistry and aspects of general coordination chemistry and oxygen atom donor chemistry are introduced. Also, there are nuclear isotopes of importance. A general discussion of Group 1 begins from the prevalence of the ions, and from a comparison of their ionic radii and ionization energies. While oxygen and water molecule binding have the most relevance to biology and in forming a detailed understanding between the elements, there is a wide range of basic chemistry that is potentially important, especially with respect to biological chelation and synthetic multi-dentate ligand design. The elements are widely distributed in life forms, in the terrestrial environment and in the oceans. The details about the workings in animal, as well as plant life are presented in this volume. Important biometallic aspects of human health and medicine are introduced as well. Seeing as the elements are widely present in biology, various particular endogenous molecules and enzymatic systems can be studied. Sodium and potassium are by far the most important and central elements for consideration. Aspects of lithium, rubidium, cesium and francium chemistry are also included; they help in making important comparisons related to the coordination chemistry of Na(+) and K(+). Physical methods are also introduced.

  17. Superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerene nanowhiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeya, Hiroyuki; Konno, Toshio; Hirata, Chika; Wakahara, Takatsugu; Miyazawa, Kun'ichi; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Tanaka, Masashi; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2016-09-01

    Superconductivity in alkali metal-doped fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs) was observed in K3.3C60NWs, Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs with transition temperatures at 17, 25 and 26 K, respectively. Almost full shielding volume fraction (~80%) was observed in K3.3C60NWs when subjected to thermal treatment at 200 °C for a duration of 24 h. In contrast, the shielding fraction of Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs were calculated to be 8% and 6%, respectively. Here we report on an extensive investigation of the superconducting properties of these AC60NWs (A  =  K3.3, Rb3.0 and Cs2.0Rb1.0). These properties are compared to the ones reported on the corresponding conventional (single-crystal or powder) K-doped fullerene. We also evaluated the critical current densities of these C60NWs using the Bean model under an applied magnetic field up to 50 kOe.

  18. Convective Regimes in Crystallizing Basaltic Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, A. J.; Neufeld, J. A.; Holness, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Cooling through the chamber walls drives crystallisation in crustal magma chambers, resulting in a cumulate pile on the floor and mushy regions at the walls and roof. The liquid in many magma chambers, either the bulk magma or the interstitial liquid in the mushy regions, may convect, driven either thermally, due to cooling, or compositionally, due to fractional crystallization. We have constructed a regime diagram of the possible convective modes in a system containing a basal mushy layer. These modes depend on the large-scale buoyancy forcing characterised by a global Rayleigh number and the proportion of the chamber height constituting the basal mushy region. We have tested this regime diagram using an analogue experimental system composed of a fluid layer overlying a pile of almost neutrally buoyant inert particles. Convection in this system is driven thermally, simulating magma convection above and within a porous cumulate pile. We observe a range of possible convective regimes, enabling us to produce a regime diagram. In addition to modes characterised by convection of the bulk and interstitial fluid, we also observe a series of regimes where the crystal pile is mobilised by fluid motions. These regimes feature saltation and scouring of the crystal pile by convection in the bulk fluid at moderate Rayleigh numbers, and large crystal-rich fountains at high Rayleigh numbers. For even larger Rayleigh numbers the entire crystal pile is mobilised in what we call the snowglobe regime. The observed mobilisation regimes may be applicable to basaltic magma chambers. Plagioclase in basal cumulates crystallised from a dense magma may be a result of crystal mobilisation from a plagioclase-rich roof mush. Compositional convection within such a mush could result in disaggregation, enabling the buoyant plagioclase to be entrained in relatively dense descending liquid plumes and brought to the floor. The phenocryst load in porphyritic lavas is often interpreted as a

  19. Similar Microbial Communities Found on Two Distant Seafloor Basalts.

    PubMed

    Singer, Esther; Chong, Lauren S; Heidelberg, John F; Edwards, Katrina J

    2015-01-01

    The oceanic crust forms two thirds of the Earth's surface and hosts a large phylogenetic and functional diversity of microorganisms. While advances have been made in the sedimentary realm, our understanding of the igneous rock portion as a microbial habitat has remained limited. We present the first comparative metagenomic microbial community analysis from ocean floor basalt environments at the Lō'ihi Seamount, Hawai'i, and the East Pacific Rise (EPR; 9°N). Phylogenetic analysis indicates the presence of a total of 43 bacterial and archaeal mono-phyletic groups, dominated by Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, as well as Thaumarchaeota. Functional gene analysis suggests that these Thaumarchaeota play an important role in ammonium oxidation on seafloor basalts. In addition to ammonium oxidation, the seafloor basalt habitat reveals a wide spectrum of other metabolic potentials, including CO2 fixation, denitrification, dissimilatory sulfate reduction, and sulfur oxidation. Basalt communities from Lō'ihi and the EPR show considerable metabolic and phylogenetic overlap down to the genus level despite geographic distance and slightly different seafloor basalt mineralogy. PMID:26733957

  20. An ancient recipe for flood-basalt genesis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Matthew G; Carlson, Richard W

    2011-07-27

    Large outpourings of basaltic lava have punctuated geological time, but the mechanisms responsible for the generation of such extraordinary volumes of melt are not well known. Recent geochemical evidence suggests that an early-formed reservoir may have survived in the Earth's mantle for about 4.5 billion years (ref. 2), and melts of this reservoir contributed to the flood basalt emplaced on Baffin Island about 60 million years ago. However, the volume of this ancient mantle domain and whether it has contributed to other flood basalts is not known. Here we show that basalts from the largest volcanic event in geologic history--the Ontong Java plateau--also exhibit the isotopic and trace element signatures proposed for the early-Earth reservoir. Together with the Ontong Java plateau, we suggest that six of the largest volcanic events that erupted in the past 250 million years derive from the oldest terrestrial mantle reservoir. The association of these large volcanic events with an ancient primitive mantle source suggests that its unique geochemical characteristics--it is both hotter (it has greater abundances of the radioactive heat-producing elements) and more fertile than depleted mantle reservoirs-may strongly affect the generation of flood basalts.

