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Sample records for alkali basaltic magmas

  1. Recycled oceanic crust and marine sediment in the source of alkali basalts in Shandong, eastern China: Evidence from magma water content and oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Xia, Qun-Ke; Deloule, Etienne; Chen, Huan; Feng, Min

    2015-12-01

    The magma water contents and cpx δ18O values in alkali basalts from the Fuyanyshan (FYS) volcano in Shandong, eastern China, were investigated by an inverse calculation based on the water content of clinopyroxene (cpx) phenocrysts, the ivAlcpx-dependent water partitioning coefficient Dwatercpx>/melt, and secondary ion mass spectrometer, respectively. The calculated water content (H2O wt.) of magma ranges from 0.58% to 3.89%. It positively correlates with heavy rare earth element concentrations and bulk rock 87Sr/86Sr ratios, and it negatively correlates with Nb/U ratios. However, it is not correlated with bulk Mg# (Mg# = 100 × Mg / (Mg + Fe)) and (La/Yb)n (n represents primitive mantle normalization). Combined with the rather homogenous distribution of water content within cpx grains, these correlations indicate that the water variations among different samples represent the original magma signature, rather than results of a shallow process, such as degassing and diffusion. The δ18O of cpx phenocrysts varies from 3.6‰ to 6.3‰ (±0.5‰, 2SD), which may be best explained by the involvement of components from the lower and upper oceanic crust with marine sediments within the mantle source. The H2O/Ce ratios of the calculated melts range from 113 to 696 and form a positive trend with bulk rock 87Sr/86Sr, which cannot be explained by the recycled Sulu eclogite or by the metasomatized lithospheric mantle. Our modeling calculation shows that the decoupling of ɛHf and ɛNd could be caused by the involvement of marine sediments. Combing the high Ba/Th ratios, positive Sr spikes, and low Ce/Pb ratios for the Fuyanshan basalts, we suggest that the hydrous nature of the FYS basalts was derived from the hydrous mantle transition zone with ancient sediments.

  2. Mare basalt magma source region and mare basalt magma genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, A.B.

    1982-11-15

    Given the available data, we find that the wide range of mare basaltic material characteristics can be explained by a model in which: (1) The mare basalt magma source region lies between the crust-mantle boundary and a maximum depth of 200 km and consists of a relatively uniform peridotite containing 73--80% olivine, 11--14% pyroxene, 4--8% plagioclase, 0.2--9% ilmenite and 1--1.5% chromite. (2) The source region consists of two or more density-graded rhythmic bands, whose compositions grade from that of the very low TiO/sub 2/ magma source regions (0.2% ilmenite) to that of the very high TiO/sub 2/ magma source regions (9% ilmenite). These density-graded bands are proposed to have formed as co-crystallizing olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase, ilmenite, and chromite settled out of a convecting magma (which was also parental to the crust) in which these crystals were suspended. Since the settling rates of the different minerals were governed by Stoke's law, the heavier minerals settled out more rapidly and therefore earlier than the lighter minerals. Thus the crystal assemblages deposited nearest the descending side of each convection cell were enriched in heavy ilmenite and chromite with respect to lighter olivine and pyroxene and very much lighter plagioclase. The reverse being the case for those units deposited near the ascending sides of the convection cells.

  3. Composition and origin of basaltic magma of the Hawaiian Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, H.A.

    1955-01-01

    Silica-saturated basaltic magma is the source of the voluminous lava flows, erupted frequently and rapidly in the primitive shield-building stage of activity, that form the bulk of each Hawaiian volcano. This magma may be available in batches that differ slightly in free silica content from batch to batch both at the same and at different volcanoes; differentiation by fractionation of olivine does not occur within this primitive magma. Silica-deficient basaltic magma, enriched in alkali, is the source of commonly porphyritic lava flows erupted less frequently and in relatively negligible volume during a declining and decadent stage of activity at some Hawaiian volcanoes. Differentiation by fractionation of olivine, plagioclase and augite is evident among these lavas, but does not account for the silica deficiency or the alkali enrichment. Most of the data of Hawaiian volcanism and petrology can be explained by a hypothesis that batches of magma are melted from crystalline paridotite by a recurrent process (distortion of the equatorial bulge by forced and free nutational stresses) that accomplishes the melting only of the plagioclase and pyroxene component but not the excess olivine and more refractory components within a zone of fixed and limited depth. Eruption exhausts the supply of meltable magma under a given locality and, in the absence of more violent melting processes, leaves a stratum of crystalline refractory components. ?? 1955.

  4. Basaltic injections into floored silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, R. A.

    Recent studies have provided compelling evidence that many large accumulations of silicic volcanic rocks erupted from long-lasting, floored chambers of silicic magma that were repeatedly injected by basaltic magma. These basaltic infusions are commonly thought to play an important role in the evolution of the silicic systems: they have been proposed as a cause for explosive silicic eruptions [Sparks and Sigurdsson, 1977], compositional variation in ash-flow sheets [Smith, 1979], mafic magmatic inclusions in silicic volcanic rocks [Bacon, 1986], and mixing of mafic and silicic magmas [Anderson, 1976; Eichelberger, 1978]. If, as seems likely, floored silicic magma chambers have frequently been invaded by basalt, then plutonic bodies should provide records of these events. Although plutonic evidence for mixing and commingling of mafic and silicic magmas has been recognized for many years, it has been established only recently that some intrusive complex originated through multiple basaltic injections into floored chambers of silicic magma [e.g., Wiebe, 1974; Michael, 1991; Chapman and Rhodes, 1992].

  5. Convective Regimes in Crystallizing Basaltic Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, A. J.; Neufeld, J. A.; Holness, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Cooling through the chamber walls drives crystallisation in crustal magma chambers, resulting in a cumulate pile on the floor and mushy regions at the walls and roof. The liquid in many magma chambers, either the bulk magma or the interstitial liquid in the mushy regions, may convect, driven either thermally, due to cooling, or compositionally, due to fractional crystallization. We have constructed a regime diagram of the possible convective modes in a system containing a basal mushy layer. These modes depend on the large-scale buoyancy forcing characterised by a global Rayleigh number and the proportion of the chamber height constituting the basal mushy region. We have tested this regime diagram using an analogue experimental system composed of a fluid layer overlying a pile of almost neutrally buoyant inert particles. Convection in this system is driven thermally, simulating magma convection above and within a porous cumulate pile. We observe a range of possible convective regimes, enabling us to produce a regime diagram. In addition to modes characterised by convection of the bulk and interstitial fluid, we also observe a series of regimes where the crystal pile is mobilised by fluid motions. These regimes feature saltation and scouring of the crystal pile by convection in the bulk fluid at moderate Rayleigh numbers, and large crystal-rich fountains at high Rayleigh numbers. For even larger Rayleigh numbers the entire crystal pile is mobilised in what we call the snowglobe regime. The observed mobilisation regimes may be applicable to basaltic magma chambers. Plagioclase in basal cumulates crystallised from a dense magma may be a result of crystal mobilisation from a plagioclase-rich roof mush. Compositional convection within such a mush could result in disaggregation, enabling the buoyant plagioclase to be entrained in relatively dense descending liquid plumes and brought to the floor. The phenocryst load in porphyritic lavas is often interpreted as a

  6. Symplectites in garnet megacrysts captured by alkali mafic magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aseeva, Anna; Vysotskiy, Sergey; Karabtsov, Alexander; Alexandrov, Igor; Chashchin, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Megacrysts are widespread in Cenozoic alkali-basalts of many volcanic provinces of the world. Garnet megacrysts containing symplectites are the most interesting, as can be used for reconstruction of physical and chemical conditions in liquid basalt at the moment of garnet crystal capture. The collection of garnet megacrysts and garnet-pyroxene aggregates from Shavaryn-Tsaram (Hangaj plateau, Mongolia) and Bartoj (Dzhida basaltic field, Russia) paleovolcanoes has studied. Cenozoic alkali basaltic volcanism of these two spatially separated areas is considered to be related to a uniform process of lithosphere spreading in Baikal and related Central Asian rift systems. The studying of garnet-pyroxene aggregate and fragments of garnet megacrysts from these two paleovolcanoes revealed two mineral associations: primary and secondary. The former includes garnet and clinopyroxene, the letter (symplectite) is presented by products of garnet disintegration (clinopyroxene remain unaltered). At least two paragenesis can be allocated: 1) shpinel - plagioclase-olivine sometimes with gedrite and orthopyroxene; 2) olivine (with glass). Experimental modeling of decomposition process in garnet megacryst has been carried out with the help of 'Selector' softwear at various P-T parameters. Physical and chemical conditions of this paragenesis occurrence have also been estimated by up-to-date geothermometers and geobarometers (T 950-1000 C, P 4-4.5 kbar. Conclusions: 1. Garnet megacrysts are apparently in non-equilibrium with alkali-basalts. They were formed in conditions corresponding to zones of mantle plums at the bottom of crust, in magmatic chambers at constant infiltration of fluid. Subsequently megacrysts were captured by alkali-basalt magma and taken out to the surface. 2. Kelyphitic rims on garnet megacrysts is a result of partial melting of megacrysts on interaction with the hosting alkali basaltic rock. During melting garnet transforms with the formation of Na-K glass and Mg

  7. Volatile degassing of basaltic achondrite parent bodies Evidence from alkali elements and phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.

    1987-01-01

    The Na, K, Rb, Cs, and P abundances in eucrites, diogenites, basaltic clasts from polymict eucrite, howardites, and mesosiderites are examined, and compared with an average of highly incompatible refractory (AHIR) elements normalized to cosmic abundances. It is observed that basaltic eucrites and basaltic clasts show a positive correlation between K, Rb, and Cs, and alkali element/AHIR ratios; the volatile loss of the alkali elements from the basalt affects the parent body inventory of volatile elements. The data reveal that for diogenites, the alkali /AHIR ratios are 1.4-2 times greater than in basaltic eucrites and are more variable; and the negative relation between K, Rb, Cs, and the alkali/AHIR ratio correlate with progressive alkali loss through volatile outgassing during crystallization of one or more magmas resulting in a greater than 90 percent loss of the volatile element inventory from the parent body. It is also detected that P displays volatile loss from the basaltic eucrites and elevated P/AHIR ratios in diogenites.

  8. Origin of high-alumina basalt, andesite, and dacite magmas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, W.

    1964-01-01

    The typical volcanic rocks of most island arcs and eugeosynclines, and of some continental environments, are basalt, andesite, and dacite, of high alumina content. The high-alumina basalt differs from tholeiitic basalt primarily in having a greater content of the components of calcic plagioclase. Laboratory data indicate that in the upper mantle, below the level at which the basaltic component of mantle rock is transformed by pressure to eclogite or pyroxenite, the entire basaltic portion probably is melted within a narrow temperature range, but that above the level of that transformation plagioclase is melted selectively before pyroxene over a wide temperature range. The broad spectrum of high-alumina magmas may represent widely varying degrees of partial melting above the transformation level, whereas narrow-spectrum tholeiite magma may represent more complete melting beneath it.

  9. Origin of High-Alumina Basalt, Andesite, and Dacite Magmas.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, W

    1964-10-30

    The typical volcanic rocks of most island arcs and eugeosynclines, and of some continental environments, are basalt, andesite, and dacite, of high alumina content. The high-alumina basalt differs from tholeiitic basalt primarily in having a greater content of the components of calcic plagioclase. Laboratory data indicate that in the upper mantle, below the level at which the basaltic component of mantle rock is transformed by pressure to eclogite or pyroxenite, the entire basaltic portion probably is melted within a narrow temperature range, but that above the level of that transformation plagioclase is melted selectively before pyroxene over a wide temperature range. The broad spectrum of high-alumina magmas may represent widely varying degrees of partial melting above the transformation level, whereas narrow-spectrum tholeiite magma may represent more complete melting beneath it. PMID:17794034

  10. Deep degassing and the eruptibility of flood basalt magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, B. A.; Manga, M.

    2015-12-01

    Individual flood basalt lavas often exceed 103 km3 in volume, and many such lavas erupt during emplacement of flood basalt provinces. The large volume of individual flood basalt lavas demands correspondingly large magma reservoirs within or at the base of the crust. To erupt, some fraction of this magma must become buoyant and overpressure must be sufficient to encourage failure and dike propagation. Because the overpressure associated with a new injection of magma is inversely proportional to the total reservoir volume, buoyancy overpressure has been proposed as a trigger for flood basalt eruptions. To test this hypothesis, we develop a new one-dimensional model for buoyancy overpressure-driven eruptions that combines volatile exsolution, bubble growth and rise, assimilation, and permeable fluid escape through the surrounding country rocks. Degassing during emplacement of flood basalt provinces may have major environmental repercussions. We investigate the temporal evolution of permeable degassing through the crust and degassing during eruptive episodes. We find that assimilation of volatile-rich country rocks strongly enhances flood basalt eruptibility, implying that the eruptive dynamics of flood basalts may be intertwined with their climatic consequences.

  11. Degassing of carbon dioxide from basaltic magma at spreading centers: I. Afar transitional basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Terrence M.

    1989-11-01

    This study investigates the hypothesis that a significant fraction of the CO 2 in basalt supplied to axial volcanic ranges of spreading centers in the Afar depression, escapes by degassing during residence in crustal magma reservoirs. The investigation employs volcanic gas data to test the degassing hypothesis. Volcanic gases emitted from source vents at Erta'Ale lava lake are used to represent volatiles present in the basalt supplied to magma reservoirs underlying Afar spreading centers. For comparison, volcanic gases from a large fissure eruption at Ardoukoba are used to represent volatiles in basalt after a period of storage in the Afar magma reservoirs. The results confirm the hypothesis. Gases from the lava lake and fissure eruption are the same except for CO 2. They lie along a common CO 2 control line. The fissure eruption gases are six-fold depleted in CO 2 compared to gases from the continuously supplied lava lake. This difference corresponds to a loss of approximately 85% of the initial CO 2. Moreover, gases from the fissure eruption are nearly identical to those emitted by Kilauea basalts that have lost CO 2 by magma reservoir degassing. Mass balance modeling indicates an initial CO 2 content for Afar basalt of 0.12 wt.% compared to CO 2 concentrations as low as 0.02 wt.% after degassing at depth.

  12. Assesment of Alkali Resistance of Basalt Used as Concrete Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    al-Swaidani, Aref M.; Baddoura, Mohammad K.; Aliyan, Samira D.; Choeb, Walid

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to report a part of an ongoing research on the influence of using crushed basalt as aggregates on one of durability-related properties of concrete (i.e. alkali-silica reaction which is the most common form of Alkali-Aggregate Reaction). Alkali resistance has been assessed through several methods specified in the American Standards. Results of petrographic examination, chemical test (ASTM C289) and accelerated mortar bar test (ASTM C1260) have particularly been reported. In addition, the weight change and compressive strength of 28 days cured concrete containing basaltic aggregates were also reported after 90 days of exposure to 10% NaOH solution. Dolomite aggregate were used in the latter test for comparison. The experimental results revealed that basaltic rocks quarried from As-Swaida'a region were suitable for production of aggregates for concrete. According to the test results, the studied basalt aggregates can be classified as innocuous with regard to alkali-silica reaction. Further, the 10% sodium hydroxide attack did not affect the compressive strength of concrete.

  13. The Rheology of Three-Phase Basaltic Magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellin, E. W.; Truby, J.; Mueller, S. P.; Mader, H. M.

    2014-12-01

    The transport of magma is controlled by its rheology which, in turn, is a function of its crystal and bubble content. We develop the first empirically-validated model for the rheology of a three-phase magma (i.e. one containing both bubbles and crystals). The model is valid at low bubble capillary number (where bubble deformation is small) which is typical of basaltic magma. We adopt an 'effective-medium' approach in which the bubbly melt is treated as a continuous medium which suspends the crystals. The resulting three-phase model combines separate two-phase models for bubble suspension rheology and crystal suspension rheology, which are taken from the literature. The model is validated against new analogue experimental data for three-phase suspensions of bubbles and spherical particles, collected in the low bubble capillary number regime. Good agreement is found across the experimental range of particle volume fraction (0 ≤ Фp ≤0.5) and bubble volume fraction (0 ≤ Фb ≤ 0.3). Consistent with model predictions, experimental results demonstrate that, at low capillarity, bubble growth in a crystal-poor magma increases its viscosity, whilst bubble growth in a crystal-rich magma decreases its viscosity. The validity range of the model makes it particularly applicable to the transport of magma in the sub-volcanic plumbing system. The model is trivially extended to account for variations in crystal shape, and for the high capillarity regime; these extended models await experimental validation.

  14. Degassing of carbon dioxide from basaltic magma at spreading centers: II. mid-oceanic ridge basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Terrence M.

    1989-11-01

    This study examines the hypothesis that a significant fraction of the CO 2 in basalt supplied to mid-oceanic spreading centers escapes by degassing from magma chambers of the oceanic crust. The approach employs mass balance calculations, stepped-heating data for carbon in sea-floor mid-oceanic ridge basalts (MORBs), and the CO 2 content determined in part I for transitional basalt supplied to the Erta'Ale spreading center in the Afar depression. It is also shown as part of the analysis that carbon data acquired for sea-floor MORBs by single-heating techniques give systematically high values that are difficult to reconcile with solubility data for CO 2 in MORB liquid and the depths of subridge magma chambers. The results confirm the hypothesis. A conservative estimate of the average loss of CO 2 during degassing from subridge magma chambers is between 30 and 65% of the CO 2 initially present in the magma. The conservative estimate for CO 2 degassing at depth is between two and seven times greater than the maximum amount of volcanic CO 2 degassing from MORB. CO 2 degassing from subridge magma chambers is sufficient to supply much (perhaps most) of the mantle carbon discharged from the global mid-oceanic spreading system to the oceans. CO 2 degassing from subridge magma chambers has several important implications. It may be more important than hydrothermal stripping in supplying mantle carbon to mid-oceanic hydrothermal vents. It is an effective mechanism for removing most of the heavier rare gases (Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn) and much of the He and Ne in magma supplied to mid-oceanic spreading centers and for transporting them and possibly other volatiles from subridge magma chambers to the ocean-atmosphere system. It should also be an effective mechanism for fractionating carbon isotopes in MORB.

  15. Experimental constraints on the outgassing dynamics of basaltic magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pioli, L.; Bonadonna, C.; Azzopardi, B. J.; Phillips, J. C.; Ripepe, M.

    2012-03-01

    The dynamics of separated two-phase flow of basaltic magmas in cylindrical conduits has been explored combining large-scale experiments and theoretical studies. Experiments consisted of the continuous injection of air into water or glucose syrup in a 0.24 m diameter, 6.5 m long bubble column. The model calculates vesicularity and pressure gradient for a range of gas superficial velocities (volume flow rates/pipe area, 10-2-102 m/s), conduit diameters (100-2 m), and magma viscosities (3-300 Pa s). The model is calibrated with the experimental results to extrapolate key flow parameters such as Co (distribution parameter) and Froude number, which control the maximum vesicularity of the magma in the column, and the gas rise speed of gas slugs. It predicts that magma vesicularity increases with increasing gas volume flow rate and decreases with increasing conduit diameter, until a threshold value (45 vol.%), which characterizes churn and annular flow regimes. Transition to annular flow regimes is expected to occur at minimum gas volume flow rates of 103-104 m3/s. The vertical pressure gradient decreases with increasing gas flow rates and is controlled by magma vesicularity (in bubbly flows) or the length and spacing of gas slugs. This study also shows that until conditions for separated flow are met, increases in magma viscosity favor stability of slug flow over bubbly flow but suggests coexistence between gas slugs and small bubbles, which contribute to a small fraction of the total gas outflux. Gas flow promotes effective convection of the liquid, favoring magma homogeneity and stable conditions.

  16. Bubble plumes generated during recharge of basaltic magma reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Jeremy C.; Woods, Andrew W.

    2001-03-01

    CO 2 is relatively insoluble in basaltic magma at low crustal pressures. It therefore exists as a gas phase in the form of bubbles in shallow crustal reservoirs. Over time these bubbles may separate gravitationally from the magma in the chamber. As a result, any new magma which recharges the chamber from deeper in the crust may be more bubble-rich and hence of lower density than the magma in the chamber. Using scaling arguments, we show that for typical recharge fluxes, such a source of low-viscosity, bubble-rich basalt may generate a turbulent bubble plume within the chamber. We also show that the bubbles are typically sufficiently small to have a low Reynolds number and to remain in the flow. We then present a series of analogue laboratory experiments which identify that the motion of such a turbulent bubble-driven line plume is well described by the classical theory of buoyant plumes. Using the classical plume theory we then examine the effect of the return flow associated with such bubble plumes on the mixing and redistribution of bubbles within the chamber. Using this model, we show that a relatively deep bubbly layer of magma may form below a thin foam layer at the roof. If, as an eruption proceeds, there is a continuing influx at the base of the chamber, then our model suggests that the bubble content of the bubbly layer may gradually increase. This may lead to a transition from lava flow activity to more explosive fire-fountaining activity. The foam layer at the top of the chamber may provide a flux for the continual outgassing from the flanks of the volcano [Ryan, Am. Geophys. Union Geophys. Monogr. 91 (1990)] and if it deepens sufficiently it may contribute to the eruptive activity [Vergniolle and Jaupart, J. Geophys. Res. 95 (1990) 2793-3001].

  17. The variation of magma discharge during basaltic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadge, G.

    1981-12-01

    The rate at which basaltic magma is discharged varies substantially during many eruptions. An individual eruption has an eruption rate ( Qe), the volumetric rate of discharge averaged over the whole or a major part of an eruption, and an effusion rate ( Qf), the volumetric flux rate at any given time. In many examples Qf soon reaches a maximum value after a short period of waxing flow, partly because of magmatic expansion, and then falls more slowly in the later parts of the eruption. The release of elastic strain energy from stored magma and the sub-volcanic reservoir during eruption can produce an exponential form of such waning flow. Comparison of the eruption rates of the historic eruptions of Mauna Loa, Kilauea and Etna shows that for each volcano there is a trend of decreasing Qe with increasing duration of eruption. This relationship is not predicted by a simple elastic model of magma release. Two additional processes are invoked to explain the eruptive histories of these volcanoes: modification of the eruptive conduits, and the continued supply of magma from depth during eruption. Conduits evolving from dikes to plugs by wall-rock erosion or freezing of magma can result in increased early values of Qf and the maintenance of very low values of Qf values for long periods later in the eruption. Discharge variations during three specific eruptions are discussed in detail. Paricutin (1943-1952) had exponentially waning flow, with a time constant of about three years, that is consistent with a deep reservoir. The waning flow of Hekla's 1947-1948 eruption showed some of the characteristics of conduit modification, whilst the 1959 Kilauea Iki eruption is interpreted in terms of a closed system with varying magma rheology.

  18. The variation of magma discharge during basaltic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadge, G.

    The different types of magmatic flow in basaltic eruptions are discussed, and processes explaining the eruptive history of specific volcanoes are investigated. The effusion rate curve is divided into waxing and waning flow parts, and the ideal, elastic response of the reservoir in the waning phase is analytically shown. Historical eruption rates of Mauna Loa, Kilauea, and Etna are presented, demonstrating that for each volcano there is a trend of decreasing rate with increasing duration of eruption, a relationship not predicted by a simple elastic model of magma release. The eruptive histories of these volcanoes is explained by the processes of modification of the eruptive conduits and the continued supply of magma from depth during eruption. Discharge variations from Paricutin, Hekla, and Kilauea Iki are discussed in detail.

  19. Oxygen fugacity of basaltic magmas and the role of gas-forming elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, M.

    1978-01-01

    It is suggested that major variations in the relative oxygen fugacity of a basaltic magma are caused primarily by gas-forming elements, especially carbon and hydrogen. According to this theory, carbon, present in the source region of a basaltic magma, reduces the host magma during ascent, as isothermally carbon becomes more reducing with decreasing pressure. For an anhydrous magma such as lunar basalts, this reduction continues through the extrusive phase and the relative oxygen fugacity decreases rapidly until buffered by the precipitation of a metallic phase. For hydrous magmas such as terrestrial basalts, reduction by carbon is eventually superceded by oxidation due to loss of H2 generated by the reaction of C with H2O and by thermal dissociation of H2O. The relative oxygen fugacity of a hydrous magma initially decreases as a magma ascends from the source region and then increases until magnetite crystallization curbs the rising trend of the relative oxygen fugacity.

  20. Fractionation products of basaltic komatiite magmas at lower crustal pressures: implications for genesis of silicic magmas in the Archean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandler, B. E.; Grove, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    Hypotheses for the origin of crustal silicic magmas include both partial melting of basalts and fractional crystallization of mantle-derived melts[1]. Both are recognized as important processes in modern environments. When it comes to Archean rocks, however, partial melting hypotheses dominate the literature. Tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG)-type silicic magmas, ubiquitous in the Archean, are widely thought to be produced by partial melting of subducted, delaminated or otherwise deeply buried hydrated basalts[2]. The potential for a fractional crystallization origin for TTG-type magmas remains largely unexplored. To rectify this asymmetry in approaches to modern vs. ancient rocks, we have performed experiments at high pressures and temperatures to closely simulate fractional crystallization of a basaltic komatiite magma in the lowermost crust. These represent the first experimental determinations of the fractionation products of komatiite-type magmas at elevated pressures. The aim is to test the possibility of a genetic link between basaltic komatiites and TTGs, which are both magmas found predominantly in Archean terranes and less so in modern environments. We will present the 12-kbar fractionation paths of both Al-depleted and Al-undepleted basaltic komatiite magmas, and discuss their implications for the relative importance of magmatic fractionation vs. partial melting in producing more evolved, silicic magmas in the Archean. [1] Annen et al., J. Petrol., 47, 505-539, 2006. [2] Moyen J-F. & Martin H., Lithos, 148, 312-336, 2012.

  1. Thermobarometry for spinel lherzolite xenoliths in alkali basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Kazuhito; Youbi, Nasrrddine; Boumehdi, Moulay Ahmed; Nagahara, Hiroko

    2016-04-01

    geothermobarometry based on reactions with large and distinct volume changes, is necessary. Specification of mineral domains and their components representing the thermal state of the mantle just before xenolith extraction is one of the major tasks for the establishment of reliable geothermobarometry for spinel lherzolite xenoliths. Systematic variations of such mineralogical information among xenoliths transported by a single volcanic eruption guarantees proper estimation of a mantle geotherm. For the development of such geobarometry, it is important to choose appropriate xenolith locality, where previous studies provide enough information and where many xenolith samples are available for extending a range of derivation depth. Spinel lherzolite xenoliths in alkali basalts from Bou Ibalhatene maars in the Middle Atlas in Morocco are suitable study target. Geochemical, geochronological, petrological, and rheological aspects of the spinel lherzolite xenoliths have been studied (Raffone et al. 2009; El Messbahi et al., 2015; Witting et al., 2010; El Azzouzi et al., 2010), which show that they represent fragments of the lithospheric mantle formed and modified since 1.7Ga before their extraction from Miocene to recent. We have pinpointed portions of minerals in the xenolith samples and their components representing condition just before their entrapment in magmas, on which appropriate geothermobarometers are applied and detected ~0.5GPa pressure difference (1.5-2.0GPa) for ~100°C variation in temperatures (950-1050°C).

  2. The magma storage capacity of Mt. Etna's feeding system constrained by four decades of alkali enrichment in erupted lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, Patrick; Corsaro, Rosanna; Métrich, Nicole

    2015-04-01

    Deciphering the magma plumbing system of volcanoes is fundamental to improved understanding of their behaviour and forecasting of their eruptions. Mount Etna, in Sicily, is one of the most active basaltic volcanoes on Earth, built upon a 20-km thick continental crust at the collision boundary between the African and Eurasian plates. Seismic tomography and inversion of natural seismic data have revealed a complex feeding system that includes a huge vertical plutonic body and magma ponding zones in coincidence with the main lithological discontinuities in the crust (at ca. 8-10 km and 2-3 km depth b.s.l.). However, limitations in spatial resolution hamper accurate size estimate of these magma ponding zones. Here we use the remarkable trend of alkali enrichment observed in Etnean lavas since the early seventies and their cumulated erupted volumes to provide an updated estimate of the magma storage capacity of the volcano feeding system. The temporal evolution of K2O/Th and Rb/Th ratios - unaffected by magma differentiation processes - tracks the replenishment of Etna's plumbing system by a new, more alkaline trachybasaltic magma that has gradually mixed with the former resident magma. In a few occasions (e.g. 1974, 1998, 2001-2002) this new magma could reach the surface without pre-eruptive homogeneization in the mixing cell, producing highest eruption rates. Such variations indicate a complex storage system, made of sills and dykes, in which long-term mixing processes but also separate storage or upraise of some magma batches can happen. Combining with the co-erupted magma volumes, we estimate an overall magma storage capacity beneath Etna that is larger than previously inferred from radioactive disequilibria in lavas or SO2 gas fluxes. Our new estimate could be usefully compared with the results from recent seismic tomography realized within the framework of the European MED-SUV project (Mediterranean Supersite Volcanoes).

  3. The Madinah eruption, Saudi Arabia: Magma mixing and simultaneous extrusion of three basaltic chemical types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Victor E.; Hooper, Peter R.; Roobol, M. John; White, D. L.

    1987-04-01

    During a 52-day eruption in 1256 A.D., 0.5 km3 of alkali-olivine basalt was extruded from a 2.25-km-long fissure at the north end of the Harrat Rahat lava field, Saudi Arabia. The eruption produced 6 scoria cones and a lava flow 23 km long that approached the ancient and holy city of Madinah to within 8 km. Three chemical types of basalt are defined by data point clusters on variation diagrams, i.e. the low-K, high-K, and hybrid types. All three erupted simultaneously. Their distribution is delineated in both scoria cones and lava flow units from detailed mapping and a petrochemical study of 135 samples. Six flow units, defined by distinct flow fronts, represent extrusive pulses. The high-K type erupted during all six pulses, the low-K type during the first three, and the hybrid type during the first two. Three mineral assemblages occur out of equilibrium in all three chemical types. Assemblage 1 contains resorbed olivine and clinopyroxene megacrysts and ultramafic microxenoliths (Fo90 + Cr spinel + Cr endiopside) which fractionated within the spinel zone of the mantle. Assemblage 2 contains resorbed plagioclase megacrysts (An60) with olivine inclusions (Fo78) which fractionated in the crust. Assemblage 3 contains microphenocrysts of plagioclase and olivine in a groundmass of the same minerals with late-crystallizing titansalite and titanomagnetite; assemblage 3 crystallized at the surface and/or in the upper crust. Each assemblage represents a distinct range in PTX environment, suggesting that their coexistence in each chemical type may be a function of magma mixing. Such a process is confirmed by variable ratios of incompatible element pairs in a range of analyses. All three chemical types are products of mixing. Some of the hybrid types may have developed from surface mixing of the low-K and high-K lavas; however, the occurrence of all three types at the vent system suggests that subsurface mixing was the dominant process. We suggest that the Madinah flow was

  4. Eruptive history of an alkali basaltic diatreme from Elie Ness, Fife, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gernon, T. M.; Upton, B. G. J.; Hincks, T. K.

    2013-05-01

    The Elie Ness diatreme (Fife, Scotland) is an ideal place to study the internal architecture and emplacement processes of diatremes. Elie Ness is one of approximately 100 alkali basaltic diatremes and intrusions in the East Fife area, emplaced during Upper Carboniferous to Early Permian times into an extensive rift system in the northern Variscan foreland. Within the diatreme, seven lithofacies and three lithofacies associations (LFAs 1-3) are recognised. Field, petrographic and geochemical studies demonstrate that the diatreme experienced a protracted history of eruption and infill, initially driven by volatile expansion and later by magma-water interaction. Massive lapilli tuffs of LFA 1 contain abundant highly vesicular juvenile scoria and magma-coated clasts, which are best explained by a magmatic origin for the early explosive eruptions. On a large-scale, the tuffs are well mixed and locally exhibit small-scale degassing structures attributed to fluidisation processes occurring within the diatreme fill. The occurrence of abundant volcaniclastic autoliths and megablocks within LFA 1 can be explained by subsidence of volcaniclastic strata from the maar crater and upper diatreme during emplacement. Pyroclastic density current deposits of LFA 2 form a series of continuous sheets across the diatreme, some of which may have originated from phreatomagmatic explosions in a neighbouring vent. We attribute the overall bedding pattern to a combination of primary volcanic processes and post-depositional folding related to movement along an adjacent fault. Minor steeply inclined breccias and tuffs of LFA 3 cross-cut the LFA 2 succession and are interpreted as late-stage volcaniclastic dykes and conduits, signalling the final phase of eruptive activity at Elie Ness. The study offers new insights into the volcanic evolution of diatremes fed by low viscosity, alkali-rich magmas.

  5. Growing magma chambers control the distribution of small-scale flood basalts

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xun; Chen, Li-Hui; Zeng, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Small-scale continental flood basalts are a global phenomenon characterized by regular spatio-temporal distributions. However, no genetic mechanism has been proposed to explain the visible but overlooked distribution patterns of these continental basaltic volcanism. Here we present a case study from eastern China, combining major and trace element analyses with Ar–Ar and K–Ar dating to show that the spatio-temporal distribution of small-scale flood basalts is controlled by the growth of long-lived magma chambers. Evolved basalts (SiO2 > 47.5 wt.%) from Xinchang–Shengzhou, a small-scale Cenozoic flood basalt field in Zhejiang province, eastern China, show a northward younging trend over the period 9.4–3.0 Ma. With northward migration, the magmas evolved only slightly ((Na2O + K2O)/MgO = 0.40–0.66; TiO2/MgO = 0.23–0.35) during about 6 Myr (9.4–3.3 Ma). When the flood basalts reached the northern end of the province, the magmas evolved rapidly (3.3–3.0 Ma) through a broad range of compositions ((Na2O + K2O)/MgO = 0.60–1.28; TiO2/MgO = 0.30–0.57). The distribution and two-stage compositional evolution of the migrating flood basalts record continuous magma replenishment that buffered against magmatic evolution and induced magma chamber growth. Our results demonstrate that the magma replenishment–magma chamber growth model explains the spatio-temporal distribution of small-scale flood basalts. PMID:26581905

  6. Growing magma chambers control the distribution of small-scale flood basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xun; Chen, Li-Hui; Zeng, Gang

    2015-11-01

    Small-scale continental flood basalts are a global phenomenon characterized by regular spatio-temporal distributions. However, no genetic mechanism has been proposed to explain the visible but overlooked distribution patterns of these continental basaltic volcanism. Here we present a case study from eastern China, combining major and trace element analyses with Ar-Ar and K-Ar dating to show that the spatio-temporal distribution of small-scale flood basalts is controlled by the growth of long-lived magma chambers. Evolved basalts (SiO2 > 47.5 wt.%) from Xinchang-Shengzhou, a small-scale Cenozoic flood basalt field in Zhejiang province, eastern China, show a northward younging trend over the period 9.4-3.0 Ma. With northward migration, the magmas evolved only slightly ((Na2O + K2O)/MgO = 0.40-0.66 TiO2/MgO = 0.23-0.35) during about 6 Myr (9.4-3.3 Ma). When the flood basalts reached the northern end of the province, the magmas evolved rapidly (3.3-3.0 Ma) through a broad range of compositions ((Na2O + K2O)/MgO = 0.60-1.28 TiO2/MgO = 0.30-0.57). The distribution and two-stage compositional evolution of the migrating flood basalts record continuous magma replenishment that buffered against magmatic evolution and induced magma chamber growth. Our results demonstrate that the magma replenishment-magma chamber growth model explains the spatio-temporal distribution of small-scale flood basalts.

  7. Growing magma chambers control the distribution of small-scale flood basalts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xun; Chen, Li-Hui; Zeng, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Small-scale continental flood basalts are a global phenomenon characterized by regular spatio-temporal distributions. However, no genetic mechanism has been proposed to explain the visible but overlooked distribution patterns of these continental basaltic volcanism. Here we present a case study from eastern China, combining major and trace element analyses with Ar-Ar and K-Ar dating to show that the spatio-temporal distribution of small-scale flood basalts is controlled by the growth of long-lived magma chambers. Evolved basalts (SiO2 > 47.5 wt.%) from Xinchang-Shengzhou, a small-scale Cenozoic flood basalt field in Zhejiang province, eastern China, show a northward younging trend over the period 9.4-3.0 Ma. With northward migration, the magmas evolved only slightly ((Na2O + K2O)/MgO = 0.40-0.66; TiO2/MgO = 0.23-0.35) during about 6 Myr (9.4-3.3 Ma). When the flood basalts reached the northern end of the province, the magmas evolved rapidly (3.3-3.0 Ma) through a broad range of compositions ((Na2O + K2O)/MgO = 0.60-1.28; TiO2/MgO = 0.30-0.57). The distribution and two-stage compositional evolution of the migrating flood basalts record continuous magma replenishment that buffered against magmatic evolution and induced magma chamber growth. Our results demonstrate that the magma replenishment-magma chamber growth model explains the spatio-temporal distribution of small-scale flood basalts. PMID:26581905

  8. The alkali basaltic and picritic Magmatism in Minusa and Kusnetsk basin, geochemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firsov, Andrei; Ashchepkov, Igor; Rikhvanov, Leonid; Wald, Alexandr

    2015-04-01

    The alkali basalts and picrites are widely distributed within the Minusa depressions. They manifest quite different episodes of the magmatic activity and plumes. Some of them relate to late Devonian which are parallel to magmatism in Vilyui rift and Tungus basin as well as to Agul basaltic plateau in Sayan Foothills and in Kuznetsk Alatau (385 -360 Ma) and are mainly represented by the alkali basalts (Rikhvanov et al., 1991). The others are close in time to the Late Devonian kimberlitic basaltic magmatism and camptonite dykes in West Sayan. The Early stage of the Permian -Triassic super plume in Minusa and Kusnetsk basin 250 -254 Ma (Rikhvanov et al., 1991). The major pulse of magmatic activity at 248 -245 MA was not appeared in southern margin. But the latest which is represented in Meimecha province Northern Siberia But the late or new Early Triassic stage at 230 -240 Ma was again manifested by the appearance of the alkali picrite ankaratrite dykes. The later alkaline magmatism in Late Jurassic - Cretaceaus stages which was appeared in the Northern Siberian provinces appeared in Southern Siberia were much less pronounced. The Latest episode of the Mezo- Cenozoic activity (Kutolin, Frolova, 1970; Ashchepkov et al., 1995) in the Kopiev uplift with the abundant mantle xenoliths in magma manifest another stages which possibly is related to the hydrous plumes. The trace elements of the magmas in the Minusa depression show rather high concentration if the incompatible elements in all stages which suggest primary enrichment in the metasomatic components probably due to the ancient subducted related magmatism starting from the Devonian stage (Vorontsov et al., 2013) which had the model ages of about 0.9 Ga (Vrublevskii et al., 2014 ). The high melting stages which should be followed by the depletion and homogenization of the source mantle at the Superplume stage and the erupted volcanic still demonstrated rather high La/Yb rations. An thus the alkali picrite volcanic of

  9. Factors controlling the structures of magma chambers in basaltic volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L.; Head, James W.

    1991-01-01

    The depths, vertical extents, and lateral extents of magma chambers and their formation are discussed. The depth to the center of a magma chamber is most probably determined by the density structure of the lithosphere; this process is explained. It is commonly assumed that magma chambers grow until the stress on the roof, floor, and side-wall boundaries exceed the strength of the wall rocks. Attempts to grow further lead to dike propagation events which reduce the stresses below the critical values of rock failure. The tensile or compressive failure of the walls is discussed with respect to magma migration. The later growth of magma chambers is accomplished by lateral dike injection into the country rocks. The factors controlling the patterns of growth and cooling of such dikes are briefly mentioned.

  10. Combined effect of permeability and crystallization on the explosive eruption of basaltic magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moitra, P.; Gonnermann, H. M.; Houghton, B. F.; Crozier, J.

    2015-12-01

    Plinian eruptions are the most dangerous style of eruptive activity of basaltic magma. In this study, we focus on the two best studied Plinian eruptions of basaltic magma at Mt. Tarawera, New Zealand (1886 CE) and Mt. Etna, Italy (122 BCE). We measured and analyzed the porosity-permeability relationships of the pyroclasts from both eruptions. We then used numerical modeling to assess the relative importance of two competing processes during eruptive magma ascent, which are the syneruptive crystallization that increases viscosity, potentially increasing bubble overpressure, and the open-system degassing of the permeable magma that allows the pressurized gas to escape, potentially reducing bubble overpressure. We find that the onset of crystallization is likely to have occurred prior to the onset of magma percolation. The orders of magnitude increase in magma viscosity due to the nucleation and growth of microlites had the combined effect of rapidly increasing the decompression rate, due to viscous pressure losses associated with magma flow within the volcanic conduit, and decreasing the rates of bubble growth, thus building up large overpressures inside bubbles. Although measured permeabilities of the studied pyroclasts are 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than their silicic counterpart, our model results show that crystallization and subsequent increase in viscosity are likely to surpass the effect of open-system gas loss, thus increasing bubble overpressure, required for explosive magma fragmentation.

  11. Solidification of basaltic magma during flow in a dike.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delaney, P.T.; Pollard, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    A model for time-dependent unsteady heat transfer from magma flowing in a dyke is developed. The ratio of solidification T to magma T is the most important parameter. Observations of volcanic fissure eruptions and study of dykes near Ship Rock, New Mexico, show that the low T at dyke margins and the rapidly advancing solidification front predicted by the model are qualitatively correct.-M.S.

  12. The Perils of Partition: Difficulties in Retrieving Magma Compositions from Chemically Equilibrated Basaltic Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1996-01-01

    The chemical compositions of magmas can be derived from the compositions of their equilibrium minerals through mineral/magma partition coefficients. This method cannot be applied safely to basaltic rocks, either solidified lavas or cumulates, which have chemically equilibrated or partially equilibrated at subsolidus temperatures, i.e., in the absence of magma. Applying mineral/ melt partition coefficients to mineral compositions from such rocks will typically yield 'magma compositions' that are strongly fractionated and unreasonably enriched in incompatible elements (e.g., REE's). In the absence of magma, incompatible elements must go somewhere; they are forced into minerals (e.g., pyroxenes, plagioclase) at abundance levels far beyond those established during normal mineral/magma equilibria. Further, using mineral/magma partition coefficients with such rocks may suggest that different minerals equilibrated with different magmas, and the fractionation sequence of those melts (i.e., enrichment in incompatible elements) may not be consistent with independent constraints on the order of crystallization. Subsolidus equilibration is a reasonable cause for incompatible- element-enriched minerals in some eucrites, diogenites, and martian meteorites and offers a simple alternative to petrogenetic schemes involving highly fractionated magmas or magma infiltration metasomatism.

  13. Partial melting and fractionation in the Mesa Chivato alkali basalt-trachyte series, Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, C. M.; Schmidt, M. E.; Crumpler, L. S.; Wolff, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Mesa Chivato comprises a series of alkaline cones, flows, and domes within the Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF) in northwest New Mexico. Compositions range from alkali basalt to trachyte. Intermediate magmas are less well represented than mafic and felsic rocks, but benmoreites and transitional benmoreite-trachytes provide a window into the differentiation processes. Major element, trace element, and isotopic data suggest that petrogenesis of benmoreite proceeded by fractional crystallization of mafic liquids and magma mixing with partially melted mafic rocks. Major element mass balance models permit the derivation of transitional benmoreite/trachyte from the benmoreite by 20-25% crystallization of microphenocryst phases (olivine, plagioclase, Ti-magnetite, and apatite) and further fractionation to trachyte by 10-15% crystallization of olivine, plagioclase and alkali feldspar, Fe-Ti oxide, and apatite. These models are supported by SiO2-Sr and -Ba systematics. However, the hawaiite to benmoreite gap cannot be crossed by fractional crystallization alone. While major element models permit the mafic lavas to yield the benmoreite, they require extensive fractionation of clinopyroxene and plagioclase - this is unsupported by petrography (clinopyroxene phenocrysts are rare in the mafic rocks and lacking in the intermediate rocks) and cannot explain the benmoreite's very high Sr contents (>1800 ppm), which would have been depleted by plagioclase fractionation. From LA-ICPMS analysis of plagioclase: 87Sr/86Sr of early alkali basalt (0.70285-0.70300) and late hawaiite (0.70406-0.70421) bracket the 87Sr/86Sr of the benmoreite (0.70361-0.70406). Thus, either could represent the fractionated liquid parental to the benmoreite and the other the partially melted source.

  14. Igneous Rocks of the East Pacific Rise: The alkali volcanic suite appear to be differentiated from a tholeiitic basalt extruded from the mantle.

    PubMed

    Engel, A E; Engel, C G

    1964-10-23

    The apical parts of large volcanoes along the East Pacific Rise (islands and seamounts) are encrusted with rocks of the alkali volcanic suite (alkali basalt, andesine- and oligoclase-andesite, and trachyte). In contrast, the more submerged parts of the Rise are largely composed of a tholeiitic basalt which has low concentrations of K, P, U, Th, Pb, and Ti. This tholeiitic basalt is either the predominant or the only magma generated in the earth's mantle under oceanic ridges and rises. It is at least 1000-fold more abundant than the alkali suite, which is probably derived from tholeiitic basalt by magmatic differentiation in and immediately below the larger volcanoes. Distinction of oceanic tholeiites from almost all continental tholeiites is possible on the simple basis of total potassium content, with the discontinuity at 0.3 to 0.5 percent K(2)O by weight. Oceanic tholeiites also are readily distinguished from some 19 out of 20 basalts of oceanic islands and seamount cappings by having less than 0.3 percent K(2)O by weight and more than 48 percent SiO(2). Deep drilling into oceanic volcanoes should, however, core basalts transitional between the oceanic tholeiites and the presumed derivative alkali basalts. The composition of the oceanic tholeiites suggests that the mantle under the East Pacific Rise contains less than 0.10 percent potassium oxide by weight; 0.1 part per million of uranium and 0.4 part of thorium; a potassium:rubidium ratio of about 1200 and a potassium: uranium ratio of about 10(4). PMID:17806796

  15. Alkali basalts and enclosed ultramafic xenoliths near Ushuaia, Tierra Del Fuego, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Rogelio Daniel

    2016-01-01

    At the southernmost part of Tierra del Fuego a few outcrops and erratic boulders of alkali basaltic rocks with ultramafic enclaves have been studied. Alkali basalt plugs or pipes hitherto identified are scarce, and host rocks are constituted by slates that belong to Mesozoic deposition. The petrography, texture and composition of the basalt and xenoliths were investigated by petrographic microscope and electron microprobe analysis. Xenocrysts of amphibole and alkali feldspar, phenocrysts of nepheline, olivine, spinel, phlogopite and Fe-Ti minerals (10 %) and a diversity of xenoliths, mainly lherzolitic, pyroxenite and wehrlitic nodules (15 %), but also from metamorphic rocks provenance, are contained in the basalt groundmass (75 %). This finer-grained material is made up of laths or needles of plagioclase, pyroxene, opaque minerals, apatite and glass, with intersertal, hyalopilitic and pilotaxitic. Locally, rock has an even granoblastic texture. Former amygdules are filled by analcite, zeolites, sodalite and calcite. The normative classification, based on nepheline content, conclude that this rock is an alkali basalt. The chemical classification, considering immobile elements as Zr/TiO2 versus Nb/Y indicate an alkali basalt too and plots over the TAS diagram fall in the foidite (Na-rich or nephelinite) and basanite fields. The REE patterns are fractionated (La/Yb primitive mantle normalized is approximately 30). The K-Ar isotopic technique on individual macrocrysts gave ages of 146 ± 5 Ma (amphibole) and 127 ± 4 Ma (alkali feldspar); and K-Ar whole rock datum reported 8.3 ± 0.3 Ma. Nevertheless, fertile samples show geochemical features typical of deep derived material thus, based on the position in the actual tectonic setting, indicate that the basalt is older than its isotopic age. PMID:27610313

  16. Linking magma composition with volcano size and eruptive style in basaltic monogenetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, I. E.; McGee, L. E.; Cronin, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Magma composition, volcano size and eruptive style (together with vent locations) are the definitive parameters of basaltic monogenetic systems. These variables are not independent, but the relationships between them are complex. Monogenetic volcano fields that episodically erupt small-volume, discrete magma batches such as the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF, northern New Zealand), typically represent primary mantle melts variably modified by near source processes. In such cases, where the volume of magma is small, eruption styles are strongly controlled by the interaction of magma with the surficial environment and this is determined by both magma volume and its rise rate. The magmatic compositional extremes of primitive magmas in the AVF define a spectrum ranging from strongly silica-undersaturated nephelinite to sub-alkalic basalt. Nephelinites are low SiO2 (~40 wt.%), highly incompatible-element enriched compositions, representing very low degrees of partial melting (<2%) in the asthenospheric mantle. Higher SiO2 (~48 wt.%) sub-alkalic compositions have lower incompatible element contents representing higher degrees of melting (~<5%) at slightly shallower depths. Geochemical modeling indicates that all of these magmas are sourced within the same general mantle region at depths of 80-70 km. The two compositional extremes also define extremes in volume of magma and ultimately magma flux at the surface. The surficial environment of the AVF is characterized by highly water saturated sediments of variable competency and many pressurized aquifer systems. Where there is a combination of small volumes and low flux rates, environmental factors dominate and phreatomagmatic explosive eruptions ensue, forming tuff cones, rings and maars. Larger volumes and flux rates result in dry eruptions forming cinder cones and lava fields. Thus at a fundamental level defining magma source characteristics and temporal or spatial variation in these (such as cyclic or evolutionary trends

  17. Magma Genesis in the Hawaiian Hot Spot: From melting experiments on basalt/peridotite hybrid source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, E.

    2003-12-01

    Melting mantle peridotite is one of the central themes in experimental petrology. Melting studies in CMAS, NCMAS and natural peridotites have extensively documented the magma genesis process at Mid Oceanic Ridges (e.g., Presnall et al., 1979). Magma genesis in OIBs and LIPs, on the other hand, has been poorly constrained by experiments. Evidences from isotope geochemistry indicate that the source materials for basalt magmas in these provinces are not peridotite alone. Based on a geological and geochemical reconstruction of 3 Ma old Koolau volcano, I proposed that the size of eclogite blocks in the Hawaiian plume would exceed 1000km3 (Takahashi and Nakajima, 2002) and therefore the melting interaction of eclogite blocks and the surrounding peridotite would play essential roles in magma genesis in the Hawaiian hot spot. Melting experiments on basalt/peridotite composite starting materials were carried out at 2.5 to 3.0 GPa at temperatures from the peridotite dry solidus to that of basalt for 20 to 100 hours. Three layered starting materials consisting of 1 basalt to 2 peridotite (in volume) were placed in graphite/Pt double capsules. Peridotite KLB-1 (Fo89.6) and two basalt-starting materials (CLG-46 and CRB72-31) were used as starting materials. In temperatures ca.50-100 degrees below the peridotite solidus, silica-rich partial melts are produced in the basalt zone and the boundaries between the basalt and peridotite are coated with a 10 to 50 micron thick opx reaction band. The chemical reactions between the basalt and peridotite domains are controlled by solid diffusions across the opx reaction band and are very slow. In temperatures within 50 degrees of the peridotite dry solidus, a time dependent reaction process takes place. The basalt/peridotite boundary gradually partial melts as the chemical reaction lowers the peridotite solidus locally. At 2.8 GPa and 1450-1470C after 50-100 hours, resultant melt in the basalt layer becomes saturated with oliv + opx + cpx

  18. Basaltic Shergottite NWA 856: Differentiation of a Martian Magma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferdous, J.; Brandon, A. D.; Peslier, A. H.; Pirotte, Z.

    2016-01-01

    NWA 856 or Djel Ibone, is a basaltic shergottite discovered as a single stone of 320 g in South Morocco in April, 2001. This meteorite is fresh, i.e. shows minimal terrestrial weathering for a desert find. No shergottite discovered in North Africa can be paired with NWA 856. The purpose of this study is to constrain its crystallization history using textural observations, crystallization sequence modeling and in-situ trace element analysis in order to understand differentiation in shergottite magmatic systems.

  19. Mineralogy, geochemistry and expansion testing of an alkali-reactive basalt from western Anatolia, Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Copuroglu, Oguzhan; Andic-Cakir, Ozge; Broekmans, Maarten A.T.M.; Kuehnel, Radko

    2009-07-15

    In this paper, the alkali-silica reaction performance of a basalt rock from western Anatolia, Turkey is reported. It is observed that the rock causes severe gel formation in the concrete microbar test. It appears that the main source of expansion is the reactive glassy phase of the basalt matrix having approximately 70% of SiO{sub 2}. The study presents the microstructural characteristics of unreacted and reacted basalt aggregate by optical and electron microscopy and discusses the possible reaction mechanism. Microstructural analysis revealed that the dissolution of silica is overwhelming in the matrix of the basalt and it eventually generates four consequences: (1) Formation of alkali-silica reaction gel at the aggregate perimeter, (2) increased porosity and permeability of the basalt matrix, (3) reduction of mechanical properties of the aggregate and (4) additional gel formation within the aggregate. It is concluded that the basalt rock is highly prone to alkali-silica reaction. As an aggregate, this rock is not suitable for concrete production.

  20. Magma storage of an alkali ultramafic igneous suite from Chamberlindalen, SW Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gołuchowska, Karolina; Barker, Abigail K.; Czerny, Jerzy; Majka, Jarosław; Manecki, Maciej; Farajewicz, Milena; Dwornik, Maciej

    2016-02-01

    An alkali mafic-ultramafic igneous suite of composite intrusions, lenses and associated greenstones are hosted by Neoproterozoic metasedimentary sequences in Chamberlindalen, Southwest Svalbard. This study focuses on the alkali igneous suite of Chamberlindalen with a view to determining the conditions of magma storage. The rocks from Chamberlindalen display cumulate textures, are highly magnesian and are classified as alkaline by the occurrence of kaersutite. They have textures that indicate cocrystallization of primary magmatic minerals such as diopside, kaersutite-ferrokaersutite and biotite-phlogopite in different proportions. The historic magma plumbing system for the alkaline cumulates has been reconstructed by thermobarometry. Diopside and kaersutite crystallization in the alkaline cumulates show a dominant level of magma storage between 30 and 50 km in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle.

  1. Volatile Behavior in Lunar and Terrestrial Basalts During Shock: Implications for Martian Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaklader, Johny; Shearer, C. K.; Hoerz, F.; Newsom, H. E.

    2004-01-01

    The amount of water in martian magmas has significant ramifications for the martian atmosphere-hydrosphere cycle. Large D-enrichments have been observed in kaersutitic amphiboles in Zagami, Chassigny and Shergotty meteorites (delta-D values up to 4400 per mil) suggesting that substantial amounts of H escaped Mars in its past. Furthermore, martian meteorites with inclusions of biotite and apatite imply possible origins in a hydrous mantle. However, whether martian magmas ever possessed considerable proportions of water remains controversial and unclear. The H-content of mica and amphibole melt inclusions has been found to be low, while bulk-rock H2O content is also low ranging from 0.013 to 0.035 wt. % in Shergotty. Hydrous martian magmas were considered responsible for light lithophile element (LLE) zoning patterns observed in Nakhlite and Shergottite pyroxenes. Since LLEs, such as Li and B, partition into aqueous fluids at temperatures greater than 350 C, workers interpreted Li-B depletions in pyroxene rims as evidence that supercritical fluid exsolution occurred during magma degassing. In that many martian basalts experienced substantial shock (15-45 GPa) it is possible that the magmatic volatile record preserved in martian basalts has been disturbed. Previous shock experiments suggest that shock processes may effect water content and H/D. To better understand the possible effects of shock on this volatile record, we are studying the redistribution of volatile elements in naturally and experimentally shocked basalts. Here, we report the initial results from shocked basalts associated with the Lonar Crater, India and an experimentally shocked lunar basalt.

  2. Temperature evolution during magma ascent in basaltic effusive eruptions: A numerical application to Stromboli volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Spina, G.; Burton, M.; de'Michieli Vitturi, M.

    2015-09-01

    The dynamics of magma ascent are controlled by the complex, interdependent processes of crystallisation, rheological evolution, gas exsolution, outgassing, non-ideal gas expansion and temperature evolution. Temperature changes within the conduit, in particular, play a key role on ascent dynamics, since temperature strongly controls the crystallisation process, which in turn has an impact on viscosity and thus on magma ascent rate. The cooling produced by gas expansion is opposed by the heat produced by crystallisation, and therefore the temperature profile within the conduit is quite complex. This complexity means that unravelling the dynamics controlling magma ascent requires a numerical model. Unfortunately, comprehensive, integrated models with full thermodynamic treatment of multiple phases and rheological evolution are challenging to produce, due to the numerical challenges involved. Until now, models have tended to focus on aspects of the problem, without a holistic approach in which petrological, thermodynamic, rheological and degassing processes, and their interactions, were all explicitly addressed and quantified. Here, we present a new, multiphase steady-state model for magma ascent in which the main physical and chemical processes, such as crystallisation, degassing, outgassing, rheological evolution and temperature variations, are quantitatively calculated. Basaltic magma's crystallisation and flow are sensitive to initial temperature and volatile content, and therefore we investigate temperature variations during magma ascent in a basaltic system with a range of volatile contents. As a test case, we use one of the most well-studied recent basaltic effusive eruptions: the 2007 eruption of Stromboli, Italy. Assuming equilibrium crystallisation and exsolution, we compare the solutions obtained both with and without an isothermal constraint, finding that temperature variations within the conduit have a significant influence on the ascent dynamics and

  3. Thermal control of low-pressure fractionation processes. [in basaltic magma solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usselman, T. M.; Hodge, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal models detailing the solidification paths for shallow basaltic magma chambers (both open and closed systems) were calculated using finite-difference techniques. The total solidification time for closed chambers are comparable to previously published calculations; however, the temperature-time paths are not. These paths are dependent on the phase relations and the crystallinity of the system, because both affect the manner in which the latent heat of crystallization is distributed. In open systems, where a chamber would be periodically replenished with additional parental liquid, calculations indicate that the possibility is strong that a steady-state temperature interval is achieved near a major phase boundary. In these cases it is straightforward to analyze fractionation models of the basaltic liquid evolution and their corresponding cumulate sequences. This steady thermal fractionating state can be invoked to explain large amounts of erupted basalts of similar composition over long time periods from the same volcanic center and some rhythmically layered basic cumulate sequences.

  4. Magma Processes in Generating Basalts at the Poison Lake Chain, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenner, J. M.; Teasdale, R.; Kroeninger, K. L.; Albanese, C.; Duhamel, N.

    2012-12-01

    We present new data for primitive basalts in the Poison Lake chain east of Lassen Volcanic National Park in northern California. The primitive composition and location of Poison Lake chain cinder cones on the western margin of the Basin and Range suggest that extensional tectonics may facilitate efficient magma ascent with little contamination. The Poison Lake chain is an ideal location to study small-scale variations in the mantle beneath the southern Cascades because of the small volumes erupted and the proximity to the Basin and Range. The volcanic field encompasses 39 units that comprise nine chemically distinct groups of primitive calc-alkaline basalts (defined by major element geochemistry and mineralogy). Olivine core compositions range from Fo72 - Fo89; most are in equilibrium with their whole rock compositions. Plagioclase core compositions range from An62-An88. Trace-element and isotope data for the groups confirm distinct chemistries that show little evidence of direct genetic relationships or a common source among these basalts. The small volume and distinct isotopic characteristics of individual groups suggest that they are the product of small mantle source domains. CaO compositions of olivine crystals further support that these basalts represent small independent magma batches. Isotope ratios, major and trace element compositions (whole rock) and crystal compositions reflect pre-eruption processing for some groups, which provide insights into the degree of pre-eruption processing versus the extent of source heterogeneities. Other groups have smaller compositional ranges (whole rock isotopes, trace, and major elements), more homogeneous olivine and plagioclase compositions, and reflect smaller degrees of processing prior to eruption. Compositional ranges within individual groups constrain the degree to which magmas were processed during transport from the mantle source to the surface in the Poison Lake chain.

  5. Explosive magma interaction revealed by physical and textural properties of basaltic scoria at Stromboli volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pioli, L.; Pistolesi, M.; Rosi, M.

    2012-12-01

    Increase of explosivity at Stromboli, an open conduit, persistently active basaltic volcano located in southern Italy, is marked by the contemporaneous emission of a degassed, crystal-rich magma (HP) and a crystal-poor, probably volatile-richer magma (LP) rising from a deeper reservoir (Bertagnini et al. 2003). These magmas have very similar bulk composition, and very uniform petrological features (Landi et al., 2009; Métrich et al., 2010). Despite this uniformity, the volcano has a large variability of explosive eruptive style and intensity, with eruptive volumes ranging from 10 2 to 107 m3, very short (seconds to minutes) durations, MERs ranging from 102 to 107 kg/s. Each larger explosion is also marked by a sudden onset without any significant precursory activity, suggesting the fast rise of small, volatile-rich magma batches (Rosi et al. 2012). The erupted material consists of mingled clasts, with very variable vesicularity and textural features, and, more rarely, of homogeneous clasts composed only by HP magma. To understand the role of interaction between the two magmas in the explosion dynamics, we have peformed a systematic study of the chemical and physical properties of scoria clasts selected at random from proximal to medial locations from recent eruptions covering the entire spectrum of the high-intensity activity, and compare their variability with the eruptive parameters. The scoria clasts erupted from single eruption display a unimodal, relatively narrow vesicularity distribution with a definite peak, but a large variability, from 35 to 90 %, characterizes the total sample suite. In general, there is a negative correlation between explosion intensity and average vesicularity of population from different eruptions, but a more complex relationship with vesicle size distribution and relative proportion between the two magma end members. Mingling textures also differ in terms of scale, and geometry of contact structures between the two magmas. The

  6. Enriched asthenosphere melting beneath the nascent North African margin: trace element and Nd isotope evidence in middle-late Triassic alkali basalts from central Sicily (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrincione, Rosolino; Fiannacca, Patrizia; Lustrino, Michele; Romano, Vanessa; Tranchina, Annunziata; Villa, Igor M.

    2016-03-01

    During the dismembering of the Pangea supercontinent, middle-late Triassic sub-volcanic alkaline rocks were emplaced in central Sicily. These rocks have an alkali basaltic composition and show OIB-like incompatible element patterns in primitive mantle-normalized diagrams (e.g., enrichments in HFSE and LREE coupled with high HFSE/LILE ratios), as well as slightly positive \\varepsilon_{Nd} values. Only subtle effects of crustal contamination at shallow depths emerge from geochemical data. These characteristics are very different compared with the Permian calcalkaline magmas from elsewhere in SW Europe still carrying the geochemical signature of modifications related to the Variscan orogeny. The mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic compositions of the investigated samples from central Sicily are also different from the coeval shoshonitic volcano-plutonic formations of Southern Alps (Dolomites). The incompatible element composition and Nd isotopic ratios are consistent with low-degree partial melting of a moderately depleted asthenospheric mantle source, with a negligible involvement of the thinned continental crust. The studied alkaline basalts represent the only known evidence of a segment of the Triassic rift system associated with early Pangea breakup in central Sicily. The close similarity of the central Sicily Triassic alkali basalts with coeval basalts emplaced along former orogenic sutures across the peri-Mediterranean area suggests a common origin related, at least partly, to asthenospheric passive upwelling following the tectonic collapse of the Variscan Belt. These rocks provide new constraints on the spatial-temporal distribution, magma source evolution and geodynamic meaning of the widespread Permo-Triassic basic magmatism developed after the end of the Variscan Orogeny in southwestern Europe.

  7. Tidal Dissipation in Basalt Magma Chambers - Implications for Io's Loki Patera and Icy Satellite Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, J. C.; Matson, D. L.; Davies, A. G.; Johnson, T. V.; Veeder, G. J.

    2006-05-01

    We discuss tidal dissipation in molten basaltic magma and the results from model application to Io and Enceladus. Magma is a non-newtonian liquid with a complex rheology dependent on interactions between different phases: liquid, crystals and bubbles, resulting in a slurry with each component responding differently to temperature and stress. This study is based on results obtained for terrestrial basalts. For example, the evolution of crystal content as a function of temperature has been described for basalts [e.g., 1]. The behavior of cyclically stressed basalt has been observed in laboratory for frequencies corresponding to seismic waves between 1 and 200 sec. [e.g., 2-5]. While this frequency range is outside the range of dynamical frequencies considered in planetary sciences, these results show variations of the response as a function of the wavelength of the structure involved in the response. From the trend observed at low frequencies we extrapolate these data to tidal frequencies encountered at Io and Enceladus. We apply this result to a silicate magma chamber deep in Enceladus's core. Such a magma body has been proposed by Matson et al. [6, 7] as a heat source for keeping Enceladus warm over geological time and ultimately powering the observed volcanism [8]. We also apply the model to the 'magma sea' at Loki Patera [9] the source of 10-20% of Io's heat flow. In both cases we evaluate how much tidal dissipation can be produced. Our objectives are to chart the development and long-term evolution of magma chambers on bodies heavily influenced by tidal dissipation. From consideration of the relevant processes taking place over appropriate timescales, results show that self- regulation mechanisms are in place, such that crystal content and heat production remain in equilibrium over geological time. Our preliminary results support long-term preservation of a magma chamber in Enceladus' core. Coupled thermal-orbital modeling also indicates consistency between this

  8. Ambrym Basaltic Volcano (Vanuatu Arc): Volatile Fluxes, Magma Degassing Rate and Chamber Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, P.; Aiuppa, A.; Bani, P.; Metrich, N.; Bertagnini, A.; Gauthier, P. G.; Parello, F.; Sawyer, G. M.; Shinohara, H.; Bagnato, E.; Mariet, C.; Garaebiti, E.; Pelletier, B.

    2009-12-01

    Basaltic magma continuously erupts and degases during lava lake and/or Strombolian explosive activity at Marum and Benbow cones, the two active vents of Ambrym arc volcano in Vanuatu (800 m asl), generating a huge volcanic plume. Here we report the first complete budget for the volatile emissions of major, trace and radioactive species, as well as the first data for dissolved volatiles in the erupted basalt (Fo83-74 olivine-hosted melt inclusions, MIs), which allows us to assess the depth and degassing rate of the magma reservoir feeding Ambrym volcano. Real-time multi-gas measurements, coupled with lab analysis of filtered-pack plume samples, demonstrate that gas emissions from Marum and Benbow cones are uniform in their water content (90 mol%), SO2/HCl (5), SO2/HF (11) and trace metals/SO2 ratios but differ in their CO2/SO2 ratio (5.6 and 1.0, respectively), suggesting a deeper (CO2-enriched) gas derivation at Marum. Airborne measurements of SO2 flux (8000 tons/day) and the bulk plume CO2/SO2 ratio (3.7) verify that Marum cone produces 60% of the overall emissions, while Benbow only 40%. Ambrym ranks among the strongest volcanic emitters on Earth not only for SO2 (this work and a), but also for H2O, CO2, HCl, HF and HBr (2x105, 2x104, 800, 180 and 7 tons/day, respectively), for several volatile to mildly-volatile trace elements (Se, As, Sn, Tl, Cu, Pb, Rb, Cd, Ag) and for radioactive 210Po (~8.5% of the global volcanic flux). The aphyric nature of the basalt and the quite low dissolved wt% of H2O (≤1.5), CO2 (≤0.1) and S (≤0.15) in MIs of Fo83-olivine point to shallow melt entrapment in a gas-rich magma reservoir emplaced at ~3.6 km depth beneath the caldera. This depth is in good agreement with inference from available VLPT-seismic data (b). The magma degassing rate - from 2.7x108 kg/d (based on S data) to 1.3x109 kg/d (using the Pb’s output, melt content and vapour-melt partition coefficient) - largely exceeds the production of ash (~106 kg/d) and

  9. Magma flow-direction indicators in the diabase feeder dike to the first flood basalt in the Mesozoic Hartford basin, Connecticut

    SciTech Connect

    Philpotts, A.R.; Asher, P.M. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-03-01

    Recent kinematic analysis has indicated that magma may have been emplaced horizontally rather than vertically in some large regional diabase dikes. Such analysis, however, has commonly relied on a single flow indicator, such as anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility, which may reflect only late stage adjustments in a body of crystallizing magma. This study of kinematic indicators in a Mesozoic diabase dike in southern New England indicates that the direction of flow in large dikes may change during emplacement, and that a single flow indicator cannot give a complete picture of the flow history. The 250-km-long Higganum dike fed the first flood basalt in the Hartford basin of Connecticut. The margins of this dike contain 8 independent magma flow indicators, which involve the imbrication and deformation of phenocrysts, the shearing of felsic wisps, and the segregation of residual liquids. The felsic wisps, which were derived by partial melting of the wallrock, preserve the most complete record of flow in the dike. Early felsic liquids exchanged alkalis with the still largely molten diabase magma and consequently are K-poor; ones that entered after the diabase was largely solid are relatively K-rich. Most K-poor felsic wisps were deformed into recumbent folds by back-flowing magma. Later K-rich felsic streaks parallel the axial planes of these folds. The shear of magma past phenocrysts near the dike margins also caused K-rich felsic liquids to segregate in low-pressure zones on the opposing ends of these crystals. All of these flow indicators record a complex history of dike emplacement, with periods of upward intrusion always being followed by periods of back-flow.

  10. Evaluation of crustal recycling during the evolution of Archean-age Matachewan basaltic magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Dennis O.

    1989-01-01

    The simplest model for the Matachewan-Hearst Dike (MHD) magmas is assimilation-fractional crystallization (AFC), presumably occurring at the base of the crust during underplating. Subduction zone enriched mantle sources are not required. Trace elements suggest that the mantle sources for the MHD were depleted, but possessed a degree of heterogeneity. Rates of assimilation were approximately 0.5 (= Ma/Mc); the contaminant mass was less than 20 percent. The contaminant was dominated by tonalites-randodiorites, similar to xenoliths and rocks in the Kapuskasing Structural Zone (KSZ). Assimilation of partial melts of light-rare earth and garnet-bearing basaltic precursors may have produced some the MHD magmas. Apparently, previous underplating-AFC processes had already produced a thick crust. The silicic granitoid assimilant for the MHD magmas was probably produced by earlier processing of underplated mafic crust (4, 5, 10, 21 and 30). Calculations suggest that the derived silicic rocks possess negative Ta and Ti anomalies even though they were not the product of subduction.

  11. Density and structure of basaltic magma under high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamaki, T.; Ohtani, E.; Suzuki, A.; Terasaki, H.; Urakawa, S.; Katayama, Y.; Funakoshi, K.

    2008-12-01

    The density of magma is one of the important properties for discussing evolution of magma ocean at the early history of the planets and magmatic activity in the planetary mantle. We have measured the density of basaltic melt at high temperature and high pressure by X-ray absorption method. The experiments were carried out using a DIA-type cubic press at BL22XU of the SPring-8. X-ray absorption method is accurate method for the density measurement under desired pressure and temperature compared to the other methods. This method for density measurements was originally developed by Katayama et al. (1993). It is based on the Lambert-Beer"fs law. The sample was placed in a diamond capsule to calibrate the sample thickness and the X-ray absorption profile of the sample was measured by ion chambers. We succeeded in measuring the density of basaltic melt up to 4.6 GPa and up to 2000 K. We obtained the compression curve of basaltic melt by using the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state with a negative pressure derivative of bulk modulus (dK/dP). A negative dK/dP might be caused by the structural change of the silicate melts, although it is unlikely in crystals. The structure of magma is based on continuous three-dimensional networks of corner-sharing SiO4 and AlO4 tetrahedra, as being derived from a network of tetrahedrally coordinated Si and Al atoms each linked to four others through a shared O atom. The principal mechanisms of compression for silicate melts involve continuous changes in T-O-T bond angles and bond lengths. Silicate melts might undergo continuous and gradual changes in topology and cation coordinations. In order to further understand these changes and how they are affected by the microscopic structure, we have conducted the energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction to determine the structure of the basaltic melt up to 5 GPa. High pressure and high temperature X-ray diffraction experiments on basaltic melts were carried out by the energy dispersive method using

  12. Basaltic Magma-Water Interaction on Earth: Recognition Criteria To Aid Planetary Mapping on Mars (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skilling, I. P.; Graettinger, A. H.; Mercurio, E.; McGarvie, D.; Edwards, B. R.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction of basaltic magma with frozen/liquid water or wet sediment is a very common process on Earth, resulting in a wide array of explosively and non-explosively generated products at the micron to kilometre scale. A variety of products and edifices on Mars have also been interpreted as having formed by such interaction, but with the exception of rootless cones, such interpretations are rarely unequivocal. This talk focuses on terrestrial process recognition criteria at a scale, orientation (vertical) and erosion level that is relevant to Mars geological mapping. In this context, we emphasise intrusions with peperite margins and wide hydrothermal haloes, steep margins of ice-contact lava flows, subaerial-subaqueous lava delta transitions, lava domains with distinctive water-cooled jointing, edifices that are dominated by slumped and rotated beds, and the presence of surrounding fluvial deposits and erosion. The most common products of magma-water interaction on Earth are subaqueously emplaced lava flows, which are dominated by pillow lavas. Though pillows are not easy to distinguish from subaerial pahoehoe toes at the resolution of most remote imagery, they are commonly associated with distinctively jointed lava domains, which are usually on a larger scale, including areas of water-cooled jointing (curvicolumnar, blocky etc), lava-filled tubes, which often display radial jointing, and steep talus deposits of joint-block breccia. Subaqueous basaltic lavas emplaced in an ice-confined environment may also display near-vertical ice-contact margins, draped by curtains of elongate pillows or cavities formed from melting of included ice-blocks. Subaerial lava flows that transition into water also develop large-scale foreset-bedding close to the angle of repose, which should be easily visible, at least in oblique imagery. As the majority of the Martian surface is more deeply eroded than most areas of terrestrial basaltic volcanism, it is important to discuss

  13. Lithium tracer-diffusion in an alkali-basaltic melt — An ion-microprobe determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, R. K.; Reed, S. J. B.; Nolan, J.; Henderson, P.; Long, J. V. P.

    1981-03-01

    An ion-microprobe-based technique has been used to measure lithium tracer-diffusion coefficients ( D Li) in an alkali-basaltic melt at 1300, 1350 and 1400°C. The results can be expressed in the form: D Li=7.5 ×10 -2exp(-27,600/RT)cm 2S -1 The results show significantly faster diffusion rates than those previously recorded for other monovalent, divalent and trivalent cations in a tholeiitic melt. Consequently, diffusive transport of ions acting over a given time in a basaltic melt can produce a wider range of transport distance values than hitherto supposed. Hence, it is concluded that great care should be exercised when applying diffusion data to petrological problems.

  14. Uptaking of plagioclase xenocryst into H2O-rich rear-arc basaltic magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, M.

    2015-12-01

    Kuritani et al. (2013, Mineral. Petrol.) and Kuritani et al. (2014, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol.) estimated genetic conditions of primary arc magmas beneath the Iwate volcano (a frontal arc volcano in the northeast Japan arc) and the Sannome-gata volcano (a rear-arc volcano in the northeast Japan arc) based on analyses of volcanic rocks and numerical simulation. They estimated that H2O concentrations of primary melts are 4-5 wt.% beneath the Iwate volcano and 6-7 wt.% beneath the Sannnome-gata volcano, respectively. Their arguments mean that primary melts beneath frontal-arc volcanoes and rear-arc volcanoes are both H2O-rich, yet there has been no direct evidence to support their arguments at the Sannnome-gata volcano because volcanic rocks are either almost aphyric and/or almost no melt inclusions were found. Hydrogen concentration in nominally anhydrous minerals serves as a hygrometer of arc basaltic melts (e.g., Hamada et al. 2013, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.). In this study, hydrogen concentration of plagioclase as a crustal xenocryst was analyzed to estimate H2O concentration of basaltic melt coexisted with plagioclase before the eruption. Plagioclase xenocrists were separated from crushed scoria which erupted from the Sannome-gata volcano 20,000-24,000 years ago. Composition of the plagioclase core is homogeneous and ranges from An30 through An35. The rim is 150 to 200-μm-thick dusty zone whose composition is around An60, suggesting that the rim crystallized rapidly from degassed basaltic melt. The profiles of infrared absorption area per unit thickness across the plagioclase core were obtained using Fourier Transform InfraRed spectrometer (FTIR). The inner core contains hydrogen of about 60 wt. ppm H2O, and hydrogen concentration elevates at outer core. Hydrogen concentration at the outermost core of plagioclase is >200 wt. ppm H2O, suggesting that plagioclase xenocrists were taken by hydrous melt (H2O>5 wt.%; Hamada et al. 2014, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.) and

  15. Rheological Properties of Ascending Magma at a Basaltic Andesitic System: Puy De La Vache, France As a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, L.; Sehlke, A.; Harris, A. J. L.; Whittington, A. G.; Menand, T.

    2014-12-01

    Eruptions at basaltic andesitic systems are often characterized by effusive behavior. However, an increasing number of examples around the World indicate that these magmas, with low degrees of differentiation and basic compositions, have the capacity to produce explosive eruptions; thus presenting a considerable hazard. Volcanoes in the Chaîne des Puys (France), more specically the Puy de la Vache volcano, are good examples of explosive activity at basaltic andesitic centers. A combination of factors can explain this behavior: high magma ascent rate, high content of dissolved gases and high crystal contents. The latter leads to an increase in magma viscosity. The rheological properties of the magma control the eruptive style; viscosity itself strongly depends on composition, temperature, crystal fraction and vesicularity. In particular, an increase in crystal content may drastically change the composition of the residual melt and adds rigid particles to the mixture, inducing a complex strain rate dependence. Here, we are interested in the rheology of basaltic andesitic magmas as a function of crystal content. To quantify the effect of crystals on the viscosity, we measured the stress-strain relationship of the remelted Puy de la Vache lava by concentric cylinder viscometry at super and subliquidus conditions. Concurrently, we performed a textural analysis to determine the crystal fraction at each temperature. We also measured viscosities close to the glass transition using a parallel plate viscometer. We then compared the measured viscosities with those obtained from calculations using existing models. With the experimentally obtained stress-strain rate relationship of the magma at different temperatures and crystal fractions, our goal is to design a model where viscosity varies across the conduit depending on the shear stress and strain rate conditions. This will allow us to characterize the potential explosive behavior of basaltic to andesitic magmas.

