Science.gov

Sample records for alkali cations remaining

  1. Alkali cation specific adsorption onto fcc(111) transition metal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Mills, J N; McCrum, I T; Janik, M J

    2014-07-21

    The presence of alkali cations in electrolyte solutions is known to impact the rate of electrocatalytic reactions, though the mechanism of such impact is not conclusively determined. We use density functional theory (DFT) to examine the specific adsorption of alkali cations to fcc(111) electrode surfaces, as specific adsorption may block catalyst sites or otherwise impact surface catalytic chemistry. Solvation of the cation-metal surface structure was investigated using explicit water models. Computed equilibrium potentials for alkali cation adsorption suggest that alkali and alkaline earth cations will specifically adsorb onto Pt(111) and Pd(111) surfaces in the potential range of hydrogen oxidation and hydrogen evolution catalysis in alkaline solutions.

  2. High capacity nickel battery material doped with alkali metal cations

    DOEpatents

    Jackovitz, John F.; Pantier, Earl A.

    1982-05-18

    A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

  3. Alkali Metal Cation Transport and Homeostasis in Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Ariño, Joaquín; Ramos, José; Sychrová, Hana

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The maintenance of appropriate intracellular concentrations of alkali metal cations, principally K+ and Na+, is of utmost importance for living cells, since they determine cell volume, intracellular pH, and potential across the plasma membrane, among other important cellular parameters. Yeasts have developed a number of strategies to adapt to large variations in the concentrations of these cations in the environment, basically by controlling transport processes. Plasma membrane high-affinity K+ transporters allow intracellular accumulation of this cation even when it is scarce in the environment. Exposure to high concentrations of Na+ can be tolerated due to the existence of an Na+, K+-ATPase and an Na+, K+/H+-antiporter, which contribute to the potassium balance as well. Cations can also be sequestered through various antiporters into intracellular organelles, such as the vacuole. Although some uncertainties still persist, the nature of the major structural components responsible for alkali metal cation fluxes across yeast membranes has been defined within the last 20 years. In contrast, the regulatory components and their interactions are, in many cases, still unclear. Conserved signaling pathways (e.g., calcineurin and HOG) are known to participate in the regulation of influx and efflux processes at the plasma membrane level, even though the molecular details are obscure. Similarly, very little is known about the regulation of organellar transport and homeostasis of alkali metal cations. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date vision of the mechanisms responsible for alkali metal cation transport and their regulation in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to establish, when possible, comparisons with other yeasts and higher plants. PMID:20197501

  4. Alkali metal cation-hexacyclen complexes: effects of alkali metal cation size on the structure and binding energy.

    PubMed

    Austin, C A; Rodgers, M T

    2014-07-24

    Threshold collision-induced dissociation (CID) of alkali metal cation-hexacyclen (ha18C6) complexes, M(+)(ha18C6), with xenon is studied using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry techniques. The alkali metal cations examined here include: Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+). In all cases, M(+) is the only product observed, corresponding to endothermic loss of the intact ha18C6 ligand. The cross-section thresholds are analyzed to extract zero and 298 K M(+)-ha18C6 bond dissociation energies (BDEs) after properly accounting for the effects of multiple M(+)(ha18C6)-Xe collisions, the kinetic and internal energy distributions of the M(+)(ha18C6) and Xe reactants, and the lifetimes for dissociation of the activated M(+)(ha18C6) complexes. Ab initio and density functional theory calculations are used to determine the structures of ha18C6 and the M(+)(ha18C6) complexes, provide molecular constants necessary for the thermodynamic analysis of the energy-resolved CID data, and theoretical estimates for the M(+)-ha18C6 BDEs. Calculations using a polarizable continuum model are also performed to examine solvent effects on the binding. In the absence of solvent, the M(+)-ha18C6 BDEs decrease as the size of the alkali metal cation increases, consistent with the noncovalent nature of the binding in these complexes. However, in the presence of solvent, the ha18C6 ligand exhibits selectivity for K(+) over the other alkali metal cations. The M(+)(ha18C6) structures and BDEs are compared to those previously reported for the analogous M(+)(18-crown-6) and M(+)(cyclen) complexes to examine the effects of the nature of the donor atom (N versus O) and the number donor atoms (six vs four) on the nature and strength of binding.

  5. Effects of Alkali Cations and Halide Anions on the Self-Assembly of Phosphatidylcholine in Oils.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Ting; Lin, Chen-Shin; Chang, Ya-Ying; Whitten, Andrew E; Sokolova, Anna; Wu, Chun-Ming; Ivanov, Viktor A; Khokhlov, Alexei R; Tung, Shih-Huang

    2016-11-22

    The interactions between ions and phospholipids are closely associated with the structures and functions of cell membrane. Instead of conventional aqueous systems, we systematically investigated the effects of inorganic ions on the self-assembly of lecithin, a zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine, in cyclohexane. Previous studies have shown that addition of inorganic salts with specific divalent and trivalent cations can transform lecithin organosols into organogels. In this study, we focused on the effect of monovalent alkali halides. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to demonstrate that the binding strength of the alkali cations with the phosphate of lecithin is in the order Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+). More importantly, the cation-phosphate interaction is affected by the paired halide anions, and the effect follows the series I(-) > Br(-) > Cl(-). The salts of stronger interactions with lecithin, including LiCl, LiBr, LiI, and NaI, were found to induce cylindrical micelles sufficiently long to form organogels, while others remain organosols. A mechanism based on the charge density of ions and the enthalpy change of the ion exchange between alkali halides and lecithin headgroup is provided to explain the contrasting interactions and the effectiveness of the salts to induce organogelation.

  6. Influence of alkali cation on the mechanical properties and durability of fly ash based geopolymers.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Irena; Zejak, Radomir; Jankovič-Častvan, Ivona; Karanović, Ljiljana; Radmilović, Vuk; Radmilović, Velimir

    2013-01-01

    This research has provided information about the influence of alkali cations (Na+ and K+) on the mechanical properties and durability of fly ash based geopolymers. The results have shown that alkali cations have a strong influence on the mechanical properties of fly ash based geopolymers. K-geopolymers generally reach a higher value of compressive strength in comparison to Na- geopolymers. On the other hand, microstructure and phase composition of fly ash based geopolymers are not influenced by the nature of alkali cations. The ratio of main gel structure forming elements is practically not affected by the nature of alkali cations. Durability of fly ash based geopolymers in different aquatic environments is greatly dependent on the choice of alkali cations. Na- geopolymers are generally more resistant in water and aggressive environments than the K-geopolymers. The best durability of fly ash based geopolymers was observed in sea water.

  7. Alkali-cation affinities of polyoxyethylene dodecylethers and helical conformations of their cationized molecules studied by electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yukio; Hirajima, Rui; Morigaki, Ken; Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Ueda, Kazuyoshi

    2007-11-01

    Relative alkali-cation affinity of polyoxyethylene (POE) dodecylethers in gas phase was studied by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry using dodecylether-poly-ethoxylate (C(12)EO:n, "n" denotes ethyleneoxide unit number) nonionic surfactants, and possible helical conformations of the cationized molecules were demonstrated. The alkali-cation affinity highly depended on the cation diameters. The mass spectra of C(12)EO:8 cationized by alkali-metal ions were dominated by potassiated molecules. The results indicated that the POE moiety could have specific affinity to K(+) ions based on a host-guest interaction between POE helix and potassium ions. This is very similar to the relationships between 18-crown-6 and K(+). The ESI mass spectra exhibited the multiply cationized C(12)EO:n in addition to the singly cationized molecules. The critical EO unit numbers necessary for producing the multiply-charged cationized molecules also depended on the cation diameters. In addition, the POE surfactants highly preferred alkali cations to proton. The results were strongly supported by molecular mechanics/dynamics calculations. A helical conformation of the POE moiety of C(12)EO:15 including two K(+) ions gave a potential minimum, while a lowest energy structure of the protonated molecule took irregular conformations due to the formation of local hydrogen bonds.

  8. Coordination Chemistry of Alkali and Alkaline-Earth Cations with Macrocyclic Ligands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Bernard

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (l) alkali and alkaline-earth cations in biology (considering naturally occurring lonophores, their X-ray structures, and physiochemical studies); (2) synthetic complexing agents for groups IA and IIA; and (3) ion transport across membranes (examining neutral macrobicyclic ligands as metal cation carriers, transport by anionic carriers,…

  9. Solvation structure and transport properties of alkali cations in dimethyl sulfoxide under exogenous static electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien; Vijayakumar, M. E-mail: karl.mueller@pnnl.gov; Han, Kee Sung; Mueller, Karl T. E-mail: karl.mueller@pnnl.gov

    2015-06-14

    A combination of molecular dynamics simulations and pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to investigate the role of exogenous electric fields on the solvation structure and dynamics of alkali ions in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and as a function of temperature. Good agreement was obtained, for select alkali ions in the absence of an electric field, between calculated and experimentally determined diffusion coefficients normalized to that of pure DMSO. Our results indicate that temperatures of up to 400 K and external electric fields of up to 1 V nm{sup −1} have minimal effects on the solvation structure of the smaller alkali cations (Li{sup +} and Na{sup +}) due to their relatively strong ion-solvent interactions, whereas the solvation structures of the larger alkali cations (K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, and Cs{sup +}) are significantly affected. In addition, although the DMSO exchange dynamics in the first solvation shell differ markedly for the two groups, the drift velocities and mobilities are not significantly affected by the nature of the alkali ion. Overall, although exogenous electric fields induce a drift displacement, their presence does not significantly affect the random diffusive displacement of the alkali ions in DMSO. System temperature is found to have generally a stronger influence on dynamical properties, such as the DMSO exchange dynamics and the ion mobilities, than the presence of electric fields.

  10. Enhancing electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution by nickel salicylaldimine complexes with alkali metal cations in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Shao, Haiyan; Muduli, Subas K; Tran, Phong D; Soo, Han Sen

    2016-02-18

    New salicylaldimine nickel complexes, comprising only earth-abundant elements, have been developed for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution in aqueous media. The second-sphere ether functionalities on the periphery of the complexes enhance the electrocatalytic activity in the presence of alkali metal cations. The electrocatalysts demonstrate improved performances especially in the economical and sustainable seawater reaction medium.

  11. Structural resolution of 4-substituted proline diastereomers with ion mobility spectrometry via alkali metal ion cationization.

    PubMed

    Flick, Tawnya G; Campuzano, Iain D G; Bartberger, Michael D

    2015-03-17

    The chirality of substituents on an amino acid can significantly change its mode of binding to a metal ion, as shown here experimentally by traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (TWIMS-MS) of different proline isomeric molecules complexed with alkali metal ions. Baseline separation of the cis- and trans- forms of both hydroxyproline and fluoroproline was achieved using TWIMS-MS via metal ion cationization (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Cs(+)). Density functional theory calculations indicate that differentiation of these diastereomers is a result of the stabilization of differing metal-complexed forms adopted by the diastereomers when cationized by an alkali metal cation, [M + X](+) where X = Li, Na, K, and Cs, versus the topologically similar structures of the protonated molecules, [M + H](+). Metal-cationized trans-proline variants exist in a linear salt-bridge form where the metal ion interacts with a deprotonated carboxylic acid and the proton is displaced onto the nitrogen atom of the pyrrolidine ring. In contrast, metal-cationized cis-proline variants adopt a compact structure where the carbonyl of the carboxylic acid, nitrogen atom, and if available, the hydroxyl and fluorine substituent solvate the metal ion. Experimentally, it was observed that the resolution between alkali metal-cationized cis- and trans-proline variants decreases as the size of the metal ion increases. Density functional theory demonstrates that this is due to the decreasing stability of the compact charge-solvated cis-proline structure with increased metal ion radius, likely a result of steric hindrance and/or weaker binding to the larger metal ion. Furthermore, the unique structures adopted by the alkali metal-cationized cis- and trans-proline variants results in these molecules having significantly different quantum mechanically calculated dipole moments, a factor that can be further exploited to improve the diastereomeric resolution when utilizing a drift gas with a

  12. DFT and MP2 study of the interaction between corannulene and alkali cations.

    PubMed

    Rellán-Piñeiro, Marcos; Rodríguez-Otero, Jesús; Cabaleiro-Lago, Enrique M; Josa, Daniela

    2013-05-01

    Corannulene is an unsaturated hydrocarbon composed of fused rings, with one central five-membered ring and five peripheral six-membered rings. Its structure can be considered as a portion of C60. Corannulene is a curved π surface, but unlike C60, it has two accessible different faces: one concave (inside) and one convex (outside). In this work, computational modeling of the binding between alkali metal cations (Li(+), Na(+), and K(+)) and corannulene has been performed at the DFT and MP2 levels. Different corannulene···M(+) complexes have been studied and the transition states interconnecting local minima were located. The alkali cations can be bound to a five or six membered ring in both faces. At the DFT level, binding to the convex face (outside) is favored relative to the concave face for the three alkali cations studied, as it was previously published. This out preference was found to decrease as cation size increases. At the MP2 level, although a similar trend is found, some different conclusions related to the in/out preference were obtained. According to our results, migration of cations can take place on the convex or on the concave face. Also, there are two ways to transform a concave complex in a convex complex: migration across the edge of corannulene and bowl-to-bowl inversion.

  13. Alkali metal-cationized serine clusters studied by sonic spray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nanita, Sergio C; Sokol, Ewa; Cooks, R Graham

    2007-05-01

    Serine solutions containing salts of alkali metals yield magic number clusters of the type (Ser(4)+C)(+), (Ser(8)+C)(+), (Ser(12)+C)(+), and (Ser(17)+2C)(+2) (where C = Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), or Cs(+)), in relative abundances which are strongly dependent on the cation size. Strong selectivity for homochirality is involved in the formation of serine tetramers cationized by K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+). This is also the case for the octamers cationized by the smaller alkalis but there is a strong preference for heterochirality in the octamers cationized by the larger alkali cations. Tandem mass spectrometry shows that the octamers and dodecamers cationized by K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+) dissociate mainly by the loss of Ser(4) units, suggesting that the neutral tetramers are the stable building blocks of the observed larger aggregates, (Ser(8)+C)(+) and (Ser(12)+C)(+). Remarkably, although the Ser(4) units are formed with a strong preference for homochirality, they aggregate further regardless of their handedness and, therefore, with a preference for the nominally racemic 4D:4L structure and an overall strong heterochiral preference. The octamers cationized by K(+), Rb(+), or Cs(+) therefore represent a new type of cluster ion that is homochiral in its internal subunits, which then assemble in a random fashion to form octamers. We tentatively interpret the homochirality of these tetramers as a consequence of assembly of the serine molecules around a central metal ion. The data provide additional evidence that the neutral serine octamer is homochiral and is readily cationized by smaller ions.

  14. Effect of alkali cations on heterogeneous photo-Fenton process mediated by Prussian blue colloids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shou-Qing; Cheng, Shi; Feng, Lian-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Zhi-Gang

    2010-10-15

    This article evaluates Prussian blue (iron hexacyanoferrate) colloids as a heterogeneous photo-Fenton catalyst for the degradation of Rhodamine B. The emphasis is laid on the effects of alkali metal cations on the photo-Fenton process. The facts show that alkali cations strongly affect the degradation rate of organic species. The degradation rates of Rhodamine B, Malachite Green, and Methyl Orange in the presence of KCl, KNO(3), and K(2)SO(4), respectively, are faster than their degradation rates in the presence of the corresponding sodium salts. The average degradation rates of Rhodamine B in 0.2 M KCl, NaCl, RbCl, and CsCl solution, decline in sequence, and the rate in KCl solution is greater than that without any salt added deliberately. Thus, potassium ions accelerate the degradation rate, but sodium, rubidium, and cesium ions slow the rate. The order of the rates is R(K)>R>R(Na)>R(Rb)>R(Cs), which is consistent with that of the voltammetric oxidation currents of Prussian blue in the corresponding cation solutions. This phenomenon is attributed to the molecular recognition of the microstructure in Prussian blue nanoparticles to the alkali cations. The reaction mechanism of the photo-Fenton process has also been explored.

  15. Permeability of human erythrocyte membrane vesicles to alkali cations.

    PubMed

    Sze, H; Solomon, A K

    1979-02-02

    The permeability of inside-out and right-side-out vesicles from erythrocyte membranes to inorganic cations was determined quantitatively. Using 86Rb as a K analog, we have measured the rate constant of 86Rb efflux from vesicles under equilibrium exchange conditions, using a dialysis procedure. The permeability coefficients of the vesicles to Rb are only about an order of magnitude greater than that of whole erythrocytes. Furthermore, we have measured many of the specialized transport systems known to exist in erythrocytes and have shown that glucose, sulfate, ATP-dependent Ca and ATP-dependent Na transport activities are retained by the vesicle membranes. These results suggest that inside-out and right-side-out vesicles can be used effectively to study transport properties of erythrocyte membranes.

  16. A simple method to estimate relative stabilities of polyethers cationized by alkali metal ions.

    PubMed

    Kuki, Ákos; Nagy, Lajos; Shemirani, Ghazaleh; Memboeuf, Antony; Drahos, László; Vékey, Károly; Zsuga, Miklós; Kéki, Sándor

    2012-02-15

    Dissociation of doubly cationized polyethers, namely [P + 2X](2+) into [P + X](+) and X(+), where P = polyethylene glycol (PEG), polypropylene glycol (PPG) and polytetrahydrofuran (PTHF) and X = Na, K and Cs, was studied by means of energy-dependent collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. It was observed that the collision voltage necessary to obtain 50% fragmentation (CV(50)) determined for the doubly cationized polyethers of higher degree of polymerization varied linearly with the number of degrees of freedom (DOF) values. This observation allowed us to correlate these slopes with the corresponding relative gas-phase dissociation energies for binding of alkali ions to polyethers. The relative dissociation energies determined from the corresponding slopes were found to decrease in the order Na(+)  > K(+)  > Cs(+) for each polyether studied, and an order PPG ≈ PEG > PTHF can be established for each alkali metal ion.

  17. Interaction of alkali metal cations and short chain alcohols: effect of core size on theoretical affinities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, N. L.; Siu, F. M.; Tsang, C. W.

    2000-05-01

    The effect of core size on the calculated binding energies of alkali metal cations (Li +, Na +, K +) to methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, i-propanol, n-butanol, i-butanol, s-butanol, and t-butanol are evaluated using G2(MP2,SVP) protocol. The K + affinities, reported for the first time, were found to be negative if a core size larger than that of neon (2s 22p 6) was used. Given this, we suggest that the 1s 2, 2s 22p 6, and 3s 23p 6 electrons have to be included in the electron correlation treatment for Li +, Na + and K + containing species, respectively. With these core sizes, our G2(MP2,SVP) Li + and Na + affinities are in excellent agreement with values obtained from the newly developed G3 protocol. The nature of alkali metal cation-alcohol interaction is also discussed.

  18. The intrinsic stabilities and structures of alkali metal cationized guanine quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Azargun, M; Jami-Alahmadi, Y; Fridgen, T D

    2017-01-04

    The structures and stabilities of self-assembled guanine quadruplexes, M(9eG)8(+) (M = Na, K, Rb, Cs; 9eG = 9-ethylguanine), have been studied in the gas phase by blackbody infrared radiative dissociation to determine the difference in the stabilizing effect of the alkali metal cations. The order of stabilities to decomposition was determined to be K(+) > Rb(+) > Cs(+) ≫ Na(+), which is consistent with the observation of K(+) being the ion of choice in guanine quadruplexes in nucleic acids. In the gas phase, the sodiated quadruplex was found to lose one 9eG at a time, whereas the quadruplexes of the heavier cations lost a neutral guanine tetrad. Vibrational spectroscopy on the gas-phase quadruplex ions was consistent with the structures in which the metal cations were sandwiched between two guanine tetrads. Electronic structure calculations are also used to compare with the observed stabilities and vibrational spectra.

  19. Gas-phase synthesis of hydrodiphenylcyclopropenylium via nonclassical Favorskii rearrangement from alkali-cationized alpha,alpha'-dibromodibenzyl ketone.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Xiong; Wang, Hao-Yang; Xu, Chu; Guo, Yin-Long

    2010-09-15

    The gas-phase synthesis of hydrodiphenylcyclopropenylium from alkali-cationized alpha,alpha'-dibromodibenzyl ketone (1) via nonclassical Lewis-acid-induced Favorskii rearrangement has been studied by electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) and theoretical methods, showing that cations [1-Br](+) by debromination from 1 and 1.M(+)(M = Li or Na) by alkali-metal cationization of 1 could convert into the protonated diphenylcyclopropenone 2.H(+) by collision-induced dissociation in the gas phase. A concerted mechanism for the Lewis-acid-induced Favorskii rearrangement from alkali-metal-cationized alpha,alpha'-dibromodibenzyl ketone was proposed and studied, based on mass spectrometric results and theoretical methods.

  20. Alkali Cation Chelation in Cold β-O-4 Tetralignol Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBlase, Andrew F.; Dziekonski, Eric T.; Hopkins, John R.; Burke, Nicole L.; Kenttamaa, Hilkka I.; McLuckey, Scott A.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2016-06-01

    Lignins are the second most abundant naturally occurring polymer class, contributing to about 30% of the organic carbon in the biosphere. Their primary function is to provide the structural integrity of plant cell walls and have recently come under consideration as a potential source of biofuels because they have an energy content similar to coal. Herein, we employ cold ion spectroscopy (UV action and IR-UV double resonance) to unravel the spectroscopic signatures of G-type alkali metal cationized (X = Li+, Na+, K+) lignin tetramers connected by β-O-4 linkages. The conformation-specific spectroscopy reveals a variety of conformers, each containing distinct infrared spectra in the OH stretching region building on recent studies on the neutral and alkali metal cationized β-O-4 dimers. Based on comparisons of our infrared spectra to density functional theory [M05-2X/6-31+G*] harmonic level calculations for structures derived from a Monte Carlo conformational search, the alkali metal ion is discovered to engage in M+-OH-O interactions as important motifs that determine the secondary structures of these complexes. This interaction disappears in the major conformer of the K+ adduct, suggesting a reemergence of a neutral dimer segment as the metal binding energy decreases. Chelation of the metal cation by oxygen lone pair(s) of nearby oxygens in the β-O-4 linkage is observed to be the predominant driving force for 3D structure around the charge site, relegating OH-O H-bonds as secondary stabilizing elements.

  1. Emergence of symmetry and chirality in crown ether complexes with alkali metal cations.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Haya, Bruno; Hurtado, Paola; Hortal, Ana R; Hamad, Said; Steill, Jeffrey D; Oomens, Jos

    2010-07-08

    Crown ethers provide a valuable benchmark for the comprehension of molecular recognition mediated by inclusion complexes. One of the most relevant crown ethers, 18-crown-6 (18c6), features a flexible six-oxygen cyclic backbone that is well-known for its selective cation binding. This study employs infrared spectroscopy and quantum mechanical calculations to elucidate the structure of the gas-phase complexes formed by the 18c6 ether with the alkali metal cations. It is shown that symmetric and chiral arrangements play a dominant role in the conformational landscape of the 18c6-alkali system. Most stable 18c6-M(+) conformers are found to have symmetries C(3v) and C(2) for Cs(+), D(3d) for K(+), C(1) and D(3d) for Na(+), and D(2) for Li(+). Remarkably, whereas the bare 18c6 ether is achiral, chirality emerges in the C(2) and D(2) 18c6-M(+) conformations, both of which involve pairs of stable atropoisomers capable of acting as enantiomeric selective substrates.

  2. Alkali metal cation doped Al-SBA-15 for carbon dioxide adsorption.

    PubMed

    Zukal, Arnošt; Mayerová, Jana; Čejka, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Mesoporous aluminosilicate adsorbents for carbon dioxide were prepared by the grafting of aluminium into SBA-15 silica using an aqueous solution of aluminium chlorohydrate. As the ion exchange sites are primarily associated with the presence of tetrahedrally coordinated aluminium, extra-framework aluminium on the SBA-15 surface was inserted into the silica matrix by a treatment with an aqueous solution of NH(4)OH. Synthesized mesoporous aluminosilicate preserving all the characteristic features of a mesoporous molecular sieve was finally modified by the alkali metal cation exchange. To examine carbon dioxide adsorption on prepared materials, adsorption isotherms in the temperature range from 0 °C to 60 °C were measured. Based on the known temperature dependence of adsorption isotherms, isosteric adsorption heats giving information on the surface energetics of CO(2) adsorption were calculated and discussed. The comparison of carbon dioxide isotherms obtained on aluminosilicate SBA-15, aluminosilicate SBA-15 containing cations Na(+) and K(+) and activated alumina F-200 reveals that the doping with sodium or potassium cations dramatically enhances adsorption in the region of equilibrium pressures lower than 10 kPa. Therefore, synthesized aluminosilicate adsorbents doped with Na(+) or K(+) cations are suitable for carbon dioxide separation from dilute gas mixtures.

  3. Alkali metal cation binding affinities of cytosine in the gas phase: revisited.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M T

    2014-08-14

    Binding of metal cations to the nucleobases can influence base pairing, base stacking and nucleobase tautomerism. Gas-phase condensation of dc discharge generated alkali metal cations and thermally vaporized cytosine (DC/FT) has been found to produce kinetically trapped excited tautomeric conformations of the M(+)(cytosine) complexes, which influences the threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) behavior. In order to elucidate the effects of the size of alkali metal cation on the strength of binding to the canonical form of cytosine, the binding affinities of Na(+) and K(+) to cytosine are re-examined here, and studies are extended to include Rb(+) and Cs(+) again using TCID techniques. The M(+)(cytosine) complexes are generated in an electrospray ionization source, which has been shown to produce ground-state tautomeric conformations of M(+)(cytosine). The energy-dependent cross sections are interpreted to yield bond dissociation energies (BDEs) using an analysis that includes consideration of unimolecular decay rates, the kinetic and internal energy distributions of the reactants, and multiple M(+)(cytosine)-Xe collisions. Revised BDEs for the Na(+)(cytosine) and K(+)(cytosine) complexes exceed those previously measured by 31.9 and 25.5 kJ mol(-1), respectively, consistent with the hypothesis proposed by Yang and Rodgers that excited tautomeric conformations are accessed when the complexes are generated by DC/FT ionization. Experimentally measured BDEs are compared to theoretical values calculated at the B3LYP and MP2(full) levels of theory using the 6-311+G(2d,2p)_HW* and def2-TZVPPD basis sets. The B3LYP/def2-TZVPPD level of theory is found to provide the best agreement with the measured BDEs, suggesting that this level of theory can be employed to provide reliable energetics for similar metal-ligand systems.

  4. Potential-modulated intercalation of alkali cations into metal hexacyanoferrate coated electrodes. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, D.T.

    1998-06-01

    'This program is studying potential-driven cation intercalation and deintercalation in metal hexacyanoferrate compounds, with the eventual goal of creating materials with high selectivity for cesium separations and long cycle lifetimes. The separation of radiocesium from other benign cations has important implications for the cost of processing a variety of cesium contaminated DOE wasteforms. This report summarizes results after nine months of work. Much of the initial efforts have been directed towards quantitatively characterizing the selectivity of nickel hexacyanoferrate derivatized electrodes for intercalating cesium preferentially over other alkali metal cations. Using energy dispersive xray spectroscopy (ex-situ, but non-destructive) and ICP analysis (ex-situ and destructive), the authors have demonstrated that the nickel hexacyanoferrate lattice has a strong preference for intercalated cesium over sodium. For example, when ions are reversibly loaded into a nickel hexacyanoferrate thin film from a solution containing 0.9999 M Na{sup +} and 0.0001 M Cs{sup +}, the film intercalates 40% as much Cs{sup +} as when loaded from pure 1 M Cs{sup +} containing electrolyte (all electrolytes use nitrates as the common anion). The authors have also shown that, contrary to the common assumptions found in the literature, a significant fraction of the thin film is not active initially. A new near infrared laser has been purchased and is being added to the Raman spectroscopy facilities to allow in-situ studies of the intercalation processes.'

  5. Effects of Alkali Metal Ion Cationization on Fragmentation Pathways of Triazole-Epothilone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiyan; Luo, Guoan; Chen, Yue; Kong, Xianglei

    2012-06-01

    The collisionally activated dissociation mass spectra of the protonated and alkali metal cationized ions of a triazole-epothilone analogue were studied in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. The fragmentation pathway of the protonated ion was characterized by the loss of the unit of C3H4O3. However, another fragmentation pathway with the loss of C3H2O2 was identified for the complex ions with Na+, K+, Rb+, and Cs+. The branching ratio of the second pathway increases with the increment of the size of alkali metal ions. Theoretical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) method show the difference in the binding position of the proton and the metal ions. With the increase of the radii of the metal ions, progressive changes in the macrocycle of the compound are induced, which cause the corresponding change in their fragmentation pathways. It has also been found that the interaction energy between the compound and the metal ion decreases with increase in the size of the latter. This is consistent with the experimental results, which show that cesiated complexes readily eject Cs+ when subject to collisions.

  6. Intracellular acidification-induced alkali metal cation/H+ exchange in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Pretreatment of isolated human neutrophils (resting pHi congruent to 7.25 at pHo 7.40) with 30 mM NH4Cl for 30 min leads to an intracellular acidification (pHi congruen to 6.60) when the NH4Cl prepulse is removed. Thereafter, in 140 mM Na+ medium, pHi recovers exponentially with time (initial rate, approximately 0.12 pH/min) to reach the normal resting pHi by approximately 20 min, a process that is accomplished mainly, if not exclusively, though an exchange of internal H+ for external Na+. This Na+/H+ countertransport is stimulated by external Na+ (Km congruent to 21 mM) and by external Li+ (Km congruent to 14 mM), though the maximal transport rate for Na+ is about twice that for Li+. Both Na+ and Li+ compete as substrates for the same translocation sites on the exchange carrier. Other alkali metal cations, such as K+, Rb+, or Cs+, do not promote pHi recovery, owing to an apparent lack of affinity for the carrier. The exchange system is unaffected by ouabain or furosemide, but can be competitively inhibited by the diuretic amiloride (Ki congruent to 8 microM). The influx of Na+ or Li+ is accompanied by an equivalent counter-reflux of H+, indicating a 1:1 stoichiometry for the exchange reaction, a finding consistent with the lack of voltage sensitivity (i.e., electroneutrality) of pHi recovery. These studies indicate that the predominant mechanism in human neutrophils for pHi regulation after intracellular acidification is an amiloride-sensitive alkali metal cation/H+ exchange that shares a number of important features with similar recovery processes in a variety of other mammalian cell types. PMID:3694176

  7. Novel Ternary Graphite Intercalation Compounds of Alkali Metal Cations and Amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maluangnont, Tosapol

    Novel ternary graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) of alkali metal cations and a wide variety of amines have been synthesized by one-pot chemical syntheses. Alkali metals studied includes Li, Na and K. The families of amines employed are nalkylamines, branched alkylamines, and different structural isomers of diamines and polyamines. Intragallery structures of the amine co-intercalates residing between the graphene sheets are proposed based on powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), supplemented by compositional analyses, thermal analyses, and structure optimization when appropriate. A homologous series of M-n-alkylamine-GICs (M = Na, Li) is reported for the first time, with the n-alkylamines of 3-14 carbon atoms (nC3-nC14). The following new GICs with indicated stages and intercalate arrangements are obtained: stage 1, di~ 0.70 nm, monolayer (nC3, nC4); stage 1, di ~ 1.10 nm, bilayer (nC6, nC8); and stage 2, di ~ 1.10 nm, bilayer (nC12, nC14). Here di is the gallery height. Two features new to donor-type GICs found are (i) an intercalate bilayer arrangement with guest alkyl chains parallel to encasing graphene layers, and (ii) the transition from an intercalate bilayer to monolayer arrangement upon evacuation for nC6. GICs containing branched alkylamines co-intercalates are prepared and their intragallery structures compared to those of selected n-alkylamines. A notable difference is observed for amines with 4 carbon atoms. While the linear n-butylamine forms parallel monolayers (di ~ 0.70 nm), the branched analogs (iso-butylamine and sec-butylamine) instead form bilayers with di ~ 1.30 nm. This result contrasts with the general observation that more sterically-hindered intercalates tend to intercalate at lower concentrations. This structural difference is not observed, however, between npropylamine and iso-propylamine (di ~ 0.70 and 0.76 nm respectively). A rare example of a ternary GIC exhibiting cation-directed orientation of the diamine co-intercalate (1

  8. Sodium Absorption by Barley Roots: Role of the Dual Mechanisms of Alkali Cation Transport 1

    PubMed Central

    Rains, D. W.; Epstein, Emanuel

    1967-01-01

    Radioactively labeled Na+ absorbed by barley roots was sequestered in an intracellular compartment or compartments (“inner” spaces) in which it was only very slowly exchangeable with exogenous Na+. Absorption of this fraction proceeded at a constant rate for at least 1 hour. When the rate of Na+ absorption was examined over the range of concentrations, 0.005 to 50 mm, the isotherm depicting the relation showed dual kinetics as follows. Over the range, 0.005 to 0.2 mm, a single Michaelis-Menten term describes the relation between the concentration of Na+ and the rate of its absorption. The mechanism of Na+ absorption operating over this range of concentrations, mechanism 1 of alkali cation transport, is severely inhibited in the presence of Ca2+ and virtually rendered inoperative for Na+ transport by the combined presence of Ca2+ and K+. The mechanism is equally effective in Na+ transport whether Cl− or F− is the anion, but is somewhat inhibited when the anion is SO42−. Over the high range of concentrations, 0.5 to 50 mm Na+, a second, low-affinity mechanism of Na+ absorption comes into play. In the presence of Ca2+ and K+, this mechanism 2 is the only one to transport Na+ effectively, since Na+ absorption via mechanism 1 is virtually abolished under these conditions. Anaerobic conditions, low temperature, and the uncoupler, 2,4-dinitrophenol, inhibit Na+ absorption both at low and high Na+ concentrations. PMID:16656509

  9. An extended basis set {ital ab} {ital initio} study of alkali metal cation--water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, D.; Glendening, E.D.; Woon, D.E.; Feyereisen, M.W.

    1995-09-01

    Ionic clusters comprised of a single alkali metal cation and up to eight water molecules were studied at the Hartree--Fock and correlated levels of theory using the correlation consistent sequence of basis sets. Estimates of the degree of convergence in the computed properties with respect to the complete basis set limit were facilitated by the underlying systematic manner in which the correlation consistent sets approach completeness. In favorable cases, improved property values could be obtained by fitting finite basis set results with a simple analytical expression in order to extrapolate to the complete basis set limit. The sensitivity of structures and binding energies were analyzed with regard to the inclusion of valence and core-valence correlation recovery at the MP2, MP4, and CCSD(T) levels of theory. The replacement of metal core electrons and the introduction of relativistic contributions via effective core potentials was compared to corresponding all-electron results. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  10. Ion-chromatographic behavior of alkali metal cations and ammonium ion on zirconium-adsorbing silica gel.

    PubMed

    Ohta, K; Morikawa, H; Tanaka, K; Uwamino, Y; Furukawa, M; Sando, M

    2000-07-07

    The preparation and evaluation of zirconium-adsorbing silica gel (Zr-Silica) as an ion-exchange stationary phase in ion chromatography for inorganic anions and cations was carried out. The Zr-Silica was prepared by the reaction of silanol groups on the surface of the silica gel with zirconium butoxide (Zr(OCH2CH2CH2CH3)4) in ethanol. The ion-exchange characteristics of the Zr-Silica were evaluated using 10 mM tartaric acid at pH 2.5 as eluent. The Zr-Silica was found to act as a cation-exchanger under the eluent conditions. The retention behavior of alkali and alkaline earth metal cations was then investigated. The Zr-Silica column was proved to be suitable for the simultaneous separation of alkali metal cations and ammonium ion. Excellent separation of the cations on a 15 cm Zr-Silica column was achieved in 25 min using 10 mM tartaric acid as eluent.

  11. Thermochemistry of alkali metal cation interactions with histidine: influence of the side chain.

    PubMed

    Armentrout, P B; Citir, Murat; Chen, Yu; Rodgers, M T

    2012-12-06

    The interactions of alkali metal cations (M(+) = Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), Cs(+)) with the amino acid histidine (His) are examined in detail. Experimentally, bond energies are determined using threshold collision-induced dissociation of the M(+)(His) complexes with xenon in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. Analyses of the energy dependent cross sections provide 0 K bond energies of 2.31 ± 0.11, 1.70 ± 0.08, 1.42 ± 0.06, and 1.22 ± 0.06 eV for complexes of His with Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+), respectively. All bond dissociation energy (BDE) determinations include consideration of unimolecular decay rates, internal energy of reactant ions, and multiple ion-neutral collisions. These experimental results are compared to values obtained from quantum chemical calculations conducted previously at the MP2(full)/6-311+G(2d,2p), B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p), and B3P86/6-311+G(2d,2p) levels with geometries and zero point energies calculated at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level where Rb and Cs use the Hay-Wadt effective core potential and basis set augmented with additional polarization functions (HW*). Additional calculations using the def2-TZVPPD basis set with B3LYP geometries were conducted here at all three levels of theory. Either basis set yields similar results for Na(+)(His) and K(+)(His), which are in reasonable agreement with the experimental BDEs. For Rb(+)(His) and Cs(+)(His), the HW* basis set and ECP underestimate the experimental BDEs, whereas the def2-TZVPPD basis set yields results in good agreement. The effect of the imidazole side chain on the BDEs is examined by comparing the present results with previous thermochemistry for other amino acids. Both polarizability and the local dipole moment of the side chain are influential in the energetics.

  12. Bimolecular gas-phase exchange of alkali metals between cationized biomolecules and neutral crown ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, M.; Dearden, D.V.; Hofstadler, S.

    1995-12-31

    Electrospray ionization of polypeptides and nucleic acids often yields ions containing sodium or potassium charge carriers. These alkali adducts are frequently the residue of ionic buffers used to preserve protein conformation in solution or artifacts of a natural matrix such as blood plasma. Measures taken in solution to desalinate these samples are hindered by the desire to maintain native conformation. The authors here show that ion-molecule chemistry is an alternate means of removing alkali metal ions from multiply-charged biomolecules. Ion-molecule reactions of multiply charged polypeptides with crown ethers result in adduction of the crown if protons are the only charge bearing species, or desalting if alkali metals are among the charge carriers. Both product ions, the desalted peptide and the crown/alkali metal complex, are observed in the latter case.

  13. Selective trans-membrane transport of alkali and alkaline earth cations through graphene oxide membranes based on cation-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengzhan; Zheng, Feng; Zhu, Miao; Song, Zhigong; Wang, Kunlin; Zhong, Minlin; Wu, Dehai; Little, Reginald B; Xu, Zhiping; Zhu, Hongwei

    2014-01-28

    Graphene and graphene oxide (G-O) have been demonstrated to be excellent filters for various gases and liquids, showing potential applications in areas such as molecular sieving and water desalination. In this paper, the selective trans-membrane transport properties of alkali and alkaline earth cations through a membrane composed of stacked and overlapped G-O sheets ("G-O membrane") are investigated. The thermodynamics of the ion transport process reveal that the competition between the generated thermal motions and the interactions of cations with the G-O sheets results in the different penetration behaviors to temperature variations for the considered cations (K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and Ba(2+)). The interactions between the studied metal atoms and graphene are quantified by first-principles calculations based on the plane-wave-basis-set density functional theory (DFT) approach. The mechanism of the selective ion trans-membrane transportation is discussed further and found to be consistent with the concept of cation-π interactions involved in biological systems. The balance between cation-π interactions of the cations considered with the sp(2) clusters of G-O membranes and the desolvation effect of the ions is responsible for the selectivity of G-O membranes toward the penetration of different ions. These results help us better understand the ion transport process through G-O membranes, from which the possibility of modeling the ion transport behavior of cellular membrane using G-O can be discussed further. The selectivity toward different ions also makes G-O membrane a promising candidate in areas of membrane separations.