  1. Similar Microbial Communities Found on Two Distant Seafloor Basalts.

    PubMed

    Singer, Esther; Chong, Lauren S; Heidelberg, John F; Edwards, Katrina J

    2015-01-01

    The oceanic crust forms two thirds of the Earth's surface and hosts a large phylogenetic and functional diversity of microorganisms. While advances have been made in the sedimentary realm, our understanding of the igneous rock portion as a microbial habitat has remained limited. We present the first comparative metagenomic microbial community analysis from ocean floor basalt environments at the Lō'ihi Seamount, Hawai'i, and the East Pacific Rise (EPR; 9°N). Phylogenetic analysis indicates the presence of a total of 43 bacterial and archaeal mono-phyletic groups, dominated by Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, as well as Thaumarchaeota. Functional gene analysis suggests that these Thaumarchaeota play an important role in ammonium oxidation on seafloor basalts. In addition to ammonium oxidation, the seafloor basalt habitat reveals a wide spectrum of other metabolic potentials, including CO2 fixation, denitrification, dissimilatory sulfate reduction, and sulfur oxidation. Basalt communities from Lō'ihi and the EPR show considerable metabolic and phylogenetic overlap down to the genus level despite geographic distance and slightly different seafloor basalt mineralogy.

  2. Similar Microbial Communities Found on Two Distant Seafloor Basalts

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Esther; Chong, Lauren S.; Heidelberg, John F.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2015-01-01

    The oceanic crust forms two thirds of the Earth’s surface and hosts a large phylogenetic and functional diversity of microorganisms. While advances have been made in the sedimentary realm, our understanding of the igneous rock portion as a microbial habitat has remained limited. We present the first comparative metagenomic microbial community analysis from ocean floor basalt environments at the Lō’ihi Seamount, Hawai’i, and the East Pacific Rise (EPR; 9°N). Phylogenetic analysis indicates the presence of a total of 43 bacterial and archaeal mono-phyletic groups, dominated by Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, as well as Thaumarchaeota. Functional gene analysis suggests that these Thaumarchaeota play an important role in ammonium oxidation on seafloor basalts. In addition to ammonium oxidation, the seafloor basalt habitat reveals a wide spectrum of other metabolic potentials, including CO2 fixation, denitrification, dissimilatory sulfate reduction, and sulfur oxidation. Basalt communities from Lō’ihi and the EPR show considerable metabolic and phylogenetic overlap down to the genus level despite geographic distance and slightly different seafloor basalt mineralogy. PMID:26733957

  3. Relation between the electroforming voltage in alkali halide-polymer diodes and the bandgap of the alkali halide

    SciTech Connect

    Bory, Benjamin F.; Wang, Jingxin; Janssen, René A. J.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Gomes, Henrique L.; De Leeuw, Dago M.

    2014-12-08

    Electroforming of indium-tin-oxide/alkali halide/poly(spirofluorene)/Ba/Al diodes has been investigated by bias dependent reflectivity measurements. The threshold voltages for electrocoloration and electroforming are independent of layer thickness and correlate with the bandgap of the alkali halide. We argue that the origin is voltage induced defect formation. Frenkel defect pairs are formed by electron–hole recombination in the alkali halide. This self-accelerating process mitigates injection barriers. The dynamic junction formation is compared to that of a light emitting electrochemical cell. A critical defect density for electroforming is 10{sup 25}/m{sup 3}. The electroformed alkali halide layer can be considered as a highly doped semiconductor with metallic transport characteristics.

  4. Three basaltic earth-approaching asteroids and the source of the basaltic meteorites

    SciTech Connect

    Cruikshank, D.P.; Tholen, D.J.; Bell, J.F.; Hartmann, W.K.; Brown, R.H. Hawaii Univ., Honolulu Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ JPL, Pasadena, CA )

    1991-01-01

    Diameters of 1.2, 1.0, and 3.4 km are respectively derived for the earth-approaching asteroids 1983 RD, 1980 PA, and 1985 DO2, whose spectra are virtually identical to that of the basaltic-surfaced large asteroid, Vesta. While probably not fragments of Vesta, the three asteroids may be fragments of one or more Vesta-like parent bodies; it is suggested that they may be fragments of the source body or bodies of the HED meteorites. While these asteroids regoliths have significant insulating properties, they differ from that of the moon in that lunar-like glasses and agglutinates are largely absent. It is noted that asteroids of this kind may have impacted the earth without leaving the chemical signatures associated with the K-T boundary event. 59 refs.

  5. Efficient destruction of CF4 through in situ generation of alkali metals from heated alkali halide reducing mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Churl; Choi, Wonyong

    2002-03-15

    Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are the most potent green house gases that are very recalcitrant at destruction. An effective way of converting PFCs using hot solid reagents into safe products has been recently introduced. By investigating the thermal reductive destruction of tetrafluoromethane (CF4) we provided new insight and more physicochemical consideration on this novel process. The complete destruction of CF4was successfully achieved by flowing the gas through a heated reagent bed (400-950 degrees C) that contained powder mixtures of alkali halides, CaO, and Si. The silicon acted as a reducing agent of alkali halides for the in-situ production of alkali metals, and the calcium oxide played the role of a halide ion acceptor. The absence of any single component in this ternary mixture drastically reduced the destruction efficiency of CF4. The CF4 destruction efficiencies with the solid reagent containing the alkali halide, MX, increased in the order of Li approximately Na < K < Cs for alkali cations and I < Br < Cl < F for halide anions. This trend agreed with the endothermicity of the alkali metal generation reaction: the higher the endothermicity, the lower the destruction efficiency. Alkali metal generation was indirectly detected by monitoring H2 production from its reaction with water. The production of alkali metals increased with NaF, KF, and CsF in this order. The CsF/CaO/Si system exhibited the complete destruction of CF4 at as low as 600 degrees C. The solid product analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the formation of CaF2 and the depletion of Si with black carbon particles formed in the solid reagent residue. No CO/CO2 and toxic HF and SiF4 formation were detected in the exhaust gas.

  6. Alkali-aggregate reactivity of typical siliceious glass and carbonate rocks in alkali-activated fly ash based geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Duyou; Liu, Yongdao; Zheng, Yanzeng; Xu, Zhongzi; Shen, Xiaodong

    2013-08-01

    For exploring the behaviour of alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR) in alkali-activated geopolymeric materials and assessing the procedures for testing AAR in geopolymers, the expansion behaviour of fly ash based geopolymer mortars with pure silica glass and typical carbonate rocks were studied respectively by curing at various conditions, i.e. 23°C and 38°C with relative humidity over 95%, immersed in 1M NaOH solution at 80°C. Results show that, at various curing conditions, neither harmful ASR nor harmful ACR was observed in geopolymers with the criteria specified for OPC system. However, with the change of curing conditions, the geopolymer binder and reactive aggregates may experience different reaction processes leading to quite different dimensional changes, especially with additional alkalis and elevated temperatures. It suggests that high temperature with additional alkali for accelerating AAR in traditional OPC system may not appropriate for assessing the alkali-aggregate reactivity behaviour in geopolymers designed for normal conditions. On the other hand, it is hopeful to control the dimensional change of geopolymer mortar or concrete by selecting the type of aggregates and the appropriate curing conditions, thus changing the harmful AAR in OPC into beneficial AAR in geopolymers and other alkali-activated cementitious systems.