  16. Evidence for Magma-Mixing and Disequilibrium in 'Primitive' Basaltic Andesites From Mount Shasta, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeman, W. P.; Streck, M. J.; Chesley, J. T.; Tonarini, S.

    2005-12-01

    High-Mg basaltic andesites near Mt. Shasta volcano have been considered fundamental to establishing the existence of exceptionally water-rich primary magmas in this system, implying significant slab-derived fluid fluxes into the underlying mantle wedge (Grove et al., 2002). This notion was reinvestigated via new mineralogical and geochemical studies of fresh scoria blocks from the Whaleback volcano (loc. S17; Anderson,1979). These high-Mg andesites (58% SiO2, 8.5% MgO, Mg# = 76, 120 ppm Ni, 550 ppm Cr) carry small dunitic xenoliths and xeno/phenocrysts (ol+opx+cpx). Plagioclase is not a liquidus phase. Electron microprobe traverses and back-scattered images show that mafic silicates, particularly pyroxenes, have complex histories. Olivine compositions of larger crystals and interiors are often above Fo90 up to Fo94 whereas microphenocrysts and rims of larger crystals are ~Fo87. Complexities among pyroxenes include: (a) Cores of opx and cpx with low Mg# (~67) containing melt inclusions; this evidence indicates these pyroxenes crystallized from magma of roughly dacitic composition; (b) Virtually all low Mg# grains are resorbed and have overgrowths (~20 microns) of high Mg# (87-92) that may be internally zoned arriving at a Mg# near 80 at the outermost euhedral rim; (c) Another variant is orthopyroxene with 'wormy' texture and either a thin (~15 microns) euhedral overgrowth or anhedral outline; compositions of resorbed interiors and overgrowth are similar ( Mg# range: 80 to 90), but distribution of lower and higher Mg# in resorbed areas is patchy whereas any compositional zoning of overgrowth follows crystal shape and arrives again at a Mg# of ~80 at the outermost rim. These data record mixing of diverse magmas (dacite and one or more basaltic liquids) combined with entrainment of ultramafic crystal debris during wall rock contamination, and eventual cooling and equilibration. Low Al2O3 contents in the pyroxenes imply that these minerals grew at relatively low

  17. Petrogenesis of basaltic volcanic rocks from the Pribilof Islands, Alaska, by melting of metasomatically enriched depleted lithosphere, crystallization differentiation, and magma mixing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, J.M.; Feeley, T.C.; Deraps, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    The Pribilof Islands, Alaska, are located in the Bering Sea in a continental intraplate setting. In this study we examine the petrology and geochemistry of volcanic rocks from St. Paul (0??54-0??003 Ma) and St. George (2??8-1??4 Ma) Islands, the two largest Pribilof Islands. Rocks from St. George can be divided into three groups: group 1 is a high-MgO, low-SiO. 2 suite composed primarily of basanites; group 2 is a high-MgO, high-SiO 2 suite consisting predominantly of alkali basalts; group 3 is an intermediate- to low-MgO suite that includes plagioclase-phyric subalkali basalts and hawaiites. Major and trace element geochemistry suggests that groups 1 and 2 formed by small-degree partial melting of amphibole-bearing to amphibole-free garnet peridotite. Group 1 rocks were the earliest melts produced from the most hydrous parts of the mantle, as they show the strongest geochemical signature of amphibole in their source. The suite of rocks from St. Paul ranges from 14??4 to 4??2 wt % MgO at relatively constant SiO 2 contents (43??1-47??3 wt %). The most primitive St. Paul rocks are modeled as mixtures between magmas with compositions similar to groups 1 and 2 from St. George Island, which subsequently fractionated olivine, clinopyroxene, and spinel to form more evolved rocks. Plagioclase-phyric group 3 rocks from St. George are modeled as mixtures between an evolved melt similar to the evolved magmas on St. Paul and a fractionated group 2 end-member from St. George. Mantle potential temperatures estimated for primitive basanites and alkali basalts are ???1400??C and are similar to those of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB). Similarly, 87Sr/. 86Sr and 143Nd/. 144Nd values for all rocks are MORB-like, in the range of 0??702704-0??703035 and 0??513026-0??513109, respectively. 208Pb/. 204Pb vs 206Pb/. 204Pb values lie near the MORB end-member but show a linear trend towards HIMU (high time-integrated 238U/. 204Pb). Despite isotopic similarities to MORB, many of the major and

  18. Halogen degassing during ascent and eruption of water-poor basaltic magma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edmonds, M.; Gerlach, T.M.; Herd, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    A study of volcanic gas composition and matrix glass volatile concentrations has allowed a model for halogen degassing to be formulated for K??lauea Volcano, Hawai'i. Volcanic gases emitted during 2004-2005 were characterised by a molar SO2/HCl of 10-64, with a mean of 33; and a molar HF/HCl of 0-5, with a mean of 1.0 (from approximately 2500 measurements). The HF/HCl ratio was more variable than the SO2/HCl ratio, and the two correlate weakly. Variations in ratio took place over rapid timescales (seconds). Matrix glasses of Pele's tears erupted in 2006 have a mean S, Cl and F content of 67, 85 and 173??ppm respectively, but are associated with a large range in S/F. A model is developed that describes the open system degassing of halogens from parental magmas, using the glass data from this study, previously published results and parameterisation of sulphur degassing from previous work. The results illustrate that halogen degassing takes place at pressures of < 1??MPa, equivalent to < ~ 35??m in the conduit. Fluid-melt partition coefficients for Cl and F are low (< 1.5); F only degasses appreciably at < 0.1??MPa above atmospheric pressure, virtually at the top of the magma column. This model reproduces the volcanic gas data and other observations of volcanic activity well and is consistent with other studies of halogen degassing from basaltic magmas. The model suggests that variation in volcanic gas halogen ratios is caused by exsolution and gas-melt separation at low pressures in the conduit. There is no evidence that either diffusive fractionation or near-vent chemical reactions involving halogens is important in the system, although these processes cannot be ruled out. The fluxes of HCl and HF from K??lauea during 2004-5 were ~ 25 and 12??t/d respectively. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Tectonic focusing of voluminous basaltic eruptions in magma-deficient backarc rifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Melissa O.; Hannington, Mark D.; Haase, Karsten; Schwarz-Schampera, Ulrich; Augustin, Nico; McConachy, Timothy F.; Allen, Katie

    2016-04-01

    The Coriolis Troughs of the New Hebrides subduction zone are among the youngest backarc rifts in the world. They reach depths of >3 km, despite their small size (<100 km in length and only 25-45 km wide) and their proximity to the arc front (∼50 km). The narrow, deep graben morphology is characteristic of magma-deficient arc rifts in the early stages of backarc extension, where the rate of extension and subsidence exceeds the magmatic input. Unexpectedly, the youngest graben, the Vate Trough, contains a centrally-located 1000-m tall and 14-km wide shield volcano with a large, 5 × 8 km breached summit caldera. The Nifonea axial volcano has a volume of ∼126 km3, reflecting unusually high extrusion rates, given its young age (<3 Ma), and the summit caldera hosts the remnants of a large lava lake, the first described from a submarine backarc setting. Extensive diffuse hydrothermal venting and several clusters of black smoker chimneys, with the highest recorded fluid temperatures (368 °C) in the SW Pacific, occur on the youngest lava flows. Comparison with similar axial volcanoes on the mid-ocean ridges suggests that the 46 ×106 m3 of sheet flows in the caldera could have been erupted in <30 hours. The focusing of voluminous basaltic eruptions into an otherwise magma-deficient backarc has been linked to strong left-lateral transtension caused by clockwise rotation and segmentation of the southern portion of the arc after collision with d'Entrecasteaux ridge. This study shows that the upper plate stresses can result in dramatic variability in magma supply and hydrothermal activity at the earliest stages of arc rifting and could explain the wide range of melt compositions, volcanic styles and mineral deposit types found in nascent backarc rifts.

  20. Xenoliths from Late Cretaceous seamounts in the Central Pacific: Cumulates of fractionating alkalic basalt magma chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.S.; Friesen, W.B.; Pickthorn, L.; Pringle, M.S.; Clague, D.A. )

    1990-06-01

    Abundant xenoliths in alkalic basalt were recovered from two Late Cretaceous seamounts in the Central Pacific. One seamount, located in the Phoenix archipelago (lat 0{degree}22'5, long 176{degree}05'W), is dated by {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar techniques as 65 Ma. The other seamount, located in the northern Line Islands (lat 15{degree}39'N, long 170{degree}23'W), is dated as 70 Ma. Host lavas are basanite and differentiated alkalic basalt. Mafic xenolith assemblages consist of clinopyroxene with variable amounts of amphibole and mica. Intermediate assemblages have abundant feldspar in addition to the mafic minerals. Rare felsic xenoliths consist of two or more feldspars. Variable amounts of apatite, titanite, and magnetite are poikilitically enclosed in mafic phases, and minor feldspathoids are present in some xenoliths. Most xenoliths are holocrystalline with fine- to medium-grained, equigranular cumulus texture, but two xenoliths have a seriate, interlocking crystal framework in a small amount of glassy to microcrystalline matrix. Clinopyroxene in the holocrystalline samples is partially replaced by amphibole. In a few samples, extensive replacement of clinopyroxene by rounded amphibole grains results in a nearly granoblastic texture. Clinopyroxene compositions range from diopside to ferrosalite and are essentially Cr-free but generally have high Ti and Al contents. Cr-rich diopside and Al-augite, characteristic of mantle clinopyroxene, are absent. Feldspars include plagioclase, anorthoclase, and sanidine. Mineral compositions of xenoliths are similar to those of phenocrysts in the host lavas, indicating that these xenoliths are not metasomatized mantle material, but rather are cumulates from fractionating alkalic basalt magma chambers.

  1. Geochemistry of basalts from small eruptive centers near Villarrica stratovolcano, Chile: Evidence for lithospheric mantle components in continental arc magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey-Vargas, R.; Sun, M.; Holbik, S.

    2016-07-01

    In the Central Southern Volcanic Zone (CSVZ) of the Andes, the location of stratovolcanoes and monogenetic small eruptive centers (SEC) is controlled by the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ), a trench-parallel strike-slip feature of over 1000 km length. The geochemistry of basalts from SEC is different from those of stratovolcanoes, and are termed Type 2 and Type 1 basalts, respectively. In the region of Villarrica stratovolcano, contemporaneous SEC are more MgO-rich, and have greater light rare earth element (LREE) enrichment, lower 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd, and lower ratios of large ion lithophile elements (LILE) to LREE and high field strength elements (HFSE). A unique finding in this region is that basalts from one SEC, San Jorge, has Type 1 character, similar to basalts from Villarrica stratovolcano. Type 1 basalts from Villarrica and San Jorge SEC have strong signals from time-sensitive tracers of subduction input, such as high 10Be/9Be and high (238U/230Th), while Type 2 SEC have low 10Be/9Be and (238U/230Th) near secular equilibrium. Based on new trace element, radiogenic isotope and mineral analyses, we propose that Type 1 basaltic magma erupted at San Jorge SEC and Villarrica stratovolcano forms by melting of the ambient actively subduction-modified asthenosphere, while Type 2 SEC incorporate melts of pyroxenite residing in the supra-subduction zone mantle lithosphere. This scenario is consistent with the close proximity of the volcanic features and their inferred depths of magma separation. The pyroxenite forms from arc magma produced during earlier episodes of subduction modification and magmatism, which extend back >300 Ma along this segment of the western South American margin. Type 2 basaltic magmas may reach the surface during LOFZ-related decompression events, and they may also be a normal but episodic part of the magma supply to large stratovolcanoes, resulting in cryptic geochemical variations over time. The presence and mobilization of stored

  2. Interpretation of trace element and isotope features of basalts: relevance of field relations, petrology, major element data, phase equilibria, and magma chamber modeling in basalt petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, M. J.; Herzberg, C.

    2002-06-01

    The concentrations and ratios of the major elements determine the physical properties and the phase equilibria behavior of peridotites and basalts in response to the changing energy contents of the systems. The behavior of the trace elements and isotopic features are influenced in their turn by the phase equilibria, by the physical character of the partial melting and partial crystallization processes, and by the way in which a magma interacts with its wall rocks. Concentrating on the trace element and isotope contents of basalts to the exclusion of the field relations, petrology, major element data, and phase equilibria is as improvident as slaughtering the buffalo for the sake of its tongue. The crust is a cool boundary layer and a density filter, which impedes the upward transfer of hot, dense "primary" picritic and komatiitic liquids. Planetary crusts are sites of large-scale contamination and extensive partial crystallization of primitive melts striving to escape to the surface. Escape of truly unmodified primitive melts to the surface is a rare event, requiring the resolution of daunting problems in chemical and mechanical engineering. Primary status for volumetrically abundant basalts such as mid-ocean ridge basalt, ocean island basalt, and continental flood basalts is denied by their low-pressure cotectic character, first remarked upon on petrological grounds in 1928 and on experimental grounds in 1962. These basalt liquids are products of crystal-liquid separation at low pressure. Primary status for these common basalts is further denied by the phase equilibria of such compositions at elevated pressures, when the required residual mantle mineralogy (magnesian olivine and orthopyroxene) is not stable at the liquidus. It is also denied by the picritic or komatiitic nature of partial melts of candidate upper-mantle compositions at high pressures - a conclusion supported by calculation of the melt composition, which would need to be extracted in order to

  3. The influence of magmatic differentiation on the oxidation state of Fe in a basaltic arc magma

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, Katherine A.; Cottrell, Elizabeth

    2012-05-09

    Subduction zone basalts are more oxidized than basalts from other tectonic settings (e.g., higher Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe), and this contrast may play a central role in the unique geochemical processes that generate arc and continental crust. The processes generating oxidized arc magmas, however, are poorly constrained, although they appear inherently linked to subduction. Near-surface differentiation processes unique to arc settings might drive oxidation of magmas that originate in equilibrium with a relatively reduced mantle source. Alternatively, arc magmas could record the oxidation conditions of a relatively oxidized mantle source. Here, we present new measurements of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from a single eruption of Agrigan volcano, Marianas, in order to test the influence of differentiation processes vs. source conditions on the Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratio, a proxy for system oxygen fugacity (fO{sub 2}). We determined Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios in glass inclusions using {mu}-XANES and couple these data with major elements, dissolved volatiles, and trace elements. After correcting for post-entrapment crystallization, Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios in the Agrigan melt inclusions (0.219 to 0.282), and their modeled fO{sub 2}s ({Delta}QFM + 1.0 to + 1.8), are uniformly more oxidized than MORB, and preserve a portion of the evolution of this magma from 5.7 to 3.2 wt.% MgO. Fractionation of olivine {+-} clinopyroxene {+-} plagioclase should increase Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe as MgO decreases in the melt, but the data show Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios decreasing as MgO decreases below 5 wt.% MgO. The major element trajectories, taken in combination with this strong reduction trend, are inconsistent with crystallization of common ferromagnesian phases found in the bulk Agrigan sample, including magnetite. Rather, decreasing Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios correlate with decreasing S concentrations, suggesting that electronic exchanges associated with SO{sub 2} degassing may

  4. CO2-rich melts generated during basalt magma ascent and degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichavant, M.; Di Carlo, I.; Rotolo, S.; Scaillet, B.; Burgisser, A.; Martel, C.

    2012-12-01

    To test mechanisms of basaltic magma degassing, experimental decompressions of volatile-bearing (2.7-3.8 wt% H2O, 600-1300 ppm CO2) Stromboli melts have been performed from 250-200 to 50-25 MPa at 1180-1140°C. Ascent rates were varied from 0.25 to ~ 1.5 m/s. Both the synthesis experiments that served to produce the volatile-bearing pre-decompression melts and the decompression experiments were performed in an internally heated vessel pressurized with Ar-H2 mixtures and fitted with a rapid-quench device. Charges were examined microscopically and by SEM. Vesicularities (% bubbles) were determined from image analysis on polished surfaces and in a few cases from X-ray microtomography. Electron microprobe analysis of post-decompression glasses shows that Fe loss to Au80Pd20 capsules is negligible. Concentrations of H2O and CO2 in both the pre- and post-decompression glasses, as well as their spatial distribution in the charge, were determined by FTIR. Glasses after decompression show a large range of vesicularities, from totally bubble-free to bubble-rich (~ 20 vol% bubbles), the latter with bubble number densities from 104 to 106/cm3, similar to Stromboli pumices. Bubble-poor or bubble-free samples (< 5 vol% bubbles) come from experiments decompressed either at constant rates to 50 MPa or at variable rates to 25 MPa. The bubble-rich charges are found among those decompressed under constant and fast ascent rates to 25 MPa. This suggest that, for our melt composition and dissolved volatile concentrations, homogeneous bubble nucleation requires a pressure drop of at least 150 MPa to be initiated. Varying ascent rates along the decompression path has a significant influence on bubble nucleation. Final melt H2O concentrations are homogeneous and in all cases close to solubilities. In contrast, the post-decompression melt CO2 concentrations are inversely correlated with vesicularities. Bubble-rich glasses have CO2 concentrations that follow theoretical closed

  5. Li, B - Behavior in Lunar Basalts During Shock and Thermal Metamorphism: Implications for H2O in Martian Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaklader, Johny; Shearer, C. K.; Horz, F.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: The water-content of Martian magmas is a topic of debate among researchers. Some Martian basalts are characterized with melt inclusions of biotite, apatite and amphibole; phases typically associated with hydration reactions on Earth [1-3]. However, the H-content of melt inclusions from these basalts is low, and bulk-rock H2O-contents range from a meager 0.013 to 0.035 wt. % in Shergotty [4]. Nonetheless, researchers note that low present-day water contents do not preclude a once hydrous past [5]. Since light lithophile elements (LLE), such as Li and B, partition into aqueous fluids at T > 350 C, workers proposed that Li-B depletions in pyroxene rims of Nakhlite and Shergottite basalts reflect the loss of several weight percent water from Martian magmas during crystallization [6]. Since similar depletions were observed in pyroxene rims from completely dry lunar basalts, it is likely that alternative mechanisms also contribute to the distribution of elements such as Li and B [7]. Given that many Martian basalts have experienced considerable shock pressures (15-45 GPa), it is possible that shock and subsequent thermal metamorphism may have influenced the volatile element records of these basalts [8]. In order to better understand the distribution of Li and B, we are studying the effects of crystal chemistry, shock pressure, and thermal metamorphism in pyroxenes from lunar basalts. Below, we discuss results from experimentally shocked and thermally metamorphosed Apollo 11, 10017 (A-11) and Apollo 17, 75035 (A-17) basalts.

  6. Pre-eruption Conditions and Magma Dynamics of Recent Amphibole-Bearing Etna Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompilio, M.; Rutherford, M. J.

    2002-12-01

    ; they have a lower silica and an higher alumina content than those measured in natural samples. Experimental glasses in equilibrium with cpx, mt and ol plot along the liquid line of descent observed for natural historical magmas. However, the appearance of the amphibole on the liquidus, induces a significant shift toward compositions with lower MgO-FeOtot and CaO-Al2O3 ratios. These compositions were not measured neither in the residual natural glasses, nor in glass inclusion in minerals of recent volcanics. The above preliminary data suggest that some fine-tuning of physico-chemical parameters for the magma (e.g { \\it f}O2) must be still be done in order to reproduce the natural assemblage and the abundance and compositions of minerals observed in natural samples. However these refinements will not significantly modify the field of amphibole stability in these magmas. The crystallization of the amphibole only below 1000 ° C is in striking contrast with the supposed eruptive temperature (T>1050° C) of the main Etna basalt, and indicates that the amphiboles are xenocrysts or they come from colder portions (roof, walls) of the magmatic reservoir feeding the eruption.

  7. The roles of fractional crystallization, magma mixing, crystal mush remobilization and volatile-melt interactions in the genesis of a young basalt-peralkaline rhyolite suite, the greater Olkaria volcanic complex, Kenya Rift valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macdonald, R.; Belkin, H.E.; Fitton, J.G.; Rogers, N.W.; Nejbert, K.; Tindle, A.G.; Marshall, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    The Greater Olkaria Volcanic Complex is a young (???20 ka) multi-centred lava and dome field dominated by the eruption of peralkaline rhyolites. Basaltic and trachytic magmas have been erupted peripherally to the complex and also form, with mugearites and benmoreites, an extensive suite of magmatic inclusions in the rhyolites. The eruptive rocks commonly represent mixed magmas and the magmatic inclusions are themselves two-, three- or four-component mixes. All rock types may carry xenocrysts of alkali feldspar, and less commonly plagioclase, derived from magma mixing and by remobilization of crystal mushes and/or plutonic rocks. Xenoliths in the range gabbro-syenite are common in the lavas and magmatic inclusions, the more salic varieties sometimes containing silicic glass representing partial melts and ranging in composition from anorthite ?? corundum- to acmite-normative. The peralkaline varieties are broadly similar, in major element terms, to the eruptive peralkaline rhyolites. The basalt-trachyte suite formed by a combination of fractional crystallization, magma mixing and resorption of earlier-formed crystals. Matrix glass in metaluminous trachytes has a peralkaline rhyolitic composition, indicating that the eruptive rhyolites may have formed by fractional crystallization of trachyte. Anomalous trace element enrichments (e.g. ??? 2000 ppm Y in a benmoreite) and negative Ce anomalies may have resulted from various Na- and K-enriched fluids evolving from melts of intermediate composition and either being lost from the system or enriched in other parts of the reservoirs. A small group of nepheline-normative, usually peralkaline, magmatic inclusions was formed by fluid transfer between peralkaline rhyolitic and benmoreitic magmas. The plumbing system of the complex consists of several independent reservoirs and conduits, repeatedly recharged by batches of mafic magma, with ubiquitous magma mixing. ?? The Author 2008. Published by Oxford University Press. All

  8. Using chalcophile elements to constrain crustal contamination and xenolith-magma interaction in Cenozoic basalts of eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Gang; Huang, Xiao-Wen; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Chen, Li-Hui; Xu, Xi-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    Continental basalts have complicated petrogenetic processes, and their chemical compositions can be affected by multi-staged geological evolution. Compared to lithophile elements, chalcophile elements including Ni, platinum-group elements (PGEs) and Cu are sensitive to sulfide segregation and fractional crystallization during the evolution of mantle-derived magmas and can provide constraints on the genesis of continental basalts. Cenozoic intra-continental alkaline basalts in the Nanjing basaltic field, eastern China, include high-Ca and low-Ca varieties. All these basalts have poor PGE contents with Ir ranging from 0.016 ppb to 0.288 ppb and high Cu/Pd ratios from 0.7 × 105 to 4.7 × 105 (5.7 × 103 for DMM), indicating that they were derived from sulfide-saturated mantle sources with variable amounts of residual sulfide during melting or might undergo an early-sulfide segregation in the mantle. Relatively high Cu/Pd ratios along with high Pd concentrations for the high-Ca alkaline basalts indicate an additional removal of sulfide during magma ascent. Because these basalts have high, variable Pd/Ir ratios (2.8-16.8) with low Ce/Pb (9.9-19.7) ratios and εNd values (+ 3.6-+6.4), crustal contamination is proposed to be a potential process to induce the sulfide saturation and removal. Significantly increased Pd/Ir ratios for few high-Ca basalts can be explained by the fractionation of laurite or Ru-Os-Ir alloys with olivine or chromite. For low-Ca alkaline basalts, their PGE contents are well correlated with the MgO, Sc contents, incompatible element ratios (Lu/Hf, Na/Ti and Ca/Al) and Hf isotopes. Good correlations are also observed between Pd/Ir (or Rh/Ir) and Na/Ti (or Ca/Al) ratios. Variations of these elemental ratios and Hf isotopes is previously documented to be induced by the mixing of peridotite xenolith-released melts during ascent. Therefore, we suggest that such xenolith-magma interaction are also responsible for the variable PGE compositions of low

  9. Influence of an ocean on the propagation of magmas within an oceanic basaltic shield volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corvec, Nicolas; McGovern, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Basaltic shield volcanoes are a common feature on Earth and mostly occur within oceans, forming volcanic islands (e.g. Hawaii (USA), Galapagos (Ecuador), and recently Niijima (Japan)). As the volcano grows it will reach and emerge from the water surface and continue to grow above it. The deformation affecting the volcanic edifice may be influenced by the presence of the water level. We investigate how the presence of an ocean affects the state of stress within a volcanic edifice and thus magma propagation and fault formation. Using COMSOL Multiphysics, axisymmetric elastic models of a volcanic edifice overlying an elastic lithosphere were created. The volcanic edifice (height of ~6000 m and radius of ~ 60 km) was built either instantaneously or iteratively by adding new layers of equivalent volume on top of each other. In the later process, the resulting stress and geometry from the one step is transferred to the next as initial conditions. Thus each new layer overlies a deformed and stressed model. The water load was modeled with a boundary condition at the surface of the model. In the case of an instantaneous volcano different water level were studied, for an iteratively growing volcano the water level was set up to 4000 m. We compared the deformation of the volcanic edifice and lithosphere and the stress orientation and magnitude in half-space and flexural models with the presence or not of an ocean. The preliminary results show 1- major differences in the resulting state of stress between an instantaneous and an iteratively built volcanic edifice, similar to the results of Galgana et al. (2011) and McGovern and Solomon (1993), respectively; 2- the presence of an ocean decreases the amount of flexural response, which decreases the magnitude of differential stress within the models; and 3- stress orientation within the volcano and lithosphere in also influence of an ocean. Those results provide new insights on the state of stress and deformation of oceanic

  10. Water content in arc basaltic magma in the Northeast Japan and Izu arcs: an estimate from Ca/Na partitioning between plagioclase and melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushioda, Masashi; Takahashi, Eiichi; Hamada, Morihisa; Suzuki, Toshihiro

    2014-12-01

    The variation in water content of arc basaltic magmas in the Northeast Japan arc and the Izu arc was estimated using a simple plagioclase phenocryst hygrometer. In order to construct a plagioclase phenocryst hygrometer optimized for arc basalt magmas, we have conducted high-pressure melting experiments of relatively primitive basalt from the Miyakejima volcano, a frontal-arc volcano in the Izu arc. As a result of the experiments, we found that the Ca/Na partition coefficient between plagioclase and hydrous basaltic melt increases linearly with an increase in H2O content in the melts. We then selected from literature geochemical data sets of relatively primitive basaltic rocks with no evidence of magma mixing and the most frequent Ca-rich plagioclase phenocrysts from 15 basaltic arc volcanoes including both frontal-arc and rear-arc volcanoes. In the 15 volcanoes studied, plagioclase phenocrysts of high anorthite content (An > 90) were commonly observed, whereas plagioclase phenocrysts in rear arc volcanoes usually had a lower anorthite content (90 > An > 80). In all volcanoes studied, the estimated H2O content of basaltic magma was at least 3 wt.% H2O or higher. The magmas of volcanoes located on the volcanic front have about 5 wt.% H2O in magma whereas those from the rear-arc side are slightly lower in H2O content.

  11. An Experimental Study of Harzburgite Reactive Dissolution in an Alkali Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Z. T.; Liang, Y.

    2001-12-01

    Dissolution of a melt-bearing harzburgite (Ol:Opx ~ 1:1 in mass, and 10+/-2% melt) in an alkali basalt was examined at 1260 - 1290° C and 0.6-0.75 GPa using a piston cylinder apparatus. One of the purposes of this study is to examine the systematic variations in mineralogy, mineral chemistry and melt porosity that are associated with harzburgite reactive dissolution. Such information, along with dissolution rate, is essential in quantitative understanding of melt transport in the mantle. Using natural starting materials, dissolution couples were formed by juxtaposing pre-synthesized rods of alkali basalt and harzburgite (1290° C and 0.6 GPa or 1260° C and O.75 GPa, 4 - 37 hrs) in Pt and graphite lined Mo capsules, and were run at the respective P and T for 0.4 to 8 hrs. Harzburgite (olivine Mg# = 88.5) dissolves incongruently into the alkali basalt (Mg# 54) forming an olivine + melt reactive boundary layer. The thickness of the reaction zone (Xb, in \\mum) is proportional to the square root of experimental run time (t, in seconds), with X_{b} = 1.40 (+/-0.09) * sqrt\\{t\\}, r = 0.91. The olivine crystals in the reaction zone (5-60 μ m) are euhedral, and some contain melt inclusions. The average porosity of the reactive boundary layer varies from 20% to 24% among the 15 experiments analyzed to date, whereas grain scale porosity of the reaction zone is quite heterogeneous (15% to 38%) in a given sample. The Mg#, as well as the NiO and CaO contents of the olivine crystals in the reaction zone vary systematically as a function of distance and time. The Mg# and NiO content in the olivine decrease from 89 and 0.39 wt%, respectively, at the interface with the harzburgite to 83 and 0.15% at the interface with the alkali basalt. The CaO content of the olivine is inversely correlated with the Mg#, ranging from 0.1% to 0.3%. The larger olivine crystals ( > 16 μ m) in the reactive boundary layer are strongly zoned with core compositions similar to the original olivine

  12. Evidence for the mixing of granitic and basaltic magmas in the Pleasant Bay layered intrusion, coastal Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, P.M. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    The Pleasant Bay layered intrusion has the shape of a shallow basin about 200 km[sup 2] in area and crops out along the coast of Maine between Bar Harbor and Machias. This intrusion evolved as repeated replenishments of basaltic magma were emplaced into a silicic magma chamber (Wiebe, in press). These replenishments surged into the chamber through fractures, spreading laterally on a floor of silicic cumulates and beneath silicic magma. This produced a sequence of layers (up to 100 m thick) that grade from chilled basalt at the base to gabbroic, dioritic, or granitic emulates at the top. This study focuses on two layers, each of which grades from chilled gabbro at the base to quartz syenite at the top. Petrography and geochemistry suggest that mechanical mixing and other interactions between two stably stratified magmas were responsible for much of this variation. Plagioclase grains typically have corroded calcic cores (An[sub 52--56]) that decrease in size upward and sodic rims (An[sub 32--36]) that thicken upward. Larger plagioclase grains at higher levels often have K-spar cores. Scarce large zircon, apatite, and biotite crystals in the lower parts of the layers are often corroded. The apatites have dark pleochroic halos, suggesting they crystallized from a liquid enriched in U and Th. The silicic melt was likely the source of K and H[sub 2]O needed to crystallize hornblende and biotite. The large corroded zircon, apatite, and biotite crystals, as well as much of the hornblende, probably grew at an interface between separately convecting silicic and basaltic magmas.

  13. Conditions of basaltic magma generation at Mount Baker Volcanic Field, North Cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCallum, I. S.; Mullen, E. K.

    2011-12-01

    Significant unresolved questions remain on the processes of mantle melting throughout the wide range of thermal conditions encompassed by subduction zones. For example, subducting slabs in "hot" arc settings are thought to dehydrate at relatively shallow depths, yet volcanoes develop in locations indistinguishable from those in "cold" arcs. The northern Cascade arc is considered a classic end-member example of a "hot" subduction zone because the subducting crust is extremely young, 6-10 Ma at the trench [1], with a thick layer of insulating sediment and a relatively low convergence rate [2]. The most magmatically productive volcanic center of the northern Cascades is the Mt. Baker volcanic field (MBVF) [3], and here we glean information from the most primitive MBVF lavas to develop a petrogenetic model for basalt generation in a "hot" arc setting. Whole-rock geochemical data and the compositions of coexisting minerals are used to establish the initial water contents and redox states of the magmas, and the temperatures and pressures of segregation from the mantle. Melt silica activities indicate the MBVF magmas segregated from their residual mantle source assemblages at depths ranging from 60 to 40 km, corresponding to a few km shallower than the hot core of the mantle wedge [4] to the base of the crust. Plagioclase core compositions indicate that the initial water contents of the magmas ranged from 1.7 to 2.3 wt. % H2O, and show a good inverse correlation with segregation depths. Fe-Ti oxide pairs and spinel inclusions in olivine phenocrysts indicate redox states slightly more oxidizing than the quartz-fayalite-magnetite buffer. Segregation depths are also strongly correlated with temperatures calculated from olivine-liquid equilibria, which range from 1286°C to 1350°C. Coupled with the most recent thermal model for the subducting slab in northern Cascadia [4], we use petrologic phase equilibria for the P-T stability of mineral assemblages in the mantle and

  14. La/Sm ratios in mare basalts as a consequence of mafic cumulate fractionation from an initial lunar magma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, E. E.; Brophy, J. G.; Basu, A.

    1991-01-01

    A model is constructed for the La/Sm ratio and the abundance of chrondrite-normalized La in different proportions of partial melts of a mafic cumulate source that might have settled to the bottom of an initial lunar magma ocean prior to any plagioclase separation. It is proposed that La/Sm ratios and chrondrite-normalized La abundances of common mare basalts are found in partial melts only if: the mafic cumulate consists mostly of clinopyroxene, a very low fraction of the cumulate melts, and the cumulate represents a moderate to high proportion of the crystallization of the initial magma ocean. Only if the partitioning of clinopyroxene is forced to mimic plagioclase (DLa is greater than DSm) do the present modeling results become compatible with the scenario for producing appropriate parent melts of mare basalts from mafic cumulates. It is found unlikely that parent melts of mare basalts were produced from mafic cumulates of an initial lunar magma ocean that had not had any plagioclase crystallization.

  15. Very high potassium (VHK) basalt - Complications in mare basalt petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, J. W.; Taylor, L. A.; Laul, J. C.; Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    The first comprehensive report on the petrology and geochemistry of Apollo 14 VHK (Very High Potassium) basalts and their implications for lunar evolution is presented. The reported data are most consistent with the hypothesis that VHK basalts formed through the partial assimilation of granite by a normal low-Ti, high-Al mare basalt magma. Assimilation was preceded by the diffusion-controlled exchange of alkalis and Ba between basalt magma and the low-temperature melt fraction of the granite. Hypotheses involving volatile/nonvolatile fractionations or long-term enrichment of the source regions in K are inconsistent with the suprachondritic Ba/La ratios and low initial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios of VHK basalt. An important implication of this conclusion is that granite should be a significant component of the lunar crust at the Apollo 14 site.

  16. The Atlantis Bank gabbro-suite was not a "normal" magma-chamber that produced basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvassnes, A. J.; Dick, H. J. B.; Grove, T. L.

    2003-04-01

    The differentiation of the basalts sampled at Atlantis II Fracture Zone, South-West Indian Ridge, is not the result of simple fractionation of gabbroic mineral-assemblages like those recovered from the adjacent Atlantis Bank and ODP Hole 735B. Large mineral data sets for the gabbros (Dick, et al 2002) are now available for analysis and comparison to spatially associated basalts. We have used Melts and pMelts (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995) to estimate the fractional crystallization trend gabbros from a primitive mantle melt or of the AII F.Z. MORB. Thermodynamic models (Grove et al (1992), Putirka (1999)) were also used to model the glasses hypothetical mafic and felsic mineral equilibrium-compositions. Our results show that while the basalts suggest 30-50% crystallization, the gabbros indicate 35-90% crystallization of a primary melt. It is therefore unlikely that the gabbros sampled from Atlantis Bank are the fossil magma-chambers that expelled melts that formed the spatially associated basalts. The models also show that the most primitive gabbros have elevated clinopyroxene Mg#s (Mg/(Mg+Fe)) relative to the coexisting plagioclase An%. This was unexpected, as the clinopyroxene frequently occurs as oikocrysts surrounding the plagioclase and encloses rounded olivine chadacrysts, indicating that the clinopyroxene precipitated late. Elthon (1992) noted the same problem for Cayman Trough gabbros; suggesting that this was the result of intermediate pressure fractionation. In our models, pressure does have some effect up to 5kbar, but is not enough to explain the discrepancy. We propose a model where melts are modified in a porous network or mush. Plagioclase-olivine networks form by accumulation of buoyant glomerocrysts and then work as filters as new melts pass through. Dissolution of the minerals would make the new melt appear to be more primitive with regards to increased Mg#s, as the dissolution happens fast without complete internal re-equilibration with the gabbro

  17. Petrogenesis of primitive and evolved basalts in a cooling Moon: Experimental constraints from the youngest known lunar magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elardo, Stephen M.; Shearer, Charles K.; Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Bell, Aaron S.

    2015-07-01

    We have conducted high-temperature experiments over a range of pressures to constrain the petrogenesis of the youngest sampled lunar magmas, which have contrasting primitive and evolved compositions. Our results indicate that at ∼3 Ga, melting still occurred within the same mantle depth range that produced crystalline mare basalts for the previous ∼1 Ga, although our data cannot support or confirm that the shallowest extents of melting moved deeper into the mantle by ∼3 Ga, as is predicted by most thermal evolution models. Furthermore, melting still occurred in regions with low abundances of heat-producing elements. Basaltic lunar meteorite NEA 003A has some of the lowest abundances of incompatible trace elements among all mare basalts and no negative Eu anomaly. Our experiments show that NEA 003A is multiply saturated with olivine and low-Ca pyroxene on its liquidus at ∼1.1 GPa (∼215 km) and ∼1330 °C. If the primitive NEA 003A liquid composition is a minimally-modified melt, the relatively low Mg# of its source region (73-75), its lack of a Eu anomaly, and its chondritic initial Nd isotopic composition indicate its source region likely escaped mixing during mantle overturn with later-stage magma ocean cumulates that formed after plagioclase saturation. This condition would require the sources of the ultramafic glasses to have experienced cumulate mixing, or for assimilation of later-stage magma ocean cumulates by the ultramafic glass parental magmas before eruption in order to account for their higher Mg#'s and deeper negative Eu anomalies. Alternatively, NEA 003A may have undergone some fractional crystallization, in which case its more primitive source region would be deeper than 215 km and may approach the depth range of the ultramafic glass source regions. Iron- and incompatible trace element-rich basaltic lunar meteorites LAP 02205, NWA 032/479, and NWA 4734 have nearly identical bulk compositions and have a multiple saturation point on their

  18. Rapid high-silica magma generation in basalt-dominated rift settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Sylvia E.; Troll, Valentin R.; Burchardt, Steffi; Deegan, Frances M.; Riishuus, Morten S.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Harris, Chris; Freda, Carmela; Ellis, Ben S.; Krumbholz, Michael; Gústafsson, Ludvik E.

    2015-04-01

    The processes that drive large-scale silicic magmatism in basalt-dominated provinces have been widely debated for decades, with Iceland being at the centre of this discussion [1-5]. Iceland hosts large accumulations of silicic rocks in a largely basaltic oceanic setting that is considered by some workers to resemble the situation documented for the Hadean [6-7]. We have investigated the time scales and processes of silicic volcanism in the largest complete pulse of Neogene rift-related silicic magmatism preserved in Iceland (>450 km3), which is a potential analogue of initial continent nucleation in early Earth. Borgarfjörður Eystri in NE-Iceland hosts silicic rocks in excess of 20 vol.%, which exceeds the ≤12 vol% usual for Iceland [3,8]. New SIMS zircon ages document that the dominantly explosive silicic pulse was generated within a ≤2 Myr window (13.5 ± 0.2 to 12.2 ± 03 Ma), and sub-mantle zircon δ18O values (1.2 to 4.5 ± 0.2‰, n=337) indicate ≤33% assimilation of low-δ18O hydrothermally-altered crust (δ18O=0‰), with intense crustal melting at 12.5 Ma, followed by rapid termination of silicic magma production once crustal fertility declined [9]. This silicic outburst was likely caused by extensive rift flank volcanism due to a rift relocation and a flare of the Iceland plume [4,10] that triggered large-scale crustal melting and generated mixed-origin silicic melts. High-silica melt production from a basaltic parent was replicated in a set of new partial melting experiments of regional hydrated basalts, conducted at 800-900°C and 150 MPa, that produced silicic melt pockets up to 77 wt.% SiO2. Moreover, Ti-in-zircon thermometry from Borgarfjörður Eystri give a zircon crystallisation temperature ~713°C (Ti range from 2.4 to 22.1 ppm, average=7.7 ppm, n=142), which is lower than recorded elsewhere in Iceland [11], but closely overlaps with the zircon crystallisation temperatures documented for Hadean zircon populations [11-13], hinting at

  19. Influence of an ocean on the propagation of magmas within an oceanic basaltic shield volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corvec, N.; McGovern, P. J., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Basaltic shield volcanoes are a common feature on Earth and mostly occur within oceans, forming volcanic islands (e.g. Hawaii (USA), Galapagos (Ecuador), and recently Niijima (Japan)). As the volcano grows it will reach and emerge from the water surface and continue to grow above it. The deformation affecting the volcanic edifice may be influenced by the presence of the water level. We investigate how the presence of an ocean affects the state of stress within a volcanic edifice and thus magma propagation and fault formation. Using COMSOL Multiphysics, axisymmetric elastic models of a volcanic edifice overlying an elastic lithosphere were created. The volcanic edifice (height of ~6000 m and radius of ~ 60 km) was built either instantaneously or iteratively by adding new layers of equivalent volume on top of each other. In the later process, the resulting stress and geometry from the one step is transferred to the next as initial conditions. Thus each new layer overlies a deformed and stressed model. The water load was modeled with a boundary condition at the surface of the model. In the case of an instantaneous volcano different water level were studied, for an iteratively growing volcano the water level was set up to 4000 m. We compared the deformation of the volcanic edifice and lithosphere and the stress orientation and magnitude in half-space and flexural models with the presence or not of an ocean. The preliminary results show 1- major differences in the resulting state of stress between an instantaneous and an iteratively built volcanic edifice, similar to the results of [Galgana et al., 2011] and [McGovern and Solomon, 1993], respectively; 2- the presence of an ocean decreases the amount of flexural response, which decreases the magnitude of differential stress within the models; and 3- stress orientation within the volcano and lithosphere in also influence of an ocean. Those results provide new insights on the state of stress and deformation of oceanic

  20. Magma Supply at the Arctic Gakkel Ridge: Constraints from Peridotites and Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, C.; Dick, H. J.; Hellebrand, E.; Snow, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Crustal thickness in global ridge systems is widely believed to be nearly uniform (~7 km) at slow- and fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges, but appears significantly thinner (< ~4 km) at ultraslow-spreading ridges. At the slowest-spreading Arctic Gakkel Ridge, the crust becomes extremely thin (1.4 - 2.9 km; [1]). The thin crust at the Gakkel and other ultraslow-spreading ridges, has been attributed to lithosphere thickening, ancient mantle depletion, lower mantle temperature, ridge obliquity, and melt retention/focusing. To better understand the magma supply at ultraslow-spreading ridges, we examined melting dynamics by linking peridotites and basalts dredged along the Gakkel Ridge. We analyzed rare earth elements in clinopyroxene from 84 residual peridotites, and estimated melting parameters for individual samples through nonlinear least squares analyses. The degrees of melting show a large variation but mainly center at around 7% assuming a somewhat arbitrary but widely used depleted MORB mantle starting composition. Thermobarometry on published primitive basaltic glasses from [2] indicates that the mantle potential temperature at the Gakkel Ridge is ~50°C cooler than that at the East Pacific Rise. The ridge-scale low-degree melting and lower mantle potential temperature place the final depth of melting at ~30 km and a melt thickness of 1.0 or 2.9 km for a triangular or trapezoidal melting regime, respectively. The final melting depth is consistent with excess conductive cooling and lithosphere thickening suggested by geodynamic models, while the estimated melt thickness is comparable to the seismic crust (1.4 - 2.9 km; [1]). The general agreement among geochemical analyses, seismic measurements, and geodynamic models supports that lower mantle potential temperature and thick lithosphere determine the ridge-scale low-degree melting and thin crust at the Gakkel Ridge, while melt retention/focusing and excess ancient mantle depletion are perhaps locally important at

  1. Siderophile and chalcophile metal variations in Tertiary picrites and basalts from West Greenland with implications for the sulphide saturation history of continental flood basalt magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keays, Reid R.; Lightfoot, Peter C.

    2007-04-01

    Sixty-five million year old continental flood basalts crop out on Qeqertarssuaq Island and the Nuussuaq Peninsula in West Greenland, and they include ˜1,000 m of picritic lavas and discrete 10- to 50-m-thick members of highly contaminated basalts. On Qeqertarssuaq, the lavas are allocated to the Vaîgat and Maligât Formations of which the former includes the Naujánguit member, which consists of picrites with 7-29 wt% MgO, 80-1,400 ppm Ni, 5.7-9.4 ppb Pt and 4.2-12.9 ppb Pd. The Naujánguit member contains two horizons of contaminated basalts, the Asûk and Kûgánguaq, which have elevated SiO2 (52-58 wt%) and low to moderate MgO (7.5-12.8 wt%). These lavas are broadly characterized by low Cu and Ni abundances (average, 40 ppm Ni and 45 ppm Cu) and very low Pt (0.16-0.63 ppb) and Pd (0.13-0.68 ppb) abundances, and in the case of the Asûk, they contain shale xenoliths and droplets of native iron and troilite. The contaminated basalts from Nuussuaq, the B0 to B4 members, are also usually Ni-, Cu-, and platinum-group elements (PGE)-depleted. The geochemical signatures (especially the ratios of incompatible trace elements such as Th/Nb) of all of the contaminated basalts from Qeqertarssuaq and some of those from Nuussuaq record what appears to be a chemical contribution from deltaic shales that lie immediately below the lavas. This suggests that the contamination of the magmas occurred during the migration of the magmas through plumbing systems developed in sedimentary rocks, and hence, at a high crustal level. Nickel, Cu, and PGE depletion together with geochemical signatures produced by crustal contamination are also a feature of Siberian Trap basalts from the Noril’sk region. These basalts belong to the 0- to 500-m thick, ˜5,000- to 10,000-km3 Nadezhdinsky Formation, which is centered in the Noril’sk Region. A major difference between Siberia and West Greenland is that PGE depletion in the Nadezhdinsky Formation samples with the lowest Cu and Ni contents is

  2. Incompatible Trace Elements in Olivine: Using Sc, Y and V as Temperature and Redox Monitors in Basaltic Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallmann, G.; O'Neill, H. S.

    2012-12-01

    Olivine is the dominant constituent phase of the Earth's upper mantle and the first silicate mineral to crystallize from primitive basaltic melts on cooling following decompression. The physical and chemical properties of olivine have, therefore, been of great interest to geochemists and geophysicists. Yet, olivine is so poor in incompatible trace elements (phosphorus being the exception) that it features in much geochemical modeling merely as an inert dilutant. Consequently, our understanding of incompatible trace-element partitioning between olivine and silicate melt has lagged behind that of phases such as pyroxenes or garnet, which control bulk crystal/melt partitioning behavior during mantle melting. Advances in trace-element microanalysis, particularly LA-ICP-MS, have now placed the determination of incompatible elements in natural olivines within reach, and recent studies have shown that mantle and magmatic olivines can preserve complex intracrystalline distributions of these elements. The combined major and trace element compositions of phenocrystal olivines could, therefore, provide unique and detailed insights into magmatic evolution. The course of evolution of basaltic magmas depends substantially on their redox state, hence oxygen fugacity, but there is increasing evidence that this intensive thermodynamic variable may be less well understood in basalts than commonly supposed. The redox state of terrestrial basalts has to a large extent been inferred from the Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios of their quenched glasses. However, this quantity appears to be significantly affected during late and post-eruptive processes in magmatic systems (e.g. by degassing, charge-transfer reactions of redox-variable species, and alteration), so that the degree to which the Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios preserved in basaltic glasses reflect the oxidation state of the magma at high temperature is unclear. The equilibrium partitioning relations preserved in olivine phenocrysts in basalts are, in

  3. Basaltic melt evolution of the Hengill volcanic system, SW Iceland, and evidence for clinopyroxene assimilation in primitive tholeiitic magmas

    SciTech Connect

    Troennes, R.G. )

    1990-09-10

    The thick oceanic crust of Iceland is formed by tholeiitic central volcanoes arranged in en echelon patterns along the 40-50 km wide rift zones. The Hengill central volcano in the southwestern rift zone has produced 25-30 km{sup 3} of hyaloclastites and lava during the last 0.11 m.y., with maximum productivity during the isostatic rebound following the degalciations 0.13 and 0.01 m.y. ago. The petrographic relations of pillow rim and hyaloclastite glass indicate that the basaltic melts were saturated with olivine and plagioclase, except for the most primitive ones that were undersaturated with plagioclase. Saturation with clinopyroxene was reached in some of the intermediate and evolved basaltic melts. Corroded and partly resorbed crystals of clinopyroxene and partly disintegrated gabbro nodules with resorbed clinopyroxene indicate that selective assimilation contributed to the evolution of the most primitive melts. The intermediate and evolved basaltic glass compositions fall along the low-pressure cotectic for mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) compositions saturated with olivine, plagioclase, and clinopyroxene, but the primitive glasses fall well inside the low-pressure olivine + plagioclase primary phase volume. The dense picritic magmas were driven to the surface by magmatic overpressure in the mantle at an early deglaciation stage characterized by the absence of large, trapping magma chambers in the lower crust. The assimilation of clinopyroxene in these melts could proceed by direct contact with the solidified cumulate sequences and gabbro intrusions. Clinopyroxene assimilation in combination with olivine fractionation may also contribute to the chemical evolution of some of the most primitive MORB magmas.

  4. Composition of basalts from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, A.E.J.; Engel, C.G.

    1964-01-01

    Studies of volcanic rocks in dredge hauls from the submerged parts of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge suggest that it consists largely of tholeiitic basalt with low values of K, Ti, and P. In contrast, the volcanic islands which form the elevated caps on the Ridge are built of alkali basalt with high values of Ti, Fe3+, P, Na, and K. This distinct correlation between the form of the volcanic structures, elevation above the sea floor, and composition suggests that the islands of alkali basalt are derived from a parent tholeiitic magma by differentiation in shallow reservoirs. The volume of low-potassium tholeiites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and elsewhere in the oceans appears to be many times that of the alkali basalts exposed on oceanic islands. Tholeiitic basalts with about 0.2 K2O appear to be the primary and predominant magma erupted on the oceanic floor.

  5. Geochemical characteristics of hydrous basaltic magmas due to assimilation and fractional crystallization: the Ikoma gabbroic complex, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, N.; Okudaira, T.; Ogawa, D.; Yamashita, K.; Suda, Y.

    2016-02-01

    To clarify the processes that occur in hydrous basaltic magma chambers, we have undertaken detailed petrological and geochemical analyses of mafic and intermediate rocks from the Ikoma gabbroic complex, southwest Japan. The complex consists mainly of hornblende gabbros, hornblende gabbronorites, and hornblende leucogabbros. The hornblende leucogabbros are characterized by low TiO2 and high CaO contents, whereas the hornblende gabbronorites have high TiO2 and low CaO contents. The initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (SrI) of the hornblende gabbronorites and hornblende gabbros are higher than those of the hornblende leucogabbros and plagioclase, and they may have resulted from a higher degree of assimilation of metasediments. The geochemical features of the hornblende leucogabbros and hornblende gabbronorites can be explained by accumulation of plagioclase and ilmenite, respectively, in a hybrid magma that formed by chemical interaction between mafic magma and metasediment, whereas the hornblende gabbros were produced by a high degree of crustal assimilation and fractional crystallization of this hybrid magma. As a result of the density differences between crystals and melt, the Ikoma gabbroic rocks formed by the accumulation of plagioclase in the middle of the magma chamber and by the accumulation of ilmenite in the bottom of the chamber. Taking into account the subsequent assimilation and fractional crystallization, our observations suggest an enriched mantle (SrI = ~0.7071) as the source material for the Ikoma gabbros.

  6. Petrological processes in mantle plume heads: Evidence from study of mantle xenoliths in the late Cenozoic alkali Fe-Ti basalts in Western Syria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkov, Evgenii

    2015-04-01

    It is consensus now that within-plate magmatism is considered with ascending of mantle plumes and adiabatic melting of their head. At the same time composition of the plumes' matter and conditions of its adiabatic melting are unclear yet. The major source of objective information about it can be mantle xenoliths in alkali basalts and basanites which represent fragments of material of the plume heads above magma-generation zone. They are not represent material in melting zone, however, carry important information about material of modern mantle plumes, its phase composition and components, involved in melting. Populations of mantle xenoliths in basalts are characterized by surprising sameness in the world and represented by two major types: (1) dominated rocks of ``green'' series, and (2) more rare rocks of ``black'' series, which formed veins in the ``green'' series matrix. It can evidence about common composition of plume material in global scale. In other words, the both series of xenoliths represent two types of material of thermochemical mantle plumes, ascended from core-mantle boundary (Maruyama, 1994; Dobretsov et al., 2001). The same types of xenoliths are found in basalts and basanites of Western Syria (Sharkov et al., 1996). Rocks of ``green'' series are represented by Sp peridotites with cataclastic and protogranular structures and vary in composition from dominated spinel lherzolites to spinel harzburgites and rare spinel pyroxenites (websterites). It is probably evidence about incomplete homogenizing of the plume head matter, where material, underwent by partial melting, adjoins with more fertile material. Such heterogeneity was survived due to quick cooling of upper rim of the plume head in contact with relatively cold lithosphere. Essential role among xenoliths of the ``black'' series play Al-Ti-augite and water-bearing phases like hornblende (kaersutute) and Ti-phlogopite. Rocks of this series are represented by wehrlite, clinopyroxenite, amphibole

  7. Geochemical and oxygen isotope signatures of mantle corundum megacrysts from the Mbuji-Mayi kimberlite, Democratic Republic of Congo, and the Changle alkali basalt, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Gaston; Pivin, Marjorie; Fallick, Anthony E.; Ohnenstetter, Daniel; Song, Yucai; Demaiffe, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen isotope signatures of ruby and sapphire megacrysts, combined with trace-element analysis, from the Mbuji-Mayi kimberlite, Democratic Republic of Congo, and the Changle alkali basalt, China, provide clues to specify their origin in the deep Earth. At Mbuji-Mayi, pink sapphires have δ18O values in the range 4.3 to 5.4‰ (N = 10) with a mean of 4.9 ± 0.4‰, and rubies from 5.5 to 5.6‰ (N = 3). The Ga/Mg ratio of pink sapphires is between 1.9 and 3.9, and in rubies, between 0.6 and 2.6. The blue or yellow sapphires from Changle have δ18O values from 4.6 to 5.2 ‰, with a mean of 4.9 ± 0.2‰ (N = 9). The Ga/Mg ratio is between 5.7 and 11.3. The homogenous isotopic composition of ruby suggests a derivation from upper mantle xenoliths (garnet lherzolite, pyroxenite) or metagabbros and/or lower crustal garnet clinopyroxenite eclogite-type xenoliths included in kimberlites. Data from the pink sapphires from Mbuji-Mayi suggest a mantle origin, but different probable protoliths: either subducted oceanic protolith transformed into eclogite with δ18O values buffered to the mantle value, or clinopyroxenite protoliths in peridotite. The Changle sapphires have a mantle O-isotope signature. They probably formed in syenitic magmas produced by low degree partial melting of a spinel lherzolite source. The kimberlite and the alkali basalt acted as gem conveyors from the upper mantle up to the surface.

  8. Water content in arc basaltic magma in the Northeast Japan and Izu arcs: an estimate from Ca/Na partitioning between plagioclase and melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushioda, M.; Takahashi, E.; Hamada, M.; Suzuki, T.

    2015-12-01

    The variation in water content of arc basaltic magmas in the Northeast Japan arc and the Izu arc was estimatedusing a simple plagioclase phenocryst hygrometer. In order to construct a plagioclase phenocryst hygrometeroptimized for arc basalt magmas, we have conducted hydrous melting experiments of relatively primitive basaltfrom the Miyakejima volcano, a frontal-arc volcano in the Izu arc. As a result of the experiments, we found that theCa/Na partition coefficient between plagioclase and hydrous basaltic melt increases linearly with an increase in H2Ocontent in the melts. We then compiled published geochemical data sets of relatively primitive basaltic rocks with no evidence of magma mixing and the most frequent Ca-rich plagioclase phenocrysts from 15 basaltic arc volcanoesincluding both frontal-arc and rear-arc volcanoes. In the 15 volcanoes studied, plagioclase phenocrysts of high anorthitecontent (An > 90) were commonly observed, whereas plagioclase phenocrysts in rear arc volcanoes usually had a loweranorthite content (90 > An > 80). In all volcanoes studied, the estimated H2O content of basaltic magma was at least3 wt.% H2O or higher. The magmas of volcanoes located on the volcanic front have about 5 wt.% H2O in magmawhereas those from the rear-arc side are slightly lower in H2O content.

  9. Lithospheric control on basaltic magma compositions within a long-lived monogenetic magmatic province: the Cainozoic basalts of eastern Victoria, south-eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, R. C.; Nicholls, I. A.; Maas, R.

    2012-12-01

    Palaeozoic lithospheric blocks are present beneath southern Victoria and the lowest 87Sr/86Sr ratios are observed in basalts erupted above the Proterozoic (Selwyn) block. The inference is that there is a lithospheric control on basaltic magma chemistry and since a substantial proportion of Older Volcanics have the geochemical characteristics of primary magmas, this could indicate that magmas have been sourced from regionally heterogeneous sub-continental lithospheric mantle. References Price, RC, Gray, CM, Frey, FA. (1997). Strontium isotopic and trace element heterogeneity in the plains basalts of the Newer Volcanic Province, Victoria, Australia. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 61, 171-192. Price RC, Nicholls, IA, Gray, CM. (2003). Cainozoic igneous activity: widespread volcanism resulting from long-term mantle instability and rifting. In: Birch, WD (ed.). Geology of Victoria, Geological Society of Australia Special Publication 23, 360-375.

  10. The petrogenesis of felsic calc-alkaline magmas from the southernmost Cascades, California: origin by partial melting of basaltic lower crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borg, L.E.; Clynne, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The majority offelsic rocks from composite centers in teh southernmost Cascades have geochemical and Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic ratios that suggest derivation by partial melting of lower crust that is compositionally similar to cale-alkaline basalts observed in the region. Only a few felsic rocks have ???18O and Pb isotopic compositions that indicate interaction with the upper crust. Mineralogical and geochemical differences among the felsic magmas results primarily from melting under variable f(H2O) and lower temperature conditions leaves an amphibole-rich residuum, and produced magmas that have amphibole ?? biotite phenocrysts, relatively high silica contents, and pronounced middle rare earch element depletions. These conclusions are consistent with published thermal models that suggest that reasonable volumes of basaltic magma emplaced beneath large composite centers in the southernmost Cascades can serve as the eat source for melting of the lower crust. Melting of the lower crust under varible f(H2O contents of these basaltic magmas.

  11. Understanding Magma Storage Conditions that Produce Highly Explosive Monogenetic Basaltic Eruptions Using Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusions from Sunset Crater, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, C. M.; Roggensack, K.; Clarke, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    To investigate mechanisms of explosive basaltic volcanism, we studied the ca. 1085 AD Sunset Crater eruption in the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) of northern Arizona. This eruption, the youngest in the SFVF, first featured fissure eruptions (explosive phases 1-2) and a small lava flow, and then activity narrowed to a central vent producing explosive phases 3-8 and two additional lava flows. While the first two phases were Strombolian-style explosions, middle phases (3-5) were subplinian in character and produced an anomalously large tephra deposit. The final phases (6-8) are poorly characterized at this stage. The total erupted volume of lava and tephra is >0.7 km3 DRE of alkali olivine basalt with a large proportion of crystal-free glass and low phenocryst content. We studied 82 primary melt inclusions (MIs) in the largest tephra units (explosive phases 3, 4) to investigate magma volatiles and storage conditions. To prioritize primary volatile contents, we picked rapidly quenched free olivine crystals (Fo 81-85; 0.5-2 mm) and selected large volume MIs (50-180 μm) located near crystal cores for analysis. We observed vapor bubbles in all MIs and also noted rare occurrences of CO2-rich gas inclusions. MIs show little major element variability suggesting little crystal fractionation (K2O 0.8-1.1 wt.%). Post-entrapment crystallization is also minor (2-9%). The MI compositions from the two phases largely overlap, with phase 4 skewed to slightly higher K2O. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the MIs are relatively dry and CO2-rich. Water abundances vary 0.8-1.6 wt.% with a median of 1.25 wt.%, while most MIs have CO2 abundances 1,600-3,400 ppm. Phases 3 and 4 are essentially identical in water content. CO2 contents of phases 3 and 4 show considerable overlap, however the phase 4 MIs are skewed toward high CO2 (>2,500 ppm). These results require a minimum MI entrapment depth of ~11 km from fluid saturation constraints. Overall, the MIs indicate a largely homogeneous

  12. Isotopic and chemical evidence concerning the genesis and contamination of basaltic and rhyolitic magma beneath the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, W.; Halliday, A.N.; Christiansen, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Since 2.2 Ma, the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field has produced ~6000 km3 of rhyolite tuffs and lavas in >60 separate eruptions, as well as ~100 km3 of tholeiitic basalt from >50 vents peripheral to the silicic focus. Intermediate eruptive products are absent. Early postcollapse rhyolites show large shifts in Nd, Sr, Pb, and O isotopic composition caused by assimilation of roof rocks and hydrothermal brines during collapse and resurgence. Younger intracaldera rhyolite lavas record partial isotopic recovery toward precaldera ratios. Thirteen extracaldera rhyolites show none of these effects and have sources independent of the subcaldera magma system. Contributions from the Archaean crust have extreme values and wide ranges of Nd-, Sr, and Pb-isotope ratios, but Yellowstone rhyolites have moderate values and limited ranges. This requires their deep-crustal sources to have been pervasively hybridized by distributed intrusion of Cenozoic basalt, most of which was probably contemporaneous with the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanism. Most Yellowstone basalts had undergone cryptic clinopyroxene fractionation in the lower crust or crust-mantle transition zone and, having also ascended through or adjacent to crustal zones of silicic-magma generation, most underwent some crustal contamination. -from Authors

  13. Degassing-induced crystallization of basaltic magma and effects on lava rheology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Banks, N.G.; Rhodes, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    During the north-east rift eruption of Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii, on 25 March-14 April 1984 (Fig. 1), microphenocryst contents of erupted lava increased from 0.5 to 30% without concurrent change in either bulk magma composition or eruption temperature (1,140 ?? 3 ??C). The crystallization of the microphenocrysts is interpreted here as being due to undercooling of the magma 20-30 ??C below its liquidas; the undercooling probably resulted from separation and release of volatiles as the magma migrated 12 km from the primary summit reservoir to the eruption site on the north-east rift zone. Such crystallization of magma during an eruption has not been documented previously. The undercooling and crystallization increased the effective viscosity of the magma, leading to decreased eruption rates and stagnation of the lava flow. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  14. Geochemistry of the Quaternary alkali basalts of Garrotxa (NE Volcanic Province, Spain): a case of double enrichment of the mantle lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebriá, J. M.; López-Ruiz, J.; Doblas, M.; Oyarzun, R.; Hertogen, J.; Benito, R.

    2000-11-01

    The area of Garrotxa (also known as the Olot area) represents the most recent (700,000-11,500 y) and better preserved area of magmatic activity in the NE Volcanic Province of Spain (NEVP). This region comprises a suite of intracontinental leucite basanites, nepheline basanites and alkali olivine basalts, which in most cases represent primary or nearly primary liquids. The geochemical characteristics of these lavas are very similar to the analogous petrologic types of other Cenozoic volcanics of Europe, which are intermediate between HIMU, DM and EM1. Quantitative trace element modeling, suggests derivation from an enriched mantle source by degrees of melting that progressively increased from the leucite basanites (˜4%) to the olivine basalts (˜16%). However, the relatively more variable Sr-Nd-Pb isotope signature of the magmas suggests the participation of at least two distinct components in the mantle source: (1) a sublithospheric one with a geochemical signature similar to the magmas of Calatrava (Central Spain) and other basalts of Europe; and (2) an enriched lithospheric component with a K-bearing phase present. The geochemical model proposed here involves the generation of a hybrid mantle lithosphere source produced by the infiltration of the sublithospheric liquids into enriched domains of the mantle lithosphere, shortly before the melting event that generated the Garrotxa lavas. The available geological data suggest that the first enrichment event of the mantle lithosphere under the NEVP could be the result of Late Variscan mantle upwelling triggered by the extensional collapse of the Variscan orogen during the Permo-Carboniferous. By Jurassic/Cretaceous time, large-scale NNE-directed sublithospheric mantle channeling of thermally and chemically anomalous plume material was placed under the Iberian Peninsula and Central Europe. However, the geodynamic conditions in the NEVP did not favor magmatism, which could not take place until the Cenozoic after

  15. Basalt Magma, Whisky and Tequila: finely-crafted mixes of small liquid batches that defy the parent liquid concept but whose complexities teach us much

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, K. H.; Sinton, J. M.; Perfit, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Basalt is the most ubiquitous magma type we know of in the solar system. It comes in various varieties manifested as compositional sub groups, erupts from a wide variety of volcanic systems and tectonic settings, and its eruptions span many order of magnitude in duration and volume. Igneous petrology, thermodynamics, geochemistry, and geodynamical modelling have been used to develop a sophisticated understanding of source lithologies, compositions and formation conditions (e.g., pressure and temperature) for parent melts and their subsequent transport, storage and evolution. These demonstrate some striking systematics as a function of volcano tectonic setting (on Earth). Yet much like Whisky, what makes it into the bottle, or the eruption, is a mixture of different liquids with unique characteristics, sometimes stirred so well that successive batches are indistinguishable, and sometimes stirred more incompletely, preserving small batch characters that are unique. Recently, geochemical and petrological studies in high spatial density within the products of individual eruptions have shown chemical and mineralogical evidence for incompletely mixed heterogeneous magmas in a majority of systems examined, begging the question of when, if ever, is it realistic to speak of a single parent magma composition, and even in cases where it apparently is, if these are instead just more thoroughly stirred multi-parent magmas. For instance, do monogenetic fields really erupt basalts of more varied parent melt compositions than large hot spot and flood basalt eruptions, or are they just more poorly stirred? This presentation will focus on work by ourselves and others constraining spatial and temporal single-eruption basaltic magma histories at different settings, using them to unravel the time and space scales of magma formation and mixing, how these translate to the assembly of an erupted basalt magma, and the implications for deducing things about and from presumed parents.

  16. Silicic magma entering a basaltic magma chamber: eruptive dynamics and magma mixing — an example from Salina (Aeolian islands, Southern Tyrrhenian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calanchi, Natale; de Rosa, Rosanna; Mazzuoli, Roberto; Rossi, Pierluigi; Santacroce, Roberto; Ventura, Guido

    1993-09-01

    The Pollara tuff-ring resulted from two explosive eruptions whose deposits are separated by a paleosol 13 Ka old. The oldest deposits (LPP, about 0.2 km3) consist of three main fall units (A, B, C) deposited from a subplinian column whose height (7 14 km) increased with time from A to C, as a consequence of the increased magma discharge rate during the eruption (1 8x106 kg/s). A highly variable juvenile population characterizes the eruption. Black, dense, highly porphyritic, mafic ejecta (SiO2=50 55%) almost exclusively form A deposits, whereas grey, mildly vesiculated, mildly porphyritic pumice (SiO2=56 67%) and white, highly vesiculated, nearly aphyric pumice (SiO2=66 71%) predominate in B and C respectively. Mafic cumulates are abundant in A, while crystalline lithic ejecta first appear in B and increase upward. The LPP result from the emptying of an unusual and unstable, compositionally zoned, shallow magma chamber in which high density mafic melts capped low density salic ones. Evidence of the existence of a short crystal fractionation series is found in the mafic rocks; the andesitic pumice results from complete blending between rhyolitic and variously fractionated mafic melts (salic component up to 60 wt%), whereas bulk dacitic compositions mainly result from the presence of mafic xenocrysts within rhyolitic glasses. Viscosity and composition-mixing diagrams show that blended liquids formed when the visosities of the two end members had close values. The following model is suggested: 1. A rhyolitic magma rising through the metamorphic basement enterrd a mafic magma chamber whose souter portions were occupied by a highly viscous, mafic crystal mush. 2. Under the pressure of the rhyolitic body the nearly rigid mush was pushed upwards and mafic melts were squeezed against the walls of the chamber, beginning roof fracturing and mingling with silicic melts. 3. When the equilibrium temperature was reached between mafic and silicic melts, blended liquids rapidly

  17. Formation of low-δ18O magmas of the Kangerlussuaq Intrusion by addition of water derived from dehydration of foundered basaltic roof rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riishuus, Morten S.; Harris, Chris; Peate, David W.; Tegner, Christian; Wilson, J. Richard; Brooks, C. Kent

    2015-05-01

    The Kangerlussuaq Intrusion in East Greenland is concentrically zoned from quartz nordmarkite (quartz syenite) at the margin, through pulaskite, to foyaite (nepheline syenite) in the centre, with no apparent intrusive contacts. The δ18O values of coexisting minerals are consistent with oxygen isotope equilibrium at magmatic temperatures. Most of the intrusion formed from low-δ18O magma; magma δ18O values generally increased upwards from about 3.3 ‰ in the quartz nordmarkites to 5.6 ‰ in the foyaites. The lowest magma δ18O value of about -1.0 ‰ is from the upper part of the nordmarkites, where there is a high concentration of foundered basaltic xenoliths (stoped from the roof of the intrusion). The amphiboles in the syenites have δD values that range from those typical of hydrous mantle-derived minerals to much lower values (-86 to -157 ‰), as do whole-rock samples of xenolith and country rock (-125 to -148 ‰). The low magma δ18O and δD values are consistent with continuous incorporation, exchange and upward escape of low-δ18O and δD fluids released from stoped basaltic roof material. Mass balance suggests that the integrated amount of water involved was 7 wt% of the volume of the magma, but locally reached 30 wt% water. The requirement for large amounts of water with low δ18O value is satisfied only if the foundered basalt contained most of its water in cavities as opposed to hydrous minerals. Even with this requirement, the volume of stoped basalt would have been equal to the volume of the magma. Repeated recharge of the residual magma with progressively less contaminated silica undersaturated melt resulted in a gradual shift across the low-pressure thermal divide. Crystallisation was suppressed by the depression of the liquidus due to water saturation of the residual magma (pH2O ~1 kbar).

  18. Origin of the Early Permian zircons in Keping basalts and magma evolution of the Tarim Large Igneous Province (northwestern China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yin-Qi; Li, Zi-Long; Yu, Xing; Langmuir, Charles H.; Santosh, M.; Yang, Shu-Feng; Chen, Han-Lin; Tang, Zhong-Li; Song, Biao; Zou, Si-Yuan

    2014-09-01

    The Tarim continental flood basalts (CFBs) provide important clues about the genesis and magmatic evolution of the Early Permian Tarim Large Igneous Province (Tarim LIP) in northwestern China. Here we present results of LA-MC-ICPMS Lu-Hf isotope analysis on Early Permian (ca. 290 Ma) zircons extracted from the Tarim CFBs in the Keping area, northwest of the Tarim Basin. Zircons from two sub-groups of Keping basalts (Groups 1a and 1b) have similar Lu-Hf isotopic compositions and exhibit a relatively large range of 176Hf/177Hf ratios between 0.282422 and 0.282568. Their negative εHf(t) values (- 6.8-- 1.4) are generally lower than the whole-rock εHf(t) values of their host basalts (- 2.8-2.1), and are distinct from other known intrusive rocks (- 0.3-7.1) in the Tarim LIP and their hosted zircons (4.9-8.8). Systematic studies of Hf isotopic data from Tarim and its adjacent regions reveal that these zircons are probably xenocrysts, sourced from coeval igneous rocks in the South Tianshan Orogen (e.g., the Lower Permian Xiaotikanlike Formation volcanic and pyroclastic rock suite). This, together with the presence of Precambrian zircons in Keping basalts, clearly indicates crustal contamination during their eruptions and provides hints about the potential contaminant sources. Geochemical modeling further suggests that the earlier erupted Group 1b basalts experienced more contamination, predominantly by some high Th-U-Pb rock components, most likely from the South Tianshan Orogen. The later erupted Group 1a basalts in the Keping area have been less contaminated with mainly the Tarim Precambrian rocks. Another group of the Tarim CFBs in the Northern Tarim Uplift (Group 2) appears to have undergone negligible crustal contamination but possesses evidence for variable source compositions. The modeling also indicates that the uncontaminated parental magmas of various Tarim LIP rocks (from the picrites and basalts to ultramafic-mafic and syenitic intrusive rocks) exhibit a

  19. Source components and intensive parameters of magma genesis in the CentAm and North IBM arcs: analyses using Arc Basalt Simulator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, J.; Stern, R. J.; Yoshida, T.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed a general mass balance model nfor magma genesis in subduction zones and applied it to IBM and Central American arcs. The Arc Basalt Simulator (ABS) model includes: 1) P-T dependent compositional variations of fluids from subducted altered oceanic crust (AOC) and sediment (SED); 2) zone refining chemical modification of slab-derived fluid by interaction with mantle peridotite; and 3) metasomatism and fluid flux melting of mantle peridotite caused by the modified fluid. Application of the model to the northern Izu arc (N-Izu) and Central America arc (CentAm) highlights differences between the two arc systems. The N-Izu basalts are modeled to have derived from a common SED/AOC = 10/90 slab composite with slab fluid dehydration at 880C/4GPa (VF: volcanic front) and 980C/6GPa (RA: rear arc). Mantle wedge peridotite (PERID) composition is assumed to be a common 8% MORB extracted primitive mantle (DMM) with depleted DM isotopic composition for both VF and RA. Melting conditions of the mantle are estimated to be F=24% with 0.4-0.5% fluid flux rate at 1.0 GPa (VF) and 2-4%F with 0.07% fluid flux rate at 2.3 GPa (RA). The CentAm arc basalts require at least three AOC components:Cocos-Nazca Spreading Center (CNS), Northern Galapagos domain (NGD), and Southern Galapagos domain (SGD), with increasing HIMU component in that order. SED component is a unique mixture between hemipelagic and carlcareous sediments. The PERID component ranges from undepleted PM to 4% MORB-depleted PM (DPM) with isotopic composition represented by Utila OIB in the RA of Honduras, which is unaffected by Cocos Plate components. The Guatemala-El Salvador VF basalt requires CNS-AOC, SED, and DPM with SED/AOC = 1/99 slab, dehydrated at 950C/4GPa, and mantle melting at 2%F/2.4GPa with flux rate at 2%. RA alkali basalt of the same segment (Yojoa volcano) requires same AOC and SED but needs undepleted PM melted with fluid flux from SED/AOC = 3/97 slab dehydrated at 1000C/6GPa, and mantle

  20. First data on magma ascent and residence times retrieved from Fe-Mg and trace element zonation in olivine phenocrysts from Kamchatka basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeychik, Boris; Churikova, Tatiana; Kronz, Andreas; Simakin, Alexander; Wörner, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    Compositional zonation in olivine phenocrysts and diffusion modelling have been used in the last ten years to estimate magma residence times and the duration of magma ascent. The fundamental assumption is that mixing with newly injected magma into a reservoir triggers diffusional exchange between mafic olivine crystals and more evolved magma and that this magma mixing eventually triggers eruption. If depth of mixing is known, this translates to ascent rates of magmas to the surface. We applied this approach to a series of different arc basalt lavas from Kamchatka to constrain the rates of magma ascent and magma resident in what is one of the most active subduction zones in the world that is also dominated by an abundance of unusually mafic magmas. Our sample collection cover the principal modes of arc magmatism in Kamchatka: from different volcanic complexes (stratovolcano, dikes, summit eruptions, monogenetic cones), of different age (from Late-Pleistocene to Holocene and recent eruptions), from different magmatic regimes (long-lived volcanoes vs. monogenetic eruptions) and different major element composition (from basalt to basaltic andesite of different geochemical character including LILE enrichments). We analyzed and modelled zonation profiles for a range of elements with different diffusivities (e.g. Mg-Fe, Ca, Ni, Mn, Cr) to assess the role of variable diffusivities as a function of major and trace elements in the olivines from different P-T conditions. First data were obtained on samples from the Klyuchevskoy, Shiveluch and Tolbachik, including recent most eruption in 2012/2013. These data show that for some samples the zonation patterns are much more complex than is usually observed: high-Mg olivines at different volcanoes have very different zonation patterns, including normally, reversely zoned grains or even show highly complex repetitive zonation that indicate large compositional changes in the surrounding magma at very short time scales (years). Thus

  1. Mixing of rhyolite, trachyte and basalt magma erupted from a vertically and laterally zoned reservoir, composite flow P1, Gran Canaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freundt, Armin; Schmincke, Hans-Ulrich

    1992-10-01

    The 14.1 Ma composite welded ignimbrite P1 (45 km3 DRE) on Gran Canaria is compositionally zoned from a felsic lower part to a basaltic top. It is composed of four component magmas mixed in vertically varying proportions: (1) Na-rhyolite (10 km3) zoned from crystal-poor to highly phyric; (2) a continuously zoned, evolved trachyte to sodic trachyandesite magma group (6 km3); (3) a minor fraction of Na-poor trachyandesite (<1 km3); and (4) nearly aphyric basalt (26 km3) zoned from 4.3 to 5.2 wt% MgO. We distinguish three sites and phases of mixing: (a) Mutual mineral inclusions show that mixing between trachytic and rhyolitic magmas occurred during early stages of their intratelluric crystallization, providing evidence for long-term residence in a common reservoir prior to eruption. This first phase of mixing was retarded by increasing viscosity of the rhyolite magma upon massive anorthoclase precipitation and accumulation. (b) All component magmas probably erupted through a ring-fissure from a common upper-crustal reservoir into which the basalt intruded during eruption. The second phase of mixing occurred during simultaneous withdrawal of magmas from the chamber and ascent through the conduit. The overall withdrawal and mixing pattern evolved in response to pre-eruptive chamber zonation and density and viscosity relationships among the magmas. Minor sectorial variations around the caldera reflect both varying configurations at the conduit entrance and unsteady discharge. (c) During each eruptive pulse, fragmentation and particulate transport in the vent and as pyroclastic flows caused additional mixing by reducing the length scale of heterogeneities. Based on considerations of magma density changes during crystallization, magma temperature constraints, and the pattern of withdrawal during eruption, we propose that eruption tapped the P1 magma chamber during a transient state of concentric zonation, which had resulted from destruction of a formerly layered zonation

  2. Dynamics of magma supply, storage and migration at basaltic volcanoes: Geophysical studies of the Galapagos and Hawaiian volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnardi, Marco

    Basaltic shields forming ocean island volcanoes, in particular those of Hawai'i and of the Galapagos Islands, constitute some of the largest volcanic features on Earth. Understanding subsurface processes such as those controlling magma supply, storage and migration at these volcanoes, is essential to any attempt to anticipate their future behavior. This dissertation presents a series of studies carried out at Hawaiian and Galapagos volcanoes. InSAR measurements acquired between 2003 and 2010 at Fernandina Volcano, Galapagos, are used to study the structure and the dynamics of the shallow magmatic system of the volcano (Chapter 3). Spatial and temporal variations in the measured displacements reveal the presence of two hydraulically connected areas of magma storage, and the modeling of the deformation data provides an estimate of their location and geometry. The same dataset also provides the first geodetic evidence for two subvolcanic sill intrusions (in 2006 and 2007) deep beneath the volcano's flank. The lateral migration of magma from the reservoirs during these intrusions could provide an explanation for enigmatic volcanic events at Fernandina such as the 1968 caldera collapse without significant eruption. Space-geodetic measurements of the surface deformation produced by the most recent eruptions at Fernandina, reveal that all have initiated with the intrusion of subhorizontal sills from the shallow magma reservoir (Chapter 4). A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image acquired 1-2 h before the start of a radial fissure eruption in 2009 captures one of these sills in the midst of its propagation toward the surface. Galapagos eruptive fissures of all orientations have previously been presumed to be fed by vertical dikes, but these new findings allow a reinterpretation of the internal structure and evolution of Galapagos volcanoes and of similar basaltic shields elsewhere on Earth and on other planets. A joint analysis of InSAR and groud-based microgravity data

  3. Silica- and LREE-enriched spinel peridotite xenoliths from the Quaternary intraplate alkali basalt, Jeju Island, South Korea: Old subarc fragments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Yonghoon; Yang, Kyounghee; Kil, Youngwoo; Yun, Sung-Hyo; Arai, Shoji

    2014-11-01

    Spinel harzburgite to lherzolite xenoliths are entrapped in Quaternary intraplate alkali basalts on Jeju Island, South Korea. These xenoliths are unusual in containing late-stage secondary orthopyroxene, free of deformation and exsolution that is replacing olivine as the main pervasive metasomatic mineral. These xenoliths are characterized by high Mg# in olivine, orthopyroxene, and clinopyroxene (89-93) and variable Cr# of spinel (9-53), representing residues left after variable degrees of melt extraction (~ 25%). In contrast to their depleted major-element compositions, clinopyroxenes in the xenoliths are enriched in most incompatible trace elements. Clinopyroxenes display enrichment in light rare earth elements (LREE) or spoon-shaped REE with a general enrichment in La over Ce, and depletion in high field strength elements (HFSE; e.g., Nb-Ta, Zr-Hf, Ti). Orthopyroxenes (either primary or secondary) are characterized by low TiO2, high Al2O3, and moderate CaO contents, and resemble those of sub-continental arc peridotites from the eastern Pacific. The geochemical evidence, in addition to the formation of secondary orthopyroxene, indicates that Jeju peridotite xenoliths have been subjected to different degrees of metasomatism by subduction-related silica- and LREE-enriched fluids (or melts). However, chemical equilibrium is evident between the primary and secondary orthopyroxene, implying that the duration of post-metasomatic high temperatures enabled complete resetting/reequilibration of the mineral compositions. The metasomatic enrichment pre-dates the host Jeju Quaternary magmatism, and a genetic relationship with the host magmas is considered unlikely. We therefore propose that the Jeju peridotite xenoliths went through a two-stage evolution, with their composition primarily controlled by early fractional melt extraction, which was subsequently modified by residual slab-derived fluids (or melts). Following enrichment in the peridotite protolith in the mantle

  4. Moon and earth - Compositional differences inferred from siderophiles, volatiles, and alkalis in basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, R.; Anders, E.