  14. Monitoring of photoluminescence decay by alkali and alkaline earth metal cations using a photoluminescent bolaamphiphile self-assembly as an optical probe.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunhyung; Kwak, Jinyoung; Lee, Sang-Yup

    2014-05-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) decay induced by the displacement of an ionic fluorescence component, Tb(3+), with alkali and alkaline earth metal cations was investigated using photoluminescent spherical self-assemblies as optical probes. The photoluminescent spherical self-assembly was prepared by the self-organization of a tyrosine-containing bolaamphiphile molecule with a photosensitizer and Tb(3+) ion. The lanthanide ion, Tb(3+), electrically bound to the carboxyl group of the bolaamphiphile molecule, was displaced by alkali and alkaline earth metal cations that had stronger electrophilicity. The PL of the self-assembly decayed remarkably due to the substitution of lanthanide ions with alkali and alkaline earth metal cations. The PL decay showed a positive correlation with cation concentration and was sensitive to the cation valency. Generally, the PL decay was enhanced by the electrophilicity of the cations. However, Ca(2+) showed greater PL decay than Mg(2+) because Ca(2+) could create various complexes with the carboxyl groups of the bolaamphiphile molecule. Microscopic and spectroscopic investigations were conducted to study the photon energy transfer and displacement of Tb(3+) by the cation exchange. This study demonstrated that the PL decay by the displacement of the ionic fluorescent compound was applied to the detection of various cations in aqueous media and is applicable to the development of future optical sensors.

  15. Alkali metal cation complexation by 1,3-alternate, mono-ionisable calix[4]arene-benzocrown-6 compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Surowiec, Malgorzata A.; Custelcean, Radu; Surowiec, Kazimierz; Bartsch, Richard A.

    2014-04-23

    Alkali metal cation extraction behavior for two series of 1,3-alternate, mono-ionizable calix[4]arene-benzocrown-6 compounds is examined. In Series 1, the proton-ionizable group is a substituent on the benzo group of the polyether ring that directs it away from the crown ether cavity. In Series 2, the proton-ionizable group is attached to one para position in the calixarene framework, thus positioning it over the crown ether ring. Competitive solvent extraction of alkali metal cations from aqueous solutions into chloroform shows high Cs+ efficiency and selectivity. Single-species extraction pH profiles of Cs+ for Series 1 and 2 ligands with the same proton-ionizable group are very similar. Thus, association of Cs+ with the calixcrown ring is more important than the the proton-ionizable group’s position in relation to the crown ether cavity. Solid-state structures are presented for two unionized ligands from Series 2, as is a crystal containing two different ionized ligand–Cs+ complexes.

  16. Alkali metal cation complexation by 1,3-alternate, mono-ionisable calix[4]arene-benzocrown-6 compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Surowiec, Malgorzata A.; Custelcean, Radu; Surowiec, Kazimierz; ...

    2014-04-23

    Alkali metal cation extraction behavior for two series of 1,3-alternate, mono-ionizable calix[4]arene-benzocrown-6 compounds is examined. In Series 1, the proton-ionizable group is a substituent on the benzo group of the polyether ring that directs it away from the crown ether cavity. In Series 2, the proton-ionizable group is attached to one para position in the calixarene framework, thus positioning it over the crown ether ring. Competitive solvent extraction of alkali metal cations from aqueous solutions into chloroform shows high Cs+ efficiency and selectivity. Single-species extraction pH profiles of Cs+ for Series 1 and 2 ligands with the same proton-ionizable groupmore » are very similar. Thus, association of Cs+ with the calixcrown ring is more important than the the proton-ionizable group’s position in relation to the crown ether cavity. Solid-state structures are presented for two unionized ligands from Series 2, as is a crystal containing two different ionized ligand–Cs+ complexes.« less

  17. Heavier alkali-metal monosulfides (KS, RbS, CsS, and FrS) and their cations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Edmond P F; Wright, Timothy G

    2005-10-08

    The heavier alkali-metal monosulfides (KS, RbS, CsS, and FrS) have been studied by high-level ab initio calculations. The RCCSD(T) method has been employed, combined with large flexible valence basis sets. All-electron basis sets are used for potassium and sulfur, with effective core potentials being used for the other metals, describing the core electrons. Potential-energy curves are calculated for the lowest two neutral and cationic states: all neutral monosulfide species have a (2)Pi ground state, in contrast with the alkali-metal monoxide species, which undergo a change in the electronic ground state from (2)Pi to (2)Sigma(+) as the group is descended. In the cases of KS, RbS, and CsS, spin-orbit curves are also calculated. We also calculate potential-energy curves for the lowest (3)Sigma(-) and (3)Pi states of the cations. From the potential-energy curves, spectroscopic constants are derived, and for KS the spectroscopic results are compared to experimental spectroscopic values. Ionization energies, dissociation energies, and heats of formation are also calculated; for KS, we explore the effects of relativity and basis set extrapolation on these values.

  18. Influence of alkali metal cations on the thermal, mechanical and morphological properties of rectorite/chitosan bio-nanocomposite films.

    PubMed

    Babul Reddy, A; Jayaramudu, J; Siva Mohan Reddy, G; Manjula, B; Sadiku, E R

    2015-05-20

    The main theme of this work is to study the influence of ion-exchangeable alkali metal cations, such as: Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Cs(+) on the thermal, mechanical and morphological properties. In this regard, a set of rectorite/chitosan (REC-CS) bio-nanocomposite films (BNCFs) was prepared by facile reaction of chitosan with ion-exchanged REC clay. The microstructure and morphology of BNCFs were investigated with XRD, TEM, SEM and AFM. Thermal and tensile properties of BNCFs were also investigated. As revealed from TEM and XRD results, the BNCFs featured a mixed morphology. Some intercalated clay sheets, together with nano-sized clay tactoids were obtained in LiREC/CS, NaREC/CS and KREC/CS of the BNCFs. From fractured surface study, via SEM, it was observed that the dispersion of chitosan polymer attaches to (and covers) the clay platelets. FTIR confirmed strong hydrogen bonds between clay and chitosan polymer. In addition, the thermal stabilities significantly varied when alkali metal cations varied from Li(+) to Cs(+). The BNCFs featured high tensile strengths (up to 84 MPa) and tensile moduli (up to 45 GPa). After evaluating these properties of BNCFs, we came to conclusion that these bio-nano composites can be used for packaging applications.

  19. Electronic effect on protonated hydrogen-bonded imidazole trimer and corresponding derivatives cationized by alkali metals (Li+, Na+, and K+)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shihai; Bu, Yuxiang; Li, Ping

    2005-02-01

    The electronic effects on the protonated hydrogen-bonded imidazole trimer (Im)3H+ and the derivatives cationized by alkali metals (Li+, Na+, and K+) are investigated using B3LYP method in conjunction with the 6-311+G* basis set. The prominent characteristics of (Im)3H+ on reduction are the backflow of the transferred proton to its original fragment and the remoteness of the H atom from the attached side bare N atom. The proton transfer occurs on both reduction and oxidation for the corresponding hydrogen-bonded imidazole trimer. For the derivatives cationized by Li+, (Im)3Li+, the backflow of the transferred proton occurs on reduction. The electron detachment from respective highest occupied molecular orbital of (Im)3Na+ and (Im)3K+ causes the proton transferring from the fragment attached by the alkali metal cation to the middle one. The order of the adiabatic ionization potentials of (Im)3M+ is (Im)3H+>(Im)3Li+>(Im)3Na+>(Im)3K+; the order of (Im)3M indicates that (Im)3H is the easicst complex to be ionized. The polarity of (Im)3M+ (M denotes H, Li, Na, and K) increases on both oxidation and reduction. The (Im)3M+ complexes dissociate into (Im)3 and M+ except (Im)3H+, which dissociates preferably into (Im)3+ and H atom, while the neutral complexes [(Im)3M] dissociate into (Im)3 and M. The stabilization energy of (Im)3Li2+, (Im)3Na2+, and (Im)3K2+ indicate that their energies are higher as compared to those of the monomers.

  20. Coordination preferences of the alkali cations sodium and caesium in the mixed-cationic Zintl ammoniate Cs(3.2)Na(0.8)Ge₉·5.3NH₃.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Stefanie; Suchentrunk, Christof; Korber, Nikolaus

    2014-11-01

    The involvement of two different alkali cations in the nonagermanide ammoniate Cs(3.2)Na(0.8)Ge9·5.3NH3 [tricaesium sodium nonagermanide-ammonia (1/5.3)] provides insights into the coordination behaviour of ammonia towards sodium and caesium cations within one compound and represents the first mixed-cationic solvate structure of nonagermanide tetraanions. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2₁/m and, with the presence of pseudomerohedral twinning, mixed-cation sites and disordering of the nonagermanide cage anions, features a combination of crystallographic challenges which could all be resolved during the refinement.

  1. Separation of alkali, alkaline earth and rare earth cations by liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Third progress report, September 1, 1980-April 1, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J.J.

    1981-04-15

    The overall objective of this project is to study the use of liquid membrane systems employing macrocyclic ligand carriers in making separations among metal cations. During the third year of the project, work continued in the development of a mathematical model to describe cation transport. The model was originally developed to describe the relationship between cation transport rate (J/sub M/) and the cation-macrocycle stability constant (K). The model was tested by determining the rates of transport of alkali and alkaline earth cations through chloroform membranes containing carrier ligands where the stability constants for their reaction with cations in methanol were known. From the results, it is clear that the model correctly describes the dependence of J/sub M/ on log K. The model also correctly describes the effect of cation concentration and carrier concentration on cation transport rates, as detailed in the previous progress report. During the third year of the project, the transport model was expanded so as to apply to competitive transport of cations from mixtures of two cations in the source aqueous phase. Data were collected under these conditions and the ability of the model to predict the flux of each cation was tested. Representative data of this type are presented along with corresponding data which were obtained when each cation was transported by the same carrier from a source phase containing only that cation. Comparison of transport rates determined under the two experimental conditions indicates that the relationship between the two sets of data is complex. To date, a few of these data involving transport from binary cation mixtures have been tested against the transport model. It was found that the model correctly predicts the cation fluxes from cation mixtures. These preliminary results indicate that the transport model can successfully predict separation factors when cation mixtures are used.

  2. Cation effects on rotational dynamics of anions and water molecules in alkali (Li+, Na+, K+, Cs+) thiocyanate (SCN-) aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Bian, Hongtao; Chen, Hailong; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Jiebo; Wen, Xiewen; Zhuang, Wei; Zheng, Junrong

    2013-07-03

    Waiting time dependent rotational anisotropies of SCN(-) anions and water molecules in alkali thiocyanate (XSCN, X = Li, Na, K, Cs) aqueous solutions at various concentrations were measured with ultrafast infrared spectroscopy. It was found that cations can significantly affect the reorientational motions of both water molecules and SCN(-) anions. The dynamics are slower in a solution with a smaller cation. The reorientational time constants follow the order of Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+) ~/= Cs(+). The changes of rotational time constants of SCN(-) at various concentrations scale almost linearly with the changes of solution viscosity, but those of water molecules do not. In addition, the concentration-dependent amplitudes of dynamical changes are much more significant in the Li(+) and Na(+) solutions than those in the K(+) and Cs(+) solutions. Further investigations on the systems with the ultrafast vibrational energy exchange method and molecular dynamics simulations provide an explanation for the observations: the observed rotational dynamics are the balanced results of ion clustering and cation/anion/water direct interactions. In all the solutions at high concentrations (>5 M), substantial amounts of ions form clusters. The structural inhomogeneity in the solutions leads to distinct rotational dynamics of water and anions. The strong interactions of Li(+) and Na(+) because of their relatively large charge densities with water molecules and SCN(-) anions, in addition to the likely geometric confinements because of ion clustering, substantially slow down the rotations of SCN(-) anions and water molecules inside the ion clusters. The interactions of K(+) and Cs(+) with water or SCN(-) are much weaker. The rotations of water molecules inside ion clusters of K(+) and Cs(+) solutions are not significantly different from those of other water species so that the experimentally observed rotational relaxation dynamics are only slightly affected by the ion concentrations.

  3. Infrared spectroscopy of hydrated alkali metal cations: Evidence of multiple photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Jordan P.; Lisy, James M.

    2011-07-01

    Infrared predissociation spectra of M+(H2O)4-7, where M = alkali metal, are presented. Hydrogen bonding O-H stretching features are strongly dependent on which fragmentation channel is monitored. Spectra recorded by monitoring the loss of multiple waters show a preference for one absorption feature in the hydrogen-bonded region centered at ˜3430-3500 cm-1, which is assigned to linear-type hydrogen bonded OH stretches. Cyclic- and bent-type hydrogen bonded OH stretches have diminished photodissociation cross sections in the multiple ligand loss channels. Evidence from Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus-evaporative ensemble calculations and laser fluence dependence experiments indicates that the multiple water loss channels are primarily the result of multiple photon absorption which we propose could be due to multiple, independent oscillators within a cluster ion each absorbing a photon during a single, 10 ns laser pulse.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of ionic mobility. I. Alkali metal cations in water at 25 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Song Hi; Rasaiah, Jayendran C.

    1994-10-01

    We describe a series of molecular dynamics simulations performed on model cation-water systems at 25 °C representing the behavior of Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, and Cs+ in an electric field of 1.0 V/nm and in its absence. The TIP4P model was used for water and TIPS potentials were adapted for the ion-water interactions. The structure of the surrounding water molecules around the cations was found to be independent of the applied electric field. Some of the dynamic properties, such as the velocity and force autocorrelation functions of the cations, are also field independent. However, the mean-square displacements of the cations, their average drift velocities, and the distances traveled by them are field dependent. The mobilities of the cations calculated directly from the drift velocity or the distance traveled by the ion are in good agreement with each other and they are in satisfactory agreement with the mobilities determined from the mean-square displacement and the velocity autocorrelation function in the absence of the field. They also show the same trends with ionic radii that are observed experimentally; the magnitudes are, however, smaller than the experimental values in real water by almost a factor of 2. It is found that the water molecules in the first solvation shell around the small Li+ ion are stuck to the ion and move with it as an entity for about 190 ps, while the water molecules around the Na+ ion remain for 35 ps, and those around the large cations stay for 8-11 ps before significant exchange with the surroundings occurs. The picture emerging from this analysis is that of a solvated cation whose mobility is determined by its size as well as the static and dynamic properties of its solvation sheath and the surrounding water. The classical solventberg model describes the mobility of Li+ ions in water adequately but not those of the other ions.

  5. Ion-exchange selectivities of periderm and cuticular membranes toward alkali cations

    SciTech Connect

    Ersoz, M.; Duncan, H.J.

    1994-08-01

    The ion-exchange selectivities of lithium, sodium, potassium, and cesium on isolated potato periderm (Solanum tuberosum) and pear fruit cuticular membranes were investigated; the general order of preference both for cation selectivities and ion-exchange capacities was lithium > sodium > potassium > cesium. The potato periderm and pear fruit cuticular membranes exhibited a behavior typical of ion-exchange resins of the weak acid type. At constant pH 7, the ion-exchange capacities of periderm and cuticular membranes increased with hydrated ionic radius, and also with increasing pH and neutral salt concentration, and decreased with crystal ionic radius. Counterion selectivities also exhibited the same behavior. The ion-exchange properties are discussed in terms of the structure and function of potato periderm and pear fruit cuticular membranes.

  6. Alkali recovery using PVA/SiO2 cation exchange membranes with different -COOH contents.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jianwen; Gong, Ming; Wu, Yonghui; Wu, Cuiming; Luo, Jingyi; Xu, Tongwen

    2013-01-15

    By changing -COOH content in poly(acrylic acid-co-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxy silane (poly(AA-co-γ-MPS)), a series of PVA/SiO(2) cation exchange membranes are prepared from sol-gel process of poly(AA-co-γ-MPS) in presence of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). The membranes have the initial decomposition temperature (IDT) values of 236-274 °C. The tensile strength (TS) ranges from 17.4 MPa to 44.4 MPa. The dimensional stability in length (DS-length) is in the range of 10%-25%, and the DS-area is in the range of 21%-56% in 65 °C water. The water content (W(R)) ranges from 61.2% to 81.7%, the ion exchange capacity (IEC) ranges from 1.69 mmol/g to 1.90 mmol/g. Effects of -COOH content on diffusion dialysis (DD) performance also are investigated for their potential applications. The membranes are tested for recovering NaOH from the mixture of NaOH/Na(2)WO(4) at 25 - 45 °C. The dialysis coefficients of NaOH (U(OH)) are in the range of 0.006-0.032 m/h, which are higher than those of the previous membranes (U(OH): 0.0015 m/h, at 25 °C). The selectivity (S) can reach up to 36.2. The DD performances have been correlated with the membrane structure, especially the continuous arrangement of -COOH in poly(AA-co-γ-MPS) chain.

  7. Electrospray tandem mass spectrometry of alkali-cationized BocN-carbo-alpha,beta- and -beta,alpha-peptides: Differentiation of positional isomers.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P Nagi; Srikanth, R; Srinivas, R; Sharma, V U M; Sharma, G V M; Nagendar, P

    2006-01-01

    Dissociation pathways of a series of alkali-cationized hybrid peptides, viz., Boc-alpha,beta- and -beta,alpha-carbopeptides, synthesized from C-linked carbo-beta3-amino acids [Caa (S)] and alpha-alanine (L-Ala), have been investigated by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The positional isomers (six pairs) of the cationized alpha,beta- and beta,alpha-peptides can be differentiated by the collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra of their [M + Cat-Boc + H]+ ions which give characteristic series of alkali-cationized C- (x(n)+, y(n)+, z(n)+) and N-terminal (a(n)+, b(n)+, c(n)+) ions. Another noteworthy difference is cationized beta,alpha-peptides eliminate a molecule of ammonia whereas this pathway is absent for alpha,beta-peptides. This is useful for identifying the presence of a beta-amino acid at the N-terminus. The CID spectra of [M + Cat-Boc + H]+ ions of these peptide acids show abundant rearrangement [b(n) + 17 + Cat]+ (n = 1 to n-1) ions which is diagnostic for distinguishing between alpha- and beta-amino acid at the C-terminus. MS(n) experiments of [b(n) + Li-H]+ ions from these hybrid peptides showed the loss of CO and 72 u giving rise to [a(n) + Li-H]+ and cationized nitrile product ions which render support to earlier proposals that b(n)+ or [b(n) + Cat-H]+ ions have protonated or cationized oxazolinone structures, respectively.

  8. Three Alkali-Metal-Gold-Gallium Systems. Ternary Tunnel Structures and Some Problems with Poorly Ordered Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Smetana, Volodymyr; Miller, Gordon J.; Corbett, John D.

    2012-06-27

    Six new intermetallic compounds have been characterized in the alkali metal (A = Na, Rb, Cs)–gold–gallium systems. Three isostructural compounds with the general composition A0.55Au2Ga2, two others of AAu3Ga2 (A = Rb, Cs), and the related Na13Au41.2Ga30.3 were synthesized via typical high-temperature reactions and their crystal structures determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis: Na0.56(9)Au2Ga2 (I, I4/mcm, a = 8.718(1) Å, c = 4.857(1) Å, Z = 4), Rb0.56(1)Au2Ga2 (II, I4/mcm, a = 8.950(1) Å, c = 4.829(1) Å, Z = 4), Cs0.54(2)Au2Ga2 (III, I4/mcm, a = 9.077(1) Å, c = 4.815(1) Å, Z = 4), RbAu3Ga2 (IV, Pnma, a = 13.384(3) Å, b = 5.577(1) Å, c = 7.017(1) Å, Z = 4), CsAu3Ga2 (V, Pnma, a = 13.511(3) Å, b = 5.614(2) Å, c = 7.146(1) Å, Z = 4), Na13Au41.2(1)Ga30.3(1) (VI, P6 mmm, a = 19.550(3) Å, c = 8.990(2) Å, Z = 2). The first three compounds (I–III) are isostructural with tetragonal K0.55Au2Ga2 and likewise contain planar eight-member Au/Ga rings that stack along c to generate tunnels and that contain varying degrees of disordered Na–Cs cations. The cation dispositions are much more clearly and reasonably defined by electron density mapping than through least-squares refinements with conventional anisotropic ellipsoids. Orthorhombic AAu3Ga2 (IV, V) are ordered ternary Rb and Cs derivatives of the SrZn5 type structure, demonstrating structural variability within the AAu3Ga2 family. All attempts to prepare an isotypic “NaAu3Ga2” were not successful, but yielded only a similar composition Na13Au41.2Ga30.3 (NaAu3.17Ga2.33) (VI) in a very different structure with two types of cation sites. Crystal orbital Hamilton population (COHP) analysis obtained from tight-binding electronic structure calculations for idealized I–IV via linear muffin-tin-orbital (LMTO) methods emphasized the major contributions of heteroatomic Au–Ga bonding to the structural stability of these compounds. The relative minima (pseudogaps) in the DOS curves for IV

  9. Conformations of alkali ion cationized polyethers in the gas phase: polyethylene glycol and bis[(benzo-15-crown-5)-15-ylmethyl] pimelate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyttenbach, Thomas; von Helden, Gert; Bowers, Michael T.

    1997-11-01

    Ion chromatography/ion mobility methods are applied to two polyether systems cationized by alkali ions. MALDI is used to generate the ions in all cases. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 600 is cationized by Li+ and Cs+ and compared to earlier work by von Helden et al. on Na+ cationized PEG 600. A very similar distribution is obtained in the MALDI spectrum of all three metals suggesting the true PEG 600 distribution is being observed. Each cation efficiently wraps the polymer around it, however, the detailed structure of the inner coordination sphere of ether oxygens around the metal ion is metal dependent. Both Li+ and Na+ prefer a near planar five-fold coordination sphere capped on top and bottom leading to seven-fold coordination (Li+) and eight-fold coordination (Na+). The much larger Cs+ prefers 11-fold coordination if sufficient oxygen centers are available. The second system studied is the interesting dicrown bis[(benzo-15-crown-5)-15-ylmethyl] pimelate, or BBP. This tweezers-like molecule coordinates the metal ions primarily in folded, or sandwich, complexes where both rings are involved. Other structures that include metal coordination to one ring and a carbonyl oxygen (partially folded) and to one ring and no additional oxygens (unfolded) are observed in elevated temperature molecular dynamics simulations and are more important for small alkali ions (Li+) and essentially not important for large ions (Cs+). The AMBER 4.0 suite of programs is used for all calculations which in general are in excellent agreement with experiment. A quite detailed discussion of the folding dynamics of cationized BBP is presented.

  10. Conformational effects on cationization of poly(ethylene glycol) by alkali metal ions in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Kayori; Matsuyama, Shigetomo; Saito, Takeshi; Kinugasa, Shinichi; Nagahata, Ritsuko; Kawabata, Shin-Ichirou

    2005-12-01

    Conformational effects of polymer chains on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) were studied by using an equimolar mixture of uniform poly(ethylene glycol)s (PEGs) and by molecular dynamics simulations. Uniform PEGs with degrees of polymerization n = 8-39 were separated from commercial PEG samples by preparative supercritical fluid chromatography. MALDI-TOFMS spectra of an equimolar mixture of the uniform PEGs in aqueous ethanol were measured by adding a mixture of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (as a matrix reagent) and five alkali metal chlorides (LiCl, NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl). After optimization of the matrix concentration and laser power, five types of adduct cationized by Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, and Cs+ could be identified simultaneously in the same spectrum. In the lower molecular-mass region around 103, the spectral intensity increase rapidly with increasing molecular mass of PEG; this rapid increase in the spectral intensity started at a lower molecular mass for smaller adduct cations. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to calculated the affinity of PEG for the adduct cations. These experimental and simulated results showed that the observed spectral intensities in MALDI-TOFMS were markedly affected by the species of adduct cations and the degree of polymerization of the PEG, and that they were dependent on the stability of the PEG-cation complex.

  11. Quantum-chemistry based calibration of the alkali metal cation series (Li(+)-Cs(+)) for large-scale polarizable molecular mechanics/dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Dudev, Todor; Devereux, Mike; Meuwly, Markus; Lim, Carmay; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Gresh, Nohad

    2015-02-15

    The alkali metal cations in the series Li(+)-Cs(+) act as major partners in a diversity of biological processes and in bioinorganic chemistry. In this article, we present the results of their calibration in the context of the SIBFA polarizable molecular mechanics/dynamics procedure. It relies on quantum-chemistry (QC) energy-decomposition analyses of their monoligated complexes with representative O-, N-, S-, and Se- ligands, performed with the aug-cc-pVTZ(-f) basis set at the Hartree-Fock level. Close agreement with QC is obtained for each individual contribution, even though the calibration involves only a limited set of cation-specific parameters. This agreement is preserved in tests on polyligated complexes with four and six O- ligands, water and formamide, indicating the transferability of the procedure. Preliminary extensions to density functional theory calculations are reported.

  12. Binding selectivity of dibenzo-18-crown-6 for alkali metal cations in aqueous solution: A density functional theory study using a continuum solvation model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DB18C6) exhibits the binding selectivity for alkali metal cations in solution phase. In this study, we investigate the main forces that determine the binding selectivity of DB18C6 for the metal cations in aqueous solution using the density functional theory (DFT) and the conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM). Results The bond dissociation free energies (BDFE) of DB18C6 complexes with alkali metal cations (M+-DB18C6, M = Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) in aqueous solution are calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-31 + G(d) level using the CPCM. It is found that the theoretical BDFE is the largest for K+-DB18C6 and decreases as the size of the metal cation gets larger or smaller than that of K+, which agrees well with previous experimental results. Conclusion The solvation energy of M+-DB18C6 in aqueous solution plays a key role in determining the binding selectivity of DB18C6. In particular, the non-electrostatic dispersion interaction between the solute and solvent, which depends strongly on the complex structure, is largely responsible for the different solvation energies of M+-DB18C6. This study shows that the implicit solvation model like the CPCM works reasonably well in predicting the binding selectivity of DB18C6 in aqueous solution. PMID:22873431

  13. Effect of cation driven loading of dibenzo-18-crown-6 in Nafion-117 membrane on the diffusion and transport behavior of alkali metal ions.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, A; Goswami, A

    2009-10-01

    The possibility of enhancing the selectivity to separate the alkali metal ions was studied by loading dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DB18C6) in Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Cs(+) form of cation exchange membrane, Nafion-117 (M-Naf-Cr where M = Li, Na, K, and Cs). DB18C6 was incorporated in Nafion-117 in corresponding ionic forms. Presence of DB18C6 in Nafion-117 was confirmed by FTIR. Self-diffusion and ion exchange kinetics of the alkali metal ions were studied in these membranes. It was observed that the diffusion in the membrane slowed down drastically from Li(+) to all other monovalent alkali metal ions. Two compartment cell experiments were done with DB18C6 loaded Cs(+)- form of Nafion-117 (Cs-Naf-Cr) membrane to study the transport of Na(+) and Cs(+) ions. No transport of ions was observed. When the same experiment were performed by replacing Li(+) of Li-Naf-Cr with Cs(+) (Cs-Li-Naf-Cr), transport of Cs(+) and H(+) were observed at much faster time scale compared to Cs-Naf-Cr. The selectivity of Cs(+) over Li(+) was enhanced by a factor of about 6 when Li-Naf-Cr was used in place Li(+) form of Nafion-117 for the transport experiments.

  14. Role of sequence in salt-bridge formation for alkali metal cationized GlyArg and ArgGly investigated with IRMPD spectroscopy and theory.

    PubMed

    Prell, James S; Demireva, Maria; Oomens, Jos; Williams, Evan R

    2009-01-28

    The roles of hydrogen bonding, electrostatic interactions, sequence, gas-phase basicity, and molecular geometry in determining the structures of protonated and alkali metal-cationized glycyl-L-arginine (GlyArg) and L-arginylglycine (ArgGly) were investigated using infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy in the spectral range 900-1800 cm(-1) and theory. The IRMPD spectra clearly indicate that GlyArg x M(+), M = Li, Na, and Cs, form similar salt-bridge (SB) structures that do not depend significantly on metal ion size. In striking contrast, ArgGly x Li(+) exists in a charge-solvated (CS) form, whereas ArgGly x M(+), M = K and Cs, form SB structures. SB and CS structures are similarly populated for ArgGly x Na(+). Computed energies of low-energy structures are consistent with these results deduced from the experimental spectra. By comparison to Arg x M(+), GlyArg x M(+) and ArgGly x M(+) have a greater and lesser propensity, respectively, to form SB structures. The greater propensity for GlyArg to adopt SB structures in complexes with smaller metal cations than for ArgGly is due to the ability of alkali metal-cationized GlyArg to adopt a nearly linear arrangement of formal charge sites, a structure unfavorable for ArgGly complexes due to geometric constraints induced by its different amino acid sequence. The amide carbonyl oxygen solvates charge in both the SB and CS form of both dipeptides. ArgGly is calculated to be slightly more basic than GlyArg, indicating that differences in intrinsic basicity do not play a role in the relative SB stabilization of these ions. Loss of a neutral water molecule from complexes in which SB structures are most stable indicates that CS structures are intermediates in the dissociation pathway, but these intermediates do not contribute to the measured IRMPD spectra.

  15. Structures of Hydrated Alkali Metal Cations, M+(H2O)nAr (m = Li, Na, K, rb and Cs, n = 3-5), Using Infrared Photodissociation Spectroscopy and Thermodynamic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Haochen; van der Linde, Christian; Lisy, James M.

    2014-06-01

    Alkali metal cations play vital roles in chemical and biochemical systems. Lithium is widely used in psychiatric treatment of manic states and bipolar disorder; Sodium and potassium are essential elements, having major biological roles as electrolytes, balancing osmotic pressure on body cells and assisting the electroneurographic signal transmission; Rubidium has seen increasing usage as a supplementation for manic depression and depression treatment; Cesium doped compounds are used as essential catalysts in chemical production and organic synthesis. Since hydrated alkali metal cations are ubiquitous and the basic form of the alkali metal cations in chemical and biochemical systems, their structural and thermodynamic properties serve as the foundation for modeling more complex chemical and biochemical processes, such as ion transport and ion size-selectivity of ionophores and protein channels. By combining mass spectrometry and infrared photodissociation spectroscopy, we have characterized the structures and thermodynamic properties of the hydrated alkali metal cations, i.e. M+(H2O)nAr, (M = Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs, n = 3-5). Ab initio calculations and RRKM-EE (evaporative ensemble) calculations were used to assist in the spectral assignments and thermodynamic analysis. Results showed that the structures of hydrated alkali metal cations were determined predominantly by the competition between non-covalent interactions, i.e. the water---water hydrogen bonding interactions and the water---cation electrostatic interactions. This balance, however, is very delicate and small changes, i.e. different cations, different levels of hydration and different effective temperatures clearly impact the balance.

  16. Fullerene-C60 and crown ether doped on C60 sensors for high sensitive detection of alkali and alkaline earth cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghmarzi, Fatemeh Alipour; Zahedi, Mansour; Mola, Adeleh; Abedini, Saboora; Arshadi, Sattar; Ahmadzadeh, Saeed; Etminan, Nazanin; Younesi, Omran; Rahmanifar, Elham; Yoosefian, Mehdi

    2017-03-01

    Fullerenes are effective acceptor components with high electron affinity for charge transfer. The significant influences of chemical adsorption of the cations on the electrical sensitivity of pristine C60 and 15-(C2H4O)5/C60 nanocages could be the basis of new generation of electronic sensor design. The density functional theory calculation for alkali and alkaline earth cations detection by pristine C60 and 15-(C2H4O)5/C60 nanocages are considered at B3LYP level of theory with 6-31 G(d) basis set. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules analysis have been performed to understand the nature of intermolecular interactions between the cations and nanocages. Also, the natural bond orbital analysis have been performed to assess the intermolecular interactions in detail. Furthermore, the frontier molecular orbital, energy gap, work function, electronegativity, number of transferred electron (∆N), dipole moment as well as the related chemical hardness and softness are investigated and calculated in this study. The results show that the adsorption of cations (M=Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) are exothermic and the binding energy in pristine C60 nanocage and 15-(C2H4O)5/C60 increases with respect to the cations charge. The results also denote a decrease in the energy gap and an increase in the electrical conductivity upon the adsorption process. In order to validate the obtained results, the density of state calculations are employed and presented in the end as well.

  17. Theoretical study of alkali cation-benzene complexes: potential energy surfaces and binding energies with improved results for rubidium and cesium.

    PubMed

    Coletti, Cecilia; Re, Nazzareno

    2006-05-25

    High level ab initio quantum chemical calculations have been carried out on the binding of alkali metal to benzene with special attention to heavier metals for which the agreement between the most recent theoretical investigations and the experimental bond dissociation energies (BDEs) is not very good. We performed BSSE-corrected geometry optimizations employing the MP2 level of theory with large basis sets and a modified Stuttgart RSC 1997 basis set for rubidium and cesium and carried out single point energy calculations at the MP4 level, obtaining, also for the latter metals, BDE values in good agreement with the experimental results. Furthermore, in view of the development of empirical correction terms to force fields to describe cation-pi interactions, we evaluated the potential energy surface along the benzene symmetry axis and discussed the role of the BSSE correction on the accuracy of our results.

  18. Selectivity of externally facing ion-binding sites in the Na/K pump to alkali metals and organic cations.

    PubMed

    Ratheal, Ian M; Virgin, Gail K; Yu, Haibo; Roux, Benoît; Gatto, Craig; Artigas, Pablo

    2010-10-26

    The Na/K pump is a P-type ATPase that exchanges three intracellular Na(+) ions for two extracellular K(+) ions through the plasmalemma of nearly all animal cells. The mechanisms involved in cation selection by the pump's ion-binding sites (site I and site II bind either Na(+) or K(+); site III binds only Na(+)) are poorly understood. We studied cation selectivity by outward-facing sites (high K(+) affinity) of Na/K pumps expressed in Xenopus oocytes, under voltage clamp. Guanidinium(+), methylguanidinium(+), and aminoguanidinium(+) produced two phenomena possibly reflecting actions at site III: (i) voltage-dependent inhibition (VDI) of outwardly directed pump current at saturating K(+), and (ii) induction of pump-mediated, guanidinium-derivative-carried inward current at negative potentials without Na(+) and K(+). In contrast, formamidinium(+) and acetamidinium(+) induced K(+)-like outward currents. Measurement of ouabain-sensitive ATPase activity and radiolabeled cation uptake confirmed that these cations are external K(+) congeners. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that bound organic cations induce minor distortion of the binding sites. Among tested metals, only Li(+) induced Na(+)-like VDI, whereas all metals tested except Na(+) induced K(+)-like outward currents. Pump-mediated K(+)-like organic cation transport challenges the concept of rigid structural models in which ion specificity at site I and site II arises from a precise and unique arrangement of coordinating ligands. Furthermore, actions by guanidinium(+) derivatives suggest that Na(+) binds to site III in a hydrated form and that the inward current observed without external Na(+) and K(+) represents cation transport when normal occlusion at sites I and II is impaired. These results provide insights on external ion selectivity at the three binding sites.

  19. Synthesis and X-ray crystal structures of amine bis(phenolate) lanthanide complexes containing alkali metal cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Mengtao; Xu, Xiaoping; Yao, Yingming; Zhang, Yong; Shen, Qi

    2005-04-01

    Three lanthanide "ate" complexes L 2YbM(THF) n supported by amine bis(phenolate) ligand [L=Me 2NCH 2CH 2N{CH 2-(2-O-C 6H 2-Bu t2-2,4)} 2; M=Li, n=2 ( 1); M=Na, n=2 ( 2); M=K, n=3 ( 3)] were synthesized by the metathesis reactions of LM 2 with anhydrous YbCl 3 in 2:1 molar ratio in high yield. All the complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The influence of the alkali metal ions on the molecular structure of these lanthanide complexes has been elucidated.

  20. Characterization of selective binding of alkali cations with carboxylate by x-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquid microjets

    SciTech Connect

    Saykally, Richard J; Uejio, Janel S.; Schwartz, Craig P.; Duffin, Andrew M.; Drisdell, Walter S.; Cohen, Ronald C.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2008-01-08

    We describe an approach for characterizing selective binding between oppositely charged ionic functional groups under biologically relevant conditions. Relative shifts in K-shell x-ray absorption spectra of aqueous cations and carboxylate anions indicate the corresponding binding strengths via perturbations of carbonyl antibonding orbitals. XAS spectra measured for aqueous formate and acetate solutions containing lithium, sodium, and potassium cations reveal monotonically stronger binding of the lighter metals, supporting recent results from simulations and other experiments. The carbon K-edge spectra of the acetate carbonyl feature centered near 290 eV clearly indicate a preferential interaction of sodium versus potassium, which was less apparent with formate. These results are in accord with the Law of Matching Water Affinities, relating relative hydration strengths of ions to their respective tendencies to form contact ion pairs. Density functional theory calculations of K-shell spectra support the experimental findings.

  1. Electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric study of protonated and alkali- cationized α/ε-hybrid peptides: differentiation of a pair of dipeptide positional isomers.

    PubMed

    Ramesh Babu, A; Raju, G; Purna Chander, C; Shoban Babu, B; Srinivas, R; Sharma, G V M

    2016-01-01

    A new class of Boc-N-protected hybrid peptides derived from L- Ala and ε(6)-Caa (L-Ala = L-Alanine, Caa = C-linked carboamino acid derived from D-xylose) have been studied by positive ion electrospray ionization (ESI) ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS(n) spectra of protonated and alkali-cationized hybrid peptides produce characteristic fragmentation involving the peptide backbone, the tert-butyloxycarbonyl (Boc) group, and the side chain. The dipeptide positional isomers are differentiated by the collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the protonated and alkali-cationized peptides. The CID of [M + H](+) ion of Boc-NH-L-Ala-ε-Caa- OCH3 (1) shows a prominent [M + H - C4H8](+) ion, which is totally absent for its positional isomer Boc-NH-ε-Caa-L-Ala-OCH3 (6), which instead shows significant loss of t-butanol. The formation of the [M + Cat - C4H8](+) ion is totally absent and [M + Cat - Boc + H](+) is prominent in the CID of the [M + Cat](+) ion of Boc-NH-L-Ala-ε-Caa- OCH3 (1), whereas the former is highly abundant and the latter is of low abundance for its positional isomer Boc-NH-ε-Caa-L-Ala-OCH3 (6). It is observed that 'b' ions are abundant when oxazolone structures are formed through a five-membered cyclic transition state in tetra-, penta-, and hexapeptides and the cyclization process for larger 'b' ions led to an insignificant abundance. However, the significant 'b' ion is formed in ε,α-dipeptide, which may have a seven-membered substituted 2-oxoazepanium ion structure. The MS(n) spectra of [M + Cat - Boc + H](+) ions of these peptides are found to be significantly different to those of [M + H - Boc + H](+) ions. The CID spectra of [M + Cat - Boc + H](+) ions of peptide acids containing L-Ala at the C-terminus show an abundant N-terminal rearrangement ion, [b(n) + 17 + Cat](+), which is absent for the peptide acids containing ε-Caa at the C-terminus. Thus, the results of these hybrid peptides

  2. Channeling Through Two Stacked Guanine Quartets of One and Two Alkali Cations in the Li(+), Na(+) , K(+) and Rb(+) Series. Assessment of the Accuracy of the SIBFA Anisotropic Polarizable Molecular Mechanics Potential.

    PubMed

    Gresh, Nohad; Naseem-Khan, Sehr; Lagardère, Louis; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Sponer, Judit E; Sponer, Jiri

    2017-03-31

    Stacking of guanine quartets (GQ) can trigger the formation of DNA or RNA quadruple helices, which play numerous biochemical roles. The GQs are stabilized by alkali cations, mainly K+ and Na+, which can reside in, or channel through, the central axis of the GQ stems. Further, ion conduction through GQ wires can be leveraged for nanochemistry applications. G-quadruplex systems have been extensively studied by classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using pair-additive force fields or by quantum-chemical (QC) calculations. However, the non-polarizable force fields are very approximate while QC calculations lack the necessary sampling. Thus, ultimate description of QG systems would require long-enough simulations using advanced polarizable molecular mechanics (MM). However, to perform such calculations, it is first mandatory to evaluate the method's accuracy using benchmark QC. We report such an evaluation for the SIBFA polarizable MM, bearing on the channeling (movement) of an alkali cation (Li+, Na+, K+, or Rb+) along the axis of two stacked G quartets interacting with either one or two ions. The QC energy profiles display markedly different features depending upon the cation but can be retrieved in the majority of cases by the SIBFA profiles. An appropriate balance of first-order (electrostatic and short-range repulsion) and second-order (polarization, charge-transfer and dispersion) contributions within ΔE is mandatory. With two cations in the channel, the relative weights of the second-order contributions increase steadily upon increasing the ion size. In the G8 complexes with two K+ or two Rb+ cations, the sum of polarization and charge-transfer exceeds the first-order along terms for all ion positions.