  7. Mixed alkali effect on the spectroscopic properties of alkali-alkaline earth oxide borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, G.; Ramesh, B.; Shareefuddin, Md.; Chary, M. N.; Sayanna, R.

    2016-05-01

    The mixed alkali and alkaline earth oxide borate glass with the composition xK2O - (25-x) Li2O-12.5BaO-12.5MgO-50B2O3 (x = 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25mol %) and doped with 1mol% CuO were prepared by the melt quenching technique. From the optical absorption spectra the optical band gap, electronic polarizability(α02-), interaction parameter (A), theoretical and experimental optical basicity (Λ) values were evaluated. From the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectral data the number of spins (N) and susceptibility (χ) were evaluated. The values of (α02-), and (Λ) increases with increasing of K2O content and electronic polarizability and interaction parameter show opposite behaviuor which may be due to the creation of non-bridging oxygens and expansion of borate network. The reciprocal of susceptibility (1/χ) and spin concentration (N) as a function of K2O content, varied nonlinearly which may be due to creation of non-bridging oxygens in the present glass system. This may be attributed to mixed alkali effect (MAE).

  8. Mineralogy of the last lunar basalts: Results from Clementine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staid, M.I.; Pieters, C.M.

    2001-01-01

    The last major phase of lunar volcanism produced extensive high-titanium mare deposits on the western nearside which remain unsampled by landing missions. The visible and near-infrared reflectance properties of these basalts are examined using Clementine multispectral images to better constrain their mineralogy. A much stronger 1 ??m ferrous absorption was observed for the western high-titanium basalts than within earlier maria, suggesting that these last major mare eruptions also may have been the most iron-rich. These western basalts also have a distinctly long-wavelength, 1 ??m ferrous absorption which was found to be similar for both surface soils and materials excavated from depth, supporting the interpretation of abundant olivine within these deposits. Spectral variation along flows within the Imbrium basin also suggests variations in ilmenite content along previously mapped lava flows as well as increasing olivine content within subsequent eruptions. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Evidence against hydrogen-based microbial ecosystems in basalt aquifers

    PubMed

    Anderson; Chapelle; Lovley

    1998-08-14

    It has been proposed that hydrogen produced from basalt-ground-water interactions may serve as an energy source that supports the existence of microorganisms in the deep subsurface on Earth and possibly on other planets. However, experiments demonstrated that hydrogen is not produced from basalt at an environmentally relevant, alkaline pH. Small amounts of hydrogen were produced at a lower pH in laboratory incubations, but even this hydrogen production was transitory. Furthermore, geochemical considerations suggest that previously reported rates of hydrogen production cannot be sustained over geologically significant time frames. These findings indicate that hydrogen production from basalt-ground-water interactions may not support microbial metabolism in the subsurface.

  10. Lunar basalt meteorite EET 87521: Petrology of the clast population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semenova, A. S.; Nazarov, M. A.; Kononkova, N. N.

    1993-01-01

    The Elephant Moraine meteorite EET 87521 was classified as a lunar mare basalt breccia which is composed mainly of VLT basalt clasts. Here we report on our petrological study of lithic clasts and monomineralic fragments in the thin sections EET 87521,54 and EET 87521,47,1, which were prepared from the meteorite. The results of the study show that EET 87521 consists mainly of Al-rich ferrobasalt clasts and olivine pyroxenite clasts. The bulk composition of the meteorite can be well modelled by the mixing of these lithic components which appear to be differentiates of the Luna 25 basalt melt. KREEP and Mg-rich gabbro components are minor constituents of EET 87521.

  11. Evidence against hydrogen-based microbial ecosystems in basalt aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R.T.; Chapelle, F.H.; Lovley, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    It has been proposed that hydrogen produced from basalt-ground-water interactions may serve as an energy source that supports the existence of microorganisms in the deep subsurface on Earth and possibly on other planets. However, experiments demonstrated that hydrogen is not produced from basalt at an environmentally relevant, alkaline pH. Small amounts of hydrogen were produced at a lower pH in laboratory incubations, but even this hydrogen production was transitory. Furthermore, geochemical considerations suggest that previously reported rates of hydrogen production cannot be sustained over geologically significant time frames. These findings indicate that hydrogen production from basalt-ground-water interactions may not support microbial metabolism in the subsurface.

  12. Basalt fiber reinforced polymer composites: Processing and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiang

    A high efficiency rig was designed and built for in-plane permeability measurement of fabric materials. A new data derivation procedure to acquire the flow fluid pattern in the experiment was developed. The measurement results of the in-plane permeability for basalt twill 31 fabric material showed that a high correlation exists between the two principal permeability values for this fabric at 35% fiber volume fraction. This may be the most important scientific contribution made in this thesis. The results from radial measurements corresponded quite well with those from Unidirectional (UD) measurements, which is a well-established technique. No significant differences in mechanical properties were found between basalt fabric reinforced polymer composites and glass composites reinforced by a fabric of similar weave pattern. Aging results indicate that the interfacial region in basalt composites may be more vulnerable to environmental damage than that in glass composites. However, the basalt/epoxy interface may have been more durable than the glass/epoxy interface in tension-tension fatigue because the basalt composites have significantly longer fatigue life. In this thesis, chapter I reviews the literature on fiber reinforced polymer composites, with concentration on permeability measurement, mechanical properties and durability. Chapter II discusses the design of the new rig for in-plane permeability measurement, the new derivation procedure for monitoring of the fluid flow pattern, and the permeability measurement results. Chapter III compares the mechanical properties and durability between basalt fiber and glass fiber reinforced polymer composites. Lastly, chapter IV gives some suggestions and recommendations for future work.

  13. On causal links between flood basalts and continental breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtillot, V.; Jaupart, C.; Manighetti, I.; Tapponnier, P.; Besse, J.