    1980-01-01

    A comparison of RNAA analyses of 18 trace elements in 25 low-Ti lunar and 10 terrestrial oceanic basalts indicated that the volatiles such as Ag, Bi, and Br are depleted in lunar basalts by nearly constant factors of 0.026 relative to terrestrial basalts. This constancy is not consistent with models that derive the moon's volatiles from partial recondensation of the earth's mantle or from partial degassing of a captured body; it is consistent with models which derive planetary volatiles from a thin veneer of C-chondrite material. Chalcogens (Se and Te) have almost constant and identical abundances in lunar and terrestrial basalts; siderophiles show abundant Ni in lunar basalts, while Ir, Re, Ge, and Au are depleted.

  5. Geochemical investigation of a semi-continuous extrusive basaltic section from the Deccan Volcanic Province, India: implications for the mantle and magma chamber processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaya Kumar, Kopparapu; Chavan, Chakradhar; Sawant, Sariput; Naga Raju, K.; Kanakdande, Prachiti; Patode, Sangita; Deshpande, Krishna; Krishnamacharyulu, S. K. G.; Vaideswaran, T.; Balaram, V.

    2010-06-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in the geochemistry of an extrusive basaltic section of Deccan traps record progressive changes in mantle melting and crustal filtration and are relevant to understand continental flood basalt (CFB) magmatism. In the present work we have carried out detailed field, petrographic, density and magnetic susceptibility, and geochemical investigations on a small, semi-continuous extrusive section in the eastern Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP) to understand the role of shallow magma chambers in CFB magmatism. Four formations, Ajanta, Chikhli, Buldhana and Karanja crop out in the Gangakhed-Ambajogai area with increasing elevation. Our studies indicate that: (1) the Karanja Formation represents a major magma addition, as indicated by abrupt change in texture, increases in MgO, CaO, Ni, Cr, and Sr, and drastic decreases in Al2O3, Na2O, K2O, Rb, Ba, REE, bulk-rock density and magnetic susceptibility; (2) assimilation fractional crystallization, crystal-laden magmas, and accessory cumulus phases influence the trace element chemistry of Deccan basalts; (3) the predicted cumulate sequence of olivine gabbro-leucogabbro-oxide-apatite gabbro is supported by the observed layered series in a shallow magma chamber within the DVP; (4) the initial magma was saturated with olivine, plagioclase, and augite, and final the pressure of equilibration for the Gangakhed-Ambajogai section basalts is ~2 kbar (~6 km depth); (5) petrophysical parameters act as proxies for magmatic processes; (6) a small layer of oxide-rich basalts may represent the latest erupted pulse in a given magmatic cycle in the DVP; (7) parental basalts to some of the red boles, considered as formation boundaries, might represent small degree partial melts of the mantle; (8) SW Deccan basaltic-types continue into the eastern DVP; and (9) in addition to the magma chamber processes, dynamic melting of the mantle may have controlled DVP geochemistry. The present study underscores the importance of

  6. Sediment-enriched adakitic magmas from the Daisen volcanic field, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feineman, Maureen; Moriguti, Takuya; Yokoyama, Tetsuya; Terui, Sakiko; Nakamura, Eizo

    2013-08-01

    The Quaternary Southwest Japan Arc is a product of subduction of the hot, young Philippine Sea Plate beneath the Eurasian Continental Plate. The magmas erupted from the Southwest Japan Arc belong to a category of magmas commonly referred to as "adakites" or "adakitic magmas". These magmas show trace element evidence for interaction with garnet at depth, and may be associated with partial melting of subducted altered oceanic crust. Also found throughout the southern Sea of Japan region are alkali basalts with little apparent connection to the subduction zone. We have determined major element, trace element, and Sr, Nd, Pb, and U-Th isotopic compositions for a bimodal suite of lavas erupted at the Daisen volcanic field in the Southwest Japan Arc. These magmas consist of mildly alkaline basalts and a calcalkaline intermediate suite, separated by a ˜10 wt.% silica gap. The intermediate magmas show trace element and isotopic evidence for interaction with garnet, consistent with partial melting of the hot, young (˜20 Ma) Philippine Sea Plate. The Daisen intermediate magmas are distinct from other adakitic magmas in their radiogenic isotopic characteristics, consistent with a significant contribution (˜25%) from subducted Nankai Trough sediments. Our data suggest that the basalts erupted at the Daisen volcanic field are not parental to the intermediate magmas, and contain a small contribution of EM1-like mantle common in Sea of Japan alkali basalts but not apparent in the Daisen intermediate magmas.

  7. A strontium and neodymium isotopic study of Apollo 17 high-Ti mare basalts - Resolution of ages, evolution of magmas, and origins of source heterogeneities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paces, James B.; Neal, Clive R.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Nakai, Shun'ichi; Halliday, Alex N.

    1991-01-01

    The geochronological and compositional differences between previously identified magma types (A, B1, B2, and C) were investigated using high-precision Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic data for a set of Apollo 17 high-Ti mare basalt samples chosen to span the range of each of the magma types. These data, combined with previously reported geochemical ages, suggest that Apollo 17 volcanism was initially dominated by an eruption of Type B basalts. Data obtained from new whole-rock Sr and Nd isotopic analyses exhibited distinct differences in initial Sr and Nd isotopic compositions between Types A, B1, B2, and C basalts and were found to be consistent with existing petrogenetic models.

  8. Contrasting magma types and steady-state, volume-predictable, basaltic volcanism along the Great Rift, Idaho.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuntz, M.A.; Champion, D.E.; Spiker, E. C.; Lefebvre, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    The Great Rift is an 85 km-long, 2-8 km-wide volcanic rift zone in the Snake River Plain, Idaho. Three basaltic lava fields, latest Pleistocene to Holocene, are located along the Great Rift: Craters of the Moon, Kings Bowl and Wapi. Craters of the Moon is the largest, covering 1600 km2 and containing approx 30 km3 of lava flows and pyroclastics. Field, radiocarbon and palaeomagnetic data show that this lava field formed in eight eruptive periods, each lasted several hundred years with a recurrence interval of several hundred to approx 3000 yr. The first eruption began approx 15 000 yr B.P. and the last ended at approx 2100 yr B.P. The other two lava fields formed approx 2250 yr B.P. Three magma types fed flows along the Great Rift. A contaminated and a fractionated type were erupted at the Craters of the Moon lava field. The third, little-fractionated Snake River Plain magma-type was erupted at the other two lava fields. The Craters of the Moon segment of the Great Rift has experienced quasi-steady state, volume-predictable volcanism for the last 15 000 yr. Based on this, about 5-6 km3 of lava will be erupted within the next 1000 yr.-L.C.H.

  9. The impact of degassing on the oxidation state of basaltic magmas: A case study of Kīlauea volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussallam, Yves; Edmonds, Marie; Scaillet, Bruno; Peters, Nial; Gennaro, Emanuela; Sides, Issy; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2016-09-01

    Volcanic emissions link the oxidation state of the Earth's mantle to the composition of the atmosphere. Whether the oxidation state of an ascending magma follows a redox buffer - hence preserving mantle conditions - or deviates as a consequence of degassing remains under debate. Thus, further progress is required before erupted basalts can be used to infer the redox state of the upper mantle or the composition of their co-emitted gases to the atmosphere. Here we present the results of X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the iron K-edge carried out for a series of melt inclusions and matrix glasses from ejecta associated with three eruptions of Kīlauea volcano (Hawai'i). We show that the oxidation state of these melts is strongly correlated with their volatile content, particularly in respect of water and sulfur contents. We argue that sulfur degassing has played a major role in the observed reduction of iron in the melt, while the degassing of H2O and CO2 appears to have had a negligible effect on the melt oxidation state under the conditions investigated. Using gas-melt equilibrium degassing models, we relate the oxidation state of the melt to the composition of the gases emitted at Kīlauea. Our measurements and modelling yield a lower constraint on the oxygen fugacity of the mantle source beneath Kīlauea volcano, which we infer to be near the nickel nickel-oxide (NNO) buffer. Our findings should be widely applicable to other basaltic systems and we predict that the oxidation state of the mantle underneath most hotspot volcanoes is more oxidised than that of the associated lavas. We also suggest that whether the oxidation states of a basalt (in particular MORB) reflects that of its source, is primarily determined by the extent of sulfur degassing.

  10. The origin of pyroxene megacrysts in alkali basalts from Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntaflos, Theo; Bjerg, Ernesto; Gregoire, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Clinopyroxene and othopyroxene megacrysts have been brought to the surface together with mantle xenoliths by Neogene and Quaternary alkali basalts from the back-arc environment in Patagonia. The collected megacrysts are from Pali Aike Volcanic Field (El Ruido, maar) and the Gobernador Gregores cinder cone in southern Patagonia, and from the Laguna Fria outcrop in northern Patagonia. The most frequent pyroxene megacrysts are augites (twelve samples), one diopside and two enstatites. Enstatites were found in El Ruido and Laguna Fria. The augites are magnesian rich with MG# that vary from 73.1 to 75.3 in Gobernador Gregores, fairly constant at 76.6 in El Ruido and from 74.0 to 78.6 in Laguna Fria. The MG# of diopside is 91.1 and the two enstatites, one from Gobernador Gregores and the other from Laguna Fria, have MG#s 78.3 and 82.5 respectively. The Na2O and TiO2 contents in augites vary from 0.99 to 2.06 wt% and from 0.69 to 1.86 wt% repectively. Systematically, the Gobernador Gregores augites have the highest TiO2 and Na2O contents. The primitive mantle normalized REE abundances have concave upwards patterns. While the Gobernador Gregores augites have (La/Y)N ratios that vary from 2.4 to 3.8, the El Ruido and Laguna Fria augites have ratios that vary from 0.91 to 1.74. The enstatites from both localities have similar MREE but they differ markedly in their LREE (in GG LaN=0.04xPM and in El Ruido LAN=0.14) and in their HREE (in Gobernador Gregores YbN=0.25 and in El Ruido YBN=0.6). The AL IV/AL VI in all augites is high and vary from 0.75 to1.07 suggesting that they have been formed at - more than 30 km depth. The calculated minimum equilibrium temperatures vary between 1260 to 1320°C. Pressure estimates for augites, with exception of the El Ruido augites with a pressure of 1.65 GP, vary between 1.27 and 1.47 GPa. Especially the pressure estimates from Gobernador Gregores megacrysts vary within a small interval from 1.29 to 1.36 GPa indicating an isobaric

  11. Meteoritic basalts: The nakhlites, their parental magmas, cooling rates, and equivalents on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed one-bar phase equilibrium experiments, designed to determine the compositions of the nakhlites' parental magmas, are in progress. Proposed field studies on Earth, designed to find occurrences of rocks like the nakhlites, were extraordinarily successful. Other work supported in the past year included: attendance at the 1986 national meeting of the Geological Society of America; attendance at the 18th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference; completion and publication of a study of core formation in the SNC parent body; initiation of a study of the flux of SNC meteorites onto the Earth; and initiation of petrologic study of the Angra dos Reis achondrite.

  12. Petrogenesis of Mare Basalts, Mg-Rich Suites and SNC Parent Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Paul C.

    2004-01-01

    The successful models for the internal evolution of the Moon must consider the volume, distribution, timing, composition and, ultimately, the petrogenesis of mare basaltic volcanism. Indeed, given the paucity of geophysical data, the internal state of the Moon in the past can be gleaned only be unraveling the petrogenesis of the various igneous products on the Moon and, particularly, the mare basalts. most useful in constraining the depth and composition of their source region [Delano, 1980] despite having undergone a certain degree of shallow level olivine crystallization.The bulk of the lunar volcanic glass suite can be modeled as the partial melting products of an olivine + orthopyroxene source region deep within the lunar mantle. Ti02 contents vary from 0.2 wt % -1 7.0wt [Shearer and Papike, 1993]. Values that extreme would seem to require a Ti- bearing phase such as ilmenite in the source of the high-Ti (but not in the VLT source) because a source region of primitive LMO olivine and orthopyroxene, even when melted in small degrees cannot account for the observed range of Ti02 compositions. The picritic glasses are undersaturated with respect to ilmenite at all pressures investigated therefore ilmenite must have been consumed during melting, leaving an ilmenite free residue and an undersaturated melt [Delano, 1980, Longhi, 1992, Elkins et al, 2000 among others]. Multi- saturation pressures for the glasses potentially represent the last depths at which the liquids equilibrated with a harzburgite residue before ascending to the surface. These occur at great depths within the lunar mantle. Because the liquids have suffered some amount of crystal fractionation, this is at best a minimum depth. If the melts are mixtures, then it is only an average depth of melting. Multisaturation, nevertheless, is still a strong constraint on source mineralogy, revealing that the generation of the lunar basalts was dominated by melting of olivine and orthopyroxene.

  13. High alumina (HA) and very high potassium (VHK) basalt clasts from Apollo 14 breccias. I - Mineralogy and Petrology - Evidence of crystallization from evolving magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, C. R.; Taylor, L. A.; Patchen, A. D.

    1989-01-01

    The mineralogy and petrography of very high potassium (VHK) and high alumina (HA) basalts from the Apollo 14 site provide an insight into their magmatic evolution. Generally, their parageneses are similar, with olivine and chromite the early liquidus phases, followed by plagioclase and pyroxene, which crystallized together. Although late-stage ilmenite and FeNi metal occur in both VHK and HA samples, the VHKs also crystallize K-feldspar and Fa-rich olivine. Zoning of constituent minerals is similar for both basalt types, demonstrating that the parental magmas for both HA and VHK basalts became enriched in K, Na, Ca, Fe, and Ti and depleted in Mg and Al as crystallization proceeded. Enrichment of K in the VHK basalts is above that expected from normal fractional crystallization.

  14. Fluid and melt inclusions in the Mesozoic Fangcheng basalt from North China Craton: implications for magma evolution and fluid/melt-peridotite reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, He; Xiao, Yilin; Gao, Yongjun; Lai, Jianqing; Hou, Zhenhui; Wang, Yangyang

    2013-05-01

    Melt inclusions and fluid inclusions in the Fangcheng basalt were investigated to understand the magma evolution and fluid/melt-peridotite interaction. Primary silicate melt inclusions were trapped in clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene phenocrysts in the Fangcheng basalt. Three types of melt inclusions (silicate, carbonate, and sulfide) coexisting with fluid inclusions occur in clinopyroxene xenocrysts and clinopyroxene in clinopyroxenite xenoliths. In situ laser-ablation ICP-MS analyses of major and trace element compositions on individual melt inclusions suggest that the silicate melt inclusions in clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene phenocrysts were trapped from the same basaltic magma. The decoupling of major and trace elements in the melt inclusions indicates that the magma evolution was controlled by melt crystallization and contamination from entrapped ultramafic xenoliths. Trace element patterns of melt inclusions are similar to those of the average crust of North China Craton and Yangtze Craton, suggesting a considerable crustal contribution to the magma source. Calculated parental melt of the Fangcheng basalt has features of low MgO (5.96 wt%), high Al2O3 (16.81 wt%), Sr (1,670 ppm), Y (>35 ppm), and high Sr/Y (>40), implying that subducted crustal material was involved in the genesis of the Fangcheng basalt. The coexisting fluid and melt inclusions in clinopyroxene xenocrysts and in clinopyroxene of xenoliths record a rare melt-peridotite reaction, that is olivine + carbonatitic melt1 (rich in Ca) = clinopyroxene + melt2 ± CO2. The produced melt2 is enriched in LREE and CO2 and may fertilize the mantle significantly, which we consider to be the cause for the rapid replacement of lithospheric mantle during the Mesozoic in the region.

  15. Phenomena associated with magma expansion into a drift

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, E. S.

    2002-01-01

    One of the significant threats to the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository has been identified as the possibility of intersection of the underground structure by a basaltic intrusion. Based on the geology of the region, it is assumed that such an intrusion would consist of an alkali basalt similar to the nearby Lathrop Wells cone, which has been dated at about 78 ka. The threat of radioactive release may be either from eruption through the surface above the repository of basalt that had been contaminated or from migration through ground water of radionucleides released as a result of damage to waste packages that interact with the magma. As part of our study of these threats, we are analyzing the phenomena associated with magma expansion into drifts in tuff. The early phenomena of the encounter of volatile-rich basaltic magma with a drift are discussed here.

  16. Io: Generation of Silicate Magma by Shear Melting at the Base of a Basaltic Lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    Tidal theory and observational evidence indicates that about 1 w/sq. m. of energy is released at the surface of Io. In order to place limits on how much tidal energy can be dissipated within a rigid lithosphere, depth-temperature profiles were calculated for different lithosphere thickness assuming that the tidal energy was dissipated uniformly throughout the lithosphere. Thus a thick lithosphere implies that a significant fraction of the tidal energy is dissipated below the depth where solidus temperatures are reached. One possibility is that Io has a crust consisting of a low melting temperature fraction such as basalt, overlying a mantle of a high melting temperature fraction such as peridotite. Thus, if the lithosphere of Io is thicker than 30 km, as appears probable, then high rates of silicate volcanism are implied and a significant fraction of the tidal energy must be dissipated by viscous deformation rather than rigid flexure.

  17. Origin of magmas in subduction zones: a review of experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Kushiro, Ikuo

    2007-01-01

    Studies of the origin of magmas in subduction zones, particularly in the Japanese island arc, have been significantly advanced by petrological, geochemical, geophysical and experimental studies during last 50 years. Kuno’s original model1) for magma generation in the Japanese island arc, that tholeiite magmas are formed at relatively shallow levels in the mantle on the Pacific Ocean side whereas alkali basalt magmas are formed in deeper levels on the Japan Sea side, stimulated subsequent studies, particularly high-pressure experimental studies in which the author participated. Recent seismic tomographic studies of regions beneath the Japanese island arc demonstrate that seismic low-velocity zones where primary magmas are formed have finger-like shapes and rise obliquely from the Japan Sea side toward the Pacific Ocean side. Based on experimental studies, it is suggested that the compositions of primary magmas depend mainly on the H2O content and degree of melting in the melting zones, and that primary tholeiite magmas are formed by 10–25% melting of the source mantle containing less than 0.2 wt.% H2O. High-alumina basalt and alkali basalt magmas are formed by smaller degrees of melting of similar mantle, whereas primary boninite magmas are formed by more than 20% melting of the source mantle with more than 0.2 wt.% H2O, and finally, high-magnesia andesite magmas are formed by smaller degrees of melting of similar mantle. PMID:24019580

  18. Origin of magmas in subduction zones: a review of experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Kushiro, Ikuo

    2007-02-01

    Studies of the origin of magmas in subduction zones, particularly in the Japanese island arc, have been significantly advanced by petrological, geochemical, geophysical and experimental studies during last 50 years. Kuno's original model(1)) for magma generation in the Japanese island arc, that tholeiite magmas are formed at relatively shallow levels in the mantle on the Pacific Ocean side whereas alkali basalt magmas are formed in deeper levels on the Japan Sea side, stimulated subsequent studies, particularly high-pressure experimental studies in which the author participated. Recent seismic tomographic studies of regions beneath the Japanese island arc demonstrate that seismic low-velocity zones where primary magmas are formed have finger-like shapes and rise obliquely from the Japan Sea side toward the Pacific Ocean side. Based on experimental studies, it is suggested that the compositions of primary magmas depend mainly on the H2O content and degree of melting in the melting zones, and that primary tholeiite magmas are formed by 10-25% melting of the source mantle containing less than 0.2 wt.% H2O. High-alumina basalt and alkali basalt magmas are formed by smaller degrees of melting of similar mantle, whereas primary boninite magmas are formed by more than 20% melting of the source mantle with more than 0.2 wt.% H2O, and finally, high-magnesia andesite magmas are formed by smaller degrees of melting of similar mantle. PMID:24019580

  19. Major-element evidence for multiple magma batches in the evolution of Pleistocene and Holocene volcanic rocks of the Markagunt Plateau volcanic field, southwestern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Nealey, L.D.; Maldonado, F. )

    1993-04-01

    Pearce element ratios (PER) provide an initial understanding of the evolution of Pleistocene and Holocene alkali basalt to trachyandesite magmas of the Markagunt Plateau. The magmas erupted from numerous cinder cones, shield-like centers, and dikes. Vent areas were controlled by structures (e.g., grabens) related to the tectonic evolution of the transition zone between the Basin and Range and Colorado Plateaus provinces. The cinder cone-fed basalt flows and a single dike-fed basalt flow are probably older than shield-fed basalt and trachyandesite flows. Chemically, cinder cone- and dike-fed basalt flows are more mafic than shield-fed basalt flows. Trachyandesite flows are latite and benmoreite (58.7--59.7 wt % SiO[sub 2]). PER analysis of flow chemistry indicates that the shield-fed flows represent at leas three cogenetic magma batches, that cinder cone-fed flows must be related to more than one magma batch, but that all andesite is genetically related to a common parent magma. The dike-fed basalt flow is not genetically related to any other magma type. Although several magma batches erupted, chemical variations in the magmatic series are consistent with the fractionation of the observed phenocryst phases: olivine, plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and spinel. This four-phase fractionation assemblage relates compositional differences within each basalt type better than it does the entire magmatic series. Fractionation of no single mineral phase can adequately explain chemical variations in the basaltic magmas of the Markagunt Plateau.

  20. Mechanics and Timescales of Magma Mixing Inferred by Texture and Petrology of Basalt Inclusions and Host Andesite From the 2006 Eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, M. L.; Browne, B. L.

    2010-12-01

    This study characterizes the texture, mineralogy and phenocryst disequilibrium textures in basaltic inclusions and host andesite lavas and scoria to advance our understanding of the mechanics and timescales of open system magma processes driving the 2006 eruption at Augustine Volcano, Alaska. Inclusions account for approximately 1 volume percent in all andesite lithologies emplaced during the explosive, continuous, and effusive eruption phases. In outcrop, quenched basaltic to andesite inclusions (51.3 to 57.3 weight percent SiO2) hosted by andesite lavas (59.1-62.6 weight percent SiO2) range in diameter from 1 cm to over 9 cm, are dark black and characterized by vesicular interiors, quenched and cuspate margins, and porphyritic texture. Inclusion mineralogy is dominated by phenocryst-sized plagioclase with lesser amounts of hornblende, clinopyroxene and olivine, as well as, microphenocrysts-sized plagioclase, hornblende, clinopryoxene, olivine, magnetite, ilmenite and apatite in a glassy, vesicular and acicular groundmass. Intrusion of a hotter, basaltic magma into a cooler silicic magma followed by inclusion formation through mingling processes is evidenced by (1) plagioclase crystal textures displaying (a) oscillatory zoned interiors surrounded by a dusty sieved layer and enclosed by clear, euhedral overgrowth rims, (b) coarsely-sieved interiors characterized by 0.01 mm -0.02 mm diameter melt inclusions and/or similarly sized inclusions of clinopyroxene, orthopryoxene, or hornblende, (2) Anorthite concentration profiles of engulfed host plagioclase crystals displaying contact with a basaltic magma, (3)Fe-Ti oxides from inclusions and low-silica andesite host recording core to rim temperatures ranging from 908°C to 1100°C, indicative of pre- and post- mixing temperatures, respectively, with oxygen fugacity approximately 2 log units above the nickel-nickel oxide buffer. The closest approximation of the basaltic end-member magma composition involved in magma

  1. Petrology of some oceanic island basalts: PRIMELT2.XLS software for primary magma calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzberg, C.; Asimow, P. D.

    2008-09-01

    PRIMELT2.XLS software is introduced for calculating primary magma composition and mantle potential temperature (TP) from an observed lava composition. It is an upgrade over a previous version in that it includes garnet peridotite melting and it detects complexities that can lead to overestimates in TP by >100°C. These are variations in source lithology, source volatile content, source oxidation state, and clinopyroxene fractionation. Nevertheless, application of PRIMELT2.XLS to lavas from a wide range of oceanic islands reveals no evidence that volatile-enrichment and source fertility are sufficient to produce them. All are associated with thermal anomalies, and this appears to be a prerequisite for their formation. For the ocean islands considered in this work, TP maxima are typically ˜1450-1500°C in the Atlantic and 1500-1600°C in the Pacific, substantially greater than ˜1350°C for ambient mantle. Lavas from the Galápagos Islands and Hawaii record in their geochemistry high TP maxima and large ranges in both TP and melt fraction over short horizontal distances, a result that is predicted by the mantle plume model.

  2. Lead and strontium isotopic evidence for crustal interaction and compositional zonation in the source regions of Pleistocene basaltic and rhyolitic magmas of the Coso volcanic field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Kurasawa, H.; Delevaux, M.H.; Kistler, R.W.; Doe, B.R.

    1984-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of Pb and Sr in Pleistocene basalt, high-silica rhyolite, and andesitic inclusions in rhyolite of the Coso volcanic field indicate that these rocks were derived from different levels of compositionally zoned magmatic systems. The 2 earliest rhyolites probably were tapped from short-lived silicic reservoirs, in contrast to the other 36 rhyolite domes and lava flows which the isotopic data suggest may have been leaked from the top of a single, long-lived magmatic system. Most Coso basalts show isotopic, geochemical, and mineralogic evidence of interaction with crustal rocks, but one analyzed flow has isotopic ratios that may represent mantle values (87Sr/86Sr=0.7036,206Pb/204Pb=19.05,207Pb/204Pb=15.62,208Pb/204Pb= 38.63). The (initial) isotopic composition of typical rhyolite (87Sr/86Sr=0.7053,206Pb/204Pb=19.29,207Pb/204Pb= 15.68,208Pb/204Pb=39.00) is representative of the middle or upper crust. Andesitic inclusions in the rhyolites are evidently samples of hybrid magmas from the silicic/mafic interface in vertically zoned magma reservoirs. Silicic end-member compositions inferred for these mixed magmas, however, are not those of erupted rhyolite but reflect the zonation within the silicic part of the magma reservoir. The compositional contrast at the interface between mafic and silicic parts of these systems apparently was greater for the earlier, smaller reservoirs. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Eruptive History and Chemical Evolution of the Precaldera and Postcaldera Basalt-Dacite Sequences, Long Valley, California: Implications for Magma Sources, Current Seismic Unrest, and Future Volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Roy A.

    2004-01-01

    The Long Valley Volcanic Field in east-central California straddles the East Sierran frontal fault zone, overlapping the Sierra Nevada and western Basin and Range Provinces. The volcanic field overlies a mature mid-Tertiary erosional surface that truncates a basement composed mainly of Mesozoic plutons and associated roof pendants of Mesozoic metavolcanic and Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. Long Valley volcanism began about 4 Ma during Pliocene time and has continued intermittently through the Holocene. The volcanism is separable into two basalt-rhyolite episodes: (1) an earlier, precaldera episode related to Long Valley Caldera that climaxed with eruption of the Bishop Tuff and collapse of the caldera; and (2) a later, postcaldera episode structurally related to the north-south-trending Mono-Inyo Craters fissure system, which extends from the vicinity of Mammoth Mountain northward through the west moat of the caldera to Mono Lake. Eruption of the basalt-dacite sequence of the precaldera basalt-rhyolite episode peaked volumetrically between 3.8 and 2.5 Ma; few basalts were erupted during the following 1.8 m.y. (2.5?0.7 Ma). Volcanism during this interval was dominated by eruption of the voluminous rhyolites of Glass Mountain (2.2?0.8 Ma) and formation of the Bishop Tuff magma chamber. Catastrophic rupture of the roof of this magma chamber caused eruption of the Bishop Tuff and collapse of Long Valley Caldera (760 ka), after which rhyolite eruptions resumed on the subsided caldera floor. The earliest postcaldera rhyolite flows (700?500 ka) contain quenched globular basalt enclaves (mafic magmatic inclusions), indicating that basaltic magma had reentered shallow parts of the magmatic system after a 1.8-m.y. hiatus. Later, at about 400 ka, copious basalts, as well as dacites, began erupting from vents mainly in the west moat of the caldera. These later eruptions initiated the postcaldera basalt-rhyolite episode related to the Mono-Inyo Craters fissure system, which

  4. Constraints on crystallization of basaltic magma: observations from Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helz, Rosalind

    2013-04-01

    Kilauea Iki lava lake is a picritic (average MgO = 15.5%) magma body, approximately 135 m thick, which underwent extensive internal differentiation as it cooled and crystallized from its formation during the eruption of 1959 until final solidification in the mid-nineties. Observations of its initial state include data on the stages of filling of the lava lake, plus the sequence and temperature of lava compositions erupted. Drilling and core recovery (from 1960 to 1988) have documented the state of the lake at specific times, showing that the rate of growth of the upper crust was nearly linear (~2.5 m per year between 1962 and 1979), and that the overall pattern of cooling of the lava lake is consistent with conductive heat loss. Recovery and analysis of partially molten drill core has provided a detailed view of the cooling and differentiation history of the melts and minerals within the lake. Observations that may be relevant to older systems include: (1) documentation of when and to what extent olivine settling occurred in the lake; (2) the observation that the most differentiated part of the lake, which lies within the upper crust at a depth of 20-40 m, had completely crystallized by 1975, and (3) the observation that the position of the last interstitial melt was at 80-85 m down, or 62% of the way down in the lake, as would be predicted from conductive cooling. The lava lake lost heat through its roof faster than through the floor, with the result that the position of most-differentiated horizon is grossly offset from the position of the final melt. Circulation patterns in Kilauea Iki were initially driven by lava input during the eruption plus extensive loss of volatiles. These processes significantly affected the location of foundered crust within the lake, as well as the accumulation of coarse, pre-existing olivine phenocrysts between 50 and 95 m. Subsequently, two other major differentiation processes within the lake were driven by upward movement of low

  5. Water and magmas: insights about the water solution mechanisms in alkali silicate melts from infrared, Raman, and 29Si solid-state NMR spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Losq, Charles; Mysen, Bjorn O.; Cody, George D.

    2015-12-01

    Degassing of water during the ascent of hydrous magma in a volcanic edifice produces dramatic changes in the magma density and viscosity. This can profoundly affect the dynamics of volcanic eruptions. The water exsolution history, in turn, is driven by the water solubility and solution mechanisms in the silicate melt. Previous studies pointed to dissolved water in silicate glasses and melts existing as molecules (H2Omol species) and hydroxyl groups, OH. These latter OH groups commonly are considered bonded to Si4+ but may form other bonds, such as with alkali or alkaline-earth cations, for instance. Those forms of bonding influence the structure of hydrous melts in different ways and, therefore, their properties. As a result, exsolution of water from magmas may have different eruptive consequences depending on the initial bonding mechanisms of the dissolved water. However, despite their importance, the solution mechanisms of water in silicate melts are not clear. In particular, how chemical composition of melts affects water solubility and solution mechanism is not well understood. In the present experimental study, components of such information are reported via determination of how water interacts with the cationic network of alkali (Li, Na, and K) silicate quenched melts. Results from 29Si single-pulse magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (29Si SP MAS NMR), infrared, and Raman spectroscopies show that decreasing the ionic radius of alkali metal cation in silicate melts results in decreasing fraction of water dissolved as OH groups. The nature of OH bonding also changes as the alkali ionic radius changes. Therefore, as the speciation and bonding of water controls the degree of polymerization of melts, water will have different effects on the transport properties of silicate melts depending on their chemical composition. This conclusion, in turn, may affect volcanic phenomena related to the viscous relaxation of hydrous magmas, such as for instance the

  6. CO2 contents of basaltic arc magmas from the southern Cascades: Corrections for shrinkage bubble effects and implications for crustal storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walowski, K. J.; Wallace, P. J.; Aster, E. M.; Clynne, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Volatiles such as H2O and CO2 play an important role in a variety of magmatic processes from magma generation to eruption, and melt inclusions (MI) - small volumes of melt trapped inside phenocrysts - have been used to measure their pre-eruptive concentrations. In particular, the volatile contents of MI from basaltic arc magmas have been used to track the role of dehydrating subducted oceanic lithosphere in magma formation in subduction zones. However, recent studies have shown that MI are imperfect storage containers and can lose H by diffusion through the mineral host and CO2 due to formation of a vapor bubble in the inclusion. Such results suggest that even the least degassed melt inclusions from a volcano may have volatile concentrations that underestimate the initial volatile contents of the magma. Thus, recognizing pre- and post-entrapment processes that influence MIs is important for interpreting magmatic processes at depth. Recent studies have developed methods that can be used to distinguish and correct for H diffusive loss (Bucholz et al., 2013) and CO2 loss to vapor bubbles (Wallace et al., 2015). Here, we focus on MI from eight cinder cones that erupted primitive basaltic magmas in the Lassen region of the Cascade arc, where H2O and Cl concentrations have been shown to relate to the amount of a subduction component added to the mantle wedge (Walowski et al., 2015). Using methods of Aster (2015), we correct for the loss of CO2 to a vapor bubble formed within a melt inclusion as the result of post-entrapment crystallization and thermal contraction. The results of the CO2 restoration calculations suggest that ~25-75% of the initial dissolved CO2 in the melt inclusions at the time of trapping was lost to a vapor bubble after entrapment. Trapping pressures for the restored CO2 and maximum H2O contents calculated using methods of Iacono-Marziano et al. (2012) range from ~2-5 kbar, equivalent to entrapment depths of ~7-18 km below the surface. The results

  7. Porosity evolution, contact metamorphism, and fluid flow in the host basalts of the Skaergaard magma-hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    Temporal and spatial variations in porosity during contact metamorphism of the basaltic country rocks to the Skaergaard intrusion in East Greenland resulted in a complex hydrological evolution of the metamorphic aureole. Contrasts in macroscopic porosities in different lithologies led to differences in mineralogical, bulk chemical, and oxygen isotopic alteration, and units with greater macroscopic porosities record larger fluid flux during metamorphism. Calculated Darcy velocities indicate that the horizontal component of fluid flow in the aureole was toward the intrusive contact. In the actinolite + chlorite zone time-integrated fluid flux was higher in aa units ({approximately} 300 kg cm{sup {minus}2}) than in massive units ({approximately} 130 kg cm{sup {minus}2}). Approximately equal time-integrated fluxes of respectively 4 and 5 kg cm{sup {minus}2} in aa and massive units in the pyroxene zone indicate that the volume of fluid flow in the higher grade rocks was independent of primary porosity. These results are consistent with inward fluid migration in the actinolite + chlorite zone through an open network of pores whose abundance varied as a function of primary lava morphology. At higher metamorphic grades fluid fluxes were lower and were independent of primary porosity, probably as a consequence of (1) channelization of fluids due to more extensive pore filling and (2) decreasing horizontal component of flow due to upward migration of fluids near the contact. The results of this study indicate that explicit provision for rock porosity aids interpretation of the nature of fluid flow during contact metamorphism in magma-hydrothermal systems.

  8. Evidence for fractionation of Quaternary basalts on St. Paul Island, Alaska, with implications for the development of shallow magma chambers beneath Bering Sea volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeley, T. C.; Winer, G. S.

    1999-04-01

    St. Paul Island is the youngest volcanic center in the Bearing Sea basalt province. We have undertaken a field, petrographic, and geochemical study of select St. Paul volcanic rocks in order to better understand their differentiation; specifically, to test the hypothesis that magmas erupted from individual Bering Sea basaltic volcanoes are not related by shallow-level processes such as crystal fractionation. Petrographically, all of the St. Paul volcanic rocks are olivine-, plagioclase-, and clinopyroxene-phyric. Textural features and modal contents of olivine phenocrysts, however, vary widely throughout the spectrum of basalt compositions. Although differing in size and abundance, olivine phenocrysts in all rock compositions are euhedral and commonly skeletal, suggesting rapid growth during ascent or eruptive quenching. None, however, display reaction textures with surrounding groundmass liquid. Compositionally, the St. Paul volcanic rocks are basalts and tephritic basalts and all have high contents of normative nepheline (8% to 16%). Concentrations of many major and incompatible trace elements display no clear correlations with bulk-rock SiO 2 and MgO contents or modal abundances of phenocrysts, suggesting that much of the compositional diversity of these magmas reflects variable mantle sources and degrees of partial melting. Similarly, chondrite-normalized REE patterns show variable degrees of light REE enrichment (La n=70-90) that do not correlate with bulk-rock mg-numbers. In contrast, concentrations of compatible trace elements (Ni, Cr, and Co) are positively correlated with MgO contents and modal percentages of olivine phenocrysts. Maximum forsterite contents of olivine phenocryst cores in most St. Paul rocks decrease with decreasing bulk-rock mg-number and are similar to the calculated equilibrium range. This is evidence that the high mg-numbers are magmatic and do not result from olivine accumulation. Instead, major and compatible trace element mass

  9. Jun Jaegyu Volcano: A Recently Discovered Alkali Basalt Volcano in Antarctic Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, A.; Bailey, D.; Domack, E.; Brachfeld, S.; Gilbert, R.; Ishman, S.; Krahmann, G.; Leventer, A.

    2004-12-01

    Jun Jaegyu is a young volcanic construct discovered in May 2004 by researchers aboard the National Science Foundation (NSF) vessel Laurence M. Gould (LMG04-04). The volcano is located on the Antarctic continental shelf in Antarctic Sound, approximately 9 km due north of the easternmost point of Andersson Island. Swath bathymetry (NBP01-07) indicates that the volcano stands 700 meters above the seafloor, yet remains 275 meters short of the ocean surface. The seamount lies along a northwest-southeast oriented fault scarp and contains at least 1.5 km3 of volcanic rock. Video recording of the volcano's surface revealed regions nearly devoid of submarine life. These areas are associated with a thermal anomaly of up to 0.052° C higher than the surrounding ocean water. A rock dredge collected ~13 kg of material, over 80% of which was fresh volcanic rock; the remainder was glacial IRD. These observations, along with reports by mariners of discolored water in this region of Antarctic Sound, suggest that the volcano has been recently active. The basalt samples are generally angular, glassy and vesicular. Preliminary petrographic observations indicate that plagioclase, olivine, and clinopyroxene are all present as phenocryst phases, and that small (<1cm) rounded xenoliths are common. A comprehensive study of the volcano's petrography and whole-rock chemistry is currently underway. Jun Jaegyu is the northernmost volcanic center of the James Ross Island Volcanic Group (JRIVG), and the only center in this region of the Antarctic Peninsula with evidence of recent activity. It lies along the boundary between the Late Cenozoic JRIVG and the Upper Paleozoic rocks of the Trinity Peninsula Formation. While the tectonic setting of the region is complex, volcanism appears to be associated with active faults related to within-plate extension.

  10. Variation in parental magmas of Mt Rouse, a complex polymagmatic monogenetic volcano in the basaltic intraplate Newer Volcanics Province, southeast Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, Julie A.; Nicholls, Ian A.; Keays, Reid R.; Hayman, Patrick C.

    2015-02-01

    Monogenetic volcanoes have long been regarded as simple in nature, involving single magma batches and uncomplicated evolutions; however, recent detailed research into individual centres is challenging that assumption. Mt Rouse (Kolor) is the volumetrically largest volcano in the monogenetic Newer Volcanics Province of southeast Australia. This study presents new major, trace and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data for samples selected on the basis of a detailed stratigraphic framework analysis of the volcanic products from Mt Rouse. The volcano is the product of three magma batches geochemically similar to Ocean-Island basalts, featuring increasing LREE enrichment with each magma batch (batches A, B and C) but no evidence of crustal contamination; the Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes define two groupings. Modelling suggests that the magmas were sourced from a zone of partial melting crossing the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, with batch A forming a large-volume partial melt in the deep lithosphere (1.7 GPa/55.5 km); and batches B and C from similar areas within the shallow asthenosphere (1.88 GPa/61 km and 1.94 GPa/63 km, respectively). The formation and extraction of these magmas may have been due to high deformation rates in the mantle caused by edge-driven convection and asthenospheric upwelling. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary is important with respect to NVP volcanism. An eruption chronology involves sequential eruption of magma batches A, C and B, followed by simultaneous eruption of batches A and B. Mt Rouse is a complex polymagmatic monogenetic volcano that illustrates the complexity of monogenetic volcanism and demonstrates the importance of combining detailed stratigraphic analysis alongside systematic geochemical sampling.

  11. Perspectives on basaltic magma crystallization and differentiation: Lava-lake blocks erupted at Mauna Loa volcano summit, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarter, R.L.; Fodor, R.V.; Trusdell, F.

    2006-01-01

    Explosive eruptions at Mauna Loa summit ejected coarse-grained blocks (free of lava coatings) from Moku'aweoweo caldera. Most are gabbronorites and gabbros that have 0-26??vol.% olivine and 1-29??vol.% oikocrystic orthopyroxene. Some blocks are ferrogabbros and diorites with micrographic matrices, and diorite veins (??? 2??cm) cross-cut some gabbronorites and gabbros. One block is an open-textured dunite. The MgO of the gabbronorites and gabbros ranges ??? 7-21??wt.%. Those with MgO > 10??wt.% have some incompatible-element abundances (Zr, Y, REE; positive Eu anomalies) lower than those in Mauna Loa lavas of comparable MgO; gabbros (MgO < 10??wt.%) generally overlap lava compositions. Olivines range Fo83-58, clinopyroxenes have Mg#s ??? 83-62, and orthopyroxene Mg#s are 84-63 - all evolved beyond the mineral-Mg#s of Mauna Loa lavas. Plagioclase is An75-50. Ferrogabbro and diorite blocks have ??? 3-5??wt.% MgO (TiO2 3.2-5.4%; K2O 0.8-1.3%; La 16-27??ppm), and a diorite vein is the most evolved (SiO2 59%, K2O 1.5%, La 38??ppm). They have clinopyroxene Mg#s 67-46, and plagioclase An57-40. The open-textured dunite has olivine ?????Fo83.5. Seven isotope ratios are 87Sr/86Sr 0.70394-0.70374 and 143Nd/144Nd 0.51293-0.51286, and identify the suite as belonging to the Mauna Loa system. Gabbronorites and gabbros originated in solidification zones of Moku'aweoweo lava lakes where they acquired orthocumulate textures and incompatible-element depletions. These features suggest deeper and slower cooling lakes than the lava lake paradigm, Kilauea Iki, which is basalt and picrite. Clinopyroxene geobarometry suggests crystallization at < 1??kbar P. Highly evolved mineral Mg#s, < 75, are largely explained by cumulus phases exposed to evolving intercumulus liquids causing compositional 'shifts.' Ferrogabbro and diorite represent segregation veins from differentiated intercumulus liquids filter pressed into rigid zones of cooling lakes. Clinopyroxene geobarometry suggests < 300??bar P

  12. Neogene to Quaternary basalts of the Jabal Eghei (Nuqay) area (south Libya): Two distinct volcanic events or continuous volcanism with gradual shift in magma composition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radivojević, Maša; Toljić, Marinko; Turki, Salah M.; Bojić, Zoran; Šarić, Kristina; Cvetković, Vladica

    2015-02-01

    This study reports and discusses a set of new K/Ar age and new petrochemical data on basalts of the Jabal Eghei (Nuqay) area (south Libya). This area is part of a > 1000 km long NNW-SSE Libyan volcanic field that stretches from the Mediterranean coastal near Tripoli to the Tibesti massif in Chad. Whole rock K/Ar ages, stratigraphy, volcanology and rock petrochemistry indicate that the Jabal Eghei developed during two volcanic events. The first occurred from the Middle Miocene to the Pliocene (K/Ar ages from ~ 16 to ~ 5 Ma) when large volumes of low aspect ratio lava flows of transitional basalts formed. The second event happened in Pliocene-mid-Pleistocene time (4-≤ 1 Ma) and it gave rise to basanite spatter to scoria pyroclastic cones and subordinate lava flow facies. The transitional basalts are less primitive and less enriched in incompatible trace elements than the basanites. Petrochemical characteristics reveal that the transitional basalts underwent weak to moderate olivine-dominated fractionation and that crustal assimilation had negligible effects. REE geochemical modeling shows that primary magmas of both transitional basalts and basanites formed by melting of a similar garnet-bearing, primitive mantle-like source with degree of melting of 3-5% and ≤ 1%, respectively. It is also demonstrated that the transitional basalts show systematic compositional changes in time because progressively younger rocks are petrochemically more similar to basanites. We argue that our data definitely prove that the age pattern along the entire Libyan volcanic field is much more complex than it was thought before.

  13. Ion microprobe studies of trace elements in Apollo 14 volcanic glass beads - Comparisons to Apollo 14 mare basalts and petrogenesis of picritic magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.; Simon, S. B.; Shimizu, N.; Yurimoto, H.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from trace element analysis, by ion microprobe techniques, of individual glass beads representing seven compositionally distinct types of picritic glass beads from the Apollo 14 landing site. The picritic glass beads at the A-14 exhibited a wide range of primary magma compositions and a lack of petrogenetic linkage (via crystal fractionation) to crystalline basalts. The wide range of major and trace element characteristics of the picritic glass beads is consistent with derivation from mineralogically distinct sources which consist of varying proportions of olivine + orthopyroxene +/- clonopyroxene +/- ilmenite +/- plagioclase +/- KREEP component.

  14. Pliocene-Quaternary basalts from the Harrat Tufail, western Saudi Arabia: Recycling of ancient oceanic slabs and generation of alkaline intra-plate magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhsh, Rami A.

    2015-12-01

    Harrat Tufail represents a Caenozoic basalt suite at the western margin of the Arabian plate. This rift-related suite includes voluminous Quaternary non-vesicular basalt (with fragments of earlier Pliocene vesicular flow) that forms a cap sheet over Miocene rhyolite and minor vesicular basalt. The contact between rhyolite and the basaltic cap is erosional with remarkable denudations indicating long time gap between the felsic and mafic eruptions. The geochemical data prove alkaline, sodic and low-Ti nature of the olivine basalt cap sheet. The combined whole-rock and mineral spot analyses by the electron microprobe (EMPA) suggest magma generation from low degree of partial melting (∼5%) from spinel- and garnet-lherzolite mantle source. Derivation from a mantle source is supported by low Na content in clinopyroxene (ferroan diopside) whereas high Mg content in ilmenite is an evidence of fractional crystallization trajectory. Accordingly, the Pliocene basaltic cap of Harrat Tufail is a product of mantle melt that originates by recycling in the asthenosphere during subduction of ancient oceanic slab(s). The whole-rock chemistry suggests an ancient ocean island basaltic slab (OIB) whereas the EMPA of Al-rich spinel inclusions in olivine phenocrysts are in favour of a mid-ocean ridge basaltic source (MORB). Calculations of oxygen fugacity based on the composition of co-existing Fe-Ti oxide suggest fluctuation from highly to moderately oxidizing conditions with propagation of crystallization (log10 fO2 from -22.09 to -12.50). Clinopyroxene composition and pressure calculation indicates low-pressure (0.4-2 kbar). Cores of olivine phenocrysts formed at highest temperature (1086-1151 °C) whereas the rims and olivine micro-phenocrysts formed at 712-9-796 °C which is contemporaneous to formation of clinopyroxene at 611-782 °C. Fe-Ti oxides crystallized over a long range (652-992 °C) where it started to form at outer peripheries of olivine phenocrysts and as interstitial

  15. A trachyte-syenite core within a basaltic nest: filtering of primitive injections by a multi-stage magma plumbing system (Oki-Dōzen, south-west Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenna, Marco; Nakada, Setsuya; Miura, Daisuke; Toshida, Kiyoshi; Ito, Hisatoshi; Hokanishi, Natsumi; Nakai, Shun'ichi

    2015-08-01

    Oki-Dōzen (Japan) is a Late Miocene (7-5 Ma) intraplate alkalic volcano composed of a central trachytic pyroclastic complex surrounded by a ring-shaped succession of basaltic to trachybasaltic lavas and pyroclastic rocks and dispersed trachytic bodies. The central trachytic complex is in contact with a syenite that was intruded into the basement early Miocene volcano-sedimentary succession. In the centre of the system there are no alkalic basaltic rocks that are correlative of the outer flank ring. We present whole-rock major and trace element chemistry, Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions and petrological data from the central trachytic volcanic complex and the intrusive syenite body, as well as from the outer ring basaltic succession. We also present and discuss a new set of zircon U/Pb ages collected from the central trachyte and syenite bodies. All the eruptive products of Oki-Dōzen, as well as the syenite, plot on a single liquid line of descent initiated from a mantle-derived alkalic basaltic parent. A younger (2.8 Ma) basaltic eruption (Uzuka basalt) has isotopic compositions that distinguish it from the rest of the system. Geochemical modelling indicates that magmatic differentiation through crystal fractionation and minor crustal assimilation occurred in crustal and shallow sub-volcanic magma reservoirs. In the central part of the system, a number of vertically spaced reservoirs acted as a filter, capturing basaltic dykes and hindering their ascent. In the outer region, dykes either reached the surface unhindered and erupted to form the basaltic/trachybasaltic succession or stalled at crustal levels and differentiated to trachyte before forming dispersed domes/flows. The central plumbing system "filter" resulted in a nest-shaped volcano, with a trachytic core surrounded by basaltic products, and stopped direct injection of basaltic magmas into the shallow syenitic magma reservoir, likely preventing its destabilization and explosive eruption.

  16. Assimilation of granite by basaltic magma at Burnt Lava flow, Medicine Lake volcano, northern California: Decoupling of heat and mass transfer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, T.L.; Kinzler, R.J.; Baker, M.B.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Lesher, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    At Medicine Lake volcano, California, andesite of the Holocene Burnt Lava flow has been produced by fractional crystallization of parental high alumina basalt (HAB) accompanied by assimilation of granitic crustal material. Burnt Lava contains inclusions of quenched HAB liquid, a potential parent magma of the andesite, highly melted granitic crustal xenoliths, and xenocryst assemblages which provide a record of the fractional crystallization and crustal assimilation process. Samples of granitic crustal material occur as xenoliths in other Holocene and Pleistocene lavas, and these xenoliths are used to constrain geochemical models of the assimilation process. A large amount of assimilation accompanied fractional crystallization to produce the contaminated Burnt lava andesites. Models which assume that assimilation and fractionation occurred simultaneously estimate the ratio of assimilation to fractional crystallization (R) to be >1 and best fits to all geochemical data are at an R value of 1.35 at F=0.68. Petrologic evidence, however, indicates that the assimilation process did not involve continuous addition of granitic crust as fractionation occurred. Instead, heat and mass transfer were separated in space and time. During the assimilation process, HAB magma underwent large amounts of fractional crystallization which was not accompanied by significant amounts of assimilation. This fractionation process supplied heat to melt granitic crust. The models proposed to explain the contamination process involve fractionation, replenishment by parental HAB, and mixing of evolved and parental magmas with melted granitic crust. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag.

  17. Impact melts in the MAC88105 lunar meteorite - Inferences for the lunar magma ocean hypothesis and the diversity of basaltic impact melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    The MAC88105 lunar meteorite, as represented by thin section 78, contains three major types of impact melt breccias. The most abundant type is clast-laden, fine-grained, and rich in Al2O3 (28 wt pct); these clasts constitute most of the meteorite. Their abundance and aluminous nature indicate that the MAC88105 source area was very aluminous. This is consistent with formation of the primordial lunar crust from a global magma ocean. The second type of impact melt is represented by only one clast in 78. It has a basaltic bulk composition similar to many other lunar impact melts, but is significantly richer in P2O5 than most and has a much lower MgO/(MgO + FeO). The third impact-melt type resembles a prominent melt group at Apollo 16, but has lower MgO/(MgO + FeO). These data show that basaltic impact melts are compositionally diverse. Dating samples of the Al-rich impact melts and the new types of basaltic impact melts from this meteorite can test the idea that the Moon suffered a terminal cataclysm 3.9 Ga ago.

  18. Impact melts in the MAC88105 lunar meteorite: Inferences for the lunar magma ocean hypothesis and the diversity of basaltic impact melts

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.J. )

    1991-11-01

    The MAC88105 lunar meteorite, as represented by thin section 78, contains three major types of impact melt breccias. The most abundant type is clast-laden, fine grained, and rich in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (28 wt%); these clasts constitute most of the meteorite. Their abundance and aluminous nature indicate that the MAC88105 source area was very aluminous. This is consistent with formation of the primordial lunar crust from a global magma ocean. The second type of impact melt is represented by only one clast in 78. It has a basaltic bulk composition similar to many other lunar impact melts, but is significantly richer in P{sub 2}O{sub 5} than most and has a much lower MgO/(MgO + FeO). These data show that basaltic impact melts are compositionally diverse. Dating samples of the Al-rich impact melts and the new types of basaltic impact melts from this meteorite can test that idea that the Moon suffered a terminal cataclysm 3.9 Ga ago.

  19. Lithospheric influences on magma compositions of late Mesozoic and Cenozoic intraplate basalts (the Older Volcanics) of Victoria, south-eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Richard C.; Nicholls, Ian A.; Day, Arthur

    2014-10-01

    distinctive convex upwards patterns but are characterised by strong depletions of K, Rb and Ba relative to Nb. In both groups there is additional subtle variation with some samples having patterns with relative enrichments in Nb, Sr and Eu and/or depletions in Pb. Group 1 basalt compositions can be approximated by quantitative models involving 2 to 10% partial melting of an originally depleted mantle composition that has been metasomatised by the addition of 2 to 3% of an enriched component with a composition similar to EM1 intraplate basalt. The trace element patterns of Group 2 basalts can be modelled by 2 to 10% partial melting of an originally depleted mantle metasomatised by the addition of 1% of a calci-carbonatite composition. When Sr isotope data for Older Volcanics are projected onto an east-west profile across the state of Victoria, they outline distinctive discontinuities in isotopic composition that appear to be related to surface and subsurface structural features within the basement. One such discontinuity has previously been identified using data for the Newer Volcanics of the Western District Province of Victoria. Lithospheric blocks present beneath southern Victoria range in age from NeoProterozoic or Cambrian to Palaeozoic and some of the lowest 87Sr/86Sr ratios are observed in basalts erupted above an older basement unit (the Selwyn Block). The inference is that there is some form of lithospheric control on basaltic magma chemistry and since a substantial proportion of Older Volcanics have the geochemical characteristics of primary magmas (high Mg# and moderate to high abundances of Ni and Cr), this could indicate that magmas have been sourced from regionally heterogeneous, variably metasomatised, sub-continental lithospheric mantle. Neither the temporal and spatial relationships of the magmatic activity that followed continental breakup nor the uplift history of the south-eastern Australian passive margin are readily explained in terms of deep mantle plume

  20. High-Mg# andesites and basalts from the Kamchatka-Kurile subduction system: Implications for primitive arc magma genesis and mantle wedge processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, J. A.; Yogodzinski, G. M.; Churikova, T. G.; Volynets, O. N.

    2007-12-01

    Primitive arc magmatism and mantle wedge processes are investigated through a petrologic and geochemical study of high Mg# (Mg/Mg+Fe>0.65) basalts and andesites from the Kurile-Kamchatka subduction system. The primitive andesites are from the Shisheisky complex (Portnyagin et al., AGU Monograph 172, 2007), a field of Quaternary-age, monogenetic cones located in the Aleutian-Kamchatka junction, north of Shiveluch Volcano, the northernmost active composite cone in Kamchatka. The Shisheisky lavas are similar to primitive andesites from Mt. Shasta, Piip Volcano, and Setouchi, Japan. They have Mg# of 0.66-0.73 at intermediate SiO2 (54-58 wt%), low CaO/Al2O3 (<0.54), and high Ni (184-243 ppm) and Cr (418-880 ppm). Olivine phenocryst core compositions of ~FO90 appear to be in equilibrium with whole-rock `melts', consistent with the aphyric to sparsely phyric nature of these lavas. Compared to the Shishiesky andesites, primitive basalts from the region (Alaid, Tolbachik, Kharchinsky) have higher CaO/Al2O3 (0.69-0.86), and lower whole-rock Ni (105-182 ppm), Cr (395-531 ppm), and Ni/MgO (10-17) at similar Mg# (0.66-.70). Olivine phenocrysts in the basalts have similarly higher CaO, lower Ni, and lower Ni/MgO at ~FO88 compared to the andesites. The absence of plagioclase phenocrysts from the primitive andesites strongly contrasts petrographic observations of the plagioclase-phyric basalts, indicating relatively high pre-eruptive water contents for the andesites compared to the basalts. Petrographic and mineral composition data suggest that the Shisheisky primitive andesites were liquids in equilibrium with mantle peridotite, and were not produced by mixing between primitive basalts and evolved felsic magmas or from contamination by xenocrystic olivine. The key features of the Shisheisky primitive andesites (e.g., low CaO/Al2O3 and high Ni/MgO at high Mg#) appear to have been acquired at sub-moho depths, by processes and under physical conditions in the mantle wedge (lower

  1. Project Hotspot: Temporal Compositional Variation in Basalts of the Kimama Core and Implications for Magma Source Evolution, Snake River Scientific Drilling Project, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, K. E.; Shervais, J. W.; Champion, D.; Duncan, R. A.; Christiansen, E. H.

    2012-12-01

    Project Hotspot produced continuous core from three drill sites in the Snake River plain, including 1912 m of core from the Kimama drill site on the axis of the plain. Ongoing major and trace element chemical characterization of the Kimama core and new 40Ar/39Ar and paleomagnetic age data demonstrate temporal variations in the evolution of Snake River Plain volcanism. Cyclic fluctuations in magma chemistry identify over a hundred chemically distinct basalt flow groups (comprising 550 individual lava flows) within 54 periods of volcanic activity, separated by hiatuses of decades to many millennia. From a surface age of 700 ka to a bottom-hole age of 6.5 Ma, the Kimama core records the presence of several nearly coeval but compositionally different lava flows, ranging from highly evolved lavas to non-evolved tholeiites. Determining whether Kimama lavas are genetically unrelated or extreme differentiates of a single magma batch relies upon a combination of detailed chemostratigraphy and absolute and relative age data. Age and geochemical data introduce new ideas on the role of multiple magma sources and/or differentiation processes in the development of central Snake River Plain volcanic systems. The relatively short gestation of evolved liquids is demonstrated throughout the Kimama core, with evidence for cyclic fractionation of mafic lavas at depths of 318 m, 350 m, 547 m, and 1078 m. Here, highly evolved lava flows (FeOT 16.0-18.4 wt %; TiO2 3.43-4.62 wt %) are stratigraphically bounded by more primitive tholeiitic basalts (FeOT 9.9-14.8 wt%; TiO2 1.22-3.56 wt%) within the same inclination range, suggesting that cyclic fractionation is a regular feature of shield volcano development on the central Snake River Plain. Between 1.60 ± 0.13 Ma (453.5 m depth) and 1.54 ± 0.15 Ma (320.0 m depth), Kimama lavas ranged in composition from primitive tholeiite (FeOT 11.7 wt %; TiO2 1.76 wt %) to evolved basalt (FeOT 16.0 wt %; TiO2 4.00 wt %). At depths of 1119 m and 1138 m

  2. Very low Ti /VLT/ basalts - A new mare rock type from the Apollo 17 drill core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Papike, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Phaneritic fragments, vitrophyres, and glass beads of a new very low Ti (VLT) mare basalt are found in the Apollo 17 drill core. VLT lithic fragments are characterized by TiO2 content of approximately 0.5%, Mg/(Mg + Fe) of approximately 0.52, CaO/Al2O3 of approximately 0.9, and low alkali content. Although mineral systematics and modal composition of VLT basalt are similar to Apollo 12 and 15 low Ti basalts, VLT basalts cannot be related to these mare basalts by crystal fractionation. Since VLT basalt is isochemical with some of the less mafic green glasses, fractionation of VLT magma from a liquid of green-glass composition is a possibility. Spectral reflectance studies suggest that VLT-type basalts may be relatively common in mare basins.

  3. Light Lithophile Elements in Natural and Experimental Phases in Martian Basalts: Implications for the Degassing of Water from Martian Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herd, C. D. K.; Treiman, A. H.; McKay, G. A.; Shearer, C. K.

    2003-01-01

    Lentz et al. argued that zoning trends in light lithophile elements (LLE) in pyroxene in Shergotty and Zagami are evidence for the degassing of magmatic water. We tested this inference by obtaining: additional LLE analyses of Shergotty and Zagami pyroxene; analyses of Pasamonte pyroxene; and silicate and phosphate partition coefficients for B and Li for martian magma and mineral compositions.

  4. Volatile constraints on the magma supply, dynamics and plumbing system of a top-ranking basaltic gas emitter: Ambrym volcano, Vanuatu Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    P. Allard1,2, A. Aiuppa3,4, P. Bani5, N. Métrich1,6, A. Bertagnini6, M. Burton7, P-J. Gauthier5, F. Parello3, H. Shinohara8, G. Sawyer9, E. Bagnato3, E. Garaebiti10 1IPGP, UMR7154 CNRS, Paris France; 2INGV, Sezione di Catania, Italy; 3DiSTEM, Palermo University, Italy; 4INGV, Sezione di Palermo, Italy; 5LMV-OPGC, Clermont-Ferrand, France; 6INGV, Sezione di Pisa, Italy; 7SEAES, University of Manchester, UK; 8Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba, Japan; 9Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, UK; 10GEOHAZARD, Port Vila, Vanuatu. Ambrym basaltic volcano (central Vanuatu arc) is one of the most active volcanic systems of the Southwest Pacific region, where recurrent lava lake activity sustains voluminous gas release from two main cones, Benbow and Marum, in a 12 km-wide summit caldera. In 2007-2008 we could perform the first detailed investigations of gas emissions from this very active but remote and hardly accessible intra-oceanic arc volcano, combining ground-based and airborne measurements and using both in situ and remote sensing tools. The degassing budget of major, minor, trace and radioactive volatile species reveals that Ambrym ranks amongst the three most powerful persistent emitters of magmatic volatiles at global scale [1]. Coupled with the analysis of dissolved volatiles in the feeding basalt (olivine-hosted melt inclusions), the gas emission rates imply a very high average magma supply/degassing rate of 25 m3/s - 6 times the rate at Mount Etna - from a reservoir emplaced at about 4 km depth beneath the caldera floor. The chemical composition of emitted volcanic gases is compatible with dominant closed-system ascent and degassing of the basalt, followed by open degassing at shallow depth as water exsolution becomes extensive. The modest time-averaged extrusion rate, estimated from caldera infilling over the past 2 ka, requires convective downward recycling of the denser degassed magma in conduits with diameter of order 10 m. High resolution OP

  5. H 2O in basalt and basaltic andesite glass inclusions from four subduction-related volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisson, T. W.; Layne, G. D.

    1993-06-01

    Total dissolved H 2O and major element abundances were measured in basalt and basaltic andesite glass inclusions in olivine phenocrysts from Quaternary eruptions of four subduction-related volcanoes to test the hypothesis that low-MgO high-alumina basalts contain high H 2O at depth [1] and to reveal any petrogenetically significant correlations between arc basalt compositions and H 2O contents. Total dissolved H 2O (combined molecular H 2O and OH groups) measured by ion microprobe in mafic glass inclusions from the 1974 eruption of Fuego, Guatemala, reaches 6.2 wt.%. Dissolved H 2O contents decrease in more evolved Fuego glasses. Correlations of H 2O with MgO, Na 2O, K 2O, S and Cl indicate that aqueous fluid exsolution during magma ascent forced crystallization and differentiation of residual liquids. Low-K 2O magnesian high-alumina basalt glass inclusions from the 3 ka eruption of Black Crater (Medicine Lake volcano, California) have low H 2O contents, near 0.2 wt.%, which are consistent with the MORB-like character of these and other primitive lavas of the Medicine Lake region. Basalt and basaltic andesite glass inclusions from Copco Cone and Goosenest volcano on the Cascade volcanic front north of Mt. Shasta have H 2O contents of up to 3.3 wt.%. The range of H 2O contents in Cascade mafic magmas is too large to have resulted solely from enrichment by crystallization and indicates the participation of an H 2O-rich component in magma generation or crustal-level modification. Whereas fluid-absent melting of amphibole-bearing peridotite can account for the H 2O in most mafic arc liquids, the very high H 2O/alkali ratios of the 1974 Fuego eruptives suggest that an aqueous fluid was involved in the generation of Fuego basalts.

  6. Crystal preferred orientations of minerals from mantle xenoliths in alkali basaltic rocks form the Catalan Volcanic Zone (NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Roig, Mercè; Galán, Gumer; Mariani, Elisabetta

    2015-04-01

    Mantle xenoliths in alkali basaltic rocks from the Catalan Volcanic Zone, associated with the Neogene-Quaternary rift system in NE Spain, are formed of anhydrous spinel lherzolites and harzburgites with minor olivine websterites. Both peridotites are considered residues of variable degrees of partial melting, later affected by metasomatism, especially the harzburgites. These and the websterites display protogranular microstructures, whereas lherzolites show continuous variation between protogranular, porphyroclastic and equigranular forms. Thermometric data of new xenoliths indicate that protogranular harzburgites, lherzolites and websterites were equilibrated at higher temperatures than porphyroclastic and equigranular lherzolites. Mineral chemistry also indicates lower equilibrium pressure for porphyroclastic and equigranular lherzolites than for the protogranular ones. Crystal preferred orientations (CPOs) of olivine and pyroxenes from these new xenoliths were determined with the EBSD-SEM technique to identify the deformation stages affecting the lithospheric mantle in this zone and to assess the relationships between the deformation fabrics, processes and microstructures. Olivine CPOs in protogranular harzburgites, lherzolites and a pyroxenite display [010]-fiber patterns characterized by a strong point concentration of the [010] axis normal to the foliation and girdle distribution of [100] and [001] axes within the foliation plane. Olivine CPO symmetry in porphyroclastic and equigranular lherzolites varies continuously from [010]-fiber to orthorhombic and [100]-fiber types. The orthorhombic patterns are characterized by scattered maxima of the three axes, which are normal between them. The rare [100]-fiber patterns display strong point concentration of [100] axis, with normal girdle distribution of the other two axes, which are aligned with each other. The patterns of pyroxene CPOs are more dispersed than those of olivine, especially for clinopyroxene, but

  7. Major element chemistry of Apollo 14 mare basalt clasts and highland plutonic clasts from lunar breccia 14321: Comparison with neutron activation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, John W.; Vetter, Scott K.

    1993-01-01

    Studies of lithic components in lunar breccias have documented a wide variety of rock types and magma suites which are not found among large, discrete lunar samples. Rock types found exclusively or dominantly as clasts in breccias include KREEP basalts, VHK mare basalts, high-alumina mare basalts, olivine vitrophyres, alkali anorthosites, and magnesian anorthosites and troctolites. These miniature samples are crucial in petrogenetic studies of ancient mare basalts and the highlands crust of the western nearside, both of which have been battered by basin-forming impacts and no longer exist as distinct rock units.

  8. Source Components and Intensive Parameters of Magma Genesis in the CentAm and North IBM Arcs: Analyses using Arc Basalt Simulator Version 2 Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, J.; Hacker, B. R.; van Keken, P. E.; Kent, A. J.; Kawabata, H.; Stern, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    We have developed a mass balance calculation model for basalt magma genesis in subduction zones. The Arc Basalt Simulator version 2 (ABS2) model includes: 1) calculation of slab fluid composition based on PerpleX (ver.7) metamorphic mineralogy for altered oceanic crust (AOC) and sediment (SED) along the slab P-T trajectory derived by the latest geodynamic model; 2) zone refining chemical modification of the slab-derived fluid by interaction with the mantle peridotite, using mineralogy calculated by PerpleX for low-T hydrous peridotite and for high-T peridotite with nominally anhydrous minerals; and 3) fluid-fluxed, open system melting of the high-T mantle peridotite based on pMELTS mineralogy and Katz et al. (2003)s hydrous melting parameterization. Application of the ABS2 model to the northern Izu arc (N-Izu) and the Central America arcs (CentAm) highlights differences between the two arc systems. N-Izu basalts are best fit by a mixture of 10% sediment (SED) and 90% altered oceanic crust (AOC), with fluid dehydration at 4GPa/850°C beneath the volcanic front (VF) and 5GPa/900°C rear arc beneath the rear-arc (RA). Mantle melting conditions for N-Izu lavas are F=24% with 2-5% fluid at 1.0-2.5GPa/1250-1400°C (VF) and 6-20%F with 1-5% fluid at 2.5 GPa/1000-1200°C (RA). Guatemala-Nicaraguan basalts require two AOC components: Cocos-Nazca Spreading Center (CNS) and Northern Galapagos domain (NGD) with increasing HIMU component in that order. Guatemala VF basalt (Izarco) requires CNS-AOC, SED, and PM with SED:AOC = 25:75, dehydrated at 5GPa/870°C, and mantle melting at 15%F/2.7GPa/1050°C with 4% fluid. Costa Rica VF basalt (Arenal: strongest HIMU signature) requires NGD-AOC, SED, and PM. Slab dehydration conditions are SED:AOC = 30:70 at 5.7GPa/990°C. Melting conditions are 13%F/2.8GPa/1100°C with 4% fluid. Slab dehydration temperature is generally higher beneath CentAm VF (830-900°C) than N-Izu VF (780-860°C), reflecting the much younger age of the CentAm slab

  9. Delineating contamination of basaltic magma by mafic crust VIA U/Th disequilibrium determined by TIMS, Pisgah Craters, Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, F.C.; Reid, M.R. . Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Compositional changes in basaltic lavas at Pisgah Craters, CA, are hypothesized to reflect contamination by variable amounts of mafic crust (Glazner et al, 1991). Data determined by Glazner and coworker indicate that the lavas range in isotopic composition from [sup 143]Nd/[sup 144]Nd = 0.51293--0.51276 and [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr = 0.7038--0.7050, and have decreasing concentrations of incompatible elements with decreasing MgO. The lavas are postulated to range from nearly pure primitive mantle-derived magmas (>8 wt % MgO) early in the eruptive history to nearly pure melts of mafic crust (<4.5 wt % MgO) late in the eruptive history. Preliminary U-series isotopic results obtained by thermal ionization mass spectrometry suggest that the crustal contaminant contains minor concentrations of Th and U. Th and U concentrations in the lavas correlate positively with MgO contents, with ([sup 238]U)/([sup 232]Th) increasing by almost 30% over a variation from 8 to 4.5 wt % MgO. In contrast, [sup 232]Th/[sup 230]Th varies little with MgO concentration and averages 1.8 [times] 10[sup 5] (([sup 230]Th)/([sup 232]Th) [approximately]1.03; 5 samples). The [sup 232]Th/[sup 230]Th ratios of the Pisgah lavas are those expected for mantle-derived magmas based on their Sr and Nd isotopic compositions. The lack of Th isotopic variation coupled with decreasing Th concentrations suggests that the contaminant contained very little Th, consistent with a mafic and/or deep crustal source. U/Th disequilibrium in these lavas indicates that contamination and eruption occurred within the past 50,000 years from the present.

  10. Insights into mantle heterogeneities: mid-ocean ridge basalt tapping an ocean island magma source in the North Fiji Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brens, R., Jr.; Jenner, F. E.; Bullock, E. S.; Hauri, E. H.; Turner, S.; Rushmer, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    The North Fiji Basin (NFB), and connected Lau Basin, is located in a complex area of volcanism. The NFB is a back-arc basin (BAB) that is a result of an extinct subduction zone, incorporating the complicated geodynamics of two rotating landmasses: Fiji and the Vanuatu island arc. Collectively this makes the spreading centers of the NFB the highest producing spreading centers recorded. Here we present volatile concentrations, major, and trace element data for a previously undiscovered triple junction spreading center in the NFB. We show our enrichment samples contain some of the highest water contents yet reported from (MORB). The samples from the NFB exhibit a combination of MORB-like major chemical signatures along with high water content similar to ocean island basalts (OIB). This peculiarity in geochemistry is unlike other studied MORB or back-arc basin (to our knowledge) that is not attributed to subduction related signatures. Our results employ the use of volatiles (carbon dioxide and water) and their constraints (Nb and Ce) combined with trace element ratios to indicate a potential source for the enrichment in the North Fiji Basin. The North Fiji Basin lavas are tholeiitic with similar major element composition as averaged primitive normal MORB; with the exception of averaged K2O and P2O5, which are still within range for observed normal MORB. For a mid-ocean ridge basalt, the lavas in the NFB exhibit a large range in volatiles: H2O (0.16-0.9 wt%) and CO2 (80-359 ppm). The NFB lavas have volatile levels that exceed the range of MORB and trend toward a more enriched source. In addition, when compared to MORB, the NFB lavas are all enriched in H2O/Ce. La/Sm values in the NFB lavas range from 0.9 to 3.8 while, Gd/Yb values range from 1.2 to 2.5. The NFB lavas overlap the MORB range for both La/Sm (~1.1) and Gd/Yb (~1.3). However, they span a larger range outside of the MORB array. High La/Sm and Gd/Yb ratios (>1) are indications of deeper melting within the

  11. Early and Late Alkali Igneous Pulses and a High-3He Plume Origin for the Deccan Flood Basalts.

    PubMed

    Basu, A R; Renne, P R; Dasgupta, D K; Teichmann, F; Poreda, R J

    1993-08-13

    Several alkalic igneous complexes of nephelinite-carbonatite affinities occur in extensional zones around a region of high heat flow and positive gravity anomaly within the continental flood basalt (CFB) province of Deccan, India. Biotites from two of the complexes yield (40)Ar/(39)Ar dates of 68.53 +/- 0.16 and 68.57 +/- 0.08 million years. Biotite from a third complex, which intrudes the flood basalts, yields an (40)Ar/(39)Ar date of 64.96 +/- 0.1 1 million years. The complexes thus represent early and late magmatism with respect to the main pulse of CFB volcanism 65 million years ago. Rocks from the older complexes show a (3)He/(4)He ratio of 14.0 times the air ratio, an initial (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratio of 0.70483, and other geochemical characteristics similar to ocean island basalts; the later alkalic pulse shows isotopic evidence of crustal contamination. The data document 3.5 million years of incubation of a primitive, high-(3)He mantle plume before the rapid eruption of the Deccan CFB. PMID:17783739

  12. Water Content of Basalt Erupted on the ocean floor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.

    1970-01-01

    Deep sea pillow basalts dredged from the ocean floor show that vesicularity changes with composition as well as with depth. Alkalic basalts are more vesicular than tholeiitic basalts erupted at the same depth. The vesicularity data, when related to experimentally determined solubility of water in basalt, indicate that K-poor oceanic tholeiites originally contained about 0.25 percent water, Hawaiian tholeiites of intermediate K-content, about 0.5 percent water, and alkali-rich basalts, about 0.9 percent water. Analyses of fresh basalt pillows show a systematic increase of H2O+ as the rocks become more alkalic. K-poor oceanic tholeiites contain 0.06-0.42 percent H2O+, Hawaiian tholeiites, 0.31-0.60 percent H2O+, and alkali rich basalts 0.49-0.98 percent H2O+. The contents of K2O, P2O5, F, and Cl increase directly with an increase in H2O+ content such that at 1.0 weight percent H2O+, K2O is 1.58 percent, P2O5 is 0.55 percent, F is 0.07 percent, and Cl is 0.1 percent. The measured weight percent of deuterium on the rim of one Hawaiian pillow is -6.0 (relative to SMOW); this value, which is similar to other indications of magmatic water, suggests that no appreciable sea water was absorbed by the pillow during or subsequent to eruption on the ocean floor. Concentrations of volatile constituents in the alkali basalt melts relative to tholeiitic melts can be explained by varying degrees of partial melting of mantle material or by fractional crystallization of a magma batch. ?? 1970 Springer-Verlag.