  3. Separation of alkali, alkaline earth and rare earth cations by liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Fourth progress report, 1 November 1981-31 July 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J J; Izatt, R M

    1982-07-31

    The H/sub 2/O-CHCl/sub 3/-H/sub 2/O liquid membrane system was characterized with respect to the effect on cation (K/sup +/) transport rate of salt concentration and anion type. A bulk liquid membrane cell was used. A mathematical model for cation flux is being developed for several cations, several macrocycles, and mixtures of two or three cations. Eu/sup 3 +/ was not transported by 18-crown-6, but its reduced from Eu/sup 2 +/ was. Cation transport properties of calixarenes are also being investigated. Emulsion membrane systems were studied as a way of increasing the cation transport. Pb/sup 2 +/ was found to be transported by dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 through the liquid membrane. Transport rates of metal cation nitrates were measured in a water-toluene-water emulsion membrane system. 14 figures, 7 tables. (DLC)

  4. Controlling chemistry with cations: photochemistry within zeolites.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, V; Shailaja, J; Kaanumalle, Lakshmi S; Sunoj, R B; Chandrasekhar, J

    2003-08-21

    The alkali ions present in the supercages of zeolites X and Y interact with included guest molecules through quadrupolar (cation-pi), and dipolar (cation-carbonyl) interactions. The presence of such interactions can be inferred through solid-state NMR spectra of the guest molecules. Alkali ions, as illustrated in this article, can be exploited to control the photochemical and photophysical behaviors of the guest molecules. For example, molecules that rarely phosphoresce can be induced to do so within heavy cation-exchanged zeolites. The nature (electronic configuration) of the lowest triplet state of carbonyl compounds can be altered with the help of light alkali metal ions. This state switch (n pi*-pi pi*) helps to bring out reactivity that normally remains dormant. Selectivity obtained during the singlet oxygen oxidation of olefins within zeolites illustrates the remarkable control that can be exerted on photoreactions with the help of a confined medium that also has active sites. The reaction cavities of zeolites, like enzymes, are not only well-defined and confined, but also have active sites that closely guide the reactant molecule from start to finish. The examples provided here illustrate that zeolites are far more useful than simple shape-selective catalysts.

  5. Salts of alkali metal anions and process of preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Dye, James L.; Ceraso, Joseph M.; Tehan, Frederick J.; Lok, Mei Tak

    1978-01-01

    Compounds of alkali metal anion salts of alkali metal cations in bicyclic polyoxadiamines are disclosed. The salts are prepared by contacting an excess of alkali metal with an alkali metal dissolving solution consisting of a bicyclic polyoxadiamine in a suitable solvent, and recovered by precipitation. The salts have a gold-color crystalline appearance and are stable in a vacuum at -10.degree. C. and below.

  6. Effect of alkali cations on two-dimensional networks of two new quaternary thioarsenates (III) prepared by a facile surfactant-thermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dongming; Hou, Peipei; Liu, Chang; Chai, Wenxiang; Zheng, Xuerong; Zhang, Luodong; Zhi, Mingjia; Zhou, Chunmei; Liu, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Two new quaternary thioarsenates(III) NaAg2AsS3·H2O (1) and KAg2AsS3 (2) with high yields have been successfully prepared through a facile surfactant-thermal method. It is interesting that 2 can only be obtained with the aid of ethanediamine (en), which indicates that weak basicity of solvent is beneficial to the growth of 2 compared with 1. Both 1 and 2 feature the similar two-dimensional (2D) layer structures. However, the distortion of the primary honeycomb-like nets in 2 is more severe than that of 1, which demonstrates that Na+ and K+ cations have different structure directing effects on these two thioarsenates(III). Both experimental and theoretical studies confirm 1 and 2 are semiconductors with band gaps in the visible region. Our success in preparing these two quaternary thioarsenates(III) proves that surfactant-thermal technique is a powerful yet facile synthetic method to explore new complex chalcogenides.

  7. The renaissance of high-energy CID for structural elucidation of complex lipids: MALDI-TOF/RTOF-MS of alkali cationized triacylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Pittenauer, Ernst; Allmaier, Günter

    2009-06-01

    Triacylglycerols were analyzed as cationized species (Li(+), Na(+), K(+)) by high-energy CID at 20 keV collisions utilizing MALDI-TOF/RTOF mass spectrometry. Precursor ions, based on [M + Li](+)-adduct ions exhibited incomplete fragmentation in the high and low m/z region whereas [M + K](+)-adducts did not show useful fragmentation. Only sodiated precursor ions yielded product ion spectra with structurally diagnostic product ions across the whole m/z range. The high m/z region of the CID spectra is dominated by abundant charge-remote fragmentation of the fatty acid substituents. In favorable cases also positions of double bonds or of hydroxy groups of the fatty acid alkyl chains could be determined. A-type product ions represent the end products of these charge-remote fragmentations. B- and C-type product ions yield the fatty acid composition of individual triacylglycerol species based on loss of either one neutral fatty acid or one sodium carboxylate residue, respectively. Product ions allowing fatty acid substituent positional determination were present in the low m/z range enabling identification of either the sn-1/sn-3 substituents (E-, F-, and G-type ions) or the sn-2 substituent (J-type ion). These findings were demonstrated with synthetic triacylglycerols and plant oils such as cocoa butter, olive oil, and castor bean oil. Typical features of 20 keV CID spectra of sodiated triacylglycerols obtained by MALDI-TOF/RTOF MS were an even distribution of product ions over the entire m/z range and a mass accuracy of +/-0.1 to 0.2 u. One limitation of the application of this technique is mainly the insufficient precursor ion gating after MS1 (gating window at 4 u) of species separated by 2 u.

  8. Structure-Directing Effect of Alkali Metal Cations in New Molybdenum Selenites, Na2Mo2O5(SeO3)2, K2Mo2O5(SeO3)2, and Rb2Mo3O7(SeO3)3.

    PubMed

    Bang, Seong-eun; Ok, Kang Min

    2015-09-08

    Both single crystals and pure polycrystalline samples of three new quaternary alkali metal molybdenum selenites, Na2Mo2O5(SeO3)2, K2Mo2O5(SeO3)2, and Rb2Mo3O7(SeO3)3, have been synthesized through hydrothermal and solid-state reactions using A2CO3 (A = Na, K, and Rb), MoO3, and SeO2 as reagents. The frameworks of all three materials consist of both families of second-order Jahn-Teller distortive cations, i.e., the d(0) cation (Mo(6+)) and the lone pair cation (Se(4+)). Although the extent of framework distortions and the resulting occupation sites of alkali metal cations are dissimilar, Na2Mo2O5(SeO3)2 and K2Mo2O5(SeO3)2 exhibit similar three-dimensional networks that are composed of highly asymmetric Mo2O11 dimers and SeO3 polyhedra. Rb2Mo3O7(SeO3)3 reveals a two-dimensional structure that is built with Mo3O15 trimers and SeO3 intralayer linkers. Close structural examinations suggest that the structure-directing effect of alkali metal cations is significant in determining the framework distortions and the dimensions of the molybdenum selenites. UV-vis diffuse reflectance and infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analyses, and ion-exchange reactions are reported, as are out-of-center distortion and dipole moment calculations.

  9. Oxidation of guanine in G, GG, and GGG sequence contexts by aromatic pyrenyl radical cations and carbonate radical anions: relationship between kinetics and distribution of alkali-labile lesions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ae; Durandin, Alexander; Dedon, Peter C; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2008-02-14

    Oxidatively generated DNA damage induced by the aromatic radical cation of the pyrene derivative 7,8,9,10-tetrahydroxytetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BPT), and by carbonate radicals anions, was monitored from the initial one-electron transfer, or hole injection step, to the formation of hot alkali-labile chemical end-products monitored by gel electrophoresis. The fractions of BPT molecules bound to double-stranded 20-35-mer oligonucleotides with noncontiguous guanines G and grouped as contiguous GG and GGG sequences were determined by a fluorescence quenching method. Utilizing intense nanosecond 355 nm Nd:YAG laser pulses, the DNA-bound BPT molecules were photoionized to BPT*+ radicals by a consecutive two-photon ionization mechanism. The BPT*+ radicals thus generated within the duplexes selectively oxidize guanine by intraduplex electron-transfer reactions, and the rate constants of these reactions follow the trend 5'-..GGG.. > 5'-..GG.. > 5'-..G... In the case of CO3*- radicals, the oxidation of guanine occurs by intermolecular collision pathways, and the bimolecular rate constants are independent of base sequence context. However, the distributions of the end-products generated by CO3*- radicals, as well as by BPT*+, are base sequence context-dependent and are greater than those in isolated guanines at the 5'-G in 5'-...GG... sequences, and the first two 5'- guanines in the 5'-..GGG sequences. These results help to clarify the conditions that lead to a similar or different base sequence dependence of the initial hole injection step and the final distribution of oxidized, alkali-labile guanine products. In the case of the intermolecular one-electron oxidant CO3*-, the rate constant of hole injection is similar for contiguous and isolated guanines, but the subsequent equilibration of holes by hopping favors trapping and product formation at contiguous guanines, and the sequence dependence of these two phenomena are not correlated. In contrast, in the case of the DNA

  10. Generation and characterization of alkali metal clusters in Y-FAU zeolites. An ESR and MAS NMR spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannus, István; Béres, Attila; Nagy, János B.; Halász, János; Kiricsi, Imre

    1997-06-01

    Charged and neutral metal clusters of various compositions and sizes can be prepared by controlling the alkali metal content by the decomposition of alkali azides and the composition of the host zeolite by ion-exchange. ESR signals show that electron transfer from alkali metal atoms to alkali metal cations does occur, but in a direction opposite to that predicted by the gas-phase thermochemistry. Alkali metal clusters proved to be very active basic catalytic centers.

  11. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  12. Milk-alkali syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000332.htm Milk-alkali syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Milk-alkali syndrome is a condition in which there ...

  13. Electrochemical cell utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Virkar, Anil V.; Miller, Gerald R.

    1983-11-04

    An improved electrochemical cell comprising an additive-modified molten alkali metal electrode-reactant and/or electrolyte is disclosed. Various electrochemical cells employing a molten alkali metal, e.g., sodium, electrode in contact with a cationically conductive ceramic membrane experience a lower resistance and a lower temperature coefficient of resistance whenever small amounts of selenium are present at the interface of the electrolyte and the molten alkali metal. Further, cells having small amounts of selenium present at the electrolyte-molten metal interface exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte under long term cycling conditions.

  14. (abstract) Fundamental Mechanisms of Electrode Kinetics and Alkali Metal Atom Transport at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kisor, A.; Kikkert, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of electrode kinetics and mass transport of alkali metal oxidation and alkali metal cation reduction at the solid electrolyte/porous electrode boundary as well as alkali metal transport through porous metal electrodes has important applications in optimizing device performance in alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) cells which are high temperature, high current density electrochemical cells. Basic studies of these processes also affords the opportunity to investigate a very basic electrochemical reaction over a wide range of conditions; and a variety of mass transport modes at high temperatures via electrochemical techniques. The temperature range of these investigations covers 700K to 1240K; the alkali metal vapor pressures range from about 10(sup -2) to 10(sup 2) Pa; and electrodes studied have included Mo, W, Mo/Na(sub 2)MoO(sub 4), W/Na(sub 2)WO(sub 4), WPt(sub x), and WRh(sub x) (1.0 < x < 6.0 ) with Na at Na-beta'-alumina, and Mo with K at K-beta'-alumina. Both liquid metal/solid electrolyte/alkali metal vapor and alkali metal vapor/solid electrolyte/vapor cells have been used to characterize the reaction and transport processes. We have previously reported evidence of ionic, free molecular flow, and surface transport of sodium in several types of AMTEC electrodes.

  15. Mechanisms of fragmentation of cationic peptide ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Adams, Jeanette

    1993-06-01

    Fragmentation mechanisms for formation of several commonly occurring product ions in high-energy collision-induced induced decomposition spectra of either (M + Cat2+ - H)+ ions of peptides cationized with alkaline earth metal ions, (M + Ca+)+ ions cationized with alkali metal ions, or (M + H)+ ions are evaluated by using deuterium-labelled peptides. The different sources of hydrogen transferred in the reactions are identified. Our study supports some previously proposed mechanisms but also provides evidence for others.

  16. Chemically induced fracturing in alkali feldspar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidl, K. S.; Schaeffer, A.-K.; Petrishcheva, E.; Habler, G.; Fischer, F. D.; Schreuer, J.; Abart, R.

    2014-01-01

    Fracturing in alkali feldspar during Na+-K+ cation exchange with a NaCl-KCl salt melt was studied experimentally. Due to a marked composition dependence of the lattice parameters of alkali feldspar, any composition gradient arising from cation exchange causes coherency stress. If this stress exceeds a critical level fracturing occurs. Experiments were performed on potassium-rich gem-quality alkali feldspars with polished (010) and (001) surfaces. When the feldspar was shifted toward more sodium-rich compositions over more than about 10 mole %, a system of parallel cracks with regular crack spacing formed. The cracks have a general (h0l) orientation and do not correspond to any of the feldspar cleavages. The cracks are rather oriented (sub)-perpendicular to the direction of maximum tensile stress. The critical stress needed to initiate fracturing is about 325 MPa. The critical stress intensity factor for the propagation of mode I cracks, K Ic, is estimated as 2.30-2.72 MPa m1/2 (73-86 MPa mm1/2) from a systematic relation between characteristic crack spacing and coherency stress. An orientation mismatch of 18° between the crack normal and the direction of maximum tensile stress is ascribed to the anisotropy of the longitudinal elastic stiffness which has pronounced maxima in the crack plane and a minimum in the direction of the crack normal.

  17. K{sub 2}NaOsO{sub 5.5} and K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9}: The first osmium perovskites containing alkali cations at the 'A' site

    SciTech Connect

    Mogare, Kailash M.; Klein, Wilhelm; Jansen, Martin

    2012-07-15

    K{sub 2}NaOsO{sub 5.5} and K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} were obtained from solid-state reactions of potassium superoxide, sodium peroxide and osmium metal at elevated oxygen pressures. K{sub 2}NaOsO{sub 5.5} crystallizes as an oxygen-deficient cubic double perovskite in space group Fm3{sup Macron }m with a=8.4184(5) A and contains isolated OsO{sub 6} octahedra. K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} crystallizes hexagonally in P6{sub 3}/mmc with a=5.9998(4) A and c=14.3053(14) A. K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} consists of face sharing Os{sub 2}O{sub 9} pairs of octahedra. According to magnetic measurements K{sub 2}NaOsO{sub 5.5} is diamagnetic, whereas K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} displays strong antiferromagnetic coupling (T{sub N}=140 K), indicating enhanced magnetic interactions within the octahedral pair. - Graphical abstract: High oxidation states of Os, obtained by high oxygen pressure synthesis, are accommodated in double and triple perovskite matrices. K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} displays enhanced magnetic interactions. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New osmates containing highly oxidized Os were obtained by high O{sub 2} pressure synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High oxidation states of Os are accommodated in double and triple perovskite matrices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both compounds represent the first Os perovskites with an alkali metal at the A site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} displays enhanced magnetic interactions within the octahedral pair.

  18. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  19. The role of the alkali and chalcogen atoms on the stability of the layered chalcogenide \\mathbf{{{A}_{2}}{{M}^{II}}M_{3}^{\\,IV}{{Q}_{8}}} (A  =  alkali-metal M  =  metal-cations Q  =  chalcogen) compounds: a density functional theory investigation within van der Waals corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besse, Rafael; Da Silva, Juarez L. F.

    2017-01-01

    There is a great interest to design two-dimensional (2D) chalcogenide materials, however, our atomistic understanding of the major physical parameters that drive the formation of 2D or three-dimensional (3D) chalcogenides is far from satisfactory, in particular, for complex quaternary systems. To address this problem, we selected a set of quaternary 2D and 3D chalcogenide compounds, namely, {{\\text{A}}2}\\text{ZnS}{{\\text{n}}3}{{\\text{Q}}8} (A  =  Li, K, Cs; Q  =  S, Se, Te), which were investigated by density functional theory calculations within van der Waals (vdW) corrections. Employing experimental crystal structures and well designed crystal modifications, we found that the average atomic radius of the alkali-metal, A, and chalcogen, Q, species play a crucial role in the stability of the 2D structures. For example, the 2D structures are energetically favored for smaller (R<1.5~{\\mathring{\\text{A}}}) and larger (R>1.8~{\\mathring{\\text{A}}}) average atomic radius, while 3D structures are favored at intermediate average atomic radius. Those results are explained in terms of strain minimization and Coulomb repulsion of the anionic species in the structure framework. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice parameters are in excellent agreement with experimental results. Thus, the present insights can help in the design of stable quartenary 2D chalcogenide compounds.

  20. Alkali slurry ozonation to produce a high capacity nickel battery material

    DOEpatents

    Jackovitz, John F.; Pantier, Earl A.

    1984-11-06

    A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

  1. Apparatus enables accurate determination of alkali oxides in alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupraw, W. A.; Gahn, R. F.; Graab, J. W.; Maple, W. E.; Rosenblum, L.

    1966-01-01

    Evacuated apparatus determines the alkali oxide content of an alkali metal by separating the metal from the oxide by amalgamation with mercury. The apparatus prevents oxygen and moisture from inadvertently entering the system during the sampling and analytical procedure.

  2. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    DOEpatents

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  3. Ideas about Acids and Alkalis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toplis, Rob

    1998-01-01

    Investigates students' ideas, conceptions, and misconceptions about acids and alkalis before and after a teaching sequence in a small-scale research project. Concludes that student understanding of acids and alkalis is lacking. (DDR)

  4. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04

    Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

  5. Alkali Metal Variation and Twisting of the FeNNFe Core in Bridging Diiron Dinitrogen Complexes.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Sean F; Rodgers, Kenton R; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun; Mercado, Brandon Q; Grubel, Katarzyna; Holland, Patrick L

    2016-03-21

    Alkali metal cations can interact with Fe-N2 complexes, potentially enhancing back-bonding or influencing the geometry of the iron atom. These influences are relevant to large-scale N2 reduction by iron, such as in the FeMoco of nitrogenase and the alkali-promoted Haber-Bosch process. However, to our knowledge there have been no systematic studies of a large range of alkali metals regarding their influence on transition metal-dinitrogen complexes. In this work, we varied the alkali metal in [alkali cation]2[LFeNNFeL] complexes (L = bulky β-diketiminate ligand) through the size range from Na(+) to K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+). The FeNNFe cores have similar Fe-N and N-N distances and N-N stretching frequencies despite the drastic change in alkali metal cation size. The two diketiminates twist relative to one another, with larger dihedral angles accommodating the larger cations. In order to explain why the twisting has so little influence on the core, we performed density functional theory calculations on a simplified LFeNNFeL model, which show that the two metals surprisingly do not compete for back-bonding to the same π* orbital of N2, even when the ligand planes are parallel. This diiron system can tolerate distortion of the ligand planes through compensating orbital energy changes, and thus, a range of ligand orientations can give very similar energies.

  6. Alkali Metal Variation and Twisting of the FeNNFe Core in Bridging Diiron Dinitrogen Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Alkali metal cations can interact with Fe–N2 complexes, potentially enhancing back-bonding or influencing the geometry of the iron atom. These influences are relevant to large-scale N2 reduction by iron, such as in the FeMoco of nitrogenase and the alkali-promoted Haber–Bosch process. However, to our knowledge there have been no systematic studies of a large range of alkali metals regarding their influence on transition metal–dinitrogen complexes. In this work, we varied the alkali metal in [alkali cation]2[LFeNNFeL] complexes (L = bulky β-diketiminate ligand) through the size range from Na+ to K+, Rb+, and Cs+. The FeNNFe cores have similar Fe–N and N–N distances and N–N stretching frequencies despite the drastic change in alkali metal cation size. The two diketiminates twist relative to one another, with larger dihedral angles accommodating the larger cations. In order to explain why the twisting has so little influence on the core, we performed density functional theory calculations on a simplified LFeNNFeL model, which show that the two metals surprisingly do not compete for back-bonding to the same π* orbital of N2, even when the ligand planes are parallel. This diiron system can tolerate distortion of the ligand planes through compensating orbital energy changes, and thus, a range of ligand orientations can give very similar energies. PMID:26925968

  7. Experimental Na/K exchange between alkali feldspar and an NaCl-KCl salt melt: chemically induced fracturing and element partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neusser, G.; Abart, R.; Fischer, F. D.; Harlov, D.; Norberg, N.

    2012-08-01

    The exchange of Na+ and K+ between alkali feldspar and a NaCl-KCl salt melt has been investigated experimentally. Run conditions were at ambient pressure and 850 °C as well as 1,000 °C. Cation exchange occurred by interdiffusion of Na+ and K+ on the feldspar sub-lattice, while the Si-Al framework remained unaffected. Due to the compositional dependence of the lattice parameters compositional heterogeneities resulting from Na+/K+ interdiffusion induced coherency stress and associated fracturing. Depending on the sense of chemical shift, different crack patterns developed. For the geometrically most regular case that developed when potassic alkali feldspar was shifted toward more sodium-rich compositions, a prominent set of cracks corresponding to tension cracks opened perpendicular to the direction of maximum tensile stress and did not follow any of the feldspar cleavage planes. The critical stress needed to initiate fracturing in a general direction of the feldspar lattice was estimated at ≤0.35 GPa. Fracturing provided fast pathways for penetration of salt melt or vapor into grain interiors enhancing overall cation exchange. The Na/K partitioning between feldspar and the salt melt attained equilibrium values in the exchanged portions of the grains allowing for extraction of the alkali feldspar mixing properties.

  8. Chlor-Alkali Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venkatesh, S.; Tilak, B. V.

    1983-01-01

    Chlor-alkali technology is one of the largest electrochemical industries in the world, the main products being chlorine and caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) generated simultaneously by the electrolysis of sodium chloride. This technology is reviewed in terms of electrochemical principles and manufacturing processes involved. (Author/JN)

  9. Alkali oxide-tantalum oxide and alkali oxide-niobium oxide ionic conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, R. S.; Parker, H. S.; Brower, W. S.; Minor, D.

    1974-01-01

    A search was made for new cationic conducting phases in alkali-tantalate and niobate systems. The phase equilibrium diagrams were constructed for the six binary systems Nb2O5-LiNbO3, Nb2O5-NaNbO3, Nb2O5-KNbO3, Ta2O5-NaTaO3, Ta2O5-LiTaO3, and Ta2O5-KTaO3. Various other binary and ternary systems were also examined. Pellets of nineteen phases were evaluated (by the sponsoring agency) by dielectric loss measurements. Attempts were made to grow large crystals of eight different phases. The system Ta2O5-KTaO3 contains at least three phases which showed peaks in dielectric loss vs. temperature. All three contain structures related to the tungsten bronzes with alkali ions in non-stoichiometric crystallographic positions.

  10. Alkali Metal Cluster Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. In this thesis, we apply the tight-binding Hubbard model to alkali metal clusters with Hartree-Fock self-consistent methods and perturbation methods for the numerical calculations. We have studied the relation between the equilibrium structures and the range of the hopping matrix elements in the Hubbard Hamiltonian. The results show that the structures are not sensitive to the interaction range but are determined by the number of valence electrons each atom has. Inertia tensors are used to analyse the symmetries of the clusters. The principal axes of the clusters are determined and they are the axes of rotational symmetries of clusters if the clusters have any. The eigenvalues of inertia tensors which are the indication of the deformation of clusters are compared between our model and the ellipsoidal jellium model. The agreement is good for large clusters. At a finite temperature, the thermal motion fluctuates the structures. We defined a fluctuation function with the distance matrix of a cluster. The fluctuation has been studied with the Monte-Carlo simulation method. Our studies show that the clusters remain in the solid state when temperature is low. The small values of fluctuation functions indicates the thermal vibration of atoms around their equilibrium positions. If the temperature is high, the atoms are delocalized. The cluster melts and enters the liquid region. The cluster melting is simulated by the Monte-Carlo simulation with the fluctuation function we defined. Energy levels of clusters are calculated from the Hubbard model. Ionization potentials and magic numbers are also obtained from these energy levels. The results confirm that the Hubbard model is a good approximation for a small cluster. The excitation energy is presented by the difference between the original level and excited level, and the electron-hole interactions. We also have studied cooling of clusters

  11. Alkali absorption and citrate excretion in calcium nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakhaee, K.; Williams, R. H.; Oh, M. S.; Padalino, P.; Adams-Huet, B.; Whitson, P.; Pak, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The role of net gastrointestinal (GI) alkali absorption in the development of hypocitraturia was investigated. The net GI absorption of alkali was estimated from the difference between simple urinary cations (Ca, Mg, Na, and K) and anions (Cl and P). In 131 normal subjects, the 24 h urinary citrate was positively correlated with the net GI absorption of alkali (r = 0.49, p < 0.001). In 11 patients with distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA), urinary citrate excretion was subnormal relative to net GI alkali absorption, with data from most patients residing outside the 95% confidence ellipse described for normal subjects. However, the normal relationship between urinary citrate and net absorbed alkali was maintained in 11 patients with chronic diarrheal syndrome (CDS) and in 124 stone-forming patients devoid of RTA or CDS, half of whom had "idiopathic" hypocitraturia. The 18 stone-forming patients without RTA or CDS received potassium citrate (30-60 mEq/day). Both urinary citrate and net GI alkali absorption increased, yielding a significantly positive correlation (r = 0.62, p < 0.0001), with the slope indistinguishable from that of normal subjects. Thus, urinary citrate was normally dependent on the net GI absorption of alkali. This dependence was less marked in RTA, confirming the renal origin of hypocitraturia. However, the normal dependence was maintained in CDS and in idiopathic hypocitraturia, suggesting that reduced citrate excretion was largely dietary in origin as a result of low net alkali absorption (from a probable relative deficiency of vegetables and fruits or a relative excess of animal proteins).

  12. Infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of cationized histidine: effects of metal cation size on gas-phase conformation.

    PubMed

    Citir, Murat; Hinton, Christopher S; Oomens, Jos; Steill, Jeffrey D; Armentrout, P B

    2012-02-16

    The gas phase structures of cationized histidine (His), including complexes with Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+), are examined by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy utilizing light generated by a free electron laser, in conjunction with quantum chemical calculations. To identify the structures present in the experimental studies, measured IRMPD spectra are compared to spectra calculated at B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) (Li(+), Na(+), and K(+) complexes) and B3LYP/HW*/6-311+G(d,p) (Rb(+) and Cs(+) complexes) levels of theory, where HW* indicates that the Hay-Wadt effective core potential with additional polarization functions was used on the metals. Single point energy calculations were carried out at the B3LYP, B3P86, and MP2(full) levels using the 6-311+G(2d,2p) basis set. On the basis of these experiments and calculations, the only conformation that reproduces the IRMPD action spectra for the complexes of the smaller alkali metal cations, Li(+)(His) and Na(+)(His), is a charge-solvated, tridentate structure where the metal cation binds to the backbone carbonyl oxygen, backbone amino nitrogen, and nitrogen atom of the imidazole side chain, [CO,N(α),N(1)], in agreement with the predicted ground states of these complexes. Spectra of the larger alkali metal cation complexes, K(+)(His), Rb(+)(His), and Cs(+)(His), have very similar spectral features that are considerably more complex than the IRMPD spectra of Li(+)(His) and Na(+)(His). For these complexes, the bidentate [CO,N(1)] conformer in which the metal cation binds to the backbone carbonyl oxygen and nitrogen atom of the imidazole side chain is a dominant contributor, although features associated with the tridentate [CO,N(α),N(1)] conformer remain, and those for the [COOH] conformer are also clearly present. Theoretical results for Rb(+)(His) and Cs(+)(His) indicate that both [CO,N(1)] and [COOH] conformers are low-energy structures, with different levels of theory predicting different

  13. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Wolfs, Denise Y.; Clavenna, Le Roy R.; Eakman, James M.; Kalina, Theodore

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  14. Efficient destruction of CF4 through in situ generation of alkali metals from heated alkali halide reducing mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Churl; Choi, Wonyong

    2002-03-15

    Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are the most potent green house gases that are very recalcitrant at destruction. An effective way of converting PFCs using hot solid reagents into safe products has been recently introduced. By investigating the thermal reductive destruction of tetrafluoromethane (CF4) we provided new insight and more physicochemical consideration on this novel process. The complete destruction of CF4was successfully achieved by flowing the gas through a heated reagent bed (400-950 degrees C) that contained powder mixtures of alkali halides, CaO, and Si. The silicon acted as a reducing agent of alkali halides for the in-situ production of alkali metals, and the calcium oxide played the role of a halide ion acceptor. The absence of any single component in this ternary mixture drastically reduced the destruction efficiency of CF4. The CF4 destruction efficiencies with the solid reagent containing the alkali halide, MX, increased in the order of Li approximately Na < K < Cs for alkali cations and I < Br < Cl < F for halide anions. This trend agreed with the endothermicity of the alkali metal generation reaction: the higher the endothermicity, the lower the destruction efficiency. Alkali metal generation was indirectly detected by monitoring H2 production from its reaction with water. The production of alkali metals increased with NaF, KF, and CsF in this order. The CsF/CaO/Si system exhibited the complete destruction of CF4 at as low as 600 degrees C. The solid product analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the formation of CaF2 and the depletion of Si with black carbon particles formed in the solid reagent residue. No CO/CO2 and toxic HF and SiF4 formation were detected in the exhaust gas.

  15. Spectroscopic and theoretical study on alkali metal phenylacetates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regulska, E.; Świsłocka, R.; Samsonowicz, M.; Lewandowski, W.

    2013-07-01

    The influence of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium cations on the electronic system of phenylacetic acid was studied. The FT-IR, FT-Raman and 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded for studied compounds. Characteristic shifts in IR and NMR spectra along alkali metal phenylacetates were observed. Good correlations between the wavenumbers of the vibrational bands in the IR spectra of phenylacetates and some alkali metal parameters such as ionic potential, electronegativity, inverse of atomic mass, atomic radius and ionization energy were found. The density functional hybrid method B3LYP with 6-311++G** basis set was used to calculate optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds. Aromaticity indices, atomic charges, dipole moments and energies were calculated as well as the wavenumbers and intensities of IR spectra and chemical shifts in NMR spectra. The theoretical parameters were compared to experimental characteristic of alkali metal phenylacetates.

  16. Alkalis in alternative biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr.; Bryers, R.W.; Baxter, L.L.; Jenkins, B.M.; Oden, L.L.

    1994-12-31

    The alkali content and behavior of inorganic material of annually produced biofuels severely limits their use for generating electrical power in conventional furnaces. A recent eighteen-month investigation of the chemistry and firing characteristics of 26 different biofuels has been conducted. Firing conditions were simulated in the laboratory for eleven biofuels. This paper describes some results from the investigation including fuel properties, deposits, deposition mechanisms, and implications for biomass boiler design, fuel sampling and characterizations. Urban wood fuel, agricultural residues, energy crops, and other potential alternate fuels are included in the study. Conventional methods for establishing fuel alkali content and determining ash sticky temperatures were deceptive. The crux of the problem was found to be the high concentration of potassium in biofuels and its reactions with other fuel constituents which lower the ``sticky temperature`` of the ash to the 650 C to 760 C (1,200 F-1,400 F).

  17. Alkali-vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.; Krupke, W. F.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the results from several of our alkali laser systems. We show highly efficient performance from an alexandrite-pumped rubidium laser. Using a laser diode stack as a pump source, we demonstrate up to 145 W of average power from a CW system. We present a design for a transversely pumped demonstration system that will show all of the required laser physics for a high power system.

  18. (abstract) Experimental and Modeling Studies of the Exchange Current at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1993-01-01

    The microscopic mechanism of the alkali ion-electron recombination reaction at the three phase boundary zone formed by a porous metal electrode in the alkali vapor on the surface of an alkali beta'-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) ceramic has been studied by comparison of the expected rates for the three simplest reaction mechanisms with known temperature dependent rate data; and the physical parameters of typical porous metal electrode/BASE/alkali metal vapor reaction zones. The three simplest reactions are tunneling of electrons from the alkali coated electrode to a surface bound alkali metal ion; emission of an electron from the electrode with subsequent capture by a surface bound alkali metal ion; and thermal emission of an alkali cation from the BASE and its capture on the porous metal electrode surface where it may recombine with an electron. Only the first reaction adequately accounts for both the high observed rate and its temperature dependence. New results include crude modeling of simple, one step, three phase, solid/solid/gas electrochemical reaction.

  19. High pressure Raman and single crystal X-ray diffraction of the alkali/calcium carbonate, shortite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Q. C.; Vennari, C.; O'Bannon, E. F., III

    2015-12-01

    Raman and synchrotron-based single crystal x-ray diffraction data have been collected on shortite (Na2Ca2(CO3)3) up to 10 GPa at 300 K. Shortite is of geological importance due to its presence in the ground-mass of kimberlites, and the alkaline-/carbon-rich character of kimberlitic eruptions. This investigation focuses on shortite's high pressure behavior and is relevant to the behavior of alkali-carbonate systems within Earth's upper mantle. X-ray data demonstrate that shortite's symmetry remains stable at high pressures—retaining orthorhombic C crystal system (Amm2) up to 10 GPa; diffraction data show a 12% volume decrease from room pressure, and a bulk modulus of 71.0(3) GPa. These also demonstrate that the c-axis is twice as compressible as the a- and b-axes. This anisotropic compression is likely due to the orientation of the relatively stiff carbonate groups, a third of which are oriented close to the plane of the a- and b-axes, c axis compression primarily involves the compaction of the 9-fold coordinate sodium and calcium polyhedral. The two distinct carbonate sites within the unit cell give rise to two Raman symmetric stretching modes of the symmetric stretch; the carbonate group stretching vibration which is close to in plane with the a- and b-axes shifts at 3.75 cm-1/GPa as opposed to the carbonate groups which is closer to in plane with the b- and c-axes which shift at 4.25 cm-1/GPa. This furthers evidence for anisotropic compression observed using x-ray diffraction--as the carbonate in plane with the a- and b-axes is compressed, the strength of oxygen bonds along the c-axis with the cations increases, thus decreasing the pressure shift of the mode. The out of plane bending vibration shifts at -0.48 cm-1/GPa, indicating an enhanced interaction of the oxygens with the cations. The multiple in plane bending modes all shift positively, as do at the low frequency lattice modes, indicating that major changes in bonding do not occur up to 10 GPa. The data

  20. Preparation of alkali metal dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Landel, R. F. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for producing alkali metal dispersions of high purity. The dispersions are prepared by varying the equilibrium solubility of the alkali metal in a suitable organic solvent in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The equilibrium variation is produced by temperature change. The size of the particles is controlled by controlling the rate of temperature change.

  1. PROCESS OF RECOVERING ALKALI METALS

    DOEpatents

    Wolkoff, J.

    1961-08-15

    A process is described of recovering alkali metal vapor by sorption on activated alumina, activated carbon, dehydrated zeolite, activated magnesia, or Fuller's earth preheated above the vaporization temperature of the alkali metal and subsequent desorption by heating the solvent under vacuum. (AEC)

  2. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  3. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  4. Vibrations of alkali metal overlayers on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusina, G. G.; Eremeev, S. V.; Echenique, P. M.; Benedek, G.; Borisova, S. D.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2008-06-01

    We review the current progress in the understanding of vibrations of alkalis adsorbed on metal surfaces. The analysis of alkali vibrations was made on the basis of available theoretical and experimental results. We also include in this discussion our recent calculations of vibrations in K/Pt(111) and Li(Na)/Cu(001) systems. The dependence of alkali adlayer localized modes on atomic mass, adsorption position and coverage as well as the dependence of vertical vibration frequency on the substrate orientation is discussed. The square root of atomic mass dependence of the vertical vibration energy has been confirmed by using computational data for alkalis on the Al(111) and Cu(001) substrates. We have confirmed that in a wide range of submonolayer coverages the stretch mode energy remains nearly constant while the energy of in-plane polarized modes increases with the increase of alkali coverage. It was shown that the spectrum of both stretch and in-plane vibrations can be very sensitive to the adsorption position of alkali atoms and substrate orientation.

  5. [PALEOPATHOLOGY OF HUMAN REMAINS].

    PubMed

    Minozzi, Simona; Fornaciari, Gino

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases induce alterations in the human skeleton, leaving traces of their presence in ancient remains. Paleopathological examination of human remains not only allows the study of the history and evolution of the disease, but also the reconstruction of health conditions in the past populations. This paper describes the most interesting diseases observed in skeletal samples from the Roman Imperial Age necropoles found in urban and suburban areas of Rome during archaeological excavations in the last decades. The diseases observed were grouped into the following categories: articular diseases, traumas, infections, metabolic or nutritional diseases, congenital diseases and tumours, and some examples are reported for each group. Although extensive epidemiological investigation in ancient skeletal records is impossible, the palaeopathological study allowed to highlight the spread of numerous illnesses, many of which can be related to the life and health conditions of the Roman population.

  6. Propellant-remaining modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgovitsky, S.

    1991-01-01

    A successful satellite mission is predicted upon the proper maintenance of the spacecraft's orbit and attitude. One requirement for planning and predicting the orbit and attitude is the accurate estimation of the propellant remaining onboard the spacecraft. Focuss is on the three methods that were developed for calculating the propellant budget: the errors associated with each method and the uncertainties in the variables required to determine the propellant remaining that contribute to these errors. Based on these findings, a strategy is developed for improved propellant-remaining estimation. The first method is based on Boyle's law, which related the values of pressure, volume, and temperature (PVT) of an ideal gas. The PVT method is used for the monopropellant and the bipropellant engines. The second method is based on the engine performance tests, which provide data that relate thrust and specific impulse associated with a propellant tank to that tank's pressure. Two curves representing thrust and specific impulse as functions of pressure are then generated using a polynomial fit on the engine performance data. The third method involves a computer simulation of the propellant system. The propellant flow is modeled by creating a conceptual model of the propulsion system configuration, taking into account such factors as the propellant and pressurant tank characteristics, thruster functionality, and piping layout. Finally, a thrust calibration technique is presented that uses differential correction with the computer simulation method of propellant-remaining modeling. Thrust calibration provides a better assessment of thruster performance and therefore enables a more accurate estimation of propellant consumed during a given maneuver.

  7. Effect of the alkali metal activator on the properties of fly ash-based geopolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Jaarsveld, J.G.S. van; Deventer, J.S.J. van

    1999-10-01

    The alkali and alkali earth metal cations present during the formation of most known aluminosilicate structures have a very significant effect on both the physical and chemical properties of the final product. Geopolymers are no exception, although this effect has not been thoroughly quantified and in the case of waste-based geopolymers it has not received any significant attention. The present study investigates the effect of mainly Na{sup +} and K{sup +} on the physical and chemical properties of fly ash-based geopolymeric binders both before and after setting has occurred. A variety of tests were conducted, including rheological measurements, various leaching tests, compressive strength testing, specific surface area determinations, and infrared spectroscopy (IR). It is concluded that the alkali metal cation controls and affects almost all stages of geopolymerization, from the ordering of ions and soluble species during the dissolution process to playing a structure-directing role during gel hardening and eventual crystal formation.

  8. [What remains of arthrography?].