    1999-03-01

    Temporal coincidence between continental flood basalts and breakup has been noted for almost three decades. Eight major continental flood basalts have been produced over the last 300 Ma. The most recent, the Ethiopian traps, erupted in about 1 Myr at 30 Ma. Rifting in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden, and possibly East African rift started at about the same time. A second trap-like episode occurred around 2 Ma and formation of true oceanic crust is due in the next few Myr. We find similar relationships for the 60 Ma Greenland traps and opening of the North Atlantic, 65 Ma Deccan traps and opening of the NW Indian Ocean, 132 Ma Parana traps and South Atlantic, 184 Ma Karoo traps and SW Indian Ocean, and 200 Ma Central Atlantic Margin flood basalts and opening of the Central Atlantic Ocean. The 250 Ma Siberian and 258 Ma Emeishan traps seem to correlate with major, if aborted, phases of rifting. Rifting asymmetry, apparent triple junctions and rift propagation (towards the flood basalt area) are common features that may, together with the relative timings of flood basalt, seaward dipping reflector and oceanic crust production, depend on a number of plume- and lithosphere- related factors. We propose a mixed scenario of `active/passive' rifting to account for these observations. In all cases, an active component (a plume and resulting flood basalt) is a pre-requisite for the breakup of a major oceanic basin. But rifting must be allowed by plate-boundary forces and is influenced by pre-existing heterogeneities in lithospheric structure. The best example is the Atlantic Ocean, whose large-scale geometry with three large basins was imposed by the impact points of three mantle plumes.

  14. Mineral CO2 Sequestration into Basalt: The Carbfix Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gislason, S. R.; Broecker, W. S.; Oelkers, E. H.; Gunnlaugsson, E.; Stefansson, A.; Wolff-Boenisch, D.; Matter, J.; Björnsson, G.

    2008-12-01

    The reduction of industrial CO2 emissions is considered one of the main challenges of this century. Among commonly proposed CO2 storage techniques, the injection of anthropogenic CO2 into deep geological formations is quite promising due their large potential storage capacity and geographic ubiquity. Finding a storage solution that is long lasting, thermodynamically stable and environmentally benign would be ideal. Storage of CO2, as solid calcium magnesium iron carbonate, in basaltic rocks may provide such a long lasting, thermodynamically stable and environmentally benign solution. In nature, the carbonization of basaltic rocks occurs in a variety of well-documented settings, such as the hydrothermal alteration in geothermal systems and in deep ocean vent systems. The goal of this research project is to optimize industrial methods for storing CO2 in basaltic rocks through a combined program consisting of, field scale injection of CO2 charged waters into basaltic rocks, laboratory based experiments, study of natural CO2 waters as natural analogue and state of the art geochemical modelling. A second and equally important goal of this research project is to generate the human capital and expertise to apply the advances made in this project in the future. Towards this goal the bulk of the research is to be performed by graduate student and post-doctoral trainees. At the Hellisheidi Iceland site, the hot gases released from geothermal energy production will be processed to separate the CO2. It will then be dissolved in water at about 25 bar pressure and pumped into the porous basalt at 400 to 700 m depth, at the rate of 30 000 tonnes per year. Model simulations, natural analogues and experimental work suggest that the CO2 charged waters will reacts with the basalt and form carbonate minerals such as FeCO3 - MgCO3 solid solutions and CaCO3. By this method the fixed CO2 will remain trapped as mineral for millions of years.

  15. Isotope fractionation by chemical diffusion between molten basalt and rhyolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Frank M.; Davis, Andrew M.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Watson, E. Bruce

    2003-10-01

    Experimental diffusion couples were used to study chemical diffusion between molten rhyolite and basalt with special emphasis on the associated fractionation of calcium and lithium isotopes. Diffusion couples were made by juxtaposing firmly packed powders of a natural basalt (SUNY MORB) and a natural rhyolite (Lake County Obsidian) and then annealing them in a piston cylinder apparatus for times ranging from 0.1 to 15.7 h, temperatures of 1350-1450°C, and pressures of 1.2-1.3 GPa. Profiles of the major elements and many trace elements were measured on the recovered quenched glasses. The diffusivities of all elements except lithium were found to be remarkably similar, while the diffusivity of lithium was two to three orders of magnitude larger than that of any of the other elements measured. Chemical diffusion of calcium from molten basalt into rhyolite was driven by a concentration ratio of ˜18 and produced a fractionation of 44Ca from 40Ca of about 6 ‰. Because of the relatively low concentration of lithium in the natural starting materials a small amount of spodumene (LiAlSi 2O 6) was added to the basalt in order to increase the concentration difference between basalt and rhyolite, which was expected to increase the magnitude of diffusive isotopic fractionation of lithium. The concentration ratio between Li-doped basalt and natural rhyolite was ˜15 and the resulting diffusion of lithium into the rhyolite fractionated 7Li from 6Li by about 40‰. We anticipate that several other major rock-forming elements such as magnesium, iron and potassium will also exhibit similarly larger isotopic fractionation whenever they diffuse between natural melts with sufficiently large differences in the abundance of these elements.

  16. Seismic wave propagation through an extrusive basalt sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, Oliver; Hobbs, Richard; Brown, Richard; Schofield, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Layers of basalt flows within sedimentary successions (e.g. in the Faeroe-Shetland Basin) cause complex scattering and attenuation of seismic waves during seismic exploration surveys. Extrusive basaltic sequences are highly heterogeneous and contain strong impedance contrasts between higher velocity crystalline flow cores (˜6 km s-1) and the lower velocity fragmented and weathered flow crusts (3-4 km s-1). Typically, the refracted wave from the basaltic layer is used to build a velocity model by tomography. This velocity model is then used to aid processing of the reflection data where direct determination of velocity is ambiguous, or as a starting point for full waveform inversion, for example. The model may also be used as part of assessing drilling risk of potential wells, as it is believed to constrain the total thickness of the sequence. In heterogeneous media, where the scatter size is of the order of the seismic wavelength or larger, scattering preferentially traps the seismic energy in the low velocity regions. This causes a build-up of energy that is guided along the low velocity layers. This has implications for the interpretation of the observed first arrival of the seismic wave, which may be a biased towards the low velocity regions. This will then lead to an underestimate of the velocity structure and hence the thickness of the basalt, with implications for the drilling of wells hoping to penetrate through the base of the basalts in search of hydrocarbons. Using 2-D acoustic finite difference modelling of the guided wave through a simple layered basalt sequence, we consider the relative importance of different parameters of the basalt on the seismic energy propagating through the layers. These include the proportion of high to low velocity material, the number of layers, their thickness and the roughness of the interfaces between the layers. We observe a non-linear relationship between the ratio of high to low velocity layers and the apparent velocity