  13. A Mantle Cross-Section Through Western And Central Nevada From Young Basaltic Magmas In The Sierra Nevada And Western Great Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V.; Cousens, B. L.; Henry, C. D.

    2007-12-01

    The geochemistry of basaltic magmas erupted in the Basin and Range province of the western USA has demonstrated that at least two mantle sources exist, one with a subduction signature and another with an "ocean island basalt" (OIB) signature. Here we investigate the distribution of these two sources during the Pleistocene and Holocene in a 250 km-long transect from the eastern Sierra Nevada near Reno, NV, into central Nevada. Samples were collected from young, dated mafic lava flows from the Carson Range (2.5 to 1.4 Ma), Steamboat Hills (2.6 Ma), Virginia City and Chalk Hills (1.5 to 1.44 Ma), east of Carson City (1.36 Ma), Rattlesnake Hill (1.2 to 0.9 Ma), Buffalo Valley (1.1 to 0.95 Ma), Upsal Hogback (0.6 Ma), and Soda Lake (Holocene). With the exception of Carson Range andesites, all of the lavas are alkaline basalts and basaltic trachyandesites with K2O/Na2O > 0.4. Incompatible element abundances, incompatible element ratios, and radiogenic isotope ratios vary widely between locations. Many key incompatible element ratios, such as Ce/Pb, Sr/P, Ba/Nb, and Nb/La, and isotopic ratios vary as a function of age and longitude. Lavas less than 1 Ma in age have low Ba/Nb, Sr/P, 87Sr/86Sr, 206Pb/204Pb, and high Ce/Pb and Nd/La compared to lavas greater than 1Ma in age. These ratios vary more strongly as a function of longitude, from high Ba/Nb, Sr/P, 206Pb/204Pb, 87Sr/86Sr and low Ce/Pb and Nb/La (subduction signature mantle) lavas in the Sierra Nevada margin to lavas with the opposite characteristics (OIB signature mantle) in central Nevada. La/Sm does not vary with either age or longitude. The relationship with longitude indicates that two mantle sources currently exist beneath western Nevada, subduction-modified mantle to the west and OIB-type mantle to the east, and that these two mantle types probably taper in thickness towards one another. The termination of subduction beneath the Reno area at 5-3 Ma, in conjunction with 87Sr/86Sr greater than modern Cascade arc

  14. The Cretaceous Duimiangou adakite-like intrusion from the Chifeng region, northern North China Craton: Crustal contamination of basaltic magma in an intracontinental extensional environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lebing; Wei, Junhao; Kusky, Timothy M.; Chen, Huayong; Tan, Jun; Li, Yanjun; Shi, Wenjie; Chen, Chong; Zhao, Shaoqing

    2012-03-01

    Zircon U-Pb ages, major and trace element and Sr, Nd and Pb isotope compositions of the Duimiangou (DMG) quartz monzonite from the Chifeng region on the northern North China Craton (NCC) were studied to investigate its derivation, evolution and geodynamic significance. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) zircon U-Pb dating yields an emplacement age of 128 ± 1 Ma for this intrusion, with numerous Mesozoic inherited zircons clustering at 219 ± 12 Ma and 161 ± 3 Ma, along with some ancient zircons with ages of 2.5 Ga, 1.77 Ga and 324 Ma. Bulk-rock analyses show that this intrusion is characterized by variable SiO2 (63.4-69.4 wt.%), Al2O3 (14.5-16.3 wt.%), Na2O + K2O (8.01-8.95 wt.%), and Mg# (41.3-48.0). They are enriched in large ion lithophile elements and light rare earth elements without significant Eu anomalies (mostly between 0.89-1.10), and depleted in heavy rare earth elements and high field strength elements, with high Sr/Y (63.7-101.7) and (La/Yb)N (20.5-31.0) ratios. The DMG intrusion formed in an intracontinental extensional setting contemporaneous with the formation of pull-apart basins, metamorphic core complexes and intense magmatism, rather than in a convergent margin. It has homogeneous Sr ((87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.7059-0.7066), Nd (εNd(t) = - 6.2 to - 7.2) and Pb ((206Pb/204Pb)i = 17.289-17.375, (207Pb/204Pb)i = 15.359-15.463, (208Pb/204Pb)i = 37.130-37.472) isotope compositions. Sr-Nd isotope modeling results, plus relatively young Nd model ages (1522-1618 Ma) and the presence of relict zircons, suggest that this intrusion could have originated from crustal contamination of newly formed basaltic melts derived from asthenospheric mantle, accompanied by fractional crystallization of K-feldspar, biotite, apatite, Fe-Ti oxides and minor hornblende and plagioclase. Thus, the DMG adakite-like intrusion may record the magmatic event associated with underplating of asthenospheric magma in an intracontinental extensional

  15. Crystallization kinetics in magmas during decompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, Fabio; Burton, Mike; Carroll, Michael R.

    2016-04-01

    Many variables play a role during magma crystallization at depth or in a volcanic conduit, and through experimentally derived constraints we can better understand pre- and syn-eruptive magma crystallization behavior. The thermodynamic properties of magmas have been extensively investigated as a function of T, P, fO2 and magma composition [1], and this allows estimation of the stability of equilibrium phases and physical parameters (e.g., density, viscosity). However, many natural igneous rocks contain geochemical, mineralogical and textural evidence of disequilibrium, suggesting that magmas frequently follow non-equilibrium, time-dependent pathways that are recorded in the geochemical and petrographic characteristics of the rocks. There are currently no suitable theoretical models capable of calculating nucleation and growth rates in disequilibrium conditions without experimental constraints. The aim of this contribution is provide quantitative data on growth and nucleation rates of feldspar crystals in silicate melts obtained through decompression experiments, in order to determine the magma evolution in pre- and sin-eruptive conditions. Decompression is one of the main processes that induce the crystallization of feldspar during the magma ascent in the volcanic conduit. Decompression experiments have been carried out on trachytic and basaltic melts to investigate crystallization kinetics of feldspar as a function of the effect of the degassing, undercooling and time on nucleation and crystal growth process [2; 3]. Furthermore, feldspar is the main crystals phase present in magmas, and its abundance can strongly vary with small changes in pressure, temperature and water content in the melt, implying appreciable variations in the textures and in the crystallization kinetics. Crystallization kinetics of trachytic melts show that long experiment durations involve more nucleation events of alkali feldspar than short experiment durations [2]. This is an important

  16. Kinetics of iron redox reaction in silicate melts: A high temperature Xanes study on an alkali basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochain, B.; Neuville, D. R.; de Ligny, D.; Roux, J.; Baudelet, F.; Strukelj, E.; Richet, P.

    2009-11-01

    In Earth and Materials sciences, iron is the most important transition element. Glass and melt properties are strongly affected by iron content and redox state with the consequence that some properties (i.e. viscosity, heat capacity, crystallization...) depend not only on the amounts of Fe2+ and Fe3+, but also on the coordination state of these ions. In this work we investigate iron redox reactions through XANES experiments at the K-edge of iron. Using a high-temperature heating device, pre-edge of XANES spectra exhibits definite advantages to make in-situ measurements and to determine the evolution of redox state with time, temperature and composition of synthetic silicate melts. In this study, new kinetics measurements are presented for a basalt melt from the 31,000-BC eruption of the Puy de Lemptegy Volcano in France. These measurements have been made between 773 K and at superliquidus temperatures up to 1923 K.

  17. PGE abundance and Re-Os isotope Systematics of Native-Fe-Bearing Basaltic Rocks and Their Carbonaceous Crustal Contaminants: Insights into magma plumbing-system dynamics in LIPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, G. H.; Day, J. M.; Goodrich, C. A.; Pernet-Fisher, J.; Pearson, D. G.; Taylor, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Native-Fe grains form in basaltic melts at highly reducing conditions (magmas. Only three known terrestrial occurrences exist: 1) ~60 Ma basalts at Disko Island, Greenland; 2) ~20 Ma Bühl basalts, Germany, and 3) intrusions of the ~250 Ma Siberian Large Igneous Province (LIP). The reducing conditions recorded are the direct result of assimilation of carbonaceous crustal material during emplacement of the basaltic magmas at or near the surface. Native Fe-bearing basalts are useful natural analogues for studying PGE pre-concentration mechanisms, and the potential for PGE additions to magmas from crustal sources. Here, we present PGE LA-ICP-MS data for Fe-alloy, cohenite, and sulfide for a suite of Siberian and Disko Island native-Fe basalts, in combination with whole-rock PGE data for all known occurrences. The Siberian native-Fe alloys are characterized by highly variable PGE concentrations (1-30 ppm total PGEs), distinct low Os abundances, and PGE profiles similar to those of the nearby Noril'sk sulfide ores. In contrast, the Disko Island alloys are characterized by total PGE concentrations of 1-10 ppm and distinct positive Os and Re anomalies in extended PGE profiles. The Bühl basalts contain low PGE concentrations (~20 ppb). In order to understand contamination contributions, Os-isotopes analyses have been performed. Preliminary whole-rock 187Os/188Os data for high metal content samples from Siberia (0.33606 ± 37) and Disko (0.15402 ± 15) indicate high-time integrated Re/Os. The Re anomalies observed in extended PGE profiles of the Disko Island samples may reflect a potential crustal contribution to the overall PGE budget, through the addition of carbonaceous material. Whereas the Siberian samples contain abundant carbonaceous xenoliths, there is no apparent PGE contribution from crustal materials. Therefore, the role of crustal contamination is important in forming the native-Fe alloys, but the interaction

  18. Underplating of basaltic magmas and crustal growth in a continental arc: Evidence from Late Mesozoic intermediate-felsic intrusive rocks in southern Qiangtang, central Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lu-Lu; Wang, Qiang; Wyman, Derek A.; Ou, Quan; Dan, Wei; Jiang, Zi-Qi; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Yang, Jin-Hui; Long, Xiao-Ping; Li, Jie

    2016-02-01

    depleted isotope compositions [(87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.7054-0.7065; εNd(t) = - 0.61 to + 0.25; zircon εHf(t) = + 4.7 to + 9.7] of the granodiorite porphyries indicate that they were most probably generated by partial melting of newly underplated and thickened basaltic lower crust. Taking into account ophiolites in the Bangong-Nujiang Suture and Late Mesozoic magmatic rocks in the southern Qiangtang sub-block, we suggest that this area was located in a continental arc setting. Moreover, from the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, the ancient lower crust in the southern Qiangtang sub-block was gradually replaced by mantle-derived juvenile materials. The crustal evolution indicates that, in a continental arc, basaltic magma underplating plays a key role in vertical crustal growth.

  19. Distribution coefficients of major and trace elements; fractional crystallization in the alkali basalt series of Chaîne des Puys (Massif Central, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villemant, Benoît; Jaffrezic, Henri; Joron, Jean-Louis; Treuil, Michel

    1981-11-01

    Major and seventeen trace element distribution coefficients between main phenocrysts (olivine, clinopyroxene, amphibole, mica, feldspars and Fe-Ti oxides) and groundmass have been measured in the alkali basalt suite of Chaîne des Puys (Massif Central, France). The suite appears to be a well behaved crystal fractionation series. We pinpoint key elements whose behavior is closely related to the appearance or disappearance of specific crystal phases in the fractionation process. Ta, for instance, clearly indicates the role of hydrous silicates (amphiboles and micas). Distribution coefficients are shown to vary systematically along the differentiation trend. Significantly the hygromagmaphile tendency ( TREUILet al., 1979) of U, Th, Ta and La is variable along the series. The mass balance equations, D i= limit∑;x jD jii where Di and Dji are the bulk and mineral/liquid distribution coefficients respectively, and xj the weight fractions of the fractionating phases, are solved by least square resolution of the overdetermined system, taking into account the analytical errors on data. The solution applied to the Chaîne des Puys suite leads to a coherent and quantitative model of the fractional crystallization process. The suite has apparently evolved in three stages. Each stage is characterized by constant bulk distribution coefficients and a specific mineral assemblage. Amphibole fractionation plays an important role in the early stages. Some intensive parameters ( T, ƒ ƒ O 2, PH2O) as well as f (weight fraction of residual liquid) are also estimated.

  20. Heat transfer in magma in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.; Carrigan, C.R.; Wemple, R.P.

    1983-12-16

    Heat transfer rates in a basaltic magma were measured under typical magma chamber conditions and a numerical model of the experiment was used to estimate magma viscosity. The results are of value for assessing methods of thermal energy extraction from magma bodies in the upper crust as well as for modeling the evolutionary track of these systems. 13 references, 3 figures.

  1. Petrogenesis of Late Cenozoic basalts from North Hainan Island: Constraints from melt inclusions and their host olivines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Qiang; Ren, Zhong-Yuan; Nichols, Alexander R. L.; Song, Mao-Shuang; Qian, Sheng-Ping; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Pei-Pei

    2015-03-01

    Melt inclusions and their host olivines in basaltic lavas provide important information about the nature of their mantle source. We present the first analyzed chemical data of olivine-hosted melt inclusions in Cenozoic basalts from the North Hainan Island and report the discovery of both tholeiitic and alkalic melt inclusions in a single rock sample. Cenozoic basalts from the Hainan Island are predominantly tholeiites with only small amounts of alkali basalts. There is a much broader compositional variation in melt inclusions than whole rocks. Compared to partial melts of mantle peridotite, the Hainan basalts have lower CaO, Na2O/TiO2, CaO/Al2O3 and Co/Fe, and higher TiO2, FeO∗, Fe/Mn, Zn/Fe and Zn/Mn. The olivine phenocrysts from the Hainan basalts contain lower Ca and Mn, and higher Ni and Fe/Mn than those of olivines crystallized from partial melts of peridotite. Projections from or towards olivine into the plane CS-MS-A for melt inclusions and whole rocks with MgO >7.5 wt% imply that the residual minerals in the source of the tholeiites are mainly clinopyroxene and garnet, possibly with some orthopyroxene, while in the source of the alkali basalts they are dominated by clinopyroxene and garnet. This indicates that a pyroxenite component could serve as the source lithology of the Hainan basalts. The OIB-like trace element compositions, with Ba, Sr, Nb and Ta positive anomalies, and Th and U negative anomalies, of the Hainan basalts suggest that a recycled oceanic crust component was involved in the source of the Hainan basalts. Based on a CMAS projection of primary magma compositions of the whole rocks and melt inclusions, we infer that a stage-2 silica-deficient pyroxenite derived from melt-peridotite reaction or mechanical mixing between recycled oceanic crust and peridotite can serve as the source lithology. Partial melts derived from such a source can match the overall compositions of the Hainan basalts better than those of MORB-eclogite and fertile

  2. Hydrogen isotope systematics of submarine basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kyser, T.K.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The D/H ratios and water contents in fresh submarine basalts from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the East Pacific Rise, and Hawaii indicate that the primary D/H ratios of many submarine lavas have been altered by processes including (1) outgassing, (2) addition of seawater at magmatic temperature, and (3) low-temperature hydration of glass. Decreases in ??D and H2O+ from exteriors to interiors of pillows are explained by outgassing of water whereas inverse relations between ??D and H2O+ in basalts from the Galapagos Rise and the FAMOUS Area are attributed to outgassing of CH4 and H2. A good correlation between ??D values and H2O is observed in a suite of submarine tholeiites dredged from the Kilauea East Rift Zone where seawater (added directly to the magma), affected only the isotopic compositions of hydrogen and argon. Analyses of some glassy rims indicate that the outer millimeter of the glass can undergo lowtemperature hydration by hydroxyl groups having ??D values as low as -100. ??D values vary with H2O contents of subaerial transitional basalts from Molokai, Hawaii, and subaerial alkali basalts from the Society Islands, indicating that the primary ??D values were similar to those of submarine lavas. Extrapolations to possible unaltered ??D values and H2O contents indicate that the primary ??D values of most thoteiite and alkali basalts are near -80 ?? 5: the weight percentages of water are variable, 0.15-0.35 for MOR tholeiites, about 0.25 for Hawaiian tholeiites, and up to 1.1 for alkali basalts. The primary ??D values of -80 for most basalts are comparable to those measured for deep-seated phlogopites. These results indicate that hydrogen, in marked contrast to other elements such as Sr, Nd, Pb, and O, has a uniform isotopic composition in the mantle. This uniformity is best explained by the presence of a homogeneous reservoir of hydrogen that has existed in the mantle since the very early history of the Earth. ?? 1984.

  3. Geochemical composition of subcontinental lithospheric mantle in the westernmost Mediterranean: constrains from peridotite xenoliths in Plio-Pleistocene alkali basalts (eastern Betic Cordillera, SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesi, Claudio; Konc, Zoltán; Bosch, Delphine; Garrido, Carlos J.; Hidas, Károly; Varas-Reus, María Isabel

    2016-04-01

    Peridotite xenoliths in Plio-Pleistocene alkali basalts from the eastern Betic Cordillera (Murcia, SE Spain) provide key information on Alpine tectono-magmatic processes that affected the subcontinental lithospheric mantle beneath the westernmost Mediterranean. Here we present a detailed geochemical study comprising whole-rock and mineral major- and trace-element, as well as Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositional data of spinel ± plagioclase lherzolite, spinel ± plagioclase harzburgite and spinel wehrlite xenoliths from Tallante and Los Perez volcanic centers. The whole-rock major element compositions and mineral chemistry of the studied xenoliths reflect increasing fertility from clinopyroxene-poor peridotites (Group I; Mg# up to 91.5), to common lherzolites (Group II; Mg# up to 90.6), fertile lherzolites (Group III; Mg# = 86.8-88.9) and wehrlites (Mg# = 86.7-87.4). The mineral major element chemistry records the geochemical imprint of maximum 10-12 % partial melting in the most depleted Group I peridotites. However, trace element and isotopic data attest for various degrees of metasomatic enrichment that overprinted the previously depleted lithospheric mantle. Interaction with melts produced enrichment of LREE in Group II and Group III peridotites, as well as in wehrlites. In contrast to major and trace elements, Sr-Nd-Pb radiogenic isotope systematic is unrelated to compositional groups and shows isotopic variations between DMM and EM2 end-members and contribution of an Atlantic sediment-like component. Different whole-rock trace element compositions coupled to similar isotopic signatures indicate that metasomatism was caused by external melt(s) issued from a common source not before the Tertiary. These geochemical evidences attest for the percolation of slab-derived, SiO2-undersaturated melts (and hydrous fluids) with carbonate sediment affinity in the pre-Miocene supra-subduction continental lithospheric mantle beneath the Alboran Basin.

  4. Dynamics of magma ascent through the Sierra Nevada, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    A 9 m.y. old alkali basalt intrudes the Red Lake pluton, approx.90 m.y. old granodiorite of the Huntington Lake quadrangle in the Sierra Nevada, California. The basaltic neck, standing 5 meters above the floor of the Big Creek drainage (approx. 25 meters in diameter), appears to have been the feeder for the flows that cap Chinese Peak (approx. 1 km to the south). The surrounding Red Lake granodiorite was partially fused during the intrusive process. Ten meters of the fused rock is now exposed surrounding the basaltic neck. Thermal models indicate that magma must have flowed through the pipe for approx. 1000 years to produce the extensive melting of the country rock. The basalt was probably intruded at a temperature of 900/sup 0/C, ultramafic nodules indicate its mantle origin. Surrounding the inner basaltic core is a region of basalt interlayered with granitic melt and xenoliths, which formed due to interaction of the basalt and partially molten wall rock during magma ascent. The partially fused granodiorite wall rock contains 40-45% melt at the contact, decreasing to 20% melt 10 meters from the contact. The glass composition (approx.73%-approx.75% SiO/sub 2/, 5% K/sub 2/O) suggests invariant melting. Data on Rb, Sr, and Sr isotopic composition of the glass, residual crystals, and whole rocks are used to model chemical and isotopic equilibration of silicic liquids with their residual crystals. In comparison to the granodiorite, the glass is enriched in Rb (approx.250 ppm), depleted in Sr (approx.135 ppm), permitting the construction of an apparent isochron 11.0 +/- 2.7 m.y.

  5. Chemical heterogeneity of Mt. Etna magmas in the last 15 ka. Inferences on their mantle sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsaro, Rosa Anna; Métrich, Nicole

    2016-05-01

    Primitive basaltic magmas are crucial in the study of the geochemical heterogeneity documented in Etna magmas and their inferred mantle sources. We undertook a systematic sampling of the less evolved basalts (Mg# > 50) erupted over the last 15 ka, a time period which corresponds to the activity of the youngest volcanic edifice of Mt. Etna complex, i.e. Mongibello volcano. We focused on lava flows and pyroclastites emplaced during 'deep-dyke fed' (DDF) eruptions which were driven by the rapid ascent of deeply-rooted magma intrusions that bypassed the shallow plumbing system of the volcano. All the samples were analyzed by the same laboratory to avoid analytical bias, to build a comprehensive dataset on their major and trace element compositions and to propose a coherent framework for interpreting the geochemical fingerprints of present-day Etna basalts. Trace element modeling, together with literature data for Sr isotopes, gave insight into long-term magmatic processes related to different melting degrees of the heterogeneous mantle beneath Mt Etna. DDF magma batches provide good snapshots of their mantle source heterogeneities that point to the variable involvement of clinopyroxenitic lithology, Rb-87Sr-Cl-rich fluid component(s) possibly controlled by their source mineralogy, and slab-derived fluids selectively enriched in alkalis (Rb, K). The ongoing alkali (Rb, K) enrichment of the present-day magmas, well manifest since the 1970s, is decoupled from that of Sr and Cl. We propose that this process is linked to mantle source composition and is concomitant with changes in both volcanological and seismotectonic patterns of the volcano. There is no time evolution of DDF magma chemistry.

  6. Bubble coalescence in magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herd, Richard A.; Pinkerton, Harry

    1993-01-01

    The most important factors governing the nature of volcanic eruptions are the primary volatile contents, the ways in which volatiles exsolve, and how the resulting bubbles grow and interact. In this contribution we assess the importance of bubble coalescence. The degree of coalescence in alkali basalts has been measured using Image Analysis techniques and it is suggested to be a process of considerable importance. Binary coalescence events occur every few minutes in basaltic melts with vesicularities greater than around 35 percent.

  7. Flow in the shallow mantle in the westernmost Mediterranean: insights from xenoliths in Plio-Pleistocene alkali basalts from the eastern Betic Cordillera (SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konc, Zoltán; Hidas, Károly; Garrido, Carlos J.; Tommasi, Andréa; Vauchez, Alain; Padrón Navarta, José Alberto; Marchesi, Claudio; Acosta-Vigil, Antonio; Szabó, Csaba; Varas-Reus, Maria Isabel

    2016-04-01

    Peridotite mantle xenoliths in Plio-Pleistocene alkali basalts of the eastern Betic Cordillera (Cartagena area, Murcia, SE Spain) provide a snapshot of the structure and composition of the lithospheric mantle at the northern limb of the Alpine Betic-Rif arched belt in the westernmost Mediterranean. The xenoliths are spinel and plagioclase lherzolite with minor harzburgite and wehrlite, displaying porphyroclastic to equigranular textures. Regardless of composition and texture, the Crystal Preferred Orientation (CPO) of olivine shows an axial-[100] pattern characterized by a strong alignment of [100]-axes near or parallel to the peridotite lineation and a girdle distribution of [010]-axes with a maximum normal to the peridotite foliation. This CPO pattern is consistent with ductile deformation accommodated by dislocation creep with dominant activation of the high temperature {0kl}[100] olivine slip system, indicative of deformation by simple shear or combinations of simple shear and pure shear with a transtensional component. Calculated seismic properties are characterized by fast propagation of P-waves and polarization of fast S-waves parallel to olivine [100]-axis, indicating the flow direction. SKS and Pn anisotropy in the eastern Betics can be explained by a lithospheric mantle peridotite with similar fabric to the one displayed by the studied mantle xenoliths. Considering the limited thickness of the mantle lithosphere in the Betics (40-80 km), the measured azimuths and delays of SKS waves in the eastern Betics are consistent with a steeply dipping mantle foliation and a subhorizontal lineation with ENE strike. This geometry of the lithospheric fabrics implies active or frozen mantle flow with a dominantly strike-slip component subparallel to the paleo-Iberian margin. Synkinematic overprinting of mineral assemblages from the garnet-spinel to the plagioclase facies demonstrates 36-40 km uplift continuously accommodated by ductile shear thinning of the

  8. Melt rock components in KREEPy breccia 15205: Petrography and mineral chemistry of KREEP basalts and quartz-normative mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, John W.; Vetter, Scott K.

    1993-01-01

    Many current models for the origin of lunar highland rocks feature as an essential component the assimilation of KREEPy material by primitive magmas parental to the Mg-rich suite and alkali suite plutonic rocks. Similar models have also been proposed for the origin of various mare basalt suites. However, any model which considers assimilation of KREEP an important petrologic process must sooner-or-later deal with the question: what is KREEP? Because pristine KREEP basalts are rare, and most known samples are small (e.g., 15382/15386), the geochemical variability of KREEP basalts is poorly known. Other KREEP compositions which are commonly used in these models include the hypothetical 'high-K KREEP' component of Warren and Wasson, which is derived from Apollo 14 soil data, and the 'superKREEP' quartz-monzodiorite 15405. Lunar breccia 15205 is a polymict regolith breccia that consists of approximately 20% KREEP basalt clasts and 20% quartz-normative basalt clasts in a KREEP-rich matrix. Bulk rock mixing calculations show that this sample comprises about 84% KREEP. The clasts range up to 1 cm in size, but most are considerably smaller. The primary aim is to characterize pristine KREEP basalts petrographically, to establish the range in chemical compositions of KREEP basalts, and to test models that were proposed for their origin. In addition, we may be able to extend the compositional range recognized in the quartz-normative basalt suite and cast some light on its origin as well. Preliminary whole rock geochemical data on the KREEP basalts are presented in a companion paper by M.M. Lindstrom and co-workers. Concentration is on petrography and mineral chemistry of these clasts, and the implications these data have for the origin of the different melt rock suites.

  9. The oxygen-hafnium isotope paradox in the early post Columbia River Basalt silicic volcanism: Evidence for complex batch assembly of upper crustal, lower crustal and low-δ18O silicic magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon, D.; Bindeman, I. N.; Ellis, B. S.; Schmitt, A. K.; Fisher, C. M.; Vervoort, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Eruptions of the Columbia River flood basalts were immediately followed by large eruptions of silicic magmas; some may have been coeval, others genetically-linked to the CRB. Among the most voluminous of these eruptions was the Jarbidge Rhyolite, which comprises ~500 km3 of lava erupted from 16.1-15.0 Ma in northern Nevada. Activity at Jarbidge was followed at 15.0 Ma by a series of rhyolitic ignimbrites and lavas in the J-P Desert of Idaho ~50 km NW of the Jarbidge Rhyolite center. To constrain magmatic origins and upper crustal magma storage conditions of these two silicic magmatic systems, we conducted bulk and high spatial resolution analysis of whole rocks and minerals (quartz, feldspar, and zircon). Bulk quartz and plagioclase δ18O values of the J-P Desert units are only moderately lower than mantle values, with δ18O-quartz of 5.0-5.5‰ and plagioclase δ18O of ~3.9-5.8‰, along with slightly unradiogenic Nd and Hf whole rock values (average ɛHf and ɛNd of -13.1 and -10.0, respectively), while quartz from the Jarbidge Rhyolite has normal δ18O (+8.4‰), but very unradiogenic ɛHf-ɛNd (ɛHf = -34.7, ɛNd = -24.0), fingerprinting Archean upper crust. SIMS analysis of J-P Desert zircons reveals considerably diverse δ18O values, ranging from -0.6‰ to +6.5‰ in a single unit. The same zircon spots yielded U-Pb SIMS ages which generally agree with the 40Ar/39Ar eruption ages, with no evidence of inheritance of pre-Miocene zircons. Combined with LA-MC-ICP-MS analysis of Hf isotopes overlapping the earlier SIMS spots, these zircons show a clear near-linear correlation between ɛHf and δ18O values observed in individual zircons. This relationship suggests variable mixing of two distinct silicic magmas prior to eruption of the J-P Desert rhyolites. One of these, characterized by extremely low ɛHf values and normal δ18O values, is likely a mantle magma strongly contaminated with shallow Archean crust, represented by the Jarbidge Rhyolite. The other is

  10. Alkali content of alpine ultramafic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, W.; Mountjoy, W.

    1965-01-01

    The lower limit of abundance of sodium and potassium in ultramafic rocks is less than the threshold amount detectable by conventional analytical methods. By a dilutionaddition modification of the flame-spectrophotometric method, sodium and potassium have been determined in 40 specimens of alpine ultramafic rocks. Samples represent six regions in the United States and one in Australia, and include dunite, peridotite, pyroxenite, and their variably serpentinized and metamorphosed derivatives. The median value found for Na2O is 0.004 per cent, and the range of Na2O is 0.001-0.19. The median value for K2O is 0.0034 per cent and the range is 0.001-0.031 per cent. Alkali concentrations are below 0.01 per cent Na2O in 28 samples and below 0.01 per cent K2O in 35. Derivation of basalt magma from upper-mantle material similar to such ultramafic rocks, as has been postulated, is precluded by the relative amounts of sodium and potassium, which are from 200 to 600 times more abundant in basalt than in the ultramafic rocks. Similar factors apply to a number of other elements. No reasonable process could produce such concentrations in, for example, tens of thousands of cubic miles of uniform tholeiitic basalt. The ultramafic rocks might have originated either as magmatic crystal precipitates or as mantle residues left after fusion and removal of basaltic magma. Injection of ultramafic rocks to exposed positions is tectonic rather than magmatic. ?? 1965.

  11. Magma Differentiation and Storage Inferred from Crystal Textures at Harrat Rahat Volcanic Field, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witter, M. R.; Mahood, G. A.; Stelten, M. E.; Downs, D. T.; Zahran, H. M.

    2015-12-01

    We present results of a petrographic study of Harrat Rahat volcanic field in western Saudi Arabia as part of a collaborative project between the U.S.G.S. and the Saudi Geological Survey. Lavas range in composition from alkali basalt to trachyphonolite. Basalts have <2-10 vol.% phenocrysts of euhedral olivine and plagioclase (± minor clinopyroxene). In intermediate lavas, phenocrysts (<5 vol.%) of olivine and plagioclase are resorbed, and plagioclase also exhibits sieve textures and strong zoning, indicative of complex magmatic histories. Trachyphonolite lavas have 0-35 vol.% large phenocrysts of anorthoclase and trace fayalitic olivine but are characterized by a size distribution of crystals that is seriate in hand specimen, so that most exceeded 45% crystals at the time of eruption. Some contain groundmass alkali amphibole. Crystal size distributions (CSD) of crystal-rich trachyphonolites produce simple linear trends (see below), which are interpreted as signifying that all the crystals are related through a common nucleation and growth history, at more or less constant pressure. Linear CSDs indicate no loss of small crystals due to reheating of magmas by recharge, no gain of small crystals due to late-stage nucleation on ascent or degassing, and no addition of large phenocrysts by crystal accumulation or magma mixing. Experimental studies demonstrate that silica-undersaturated evolved magmas like those erupted at Harrat Rahat can form by fractionation of alkali basalts at crustal depths greater than ~25 km. The observed phenocryst assemblage in the trachyphonolites, however, forms at shallow depths, ~2-4 km, according to MELTS modeling. Coupled with CSD data, this suggests that deep extraction events yield crystal-poor trachyphonolite magmas that rise to the upper crust where they undergo crystallization. Extensive shallow crystallization of trachyphonolites may have triggered eruptions by causing vapor saturation, which lowers magma density via vesiculation and

  12. Chemical heterogeneity of Mt. Etna magmas in the last 15 ky and inferences on their mantle sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsaro, Rosa Anna; Métrich, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    Primitive basaltic magmas are crucially important in the study of geochemical heterogeneity documented in Etna magmas and their inferred mantle sources. We undertook a systematic sampling of the less evolved basalts erupted at Mt. Etna over the past few millennia, focusing on lava flows and pyroclastites emplaced during deep-dyke fed (DDF) eruptions which were driven by the rapid ascent of deeply-rooted magma intrusions that bypassed the shallow plumbing system of the volcano. All the samples were analyzed by the same laboratory to avoid analytical biases and to build up a comprehensive dataset on their major and trace element compositions in order to propose a coherent framework to interpret the geochemical fingerprints of Etna present-day basalts. Trace element modelling together with literature data for Sr isotopes gave insight into long-term magmatic processes related to different melting degrees of the heterogeneous mantle beneath Mt. Etna. DDF magma batches younger than 15 ky provide good snapshots of their mantle source heterogeneities that point to the variable involvement of clinopyroxenitic lithology, Rb-87Sr-Cl-rich fluid component(s) possibly controlled by their source mineralogy, and slab-derived fluids selectively enriched in alkalis (Rb, K). The ongoing alkali (Rb, K) enrichment of the present-day magmas, well manifest since the 1970s, is decoupled from that of Sr and Cl. This recent process is linked to mantle source composition and is concomitant with changes in both volcanological and seismotectonic patterns of the volcano. There is no evidence for any time evolution of DDF magma chemistry.

  13. Unraveling the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 plumbing system and magma chamber dynamics through high-resolution geochemical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laeger, Kathrin; Petrelli, Maurizio; Andronico, Daniele; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Cimarelli, Corrado; Misiti, Valeria; del Bello, Elisabetta; Perugini, Diego

    2016-04-01

    The April-May 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano (EFJ, Iceland) was triggered by an intrusion of fresh magma coming from deeper portions of the crust migrating into shallower depth of 3-6 km in the magmatic system. Here, we present new EMPA and LA-ICP-MS analyses on groundmass glasses of ash particles erupted between 18 and 22 May 2010, the last days of the eruption. The glasses define two well separated groups. The first group is basaltic in composition with SiO2 ranging from 49.98 to 51.76 wt.% and a total alkali content (Na2O + K2O) in the range between 4.63 and 5.17 wt.%. The second group ranges between trachyandesitic and rhyolitic compositions with SiO2 ranging between 57.13 to 70.38 wt.% and a total alkali content from 7.21 to 10.90 wt.%. Least square modelling after Störmer and Nicholls (1978) discriminates best the origin of the basaltic glass by both fractional crystallization of a more primitive basalt or mixing of a basalt and a felsic magma. Furthermore, this model proves that the trachyandesitic range is the result of mixing of trachyandesite and trachyte magma. Magma mixing modeling after Langmuir (1978) and element concentration histograms indicate a probable incomplete magma mixing as the main process forming the great compositional variability observed in the erupted products. Finally, we estimated mixing end-members of intermediate (~59 wt.% SiO2) and felsic composition (~66-68 wt.% SiO2) with a felsic melt-proportion of 0.35-0.47. In the 90s, recorded seismicity and ground deformation indicated intrusions at shallow depth under the EFJ edifice probably forming separated sills. Therefore, the origin of the trachyandesite is presumably to find in a discrete magma batch that generated years before eruption. The rhyolite composition can be considered as the residual melt that remained in the plumbing system of EFJ since the last eruption in 1821-23. We suggest that these different magma batches formed the plumbing system of EFJ and have

  14. Earliest Silicic Volcanism Associated with Mid-Miocene Flood Basalts: Tuffs Interbedded with Steens Basalt, Nevada and Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckett, M.; Mahood, G. A.; Benson, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    During the main phase of Steens and Columbia River flood basalt eruptions between ~16.7 and 15.0 Ma, spatially associated silicic volcanism was widespread, ~4,000 km3 of silicic magma erupting at calderas and smaller centers dispersed across ~25,000 km2 in eastern Oregon and northern Nevada (Coble and Mahood, 2012). The oldest flood basalts erupted from a focus at Steens Mountain in eastern Oregon, where the section of lavas is ~1 km thick. The Steens Basalt thins southward to only a few flows thick in northern Nevada, either because fewer flows were emplaced this far from the focus or because fewer dikes propagated to the surface on encountering thicker continental crust and/or were intercepted by growing bodies of silicic magma that ultimately erupted in McDermitt Caldera Field (Rytuba and McKee, 1984), High Rock Caldera Complex, and the Lone Mountain/Hawks Valley center (Wypych et al., 2011). Rhyolitic tuffs have not been recognized interbedded with the basalt lavas in the type section, but we have identified several silicic tuffs interbedded with Steens Basalt in the southern Pueblo Mountains and in the Trout Creek Mountains. Although noted by previous workers (e.g., Avent, 1965; Minor, 1986; Hart et al., 1989), they have not been studied. We identified six tuffaceous intervals 20 cm to 15 m thick in the escarpment of the southern Pueblo Mountains near the Oregon-Nevada border where the Steens basalt section is ~250 m thick, with the base unexposed. Two intervals are lithic-rich, reworked volcaniclastic sediments, but four are primary or only slightly reworked sequences of fall deposits that range from fine ash to lapilli in grain size. The heat and weight of the overlying basaltic lava flows has fused the tuffs so that the upper parts of thicker tuffaceous intervals and entire thinner ones are converted to vitrophyres, with crystals of alkali feldspar × quartz × biotite typically 1-2 mm in diameter set in a dense, black, variably hydrated, glassy matrix. We

  15. Geochronology and geochemistry of late Cenozoic basalts from the Leiqiong area, southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Kung-suan; Chen, Ju-chin; Juang, Wen-shing

    2000-06-01

    The Leiqiong area, which includes the Leizhou Peninsula and the northern part of the Hainan Island, is the largest province of exposed basalts in southern China. Ar-Ar and K-Ar dating indicates that incipient volcanism in the Leiqiong area may have taken place in late Oligocene time and gradually increased in tempo toward the Miocene and Pliocene Epoch. Volcanic activities were most extensive during Pleistocene, and declined and ended in Holocene. Based on radiometric age dating and geographic distribution, Pliocene and Quaternary volcanism in Hainan Island can be grouped into two stages and six eruptive regions. The early volcanism is dominated by flood type fissure eruption of quartz tholeiites and olivine tholeiites whereas the later phase is dominated by central type eruption of alkali olivine basalts and olivine tholeiites. The systematic decrease of MgO, ΣFeO and TiO 2 with increasing SiO 2 content for basalts from Hainan Island indicates that fractional crystallization of olivine, clinopyroxene and Ti-bearing opaques may have occurred during magmatic evolution. From coexisting Fe-Ti oxide minerals, it is estimated that the equilibrium temperatures range from 895-986°C and oxygen fugacities range from 10 -13.4 to 10 -10.7 atmospheres in the basaltic magmas. The incompatible element ratios and the chondrite-normalized REE patterns of basalts from the Leiqiong area are generally similar to OIB. The Nb/U ratios (less than 37) in most of the tholeiitic rocks and the negative Nb anomaly observed in the spidergram of some basalts indicated that the influence of a paleo-subduction zone derived component can not be excluded in considering the genesis of the basalts from the Leiqiong area. The tholeiites in the Leiqiong area may have mixed with a more enriched lithospheric mantle component as well as undergone relatively larger percentages of partial melting than the alkali basalts.

  16. Residence times of alkali feldspar phenocrysts from magma feeding the Agnano-Monte Spina Eruption (4.7 ka), Campi Flegrei caldera (Napoli, southern Italy) based on Ba-zonation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iovine, Raffaella Silvia; Wörner, Gerhard; Carmine Mazzeo, Fabio; Arienzo, Ilenia; Fedele, Lorenzo; Civetta, Lucia; D'Antonio, Massimo; Orsi, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Timescales governing the development of crustal magma reservoirs are a key for understanding magmatic processes such as ascent, storage and mixing event. An estimate of these timescales can provide important constraints for volcanic hazard assessment of active volcanoes. We studied the Agnano-Monte Spina eruption (A-MS; 4.7 ka; VEI = 4; 0.85 km3 D.R.E. of magma erupted) of the Campi Flegrei caldera, one of the most dangerous volcanic areas on Earth. The A-MS eruption has been fed by magmas varying from more to less evolved trachyte whose variable 87Sr/86Sr and trace elements features suggest magma mixing between two end-members. Ba zonation profiles of alkali feldspar phenocrysts have been determined through combined energy-dispersive and wavelength-dispersive electron microprobe analyses (EDS-WDS-EMPA). We focused on distinct compositional breaks near the rim of the crystals that likely represent the last mixing event prior to eruption. We always chose the steepest gradients close to the crystal rims, taking into account that any effects related to cutting angles or crystal orientation should give longer apparent diffusion times. Two different approaches were undertaken: (1) a quantitative Ba compositional profiles were measured by point analyses along a short transect crossing growth discontinuities and (2) grey-scale profiles were taken parallel to the acquired point profiles. Assuming that Ba dominates the backscattered electron intensities in sanidines, greyscale gradients can be used as a diffusive tracer. BSE images were processed using the ImageJ® software, in order to extract a numerical greyscale profile. In both cases, each profile was interpolated through a non-linear Boltzmann fit curve with the Mathematica® software. A few traverses done at angles smaller than 90° to the compositional boundary interface were corrected by multiplying the distance values by the sinus of the traverse angle relative to the vertical on the interface. Our preliminary

  17. Production of hybrid granitic magma at the advancing front of basaltic underplating: Inferences from the Sesia Magmatic System (south-western Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigoi, Silvano; Quick, James E.; Demarchi, Gabriella; Klötzli, Urs S.

    2016-05-01

    The Permian Sesia Magmatic System of the southwestern Alps displays the plumbing system beneath a Permian caldera, including a deep crustal gabbroic complex, upper crustal granite plutons and a bimodal volcanic field dominated by rhyolitic tuff filling the caldera. Isotopic compositions of the deep crustal gabbro overlap those of coeval andesitic basalts, whereas granites define a distinct, more radiogenic cluster (Sri ≈ 0.708 and 0.710, respectively). AFC computations starting from the best mafic candidate for a starting melt show that Nd and Sr isotopic compositions and trace elements of andesitic basalts may be modeled by reactive bulk assimilation of ≈ 30% of partially depleted crust and ≈ 15%-30% gabbro fractionation. Trace elements of the deep crustal gabbro cumulates require a further ≈ 60% fractionation of the andesitic basalt and loss of ≈ 40% of silica-rich residual melt. The composition of the granite plutons is consistent with a mixture of relatively constant proportions of residual melt delivered from the gabbro and anatectic melt. Chemical and field evidence leads to a conceptual model which links the production of the two granitic components to the evolution of the Mafic Complex. During the growth of the Mafic Complex, progressive incorporation of packages of crustal rocks resulted in a roughly steady state rate of assimilation. Anatectic granite originates in the hot zone of melting crust located above the advancing mafic intrusion. Upward segregation of anatectic melts facilitates the assimilation of the partially depleted restite by stoping. At each cycle of mafic intrusion and incorporation, residual and anatectic melts are produced in roughly constant proportions, because the amount of anatectic melt produced at the roof is a function of volume and latent heat of crystallization of the underplated mafic melt which in turn produces proportional amounts of hybrid gabbro cumulates and residual melt. Such a process can explain the

  18. Understanding highly explosive basaltic eruptions: Evidence from olivine-hosted melt inclusions from Sunset Crater, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, C. M.; Roggensack, K.; Clarke, A. B.; Alfano, F.

    2013-12-01

    Basaltic scoria cone volcanoes are the most abundant volcanic landform on Earth and occur in all tectonic settings. Basaltic magmas have lower viscosities, higher temperatures, and lower volatile contents than silicic magmas, and therefore generally have a lower potential for explosive activity. However, basaltic eruptions display great variability, from mild lava flows to more energetic explosions with large plumes. The mechanism controlling highly explosive basaltic eruptions, such as the ca. 1085 AD eruption of Sunset Crater, is poorly understood. Processes or conditions such as high volatile content in the source magma, injection of a compositionally distinct magma at depth, interaction with shallow magma reservoirs, or rapid crystallization and/or bubble nucleation in the shallow subsurface could increase explosivity of basaltic magmas. One method to test these hypotheses is melt inclusion analysis in order to constrain initial melt composition, volatile content and minimum storage depth. The San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) in northern Arizona, active from 6 Ma-present, consists of over 600 volcanoes - mainly alkali basalt scoria cones along with five silicic centers. The eruption of Sunset Crater in the SFVF during the Holocene was an anomalously large basaltic explosive eruption, consisting of >8 explosive phases and 3 lava flows. Typical scoria cone-forming eruptions produce <0.1 km3 DRE of material, while the Sunset Crater tephra deposit is on the order of ~0.3 km3 DRE, with each phase characterized by volumes of 0.02-0.08 km3 DRE. The phases vary in size and style; the beginning stages of explosive activity (phases 1-2) were considerably smaller than phases 3-5, classified as subplinian. Because of the young age and desert setting of the volcano, the eruptive material is fresh and the deposit is well preserved. The bulk composition is an alkali basalt with Mg# 74. We studied 40 primary melt inclusions (MIs) hosted in 36 olivine crystals 0.5-2 mm in

  19. Formation of composite dykes by contact remelting and magma mingling: The Shaluta pluton, Transbaikalia (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinovsky, B. A.; Zanvilevich, A. N.; Katzir, Y.

    2012-10-01

    A unique opportunity to study the source areas, from which composite dykes were injected, occurs in the Shaluta pluton, Transbaikalia, Russia. The major quartz syenite pluton was intruded by several synplutonic gabbro bodies of various sizes. Investigations of the contact zones between gabbro and host syenite showed that liquid basalt magma intruded the incompletely crystallized coarse-grained quartz syenite with T = 700-720 °C and caused contact remelting of the silicic rock at about 900-950 °C. Mechanical interaction between newly formed silicic melt and partially crystallized mafic magma resulted in extensive magma mingling. Chemical interaction was exhibited by migration of MgO, CaO, FeO∗, Sr, H2O and Cl from the basalt magma, whereas silica, alkalis, Rb and Ba migrated from the silicic refusion zone into the crystallized gabbro. Presence of melt inclusions with homogenization temperature ranging from 640 to 790 °C in quartz and attaining 850-900 °C in late clinopyroxene indicates that at least part of newly formed minerals crystallized from the hybrid melt. Mingled magmatic material was squeezed out inwards, into the host solid quartz syenite pluton and formed dyke-like apophyses that can be traced for a distance of 60-70 m from the contact zone. Apophyses have the same dimensions, structure and composition as typical composite dykes that are common in the roof pendant over the gabbro bodies and nearby the gabbro exposures.

  20. Sr, Nd, Pb and Hf Isotopic Compositions of Late Cenozoic Alkali Basalts in South Korea: Evidence for Mixing Between the Two Dominant Asthenospheric Mantle Domains beneath East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.; Mukasa, S. B.; Kwon, S.; Andronikov, A. V.

    2004-12-01

    We determined the Sr, Nd, Pb and Hf isotopic compositions of late Cenozoic basaltic rocks from six lava-field provinces in South Korea, including Baengnyeong Island, Jogokni, Ganseong area, Jeju Island, Ulleung Island and Dog Island, in order to understand the nature of the mantle source. The basalts have OIB-like trace element abundance patterns, and also contain mantle-derived xenoliths. Available isotope data of late Cenozoic basalts from East Asia, along with ours, show that the mantle source has a DMM-EM1 array for northeast China and a DMM-EM2 array for Southeast Asia. We note that the basalts falling on an array between DMM and an intermediate end member between EM1 and EM2, are located between the two large-scale isotopic provinces, i.e., around the eastern part of South Korea. The most intriguing observation on the isotopic correlation diagrams is spatial variation from predominantly EM2 signatures in the basaltic lavas toward increasingly important addition of EM1, starting from Jeju Island to Ulleung and Dog Islands to Ganseong area, and to Baengnyeong Island. This is without any corresponding changes in the basement and the lithospheric mantle beneath the region. These observations suggest that the asthenospheric mantle source is dominant for the Cenozoic intraplate volcanism in East Asia, which is characterized by two distinct, large-scale domains. Previous studies on East Asian Cenozoic volcanic rocks have invoked origins by either plume activity or decompressional melting in a rift environment. On the basis of our new trace element and isotopic compositions which have OIB-like characteristics, we prefer a plume origin for these lavas. However, because tomographic images do not show distinct thermal anomaly that would be interpreted as a plume, we suggest that the magmatism might be the product of small, difficult to image multiple plumes that tapped the shallow part of the asthenosphere (probably the transition zone in the upper mantle).

  1. Source component mixing in the regions of arc magma generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arculus, Richard J.; Powell, Roger

    1986-05-01

    Most recent workers attribute the main features of island arc basalt geochemistry to variable contributions of at least two source components. The major source appears to be the peridotitic wedge of upper mantle overlying the subducted slab, but the nature of the second component and the processes by which the sources become mixed during genesis of arc magmas are in dispute. A metasomatic addition to the wedge resulting from devolatilization in the slab is the simplest explanation of the marked enrichment of the alkali and alkaline earth elements with respect to the rare earths in island arc basalts, together with the variably developed trends in Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopic data toward sedimentary contaminants. However, lack of the correlations between relative degrees of trace element fractionation and radiogenic isotopic ratios expected of such processes requires a more complex explanation. Alternative models that suggest that all of the characteristics of island arc basalts can be accounted for by melting of an intraoceanic, hot spot type of mantle source also face specific difficulties, particularly with regard to the strong depletions of trace high-field-strength elements in arc compared with hot spot magmas. A possible resolution of these specific geochemical difficulties may lie in dynamic transport processes within the wedge linked with the slab through coupled drag, and the marked depression of mantle isotherms in subduction zones. Inefficient escape of melts and subsequent repeated freezing within the overturning wedge can lead to local mineralogic and geochemical heterogeneity of the peridotite overlying the slab. Fluids released from the slab may infiltrate the heterogeneous wedge and preferentially scavenge the alkalis and alkaline earths with respect to the rare earths and high field strength elements from locally enriched portions of the wedge. Incorporation of such metasomatic fluids in renewed melting at shallower but hotter levels within the wedge can

  2. Dynamics of an open basaltic magma system: The 2008 activity of the Halema'uma'u Overlook vent, Kīlauea Caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eychenne, Julia; Houghton, Bruce F.; Swanson, Donald A.; Carey, Rebecca J.; Swavely, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    On March 19, 2008 a small explosive event accompanied the opening of a 35-m-wide vent (Overlook vent) on the southeast wall of Halema'uma'u Crater in Kīlauea Caldera, initiating an eruptive period that extends to the time of writing. The peak of activity, in 2008, consisted of alternating background open-system outgassing and spattering punctuated by sudden, short-lived weak explosions, triggered by collapses of the walls of the vent and conduit. Near-daily sampling of the tephra from this open system, along with exceptionally detailed observations, allow us to study the dynamics of the activity during two eruptive sequences in late 2008. Each sequence includes background activity preceding and following one or more explosions in September and October 2008 respectively. Componentry analyses were performed for daily samples to characterise the diversity of the ejecta. Nine categories of pyroclasts were identified in all the samples, including wall-rock fragments. The six categories of juvenile clasts can be grouped in three classes based on vesicularity: (1) poorly, (2) uniformly highly to extremely, and (3) heterogeneously highly vesicular. The wall-rock and juvenile clasts show dissimilar grainsize distributions, reflecting different fragmentation mechanisms. The wall-rock particles formed by failure of the vent and conduit walls above the magma free surface and were then passively entrained in the eruptive plume. The juvenile componentry reveals consistent contrasts in degassing and fragmentation processes before, during and after the explosive events. We infer a crude 'layering' developed in the shallow melt, in terms of both rheology and bubble and volatile contents, beneath a convecting free surface during background activity. A tens-of-centimetres thick viscoelastic surface layer was effectively outgassed and relatively cool, while at depths of less than 100 m, the melt remained slightly supersaturated in volatiles and actively vesiculating. Decoupled metre

  3. Dynamics of an open basaltic magma system: The 2008 activity of the Halema‘uma‘u Overlook vent, Kīlauea Caldera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eychenne, Julia; Houghton, Bruce; Swanson, Don; Carey, Rebecca; Swavely, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    On March 19, 2008 a small explosive event accompanied the opening of a 35-m-wide vent (Overlook vent) on the southeast wall of Halema‘uma‘u Crater in Kīlauea Caldera, initiating an eruptive period that extends to the time of writing. The peak of activity, in 2008, consisted of alternating background open-system outgassing and spattering punctuated by sudden, short-lived weak explosions, triggered by collapses of the walls of the vent and conduit. Near-daily sampling of the tephra from this open system, along with exceptionally detailed observations, allow us to study the dynamics of the activity during two eruptive sequences in late 2008. Each sequence includes background activity preceding and following one or more explosions in September and October 2008 respectively. Componentry analyses were performed for daily samples to characterise the diversity of the ejecta. Nine categories of pyroclasts were identified in all the samples, including wall-rock fragments. The six categories of juvenile clasts can be grouped in three classes based on vesicularity: (1) poorly, (2) uniformly highly to extremely, and (3) heterogeneously highly vesicular. The wall-rock and juvenile clasts show dissimilar grainsize distributions, reflecting different fragmentation mechanisms. The wall-rock particles formed by failure of the vent and conduit walls above the magma free surface and were then passively entrained in the eruptive plume. The juvenile componentry reveals consistent contrasts in degassing and fragmentation processes before, during and after the explosive events. We infer a crude ‘layering’ developed in the shallow melt, in terms of both rheology and bubble and volatile contents, beneath a convecting free surface during background activity. A tens-of-centimetres thick viscoelastic surface layer was effectively outgassed and relatively cool, while at depths of less than 100 m, the melt remained slightly supersaturated in volatiles and actively vesiculating

  4. Externally triggered renewed bubble nucleation in basaltic magma: the 12 October 2008 eruption at Halema‘uma‘u Overlook vent, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carey, Rebecca J.; Manga, Michael; Degruyter, Wim; Swanson, Donald; Houghton, Bruce; Orr, Tim R.; Patrick, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    From October 2008 until present, dozens of small impulsive explosive eruptions occurred from the Overlook vent on the southeast side of Halema‘uma‘u Crater, at Kīlauea volcano, USA. These eruptions were triggered by rockfalls from the walls of the volcanic vent and conduit onto the top of the lava column. Here we use microtextural observations and data from clasts erupted during the well-characterized 12 October 2008 explosive eruption at Halema‘uma‘u to extend existing models of eruption triggering. We present a potential mechanism for this eruption by combining microtextural observations with existing geophysical and visual data sets. We measure the size and number density of bubbles preserved in juvenile ejecta using 2D images and X-ray microtomography. Our data suggest that accumulations of large bubbles with diameters of >50μm to at least millimeters existed at shallow levels within the conduit prior to the 12 October 2008 explosion. Furthermore, a high number density of small bubbles <50 μm is measured in the clasts, implying very rapid nucleation of bubbles. Visual observations, combined with preexisting geophysical data, suggest that the impact of rockfalls onto the magma free surface induces pressure changes over short timescales that (1) nucleated new additional bubbles in the shallow conduit leading to high number densities of small bubbles and (2) expanded the preexisting bubbles driving upward acceleration. The trigger of eruption and bubble nucleation is thus external to the degassing system.

  5. Timescale of Petrogenetic Processes Recorded in the Mount Perkins Magma System, Northern Colorado River Extension Corridor, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, Lisa R.; Metcalf, Rodney V.; Miller, Calvin F.; Rhodes Gregory T.; Wooden, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    The Miocene Mt. Perkins Pluton is a small composite intrusive body emplaced in the shallow crust as four separate phases during the earliest stages of crustal extension. Phase 1 (oldest) consists of isotropic hornblende gabbro and a layered cumulate sequence. Phase 2 consists of quartz monzonite to quartz monzodiorite hosting mafic microgranitoid enclaves. Phase 3 is composed of quartz monzonite and is subdivided into mafic enclave-rich zones and enclave-free zones. Phase 4 consists of aphanitic dikes of mafic, intermediate and felsic compositions hosting mafic enclaves. Phases 2-4 enclaves record significant isotopic disequilibrium with surrounding granitoid host rocks, but collectively enclaves and host rocks form a cogenetic suite exhibiting systematic variations in Nd-Sr-Pb isotopes that correlate with major and trace elements. Phases 2-4 record multiple episodes of magma mingling among cogenetic hybrid magmas that formed via magma mixing and fractional crystallization at a deeper crustal. The mafic end-member was alkali basalt similar to nearby 6-4 Ma basalt with enriched OIB-like trace elements and Nd-Sr-Pb isotopes. The felsic end-member was a subalkaline crustal-derived magma. Phase 1 isotropic gabbro exhibits elemental and isotopic compositional variations at relatively constant SiO2, suggesting generation of isotropic gabbro by an open-system process involving two mafic end-members. One end-member is similar in composition to the OIB-like mafic end-member for phases 2-4; the second is similar to nearby 11-8 Ma tholeiite basalt exhibiting low epsilon (sub Nd), and depleted incompatible trace elements. Phase 1 cumulates record in situ fractional crystallization of an OIB-like mafic magma with isotopic evidence of crustal contamination by partial melts generated in adjacent Proterozoic gneiss. The Mt Perkins pluton records a complex history in a lithospheric scale magma system involving two distinct mantle-derived mafic magmas and felsic magma sourced in the

  6. Silicic magma generation at Askja volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmarsson, O.

    2009-04-01

    Rate of magma differentiation is an important parameter for hazard assessment at active volcanoes. However, estimates of these rates depend on proper understanding of the underlying magmatic processes and magma generation. Differences in isotope ratios of O, Th and B between silicic and in contemporaneous basaltic magmas have been used to emphasize their origin by partial melting of hydrothermally altered metabasaltic crust in the rift-zones favoured by a strong geothermal gradient. An alternative model for the origin of silicic magmas in the Iceland has been proposed based on U-series results. Young mantle-derived mafic protolith is thought to be metasomatized and partially melted to form the silicic end-member. However, this model underestimates the compositional variations of the hydrothermally-altered basaltic crust. New data on U-Th disequilibria and O-isotopes in basalts and dacites from Askja volcano reveal a strong correlation between (230Th/232Th) and delta 18O. The 1875 AD dacite has the lowest Th- and O isotope ratios (0.94 and -0.24 per mille, respectively) whereas tephra of evolved basaltic composition, erupted 2 months earlier, has significantly higher values (1.03 and 2.8 per mille, respectively). Highest values are observed in the most recent basalts (erupted in 1920 and 1961) inside the Askja caldera complex and out on the associated fissure swarm (Sveinagja basalt). This correlation also holds for older magma such as an early Holocene dacites, which eruption may have been provoked by rapid glacier thinning. Silicic magmas at Askja volcano thus bear geochemical signatures that are best explained by partial melting of extensively hydrothermally altered crust and that the silicic magma source has remained constant during the Holocene at least. Once these silicic magmas are formed they appear to erupt rapidly rather than mixing and mingling with the incoming basalt heat-source that explains lack of icelandites and the bi-modal volcanism at Askja

  7. Polymagmatic activity and complex magma evolution at the monogenetic Mt Gambier Volcanic Complex in the Newer Volcanics Province, SE Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Otterloo, Jozua; Raveggi, Massimo; Cas, Ray; Maas, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Monogenetic volcanism can produce eruptive suites showing considerable complexity in compositional features and pre-eruptive magma evolution. The ~5 ka Mt Gambier Volcanic Complex (MGVC), a monogenetic volcanic centre in the Newer Volcanics Province (NVP), SE Australia, is a good example. It displays a complex stratigraphy of interbedded deposits related to different eruption styles from a multi-vent system. Formation of the MGVC proceeded through simultaneous eruption of two alkali basaltic magma batches: a more alkaline and light rare earth element enriched basanite batch (Mg# 58-62) in the west and a trachybasalt batch (Mg# 58-64) enriched in SiO2 and CaO in the east. Trace element modelling suggests an origin of both magma batches from a single parental melt formed by 4-5% partial melting of a metasomatised lherzolite source in the asthenospheric mantle (2.2 GPa; ~80 km). At the base of the lithosphere, part of this parental melt interacted with a deep-seated pyroxenite contaminant to form the trachybasaltic suite. Further modification of either magma batch at crustal levels appears to have been negligible. Isotope and trace element signatures are consistent with the inferred asthenospheric magma source; Pb isotopes in particular suggest a source with mixed Indian mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)-Enriched Mantle 2 (EM2) affinities, the latter perhaps related to metasomatic overprinting. It is argued that Cainozoic NVP volcanism in SE Australia is not necessarily related to a mantle plume but can be explained by other models involving asthenospheric upwelling. Fast magma ascent rates in the lithosphere evidenced by the presence of mantle xenoliths may reflect reactivation of lithospheric structures that provide magma pathways to the surface.

  8. Geochemical fingerprint of the primary magma composition in the marine tephras originated from the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chungwan; Kim, Seonyoung; Lee, Changyeol

    2014-12-01

    The intraplate Baegdusan (Changbai) and Ulleung volcanoes located on the border of China, North Korea, and East/Japan Sea, respectively, have been explained by appeals to both hotspots and asthenospheric mantle upwelling (wet plume) caused by the stagnant Pacific plate. To understand the origin of the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanism, we performed geochemical analyses on the tephra deposits in the East/Japan Sea basins originating from the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanoes. The volcanic glass in the tephra from the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanoes ranged from alkaline trachyte to peralkaline rhyolite and from phonolite to trachyte, respectively. The tephra from the two intraplate volcanoes showed highly enriched incompatible elements, such as Tb, Nb, Hf, and Ta, distinct from those of the ordinary arc volcanoes of the Japanese islands. The straddle distribution of the Th/Yb and Ta/Yb ratios of the tephra deposits from the Baegdusan volcano may originate from the alkali basaltic magma resulting from mixing between the wet plume from the stagnant Pacific plate in the transition zone and the overlying shallow asthenospheric mantle. In contrast, the deposits from the Ulleung volcano show a minor contribution of the stagnant slab to the basaltic magma, implying either partial melting of a more enriched mantle, smaller degrees of partial melting of a garnet-bearing mantle source, or a combination of both processes as the magma genesis. Our study indicated that the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanoes have different magma sources and evolutionary histories.

  9. Th-230 - U-238 series disequilibrium of the Olkaria basalts Gregory Rift Valley, Kenya: Petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, S.; Macdonald, R.; Kelly, M.

    1993-01-01

    Strong mixing trends on a (Th-230/Th-232) versus Th diagram show that the basalts are mixed magmas which have undergone interaction with the crust. Instantaneous Th/U ratios are less than time integrated ones but these exceed the Th/U ratios in the MORB and OIB sources. This indicates that the mantle may have undergone some metasomatic fluxing, crustal contamination of the basalts will also enhance these ratios. Early activity on the Akira plain is represented by early basalts and hawaiites. The early basalt samples are known to predate the earliest comendites. The most recent phase of activity is represented by another cinder cone 40-50 m high being feldspar and clinopyroxene phyric. Inclusions which occur in the comendites vary in size and distribution. The largest and most porphyritic are the trachytes (up to 40 cm) with alkali feldspar phases up to 6 mm and small pyroxenes in the ground mass. The second set of inclusions are smaller (up to 10 cm) and are largely aphyric. The distribution of the inclusions are not uniform, the Broad Acres (C5) lavas contain 2-5 percent. The size of the inclusions decrease from south to north, as does the abundance of the trachytic inclusions. The major element variations in the Naivasha basalts, hawaiites and magmatic inclusions are discussed.

  10. Origins of felsic magmas in Japanese subduction zone: Geochemical characterizations of tephra from caldera-forming eruptions <5 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Nagahashi, Yoshitaka; Satoguchi, Yasufumi; Chang, Qing

    2015-07-01

    Dacitic to rhyolitic glass shards from 80 widespread tephras erupted during the past 5 Mys from calderas in Kyushu, and SW, central, and NE Japan were analyzed. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to determine 10 major and 33 trace elements and 207Pb/206Pb-208Pb/206Pb isotope ratios. The tephras were classified into three major geochemical types and their source rocks were identified as plutonic, sedimentary, and intermediate amphibolite rocks in the upper crust. A few tephras from SW Japan were identified as adakite and alkali rhyolite and were regarded to have originated from slab melt and mantle melt, respectively. The Pb isotope ratios of the tephras are comparable to those of the intermediate lavas in the source areas but are different from the basalts in these areas. The crustal assimilants for the intermediate lavas were largely from crustal melts and are represented by the rhyolitic tephras. A large heat source is required for forming large volumes of felsic crustal melts and is usually supplied by the mantle via basalt. Hydrous arc basalt formed by cold slab subduction is voluminous, and its heat transfer with high water content may have melted crustal rocks leading to effective felsic magma production. Coincidence of basalt and felsic magma activities shown by this study suggests caldera-forming eruptions are ultimately the effect of a mantle-driven cause.

  11. Petrologic and Volcanologic Constraints on Depths of Evolved Magma Generation and Storage at Northern Harrat Rahat and Harrat Khaybar, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahood, G. A.; Calvert, A. T.; Witter, M. R.; Stelten, M. E.; Zahran, H. M.; Shawali, J.; Hassan, K. H.; Muquyyim, F. A.; Ashur, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    We present preliminary results of a petrologic study of northern Harrat Rahat that is part of an interdisciplinary hazard assessment of this rift-related volcanic field in Saudi Arabia. Alkali basalts and hawaiites occur with mugearites and trachyphonolites. This silica-undersaturated suite is consistent with fractionation at crustal depths greater than 25 km, i.e., at pressures for which experimental studies find that sodic clinopyroxene dominates the liquidus assemblage, resulting in a differentiation trend in which SiO2 rises only moderately. Trachyphonolites lack positive Eu anomalies despite abundant anorthoclase phenocrysts, and exhibit linear crystal-size distributions indicative of a simple, one-stage crystallization history. We suggest that trachyphonolite melts are extracted from extensively crystallized alkali basalts in the middle to lower crust. Any crystals entrained from depth (e.g., sodic clinopyroxene) are resorbed during ascent of these water-poor magmas to shallow levels, where they cool and crystallize. Abundant phenocrysts and low H2O contents resulted in viscous magmas that produced numerous cryptodomes along with domes and spines that pierced the uplifts. Eruption of trachyphonolite domes was accompanied by poorly fluidized scoria flows that traveled up to 4 km from their vents. Explosive disruption of domes produced block flows that ring craters. Vulcanian deposits with accretionary lapilli and lithics of rounded metamorphic rocks point to the involvement of groundwater sourced in basinal sediments eroded from Precambrian basement. Although phreatomagmatic eruptions produced tuff rings up to 1.5 km in diameter, there is no evidence for collapse calderas, suggesting there have not been sizable reservoirs of evolving magma in the shallow crust, consistent with petrologic evidence for a deep origin of the trachyphonolite magmas. In contrast, Harrat Khaybar, which lies 140 km NNE of Harrat Rahat, erupted silica-saturated evolved magmas

  12. The Surtsey Magma Series

    PubMed Central

    Ian Schipper, C.; Jakobsson, Sveinn P.; White, James D.L.; Michael Palin, J.; Bush-Marcinowski, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The volcanic island of Surtsey (Vestmannaeyjar, Iceland) is the product of a 3.5-year-long eruption that began in November 1963. Observations of magma-water interaction during pyroclastic episodes made Surtsey the type example of shallow-to-emergent phreatomagmatic eruptions. Here, in part to mark the 50th anniversary of this canonical eruption, we present previously unpublished major-element whole-rock compositions, and new major and trace-element compositions of sideromelane glasses in tephra collected by observers and retrieved from the 1979 drill core. Compositions became progressively more primitive as the eruption progressed, with abrupt changes corresponding to shifts between the eruption’s four edifices. Trace-element ratios indicate that the chemical variation is best explained by mixing of different proportions of depleted ridge-like basalt, with ponded, enriched alkalic basalt similar to that of Iceland’s Eastern Volcanic Zone; however, the systematic offset of Surtsey compositions to lower Nb/Zr than other Vestmannaeyjar lavas indicates that these mixing end members are as-yet poorly contained by compositions in the literature. As the southwestern-most volcano in the Vestmannaeyjar, the geochemistry of the Surtsey Magma Series exemplifies processes occurring within ephemeral magma bodies on the extreme leading edge of a propagating off-axis rift in the vicinity of the Iceland plume. PMID:26112644

  13. Lunar magma transport phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    An outline of magma transport theory relevant to the evolution of a possible Lunar Magma Ocean and the origin and transport history of the later phase of mare basaltic volcanism is presented. A simple model is proposed to evaluate the extent of fractionation as magma traverses the cold lunar lithosphere. If Apollo green glasses are primitive and have not undergone significant fractionation en route to the surface, then mean ascent rates of 10 m/s and cracks of widths greater than 40 m are indicated. Lunar tephra and vesiculated basalts suggest that a volatile component plays a role in eruption dynamics. The predominant vapor species appear to be CO CO2, and COS. Near the lunar surface, the vapor fraction expands enormously and vapor internal energy is converted to mixture kinetic energy with the concomitant high-speed ejection of vapor and pyroclasts to form lunary fire fountain deposits such as the Apollo 17 orange and black glasses and Apollo 15 green glass.

  14. The Surtsey Magma Series.

    PubMed

    Schipper, C Ian; Jakobsson, Sveinn P; White, James D L; Michael Palin, J; Bush-Marcinowski, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The volcanic island of Surtsey (Vestmannaeyjar, Iceland) is the product of a 3.5-year-long eruption that began in November 1963. Observations of magma-water interaction during pyroclastic episodes made Surtsey the type example of shallow-to-emergent phreatomagmatic eruptions. Here, in part to mark the 50(th) anniversary of this canonical eruption, we present previously unpublished major-element whole-rock compositions, and new major and trace-element compositions of sideromelane glasses in tephra collected by observers and retrieved from the 1979 drill core. Compositions became progressively more primitive as the eruption progressed, with abrupt changes corresponding to shifts between the eruption's four edifices. Trace-element ratios indicate that the chemical variation is best explained by mixing of different proportions of depleted ridge-like basalt, with ponded, enriched alkalic basalt similar to that of Iceland's Eastern Volcanic Zone; however, the systematic offset of Surtsey compositions to lower Nb/Zr than other Vestmannaeyjar lavas indicates that these mixing end members are as-yet poorly contained by compositions in the literature. As the southwestern-most volcano in the Vestmannaeyjar, the geochemistry of the Surtsey Magma Series exemplifies processes occurring within ephemeral magma bodies on the extreme leading edge of a propagating off-axis rift in the vicinity of the Iceland plume. PMID:26112644

  15. Sulfide Stability of Planetary Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiazza, C. M.; Righter, K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Chesley, J. T.; Ruiz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The isotopic system, 187Re 187Os, can be used to determine the role of crust and mantle in magma genesis. In order to apply the system to natural samples, we must understand variations in Re/Os concentrations. It is thought that low [Os] and [Re] in basalts can be attributed to sulfide (FeS) saturation, as Re behaves incompatibly to high degrees of evolution until sulfide saturation occurs [1]. Previous work has shown that lunar basalts are sulfide under-saturated, and mid-ocean ridge, ocean-island and Martian (shergottites) basalts are saturated [2,3]. However, little is known about arc basalts. In this study, basaltic rocks were analyzed across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt.

  16. Petrogenesis and evolution of Quaternary basaltic rocks from the Wulanhada area, North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Qi-Cheng; Chen, Sheng-Sheng; Zhao, Yong-Wei; Zou, Hai-Bo; Li, Ni; Sui, Jian-Li

    2014-10-01

    The origin of alkali basalts in eastern China has been the subject of considerable debate. Here we focus on the Wulanhada basalts located in the western block of North China Craton to provide new insights into recent deep mantle dynamics. The Wulanhada volcanic group has 30 volcanic cones with variable volumes, consisting of scoria cone (cinder cone + spatter cone) and lava. The Wulanhada volcanoes exhibit Strombolian eruption activities during late Pleistocene epoch and Holocene. The Wulanhada basalts are strongly alkaline rocks (tephrite). According to the characteristics of trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic compositions, the Wulanhada magmas were mainly derived from garnet-bearing peridotite within the asthenosphere and underwent fractional crystallization of olivine and clinopyroxene without significant crustal contamination. Their elevated values of Na, Al, Sr/Sm, Sm/Hf, Zr/Hf, and Nb/Ta, positive Ba, K, Pb, and Sr anomalies and negative Zr, Hf anomalies, combined with a negative correlation between 176Hf/177Hf and 143Nd/144Nd and relatively low 87Sr/86Sr, suggest that the magma source may be a mixture of garnet peridotites and carbonated melts. The presence of carbonated melts is likely associated with the sediments or fluids carried by the subducted or stagnant Pacific Plate.

  17. Mare Basaltic Magmatism: A View from the Sample Suite With and Without a Remote-Sensing Prospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.; Gaddis, L. R.

    1999-01-01

    and will continue to bear fruit are the duration and early history of lunar volcanism and the relationship between mare basalt composition and eruptive history. Although the petrologic record has been obscured by the early catastrophic impact history of the Moon, there is abundant evidence of pre-3.9 Ga nonmare basaltic volcanism [e.g., 7-8]. Most of this record is retained in small clasts from highland soils and breccias or has been identified through remote sensing. The relationship between the samples and units identified through remote sensing is speculative. Further identification and delineation of older episodes of volcanism and their relationship to episodes of crustal plutonism (Mg and alkali suites) is critical to our interpretation of mantle evolution following magma ocean crystallization and prior to the onset of mare volcanism. Combined sample and remote sensing data sets will allow us to better distinguish among the wide range of models that have been proposed for these early periods of lunar magmatism (Mg suite, alkali suite, KREEP basalts). These models include (1) impact origin; (2) magma ocean crystallization; (3) melting and remobilization of late magma ocean cumulates and/or KREEP infiltrated lower crust; (4) melting of the lower portions of the cumulate pile followed by assimilation of KREEP or anorthositic crust; and (5) melting of deep, hybrid mixed cumulate sources. Additional information is contained in the original.

  18. Magma energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The thermal energy contained in magmatic systems represents a huge potential resource. In the US, useful energy contained in molten and partially-molten magma within the upper 10 km of the crust has been estimated at 5 to 50 x 10/sup 22/ J (50,000 to 500,000 Quads). The objective of the Magma Energy Extraction Program is to determine the engineering feasibility of locating, accessing, and utilizing magma as a viable energy resource. This program follows the DOE/OBES-funded Magma Energy Research Project that concluded scientific feasibility of the magma energy concept. A primary long-range goal of this program is to conduct an energy extraction experiment directly in a molten, crustal magma body. Critical to determining engineering feasibility are several key technology tasks: (1) Geophysics - to obtain detailed definition of potential magma targets, (2) Geochemistry/Materials - to characterize the magma environment and select compatible engineering materials, (3) Drilling - to develop drilling and completion techniques for entry into a magma body, and (4) Energy Extraction - to develop heat extraction technology.

  19. Magma Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, Helge M.

    2015-05-01

    Magma fragmentation is the breakup of a continuous volume of molten rock into discrete pieces, called pyroclasts. Because magma contains bubbles of compressible magmatic volatiles, decompression of low-viscosity magma leads to rapid expansion. The magma is torn into fragments, as it is stretched into hydrodynamically unstable sheets and filaments. If the magma is highly viscous, resistance to bubble growth will instead lead to excess gas pressure and the magma will deform viscoelastically by fracturing like a glassy solid, resulting in the formation of a violently expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. In either case, fragmentation represents the conversion of potential energy into the surface energy of the newly created fragments and the kinetic energy of the expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. If magma comes into contact with external water, the conversion of thermal energy will vaporize water and quench magma at the melt-water interface, thus creating dynamic stresses that cause fragmentation and the release of kinetic energy. Lastly, shear deformation of highly viscous magma may cause brittle fractures and release seismic energy.