    PubMed

    Morvan, G

    1994-06-15

    At the time of RMI, arthrography appears sometimes old-fashioned. However this exam, which knows a second youth in relation with the supply of CT-scan (arthro-CT) remains the gold-standard in the exploration of many pathologic situations: intra-articular foreign bodies, tears of glenoid or acetabular labrum, precise assessment of chondral or ligamentous lesions (especially of the ankle), sub-scapularis tendon tears, adhesive capsulitis, complications of prosthesis, appreciation of intra-articular position of the needle's tip before injection of a therapeutic drug. Arthrography, completed or not by CT-slices gives, in this indications, excellent spatial resolution images, easy to perform, to read, to understand and to transmit at the clinicians, with a reasonable cost and a minor risk. RMI is a more and more used alternative, especially for the study of meniscus and ligaments of the knee, and rotator's cuff of the shoulder. It's sure that, with the increase of the RMI image's quality, other common indications will slip towards this technique, but nevertheless at this time (and it seams to me, for a long time) arthrography and arthro-CT will remain an excellent diagnostic tool with a very competitive advantages/inconvenience ratio.

  9. Is Electronegativity a Useful Descriptor for the "Pseudo-Alkali-Metal" NH4?

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteside, Alexander; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Gutowski, Maciej S.

    2011-11-18

    Molecular ions in the form of "pseudo-atoms" are common structural motifs in chemistry, with properties that are transferrable between different compounds. We have determined the electronegativity of the "pseudo-alkali metal" ammonium (NH4) and evaluated its reliability as a descriptor in comparison to the electronegativities of the alkali metals. The computed properties of its binary complexes with astatine and of selected borohydrides confirm the similarity of NH4 to the alkali metal atoms, although the electronegativity of NH4 is relatively large in comparison to its cationic radius. We paid particular attention to the molecular properties of ammonium (angular anisotropy, geometric relaxation, and reactivity), which can cause deviations from the behaviour expected of a conceptual "true alkali metal" with this electronegativity. These deviations allow for the discrimination of effects associated with the polyatomic nature of NH4.

  10. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard

    2017-01-17

    A method for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock. The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  11. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  12. Solvent effects and alkali metal ion catalysis in phosphodiester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Tagle, Paola; Vargas-Zúñiga, Idania; Taran, Olga; Yatsimirsky, Anatoly K

    2006-12-22

    The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP) have been studied in aqueous DMSO, dioxane, and MeCN. In all solvent mixtures the reaction rate steadily decreases to half of its value in pure water in the range of 0-70 vol % of organic cosolvent and sharply increases in mixtures with lower water content. Correlations based on different scales of solvent empirical parameters failed to describe the solvent effect in this system, but it can be satisfactorily treated in terms of a simplified stepwise solvent-exchange model. Alkali metal ions catalyze the BNPP hydrolysis but do not affect the rate of hydrolysis of neutral phosphotriester p-nitrophenyl diphenyl phosphate in DMSO-rich mixtures. The catalytic activity decreases in the order Li+ > Na+ > K+ > Rb+ > Cs+. For all cations except Na+, the reaction rate is first-order in metal ion. With Na+, both first- and second-order kinetics in metal ions are observed. Binding constants of cations to the dianionic transition state of BNPP alkaline hydrolysis are of the same order of magnitude and show a similar trend as their binding constants to p-nitrophenyl phosphate dianion employed as a transition-state model. The appearance of alkali metal ion catalysis in a medium, which solvates metal ions stronger than water, is attributed to the increased affinity of cations to dianions, which undergo a strong destabilization in the presence of an aprotic dipolar cosolvent.

  13. Coordination effect-regulated CO2 capture with an alkali metal onium salts/crown ether system

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhen-Zhen; Jiang, Deen; Zhu, Xiang; Tian, Chengcheng; Brown, Suree; Do-Thanh, Chi-Linh; He, Liang-Nian; Dai, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    A coordination effect was employed to realize equimolar CO2 absorption, adopting easily synthesized amino group containing absorbents (alkali metal onium salts). The essence of our strategy was to increase the steric hindrance of cations so as to enhance a carbamic acid pathway for CO2 capture. Our easily synthesized alkali metal amino acid salts or phenolates were coordinated with crown ethers, in which highly sterically hindered cations were obtained through a strong coordination effect of crown ethers with alkali metal cations. For example, a CO2 capacity of 0.99 was attained by potassium prolinate/18-crown-6, being characterized by NMR, FT-IR, and quantum chemistry calculations to go through a carbamic acid formation pathway. The captured CO2 can be stripped under very mild conditions (50 degrees C, N-2). Thus, this protocol offers an alternative for the development of technological innovation towards efficient and low energy processes for carbon capture and sequestration.

  14. First-principles study of ternary graphite compounds cointercalated with alkali atoms (Li, Na, and K) and alkylamines towards alkali ion battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ri, Gum-Chol; Yu, Chol-Jun; Kim, Jin-Song; Hong, Song-Nam; Jong, Un-Gi; Ri, Mun-Hyok

    2016-08-01

    First-principles calculations were carried out to investigate the structural, energetic, and electronic properties of ternary graphite compounds cointercalated with alkali atoms (AM = Li, Na, and K) and normal alkylamine molecules (nCx; x = 1, 2, 3, 4), denoted as AM-nCx-GICs. From the optimization of the orthorhombic unit cells for the crystalline compounds, it was found that, with the increase in the atomic number of alkali atoms, the layer separations decrease in contrast to AM-GICs, while the bond lengths between alkali atoms and graphene layer, and nitrogen atom of alkylamine increase. The calculated formation energies and interlayer binding energies of AM-nC3-GICs indicate that the compounds is increasingly stabilized from Li to K, and the energy barriers for migration of alkali atoms suggest that alkali cation with larger ionic radius diffuses more smoothly in graphite, being similar to AM-GICs. Through the analysis of electronic properties, it was established that more extent of electronic charge is transferred from more electropositive alkali atom to the carbon ring of graphene layer, and the hybridization of valence electron orbitals between alkylamine molecules and graphene layer is occurred.

  15. High-temperature interactions of alkali vapors with solids during coal combustion and gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Punjak, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    A temperature and concentration programmed reaction method is used to investigate the mechanism by which organically bound alkali is released from carbonaceous substrates. Vaporization of the alkali is preceded by reduction of oxygen-bearing groups during which CO is generated. A residual amount of alkali remains after complete reduction. This residual level is greater for potassium, indicating that potassium has stronger interactions with graphitic substrates that sodium. Other mineral substrates were exposed to high temperature alkali chloride vapors under both nitrogen and simulated flue gas atmospheres to investigate their potential application as sorbents for the removal of alkali from coal conversion flue gases. The compounds containing alumina and silica are found to readily adsorb alkali vapors and the minerals kaolinite, bauxite and emathlite are identified as promising alkali sorbents. The fundamentals of alkali adsorption on kaolinite, bauxite and emathlite are compared and analyzed both experimentally and through theoretical modeling. The experiments were performed in a microgravimetric reactor system; the sorbents were characterized before and after alkali adsorption using scanning Auger microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, mercury porosimetry and atomic emission spectrophotometry. The results show that the process is not a simple physical condensation, but a complex combination of several diffusion steps and reactions.

  16. Predicting the remaining service life of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, J.F.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear power plants are providing, currently, about 17 percent of the U.S. electricity and many of these plants are approaching their licensed life of 40 years. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Laboratory are carrying out a program to develop a methodology for assessing the remaining safe-life of the concrete components and structures in nuclear power plants. This program has the overall objective of identifying potential structural safety issues, as well as acceptance criteria, for use in evaluations of nuclear power plants for continued service. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is contributing to this program by identifying and analyzing methods for predicting the remaining life of in-service concrete materials. This report examines the basis for predicting the remaining service lives of concrete materials of nuclear power facilities. Methods for predicting the service life of new and in-service concrete materials are analyzed. These methods include (1) estimates based on experience, (2) comparison of performance, (3) accelerated testing, (4) stochastic methods, and (5) mathematical modeling. New approaches for predicting the remaining service lives of concrete materials are proposed and recommendations for their further development given. Degradation processes are discussed based on considerations of their mechanisms, likelihood of occurrence, manifestations, and detection. They include corrosion, sulfate attack, alkali-aggregate reactions, frost attack, leaching, radiation, salt crystallization, and microbiological attack.

  17. Variational first hyperpolarizabilities of 2,3-naphtho-15-crown-5 ether derivatives with cation-complexing: a potential and selective cation detector.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai-Ling; Wang, Wen-Yong; Hong, Bo; Zong, Ying; Si, Yan-Ling; Hu, Zhong-Qiang

    2016-09-29

    Crown ethers, as a kind of heterocycle, have been the subject of great interest over recent decades due to their selective capability to bind to metal cations. The use of a constant crown ether, such as naphtho-15-crown-5 (N15C5), and varied metal cations (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Be(2+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+)) makes it possible to determine the contributions of the metal cations to nonlinear optical (NLO) responses and to design an appropriate NLO-based cation detector. N15C5 and its metal cation derivatives have been systematically investigated by density functional theory. It is found that the dependency of the first hyperpolarizability relies on the metal cation, especially for transition metals. The decrease of the first hyperpolarizabilities for alkali metal cation derivatives is due to their relatively low oscillator strengths, whereas the significant increase of the first hyperpolarizabilities for transition metal cation derivatives can be further illustrated by their low transition energies, large amplitudes and separate distributions of first hyperpolarizability density. Thus, the alkali metal and transition metal cations are distinguishable and the transition metal cations are easier to detect by utilizing the variations in NLO responses.

  18. Aqueous Cation-Amide Binding: Free Energies and IR Spectral Signatures by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pluharova, Eva; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Schmidt, Burkhard; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-07-03

    Understanding specific ion effects on proteins remains a considerable challenge. N-methylacetamide serves as a useful proxy for the protein backbone that can be well characterized both experimentally and theoretically. The spectroscopic signatures in the amide I band reflecting the strength of the interaction of alkali cations and alkali earth dications with the carbonyl group remain difficult to assign and controversial to interpret. Herein, we directly compute the IR shifts corresponding to the binding of either sodium or calcium to aqueous N-methylacetamide using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the two cations interact with aqueous N-methylacetamide with different affinities and in different geometries. Since sodium exhibits a weak interaction with the carbonyl group, the resulting amide I band is similar to an unperturbed carbonyl group undergoing aqueous solvation. In contrast, the stronger calcium binding results in a clear IR shift with respect to N-methylacetamide in pure water. Support from the Czech Ministry of Education (grant LH12001) is gratefully acknowledged. EP thanks the International Max-Planck Research School for support and the Alternative Sponsored Fellowship program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PJ acknowledges the Praemium Academie award from the Academy of Sciences. Calculations of the free energy profiles were made possible through generous allocation of computer time from the North-German Supercomputing Alliance (HLRN). Calculations of vibrational spectra were performed in part using the computational resources in the National Energy Research Supercomputing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This work was supported by National Science Foundation grant CHE-0431312. CJM is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. PNNL is operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle. MDB is

  19. Hydrothermal alkali metal catalyst recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Eakman, James M.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.

    1979-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles primarily in the form of water soluble alkali metal formates by treating the particles with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of added carbon monoxide. During the treating process the water insoluble alkali metal compounds comprising the insoluble alkali metal residues are converted into water soluble alkali metal formates. The resultant aqueous solution containing water soluble alkali metal formates is then separated from the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment process, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal formates serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. This process permits increased recovery of alkali metal constituents, thereby decreasing the overall cost of the gasification process by reducing the amount of makeup alkali metal compounds necessary.

  20. Electrolytic method to make alkali alcoholates using ion conducting alkali electrolyte/separator

    DOEpatents

    Joshi, Ashok V [Salt Lake City, UT; Balagopal, Shekar [Sandy, UT; Pendelton, Justin [Salt Lake City, UT

    2011-12-13

    Alkali alcoholates, also called alkali alkoxides, are produced from alkali metal salt solutions and alcohol using a three-compartment electrolytic cell. The electrolytic cell includes an anolyte compartment configured with an anode, a buffer compartment, and a catholyte compartment configured with a cathode. An alkali ion conducting solid electrolyte configured to selectively transport alkali ions is positioned between the anolyte compartment and the buffer compartment. An alkali ion permeable separator is positioned between the buffer compartment and the catholyte compartment. The catholyte solution may include an alkali alcoholate and alcohol. The anolyte solution may include at least one alkali salt. The buffer compartment solution may include a soluble alkali salt and an alkali alcoholate in alcohol.

  1. Process for recovering alkali metals and sulfur from alkali metal sulfides and polysulfides

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard; Alvare, Javier

    2016-10-25

    Alkali metals and sulfur may be recovered from alkali monosulfide and polysulfides in an electrolytic process that utilizes an electrolytic cell having an alkali ion conductive membrane. An anolyte solution includes an alkali monosulfide, an alkali polysulfide, or a mixture thereof and a solvent that dissolves elemental sulfur. A catholyte includes molten alkali metal. Applying an electric current oxidizes sulfide and polysulfide in the anolyte compartment, causes alkali metal ions to pass through the alkali ion conductive membrane to the catholyte compartment, and reduces the alkali metal ions in the catholyte compartment. Liquid sulfur separates from the anolyte solution and may be recovered. The electrolytic cell is operated at a temperature where the formed alkali metal and sulfur are molten.

  2. Acid and alkali doped PBI electrolyte in electrochemical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Baozhong

    was established. In solution the cations and OH- all participate in the transport of current. It is the OH- that breaks the bonds between PBI molecules and enables the cations pass through the membrane. The performance of alkali doped PBI (doped under optimum conditions) in fuel cell as PEM is as good as NafionRTM.

  3. Electrical Resistivity of Alkali Elements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    rubidium, cesium, and francium ) and contains recommended reference values (or provisional or typical values). The compiled data include all the...and information on the electrical resistivity of alkali elements (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, and francium ) and contains...107Ic. Magnetic Flux Density Dependence o.. .. ... .... 112 4.6. Francium ..........................115j a. Temperature Dependence

  4. Energies and physicochemical properties of cation-π interactions in biological structures.

    PubMed

    Du, Qi-Shi; Meng, Jian-Zong; Liao, Si-Ming; Huang, Ri-Bo

    2012-04-01

    The cation-π interactions occur frequently within or between proteins due to six (Phe, Tyr, Trp, Arg, Lys, and His) of the twenty natural amino acids potentially interacting with metallic cations via these interactions. In this study, quantum chemical calculations and molecular orbital (MO) theory are used to study the energies and properties of cation-π interactions in biological structures. The cation-π interactions of H⁺ and Li⁺ are similar to hydrogen bonds and lithium bonds, respectively, in which the small, naked cations H⁺ and Li⁺ are buried deep within the π-electron density of aromatic molecules, forming stable cation-π bonds that are much stronger than the cation-π interactions of other alkali metal cations. The cation-π interactions of metallic cations with atomic masses greater than that of Li⁺ arise mainly from the coordinate bond comprising empty valence atomic orbitals (AOs) of metallic cations and π-MOs of aromatic molecules, though electrostatic interactions may also contribute to the cation-π interaction. The binding strength of cation-π interactions is determined by the charge and types of AOs in the metallic cations. Cation-π interaction energies are distance- and orientation-dependent; energies decrease with the distance (r) and the orientation angle (θ). In solution, the cation-π energies decrease with the increase of the dielectric constant (ɛ) of the solvent; however, solvation has less influence on the H⁺-π and H₃O⁺-π interactions than on interactions with other cations. The conclusions from this study provide useful theoretical insights into the nature of cation-π interactions and may contribute to the development of better force field parameters for describing the molecular dynamics of cation-π interactions within and between proteins.

  5. Communication: Dopant-induced solvation of alkalis in liquid helium nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renzler, Michael; Daxner, Matthias; Kranabetter, Lorenz; Kaiser, Alexander; Hauser, Andreas W.; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Lindinger, Albrecht; Zillich, Robert; Scheier, Paul; Ellis, Andrew M.

    2016-11-01

    Alkali metal atoms and small alkali clusters are classic heliophobes and when in contact with liquid helium they reside in a dimple on the surface. Here we show that alkalis can be induced to submerge into liquid helium when a highly polarizable co-solute, C60, is added to a helium nanodroplet. Evidence is presented that shows that all sodium clusters, and probably single Na atoms, enter the helium droplet in the presence of C60. Even clusters of cesium, an extreme heliophobe, dissolve in liquid helium when C60 is added. The sole exception is atomic Cs, which remains at the surface.

  6. A study on optical properties of poly (ethylene oxide) based polymer electrolyte with different alkali metal iodides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, B. Narasimha; Suvarna, R. Padma

    2016-05-01

    Polymer electrolytes were prepared by adding poly (ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether (PEGDME), TiO2 (nano filler), different alkali metal iodide salts RI (R+=Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+) and I2 into Acetonitrile gelated with Poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO). Optical properties of poly (ethylene oxide) based polymer electrolytes were studied by FTIR, UV-Vis spectroscopic techniques. FTIR spectrum reveals that the alkali metal cations were coordinated to ether oxygen of PEO. The optical absorption studies were made in the wavelength range 200-800 nm. It is observed that the optical absorption increases with increase in the radius of alkali metal cation. The optical band gap for allowed direct transitions was evaluated using Urbach-edges method. The optical properties such as optical band gap, refractive index and extinction coefficient were determined. The studied polymer materials are useful for solar cells, super capacitors, fuel cells, gas sensors etc.

  7. Positron-alkali atom scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.; Ward, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron-alkali atom scattering was recently investigated both theoretically and experimentally in the energy range from a few eV up to 100 eV. On the theoretical side calculations of the integrated elastic and excitation cross sections as well as total cross sections for Li, Na and K were based upon either the close-coupling method or the modified Glauber approximation. These theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the total cross section for both Na and K. Resonance structures were also found in the L = 0, 1 and 2 partial waves for positron scattering from the alkalis. The structure of these resonances appears to be quite complex and, as expected, they occur in conjunction with the atomic excitation thresholds. Currently both theoretical and experimental work is in progress on positron-Rb scattering in the same energy range.

  8. Alkali metal/sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Joginder N.

    1978-01-01

    Alkali metal/sulfur batteries in which the electrolyte-separator is a relatively fragile membrane are improved by providing means for separating the molten sulfur/sulfide catholyte from contact with the membrane prior to cooling the cell to temperatures at which the catholyte will solidify. If the catholyte is permitted to solidify while in contact with the membrane, the latter may be damaged. The improvement permits such batteries to be prefilled with catholyte and shipped, at ordinary temperatures.

  9. EPR, ELDOR, and ENDOR studies of alkali metal- o-dimesitoylbenzene radical complexes in solution. II. The lithium and sodium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Drift, E.; Smidt, J.

    A combined EPR-ELDOR-ENDOR study on ion pairs of o-dimesitoylbenzene anions with Li or Na cations provides a unique description of the alkali relaxation pattern in terms of dipolar and quadrupolar relaxation resulting from molecular tumbling. Internal motions in the chelating ring structure appear to be of minor importance. From the EPR and ELDOR results a variety of structural information is obtained: spectral densities, rotational correlation time of the complex, and anisotropic magnetic interactions of the alkali nucleus.

  10. Advancements in Anion Exchange Membrane Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, Matthew R.; Long, Hai; Park, Andrew M.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2015-10-15

    Anion-exchange membrane fuel cells (AME-FCs) are of increasingly popular interest as they enable the use of non-Pt fuel cell catalysts, the primary cost limitation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA) is the standard cation that has historically been utilized as the hydroxide conductor in AEMs. Herein we approach AEMs from two directions. First and foremost we study the stability of several different cations in a hydroxide solution at elevated temperatures. We specifically targeted BTMA and methoxy and nitro substituted BTMA. We've also studied the effects of adding an akyl spacer units between the ammonium cation and the phenyl group. In the second approach we use computational studies to predict stable ammonium cations, which are then synthesized and tested for stability. Our unique method to study cation stability in caustic conditions at elevated temperatures utilizes Teflon Parr reactors suitable for use under various temperatures and cation concentrations. NMR analysis was used to determine remaining cation concentrations at specific time points with GCMS analysis verifying product distribution. We then compare the experimental results with calculated modeling stabilities. Our studies show that the electron donating methoxy groups slightly increase stability (compared to that of BTMA), while the electron withdrawing nitro groups greatly decrease stability in base. These results give insight into possible linking strategies to be employed when tethering a BTMA like ammonium cation to a polymeric backbone; thus synthesizing an anion exchange membrane.

  11. Formation of cation channels in planar lipid bilayers by brefeldin A.

    PubMed

    Zizi, M; Fisher, R S; Grillo, F G

    1991-10-05

    Brefeldin A (BFA) is a novel agent with the unique property of effecting a rapid increase of Golgi cisternae volume and subsequent loss of a recognizable Golgi apparatus in treated cells. Although a receptor-mediated mechanism has been proposed, the molecular basis of BFA action remains unknown (Lippincott-Schwartz, J., Glickman, J., Donaldson, J. G., Robbins, J., Kreis, T. E., Seamon, K. B., Sheetz, M. P., and Klausner, R. D. (1991) J. Cell Biol. 112, 567-577). Since a variety of ionophores distort Golgi architecture by initially causing osmotic swelling of the cisternae (Mollenhauer, H. H., Morre, D. J., and Rowe, L. D. (1990) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1031, 225-246), Golgi membrane permeabilization by BFA seemed possible. We examined the effects of BFA on the conductance of planar lipid bilayers bathed in several aqueous salt solutions. Addition of BFA (1 microgram/ml) quickly augmented alkali cation conductance (K+ greater than Na+ much greater than Li+) but not anion conductance of the bilayer. Lower concentrations (1 ng/ml) indicated that BFA formed discrete, cation-selective channels in these bilayers. Given that Golgi cisternae volume increases immediately upon treatment with BFA, these findings suggest that alteration of ion gradients or Golgi membrane potential followed by an influx of water may be the mechanism by which BFA initiates disruption of Golgi structural integrity. Subsequent functional perturbations may then ensue either as a consequence of these initial structural changes or by a combination of several distinct mechanisms.

  12. Infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of cationized asparagine: effects of metal cation size on gas-phase conformation.

    PubMed

    Heaton, A L; Bowman, V N; Oomens, J; Steill, J D; Armentrout, P B

    2009-05-14

    Gas-phase structures of cationized asparagine (Asn) including complexes with Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), Cs(+), and Ba(2+), as well as protonated Asn, are examined by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy utilizing light generated by a free electron laser. Experimental spectra for the alkali metal cation complexes exhibit systematic trends, whereas spectra for Ba(2+)(Asn) and H(+)(Asn) are more distinct. To identify the structures formed experimentally, measured IRMPD spectra are compared to spectra calculated at a B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level with several effective core potentials and basis sets evaluated for the heavy metal systems. The dominant conformation ascertained for complexes with the smaller metal cations, Li(+)(Asn) and Na(+)(Asn), is a charge-solvated, tridentate [N,CO,CO] structure that binds the metal cation with the amine group of the amino acid backbone and to the carbonyl oxygen atoms of the backbone and amino acid side chain. For the larger alkali metal cation complexes, K(+)(Asn), Rb(+)(Asn), and Cs(+)(Asn), an additional charge-solvated, tridentate [COOH,CO] structure that binds the metal cation with the two oxygen atoms of the backbone carboxylic acid group and the carbonyl oxygen atom of the Asn side chain may also be present. The Ba(2+)(Asn) spectrum is characteristic of a single charge-solvated [N,CO,CO] conformation, in contrast to Gly, Trp, Arg, Gln, Pro, Ser, Val, and Glu, which all take on a zwitterionic structure when complexed to Ba(2+). In no case do the cationized Asn complexes show definitive evidence of forming a zwitterionic structure in the complexes studied here. For H(+)(Asn), a mixture of two [N,CO] structures, which differ only in the orientation the side chain and are calculated to be nearly identical in energy, explains the experimental spectrum well.

  13. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  14. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1991-01-22

    This invention relates to a regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor 5 concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC 10 exhaust gases.

  15. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  16. The cubyl cation rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Jalife, Said; Mondal, Sukanta; Cabellos, Jose Luis; Martinez-Guajardo, Gerardo; Fernandez-Herrera, Maria A; Merino, Gabriel

    2016-02-25

    Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations and high-level ab initio computations predict that the cage-opening rearrangement of the cubyl cation to the 7H(+)-pentalenyl cation is feasible in the gas phase. The rate-determining step is the formation of the cuneyl cation with an activation barrier of 25.3 kcal mol(-1) at the CCSD(T)/def2-TZVP//MP2/def2-TZVP level. Thus, the cubyl cation is kinetically stable enough to be formed and trapped at moderate temperatures, but it may be rearranged at higher temperatures.

  17. A second component of the SltA-dependent cation tolerance pathway in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Mellado, Laura; Calcagno-Pizarelli, Ana Maria; Lockington, Robin A.; Cortese, Marc S.; Kelly, Joan M.; Arst, Herbert N.; Espeso, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptional response to alkali metal cation stress is mediated by the zinc finger transcription factor SltA in Aspergillus nidulans and probably in other fungi of the pezizomycotina subphylum. A second component of this pathway has been identified and characterized. SltB is a 1272 amino acid protein with at least two putative functional domains, a pseudo-kinase and a serine-endoprotease, involved in signaling to the transcription factor SltA. Absence of SltB activity results in nearly identical phenotypes to those observed for a null sltA mutant. Hypersensitivity to a variety of monovalent and divalent cations, and to medium alkalinization are among the phenotypes exhibited by a null sltB mutant. Calcium homeostasis is an exception and this cation improves growth of sltΔ mutants. Moreover, loss of kinase HalA in conjunction with loss-of-function sltA or sltB mutations leads to pronounced calcium auxotrophy. sltA sltB double null mutants display a cation stress sensitive phenotype indistinguishable from that of single slt mutants showing the close functional relationship between these two proteins. This functional relationship is reinforced by the fact that numerous mutations in both slt loci can be isolated as suppressors of poor colonial growth resulting from certain null vps (vacuolar protein sorting) mutations. In addition to allowing identification of sltB, our sltB missense mutations enabled prediction of functional regions in the SltB protein. Although the relationship between the Slt and Vps pathways remains enigmatic, absence of SltB, like that of SltA, leads to vacuolar hypertrophy. Importantly, the phenotypes of selected sltA and sltB mutations demonstrate that suppression of null vps mutations is not dependent on the inability to tolerate cation stress. Thus a specific role for both SltA and SltB in the VPS pathway seems likely. Finally, it is noteworthy that SltA and SltB have a similar, limited phylogenetic distribution, being restricted to

  18. A second component of the SltA-dependent cation tolerance pathway in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Mellado, Laura; Calcagno-Pizarelli, Ana Maria; Lockington, Robin A; Cortese, Marc S; Kelly, Joan M; Arst, Herbert N; Espeso, Eduardo A

    2015-09-01

    The transcriptional response to alkali metal cation stress is mediated by the zinc finger transcription factor SltA in Aspergillus nidulans and probably in other fungi of the pezizomycotina subphylum. A second component of this pathway has been identified and characterized. SltB is a 1272 amino acid protein with at least two putative functional domains, a pseudo-kinase and a serine-endoprotease, involved in signaling to the transcription factor SltA. Absence of SltB activity results in nearly identical phenotypes to those observed for a null sltA mutant. Hypersensitivity to a variety of monovalent and divalent cations, and to medium alkalinization are among the phenotypes exhibited by a null sltB mutant. Calcium homeostasis is an exception and this cation improves growth of sltΔ mutants. Moreover, loss of kinase HalA in conjunction with loss-of-function sltA or sltB mutations leads to pronounced calcium auxotrophy. sltA sltB double null mutants display a cation stress sensitive phenotype indistinguishable from that of single slt mutants showing the close functional relationship between these two proteins. This functional relationship is reinforced by the fact that numerous mutations in both slt loci can be isolated as suppressors of poor colonial growth resulting from certain null vps (vacuolar protein sorting) mutations. In addition to allowing identification of sltB, our sltB missense mutations enabled prediction of functional regions in the SltB protein. Although the relationship between the Slt and Vps pathways remains enigmatic, absence of SltB, like that of SltA, leads to vacuolar hypertrophy. Importantly, the phenotypes of selected sltA and sltB mutations demonstrate that suppression of null vps mutations is not dependent on the inability to tolerate cation stress. Thus a specific role for both SltA and SltB in the VPS pathway seems likely. Finally, it is noteworthy that SltA and SltB have a similar, limited phylogenetic distribution, being restricted to

  19. Kinetics of Coloration in Photochromic Tungsten(VI) Oxide/Silicon Oxycarbide/Silica Hybrid Xerogel: Insight into Cation Self-diffusion Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Kenta; Tokushige, Masataka; Omata, Kaoru; Yamazaki, Suzuko; Iwadate, Yoshiaki

    2016-06-08

    Silicon oxycarbide/silica composites with well-dispersed tungsten(VI) oxide (WO3) nanoparticles were obtained as transparent hybrid xerogels via an acid-catalyzed sol-gel process (hydrolysis/condensation polymerization) of 3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (TESPMA) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). The self-diffusion mechanism of alkali-metal cations and the kinetics of the photochromic coloration process in the WO3/TESPMA/TEOS hybrid xerogel systems have been systematically investigated. Under continuous UV illumination, a gradual color change (colorless → blue) corresponding to the reduction of W(6+) into W(5+) states in WO3 nanoparticles can be confirmed from the WO3/TESPMA/TEOS hybrid xerogels containing alkali-metal sulfates, although no coloration of the hybrid xerogel without alkali-metal sulfate was observed. The coloration behavior depended exclusively on a variety of alkali-metal cations present in the hybrid xerogel system. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of the self-diffusion mechanism confirmed that the alkali-metal cations electrostatically interact with a layer of unreacted silanol groups on the TESPMA/TEOS matrix surface, and subsequently pass through the interconnected pore network of the hybrid xerogel. More interestingly, in the context of an Arrhenius analysis, we found a good coincidence between the activation energies for alkali-metal cation self-diffusion and UV-induced coloration in the WO3/TESPMA/TEOS hybrid xerogel system containing the corresponding alkali-metal sulfate. It is experimentally obvious that the photochromic properties are dominated by the diffusion process of alkali-metal cations in the WO3/TESPMA/TEOS hybrid xerogel system. Such hybrid materials with cation-controlled photochromic properties will show promising prospects in applications demanding energy-efficient "smart windows" and "smart glasses".

  20. The interactions of sorbates with gallosilicates and alkali-metal exchanged gallosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limtrakul, J.; Kuno, M.; Treesukol, P.

    1999-11-01

    Structures, energetics and vibrational frequencies of the interaction of adsorbates with H-aluminosilicates (H-AlZ), H-gallosilicates (H-GaZ), alkali-metal exchanged aluminosilicates (X-AlZ) and alkali-metal exchanged gallosilicates (X-GaZ), where X being Li, Na, or K, have been carried out at B3LYP and HF levels of theory with 6-31G(d) as the basis set. The charge compensating alkali-metal ions can affect the catalytically active site (Si-O-T where T=Al or Ga) by weakening the Si-O, Al-O, and Ga-O bonds as compared to their anionic frameworks. Comparing the net stabilization energies, Δ ENSE, of the naked alkali-metal/H 2O adducts with those of the alkali-metal exchanged zeolite/H 2O systems, the latter amounts only to about 50% of the former, which is partly due to the destabilizing role of the negative zeolitic oxygen frameworks surrounding the cations. The interaction of sorbates with the alkali-metal exchanged gallosilicates can be employed to probe the field strength inside the catalytic frameworks as indicated by the plot of the binding energy, Δ E, versus 1/ RX-O w2, with R(X-O w) being the distance between the cationic nucleus and the oxygen atom of the adsorbate. The IR spectra of H 2O adsorbed on Na-AlZ are calculated to be 3584, 3651, and 1686 cm -1. The obtained results are in excellent agreement with the very recent experimental IR spectra of water adsorbed on Na-ZSM-5 of Zecchina et al. (J. Phys. Chem., 100 (1996) 16 484). Other important features, i.e. the correlation between Δ νOH and, Δ E, R(X-O w) , and 1/ RX-O w2, cationic size, demonstrate that the interactions of sorbates with alkali-metal exchanged gallosilicates are well approximated by electrostatic contribution.

  1. All-inorganic Germanium nanocrystal films by cationic ligand exchange

    DOE PAGES

    Wheeler, Lance M.; Nichols, Asa W.; Chernomordik, Boris D.; ...

    2016-01-21

    In this study, we introduce a new paradigm for group IV nanocrystal surface chemistry based on room temperature surface activation that enables ionic ligand exchange. Germanium nanocrystals synthesized in a gas-phase plasma reactor are functionalized with labile, cationic alkylammonium ligands rather than with traditional covalently bound groups. We employ Fourier transform infrared and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies to demonstrate the alkylammonium ligands are freely exchanged on the germanium nanocrystal surface with a variety of cationic ligands, including short inorganic ligands such as ammonium and alkali metal cations. This ionic ligand exchange chemistry is used to demonstrate enhanced transport inmore » germanium nanocrystal films following ligand exchange as well as the first photovoltaic device based on an all-inorganic germanium nanocrystal absorber layer cast from solution. This new ligand chemistry should accelerate progress in utilizing germanium and other group IV nanocrystals for optoelectronic applications.« less

  2. All-Inorganic Germanium Nanocrystal Films by Cationic Ligand Exchange.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Lance M; Nichols, Asa W; Chernomordik, Boris D; Anderson, Nicholas C; Beard, Matthew C; Neale, Nathan R

    2016-03-09

    We introduce a new paradigm for group IV nanocrystal surface chemistry based on room temperature surface activation that enables ionic ligand exchange. Germanium nanocrystals synthesized in a gas-phase plasma reactor are functionalized with labile, cationic alkylammonium ligands rather than with traditional covalently bound groups. We employ Fourier transform infrared and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies to demonstrate the alkylammonium ligands are freely exchanged on the germanium nanocrystal surface with a variety of cationic ligands, including short inorganic ligands such as ammonium and alkali metal cations. This ionic ligand exchange chemistry is used to demonstrate enhanced transport in germanium nanocrystal films following ligand exchange as well as the first photovoltaic device based on an all-inorganic germanium nanocrystal absorber layer cast from solution. This new ligand chemistry should accelerate progress in utilizing germanium and other group IV nanocrystals for optoelectronic applications.

  3. All-inorganic Germanium nanocrystal films by cationic ligand exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, Lance M.; Nichols, Asa W.; Chernomordik, Boris D.; Anderson, Nicholas C.; Beard, Matthew C.; Neale, Nathan R.

    2016-01-21

    In this study, we introduce a new paradigm for group IV nanocrystal surface chemistry based on room temperature surface activation that enables ionic ligand exchange. Germanium nanocrystals synthesized in a gas-phase plasma reactor are functionalized with labile, cationic alkylammonium ligands rather than with traditional covalently bound groups. We employ Fourier transform infrared and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies to demonstrate the alkylammonium ligands are freely exchanged on the germanium nanocrystal surface with a variety of cationic ligands, including short inorganic ligands such as ammonium and alkali metal cations. This ionic ligand exchange chemistry is used to demonstrate enhanced transport in germanium nanocrystal films following ligand exchange as well as the first photovoltaic device based on an all-inorganic germanium nanocrystal absorber layer cast from solution. This new ligand chemistry should accelerate progress in utilizing germanium and other group IV nanocrystals for optoelectronic applications.

  4. Phonon spectra of alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeković, S.; Vukajlović, F.; Veljković, V.

    1982-10-01

    In this work we used a simple local model pseudopotential which includes screening for the phonon spectra calculations of alkali metals. The results obtained are in very good agreement with experimental data. In some branches of phonon spectra the differences between theoretical and experimental results are within 1-2%, while the maximum error is about 6%. The suggested form of the pseudopotential allows us to describe the phonon spectra of Na, K and Rb with only one, and, at the same time, a unique, parameter. In this case, the maximum disagreements from experiment are 9% for Na, 8% for K and 7% for Rb.

  5. Properties and Performance of Alkali-Activated Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Robert J.

    Alkali-activated concrete (AAC) made with industrial byproducts as the sole binder is rapidly emerging as a sustainable alternative to ordinary portland cement concrete (PCC). Despite its exemplary mechanical performance and durability, there remain several barriers to widespread commercialization of AAC. This dissertation addresses several of these barriers. Mathematical models are proposed which efficiently and accurately predict the compressive strength of AAC as a function of activator composition, binder type, and curing condition. The relationships between compressive strength and other mechanical properties (i.e., tensile strength and modulus of elasticity) are discussed, as are stress-strain relationships. Several aspects related to the durability of AAC are also discussed, including dimensional stability under drying conditions, alkali-silica reactivity, and chloride permeability. The results of these experimental investigations are disseminated in the context of real-world applicability.

  6. Aggregation of nucleosomes by divalent cations.

    PubMed Central

    de Frutos, M; Raspaud, E; Leforestier, A; Livolant, F

    2001-01-01

    Conditions of precipitation of nucleosome core particles (NCP) by divalent cations (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) have been explored over a large range of nucleosome and cation concentrations. Precipitation of NCP occurs for a threshold of divalent cation concentration, and redissolution is observed for further addition of salt. The phase diagram looks similar to those obtained with DNA and synthetic polyelectrolytes in the presence of multivalent cations, which supports the idea that NCP/NCP interactions are driven by cation condensation. In the phase separation domain the effective charge of the aggregates was determined by measurements of their electrophoretic mobility. Aggregates formed in the presence of divalent cations (Mg(2+)) remain negatively charged over the whole concentration range. They turn positively charged when aggregation is induced by trivalent (spermidine) or tetravalent (spermine) cations. The higher the valency of the counterions, the more significant is the reversal of the effective charge of the aggregates. The sign of the effective charge has no influence on the aspect of the phase diagram. We discuss the possible reasons for this charge reversal in the light of actual theoretical approaches. PMID:11463653

  7. Process for the disposal of alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Leroy C.

    1977-01-01

    Large quantities of alkali metals may be safely reacted for ultimate disposal by contact with a hot concentrated caustic solution. The alkali metals react with water in the caustic solution in a controlled reaction while steam dilutes the hydrogen formed by the reaction to a safe level.

  8. Parasite remains in archaeological sites.

    PubMed

    Bouchet, Françoise; Guidon, Niéde; Dittmar, Katharina; Harter, Stephanie; Ferreira, Luiz Fernando; Chaves, Sergio Miranda; Reinhard, Karl; Araújo, Adauto

    2003-01-01

    Organic remains can be found in many different environments. They are the most significant source for paleoparasitological studies as well as for other paleoecological reconstruction. Preserved paleoparasitological remains are found from the driest to the moistest conditions. They help us to understand past and present diseases and therefore contribute to understanding the evolution of present human sociality, biology, and behavior. In this paper, the scope of the surviving evidence will be briefy surveyed, and the great variety of ways it has been preserved in different environments will be discussed. This is done to develop to the most appropriated techniques to recover remaining parasites. Different techniques applied to the study of paleoparasitological remains, preserved in different environments, are presented. The most common materials used to analyze prehistoric human groups are reviewed, and their potential for reconstructing ancient environment and disease are emphasized. This paper also urges increased cooperation among archaeologists, paleontologists, and paleoparasitologists.

  9. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C.

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  10. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, Raymond D.; McPheeters, Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  11. Regulation of Cation Balance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cyert, Martha S.; Philpott, Caroline C.

    2013-01-01

    All living organisms require nutrient minerals for growth and have developed mechanisms to acquire, utilize, and store nutrient minerals effectively. In the aqueous cellular environment, these elements exist as charged ions that, together with protons and hydroxide ions, facilitate biochemical reactions and establish the electrochemical gradients across membranes that drive cellular processes such as transport and ATP synthesis. Metal ions serve as essential enzyme cofactors and perform both structural and signaling roles within cells. However, because these ions can also be toxic, cells have developed sophisticated homeostatic mechanisms to regulate their levels and avoid toxicity. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have characterized many of the gene products and processes responsible for acquiring, utilizing, storing, and regulating levels of these ions. Findings in this model organism have often allowed the corresponding machinery in humans to be identified and have provided insights into diseases that result from defects in ion homeostasis. This review summarizes our current understanding of how cation balance is achieved and modulated in baker’s yeast. Control of intracellular pH is discussed, as well as uptake, storage, and efflux mechanisms for the alkali metal cations, Na+ and K+, the divalent cations, Ca2+ and Mg2+, and the trace metal ions, Fe2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, and Mn2+. Signal transduction pathways that are regulated by pH and Ca2+ are reviewed, as well as the mechanisms that allow cells to maintain appropriate intracellular cation concentrations when challenged by extreme conditions, i.e., either limited availability or toxic levels in the environment. PMID:23463800

  12. Content and Access Remain Key

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Linda B.