  17. Seismic wave propagation through an extrusive basalt sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, Oliver; Hobbs, Richard; Brown, Richard; Schofield, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Layers of basalt flows within sedimentary successions (e.g. in the Faeroe-Shetland Basin) cause complex scattering and attenuation of seismic waves during seismic exploration surveys. Extrusive basaltic sequences are highly heterogeneous and contain strong impedance contrasts between higher velocity crystalline flow cores (˜6 km s‑1) and the lower velocity fragmented and weathered flow crusts (3-4 km s‑1). Typically, the refracted wave from the basaltic layer is used to build a velocity model by tomography. This velocity model is then used to aid processing of the reflection data where direct determination of velocity is ambiguous, or as a starting point for full waveform inversion, for example. The model may also be used as part of assessing drilling risk of potential wells, as it is believed to constrain the total thickness of the sequence. In heterogeneous media, where the scatter size is of the order of the seismic wavelength or larger, scattering preferentially traps the seismic energy in the low velocity regions. This causes a build-up of energy that is guided along the low velocity layers. This has implications for the interpretation of the observed first arrival of the seismic wave, which may be a biased towards the low velocity regions. This will then lead to an underestimate of the velocity structure and hence the thickness of the basalt, with implications for the drilling of wells hoping to penetrate through the base of the basalts in search of hydrocarbons. Using 2-D acoustic finite difference modelling of the guided wave through a simple layered basalt sequence, we consider the relative importance of different parameters of the basalt on the seismic energy propagating through the layers. These include the proportion of high to low velocity material, the number of layers, their thickness and the roughness of the interfaces between the layers. We observe a non-linear relationship between the ratio of high to low velocity layers and the apparent

  18. Crustal influence in the generation of continental flood basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Lugmair, G. W.; Macdougall, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    The suggestion that primordial undifferentiated material may exist in the earth's mantle has recently been revived on the strength of Nd isotope data for two types of young continental rocks - flood basalts and kimberlites. The limited published data show a clustering of Nd isotopic compositions close to those for meteorites with chondritic relative rare-earth (REE) abundance. In contrast, data are presented for samples from the Columbia flood basalt province of the northwestern United States which show large isotopic variability suggestive of mixing processes acting after the separation of the primary magmas from their mantle source.

  19. Infrared Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Alkali Metal Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ei; Hommerich, Uwe; Yang, Clayton; Trivedi, Sudhir; Samuels, Alan; Snyder, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a powerful diagnostic tool for detection of trace elements by monitoring the atomic and ionic emission from laser-induced plasmas. LIBS is a relatively simple technique and has been successfully employed in applications such as environmental monitoring, materials analysis, medical diagnostics, industrial process control, and homeland security. Most LIBS applications are limited to emission features in the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-VIS-NIR) region arising from atoms and simple molecular fragments. In the present work, we report on the observation of mid- infrared emission lines from alkali metal halides due to laser-induced breakdown processes. The studied alkali metal halides included LiCl, NaCl, NaBr, KCl, KBr, KF, RbCl, and RbBr. The laser-induced plasma was produced by focusing a 16 mJ pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) on the target. The LIBS infrared emission from alkali halides showed intense and narrow bands located in the region from 2-8 μm. The observed emission features were assigned to atomic transitions between higher-lying Rydberg states of neutral alkali atoms. More detailed results of the performed IR LIBS studies on alkali metal halides will be discussed at the conference.

  20. Multi-photon processes in alkali metal vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Baodong; Hu, Shu; Li, Hui; Shi, Zhe; Cai, Xianglong; Guo, Jingwei; Tan, Yannan; Liu, Wanfa; Jin, Yuqi; Sang, Fengting

    2015-02-01

    Achieving population inversion through multi-photon cascade pumping is almost always difficult, and most laser medium work under 1-photon excitation mechanism. But for alkali atoms such as cesium, relatively large absorption cross sections of several low, cascading energy levels enable them properties such as up conversion. Here we carried out research on two-photon excitation alkali fluorescence. Two photons of near infrared region are used to excite alkali atoms to n 2 D5/2, n 2 D3/2 or higher energy levels, then the blue fluorescence of (n+1) 2 P3/2,(n+1) 2 P1/2-->n 2 S1/2 are observed. Different pumping paths are tried and by the recorded spectra, transition routes of cesium are deducted and concluded. Finally the possibility of two-photon style DPALs (diode pumped alkali laser) are discussed, such alkali lasers can give output wavelengths in the shorter end of visual spectroscopy (400-460 nm) and are expected to get application in underwater communication and material laser processing.

  1. Waters associated with an active basaltic volcano, Kilauea, Hawaii: Variation in solute sources, 1973-1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, R.I.; Jones, B.F.

    1996-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic analyses of samples collected from a 1262-m-deep research borehole at the summit of Kilauea Volcano provide unique time-series data for composition of waters in the uppermost part of its hydrothermal system. These waters have a distinctive geochemical signature: a very low proportion of chloride relative to other anions compared with other Hawaiian wa-ters - thermal (???30 ??C) or nonthermal (<30 ??C) - and with most thermal waters of the world. Isotope data demonstrate that the borehole waters are of essentially meteoric origin, with minimal magmatic input. The water chemistry exhibits marked temporal variations, including pronounced short-term (days to weeks) effects of rainfall dilution and longer term (months to years) decline of total solutes. The 1973-1974 samples are Na-sulfate-dominant, but samples collected after July 1975 are (Mg + Ca)-bicarbonate-dominant. This compositional shift, probably abrupt, was associated with an increase in the partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2) related to volcanic degassing of CO2 accompanying a large eruption (December 31, 1974) and associated intense seismicity. Following the initial sharp increase, the PCO2 then decreased, approaching preemption values in April 1976. Beginning in mid-1975, solute concentrations of the borehole waters decreased substantially, from ???45 meq/L to <25 meq/L in only eight months; by 1991, total solute concentrations were <17 meq/L. This decline in solutes cannot be attributed to rainfall dilution and is inferred to reflect the decreasing availability with time of the easily leachable salts of alkali metals and sulfate, which originated in sublimates and fumarolic encrustations in fractures and cavities of rocks along the hydrologic flow paths. The overall chemistry of the summit-borehole waters is largely determined by hydrolysis reactions associated with normal weathering of host tholeiitic basalts on a geologic time scale, despite short-term perturbations in composition

  2. Maternal exposure to alkali, alkali earth, transition and other metals: Concentrations and predictors of exposure.

    PubMed

    Hinwood, A L; Stasinska, A; Callan, A C; Heyworth, J; Ramalingam, M; Boyce, M; McCafferty, P; Odland, J Ø