  20. The Plumbing System of a Highly Explosive Basaltic Volcano: Sunset Crater, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, C. M.; Roggensack, K.; Clarke, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    We seek to better understand highly explosive basaltic eruptions with specific focus on magmatic volatile solubility in alkali basalts and the magma plumbing system. Sunset Crater, an alkali basalt (~3.7 wt.% alkalis) scoria cone volcano, erupted explosively in 1085 AD. We analyzed 125 primary melt inclusions (MIs) from Sunset Crater tephra deposited by 2 subplinian phases and 1 Strombolian explosion to compare magma volatiles and storage conditions. We picked rapidly quenched free olivine crystals and selected large volume MIs (50-180 μm) located toward crystal cores. MIs are faceted and exhibit little major element composition variability with minor post entrapment crystallization (2-10%). MIs are relatively dry but CO2-rich. Water content varies from 0.4 wt.% to 1.5 wt.% while carbon dioxide abundance ranges between 1,150 ppm and 3,250 ppm. Most MIs contain >1 wt.% H2O and >2,150 ppm CO2. All observed MIs contain a vapor bubble, so we are evaluating MI vapor bubbles with Raman spectroscopy and re-homogenization experiments to determine the full volatile budget. Because knowledge of volatile solubility is critical to accurately interpret results from MI analyses, we measured H2O-CO2 solubility in the Sunset Crater bulk composition. Fluid-saturated experiments at 4 and 6 kbar indicate shallower entrapment pressures for these MIs than values calculated for this composition using existing models. Assuming fluid saturation, MIs record depths from 6 km to 14 km, including groupings suggesting two pauses for longer-term storage at ~6 km and ~10.5 km. We do not observe any significant differences in MIs from phases exhibiting different eruptive styles, suggesting that while a high CO2 content may drive rapid magma ascent and be partly responsible for highly explosive eruptions, shallower processes may govern the final eruptive character. To track shallow processes during magma ascent from depth of MI-entrapment up to the surface, we are examining MI re-entrants.

  1. Electrical Properties of Hydrous Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laumonier, M.; Sifre, D.; Gaillard, F.

    2013-12-01

    Volatiles strongly affect physical and chemical properties of magmas which are major vectors of mass and heat transfer in the Earth's. In subduction zones, hydrated melts prevail during the entire course of differentiation from basalts, andesites, dacites to rhyolites. Several electrical surveys obtained by magneto telluric investigations are currently deployed at subduction zones. The electrical conductivity of hydrous melts is however poorly constrained: so far only three studies have experimentally addressed this topic. Here, we show in situ electrical impedance of natural dacites, andesites (from Uturuncu Volcano, Bolivia) and basaltic magmas obtained with a 4-wire set up in a piston cylinder and internally heated pressure vessel. The range of temperature (500 to 1300°C), pressure (0.3 to 2 Gpa), and the various water contents and crystal fractions covers the respective ranges occurring at natural conditions. First results show that the conductivity increases with the temperature, the melt fraction, and a slightly decreases with the pressure and the crystal fraction. The compilation of these results with previous studies (rhyolitic, phonolitic and basaltic compositions) will lead to a general model of the electrical properties of magmas. Such a model will help in (i) interpreting the electrical signature of natural magmas and (ii) constraining their conditions (chemical composition, temperature, pressure, water content, melt fraction) from the source to the storage location.

  2. Variations in magma supply and magma partitioning: the role of tectonic settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Akira

    1999-11-01

    Magma supply rates for 200 years at Krafla and Lakagigar, Iceland, and those for 150 years at Kilauea and Mauna Loa, Hawaii, are estimated roughly, based on their geophysical and geological observations. A diagram that relates erupted volumes to eruption intervals at volcanoes under various tectonic settings is represented. These results lead to a new model that a large volume (1-10 km 3) of magma is supplied intermittently at a long interval (10 2-10 4 years) beneath volcanoes in rift zones, while magma is supplied continuously with oscillations or fluctuations beneath intraplate volcanoes. Chemical data such as the MgO wt.% of lava may be one indicator in evaluating the magma supply rates of Hawaiian volcanoes. Systematic variation with time in magma partitioning within a volcano or to the surface is obtained in comparisons between among migration patterns of eruption sites, cumulative supplied volumes, and the volume ratios of erupted to supplied magma at Krafla and Kilauea. The variations suggest that a magma plumbing system may act under self-control (regulating) system through stress as one system. In response to a change in magma supply rate, the system partitions magma horizontally into dikes or vertically toward the surface. A large magma supply rate promotes the vertical extent of a crack to result in an eruption with a large volume ratio of erupted to supplied magma. This tendency is supported by field observations of flood basalts. The partitioned magma as dike intrusions suppresses magma supply partially in the shallow crust. Using analog experiments on liquid-filled cracks in gelatin, this paper demonstrates fundamental processes for magma partitioning on the effect of magma supply and stress change by the partitioned magma. A dynamical system of two differential equations on magma supply rate and stress around a magma plumbing system is proposed, to understand the qualitative variations in magma supply rate imposed by tectonic settings.

  3. Magma energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, H.C.

    1985-01-01

    The paper briefly describes the potential magma resources in the US and worldwide, and possible ways of exploiting this resource. Two target sites for field experiments to characterize magma targets are identified: Long Valley Caldera and Coso Hot Springs. 11 refs. (ACR)

  4. Mare Basalt Volcanism: Generation, Ascent, Eruption, and History of Emplacement of Secondary Crust on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, J. W.; Wilson, L.

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical analyses of the generation, ascent, intrusion and eruption of basaltic magma provides new insight into magma source depths, supply processes, transport and emplacement mechanisms (dike intrusions, effusive and explosive eruptions).

  5. Viscous flow behavior of tholeiitic and alkaline Fe-rich martian basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrel, Magdalena Oryaëlle; Baratoux, David; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical compositions of martian basalts are enriched in iron with respect to terrestrial basalts. Their rheology is poorly known and liquids of this chemical composition have not been experimentally investigated. Here, we determine the viscosity of five synthetic silicate liquids having compositions representative of the diversity of martian volcanic rocks including primary martian mantle melts and alkali basalts. The concentric cylinder method has been employed between 1500 °C and the respective liquidus temperatures of these liquids. The viscosity near the glass transition has been derived from calorimetric measurements of the glass transition. Although some glass heterogeneity limits the accuracy of the data near the glass transition, it was nevertheless possible to determine the parameters of the non-Arrhenian temperature-dependence of viscosity over a wide temperature range (1500 °C to the glass transition temperature). At superliquidus conditions, the martian basalt viscosities are as low as those of the Fe-Ti-rich lunar basalts, similar to the lowest viscosities recorded for terrestrial ferrobasalts, and 0.5 to 1 order of magnitude lower than terrestrial tholeiitic basalts. Comparison with empirical models reveals that Giordano et al. (2008) offers the best approximation, whereas the model proposed by Hui and Zhang (2007) is inappropriate for the compositions considered. The slightly lower viscosities exhibited by the melts produced by low degree of mantle partial melting versus melts produced at high degree of mantle partial melting (likely corresponding to the early history of Mars), is not deemed sufficient to lead to viscosity variations large enough to produce an overall shift of martian lava flow morphologies over time. Rather, the details of the crystallization sequence (and in particular the ability of some of these magmas to form spinifex texture) is proposed to be a dominant effect on the viscosity during martian lava flow emplacement and

  6. Primitive magmas at five Cascade volcanic fields: Melts from hot, heterogeneous sub-arc mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Bruggman, P.E.; Christiansen, R.L.; Clynne, M.A.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Hildreth, W.

    1997-01-01

    Major and trace element concentrations, including REE by isotope dilution, and Sr, Nd, Pb, and O isotope ratios have been determined for 38 mafic lavas from the Mount Adams, Crater Lake, Mount Shasta, Medicine Lake, and Lassen volcanic fields, in the Cascade arc, northwestern part of the United States. Many of the samples have a high Mg# [100Mg/(Mg + FeT) > 60] and Ni content (>140 ppm) such that we consider them to be primitive. We recognize three end-member primitive magma groups in the Cascades, characterized mainly by their trace-element and alkali-metal abundances: (1) High-alumina olivine tholeiite (HAOT) has trace element abundances similar to N-MORB, except for slightly elevated LILE, and has Eu/Eu* > 1. (2) Arc basalt and basaltic andesite have notably higher LILE contents, generally have higher SiO2 contents, are more oxidized, and have higher Cr for a given Ni abundance than HAOT. These lavas show relative depletion in HFSE, have lower HREE and higher LREE than HAOT, and have smaller Eu/Eu* (0.94-1.06). (3) Alkali basalt from the Simcoe volcanic field east of Mount Adams represents the third end-member, which contributes an intraplate geochemical signature to magma compositions. Notable geochemical features among the volcanic fields are: (1) Mount Adams rocks are richest in Fe and most incompatible elements including HFSE; (2) the most incompatible-element depleted lavas occur at Medicine Lake; (3) all centers have relatively primitive lavas with high LILE/HFSE ratios but only the Mount Adams, Lassen, and Medicine Lake volcanic fields also have relatively primitive rocks with an intraplate geochemical signature; (4) there is a tendency for increasing 87Sr/86Sr, 207Pb/204Pb, and ??18O and decreasing 206Pb/204Pb and 143Nd/144Nd from north to south. The three end-member Cascade magma types reflect contributions from three mantle components: depleted sub-arc mantle modestly enriched in LILE during ancient subduction; a modern, hydrous subduction component

  7. Petrochemistry and tectonic significance of Lower Cretaceous Barros Arana Formation basalts, southernmost Chilean Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, C. R.; Mohseni, P. P.; Fuenzalida, P. R.

    The Lower Cretaceous Barros Arana Formation (Albian, hornblende KAr age of 104 Ma), in the Magallanes region of Chile, consists of a sequence of spilitized clinopyroxene- and amphibole-bearing mafic dikes and lavas, and volcaniclastic breccias, occurring within the sedimentary infill of the Rocas Verdes marginal basin and its eastward extension onto the Cretaceous continental platform. Although the original alkali and alkaline earth element concentrations of the basaltic lavas and dikes have been altered by spilitization, the presence of relict pargasitic amphibole phenocrysts, the absence of orthopyroxene, and high LREE contents and LREE/HREE ratios imply mildly alkaline affinities for these basalts. Their low TiO 2 and HFSE (Zr, Nb, Ta, and Hf) contents and high LREE/HFSE ratios suggest affinities with convergent plate boundary arc magmas. The Barros Arana basalts are interpreted as mafic members of the mildly alkaline shoshonitic rock suite of subduction-related arcs. They may have formed as subduction geometry began to undergo the changes (flattening) that ultimately led to the initiation of the closure, deformation, and uplift of the Rocas Verdes basin by the late or post-Albian. The low initial 87Sr/ 86Sr (0.7031) and high initial 143Nd/ 144Nd (0.51277) of the basalts indicate that a generally extensional tectonic regime east of the main calc-alkaline arc allowed eruption of these mafic shoshonites without interaction with continental crust (in contrast to the contemporaneous plutons of the Patagonian batholith).

  8. Geochemical variations in Andean basaltic and silicic lavas from the Villarrica-Lanin volcanic chain (39.5° S): an evaluation of source heterogeneity, fractional crystallization and crustal assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey-Vargas, Rosemary; Roa, Hugo Moreno; Escobar, Leopolde Lopez; Frey, Frederick A.

    1989-11-01

    At 39.5° S in the southern volcanic zone of the Andes three Pleistocene-recent stratovolcanoes, Villarrica, Quetrupillan and Lanin, form a trend perpendicular to the strike of the Andes, 275 to 325 km from the Peru-Chile trench. Basalts from Villarrica and Lanin are geochemically distinct; the latter have higher incompatible element abundances and La/Sm but lower Ba/La and alkali metal/La ratios. These differences are consistent with our previously proposed models involving: a) a west to east decrease in an alkali metal-rich, high Ba/La slab-derived component which causes an across strike decrease in degree of melting; or b) a west to east increase in the contamination of subduction-related magma by enriched subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Silicic and mafic lavas from the stratovolcanoes have overlapping Sr, Nd and O isotopic ratios. Silicic lavas also have geochemical differences that parallel those of their associated basalts, e.g., rhyolite from Villarrica has lower La/Sm and incompatible element contents than high-SiO2 andesite from Lanin. At each volcano the most silicic lavas can be modelled by closed system fractional crystallization while andesites are best explained by magma mixing. Apparently crustal contamination was not an important process in deriving the evolved lavas. Basaltic flows from small scoria cones, 20 35 km from Villarrica volcano have high incompatible element contents and low Ba/La, like Lanin basalts, but trend to higher K/Rb (356 855) and lower 87Sr/ 86Sr (0.70361 0.70400) than basalts from either stratovolcano. However all basalts have similar Nd, Pb and O isotope ratios. The best explanation for the unique features of the cones is that the sources of SVZ magmas, e.g., slab-derived fluids or melts of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle, have varying alkali metal and radiogenic Sr contents. These heterogeneities are not manifested in stratovolcano basalts because of extensive subcrustal pooling and mixing. This model is

  9. A high 87Sr 86Sr mantle source for low alkali tholeiite, northern Great Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mark, R.K.; Lee, Hu C.; Bowman, H.R.; Asaro, F.; McKee, E.H.; Coats, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    Olivine tholeiites, the youngest Tertiary units (about 8-11 m.y. old) at five widely spaced localities in northeastern Nevada, are geologically related to the basalts of the Snake River Plain, Idaho, to the north and are similar in major element and alkali chemistry to mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) and island arc tholeiites. The measured K (1250-3350 ppm), Rb (1??9-6??2 ppm) and Sr (140-240 ppm) concentrations overlap the range reported for MORB. Three of the five samples have low, unfractionated rare earth element (REE) patterns, the other two show moderate light-REE enrichment. Barium concentration is high and variable (100-780 ppm) and does not correlate with the other LIL elements. The rocks have 87Sr/86Sr = 0??7052-0??7076, considerably higher than MORB (~0??702-0??703). These samples are chemically distinct (i.e. less alkalic) from the olivine tholeiites from the adjacent Snake River Plain, but their Sr isotopic compositions are similar. They contain Sr that is distinctly more radiogenic than the basalts from the adjacent Great Basin. About 10 b.y. would be required for the mean measured Rb/Sr (~ 0??02) of these samples to generate, in a closed system, the radiogenic Sr they contain. The low alkali content of these basalts makes crustal contamination an unlikely mechanism. If the magma is uncontaminated, the time-averaged Rb/Sr of the source material must have been ~0??04. A significant decrease in Rb/Sr of the source material (a factor 2??) thus most probably occurred in the relatively recent (1??09 yr) past. Such a decrease of Rb/Sr in the mantle could accompany alkali depletion produced by an episode of partial melting and magma extraction. In contrast, low 87Sr 86Sr ratios indicate that the source material of the mid-ocean ridge basalts may have been depleted early in the Earth's history. ?? 1975.

  10. Extensive mixing features at 27-41 Ka postcaldera trachytes at Long Valley caldera, CA: Mixing/mingling of basalt with trachyte and mobilization of young granitic material to form kspar megacrysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagmann, I. J.; Mahood, G.

    2014-12-01

    Five small lava domes erupted at the NW margin of Long Valley caldera from 41 to 27 Ka. They range from trachyte (66% SiO2) to trachyandesite (60%), with the youngest lava being the most mafic. Mixing features are pervasive, with enclaves, kspar megacrysts, crystal clots of various grain sizes, compositions, and degrees of resorption indicating multiple episodes of mafic injection, mobilization of young granitic material, and mixing/mingling of alkali basalt with trachyte to alkali rhyolite magmas similar to those at Mammoth Mountain. Enclaves range from 49 to 57% SiO2 and form a mixing line with a felsic end member at 67% SiO2. In order to quantify the distribution of enclaves and large (1-4 cm), resorbed, kspar megacrysts, outcrop-scale point counting was performed at >200 locations on the lavas. Contour maps show that kspar content is highest at the vent, but mafic-intermediate enclaves are irregularly distributed. Fe-Ti oxide temperatures for the host trachytic magmas are 915-1080°C, with the coolest temperatures at flow termini. Enclave temperatures are similar, 950-1120°C, with cooler temperatures in more felsic enclaves that are typically located near flow termini, indicating prolonged thermal and chemical interaction with the host magma. Calculated pressures are 2-4 kbar for host magmas, but some mafic crystal clots yield pressures up to 12 kbar, near the Moho at Long Valley. The kspar megacrysts match the composition of phenocrysts in late-erupted Bishop Tuff, suggesting that the megacrysts originated from solidified equivalents of magma remaining after eruption of the Bishop Tuff at 760 Ka. These data suggest a model in which alkali basalts are generated in the uppermost mantle and, through AFC, evolve into trachytes. Repeated basaltic injections keep the trachyte hot and partially melt young granites, resulting in entrainment of kspar megacrysts. The most mafic enclaves in the NW domes match the alkali basalt compositions of the most mafic enclaves in

  11. The Effects of Preeruptive Magma Viscosity on Eruption Styles and Magma Eruption Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiya, A.; Koyaguchi, T.; Kozono, T.; Takeuchi, S.

    2014-12-01

    We have collected data on magma eruption rate, which is one of the most fundamental parameters for a volcanic eruption. There are several compilations on eruption rates, for example, for Plinian eruptions (Carey and Sigurdsson, 1989), basaltic eruptions (Wadge, 1981), lava dome eruptions (Newhall and Melson, 1983), and all combined (Tomiya and Koyaguchi, 1998; Pyle, 2000). However, they did not quantitatively discuss the effects of magma viscosity, which must control eruption rates. Here, we discuss the effects of magma viscosity on eruption rates, by using 'preeruptive magma viscosities', which are important measures of magma eruptibility (Takeuchi, 2011). Preeruptive magma viscosity is the viscosity of magma (melt, dissolved water, and crystals) in the magma chamber at the preeruptive conditions, and can be approximately obtained only by the bulk rock SiO2 and phenocryst content, using an empirical formula (Takeuchi, 2010). We have found some interesting relationships, such as (1) eruption styles and rates are correlated to preeruptive magma viscosity but not correlated to bulk rock composition, and (2) the gap (ratio) in eruption rates between explosive and effusive phases in a series of eruptions is proportional to preeruptive magma viscosity. We also propose, by combining (1) and (2), that (3) the radius (or width) of volcanic conduit is positively correlated with preeruptive magma viscosity. Our data also show that the eruptive magmas are divided into two types. One is the low-viscosity type (basalt ~ phenocryst-poor andesite), characterized by lava flow and sub-Plinian eruptions. The other is the high-viscosity type (phenocryst-rich andesite ~ rhyolite), characterized by lava dome and Plinian eruptions. The boundary is at about 104 Pa s. These two types may be closely linked to the magma generation processes (fractional/batch crystallization vs. extraction from a mushy magma chamber).

  12. A basalt trigger for the 1991 eruptions of Pinatubo volcano?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pallister, J.S.; Hoblitt, R.P.; Reyes, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    THE eruptive products of calc-alkaline volcanos often show evidence for the mixing of basaltic and acid magmas before eruption (see, for example, refs 1, 2). These observations have led to the suggestion3 that the injection of basaltic magma into the base of a magma chamber (or the catastrophic overturn of a stably stratified chamber containing basaltic magma at its base) might trigger an eruption. Here we report evidence for the mixing of basaltic and dacitic magmas shortly before the paroxysmal eruptions of Pinatubo volcano on 15 June 1991. Andesitic scoriae erupted on 12 June contain minerals and glass with disequilibrium compositions, and are considerably more mafic than the dacitic pumices erupted on 15 June. Differences in crystal abundance and glass composition among the pumices may arise from pre-heating of the dacite magma by the underlying basaltic liquid before mixing. Degassing of this basaltic magma may also have contributed to the climatologically important sulphur dioxide emissions that accompanied the Pinatubo eruptions.

  13. A Xenolith-rich, Basaltic Peperite on Earth: Analogue for Other Planets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obenholzner, J. H.

    2002-12-01

    Peperites are typically the product of wet sediment-magma/lava/hot volcaniclastic deposits interaction and are therefore indicative for the existence of frozen/liquefied or fluid water in the history of a planet. Most of the peperites on Earth are found in a paleo-near-surface environment and are exposed to alteration if burial did not protect them (Skilling et al. 2002). Sediments can be incorporated into ascending magma (Obenholzner et al. 2003). These macro- or micro-xenoliths show various degrees of metamorphism. Carbonate and evaporite xenoliths brought to the surface could include fossils or even bacteria, otherwise hidden deeply in the sedimentary record. A xenolith-rich basaltic peperite of Pliocene age is exposed in a quarry at Neuhaus/Kl./Burgenland/Austria. These alkali basalts are related to the time-equivalent volcanism of the W Pannonian Basin/Hungary. Although the peperite sequence is highly altered the primary structures are well preserved. The xenolith spectrum comprises marls, argillitic and other basement rocks showing various degrees of metamorphism. The xenoliths are white to yellow colored, egg-shaped or blocky and typically manteled by the grey basalt in peperite fragments. This encapsulation of xenoliths by the basalt protects the xenoliths against various atmospheric interaction, execpt for Earth where water easily enters the peperite fragments. This sequence could be used as a structural model for similar sequences on planets known for the occurrences of basaltic volcanism and potential water-bearing sediments. The Neuhaus peperite represents a training site for scientists working with remotely operated analyzers to differentiate between xenoliths, the peperite (basalt and sandy sediment) and alteration-related structures. Similar peperites could be encountered on Mars and would be a proof for the existence of water or other fluids in its history, even if the alteration history of peperite sequences would be different from what is known on

  14. Thermal and mechanical constraints on mixing between mafic and silicic magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, R. S. J.; Marshall, L. A.

    1986-09-01

    -veined complexes. When basaltic magma is intermingled with silicic magma, high proportions (typically 50% or greater) of basalt are necessary to enable mixing to occur. Hybrid magmas involving small proportions of basalr magma with large proportions of silicic magma are notably absent from St. Kilda hybrid rocks and other areas. Many mafic xenoliths may represent less evolved basaltic magma which solidified when commingled with a much larger volume of silicic magma.

  15. The mantle and basalt-crust interaction below the Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, C. M.; Crumpler, L. S.; Schmidt, M. E.

    2010-12-01

    The Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF) lies on the Jemez Lineament on the southeastern margin of the Colorado Plateau. The field is centered on the Mt. Taylor composite volcano and includes Mesa Chivato to the NE and Grants Ridge to the WSW. MTVF magmatism spans ~3.8-1.5 Ma (K-Ar, Perry et al., 1990). Magmas are dominantly alkaline with mafic compositions ranging from basanite to hy-basalt and felsic compositions ranging from ne-trachyte to rhyolite. We are investigating the state of the mantle and the spatial and temporal variation in basalt-crustal interaction below the MTVF by examining mantle xenoliths and basalts in the context of new mapping and future Ar-Ar dating. The earliest dated magmatism in the field is a basanite flow south of Mt. Taylor (Perry et al., 1990). Mantle xenolith-bearing alkali basalts and basanites occur on Mesa Chivato (Crumpler, 1980) and in the region of Mt. Taylor, though most basalts are peripheral to the main cone. Xenolith-bearing magmatism persists at least into the early stages of cone-building. Preliminary examination of the mantle xenolith suite suggests it is dominantly lherzolitic but contains likely examples of both melt-depleted (harzburgitic) and melt-enriched (clinopyroxenitic) mantle. There are aphyric and crystal-poor hawaiites, some of which are hy-normative (Perry et al., 1990), on and near Mt. Taylor, but many of the more evolved MTVF basalts show evidence of complex histories. Mt. Taylor basalts higher in the cone-building sequence contain >40% zoned plagioclase pheno- and megacrysts. Other basalts peripheral to Mt. Taylor and at Grants Ridge contain clinopyroxene and plagioclase megacrysts and cumulate-textured xenoliths, suggesting they interacted with lower crustal cumulates. Among the questions we are addressing: What was the chemical and thermal state of the mantle recorded by the basaltic suites and xenoliths and how did it change with time? Are multiple parental basalts (Si-saturated vs. undersaturated

  16. The Mantle and Basalt-Crust Interaction Below the Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, Christian M.; Crumpler, Larry S.; Schmidt, Marick E.

    2010-01-01

    The Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF) lies on the Jemez Lineament on the southeastern margin of the Colorado Plateau. The field is centered on the Mt. Taylor composite volcano and includes Mesa Chivato to the NE and Grants Ridge to the WSW. MTVF magmatism spans approximately 3.8-1.5 Ma (K-Ar). Magmas are dominantly alkaline with mafic compositions ranging from basanite to hy-basalt and felsic compositions ranging from ne-trachyte to rhyolite. We are investigating the state of the mantle and the spatial and temporal variation in basalt-crustal interaction below the MTVF by examining mantle xenoliths and basalts in the context of new mapping and future Ar-Ar dating. The earliest dated magmatism in the field is a basanite flow south of Mt. Taylor. Mantle xenolith-bearing alkali basalts and basanites occur on Mesa Chivato and in the region of Mt. Taylor, though most basalts are peripheral to the main cone. Xenolith-bearing magmatism persists at least into the early stages of conebuilding. Preliminary examination of the mantle xenolith suite suggests it is dominantly lherzolitic but contains likely examples of both melt-depleted (harzburgitic) and melt-enriched (clinopyroxenitic) mantle. There are aphyric and crystal-poor hawaiites, some of which are hy-normative, on and near Mt. Taylor, but many of the more evolved MTVF basalts show evidence of complex histories. Mt. Taylor basalts higher in the cone-building sequence contain >40% zoned plagioclase pheno- and megacrysts. Other basalts peripheral to Mt. Taylor and at Grants Ridge contain clinopyroxene and plagioclase megacrysts and cumulate-textured xenoliths, suggesting they interacted with lower crustal cumulates. Among the questions we are addressing: What was the chemical and thermal state of the mantle recorded by the basaltic suites and xenoliths and how did it change with time? Are multiple parental basalts (Si-saturated vs. undersaturated) represented and, if so, what changes in the mantle or in the tectonic

  17. Replenishment of magma chambers by light inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppert, Herbert E.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.; Whitehead, John A.; Hallworth, Mark A.

    1986-05-01

    Magma chambers, particularly those of basaltic composition, are often replenished by an influx of magma whose density is less than that of the resident magma. This paper describes the fundamental fluid mechanics involved in the replenishment by light inputs. If ρ denotes the uniform density of the resident magma and ρ — Δρ that of the input, the situation is described by the reduced gravity g' = gΔρ/ρ, the volume flux Q, and the viscosities of the resident and input magmas νe and νi, respectively. The (nondimensional) Reynolds numbers, Ree = (g'Q3)1/5/νe and Rei = (g'Q3)1/5/νi and chamber geometry then completely specify the system. For sufficiently low values of the two Reynolds numbers (each less than approximately 10), the input rises as a laminar conduit. For larger values of the Reynolds numbers, the conduit may break down and exhibit either a varicose or a meander instability and entrain some resident magma. At still larger Reynolds numbers, the flow will become quite unsteady and finally turbulent. The values of the Reynolds numbers at which these transitions occur have been documented by a series of experiments with water, glycerine, and corn syrup. If the input rises as a turbulent plume, significant entrainment of the resident magma can take place. The final spatial distribution of the mixed magma depends on the geometry of the chamber. If the chamber is much wider than it is high, the mixed magma forms a compositionally stratified region between the roof and a sharp front above uncontaminated magma. In the other geometrical extreme, the input magma is mixed with almost all of the resident magma. If the density of the resident magma is already stratified, the input plume may penetrate only part way into the chamber, even though its initial density is less than that of the lowest density resident magma. The plume will then intrude horizontally and form a hybrid layer at an intermediate depth. This provides a mechanism for preventing even

  18. Water Content of Lunar Alkali Fedlspar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, R. D.; Simon, J. I.; Wang, J.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Hauri, E. H.

    2016-01-01

    Detection of indigenous hydrogen in a diversity of lunar materials, including volcanic glass, melt inclusions, apatite, and plagioclase suggests water may have played a role in the chemical differentiation of the Moon. Spectroscopic data from the Moon indicate a positive correlation between water and Th. Modeling of lunar magma ocean crystallization predicts a similar chemical differentiation with the highest levels of water in the K- and Th-rich melt residuum of the magma ocean (i.e. urKREEP). Until now, the only sample-based estimates of water content of KREEP-rich magmas come from measurements of OH, F, and Cl in lunar apatites, which suggest a water concentration of < 1 ppm in urKREEP. Using these data, predict that the bulk water content of the magma ocean would have <10 ppm. In contrast, estimate water contents of 320 ppm for the bulk Moon and 1.4 wt % for urKREEP from plagioclase in ferroan anorthosites. Results and interpretation: NanoSIMS data from granitic clasts from Apollo sample 15405,78 show that alkali feldspar, a common mineral in K-enriched rocks, can have approx. 20 ppm of water, which implies magmatic water contents of approx. 1 wt % in the high-silica magmas. This estimate is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that estimated from apatite in similar rocks. However, the Cl and F contents of apatite in chemically similar rocks suggest that these melts also had high Cl/F ratios, which leads to spuriously low water estimates from the apatite. We can only estimate the minimum water content of urKREEP (+ bulk Moon) from our alkali feldspar data because of the unknown amount of degassing that led to the formation of the granites. Assuming a reasonable 10 to 100 times enrichment of water from urKREEP into the granites produces an estimate of 100-1000 ppm of water for the urKREEP reservoir. Using the modeling of and the 100-1000 ppm of water in urKREEP suggests a minimum bulk silicate Moon water content between 2 and 20 ppm. However, hydrogen loss was

  19. Comparative Magma Oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.

    1999-01-01

    The question of whether the Earth ever passed through a magma ocean stage is of considerable interest. Geochemical evidence strongly suggests that the Moon had a magma ocean and the evidence is mounting that the same was true for Mars. Analyses of martian (SNC) meteorites have yielded insights into the differentiation history of Mars, and consequently, it is interesting to compare that planet to the Earth. Three primary features of Mars contrast strongly to those of the Earth: (i) the extremely ancient ages of the martian core, mantle, and crust (about 4.55 b.y.); (ii) the highly depleted nature of the martian mantle; and (iii) the extreme ranges of Nd isotopic compositions that arise within the crust and depleted mantle. The easiest way to explain the ages and diverse isotopic compositions of martian basalts is to postulate that Mars had an early magma ocean. Cumulates of this magma ocean were later remelted to form the SNC meteorite suite and some of these melts assimilated crustal materials enriched in incompatible elements. The REE pattern of the crust assimilated by these SNC magmas was LREE enriched. If this pattern is typical of the crust as a whole, the martian crust is probably similar in composition to melts generated by small degrees of partial melting (about 5%) of a primitive source. Higher degrees of partial melting would cause the crustal LREE pattern to be essentially flat. In the context of a magma ocean model, where large degrees of partial melting presumably prevailed, the crust would have to be dominated by late-stage, LREE-enriched residual liquids. Regardless of the exact physical setting, Nd and W isotopic evidence indicates that martian geochemical reservoirs must have formed early and that they have not been efficiently remixed since. The important point is that in both the Moon and Mars we see evidence of a magma ocean phase and that we recognize it as such. Several lines of theoretical inference point to an early Earth that was also hot

  20. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  1. Magma mixing in a zoned alkalic intrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.G.; Henry, C.D.; Barker, D.S.; Rubin, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    The Marble Canyon stock is unique among the alkalic intrusions of the Trans-Pecos magmatic province in being zoned from a critically silica-undersaturated rim of alkali gabbro (AG) to a silica-oversaturated core of quartz syenite (QS). Hybrid rocks of intermediate chemical and mineralogical compositions occur between the rim and core. Nepheline-syenite dikes occur only within the AG. Silica-rich dikes of quartz trachyte, pegmatite, and aplite cut the AG, QS, and hybrid rocks. Thermodynamic calculations of silica activity in the magmas illustrate the presence of two trends with decreasing temperature: a silica-poor trend from AG to nepheline syenite and a silica-rich trend from hybrid rocks to QS. Least-square modeling of rock and mineral compositions suggests 1) the nepheline syenites were derived by crystal-liquid fractionation from nearly solidified AG at the rim of the stock, 2) AG magma farther from the rim mixed with a small proportion of granitic magma, and 3) the mixture then differentiated to produce the hybrid rocks and QS. Zirconium dioxide inclusions in plagioclase crystals of the hybrid rocks and QS indicate that the AG magma contained some crystals before it mixed with the granitic magma. Two origins for the granitic magma are possible: 1) a late-stage differentiate of a mantle-derived hypersthene-normative magma and 2) melting of crustal material by the AG magma. Recognition of magma mixing might not have been possible if the AG had been hypersthene-normative.

  2. Basaltic cannibalism at Thrihnukagigur volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudak, M. R.; Feineman, M. D.; La Femina, P. C.; Geirsson, H.

    2014-12-01

    Magmatic assimilation of felsic continental crust is a well-documented, relatively common phenomenon. The extent to which basaltic crust is assimilated by magmas, on the other hand, is not well known. Basaltic cannibalism, or the wholesale incorporation of basaltic crustal material into a basaltic magma, is thought to be uncommon because basalt requires more energy than higher silica rocks to melt. Basaltic materials that are unconsolidated, poorly crystalline, or palagonitized may be more easily ingested than fully crystallized massive basalt, thus allowing basaltic cannibalism to occur. Thrihnukagigur volcano, SW Iceland, offers a unique exposure of a buried cinder cone within its evacuated conduit, 100 m below the main vent. The unconsolidated tephra is cross-cut by a NNE-trending dike, which runs across the ceiling of this cave to a vent that produced lava and tephra during the ~4 Ka fissure eruption. Preliminary petrographic and laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses indicate that there are two populations of plagioclase present in the system - Population One is stubby (aspect ratio < 1.7) with disequilibrium textures and low Ba/Sr ratios while Population Two is elongate (aspect ratio > 2.1), subhedral to euhedral, and has much higher Ba/Sr ratios. Population One crystals are observed in the cinder cone, dike, and surface lavas, whereas Population Two crystals are observed only in the dike and surface lavas. This suggests that a magma crystallizing a single elongate population of plagioclase intruded the cinder cone and rapidly assimilated the tephra, incorporating the stubbier population of phenocrysts. This conceptual model for basaltic cannibalism is supported by field observations of large-scale erosion upward into the tephra, which is coated by magma flow-back indicating that magma was involved in the thermal etching. While the unique exposure at Thrihnukagigur makes it an exceptional place to investigate basaltic

  3. Chemical and isotopic constraints on the petrogenesis of the large mare basalt clast in breccia 15459

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L.; Lindstrom, M.; Bansal, B.; Mittlefehldt, D.; Shih, C.-Y.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented that demonstrate that the large mare basalt clast in Apollo 15 breccia 15459 may represent one or more independent magma types. The complex nonequilibrium pyroxene and plagioclase compositions and relatively abundant mesostasis suggest that the 15459 clast is not a slowly cooled crystal cumulate. The addition of about 40 percent olivine to an olivine-normative basalt parental magma is found to be necessary to explain the high MgO abundances of picritic basalts by the accumulation of olivine in the magma. The present clast has a slightly younger age and a slightly higher Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio than most Apollo 15 basalts.

  4. The basalts of Mare Frigoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, G. Y.; Jaiswal, B.; Hawke, B. R.; Öhman, T.; Giguere, T. A.; Johnson, K.

    2015-10-01

    This paper discusses the methodology and results of a detailed investigation of Mare Frigoris using remote sensing data from Clementine, Lunar Prospector, and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, with the objective of mapping and characterizing the compositions and eruptive history of its volcanic units. With the exception of two units in the west, Mare Frigoris and Lacus Mortis are filled with basalts having low-TiO2 to very low TiO2, low-FeO, and high-Al2O3 abundances. These compositions indicate that most of the basalts in Frigoris are high-Al basalts—a potentially undersampled, yet important group in the lunar sample collection for its clues about the heterogeneity of the lunar mantle. Thorium abundances of most of the mare basalts in Frigoris are also low, although much of the mare surface appears elevated due to contamination from impact gardening with the surrounding high-Th Imbrium ejecta. There are, however, a few regional thorium anomalies that are coincident with cryptomare units in the east, the two youngest mare basalt units, and some of the scattered pyroclastic deposits and volcanic constructs. In addition, Mare Frigoris lies directly over the northern extent of the major conduit for a magma plumbing system that fed many of the basalts that filled Oceanus Procellarum, as interpreted by Andrews-Hanna et al. (2014) using data from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory mission. The relationship between this deep-reaching magma conduit and the largest extent of high-Al basalts on the Moon makes Mare Frigoris an intriguing location for further investigation of the lunar mantle.

  5. Chemistry and fluxes of magmatic gases powering the explosive trachyandesitic phase of Eyjafjallajokull 2010 eruption: constraints on degassing magma volumes and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, P.; Burton, M. R.; Oskarsson, N.; Michel, A.; Polacci, M.

    2010-12-01

    The 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption developed in two distinct phases, with initial lateral effusion of alkali basalt since March 20, followed by highly explosive extrusion of a quite homogenous and crystal-poor trachyandesitic magma [1] through the central volcano ice cap between April 14 and May 24. As usual, magmatic volatiles played a key role in the eruption dynamics. Here we report on the chemical composition and the mass output of magmatic gases powering intense explosive activity during the second eruptive phase in early May. On May 8 we could measure the composition of magmatic gases directly issuing from the eruptive vents, by using OP-FTIR spectroscopy from the crater rim (~900 m distance) and molten lava blocks as IR radiation source. FTIR spectra reveal a variable mixture between two gas components equally rich in H2O (91.3 mol%) and CO2 (8%) but differing in their SO2/HCl ratio (up to 3.5 for the main one and 0.5 for the Cl-richer second one). Analysis of S-Cl-F in ash leachates and in ash and lava bomb samples (pyrohydrolysis) show that this second component was generated by greater chlorine loss during extensive magma fragmentation into fine ash. S/Cl and Cl/F ratios from both these analyses and solar occultation FTIR plume sensing indicate a modest fluorine content in emitted gas and its preferential adsorption onto solid particles during plume transport. DOAS traverses under the volcanic plume (4-6 km height), though hampered by dense ash load, gave most reliable SO2 fluxes of 4500-6600 tons d-1 on May 9, consistent with OMI satellite data [2]. These imply the daily co-emission of 7.2x105 tons of H2O, 1.5x105 tons of CO2, 2000 tons of HCl and ≤200 tons of HF. Eyjafjallajökull thus produced more hydrous and relatively CO2-poorer gas, in much greater quantities, during that stage than during its first basaltic phase [3]. Linear variations of dissolved S with TiO2/FeO ratio in nearby Katla alkali magmas [4] suggest possible pre-eruptive S contents

  6. Parsing Aleutian Arc Magma Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    The first-order subdivision of Aleutian arc magma compositions is based on SiO2, and the second-order subdivision is usually based on the change of FeOt/MgO as a function of SiO2, resulting in the additional twofold subdivision into (TH) and calcalkaline (CA) magmas. However, additional robust compositional variations exist. The two most important of these are (1) variation of the calcium number [Ca#; Ca/(Na+Ca)] as a function of SiO2, and (2) the Rate of Incompatible Trace-element Enrichment (RITE) at individual volcanic centers. Additionally, the data show that the low FeOt/MgO of CA andesite and dacite is more controlled by MgO excess than FeOt depletion. The Ca# of andesites and dacites is strongly bimodal. The low-Ca# group is "calc-alkalic", while the high-Ca# group is "calcic", using Peacock (1931) criteria. A continuum of Ca#s exists, but lavas intermediate between high-Ca# and low-Ca# are much less abundant. Ca#s merge below about 55% SiO2, and have a simple normal distribution. RITE, with rare but important exceptions, is generally constant at the temporal and spatial scale of a single volcano. Among high-RITE magmas LILE, LREE, HFSE, and Th increase ~3.5-fold, and HREE increase ~2.5-fold from basalt or basaltic-andesite through andesite to dacite. There is no strong indication that RITE is silica-dependant. High-RITE magmas develop a strong negative Eu anomaly, and are qualitatively compatible with an origin primarily involving fractionation of plagioclase-dominated mineral assemblages. Low-RITE magmas, in contrast, have nearly invariant REE and HFSE, and LILE and Th increase merely 1.5-fold over the same silica range. Low-RITE magmas are not compatible with fractionation of a plagioclase-dominant mineral assemblage. Alternative qualitatively plausible explanations (needing rigorous evaluation) include fractionation of an ultramafic mineral assemblage (Alaskan-type mafic-ultramafic bodies may be a model; see USGS Prof Paper 1564); that low-RITE basaltic

  7. Magma chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Bruce D.

    1989-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical investigations of terrestrial magma chambers (MCs) are reviewed. Consideration is given to the evidence for MCs with active convection and crystal sorting, problems of direct MC detection, theoretical models of MC cooling, the rheology and dynamics of solidification fronts, crystal capture and differentiation, convection with solidification, MC wall flows, and MC roof melting. Diagrams, graphs, and a list of problems requiring further research are provided.

  8. Isotopic characteristics of mantle sources for Quaternary continental alkaline magmas in the northern Canadian Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, Jean; Ludden, John; Francis, Don

    1994-12-01

    Three mantle compositions are identified as potential source end members for Quaternary to recent alkaline volcanic rocks from Fort Selkirk, Llangorse-Hirschfeld, Alligator Lake and Mt. Edziza in the northern Canadian Cordillera. These are: (1) an amphibole-rich source, characterized by unradiogenic Sr, Nd and Pb, from which the olivine nephelinite lavas formed, (2) the continental lithospheric mantle which is characterised by high Pb-207/Pb-204 and appears to be involved in the formation of the alkali olivine basalts of Fort Selkirk, and (3) a mantle with radiogenic Pb and unradiogenic Sr (HIMU-type) represented by lavas from Mt. Edziza. The Mt. Edziza volcano is the largest of the volcanic centres in the region, and is considered to reflect melting of sublithospheric mantle of HIMU composition below central British Columbia. Incipient melting of amphibole-veined subcontinental mantle lithosphere resulted from plume upwelling and/or transtensional pressure release and produced the small nephelinite to olivine basalt centres of the northern Cordilleran Province. The source of the nephelinite magmas is slightly more radiogenic than present-day Pacific Mid-Ocean ridge basalts (MORB), and is best represented by the most depleted component of the Aleutian magmas. This suggests enrichment of the subcontinental lithosphere in the northern Cordillera by melts of this isotopic composition during Cretaceous subduction. The Alligator Lake complex is anomalous and charaterized by the most radiogenic lavas. Despite the presence of crustal xenoliths there is no clear geochemical signature for crustal contamination and, in contrast to the other volcanic centers which were erupted through the Intermontain Belt, the lavas of this center may have been derived from a highly radiogenic lithospheric mantle beneath the Coast Plutonic complex.

  9. Petrogenesis of Mafic Volcanic Rocks from the Pribilof Islands, Alaska, by Melting of Metasomatically Enriched Depleted Lithosphere, Crystallization Differentiation, and Magma Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeley, T. C.; Chang, J. M.; Deraps, M. R.

    2008-12-01

    The Pribilof Islands, Alaska, are located in the Bering Sea in a continental intraplate setting. In this study we examine the petrology and geochemistry of mafic volcanic rocks from St. Paul (0.54 to 0.003 Ma) and St. George (2.9 to 1.4 Ma) Islands, the two largest Pribilof Islands. Together these islands offer an opportunity to simultaneously investigate an active and extinct Bering Sea basaltic volcanic field in a setting where features such as lithospheric thickness and composition, distance from the Aleutian arc front, and other tectonic factors are virtually constant. Rocks from St. George can be divided into three groups. Group 1 contains high MgO, low SiO2 rocks that are primarily basanites. Group 2 contains high MgO, high SiO2 rocks that predominantly alkali basalts. Group 3 contains intermediate to low MgO rocks that include alkali basalts and trachybasalts with high modal plagioclase contents. Major and trace element compositions indicate that Groups 1 and 2 formed by partial melting (2-4%) of amphibole-bearing, garnet peridotite. Group 1 rocks were produced from the most hydrous parts of the mantle, as they show the strongest signature of amphibole in their source. Rocks from St. Paul inlcude alkali basalts and basanites with MgO contents from 4.2 to 14.4 wt% at relatively constant SiO2 contents (43.1 to 47.3 wt%). The most primitive St. Paul rocks are interpreted as mixtures between magmas with compositions similar to Groups 1 and 2 from St. George Island. These magmas subsequently fractionated olivine, clinopyroxene, and spinel to form more evolved, plagioclase-rich rocks. Plagioclase-rich Group 3 rocks from St. George can be modeled as mixtures between an evolved St. Paul end-member and a fractionated Group 2 end-member from St. George. Mantle potential temperatures estimated for primitive basanites and alkali basalts average 1370°C and are similar to those calculated for mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB). Similarly, 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd values for

  10. Basaltic maar-diatreme volcanism in the Lower Carboniferous of the Limerick Basin (SW Ireland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, H. A. L.; Gernon, T. M.; Roberts, S.; Hewson, C.

    2015-05-01

    Lead-zinc exploration drilling within the Limerick Basin (SW Ireland) has revealed the deep internal architecture and extra-crater deposits of five alkali-basaltic maar-diatremes. These were emplaced as part of a regional north-east south-west tectonomagmatic trend during the Lower Carboniferous Period. Field relationships and textural observations suggest that the diatremes erupted into a shallow submarine environment. Limerick trace element data indicates a genetic relationship between the diatremes and extra-crater successions of the Knockroe Formation, which records multiple diatreme filling and emptying cycles. Deposition was controlled largely by bathymetry defined by the surrounding Waulsortian carbonate mounds. An initial non-diatreme forming eruption stage occurred at the water-sediment interface, with magma-water interaction prevented by high magma ascent rates. This was followed by seawater incursion and the onset of phreatomagmatic activity. Magma-water interaction generated poorly vesicular blocky clasts, although the co-occurrence of plastically deformed and highly vesicular clasts indicate that phreatomagmatic and magmatic processes were not mutually exclusive. At a later stage, the diatreme filled with a slurry of juvenile lapilli and country rock lithic clasts, homogenised by the action of debris jets. The resulting extra-crater deposits eventually emerged above sea level, so that water ingress significantly declined, and late-stage magmatic processes became dominant. These deposits, largely confined to the deep vents, incorporate high concentrations of partially sintered globular and large `raggy' lapilli showing evidence for heat retention. Our study provides new insights into the dynamics and evolution of basaltic diatremes erupting into a shallow water (20-120 m) submarine environment.

  11. Magma mixing and crust-mantle interaction in Southeast China during the Early Cretaceous: Evidence from the Furongshan granite porphyry and mafic microgranular enclaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-Zuo; Chen, Pei-Rong; Sun, Li-Qiang; Ling, Hong-Fei; Zhao, You-Dong; Lan, Hong-Feng

    2015-11-01

    The petrogenesis and tectonic setting of Early Cretaceous granitoids and their enclaves emplaced in the Gan-Hang Tectonic Belt are still controversial. Here, we investigate mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs) and their host granite porphyry from the Furongshan caldera to elucidate magma mixing and crust-mantle interaction in the Gan-Hang Tectonic Belt. The Furongshan granite porphyry is characterized by enrichments of alkalis, REE, Zr + Nb + Ce + Y contents (averaging 377 ppm), and high zircon saturation temperatures (793-843 °C), suggesting A-type granitic affinities. The granite porphyry can be further classified as an A2 subtype granite based on high Y/Nb ratios (averaging 1.37). Zircon cores from the Furongshan MMEs exhibit the same εHf(t) values (-10.0 to -3.0) and U-Pb ages (127-129 Ma) as zircons form the granite porphyry, implying that they were captured from the felsic magma as xenocrysts. Petrological and mineralogical characteristics (such as needle-like apatite and disequilibrium feldspar xenocryst) suggest that the Furongshan MMEs and host granite porphyry were formed by magma mixing rather than restite, xenolith or fractional crystallization of mafic magma. The Furongshan granite porphyry samples have initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7073-0.7099 and εNd(t) values of -3.7 to -3.3, which are similar to those of the MMEs (0.7068-0.7077 and -3.2 to -2.9, respectively). Similar trace element and Sr-Nd isotopic compositions imply a high degree of geochemical equilibration between the granite porphyry and its MMEs, and hence intense magma mixing, although some element contents and zircons εHf(t) values differ due to high zircon closure temperature and rapid cooling of commingled magmas. A binary mixing model based on Sr-Nd isotopes indicates a contribution of ∼50% basaltic melt to the hybrid magma of the Furongshan granite porphyry. A compilation of Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic data of the granitoids and MMEs from the Xiangshan, Furongshan and Muchen areas suggest

  12. Magma oceanography. I - Thermal evolution. [of lunar surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S. C.; Longhi, J.

    1977-01-01

    Fractional crystallization and flotation of cumulate plagioclase in a cooling 'magma ocean' provides the simplest explanation for early emplacement of a thick feldspar-rich lunar crust. The complementary mafic cumulates resulting from the differentiation of such a magma ocean have been identified as the ultimate source of mare basalt liquids on the basis or rare-earth abundance patterns and experimental petrology studies. A study is conducted concerning the thermal evolution of the early differentiation processes. A range of models of increasing sophistication are considered. The models developed contain the essence of the energetics and the time scale for magma ocean differentiation. Attention is given to constraints on a magma ocean, modeling procedures, single-component magma oceans, fractionating magma oceans, and evolving magma oceans.

  13. Petrologic models of 15388, a unique Apollo 15 mare basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, S. S.; Dasch, E. J.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1993-01-01

    Mare basalt 15388, a feldspathic microgabbro from the Apennine Front, is chemically and petrographically distinct from Apollo 15 picritic, olivine-normative (ON), and quartz-normative basalts. The evolved chemistry, coarse texture, lack of olivine, and occurrence of cristobalite in 15388 argue for derivation by a late-stage magmatic process that is significantly removed from parental magma. It either crystallized from a magma evolved from the more mafic Apollo 15 basalts, or it crystallized from a currently unrepresented magma. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic systematics yield isochron ages of 3.391 plus or minus 0.036 and 3.42 plus or minus 0.07 Ga, respectively, and epsilon(sub Nd) = 8.6 plus or minus 2.4, which is relatively high for Apollo 15 mare basalts. In contrast to chemical patterns of average Apollo 15 ON basalts and Apollo 15 picritic basalt, 15388 has a strongly positive LREE slope, high Ti, shallower HREE slope and a slightly positive Eu anomaly. These features argue against 15388 evolution by simple olivine fractionation of a parental ON or picritic basalt magma, although olivine is a dominant liquidus phase in both potential parents.

  14. Remobilization of granitoid rocks through mafic recharge: evidence from basalt-trachyte mingling and hybridization in the Manori-Gorai area, Mumbai, Deccan Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellmer, Georg F.; Sheth, Hetu C.; Iizuka, Yoshiyuki; Lai, Yi-Jen

    2012-01-01

    Products of contrasting mingled magmas are widespread in volcanoes and intrusions. Subvolcanic trachyte intrusions hosting mafic enclaves crop out in the Manori-Gorai area of Mumbai in the Deccan Traps. The petrogenetic processes that produced these rocks are investigated here with field data, petrography, mineral chemistry, and whole rock major, trace, and Pb isotope chemistry. Local hybridization has occurred and has produced intermediate rocks such as a trachyandesitic dyke. Feldspar crystals have complex textures and an unusually wide range in chemical composition. Crystals from the trachytes cover the alkali feldspar compositional range and include plagioclase crystals with anorthite contents up to An47. Crystals from the mafic enclaves are dominated by plagioclase An72-90, but contain inclusions of orthoclase and other feldspars covering the entire compositional range sampled in the trachytes. Feldspars from the hybridized trachyandesitic dyke yield mineral compositions of An80-86, An47-54, Ab94-99, Or45-60, and Or96-98, all sampled within individual phenocrysts. We show that these compositional features are consistent with partial melting of granitoid rocks by influx of mafic magmas, followed by magma mixing and hybridization of the partial melts with the mafic melts, which broadly explains the observed bulk rock major and trace element variations. However, heterogeneities in Pb isotopic compositions of trachytes are observed on the scale of individual outcrops, likely reflecting initial variations in the isotopic compositions of the involved source rocks. The combined data point to one or more shallow-level trachytic magma chambers disturbed by multiple injections of trachytic, porphyritic alkali basaltic, and variably hybridized magmas.

  15. Mobility and fluxes of major, minor and trace metals during basalt weathering and groundwater transport at Mt. Etna volcano (Sicily)

    SciTech Connect

    Aiuppa, A.; Allard, P.; D'Alessandro, W.; Michel, A.; Parello, F.; Treuil, M.; Valenza, M.

    2000-06-01

    The concentrations and fluxes of major, minor and trace metals were determined in 53 samples of groundwaters from around Mt. Etna, in order to evaluate the conditions and extent of alkali basalt weathering by waters enriched in magma-derived CO{sub 2} and the contribution of aqueous transport to the overall metal discharge of the volcano. The authors show that gaseous input of magmatic volatile metals into the Etnean aquifer is small or negligible, being limited by cooling of the rising fluids. Basalt leaching by weakly acidic, CO{sub 2}-charged water is the overwhelming source of metals and appears to be more extensive in two sectors of the S-SW (Paterno) and E (Zafferana) volcano flanks, where out flowing groundwaters are the richest in metals and bicarbonate of magmatic origin. Thermodynamic modeling of the results allows evaluation of the relative mobility and chemical speciation of various elements during their partitioning between solid and liquid phases through the weathering process. At Mt. Etna, poorly mobile elements (Al, Th, Fe) are preferentially retained in the solid residue of weathering, while alkalis, alkaline earth and oxo-anion-forming elements (As, Se, Sb, Mo) are more mobile and released to the aqueous system. Transition metals display an intermediate behavior and are strongly dependent on either the redox conditions (Mn, Cr, V) or solid surface-related processes (V, Zn, Cu).

  16. Lunar ferroan anorthosites and mare basalt sources - The mixed connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, Graham

    1991-11-01

    Global overturn of a hot, gravitationally unstable lunar mantle immediately following the solidification of a magma ocean explains several characteristics of lunar petrology. Lunar mare basalt sources are inferred to be depleted in europium and alumina. These depletions are consensually attributed to complementary plagioclase floating from a magma ocean. However, in contrast to the mare basalt source parent magma, the ferroan anorthosite parent magma was more evolved by virtue of its lower Mg/Fe ratio and Ni abundances, although less evolved in its poverty of clinopyroxene constituents, flat rare earth pattern, and lower incompatible element abundances. The europium anomaly in mare sources is inferred to be present at 400 km depth, too deep to have been directly influenced by plagioclase crystallization. Massive overturning of the post-magma ocean mantle would have carried down clinopyroxene, ilmenite, and phases containing fractionated rare earths, europium anomalies, and some heat-producing radionuclides.

  17. Lunar ferroan anorthosites and mare basalt sources - The mixed connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Graham

    1991-01-01

    Global overturn of a hot, gravitationally unstable lunar mantle immediately following the solidification of a magma ocean explains several characteristics of lunar petrology. Lunar mare basalt sources are inferred to be depleted in europium and alumina. These depletions are consensually attributed to complementary plagioclase floating from a magma ocean. However, in contrast to the mare basalt source parent magma, the ferroan anorthosite parent magma was more evolved by virtue of its lower Mg/Fe ratio and Ni abundances, although less evolved in its poverty of clinopyroxene constituents, flat rare earth pattern, and lower incompatible element abundances. The europium anomaly in mare sources is inferred to be present at 400 km depth, too deep to have been directly influenced by plagioclase crystallization. Massive overturning of the post-magma ocean mantle would have carried down clinopyroxene, ilmenite, and phases containing fractionated rare earths, europium anomalies, and some heat-producing radionuclides.

  18. Making rhyolite in a basalt crucible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, John

    2016-04-01

    Iceland has long attracted the attention of those concerned with the origin of rhyolitic magmas and indeed of granitic continental crust, because it presents no alternative for such magmas other than deriving them from a basaltic source. Hydrothermally altered basalt has been identified as the progenitor. The fact that rhyolite erupts as pure liquid requires a process of melt-crustal separation that is highly efficient despite the high viscosity of rhyolite melt. Volcanoes in Iceland are foci of basaltic magma injection along the divergent plate boundary. Repeated injection produces remelting, digestion, and sometimes expulsion or lateral withdrawal of material resulting in a caldera, a "crucible" holding down-dropped and interlayered lava flows, tephras, and injected sills. Once melting of this charge begins, a great deal of heat is absorbed in the phase change. Just 1% change in crystallinity per degree gives a melt-present body an effective heat capacity >5 times the subsolidus case. Temperature is thus buffered at the solidus and melt composition at rhyolite. Basalt inputs are episodic ("fires") so likely the resulting generation of rhyolite by melting is too. If frequent enough to offset cooling between events, rhyolite melt extractions will accumulate as a rhyolite magma reservoir rather than as discrete crystallized sills. Evidently, such magma bodies can survive multiple firings without themselves erupting, as the 1875 eruption of Askja Caldera of 0.3 km3 of rhyolite equilibrated at 2-km depth without previous leakage over a ten-millennium period and the surprise discovery of rhyolite magma at 2-km depth in Krafla suggest. Water is required for melting; otherwise melting cannot begin at a temperature lower than that of the heat source. Because the solubility of water in melt is pressure-dependent and almost zero at surface pressure, there must be a minimum depth at which basalt-induced melting can occur and a rhyolite reservoir sustained. In practice, the

  19. Lu-Hf constraints on the evolution of lunar basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimaki, H.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that a cumulate-remelting model best explains the recently acquired data on the Lu-Hf systematics of lunar mare basalts. The model is constructed using Lu and Hf concentration data and is strengthened by Hf isotopic evidence of Unruh et al. (1984). It is shown that the similarity in MgO/FeO ratios and Cr2O3 content in high-Ti and low-Ti basalts are not important constraints on lunar basalt petrogenesis. The model demonstrates that even the very low Ti or green glass samples are remelting products of a cumulate formed after at least 80-90 percent of the lunar magma ocean had solidified. In the model, all the mare basalts and green glasses were derived from 100-150 km depth in the lunar mantle. The Lu-Hf systematics of KREEP basalts clearly indicate that they would be the final residual liquid of the lunar magma ocean.

  20. Oxidized sulfur-rich mafic magma at Mount Pinatubo, Philippines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    de Hoog, J.C.M.; Hattori, K.H.; Hoblitt, R.P.

    2004-01-01

    Basaltic fragments enclosed in andesitic dome lavas and pyroclastic flows erupted during the early stages of the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo, Philippines, contain amphiboles that crystallized during the injection of mafic magma into a dacitic magma body. The amphiboles contain abundant melt inclusions, which recorded the mixing of andesitic melt in the mafic magma and rhyolitic melt in the dacitic magma. The least evolved melt inclusions have high sulfur contents (up to 1,700 ppm) mostly as SO42, which suggests an oxidized state of the magma (NNO + 1.4). The intrinsically oxidized nature of the mafic magma is confirmed by spinel-olivine oxygen barometry. The value is comparable to that of the dacitic magma (NNO + 1.6). Hence, models invoking mixing as a means of releasing sulfur from the melt are not applicable to Pinatubo. Instead, the oxidized state of the dacitic magma likely reflects that of parental mafic magma and the source region in the sub-arc mantle. Our results fit a model in which long-lived SO2 discharge from underplated mafic magma accumulated in the overlying dacitic magma and immiscible aqueous fluids. The fluids were the most likely source of sulfur that was released into the atmosphere during the cataclysmic eruption. The concurrence of highly oxidized basaltic magma and disproportionate sulfur output during the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption suggests that oxidized mafic melt is an efficient medium for transferring sulfur from the mantle to shallow crustal levels and the atmosphere. As it can carry large amounts of sulfur, effectively scavenge sulfides from the source mantle and discharge SO2 during ascent, oxidized mafic magma forms arc volcanoes with high sulfur fluxes, and potentially contributes to the formation of metallic sulfide deposits. ?? Springer-Verlag 2003.

  1. Ilchulbong tuff cone, Jeju Island, Korea, revisited: A compound monogenetic volcano involving multiple magma batches, shifting vents, and discrete eruptive phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Y.; Brenna, M.; Smith, I. E.; Nemeth, K.; White, J. D.; Murtagh, R.; Jeon, Y.; Kwon, C.; Cronin, S. J.

    2010-12-01

    Ilchulbong (Sunrise Peak) tuff cone is a UNESCO World Heritage site that owes its scientific importance to the outstanding coastal exposures that surround it. It is also one of the classic sites that provided the sedimentary evidence for the primary pyroclastic processes that occur during phreatomagmatic basaltic eruptions. It has been long considered, based on the cone morphology, that this classic cone was produced via eruption from a single vent site. Reanalysis of the detailed sedimentary sequence has now revealed that two subtle paraconformities occur in this deposition sequence, one representing a significant time break of perhaps days to weeks or months, during which erosion and compaction of the lower cone occurred, the conduit cooled and solidified and a subsequent resumption of eruption took place in a new vent location. Detailed geochemical study of the juvenile clasts through this cone reveals that three separate alkali basaltic magma batches were erupted, the first and third erupted may be genetically related, with the latter showing evidence for longer periods of shallow-level fractionation. The second magma batch erupted was generated in a different mantle source area. Reconstructing the eruption sequence, the lower Ilchulbong cone was formed by eruption of magma 1. Cessation of eruption was accompanied by erosion to generate a volcano-wide unconformity, associated with reworked deposits in the lower cone flanks. The eruption resumed with magma 2 that, due to the cooled earlier conduit, was forced to erupt in a new site to the west of the initial vent. This formed the middle cone sequence over the initially formed structure. The third magma batch erupted with little or no interval after magma 2 from the same vent location, associated with cone instability and slumping, and making up the deposits of the upper cone. These results demonstrate how critical the examination for sedimentary evidence for time breaks in such eruption sequences is for

  2. Magma mixing enhanced by bubble ascent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmaier, S.; Morgavi, D.; Perugini, D.; De Campos, C. P.; Hess, K.; Lavallee, Y.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the processes that affect the rate of liquid state homogenization provides fundamental clues on the otherwise inaccessible subsurface dynamics of magmatic plumbing systems. Compositional heterogeneities detected in the matrix of magmatic rocks represent the arrested state of a chemical equilibration. Magmatic homogenization has been divided into a) the mechanical interaction of magma batches (mingling) and b) the diffusive equilibration of compositional gradients, where diffusive equilibration is exponentially enhanced by progressive mechanical interaction [1]. The mechanical interaction between two distinct batches of magma has commonly been attributed to shear and folding movements between two liquids of distinct viscosities. A mode of mechanical interaction scarcely invoked is the advection of mafic material into a felsic one through bubble motion. Yet, experiments with analogue materials demonstrated that bubble ascent has the potential to enhance the fluid mechanical component of magma mixing [2]. Here, we present preliminary results from bubble-advection experiments. For the first time, experiments of this kind were performed using natural materials at magmatic temperatures. Cylinders of Snake River Plain (SRP) basalt were drilled with a cavity of defined volume and placed underneath cylinders of SRP rhyolite. Upon melting, the gas pocket, or bubble trapped within the cavity, rose into the rhyolite, so entraining a layer of basalt. Successive iterations of the same experiment at progressive intervals ensured a time series of magmatic interaction caused by bubble segregation. Variations in initial bubble size allowed the tracking of bubble volume to advected material ratio at defined viscosity contrast. The resulting plume-like structures that the advected basalt formed within the rhyolite were characterized by microCT and subsequent high-resolution EMP analyses. The mass of advected material per bubble correlated positively with bubble size. The

  3. Megacrystic Clinopyroxene Basalts Sample A Deep Crustal Underplate To The Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. E.; Schrader, C. M.; Crumpler, L. S.; Wolff, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The alkaline and compositionally diverse (basanite to high-Si rhyolite) Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF), New Mexico comprises 4 regions that cover ~75 x 40 km2: (1) Mount Taylor, a large composite volcano and a surrounding field of basaltic vents; (2) Grants Ridge, constructed of topaz rhyolitic ignimbrite and coulees; (3) Mesa Chivato, a plateau of alkali basalts and mugearitic to trachytic domes; and (4) the Rio Puero basaltic necks. Distributed throughout its history (~3.6 to 1.26 Ma; Crumpler and Goff, 2012) and area (excepting Rio Puerco Necks) is a texturally distinct family of differentiated basalts (Mg# 43.2-53.4). These basalts contain resorbed and moth-eaten megacrysts (up to 2 cm) of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and olivine ±Ti-magnetite ±ilmenite ±rare orthopyroxene. Some megacrystic lava flows have gabbroic cumulate inclusions with mineral compositions similar to the megacrysts, suggesting a common origin. For instance, gabbroic and megacrystic clinopyroxenes form linear positive arrays in TiO2 (0.2-2.3 wt%) with respect to Al2O3 (0.7-9.3 wt%). The lowest Al clinopyroxenes are found in a gabbroic inclusion and are associated with partially melted intercumulus orthopyroxene. Megacrystic and gabbroic plagioclase (An 41-80) in 4 representative thin sections were analyzed for 87Sr/86Sr by Laser Ablation ICP-MS. 87Sr/86Sr values for the suite range from 0.7036 to 0.7047. The low 87Sr/86Sr plagioclases (0.7036 to 0.7037) are associated with high Ti-Al clinopyroxenes. Likewise, the higher 87Sr/86Sr plagioclases (0.7043 to 0.7047) are associated with the low-Al clinopyroxenes. Taken together, these megacrysts track the differentiation of an intrusive body (or related bodies) from alkaline to Si-saturated conditions by fractional crystallization and crustal assimilation. The intrusive body likely underplates portions of the MTVF that have generated silicic magmas (Mount Taylor, Grants Ridge, Mesa Chivato). Although disequilibrium is implied by resorbed

  4. Characterization of mesostasis regions in lunar basalts: Understanding late-stage melt evolution and its influence on apatite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potts, Nicola J.; TartèSe, Romain; Anand, Mahesh; Westrenen, Wim; Griffiths, Alexandra A.; Barrett, Thomas J.; Franchi, Ian A.

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies geared toward understanding the volatile abundances of the lunar interior have focused on the volatile-bearing accessory mineral apatite. Translating measurements of volatile abundances in lunar apatite into the volatile inventory of the silicate melts from which they crystallized, and ultimately of the mantle source regions of lunar magmas, however, has proved more difficult than initially thought. In this contribution, we report a detailed characterization of mesostasis regions in four Apollo mare basalts (10044, 12064, 15058, and 70035) in order to ascertain the compositions of the melts from which apatite crystallized. The texture, modal mineralogy, and reconstructed bulk composition of these mesostasis regions vary greatly within and between samples. There is no clear relationship between bulk-rock basaltic composition and that of bulk-mesostasis regions, indicating that bulk-rock composition may have little influence on mesostasis compositions. The development of individual melt pockets, combined with the occurrence of silicate liquid immiscibility, exerts greater control on the composition and texture of mesostasis regions. In general, the reconstructed late-stage lunar melts have roughly andesitic to dacitic compositions with low alkali contents, displaying much higher SiO2 abundances than the bulk compositions of their host magmatic rocks. Relevant partition coefficients for apatite-melt volatile partitioning under lunar conditions should, therefore, be derived from experiments conducted using intermediate compositions instead of compositions representing mare basalts.

  5. Characterization of mesostasis regions in lunar basalts: Understanding late-stage melt evolution and its influence on apatite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potts, Nicola J.; TartèSe, Romain; Anand, Mahesh; Westrenen, Wim; Griffiths, Alexandra A.; Barrett, Thomas J.; Franchi, Ian A.

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies geared toward understanding the volatile abundances of the lunar interior have focused on the volatile-bearing accessory mineral apatite. Translating measurements of volatile abundances in lunar apatite into the volatile inventory of the silicate melts from which they crystallized, and ultimately of the mantle source regions of lunar magmas, however, has proved more difficult than initially thought. In this contribution, we report a detailed characterization of mesostasis regions in four Apollo mare basalts (10044, 12064, 15058, and 70035) in order to ascertain the compositions of the melts from which apatite crystallized. The texture, modal mineralogy, and reconstructed bulk composition of these mesostasis regions vary greatly within and between samples. There is no clear relationship between bulk-rock basaltic composition and that of bulk-mesostasis regions, indicating that bulk-rock composition may have little influence on mesostasis compositions. The development of individual melt pockets, combined with the occurrence of silicate liquid immiscibility, exerts greater control on the composition and texture of mesostasis regions. In general, the reconstructed late-stage lunar melts have roughly andesitic to dacitic compositions with low alkali contents, displaying much higher SiO2 abundances than the bulk compositions of their host magmatic rocks. Relevant partition coefficients for apatite-melt volatile partitioning under lunar conditions should, therefore, be derived from experiments conducted using intermediate compositions instead of compositions representing mare basalts.

  6. Bubble Growth in Lunar Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Although Moon is usually said to be volatile-"free", lunar basalts are often vesicular with mm-size bubbles. The vesicular nature of the lunar basalts suggests that they contained some initial gas concentration. A recent publication estimated volatile concentrations in lunar basalts (Saal et al. 2008). This report investigates bubble growth on Moon and compares with that on Earth. Under conditions relevant to lunar basalts, bubble growth in a finite melt shell (i.e., growth of multiple regularly-spaced bubbles) is calculated following Proussevitch and Sahagian (1998) and Liu and Zhang (2000). Initial H2O content of 700 ppm (Saal et al. 2008) or lower is used and the effect of other volatiles (such as carbon dioxide, halogens, and sulfur) is ignored. H2O solubility at low pressures (Liu et al. 2005), concentration-dependent diffusivity in basalt (Zhang and Stolper 1991), and lunar basalt viscosity (Murase and McBirney 1970) are used. Because lunar atmospheric pressure is essentially zero, the confining pressure on bubbles is completely supplied by the overlying magma. Due to low H2O content in lunar basaltic melt (700 ppm H2O corresponds to a saturation pressure of 75 kPa), H2O bubbles only grow in the upper 16 m of a basalt flow or lake. A depth of 20 mm corresponds to a confining pressure of 100 Pa. Hence, vesicular lunar rocks come from very shallow depth. Some findings from the modeling are as follows. (a) Due to low confining pressure as well as low viscosity, even though volatile concentration is very low, bubble growth rate is extremely high, much higher than typical bubble growth rates in terrestrial melts. Hence, mm-size bubbles in lunar basalts are not strange. (b) Because the pertinent pressures are so low, bubble pressure due to surface tension plays a main role in lunar bubble growth, contrary to terrestrial cases. (c) Time scale to reach equilibrium bubble size increases as the confining pressure increases. References: (1) Liu Y, Zhang YX (2000) Earth

  7. Evidence for multiple mechanisms of crustal contamination of magma from compositionally zoned plutons and associated ultramafic intrusions of the Alaska Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reiners, P.W.; Nelson, B.K.; Nelson, S.W.

    1996-01-01

    /86Sr)i that are too high, and ??(T)Nd that are too low, to represent the expected isotopic composition of typical depleted mantle. However, gabbro xenoliths with typical depleted-mantle isotopic compositions are found in the plutons. This situation requires either an additional enriched mantle component to provide the parental magma for these plutons, or some mechanism of crustal contamination of the parent magma that did not cause significant crystallization and differentiation of the magma to more felsic compositions. Thermodynamic modeling indicates that assimilation of alkali- and water-rich partial melt of the metapelite country rock by fractionating, near-liquidus basaltic magma could cause significant contamination while suppressing significant crystallization and differentiation.

  8. Timing of Magma Mixing Prior to the 2011 Eruption of Shinmoedake, Japan: On the Relationship Between Magma Injection, Magma Mixing, and Eruption Triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiya, A.; Miyagi, I.; Saito, G.; Geshi, N.

    2013-12-01

    Various petrological evidences indicate magma mixing often preceded volcanic eruptions. Magma injection into the associated magma chambers also often occurs prior to eruptions as evidenced by inflation of a volcanic edifice. However, the relationship between magma injection, magma mixing, and eruption triggering is unclear because injection does not necessarily cause instantaneous mixing if the injected magma is sufficiently denser than the pre-existing magma and has formed stable stratified layers. To investigate the relationship, we estimated the timing of magma mixing prior to the 2011 sub-Plinian eruptions of Shinmoedake volcano, Kirishima volcanic group, Japan, on the basis of chemical zoning observed in magnetite phenocrysts and numerical diffusion modeling. We compared the timing with that of volcanic inflation/deflation processes. The eruptive products are comprised mainly of phenocryst-rich (28 vol%) gray pumice (SiO2 = 57 wt%) with minor amount of white pumice (SiO2 = 62 wt%). We recognized two magmatic end members, low-T dacitic magma and high-T mafic magma (basalt or basaltic andesite), and hybrid andesitic magma on the basis of our petrologic studies. Gray pumice is comprised mainly of the hybrid andesitic magma. White pumice is comprised mainly of the low-T dacitic magma with mixing of small volume of the hybrid andesitic magma. Most of the magnetite phenocrysts (type-A1) were crystallized in the hybrid andesitic magma. Their zoning profiles showed considerable increase in Mg and Al contents toward the rims of the phenocrysts, due to mixing with the high-T mafic magma. We calculated the time for diffusion to form these zoning profiles to be only 0.4 to 3 days. The short time scale suggests that the mixing of high-T magma triggered the sub-Plinian eruptions. This mixing process was not accompanied by a significant change in the volume of the magma chamber because no significant crustal deformation was observed several days prior to the eruptions (Japan

  9. Alkali Bee

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alkali bee, Nomia melanderi, is native to deserts and semi-arid desert basins of the western United States. It is a very effective and manageable pollinator for the production of seed in alfalfa (=lucerne) and some other crops, such as onion. It is the world’s only intensively managed ground-n...

  10. Phonolites and peralkaline rhyolites from a single magma source in the mantle : A new look at some Black Hills rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, J.G. . Dept. of Geography-Geology)

    1993-03-01

    A re-evaluation of existing data from the Deer Mountain-Terry Peak-Sugarloaf Mountain area of the Black Hills, plus some new data, suggests the real possibility that both silica-undersaturated and silica-oversaturated alkaline-peralkaline rocks evolved from the same mantle-derived parent magma. Mineralogically, aegirine rhyolites, phonolites, a minette and the mantle are linked by an association of Mg-rich olivine-phlogopite structures, zenocrystic phlogopite and diopside-cored pyroxene phenocrysts. Trends of silica vs. major elements, trace elements (V,Sc,Ni) and MgO/FeOt are continuous and preclude being fortuitous. Peralkalinity also increases with silica in a well-defined trend. Increasing ferric oxide to total iron oxide indicates increasing oxygen fugacity with silica saturation. A mantle origin for the phonolites is supported by Sr-isotope data of Beintema (1986) and Beintema and Montgomery (1986). Higher Sr-isotope ratios for the aegirine rhyolites, suggesting a lower crustal origin, actually may result from magmatic processes, as shown by others for ocean island basalt-phonolite-comendite associations. Early fractionation of mafic phases drives trends away from the Ne-minimum on the residua diagram, indicating that magma evolution took place above residua temperatures, thus avoiding the thermal divide. Later fractionation of alkali feldspars accounts for variation in the aegirine rhyolites. Rising alkalies and oxygen explain variations in peralkalinity and ferric iron content. Pressure-dependent immiscibility possibly may be the cause of a silica gap in rock types, as rocks with low quartz contents are not found, except as phaneritic inclusions. A model is suggested in which either a fractionating minette or trachyte magma could yield the series of rocks under study.

  11. Geochemical characteristics of the "Mid-Alkaline Basalts" from the "adventive cones" of Piton de la Fournaise volcano (La Réunion Island)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valer, Marina; Bachèlery, Patrick; Schiano, Pierre; Upton, Brian G. J.

    2016-04-01

    Piton de la Fournaise, the youngest volcano of La Réunion Island, is renowned for being frequently active. Its lavas (younger than ~450 ka) have been subdivided into three compositional groups (see Lénat et al. 2012 for a review). Almost all recent and historical lavas belong to two of these groups: "cotectic basalts" and "olivine-rich basalts", marked by a constant CaO/Al2O3 ratio of ~0.8, and MgO content ranging from 5 to 30 wt % reflecting different degrees of olivine accumulation. Whereas that current activity is mainly located within the "Enclos Fouqué" caldera, ~100 strombolian cones lie on the volcano's flanks, thought to date from ~300 years to a few thousand years. Our study focuses on these "adventive cones", by studying bulk-rock major and trace element compositions, isotopic compositions, mineral phases and olivine-hosted melt inclusions. The bulk-rock compositions correspond to the third group of the Piton de la Fournaise lavas (see above), called the "mid-alkaline basalts". They mainly consist of magnesian basalts at 7.55 - 10.24 wt% MgO and CaO/Al2O3 values down to 0.55. At constant MgO content, this group shows higher alkali content and a relative deficiency in Ca compared to the historic basalts. The "adventive cones" lavas usually contain magnesian olivine crystals (Fo > 86). Such crystals are not at the equilibrium with their host lava, raising thus the question of the recycling processes. The volatile contents of these olivine-hosted melt inclusions (work in progress) will allow to determine if such magnesian olivine crystals come from deep storage levels, as previously proposed by Bureau et al. (1998; 1999). The specific geochemistry the "adventive cones" lavas is attributed either to a high-pressure fractionation of a clinopyroxene-rich assemblage (Albarède et al. 1997), or to an assimilation process involving wehrlite-gabbro cumulates (e.g. Salaün et al. 2010). Although the trace element data show that the source of these magmas is

  12. Experimental Study of Lunar and SNC Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, Malcolm J.

    2004-01-01

    The research described in this progress report involved the study of petrological, geochemical, and volcanic processes that occur on the Moon and the SNC meteorite parent body, generally accepted to be Mars. The link between these studies is that they focus on two terrestrial-type parent bodies somewhat smaller than earth, and the fact that they focus on the types of magmas (magma compositions) present, the role of volatiles in magmatic processes, and on processes of magma evolution on these planets. We are also interested in how these processes and magma types varied over time.In earlier work on the A15 green and A17 orange lunar glasses, we discovered a variety of metal blebs. Some of these Fe-Ni metal blebs occur in the glass; others (in A17) were found in olivine phenocrysts that we find make up about 2 vol 96 of the orange glass magma. The importance of these metal spheres is that they fix the oxidation state of the parent magma during the eruption, and also indicate changes during the eruption . They also yield important information about the composition of the gas phase present, the gas that drove the lunar fire-fountaining. During the tenure of this grant, we have continued to work on the remaining questions regarding the origin and evolution of the gas phase in lunar basaltic magmas, what they indicate about the lunar interior, and how the gas affects volcanic eruptions. Work on Martian magmas petrogenesis questions during the tenure of this grant has resulted in advances in our methods of evaluating magmatic oxidation state variations in Mars and some new insights into the compositional variations that existed in the SNC magmas over time . Additionally, Minitti has continued to work on the problem of possible shock effects on the abundance and distribution of water in Mars minerals.