    2007-01-01

    It is impossible to review the year's outstanding government publication landscape without acknowledging that change remains paramount. Just as striking, however, is that these changes go hand in hand with some familiar constants. Within this shifting environment, there are the consistency and dependability of government information itself,…

  13. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Schmalzer, D.K.; Steindler, M.J.; Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-12-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of Pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an alternative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no high temperature/high pressure (HTHP) sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-reaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial-grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6{und M}-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed in the following.

  14. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Schmalzer, D.K.; Steindler, M.J.; Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of Pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an alternative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no high temperature/high pressure (HTHP) sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-reaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial-grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6[und M]-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed in the following.

  15. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of PFBC technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an altemative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. As shown in Fig. 1, the RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no HTHP sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-leaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6M-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite [8]. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed.

  16. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-11-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of PFBC technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an altemative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. As shown in Fig. 1, the RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no HTHP sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-leaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6M-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite [8]. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed.

  17. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  18. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  19. Advancements in flowing diode pumped alkali lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Stalnaker, Donald M.; Guild, Eric M.; Oliker, Benjamin Q.; Moran, Paul J.; Townsend, Steven W.; Hostutler, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple variants of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) have recently been demonstrated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Highlights of this ongoing research effort include: a) a 571W rubidium (Rb) based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with a gain (2α) of 0.48 cm-1, b) a rubidium-cesium (Cs) Multi-Alkali Multi-Line (MAML) laser that simultaneously lases at both 795 nm and 895 nm, and c) a 1.5 kW resonantly pumped potassium (K) DPAL with a slope efficiency of 50%. The common factor among these experiments is the use of a flowing alkali test bed.

  20. Alkali metal for ultraviolet band-pass filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, Nick (Inventor); Fraschetti, George A. (Inventor); Mccann, Timothy A. (Inventor); Mayall, Sherwood D. (Inventor); Dunn, Donald E. (Inventor); Trauger, John T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An alkali metal filter having a layer of metallic bismuth deposited onto the alkali metal is provided. The metallic bismuth acts to stabilize the surface of the alkali metal to prevent substantial surface migration from occurring on the alkali metal, which may degrade optical characteristics of the filter. To this end, a layer of metallic bismuth is deposited by vapor deposition over the alkali metal to a depth of approximately 5 to 10 A. A complete alkali metal filter is described along with a method for fabricating the alkali metal filter.

  1. Cation exchange chromatographic elution and separation of rubidium

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, V.P.; Khopkar, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    The systematic cation exchange chromatographic separation of rubidium on Dowex 50W-X8 was carried out with mineral acids and their salts as eluants.A selectivity scale for various eluants in terms of the elution constant was devised. Rubidium was separated from a large number of elements in binary mixtures by the process of gradient or selective elutions or selective sorption. The noteworthy feature of the method is the sequential separation of rubidium from alkali as well as alkaline earth elements.

  2. Improved alkali-metal/silicate binders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, J.

    1978-01-01

    Family of inorganic binders utilizes potassium or sodium oxide/silicate dispersion and employs high mole ratio of silicon dioxide to alkali-metal binder. Binders are stable, inexpensive, extremely water resistant, and easy to apply.

  3. Alkali Metal Handling Practices at NASA MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvail, Patrick G.; Carter, Robert R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is NASA s principle propulsion development center. Research and development is coordinated and carried out on not only the existing transportation systems, but also those that may be flown in the near future. Heat pipe cooled fast fission cores are among several concepts being considered for the Nuclear Systems Initiative. Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a capability to handle high-purity alkali metals for use in heat pipes or liquid metal heat transfer loops. This capability is a low budget prototype of an alkali metal handling system that would allow the production of flight qualified heat pipe modules or alkali metal loops. The processing approach used to introduce pure alkali metal into heat pipe modules and other test articles are described in this paper.

  4. Alkali metal propellants for MPD thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, J. E.; Pivirotto, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments performed in the United States in the 1960s and early 1970s and in the Soviet Union with alkali metal-fuelled MPD thrusters indicate performance levels substantially better than those achieved with gaseous propellants. Cathode wear appears to be less in engines with alkali metal propellants also. A critical review of the available data indicates that the data are consistent and reliable. An analysis of testing and systems-level considerations shows that pumping requirements for testing are substantially decreased and reductions in tankage fraction can be expected. In addition, while care must be exercised in handling the alkali metals, it is not prohibitively difficult or hazardous. The greatest disadvantage seems to be the potential for spacecraft contamination, but there appear to be viable strategies for minimizing the impact of propellant deposition on spacecraft surfaces. Renewed examination of alkali metal-fuelled MPD thrusters for ambitious SEI missions is recommended.

  5. Na(H{sub 3}NCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 3}){sub 0.5}[Co(C{sub 2}O{sub 4})(HPO{sub 4})]: A novel phosphoxalate open-framework compound incorporating both an alkali cation and an organic template in the structural tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Tao; Vanchura, Britt A.; Shan Yongkui; Huang, Songping D.

    2007-07-15

    The first open-framework metal phosphoxalate compound containing both an organic and an inorganic template in the same structure is reported. Na(H{sub 3}N{sup +}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}N{sup +}H{sub 3}){sub 0.5}[Co(C{sub 2}O{sub 4})(HPO{sub 4})] (1) was synthesized hydrothermally via a direct metathesis reaction using the sodium salts of oxalate and phosphate in the presence of cobalt chloride and ethylenediamine dihydrochloride. The structure of 1 consists of a 3D framework built from the [Co(C{sub 2}O{sub 4})] {sub n} layers connected by HPO{sub 4} {sup 2-} group bridging two different cobalt centers between the adjacent layers. A major and a minor structural tunnels are created and occupied by the Na{sup +} and H{sub 3}N{sup +}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 3} {sup 2+} ions, respectively, in the same structure. Single-crystal X-ray crystallographic data for 1 are: monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/c, a=5.8189(6), b=10.235(1), c=13.066(1) A, {beta}=96.671(2){sup o}, Z=4, V=772.9(1) A{sup 3}, R=3.95% and R {sub w}=6.37%. - Graphical abstract: View along a of the structure of Na(H{sub 3}NCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 3}){sub 0.5}[Co(C{sub 2}O{sub 4})(HPO{sub 4})] exhibiting 3D tunnels created and occupied by the Na{sup +} and H{sub 3}NCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 3} {sup 2+} cations.

  6. Desulfurizing Coal With an Alkali Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravindram, M.; Kalvinskas, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental coal-desulfurization process uses alkalies and steam in fluidized-bed reactor. With highly volatile, high-sulfur bituminous coal, process removed 98 percent of pyritic sulfur and 47 percent of organic sulfur. Used in coal liquefaction and in production of clean solid fuels and synthetic liquid fuels. Nitrogen or steam flows through bed of coal in reactor. Alkalies react with sulfur, removing it from coal. Nitrogen flow fluidizes bed while heating or cooling; steam is fluidizing medium during reaction.

  7. The alkali molten globule state of horse ferricytochrome c: observation of cold denaturation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Prabhu, N Prakash; Rao, D Krishna; Bhuyan, Abani K

    2006-12-01

    Here, we present the basic structural properties and the thermodynamic description of a previously unknown alkali molten globule state of horse "ferricytochrome c". Both sodium and guanidinium cations stabilize the alkali-denatured state at pH 13, presumably by a charge screening mechanism. The Na(+)-stabilized conformation (B state) clearly meets with the molecular organizational definition of the generic molten globule state. The B state exhibits highly cooperative thermal unfolding transitions monitored by both near and far-UV CD. Analyses of these transitions show substantial heat capacity change, suggesting that the hydrophobic effect contributes considerably to its energetic stability. At low salt concentration where molten globules are less stable, the B state undergoes reversible cold denaturation.

  8. Alteration of alkali reactive aggregates autoclaved in different alkali solutions and application to alkali-aggregate reaction in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Duyou; Xu Zhongzi; Tang Mingshu; Fournier, Benoit

    2006-06-15

    Surface alteration of typical aggregates with alkali-silica reactivity and alkali-carbonate reactivity, i.e. Spratt limestone (SL) and Pittsburg dolomitic limestone (PL), were studied by XRD and SEM/EDS after autoclaving in KOH, NaOH and LiOH solutions at 150 deg. C for 150 h. The results indicate that: (1) NaOH shows the strongest attack on both ASR and ACR aggregates, the weakest attack is with LiOH. For both aggregates autoclaved in different alkali media, the crystalline degree, morphology and distribution of products are quite different. More crystalline products are formed on rock surfaces in KOH than that in NaOH solution, while almost no amorphous product is formed in LiOH solution; (2) in addition to dedolomitization of PL in KOH, NaOH and LiOH solutions, cryptocrystalline quartz in PL involves in reaction with alkaline solution and forms typical alkali-silica product in NaOH and KOH solutions, but forms lithium silicate (Li{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}) in LiOH solution; (3) in addition to massive alkali-silica product formed in SL autoclaved in different alkaline solutions, a small amount of dolomite existing in SL may simultaneously dedolomitize and possibly contribute to expansion; (4) it is promising to use the duplex effect of LiOH on ASR and ACR to distinguish the alkali-silica reactivity and alkali-carbonate reactivity of aggregate when both ASR and ACR might coexist.

  9. Structural and Dynamical Trends in Alkali-Metal Silanides Characterized by Neutron-Scattering Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wan Si; Dimitrievska, Mirjana; Chotard, Jean-Noël; Zhou, Wei; Janot, Raphaël; Skripov, Alexander V.; Udovic, Terrence J.

    2016-09-29

    Structural, vibrational, and dynamical properties of the mono- and mixed-alkali silanides (MSiH3, where M = K, Rb, Cs, K0.5Rb0.5, K0.5Cs0.5, and Rb0.5Cs0.5) were investigated by various neutron experiments, including neutron powder diffraction (NPD), neutron vibrational spectroscopy (NVS), neutron-scattering fixed-window scans (FWSs), and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements. Structural characterization showed that the mixed compounds exhibit disordered (..alpha..) and ordered (..beta..) phases for temperatures above and below about 200-250 K, respectively, in agreement with their monoalkali correspondents. Vibrational and dynamical properties are strongly influenced by the cation environment; in particular, there is a red shift in the band energies of the librational and bending modes with increasing lattice size as a result of changes in the bond lengths and force constants. Additionally, slightly broader spectral features are observed in the case of the mixed compounds, indicating the presence of structural disorder caused by the random distribution of the alkali-metal cations within the lattice. FWS measurements upon heating showed that there is a large increase in reorientational mobility as the systems go through the order-disorder (..beta..-..alpha..) phase transition, and measurements upon cooling of the ..alpha..-phase revealed the known strong hysteresis for reversion back to the ..beta..-phase. Interestingly, at a given temperature, among the different alkali silanide compounds, the relative reorientational mobilities of the SiH3- anions in the ..alpha..- and ..beta..-phases tended to decrease and increase, respectively, with increasing alkali-metal mass. This dynamical result might provide some insights concerning the enthalpy-entropy compensation effect previously observed for these potentially promising hydrogen storage materials.

  10. The effect of alkalis and polymerization on the solubility of H2O and CO2 in alkali-rich silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetere, Francesco; Holtz, Francois; Behrens, Harald; Botcharnikov, Roman E.; Fanara, Sara

    2014-05-01

    The effect of alkalis on the solubility of H2O and CO2 in alkali-rich silicate melts was investigated at 500 MPa and 1,250 °C in the systems with H2O/(H2O + CO2) ratio varying from 0 to 1. Using a synthetic analog of phonotephritic magma from Alban Hills (AH1) as a base composition, the Na/(Na + K) ratio was varied from 0.28 (AH1) to 0.60 (AH2) and 0.85 (AH3) at roughly constant total alkali content. The obtained results were compared with the data for shoshonitic and latitic melts having similar total alkali content but different structural characteristics, e.g., NBO/ T parameter (the ratio of non-bridging oxygens over tetrahedrally coordinated cations), as those of the AH compositions. Little variation was observed in H2O solubility (melt equilibrated with pure H2O fluid) for the whole compositional range in this study with values ranging between 9.7 and 10.2 wt. As previously shown, the maximum CO2 content in melts equilibrated with CO2-rich fluids increases strongly with the NBO/T from 0.29 wt % for latite (NBO/ T = 0.17) to 0.45 wt % for shoshonite (NBO/ T = 0.38) to 0.90 wt % for AH2 (NBO/ T = 0.55). The highest CO2 contents determined for AH3 and AH1 are 1.18 ± 0.05 wt % and 0.86 ± 0.12 wt %, respectively, indicating that Na is promoting carbonate incorporation stronger than potassium. At near constant NBO/ T, CO2 solubility increases from 0.86 ± 0.12 wt % in AH1 [Na/(Na + K)] = 0.28, to 1.18 ± 0.05 wt % in AH3 [Na/(Na + K)] = 0.85, suggesting that Na favors CO2 solubility on an equimolar basis. An empirical equation is proposed to predict the maximum CO2 solubility at 500 MPa and 1,100-1,300 °C in various silicate melts as a function of the NBO/ T, (Na + K)/∑cations and Na/(Na + K) parameters: This model is valid for melt compositions with NBO/ T between 0.0 and 0.6, (Na + K)/∑cation between 0.08 and 0.36 and Na/(Na + K) ratio from 0.25 to 0.95 at oxygen fugacities around the quartz-fayalite-magnetite buffer and above.

  11. The different poisoning behaviors of various alkali metal containing compounds on SCR catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xuesen; Yang, Guangpeng; Chen, Yanrong; Ran, Jingyu; Zhang, Li

    2017-01-01

    Alkali metals are poisonous to the metal oxide catalyst for NO removal. The chemical configuration of alkali containing substance and interacting temperature can affect the poisoning profile. A computational method based on Frontier Molecular Orbital analysis was proposed to determine the reacting behavior of various alkali-containing substances with SCR catalyst. The results reveal that the poisoning reactivities of various substances can be ranked as: E (MOH) > E (M2SO4) > E(MCl) > E(MNO3) > E(MHSO4). The experimental activity tests of the catalysts calcined at stepped temperatures show that NaOH can react with the catalyst below 200 °C. NaCl and NaNO3 start to react with the catalyst at a temperature between 300 and 400 °C. Unlike MOH, MCl and MNO3, which can produce volatile or decomposable species for the anions after reacting with the catalyst, M2SO4 and MHSO4 will leave both cations and anions on the catalyst surface. The sulfate ions left on the catalyst can generate active acid sites for NH3 adsorption. The experimental results also show that Na2SO4 and NaHSO4 will not lower the NO conversion. The after-reaction influences of various alkali metals were studied using theoretical and experimental methods. The theoretical results show that the acidity decreases with doping of alkali metal. Experiments show a consistent result that the NO conversion decreases as undoped >LiCl > NaCl > KCl.

  12. Synthetic, structural, and theoretical investigations of alkali metal germanium hydrides--contact molecules and separated ions.

    PubMed

    Teng, Weijie; Allis, Damian G; Ruhlandt-Senge, Karin

    2007-01-01

    The preparation of a series of crown ether ligated alkali metal (M=K, Rb, Cs) germyl derivatives M(crown ether)nGeH3 through the hydrolysis of the respective tris(trimethylsilyl)germanides is reported. Depending on the alkali metal and the crown ether diameter, the hydrides display either contact molecules or separated ions in the solid state, providing a unique structural insight into the geometry of the obscure GeH3- ion. Germyl derivatives displaying M--Ge bonds in the solid state are of the general formula [M([18]crown-6)(thf)GeH3] with M=K (1) and M=Rb (4). The compounds display an unexpected geometry with two of the GeH3 hydrogen atoms closely approaching the metal center, resulting in a partially inverted structure. Interestingly, the lone pair at germanium is not pointed towards the alkali metal, rather two of the three hydrides are approaching the alkali metal center to display M--H interactions. Separated ions display alkali metal cations bound to two crown ethers in a sandwich-type arrangement and non-coordinated GeH3- ions to afford complexes of the type [M(crown ether)2][GeH3] with M=K, crown ether=[15]crown-5 (2); M=K, crown ether=[12]crown-4 (3); and M=Cs, crown ether=[18]crown-6 (5). The highly reactive germyl derivatives were characterized by using X-ray crystallography, 1H and 13C NMR, and IR spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) calculations were performed to analyze the geometry of the GeH3- ion in the contact molecules 1 and 4.

  13. Silicon photonics: some remaining challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, G. T.; Topley, R.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Thompson, D. J.; Stanković, S.; Reynolds, S.; Chen, X.; Soper, N.; Mitchell, C. J.; Hu, Y.; Shen, L.; Martinez-Jimenez, G.; Healy, N.; Mailis, S.; Peacock, A. C.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Gardes, F. Y.; Soler Penades, J.; Alonso-Ramos, C.; Ortega-Monux, A.; Wanguemert-Perez, G.; Molina-Fernandez, I.; Cheben, P.; Mashanovich, G. Z.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses some of the remaining challenges for silicon photonics, and how we at Southampton University have approached some of them. Despite phenomenal advances in the field of Silicon Photonics, there are a number of areas that still require development. For short to medium reach applications, there is a need to improve the power consumption of photonic circuits such that inter-chip, and perhaps intra-chip applications are viable. This means that yet smaller devices are required as well as thermally stable devices, and multiple wavelength channels. In turn this demands smaller, more efficient modulators, athermal circuits, and improved wavelength division multiplexers. The debate continues as to whether on-chip lasers are necessary for all applications, but an efficient low cost laser would benefit many applications. Multi-layer photonics offers the possibility of increasing the complexity and effectiveness of a given area of chip real estate, but it is a demanding challenge. Low cost packaging (in particular, passive alignment of fibre to waveguide), and effective wafer scale testing strategies, are also essential for mass market applications. Whilst solutions to these challenges would enhance most applications, a derivative technology is emerging, that of Mid Infra-Red (MIR) silicon photonics. This field will build on existing developments, but will require key enhancements to facilitate functionality at longer wavelengths. In common with mainstream silicon photonics, significant developments have been made, but there is still much left to do. Here we summarise some of our recent work towards wafer scale testing, passive alignment, multiplexing, and MIR silicon photonics technology.

  14. Restructuring of a Peat in Interaction with Multivalent Cations: Effect of Cation Type and Aging Time

    PubMed Central

    Kunhi Mouvenchery, Yamuna; Jaeger, Alexander; Aquino, Adelia J. A.; Tunega, Daniel; Diehl, Dörte; Bertmer, Marko; Schaumann, Gabriele Ellen

    2013-01-01

    It is assumed to be common knowledge that multivalent cations cross-link soil organic matter (SOM) molecules via cation bridges (CaB). The concept has not been explicitly demonstrated in solid SOM by targeted experiments, yet. Therefore, the requirements for and characteristics of CaB remain unidentified. In this study, a combined experimental and molecular modeling approach was adopted to investigate the interaction of cations on a peat OM from physicochemical perspective. Before treatment with salt solutions of Al3+, Ca2+ or Na+, respectively, the original exchangeable cations were removed using cation exchange resin. Cation treatment was conducted at two different values of pH prior to adjusting pH to 4.1. Cation sorption is slower (>>2 h) than deprotonation of functional groups (<2 h) and was described by a Langmuir model. The maximum uptake increased with pH of cation addition and decreased with increasing cation valency. Sorption coefficients were similar for all cations and at both pH. This contradicts the general expectations for electrostatic interactions, suggesting that not only the interaction chemistry but also spatial distribution of functional groups in OM determines binding of cations in this peat. The reaction of contact angle, matrix rigidity due to water molecule bridges (WaMB) and molecular mobility of water (NMR analysis) suggested that cross-linking via CaB has low relevance in this peat. This unexpected finding is probably due to the low cation exchange capacity, resulting in low abundance of charged functionalities. Molecular modeling demonstrates that large average distances between functionalities (∼3 nm in this peat) cannot be bridged by CaB-WaMB associations. However, aging strongly increased matrix rigidity, suggesting successive increase of WaMB size to connect functionalities and thus increasing degree of cross-linking by CaB-WaMB associations. Results thus demonstrated that the physicochemical structure of OM is decisive for Ca

  15. Restructuring of a peat in interaction with multivalent cations: effect of cation type and aging time.

    PubMed

    Kunhi Mouvenchery, Yamuna; Jaeger, Alexander; Aquino, Adelia J A; Tunega, Daniel; Diehl, Dörte; Bertmer, Marko; Schaumann, Gabriele Ellen

    2013-01-01

    It is assumed to be common knowledge that multivalent cations cross-link soil organic matter (SOM) molecules via cation bridges (CaB). The concept has not been explicitly demonstrated in solid SOM by targeted experiments, yet. Therefore, the requirements for and characteristics of CaB remain unidentified. In this study, a combined experimental and molecular modeling approach was adopted to investigate the interaction of cations on a peat OM from physicochemical perspective. Before treatment with salt solutions of Al(3+), Ca(2+) or Na(+), respectively, the original exchangeable cations were removed using cation exchange resin. Cation treatment was conducted at two different values of pH prior to adjusting pH to 4.1. Cation sorption is slower (>2 h) than deprotonation of functional groups (<2 h) and was described by a Langmuir model. The maximum uptake increased with pH of cation addition and decreased with increasing cation valency. Sorption coefficients were similar for all cations and at both pH. This contradicts the general expectations for electrostatic interactions, suggesting that not only the interaction chemistry but also spatial distribution of functional groups in OM determines binding of cations in this peat. The reaction of contact angle, matrix rigidity due to water molecule bridges (WaMB) and molecular mobility of water (NMR analysis) suggested that cross-linking via CaB has low relevance in this peat. This unexpected finding is probably due to the low cation exchange capacity, resulting in low abundance of charged functionalities. Molecular modeling demonstrates that large average distances between functionalities (∼3 nm in this peat) cannot be bridged by CaB-WaMB associations. However, aging strongly increased matrix rigidity, suggesting successive increase of WaMB size to connect functionalities and thus increasing degree of cross-linking by CaB-WaMB associations. Results thus demonstrated that the physicochemical structure of OM is decisive for

  16. Oxygen-consuming chlor alkali cell configured to minimize peroxide formation

    DOEpatents

    Chlistunoff, Jerzy B.; Lipp, Ludwig; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2006-08-01

    Oxygen-consuming zero gap chlor-alkali cell was configured to minimize peroxide formation. The cell included an ion-exchange membrane that divided the cell into an anode chamber including an anode and a cathode chamber including an oxygen gas diffusion cathode. The cathode included a single-piece of electrically conducting graphitized carbon cloth. Catalyst and polytetrafluoroethylene were attached to only one side of the cloth. When the cathode was positioned against the cation exchange membrane with the catalyst side away from the membrane, electrolysis of sodium chloride to chlorine and caustic (sodium hydroxide) proceeded with minimal peroxide formation.

  17. Molecular origin of the cation selectivity in OmpF porin: single channel conductances vs. free energy calculation.

    PubMed

    Danelon, Christophe; Suenaga, Atsushi; Winterhalter, Mathias; Yamato, Ichiro

    2003-07-01

    Ion current through single outer membrane protein F (OmpF) trimers was recorded and compared to molecular dynamics simulation. Unidirectional insertion was revealed from the asymmetry in channel conductance. Single trimer conductance showed particularly high values at low symmetrical salt solution. The conductance values of various alkali metal ion solutions were proportional to the monovalent cation mobility values in the bulk phase, LiClalkali metal ions over chloride and suggested size preference for smaller cations. These results suggest that there are specific interactions between the permeating cation and charged residues lining the channel walls. This hypothesis was supported by computational study which predicted that monovalent cations bind to Asp113 at low concentration. Here, free energy calculations revealed that the affinity of the alkali metal ions to its binding site increased with their atomic radii, Li(+) approximately Na(+)cations under applied voltage by increasing their local concentration relative to the bulk solution.

  18. Free volume anomalies in mixed-cation glasses revealed by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS).

    PubMed

    Ingram, Malcolm D; Pas, Steven J; Cramer, Cornelia; Gao, Yong; Hill, Anita J

    2005-04-21

    PALS experiments reveal a minimum in ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetimes and a maximum in the corresponding intensities that emerge when mixed-cation (Li/Na) borate glasses are heated from ambient temperatures up to 473 K. These free volume 'anomalies' appear to be a true manifestation of the mixed alkali effect (MAE). They are consistent with a mechanism of ion transport involving cooperation between hops of unlike cations, resulting in increased disturbance of the glass network. The result lends support to the dynamic structure model.

  19. Quantitative characterization of non-classic polarization of cations on clay aggregate stability.

    PubMed

    Hu, Feinan; Li, Hang; Liu, Xinmin; Li, Song; Ding, Wuquan; Xu, Chenyang; Li, Yue; Zhu, Longhui

    2015-01-01

    Soil particle interactions are strongly influenced by the concentration, valence and ion species and the pH of the bulk solution, which will also affect aggregate stability and particle transport. In this study, we investigated clay aggregate stability in the presence of different alkali ions (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+) at concentrations from10-5 to 10-1 mol L-1. Strong specific ion effects on clay aggregate stability were observed, and showed the order Cs+>K+>Na+>Li+. We found that it was not the effects of ion size, hydration, and dispersion forces in the cation-surface interactions but strong non-classic polarization of adsorbed cations that resulted in these specific effects. In this study, the non-classic dipole moments of each cation species resulting from the non-classic polarization were estimated. By comparing non-classic dipole moments with classic values, the observed dipole moments of adsorbed cations were up to 104 times larger than the classic values for the same cation. The observed non-classic dipole moments sharply increased with decreasing electrolyte concentration. We conclude that strong non-classic polarization could significantly suppress the thickness of the diffuse layer, thereby weakening the electric field near the clay surface and resulting in improved clay aggregate stability. Even though we only demonstrated specific ion effects on aggregate stability with several alkali ions, our results indicate that these effects could be universally important in soil aggregate stability.

  20. Cation-specific effects on enzymatic catalysis driven by interactions at the tunnel mouth.

    PubMed

    Štěpánková, Veronika; Paterová, Jana; Damborský, Jiří; Jungwirth, Pavel; Chaloupková, Radka; Heyda, Jan

    2013-05-30

    Cationic specificity which follows the Hofmeister series has been established for the catalytic efficiency of haloalkane dehalogenase LinB by a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and enzyme kinetic experiments. Simulations provided a detailed molecular picture of cation interactions with negatively charged residues on the protein surface, particularly at the tunnel mouth leading to the enzyme active site. On the basis of the binding affinities, cations were ordered as Na(+) > K(+) > Rb(+) > Cs(+). In agreement with this result, a steady-state kinetic analysis disclosed that the smaller alkali cations influence formation and productivity of enzyme-substrate complexes more efficiently than the larger ones. A subsequent systematic investigation of two LinB mutants with engineered charge in the cation-binding site revealed that the observed cation affinities are enhanced by increasing the number of negatively charged residues at the tunnel mouth, and vice versa, reduced by decreasing this number. However, the cation-specific effects are overwhelmed by strong electrostatic interactions in the former case. Interestingly, the substrate inhibition of the mutant LinB L177D in the presence of chloride salts was 7 times lower than that of LinB wild type in glycine buffer. Our work provides new insight into the mechanisms of specific cation effects on enzyme activity and suggests a potential strategy for suppression of substrate inhibition by the combination of protein and medium engineering.

  1. Magnetism in alkali-metal-doped wurtzite semiconductor materials controlled by strain engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J. H.; Li, T. H.; Liu, L. Z.; Hu, F. R.

    2016-09-01

    The study of the magnetism and optical properties of semiconductor materials by defect engineering has attracted much attention because of their potential uses in spintronic and optoelectronic devices. In this paper, first-principle calculations discloses that cationic vacancy formation energy of the doped wurtzite materials can be sharply decreased due to alkali metal dopants and shows that their magnetic properties strongly depend on defect and doping concentration. This effect can be ascribed to the volume change induced by foreign elements doped into the host system and atomic population's difference. The symmetric deformation induced by biaxial strain can further regulate this behavior. Our results suggest that the formation of cationic vacancy can be tailored by strain engineering and dopants incorporation.

  2. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, W.Y.

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased, preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  3. Alkali metal vapors - Laser spectroscopy and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stwalley, W. C.; Koch, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the rapidly expanding use of lasers for spectroscopic studies of alkali metal vapors. Since the alkali metals (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium) are theoretically simple ('visible hydrogen'), readily ionized, and strongly interacting with laser light, they represent ideal systems for quantitative understanding of microscopic interconversion mechanisms between photon (e.g., solar or laser), chemical, electrical and thermal energy. The possible implications of such understanding for a wide variety of practical applications (sodium lamps, thermionic converters, magnetohydrodynamic devices, new lasers, 'lithium waterfall' inertial confinement fusion reactors, etc.) are also discussed.

  4. Bond-length distributions for ions bonded to oxygen: alkali and alkaline-earth metals

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Olivier Charles; Hawthorne, Frank Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Bond-length distributions have been examined for 55 configurations of alkali-metal ions and 29 configurations of alkaline-earth-metal ions bonded to oxygen, for 4859 coordination polyhedra and 38 594 bond distances (alkali metals), and for 3038 coordination polyhedra and 24 487 bond distances (alkaline-earth metals). Bond lengths generally show a positively skewed Gaussian distribution that originates from the variation in Born repulsion and Coulomb attraction as a function of interatomic distance. The skewness and kurtosis of these distributions generally decrease with increasing coordination number of the central cation, a result of decreasing Born repulsion with increasing coordination number. We confirm the following minimum coordination numbers: [3]Li+, [3]Na+, [4]K+, [4]Rb+, [6]Cs+, [3]Be2+, [4]Mg2+, [6]Ca2+, [6]Sr2+ and [6]Ba2+, but note that some reported examples are the result of extensive dynamic and/or positional short-range disorder and are not ordered arrangements. Some distributions of bond lengths are distinctly multi-modal. This is commonly due to the occurrence of large numbers of structure refinements of a particular structure type in which a particular cation is always present, leading to an over-representation of a specific range of bond lengths. Outliers in the distributions of mean bond lengths are often associated with anomalous values of atomic displacement of the constituent cations and/or anions. For a sample of [6]Na+, the ratio U eq(Na)/U eq(bonded anions) is partially correlated with 〈[6]Na+—O2−〉 (R 2 = 0.57), suggesting that the mean bond length is correlated with vibrational/displacement characteristics of the constituent ions for a fixed coordination number. Mean bond lengths also show a weak correlation with bond-length distortion from the mean value in general, although some coordination numbers show the widest variation in mean bond length for zero distortion, e.g. Li+ in [4]- and [6]-coordination, Na+ in [4]- and [6

  5. Alkali-aggregate reaction in concrete containing high-alkali cement and granite aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Owsiak, Z

    2004-01-01

    The paper discusses results of the research into the influence of high-alkali Portland cement on granite aggregate. The deformation of the concrete structure occurred after 18 months. The research was carried out by means of a scanning electron microscope equipped with a high-energy dispersive X-ray analyzer that allowed observation of unpolished sections of concrete bars exhibiting the cracking pattern typical of the alkali-silica reaction. Both the microscopic observation and the X-ray elemental analysis confirm the presence of alkali-silica gel and secondary ettringite in the cracks.

  6. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  7. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  8. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  9. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  10. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  11. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  12. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  13. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  14. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  15. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  18. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  19. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  20. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  1. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  3. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  7. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  8. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in...

  9. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  11. Alkali-silica reaction resistant concrete using pumice blended cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Uma

    Durability of structures is a major challenge for the building industry. One of the many types of concrete deterioration that can affect durability is alkali-silica reaction (ASR). ASR has been found in most types of concrete structures, including dams, bridges, pavements, and other structures that are 20 to 50 years old. The degradation mechanism of ASR produces a gel that significantly expands in the presence of water as supplied from the surrounding environment. This expansion gel product can create high stresses and cracking of the concrete, which can lead to other forms of degradation and expensive structural replacement costs. The four essential factors that produce an expansive ASR gel in concrete are the presence of alkalis, siliceous aggregate, moisture, and free calcium hydroxide (CH). If concrete is starved of any one of these essential components, the expansion can be prevented. Reducing CH through the use of a supplementary cementitious material (SCM) such as natural pozzolan pumice is the focus of this research. By using a pozzolan, the amount of CH is reduced with time based on the effectiveness of the pozzolan. Many pozzolans exist, but one such naturally occurring pozzolanic material is pumice. This research focuses on determining the effect of a finely ground pumice as a SCM in terms of its resistance to ASR expansion, as well as improving resistance to other potential concrete durability mechanisms. In spite of having high alkali contents in the pumice, mixtures containing the SCM pumice more effectively mitigated the ASR expansion reaction than other degradation mechanisms. Depending on the reactivity of the aggregates and fineness of the pumice, 10-15% replacement of cement with the pumice was found to reduce the ASR expansion to the acceptable limits. The amount of CH remaining in the concrete was compared to the ASR expansion in order to improve understanding of the role of CH in the ASR reaction. Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X

  12. Stable alkali metal ion intercalation compounds as optimized metal oxide nanowire cathodes for lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunlong; Han, Chunhua; Yang, Junwei; Su, Jie; Xu, Xiaoming; Li, Shuo; Xu, Lin; Fang, Ruopian; Jiang, Hong; Zou, Xiaodong; Song, Bo; Mai, Liqiang; Zhang, Qingjie

    2015-03-11

    Intercalation of ions in electrode materials has been explored to improve the rate capability in lithium batteries and supercapacitors, due to the enhanced diffusion of Li(+) or electrolyte cations. Here, we describe a synergistic effect between crystal structure and intercalated ion by experimental characterization and ab initio calculations, based on more than 20 nanomaterials: five typical cathode materials together with their alkali metal ion intercalation compounds A-M-O (A = Li, Na, K, Rb; M = V, Mo, Co, Mn, Fe-P). Our focus on nanowires is motivated by general enhancements afforded by nanoscale structures that better sustain lattice distortions associated with charge/discharge cycles. We show that preintercalation of alkali metal ions in V-O and Mo-O yields substantial improvement in the Li ion charge/discharge cycling and rate, compared to A-Co-O, A-Mn-O, and A-Fe-P-O. Diffraction and modeling studies reveal that preintercalation with K and Rb ions yields a more stable interlayer expansion, which prevents destructive collapse of layers and allow Li ions to diffuse more freely. This study demonstrates that appropriate alkali metal ion intercalation in admissible structure can overcome the limitation of cyclability as well as rate capability of cathode materials, besides, the preintercalation strategy provides an effective method to enlarge diffusion channel at the technical level, and more generally, it suggests that the optimized design of stable intercalation compounds could lead to substantial improvements for applications in energy storage.

  13. Energetics of alkali and alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Hui; Wu, Di; Liu, Kefeng; ...

    2016-06-30

    Alkali and alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A samples were synthesized in aqueous exchange media. They were thoroughly studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe (EMPA), thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), and high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The hydration energetics and enthalpies of formation of these zeolite A materials from constituent oxides were determined. Specifically, the hydration level of zeolite A has a linear dependence on the average ionic potential (Z/r) of the cation, from 0.894 (Rb-A) to 1.317 per TO2 (Mg-A). The formation enthalpies from oxides (25 °C) range from –93.71 ± 1.77 (K-A) to –48.02more » ± 1.85 kJ/mol per TO2 (Li-A) for hydrated alkali ion-exchanged zeolite A, and from –47.99 ± 1.20 (Ba-A) to –26.41 ± 1.71 kJ/mol per TO2 (Mg-A) for hydrated alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A. As a result, the formation enthalpy from oxides generally becomes less exothermic as Z/r increases, but a distinct difference in slope is observed between the alkali and the alkaline earth series.« less

  14. Energetics of alkali and alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hui; Wu, Di; Liu, Kefeng; Guo, Xiaofeng; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2016-06-30

    Alkali and alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A samples were synthesized in aqueous exchange media. They were thoroughly studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe (EMPA), thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), and high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The hydration energetics and enthalpies of formation of these zeolite A materials from constituent oxides were determined. Specifically, the hydration level of zeolite A has a linear dependence on the average ionic potential (Z/r) of the cation, from 0.894 (Rb-A) to 1.317 per TO2 (Mg-A). The formation enthalpies from oxides (25 °C) range from –93.71 ± 1.77 (K-A) to –48.02 ± 1.85 kJ/mol per TO2 (Li-A) for hydrated alkali ion-exchanged zeolite A, and from –47.99 ± 1.20 (Ba-A) to –26.41 ± 1.71 kJ/mol per TO2 (Mg-A) for hydrated alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A. As a result, the formation enthalpy from oxides generally becomes less exothermic as Z/r increases, but a distinct difference in slope is observed between the alkali and the alkaline earth series.

  15. An Ab Initio Study of Alkali-C60 Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frick, Nathan; Hira, A. S.; Ray, A. K.

    2003-03-01

    We extend our previous work on fullerene-alkali complexes1-2 by presenting the results of an ab initio theoretical study of the alkali LiC60+, LiC60, NaC60+, NaC60, KC60+, and KC60 complexes. In the endohedral complexes for Li and Na, there is displacement of the adatom from the center. Of the ions, exohedral Li+ will sit closest to the cage, and among the neutrals, exohedral K remains closest. Bond lengths are consistently longer for the fivefold and threefold approaches. Adsorbates inside the fullerene donate negative charge to the carbons, but ions outside obtain a small amount, resulting in a polarization of the molecule. In the ion complexes, there is lowering of the orbital energy levels by 3 to 4 eV, resulting in an increase in the number of bound, but unoccupied, electronic orbitals. The HOMO-LUMO gap, of interest in superconductivity studies, is reduced by about 50 1. A.S. Hira and A.K. Ray, Phys. Rev. A 52, 141(1995); A 54, 2205(1996). 2. Ajit Hira and A. K. Ray, "An Initio Modeling of the Endohedral and Exohedral Complexes of C60Na2+ Complexes", Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 47 (March 2002).

  16. Alkali resistant optical coatings for alkali lasers and methods of production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Soules, Thomas F; Beach, Raymond J; Mitchell, Scott C

    2014-11-18

    In one embodiment, a multilayer dielectric coating for use in an alkali laser includes two or more alternating layers of high and low refractive index materials, wherein an innermost layer includes a thicker, >500 nm, and dense, >97% of theoretical, layer of at least one of: alumina, zirconia, and hafnia for protecting subsequent layers of the two or more alternating layers of high and low index dielectric materials from alkali attack. In another embodiment, a method for forming an alkali resistant coating includes forming a first oxide material above a substrate and forming a second oxide material above the first oxide material to form a multilayer dielectric coating, wherein the second oxide material is on a side of the multilayer dielectric coating for contacting an alkali.

  17. Computational studies of solid-state alkali conduction in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhi; Mo, Yifei; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-03-25

    The facile conduction of alkali ions in a crystal host is of crucial importance in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries, the dominant form of energy storage today. In this review, we provide a comprehensive survey of computational approaches to study solid-state alkali diffusion. We demonstrate how these methods have provided useful insights into the design of materials that form the main components of a rechargeable alkali-ion battery, namely the electrodes, superionic conductor solid electrolytes and interfaces. We will also provide a perspective on future challenges and directions. Here, the scope of this review includes the monovalent lithium- and sodium-ion chemistries that are currently of the most commercial interest.

  18. Computational studies of solid-state alkali conduction in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, Zhi; Mo, Yifei; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-03-25

    The facile conduction of alkali ions in a crystal host is of crucial importance in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries, the dominant form of energy storage today. In this review, we provide a comprehensive survey of computational approaches to study solid-state alkali diffusion. We demonstrate how these methods have provided useful insights into the design of materials that form the main components of a rechargeable alkali-ion battery, namely the electrodes, superionic conductor solid electrolytes and interfaces. We will also provide a perspective on future challenges and directions. Here, the scope of this review includes the monovalent lithium- and sodium-ion chemistries that aremore » currently of the most commercial interest.« less

  19. Synergistic capture mechanisms for alkali and sulfur species from combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.W.; Shadman, F.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Mwabe, P.O.