    2015-09-01

    Most studies of metals exposure focus on the heavy metals. There are many other metals (the transition, alkali and alkaline earth metals in particular) in common use in electronics, defense industries, emitted via combustion and which are naturally present in the environment, that have received limited attention in terms of human exposure. We analysed samples of whole blood (172), urine (173) and drinking water (172) for antimony, beryllium, bismuth, cesium, gallium, rubidium, silver, strontium, thallium, thorium and vanadium using ICPMS. In general most metals concentrations were low and below the analytical limit of detection with some high concentrations observed. Few factors examined in regression models were shown to influence biological metals concentrations and explained little of the variation. Further study is required to establish the source of metals exposures at the high end of the ranges of concentrations measured and the potential for any adverse health impacts in children. PMID:25984984

  3. Maternal exposure to alkali, alkali earth, transition and other metals: Concentrations and predictors of exposure.

    PubMed

    Hinwood, A L; Stasinska, A; Callan, A C; Heyworth, J; Ramalingam, M; Boyce, M; McCafferty, P; Odland, J Ø

    2015-09-01

    Most studies of metals exposure focus on the heavy metals. There are many other metals (the transition, alkali and alkaline earth metals in particular) in common use in electronics, defense industries, emitted via combustion and which are naturally present in the environment, that have received limited attention in terms of human exposure. We analysed samples of whole blood (172), urine (173) and drinking water (172) for antimony, beryllium, bismuth, cesium, gallium, rubidium, silver, strontium, thallium, thorium and vanadium using ICPMS. In general most metals concentrations were low and below the analytical limit of detection with some high concentrations observed. Few factors examined in regression models were shown to influence biological metals concentrations and explained little of the variation. Further study is required to establish the source of metals exposures at the high end of the ranges of concentrations measured and the potential for any adverse health impacts in children.

  4. Geochemistry of Mesozoic Basaltic Lavas from the West Pacific Seamount Province (WPSP): Constraints on Their Origin and Genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Q.; Shi, X.

    2014-12-01

    There distributed many relatively isolated seamounts in several inferred seamount chains in west Pacific, and the area has been named as west Pacific seamount province (WPSP). Studying on basaltic rocks from the WPSP will be helpful to better understanding the diversity of plume geodymanics and developing the plume theory. Basaltic lavas from eight seamounts in the WPSP have been studied for petrography, major-, trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic composition. The petrographic characteristics of these rocks show moderately to highly altered. Major element compositions show all of these rocks belong to alkalic series, and some samples lost their alkalis elements during submarine seawater alteration. Primitive mantle normalized spider diagram and chondrite normalized rare earth element distributional pattern show that they were originated from OIB-like source and possibly underwent low degree partial melting. Isotopic characteristics imply that three mantle end-members (DMM, EMI and HIMU) can explain Sr-Nd-Pb compositions of these rocks from the WPSP, i.e., DMM is depleted MORB mantle identical to that being created MORB in EPR, EMI (reprecented by Rarotonga island) is possibly from subducted ancient continental crust, and HIMU (represented by Cook-Austral Islands) is typically originated from recycled oceanic crust. Based on the present study combined with published data, we proposed that the origin of some (maybe all) of seamounts in the WPSP are splash plumes proposed by Davies and Bunge (2006) or smaller plumes branched at the base of lithosphere from the Superwell which has created the Ontong Java plateau. (This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under contract Nos. 41322036, and 41276003)

  5. Interpreting chemical compositions of small scale basaltic systems: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, Lucy E.; Smith, Ian E. M.

    2016-10-01

    Small scale basaltic magmatic systems occur in all of the major tectonic environments of planet Earth and are characteristically expressed at the Earth's surface as fields of small monogenetic cones. The chemical compositions of the materials that make up these cones reflect processes of magma generation and differentiation that occur in their plumbing system. The volumes of magmas involved are very small and significantly their compositional ranges reveal remarkably complex processes which are overwhelmed or homogenized in larger scale systems. Commonly, compositions are basaltic, alkalic and enriched in light rare earth elements and large ion lithophile elements, although the spectrum extends from highly enriched nephelinites to subalkalic and tholeiitic basalts. Isotopic analyses of rocks from volcanic fields almost always display compositions which can only be explained by the interaction of two or more mantle sources. Ultimately their basaltic magmas originate by small scale melting of mantle sources. Compositional variety is testament to melting processes at different depths, a range of melting proportions, a heterogeneous source and fractionation, magma mixing and assimilation within the plumbing system that brings magmas to the surface. The fact that such a variety of compositions is preserved in a single field shows that isolation of individual melting events and their ascent is an important and possibly defining feature of monogenetic volcanism, as well as the window their chemical behavior provides into the complex process of melt generation and extraction in the Earth's upper mantle.

  6. Vesicularity and CO2 in mid-ocean ridge basalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.

    1979-01-01

    Vesicles and included CO2are enriched in deep-sea basalts that are also enriched in light rare earth and incompatible elements. This enrichment probably results from a unique deep mantle origin of such melts but may have been modified by CO2 bubbles rising in shallow magma chambers. ?? 1979 Nature Publishing Group.

  7. Automated identification of basalt spectra in Clementine lunar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonenko, I.; Osinski, G. R.

    2011-06-01

    The identification of fresh basalt spectra plays an important role in lunar stratigraphic studies; however, the process can be time consuming and labor intensive. Thus motivated, we developed an empirically derived algorithm for the automated identification of fresh basalt spectra from Clememtine UVVIS data. This algorithm has the following four parameters and limits: BC Ratio=3(R950-R900)/(R900-R750)<1.1, CD Delta=(R1000-R950)/R750-1.09(R950-R900)/R750>0.003 and <0.06, B Slope=(R900-R750)/(3R750)<-0.012, and Band Depth=(R750-R950)/(R750-R415)>0.1, where R750 represents the unnormalized reflectance of the 750 nm Clementine band, and so on. Algorithm results were found to be accurate to within an error of 4.5% with respect to visual classification, though olivine spectra may be under-represented. Overall, fresh basalts identified by the algorithm are consistent with expectations and previous work in the Mare Humorum area, though accuracy in other areas has not yet been tested. Great potential exists in using this algorithm for identifying craters that have excavated basalts, estimating the thickness of mare and cryptomare deposits, and other applications.

  8. Detail of basaltic rock retaining walls just below top switchback. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of basaltic rock retaining walls just below top switchback. 500 ft long retaining wall at left, scale figure in distance, view south. - La Bajada Historic Trails and Roads, Approximately 1 mile East/Northeast of intersection of State Highway 16 and Indian Service Road 841, La Bajada, Santa Fe County, NM

  9. Swale built up of drylaid basaltic rock along the Route ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Swale built up of dry-laid basaltic rock along the Route 66 section. Sandia Peak in distance, facing south. - La Bajada Historic Trails and Roads, Approximately 1 mile East/Northeast of intersection of State Highway 16 and Indian Service Road 841, La Bajada, Santa Fe County, NM

  10. [The dust factor in the manufacture of basalt fibers].