  13. Yamato 980459: Crystallization of Martian Magnesian Magma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koizumi, E.; Mikouchi, T.; McKay, G.; Monkawa, A.; Chokai, J.; Miyamoto, M.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, several basaltic shergottites have been found that include magnesian olivines as a major minerals. These have been called olivinephyric shergottites. Yamato 980459, which is a new martian meteorite recovered from the Antarctica by the Japanese Antarctic expedition, is one of them. This meteorite is different from other olivine-phyric shergottites in several key features and will give us important clues to understand crystallization of martian meteorites and the evolution of Martian magma.

  14. Taxonomy Of Magma Mixing I: Magma Mixing Metrics And The Thermochemistry Of Magma Hybridization Illuminated With A Toy Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spera, F. J.; Bohrson, W. A.; Schmidt, J.

    2013-12-01

    The rock record preserves abundant evidence of magma mixing in the form of mafic enclaves and mixed pumice in volcanic eruptions, syn-plutonic mafic or silicic dikes and intrusive complexes, replenishment events recorded in cumulates from layered intrusions, and crystal scale heterogeneity in phenocrysts and cumulate minerals. These evidently show that magma mixing in conjunction with crystallization (perfect fractional or incremental batch) is a first-order petrogenetic process. Magma mixing (sensu lato) occurs across a spectrum of mixed states from magma mingling to complete blending. The degree of mixing is quantified (Oldenburg et al, 1989) using two measures: the statistics of the segregation length scales (scale of segregation, L*) and the spatial contrast in composition (C) relative to the mean C (intensity of segregation, I). Mingling of dissimilar magmas produces a heterogeneous mixture containing discrete regions of end member melts and populations of crystals with L* = finite and I > 0. When L*→∞ and I→0 , the mixing magmas become hybridized and can be studied thermodynamically. Such hybrid magma is a multiphase equilibrium mixture of homogeneous melt, unzoned crystals and possible bubbles of a supercritical fluid. Here, we use a toy model to elucidate the principles of magma hybridization in a binary system (components A and B with pure crystals of α or β phase) with simple thermodynamics to build an outcome taxonomy. This binary system is not unlike the system Anorthite-Diopside, the classic low-pressure model basalt system. In the toy model, there are seven parameters describing the phase equilibria (eutectic T and X, specific heat, melting T and fusion enthalpies of α and β crystals) and five variables describing the magma mixing conditions: end member bulk compositions, temperatures and fraction of resident magma (M) that blends with recharge (R) magma to form a single equilibrium hybrid magma. There are 24 possible initial states when M

  15. Evidence for Sulfur Degassing in Oceanic Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, D. T.; Saal, A. E.; Rutherford, M. J.; Hauri, E. H.

    2010-12-01

    Sulfur concentration in basaltic magmas is highly dependent on pressure, temperature, fO2, fS2, and bulk composition and therefore undergoes a complex history during melting, melt transport, degassing, and eruption. It was first recognized as a volatile in submarine basalts by Moore and Fabbi (1971) when the S content in glassy pillow rims was higher than the amount of S measured in degassed lavas at the surface. Subsequent studies concluded that degassing of S is not expected to occur in basaltic magmas erupting deeper than 500m below sea level (~50 bars). Therefore, once sulfide saturation (Liu et al, 2007) and fractionation of sulfide melts have been considered, pre-eruptive sulfur concentrations in basaltic magmas have been used to estimate the primitive S content in the melts and their mantle sources. Based on a large compilation of submarine glasses, we will show that basaltic magmas have lost not only CO2 and H2O but also S during degassing at pressures greater than 50 bars. Melt inclusion and glass compositions from submarine oceanic basalts were compiled to examine sulfur variations. Data was filtered for sulfide undersaturated samples using Liu et al.’s (2007) calculation since H2O content was available. A positive correlation between S and Dy was expected as seen by previous studies, which considered S for sulfide undersaturated basalts to behave similar to HREE (Dy) during melting and crystal fractionation (Morgan, 1986; Saal et al, 2002). A S/Dy ratio of 240±20 ppm was determined for the data compilation of the basaltic glasses. A subgroup of samples, dominantly glasses enriched in incompatible trace elements, showed lower S/Dy than the ratio determined above. This lower S/Dy would be controlled either by a change in S or Dy. A simple melting model was used to confirm that the change in S/Dy was not controlled by Dy variation due to the effect of garnet during mantle melting, but by the decrease in S content. The most likely explanation for this

  16. The Lunar Magma Ocean: Reconciling the Solidification Process with Lunar Petrology and Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Burgess, S.; Yin, Q.-Z.

    2011-03-01

    Detailed physical and chemical models of fractional solidification of the lunar magma ocean offer solutions to both basalt and picritic glass source region compositions and depths, and to the wide span of ages of highlands materials.

  17. Vapor deposition in basaltic stalactites, Kilauea, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, A. K.; Mohrig, D. C.; Welday, E. E.

    Basaltic stalacties suspended from the ceiling of a large lava tube at Kilauea, Hawaii, have totally enclosed vesicles whose walls are covered with euhedral FeTi oxide and silicate crystals. The walls of the vesicles and the exterior surfaces of stalactites are Fe and Ti enriched and Si depleted compared to common basalt. Minerals in vesicles have surface ornamentations on crystal faces which include alkali-enriched, aluminosilicate glass(?) hemispheres. No sulfide-, chloride-, fluoride-, phosphate- or carbonate-bearing minerals are present. Minerals in the stalactites must have formed by deposition from an iron oxide-rich vapor phase produced by the partial melting and vaporization of wall rocks in the tube.

  18. Miocene to Late Quaternary Patagonian basalts (46 47°S): Geochronometric and geochemical evidence for slab tearing due to active spreading ridge subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guivel, Christèle; Morata, Diego; Pelleter, Ewan; Espinoza, Felipe; Maury, René C.; Lagabrielle, Yves; Polvé, Mireille; Bellon, Hervé; Cotten, Joseph; Benoit, Mathieu; Suárez, Manuel; de la Cruz, Rita

    2006-01-01

    Miocene to Quaternary large basaltic plateaus occur in the back-arc domain of the Andean chain in Patagonia. They are thought to result from the ascent of subslab asthenospheric magmas through slab windows generated from subducted segments of the South Chile Ridge (SCR). We have investigated three volcanic centres from the Lago General Carrera-Buenos Aires area (46-47°S) located above the inferred position of the slab window corresponding to a segment subducted 6 Ma ago. (1) The Quaternary Río Murta transitional basalts display major, trace elements, and Sr and Nd isotopic features similar to those of oceanic basalts from the SCR and from the Chile Triple Junction near Taitao Peninsula (e.g., ( 87Sr/ 86Sr) o = 0.70396-0.70346 and ɛNd = + 5.5 - + 3.0). We consider them as derived from the melting of a Chile Ridge asthenospheric mantle source containing a weak subduction component. (2) The Plio-Quaternary (< 3.3 Ma) post-plateau basanites from Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires (MLBA), Argentina, likely derive from small degrees of melting of OIB-type mantle sources involving the subslab asthenosphere and the enriched subcontinental lithospheric mantle. (3) The main plateau basaltic volcanism in this region is represented by the 12.4-3.3-Ma-old MLBA basalts and the 8.2-4.4-Ma-old basalts from Meseta Chile Chico (MCC), Chile. Two groups can be distinguished among these main plateau basalts. The first group includes alkali basalts and trachybasalts displaying typical OIB signatures and thought to derive from predominantly asthenospheric mantle sources similar to those of the post-plateau MLBA basalts, but through slightly larger degrees of melting. The second one, although still dominantly alkalic, displays incompatible element signatures intermediate between those of OIB and arc magmas (e.g., La/Nb > 1 and TiO 2 < 2 wt.%). These intermediate basalts differ from their strictly alkalic equivalents by having lower High Field Strength Element (HFSE) and higher ɛNd (up to

  19. Climate Throughout Geologic Time Has Been Controlled Primarily by the Balance Between Cooling Caused by Major Explosive Eruptions of Evolved Magmas Typical of Island Arcs and Warming Caused by Voluminous Effusive Eruptions of Basaltic Magma Typical of Subaerial Ocean Ridges and Island Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, P. L.

    2014-12-01

    Most volcanic eruptions deplete ozone ~6% for a few years, allowing more high-energy, ultraviolet-B radiation to warm earth. Record low levels of total column ozone followed the 1991 explosive eruption of Pinatubo. Yet 6% depletion also followed the smaller and more effusive eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull (2010) and Grímsvötn (2011) in Iceland. Explosive volcanoes also eject 10-20 megatons of sulfur dioxide into the lower stratosphere, forming sulfuric-acid aerosols that reflect and diffuse sunlight causing a net cooling of ~0.5°C for 3 years. High rates of explosive volcanos cool earth into ice ages while high rates of effusive basaltic volcanism in Iceland between 11,500 and 9,500 years ago clearly warmed Earth out of the last ice age depositing sulfate recorded in ice cores in Greenland. Basalts from these eruptions are observed as tuyas in Iceland dated during this period. The 25 Dansgaard-Oeschger abrupt warmings are contemporaneous with increased sulfate in Greenland and with the few older dates available for tuyas in Iceland. Extensive flood basalts were formed during the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum and during times of most major mass extinctions when global temperatures rose substantially, with fossil evidence for ozone depletion. Greenhouse-gas theory assumes electromagnetic radiation travels through space as waves and therefore thermal energy reaching earth is proportional to the square of wave amplitude. Thus the change in energy reaching Earth due to ozone depletion is considered small compared to infrared energy absorbed by greenhouse gases. But waves travel in matter and there is no matter in space. Electromagnetic energy is transmitted as frequency, as shown by radio signals, where energy equals frequency times the Planck constant. Thus thermal energy reaching earth when ozone is depleted is 50 times thermal energy involved in greenhouse gases. Global warming from 1970 to 1998 was caused primarily by 3% ozone depletion due to anthropogenic

  20. Loki Patera: A Magma Sea Story

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D. L.; Rathbun, A. G.

    2005-01-01

    We consider Loki Patera on Io as the surface expression of a large uniform body of magma. Our model of the Loki magma sea is some 200 km across; larger than a lake but smaller than an ocean. The depth of the magma sea is unknown, but assumed to be deep enough that bottom effects can be ignored. Edge effects at the shore line can be ignored to first order for most of the interior area. In particular, we take the dark material within Loki Patera as a thin solidified lava crust whose hydrostatic shape follows Io's isostatic surface (approx. 1815 km radius of curvature). The dark surface of Loki appears to be very smooth on both regional and local (subresolution) scales. The thermal contrast between the low and high albedo areas within Loki is consistent with the observed global correlation. The composition of the model magma sea is basaltic and saturated with dissolved SO2 at depth. Its average, almost isothermal, temperature is at the liquidus for basalt. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  1. Hotspots, basalts, and the evolution of the mantle.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D L

    1981-07-01

    The trace element concentration patterns of continental and ocean island basalts and of mid-ocean ridge basalts are complementary. The relative sizes of the source regions for these fundamentally different basalt types can be estimated from the trace element enrichment-depletion patterns. Their combined volume occupies most of the mantle above the 670 kilometer discontinuity. The source regions separated as a result of early mantle differentiation and crystal fractionation from the resulting melt. The mid-ocean ridge basalts source evolved from an eclogite cumulate that lost its late-stage enriched fluids at various times to the shallower mantle and continental crust. The mid-ocean ridge basalts source is rich in garnet and clinopyroxene, whereas the continental and ocean island basalt source is a garnet peridotite that has experienced secondary enrichment. These relationships are consistent with the evolution of a terrestrial magma ocean. PMID:17741173

  2. Chemical Zoning of Feldspars in Lunar Granitoids: Implications for the Origins of Lunar Silicic Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, R. D; Simon, J. I.; Alexander, C.M. O'D.; Wang, J.; Christoffersen, R.; Rahman, Z..

    2014-01-01

    Fine-scale chemical and textural measurements of alkali and plagioclase feldspars in the Apollo granitoids (ex. Fig. 1) can be used to address their petrologic origin(s). Recent findings suggest that these granitoids may hold clues of global importance, rather than of only local significance for small-scale fractionation. Observations of morphological features that resemble silicic domes on the unsampled portion of the Moon suggest that local, sizable net-works of high-silica melt (>65 wt % SiO2) were present during crust-formation. Remote sensing data from these regions suggest high concentrations of Si and heat-producing elements (K, U, and Th). To help under-stand the role of high-silica melts in the chemical differentiation of the Moon, three questions must be answered: (1) when were these magmas generated?, (2) what was the source material?, and (3) were these magmas produced from internal differentiation. or impact melting and crystallization? Here we focus on #3. It is difficult to produce high-silica melts solely by fractional crystallization. Partial melting of preexisting crust may therefore also have been important and pos-sibly the primary mechanism that produced the silicic magmas on the Moon. Experimental studies demonstrate that partial melting of gabbroic rock under mildly hydrated conditions can produce high-silica compositions and it has been suggested by that partial melting by basaltic underplating is the mechanism by which high-silica melts were produced on the Moon. TEM and SIMS analyses, coordinated with isotopic dating and tracer studies, can help test whether the minerals in the Apollo granitoids formed in a plutonic setting or were the result of impact-induced partial melting. We analyzed granitoid clasts from 3 Apollo samples: polymict breccia 12013,141, crystalline-matrix breccia 14303,353, and breccia 15405,78

  3. Thermal and rheological controls on magma migration in dikes: Examples from the east rift zone of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parfitt, E. A.; Wilson, L.; Pinkerton, H.

    1993-01-01

    Long-lived eruptions from basaltic volcanoes involving episodic or steady activity indicate that a delicate balance has been struck between the rate of magma cooling in the dike system feeding the vent and the rate of magma supply to the dike system from a reservoir. We describe some key factors, involving the relationships between magma temperature, magma rheology, and dike geometry that control the nature of such eruptions.

  4. Pb isotopic heterogeneity in basaltic phenocrysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bryce, Julia G.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2002-06-01

    The Pb isotopic compositions of phenocrystic phases in young basaltic lavas have been investigated using the Getty-DePaolo method (Getty S. J. and DePaolo D. J. [1995] Quaternary geochronology by the U-Th-Pb method. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 59, 3267 3272), which allows for the resolution of small isotopic differences. Phenocryst, matrix, and whole rock analyses were made on samples from the 17 Myr-old Imnaha basalts of the Columbia River Group, a zero-age MORB from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and a ca. 260 kyr-old tholeiite from Mount Etna. Plagioclase feldspar phenocrysts have low-(U, Th)/Pb, and in each sample the plagioclase has significantly lower 206Pb/207Pb and 208Pb/207Pb values than whole rock, matrix, and magnetite-rich separates. The Pb isotopic contrast between plagioclase and matrix/whole rock is found in three samples with varying grain sizes (0.5 2 cm for the Imnaha basalt and MORB and <1 mm for the Etna sample) from different tectonic settings, suggesting that these results are not unique. The isotopic contrasts are only slightly smaller in magnitude than the variations exhibited by whole rock samples from the region. The Imnaha basalts also have Sr isotopic heterogeneity evident only in plagioclase phenocrysts, but the MORB and Etna lavas do not. The isotopic heterogeneities reflect magma mixing, and indicate that isotopically diverse magmas were mixed together just prior to eruption. The results reinforce indications from melt inclusion studies that magma source region isotopic heterogeneities have large amplitudes at short length scales, and that the isotopic variations imparted to the magmas are not entirely homogenized during segregation and transport processes.

  5. Continental basaltic volcanoes — Processes and problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, G. A.; Gregg, T. K. P.

    2008-11-01

    Monogenetic basaltic volcanoes are the most common volcanic landforms on the continents. They encompass a range of morphologies from small pyroclastic constructs to larger shields and reflect a wide range of eruptive processes. This paper reviews physical volcanological aspects of continental basaltic eruptions that are driven primarily by magmatic volatiles. Explosive eruption styles include Hawaiian and Strombolian ( sensu stricto) and violent Strombolian end members, and a full spectrum of styles that are transitional between these end members. The end-member explosive styles generate characteristic facies within the resulting pyroclastic constructs (proximal) and beyond in tephra fall deposits (medial to distal). Explosive and effusive behavior can be simultaneous from the same conduit system and is a complex function of composition, ascent rate, degassing, and multiphase processes. Lavas are produced by direct effusion from central vents and fissures or from breakouts (boccas, located along cone slopes or at the base of a cone or rampart) that are controlled by varying combinations of cone structure, feeder dike processes, local effusion rate and topography. Clastogenic lavas are also produced by rapid accumulation of hot material from a pyroclastic column, or by more gradual welding and collapse of a pyroclastic edifice shortly after eruptions. Lava flows interact with — and counteract — cone building through the process of rafting. Eruption processes are closely coupled to shallow magma ascent dynamics, which in turn are variably controlled by pre-existing structures and interaction of the rising magmatic mixture with wall rocks. Locations and length scales of shallow intrusive features can be related to deeper length scales within the magma source zone in the mantle. Coupling between tectonic forces, magma mass flux, and heat flow range from weak (low magma flux basaltic fields) to sufficiently strong that some basaltic fields produce polygenetic

  6. Germanium abundances in lunar basalts: Evidence of mantle metasomatism

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, T.; Taylor, G.J.; Keil, T.K.; Bild, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    To fill in gaps in the present Ge data base, mare basalts were analyzed for Ge and other elements by RNAA and INAA. Mare basalts from Apollo 11, 12, 15, 17 landing sites are rather uniform in Ge abundance, but Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalts and KREEP are enriched in Ge by factors of up to 300 compared to typical mare basalts. These Ge enrichments are not associated with other siderophile element enrichments and, thus, are not due to differences in the amount of metal segregated during core formation. Based on crystal-chemical and inter-element variations, it does not appear that the observed Ge enrichments are due to silicate liquid immiscibility. Elemental ratios in Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalts, green and orange glass, average basalts and KREEP suggest that incorporation of late accreting material into the source regions or interaction of the magmas with primitive undifferentiated material is not a likely cause for the observed Ge enrichments. We speculate that the most plausible explanation for these Ge enrichments is complexing and concentration of Ge by F, Cl or S in volatile phases. In this manner, the KREEP basalt source regions may have been metasomatized and Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalt magmas may have become enriched in Ge by interacting with these metasomatized areas. The presence of volatile- and Ge-rich regions in the Moon suggests that the Moon was never totally molten. 71 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  7. Petrogenesis of alkaline magmas at Minna Bluff, Antarctica: evidence for multi-stage differentiation and complex mixing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panter, K. S.; Dunbar, N. W.; Scanlan, M. K.; Wilch, T. I.; Fargo, A. J.; McIntosh, W. C.

    2011-12-01

    Minna Bluff, a 45-km-long peninsula that extends SE into the Ross Ice Shelf from the Mt. Discovery stratovolcano, consists of coalesced late Miocene volcanic centers formed through eruption of alkaline magma compositions in a continental rift setting. Highly silica-undersaturated compositions vary from basanite to phonolite and are exposed in volcanic features ranging from small, primitive, cinder cones to large, evolved domes. Lava compositions are more evolved on the eastern end of Minna Bluff and show an overall age progression to younger, more mafic compositions towards Mt. Discovery. Phenocrysts in lava include amphibole, plagioclase and alkali feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, magnetite and apatite. A notable feature of volcanic rocks at Minna Bluff is the presence of large (up to 5 cm) kaersutite and feldspar megacrysts and deposits that contain abundant comagmatic inclusions (kaersutite-rich) and rare mantle xenoliths. Many lavas exhibit strong disequilibrium textures, mainly expressed by breakdown rims on kaersutite that vary dramatically in thickness from crystal to crystal, but reverse compositional zoning in plagioclase is also common. Kaersutite compositions vary within a single sample and show the same compositional range and similar disequilibrium textures in rocks that vary significantly in bulk composition. The textural and compositional characteristics suggest that, for many, mixing between one or more magmas controlled the final composition of the magmas. We envisage a scenario by which some of the primitive, mantle-derived, fluid-rich magmas rose relatively unimpeded to erupt at the surface, while others stalled at or near the crust-mantle boundary and differentiated. Semi-quantitative thermobarometric results for kaersutite and clinopyroxene indicate maximum P-T-X conditions for crystallization of hydrous magmas at 5-9 kbar, ≧1000°C and ≈3 wt. % equiv. H2O. The P-T estimates closely match geophysical and petrologic geotherm estimates for Moho

  8. Hanford basalt flow mineralogy

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, L.L.

    1980-09-01

    Mineralogy of the core samples from five core wells was examined in some detail. The primary mineralogy study included an optical examination of polished mounts, photomicrographs, chemical analyses of feldspars, pyroxenes, metallic oxides and microcrystalline groundmasses and determination from the chemical analyses of the varieties of feldspars, pyroxenes and metallic oxides. From the primary mineralogy data, a firm understanding of the average Hanford basalt flow primary mineralogy emerged. The average primary feldspar was a laboradorite, the average pyroxene was an augite and the average metallic oxide was a solid solution of ilmenite and magnetite. Secondary mineralization consisted of vug filling and joint coating, chiefly with a nontronite-beidellite clay, several zeolites, quartz, calcite, and opal. Specific flow units also were examined to determine the possibility of using the mineralogy to trace flows between core wells. These included units of the Pomona, the Umatilla and a high chromium flow just below the Huntzinger. In the Umatilla, or high barium flow, the compositional variation of the feldspars was unique in range. The pyroxenes in the Pomona were relatively highly zoned and accumulated chromium. The high chromium flow contained chromium spinels that graded in chromium content into simple magnetites very low in chromium content. A study of the statistical relationships of flow unit chemical constituents showed that flow unit constituents could be roughly correlated between wells. The probable cause of the correlation was on-going physical-chemical changes in the source magma.

  9. Evolution of magma feeding system in Kumanodake agglutinate activity, Zao Volcano, northeastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takebe, Yoshinori; Ban, Masao

    2015-10-01

    The Kumanodake agglutinate of Zao Volcano in northeastern Japan consists of pyroclastic surge layers accumulated during the early part of the newest stage of activity (ca. 33 ka to present). Our petrologic study of this agglutinate based on systematically collected samples aims to reveal the evolution of magma feeding system. To understand the magma evolution, we have examined samples from the agglutinate by using petrologic data including, petrography, analysis of minerals (plagioclase, pyroxene, and olivine), glass compositions, and whole rock major element and trace element (Ba, Sr, Cr, Ni, V, Rb, Zr, Nb, and Y) compositions. Agglutinate are mixed, medium-K, calc-alkaline olv-cpx-opx basaltic andesite (55.2-56.2% SiO2). Results show that the magma feeding system comprised a shallow felsic chamber injected by mafic magma from depth. The felsic magma (59-62% SiO2, 950-990 °C), which was stored at a shallower depth, had orthopyroxene (Mg# = 60-69), clinopyroxene (Mg# = 65-71), and low-An plagioclase (Anca. 58-70). The mafic magma is further divisible into two types: less-differentiated and more-differentiated, designed respectively as an initial mafic magma-1 and a second mafic magma-2. The original mafic magma-1 was olivine (Fo~ 84) basalt (ca. 48-51% SiO2, 1110-1140 °C). The second mafic magma-2, stored occasionally at 4-6 km depth, was basalt (1070-1110 °C) having Foca. 80 olivine and high-An (Anca. 90) plagioclase phenocrysts. These two magmas mixed (first mixing) to form hybrid mafic magma. The forced injections of the hybrid mafic magmas activated the felsic magma, and these two were mixed (second mixing) shortly before eruptions. The explosivity is inferred to have increased over time because the abundance of large scoria increased. Furthermore, the erupted magma composition became more mafic, which reflects increased percentage of the hybrid mafic magma involved in the second mixing. At the beginning of activity, the mafic magma also acted as a heat

  10. Occurrence and Mineral Chemistry of High Pressure Phases, Potrillo Basalt, Southcentral New Mexico. M.S. Thesis Final Technical Report, 1 Jun. 1980 - 31 May 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffield, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    The presence of an older plagioclase-rich basalt and a younger olivine-rich basalt were confirmed by modal and chemical analysis. Chemical analysis also confirmed the presence of flows that are tholeiitic in composition and could be remnants of an original tholeittic parent magma. Eruptions from different levels of a differentiated magma chamber are proposed to account for the two members.

  11. Carbon solution and partitioning between metallic and silicate melts in a shallow magma ocean: Implications for the origin and distribution of terrestrial carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Chi, Han; Shimizu, Nobumichi; Buono, Antonio S.; Walker, David

    2013-02-01

    The origin of bulk silicate Earth carbon inventory is unknown and the fate of carbon during the early Earth differentiation and core formation is a missing link in the evolution of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Here we present high pressure (P)-temperature (T) experiments that offer new constraints upon the partitioning of carbon between metallic and silicate melt in a shallow magma ocean. Experiments were performed at 1-5 GPa, 1600-2100 °C on mixtures of synthetic or natural silicates (tholeiitic basalt/alkali basalt/komatiite/fertile peridotite) and Fe-Ni-C ± Co ± S contained in graphite or MgO capsules. All the experiments produced immiscible Fe-rich metallic and silicate melts at oxygen fugacity (fO2) between ˜IW-1.5 and IW-1.9. Carbon and hydrogen concentrations of basaltic glasses and non-glassy quenched silicate melts were determined using secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS) and speciation of dissolved C-O-H volatiles in silicate glasses was studied using Raman spectroscopy. Carbon contents of metallic melts were determined using both electron microprobe and SIMS. Our experiments indicate that at core-forming, reduced conditions, carbon in deep mafic-ultramafic magmas may dissolve primarily as various hydrogenated species but the total carbon storage capacity, although is significantly higher than solubility of CO2 under similar conditions, remains low (<500 ppm). The total carbon content in our reduced melts at graphite saturation increases with increasing melt depolymerization (NBO/T), consistent with recent spectroscopic studies, and modestly with increasing hydration. Carbon behaves as a metal-loving element during core-mantle separation and our experimental DCmetal/silicate varies between ˜4750 and ⩾150 and increases with increasing pressure and decreases with increasing temperature and melt NBO/T. Our data suggest that if only a trace amount of carbon (˜730 ppm C) was available during early Earth differentiation, most of it was

  12. Petrogenesis of coeval sodic and potassic alkaline magmas at Spanish Peaks, Colorado: Magmatism related to the opening of the Rio Grande rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, A. Brooke Hamil; McGregor, Heath; Roden, Michael F.; Salters, Vincent J. M.; Sarafian, Adam; Leahy, Rory

    2016-07-01

    Approximately coeval, relatively primitive (∼5-10% MgO with exception of a trachyandesite) alkaline mafic dikes and sills at or near Spanish Peaks, CO are divided into relatively sodic and potassic varieties on the basis of K2O/Na2O. Many of these dikes are true lamprophyres. In spite of variable alkali element ratios, the alkaline rocks share a number of geochemical similarities: high LIL element contents, high Ba and similar Sr, Nd and Hf isotope ratios near that of Bulk Earth. One important difference is that the potassic rocks are characterized by lower Al2O3 contents, typically less than 12 wt.%, than the sodic dikes/sills which typically have more than 13 wt.% Al2O3, and this difference is independent of MgO content. We attribute the distinct Al2O3 contents to varying pressure during melting: a mica-bearing, Al-poor vein assemblage for the potassic magmas melted at higher pressure than an aluminous amphibole-bearing vein assemblage for the sodic magmas. Remarkable isotopic and trace element similarities with approximately contemporaneous, nearby Rio Grande rift-related basalts in the San Luis Valley, indicate that the magmatism at Spanish Peaks was rift-related, and that lithosphere sources were shared between some rift magmas and those at Spanish Peaks. High Zn/Fe ratios in the Spanish Peaks mafic rocks point to a clinopyroxene- and garnet-rich source such as lithosphere veined by pyroxenite or eclogite. Lithospheric melting was possibly triggered by foundering of cool, dense lithosphere beneath the Rio Grande rift during the initiation of rifting with the potassic parent magmas generated by higher pressure melting of the foundered lithosphere than the sodic parent magmas. This process, caused by gravitational instability of the lithosphere (Elkins-Tanton, 2007) may be common beneath active continental rifts.

  13. Trace-element modelling of mare basalt parental melts: Implications for a heterogeneous lunar mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallis, L. J.; Anand, M.; Strekopytov, S.

    2014-06-01

    The heterogeneous-source model of mare basalt formation indicates that Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO) overturn produced an uneven mixture of early-formed olivine and pyroxene, and late-formed, ilmenite-rich cumulates, which subsequently partially melted to give rise to mare magmas. These heterogeneous cumulate source regions would not only have been characterised by different mineral modal abundances, but also by different trace element compositions. The aim of this work was to investigate the petrology and geochemistry of a diverse suite of Apollo mare basalts, and utilise trace-element modelling in order to understand their petrogenetic history. Chemical modelling confirms that the mare basalts were produced by relatively small degrees of partial melting (<10%) of the LMO cumulates, and that the dominant melting type (batch vs. fractional) varies among different basalt groups. Similarly, single-source mineralogy cannot be applied to all mare basalt types, confirming that the lunar mantle was heterogeneous at the time of generation of mare magmas. Plagioclase is not required in the source of most mare basalts, with the notable exception of the Apollo 14 high-Al basalts. Addition of more than 1% plagioclase to the source of other basalts produces weaker negative Eu anomalies than those observed in the samples. AFC calculations demonstrate the compositional differences between materials assimilated into the Apollo 14 high-Al and Apollo 11 high-K mare basalt partial melts, highlighting the complexities of mare basalt petrogenesis.

  14. Magma fragmentation speed: an experimental determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spieler, O.; Dingwell, D. B.; Alidibirov, M.

    2004-01-01

    The propagation speed of a fragmentation front, combined with the ascent velocity of magma is, in all likelihood, a controlling factor in the dynamics of explosive volcanic eruptions. Direct measurement of the 'fragmentation speed' in natural systems appears to be impossible at present. Fortunately, laboratory experiments can provide information on the propagation speed of the fragmentation front. Here we present the results of fragmentation speed determinations using a so-called 'fragmentation bomb'. These are, to the best of our knowledge, the first in situ fragmentation speed determinations performed on magma. Natural magma samples (Merapi basaltic andesite, Mount St. Helens dacite and Unzen dacite) have been investigated in the temperature range of 20-950°C and at pressures up to 25 MPa. Two techniques have been employed. Firstly, in experiments at 20°C, dynamic pressure transducers were placed above and below the magma samples and the fragmentation speed of the magma sample was derived from an analysis of the decompression curves. Secondly, at elevated temperatures, an alternative technique was introduced and successfully employed. This involved the severing via fragmentation of conducting wires placed within the samples at various heights. Fragmentation speeds are very low, falling in the range of 2-70 m/s and increasing with an increase in the magnitude of the decompression step responsible for the fragmentation. The first high-temperature determination seems consistent with low-temperature results. Implications for explosive volcanism are discussed briefly.

  15. Geologic evidence for a magma chamber beneath Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Macleod, N.S.; Sherrod, D.R.

    1988-09-10

    At Newberry Volcano, central Oregon, more than 0.5 m.y. of magmatic activity, including caldera collapse and renewed caldera-filling volcanism, has created a structural and thermal chimney that channels magma ascent. Holocene rhyolitic eruptions (1) have been confined mainly within the caldera in an area 5 km in diameter, (2) have been very similar in chemical composition, phenocryst mineralogy, and eruptive style, and (3) have occurred as recently as 1300 years ago, with repose periods of 2000--3000 years between eruptions. Holocene basaltic andesite eruptions are widespread on the flanks but are excluded from the area of rhyolitic volcanism. Basaltic andesite in fissures at the edge of the rhyolite area has silicic inclusions and shows mixed basalt-rhyolite magma relations. These geologic relations and the high geothermal gradient that characterizes the lower part of a drill hole in the caldera (U.S. Geological Survey Newberry 2) indicate that a rhyolitic magma chamber has existed beneath the caldera throughout the Holocene. Its longevity probably is a result of intermittent underplating by basaltic magma.

  16. New Insights to the Mid Miocene Calc-alkaline Lavas of the Strawberry Volcanics, NE Oregon Surrounded by the Coeval Tholeiitic Columbia River Basalt Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, A. R.; Streck, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Strawberry Volcanics (SV) of NE Oregon were distributed over 3,400 km2 during the mid-Miocene and comprise a diverse volcanic suite, which span the range of compositions from basalt to rhyolite. The predominant composition of this volcanic suite is calc-alkaline (CA) basaltic andesite and andesite, although tholeiitic (TH) lavas of basalt to andesite occur as well. The coeval flood basalts of the Columbia River province surround the SV. Here we will discuss new ages and geochemical data, and present a new geologic map and stratigraphy of the SV. The SV are emplaced on top of pre-Tertiary accreted terranes of the Blue Mountain Province, Mesozoic plutonic rocks, and older Tertiary volcanic rocks thought to be mostly Oligocene of age. Massive rhyolites (~300 m thick) are exposed mainly along the western flank and underlie the intermediate composition lavas. In the southern portion of this study area, alkali basaltic lavas, thought to be late Miocene to early Pliocene in age, erupted and overlie the SV. In addition, several regional ignimbrites reach into the area. The 9.7 Ma Devine Canyon Tuff and the 7.1 Ma Rattlesnake Tuff also overlie the SV. The 15.9-15.4 Ma Dinner Creek Tuff is mid-Miocene, and clear stratigraphic relationships are found in areas where the tuff is intercalated between thick SV lava flows. All of the basalts of the SV are TH and are dominated by phenocryst-poor (≤2%) lithologies. These basalts have an ophitic texture dominated by plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine (often weathered to iddingsite). Basalts and basaltic andesites have olivine Fo #'s ranging from 44 at the rims (where weathered to iddingsite) and as high as 88 at cores. Pyroxene Mg #'s range from 65 to 85. Andesites of the SV are sub-alkaline, and like the basalts, are exceedingly phenocryst-poor (≤3%) with microphenocrysts of plagioclase and lesser pyroxene and olivine, which occasionally occur as crystal clots of ~1-3 mm instead of single crystals. In addition, minimal

  17. Neodymium isotopes in flood basalts from the Siberian Platform and inferences about their mantle sources

    PubMed Central

    DePaolo, D. J.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    The initial isotopic compositions of Nd and Sr in basalts from the Central Siberian Plateau and other major continental flood basalts are reported. The continental flood basalts appear to be the product of partial melting of mantle sources that consist of relatively primitive undifferentiated material and are clearly distinct from midocean ridge basalts, which sample mantle reservoirs that have been modified by extraction of continental crust earlier in earth history. These observations provide fundamental constraints on models of mantle structure and dynamics. Isotopic effects of crustal contamination are clearly recognizable in some continental flood basalts, but these effects can be distinguished from isotopic patterns inherited from the mantle magma sources. PMID:16592671

  18. New Insights into Basaltic Balloon Formation during Submarine Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, S.; Kelly, J.; Rosi, M.; Pistolesi, M.; Marani, M.; Roman, C.; Croff Bell, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) explorations in the area of the 1891 Foerstner submarine eruption (Pantelleria, Italy) during cruise NA-018 of the E/V Nautilus has provided the first examination of the vent site of a basaltic balloon-forming eruption. Ultra high-resolution bathymetric mapping defined a mound-like vent morphology in water depths of ~250 meter, constructed dominantly of highly vesicular scoriaceous fragments with minor pillow lava flows. The formation of floating basaltic balloons that reached the surface of the Strait of Sicily during the eruption is attributed to a hybrid Strombolian eruption mechanism that involved pre-concentration of volatiles into gas-rich portions of magma beneath the vent. An important difference of this Strombolian mechanism compared to its subaerial counterpart is the occurrence of buoyant magma discharge in the submarine environment caused by localized high gas contents. The added buoyancy flux modifies the fluid dynamic configuration of magma venting on the seafloor allowing for detachment of highly-inflated parcels of gas-rich magma. Some of these parcels contain large gas cavities that are enveloped in a partially quenched shell and maintain sufficient buoyancy to rise to the sea surface as a basaltic balloon. The majority of the vesicular magma maintains only partial positive buoyancy or negative buoyancy and is explosively fragmented to form large quantities of decimeter-scale fragments that accumulate close to the vent. Formation of the basaltic balloons is thus considered a somewhat accidental process that involves a subset of the total erupted volume of magma during the eruption. Suitable conditions for balloon formation include low magma viscosity, pre-concentration of gas, and moderate pressures (i.e.water depth). The dampening effect of seawater greatly reduces the dispersal of pyroclasts resulting in a mound-like vent morphology compared to subaerial scoria cones typically associated with Strombolian activity.

  19. Magmas and reservoirs beneath the Rabaul caldera (Papua New Guinea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvet de Maisonneuve, C.; Costa Rodriguez, F.; Huber, C.

    2013-12-01

    The area of Rabaul (Papua New Guinea) consists of at least seven - possibly nine - nested-calderas that have formed over the past 200 ky. The last caldera-forming eruption occurred 1400 y BP, and produced about 10 km3 of crystal-poor, two-pyroxene dacite. Since then, five effusive and explosive eruptive episodes have occurred from volcanic centres along the caldera rim. The most recent of these was preceded by decade-long unrest (starting in 1971) until the simultaneous eruption of Vulcan and Tavurvur, two vents on opposite sides of the caldera in 1994. Most eruptive products are andesitic in composition and show clear signs of mixing/mingling between a basalt and a high-K2O dacite. The hybridization is in the form of banded pumices, quenched mafic enclaves, and hybrid bulk rock compositions. In addition, the 1400 y BP caldera-related products show the presence of a third mixing component; a low-K2O rhyodacitic melt or magma. Geochemical modeling considering major and trace elements and volatile contents shows that the high-K2O dacitic magma can be generated by fractional crystallization of the basaltic magma at shallow depths (~7 km, 200 MPa) and under relatively dry conditions (≤3 wt% H2O). The low-K2O rhyodacitic melt can either be explained by extended crystallization at low temperatures (e.g. in the presence of Sanidine) or the presence of an additional, unrelated magma. Our working model is therefore that basalts ascend to shallow crustal levels before intruding a main silicic reservoir beneath the Rabaul caldera. Storage depths and temperatures estimated from volatile contents, mineral-melt equilibria and rock densities suggest that basalts ascend from ~20 km (~600 MPa) to ~7 km (200 MPa) and cool from ~1150-1100°C before intruding a dacitic magma reservoir at ~950°C. Depending on the state of the reservoir and the volumes of basalt injected, the replenishing magma may either trigger an eruption or cool and crystallize. We use evidence from major and

  20. Magma storage depths beneath an active rift volcano in Afar (Dabbahu), constrained by melt inclusion analyses, seismicity and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (INSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, L.; Blundy, J.; Wright, T. J.; Yirgu, G.; Afar Consortium

    2010-12-01

    Dabbahu volcano is located at the northern end of the active Manda Hararo rift segment in western Afar, Ethiopia. In 2005 a major rifting episode began in the segment, which has been modelled as basalt dyke injections (1). Seismic activity, inflation and deflation have been recorded at the volcano. The aim of this research is to provide an insight into the history and evolution of a silicic magmatic centre in the rift, and to contribute to the wider aims of the NERC Afar Consortium to track the creation, migration, evolution and emplacement of magma from the asthenosphere to the crust. The volatile contents of rare melt inclusions trapped within phenocrysts of alkali feldspar, clinopyroxene and olivine from Dabbahu have been studied using secondary ion mass spectrometry. The host lavas are mildly peralkaline obsidians, which, based on field evidence and preliminary results from 40Ar-39Ar dating, represent the youngest samples on the volcano (<4 ka). Whilst the obsidian and pumice groundmass glasses are largely degassed, the H2O contents of the analysed inclusions are up to 5.8 wt%. CO2 contents are generally low; <462 ppm in the alkali feldspar-hosted inclusions, but higher values (up to 1457 ppm) have been found in the clinopyroxene-hosted inclusions. The pressure (and depth) of pre-eruptive magma storage beneath Dabbahu has been constrained using H2O and CO2 data, which suggest shallow magma storage at depths of ~1 - 5 km below the surface. These depths are consistent with observations from recorded seismicity and InSAR at Dabbahu. Seismicity has been recorded from deformation caused by deflation of the magma chamber following the 2005 dyke emplacement event (Oct 2005 - Apr 2006)(2) and InSAR has monitored deflation and subsequent steady inflation after this event. We show that melt inclusions accurately record a stable, shallow magma chamber as corroborated by remote sensing and geophysical observations at Dabbahu volcano. 1 Ayele et al. 2009 ‘September 2005

  1. Magma mixing enhanced by bubble segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmaier, S.; Morgavi, D.; Renggli, C. J.; Perugini, D.; De Campos, C. P.; Hess, K.-U.; Ertel-Ingrisch, W.; Lavallée, Y.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-08-01

    In order to explore the materials' complexity induced by bubbles rising through mixing magmas, bubble-advection experiments have been performed, employing natural silicate melts at magmatic temperatures. A cylinder of basaltic glass was placed below a cylinder of rhyolitic glass. Upon melting, bubbles formed from interstitial air. During the course of the experimental runs, those bubbles rose via buoyancy forces into the rhyolitic melt, thereby entraining tails of basaltic liquid. In the experimental run products, these plume-like filaments of advected basalt within rhyolite were clearly visible and were characterised by microCT and high-resolution EMP analyses. The entrained filaments of mafic material have been hybridised. Their post-experimental compositions range from the originally basaltic composition through andesitic to rhyolitic composition. Rheological modelling of the compositions of these hybridised filaments yield viscosities up to 2 orders of magnitude lower than that of the host rhyolitic liquid. Importantly, such lowered viscosities inside the filaments implies that rising bubbles can ascend more efficiently through pre-existing filaments that have been generated by earlier ascending bubbles. MicroCT imaging of the run products provides textural confirmation of the phenomenon of bubbles trailing one another through filaments. This phenomenon enhances the relevance of bubble advection in magma mixing scenarios, implying as it does so, an acceleration of bubble ascent due to the decreased viscous resistance facing bubbles inside filaments and yielding enhanced mass flux of mafic melt into felsic melt via entrainment. In magma mixing events involving melts of high volatile content, bubbles may be an essential catalyst for magma mixing. Moreover, the reduced viscosity contrast within filaments implies repeated replenishment of filaments with fresh end-member melt. As a result, complex compositional gradients and therefore diffusion systematics can be

  2. Ibitira: A basaltic achondrite from a distinct parent asteroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2004-01-01

    I have done detailed petrologic study of Ibitira, nominally classified as a basaltic eucrite. The Fe/Mn ratio of Ibitira pyroxenes with <10 mole % wollastonite component is 36.4 0.4, and is well-resolved from those of five basaltic eucrites studied for comparison; 31.2-32.2. Data for the latter completely overlap. Ibitira pyroxenes have lower Fe/Mg than the basaltic eucrite pyroxenes. Thus, the higher Fe/Mn ratio does not reflect a simple difference in oxidation state. Ibitira also has an oxygen isotopic composition, alkali element contents and a Ti/Hf ratio that distinguish it from basaltic eucrites. These differences support derivation from a distinct parent asteroid. Ibitira is the first recognized representative of the fifth known asteroidal basaltic crust.

  3. Origin and evolution of high-titanium mare basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohue, Patrick H.

    The Moon is the sole known locality of exposed high-titanium (high-Ti) basalts in the solar system, but their occurrence has implications for the early evolution of the terrestrial planets. High-Ti basalts derive from partial melts of cumulates in the lunar upper mantle. The ilmenite, clinopyroxene, and olivine cumulates from which these basalts form are late-stage products of crystallization of the lunar magma ocean, a planetary-scale melting event that also likely occurred early on in the evolution of Venus, Mercury, the Earth and Mars. Fortunately, despite the ancient nature of mare volcanism, pristine high-Ti basalts are preserved on the relatively inert lunar surface, and the lunar sample collection contains abundant high-Ti basaltic material. Crystals are quantifiable components of the basaltic system, and are a record of the compositional and temporal history of magmatic evolution. Complementary techniques of textural and in-situ trace element geochemical analyses comprise the crystal stratigraphy method used to investigate this history. I use crystal size distributions and spatial distribution profiles to identify crystal populations and quantitatively evaluate rock textures. I use EPMA and LA-ICP-MS analysis of major crystallizing phases to identify processes affecting evolving magmas. I first show that LA-ICP-MS can determine accurate and precise trace elements for ilmenite, which is a major crystallizing phase in high-Ti basalts. The Taurus-Littrow Valley on the Moon contains high-Ti basalts from multiple distinct magmatic source regions. I propose multiple flow events of some regions were sampled during the Apollo missions, and magma partially crystallized for short residence times at shallow depths. Textural characterization of a high-Ti olivine cumulate shows no other samples experienced crystal accumulation. Finally, I investigate two rocklets found in the lunar highlands that were recently classified as basalts. I confirm their basaltic nature

  4. Heterogeneity in titaniferous lunar basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D.; Longhi, J.; Hays, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    Small but real chemical differences exist between subsamples of fine-grained quench-textured titaniferous lunar basalts. The existence of different textural domains with different chemistries is thought to account for most of this variation. In addition to the textural domains, lunar sample 74275 has a population of olivine 'megacrysts' as well as dunite fragments. These materials are thought to be extraneous and to compromise the primary nature of 74275. Recognition of the small chemical variations present may aid in understanding some discrepancies in the experimental-petrology literature. However, these small variations have a distressing petrogenetic significance since they severely limit resolution in recognizing the number and depth of origin of primary magmas.

  5. Can we identify source lithology of basalt?

    PubMed

    Yang, Zong-Feng; Zhou, Jun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The nature of source rocks of basaltic magmas plays a fundamental role in understanding the composition, structure and evolution of the solid earth. However, identification of source lithology of basalts remains uncertainty. Using a parameterization of multi-decadal melting experiments on a variety of peridotite and pyroxenite, we show here that a parameter called FC3MS value (FeO/CaO-3*MgO/SiO2, all in wt%) can identify most pyroxenite-derived basalts. The continental oceanic island basalt-like volcanic rocks (MgO>7.5%) (C-OIB) in eastern China and Mongolia are too high in the FC3MS value to be derived from peridotite source. The majority of the C-OIB in phase diagrams are equilibrium with garnet and clinopyroxene, indicating that garnet pyroxenite is the dominant source lithology. Our results demonstrate that many reputed evolved low magnesian C-OIBs in fact represent primary pyroxenite melts, suggesting that many previous geological and petrological interpretations of basalts based on the single peridotite model need to be reconsidered. PMID:23676779

  6. An estimate of the juvenile sulfur content of basalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Fabbi, Brent P.

    1971-01-01

    Sulfur analyses by X-ray fluorescence give an average content of 107 ppm for 9 samples of fresh subaerially-erupted oceanic basalt and 680 ppm for 38 samples of submarine erupted basalt. This difference is the result of retention of sulfur in basalt quenched on the sea floor and loss of sulfur in basalt by degassing at the surface. The outer glassy part of submarine erupted basalt contains 800??150 ppm sulfur, and this amount is regarded as an estimate of the juvenile sulfur content of the basalt melt from the mantle. The slower cooled interiors of basalt pillows are depleted relative to the rims owing to degassing and escape through surface fractures. Available samples of deep-sea basalts do not indicate a difference in original sulfur content between low-K tholeiite, Hawaiian tholeiite, and alkali basalt. The H2O/S ratio of analyzed volcanic gases is generally lower than the H2O/S ratio of gases presumed lost from surface lavas as determined by chemical differences between pillow rims and surface lavas. This enrichment of volcanic gases in sulfur relative to water may result from a greater degassing of sulfur relative to water from shallow intrusive bodies beneath the volcano. ?? 1971 Springer-Verlag.

  7. The petrogenesis of primary mid-ocean ridge basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elthon, Don

    1990-01-01

    The nature of primary mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) is reviewed from the primary-magma composition point of view. The concept of primary MORB magma used in the study stipulates that melting of the mantle produces a discrete identifiable magma that separates from the mantle and ascends toward the surface. Constraints from abyssal peridotites are considered along with constraints from high-pressure phase equilibria studies with emphasis on partial melting of mantle peridotites, basalt-peridotite sandwich techniques, high-pressure experiments on MORB-type compositions, and constraints on the pressure of origin from mineral compositions. Compositional variations in primitive MORB glasses are discussed, and possible models for the origin of these glasses are presented.

  8. Magma energy extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.; Ortega, A.; Hickox, C.E.; Chu, T.Y.; Wemple, R.P.; Boehm, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    The rate at which energy can be extracted from crustal magma bodies has an important influence on the economic viability of the magma energy concept. Open heat exchanger systems where fluid is circulated through solidified magma offer the promise of high energy extraction rates. This concept was successfully demonstrated during experiments in the molten zone of Kilauea Iki lava lake. Ongoing research is directed at developing a fundamental understanding of the establishment and long term operation of open systems in a crustal magma body. These studies show that magma solidifying around a cooled borehole will be extensively fractured and form a permeable medium through which fluid can be circulated. Numerical modeling of the complete magma energy extraction process predicts that high quality thermal energy can be delivered to the wellhead at rates that will produce from 25 to 30 MW electric.

  9. Magma Energy Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.; Ortega, A.; Hickox, C.E.; Chu, T.Y.; Wemple, R.P.; Boehm, R.F.

    1987-01-20

    The rate at which energy can be extracted from crustal magma bodies has an important influence on the economic viability of the magma energy concept. Open heat exchanger systems where fluid is circulated through solidified magma offer the promise of high energy extraction rates. This concept was successfully demonstrated during experiments in the molten zone of Kilauea Iki lava lake. Ongoing research is directed at developing a fundamental understanding of the establishment and long term operation of open systems in a crustal magma body. These studies show that magma solidifying around a cooled borehole will be extensively fractured and form a permeable medium through which fluid can be circulated. Numerical modeling of the complete magma energy extraction process predicts that high quality thermal energy can be delivered to the wellhead at rates that will produce from 25 to 30 MW electric. 10 figs., 10 refs.

  10. Geochemistry, Petrology, and Provenance of Magnetite-Rich Ortaklar Cu Deposit Hosting Basalts from Koçali Complex, Gaziantep, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, E.; Lee, I.; Kang, J.; Dönmez, C.; Yildirim, N.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetite-rich Cyprus type VMS deposit has been recently discovered from the Ortaklar-Gaziantep region within Koçali complex, SE Turkey. Magnetite rich sulfide ore bodies are in close contact with underlying footwall spilitic basalts. These basalts are part of Koçali mélange, which represents an accreted oceanic complex during closing of southern Neotethys. These extrusives are low-K, low alkali tholeiites with Ca rich, partially sericitized plagioclase subophitically enclosed by augite with disseminated Fe-Ti oxides and pyrite. Mineral crystallization sequence of plagioclase followed by augite and opaque is typical of MORB. Major and trace element analyses for least altered basalts based on LOI (1.5~3.6 wt%), Ce/Ce* (0.9~1.1) exhibit limited range of element abundances. Low Mg# (59~60) suggests that basalts were derived from moderately evolved magma with fractional crystallization. HFSE (Th, Nb, Hf, Zr) were used for tectonic discrimination and basalts were plotted within MORB end spectrum, near MORB-IAT boundary. N-MORB normalized La to Lu ranges from 0.4 to 0.9 times N-MORB with LREE depletion [(La/Sm)N = 0.58~0.67] and flat HREE [(Tb/Lu)N = 0.95~1.05]. Chondrite normalized REE patterns resemble those of N-MORB but characterized by severe LREE depletion [(La/Sm)CN = 0.35~0.45]. LREE depletion coupled with high Sm/Nd (0.36~0.43), high CaO/Na2O (5.0~6.2) and low Nb/Yb (0.23~0.39) suggest depleted N-MORB composition derived from the refractory mantle source. Analyzed basalts are similar to those found from other rift (Costa Rica Rift Hole 504b) and intra-transform fault (Siqueiros transform). Magnetite emplacement occurring close to the ore-host boundary and lack of pyrrhotite from hosting basalts imply an involvement of oxidized hydrothermal fluids. Basalts probably have formed by late stage, partial melting of the refractory mantle at low pressure, shallow depth, and H2O rich environment. Possible source of mantle heterogeneity can be identified by isotope

  11. Continental Flood Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Continental flood basalts have been receiving considerable scientific attention lately. Recent publications have focused on several particular flood-basalt provinces (Brito-Arctic, Karoo, Parana', Deccan, and Columbia Plateau), and much attention has been given to the proposed connection between flood-basalt volcanism, bolide impacts, and mass extinctions. The editor of Continental Flood Basalts, J. D. Macdougall, conceived the book to assemble in a single volume, from a vast and scattered literature, an overview of each major post-Cambrian flood-basalt province.Continental Flood Basalts has 10 chapters; nine treat individual flood-basalt provinces, and a summary chapter compares and contrasts continental flood-basalts and mid-oceanic ridge basalts. Specifically, the chapters address the Columbia River basalt, the northwest United States including the Columbia River basalt, the Ethiopian Province, the North Atlantic Tertiary Province, the Deccan Traps, the Parana' Basin, the Karoo Province, the Siberian Platform, and Cenozoic basaltic rocks in eastern China. Each chapter is written by one or more individuals with an extensive background in the province.

  12. Tracking Development of the Taupo (New Zealand) Rhyolitic Magma Chamber Through Melt Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arculus, R. J.; Belfield, S.; Earl, K. L.

    2005-05-01

    The Taupo Volcanic Centre is one of the most globally productive in terms of magma volumes, and is located in the North Island of New Zealand, in-land from the Hikurangi Trench and along strike from the Kermadec Arc. The largest eruption in the last 30 thousand years was the Oruanui (~300 km3). On the basis of whole-rock and mineral compositions, Sutton et al. (2000; Jl. Geol. Soc. London, 157, 537-552) recognize four post-Oruanui (~26.5 ka) magma types erupted from the Taupo Volcanic Centre; the largest (about 35 km3) of these erupted at 1.77 ka had a short magma chamber residence time (less than 103 years), possibly resulting in a lack of compositional zonation. We have analysed phenocrysts, matrix glasses, and glass (formerly melt) inclusions trapped within the dominant plagioclase, pyroxene, and Fe-Ti oxide phenocryst assemblages of 3 (rhyolitic) of these groups, using electron microprobe (major elements; 5 to 20 micron-diameter spots) and laser ablation, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) (trace elements; 30 to 40 micron spots). The most significant of these results are: 1. for the trace alkali (Rb, Cs) and alkaline earth elements (Sr, Ba), there are large abundance ranges both within matrix and melt inclusions, by up to factors of two; 2. the range of individual LA-ICP-MS spot analyses encompasses the compositional range (by X-ray fluorescence) of bulk pumices; 3. distinctive (by individual eruption) and positive correlations between the alkalis, alkaline earths and light rare earth elements; 4. even within a specific eruption, there is more than one trace element correlation trend; 5. individual phenocrysts are compositionally zoned requiring some heterogeneity of former host melts. Using the experimentally-constrained criterion of Mn partitioning for equilibrium between coexisting ilmenite-magnetite solid solutions, it is possible to calculate sequentially: the equilibrium T-fO2 of homogenised host magmas (temperature ranges ~ 760 to

  13. Why do Martian Magmas erupt?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balta, J. B.; McSween, H. Y.

    2011-12-01

    Eruption of silicate lava, whether on Earth or another planet, requires that at some depth the melt has lower density than the surrounding rocks. As the densities of silicate liquids change during crystallization, whether a particular silicate liquid will erupt or be trapped at a level of neutral buoyancy is a complex yet fundamental issue for planetary dynamics. In general, 3 factors drive surface eruptions: inherent buoyancy relative to mantle phases, compositional evolution, and volatile contents. These factors manifest on Earth as terrestrial basalts commonly have compositions close to a density minimum [1]. Recent work has produced estimates of Martian parental magma compositions [2-5] based on shergottite meteorites and from Gusev crater. Using the MELTS algorithm [6] and other density calibrations, we simulated evolution of these liquids, focusing on density changes. For much of the crystallization path, density is controlled by FeO. All of the liquids begin with ρ ~ 2.8 g/cc at 1 bar, and the evolution of liquid density is controlled by the liquidus phases. At low pressures, olivine is the liquidus phase for each melt, and as FeO is not incompatible in olivine, olivine crystallization decreases liquid density, increasing buoyancy with crystallization. However, FeO is incompatible in pyroxene, and thus liquids crystallizing pyroxene become denser and less buoyant with crystallization, producing liquids with densities up to and above 3.0 g/cc. As the olivine-pyroxene saturation relationship is affected by pressure and chemistry, the identity of the liquidus phase and density evolution will vary between magmas. Without spreading centers, Mars has no location where the mantle approaches the surface, and it is likely that any magma which is denser than the crust will stall below or within that crust. The crystallization path of a liquid is a function of pressure, with pyroxene crystallizing first at P > 10 kbar (~80 km depth), close to the base of the Martian

  14. A new lunar high-Ti basalt type defined from clasts in Apollo 16 breccia 60639

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, A. L.; Neal, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the detailed examination of three basalt clasts from Apollo 16 breccia 60639 that represent a new variant of high-Ti basalt returned from the Moon by the Apollo 16 mission. Mineral chemistry and whole-rock analyses were conducted on aliquots from three clasts (breccia matrix, basalt, and basalt + breccia matrix). The basalt clasts, which are not overtly porphyritic, contain compositionally zoned pyroxene, olivine, and plagioclase crystals that represent the evolution of the magma during crystallization; ilmenite does not exhibit major-element compositional zoning within individual crystals. Mineral compositions are distinct between the basalt and breccia matrix lithologies. In addition, whole-rock analyses identify clear compositional differences between the basalt and breccia matrix lithologies in both major and trace element concentrations. The composition of the mixed lithology aliquots (i.e., basalt + breccia matrix) do not indicate simple two component mixing (i.e., compositions are not intermediate to the basalt and breccia end-members); this apparent incongruity can be accounted for by adding ∼19-40% plagioclase to an amalgamation of the average basalt and individual breccia clast compositions via impact mixing. Whole-rock analyses are consistent with previous analyses of one 60639 basalt clast, which were interpreted to indicate chemical similarity with Apollo 11 and 17 basalts. However, both major and trace elements suggest that the 60639 basalt clasts examined here have compositions that are distinct from Apollo 11 and 17 high-Ti basalts. Although the 60639 basalt clasts have similar characteristics to a variety of previously identified basalt types, the more extensive whole-rock analyses reported here indicate that they represent a type of Apollo high-Ti basalt heretofore unrecognized in the Apollo and lunar meteorite collections. By placing these new analyses in the context of other mare basalt compositions, a petrogenetic model for

  15. The Bowen-Fenner Debate Revisited: A Review of Basalt Crystal Fractionation and the Generation of Andesite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrey, R. M.

    2002-12-01

    The Bowen-Fenner debate over the nature of basalt crystal fractionation is still unresolved. Bowen's classic 1928 book detailed his basalt-andesite-rhyolite fractionation scheme, whereas Fenner emphasized the evidence for Fe-enrichment during most basalt crystallization, thus anticipating discovery of the Skaergaard. In the 1940's Bowen suggested only wet basalt generates common andesite. To address this debate MELTS simulations were performed with near-constant parents but varied water contents from 0-4 wt per cent. For comparison, data were compiled from mid-ocean ridge (MORB), back-arc basin (BABB), and arc basalts. There is a strong correlation between empirical fractionation patterns and the simulations. Dry basaltic magma exemplified by MORB shows fractionation patterns controlled by early plagioclase crystallization, whereas nearly all wet arc basaltic magmas have patterns controlled by crystallization of mafic minerals, with the later onset of highly calcic plagioclase. BABB have fractionation patterns between those two extremes. The fundamental antithetic behavior of Al and Fe during basalt crystal fractionation due to the sensitive control over plagioclase crystallization by water is completely obscured by the use of Harker and AFM diagrams. Mafic arc basalts which show evidence for significant crystallization of magnetite are largely lacking - most arc basalt fractionation patterns are consistent with 2-3 per cent H2O in the primitive melt and oxygen fugacity near the NNO buffer. A few mafic arc volcanoes have steep increases in Al content or slightly declining Fe content with only slight increases in FeO*/MgO suggestive of significant magnetite crystallization. Magma at these centers must be somewhat more hydrous and/or oxidized than is the normal case. Arc basalt clinopyroxene compositions support the inference that common high-alumina basalt (HAB) is a derivative magma, as empirical and experimental data, and MELTS simulations, all show coupled

  16. Petrological, magnetic and chemical properties of basalt dredged from an abyssal hill in the North-east pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luyendyk, B.P.; Engel, C.G.

    1969-01-01

    OVER the years, samples of basalt from the oceanic crust have been taken mainly from seamounts, fracture zones and ridge and rise crests1-6, and rarely from the vast fields of abyssal hills which cover a large part of the deep-sea floor. The basalt sampled from the deeper regions of the oceanic crust (for example, on fault scarps) is a distinct variety of tholeiitic basalt, while alkali basalt is restricted to the volcanic edifices4. Oceanic tholeiitic basalt differs from alkali basalt and continental tholeiite chiefly in having a relatively low percentage of K2O (0.2 weight per cent)4. Some authors have speculated that this type of tholeiitic basalt is the major extrusion from the upper mantle and constitutes the predominant rock type in the upper oceanic crust. ?? 1969 Nature Publishing Group.

  17. Magma mixing enhanced by bubble segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmaier, S.; Daniele, M.; Renggli, C.; Perugini, D.; De Campos, C.; Hess, K. U.; Ertel-Ingrisch, W.; Lavallée, Y.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Rising bubbles may significantly affect magma mixing paths as has been demonstrated by analogue experiments in the past. Here, bubble-advection experiments are performed for the first time employing natural materials at magmatic temperatures. Cylinders of basaltic glass were placed below cylinders of rhyolite glass. Upon melting, interstitial air formed bubbles that rose into the rhyolite melt, thereby entraining tails of basaltic liquid. The formation of plume-like filaments of advected basalt within the rhyolite was characterized by microCT and subsequent high-resolution EMP analyses. Melt entrainment by bubble ascent appears as efficient mechanism to mingle contrasting melt compositions. MicroCT imaging shows bubbles trailing each other and trails of multiple bubbles having converged. Rheological modelling of the filaments yields viscosities of up to 2 orders of magnitude lower than for the surrounding rhyolitic liquid. Such a viscosity contrast implies that subsequent bubbles rising are likely to follow the same pathways that previously ascending bubbles have generated. Filaments formed by multiple bubbles would thus experience episodic replenishment with mafic material. Fundamental implications for the concept of bubble advection in magma mixing are thus a) an acceleration of mixing because of decreased viscous resistance for bubbles inside filaments and b) non-conventional diffusion systematics because of intermittent supply of mafic material (instead of a single pulse) inside a filament. Inside these filaments, the mafic material was variably hybridised to andesitic through rhyolitic composition. Compositional profiles alone are ambiguous, however, to determine whether single or multiple bubbles were involved during formation of a filament. Statistical analysis, employing concentration variance as measure of homogenisation, demonstrates that also filaments appearing as single-bubble filaments are likely to have experienced multiple bubbles passing through

  18. Modeling Central American basalts using the Arc Basalt Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigenson, M.; Carr, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    We have used the Arc Basalt Simulator (ABS), developed by JI Kimura, to explore the conditions and components of melting beneath the Central American volcanic front. ABS is a comprehensive forward model that incorporates slab dehydration and melting and mantle wedge fluxing and melting using realistic P-T conditions and experimentally determined phase relations. We have applied ABS versions 3 and 4 to model representative magma types in Nicaragua, which span a broad geochemical range including proximal high- and low-Ti lavas in Nicaragua. Sr-Nd-Pb data require appropriate selection of previously identified sources, including: separate carbonate and hemipelagic sediments, DMM, an enriched mantle isotopically similar to the alkaline basalts of Yojoa, a Himu-influenced mantle derived from Galapagos material and altered oceanic crust (AOC) derived from both MORB and Galapagos seamounts. Following the dry solidus, the dominant arc basalts, exemplified by Cerro Negro lavas, can be generated at about 80-90 km where lawsonite and zoisite break down, releasing LILEs into a hydrous fluid that travels into the wedge. The fluid-triggered melting occurs just above the garnet stability field in the wedge to fit the HREEs. Below 90 Km, slab melting begins and the AOC component dominates, generating a fluid with little or no HFSE depletions, consistent with the unusual high-Ti lavas found in Nicaragua. However, the isotopic data require a much lower sediment input for the high-Ti lavas (consistent with 10Be results on the high-Ti lavas) and an enriched component for the AOC and/or mantle wedge. Following the wet solidus, fits to the Cerro Negro magma only occur in the absence of phengite in the AOC and with the presence of HFSE attracting minerals, rutile, zircon and allanite. The depth of the best fit is 135 km, consistent with current best estimates of the depth to the seismic zone beneath Cerro Negro. Below 150 km, the high-Ti lavas can be generated if the HFSE retaining

  19. An Apollo 15 Mare Basalt Fragment and Lunar Mare Provinces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Graham; Burling, Trina Cox

    1996-01-01

    Lunar sample 15474,4 is a tiny fragment of olivine-augite vitrophyre that is a mare basalt. Although petroraphically distinct from all other Apollo 15 samples, it has been ignored since its first brief description. Our new petrographic and mineral chemical data show that the olivines and pyroxenes are distinct from those in other basalts. The basalt cooled and solidified extremely rapidly; some of the olivine might be cumulate or crystallized prior to extrusion. Bulk-chemical data show that the sample is probably similar to an evolved Apollo 15 olivine-normative basalt in major elements but is distinct in its rare earth element pattern. Its chemical composition and petrography both show that 15474,4 cannot be derived from other Apollo 15 mare basalts by shallow-level crystal fractionation. It represents a distinct extrusion of magma. Nonetheless, the chemical features that 15474,4 has in common with other Apollo 15 mare basalts, including the high FeO/Sc, the general similarity of the rare earth element pattern, and the common (and chondritic) TiO2/Sm ratio, emphasize the concept of a geochemical province at the Apollo 15 site that is distinct from basalts and provinces elsewhere. In making a consistent picture for the derivation of all of the Apollo 15 basalts, both the commonalities and the differences among the basalts must be explained. The Apollo 15 commonalities and differences suggest that the sources must have consisted of major silicate phases with the same composition but with varied amounts of a magma trapped from a contemporary magma ocean. They probably had a high olivine/pyroxene ratio and underwent small and reasonably consistent degrees of partial melting to produce the basalts. These inferences may be inconsistent with models that suggest greatly different depths of melting among basalts, primitive sources for the green glasses, or extensive olivine fractionation during ascent. An integrated approach to lunar mare provinces, of which the Apollo 15

  20. Time scales of crystal mixing in magma mushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleicher, Jillian M.; Bergantz, George W.; Breidenthal, Robert E.; Burgisser, Alain

    2016-02-01

    Magma mixing is widely recognized as a means of producing compositional diversity and preconditioning magmas for eruption. However, the processes and associated time scales that produce the commonly observed expressions of magma mixing are poorly understood, especially under crystal-rich conditions. Here we introduce and exemplify a parameterized method to predict the characteristic mixing time of crystals in a crystal-rich magma mush that is subject to open-system reintrusion events. Our approach includes novel numerical simulations that resolve multiphase particle-fluid interactions. It also quantifies the crystal mixing by calculating both the local and system-wide progressive loss of the spatial correlation of individual crystals throughout the mixing region. Both inertial and viscous time scales for bulk mixing are introduced. Estimated mixing times are compared to natural examples and the time for basaltic mush systems to become well mixed can be on the order of 10 days.

  1. Direct Observation of Rhyolite Magma by Drilling: The Proposed Krafla Magma Drilling Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, J. C.; Sigmundsson, F.; Papale, P.; Markusson, S.; Loughlin, S.

    2014-12-01

    Remarkably, drilling in Landsvirkjun Co.'s geothermal field in Krafla Caldera, Iceland has encountered rhyolite magma or hypersolidus rhyolite at 2.1-2.5 km depth in 3 wells distributed over 3.5 km2, including Iceland Deep Drilling Program's IDDP-1 (Mortensen, 2012). Krafla's most recent rifting and eruption (basalt) episode was 1975-1984; deformation since that time has been simple decay. Apparently rhyolite magma was either emplaced during that episode without itself erupting or quietly evolved in situ within 2-3 decades. Analysis of drill cuttings containing quenched melt from IDDP-1 yielded unprecedented petrologic data (Zierenberg et al, 2012). But interpreting active processes of heat and mass transfer requires knowing spatial variations in physical and chemical characteristics at the margin of the magma body, and that requires retrieving core - a not-inconceivable task. Core quenched in situ in melt up to 1150oC was recovered from Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii by the Magma Energy Project >30 years ago. The site from which IDDP-1 was drilled, and perhaps IDDP-1 itself, may be available to attempt the first-ever coring of rhyolite magma, now proposed as the Krafla Magma Drilling Project (KMDP). KMDP would also include geophysical and geochemical experiments to measure the response of the magma/hydrothermal system to fluid injection and flow tests. Fundamental results will reveal the behavior of magma in the upper crust and coupling between magma and the hydrothermal system. Extreme, sustained thermal power output during flow tests of IDDP-1 suggests operation of a Kilauea-Iki-like freeze-fracture-flow boundary propagating into the magma and mining its latent heat of crystallization (Carrigan et al, EGU, 2014). Such an ultra-hot Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) might be developable beneath this and other magma-heated conventional hydrothermal systems. Additionally, intra-caldera intrusions like Krafla's are believed to produce the unrest that is so troubling in

  2. The parent magma of the Nakhla (SNC) meteorite: Reconciliation of composition estimates from magmatic inclusions and element partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.

    1993-01-01

    The composition of the parent magma of the Nakhla meteorite was difficult to determine, because it is accumulate rock, enriched in olivine and augite relative to a basalt magma. A parent magma composition is estimated from electron microprobe area analyses of magmatic inclusions in olivine. This composition is consistent with an independent estimate based on the same inclusions, and with chemical equilibria with the cores of Nakhla's augites. This composition reconciles most of the previous estimates of Nakhla's magma composition, and obviates the need for complex magmatic processes. Inconsistency between this composition and those calculated previously suggests that magma flowed through and crystallized into Nakhla as it cooled.

  3. The parent magma of xenoliths in shergottite EETA79001: Bulk and trace element composition inferred from magmatic inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Lindstrom, David J.; Martinez, Rene R.

    1994-01-01

    The SNC meteorites are samples of the Martian crust, so inferences about their origins and parent magmas are of wide planetologic significance. The EETA79001 shergottite, a basalt, contains xenoliths of pyroxene-olivine cumulate rocks which are possibly related to the ALHA77005 and LEW88516 SNC lherzolites. Olivines in the xenoliths contain magmatic inclusions, relics of magma trapped within the growing crystals. The magmatic inclusions allow a parent magma composition to be retrieved; it is similar to the composition reconstructed from xenolith pyroxenes by element distribution coefficients. The xenolith parent magma is similar but not identical to parent magmas for the shergottite lherzolites.

  4. The Parent Magmas of the Cumulate Eucrites: A Mass Balance Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1996-01-01

    The cumulate eucrite meteorites are gabbros that are related to the eucrite basalt meteorites. The eucrite basalts are relatively primitive (nearly flat REE patterns with La approx. 8-30 x CI), but the parent magmas of the cumulate eucrites have been inferred as extremely evolved (La to greater than 100 x CI). This inference has been based on mineral/magma partitioning, and on mass balance considering the cumulate eucrites as adcumulates of plagioclase + pigeonite only; both approaches have been criticized as inappropriate. Here, mass balance including magma + equilibrium pigeonite + equilibrium plagiociase is used to test a simple model for the cumulate eucrites: that they formed from known eucritic magma types, that they consisted only of magma + crystals in chemical equilibrium with the magma, and that they were closed to chemical exchange after the accumulation of crystals. This model is tested for major and Rare Earth Elements (REE). The cumulate eucrites Serra de Mage and Moore County are consistent, in both REE and major elements, with formation by this simple model from a eucrite magma with a composition similar to the Nuevo Laredo meteorite: Serra de Mage as 14% magma, 47.5% pigeonite, and 38.5% plagioclase; Moore County as 35% magma, 37.5% pigeonite, and 27.5% plagioclase. These results are insensitive to the choice of mineral/magma partition coefficients. Results for the Moama cumulate eucrite are strongly dependent on choice of partition coefficients; for one reasonable choice, Moama's composition can be modeled as 4% Nuevo Laredo magma, 60% pigeonite, and 36% plagioclase. Selection of parent magma composition relies heavily on major elements; the REE cannot uniquely indicate a parent magma among the eucrite basalts. The major element composition of Y-791195 can be fit adequately as a simple cumulate from any basaltic eucrite composition. However, Y-791195 has LREE abundances and La/Lu too low to be accommodated within the model using any basaltic

  5. Twilight of a Volcanic Field: 11 Million Years of Basaltic Volcanism in the Southwestern Nevada Volcanic Field, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, F. V.; Valintine, G. A.

    2007-12-01

    the presence of mantle heterogeneities enriched in hydrous minerals that are partially melted. During regional extension, these zones are relatively weak and preferentially deform, forming melt bands of increased porosity that concentrate melt and lead to dike generation. Decreasing regional extension results in less melt accumulation and decreasing eruption volumes. Without a new source of heat and limited lithospheric extension, it is likely that the next million years of volcanic activity in the field will likely be characterized by eruptions of the type that have occurred during the past million years of activity: infrequent eruptions of small-volume (<0.1 km3), volatile-rich alkali basalt magmas within the most tectonically active southern and western margins of the volcanic field.

  6. Basalt generation at the Apollo 12 site. Part 2: Source heterogeneity, multiple melts, and crustal contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Clive R.; Hacker, Matthew D.; Snyder, Gregory A.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Liu, Yun-Gang; Schmitt, Roman A.

    1994-01-01

    The petrogenesis of Apollo 12 mare basalts has been examined with emphasis on trace-element ratios and abundances. Vitrophyric basalts were used as parental compositions for the modeling, and proportions of fractionating phases were determined using the MAGFOX prograqm of Longhi (1991). Crystal fractionation processes within crustal and sub-crustal magma chambers are evaluated as a function of pressure. Knowledge of the fractionating phases allows trace-element variations to be considered as either source related or as a product of post-magma-generation processes. For the ilmenite and olivine basalts, trace-element variations are inherited from the source, but the pigeonite basalt data have been interpreted with open-system evolution processes through crustal assimilation. Three groups of basalts have been examined: (1) Pigeonite basalts-produced by the assimilation of lunar crustal material by a parental melt (up to 3% assimilation and 10% crystal fractionation, with an 'r' value of 0.3). (2) Ilmenite basalts-produced by variable degrees of partial melting (4-8%) of a source of olivine, pigeonite, augite, and plagioclase, brought together by overturn of the Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO) cumulate pile. After generation, which did not exhaust any of the minerals in the source, these melts experienced closed-system crystal fractionation/accumulation. (3) Olivine basalts-produced by variable degrees of partial melting (5-10%) of a source of olivine, pigeonite, and augite. After generation, again without exhausting any of the minerals in the source, these melts evolved through crystal accumulation. The evolved liquid counterparts of these cumulates have not been sampled. The source compositions for the ilmenite and olivine basalts were calculated by assuming that the vitrophyric compositions were primary and the magmas were produced by non-modal batch melting. Although the magnitude is unclear, evaluation of these source regions indicates that both be composed of early- and

  7. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  8. Is plagioclase removal responsible for the negative Eu anomaly in the source regions of mare basalts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    The nearly ubiquitous presence of a negative Eu anomaly in the mare basalts has been suggested to indicate prior separation and flotation of plagioclase from the basalt source region during its crystallization from a lunar magma ocean (LMO). Are there any mare basalts derived from a mantle source which did not experience prior plagioclase separation? Crystal chemical rationale for REE substitution in pyroxene suggests that the combination of REE size and charge, M2 site characteristics of pyroxene, fO2, magma chemistry, and temperature may account for the negative Eu anomaly in the source region of some types of primitive, low TiO2 mare basalts. This origin for the negative Eu anomaly does not preclude the possibility of the LMO as many mare basalts still require prior plagioclase crystallization and separation and/or hybridization involving a KREEP component.

  9. Experimental constraints on CO2 and H2O in the Martian mantle and primary magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, John R.; Domanik, Kenneth J.; Cocheo, Peter A.

    1993-01-01

    We present new data on the stability of hornblende in a Martian mantle composition, on CO2 solubility in iron-rich basaltic magmas, and on the solubility of H2O in an alkalic basaltic magma. These new data are combined with a summary of data from the literature to present a summary of the current state of our estimates of solubilities of H2O and CO2 in probable Martian magmas and the stability of hornblende in a slightly hydrous mantle. The new results suggest that hornblende stability is not sensitive to the Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratio (mg#) of the mantle, that is the results for terrestrial mantle compositions are similar to the more iron-rich Martian composition. Likewise, CO2 solubility in iron-rich tholeiitic basaltic magmas is similar to iron-poor terrestrial compositions. The solubility of H2O has been measured in an alkalic basaltic (basanite) composition for the first time, and it is significantly lower than predicted for models of water solubility in magmas. The lack of mg# dependence observed in hornblende stability and on CO2 solubility that in many cases terrestrial results can be applied to Martian compositions. This conclusion does not apply to other phenomena such as primary magma compositions and major mantle mineral mineralogy.