    1994-02-01

    Experimental work was carried out on a 17 kW, 600 cm long, gas laboratory combustor, to investigate the post flame reactive capture of alkali species by kaolinite. Emphasis was on alkali/sorbent interactions occurring in flue gas at temperatures above the alkali dewpoint and on the formation of water insoluble reaction products. Time-temperature studies were carried out by injecting kaolinite at different axial points along the combustor. The effect of chlorine and sulfur on alkali capture was investigated by doping the flame with SO{sub 2} and Cl{sub 2} gases to simulate coal flame environments. Particle time and temperature history was kept as close as possible to that which would ordinarily be found in a practical boiler. Experiments designed to extract apparent initial reaction rates were carried using a narrow range, 1-2 {mu}m modal size sorbent, while, a coarse, multi size sorbent was used to investigate the governing transport mechanisms. The capture reaction has been proposed to be between alkali hydroxide and activated kaolinite, and remains so in the presence of sulfur and chlorine. The presence of sulfur reduces sodium capture by under 10% at 1300{degree}C. Larger reductions at lower temperatures are attributed to the elevated dewpoint of sodium ({approximately}850{degree}C) with subsequent reduction in sorbent residence time in the alkali gas phase domain. Chlorine reduces sodium capture by 30% across the temperature range covered by the present experiments. This result has been linked to thermodynamic equilibria between sodium hydroxide, sodium chloride and water.

  20. Ingestion of caustic alkali farm products.

    PubMed

    Neidich, G

    1993-01-01

    Since the Poison Prevention Packaging Act took effect, the number of ingestions of caustic alkali from household products has been significantly reduced. Commercial caustic alkalis used on farms, however, were not included in this legislation. Fourteen children over a 5 year period were seen after ingestion of commercial caustic alkalis used on farms. Seven of the children had ingested liquid pipeline cleaners and seven had ingested solid agents used for a variety of reasons. Six of seven children ingesting liquid agents did so from nonoriginal containers into which the caustic had been transferred for convenience. All seven children ingesting solid agents did so from the original container. Eight of the 14 children were found to have second-degree or worse esophageal involvement. Both solid and liquid caustic agents used commercially on farms can cause significant morbidity. Development of a child-resistant container for daily transfer of liquid pipeline agents could be helpful in preventing injuries from liquid pipeline cleaners. Pediatric gastroenterologists as well as primary care physicians in rural areas should be familiar with this type of injury and should take an active role in instructing parents of children living on farms to prevent such injuries. Extension of the Poison Prevention Packaging Act to caustic alkalis used on farms needs to be considered.

  1. The Additive Coloration of Alkali Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jirgal, G. H.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an inexpensive, vacuum furnace designed to produce F-centers in alkali halide crystals by additive coloration. The method described avoids corrosion or contamination during the coloration process. Examination of the resultant crystals is discussed and several experiments using additively colored crystals are…

  2. Cohesive Energy of the Alkali Metals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a method, considered appropriate for presentation to undergraduate students in materials science and related courses, for the calculation of cohesive energies of the alkali metals. Uses a description based on the free electron model and gives results to within 0.1 eV of the experimental values. (Author/GS)

  3. Terahertz radiation in alkali vapor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, X.-C.

    2014-05-12

    By taking advantage of low ionization potentials of alkali atoms, we demonstrate terahertz wave generation from cesium and rubidium vapor plasmas with an amplitude nearly one order of magnitude larger than that from nitrogen gas at low pressure (0.02–0.5 Torr). The observed phenomena are explained by the numerical modeling based upon electron tunneling ionization.

  4. Gel nanostructure in alkali-activated binders based on slag and fly ash, and effects of accelerated carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, Susan A.; Provis, John L.; Walkley, Brant; San Nicolas, Rackel; Gehman, John D.; Brice, David G.; Kilcullen, Adam R.; Duxson, Peter; Deventer, Jannie S.J. van

    2013-11-15

    Binders formed through alkali-activation of slags and fly ashes, including ‘fly ash geopolymers’, provide appealing properties as binders for low-emissions concrete production. However, the changes in pH and pore solution chemistry induced during accelerated carbonation testing provide unrealistically low predictions of in-service carbonation resistance. The aluminosilicate gel remaining in an alkali-activated slag system after accelerated carbonation is highly polymerised, consistent with a decalcification mechanism, while fly ash-based binders mainly carbonate through precipitation of alkali salts (bicarbonates at elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations, or carbonates under natural exposure) from the pore solution, with little change in the binder gel identifiable by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In activated fly ash/slag blends, two distinct gels (C–A–S–H and N–A–S–H) are formed; under accelerated carbonation, the N–A–S–H gel behaves comparably to fly ash-based systems, while the C–A–S–H gel is decalcified similarly to alkali-activated slag. This provides new scope for durability optimisation, and for developing appropriate testing methodologies. -- Highlights: •C-A-S-H gel in alkali-activated slag decalcifies during accelerated carbonation. •Alkali-activated fly ash gel changes much less under CO{sub 2} exposure. •Blended slag-fly ash binder contains two coexisting gel types. •These two gels respond differently to carbonation. •Understanding of carbonation mechanisms is essential in developing test methods.

  5. Cation diffusion in titanomagnetites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon, R.; McCallister, R. H.; Harrison, H. R.

    1984-02-01

    Interdiffusion couple experiments were performed with titanomagnetite single crystals at 1,000°C, 1,100° C and 1,200° C in various buffered atmospheres. The dependence of the interdiffusion coefficient on oxygen fugacity, composition and temperature was interpreted in terms of point defect structure. Estimates of the cation tracer diffusivities indicate that Fe migrates via a point defect mechanism, involving mixed tetrahedral-octahedral site jumps, with an activation energy of 33 Kcal/mole; whereas Ti migration is one to two orders of magnitude slower, is restricted to octahedral sites and has an activation energy of 60 Kcal/mole.

  6. Tungstate-ferrates of some alkali and alkaline-earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gruba, A.I.; Danileiko, L.A.; Moroz, Ya.A.; Zyats, M.N.

    1988-02-01

    Tungstate-ferrates of some alkali and alkaline-earth metals with the ratio Fe:W = 2:11, the iron ions in which are found in two types of coordination, tetrahedral and octahedral, were synthesized. The similarity of the IR spectra of the compounds obtained and known compounds with the anion structure of the Keggin type with the composition M/sub X/(XZW/sub 11/O/sub 40/H/sub m/) x nH/sub 2/O indicates that their heteropolyanions are isostructural. The thermal stability of the compounds studied and the structure of the products of thermolysis depend on the charge and radius of the extrasphere cation. When the ratio of the radii of the extrasphere cation of the alkali or alkaline-earth metal to the radius of the ion of the central 3d element, appearing in the coordination sphere of the heteropolytungstates, exceeds 1.6, the most likely products of thermolysis of heteropolycompounds are the compounds of the pyrochlore family and tungsten bronzes.

  7. The influence of cationic lipid type on in-vitro release kinetic profiles of antisense oligonucleotide from cationic nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Hagigit, Tal; Nassar, Taher; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Lambert, Gregory; Benita, Simon

    2008-09-01

    Novel formulations of cationic nanoemulsions based on three different lipids were developed to strengthen the attraction of the polyanionic oligonucleotide (ODN) macromolecules to the cationic moieties on the oil nanodroplets. These formulations were developed to prolong the release of the ODN from the nanoemulsion under appropriate physiological dilutions as encountered in the eye following topical application. Increasing the concentration of the new cationic lipid exhibiting two cationic amine groups (AOA) in the emulsion from 0.05% to 0.4% did not alter markedly the particle size or zeta potential value of the blank cationic nanoemulsion. The extent of ODN association did not vary significantly when the initial concentration of ODN remained constant at 10 microM irrespective of the cationic lipid nature. However, the zeta potential value dropped consistently with the low concentrations of 0.05% and 0.1% of AOA in the emulsions suggesting that an electrostatic attraction occurred between the cationic lipids and the polyanionic ODN molecules at the o/w interface. Only the nanoemulsion prepared with N-[1-(2,3-dioleoyloxy)propyl]-N,N,N-trimethylammonium salts (DOTAP) remained physically stable over time. DOTAP cationic lipid nanoemulsion was the most efficient formulation capable of retaining the ODN despite the high dilution of 1:100 with simulated tear solution (STS). Less than 10% of the ODN was exchanged in contrast to 40-50% with the other cationic nanoemulsions. The in-vitro release kinetic behavior of ODN exchange with physiological anions present in the STS appears to be complex and difficult to characterize using mathematical fitting model equations. Further pharmacokinetic studies are needed to verify our kinetic assumptions and confirm the in-vitro ODN release profile from DOTAP cationic nanoemulsions.

  8. Cation exchange properties of zeolites in hyper alkaline aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Van Tendeloo, Leen; de Blochouse, Benny; Dom, Dirk; Vancluysen, Jacqueline; Snellings, Ruben; Martens, Johan A; Kirschhock, Christine E A; Maes, André; Breynaert, Eric

    2015-02-03

    Construction of multibarrier concrete based waste disposal sites and management of alkaline mine drainage water requires cation exchangers combining excellent sorption properties with a high stability and predictable performance in hyper alkaline media. Though highly selective organic cation exchange resins have been developed for most pollutants, they can serve as a growth medium for bacterial proliferation, impairing their long-term stability and introducing unpredictable parameters into the evolution of the system. Zeolites represent a family of inorganic cation exchangers, which naturally occur in hyper alkaline conditions and cannot serve as an electron donor or carbon source for microbial proliferation. Despite their successful application as industrial cation exchangers under near neutral conditions, their performance in hyper alkaline, saline water remains highly undocumented. Using Cs(+) as a benchmark element, this study aims to assess the long-term cation exchange performance of zeolites in concrete derived aqueous solutions. Comparison of their exchange properties in alkaline media with data obtained in near neutral solutions demonstrated that the cation exchange selectivity remains unaffected by the increased hydroxyl concentration; the cation exchange capacity did however show an unexpected increase in hyper alkaline media.

  9. Sn cation valency dependence in cation exchange reactions involving Cu(2-x)Se nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    De Trizio, Luca; Li, Hongbo; Casu, Alberto; Genovese, Alessandro; Sathya, Ayyappan; Messina, Gabriele C; Manna, Liberato

    2014-11-19

    We studied cation exchange reactions in colloidal Cu(2-x)Se nanocrystals (NCs) involving the replacement of Cu(+) cations with either Sn(2+) or Sn(4+) cations. This is a model system in several aspects: first, the +2 and +4 oxidation states for tin are relatively stable; in addition, the phase of the Cu(2-x)Se NCs remains cubic regardless of the degree of copper deficiency (that is, "x") in the NC lattice. Also, Sn(4+) ions are comparable in size to the Cu(+) ions, while Sn(2+) ones are much larger. We show here that the valency of the entering Sn ions dictates the structure and composition not only of the final products but also of the intermediate steps of the exchange. When Sn(4+) cations are used, alloyed Cu(2-4y)Sn(y)Se NCs (with y ≤ 0.33) are formed as intermediates, with almost no distortion of the anion framework, apart from a small contraction. In this exchange reaction the final stoichiometry of the NCs cannot go beyond Cu0.66Sn0.33Se (that is Cu2SnSe3), as any further replacement of Cu(+) cations with Sn(4+) cations would require a drastic reorganization of the anion framework, which is not possible at the reaction conditions of the experiments. When instead Sn(2+) cations are employed, SnSe NCs are formed, mostly in the orthorhombic phase, with significant, albeit not drastic, distortion of the anion framework. Intermediate steps in this exchange reaction are represented by Janus-type Cu(2-x)Se/SnSe heterostructures, with no Cu-Sn-Se alloys.

  10. Sn Cation Valency Dependence in Cation Exchange Reactions Involving Cu2-xSe Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We studied cation exchange reactions in colloidal Cu2-xSe nanocrystals (NCs) involving the replacement of Cu+ cations with either Sn2+ or Sn4+ cations. This is a model system in several aspects: first, the +2 and +4 oxidation states for tin are relatively stable; in addition, the phase of the Cu2-xSe NCs remains cubic regardless of the degree of copper deficiency (that is, “x”) in the NC lattice. Also, Sn4+ ions are comparable in size to the Cu+ ions, while Sn2+ ones are much larger. We show here that the valency of the entering Sn ions dictates the structure and composition not only of the final products but also of the intermediate steps of the exchange. When Sn4+ cations are used, alloyed Cu2–4ySnySe NCs (with y ≤ 0.33) are formed as intermediates, with almost no distortion of the anion framework, apart from a small contraction. In this exchange reaction the final stoichiometry of the NCs cannot go beyond Cu0.66Sn0.33Se (that is Cu2SnSe3), as any further replacement of Cu+ cations with Sn4+ cations would require a drastic reorganization of the anion framework, which is not possible at the reaction conditions of the experiments. When instead Sn2+ cations are employed, SnSe NCs are formed, mostly in the orthorhombic phase, with significant, albeit not drastic, distortion of the anion framework. Intermediate steps in this exchange reaction are represented by Janus-type Cu2-xSe/SnSe heterostructures, with no Cu–Sn–Se alloys. PMID:25340627

  11. Structure and energetics of poly(ethylene glycol) cationized by Li(+), Na(+), K(+) and Cs(+): a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Memboeuf, Antony; Vékey, Károly; Lendvay, György

    2011-01-01

    Density functional theoretical methods, including several basis sets and two functional, were used to collect information on the structure and energetic parameters of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), also referred to as poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), coordinated by alkali metal ions. The oligomer chain is found to form a spiral around the alkali cation, which grows to roughly two helical turns when the oligomer size increases to about the decamer for each alkali ion. Above this size, the additional monomer units do not build the spiral further for Li(+) and Na(+); instead, they form less organized segments outside or next to the initial spiral. The distance of the first layer of co-ordinating O atoms from the alkali cation is 1.9-2.15 Å for Li(+), 2.3-2.5 Å for Na(+), 2.75-3.2 Å for K(+) and 3.5-3.8 Å for Cs(+) complexes. The number of O atoms in the innermost shell is five, six, seven and eleven for Li(+), Na(+), K(+) and Cs(+). The collision cross sections with He increase linearly with the oligomer to a very good approximation. No sign of leaning towards the 2/3 power dependence characterizing spherical particles is observed. The binding energy of the cation to the oligomer increases up to polymerization degree of about 10, where it levels off for each alkali-metal ion, indicating that this is approximately the limit of the oligomer size that can be influenced by the alkali cation. The binding energy-degree of polymerization curves are remarkably parallel for the four cations. The limiting binding energy at large polymerization degrees is about 544 kJ mol(-1), 460 kJ mol(-1), 356 kJ mol(-1) and 314 kJ mol(-1) for Li, Na, K and Cs, respectively. The geometrical features are compared with the X-ray and neutron diffraction data on crystalline and amorphous phases of conducting polymers formed by alkali-metal salts and PEG. The implications of the observations concerning collision cross sections and binding energies to ion mobility spectroscopy and mass spectrometry

  12. Calcium-Alkali Syndrome in the Modern Era

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ami M.; Adeseun, Gbemisola A.; Goldfarb, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    The ingestion of calcium, along with alkali, results in a well-described triad of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and renal insufficiency. Over time, the epidemiology and root cause of the syndrome have shifted, such that the disorder, originally called the milk-alkali syndrome, is now better described as the calcium-alkali syndrome. The calcium-alkali syndrome is an important cause of morbidity that may be on the rise, an unintended consequence of shifts in calcium and vitamin D intake in segments of the population. We review the pathophysiology of the calcium-alkali syndrome. PMID:24288027

  13. Dissecting the cation-cation interaction between two uranyl units.

    PubMed

    Tecmer, Paweł; Hong, Sung W; Boguslawski, Katharina

    2016-07-21

    We present a state-of-the-art computational study of the uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) cation-cation interactions (dications) in aqueous solution. Reliable electronic structures of two interacting uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) subunits as well as those of the uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) clusters are presented for the first time. Our theoretical study elucidates the impact of cation-cation interactions on changes in the molecular structure as well as changes in vibrational and UV-Vis spectra of the bare uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) moieties for different total spin-states and total charges of the dications.

  14. Preparing cationic cotton linter cellulose with high substitution degree by ultrasonic treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fulong; Pang, Zhiqiang; Dong, Cuihua; Liu, Zong

    2015-11-05

    As an important cellulose derivative, cationic cellulose has becoming an attractive material. However, it remains challenging to produce cationic cellulose with high substitute degree. In this paper, we successfully increased the substitute degree of cationic cellulose by introducing ultrasonic treatment, which efficiently breaks hydrogen bonds of the chemical structure of cationic cellulose. Properties of cationic cellulose were studied by scanning electron spectroscope (SEM), contact angle, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Experimental results show that the cationic cellulose has rougher surface and lower crystallinity degree as compared to the original sample. TGA analysis verifies that the thermostability of CLC decreases after the cationic modification. The residual of the cationic cellulose (25 wt%) after pyrolysis increases significantly as compared to that of the original cellulose (15 wt%).

  15. Does Cation Size Affect Occupancy and Electrostatic Screening of the Nucleic Acid Ion Atmosphere?

    PubMed

    Gebala, Magdalena; Bonilla, Steve; Bisaria, Namita; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-08-31

    Electrostatics are central to all aspects of nucleic acid behavior, including their folding, condensation, and binding to other molecules, and the energetics of these processes are profoundly influenced by the ion atmosphere that surrounds nucleic acids. Given the highly complex and dynamic nature of the ion atmosphere, understanding its properties and effects will require synergy between computational modeling and experiment. Prior computational models and experiments suggest that cation occupancy in the ion atmosphere depends on the size of the cation. However, the computational models have not been independently tested, and the experimentally observed effects were small. Here, we evaluate a computational model of ion size effects by experimentally testing a blind prediction made from that model, and we present additional experimental results that extend our understanding of the ion atmosphere. Giambasu et al. developed and implemented a three-dimensional reference interaction site (3D-RISM) model for monovalent cations surrounding DNA and RNA helices, and this model predicts that Na(+) would outcompete Cs(+) by 1.8-2.1-fold; i.e., with Cs(+) in 2-fold excess of Na(+) the ion atmosphere would contain an equal number of each cation (Nucleic Acids Res. 2015, 43, 8405). However, our ion counting experiments indicate that there is no significant preference for Na(+) over Cs(+). There is an ∼25% preferential occupancy of Li(+) over larger cations in the ion atmosphere but, counter to general expectations from existing models, no size dependence for the other alkali metal ions. Further, we followed the folding of the P4-P6 RNA and showed that differences in folding with different alkali metal ions observed at high concentration arise from cation-anion interactions and not cation size effects. Overall, our results provide a critical test of a computational prediction, fundamental information about ion atmosphere properties, and parameters that will aid in the

  16. Novel Pendant Benzene Disulfonic Acid Blended SPPO Membranes for Alkali Recovery: Fabrication and Properties.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Abhishek N; Dai, Chunhua; Pan, Jiefeng; Zheng, Chunlei; Hossain, Md Masem; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Wu, Liang; Xu, Tongwen

    2015-07-29

    To reconcile the trade-off between separation performance and availability of desired material for cation exchange membranes (CEMs), we designed and successfully prepared a novel sulfonated aromatic backbone-based cation exchange precursor named sodium 4,4'-(((((3,3'-disulfo-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4,4'-diyl)bis(oxy)) bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(azanediyl))bis(methylene))bis(benzene-1,3-disulfonate) [DSBPB] from 4,4'-bis(4-aminophenoxy)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3,3'-disulfonic acid [BAPBDS] by a three-step procedure that included sulfonation, Michael condensation followed by reduction. Prepared DSBPB was used to blend with sulfonated poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) (SPPO) to get CEMs for alkali recovery via diffusion dialysis. Physiochemical properties and electrochemical performance of prepared membranes can be tuned by varying the dosage of DSBPB. All the thermo-mechanical properties like DMA and TGA were investigated along with water uptake (WR), ion exchange capacity (IEC), dimensional stability, etc. The effect of DSBPB was discussed in brief in connection with alkali recovery and ion conducting channels. The SPPO/DSBPB membranes possess both high water uptake as well as ion exchange capacity with high thermo-mechanical stability. At 25 °C the dialysis coefficients (UOH) appeared to be in the range of 0.0048-0.00814 m/h, whereas the separation factor (S) ranged from 12.61 to 36.88 when the membranes were tested for base recovery in Na2WO4/NaOH waste solution. Prepared membranes showed much improved DD performances compared to traditional SPPO membrane and possess the potentiality to be a promising candidate for alkali recovery via diffusion dialysis.

  17. On the feasibility of designing hyperalkali cations using superalkali clusters as ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei-Ming; Li, Xiang-Hui; Li, Ying; Liu, Jia-Yuan; Wu, Di; Li, Chun-Yan; Ni, Bi-Lian; Li, Zhi-Ru

    2016-11-01

    The possibility of using superalkali clusters instead of alkali atoms as ligands to design a class of cationic compounds, referred to as hyperalkali cations, has been examined by using gradient-corrected density functional theory. By taking typical superalkalis (FLi2, OLi3, and NLi4) as examples, a series of hyperalkali cations ML2+ [M = (super)halogen; L = superalkali] have been constructed and investigated. Calculational results show that all the superalkali moieties preserve their geometric and electronic integrity in these proposed cations. The stability of these studied cations is guaranteed by the strong ionic bonds between superalkali ligand and (super)halogen core, as well as their large highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital gaps and positive dissociation energies. In particular, all these proposed cations possess lower vertical electron affinities (2.36-3.56 eV) than those of their corresponding cationic superalkali ligands, verifying their hyperalkali nature. We, therefore, hope that this study will provide an approach to obtain new species with excellent reducing capability by utilizing various superalkalis as building blocks.

  18. Alkali metal recovery from carbonaceous material conversion process

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, David W.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.; Gorbaty, Martin L.; Tsou, Joe M.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced in the gasifier or similar reaction zone, alkali metal constitutents are recovered from the particles by withdrawing and passing the particles from the reaction zone to an alkali metal recovery zone in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen and treating the particles in the recovery zone with water or an aqueous solution in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen. The solution formed by treating the particles in the recovery zone will contain water-soluble alkali metal constituents and is recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preventing contact of the particles with oxygen as they are withdrawn from the reaction zone and during treatment in the recovery zone avoids the formation of undesirable alkali metal constituents in the aqueous solution produced in the recovery zone and insures maximum recovery of water-soluble alkali metal constituents from the alkali metal residues.

  19. The behaviour of alkali metals in biomass conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hald, P.

    1995-12-31

    Alkali metals present in biomass contribute to problems as agglomeration, deposition and corrosion. In order to reduce the problems. It is of interest to describe the behavior of alkali metals in the conversion systems. Useful tools for die description are equilibrium calculations combined with measurements of gaseous alkali metal and analyses of solid materials. A comprehensive equilibrium study has been conducted and the results organized in tables, showing which alkali metal components can be present, dependent on the temperature and the ratios alkali metal to sulphur and alkali metal to chlorine. The tables presented can be used as a catalogue, giving easy access to equilibrium results. A sampling method for die measurement of gaseous alkali metal is described and the sampling efficiency is given. The developed tools are demonstrated for a straw gasifier and a fluidized bed combustor using a coal/straw mixture as a fuel.

  20. Influence of lithium hydroxide on alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bulteel, D.; Garcia-Diaz, E.; Degrugilliers, P.

    2010-04-15

    Several papers show that the use of lithium limits the development of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) in concrete. The aim of this study is to improve the understanding of lithium's role on the alteration mechanism of ASR. The approach used is a chemical method which allowed a quantitative measurement of the specific degree of reaction of ASR. The chemical concrete sub-system used, called model reactor, is composed of the main ASR reagents: reactive aggregate, portlandite and alkaline solution. Different reaction degrees are measured and compared for different alkaline solutions: NaOH, KOH and LiOH. Alteration by ASR is observed with the same reaction degrees in the presence of NaOH and KOH, accompanied by the consumption of hydroxyl concentration. On the other hand with LiOH, ASR is very limited. Reaction degree values evolve little and the hydroxyl concentration remains about stable. These observations demonstrate that lithium ions have an inhibitor role on ASR.

  1. Quantitative Characterization of Non-Classic Polarization of Cations on Clay Aggregate Stability

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Feinan; Li, Hang; Liu, Xinmin; Li, Song; Ding, Wuquan; Xu, Chenyang; Li, Yue; Zhu, Longhui

    2015-01-01

    Soil particle interactions are strongly influenced by the concentration, valence and ion species and the pH of the bulk solution, which will also affect aggregate stability and particle transport. In this study, we investigated clay aggregate stability in the presence of different alkali ions (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+) at concentrations from10−5 to 10−1 mol L−1. Strong specific ion effects on clay aggregate stability were observed, and showed the order Cs+>K+>Na+>Li+. We found that it was not the effects of ion size, hydration, and dispersion forces in the cation–surface interactions but strong non-classic polarization of adsorbed cations that resulted in these specific effects. In this study, the non-classic dipole moments of each cation species resulting from the non-classic polarization were estimated. By comparing non-classic dipole moments with classic values, the observed dipole moments of adsorbed cations were up to 104 times larger than the classic values for the same cation. The observed non-classic dipole moments sharply increased with decreasing electrolyte concentration. We conclude that strong non-classic polarization could significantly suppress the thickness of the diffuse layer, thereby weakening the electric field near the clay surface and resulting in improved clay aggregate stability. Even though we only demonstrated specific ion effects on aggregate stability with several alkali ions, our results indicate that these effects could be universally important in soil aggregate stability. PMID:25874864

  2. Effect of alkali lignins with different molecular weights from alkali pretreated rice straw hydrolyzate on enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Qi, Benkun; Luo, Jianquan; Wan, Yinhua

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of alkali lignins with different molecular weights on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose. Different alkali lignins fractions, which were obtained from cascade ultrafiltration, were added into the dilute acid pretreated (DAP) and alkali pretreated (AP) rice straws respectively during enzymatic hydrolysis. The results showed that the addition of alkali lignins enhanced the hydrolysis and the enhancement for hydrolysis increased with increasing molecular weights of alkali lignins, with maximum enhancement being 28.69% for DAP and 20.05% for AP, respectively. The enhancement was partly attributed to the improved cellulase activity, and filter paper activity increased by 18.03% when adding lignin with highest molecular weight. It was found that the enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis was correlated with the adsorption affinity of cellulase on alkali lignins, and the difference in surface charge and hydrophobicity of alkali lignins were responsible for the difference in affinity between cellulase and lignins.

  3. Effect of alkali treatment on structure and function of pea starch granules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujun; Copeland, Les

    2012-12-01

    The effect of alkaline treatment on the structural and functional properties of pea starch granules was studied using a range of characterization methods including amylose content, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), swelling power, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the Rapid Visco Analyser (RVA) and in vitro digestibility. The amylose content decreased by about 20-25% after 15days of alkaline treatment and there were small decreases in relative crystallinity and double helix content. Deformations were observed on the surface of alkali-treated granules, and there was evidence of adhesion between some of the granules. There was a 25-30% reduction in peak and final RVA pasting viscosities, but only a small reduction in swelling power. The endothermic transition of alkali-treated starch was broadened with a shift of the endothermic peak to higher temperature. However, the endothermic enthalpy remained largely unaffected. Alkali-treatment greatly increased the rate of in vitro enzymatic breakdown of the pea starch. More prolonged alkaline treatment for 30days did not cause further significant changes to the structural and functional properties of the starch granules. The effects of alkali on structure and function of pea starch are explained on the basis of limited gelatinization of the granules.

  4. Molecular Hydrogen Effectively Heals Alkali-Injured Cornea via Suppression of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cejka, Cestmir; Kossl, Jan; Hermankova, Barbora; Holan, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of molecular hydrogen (H2) on the healing of alkali-injured cornea. The effects of the solution of H2 in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or PBS alone topically applied on the alkali-injured rabbit cornea with 0.25 M NaOH were investigated using immunohistochemical and biochemical methods. Central corneal thickness taken as an index of corneal hydration was measured with an ultrasonic pachymeter. Results show that irrigation of the damaged eyes with H2 solution immediately after the injury and then within next five days renewed corneal transparency lost after the injury and reduced corneal hydration increased after the injury to physiological levels within ten days after the injury. In contrast, in injured corneas treated with PBS, the transparency of damaged corneas remained lost and corneal hydration elevated. Later results—on day 20 after the injury—showed that in alkali-injured corneas treated with H2 solution the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, peroxynitrite, detected by nitrotyrosine residues (NT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) expressions were very low or absent compared to PBS treated injured corneas, where NT and MDA expressions were present. In conclusion, H2 solution favorably influenced corneal healing after alkali injury via suppression of oxidative stress.

  5. Feed Preparation for Source of Alkali Melt Rate Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M. E.; Lambert, D. P.

    2005-02-26

    The purpose of the Source of Alkali testing was to prepare feed for melt rate testing in order to determine the maximum melt-rate for a series of batches where the alkali was increased from 0% Na{sub 2}O in the frit (low washed sludge) to 16% Na{sub 2}O in the frit (highly washed sludge). This document summarizes the feed preparation for the Source of Alkali melt rate testing. The Source of Alkali melt rate results will be issued in a separate report. Five batches of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) product and four batches of Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product were produced to support Source of Alkali (SOA) melt rate testing. Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) simulant and frit 418 were used as targets for the 8% Na{sub 2}O baseline run. For the other four cases (0% Na{sub 2}O, 4% Na{sub 2}O, 12% Na{sub 2}O, and 16% Na{sub 2}O in frit), special sludge and frit preparations were necessary. The sludge preparations mimicked washing of the SB3 baseline composition, while frit adjustments consisted of increasing or decreasing Na and then re-normalizing the remaining frit components. For all batches, the target glass compositions were identical. The five SRAT products were prepared for testing in the dry fed melt-rate furnace and the four SME products were prepared for the Slurry-fed Melt-Rate Furnace (SMRF). At the same time, the impacts of washing on a baseline composition from a Chemical Process Cell (CPC) perspective could also be investigated. Five process simulations (0% Na{sub 2}O in frit, 4% Na{sub 2}O in frit, 8% Na{sub 2}O in frit or baseline, 12% Na{sub 2}O in frit, and 16% Na{sub 2}O in frit) were completed in three identical 4-L apparatus to produce the five SRAT products. The SRAT products were later dried and combined with the complementary frits to produce identical glass compositions. All five batches were produced with identical processing steps, including off-gas measurement using online gas chromatographs. Two slurry-fed melter feed batches, a 4% Na

  6. Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

    2003-02-26

    This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

  7. Geopolymers and Related Alkali-Activated Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provis, John L.; Bernal, Susan A.

    2014-07-01

    The development of new, sustainable, low-CO2 construction materials is essential if the global construction industry is to reduce the environmental footprint of its activities, which is incurred particularly through the production of Portland cement. One type of non-Portland cement that is attracting particular attention is based on alkali-aluminosilicate chemistry, including the class of binders that have become known as geopolymers. These materials offer technical properties comparable to those of Portland cement, but with a much lower CO2 footprint and with the potential for performance advantages over traditional cements in certain niche applications. This review discusses the synthesis of alkali-activated binders from blast furnace slag, calcined clay (metakaolin), and fly ash, including analysis of the chemical reaction mechanisms and binder phase assemblages that control the early-age and hardened properties of these materials, in particular initial setting and long-term durability. Perspectives for future research developments are also explored.

  8. Transcriptome Analysis of Alkali Shock and Alkali Adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes 10403S

    PubMed Central

    Giotis, Efstathios S.; Muthaiyan, Arunachalam; Natesan, Senthil; Wilkinson, Brian J.; Blair, Ian S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Alkali stress is an important means of inactivating undesirable pathogens in a wide range of situations. Unfortunately, Listeria monocytogenes can launch an alkaline tolerance response, significantly increasing persistence of the pathogen in such environments. This study compared transcriptome patterns of alkali and nonalkali-stressed L. monocytogenes 10403S cells, to elucidate the mechanisms by which Listeria adapts and/or grows during short- or long-term alkali stress. Transcription profiles associated with alkali shock (AS) were obtained by DNA microarray analysis of midexponential cells suspended in pH 9 media for 15, 30, or 60 min. Transcription profiles associated with alkali adaptation (AA) were obtained similarly from cells grown to midexponential phase at pH 9. Comparison of AS and AA transcription profiles with control cell profiles identified a high number of differentially regulated open-reading frames in all tested conditions. Rapid (15 min) changes in expression included upregulation of genes encoding for multiple metabolic pathways (including those associated with Na+/H+ antiporters), ATP-binding cassette transporters of functional compatible solutes, motility, and virulence-associated genes as well as the σB controlled stress resistance network. Slower (30 min and more) responses to AS and adaptation during growth in alkaline conditions (AA) involved a different pattern of changes in mRNA concentrations, and genes involved in proton export. PMID:20677981

  9. Alkali metal protective garment and composite material

    DOEpatents

    Ballif, III, John L.; Yuan, Wei W.

    1980-01-01

    A protective garment and composite material providing satisfactory heat resistance and physical protection for articles and personnel exposed to hot molten alkali metals, such as sodium. Physical protection is provided by a continuous layer of nickel foil. Heat resistance is provided by an underlying backing layer of thermal insulation. Overlying outer layers of fireproof woven ceramic fibers are used to protect the foil during storage and handling.

  10. Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Life Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Robert S.

    2004-07-01

    One approach to fission power system design uses alkali metal heat pipes for the core primary heat-transfer system. Heat pipes may also be used as radiator elements or auxiliary thermal control elements. This synopsis characterizes long-life core heat pipes. References are included where information that is more detailed can be found. Specifics shown here are for demonstration purposes and do not necessarily reflect current Nasa Project Prometheus point designs. (author)

  11. Thermal positron interactions with alkali covered tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Takashi; Iida, Shimpei; Terabe, Hiroki; Nagashima, Yasuyuki

    2016-11-01

    The branching ratios of positron reemission, positronium emission, positronium negative ion emission and capture to the surface state for thermalized positrons at polycrystalline tungsten surfaces coated with Na, K and Cs have been measured. The data shows that the ratios depend on the coverage of the alkali-metal coating. The fraction of the emitted positronium increases with the coverage of the coating up to 90%.

  12. Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Life Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    One approach to space fission power system design is predicated on the use of alkali metal heat pipes, either as radiator elements, thermal management components, or as part of the core primary heat-transfer system. This synopsis characterizes long-life core heat pipes. References are included where more detailed information can be found. Specifics shown here are for demonstrational purposes and do not necessarily reflect current Project Prometheus point designs.

  13. Petrology and geochemistry of alkali gabbronorites from Lunar Breccia 67975

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Odette B.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.; Flohr, Marta K.

    Clasts of an unusual type of lunar highlands igneous rock, alkali gabbronorite, have been found in Apollo 16 breccia 67975. The alkali gabbronorites form two distinct subgroups, magnesian and ferroan. Modes and bulk compositions are highly varied. The magnesian alkali gabbronorites are composed of bytownitic plagioclase (Or2-5An82-89), hypersthene (Wo3-5En49-62), augite (Wo39-42En36-44), a silica mineral, and trace Ba-rich K-feldspar. The ferroan alkali gabbronorites are composed of ternary plagioclase (Or11-22An65-74), pigeonite (Wo6-9En35-47), augite (Wo38-40En29-35), Ba-rich K-feldspar, and a silica mineral. Trace minerals in both subgroups are apatite, REE-rich whitlockite, and zircon. The magnesian and ferroan alkali gabbronorites appear to have formed by progressive differentiation of the same, or closely related, parent magmas; the compositional data indicate that these magmas were REE-rich. The ternary plagioclase is probably a high-temperature metastable phase formed during crystallization. In composition and mineralogy, the 67975 alkali gabbronorites show many similarities to Apollo 12 and 14 alkali norites, alkali gabbronorites, and alkali anorthosites, and all these rocks together constitute a distinctive alkali suite. In addition, the alkali gabbronorites show some similarities to KREEP basalts, Mg-norites, and some felsites. These data suggest genetic links between some or all of these types of pristine rocks. Two types of relationships are possible. The first is that alkali-suite rocks crystallized in plutons of KREEP basalt magma, and KREEP basalts are their extrusive equivalents. The second is that the alkali-suite rocks and some felsites all crystallized in plutons of Mg-norite parent magmas, and KREEP basalt magmas formed by remelting of these plutons. Additional studies are needed to resolve which of these hypotheses is correct.

  14. Petrology and geochemistry of alkali gabbronorites from lunar breccia 67975

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Odette B.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.; Flohr, Marta K.

    1987-09-01

    Clasts of an unusual type of lunar highlands igneous rock, alkali gabbronorite, have been found in Apollo 16 breccia 67975. The alkali gabbronorites form two distinct subgroups, magnesian and ferroan. Modes and bulk compositions are highly varied. The magnesian alkali gabbronorites are composed of bytownitic plagioclase (Or2-5An82-89), hypersthene (Wo3-5En49-62), augite (Wo39-42En36-44), a silica mineral, and trace Ba-rich K-feldspar. The ferroan alkali gabbronorites are composed of ternary plagioclase (Or11-22An65-74), pigeonite (Wo6-9En35-47), augite (Wo38-40En29-35), Ba-rich K-feldspar, and a silica mineral. Trace minerals in both subgroups are apatite, REE-rich whitlockite, and zircon. The magnesian and ferroan alkali gabbronorites appear to have formed by progressive differentiation of the same, or closely related, parent magmas; the compositional data indicate that these magmas were REE-rich. The ternary plagioclase is probably a high-temperature metastable phase formed during crystallization. In composition and mineralogy, the 67975 alkali gabbronorites show many similarities to Appllo 12 and 14 alkali norites, alkali gabbronorites, and alkali anorthosites, and all these rocks together constitute a distinctive alkali suite. In addition, the alkali gabbronorites, show some similarities to KREEP basalts, Mg-norites, and some felsites. These data suggest genetic links between some or all of these types of pristine rocks. Two types of relationships are possible. The first is that alkali-suite rocks crystallized in plutons of KREEP basalt magma, and KREEP basalts are their extrusive equivalents. The second is that the alkali-suite rocks and some felsites all crystallized in plutons of Mg-norite parent magmas, and KREEP basalt magmas formed by remelting of these plutons. Additional studies are needed to resolve which of these hypotheses is correct.

  15. Free energies of absorption of alkali ions onto beidellite and montmorillonite surfaces from constrained molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, James L.; Sprik, Michiel; Boek, Edo S.

    2012-08-01

    Ab initio Molecular dynamics have been performed to study the free energy of adsorption of alkali atoms onto smectite clay surfaces and to identify the most favourable region in the interlayer for the cations. This is achieved by potential of mean force calculations using a constraint method to determine the lowest free energy configurations of lithium, potassium and sodium beidellite and sodium montmorillonite clays with a monolayer and bilayer of water present in the interlayer region. The constraint method has allowed us to examine the changes in the lowest free energy configuration for each ion with increasing hydration. From this, we can interpret the likelihood of clay swelling from the monolayer to bilayer coverage and compare with experimental observations. We find, that with a bilayer of water present, both lithium beidellite and sodium montmorillonite have their free energy minimum in the centre of the interlayer. For monolayer coverage, the free energy minimum for lithium, sodium and potassium beidellite is approximately the mid-point of the interlayer. Na-beidellite has a lowest free energy region at 6.1 Å from the centre of the clay layer for both mono- and bi-layer coverage, while for the potassium counter-ion, commonly used as swelling inhibitor, the free energy profile for K-beidellite shows peaks close to both surfaces at approximately 6.2 and 8.6 Å. We find that for systems where the free energy minimum remains in the middle of the interlayer when the hydration levels increase from monolayer to bilayer, it is known experimentally that these systems will swell in contact with water. The move to the middle of the interlayer with increasing hydration is associated with the full hydration sphere of the ion being composed purely of water oxygen atoms, and no clay surface oxygen atoms.