    PubMed

    Gorban', L N; Riazanov, A V; Voloboeva, A A; Rybak, E A

    1996-01-01

    A study was made of the labour conditions of those workers engaged in the production of basalt fibre (BF). Morphological makeup is examined as is dispersity and cytotoxicity of the dust produced in the process of BF making. An issue is addressed of usefulness of setting special hygienic regulations for BF dust.

  11. Notice of Release of NBR-1 Germplasm Basalt Milkvetch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Basalt milkvetch or threadstalk milkvetch (Astragalus filipes Torr. ex A. Gray) is a perennial legume that is widely distributed on rangelands in western North America and holds promise for rangeland revegetation and restoration programs. No germplasms or cultivars are commercially available for ba...

  12. 69. Photocopy of General Arrangement of Engine Room. Basalt Rock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. Photocopy of General Arrangement of Engine Room. Basalt Rock Co. Inc., Shipbuilding Division, Napa, California. Coast Guard Headquarters Drawing No. 540-WAGL-4000-2 (right side), dated July 1943. Original drawing property of the U.S. Coast Guard. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  13. 68. Photocopy of General Arrangement of Engine Room. Basalt Rock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. Photocopy of General Arrangement of Engine Room. Basalt Rock Co. Inc., Shipbuilding Division, Napa, California. Coast Guard Headquarters Drawing No. 540-WAGL-4000-2 (left side), dated July 1943. Original drawing property of the U.S. Coast Guard. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  14. The Nature of Mare Basalts in the Procellarum KREEP Terrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.; Gillis, Jeffrey J.; Korotev, Randy L.; Jolliff, Bradley L.

    2000-01-01

    Unlike Apollo 12 and 15 basalts, many mare lavas of the Procellarum KREEP Terrane (PKT) have Th concentrations of 2.5-6 ppm and perhaps greater, as well as high TiO2. Lunar "picritic" volcanic glasses from the PKT have a similar range.

  15. Nuclear waste package materials testing report: basaltic and tuffaceous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.J.; Coles, D.G.; Hodges, F.N.; McVay, G.L.; Westerman, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The disposal of high-level nuclear wastes in underground repositories in the continental United States requires the development of a waste package that will contain radionuclides for a time period commensurate with performance criteria, which may be up to 1000 years. This report addresses materials testing in support of a waste package for a basalt (Hanford, Washington) or a tuff (Nevada Test Site) repository. The materials investigated in this testing effort were: sodium and calcium bentonites and mixtures with sand or basalt as a backfill; iron and titanium-based alloys as structural barriers; and borosilicate waste glass PNL 76-68 as a waste form. The testing also incorporated site-specific rock media and ground waters: Reference Umtanum Entablature-1 basalt and reference basalt ground water, Bullfrog tuff and NTS J-13 well water. The results of the testing are discussed in four major categories: Backfill Materials: emphasizing water migration, radionuclide migration, physical property and long-term stability studies. Structural Barriers: emphasizing uniform corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmental-mechanical testing. Waste Form Release Characteristics: emphasizing ground water, sample surface area/solution volume ratio, and gamma radiolysis effects. Component Compatibility: emphasizing solution/rock, glass/rock, glass/structural barrier, and glass/backfill interaction tests. This area also includes sensitivity testing to determine primary parameters to be studied, and the results of systems tests where more than two waste package components were combined during a single test.

  16. Zircon U-Pb dating, geochemistry and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopes of the Wajilitag alkali mafic dikes, and associated diorite and syenitic rocks: Implications for magmatic evolution of the Tarim large igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Si-Yuan; Li, Zi-Long; Song, Biao; Ernst, Richard E.; Li, Yin-Qi; Ren, Zhong-Yuan; Yang, Shu-Feng; Chen, Han-Lin; Xu, Yi-Gang; Song, Xie-Yan

    2015-01-01

    The Early Permian Tarim large igneous province (Tarim LIP) consists mainly of basaltic lavas, mafic-ultramafic intrusions including dikes and, syenite bodies in the Tarim Basin, NW China. A major unit of the Tarim LIP, the Wajilitag intrusive complex, consists of olivine pyroxenite, clinopyroxenite and gabbro units (from bottom to top), diorite and syenite rocks occurred in the upper part of the complex and alkali mafic dikes intrude the clinopyroxenite phase. Here we report the zircon U-Pb age and Hf isotopes, geochemical characteristics and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data of the alkali mafic dikes, and diorite, aegirine-nepheline syenite and syenite porphyry units in the Wajilitag intrusive complex. Zircons from the diorite and alkali mafic rocks yield concordant crystallization ages of 275.2 ± 1.2 Ma and 281.4 ± 1.7 Ma, respectively. The diorite and syenitic rocks in Wajilitag area have a narrow range of SiO2 contents (51.9-57.3 wt.%), and are enriched in total alkalis (Na2O + K2O = 8.3-14.3 wt.%), among which the aegirine-nepheline syenite and syenite porphyry have the geochemical affinity of A-type granites. The alkali mafic rocks and syenitic rocks have high Al2O3 (19.4-21.1 wt.%), Zr, Hf, Ba contents, total rare earth element abundances and LREE/HREE ratios and low Mg# value, K, P and Ti contents. Diorites have lower Al2O3 contents, total REE abundances and LREE/HREE ratios and higher Mg# values than the alkali mafic rocks and syenitic rocks. The diorites and syenitic rocks have low initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7034-0.7046), and high εNd(t) values (0.1-4.1) and zircon εHf(t) values (- 0.9-4.4). All the diorites and syenitic rocks show the 206Pb/204Pb ratios ranging of 18.0-19.5, 207Pb/204Pb of 15.4-15.6 and 208Pb/204Pb of 38.0-39.9. Sr-Nd isotopic ratios indicate a FOZO-like mantle source for the diorite and syenitic rocks, similar to that of the mafic-ultramafic rocks in the Wajilitag complex. In contrast, zircon Hf isotopes of basalt and syenite elsewhere in the

  17. First-order major element variation in basalt glasses from the Mid-Atlantic ridge : 29/sup 0/N to 73/sup 0/N

    SciTech Connect

    Sigurdsson, H.