  10. On the connection between mare basalts and picritic volcanic glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhi, John

    1987-01-01

    The liquid lines of descent were calculated for low-pressure equilibrium and fractional crystallization of mare basaltic liquids in order to examine the postulated link between picritic volcanic glasses and mare basalts. The models of Longhi (1977, 1982) were modified by including expressions for the armalcolite/ilmenite surface boundary and the Cr-spinel liquidus surface, average molar partition coefficients for armalcolite/liquid pairs, and new experimental data of Longhi and Pan (1987). The results indicate that, with two exceptions, mare basalts and picritic volcanic glasses are not related by simple, linear-surface crystallization processes. However, the compositions of Luna 24 ferrobasalt and Apollo 11 high-K basalts could be closely matched with the lines of liquid descent of certain green and orange picritic glasses, respectively. The calculations also show that the picritic magmas would have fractionated to produce basalts with bulk and mineral compositions similar to those of mare basalts, supporting the hypothesis that mare basalts have fractionated compositions and that the small number of observed linkages between basalts and picritic parents is a consequence of limited sampling.

  11. Calculation of water-bearing primary basalt and estimation of source mantle conditions beneath arcs: PRIMACALC2 model for WINDOWS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Ariskin, Alexey A.

    2014-04-01

    present a new method for estimating the composition of water-bearing primary arc basalt and its source mantle conditions. The PRIMACALC2 model uses a thermodynamic fractional crystallization model COMAGMAT3.72 and runs with an Excel macro to examine the mantle equilibrium and trace element calculations of a primary basalt. COMAGMAT3.72 calculates magma fractionation in 0-10 kb at various compositions, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and water content, but is only applicable for forward calculations. PRIMACALC2 first calculates the provisional composition of a primary basalt from an observed magma. The basalt composition is then calculated by COMAGMAT3.72 for crystallization. Differences in elemental concentrations between observed and the closest-match calculated magmas are then adjusted in the primary basalt. Further iteration continues until the calculated magma composition converges with the observed magma, resulting in the primary basalt composition. Once the fitting is satisfied, back calculations of trace elements are made using stepwise addition of fractionated minerals. Mantle equilibrium of the primary basalt is tested using the Fo-NiO relationship of olivine in equilibrium with the primary basalt, and thus with the source mantle. Source mantle pressure, temperature, and degree of melting are estimated using petrogenetic grids based on experimental data obtained in anhydrous systems. Mantle melting temperature in a hydrous system is computed by adjusting T with a parameterization for a water-bearing system. PRIMACALC2 can be used either in dry or water-bearing arc magmas and is also applicable to mid-ocean ridge basalts and nonalkalic ocean island basalts.

  12. Vapor segregation and loss in basaltic melts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edmonds, M.; Gerlach, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of volcanic gases at Pu'u'O??'o??, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, reveal distinct degassing regimes with respect to vapor segregation and loss during effusive activity in 2004-2005. Three styles of vapor loss are distinguished by the chemical character of the emitted volcanic gases, measured by open path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: 1 persistent continuous gas emission, 2 gas piston events, and 3 lava spattering. Persistent continuous gas emission is associated with magma ascent and degassing beneath the crater vents, then eruption of the degassed magma from flank vents. Gas piston events are the result of static gas accumulation at depths of 400-900 m beneath Pu'u'O??'o??. A CO2-rich gas slug travels up the conduit at a few meters per second, displacing magma as it expands. Lava spattering occurs due to dynamic bubble coalescence in a column of relatively stagnant magma. The Large gas bubbles are H2O rich and are generated by open-system degassing at depths of <150 m. Static gas accumulation and dynamic bubble coalescence are both manifestations of vapor segregation in basaltic melts, but their implications differ. Accumulation and segregation of CO2-rich vapor at depth does not deplete the melt of H2O (required to drive lava fountains near to the surface) and therefore gas piston events can occur interspersed with lava fountaining activity. Lava spattering, however, efficiently strips H2O-rich vapor from magma beneath the crater vents; the magma must then erupt effusively from vents on the flank of the cone. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  13. Continental crustal formation and recycling: Evidence from oceanic basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, A. D.; Tarney, J.; Norry, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    Despite the wealth of geochemical data for subduction-related magma types, and the clear importance of such magmas in the creation of continental crust, there is still no concensus about the relative magnitudes of crustal creation versus crustal destruction (i.e., recycling of crust into the mantle). The role of subducted sediment in the formation of the arc magmas is now well documented; but what proportion of sediment is taken into the deeper mantle? Integrated isotopic and trace element studies of magmas erupted far from presently active subduction zones, in particular basaltic rocks erupted in the ocean basins, are providing important information about the role of crustal recycling. By identifying potential chemical tracers, it is impossible to monitor the effects of crustal recycling, and produce models predicting the mass of material recycled into the mantle throughout long periods of geological time.

  14. Milk-alkali syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000332.htm Milk-alkali syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Milk-alkali syndrome is a condition in which there ...

  15. Oxygen isotope constraints on the petrogenesis of Aleutian arc magmas

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, B.S.; O'Neil, J.R. ); Brophy, J.G. )

    1992-04-01

    The first measurement of {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O ratios of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, and titanomagnetite phenocrysts from modern Aleutian island-arc lavas provides new insight and independent constraints on magma sources and intracrustal processes. Basalts are heterogeneous on the scale of the entire arc and individual volcanic centers. Combined with Sr isotope and trace element data {delta}{sup 18}O{sub plag} values suggest a variable magma source characterized by differences in the mantle wedge or the subducted sediment component along the volcanic front. Seven tholeiitic basalt to rhyodacite lavas from the Seguam volcanic center have nearly identical {delta}{sup 18}O{sub plag} values of 6.0{per thousand} {plus minus} 0.2{per thousand}, reflecting extensive closed-system plagioclase-dominated crystal fractionation. Oxygen isotope thermometry and pyroxene and oxide equilibria indicate that differentiation occurred between 1,150 {plus minus} 100C (basalt) and 950 {plus minus} 100C (rhyodacite). In contrast, {delta}{sup 18}O{sub plag} values of 12 calc-alkalic basaltic andesites and andesites from the smaller Kanaga volcanic center span a broader range of 5.9{per thousand}-6.6{per thousand}, and consist of mostly higher values. Isotopic disequilibrium in the Kanaga system is manifest in two ways: two types of basaltic inclusions with contrasting {delta}{sup 18}O values occur in one andesite, and in two other andesites plagioclase-titanomagnetite and clinopyroxene-titanomagnetite oxygen isotope temperatures are inconsistent.

  16. Formation of redox gradients during magma-magma mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruprecht, P.; Fiege, A.; Simon, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Magma-mixing is a key process that controls mass transfer in magmatic systems. The variations in melt compositions near the magma-magma interface potentially change the Fe oxidation state [1] and, thus, affect the solubility and transport of metals. To test this hypothesis, diffusion-couple experiments were performed at 1000 °C, 150 MPa and QFM+4. Synthesized crystal-bearing cylinders of hydrous dacite and hydrous basaltic andesite were equilibrated for up to 80 h. The run products show that mafic components (Fe, Mg, etc.) were transported from the andesite into the dacite, while Si, Na and K diffused from the dacite into the andesite. A crystal dissolution sequence in the order of cpx, opx, plag, and spl/il was observed for the andesite. We combined μ-XANES spectroscopy at Fe K-edge [2] with two-oxide oxybarometry [3] to measure redox profiles within our experiments. Here, fO2 decreased towards the interface within the dacite and increased towards the interface within the andesite. This discontinuous fO2 evolution, with a sharp redox gradient of ~1.8 log fO2 units at the interface was maintained throughout the time-series despite the externally imposed fO2 of the vessel. We propose a combination of two mechanisms that create and sustain this redox gradient: 1) The dissolution of cpx and opx in the andesite mainly introduced Fe2+ into the melt, which diffused towards the dacite, lowering Fe3+/SFe near the interface. 2) Charge balance calculations in the melt during diffusive exchange suggest net positive charge excess in the andesite near the interface (i.e., oxidation) and net negative charge excess in the dacite near the interface (i.e., reduction). We suggest that this (metastable) redox layer can help to explain the contrasting Au/Cu ratios observed for arc-related porphyry-type ore deposits. [1] Moretti (2005), Ann. Geophys. 48, 583-608. [2] Cottrell et al. (2009), Chem. Geol. 268, 167-179. [3] Ghiorso and Evans (2008), Am. J. Sci. 308, 957-1039.

  17. Workshop on Mare Volcanism and Basalt Petrogenesis: Astounding Fundamental Concepts (AFC) Developed Over the Last Fifteen Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence A. (Editor); Longi, John (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Papers presented at the workshop on mare volcanism and basalt petrogenesis are compiled. The discussion of recent ideas and concepts within the context of this workshop permitted to catch up on the developments over the last 15 years. The following subject areas were covered: (1) geological setting; (2) magma evolution and source regions; (3) magma source and ascent processes; and (4) history of volcanism.

  18. Quaternary volcanism near the Valley of Mexico: implications for subduction zone magmatism and the effects of crustal thickness variations on primitive magma compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Paul J.; Carmichael, Ian S. E.

    CVF and other regions of the MVB show compositional similarities to intraplate-type alkali basalts erupted behind the arc in the Mexican Basin and Range province. These similarities are consistent with the hypothesis that slab-induced convection in the mantle wedge beneath the MVB causes advection of asthenospheric mantle from behind the arc to the region of magma generation. Trace element systematics of primitive magmas in the MVB reveal substantial variability in both the extent of mantle wedge enrichment by subduction processes and in the composition of mantle heterogeneities that are related to previous extraction of alkaline to sub-alkaline basaltic melts.

  19. Origin and evolution of overlapping calc-alkaline and alkaline magmas: The Late Palaeozoic post-collisional igneous province of Transbaikalia (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinovsky, B. A.; Tsygankov, A. A.; Jahn, B. M.; Katzir, Y.; Be'eri-Shlevin, Y.

    2011-08-01

    The Late Palaeozoic voluminous magmatism in Transbaikalia, Russia (a territory of > 600,000 km 2 to the east of Lake Baikal) is highly diverse and complex. Of special interest are (1) the significant overlap in time between magmatic suites commonly ascribed to post-collisional and within-plate settings and (2) the provenance of the coeval, but distinct, granitoid magmas that are closely spaced within a large region. Magmatic activity lasted almost continuously from ~ 330 Ma to ~ 275 Ma and included five igneous suites occupying a total area of ~ 200,000 km 2: (1) the Barguzin suite of high-K calc-alkaline granite (330-310 Ma); (2 and 3) the coeval Chivyrkui suite of low-silica calc-alkaline granitoids and the Zaza suite of high-K calc-alkaline to alkaline granite and quartz syenite which were emplaced between 305 and 285 Ma; and (4 and 5) the partially overlapped in time Lower-Selenga monzonite-syenite suite (285-278 Ma) and the Early-Kunalei suite of alkali-feldspar and peralkaline quartz syenite and granite (281-275 Ma). The overall increase in alkalinity of the granitoids with time reflects the progress from post-collisional to within-plate settings. However, a ~ 20 m.y. long transitional period during which both calc-alkaline and alkaline granitoids were emplaced indicates the coexistence of thickened (batholiths) and thinned (rift) crustal tracts. Sr-Nd-O isotope and elemental geochemical data suggest that the relative contribution of mantle-derived components to the generation of silicic magmas progressively increased with time. The high-K calc-alkaline granite magmas that formed the Angara-Vitim batholith were generated by high degree melting of supracrustal metamorphic rocks [ɛNd(t) = - 5.7 to - 7.7; δ 18O(Qtz) = 12‰], with minor contribution of H 2O and K from the underplated mafic magma (the convective diffusion model). The coeval calc-alkaline Chivyrkui suite and the transitional to alkaline Zaza suite formed as a result of mixing of crustal silicic

  20. Abrupt transition from fractional crystallization to magma mixing at Gorely volcano (Kamchatka) after caldera collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilenko, Maxim; Ozerov, Alexey; Kyle, Philip R.; Carr, Michael J.; Nikulin, Alex; Vidito, Christopher; Danyushevsky, Leonid

    2016-07-01

    A series of large caldera-forming eruptions (361-38 ka) transformed Gorely volcano, southern Kamchatka Peninsula, from a shield-type system dominated by fractional crystallization processes to a composite volcanic center, exhibiting geochemical evidence of magma mixing. Old Gorely, an early shield volcano (700-361 ka), was followed by Young Gorely eruptions. Calc-alkaline high magnesium basalt to rhyolite lavas have been erupted from Gorely volcano since the Pleistocene. Fractional crystallization dominated evolution of the Old Gorely magmas, whereas magma mixing is more prominent in the Young Gorely eruptive products. The role of recharge-evacuation processes in Gorely magma evolution is negligible (a closed magmatic system); however, crustal rock assimilation plays a significant role for the evolved magmas. Most Gorely magmas differentiate in a shallow magmatic system at pressures up to 300 MPa, ˜3 wt% H2O, and oxygen fugacity of ˜QFM + 1.5 log units. Magma temperatures of 1123-1218 °C were measured using aluminum distribution between olivine and spinel in Old and Young Gorely basalts. The crystallization sequence of major minerals for Old Gorely was as follows: olivine and spinel (Ol + Sp) for mafic compositions (more than 5 wt% of MgO); clinopyroxene and plagioclase crystallized at ˜5 wt% of MgO (Ol + Cpx + Plag) and magnetite at ˜3.5 wt% of MgO (Ol + Cpx + Plag + Mt). We show that the shallow magma chamber evolution of Old Gorely occurs under conditions of decompression and degassing. We find that the caldera-forming eruption(s) modified the magma plumbing geometry. This led to a change in the dominant magma evolution process from fractional crystallization to magma mixing. We further suggest that disruption of the magma chamber and accompanying change in differentiation process have the potential to transform a shield volcanic system to that of composite cone on a global scale.

  1. Mineral chemistry of Pangidi basalt flows from Andhra Pradesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nageswara Rao, P. V.; Swaroop, P. C.; Karimulla, Syed

    2012-04-01

    This paper elucidates the compositional studies on clinopyroxene, plagioclase, titaniferous magnetite and ilmenite of basalts of Pangidi area to understand the geothermometry and oxybarometry conditions. Petrographic evidence and anorthite content (up to 85%) of plagioclase and temperature estimates of clinopyroxene indicate that the clinopyroxene is crystallized later than or together with plagioclase. The higher An content indicates that the parent magma is tholeiitic composition. The equilibration temperatures of clinopyroxene (1110-1190°C) and titaniferous magnetite and ilmenite coexisting mineral phases (1063-1103°C) are almost similar in lower basalt flow and it is higher for clinopyroxene (900-1110°C) when compared to titaniferous magnetite and ilmenite coexisting mineral phases (748-898°C) in middle and upper basalt flows. From this it can be inferred that the clinopyroxene is crystallized earlier than Fe-Ti oxide phases reequilibration, which indicates that the clinopyroxene temperature is the approximate eruption temperature of the present lava flows. The wide range of temperatures (900-1190°C) attained by clinopyroxene may point out that the equilibration of clinopyroxene crystals initiated from depth till closer to the surface before the melt erupted. Pangidi basalts follow the QFM buffer curve which indicates the more evolved tholeiitic composition. This suggests the parent tholeiitic magma suffered limited fractionation at high temperature under increasing oxygen fugacity in lower basalt flow and more fractionation at medium to lower temperatures under decreasing oxygen fugacity conditions during cooling of middle and upper basalt flows. The variation of oxygen fugacity indicates the oxidizing conditions for lower basalt flow (9.48-10.3) and extremely reducing conditions for middle (12.1-15.5) and upper basalt (12.4-15.54) flows prevailed at the time of cooling. Temperature vs. (FeO+Fe2O3)/(FeO+Fe2O3 +MgO) data plots for present basalts suggested

  2. Magma flow and interaction with waste packages in a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Bruce D.; Coleman, Neil M.

    2009-05-01

    The likelihood that a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain could be intersected by igneous activity is very low, but its potential consequences are nevertheless important to performance assessments. An ongoing critical area of concern is the nature and magnitude of the thermal interaction of magma with tunnel walls, high-level nuclear waste packages, and waste forms. Previous assessments consider a variety of dynamic scenarios, but large uncertainties remain in understanding the rheological nature of the magma likely to be involved and its behavior within a repository drift. Here we specifically address the issue of magma rheology during degassing, cooling, and solidification as basaltic magma approaches Earth's surface and enters a drift. Magma containing significant amounts (> ~ 2 wt.%) of dissolved water (Wet Magma), as is anticipated for this region, at or near its liquidus temperature and saturated with water at 200 MPa is at a temperature near or below the 1-atm solidus temperature. Isentropic ascent from this near liquidus temperature promotes extensive solidification and/or glassification. Exsolving water with approach to the surface promotes rapid vesiculation leading to fragmentation and tephra production. With continued ascent the still water-saturated magma traverses the solidification phase field and undergoes a combination of rapid crystallization and quenching, becoming a glassy highly viscous (~ 10 8 Pa s) mass of greatly reduced mobility. This immobility is reflected in the high effective viscosity regulating flows from nearby cinder cones associated with wet basalt. This also matches well with the experimentally determined rheology of dry basalt glass. This rheology greatly restricts the mobility of basalt within repository drifts, amounting to < 10 m per day. Magma in this state quenches rapidly (~ 10 cm/min) on waste packages. Wet basalt is explosive, but relatively immobile as lava. Dry Magma is not explosive, but highly mobile as lava

  3. Isotope geochemistry of early Kilauea magmas from the submarine Hilina bench: The nature of the Hilina mantle component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Sisson, Thomas W.; Nakano, Natsuko; Coombs, Michelle L.; Lipman, Peter W.

    2006-03-01

    Submarine lavas recovered from the Hilina bench region, offshore Kilauea, Hawaii Island provide information on ancient Kilauea volcano and the geochemical components of the Hawaiian hotspot. Alkalic lavas, including nephelinite, basanite, hawaiite, and alkali basalt, dominate the earliest stage of Kilauea magmatism. Transitional basalt pillow lavas are an intermediate phase, preceding development of the voluminous tholeiitic subaerial shield and submarine Puna Ridge. Most alkalic through transitional lavas are quite uniform in Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes, supporting the interpretation that variable extent partial melting of a relatively homogeneous source was responsible for much of the geochemical diversity of early Kilauea magmas ( Sisson et al., 2002). These samples are among the highest 206Pb/ 204Pb known from Hawaii and may represent melts from a distinct geochemical and isotopic end-member involved in the generation of most Hawaiian tholeiites. This end-member is similar to the postulated literature Kea component, but we propose that it should be renamed Hilina, to avoid confusion with the geographically defined Kea-trend volcanoes. Isotopic compositions of some shield-stage Kilauea tholeiites overlap the Hilina end-member but most deviate far into the interior of the isotopic field defined by magmas from other Hawaiian volcanoes, reflecting the introduction of melt contributions from both "Koolau" (high 87Sr/ 86Sr, low 206Pb/ 204Pb) and depleted (low 87Sr/ 86Sr, intermediate 206Pb/ 204Pb) source materials. This shift in isotopic character from nearly uniform, end-member, and alkalic, to diverse and tholeiitic corresponds with the major increase in Kilauea's magmatic productivity. Two popular geodynamic models can account for these relations: (1) The upwelling mantle source could be concentrically zoned in both chemical/isotopic composition, and in speed/extent of upwelling, with Hilina (and Loihi) components situated in the weakly ascending margins and the Koolau

  4. Isotope geochemistry of early Kilauea magmas from the submarine Hilina bench: The nature of the Hilina mantle component

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Sisson, T.W.; Nakano, N.; Coombs, M.L.; Lipman, P.W.

    2006-01-01

    Submarine lavas recovered from the Hilina bench region, offshore Kilauea, Hawaii Island provide information on ancient Kilauea volcano and the geochemical components of the Hawaiian hotspot. Alkalic lavas, including nephelinite, basanite, hawaiite, and alkali basalt, dominate the earliest stage of Kilauea magmatism. Transitional basalt pillow lavas are an intermediate phase, preceding development of the voluminous tholeiitic subaerial shield and submarine Puna Ridge. Most alkalic through transitional lavas are quite uniform in Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes, supporting the interpretation that variable extent partial melting of a relatively homogeneous source was responsible for much of the geochemical diversity of early Kilauea magmas (Sisson et al., 2002). These samples are among the highest 206Pb/204Pb known from Hawaii and may represent melts from a distinct geochemical and isotopic end-member involved in the generation of most Hawaiian tholeiites. This end-member is similar to the postulated literature Kea component, but we propose that it should be renamed Hilina, to avoid confusion with the geographically defined Kea-trend volcanoes. Isotopic compositions of some shield-stage Kilauea tholeiites overlap the Hilina end-member but most deviate far into the interior of the isotopic field defined by magmas from other Hawaiian volcanoes, reflecting the introduction of melt contributions from both "Koolau" (high 87Sr/86Sr, low 206Pb/204Pb) and depleted (low 87Sr/86Sr, intermediate 206Pb/204Pb) source materials. This shift in isotopic character from nearly uniform, end-member, and alkalic, to diverse and tholeiitic corresponds with the major increase in Kilauea's magmatic productivity. Two popular geodynamic models can account for these relations: (1) The upwelling mantle source could be concentrically zoned in both chemical/isotopic composition, and in speed/extent of upwelling, with Hilina (and Loihi) components situated in the weakly ascending margins and the Koolau component

  5. Derivation of primary magmas and melting of crustal materials on Venus - Some preliminary petrogenetic considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Paul C.; Head, James W.

    1990-01-01

    As an aid to understanding crustal formation and evolution processes on Venus, a general paradigm is developed for the derivation of primary magmas, and the range of possibilities of conditions for remelting of crustal materials and the evolution of the products of remelting. The present knowledge of the bulk and surface composition is used as a basis. A wide range of magma types is possible for the range of conditions of derivation of primary magmas and crustal remelting and no magma type can be arbitrarily excluded from consideration on Venus. The composition of Venus and the nature of source materials for melting, the melting of mantle material peridotites, and the melting of basalts including tholeiites and modified basalts are discussed. Magmatic differentiation is considered, and a comparison to terrestrial magmatic environments is conducted. It is concluded the magnetic and volcanic activity on Venus could be very similar to that on the earth, although eruption styles are expected to vary due to environmental conditions.

  6. Carbon Solution in Core-Forming Magma Ocean Conditions: Implications for the Origin and Distribution of Terrestrial Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, R.; Chi, H.; Walker, D.; Shimizu, N.; Buono, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    The origin of bulk silicate Earth carbon inventory is poorly known and the fate of the element during the early Earth differentiation and core formation is a missing link in the evolution of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Here we present high pressure-temperature experiments that simulate metal-silicate equilibria in a shallow magma ocean. Experiments were performed at 1-5 GPa, 1600-2100 °C on mixtures of synthetic or natural silicates (tholeiitic basalt/ alkali basalt/ komatiite/ fertile peridotite) and Fe-Ni-C±Co±S contained in graphite or MgO capsules. All the experiments produced immiscible Fe-rich metallic and silicate melts at oxygen fugacity (fO2) between ~IW-1.5 and IW-1.9. Carbon and hydrogen concentrations of basaltic glasses and non-glassy quenched silicate melts were determined using secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS) and speciation of dissolved C-O-H volatiles in silicate glasses was constrained using Raman spectroscopy. Carbon contents of metallic melts were determined using both electron microprobe and SIMS. Our experiments indicate that at core-forming, reduced conditions, carbon in mafic-ultramafic magmas dissolves primarily as various hydrogenated species and the total carbon storage capacity, although is significantly higher than solubility of CO2 under similar conditions, remains low (<500 ppm). The total carbon content in our reduced melts at graphite saturation increases with increasing melt depolymerization (NBO/T), consistent with recent spectroscopic studies [1], and modestly with increasing hydration. Carbon behaves as a metal loving element during core-mantle separation and metal/silicate carbon partition coefficient, DC varies between ~3500 and ≥150 and increases with increasing pressure and decreases with increasing temperature and melt NBO/T. Extrapolation of our data to the plausible conditions of core-mantle equilibration suggest that if only a trace amount of carbon (~730 ppm C; [2]) was available during early Earth

  7. Oxygen Isotope Variations in Lunar Mare Basalts through Fractional Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Spicuzza, M.; Day, J. M.; Valley, J. W.; Taylor, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    -Ti basalts do not follow a binary mixing trend, further supporting their derivation from different source regions. Such heterogeneity of the lunar mantle is consistent with sinking of Ti-rich differentiates of the lunar magma ocean.

  8. Nature of basalt-deep crust interaction in the petrogenesis of a potassium-rich, silicic-dominated eruptive system, Davis Mountain volcanic field, west Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R.L.; Walker, J.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The Davis Mountain volcanic field (DMVF) is one of several silicic-dominated eruptive centers that constitute the bulk of the Trans Pecos volcanic province (TPVP). New major-, trace element, and Pb-O isotope data on local granulite-facies xenoliths and the DMVF are used in evaluating the extent of basalt-deep crust interaction to produce voluminous silicic lavas and -ignimbrites. The DMVF (39.3--35.4 Ma) is a high-K, alkali basalt-potassic trachybasalt-shoshonite-latite-trachyte-rhyolite volcanoplutonic series with the evolved members being silica-saturated. DMF silicic rocks are characterized by high concentrations of Rb, Th, U, and K, low-[sup 18]O and have a broad range in Pb isotopes. These characteristics are inconsistent with an origin by partial melting of a Rb-Th-U depleted, unradiogenic Pb granulitic deep crust. However, distinctly different Pb isotope compositions between mafic and silicic rocks preclude an origin by fractional crystallization alone. Multistage-AFC involving a mantle-source, various proportions of OL-CPX-PLAG-KSPAR-MAG-AP-BIO-QTZ-aenigmatite-ZR differentiation, limited (<10%) amounts of deep and upper crustal contamination, and mixing between mafic and silicic magmas can satisfactorily account for the observed chemical and isotopic variation in the DMVF.

  9. Magmatic inclusions in rhyolites, contaminated basalts, and compositional zonation beneath the Coso volcanic field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Metz, J.

    1984-01-01

    Basaltic lava flows and high-silica rhyolite domes form the Pleistocene part of the Coso volcanic field in southeastern California. The distribution of vents maps the areal zonation inferred for the upper parts of the Coso magmatic system. Subalkalic basalts (<50% SiO2) were erupted well away from the rhyolite field at any given time. Compositional variation among these basalts can be ascribed to crystal fractionation. Erupted volumes of these basalts decrease with increasing differentiation. Mafic lavas containing up to 58% SiO2, erupted adjacent to the rhyolite field, formed by mixing of basaltic and silicic magma. Basaltic magma interacted with crustal rocks to form other SiO2-rich mafic lavas erupted near the Sierra Nevada fault zone. Several rhyolite domes in the Coso volcanic field contain sparse andesitic inclusions (55-61% SiO2). Pillow-like forms, intricate commingling and local diffusive mixing of andesite and rhyolite at contacts, concentric vesicle distribution, and crystal morphologies indicative of undercooling show that inclusions were incorporated in their rhyolitic hosts as blobs of magma. Inclusions were probably dispersed throughout small volumes of rhyolitic magma by convective (mechanical) mixing. Inclusion magma was formed by mixing (hybridization) at the interface between basaltic and rhyolitic magmas that coexisted in vertically zoned igneous systems. Relict phenocrysts and the bulk compositions of inclusions suggest that silicic endmembers were less differentiated than erupted high-silica rhyolite. Changes in inferred endmembers of magma mixtures with time suggest that the steepness of chemical gradients near the silicic/mafic interface in the zoned reservoir may have decreased as the system matured, although a high-silica rhyolitic cap persisted. The Coso example is an extreme case of large thermal and compositional contrast between inclusion and host magmas; lesser differences between intermediate composition magmas and inclusions lead to

  10. Crustal influence in the generation of continental flood basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Lugmair, G. W.; Macdougall, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    The suggestion that primordial undifferentiated material may exist in the earth's mantle has recently been revived on the strength of Nd isotope data for two types of young continental rocks - flood basalts and kimberlites. The limited published data show a clustering of Nd isotopic compositions close to those for meteorites with chondritic relative rare-earth (REE) abundance. In contrast, data are presented for samples from the Columbia flood basalt province of the northwestern United States which show large isotopic variability suggestive of mixing processes acting after the separation of the primary magmas from their mantle source.

  11. Magmatic processes that generate chemically distinct silicic magmas in NW Costa Rica and the evolution of juvenile continental crust in oceanic arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deering, Chad D.; Vogel, Thomas A.; Patino, Lina C.; Szymanski, David W.; Alvarado, Guillermo E.

    2012-02-01

    Northwestern Costa Rica is built upon an oceanic plateau that has developed chemical and geophysical characteristics of the upper continental crust. A major factor in converting the oceanic plateau to continental crust is the production, evolution, and emplacement of silicic magmas. In Costa Rica, the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP) forms the overriding plate in the subduction of the Cocos Plate—a process that has occurred for at least the last 25 my. Igneous rocks in Costa Rica older than about 8 Ma have chemical compositions typical of ocean island basalts and intra-oceanic arcs. In contrast, younger igneous deposits contain abundant silicic rocks, which are significantly enriched in SiO2, alkalis, and light rare-earth elements and are geochemically similar to the average upper continental crust. Geophysical evidence (high Vp seismic velocities) also indicates a relatively thick (~40 km), addition of evolved igneous rocks to the CLIP. The silicic deposits of NW Costa Rica occur in two major compositional groups: a high-Ti and a low-Ti group with no overlap between the two. The major and trace element characteristics of these groups are consistent with these magmas being derived from liquids that were extracted from crystal mushes—either produced by crystallization or by partial melting of plutons near their solidi. In relative terms, the high-Ti silicic liquids were extracted from a hot, dry crystal mush with low oxygen fugacity, where plagioclase and pyroxene were the dominant phases crystallizing, along with lesser amounts of hornblende. In contrast, the low-Ti silicic liquids were extracted from a cool, wet crystal mush with high oxygen fugacity, where plagioclase and amphibole were the dominant phases crystallizing. The hot-dry-reducing magmas dominate the older sequence, but the youngest sequence contains only magmas from the cold-wet-oxidized group. Silicic volcanic deposits from other oceanic arcs (e.g., Izu-Bonin, Marianas) have chemical

  12. Magmatic processes that generate chemically distinct silicic magmas in NW Costa Rica and the evolution of juvenile continental crust in oceanic arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, T. A.; Deering, C. D.; Patino, L. C.; Alvarado, G. E.; Szymanski, D. W.

    2010-12-01

    Northwestern Costa Rica is built upon an oceanic plateau that has developed chemical and geophysical characteristics of the upper continental crust. A major factor in converting the oceanic plateau to continental crust is the production, evolution and emplacement of silicic magmas. In Costa Rica, the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP) forms the overriding plate in the subduction of the Cocos Plate - a process that has occurred for at least the last 25 my. Igneous rocks in Costa Rica older than about 10 Ma have chemical compositions typical of oceanic basalts and intra-oceanic arcs. In contrast, younger igneous deposits (<10 Ma) contain abundant silicic rocks with geochemical signatures similar to the average continental crust, which are significantly enriched in SiO2, alkalis and light rare-earth elements. The silicic deposits of NW Costa Rica occur in two major compositional groups: a high-Ti and a low-Ti group with no overlap between the two. The major and trace element characteristics of these groups are consistent with these magmas being derived from liquids that were extracted from crystal mushes. In relative terms, the high-Ti silicic liquids were extracted from a hot, dry crystal mush with low-oxygen fugacity where plagioclase and pyroxene were the dominant phases crystallizing, along with lesser amounts of hornblende. In contrast, the low-Ti silicic liquids were extracted from a cool, wet crystal mush with high oxygen fugacity where plagioclase and amphibole were the dominant phases crystallizing. The hot-dry-reducing magmas dominate the older sequence, but the youngest sequence contains only magmas from the cold-wet-oxidized group. Silicic volcanic deposits from other oceanic arcs (e.g. Izu-Bonin, Marianas) have chemical characteristics distinctly different from continental crust, whereas the NW Costa Rican silicic deposits have chemical characteristics nearly identical to the upper continental crust. The transition in NW Costa Rica from mafic oceanic

  13. The production of intermediate magmas through magma mixing and commingling: Evidence from the Hoover Dam Volcanics, Mohave County, Arizona and Clark County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, J.G. Jr. . Dept. of Geoscience)

    1993-04-01

    The Hoover Dam Volcanic section ([approximately]14 Ma) is composed of the reversely-zoned dacitic tuff of Hoover Dam, Switchyard basaltic andesite, Sugarloaf dacite, Black Canyon dacite and Kingman Wash basaltic andesite (Mills, 1985). The origin of this suite is best explained by the commingling and mixing of end-member mafic and felsic magmas. These end-member magmas were most likely formed by partial melting of the mantle and subsequent advective heating and melting of the crust respectively. Textural evidence for these processes is observed in the Black Canyon dacite which contains enclaves of basaltic andesite, and, in the Paint Pots pluton which contains commingled basaltic andesite and monzonite. The Black Canyon dacite is a biotite (4%), homblende (1%) and plagioclase 10% phyric dacite flow which contains up to 5% enclaves of basaltic andesite. The enclaves contain 54 wt% SiO[sub 2], 7.22 ppm Tl, 65 ppm Rb, 1,274 ppm Sr and 1,810 ppm Ba. The gray to purplish-red enclaves have crenulate margins, are commonly vesiculated and contain phenocrysts of biotite (< 1%), hornblende ([much lt]1%), plagioclase (1%) and clinopyroxene( ) (2%). Chemically, the enclaves are distinct from the Switchyard and Kingman Wash basaltic andesites. The enclaves most likely represent a more primitive magma from which the Switchyard and Kingman Wash basaltic andesites were derived. These two units were subsequently chemically modified by mixing with crustal melt and/or crystal fractionation. The presence of a small, clinopyroxenite xenolith (clinopyroxene 90%, garnet 5%, plagioclase 4%) within one of the enclaves indicates an upper mantle source for the enclave magma.

  14. Magma Dynamics at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    D. Krier

    2005-08-29

    Small-volume basaltic volcanic activity at Yucca Mountain has been identified as one of the potential events that could lead to release of radioactive material from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Release of material could occur indirectly as a result of magmatic dike intrusion into the repository (with no associated surface eruption) by changing groundwater flow paths, or as a result of an eruption (dike intrusion of the repository drifts, followed by surface eruption of contaminated ash) or volcanic ejection of material onto the Earth's surface and the redistribution of contaminated volcanic tephra. Either release method includes interaction between emplacement drifts and a magmatic dike or conduit, and natural (geologic) processes that might interrupt or halt igneous activity. This analysis provides summary information on two approaches to evaluate effects of disruption at the repository by basaltic igneous activity: (1) descriptions of the physical geometry of ascending basaltic dikes and their interaction with silicic host rocks similar in composition to the repository host rocks; and (2) a summary of calculations developed to quantify the response of emplacement drifts that have been flooded with magma and repressurized following blockage of an eruptive conduit. The purpose of these analyses is to explore the potential consequences that could occur during the full duration of an igneous event.

  15. Pyroclastic deposits of the Mount Edgecumbe volcanic field, southeast Alaska: eruptions of a stratified magma chamber

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riehle, J.R.; Champion, D.E.; Brew, D.A.; Lanphere, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Mount Edgecumbe volcanic field in southeastern Alaska consists of 5-6 km3 (DRE) of postglacial pyroclasts that overlie Pleistocene lavas. All eleven pyroclast vents align with the long axis of the field, implying that the pyroclast magma conduits followed a crustal fissure. Most of these vents had previously erupted lavas that are compositionally similar to the pyroclasts, so a persistent magma system (chamber) had likely evolved by the onset of the pyroclastic eruptions. The pyroclastic sequence was deposited in about a millennium and is remarkable for a wide range of upward-increasing silica contents (51-72% SiO2), which is consistent with rise of coexisting magmas at different rates governed by their viscosity. Basaltic and andesitic lava flows have erupted throughout the lifetime of the field. Rhyolite erupted late; we infer that it formed early but was hindered from rising by its high viscosity. Most of the magmas-and all siliceous ones-erupted from vents on the central fissure. Basalt has not erupted from the center of the field during at least the latter part of its lifetime. Thus the field may illustrate basalt underplating: heat and mass flux are concentrated at the center of a stratified magma chamber in which a cap of siliceous melt blocks the rise of basalt. Major-element, strontium isotope, and mineral compositions of unaltered pyroclasts are broadly similar to those of older lavas of similar SiO2 content. Slightly fewer phenocrysts, inherited grains, and trace amphibole in pyroclastic magmas may be due simply to faster rise and less undercooling and degassing before eruption relative to the lavas. Dacite occurs only in the youngest deposits; the magma formed by mixing of andesitic and rhyolitic magmas erupted shortly before by the dacitic vents. ?? 1992.

  16. Luna 16 sample G36 - Another crystalline product of an extremely mafic magma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollister, L. S.; Kulick, C. G.

    1972-01-01

    Luna 16 sample G36 is a microbasalt containing skeletal olivine, plagioclase, ilmenite, and interstitial pyroxene. It apparently resulted from very rapid crystallization of a highly fractionated, totally liquid mafic magma. Although different in many details, G36 is generally similar to the ferromagnesian-rich Apollo 11 and 12 basalts. In this respect, it emphasizes the continuing problem of identifying a process on the moon which generated highly mafic magmas.

  17. Experimental Magma Mixing and Mingling in Volcanic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgavi, D.; Laumonier, M.; Petrelli, M.; Perugini, D.

    2015-12-01

    Magma mixing and mingling features are commonly observed in both plutonic and volcanic environments. Major occurrences are represented by hybrid products, enclaves and crystals in disequilibrium with the melt. According to present knowledge the complete mixing of magmas in crustal reservoirs (leading to the production of hybrids) requires a low viscosity contrast between the two end-members (0.5 log unit). On another hand, recent experimental and field works have shown that (1) crystal-free magmas with viscosity difference of 3 orders of magnitude produced mingling and mixing features at higher deformation conditions (strain and strain rate) and (2) these features are found in volcanic products out of the above mentioned rheological window. In this study, we performed magma mixing experiments, to test the effects of chaotic deformation of a two component system at volcanic conditions and strain rates comparable to natural magmatic systems (volcanic conduits and lava flows): in the ChaOtic Magma Mixing Apparatus (COMMA) installed at the University of Perugia, a synthetic haplotonalite and a natural basalt from Santorini volcano were juxtaposed and chaotically mixed for several hours at ~1140°C with a moderate strain rate of ~5.10-3. The textural and geochemical (electronic microprobe, laser ablation mass spectrometry) features developed during the experiments show the development of complex patterns with high inter-exchange between both magmas. Our results show how chaotic convection extends the mixing capacities at moderate strain rate.

  18. The chlorine isotope fingerprint of the lunar magma ocean

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Jeremy W.; Treiman, Allan H.; Guan, Yunbin; Ma, Chi; Eiler, John M.; Gross, Juliane; Greenwood, James P.; Stolper, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    The Moon contains chlorine that is isotopically unlike that of any other body yet studied in the Solar System, an observation that has been interpreted to support traditional models of the formation of a nominally hydrogen-free (“dry”) Moon. We have analyzed abundances and isotopic compositions of Cl and H in lunar mare basalts, and find little evidence that anhydrous lava outgassing was important in generating chlorine isotope anomalies, because 37Cl/35Cl ratios are not related to Cl abundance, H abundance, or D/H ratios in a manner consistent with the lava-outgassing hypothesis. Instead, 37Cl/35Cl correlates positively with Cl abundance in apatite, as well as with whole-rock Th abundances and La/Lu ratios, suggesting that the high 37Cl/35Cl in lunar basalts is inherited from urKREEP, the last dregs of the lunar magma ocean. These new data suggest that the high chlorine isotope ratios of lunar basalts result not from the degassing of their lavas but from degassing of the lunar magma ocean early in the Moon’s history. Chlorine isotope variability is therefore an indicator of planetary magma ocean degassing, an important stage in the formation of terrestrial planets. PMID:26601265

  19. The chlorine isotope fingerprint of the lunar magma ocean.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Jeremy W; Treiman, Allan H; Guan, Yunbin; Ma, Chi; Eiler, John M; Gross, Juliane; Greenwood, James P; Stolper, Edward M

    2015-09-01

    The Moon contains chlorine that is isotopically unlike that of any other body yet studied in the Solar System, an observation that has been interpreted to support traditional models of the formation of a nominally hydrogen-free ("dry") Moon. We have analyzed abundances and isotopic compositions of Cl and H in lunar mare basalts, and find little evidence that anhydrous lava outgassing was important in generating chlorine isotope anomalies, because (37)Cl/(35)Cl ratios are not related to Cl abundance, H abundance, or D/H ratios in a manner consistent with the lava-outgassing hypothesis. Instead, (37)Cl/(35)Cl correlates positively with Cl abundance in apatite, as well as with whole-rock Th abundances and La/Lu ratios, suggesting that the high (37)Cl/(35)Cl in lunar basalts is inherited from urKREEP, the last dregs of the lunar magma ocean. These new data suggest that the high chlorine isotope ratios of lunar basalts result not from the degassing of their lavas but from degassing of the lunar magma ocean early in the Moon's history. Chlorine isotope variability is therefore an indicator of planetary magma ocean degassing, an important stage in the formation of terrestrial planets. PMID:26601265

  20. Dynamic magma mixing revealed by the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmarsson, O.; Vlastelic, I.; Andreasen, R.; Bindeman, I.; Devidal, J.-L.; Moune, S.; Keiding, J. K.; Larsen, G.; Höskuldsson, A.; Thordarson, Th.

    2011-07-01

    Injection of basaltic magmas into silicic crustal holding chambers and subsequent mixing of the two components is a process that has been recognised since the late seventies to have resulted in explosive eruptions. Detailed reconstruction and assessment of the mixing process caused by such intrusion is now possible because of the exceptional time-sequence sample suite available from the tephra fallout of the 2010 summit eruption at Eyjafjallajökull volcano in South Iceland. From 14 to 19 April the tephra contains three glass types of basaltic, intermediate, and silicic compositions recording rapid magma mingling without homogenisation, involving evolved FeTi-basalt and dacite with composition identical to that produced by the 1821-1823 AD Eyjafjallajökull summit eruption. The time-dependent change in the magma composition suggests a binary mixing process with changing end-member compositions and proportions, or dynamic magma mixing. Beginning of May, a new injection of deep-derived basalt was recorded by deep seismicity, appearance of magnesium-rich olivine phenocrysts together with high sulphur output and presence of sulphide crystals. Thus the composition of the basaltic injection became more primitive and hotter with time prowoking changes in the silicic mixing end-member from pre-existing melt to the solid carapace of the magma chamber. Decreasing proportions of the mafic end-member with time in the erupted mixed-magma, demonstrate that injections of Mg-rich basalt was the motor of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull explosive eruption, and that its decreasing inflow terminated the eruption. Significant quantity of silicic magma is thus still present in the interior of the volcano. Our results show that detailed sampling during the entire eruption was essential for deciphering the complex magmatic processes at play, namely the dynamic magma mixing. Finally, the rapid compositional changes in the eruptive products suggest that magma mingling occurs on a timescale of

  1. Remobilization of silicic intrusion by mafic magmas during the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmarsson, O.; Vlastelic, I.; Andreasen, R.; Bindeman, I.; Devidal, J.-L.; Moune, S.; Keiding, J. K.; Larsen, G.; Höskuldsson, A.; Thordarson, Th.

    2011-12-01

    Injection of basaltic magmas into silicic crustal holding chambers and subsequent magma mingling or mixing is a process that has been recognised since the late seventies as resulting in explosive eruptions. Detailed reconstruction and assessment of the mixing process caused by such intrusion is now possible because of the exceptional time-sequence sample suite available from the tephra fallout of the 2010 summit eruption at Eyjafjallajökull volcano in South Iceland. Fallout from 14 to 19 April contains three glass types of basaltic, intermediate, and silicic compositions recording rapid magma mingling without homogenisation, involving evolved FeTi-basalt and silicic melt with composition identical to that produced by the 1821-1823 AD Eyjafjallajökull summit eruption. The time-dependent change in the magma composition suggests a binary mixing process with changing end-member compositions and proportions. Beginning of May, a new injection of primitive basalt was recorded by deep seismicity, appearance of Mg-rich olivine phenocrysts together with high sulphur dioxide output and presence of sulphide crystals. Thus, the composition of the basaltic injection became more magnesian and hotter with time provoking changes in the silicic mixing end-member from pre-existing melt to the solid carapace of the magma chamber. Finally, decreasing proportions of the mafic end-member with time in the erupted mixed-magma demonstrate that injections of Mg-rich basalt was the motor of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull explosive eruption, and that its decreasing inflow terminated the eruption. Significant quantity of silicic magma is thus still present in the interior of the volcano. Our results show that detailed sampling during the entire eruption was essential for deciphering the complex magmatic processes at play, i.e. the dynamics of the magma mingling and mixing. Finally, the rapid compositional changes in the eruptive products suggest that magma mingling occurs on a timescale of a few

  2. Degassing of reduced carbon from planetary basalts

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel, Diane T.; Rutherford, Malcolm J.; Jacobsen, Steven D.; Hauri, Erik H.; Saal, Alberto E.

    2013-01-01

    Degassing of planetary interiors through surface volcanism plays an important role in the evolution of planetary bodies and atmospheres. On Earth, carbon dioxide and water are the primary volatile species in magmas. However, little is known about the speciation and degassing of carbon in magmas formed on other planets (i.e., Moon, Mars, Mercury), where the mantle oxidation state [oxygen fugacity (fO2)] is different from that of the Earth. Using experiments on a lunar basalt composition, we confirm that carbon dissolves as carbonate at an fO2 higher than -0.55 relative to the iron wustite oxygen buffer (IW-0.55), whereas at a lower fO2, we discover that carbon is present mainly as iron pentacarbonyl and in smaller amounts as methane in the melt. The transition of carbon speciation in mantle-derived melts at fO2 less than IW-0.55 is associated with a decrease in carbon solubility by a factor of 2. Thus, the fO2 controls carbon speciation and solubility in mantle-derived melts even more than previous data indicate, and the degassing of reduced carbon from Fe-rich basalts on planetary bodies would produce methane-bearing, CO-rich early atmospheres with a strong greenhouse potential. PMID:23569260

  3. Degassing of reduced carbon from planetary basalts.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Diane T; Rutherford, Malcolm J; Jacobsen, Steven D; Hauri, Erik H; Saal, Alberto E

    2013-05-14

    Degassing of planetary interiors through surface volcanism plays an important role in the evolution of planetary bodies and atmospheres. On Earth, carbon dioxide and water are the primary volatile species in magmas. However, little is known about the speciation and degassing of carbon in magmas formed on other planets (i.e., Moon, Mars, Mercury), where the mantle oxidation state [oxygen fugacity (fO2)] is different from that of the Earth. Using experiments on a lunar basalt composition, we confirm that carbon dissolves as carbonate at an fO2 higher than -0.55 relative to the iron wustite oxygen buffer (IW-0.55), whereas at a lower fO2, we discover that carbon is present mainly as iron pentacarbonyl and in smaller amounts as methane in the melt. The transition of carbon speciation in mantle-derived melts at fO2 less than IW-0.55 is associated with a decrease in carbon solubility by a factor of 2. Thus, the fO2 controls carbon speciation and solubility in mantle-derived melts even more than previous data indicate, and the degassing of reduced carbon from Fe-rich basalts on planetary bodies would produce methane-bearing, CO-rich early atmospheres with a strong greenhouse potential. PMID:23569260

  4. Geochemical constraints on the origin of mafic and silicic magmas at Cordón El Guadal, Tatara-San Pedro Complex, central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeley, T. C.; Dungan, M. A.; Frey, F. A.

    The aim of this study is to quantify the crustal differentiation processes and sources responsible for the origin of basaltic to dacitic volcanic rocks present on Cordón El Guadal in the Tatara-San Pedro Complex (TSPC). This suite is important for understanding the origin of evolved magmas in the southern Andes because it exhibits the widest compositional range of any unconformity-bound sequence of lavas in the TSPC. Major element, trace element, and Sr-isotopic data for the Guadal volcanic rocks provide evidence for complex crustal magmatic histories involving up to six differentiation mechanisms. The petrogenetic processes for andesitic and dacitic lavas containing undercooled inclusions of basaltic andesitic and andesitic magma include: (1) assimilation of garnet-bearing, possibly mafic lower continental crust by primary mantle-derived basaltic magmas; (2) fractionation of olivine + clinopyroxene + Ca-rich plagioclase + Fe-oxides in present non-modal proportions from basaltic magmas at 4-8kbar to produce high-Al basalt and basaltic andesitic magmas; (3) vapor-undersaturated (i.e., PH2Omagmas; (4) crystallization of plagioclase-rich phenocryst assemblages from dacitic magmas in shallow reservoirs; (5) intrusion of basaltic andesitic magmas into shallow reservoirs containing crystal-rich dacitic magmas and subsequent mixing to produce hybrid basaltic andesitic and andesitic magmas; and (6) formation and disaggregation of undercooled basaltic andesitic and andesitic inclusions during eruption from shallow chambers to form commingled, mafic inclusion-bearing andesitic and dacitic lavas flows. Collectively, the geochemical and petrographic features of the Guadal volcanic rocks are interpreted to reflect the development of shallow silicic reservoirs within a region characterized by high crustal temperatures due to focused basaltic activity and high magma supply rates. On the periphery of

  5. Lu-Hf AND Sm-Nd EVOLUTION IN LUNAR MARE BASALTS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Unruh, D.M.; Stille, P.; Patchett, P.J.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1984-01-01

    Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd data for mare basalts combined with Rb-Sr and total REE data taken from the literature suggest that the mare basalts were derived by small ( less than equivalent to 10%) degrees of partial melting of cumulate sources, but that the magma ocean from which these sources formed was light REE and hf-enriched. Calculated source compositions range from lherzolite to olivine websterite. Nonmodal melting of small amounts of ilmenite ( less than equivalent to 3%) in the sources seems to be required by the Lu/Hf data. A comparison of the Hf and Nd isotopic characteristics between the mare basalts and terrestrial oceanic basalts reveals that the epsilon Hf/ epsilon Nd ratios in low-Ti mare basalts are much higher than in terrestrial ocean basalts.

  6. Depositional processes of the basaltic Elie Ness diatreme, East Fife, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gernon, Thomas; Hincks, Thea

    2010-05-01

    cross-cuts an anticlinal fold to the NE, and that the vent-fill is folded with a similar NE-SW fold axis orientation. This suggests that the Elie Ness diatreme was probably emplaced during the Variscan deformation, analogous with the Black Ball Head diatreme, SW Ireland. The Elie Ness diatreme offers new insights into the volcanism of low viscosity, alkali-rich silica under-saturated magmas, and provides empirical constraints on the architecture and internal workings of other types of volcanic conduit and maar-crater systems. The processes elucidated for alkali basaltic tuff diatremes are general and can also be applied to other deep volcanic conduits.

  7. Melt density and the efficiency of fractional crystallization for the generation of phonolite magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, R.; Malfait, W. J.; Petitgirard, S.; Sanchez-Valle, C.

    2012-12-01

    The natural Plateau phonolites from the Kenya rift exceed the total combined volume of phonolite lava found elsewhere in the world by several orders of magnitude [1]. These alkali-rich magmas are thought to form as fractionation products from low-silica, primary compositions such as nephelinite and melililite [2] or are generated directly within the mantle by melting or fractionation [3]. Although the density contrast between melt and crystal has an important effect on crystal fractionation and magma differentiation rates, density data for alkaline magmas typically found in continental rift zone setting is not available, precluding the assessment of the efficiency of crystal fractionation processes as a mechanism to generate phonolitic melts. We present in-situ density measurements of phonolitic melts at crustal and upper mantle conditions (1.0-3.1 GPa, 1585-1855 K) using synchrotron X-ray absorption in a Paris-Edinburgh press [4]. The starting material is a synthetic haplo-phonolite glass based on the Plateau flood phonolites from the Kenya rift [5]. Single-crystal diamond cylinders were used as sample containers and the density was determined as a function of pressure and temperature from the X-ray absorption contrast between the sample and the diamond capsule. The results were combined with available density data at room conditions to derive the first experimental equation of state (EoS) of phonolitic liquids at crustal and upper mantle conditions. The equation of state is calibrated up to 3.1 GPa, but can be reliably extrapolated to higher pressures; melt densities range from 2.45 g/cm3 up to 2.62 g/cm3 for a depth of 30 to 60 km, respectively - A comparison of our results with literature data shows that the compressibility of silicate melts decreases with increasing silica content in a similar manner observed for silicate glasses: phonolitic melts are more compressible than peridotitic and basaltic melts. The low compressibility of phonolites causes small

  8. Iron Redox Systematics of Shergottites and Martian Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin; Danielson, L. R.; Martin, A. M.; Newville, M.; Choi, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Martian meteorites record a range of oxygen fugacities from near the IW buffer to above FMQ buffer [1]. In terrestrial magmas, Fe(3+)/ SigmaFe for this fO2 range are between 0 and 0.25 [2]. Such variation will affect the stability of oxides, pyroxenes, and how the melt equilibrates with volatile species. An understanding of the variation of Fe(3+)/SigmaFe for martian magmas is lacking, and previous work has been on FeO-poor and Al2O3-rich terrestrial basalts. We have initiated a study of the iron redox systematics of martian magmas to better understand FeO and Fe2O3 stability, the stability of magnetite, and the low Ca/high Ca pyroxene [3] ratios observed at the surface.

  9. First-order major element variation in basalt glasses from the Mid-Atlantic ridge : 29/sup 0/N to 73/sup 0/N

    SciTech Connect

    Sigurdsson, H.

    1981-10-10

    Basaltic glasses from 29/sup 0/N to 73/sup 0/N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge define two geographic and compositional groups that are characterized by different major element concentrations, phase assemblages and partition coefficients. Group A glasses occur on the ridge segment north of Gibbs Fracture Zone, from 54/sup 0/N, along the Reykjanes Ridge, the western volcanic zone of Iceland and Kolbeinsey Ridge, up to 70/sup 0/N. Similar glasses occur also on the ridge from 29/sup 0/N to 34/sup 0/N. Group A is characterized by pronounced alumina depletion and iron-enrichment trends, lower silica and alkalis and higher iron and high CaO/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Clinopyroxene is only present in the more evolved group A glasses (Mg-value<58). Olivine-glass partition coefficients for Mg and Fe are systematically lower in group A than group B (Schilling and Sigurdsson, 1979), reflecting effects of melt composition on structure of the liquids. Group B glasses define the ridge segment north of 35/sup 0/N over the Azores platform and up to Gibbs F. Z., at 53/sup 0/N. They are also present on the Mohns Ridge north of the Jan Mayen F. Z. at 71/sup 0/N and at least as far north as 73/sup 0/. Group B glasses are characterized by higher silica and alkalis, low iron and lack of alumina depletion and iron-enrichment trends. They contain calcic clinopyroxene (Cpx) throughout the compositional range, whereas the sub-calcic augite is absent. The major-element variation within each group can be modeled quantitatively by fractional crystallization involving the phenocryst phases. The range of glass compositions in the two groups forms two distinct but parallel cotectic trends within the basalt tetrahedron, which are believed to define the quaternary univariant line 01-P1-Cpx-Liq along which the magmas evolved during fractionation at low to intermediate pressure.

  10. The Role of Magma Mixing in Creating Magmatic Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, J. P.; Collins, S.; Morgan, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    Most magmas derived from the mantle are fundamentally basaltic. An assessment of actual magmatic rock compositions erupted at the earth's surface, however, shows greater diversity. While still strongly dominated by basalts, magmatic rock compositions extend to far more differentiated (higher SiO2, LREE enriched) compositions. Magmatic diversity is generated by differentiation processes, including crystal fractionation/ accumulation, crustal contamination and magma mixing. Among these, magma mixing is arguably inevitable in magma systems that deliver magmas from source-to-surface, since magmas will tend to multiply re-occupy plumbing systems. A given mantle-derived magma type will mix with any residual magmas (and crystals) in the system, and with any partial melts of the wallrock which are generated as it is repeatedly flushed through the system. Evidence for magma mixing can be read from the petrography (identification of crystals derived from different magmas), a technique which is now well-developed and supplemented by isotopic fingerprinting (1,2) As a means of creating diversity, mixing is inevitably not efficient as its tendency is to blend towards a common composition (i.e. converging on homogeneity rather than diversity). It may be surprising then that many systems do not tend to homogenise with time, meaning that the timescales of mixing episodes and eruption must be similar to external magma contributions of distinct composition (recharge?). Indeed recharge and mixing/ contamination may well be related. As a result, the consequences of magma mixing may well bear on eruption triggering. When two magmas mix, volatile exsolution may be triggered by retrograde boiling, with crystallisation of anhydrous phase(s) in either of the magmas (3) or volatiles may be generated by thermal breakdown of a hydrous phase in one of the magmas (4). The generation of gas pressures in this way probably leads to geophysical signals too (small earthquakes). Recent work pulling

  11. A complex magma mixing origin for rocks erupted in 1915, Lassen Peak, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clynne, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    The eruption of Lassen Peak in May 1915 produced four volcanic rock types within 3 days, and in the following order: (1) hybrid black dacite lava containing (2) undercooled andesitic inclusions, (3) compositionally banded pumice with dark andesite and light dacite bands, and (4) unbanded light dacite. All types represent stages of a complex mixing process between basaltic andesite and dacite that was interrupted by the eruption. They contain disequilibrium phenocryst assemblages characterized by the co-existence of magnesian olivine and quartz and by reacted and unreacted phenocrysts derived from the dacite. The petrography and crystal chemistry of the phenocrysts and the variation in rock compositions indicate that basaltic andesite intruded dacite magma and partially hybridized with it. Phenocrysts from the dacite magma were reacted. Cooling, cyrstallization, and vesiculation of the hybrid andesite magma converted it to a layer of mafic foam. The decreased density of the andesite magma destabilized and disrupted the foam. Blobs of foam rose into and were further cooled by the overlying dacite magma, forming the andesitic inclusions. Disaggregation of andesitic inclusions in the host dacite produced the black dacite and light dacite magmas. Formation of foam was a dynamic process. Removal of foam propagated the foam layer downward into the hybrid andesite magma. Eventually the thermal and compositional contrasts between the hybrid andesite and black dacite magmas were reduced. Then, they mixed directly, forming the dark andesite magma. About 40-50% andesitic inclusions were disaggregated into the host dacite to produce the hybrid black dacite. Thus, disaggregation of inclusions into small fragments and individual crystals can be an efficient magma-mixing process. Disaggregation of undercooled inclusions carrying reacted host-magma phenocrysts produces co-existing reacted and unreacted phenocrysts populations.

  12. Lunar Magma Ocean Crystallization: Constraints from Fractional Crystallization Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, J. F.; Draper, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    The currently accepted paradigm of lunar formation is that of accretion from the ejecta of a giant impact, followed by crystallization of a global scale magma ocean. This model accounts for the formation of the anorthosite highlands crust, which is globally distributed and old, and the formation of the younger mare basalts which are derived from a source region that has experienced plagioclase extraction. Several attempts at modelling the crystallization of such a lunar magma ocean (LMO) have been made, but our ever-increasing knowledge of the lunar samples and surface have raised as many questions as these models have answered. Geodynamic models of lunar accretion suggest that shortly following accretion the bulk of the lunar mass was hot, likely at least above the solidus]. Models of LMO crystallization that assume a deep magma ocean are therefore geodynamically favorable, but they have been difficult to reconcile with a thick plagioclase-rich crust. A refractory element enriched bulk composition, a shallow magma ocean, or a combination of the two have been suggested as a way to produce enough plagioclase to account for the assumed thickness of the crust. Recently however, geophysical data from the GRAIL mission have indicated that the lunar anorthositic crust is not as thick as was initially estimated, which allows for both a deeper magma ocean and a bulk composition more similar to the terrestrial upper mantle. We report on experimental simulations of the fractional crystallization of a deep (approximately 100km) LMO with a terrestrial upper mantle-like (LPUM) bulk composition. Our experimental results will help to define the composition of the lunar crust and mantle cumulates, and allow us to consider important questions such as source regions of the mare basalts and Mg-suite, the role of mantle overturn after magma ocean crystallization and the nature of KREEP

  13. Supertoxic Flood Basalts: The CAMP - Siberian Trap Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puffer, J. H.

    2007-12-01

    Several diverse magma types are represented throughout the CAMP and Siberian Trap LIPs, however, the main extrusive phase of each province is highly unusual among continental flood basalts. The most widespread extrusions were intermediate titanium (ITi-type) CAMP basalt and the lower portion of the Upper Sequence of Siberian Trap. New and recently published data indicate that the geochemistry and petrology of these basalt suites closely resemble each other and infer similar origins. The basalts are characterized by strong negative Nb- Ta anomalies and unusual island arc-like depletion in high field strength elements, particularly Ti, plotted on spider diagrams. The geochemical data is consistent with significant contributions from subducted slabs into the magma source regions. If contaminated, volatile enriched mantle wedges were trapped beneath thick continental plates during the assembly of Pangea, fertile magma sources would have remained dormant until decompression melting was triggered during failed rift, then early rift stages of continental plate disassembly. The combination of volatile enriched sources and highly extensional tectonism would create rare perfect storms of toxicity. Calculated low viscosities assuming negligible carbon dioxide are consistent with rapid crustal penetration. Resulting aphyric melts extruded at enormous effusive rates as thick sub-parallel flows across wide subareal terrains through fissures extending several hundred km in length. High fountain heights would afford ample opportunity for efficient degassing, perhaps into the stratosphere. When the supply of volatile flux was exhausted magmatism ceased. The mass extinctions that coincide with CAMP and Siberian volcanism contrast with some large plume and superplume events that correlate with expansions of biodiversity. This may be due in part to contrasting magma access to sources of toxic volatiles, particularly sulfur concentrations in anoxic subducted sediments.

  14. Evidence for pressure-release melting beneath magmatic arcs from basalt at Galunggung, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, T.W.; Bronto, S.

    1998-01-01

    The melting of peridotite in the mantle wedge above subduction zones is generally believed to involve hydrous fluids derived from the subducting slab. But if mantle peridotite is upwelling within the wedge, melting due to pressure release could also contribute to magma production. Here we present measurements of the volatile content of primitive magmas from Galunggung volcano in the Indonesian are which indicate that these magmas were derived from the pressure-release melting of hot mantle peridotite. The samples that we have analysed consist of mafic glass inclusions in high-magnesium basalts. The inclusions contain uniformly low H2O concentrations (0.21-0.38 wt%), yet relatively high levels of CO2 (up to 750 p.p.m.) indicating that the low H2O concentrations are primary and not due to degassing of the magma. Results from previous anhydrous melting experiments on a chemically similar Aleutian basalts indicate that the Galunggung high-magnesium basalts were last in equilibrium with peridotite at ~1,320 ??C and 1.2 GPa. These high temperatures at shallow sub-crustal levels (about 300-600 ??C hotter than predicted by geodynamic models), combined with the production of nearly H2O- free basaltic melts, provide strong evidence that pressure-release melting due to upwelling in the sub-are mantle has taken place. Regional low- potassium and low-H2O (ref. 5) basalts found in the Cascade are indicate that such upwelling-induced melting can be widespread.

  15. The solubility of olivine in basaltic liquids - An ionic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzberg, C. T.

    1979-01-01

    A model is presented which enables the temperature at which olivine is in equilibrium with any alkali-depleted basaltic compound to be calculated to within + or - 30 C. It is noted that the error increases substantially when applied to terrestrial basalts which contain several weight percent alkalis. In addition the model predicts and quantifies the reduced activity of SiO4(4-) monomers due to increasing SiO2 concentrations in the melt. It is shown that the coordination of alumina in melts which precipitate olivine only appears to be dominantly octahedral, while titanium acts as a polmerizing agent by interconnecting previously isolated SiO4(4-) monomers. It is concluded that the model is sufficiently sensitive to show that there are small repulsive forces between Mg(2+) and calcium ions which are in association with normative diopside in the melt.

  16. Evolution of magma plumbing system of Miyakejima volcano based on high-pressure experiments and melt inclusion analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushioda, M.; Takahashi, E.; Suzuki, T.; Hamada, M.

    2012-12-01

    Miyakejima is an active volcanic island located at about 200 km south of Tokyo in Izu-Mariana arc. Because this volcano had a caldera-forming eruption in AD2000 and evacuated for 5 years due to large emission of SO2 gas, forecasting future eruptions of is important, and precise knowledge on its magma pluming system is essential. Tsukui et al. (2001) divided the volcanic activity of the last 10000 years into four stages: 10-7kyBP (Ofunato Stage), 4-2.5ky (Tsubota Stage), 2.5ky to AD1154 (Oyama Stage) since AD1469 (Shinmio Stage). Products of the Ofunato Stage are basalts and they are relatively primitive. On the other hand, products in Tsubota Stage are andesites and those in the latter two stages are mixed products of basalt and andesite. The purpose of this study is to study the evolution of the magma plumbing system in Miyakejima in the last 10ky based on high-pressure experiments and petrology. We show that a simple system in the Ofunato Stage developed into a complex one and this accounts for the change in chemical and petrological features in the subsequent stages of Miyakejima volcano. To understand the evolution of the magma plumbing system, first we studied the magma chamber in Ofunato Stage by high-pressure experiments. Experiments were performed at 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5kbar with various H2O content using IHPVs (SMC-2000 and SMC-5000) at the Magma Factory, Tokyo Tech. Based on the experimental results and petrology of products in Ofunato Stage, magma chamber in Ofunato Stage was reconstructed. The magma chamber was located at 5~6km depth (~1.5kbar) and water-rich (~3wt.%) basalt magma crystallized olivine and calcic plagioclase (which is the typical phenocryst assemblage throughout Ofunato Stage). Volatile content (H2O, CO2, S and Cl) of melt inclusions were analyzed by FTIR and EPMA. Maximum H2O and CO2 content of a melt inclusion in olivine are 3.3wt.% and 160wt.ppm, respectively. The gas saturation pressure of magma indicates that the pressure of magma

  17. Magma Piracy in the Southern Mariana Backarc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, N. C.; Fryer, P.; Martinez, F.; Stern, R. J.; Bloomer, S. H.

    2001-12-01

    Since 1997 the southern Mariana convergent margin system has been mapped with Hydrosweep, MR-1, and SeaBeam swath sonar systems on five cruises resulting in 168,500 km2 of bathymetry data and 186,800 km2 of sidescan data, revealing anomalous processes relative to the rest of the Mariana region. Most of the Mariana Arc is characterized by arc volcanism dominated by large, central volcanoes located at the boundary between a backarc basin with slow-spreading ridge morphology and a nonaccretionary forearc composed of Eocene volcanic arc rocks But southwest of Tracey Seamount, the southernmost large central arc volcano, the character of the arc and backarc changes dramatically. The arc volcanoes become small or nonexistent, but those that do occur lie along relict spreading fabric within the backarc basin. Furthermore, the spreading center appears to have an inflated, fast-spreading morphology, including dueling propagator fabric, and this southern backarc basin forms a shallow plateau overall. The spreading center then becomes less well-defined west of 143oE, and the volcanism appears to cease altogether west of 142oE in an area of amagmatic rifting, an observation supported by earthquake focal mechanisms and magnetics. The inflated morphology of the spreading axis, along with the absence or reduced size of nearby arc volcanoes suggests that arc magmas have been entrained into the backarc-spreading magmatic system. This "magma piracy" would result in arc magma being erupted at the backarc spreading center, therefore the backarc crust would be formed in part from arc magmas. Dredge samples from along the active ridge show compositions consistent with this suggestion. We suggest that this magma piracy has dominated the southern backarc basin for at least the last 3 m.y. since the robust spreading began. We suggest that the apparently higher magma production rate and the hybridized crust could account for the shallowness of the basin, as the more evolved arc-lavas would

  18. Magma mixing enhanced by bubble segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmaier, S.; Morgavi, D.; Renggli, C.; Perugini, D.; De Campos, C. P.; Hess, K.-U.; Ertel-Ingrisch, W.; Lavallée, Y.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-04-01

    That rising bubbles may significantly affect magma mixing paths has already been demon strated by analogue experiments. Here, for the first time, bubble-advection experiments are performed employing volcanic melts at magmatic temperatures. Cylinders of basaltic glass were placed below cylinders of rhyolite glass. Upon melting, interstitial air formed bubbles that rose into the rhyolite melt, thereby entraining tails of basaltic liquid. The formation of plume-like filaments of advected basalt within the rhyolite was characterized by microCT and subsequent high-resolution EMP analyses. Melt entrainment by bubble ascent appears to be an efficient mechanism for mingling volcanic melts of highly contrasting compositions and properties. MicroCT imaging reveals bubbles trailing each other and multiple filaments coalescing into bigger ones. Rheological modelling of the filaments yields viscosities of up to 2 orders of magnitude lower than for the surrounding rhyolitic liquid. Such a viscosity contrast implies that bubbles rising successively are likely to follow this pathway of low resistance that previously ascending bubbles have generated. Filaments formed by multiple bubbles would thus experience episodic replenishment with mafic material. Inevitable implications for the concept of bubble advection in magma mixing include thereby both an acceleration of mixing because of decreased viscous resistance for bubbles inside filaments and non-conventional diffusion systematics because of intermittent supply of mafic material (instead of a single pulse) inside a material. Inside the filaments, the mafic material was variably hybridised to andesitic through rhyolitic composition. Compositional profiles alone are ambiguous, however, to determine whether single or multiple bubbles were involved during formation of a filament. Statistical analysis, employing concentration variance as measure of homogenisation, demonstrates that also filaments appearing as single-bubble filaments

  19. Watching magma from space

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Wicks, Charles W., Jr.; Dzurisin, Daniel; Thatcher, Wayne R.; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; McNutt, Stephen R.; Mann, Dorte

    2000-01-01

    Westdahl is a broad shield volcano at the western end of Unimak Island in the Aleutian chain. It has apparently been dormant since a 1991-92 eruption and seismicity levels have been low. However, satellite radar imaging shows that in the years following 1992 the upper flanks of Westdahl have risen several centimeters, probably from the influx of new magma deep below its summit. Until now, deep magma reservoirs have been difficult to detect beneath most volcanoes. But using space geodetic technologies, specifically interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), we have discovered a deep magmatic source beneath Westdahl. 

  20. Dredged trachyte and basalt from kodiak seamount and the adjacent aleutian trench, alaska.

    PubMed

    Forbes, R B; Hoskin, C M

    1969-10-24

    Blocky fragments of aegirine-augite trachyte (with accompanying icerafted gravels.) were recovered from the upper slopes of Kodiak Seamount in several dredge hauls. An alkali basalt pillow segment was also dredged from a moatlike depression, at a depth of 5000 meters, near the west base of the seamount. These retrievals confirm the volcanic origin of Kodiak Seamount and further support the view of Engel, Engel, and Havens that the higher elevations of seamounts are composed of alkali basalts or related variants. PMID:17731907

  1. Long-Term Volumetric Eruption Rates and Magma Budgets

    SciTech Connect

    Scott M. White Dept. Geological Sciences University of South Carolina Columbia, SC 29208; Joy A. Crisp Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91109; Frank J. Spera Dept. Earth Science University of California, Santa Barbara Santa Barbara, CA 93106

    2005-01-01

    A global compilation of 170 time-averaged volumetric volcanic output rates (Qe) is evaluated in terms of composition and petrotectonic setting to advance the understanding of long-term rates of magma generation and eruption on Earth. Repose periods between successive eruptions at a given site and intrusive:extrusive ratios were compiled for selected volcanic centers where long-term (>104 years) data were available. More silicic compositions, rhyolites and andesites, have a more limited range of eruption rates than basalts. Even when high Qe values contributed by flood basalts (9 ± 2 Å~ 10-1 km3/yr) are removed, there is a trend in decreasing average Qe with lava composition from basaltic eruptions (2.6 ± 1.0 Å~ 10-2 km3/yr) to andesites (2.3 ± 0.8 Å~ 10-3 km3/yr) and rhyolites (4.0 ± 1.4 Å~ 10-3 km3/yr). This trend is also seen in the difference between oceanic and continental settings, as eruptions on oceanic crust tend to be predominately basaltic. All of the volcanoes occurring in oceanic settings fail to have statistically different mean Qe and have an overall average of 2.8 ± 0.4 Å~ 10-2 km3/yr, excluding flood basalts. Likewise, all of the volcanoes on continental crust also fail to have statistically different mean Qe and have an overall average of 4.4 ± 0.8 Å~ 10-3 km3/yr. Flood basalts also form a distinctive class with an average Qe nearly two orders of magnitude higher than any other class. However, we have found no systematic evidence linking increased intrusive:extrusive ratios with lower volcanic rates. A simple heat balance analysis suggests that the preponderance of volcanic systems must be open magmatic systems with respect to heat and matter transport in order to maintain eruptible magma at shallow depth throughout the observed lifetime of the volcano. The empirical upper limit of Å`10-2 km3/yr for magma eruption rate in systems with relatively high intrusive:extrusive ratios may be a consequence of the fundamental parameters

  2. High alumina (HA) and very high potassium (VHK) basalt clasts from Apollo 14 breccias. II - Whole rock geochemistry - Further evidence for combined assimilation and fractional crystallization within the lunar crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, C. R.; Taylor, L. A.; Schmitt, R. A.; Hughes, S. S.; Lindstrom, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    The understanding of basalt petrogenesis at the Apollo 14 site has increased markedly due to the study of 'new' samples from breccia 'pull-apart' efforts. Whole-rock compositions of 26 new high alumina (HA) and 7 very high potassium (VHK) basalts emphasize the importance of combined assimilation and fractional crystallization in a lunar regime. Previously formulated models for HA and VHK basalt petrogenesis are modified in order to accomodate these new data, although modeling parameters are essentially the same. The required range in HA basalt compositions is generated by the assimilation of KREEP by a 'primitive' parental magma. The VHK basalts can be generated by three parental HA basalts assimilating granite. Results indicate that VHK basalt compositions are dominated by the parental magma, and only up to 8 percent granite assimilation is required. This modeling indicates that at least three VHK basalt flows must be present at the Apollo 14 site.

  3. Carbon dioxide in magmas and implications for hydrothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, J. B.

    2001-01-01

    This review focuses on the solubility, origin, abundance, and degassing of carbon dioxide (CO2) in magma-hydrothermal systems, with applications for those workers interested in intrusion-related deposits of gold and other metals. The solubility of CO2 increases with pressure and magma alkalinity. Its solubility is low relative to that of H2O, so that fluids exsolved deep in the crust tend to have high CO2/H2O compared with fluids evolved closer to the surface. Similarly, CO2/H2O will typically decrease during progressive decompression- or crystallization-induced degassing. The temperature dependence of solubility is a function of the speciation of CO2, which dissolves in molecular form in rhyolites (retrograde temperature solubility), but exists as dissolved carbonate groups in basalts (prograde). Magnesite and dolomite are stable under a relatively wide range of mantle conditions, but melt just above the solidus, thereby contributing CO2 to mantle magmas. Graphite, diamond, and a free CO2-bearing fluid may be the primary carbon-bearing phases in other mantle source regions. Growing evidence suggests that most CO2 is contributed to arc magmas via recycling of subducted oceanic crust and its overlying sediment blanket. Additional carbon can be added to magmas during magma-wallrock interactions in the crust. Studies of fluid and melt inclusions from intrusive and extrusive igneous rocks yield ample evidence that many magmas are vapor saturated as deep as the mid crust (10-15 km) and that CO2 is an appreciable part of the exsolved vapor. Such is the case in both basaltic and some silicic magmas. Under most conditions, the presence of a CO2-bearing vapor does not hinder, and in fact may promote, the ascent and eruption of the host magma. Carbonic fluids are poorly miscible with aqueous fluids, particularly at high temperature and low pressure, so that the presence of CO2 can induce immiscibility both within the magmatic volatile phase and in hydrothermal systems

  4. Magma hybridisation at Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, Madeleine; Edmonds, Marie; Christopher, Thomas; Hards, Vicky

    2010-05-01

    Arc volcanoes commonly show evidence of mingling between mafic and silicic magma. For example, the Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat typically erupts andesitic magma containing basaltic to basaltic-andesite inclusions. However, the andesite also contains a wide variety of phenocryst textures as well as strongly zoned microlites, suggesting that more intimate physical mixing also occurs. Analysis of minor elements in both phenocrysts and microlites allows the discrimination of different crystal populations, and provides insight into their origins. Microlites of plagioclase and orthopyroxene are chemically distinct from the phenocrysts, being enriched in Fe and Mg, and Al and Ca respectively. However, they are indistinguishable from the compositions of these phases in the mafic inclusions. Microlite compositions also give anomalously high temperatures using standard geothermometry techniques, similar to those of the mafic inclusions. Compositions of clinopyroxene from overgrowth rims on quartz and orthopyroxene and coarse-grained breakdown rims on hornblende, are identical to those from the mafic inclusions, indicating that these rims form during interaction with mafic magma. We infer that the inclusions disaggregated under conditions of high shear stress during ascent in the conduit, transferring mafic material into the andesite groundmass. This implies that the mafic component of the system is greater than previously determined from the volume proportion of mafic enclaves. The presence of mafic-derived microlites in the andesite groundmass also means that care must be taken when using this as a starting material for phase equilibrium experiments. Melt inclusions and matrix glasses in the erupted include an anomalously K2O-rich population which overlaps with residual (high-K2O, high-TiO2) mafic inclusion glass. These glasses represent the effects of physical mixing with mafic magma, both during ascent and by diffusive exchange during the formation of mafic

  5. Conditions of Magma Storage, Degassing and Ascent at Stromboli: the Effect of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metrich, N.; Bertagnini, A.; di Muro, A.