  16. Transport properties of alkali metal doped fullerides

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Daluram Yadav, Nishchhal

    2015-07-31

    We have studied the intercage interactions between the adjacent C{sub 60} cages and expansion of lattice due to the intercalation of alkali atoms based on the spring model to estimate phonon frequencies from the dynamical matrix for the intermolecular alkali-C{sub 60} phonons. We considered a two-peak model for the phonon density of states to investigate the nature of electron pairing mechanism for superconducting state in fullerides. Coulomb repulsive parameter and the electron phonon coupling strength are obtained within the random phase approximation. Transition temperature, T{sub c}, is obtained in a situation when the free electrons in lowest molecular orbital are coupled with alkali-C{sub 60} phonons as 5 K, which is much lower as compared to reported T{sub c} (20 K). The superconducting pairing is mainly driven by the high frequency intramolecular phonons and their effects enhance it to 22 K. The importance of the present study, the pressure effect and normal state transport properties are calculated within the same model leading superconductivity.

  17. Evaluation of the emulsifying properties of some cationic starches.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, A; Kiekens, F; Corveleyn, S; Remon, J P

    1999-03-01

    Different cationic potato, maize, and waxy maize starches were evaluated for their emulsifying properties. Emulsions were prepared using 20% (w/w) arachidic oil and 80% (w/w) water. Emulsions with the cationic starches as emulsifier in a concentration ranging from 1% to 5% (w/w) were prepared and characterized by droplet size and viscosity measurements, and the stability was evaluated visually and by electrical conductance measurements. None of the cationic potato, waxy maize starches, and maize starches with a low degree of substitution (DS) showed adequate emulsifying properties. Emulsions prepared using non-pregelatinized (C [symbol: see text] bond 05914, 2% and 5% w/w; C [symbol: see text] bond 05907, 5% w/w) and pregelatinized (C [symbol: see text] bond 12504, 5% w/w) cationic maize starches with high-DS were visually stable. The initial mean droplet volume diameter of the emulsions prepared with these cationic starches in a 5% (w/w) concentration was similar and ranged from 2.40 to 2.84 microns; however, there was an important difference in droplet size distribution. The droplet size distribution of the emulsions prepared using the non-pregelatinized high-DS cationic starches was markedly narrower than in the case of the emulsions prepared using the pregelatinized high-DS cationic starches. The droplet size of the emulsions remained almost constant during 120 days of storage. Visual inspection and electrical conductance measurements showed that these emulsions were stable for at least 120 days.

  18. A monovalent cationic conductance that is blocked by extracellular divalent cations in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Arellano, R O; Woodward, R M; Miledi, R

    1995-01-01

    1. Native Xenopus oocytes were voltage clamped and exposed to Ringer solutions containing low concentrations of divalent cations. Oocytes, held at -60 mV, developed a reversible non-inactivating smooth inward current (Ic) associated with an increase in membrane conductance. 2. Ic was selectively carried by cations (Na+, K+), indicating that the current was not the result of a non-specific membrane breakdown, but was due instead to removal of a blocking effect of divalent cations on a specific population of endogenous ionic channels located in the oocyte membrane. 3. The blocking effects of Ca2+ and Mg2+ were voltage dependent, implying action at a binding site within the pore of the cationic channel. For example, the half-maximal inhibition (IC50) of Ic by Ca2+ was 61 microM in oocytes held at -60 mV and 212 microM in oocytes held at 0 mV. 4. The Ic channels could be unblocked by depolarization of the membrane even in the presence of physiological concentrations of Ca2+ or Mg2+. The unblocking of the channels was observed as a slowly developing outward current. 5. The novel cationic current was substantially reduced following in vitro maturation of oocytes by treatment with progesterone (10 microM, 4-5 h). 6. The physiological role of Ic channels remains to be elucidated. Nonetheless, their characteristics explain the ionic basis of the sensitivity of oocytes to reductions in extracellular divalent cations and raise the possibility that the channels play a role in calcium homeostasis. PMID:7542710

  19. Cationic liposomes as vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Dennis; Korsholm, Karen Smith; Andersen, Peter; Agger, Else Marie

    2011-04-01

    The application of cationic liposomes as vaccine delivery systems and adjuvants has been investigated extensively over the last few decades. However, cationic liposomes are, in general, not sufficiently immunostimulatory, which is why the combination of liposomes with immunostimulating ligands has arisen as a strategy in the development of novel adjuvant systems. Within the last 5 years, two novel adjuvant systems based on cationic liposomes incorporating Toll-like receptor or non-Toll-like receptor immunostimulating ligands have progressed from preclinical testing in smaller animal species to clinical testing in humans. The immune responses that these clinical candidates induce are primarily of the Th1 type for which there is a profound unmet need. Furthermore, a number of new cationic liposome-forming surfactants with notable immunostimulatory properties have been discovered. In this article we review the recent progress on the application of cationic liposomes as vaccine delivery systems/adjuvants.

  20. Alteration of alkali reactive aggregates autoclaved in different alkali solutions and application to alkali-aggregate reaction in concrete (II) expansion and microstructure of concrete microbar

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Duyou . E-mail: duyoulu@njut.edu.cn; Mei Laibao; Xu Zhongzi; Tang Mingshu; Mo Xiangyin; Fournier, Benoit

    2006-06-15

    The effect of the type of alkalis on the expansion behavior of concrete microbars containing typical aggregate with alkali-silica reactivity and alkali-carbonate reactivity was studied. The results verified that: (1) at the same molar concentration, sodium has the strongest contribution to expansion due to both ASR and ACR, followed by potassium and lithium; (2) sufficient LiOH can completely suppress expansion due to ASR whereas it can induce expansion due to ACR. It is possible to use the duplex effect of LiOH on ASR and ACR to clarify the ACR contribution when ASR and ACR may coexist. It has been shown that a small amount of dolomite in the fine-grained siliceous Spratt limestone, which has always been used as a reference aggregate for high alkali-silica reactivity, might dedolomitize in alkaline environment and contribute to the expansion. That is to say, Spratt limestone may exhibit both alkali-silica and alkali-carbonate reactivity, although alkali-silica reactivity is predominant. Microstructural study suggested that the mechanism in which lithium controls ASR expansion is mainly due to the favorable formation of lithium-containing less-expansive product around aggregate particles and the protection of the reactive aggregate from further attack by alkalis by the lithium-containing product layer.

  1. Method for the safe disposal of alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Terry R.

    1977-01-01

    Alkali metals such as those employed in liquid metal coolant systems can be safely reacted to form hydroxides by first dissolving the alkali metal in relatively inert metals such as lead or bismuth. The alloy thus formed is contacted with a molten salt including the alkali metal hydroxide and possibly the alkali metal carbonate in the presence of oxygen. This oxidizes the alkali metal to an oxide which is soluble within the molten salt. The salt is separated and contacted with steam or steam-CO.sub.2 mixture to convert the alkali metal oxide to the hydroxide. These reactions can be conducted with minimal hydrogen evolution and with the heat of reaction distributed between the several reaction steps.

  2. Reducible cationic lipids for gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Wetzer, B; Byk, G; Frederic, M; Airiau, M; Blanche, F; Pitard, B; Scherman, D

    2001-01-01

    One of the main challenges of gene therapy remains the increase of gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. We tested whether intracellular DNA release, an essential step for gene transfer, could be facilitated by using reducible cationic DNA-delivery vectors. For this purpose, plasmid DNA was complexed with cationic lipids bearing a disulphide bond. This reduction-sensitive linker is expected to be reduced and cleaved in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm, thus potentially improving DNA release and consequently transfection. The DNA--disulphide-lipid complexation was monitored by ethidium bromide exclusion, and the size of complexes was determined by dynamic light scattering. It was found that the reduction kinetics of disulphide groups in DNA--lipid complexes depended on the position of the disulphide linker within the lipid molecule. Furthermore, the internal structure of DNA--lipid particles was examined by small-angle X-ray scattering before and after lipid reduction. DNA release from lipid complexes was observed after the reduction of disulphide bonds of several lipids. Cell-transfection experiments suggested that complexes formed with selected reducible lipids resulted in up to 1000-fold higher reporter-gene activity, when compared with their analogues without disulphide bonds. In conclusion, reduction-sensitive groups introduced into cationic lipid backbones potentially allow enhanced DNA release from DNA--lipid complexes after intracellular reduction and represent a tool for improved vectorization. PMID:11389682

  3. Reducible cationic lipids for gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Wetzer, B; Byk, G; Frederic, M; Airiau, M; Blanche, F; Pitard, B; Scherman, D

    2001-06-15

    One of the main challenges of gene therapy remains the increase of gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. We tested whether intracellular DNA release, an essential step for gene transfer, could be facilitated by using reducible cationic DNA-delivery vectors. For this purpose, plasmid DNA was complexed with cationic lipids bearing a disulphide bond. This reduction-sensitive linker is expected to be reduced and cleaved in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm, thus potentially improving DNA release and consequently transfection. The DNA--disulphide-lipid complexation was monitored by ethidium bromide exclusion, and the size of complexes was determined by dynamic light scattering. It was found that the reduction kinetics of disulphide groups in DNA--lipid complexes depended on the position of the disulphide linker within the lipid molecule. Furthermore, the internal structure of DNA--lipid particles was examined by small-angle X-ray scattering before and after lipid reduction. DNA release from lipid complexes was observed after the reduction of disulphide bonds of several lipids. Cell-transfection experiments suggested that complexes formed with selected reducible lipids resulted in up to 1000-fold higher reporter-gene activity, when compared with their analogues without disulphide bonds. In conclusion, reduction-sensitive groups introduced into cationic lipid backbones potentially allow enhanced DNA release from DNA--lipid complexes after intracellular reduction and represent a tool for improved vectorization.

  4. A Modular Control Platform for a Diode Pumped Alkali Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    A Modular Control Platform for a Diode Pumped Alkali Laser Joshua Shapiro, Scott W. Teare New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, 801 Leroy...gain media, such as is done in diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs), has been proposed and early experiments have shown promising results. However...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2008 to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Modular Control Platform for a Diode Pumped Alkali Laser 5a

  5. Determination of the common and rare alkalies in mineral analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.C.; Stevens, R.E.

    1934-01-01

    Methods are described which afford a determination of each member of the alkali group and are successful in dealing with the quantities of the rare alkalies found in rocks and minerals. The procedures are relatively rapid and based chiefly on the use of chloroplatinic acid, absolute alcohol and ether, and ammonium sulfate. The percentages of all the alkalies found in a number of minerals are given.

  6. Triuret as a Potential Hypokalemic Agent: Structure Characterization of Triuret and Triuret-Alkali Metal Adducts by Mass Spectrometric Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Palii, Sergiu P.; Contreras, Cesar S.; Steill, Jeffrey D.; Palii, Stela S.; Oomens, Jos; Eyler, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Triuret (also known as carbonyldiurea, dicarbamylurea, or 2,4-diimidotricarbonic diamide) is a byproduct of purine degradation in living organisms. An abundant triuret precursor is uric acid, whose level is altered in multiple metabolic pathologies. Triuret can be generated via urate oxidation by peroxynitrite, the latter being produced by the reaction of nitric oxide radical with superoxide radical anion. From this standpoint, an excess production of superoxide radical anions could indirectly favor triuret formation; however very little is known about the potential in vivo roles of this metabolite. Triuret’s structure is suggestive of its ability to adopt various conformations and act as a flexible ligand for metal ions. In the current study, HPLC-MS/MS, energy-resolved mass spectrometry, selected ion monitoring, collision-induced dissociation, IRMPD spectroscopy, Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and computational methods were employed to characterize the structure of triuret and its metal complexes, to determine the triuret-alkali metal binding motif, and to evaluate triuret affinity toward alkali metal ions, as well as its affinity for Na+ and K+ relative to other organic ligands. The most favored binding motif was determined to be a bidentate chelation of triuret with the alkali metal cation involving two carbonyl oxygens. Using the complexation selectivity method, it was observed that in solution triuret has an increased affinity for potassium ions, compared to sodium and other alkali metal ions. We propose that triuret may act as a potential hypokalemic agent under pathophysiological conditions conducive to its excessive formation and thus contribute to electrolyte disorders. The collision- or photo-induced fragmentation channels of deprotonated and protonated triuret, as well as its alkali metal adducts, are likely to mimic the triuret degradation pathways in vivo. PMID:20371222

  7. Study on alkali removal technology from coal gasification gas

    SciTech Connect

    Inai, Motoko; Kajibata, Yoshihiro; Takao, Shoichi; Suda, Masamitsu

    1999-07-01

    The authors have proposed a new coal based combined cycle power plant concept. However, there are certain technical problems that must be overcome to establish this system. Major technical problem of the system is hot corrosion of gas turbine blades caused by sulfur and alkali vapor, because of high temperature dust removal without sulfur removal from the coal gas. So the authors have conducted several fundamental studies on dry type alkali removal sorbents for the purposed of reducing the corrosion on gas turbine blades. Based on the fundamental studies the authors found preferable alkali removal sorbents, and made clear their alkali removal performance.

  8. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Hitchcock, David C.; Mailhe, Catherine C.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    1986-01-01

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  9. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Hitchcock, D.C.; Mailhe, C.C.; De Jonghe, L.C.

    1985-07-10

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  10. Correlation between type of alkali rinsing, cytotoxicity of bio-nanocellulose and presence of metabolites within cellulose membranes.

    PubMed

    Junka, Adam; Fijałkowski, Karol; Ząbek, Adam; Mikołajewicz, Katarzyna; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Szymczyk, Patrycja; Smutnicka, Danuta; Żywicka, Anna; Sedghizadeh, Parish Paymon; Dziadas, Mariusz; Młynarz, Piotr; Bartoszewicz, Marzenna

    2017-02-10

    The study aimed at evaluation of various types of alkali rinsing with regard to their efficacy in terms of removal, not only of bacteria but also bacterial metabolites, from cellulose matrices formed by three Komagataeibacter xylinus strains. Moreover, we tested the type of alkali rinsing on membrane cytotoxicity in vitro in fibroblast and osteoblast cells and we compared matrices' ability to induce oxidative stress in macrophages. We identified 11 metabolites of bacterial origin that remained in cellulose after rinsing. Moreover, our results indicated that the type of alkali rinsing should be adjusted to specific K. xylinus strains that are used as cellulose producers to obtain safe biomaterials in the context of low cytotoxicity and macrophage induction. The findings have translational importance and may be of direct significance to cellulose dressing manufacturers.

  11. Alkali Metal Ion Complexes with Phosphates, Nucleotides, Amino Acids, and Related Ligands of Biological Relevance. Their Properties in Solution.

    PubMed

    Crea, Francesco; De Stefano, Concetta; Foti, Claudia; Lando, Gabriele; Milea, Demetrio; Sammartano, Silvio

    2016-01-01

    Alkali metal ions play very important roles in all biological systems, some of them are essential for life. Their concentration depends on several physiological factors and is very variable. For example, sodium concentrations in human fluids vary from quite low (e.g., 8.2 mmol dm(-3) in mature maternal milk) to high values (0.14 mol dm(-3) in blood plasma). While many data on the concentration of Na(+) and K(+) in various fluids are available, the information on other alkali metal cations is scarce. Since many vital functions depend on the network of interactions occurring in various biofluids, this chapter reviews their complex formation with phosphates, nucleotides, amino acids, and related ligands of biological relevance. Literature data on this topic are quite rare if compared to other cations. Generally, the stability of alkali metal ion complexes of organic and inorganic ligands is rather low (usually log K < 2) and depends on the charge of the ligand, owing to the ionic nature of the interactions. At the same time, the size of the cation is an important factor that influences the stability: very often, but not always (e.g., for sulfate), it follows the trend Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+) > Rb(+) > Cs(+). For example, for citrate it is: log K ML = 0.88, 0.80, 0.48, 0.38, and 0.13 at 25 °C and infinite dilution. Some considerations are made on the main aspects related to the difficulties in the determination of weak complexes. The importance of the alkali metal ion complexes was also studied in the light of modelling natural fluids and in the use of these cations as probes for different processes. Some empirical relationships are proposed for the dependence of the stability constants of Na(+) complexes on the ligand charge, as well as for correlations among log K values of NaL, KL or LiL species (L = generic ligand).

  12. Synthetic cation-selective nanotube: Permeant cations chaperoned by anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Gordon, Dan; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2011-01-01

    The ability to design ion-selective, synthetic nanotubes which mimic biological ion channels may have significant implications for the future treatment of bacteria, diseases, and as ultrasensitive biosensors. We present the design of a synthetic nanotube made from carbon atoms that selectively allows monovalent cations to move across and rejects all anions. The cation-selective nanotube mimics some of the salient properties of biological ion channels. Before practical nanodevices are successfully fabricated it is vital that proof-of-concept computational studies are performed. With this in mind we use molecular and stochastic dynamics simulations to characterize the dynamics of ion permeation across a single-walled (10, 10), 36 Å long, carbon nanotube terminated with carboxylic acid with an effective radius of 5.08 Å. Although cations encounter a high energy barrier of 7 kT, its height is drastically reduced by a chloride ion in the nanotube. The presence of a chloride ion near the pore entrance thus enables a cation to enter the pore and, once in the pore, it is chaperoned by the resident counterion across the narrow pore. The moment the chaperoned cation transits the pore, the counterion moves back to the entrance to ferry another ion. The synthetic nanotube has a high sodium conductance of 124 pS and shows linear current-voltage and current-concentration profiles. The cation-anion selectivity ratio ranges from 8 to 25, depending on the ionic concentrations in the reservoirs.

  13. Alkali Halide Nanotubes: Structure and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Lima, Francisco A.; Henkes, Aline Verônica; da Silveira, Enio F.; Nascimento, Marco Antonio Chaer

    2013-01-01

    Accurate density functional theory (DFT) and coupled-cluster (CCSD) calculations on a series of (LiF)n=2,36 neutral clusters suggest that nanotube structures with hexagonal and octagonal transversal cross sections show stability equal to or greater than that of the typical cubic form of large LiF crystals. The nanotube stability was further corroborated by quantum dynamic calculations at room temperature. The fact that stable nanotube structures were also found for other alkali halides (e.g., NaCl and KBr) suggests that this geometry may be widely implemented in material sciences. PMID:24376901

  14. Cathode architectures for alkali metal / oxygen batteries

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J; Nimon, Vitaliy; De Jonghe, Lutgard C; Volfkovich, Yury; Bograchev, Daniil

    2015-01-13

    Electrochemical energy storage devices, such as alkali metal-oxygen battery cells (e.g., non-aqueous lithium-air cells), have a cathode architecture with a porous structure and pore composition that is tailored to improve cell performance, especially as it pertains to one or more of the discharge/charge rate, cycle life, and delivered ampere-hour capacity. A porous cathode architecture having a pore volume that is derived from pores of varying radii wherein the pore size distribution is tailored as a function of the architecture thickness is one way to achieve one or more of the aforementioned cell performance improvements.

  15. Intensity Scaling for Diode Pumped Alkali Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    unphased diode lasers is absorbed in the near IR by atomic potassium, rubidium , or cesium. The gain cell for a DPAL system using a heat pipe design is...demonstrated linear scaling of a rubidium laser to 32 times threshold.3 In our present work, we explore scaling to pump in- tensities of >100kW/cm2. The...of output power. Each alkali atom in the laser medium may be required to cycle as many as 1010 pump photons per second. We demonstrated a rubidium

  16. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  17. Electrodes For Alkali-Metal Thermoelectric Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Wheeler, Bob L.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Lamb, James L.; Bankston, C. Perry; Cole, Terry

    1989-01-01

    Combination of thin, porous electrode and overlying collector grid reduces internal resistance of alkali-metal thermoelectric converter cell. Low resistance of new electrode and grid boosts power density nearly to 1 W/cm2 of electrode area at typical operating temperatures of 1,000 to 1,300 K. Conductive grid encircles electrode film on alumina tube. Bus wire runs along tube to collect electrical current from grid. Such converters used to transform solar, nuclear, and waste heat into electric power.

  18. Controlled release of plasmid DNA from hydrogels prepared from gelatin cationized by different amine compounds.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Tomoshige, Ryuji; Iwanaga, Kazunori; Kakemi, Masawo; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2006-05-15

    This paper is an investigation to compare the in vivo controlled release of a plasmid DNA from biodegradable hydrogels prepared from gelatin cationized by different amine compounds, ethylenediamine, putrescine, spermidine, and spermine and the consequent profile of gene expression. Cationized gelatin prepared through the chemical introduction of each amine compound was crosslinked by various concentrations of glutaraldehyde to obtain cationized gelatin hydrogels for the carrier of plasmid DNA release. When the cationized gelatin hydrogels incorporating 125I-labeled plasmid DNA were implanted into the femoral muscle of mice, the radioactivity remaining decreased with time and the retention period of radioactivity prolonged with a decrease in the water content of hydrogels. When 125I-labeled cationized gelatin hydrogels with the higher water content was implanted, the radioactivity remaining was decreased faster with time. The remaining time profile of plasmid DNA radioactivity was in good accordance with that of hydrogel radioactivity, irrespective of the type of cationized gelatin. Following intramuscular implantation, any cationized gelatin hydrogel incorporating plasmid DNA enhanced the expression level of plasmid DNA to a significantly higher extent than the free plasmid DNA injection. In addition, prolonged time period of gene expression was observed although there was no significant difference in the expressed period between the cationized gelatin hydrogels. It was concluded that plasmid DNA of biological activity was released from every cationized gelatin hydrogel accompanied with the in vivo degradation, resulting in enhanced and prolonged gene expression.

  19. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 79. Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metal Pseudohalides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hála, Jiri

    2004-03-01

    This volume presents solubility data of azides, cyanides, cyanates, and thiocyanates of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, and ammonium. Covered are binary and ternary systems in all solvents. No solubility data have been found for some of the compounds of alkali metals, alkaline metals, and ammonium. These include beryllium and magnesium azides, lithium, rubidium cesium, ammonium, and alkaline earth cyanates and cyanides, and beryllium thiocyanate. Likewise, no solubility data seem to exist for selenocyanates of the mentioned metals and ammonium. The literature has been covered up to the middle of 2001, and there was a great effort to have the literature survey as complete as possible. The few documents which remained unavailable to the editor, and could not be included in the volume, are listed in the Appendix. For some compounds it was not possible to show the Chemical Abstracts registry numbers since these have not been assigned. For this reason, the registry number index is incomplete.

  20. Where do those remains come from?

    PubMed

    Nociarová, Dominika; Adserias, M Jose; Malgosa, Assumpció; Galtés, Ignasi

    2014-12-01

    Part of the study of skeletal remains or corpses in advance decay located in the field involves determining their origin. They may be the result of criminal activity, accident, unearthed because of erosion, or they may also have originated from a cemetery. The discovery site, condition of the remains, and the associated artifacts, are factors that could be helpful for the forensic anthropologist to identify the origin of the remains. In order to contribute to this recognition, an analysis was made of the exhumations of 168 unclaimed human remains from the cemetery of Terrassa (Catalonia, Spain). This investigation presents a description of artifacts and conditions of remains that could indicate that the human remains may have originated from a cemetery.

  1. Monovalent Cations and Growth Regulation. I. Growth Responses in Cucumber Hypocotyl Segments 1

    PubMed Central

    Purves, William K.

    1966-01-01

    The elongation of etiolated cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) hypocotyl segments was stimulated by KCl and a number of other potassium salts at a concentration of 0.02 n K+. The effect of KCl was not evident until 14 hours after the beginning of treatment. NaCl, LiCl, and RbCl enhanced elongation of the segments, and their dosage-response curves were similar to that for KCl. At supraoptimal concentrations (≥ 0.05 m), LiCl inhibited segment growth. CsCl was inhibitory at all concentrations tested and was thus the only alkali metal cation to lack growth-promoting activity in this system. NH4Cl also promoted elongation, but not as effectively as did the alkali cations. CaCl2, CoCl2, and MgCl2 did not enhance growth when tested at the same concentrations as the monovalent cations. CoCl2 promoted strongly at 103 m, and NiCl2 was slightly active at 10−4 m. It is suggested that the nutritional requirement for K in higher plants results from a specific involvement in certain enzyme systems and from a relatively nonspecific role related to the elongation response described here. PMID:16656244

  2. Star-like superalkali cations featuring planar pentacoordinate carbon.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin-Chang; Tian, Wen-Juan; Wang, Ying-Jin; Zhao, Xue-Feng; Wu, Yan-Bo; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Li, Si-Dian

    2016-06-28

    Superalkali cations, known to possess low vertical electron affinities (VEAs), high vertical detachment energies, and large highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy gaps, are intriguing chemical species. Thermodynamically, such species need to be the global minima in order to serve as the promising targets for experimental realization. In this work, we propose the strategies of polyhalogenation and polyalkalination for designing the superalkali cations. By applying these strategies, the local-minimum planar pentacoordinate carbon (ppC) cluster CBe5 can be modified to form a series of star-like superalkali ppC or quasi-ppC CBe5X5 (+) (X = F, Cl, Br, Li, Na, K) cations containing a CBe5 moiety. Polyhalogenation and polyalkalination on the CBe5 unit may help eliminate the high reactivity of bare CBe5 molecule by covering the reactive Be atoms with noble halogen anions and alkali cations. Computational exploration of the potential energy surfaces reveals that the star-like ppC or quasi-ppC CBe5X5 (+) (X = F, Cl, Br, Li, Na, K) clusters are the true global minima of the systems. The predicted VEAs for CBe5X5 (+) range from 3.01 to 3.71 eV for X = F, Cl, Br and 2.12-2.51 eV for X = Li, Na, K, being below the lower bound of the atomic ionization potential of 3.89 eV in the periodic table. Large HOMO-LUMO energy gaps are also revealed for the species: 10.76-11.07 eV for X = F, Cl, Br and 4.99-6.91 eV for X = Li, Na, K. These designer clusters represent the first series of superalkali cations with a ppC center. Bonding analyses show five Be-X-Be three-center two-electron (3c-2e) σ bonds for the peripheral bonding, whereas the central C atom is associated with one 6c-2e π bond and three 6c-2e σ bonds, rendering (π and σ) double aromaticity. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the CBe5 motif is robust in the clusters. As planar hypercoordination carbon species are often thermodynamically

  3. Star-like superalkali cations featuring planar pentacoordinate carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin-Chang; Tian, Wen-Juan; Wang, Ying-Jin; Zhao, Xue-Feng; Wu, Yan-Bo; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Li, Si-Dian

    2016-06-01

    Superalkali cations, known to possess low vertical electron affinities (VEAs), high vertical detachment energies, and large highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy gaps, are intriguing chemical species. Thermodynamically, such species need to be the global minima in order to serve as the promising targets for experimental realization. In this work, we propose the strategies of polyhalogenation and polyalkalination for designing the superalkali cations. By applying these strategies, the local-minimum planar pentacoordinate carbon (ppC) cluster CBe5 can be modified to form a series of star-like superalkali ppC or quasi-ppC CBe5X5+ (X = F, Cl, Br, Li, Na, K) cations containing a CBe5 moiety. Polyhalogenation and polyalkalination on the CBe5 unit may help eliminate the high reactivity of bare CBe5 molecule by covering the reactive Be atoms with noble halogen anions and alkali cations. Computational exploration of the potential energy surfaces reveals that the star-like ppC or quasi-ppC CBe5X5+ (X = F, Cl, Br, Li, Na, K) clusters are the true global minima of the systems. The predicted VEAs for CBe5X5+ range from 3.01 to 3.71 eV for X = F, Cl, Br and 2.12-2.51 eV for X = Li, Na, K, being below the lower bound of the atomic ionization potential of 3.89 eV in the periodic table. Large HOMO-LUMO energy gaps are also revealed for the species: 10.76-11.07 eV for X = F, Cl, Br and 4.99-6.91 eV for X = Li, Na, K. These designer clusters represent the first series of superalkali cations with a ppC center. Bonding analyses show five Be-X-Be three-center two-electron (3c-2e) σ bonds for the peripheral bonding, whereas the central C atom is associated with one 6c-2e π bond and three 6c-2e σ bonds, rendering (π and σ) double aromaticity. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the CBe5 motif is robust in the clusters. As planar hypercoordination carbon species are often thermodynamically unstable and

  4. Structural differences of metal biphenylenebisphosphonate with change in the alkali metal

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnibrugh, Tiffany L.; Garcia, Nancy; Clearfield, Abraham

    2012-03-15

    A series of monovalent biphenylenebisphosphonates have been prepared using hydrothermal synthesis resulting in a composition M[HO{sub 3}PC{sub 12}H{sub 8}PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}] where M=Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, and Cs{sup +}. Three of the original four phosphonic acid protons are retained, making the compounds Broensted acids. A synthesis using microwave irradiation results in a new compound, Na{sub 2}(HO{sub 3}PC{sub 12}H{sub 8}PO{sub 3}H), where only two protons are retained. Two structural types were found for the three-dimensional compounds where one type has a continuous inorganic layer. In the other structural type, the inorganic layer is formed by hydrogen bonding between neighboring chains. These structural variations arise as the coordination number changes from 4 for lithium to 8 for cesium without change in composition. The dense packing of the biphenylenebisphosphonate restricts the access to the protons, thus these compounds cannot be used as Broensted acid catalysts. Alternatively, addition of N,N-dimethylformamide to the reaction mixture results in inclusion of ammonium ions in the cavities. - Graphical abstract: Two of five metal biphenylenebisphosphonate structures (lithium (a) and cesium (b)) are presented. Each compound is a potential Bronsted acid catalyst, where three of the original four protons are retained from the biphenylenebisphosphonic acid. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkali phosphonates are Broensted acids with the retention of three protons per alkali cation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These compounds are thermally stable to approximately 300 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new structure was formed from the in situ synthesis with dimethylformamide as a reactant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With lack of access to the protons the alkali phosphonates cannot function as a Bronsted acid catalysts.

  5. Alkali sorber (RABSAM), September 1, 1990--August 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a regenerable activated-bauxite sorber alkali monitor that requires no high-temperature/high-pressure sampling line for the reliable in situ measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in the exhaust from the pressurized fluidized-bed combustion of coal. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. COMPLEX FLUORIDES OF PLUTONIUM AND AN ALKALI METAL

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1960-08-01

    A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides. such as KPuF/sub 5/, KPu/sub 2/F/sub 9/, NaPuF/sub 5/, and RbPuF/sub 5/, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal- fluoride.

  7. Formation of lysinoalanine in egg white under alkali treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Luo, Xuying; Li, Jianke; Xu, Mingsheng; Tu, Yonggang

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the formation mechanism of lysinoalanine (LAL) in eggs during the alkali treatment process, NaOH was used for the direct alkali treatment of egg white, ovalbumin, and amino acids; in addition, the amount of LAL formed during the alkali treatment process was measured. The results showed that the alkali treatment resulted in the formation of LAL in the egg white. The LAL content increased with increasing pH and temperature, with the LAL content first increasing and then leveling off with increasing time. The amount of LAL formed in the ovalbumin under the alkali treatment condition accounted for approximately 50.51% to 58.68% of the amount of LAL formed in the egg white. Thus, the LAL formed in the ovalbumin was the main source for the LAL in the egg white during the alkali treatment process. Under the alkali treatment condition, free L-serine, L-cysteine, and L-cystine reacted with L-lysine to form LAL; therefore, they are the precursor amino acids of LAL formed in eggs during the alkali treatment process.

  8. [Raman spectra of endospores of Bacillus subtilis by alkali stress].

    PubMed

    Dong, Rong; Lu, Ming-qian; Li, Feng; Shi, Gui-yu; Huang, Shu-shi

    2013-09-01

    To research the lethal mechanism of spores stressed by alkali, laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) combined with principal components analysis (PCA) was used to study the physiological process of single spore with alkali stress. The results showed that both spores and germinated spores had tolerance with alkali in a certain range, but the ability of spores was obviously lower than that of spores due to the release of their Ca2+ -DPA which plays a key role in spores resistance as well as spores resistance to many stresses; A small amount of Ca2+ -DPA of spores was observed to release after alkali stress, however, the behavior of release was different with the normal Ca2+ -DPA release behavior induced by L-alanine; The data before and after alkali stress of the spores and g. spores with PCA reflected that alkali mainly injured the membrane of spores, and alkali could be easily enter into the inner structure of spores to damage the structure of protein backbone and injure the nucleic acid of spores. We show that the alkali could result in the small amount of Ca2+ -DPA released by destroying the member channel of spores.

  9. Self-discharge in bimetallic cells containing alkali metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, M. S.; Hesson, J. C.; Shimotake, H.

    1969-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of thermally regenerative bimetallic cells with alkali metal anodes shows a relation between the current drawn and the rate of discharge under open-circuit conditions. The self-discharge rate of the cell is due to the dissolution and ionization of alkali metal atoms in the fused-salt electrolyte

  10. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, Wen Y.

    1984-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them (46, 53, 61, 69) with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide (63) to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased (81), preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated (84) to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process (86, 18, 17) where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  11. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzton-Maziopa, A.; Svitlyk, V.; Pomjakushina, E.; Puzniak, R.; Conder, K.

    2016-07-01

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2-y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations.

  12. Durability of Alkali Activated Blast Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, K.; Alharbi, N.; Matheu, P. S.; Varela, B.; Hailstone, R.

    2015-11-01

    The alkali activation of blast furnace slag has the potential to reduce the environmental impact of cementitious materials and to be applied in geographic zones where weather is a factor that negatively affects performance of materials based on Ordinary Portland Cement. The scientific literature provides many examples of alkali activated slag with high compressive strengths; however research into the durability and resistance to aggressive environments is still necessary for applications in harsh weather conditions. In this study two design mixes of blast furnace slag with mine tailings were activated with a potassium based solution. The design mixes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, BET analysis and compressive strength testing. Freeze-thaw testing up to 100 freeze-thaw cycles was performed in 10% road salt solution. Our findings included compressive strength of up to 100 MPa after 28 days of curing and 120 MPa after freeze-thaw testing. The relationship between pore size, compressive strength, and compressive strength after freeze-thaw was explored.

  13. Molecular dispersion energy parameters for alkali and halide ions in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, S.; Deublein, S.; Hasse, H.; Vrabec, J.

    2014-01-28

    Thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions containing alkali and halide ions are determined by molecular simulation. The following ions are studied: Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cs{sup +}, F{sup −}, Cl{sup −}, Br{sup −}, and I{sup −}. The employed ion force fields consist of one Lennard-Jones (LJ) site and one concentric point charge with a magnitude of ±1 e. The SPC/E model is used for water. The LJ size parameter of the ion models is taken from Deublein et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 136, 084501 (2012)], while the LJ energy parameter is determined in the present study based on experimental self-diffusion coefficient data of the alkali cations and the halide anions in aqueous solutions as well as the position of the first maximum of the radial distribution function of water around the ions. On the basis of these force field parameters, the electric conductivity, the hydration dynamics of water molecules around the ions, and the enthalpy of hydration is predicted. Considering a wide range of salinity, this study is conducted at temperatures of 293.15 and 298.15 K and a pressure of 1 bar.

  14. Alkali Metal Control over N–N Cleavage in Iron Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Though N2 cleavage on K-promoted Fe surfaces is important in the large-scale Haber–Bosch process, there is still ambiguity about the number of Fe atoms involved during the N–N cleaving step and the interactions responsible for the promoting ability of K. This work explores a molecular Fe system for N2 reduction, particularly focusing on the differences in the results obtained using different alkali metals as reductants (Na, K, Rb, Cs). The products of these reactions feature new types of Fe–N2 and Fe-nitride cores. Surprisingly, adding more equivalents of reductant to the system gives a product in which the N–N bond is not cleaved, indicating that the reducing power is not the most important factor that determines the extent of N2 activation. On the other hand, the results suggest that the size of the alkali metal cation can control the number of Fe atoms that can approach N2, which in turn controls the ability to achieve N2 cleavage. The accumulated results indicate that cleaving the triple N–N bond to nitrides is facilitated by simultaneous approach of least three low-valent Fe atoms to a single molecule of N2. PMID:25412468

  15. The fate of minor alkali elements in the chemical evolution of salt lakes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Alkaline earth elements and alkali metals (Mg, Ca, Na and K) play an important role in the geochemical evolution of saline lakes as the final brine type is defined by the abundance of these elements. The role of major ions in brine evolution has been studied in great detail, but little has been done to investigate the behaviour of minor alkali elements in these systems despite their similar chemical affinities to the major cations. We have examined three major anionic brine types, chloride, sulphate, and bicarbonate-carbonate, in fifteen lakes in North America and Antarctica to determine the geochemical behaviour of lithium, rubidium, strontium, and barium. Lithium and rubidium are largely conservative in all water types, and their concentrations are the result of long-term solute input and concentration through evaporation and/or sublimation. Strontium and barium behaviours vary with anionic brine type. Strontium can be removed in sulphate and carbonate-rich lakes by the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Barium may be removed in chloride and sulphate brines by either the precipitation of barite and perhaps biological uptake. PMID:21992434

  16. Cell volume-regulated cation channels.

    PubMed

    Wehner, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Considering the enormous turnover rates of ion channels when compared to carriers it is quite obvious that channel-mediated ion transport may serve as a rapid and efficient mechanism of cell volume regulation. Whenever studied in a quantitative fashion the hypertonic activation of non-selective cation channels is found to be the main mechanism of regulatory volume increase (RVI). Some channels are inhibited by amiloride (and may be related to the ENaC), others are blocked by Gd(3) and flufenamate (and possibly linked to the group of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels). Nevertheless, the actual architecture of hypertonicity-induced cation channels remains to be defined. In some preparations, hypertonic stress decreases K(+) channel activity so reducing the continuous K(+) leak out of the cell; this is equivalent to a net gain of cell osmolytes facilitating RVI. The hypotonic activation of K(+) selective channels appears to be one of the most common principles of regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and, in most instances, the actual channels involved could be identified on the molecular level. These are BKCa (or maxi K(+)) channels, IK(Ca) and SK(Ca) channels (of intermediate and small conductance, respectively), the group of voltage-gated (Kv) channels including their Beta (or Kv ancilliary) subunits, two-pore K(2P) channels, as well as inwardly rectifying K(+) (Kir) channels (also contributing to K(ATP) channels). In some cells, hypotonicity activates non-selective cation channels. This is surprising, at first sight, because of the inside negative membrane voltage and the sum of driving forces for Na(+) and K(+) diffusion across the cell membrane rather favouring net cation uptake. Some of these channels, however, exhibit a P(K)/P(Na) significantly higher than 1, whereas others are Ca(++) permeable linking hypotonic stress to the activation of Ca(++) dependent ion channels. In particular, the latter holds for the group of TRPs which are specialised in the

  17. Effects of alkali treatments on Ag nanowire transparent conductive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunho; Kang, Jun-gu; Eom, Tae-yil; Moon, Bongjin; Lee, Hoo-Jeong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we employ various alkali materials (alkali metals with different base strengths, and ammonia gas and solution) to improve the conductivity of silver nanowire (Ag NW)-networked films. The alkali treatment appears to remove the surface oxide and improve the conductivity. When applied with TiO2 nanoparticles, the treatment appears more effective as the alkalis gather around wire junctions and help them weld to each other via heat emitted from the reduction reaction. The ammonia solution treatment is found to be quick and aggressive, damaging the wires severely in the case of excessive treatment. On the other hand, the ammonia gas treatment seems much less aggressive and does not damage the wires even after a long exposure. The results of this study highlight the effectiveness of the alkali treatment in improving of the conductivity of Ag NW-networked transparent conductive films.

  18. Performance of Straight Steel Fibres Reinforced Alkali Activated Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faris, Meor Ahmad; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Nizar Ismail, Khairul; Muniandy, Ratnasamy; Putra Jaya, Ramadhansyah

    2016-06-01

    This paper focus on the performance of alkali activated concrete produced by using fly ash activated by sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. These alkali activated concrete were reinforced with straight steel fibres with different weight percentage starting from 0 % up to 5 %. Chemical composition of raw material in the production alkali activated concrete which is fly ash was first identified by using X-ray fluorescence. Results reveal there have an effect of straight steel fibres inclusion to the alkali activated concrete. Highest compressive strength of alkali activated concrete which is 67.72 MPa was obtained when 3 % of straight fibres were added. As well as flexural strength, highest flexural strength which is 6.78 MPa was obtained at 3 % of straight steel fibres inclusions.