    1981-10-10

    Basaltic glasses from 29/sup 0/N to 73/sup 0/N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge define two geographic and compositional groups that are characterized by different major element concentrations, phase assemblages and partition coefficients. Group A glasses occur on the ridge segment north of Gibbs Fracture Zone, from 54/sup 0/N, along the Reykjanes Ridge, the western volcanic zone of Iceland and Kolbeinsey Ridge, up to 70/sup 0/N. Similar glasses occur also on the ridge from 29/sup 0/N to 34/sup 0/N. Group A is characterized by pronounced alumina depletion and iron-enrichment trends, lower silica and alkalis and higher iron and high CaO/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Clinopyroxene is only present in the more evolved group A glasses (Mg-value<58). Olivine-glass partition coefficients for Mg and Fe are systematically lower in group A than group B (Schilling and Sigurdsson, 1979), reflecting effects of melt composition on structure of the liquids. Group B glasses define the ridge segment north of 35/sup 0/N over the Azores platform and up to Gibbs F. Z., at 53/sup 0/N. They are also present on the Mohns Ridge north of the Jan Mayen F. Z. at 71/sup 0/N and at least as far north as 73/sup 0/. Group B glasses are characterized by higher silica and alkalis, low iron and lack of alumina depletion and iron-enrichment trends. They contain calcic clinopyroxene (Cpx) throughout the compositional range, whereas the sub-calcic augite is absent. The major-element variation within each group can be modeled quantitatively by fractional crystallization involving the phenocryst phases. The range of glass compositions in the two groups forms two distinct but parallel cotectic trends within the basalt tetrahedron, which are believed to define the quaternary univariant line 01-P1-Cpx-Liq along which the magmas evolved during fractionation at low to intermediate pressure.

  18. Injection and Monitoring at the Wallula Basalt Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B. Peter; Spane, Frank A.; Amonette, James E.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-01-01

    Continental flood basalts represent one of the largest geologic structures on earth but have received comparatively little attention for geologic storage of CO2. Flood basalt lava flows have flow tops that are porous, permeable, and have large potential capacity for storage of CO2. In appropriate geologic settings, interbedded sediment layers and dense low-permeability basalt rock flow interior sections may act as effective seals allowing time for mineralization reactions to occur. Previous laboratory experiments showed the relatively rapid chemical reaction of CO2-saturated pore water with basalts to form stable carbonate minerals. However, recent laboratory tests with water-saturated supercritical CO2 show that mineralization reactions occur in this phase as well, providing a second and potentially more important mineralization pathway than was previously understood. Field testing of these concepts is proceeding with drilling of the world’s first supercritical CO2 injection well in flood basalt being completed in May 2009 near the township of Wallula in Washington State and corresponding CO2 injection permit granted by the State of Washington in March 2011. Injection of a nominal 1000 MT of CO2 was completed in August 2013 and site monitoring is in progress. Well logging conducted immediately after injection termination confirmed the presence of CO2 predominantly within the upper flow top region, and showed no evidence of vertical CO2 migration outside the well casing. Shallow soil gas samples collected around the injection well show no evidence of leakage and fluid and gas samples collected from the injection zone show strongly elevated concentrations of Ca, Mg, Mn, and Fe and 13C/18O isotopic shifts that are consistent with basalt-water chemical reactions. If proven viable by this field test and others that are in progress or being planned, major flood basalts in the U.S., India, and perhaps Australia would provide significant additional CO2 storage capacity

  19. Injection and Monitoring at the Wallula Basalt Pilot Project

    DOE PAGES

    McGrail, B. Peter; Spane, Frank A.; Amonette, James E.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-01-01

    Continental flood basalts represent one of the largest geologic structures on earth but have received comparatively little attention for geologic storage of CO2. Flood basalt lava flows have flow tops that are porous, permeable, and have large potential capacity for storage of CO2. In appropriate geologic settings, interbedded sediment layers and dense low-permeability basalt rock flow interior sections may act as effective seals allowing time for mineralization reactions to occur. Previous laboratory experiments showed the relatively rapid chemical reaction of CO2-saturated pore water with basalts to form stable carbonate minerals. However, recent laboratory tests with water-saturated supercritical CO2 show thatmore » mineralization reactions occur in this phase as well, providing a second and potentially more important mineralization pathway than was previously understood. Field testing of these concepts is proceeding with drilling of the world’s first supercritical CO2 injection well in flood basalt being completed in May 2009 near the township of Wallula in Washington State and corresponding CO2 injection permit granted by the State of Washington in March 2011. Injection of a nominal 1000 MT of CO2 was completed in August 2013 and site monitoring is in progress. Well logging conducted immediately after injection termination confirmed the presence of CO2 predominantly within the upper flow top region, and showed no evidence of vertical CO2 migration outside the well casing. Shallow soil gas samples collected around the injection well show no evidence of leakage and fluid and gas samples collected from the injection zone show strongly elevated concentrations of Ca, Mg, Mn, and Fe and 13C/18O isotopic shifts that are consistent with basalt-water chemical reactions. If proven viable by this field test and others that are in progress or being planned, major flood basalts in the U.S., India, and perhaps Australia would provide significant additional CO2 storage

  20. Plant-induced weathering of a basaltic rock: experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinsinger, Philippe; Fernandes Barros, Omar Neto; Benedetti, Marc F.; Noack, Yves; Callot, Gabriel

    2001-01-01

    The active role of higher plants in the weathering of silicate minerals and rocks is still a question for debate. The present work aimed at providing experimental evidence of the important role of a range of crop plants in such processes. In order to quantitatively assess the possible effect of these diverse plant species on the weathering of a basaltic rock, two laboratory experiments were carried out at room temperature. These compared the amounts of elements released from basalt when leached with a dilute salt solution in the presence or absence of crop plants grown for up to 36 days. For Si, Ca, Mg, and Na, plants resulted in an increase in the release rate by a factor ranging from 1 to 5 in most cases. Ca and Na seemed to be preferentially released relative to other elements, suggesting that plagioclase dissolved faster than the other constituents of the studied basalt. Negligible amounts of Fe were released in the absence of plants as a consequence of the neutral pH and atmospheric pO 2 that were maintained in the leaching solution. However, the amounts of Fe released from basalt in the presence of plants were up to 100- to 500-fold larger than in the absence of plants, for banana and maize. The kinetics of dissolution of basalt in the absence of plants showed a constantly decreasing release rate over the whole duration of the experiment (36 days). No steady state value was reached both in the absence and presence of banana plants. However, in the latter case, the rates remained at a high initial level over a longer period of time (up to 15 days) before starting to decrease. For Fe, the maximum rate of release was reached beyond 4 days and this rate remained high up to 22 days of growth of banana. The possible mechanisms responsible for this enhanced release of elements from basalt in the presence of plants are discussed. Although these mechanisms need to be elucidated, the present results clearly show that higher plants can considerably affect the kinetics