    2009-12-01

    Stromboli is known for its persistent degassing and rythmic strombolian activity occasionally broken off by paroxysmal eruptions of variable energy. The basaltic pumice and scoria emitted, respectively, during paroxysms and strombolian activity differ in their textures, crystal contents and glass matrix compositions that testify to distinct conditions of crystallization, degassing and magma ascent. We report the most exhaustive data set so far on major elements and volatiles (CO2, H2O, S and Cl) in olivine-hosted melt inclusions and embayments from pyroclasts emplaced during explosive eruptions of variable magnitude. In particular, H2O was extensively analyzed using microRAMAN. Magma saturation pressures were assessed from the dissolved amounts of H2O and CO2 taking into account the melt composition evolution [1]. Our new data confirm the presence of a ponding zone, lying at 7-10 km in depth, refilled by deeper originated Ca-basalt and its gas phase. The later magma evolves, via crystal fractionation, in the same depth range towards the basalt that sustains Stromboli activity. Modeling of the pressure-related CO2 and H2O behaviors indicates that under closed-system conditions of ascent and decompression this basaltic magma, coexisting with 2.4-3 wt% CO2 gas, generates paroxysmal eruptions and basaltic pumice deposits. Under such conditions, crystallization during magma ascent is negligible, sulfur exsolution starts at ≤170 MPa whereas Cl remains dissolved in the melt until low pressure. As a whole more than 90% of S and only 16% of Cl are lost. In steady state conditions (i.e. strombolian activity, puffing, persistent degassing) bubbly basalt blobs enter the shallow plumbing system with a variable proportion of CO2 able to promote H2O loss, drive the magma into the domain of plagioclase crystallization and generate the crystal-rich, degassed basalt residing between 2 and 4 km in depth. We argue that this transition between basalts with a low and high crystal

  6. Hotspots, basalts, and the evolution of the mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    It is noted that the trace element concentration patterns of continental and ocean island basalts and of mid-ocean ridge basalts are complementary. Estimates of the relative sizes of the source regions for these fundamentally different basalt types can be arrived at from the trace element enrichment-depletion patterns. Their combined volume occupies the greater part of the mantle above the 670 km discontinuity. It is pointed out that the source regions separated as a result of early mantle differentiation and crystal fractionation from the resulting melt. The mid-ocean ridge basalts source evolved from an eclogite cumulate that gave up its late-stage enriched fluids at various times to the shallower mantle and continental crust. The mid-ocean ridge basalts source is rich in garnet and clinopyroxene, while the continental and ocean island basalt source is a garnet peridotite that has experienced secondary enrichment. These relationships are found to be consistent with the evolution of a terrestrial magma ocean.

  7. Testing the Origins of Basalt Fragments fro Apollo 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, P. H.; Stevens, R. E.; Neal, C. R.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    Several 2-4 mm regolith fragments of basalt from the Apollo 16 site were recently described by [1]. These included a high-Ti vitrophyric basalts (60603,10-16) and one very-low-titanium (VLT) crystalline basalt (65703,9-13). As Apollo 16 was the only highlands sample return mission distant from the maria, identification of basaltic samples at the site indicates input from remote sites via impact processes [1]. However, distinguishing between impact melt and pristine basalt can be notoriously difficult and requires significant sample material [2-6]. The crystal stratigraphy method utilizes essentially non-destructive methods to make these distinctions [7,8]. Crystal stratigraphy combines quantitative petrography in the form of crystal size distributions (CSDs) coupled with mineral geochemistry to reveal the petrogenetic history of samples. The classic CSD plot of crystal size versus population density can reveal insights on growth/cooling rates, residence times, and magma history which in turn can be used to evaluate basaltic vs impact melt origin [7-9]. Electron microprobe (EMP) and laser ablation (LA)-ICP-MS analyses of mineral phases complement textural investigations. Trace element variations document subtle changes occurring during the formation of the samples, and are key in the interpretation and preservation of this rare lunar sample collection.

  8. Physicochemical properties of alkali carbonatite lavas:Data from the 1988 eruption of Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, J. B.; Pinkerton, H.; Norton, G. E.; Pyle, D. M.

    1990-03-01

    Alkali carbonatite lavas extruded from Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania, in November 1988 are similar in composition to lavas extruded in 1960. Extrusion temperatures are 585 ±10 °C. Apparent viscosities in this temperature range are between 0.3 and 120 Paṡs, the highest values coming from very frothy and phenocryst-rich magma. The viscosities and temperatures are the lowest known for terrestrial magmas.

  9. Magma energy for power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal energy contained in crustal magma bodies represents a large potential resource for the US and magma generated power could become a viable alternative in the future. Engineering feasibility of the magma energy concept is being investigated as part of the Department of Energy's Geothermal Program. This current project follows a seven-year Magma Energy Research Project where scientific feasibility of the concept was concluded.

  10. Self Sealing Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Aulock, Felix W.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Lavallee, Yan

    2015-04-01

    During ascent of magma, pressure decreases and bubbles form. If the volume increases more rapidly than the relaxation timescale, the magma fragments catastrophically. If a permeable network forms, the magma degasses non-violently. This process is generally assumed to be unidirectional, however, recent studies have shown how shear and compaction can drive self sealing. Here, we additionally constrain skin formation during degassing and sintering. We heated natural samples of obsidian in a dry atmosphere and monitored foaming and impermeable skin formation. We suggest a model for skin formation that is controlled by diffusional loss of water and bubble collapse at free surfaces. We heated synthetic glass beads in a hydrous atmosphere to measure the timescale of viscous sintering. The beads sinter at drastically shorter timescales as water vapour rehydrates an otherwise degassed melt, reducing viscosity and glass transition temperatures. Both processes can produce dense inhomogeneities within the timescales of magma ascent and effectively disturb permeabilities and form barriers, particularly at the margins of the conduit, where strain localisation takes place. Localised ash in failure zones (i.e. Tuffisite) then becomes associated with water vapour fluxes and alow rapid rehydration and sintering. When measuring permeabilities in laboratory and field, and when discussing shallow degassing in volcanoes, local barriers for degassing should be taken into account. Highlighting the processes that lead to the formation of such dense skins and sintered infills of cavities can help understanding the bulk permeabilities of volcanic systems.

  11. The Transport of Magma from the Mare Source to the Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, M. A.; Phillips, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    Although it has been known from the beginnings of the space age that the lunar mare basalts are primarily located on the nearside of the Moon, the definitive cause of this phenomenon has remained a mystery. One popular explanation is that the hydrostatic pressure of the mare source controls the eruption of mare basalts. In this scenario, the depth of the mare source controls the maximum height that magma can rise in the crust. If the maximum depth of the mare source was globally uniform, then mare basalts would only be able to erupt at the surface below a critical elevation. Following the discovery of the Moon's 2-km center-of-mass/center-of-figure offset, many have suggested that the higher elevations of the lunar farside could have prevented farside magmas from reaching the surface due to their lack of the necessary pressure in their source. Recent data obtained from the Clementine and Lunar Prospector missions suggest that this scenario may be a bit simplistic. Using Clementine altimetry data, the full topographic extent of the South Pole Aitken Basin has been determined. Even though the lowest elevations of the Moon were found to occur within this basin's floor, mare flows in this basins are volumetrically insignificant when compared to the nearside basins and Oceanus Procellarum. If elevation was the only factor controlling the eruption of basalts, then this basin should surely have been completely flooded . Gamma-ray data from the Lunar Prospector mission also suggest that elevation is not the only factor that controls the eruption of mare basalts to the surface. Based on the surface distribution of KREEP, as well as results from previous studies, it has recently been argued that the Procellarum and Imbrium region of the Moon is a unique geochemical crustal province enriched in incompatible and heat-producing elements (named the "Procellarum KREEP terrane," or PKT). Wieczorek and Phillips have noted that more than 60% of the Moon's mare basalts reside within

  12. Magma energy: a feasible alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Colp, J.L.

    1980-03-01

    A short review of the work performed by Sandia Laboratories in connection with its Magma Energy Research Project is provided. Results to date suggest that boreholes will remain stable down to magma depths and engineering materials can survive the downhole environments. Energy extraction rates are encouraging. Geophysical sensing systems and interpretation methods require improvement, however, to clearly define a buried magma source.

  13. Magma Differentiation in the Plumbing System of an Alkaline Ocean Island Volcano (Fuerteventura, Canary Island).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornare, E.; Bussy, F.; Pilet, S.

    2014-12-01

    Magma differentiation and mixing are generally regarded as taking place in magma chambers, sills or reservoirs, while magma stagnates before continuing to ascent or erupt. Here we consider differentiation to occur during magma rise in vertical dykes, as documented in the PX1 pluton, Fuerteventura, which is part of the root-zone of an eroded ocean island volcano. PX1 is a vertically layered cumulative body composed of meter to decameter-wide bands of clinopyroxenites and gabbros, surrounded by a very high-grade contact aureole (ca. 1000°C, Hobson et al., 1998). Many clinopyroxenites are characterized by a coarse-grained texture and complexly zoned clinopyroxene crystals. Resorption features and reverse zoning observed in rims are evidence for successive pulses. Percolation of high temperature basaltic melts through the accumulating crystal-rich mush would generate the complexly zoned clinopyroxenes and lead to crystal coarsening. We interpret these coarse-grained clinopyroxenites as crystal-rich magma channels, through which sustained magma fluxes travelled to the surface over a long period of time, thus generating the contact aureole. On the other hand, gabbro bands are interpreted as sluggish magma pulses emplaced in a cooler environment during the waning stages of magmatic activity. We thus propose a model of magma differentiation by dynamic fractionation in dykes throughout magma ascent in the plumbing system of basaltic volcanoes. This model assumes fractional crystallization of continuously rising magmas in vertical channels all along their way to the surface through phenocryst accumulation and crystal-melt interaction processes.

  14. A chemical model for generating the sources of mare basalts - Combined equilibrium and fractional crystallization of the lunar magmasphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Gregory A.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Neal, Clive R.

    1992-01-01

    A chemical model for simulating the sources of the lunar mare basalts was developed by considering a modified mafic cumulate source formed during the combined equilibrium and fractional crystallization of a lunar magma ocean (LMO). The parameters which influence the initial LMO and its subsequent crystallization are examined, and both trace and major elements are modeled. It is shown that major elements tightly constrain the composition of mare basalt sources and the pathways to their creation. The ability of this LMO model to generate viable mare basalt source regions was tested through a case study involving the high-Ti basalts.

  15. Enrichment of basalt and mixing of dacite in the rootzone of a large rhyolite chamber: inclusions and pumices from the Rattlesnake Tuff, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streck, Martin J.; Grunder, Anita L.

    A variety of cognate basalt to basaltic andesite inclusions and dacite pumices occur in the 7-Ma Rattlesnake Tuff of eastern Oregon. The tuff represents 280km3 of high-silica rhyolite magma zoned from highly differentiated rhyolite near the roof to less evolved rhyolite at deeper levels. The mafic inclusions provide a window into the processes acting beneath a large silicic chamber. Quenched basaltic andesite inclusions are substantially enriched in incompatible trace elements compared to regional primitive high-alumina olivine tholeiite (HAOT) lavas, but continuous chemical and mineralogical trends indicate a genetic relationship between them. Basaltic andesite evolved from primitive basalt mainly through protracted crystal fractionation and multiple cycles (>=10) of mafic recharge, which enriched incompatible elements while maintaining a mafic bulk composition. The crystal fractionation history is partially preserved in the mineralogy of crystal-rich inclusions (olivine, plagioclase+/-clinopyroxene) and the recharge history is supported by the presence of mafic inclusions containing olivines of Fo80. Small amounts of assimilation ( 2%) of high-silica rhyolite magma improves the calculated fit between observed and modeled enrichments in basaltic andesite and reduces the number of fractionation and recharge cycles needed. The composition of dacite pumices is consistent with mixing of equal proportions of basaltic andesite and least-evolved, high-silica rhyolite. In support of the mixing model, most dacite pumices have a bimodal mineral assemblage with crystals of rhyolitic and basaltic parentage. Equilibrium dacite phenocrysts are rare. Dacites are mainly the product of mingling of basaltic andesite and rhyolite before or during eruption and to a lesser extent of equilibration between the two. The Rattlesnake magma column illustrates the feedback between mafic and silicic magmas that drives differentiation in both. Low-density rhyolite traps basalts and induces

  16. CONDITIONS LEADING TO SUDDEN RELEASE OF MAGMA PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    B. Damjanac; E.S. Gaffney

    2005-08-26

    Buildup of magmatic pressures in a volcanic system can arise from a variety of mechanisms. Numerical models of the response of volcanic structures to buildup of pressures in magma in dikes and conduits provide estimates of the pressures needed to reopen blocked volcanic vents. They also can bound the magnitude of sudden pressure drops in a dike or conduit due to such reopening. Three scenarios are considered: a dike that is sheared off by covolcanic normal faulting, a scoria cone over a conduit that is blocked by in-falling scoria and some length of solidified magma, and a lava flow whose feed has partially solidified due to an interruption of magma supply from below. For faulting, it is found that magma would be able to follow the fault to a new surface eruption. A small increase in magma pressure over that needed to maintain flow prior to faulting is required to open the new path, and the magma pressure needed to maintain flow is lower but still greater than for the original dike. The magma pressure needed to overcome the other types of blockages depends on the details of the blockage. For example, for a scoria cone, it depends on the depth of the slumped scoria and on the depth to which the magma has solidified in the conduit. In general, failure of the blockage is expected to occur by radial hydrofracture just below the blocked length of conduit at magma pressures of 10 MPa or less, resulting in radial dikes. However, this conclusion is based on the assumption that the fluid magma has direct access to the rock surrounding the conduit. If, on the other hand, there is a zone of solidified basalt, still hot enough to deform plastically, surrounding the molten magma in the conduit, this could prevent breakout of a hydrofracture and allow higher pressures to build up. In such cases, pressures could build high enough to deform the overlying strata (scoria cone or lava flow). Models of such deformations suggest the possibility of more violent eruptions resulting from

  17. Magma Storage, Recharge and the Caldera Cycle at Rabaul, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbro, G.; Bouvet de Maisonneuve, C.; Sindang, M.

    2015-12-01

    Many calderas have a history of repeated caldera-forming eruptions, interspersed with periods of more minor activity. Rabaul, for instance, has had at least 11 ignimbrite-forming eruptions over the last 200 ky. The most recent of these was the '1400 BP' eruption, which led to caldera collapse. Since then, there has been multiple smaller eruptions, including the ongoing activity from Tavurvur and Vulcan. An important question facing volcanology today is what controls the size of eruptions at calderas such as Rabaul.Detailed stratigraphic sampling of the 1400BP eruption reveals that prior to eruption, the magma reservoir below Rabaul contained a well-mixed dacite with whole-rock SiO2 contents of 65.0-66.4 wt%. The dacite contains a single phenocryst assemblage of plag (An44-52), cpx (En43-46Fs13-15Wo40-41), opx (En69-71Fs25-28Wo3) and magnetite, along with minor apatite. The homogeneity of the dacite is underscored by the narrow range of compositions of both the matrix glass and the melt inclusions (67.8-69.0 wt% SiO2). The only exception to this is at the top of the ignimbrite, representing some of the last magma to have been withdrawn. Dispersed throughout the dacitic pumices are darker, more mafic blebs. Streaks of mingled magma with a range of SiO2 contents, down to 59.9 wt% SiO2 are also found in the pumice, suggesting that a mafic recharge magma was intruded into the base of the reservoir shortly before eruption. High TiO2 contents rule out the direct involvement of basalt, and instead imply the magma that intruded into the reservoir was an andesite with at least 56 wt% SiO2. Phenocrysts related to this recharge magma are rare, and the crystals found in the dark blebs are identical in composition to those found in the dacite, indicating that the recharge was aphyric. The present-day, post-caldera recharge magma is different to the pre-1400 BP recharge magma: it is basaltic. This suggests that the plumbing system of Rabaul is different during the pre-caldera and

  18. Modeling the Time-dependent Changes in Electrical Conductivity of Basaltic Melts With Redox State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommier, A.; Gaillard, F.; Pichavant, M.

    2008-12-01

    The electrical conductivity σ is an efficient probe of mass transfer processes within silicate melts and magmas. Little attention has been given to the influence of redox state (fO2) on the melts conductivity. We present an experimental setup allowing electrical conductivity measurements for basaltic melts under variable fO2. We demonstrate a significant dependence of σ with fO2, allowing to characterize in situ the mechanisms and kinetics of redox changes in the melt. Experiments were conducted on basalts from Pu'u 'O'o, Hawaii, and Mt.Vesuvius, Italy. Measurements were performed cylindrical glass samples (OD: 6mm, ID: 1mm, L: 8mm) using an impedance spectrometer. Experiments were conducted in a 1atm vertical furnace, from 1200°C to 1400°C. Variable gas atmosphere (air, CO2 or CO-CO2 gas mixtures) were used, imposing ΔNNO from -1 to +7. Electrical conductivities were determined for the two melts at constant fO2, different T (constant fO2) and constant T, different fO2 (variable fO2) obtained by changing the gas composition. Isothermal reduction and oxidation cycles were performed. Glasses quenched from different T and fO2 conditions were analyzed by electron microprobe, the FeO concentration was determined by wet chemistry. In constant fO2 experiments, a small but detectable effect of fO2 on σ is evidenced. At 1300°C, the difference in the Kilauea sample conductivity between reduced (ΔNNO=-1) and oxidized (ΔNNO=+7) fO2 is <1(ohm.m)-1, the sample being more conductive when reduced. The temperature dependence of σ was fitted using Arrhenian equations, the activation energy Ea being 100kJ/mol. Sodium was identified as the main charge carrier in the melts. The fO2-effect on σ can thus be attributed to the influence of the Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio on sodium mobility. The fO2-dependence of σ was included in the model of Pommier et al.(2008), allowing the conductivity of natural melts to be calculated as a function of T, P, H2O, and fO2. Variable fO2 experiments

  19. Depleted components in the source of hotspot magmas: Evidence from the Ninetyeast Ridge (Kerguelen)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Frederick A.; Nobre Silva, Inês G.; Huang, Shichun; Pringle, Malcolm S.; Meleney, Peter R.; Weis, Dominique

    2015-09-01

    Although most ocean island basalts (OIB) are enriched in incompatible elements relative to mid-ocean ridge basalts, OIB depleted in these elements also occur on some islands. The Ninetyeast Ridge (NER) in the eastern Indian Ocean is a 5000 km long hotspot track defined by submarine basaltic volcanoes that were islands when they formed from 43 to 77 Ma. A subset of NER basalts, described as depleted, has high abundances of Sc, Y and Lu, which are relatively compatible in clinopyroxene and especially in garnet. It is unusual for magmas to have the trace element characteristics of a mineral. A likely explanation is that the depleted NER basalts were derived from a source that was created as a garnet- and clinopyroxene-bearing residue during partial melting. When this residue formed, the extent of melting must have been low as not all of the garnet and clinopyroxene was melted. To provide sufficient time for the relatively high Lu/Hf of the residue to develop the high 176Hf/177Hf that is characteristic of depleted NER basalts, this melting event must have been ancient. In the second much younger melting event that formed the NER, the extent of melting was sufficiently high to eliminate garnet and clinopyroxene from the ancient residue. Basalts erupted on a segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near the Azores were also derived from an ancient garnet-bearing residue. Residues from ancient partial melting events involving low extents of melting are the dominant source of mid-ocean ridge basalts and depleted magmas associated with the Kerguelen and Azores hotspots. In contrast, a very different process has been inferred for creating the source of depleted Icelandic basalts. Their source was gabbro containing cumulate plagioclase and clinopyroxene. Such gabbros are common in the lower oceanic crust, and if recycled into the Icelandic hotspot they are a source of depleted Icelandic basalts.

  20. Mantle-derived Calc-alkalic vs. Crust-derived Tholeiitic Magmas: A Radical Veiw of Andesite Genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumi, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Hirahara, Y.; Miyazaki, T.; Chang, Q.; Kimura, J.; Ban, M.; Sakayori, A.

    2008-12-01

    Two distinctive differentiation trends, tholeiitic and calc-alkalic, are recognized in Zao volcano, which is located immediately behind the volcanic front of the NE Japan arc. The genetic relation between these two magma series is critical to for a better understanding of andesite genesis, because in arc volcanoes they often coexist, in close spatial and temporal proximity in arc volcanoes. Petrographic features indicative of 'disequilibrium', such as reversely zoned pyroxene phenocrysts, the wide and bimodal compositional distribution in Ca/(Ca+Na) of plagioclase phenocrysts, honeycomb textures and dusty zones that these plagioclase phenocrysts often exhibit, and the presence of olivine-pyroxene pairs with different Mg/Fe, are observed exclusively in calc-alkalic rocks. In tholeiitic rocks the Sr isotopic ratios of plagioclase phenocrysts, determined by both micromilling combined with thermal ionization mass spectrometryscopy, and laser- ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry ICP-MS techniques, are constant at 0.7042-0.7044 in tholeiitic rocks. On the other hand, those in calc-alkalic rocks (0.7033-0.7042) show more complex characteristics, which can be best understood if at least three end-member components,; a calc-alkalic basaltic melt, a tholeiitic basaltic melt and a tholeiitic felsic melt, contribute to the production of mixed calc- alkalic magmas. 87Sr/86Sr and trace element compositions of the least-differentiated basalt magmas, which are inferred from the composition of the calcic plagioclase (Ca/(Ca+Na) >0.9), suggest that two types of basaltic magma, calc-alkalic and tholeiitic, exist beneath the volcano. The tholeiitic basalt magma possesses higher 87Sr/86Sr than the calc-alkalic magma (0.7042 vs. 0.7038) and shows characteristic trace element signatures consistent with the presence of plagioclase and amphibole as melting residues. This suggests that the tholeiitic magmas are produced via anatexis of amphibolitic crust caused by

  1. New Field, Geochronological, and Geochemical Data on the Miocene Lovejoy Basalt and its Source, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, N. J.; Busby, C. B.; Gans, P. B.; Wagner, D. L.

    2003-12-01

    The Lovejoy Basalt is a distinctive, aphanitic olivine basalt that flowed through a paleovalley across the northern end of the Sierra Nevada from the Diamond Mountains near Honey Lake to the Sacramento Valley in northern California. Approximately 150 km3 of basalt was erupted in a tectonic setting transitional between subduction, Basin and Range extension, and hot spot volcanism, but the eruptive source and timing of the Lovejoy Basalt have remained controversial. Recent field mapping and geochemical analyses suggest that Thompson Peak, located south of Susanville, California, is the source vent for the Lovejoy Basalt. At Thompson Peak, Lovejoy Basalt forms an elongate, NNW-SSE trending ridge that is capped in its central section by the Basalt of Thompson Peak. Scoria deposits, volcanic bombs, agglutinate and other near vent deposits indicate Thompson Peak as the source for the Lovejoy Basalt. Previous and new mapping indicate that the basalt was channelized within granitic basement, and flowed south from the vent 30 km to Red Clover Creek before bending to the southwest and flowing 65 km to the Sacramento Valley. The Lovejoy Basalt consists of up to 13 flows, all aphyric except for an uppermost plagioclase-phyric flow present between Thompson Peak and Red Clover Creek that locally contains xenocrysts of olivine and garnet. At Table Mountain, the basalt appears to have ponded or inflated, forming very thick flows with prominent N-S trending pressure ridges. The Lovejoy Basalt is a quartz-normative tholeiite that is geochemically similar to the Columbia River Basalt. While a conclusive statement cannot yet be made about the source magma for the Lovejoy Basalt, initial analyses show that it does not appear to be related to the main phase of Cascade arc volcanism, which is predominantly calc-alkaline. Recently published age data for the Lovejoy Basalt suggests that it is coeval with the main phase of the Columbia River Basalt Group; however, our further attempts to

  2. Effects of shallow subvolcanic magma storage regions on magma evolution and eruptions dynamics of small mafic centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K. V.; Wallace, P. J.; McKay, D.; Ruscitto, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    The existence of shallow subvolcanic dike and sill complexes has long been recognized in field investigations of mafic cinder cones and shield volcanoes. Evidence that these subvolcanic storage regions develop during (rather than separate from) eruptive activity comes from detailed studies of tephra deposits and lava flows produced during cinder cone eruptions. These deposits show both the variable volatile contents of olivine-hosted melt inclusions and pervasive microphenocryst crystallization, both of which indicate temporary magma storage at shallow levels prior to eruption. The consequences of such shallow magma storage for both eruption dynamics and syn-eruptive magma evolution have not previously been considered. Here we use both physical (density, crystallinity) and compositional (bulk, melt inclusion) data from the 1943-1952 eruption of Parícutin, Mexico to examine the impact of shallow pre-eruptive storage on both the eruption process and on the dramatic evolution in magma composition first described by Wilcox (1954). We supplement these observations with data from recent (1500-2000 ybp) mafic cinder cone eruptions in central Oregon. Our data show that shallow subvolcanic storage of magma permits pre-eruptive degassing and crystallization, which, in turn, are responsible for the (typically) wide density range of basaltic scoria observed in cinder cone activity. As pre-eruptive gas loss will diminish the volatiles available to fuel explosive activity, we further speculate that the ease of syn-eruptive dike and sill formation, which is likely to be controlled by both the rate of magma supply and the specific tectonic setting, may modulate the explosive potential of cinder cone eruptions. Additionally, all of the deposits that we have studied have a range in bulk composition, with the earliest tephra the most mafic and the latest lava the most silicic of the eruptive sequence. This observation suggests that an additional consequence of shallow magma storage

  3. Nanoparticulate mineral matter from basalt dust wastes.

    PubMed

    Dalmora, Adilson C; Ramos, Claudete G; Querol, Xavier; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Taffarel, Silvio R; Moreno, Teresa; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-02-01

    Ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during "stonemeal" soil fertilizer application have been the subject of some concern recently around the world for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the mining district of Nova Prata in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/(Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy) EDS/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM)/EDS and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3, with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, Zn that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and could so present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle mineralogy and chemical composition in typical BDW samples highlights the need to develop cleaning procedures to minimise exposure to these natural fertilizing basalt dust wastes and is thus of direct relevance to both the industrial sector of basalt mining and to agriculture in the region. PMID:26551199

  4. Geologic Mapping of Basalt Flows: Implications for Petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Grove, T. L.; Champion, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    Basaltic lava flows can display a variety of compositional signatures that hold clues to P, T, and composition of the mantle from which they originated. Compositional variation within basalt flows records individual histories of mantle and crustal processes. At the Cascades rear-arc Newberry and Medicine Lake volcanoes, detailed geologic mapping of compositionally-zoned basalts indicates clearly that "drive-through" sampling of such lava flows would fail to capture the full geochemical story. For these flows, the internal stratigraphy captures the eruptive sequence that took place as the magma reservoir was tapped. Given a range of composition, or exposures of basalt that have different compositions, how does one know whether different eruptions have occurred, or whether a single compositionally-zoned eruption took place? Geologic mapping today goes well beyond traditional approaches using petrography and morphology. In addition to those basic tools, iterative use of multiple chemical analyses and, most critically, paleomagnetic sampling are essential to identifying individual basalt eruptive events. At Medicine Lake volcano in N. CA, 4 compositionally-zoned basalt flows have been documented (see Donnelly-Nolan, 2011, USGS map SIM 2927): (1) basalt of Black Crater and Ross Chimneys; this very small eruptive event produced 0.001 km3 of lava that covers 0.4 km2. SiO2 content increased from 48.3 to 50.6% as the eruption progressed; composition also correlates with latitude; (2) basalt of Giant Crater, 200-sq-km postglacial basaltic andesite to basalt that is characterized by strong variation in a variety of elements (e.g. 47.7-53.2% SiO2, 0.07-1.1% K2O) [Baker et al. 1991 JGR; Donnelly-Nolan et al. 1991 JGR]; (3) basalt of Mammoth Crater, 250-sq-km basaltic andesite to basalt also having strong SiO2 variation (48.2-56.0%), but in addition a lobe enriched in FeO and TiO2; (4) 300-sq-km basalt of Yellowjacket Butte displays limited SiO2 variation, but linear variation

  5. Basaltic island sand provenance

    SciTech Connect

    Marsaglia, K.M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The Hawaiian Islands are an ideal location to study basaltic sand provenance in that they are a series of progressively older basaltic shield volcanoes with arid to humid microclimates. Sixty-two sand samples were collected from beaches on the islands of Hawaii, Maui, Oahu and Kauai and petrographically analyzed. The major sand components are calcareous bioclasts, volcanic lithic fragments, and monomineralic grains of dense minerals and plagioclase. Proportions of these components vary from island to island, with bioclastic end members being more prevalent on older islands exhibiting well-developed fringing reef systems and volcanic end members more prevalent on younger, volcanically active islands. Climatic variations across the island of Hawaii are reflected in the percentage of weathered detritus, which is greater on the wetter, northern side of the island. The groundmass of glassy, basaltic lithics is predominantly black tachylite, with lesser brown sideromelane; microlitic and lathwork textures are more common than holohyaline vitric textures. Other common basaltic volcanic lithic fragments are holocrystalline aggregates of silt-sized pyroxene or olivine, opaque minerals and plagioclase. Sands derived from alkalic lavas are texturally and compositionally indistinguishable from sands derived from tholeiitic lavas. Although Hawaiian basaltic sands overlap in composition with magmatic arc-derived sands in terms of their relative QFL, QmPK and LmLvLs percentages, they are dissimilar in that they lack felsic components and are more enriched in lathwork volcanic lithic fragments, holocrystalline volcanic lithic fragments, and dense minerals.

  6. A young solidification age for the lunar magma ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, Amy M.; Borg, Lars E.

    2014-09-01

    The time at which the lunar magma ocean solidified can be determined from the Lu-Hf isotope systematics of lunar rocks derived from magma sources that formed during crystallization of the lunar magma ocean. The final magma ocean crystallization product, termed urKREEP, is enriched in incompatible elements including K, REE and P. We have determined the initial Hf isotopic compositions of four samples, two KREEP basalts and two Mg-suite norites. The incompatible trace element compositions of these samples are controlled by an urKREEP component, and therefore the initial Hf isotopic compositions of these samples represent the Hf isotopic evolution of urKREEP. In order to correct the effects of neutron irradiation on the Hf isotopic compositions of these samples, we have developed a model that uses the stable Hf and Sm isotopic compositions measured on an irradiated sample to determine and correct for the thermal and epithermal neutron fluence that has modified the Hf isotopic composition of the sample. We use our corrected results to calculate a 176Lu-176Hf urKREEP model age of 4353 ± 37 Ma and the 176Lu/177Hf of urKREEP to be 0.0153 ± 0.0033. The Lu-Hf model age is concordant with the re-calculated Sm-Nd urKREEP model age of 4389 ± 45 Ma, and we take the average of these ages, 4368 ± 29 Ma, to represent the time at which urKREEP formed. This age is concordant with the age of the most reliably dated ferroan noritic anorthosite as well as 142Nd model ages for the formation or re-equilibration of mare basalt sources. Taken together, these ages indicate that the Moon experienced a widespread, large-scale magmatic event around 4370 Ma, most plausibly attributed to solidification of the lunar magma ocean.

  7. Additive Construction using Basalt Regolith Fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Lippitt, Thomas C.; Mantovani, James G.; Nugent, Matthew W.; Townsend, Ivan I.

    2014-01-01

    Planetary surfaces are often covered in regolith (crushed rock), whose geologic origin is largely basalt. The lunar surface is made of small-particulate regolith and areas of boulders located in the vicinity of craters. Regolith composition also varies with location, reflecting the local bedrock geology and the nature and efficiency of the micrometeorite-impact processes. In the lowland mare areas (suitable for habitation), the regolith is composed of small granules (20 - 100 microns average size) of mare basalt and volcanic glass. Impacting micrometeorites may cause local melting, and the formation of larger glassy particles, and this regolith may contain 10-80% glass. Studies of lunar regolith are traditionally conducted with lunar regolith simulant (reconstructed soil with compositions patterned after the lunar samples returned by Apollo). The NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Granular Mechanics & Regolith Operations (GMRO) lab has identified a low fidelity but economical geo-technical simulant designated as Black Point-1 (BP-1). It was found at the site of the Arizona Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) analog field test site at the Black Point lava flow in adjacent basalt quarry spoil mounds. This paper summarizes activities at KSC regarding the utilization of BP-1 basalt regolith and comparative work with lunar basalt simulant JSC-1A as a building material for robotic additive construction of large structures. In an effort to reduce the import or in-situ fabrication of binder additives, we focused this work on in-situ processing of regolith for construction in a single-step process after its excavation. High-temperature melting of regolith involves techniques used in glassmaking and casting (with melts of lower density and higher viscosity than those of metals), producing basaltic glass with high durability and low abrasive wear. Most Lunar simulants melt at temperatures above 1100 C, although melt processing of terrestrial regolith at 1500 C is not

  8. A preliminary analysis of lunar extra-mare basalts - Distribution, compositions, ages, volumes, and eruption styles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitford-Stark, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Extra-mare basalts occupy 8.5% of the lunar basalt area and comprise 1% of the total mare basalt volume. They are preferentially located where the crust is thin and topographically low. In terms of age, eruption style, and composition they are as variable as the mare basalts. In some instances extrusion in extra-mare craters was preceded by floor-fracturing whereas in other cases it apparently was not. The volume of lava erupted may have been controlled more by the volume of magma produced than by hydrostatic effects. A minimum of nearly 1300 separate basalt eruptions is indicated; the true value could be nearer 30,000 separate eruptions.

  9. Comparative Magma Oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John H.

    1999-01-01

    The question of whether the Earth ever passed through a magma ocean stop is of considerable interest. Geochemical evidence strongly suggests that the Moon had a magma ocean and the evidence is mounting that the same was true for Mars. Analyses of mar (SNC) meteorites have yielded insights into the differentiation history of Mars, and consequently, it is interesting to compare that planet to the Earth. Three primary features of An contrast strongly to those of the Earth: (1) the extremely ancient ages of the martian core, mantle, and crust (approx. 4.55 b.y.); (2) the highly depleted nature of the martian mantle; and (3) the extreme ranges of Nd isotopic compositions that arise within the crust and depleted mantle.

  10. Isotopic composition of lead in oceanic basalt and its implication to mantle evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tatsumoto, M.

    1978-01-01

    New data are given in this report for (1) Pb isotopic compositions and U, Th, and Pb concentrations of basalts from the island of Hawaii; (2) redetermined Pb isotopic compositions of some abyssal tholeiites; and (3) U, Th, and Pb concentrations of altered and fresh abyssal basalts, and basalt genesis and mantle evolution are discussed. The Th U ratios of abyssal and Japanese tholeiites are distinctly lower than those of tholeiites and alkali basalts from other areas. It is thought that these low values reflect a part of the mantle depleted in large ionic lithophile elements. Thus a mantle evolution model is presented, in which Th U ratios of the depleted zone in the mantle have decreased to ???2, and U Pb ratios have increased, showing an apparent ???1.5-b.y. isochron trend in the 207Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb plot. The Pb isotopic compositions of basalts from the island of Hawaii are distinct for each of the five volcanoes, and within each volcano, Pb's of tholeiites and alkali basalts are similar. An interaction between partially melted material (hot plume?) of the asthenosphere and the lithosphere is suggested to explain the trend in the Pb isotopic compositions of Hawaiian basalts. ?? 1978.

  11. Assimilation by Lunar Mare Basalts: Melting of Crustal Material and Dissolution of Anorthite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnila, A. B.; Hess, P. C.; Rutherford, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    We discuss techniques for calculating the amount of crustal assimilation possible in lunar magma chambers and dikes based on thermal energy balances, kinetic rates, and simple fluid mechanical constraints. Assuming parent magmas of picritic compositions, we demonstrate the limits on the capacity of such magmas to melt and dissolve wall rock of anorthitic, troctolitic, noritic, and KREEP (quartz monzodiorite) compositions. Significant melting of the plagioclase-rich crustal lithologies requires turbulent convection in the assimilating magma and an efficient method of mixing in the relatively buoyant and viscous new melt. Even when this occurs, the major element chemistry of the picritic magmas will change by less than 1-2 wt %. Diffusion coefficients measured for Al2O3 from an iron-free basalt and an orange glass composition are 10(exp -12) m(exp 2) s(exp -1) at 1340 C and 10(exp -11) m(exp 2) s(exp -1) at 1390 C. These rates are too slow to allow dissolution of plagioclase to significantly affect magma compositions. Picritic magmas can melt significant quantities of KREEP, which suggests that their trace element chemistry may still be affected by assimilation processes; however, mixing viscous melts of KREEP composition with the fluid picritic magmas could be prohibitively difficult. We conclude that only a small part of the total major element chemical variation in the mare basalt and volcanic glass collection is due to assimilation/fractional crystallization processes near the lunar surface. Instead, most of the chemical variation in the lunar basalts and volcanic glasses must result from assimilation at deeper levels or from having distinct source regions in a heterogeneous lunar mantle.

  12. Assimilation by lunar mare basalts: Melting of crustal material and dissolution of anorthite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnila, A. B.; Hess, P. C.; Rutherford, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    We discuss techniques for calculating the amount of crustal assimilation possible in lunar magma chambers and dikes based on thermal energy balances, kinetic rates, and simple fluid mechanical constraints. Assuming parent magmas of picritic compositions, we demonstrate the limits on the capacity of such magmas to melt and dissolve wall rock of anorthitic, troctolitic, noritic, and KREEP (quartz monzodiorite) compositions. Significant melting of the plagioclase-rich crustal lithologies requires turbulent convection in the assimilating magma and an efficient method of mixing in the relatively buoyant and viscous new melt. Even when this occurs, the major element chemistry of the picritic magmas will change by less than 1-2 wt %. Diffusion coefficients measured for Al2O3 from an iron-free basalt and an orange glass composition are 10(exp -12) sq m/s at 1340 C and 10(exp -11) sq m/s at 1390 C. These rates are too slow to allow dissolution of plagioclase to significantly affect magma compositions. Picritic magmas can melt significant quantities of KREEP, which suggests that their trace element chemistry may still be affected by assimilation processes; however, mixing viscous melts of KREEP composition with the fluid picritic magmas could be prohibitively difficult. We conclude that only a small part of the total major element chemical variation in the mare basalt and volcanic glass collection is due to assimilation/fractional crystallization processes near the lunar surface. Instead, most of the chemical variation in the lunar basalts and volcanic glasses must result from assimilation at deeper levels or from having distinct source regions in a heterogeneous lunar mantle.

  13. Does temperature increase or decrease in adiabatic decompression of magma?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilinc, A. I.; Ghiorso, M. S.; Khan, T.

    2011-12-01

    We have modeled adiabatic decompression of an andesitic and a basaltic magma as an isentropic process using the Melts algorithm. Our modeling shows that during adiabatic decompression temperature of andesitic magma increases but temperature of basaltic magma decreases. In an isentropic process entropy is constant so change of temperature with pressure can be written as dT/dP=T (dV/dT)/Cp where T (dV/dT)/Cp is generally positive. If delta P is negative so is delta T. In general, in the absence of phase change, we expect the temperature to decrease with adiabatic decompression. The effect of crystallization is to turn a more entropic phase (liquid) into a less entropic phase (solid), which must be compensated by raising the temperature. If during adiabatic decompression there is small amount or no crystallization, T (dV/dT)/Cp effect which lowers the temperature overwhelms the small amount of crystallization, which raises the temperature, and overall system temperature decreases.

  14. Dissolution behaviour of model basalt fibres studied by surface analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, T.; Scheffler, C.; Mäder, E.; Heinrich, G.; Jesson, D. A.; Watts, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    New concepts of surface modifications aimed at the enhancement of alkali resistance of basalt fibres require research work on chemical composition of interacting surface layers as well as knowledge about fundamental processes of basaltic glass dissolution. Therefore, two model basalt fibres manufactured out of subalkaline and alkaline rock material were leached in NaOH solution at a temperature of 80 °C for up to 11 days. The formation of a corrosion shell was observed in both cases and was analyzed by SEM/EDX. The model fibres out of subalkaline rocks show dissolution kinetic, which is two-staged, whereas the more alkaline fibre reflects a linear one. The complex composition of basalt fibre is detected by EDX and XPS. The surface of basalt fibres is rich in Si and Al. XPS high resolution spectra provide information on oxidation state of iron.

  15. Dynamics of basaltic plumbing systems - a theoretical model of eruptive output and timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, S.; Gunn, L. S.

    2011-12-01

    Eruptions of basaltic volcanoes are the culmination of magma transport processes within a plumbing system that extends from the mantle to the surface. We present a versatile model of this system and compare model output with the historical record of selected basaltic volcanoes. Components of the model system include a deep storage region from which magma escapes at a rate determined by magma buoyancy, viscosity, conduit dimensions and viscous collapse of ductile country rocks, and a shallow chamber from which dense magma erupts at a rate determined by viscosity, conduit dimensions and elastic relaxation of initially over-pressured magma and country rock. The volumes of the chambers are also important variables. Model systems built from these components connected to each other and/or the surface encapsulate the controls on eruption intensity and duration in several scenarios. Using appropriate ranges of input parameter values, Monte Carlo modelling generates synthetic distributions of eruption volume and duration whose characteristics are compared with the distributions derived from historic eruption data from various basaltic volcanoes. Our results provide probabilistic forecasts of eruption durations, theoretical models of the course of given eruptions, and insights on the contrasting behaviours of volcanoes fed from shallow upper crustal chambers or from chambers situated in the deep crust or mantle.

  16. Sunset Crater, AZ: Evolution of a highly explosive basaltic eruption as indicated by granulometry and clast componentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, C. M.; Clarke, A. B.; Pioli, L.; Alfano, F.

    2011-12-01

    Basaltic scoria cone volcanoes are the most abundant volcanic edifice on Earth and occur in all tectonic settings. Basaltic magmas have lower viscosities, higher temperatures, and lower volatile contents than silicic magmas, and therefore generally have a lower potential for explosive activity. However, basaltic eruptions display great variability in eruptive style, from mild lava flows to more energetic explosions with large plumes. The San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) in northern Arizona, active from 6 Ma-present, consists of over 600 volcanoes, mostly alkali basalt scoria cones, and five silicic centers [Wood and Kienle (1990), Cambridge University Press]. The eruption of Sunset Crater in the SFVF during the Holocene was an anomalously large basaltic explosive eruption, consisting of eight tephra-bearing phases and three lava flows [Amos (1986), MS thesis, ASU]. Typical scoria cone-forming eruptions have volumes <0.1km3 DRE, while the Sunset Crater deposit is at least 0.6km3 DRE [Amos (1986)]. The phases vary in size and style; the beginning stages of explosive activity (phases 1-2) were considerably smaller than phases 3-5, classified as subplinian. Due to its young age, the eruptive material is fresh and the deposit is well-preserved. We sampled the first five tephra units at 25 locations, ranging from 6 km to 20 km from the vent, concentrating our efforts in the downwind direction (E and SE of the vent) along the primary dispersal axes of several phases. Notable variations among the first five phases were found from evaluation of juvenile clast componentry, with each phase containing some proportion of red, grey, and glassy to iridescent clasts. The red and grey clasts are sub-rounded to rounded with high sphericity, while the other clasts are highly angular and slightly elongate, with blue-black to gold glassy and iridescent surfaces. The glassy and iridescent clasts likely represent fresh, juvenile ejecta, which were quenched rapidly, whereas the red and

  17. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  18. Deducing the magma chamber processes of middle Eocene volcanics, Sivas and Tokat regions; NE Turkey: Insights from clinopyroxene chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göçmengil, Gönenç; Karacık, Zekiye; Genç, Ş. Can; Prelevic, Dejan

    2016-04-01

    Middle Eocene Tokat and Sivas volcanic successions occur within the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan suture zone. Different models are suggested for the development of the middle Eocene volcanism such as post-collisional, delamination and slab-breakoff models as well as the arc magmatism. In both areas, volcanic units cover all the basement units with a regional disconformity and comprise lavas spanning a compositional range from mainly basalt-basaltic andesite to a lesser amount trachyte. Here, we report mineral chemistry of different basaltic lavas through transect from northern continent (Tokat region, Pontides) to southern continent (Sivas region, Kırşehir block) to deduce the characteristics of the magma chamber processes which are active during the middle Eocene. Basaltic lavas include olivine bearing basalts (Ol-basalt: ± olivine + clinopyroxene + plagioclase); amphibole bearing basaltic andesite (Amp-basaltic andesite: amphibole + clinopyroxene + plagioclase ± biotite) and pyroxene bearing basaltic andesite (Px-basaltic andesite: clinopyroxene + plagioclase). Microlitic, glomeroporphyric and pilotaxitic texture are common. Clinopyroxene phenocrystals (macro ≥ 750 μm and micro ≤300 μm) are common in all three lava series which are investigated by transecting core to rim compositional profiles. They are generally augite and diopside; euhedral to subhedral in shape with oscillatory, normal and reverse zoning patterns. Also, all clinopyroxene phenocrystals are marked by moderately high Mg# (for Ol-basalt: 67-91; avg. 80; Amp-basaltic andesite: 76-83, avg: 80; Px -basaltic andesite 68-95, avg: 81). In Ol-basalt, clinopyroxene phenocrystals show normal zonation (high Mg# cores and low Mg# rims). In Amp-basaltic andesite, clinopyroxenes are generally homogenous in composition with minor variation of Mg# towards the rims. On the contrary, in Px-basaltic andesite, clinopyroxene macro phenocrystals show reverse zonation with the core with low Mg# and the rims with

  19. Exhumed conduit records magma ascent and drain-back during a Strombolian eruption at Tongariro volcano, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Branney, Michael J.; von Aulock, Felix W.; Lavallée, Yan; Menendez, Amaya

    2015-09-01

    Field evidence from a basaltic-andesite dyke preserved in the eroded wall of a scoria cone at Red Crater, Tongariro volcano, New Zealand, records a history of up-conduit magma flow during a Strombolian eruption, subsequent drain-back and final cessation of flow. The dyke intrudes pre-Strombolian andesite lavas, and the overlying proximal basaltic-andesite scoria deposits associated with contemporaneous lavas, which are, in turn overlain by laminated lapilli-tuff and large blocks. Textural and kinematic evidence of ductile shear recorded in basaltic andesite at the dyke margins records magma deformation imposed by bypassing movement of magma up the centre of the conduit during the eruption, whereas the basaltic andesite occupying the central part of the lowermost exposures of the dyke preserves ductile flow-folds with the opposite (down-flow) shear sense. The evidence indicates that the downward magma flow followed the eruption, and this draining left the central part of the dyke empty (unfilled) at uppermost levels. We discuss the kinematic constraints in the context of the criteria for up-flow of mafic magma and present the factors most likely to result in a final drain-back event. With reference to experimental and numerical work, we propose a draining model for the end of this eruption, and that magmatic drain-back may feature commonly during closing stages of Strombolian eruptions at mafic volcanoes. Drain-back which leaves large cavities in a volcanic edifice could result in hazardous structural instabilities.

  20. Magma energy: engineering feasibility of energy extraction from magma bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Traeger, R.K.

    1983-12-01

    A research program was carried out from 1975 to 1982 to evaluate the scientific feasibility of extracting energy from magma, i.e., to determine if there were any fundamental scientific roadblocks to tapping molten magma bodies at depth. The next stage of the program is to evaluate the engineering feasibility of extracting energy from magma bodies and to provide insight into system economics. This report summarizes the plans, schedules and estimated costs for the engineering feasibility study. Tentative tasks and schedules are presented for discussion and critique. A bibliography of past publications on magma energy is appended for further reference. 69 references.

  1. How important is the role of crystal fractionation in making intermediate magmas? Insights from Zr and P systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cin-Ty A.; Bachmann, Olivier

    2014-05-01

    Most magmatism on Earth forms by direct melting of the mantle, generating basalts at the low silica end of the terrestrial compositional spectrum. However, most subduction zone magmas erupted or sampled at the surface are basalt-andesitic to andesitic and hence have higher Si contents. Endmember hypotheses for the origin of andesites are: (1) direct melting of the mantle at water-saturated conditions, (2) partial re-melting of altered basaltic crust, (3) crystal fractionation of arc basalts in crustal magma chambers, and (4) mixing of mafic magmas with high Si crust or magmas, e.g., dacite-rhyolite. Here, we explore the possibility of using Zr and P systematics to evaluate the importance of some of these processes. Direct melting of the mantle generates magmas with low Zr (<50 ppm) and P2O5 (<0.2 wt.%). Crystal-liquid segregation should drive an increase in P and Zr in the residual magma because the magma is initially undersaturated in zircon and apatite. With further cooling and crystallization, apatite followed by zircon will saturate, causing P and Zr to decrease so that most rhyolites and granites will have low P and Zr (high temperature rhyolites may never saturate in zircon and will maintain high Zr contents). Mixing of basalts with rhyolites having low P and Zr should generate coupled decreases in Zr and P with increasing SiO2. Here, we show that Zr (>100 ppm) and P2O5 (>0.2 wt.%) in island- and continental-arc magmas initially increase to levels higher than what can be achieved if andesites form by direct mantle melting. As Si increases, both Zr and P decrease with Zr decreasing at higher Si, and hence lagging the decrease in P. These systematics, particularly the decoupled decrease in Zr and P, cannot be explained by mixing, and instead, are more easily explained if andesites are dominantly formed by crystal-liquid segregation from moderately hydrous basalt, wherein P and Zr are controlled, respectively, by early and later saturation in apatite and zircon

  2. The role of bubble ascent in magma mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmaier, Sebastian; Morgavi, Daniele; Perugini, Diego; De Campos, Cristina; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the processes that affect the rate of liquid state homogenization provides fundamental clues on the otherwise inaccessible subsurface dynamics of magmatic plumbing systems. Compositional heterogeneities detected in the matrix of magmatic rocks represent the arrested state of a chemical equilibration. Magmatic homogenization is divided into a) the mechanical interaction of magma batches (mingling) and b) the diffusive equilibration of compositional gradients, where diffusive equilibration is exponentially enhanced by progressive mechanical interaction [1]. The mechanical interaction between two distinct batches of magma has commonly been attributed to shear and folding movements between two distinct liquids. A mode of mechanical interaction scarcely invoked is the advection of mafic material into a felsic one through bubble motion. Yet, experiments with analogue materials demonstrated that bubble ascent has the potential to enhance the fluid mechanical component of magma mixing [2]. Here, we present preliminary results from bubble-advection experiments. For the first time, experiments of this kind were performed using natural materials at magmatic temperatures. Cylinders of Snake River Plain (SRP) basalt were drilled with a cavity of defined volume and placed underneath cylinders of SRP rhyolite. Upon melting, the gas pocket (=bubble) trapped within the cavity, rose into the rhyolite, and thus entraining a portion of basaltic material in the shape of a plume trail. These plume-like structures that the advected basalt formed within the rhyolite were characterized by microCT and subsequent high-resolution EMP analyses. Single protruding filaments at its bottom end show a composite structure of many smaller plume tails, which may indicate the opening of a preferential pathway for bubbles after a first bubble has passed. The diffusional gradient around the plume tail showed a progressive evolution of equilibration from bottom to top of the plume tail

  3. Magma deformation and emplacement in rhyolitic dykes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Ellen; Tuffen, Hugh; James, Mike; Wynn, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Silicic eruption mechanisms are determined by the rheological and degassing behaviour of highly-viscous magma ascending within shallow dykes and conduits. However, we have little knowledge of how magmatic behaviour shifts during eruptions as dykes and conduits evolve. To address this we have analysed the micro- to macro-scale textures in shallow, dissected rhyolitic dykes at the Tertiary Húsafell central volcano in west Iceland. Dyke intrusion at ~3 Ma was associated with the emplacement of subaerial rhyolitic pyroclastic deposits following caldera formation[1]. The dykes are dissected to ~500 m depth, 2-3 m wide, and crop out in two stream valleys with 5-30 m-long exposures. Dykes intrude diverse country rock types, including a welded ignimbrite, basaltic lavas, and glacial conglomerate. Each of the six studied dykes is broadly similar, exhibiting obsidian margins and microcrystalline cores. Dykes within pre-fractured lava are surrounded by external tuffisite vein networks, which are absent from dykes within conglomerate, whereas dykes failed to penetrate the ignimbrite. Obsidian at dyke margins comprises layers of discrete colour. These display dramatic thickness variations and collapsed bubble structures, and are locally separated by zones of welded, brecciated and flow-banded obsidian. We use textural associations to present a detailed model of dyke emplacement and evolution. Dykes initially propagated with the passage of fragmented, gas-charged magma and generation of external tuffisite veins, whose distribution was strongly influenced by pre-existing fractures in the country rock. External tuffisites retained permeability throughout dyke emplacement due to their high lithic content. The geochemically homogenous dykes then evolved via incremental magma emplacement, with shear deformation localised along emplacement boundary layers. Shear zones migrated between different boundary layers, and bubble deformation promoted magma mobility. Brittle

  4. Analysis of magma-thermal conversion of biomass to gaseous fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlach, T.M.

    1982-02-01

    A wide range of magma types and pluton geometries believed to occur within the upper 10 km of the crust provide suitable sources of thermal energy for conversion of water-biomass mixtures to higher quality gaseous fuel. Gaseous fuel can be generated within a magma body, within the hot subsolidus margins of a magma body, or within surface reaction vessels heated by thermal energy derived from a magma body. The composition, amount, and energy content of the fuel gases generated from water-biomass mixtures are not sensitive to the type, age, depth, or temperature of a magma body thermal source. The amount and energy content of the generated fuel is almost entirely a function of the proportion of biomass in the starting mixture. CH/sub 4/ is the main gas that can be generated in important quantities by magma thermal energy under most circumstances. CO is never an important fuel product, and H/sub 2/ generation is very limited. The rates at which gaseous fuels can be generated are strongly dependent on magma type. Fuel generation rates for basaltic magmas are at least 2 to 3 times those for andesitic magmas and 5 to 6 times those for rhyolitic magmas. The highest fuel generation rates, for any particular magma body, will be achieved at the lowest possible reaction vessel operating temperature that does not cause graphite deposition from the water-biomass starting mixture. The energy content of the biomass-derived fuels is considerably greater than that consumed in the generation and refinement process.

  5. The magmatic plumbing of the submarine Hachijo NW volcanic chain, Hachijojima, Japan: long distance lateral magma transport?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, O.; Geshi, N.; Itoh, J.; Kawanabe, Y.; Tsujino, T.

    2005-12-01

    Recent geophysical observations on basaltic composite volcanoes in Izu-Bonin arc reveal the process of long distance lateral magma transport within the shallow middle crust. Such intrusion events sometimes caused flank fissure eruption and also triggered a formation of collapsed caldera (Miyakejima 2000). To clarify a long-distance magma transport system of the basaltic composite volcano in volcanic arc from geological and petrological aspects, we investigated a submarine volcanic chain (Hachijo NW chain) nested Hachijo Nishiyama volcano, a frontal composite volcano in the northern Izu arc. The volcanic chain extends 15 km from Hachijo-Nishiyama volcano and is composed of ridges and many small cones with basal diameters generally less than 2km. Dredge sampling recovered basaltic lavas and spatters. A diving survey using a ROV (Hyper Dolphin) revealed pillow lava flows on steep slopes and accumulation of spatters and agglutinates near the eruption center. Basalts from the Hachijo NW chain generally have more primitive composition (up to nearly 7% of MgO) compared to the basaltic rocks from the Nishiyama. The bulk magma composition of Hachijo NW chain is controlled by fractionation of clinopyroxene, olivine and plagioclase while plagioclase accumulation was indicated by aluminum-rich character of the Nishiyama volcano and its subaerial satellite cones. Trace element ratios unaffected by melting or crystal fractionation (e.g., Nb/Zr) are not significantly different between the Nishiyama and the Hachijo NW chain. This implies that the sources of magma for these volcanic systems are basically identical. However, ratios affected by melting process are significantly different between the two. Hachijo NW chain shows lower LREE/HREE and Zr/Y, implying difference in degree of partial melting of the source. Other possible processes for producing these differences in trace element characteristics include crustal assimilation. These results obtained so far appear to

  6. Sloshing of a bubbly magma reservoir as a mechanism of triggered eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namiki, Atsuko; Rivalta, Eleonora; Woith, Heiko; Walter, Thomas R.

    2016-06-01

    Large earthquakes sometimes activate volcanoes both in the near field as well as in the far field. One possible explanation is that shaking may increase the mobility of the volcanic gases stored in magma reservoirs and conduits. Here experimentally and theoretically we investigate how sloshing, the oscillatory motion of fluids contained in a shaking tank, may affect the presence and stability of bubbles and foams, with important implications for magma conduits and reservoirs. We adopt this concept from engineering: severe earthquakes are known to induce sloshing and damage petroleum tanks. Sloshing occurs in a partially filled tank or a fully filled tank with density-stratified fluids. These conditions are met at open summit conduits or at sealed magma reservoirs where a bubbly magma layer overlays a newly injected denser magma layer. We conducted sloshing experiments by shaking a rectangular tank partially filled with liquids, bubbly fluids (foams) and fully filled with density-stratified fluids; i.e., a foam layer overlying a liquid layer. In experiments with foams, we find that foam collapse occurs for oscillations near the resonance frequency of the fluid layer. Low viscosity and large bubble size favor foam collapse during sloshing. In the layered case, the collapsed foam mixes with the underlying liquid layer. Based on scaling considerations, we constrain the conditions for the occurrence of foam collapse in natural magma reservoirs. We find that seismic waves with lower frequencies < 1 Hz, usually excited by large earthquakes, can resonate with magma reservoirs whose width is > 0.5 m. Strong ground motion > 0.1 m s- 1 can excite sloshing with sufficient amplitude to collapse a magma foam in an open conduit or a foam overlying basaltic magma in a closed magma reservoir. The gas released from the collapsed foam may infiltrate the rock or diffuse through pores, enhancing heat transfer, or may generate a gas slug to cause a magmatic eruption. The overturn in the

  7. Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd evolution in lunar mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unruh, D. M.; Tatsumoto, M.; Stille, P.; Patchett, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    Existing cumulate remelting models for mare basalt genesis are evaluated in light of Lu-Hf, Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd data and overall REE characteristics in order to determine the simplest model that can account for these data. A data base for comparing Lu-Hf evolution in the lunar mantle as inferred from Lu-Hf analyses of oceanic basalts is presented along with a preliminary comparison of Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd evolution betwee mare basalts and terrestrial oceanic basalts. It is found that Lu/Hf characteristics of mare basalts cannot be explained in terms of modal melting of cumulate sources formed from a magma ocean with chondritic Lu/Hf. The data are consistent with a model in which the cumulate sources formed from a light REE + HF-enriched magma ocean. Nonmodal melting of ilmenite in the sources is also required. The Lu-Hf data suggest that even the high-Ti basalt sources contained no more than about 3 percent ilmenite.

  8. Compositional diversity of Late Cenozoic basalts in a transect across the southern Washington Cascades: Implications for subduction zone magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeman, William P.; Smith, Diane R.; Hildreth, Wes; Palacz, Zen; Rogers, Nick

    1990-11-01

    Major volcanoes of the Southern Washington Cascades (SWC) include the large Quaternary stratovolcanoes of Mount St. Helens (MSH) and Mount Adams (MA) and the Indian Heaven (IH) and Simcoe Mountain (SIM) volcanic fields. There are significant differences among these volcanic centers in terms of their composition and evolutionary history. The stratovolcanoes consist largely of andesitic to dacitic lavas and pyroclastics with minor basalt flows. IH consists dominantly of basaltic with minor andesite lavas, all erupted from monogenetic rift and cinder cone vents. SIM has a poorly exposed andesite to rhyolite core but mainly consists of basaltic lavas erupted from numerous widely dispersed vents; it has the morphology of a shield volcano. Distribution of mafic lavas across the SWC is related to north-northwest trending faults and fissure zones that indicate a significant component of east-west extension within the area. There is overlap in eruptive history for the areas studied, but it appears that peak activity was progressively older (MSH (<40 Ka), IH (mostly <0.5 Ma), MA (<0.5 Ma), SIM (1-4 Ma)) and more alkalic toward the east. A variety of compositionally distinct mafic magma types has been identified in the SWC, including low large ion lithophile element (LILE) tholeiitic basalts, moderate LILE calcalkalic basalts, basalts transitional between these two, LILE-enriched mildly alkalic basalts, and basaltic andesites. Compositional diversity among basaltic lavas, both within individual centers as well as across the arc, is an important characteristic of the SWC traverse. The fact that the basaltic magmas either show no correlation between isotopic and trace element components or show trends quite distinct from those of the associated evolved lavas, suggests that their compositional variability is attributable to subcrustal processes. Both the primitive nature of the erupted basalts and the fact that they are relatively common in the SWC sector also imply that such

  9. Slab melting and magma generation beneath the southern Cascade Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walowski, K. J.; Wallace, P. J.; Clynne, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Magma formation in subduction zones is interpreted to be caused by flux melting of the mantle wedge by fluids derived from dehydration of the downgoing oceanic lithosphere. In the Cascade Arc and other hot-slab subduction zones, however, most dehydration reactions occur beneath the forearc, necessitating a closer investigation of magma generation processes in this setting. Recent work combining 2-D steady state thermal models and the hydrogen isotope composition of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from the Lassen segment of the Cascades (Walowski et al., 2014; in review) has shown that partial melting of the subducted basaltic crust may be a key part of the subduction component in hot arcs. In this model, fluids from the slab interior (hydrated upper mantle) rise through the slab and cause flux-melting of the already dehydrated MORB volcanics in the upper oceanic crust. In the Shasta and Lassen segments of the southern Cascades, support for this interpretation comes from primitive magmas that have MORB-like Sr isotope compositions that correlate with subduction component tracers (H2O/Ce, Sr/P) (Grove et al. 2002, Borg et al. 2002). In addition, mass balance calculations of the composition of subduction components show ratios of trace elements to H2O that are at the high end of the global arc array (Ruscitto et al. 2012), consistent with the role of a slab-derived melt. Melting of the subducted basaltic crust should contribute a hydrous dacitic or rhyolitic melt (e.g. Jego and Dasgupta, 2013) to the mantle wedge rather than an H2O-rich aqueous fluid. We are using pHMELTS and pMELTS to model the reaction of hydrous slab melts with mantle peridotite as the melts rise through the inverted thermal gradient in the mantle wedge. The results of the modeling will be useful for understanding magma generation processes in arcs that are associated with subduction of relatively young oceanic lithosphere.

  10. Apparatus enables accurate determination of alkali oxides in alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupraw, W. A.; Gahn, R. F.; Graab, J. W.; Maple, W. E.; Rosenblum, L.

    1966-01-01

    Evacuated apparatus determines the alkali oxide content of an alkali metal by separating the metal from the oxide by amalgamation with mercury. The apparatus prevents oxygen and moisture from inadvertently entering the system during the sampling and analytical procedure.

  11. Io's theothermal (sulfur) - Lithosphere cycle inferred from sulfur solubility modeling of Pele's magma supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Steven M.; Stewart, Michael A.; Kieffer, Susan W.

    2014-06-01

    Surface deposits of volatile compounds such as water (Earth) or sulfur (Io) on volcanically active bodies suggest that a magmatic distillation process works to concentrate volatiles in surface reservoirs. On Earth, this is the combined hydrologic and tectonic cycle. On Io, sulfurous compounds are transferred from the interior to the surface reservoirs through a combination of a mantle-sourced magmatic system, vertical cycling of the lithosphere, and a sulfur-dominated crustal thermal system that we here call the "theothermal" system. We present a geochemical analysis of this process using previously inferred temperature and oxygen fugacity constraints of Pele's basaltic magma to determine the behavior of sulfur in the ionian magmas. Sulfate to sulfide ratios of Pele's magma are -4.084 ± 0.6 and -6.442 ± 0.7 log10 units, comparable to or lower than those of mid-ocean ridge basalts. This reflects the similarity of Io's oxidation state with Earth's depleted mantle as previously suggested by Zolotov and Fegley (Zolotov, M.Y., Fegley, B. [2000]. Geophys. Res. Lett. 27, 2789-2792). Our calculated limits of sulfur solubility in melts from Pele's patera (˜1100-1140 ppm) are also comparable to terrestrial mid-ocean ridge basalts, reflecting a compositional similarity of mantle sources. We propose that the excess sulfur obvious on Io's surface comes from two sources: (1) an insoluble sulfide liquid phase in the magma and (2) theothermal near-surface recycling.

  12. Partial crystallization of picritic melt and its applications for the genesis of high-Ti and low-Ti basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; WANG, C.; Jin, Z.; Jin, S.; Yan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Geochemical and petrological studies have revealed the existence of high-Ti and low-Ti basalts in large igneous provinces (LIPs). However the originate of these high-Ti and low-Ti magmas are still under debate. Several different mechanisms have been proposed: (1) the high-Ti basalts are formed by the melting of mantle plume containing recycled oceanic crust (Spandler et al., 2008) while low-Ti basalts are formed by the melting of subcontinental lithospheric mantle (Xiao et al., 2004); (2) both high-Ti and low-Ti basalts are from mantle plume source, but the production of high-Ti basalts are associated with the thick lithosphere while the low-Ti basalts are controlled by the thin lithosphere (Arndt et al., 1993); (3) they are derived from the different degrees of melting, with high-Ti basalts representing low degree of partial melting of mantle plume (Xu et al., 2004). The low Mg# (below 0.7) of high-Ti and low-Ti basalts provides that they are far away from direct melting of mantle peridotite. In addition, seismic data indicate unusually high seismic velocities bodies beneath the LIPs which explained by the fractionated cumulates from picritic magmas (Farnetani et al., 1996). Therefore, we believed that the crystallization differentiation process might play a more significant role in the genesis of high-Ti and low-Ti basalts.In order to investigate the generation of high-Ti and low-Ti basalts, a series of high pressure and high temperature partial crystallization experiments were performed at pressures of 1.5, 3.0 and 5.0 GPa and a temperature range of 1200-1700℃. The starting material is picrate glass with relative high TiO2 (2.7 wt %), which is synthesized according to the chemical composition of primary magmas of Emeishan LIP (Xu et al., 2001). The experimental results show that: (1) At a given pressure, the TiO2 content is decreased with increasing melt fraction; (2) At a given melt fraction, the TiO2 content of melts is increased with increasing pressure. On

  13. Evolution of Late Cenozoic basaltic volcanism in the Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect

    Glazner, A.F. . Dept. of Geology); Farmer, G.L. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Cenozoic volcanism in the Mojave Desert region of southern California comprises two main groups: early Miocene ([approx]24--18 Ma) synextensional magmatism ranging from basalt to rhyolite, and postkinematic middle Miocene to Quaternary volcanism that is almost exclusively basaltic. Flat-lying basalts of the latter group, herein termed the Mojave Neovolcanic Belt (MNB), are distributed across the central and eastern Mojave Desert, and were erupted in three main pulses: (1) during the middle Miocene ([approx]17--15 Ma), in a belt from near Tiefort Mtn. to the El Paso Mts.; (2) during the late Miocene ([approx]9--4 Ma); and (3) in a Plio-Quaternary pulse ([approx]3--0 Ma) that includes the southern Cima field and all the cones scattered along the axis of the Barstow-Bristol trough. Several temporal and geographic trends are evident in the MNB. In general, younger basalts are higher in [var epsilon][sub Nd], lower in [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr, more alkalic, less crustally contaminated, and more likely to contain mantle xenoliths than older basalts. Mantle xenoliths are restricted to the eastern and southern Mojave block. Basalts of all three groups become dramatically richer in K[sub 2]O to the east, ranging from subalkaline basalts in the west to alkali basalts and trachybasalts in the east. Isotopic provinciality is apparent, but mantle differences are difficult to distinguish from the effects of crustal contamination. Lavas with mantle xenoliths consistently have [var epsilon][sub Nd] > 5 and [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr < 0.7042. Eruptive centers of the MNB show no consistent relationship to regional tectonic features. Although alkali basalts are generally associated with rifting, several MNB volcanoes were erupted through active fold and thrust belts.

  14. Formation of a zoned magma chamber and its temporal evolution during the historic eruptive activity of Tarumai Volcano, Japan: Petrological implications for a long-term forecast of eruptive activity of an active volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Mitsuhiro; Hiraga, Naoto; Furukawa, Ryuta

    2011-08-01

    Tarumai Volcano started a series of historic eruptive activity in AD 1667 after a dormancy of approximately 2000 years. The historic juvenile ejecta are mainly silicic andesite pumice associated with scoria, banded pumice and dome lava (SiO 2 = 55-63%), and are mixing products of two or three end-member magmas. In the initial largest plinian eruptions (AD 1667 period), simple mixing between two end-member magmas, silicic andesite (SA) and basalt, occurred. Large plinian eruptions (AD 1739 period) and the latest intermittent eruptions (AD 1804-AD 1909: latest period) also produced mixed magmas including both the SA, intermediate-SiO 2 andesite (IA), and basalt. Magmatic temperatures of the SA and IA magmas are 900-950 °C and approximately 1000 °C, respectively. The rocks of each period form linear trends in oxide-oxide diagrams, suggesting that mixing of two end-member magmas occurred in each period. Thus, it can be estimated that the IA magma was formed by mixing between the basaltic and SA magmas. These relations suggest that the injection of the basaltic magma into the SA magma occurred before the AD 1667 period, resulting in the formation of a zoned magma chamber. These two magmas were then withdrawn to mingle, during the AD 1667 period. After the period, the zoned chamber was composed of an upper SA magma and a lower mixed IA magma. Chemical compositions of the basaltic magma have been slightly different in each period since AD 1667. In addition, the phenocrystic minerals of the IA magma also have changed as a consequence of re-equilibration with the more mafic IA bulk magma compositions present from AD 1739 to AD 1909. Thus, distinct basaltic magma has repeatedly injected into the zoned chamber before each eruption. Although the scale of eruptions became much smaller after the plinian eruptions of AD 1739, the ratio of IA magma in the latest eruptive materials is much larger than that in AD 1739, suggesting that a larger amount of the lower part (IA magma

  15. Eruption of Alkaline Basalts Prior to the Calc-alkaline Lavas of Mt. Cleveland Volcano, Aleutian Arc, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, D. L.; Nicolaysen, K. P.

    2005-12-01

    Mt. Cleveland is a 1,730 m stratovolcano, located on Chuginadak Island, that has erupted at least 23 times historically, with the latest occurring in August 2005. Major, trace, and REE analyses of 63 samples from Mt. Cleveland, including 8 from proximal cinder cones and 4 from andesitic domes on the lower flanks, identify two distinct lava suites. Modern Cleveland (MC) basalts to dacites (50.5-66.7 wt.% SiO2) exhibit a calc-alkaline differentiation trend. Major element trends suggest crystal fractionation of plagioclase +/- ortho- and clinopyroxene in MC lavas and olivine in cinder cone deposits. Resorption textures on plagioclase and olivine phenocrysts and multiple populations of plagioclase predominate throughout the MC suite suggesting magma mixing is a major process at Cleveland. Frothy white xenoliths of plagioclase + quartz + biotite are encased in glass and erupted as small pumiceous fragments in 2001. The partial resorption of the xenocrysts indicates assimilation is also an active crustal process at Cleveland. MC trace element spider diagrams exhibit a typical arc pattern in which HFS elements including Nb are depleted, and Pb and LIL elements are enriched. Th/La, Sm/La, and Sr, Nd, Pb, and Hf isotopic ratios indicate both a North Pacific MORB and a sediment component in the source of modern Cleveland lavas, consistent with sediment flux estimates of 90 to 95 m3/m/yr and an updip sediment thickness of 1300 to 1400 meters. Average 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, 87Sr/86Sr, and 143Nd/144Nd values for the calc-alkaline suite are 18.93, 15.58, 0.70345, and 0.51303 respectively. The second suite consists of 3 olivine-rich, mildly alkaline basalts (48.5-49.4 wt.% SiO2), of older stratigraphic position than MC lavas representing deposits from an older phase of activity (ancestral Cleveland, AC). La/Yb, Sr/Y, and Th/Nb ratios indicate lower degrees of partial melting, relative to MC lavas, and suggests presence of garnet in the source region. The AC lavas, however, are

  16. The Middle Fork Plutonic Complex: A plutonic association of coeval peralkaline and metaluminous magmas in the north-central Alaska Range

    SciTech Connect

    Solie, D.N.

    1988-01-01

    The 57 m.y. Middle Fork Plutonic Complex (MFPC) intrudes Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks south of the Farewell Fault zone in the north-central Alaska Range. Though spatially related to the late Cretaceous - Early Tertiary subduction-related Alaska Range batholith, MFPC is more characteristic of an extensional or anorogenic setting. A swarm of basalt, hawaiite and rhyolite dikes east of the complex intruded, and was intruded by, the plutonic rocks. Approximately 30% of the exposed rock in the 125 km[sup 2] complex is hedenbergite - fayalite syenite, [approx equal]20% is peralkalin arfvedsonite-biotite alkali-feldspar granite (AF granite), and [le]20% is pyroxene-olivine-biotite gabbro. The rest is a mixed unit including clinopyroxene-biotite-amphibole diorite, and hornblende-biotite granite (HB granite). K-Ar and Rb-Sr radiometric dating of rock types shows that they are coeval. Their close spatial and temporal relationships led to complex magmatic interactions. Calculated initial [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr for gabbro and diorite group is around 0.705 to 0.706. HB granites are heterogeneous, but fall mostly around 0.707 to 0.708. Hypersolvus syenites and AF granites form an isochron with initial [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr of 0.70965. These groupings suggest that at least three different magmas formed the MFPC; scatter of isotopic data reflects mutual contamination and assimilation. Consanguinous hypersolvus syenite and AF granite mineralogy appears to be controlled by fluorine in the magma chamber. Eruptive stratigraphy, as predicted by intrusive history of MFPC, compares favorably with volcanic stratigraphies of peralkaline volcanic systems worldwide, and MFPC may be modelled as the root zone of a peralkaline volcanic system.

  17. Sr-isotopic constraints on the petrogenesis of Apollo 12 mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Bansal, B. M.; Wooden, J. L.; Wiesmann, H.

    1977-01-01

    As part of a study of Apollo 12 basalts, crystallization ages and initial Sr-87/Sr-86 (I) were determined for pigeonite basalts 12039 and 12055 and ilmenite basalt 12051. Sr-86/Sr-87 measurements for a larger suite of whole rock and plagioclase samples were obtained, and it is found that I-values for olivine and pigeonite basalts are indistinguishable while I-values for ilmenite basalts are distinctly lower. A self-consistent model for the evolution of the Sr-isotopic composition and REE abundances suggests that basalt was formed by small (2-10%) degrees of melting of cumulate sources composed of varying proportions of olivine, orthopyroxene, and clinopyroxene. This model requires nonchondritic relative abundances of the REE in the parental liquid at the time of formation of the cumulate sources. The model also describes Sr-isotopic composition and REE abundances of Apollo 17 high-Ti basalts and Apollo 15 low-Ti basalts. A lunar 'scenario' involving open system crystallization of a magma ocean from the crust downward is proposed.

  18. Reconciling Volatile Outputs with Heat Flow and Magma Intrusion Rates at the Yellowstone Magma-Hydrothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Hurwitz, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Yellowstone hydrothermal system releases hundreds of millions of liters of water on a daily basis. Gigawatts of heat and kilotons of magmatic volatiles (CO2, S, Cl, F and He) are discharged by these waters. By quantifying the relative contributions of crustal, meteoric, and mantle-derived components, we can estimate the rate at which magma is fed to the crust from below (1). Combining isotopic studies with mass discharge rates of geothermal gases and aqueous dissolved solids, we recognize that over 20,000 tons of CO2 is released from basaltic magmas ponding beneath any silicic magma reservoir in the mid to shallow crust (1,2). In contrast, silicic magma provides significantly less volatiles than what emerges from the hydrothermal system. Estimates of heat flow range from ~3 to 8 GW (1,3,4), derived from satellite, surface geophysics and geochemical methods. Such values, combined with estimates from gas flux, imply prolific basalt intrusion rates between 0.05 and 0.3 cubic kilometers per year (1). Over the history of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field, a picture emerges where the lower crust is converted from Precambrian metasediments and silicic intrusions into a thick gabbroic batholith similar to that envisioned by some to reside beneath the Snake River Plain along the ancestral track of the Yellowstone Hot Spot (5). (1) Lowenstern and Hurwitz, 2008, Elements 4: 35-40. (2) Werner and Brantley, 2003, G-Cubed 4;7: 1061 (3) Vaughan and others, 2012, JVGR 233-234: 72-89. (4) Hurwitz and others, in press, JGR (5) Shervais and others, 2006, Geology 34:365-368.

  19. Simulation of Layered Magma Chambers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawthorn, Richard Grant

    1991-01-01

    The principles of magma addition and liquid layering in magma chambers can be demonstrated by dissolving colored crystals. The concepts of density stratification and apparent lack of mixing of miscible liquids is convincingly illustrated with hydrous solutions at room temperature. The behavior of interstitial liquids in "cumulus" piles can be…

  20. Alkalis and Skin.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, John E; Tan, Jin Lin; Ming, Justin Choong Tzen; Abell, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this editorial is to provide an overview of the chemical interactions occurring in the skin of our patients on contact with alkaline agents. Strongly basic alkali is highly aggressive and will readily hydrolyze (or cleave) key biological molecules such as lipids and proteins. This phenomenon is known as saponification in the case of lipids and liquefactive denaturation for peptides and proteins. A short section on current first-aid concepts is included. A better understanding of the basic science behind alkali burns will make us better teachers and provide an insight into the urgency needed in treating these common and dangerous chemical injuries. PMID:26182072

  1. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  2. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04

    Approaches for