  19. Anionic and cationic Hofmeister effects on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schwierz, Nadine; Horinek, Dominik; Netz, Roland R

    2013-02-26

    Using a two-step modeling approach, we address the full spectrum of direct, reversed, and altered ionic sequences as the charge of the ion, the charge of the surface, and the surface polarity are varied. From solvent-explicit molecular dynamics simulations, we extract single-ion surface interaction potentials for halide and alkali ions at hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. These are used within Poisson-Boltzmann theory to calculate ion density and electrostatic potential distributions at mixed polar/unpolar surfaces for varying surface charge. The resulting interfacial tension increments agree quantitatively with experimental data and capture the Hofmeister series, especially the anomaly of lithium, which is difficult to obtain using continuum theory. Phase diagrams that feature different Hofmeister series as a function of surface charge, salt concentration, and surface polarity are constructed from the long-range force between two surfaces interacting across electrolyte solutions. Large anions such as iodide have a high hydrophobic surface affinity and increase the effective charge magnitude on negatively charged unpolar surfaces. Large cations such as cesium also have a large hydrophobic surface affinity and thereby compensate an external negative charge surface charge most efficiently, which explains the well-known asymmetry between cations and anions. On the hydrophilic surface, the size-dependence of the ion surface affinity is reversed, explaining the Hofmeister series reversal when comparing hydrophobic with hydrophilic surfaces.

  20. Water and magmas: insights about the water solution mechanisms in alkali silicate melts from infrared, Raman, and 29Si solid-state NMR spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Losq, Charles; Mysen, Bjorn O.; Cody, George D.

    2015-12-01

    Degassing of water during the ascent of hydrous magma in a volcanic edifice produces dramatic changes in the magma density and viscosity. This can profoundly affect the dynamics of volcanic eruptions. The water exsolution history, in turn, is driven by the water solubility and solution mechanisms in the silicate melt. Previous studies pointed to dissolved water in silicate glasses and melts existing as molecules (H2Omol species) and hydroxyl groups, OH. These latter OH groups commonly are considered bonded to Si4+ but may form other bonds, such as with alkali or alkaline-earth cations, for instance. Those forms of bonding influence the structure of hydrous melts in different ways and, therefore, their properties. As a result, exsolution of water from magmas may have different eruptive consequences depending on the initial bonding mechanisms of the dissolved water. However, despite their importance, the solution mechanisms of water in silicate melts are not clear. In particular, how chemical composition of melts affects water solubility and solution mechanism is not well understood. In the present experimental study, components of such information are reported via determination of how water interacts with the cationic network of alkali (Li, Na, and K) silicate quenched melts. Results from 29Si single-pulse magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (29Si SP MAS NMR), infrared, and Raman spectroscopies show that decreasing the ionic radius of alkali metal cation in silicate melts results in decreasing fraction of water dissolved as OH groups. The nature of OH bonding also changes as the alkali ionic radius changes. Therefore, as the speciation and bonding of water controls the degree of polymerization of melts, water will have different effects on the transport properties of silicate melts depending on their chemical composition. This conclusion, in turn, may affect volcanic phenomena related to the viscous relaxation of hydrous magmas, such as for instance the

  1. Cation effects on interfacial water organization of aqueous chloride solutions. I. Monovalent cations: Li+, Na+, K+, and NH4(+).

    PubMed

    Hua, Wei; Verreault, Dominique; Huang, Zishuai; Adams, Ellen M; Allen, Heather C

    2014-07-17

    The influence of monovalent cations on the interfacial water organization of alkali (LiCl, NaCl, and KCl) and ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) salt solutions was investigated using surface-sensitive conventional vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) and heterodyne-detected (HD-)VSFG spectroscopy. It was found in the conventional VSFG spectra that LiCl and NH4Cl significantly perturb water’s hydrogen-bonding network. In contrast, NaCl and KCl had little effect on the interfacial water structure and exhibited weak concentration dependency. The Im χs(2)(ωIR) spectra from HD-VSFG further revealed that, for all chloride solutions, the net transition dipole moments of hydrogen-bonded water molecules (O → H) are oriented more toward the vapor phase relative to neat water. This suggests the presence of an interfacial electric field generated from the formation of an ionic double layer in the interfacial region with a distribution of Cl(-) ions located above the countercations, in agreement with predictions from MD simulations. The magnitude of this electric field shows a small but definite cation specificity and follows the order Li(+) ≈ Na(+) > NH4(+) > K(+). The observed trend was found to be in good agreement with previously published surface potential data.

  2. Involvement of NADPH oxidases in alkali burn-induced corneal injury.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xue-Jun; Liu, Xian; Chen, Ying-Ying; Zhao, Yao; Xu, Man; Han, Xiao-Jian; Liu, Qiu-Ping; Yi, Jing-Lin; Li, Jing-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Chemical burns are a major cause of corneal injury. Oxidative stress, inflammatory responses and neovascularization after the chemical burn aggravate corneal damage, and lead to loss of vision. Although NADPH oxidases (Noxs) play a crucial role in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the role of Noxs in chemical burn-induced corneal injury remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the transcription and expression of Noxs in corneas were examined by RT-qPCR, western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining. It was found that alkali burns markedly upregulated the transcription and expression of Nox2 and Nox4 in human or mouse corneas. The inhibition of Noxs by diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) or apocynin (Apo) effectively attenuated alkali burn-induced ROS production and decreased 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) protein levels in the corneas. In addition, Noxs/CD11b double‑immunofluorescence staining indicated that Nox2 and Nox4 were partially co-localized with CD11b. DPI or Apo prevented the infiltration of CD11b-positive inflammatory cells, and inhibited the transcription of inflammatory cytokines following alkali burn-induced corneal injury. In our mouse model of alkali burn-induced corneal injury, corneal neovascularization (CNV) occurred on day 3, and it affected 50% of the whole area of the cornea on day 7, and on day 14, CNV coverage of the cornea reached maximum levels. DPI or Apo effectively attenuated alkali burn‑induced CNV and decreased the mRNA levels of angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptors and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Taken together, our data indicate that Noxs play a role in alkali burn-induced corneal injury by regulating oxidative stress, inflammatory responses and CNV, and we thus suggest that Noxs are a potential therapeutic target in the future treatment of chemical-induced corneal injury.

  3. Influence of BH3 and alkaline cation released from the reduction agent on a tandem reduction/acylation reaction-A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Nevena I.; Nikolova, Rositca D.; Bojilova, Anka G.; Vayssilov, Georgi N.

    When an alkaline boron hydride is used as reduction reagent two byproducts are released, BH3 and alkaline cation, and both of them could influence the following reaction steps if a multi-step reaction is performed in tandem one-pot fashion. We report a theoretical study on the stability of possible complexes of the Lewis acids, BH3 and alkaline cations, with reaction intermediate, solvent molecules and basic additives in a tandem hydride reduction/acylation reaction of 3-diethylphosphonocoumarin. Both chelate complexes of the intermediate anion with the alkali cations (Li+, Na+, or K+) and complexes of BH3 bound to C or O center of the ambident anionic intermediate have been investigated. Since the formation of the latter complexes blocks the intermediate for further acylation, the reaction could take place only if BH3 is bound in a complex with a strong base as DMAP. The binding energy of BH3 to DMAP was found higher than to the intermediate for Li+ and Na+ as counter cations, while for K+ BH3 is bound to the intermediate stronger than to DMAP. Formation of the intermediate is facilitated in presence of Li+ cations, but the alteration of the alkali cation does not influence the selectivity of the reaction-C-acylations is preferred in all cases.

  4. Imidazolium Cations with Exceptional Alkaline Stability: A Systematic Study of Structure-Stability Relationships.

    PubMed

    Hugar, Kristina M; Kostalik, Henry A; Coates, Geoffrey W

    2015-07-15

    Highly base-stable cationic moieties are a critical component of anion exchange membranes (AEMs) in alkaline fuel cells (AFCs); however, the commonly employed organic cations have limited alkaline stability. To address this problem, we synthesized and characterized the stability of a series of imidazolium cations in 1, 2, or 5 M KOH/CD3OH at 80 °C, systematically evaluating the impact of substitution on chemical stability. The substituent identity at each position of the imidazolium ring has a dramatic effect on the overall cation stability. We report imidazolium cations that have the highest alkaline stabilities reported to date, >99% cation remaining after 30 days in 5 M KOH/CD3OH at 80 °C.

  5. The influence of large cations on the electrochemical properties of tunnel-structured metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yifei; Zhan, Chun; He, Kun; Chen, Hungru; Yao, Wentao; Sharifi-Asl, Soroosh; Song, Boao; Yang, Zhenzhen; Nie, Anmin; Luo, Xiangyi; Wang, Hao; Wood, Stephen M.; Amine, Khalil; Islam, M. Saiful; Lu, Jun; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2016-11-01

    Metal oxides with a tunnelled structure are attractive as charge storage materials for rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors, since the tunnels enable fast reversible insertion/extraction of charge carriers (for example, lithium ions). Common synthesis methods can introduce large cations such as potassium, barium and ammonium ions into the tunnels, but how these cations affect charge storage performance is not fully understood. Here, we report the role of tunnel cations in governing the electrochemical properties of electrode materials by focusing on potassium ions in α-MnO2. We show that the presence of cations inside 2 × 2 tunnels of manganese dioxide increases the electronic conductivity, and improves lithium ion diffusivity. In addition, transmission electron microscopy analysis indicates that the tunnels remain intact whether cations are present in the tunnels or not. Our systematic study shows that cation addition to α-MnO2 has a strong beneficial effect on the electrochemical performance of this material.

  6. Binding and selectivity of phenazino-18-crown-6-ether with alkali, alkaline earth and toxic metal species: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nasarul; Chimni, Swapandeep Singh

    2017-02-01

    The interactions of phenazino-crown ether ligands with alkali, alkaline earth and selected toxic species were investigated using density functional theory modelling by employing B3PW91/6-311G ++ (d, p) level of theory. The complex stability was analysed in terms of binding energies, perturbation energies, position of highest molecular orbital and energy gap values. In general, the complexes formed by P18C6-1a ligand with metal cations were found to be more stable than those with P18C6-1b. Among alkali and alkaline earth metals complexes having highest stability was observed for the complex formed by P18C6-1a with Be2+. Computational calculations of P18C6 ligand with toxic metal ions reveals that the P18C6-Cr6+ metal complexes acquire envelop like geometry, leading to higher binding energy values. Comparing the binding energies of neutral and monocations of Ag and Hg, the former had higher value both in neutral as well as monocation state. Thus, the stability of metal complexes is determined not only by the ligand but also by the type of metal ion. In solvent systems the stability constants of metal complexes were found increasing with decreasing permittivity of the solvent. This reflects the inherited polar character of the protic solvents stabilises the cation, resulting in decrease of effective interaction of ligand with the metal ion.

  7. Heat pipes containing alkali metal working fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A technique for improving high temperature evaporation-condensation heat-transfer devices which have important and unique advantage in terrestrial and space energy processing is described. The device is in the form of a heat pipe comprising a sealed container or envelope which contains a capillary wick. The temperature of one end of the heat pipe is raised by the input of heat from an external heat source which is extremely hot and corrosive. A working fluid of a corrosive alkali metal, such as lithium, sodium, or potassium transfers this heat to a heat receiver remote from the heat source. The container and wick are fabricated from a superalloy containing a small percentage of a corrosion inhibiting or gettering element. Lanthanum, scandium, yttrium, thorium, and hafnium are utilized as the alloying metal.

  8. Volcanic Origin of Alkali Halides on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, L.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The recent observation of NaCl (gas) on Io confirms our earlier prediction that NaCl is produced volcanically. Here we extend our calculations by modeling thermochemical equilibrium of O, S, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, F, Cl, Br, and I as a function of temperature and pressure in a Pele-like volcanic gas with O/S/Na/Cl/K = 1.518/1/0.05/0.04/0.005 and CI chondritic ratios of the other (as yet unobserved) alkalis and halogens. For reference, the nominal temperature and pressure for Pele is 1760 plus or minus 210 K and 0.01 bars based on Galileo data and modeling.

  9. Ionic alkali halide XUV laser feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.T.; Gylys, V.T.; Bower, R.D.; Harris, D.G.; Blauer, J.A.; Turner, C.E.; Hindy, R.N.

    1989-11-10

    The objective of this work is to assess the feasibility of a select set of ionic alkali halide XUV laser concepts by obtaining the relevant kinetic and spectroscopic parameters required for a proof-of-principle and conceptual design. The proposed lasers operate in the 80--200 nm spectral region and do not require input from outside radiation sources for their operation. Frequency up-conversion and frequency mixing techniques and therefore not considered in the work to be described. An experimental and theoretical study of a new type of laser operating in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength region has been conducted. The lasing species are singly ionized alkali halide molecules such as Rb{sup 2+}F{sub {minus}}, Rb{sup 2+}Br{sup {minus}} and Cs{sup 2+}F{sup {minus}}. These species are similar in electronic structure to the rare gas halide excimers, such as XeF and Krf, except that the ionic molecules emit at wavelengths of 80--200 nm, much shorter than the conventional rare-gas halide excimer laser. The radiative lifetime of these molecules are typically near 1 ns, which is about an order of magnitude shorter than that for rare-gas halide systems. The values of the cross section for stimulated emission are on the order of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}16}cm{sup 2}. Because of the fundamental similarity to existing UV lasers, these systems show promise as a high power, efficient XUV lasers. 55 refs., 50 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Ultrasonic coal washing to leach alkali elements from coals.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, S; Reddy, V Midhun; Nagarajan, R

    2015-11-01

    Deposition of fly ash particles onto heat-transfer surfaces is often one of the reasons for unscheduled shut-downs of coal-fired boilers. Fouling deposits encountered in convective sections of a boiler are characterized by arrival of ash particles in solidified (solid) state. Fouling is most frequently caused by condensation and chemical reaction of alkali vapors with the deposited ash particles creating a wet surface conducive to collect impacting ash particles. Hence, the amount of alkali elements present in coals, which, in turn, is available in the flue gas as condensable vapors, determines the formation and growth of fouling deposits. In this context, removal of alkali elements becomes vital when inferior coals having high-ash content are utilized for power generation. With the concept of reducing alkali elements present in a coal entering the combustor, whereby the fouling deposits can either be minimized or be weakened due to absence of alkali gluing effect, the ultrasonic leaching of alkali elements from coals is investigated in this study. Ultrasonic water-washing and chemical-washing, in comparison with agitation, are studied in order to estimate the intensification of the alkali removal process by sonication.

  11. Alkali elemental and potassium isotopic compositions of Semarkona chondrules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, C.M. O'D.; Grossman, J.N.

    2005-01-01

    We report measurements of K isotope ratios in 28 Semarkona chondrules with a wide range of petrologic types and bulk compositions as well as the compositions of CPX-mesostasis pairs in 17 type I Semarkona chondrules, including two chondrules with radial alkali zonation and 19 type II chondrules. Despite the wide range in K/Al ratios, no systematic variations in K isotopic compositions were found. Semarkona chondrules do not record a simple history of Rayleigh-type loss of K. Experimentally determined evaporation rates suggest that considerable alkali evaporation would have occurred during chondrule formation. Nevertheless, based on Na CPX-mesostasis distribution coefficients, the alkali contents of the cores of most chondrules in Semarkona were probably established at the time of final crystallization. However, Na CPX-mesostasis distribution coefficients also show that alkali zonation in type I Semarkona chondrules was produced by entry of alkalis after solidification, probably during parent body alteration. This alkali metasomatism may have gone to completion in some chondrules. Our preferred explanation for the lack of systematic isotopic enrichments, even in alkali depleted type I chondrule cores, is that they exchanged with the ambient gas as they cooled. ?? The Meteoritical Society, 2005.

  12. Controlled in-situ dissolution of an alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jeffrey Donald; Dooley, Kirk John; Tolman, David Donald

    2012-09-11

    A method for the controllable dissolution of one or more alkali metals from a vessel containing a one or more alkali metals and/or one or more partially passivated alkali metals. The vessel preferably comprising a sodium, NaK or other alkali metal-cooled nuclear reactor that has been used. The alkali metal, preferably sodium, potassium or a combination thereof, in the vessel is exposed to a treatment liquid, preferably an acidic liquid, more preferably citric acid. Preferably, the treatment liquid is maintained in continuous motion relative to any surface of unreacted alkali metal with which the treatment liquid is in contact. The treatment liquid is preferably pumped into the vessel containing the one or more alkali metals and the resulting fluid is extracted and optionally further processed. Preferably, the resulting off-gases are processed by an off-gas treatment system and the resulting liquids are processed by a liquid disposal system. In one preferred embodiment, an inert gas is pumped into the vessel along with the treatment liquid.

  13. FTIR Analysis of Alkali Activated Slag and Fly Ash Using Deconvolution Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madavarapu, Sateesh Babu

    The studies on aluminosilicate materials to replace traditional construction materials such as ordinary Portland cement (OPC) to reduce the effects caused has been an important research area for the past decades. Many properties like strength have already been studied and the primary focus is to learn about the reaction mechanism and the effect of the parameters on the formed products. The aim of this research was to explore the structural changes and reaction product analysis of geopolymers (Slag & Fly Ash) using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and deconvolution techniques. Spectroscopic techniques give valuable information at a molecular level but not all methods are economic and simple. To understand the mechanisms of alkali activated aluminosilicate materials, attenuated total reflectance (ATR) FTIR has been used where the effect of the parameters on the reaction products have been analyzed. To analyze complex systems like geopolymers using FTIR, deconvolution techniques help to obtain the properties of a particular peak attributed to a certain molecular vibration. Time and temperature dependent analysis were done on slag pastes to understand the polymerization of reactive silica in the system with time and temperature variance. For time dependent analysis slag has been activated with sodium and potassium silicates using two different `n'values and three different silica modulus [Ms- (SiO2 /M2 O)] values. The temperature dependent analysis was done by curing the samples at 60°C and 80°C. Similarly fly ash has been studied by activating with alkali hydroxides and alkali silicates. Under the same curing conditions the fly ash samples were evaluated to analyze the effects of added silicates for alkali activation. The peak shifts in the FTIR explains the changes in the structural nature of the matrix and can be identified using the deconvolution technique. A strong correlation is found between the concentrations of silicate monomer in the

  14. Structural and Crystal Chemical Properties of Alkali Rare-earth Double Phosphates

    DOE PAGES

    Farmer, James Matthew; Boatner, Lynn A.; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; ...

    2016-01-01

    When appropriately activated, alkali rare-earth double phosphates of the form: M3RE(PO4)2 (where M denotes an alkali metal and RE represents either a rare-earth element or Y or Sc) are of interest for use as inorganic scintillators for radiation detection at relatively long optical emission wavelengths. These compounds exhibit layered crystal structures whose symmetry properties depend on the relative sizes of the rare-earth and alkali-metal cations. Single-crystal X-ray and powder neutron diffraction methods were used here to refine the structures of the series of rare-earth double phosphate compounds: K3RE(PO4)2 with RE = Lu, Er, Ho, Dy, Gd, Nd, Ce, plus Ymore » and Sc - as well as the compounds: A3Lu(PO4)2, with A = Rb, and Cs. The double phosphate K3Lu(PO4)2 was reported and structurally refined previously. This material had a hexagonal unit cell at room temperature with the Lu ion six-fold coordinated with oxygen atoms of the surrounding phosphate groups. Additionally two lower-temperature phases were observed for K3Lu(PO4)2. The first phase transition to a monoclinic P21/m phase occurred at ~230 K, and the Lu ion retained its six-fold coordination. The second K3Lu(PO4)2 phase transition occurred at ~130 K. The P21/m space group symmetry was retained, however, one of the phosphate groups rotated to increase the oxygen coordination number of Lu from six to seven. This structure then became isostructural with the room-temperature form of the compound K3Yb(PO4)2 reported here that also exhibits an additional high-temperature phase which occurs at T = 120 °C with a transformation to hexagonal P-3 space group symmetry and a Yb-ion coordination number reduction from seven to six. This latter result was confirmed using EXAFS. The single-crystal growth methods structural systematics, and thermal expansion properties of the present series of alkali rare-earth double phosphates, as determined by X-ray and neutron diffraction methods, are treated here.« less

  15. Structural and Crystal Chemical Properties of Alkali Rare-earth Double Phosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, James Matthew; Boatner, Lynn A.; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Rawn, Claudia J.; Richardson, Jim

    2016-01-01

    When appropriately activated, alkali rare-earth double phosphates of the form: M3RE(PO4)2 (where M denotes an alkali metal and RE represents either a rare-earth element or Y or Sc) are of interest for use as inorganic scintillators for radiation detection at relatively long optical emission wavelengths. These compounds exhibit layered crystal structures whose symmetry properties depend on the relative sizes of the rare-earth and alkali-metal cations. Single-crystal X-ray and powder neutron diffraction methods were used here to refine the structures of the series of rare-earth double phosphate compounds: K3RE(PO4)2 with RE = Lu, Er, Ho, Dy, Gd, Nd, Ce, plus Y and Sc - as well as the compounds: A3Lu(PO4)2, with A = Rb, and Cs. The double phosphate K3Lu(PO4)2 was reported and structurally refined previously. This material had a hexagonal unit cell at room temperature with the Lu ion six-fold coordinated with oxygen atoms of the surrounding phosphate groups. Additionally two lower-temperature phases were observed for K3Lu(PO4)2. The first phase transition to a monoclinic P21/m phase occurred at ~230 K, and the Lu ion retained its six-fold coordination. The second K3Lu(PO4)2 phase transition occurred at ~130 K. The P21/m space group symmetry was retained, however, one of the phosphate groups rotated to increase the oxygen coordination number of Lu from six to seven. This structure then became isostructural with the room-temperature form of the compound K3Yb(PO4)2 reported here that also exhibits an additional high-temperature phase which occurs at T = 120 °C with a transformation to hexagonal P-3 space group symmetry and a Yb-ion coordination number reduction from seven to six. This latter result was confirmed using EXAFS. The single

  16. Speciation of phytate ion in aqueous solution. Alkali metal complex formation in different ionic media.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, Concetta; Milea, Demetrio; Pettignano, Alberto; Sammartano, Silvio

    2003-08-01

    The acid-base properties of phytic acid [ myo-inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakis(dihydrogen phosphate)] (H(12)Phy; Phy(12-)=phytate anion) were studied in aqueous solution by potentiometric measurements ([H+]-glass electrode) in lithium and potassium chloride aqueous media at different ionic strengths (0< I mol L(-1)< or =3) and at t=25 degrees C. The protonation of phytate proved strongly dependent on both ionic medium and ionic strength. The protonation constants obtained in alkali metal chlorides are considerably lower than the corresponding ones obtained in a previous paper in tetraethylammonium iodide (Et(4)NI; e.g., at I=0.5 mol L(-1), log K(3)(H)=11.7, 8.0, 9.1, and 9.1 in Et(4)NI, LiCl, NaCl and KCl, respectively; the protonation constants in Et(4)NI and NaCl were already reported), owing to the strong interactions occurring between the phytate and alkaline cations present in the background salt. We explained this in terms of complex formation between phytate and alkali metal ions. Experimental evidence allows us to consider the formation of 13 mixed proton-metal-ligand complexes, M(j)H(i)Phy((12-i-j)-), (M+ =Li+, Na+, K+), with j< or =7 and i< or =6, in the range 2.5< or =pH< or =10 (some measurements, at low ionic strength, were extended to pH=11). In particular, all the species formed are negatively charged: i+j-12=-5, -6. Very high formation percentages of M+-phytate species are observed in all the pH ranges investigated. The stability of alkali metal complexes follows the trend Li+ > or =Na+K+. Some measurements were also performed at constant ionic strength (I=0.5 mol L(-1)), using different mixtures of Et(4)NI and alkali metal chlorides, in order to confirm the formation of hypothesized and calculated metal-proton-ligand complex species and to obtain conditional protonation constants in these multi-component ionic media.

  17. Cryptic microtextures and geological histories of K-rich alkali feldspars revealed by charge contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flude, Stephanie; Lee, Martin R.; Sherlock, Sarah C.; Kelley, Simon P.

    2012-06-01

    Charge contrast imaging in the scanning electron microscope can provide new insights into the scale and composition of alkali feldspar microtextures, and such information helps considerably with the interpretation of their geological histories and results of argon isotope thermochronological analyses. The effectiveness of this technique has been illustrated using potassium-rich alkali feldspars from the Dartmoor granite (UK). These feldspars contain strain-controlled lamellar crypto- and microperthites that are cross-cut by strain-free deuteric microperthites. The constituent albite- and orthoclase-rich phases of both microperthite generations can be readily distinguished by atomic number contrast imaging. The charge contrast results additionally show that sub-micrometre-sized albite `platelets' are commonplace between coarser exsolution lamellae and occur together to make cryptoperthites. Furthermore, charge contrast imaging reveals that the orthoclase-rich feldspar is an intergrowth of two phases, one that is featureless with uniform contrast and another that occurs as cross-cutting veins and grains with the {110} adularia habit. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the featureless feldspar is tweed orthoclase, whereas the veins and euhedral grains are composed of irregular microcline that has formed from orthoclase by `unzipping' during deuteric or hydrothermal alteration. The charge contrast imaging results are especially important in demonstrating that deuteric perthites are far more abundant in alkali feldspars than would be concluded from investigations using conventional microscopy techniques. The unexpected presence of such a high volume of replacement products has significant implications for understanding the origins and geological histories of crustal rocks and the use of alkali feldspars in geo- and thermochronology. Whilst the precise properties of feldspars that generate contrast remain unclear, the similarity between charge contrast images

  18. A theoretical interpretation of the chemical shift of 29Si NMR peaks in alkali borosilicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanba, Tokuro; Nishimura, Mitsunori; Miura, Yoshinari

    2004-12-01

    In 29Si-NMR, it has so far been accepted that the chemical shifts of Q n species (SiO 4 units containing n bridging oxygens) were equivalent between alkali borosilicate and boron-free alkali silicate glasses. In the sodium borosilicate glasses with low sodium content, however, a contradiction was confirmed in the estimation of alkali distribution; 11B NMR suggested that Na ions were entirely distributed to borate groups to form BO 4 units, whereas a -90 ppm component was also observed in 29Si-NMR spectra, which has been attributed to Q 3 species associated with a nonbridging oxygen (NBO). Then, cluster molecular orbital calculations were performed to interpret the -90 ppm component in the borosilicate glasses. It was found that a silicon atom which had two tetrahedral borons (B4) as its second nearest neighbors was similar in atomic charge and Si2p energy to the Q 3 species in boron-free alkali silicates. Unequal distribution of electrons in Si-O-B4 bridging bonds was also found, where much electrons were localized on the Si-O bonds. It was finally concluded that the Si-O-B4 bridges with narrow bond angle were responsible for the -90 ppm 29Si component in the borosilicate glasses. There still remained another interpretation; the Q 3 species were actually present in the glasses, and NBOs in the Q 3 species were derived from the tricluster groups, such as (O 3Si)O(BO 3) 2. In the glasses with low sodium content, however, it was concluded that the tricluster groups were not so abundant to contribute to the -90 ppm component.

  19. Optical Absorption of Alkali Metal Vapors at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdman, Paul Stephen

    High pressure, high temperature lithium vapors are of interest to both basic and applied research. Lithium vapors at extreme temperatures may contain new species of molecules and molecular ions which have not been previously observed or well studied. The strong optical absorption properties of alkali metals in the visible and infrared make them desirable as solar absorbing materials for many applications. In particular, lithium is being considered as a candidate for absorption of solar energy in solar plasma propulsion. Studies of lithium vapors under high pressure and at high temperatures would simulate the rocket thruster environment in which they are expected to perform as solar absorbers. Optical absorption experiments were performed on high temperature, high pressure lithium vapors. The Plasma Spectroscopy Cell (PSC), a unique device constructed just for such experiments, was used to heat lithium vapors to a maximum temperature of 2100 K at 1 atmosphere pressure. The PSC has the potential to reach 3000 K and 100 atmospheres. Absorption spectra contain features of several well understood molecular transitions of lithium. Remaining spectral features require modeling of all possible transitions in order to identify the molecule contributing to overall absorption. Modeling of lithium optical absorption is performed here for several transitions of diatomic lithium. Several interesting features of the PSC absorption spectra have been explained by the modeling. Additional experiments and modeling are possible for future research.

  20. Luminescence of thermally altered human skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Krap, Tristan; Nota, Kevin; Wilk, Leah S; van de Goot, Franklin R W; Ruijter, Jan M; Duijst, Wilma; Oostra, Roelof-Jan

    2017-02-23

    Literature on luminescent properties of thermally altered human remains is scarce and contradictory. Therefore, the luminescence of heated bone was systemically reinvestigated. A heating experiment was conducted on fresh human bone, in two different media, and cremated human remains were recovered from a modern crematory. Luminescence was excited with light sources within the range of 350 to 560 nm. The excitation light was filtered out by using different long pass filters, and the luminescence was analysed by means of a scoring method. The results show that temperature, duration and surrounding medium determine the observed emission intensity and bandwidth. It is concluded that the luminescent characteristic of bone can be useful for identifying thermally altered human remains in a difficult context as well as yield information on the perimortem and postmortem events.

  1. Daptomycin forms cation- and size-selective pores in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, TianHua; Muraih, Jawad K; MacCormick, Ben; Silverman, Jared; Palmer, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Daptomycin is a lipopeptide antibiotic that is used clinically to treat severe infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria. Its bactericidal action involves the calcium-dependent binding to membranes containing phosphatidylglycerol, followed by the formation of membrane-associated oligomers. Bacterial cells exposed to daptomycin undergo membrane depolarization, suggesting the formation of channels or pores in the target membranes. We here used a liposome model to detect and characterize the permeability properties of the daptomycin pores. The pores are selective for cations, with permeabilities being highest for Na(+), K(+), and other alkali metal ions. The permeability is approximately twice lower for Mg(++), and lower again for the organic cations choline and hexamethonium. Anions are excluded, as is the zwitterion cysteine. These observations account for the observed depolarization of bacterial cells by daptomycin and suggest that under typical in vivo conditions depolarization is mainly due to sodium influx.

  2. Carbon dioxide and nitrogen adsorption on cation-exchanged SSZ-13 zeolites.

    PubMed

    Pham, Trong D; Liu, Qingling; Lobo, Raul F

    2013-01-15

    Samples of high-silica SSZ-13, ion exchanged with protons and alkali-metal cations Li(+), Na(+), and K(+), were investigated using adsorption isotherms of CO(2) and N(2). The results show that Li-, Na-SSZ-13 have excellent CO(2) capacity at ambient temperature and pressure; in general, Li-SSZ-13 shows the highest capacity for N(2), CO(2) particularly in the low-pressure region. The effect of cation type and Si/Al ratio (6 and 12) on the adsorption properties was investigated through analysis of adsorption isotherms and heats of adsorption. The separation of CO(2) in a flue gas mixture was evaluated for these adsorbents in the pressure swing adsorption and vacuum pressure adsorption processes.

  3. Distinct Fragmentation Pathways of Anticancer Drugs Induced by Charge-Carrying Cations in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Areum; Lee, Hong Hee; Heo, Chae Eun; Cho, Yunju; Kim, Sunghwan; Kang, Dukjin; Kim, Hugh I.

    2016-12-01

    With the growth of the pharmaceutical industry, structural elucidation of drugs and derivatives using tandem mass spectrometry (MS2) has become essential for drug development and pharmacokinetics studies because of its high sensitivity and low sample requirement. Thus, research seeking to understand fundamental relationships between fragmentation patterns and precursor ion structures in the gas phase has gained attention. In this study, we investigate the fragmentation of the widely used anticancer drugs, doxorubicin (DOX), vinblastine (VBL), and vinorelbine (VRL), complexed by a singly charged proton or alkali metal ion (Li+, Na+, K+) in the gas phase. The drug-cation complexes exhibit distinct fragmentation patterns in tandem mass spectra as a function of cation size. The trends in fragmentation patterns are explicable in terms of structures derived from ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and theoretical calculations.

  4. Near atomically smooth alkali antimonide photocathode thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jun; Karkare, Siddharth; Nasiatka, James; Schubert, Susanne; Smedley, John; Padmore, Howard

    2017-01-01

    Nano-roughness is one of the major factors degrading the emittance of electron beams that can be generated by high efficiency photocathodes, such as the thermally reacted alkali antimonide thin films. In this paper, we demonstrate a co-deposition based method for producing alkali antimonide cathodes that produce near atomic smoothness with high reproducibility. We calculate the effect of the surface roughness on the emittance and show that such smooth cathode surfaces are essential for operation of alkali antimonide cathodes in high field, low emittance radio frequency electron guns and to obtain ultracold electrons for ultrafast electron diffraction applications.

  5. Increasing Class C fly ash reduces alkali silica reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, J.K.

    2007-07-01

    Contrary to earlier studies, it has been found that incremental additions of Class C fly ash do reduce alkali silica reactivity (ASR), in highly reactive, high alkali concrete mixes. AST can be further reduced by substituting 5% metakaolin or silica fume for the aggregate in concrete mixes with high (more than 30%) Class C fly ash substitution. The paper reports results of studies using Class C fly ash from the Labadie Station plant in Missouri which typically has between 1.3 and 1.45% available alkalis by ASTM C311. 7 figs.

  6. Control of alkali species in gasification systems: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Turn, S.; Kinoshita, C.; Ishimura, D. Zhou, J.; Hiraki, T.; Masutani, S.

    2000-07-13

    Gas-phase alkali metal compounds contribute to fouling, slagging, corrosion, and agglomeration problems in energy conversion facilities. One mitigation strategy applicable at high temperature is to pass the gas stream through a fixed bed sorbent or getter material, which preferentially absorbs alkali via physical adsorption or chemisorption. This report presents results of an experimental investigation of high-temperature alkali removal from a hot filtered gasifier product gas stream using a packed bed of sorbent material. Two getter materials, activated bauxite and emathlite, were tested at two levels of space time by using two interchangeable reactors of different internal diameters. The effect of getter particle size was also investigated.

  7. Irrigant divalent cation concentrations influence bacterial adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Dass, Clarissa L.; Walsh, Mary F.; Seo, Sue; Shiratsuchi, Hiroe; Craig, David H.; Basson, Marc D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Surgical wounds are frequently contaminated by microbes, but rarely become infected if the bacterial burden is low, and irrigation is used to reduce contamination. Wound fluids are low in calcium and high in magnesium. We hypothesized that manipulating irrigant divalent cation concentrations might influence bacterial adhesion. Methods Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were stained with fluorescent Calcein AM before plating onto fibroblast monolayers, collagen I, or uncoated bacteriologic plastic. After one hour, wells were washed with HEPES-buffered pH-balanced sterile water without or with 5mM CaCl2, 5mM MgCl2 or 1mM EDTA+EGTA, and the remaining adherent bacteria were assayed fluorometrically. Results Supplementing the irrigation with magnesium or chelators increased but calcium-supplemented irrigation reduced bacterial adhesion to collagen or fibroblasts. Non-specific electrostatic bacterial adhesion to uncoated plastic was unaffected by calcium. Conclusion Bacterial adhesion to mammalian cells and matrix proteins is influenced by divalent cations, and pathogenic bacteria may be adapted to adhere under the low calcium high magnesium conditions in wounds. Although these results await confirmation for other bacteria, and in vivo validation and safety-testing, they suggest that supplementing wound irrigation with 5mM CaCl2 may reduce bacterial adhesion and subsequent wound infection. PMID:19577252

  8. Odor analysis of decomposing buried human remains

    SciTech Connect

    Vass, Arpad Alexander; Smith, Rob R; Thompson, Cyril V; Burnett, Michael N; Dulgerian, Nishan; Eckenrode, Brian A

    2008-01-01

    This study, conducted at the University of Tennessee's Anthropological Research Facility (ARF), lists and ranks the primary chemical constituents which define the odor of decomposition of human remains as detected at the soil surface of shallow burial sites. Triple sorbent traps were used to collect air samples in the field and revealed eight major classes of chemicals which now contain 478 specific volatile compounds associated with burial decomposition. Samples were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and were collected below and above the body, and at the soil surface of 1.5-3.5 ft. (0.46-1.07 m) deep burial sites of four individuals over a 4-year time span. New data were incorporated into the previously established Decompositional Odor Analysis (DOA) Database providing identification, chemical trends, and semi-quantitation of chemicals for evaluation. This research identifies the 'odor signatures' unique to the decomposition of buried human remains with projected ramifications on human remains detection canine training procedures and in the development of field portable analytical instruments which can be used to locate human remains in shallow burial sites.

  9. Juveniles' Motivations for Remaining in Prostitution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Shu-Ling; Bedford, Olwen

    2004-01-01

    Qualitative data from in-depth interviews were collected in 1990-1991, 1992, and 2000 with 49 prostituted juveniles remanded to two rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. These data are analyzed to explore Taiwanese prostituted juveniles' feelings about themselves and their work, their motivations for remaining in prostitution, and their difficulties…

  10. Identification of ancient remains through genomic sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Blow, Matthew J.; Zhang, Tao; Woyke, Tanja; Speller, Camilla F.; Krivoshapkin, Andrei; Yang, Dongya Y.; Derevianko, Anatoly; Rubin, Edward M.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of ancient DNA have been hindered by the preciousness of remains, the small quantities of undamaged DNA accessible, and the limitations associated with conventional PCR amplification. In these studies, we developed and applied a genomewide adapter-mediated emulsion PCR amplification protocol for ancient mammalian samples estimated to be between 45,000 and 69,000 yr old. Using 454 Life Sciences (Roche) and Illumina sequencing (formerly Solexa sequencing) technologies, we examined over 100 megabases of DNA from amplified extracts, revealing unbiased sequence coverage with substantial amounts of nonredundant nuclear sequences from the sample sources and negligible levels of human contamination. We consistently recorded over 500-fold increases, such that nanogram quantities of starting material could be amplified to microgram quantities. Application of our protocol to a 50,000-yr-old uncharacterized bone sample that was unsuccessful in mitochondrial PCR provided sufficient nuclear sequences for comparison with extant mammals and subsequent phylogenetic classification of the remains. The combined use of emulsion PCR amplification and high-throughput sequencing allows for the generation of large quantities of DNA sequence data from ancient remains. Using such techniques, even small amounts of ancient remains with low levels of endogenous DNA preservation may yield substantial quantities of nuclear DNA, enabling novel applications of ancient DNA genomics to the investigation of extinct phyla. PMID:18426903

  11. The case for fencing remains intact.

    PubMed

    Packer, C; Swanson, A; Canney, S; Loveridge, A; Garnett, S; Pfeifer, M; Burton, A C; Bauer, H; MacNulty, D

    2013-11-01

    Creel et al. argue against the conservation effectiveness of fencing based on a population measure that ignores the importance of top predators to ecosystem processes. Their statistical analyses consider, first, only a subset of fenced reserves and, second, an incomplete examination of 'costs per lion.' Our original conclusions remain unaltered.

  12. Odor analysis of decomposing buried human remains.

    PubMed

    Vass, Arpad A; Smith, Rob R; Thompson, Cyril V; Burnett, Michael N; Dulgerian, Nishan; Eckenrode, Brian A

    2008-03-01

    This study, conducted at the University of Tennessee's Anthropological Research Facility (ARF), lists and ranks the primary chemical constituents which define the odor of decomposition of human remains as detected at the soil surface of shallow burial sites. Triple sorbent traps were used to collect air samples in the field and revealed eight major classes of chemicals which now contain 478 specific volatile compounds associated with burial decomposition. Samples were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and were collected below and above the body, and at the soil surface of 1.5-3.5 ft. (0.46-1.07 m) deep burial sites of four individuals over a 4-year time span. New data were incorporated into the previously established Decompositional Odor Analysis (DOA) Database providing identification, chemical trends, and semi-quantitation of chemicals for evaluation. This research identifies the "odor signatures" unique to the decomposition of buried human remains with projected ramifications on human remains detection canine training procedures and in the development of field portable analytical instruments which can be used to locate human remains in shallow burial sites.

  13. Why Agricultural Educators Remain in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crutchfield, Nina; Ritz, Rudy; Burris, Scott

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe factors that are related to agricultural educator career retention and to explore the relationships between work engagement, work-life balance, occupational commitment, and personal and career factors as related to the decision to remain in the teaching profession. The target population for…

  14. Structure-properties relations of aluminum trichloride- alkali thiocyanate ionic complex liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changle

    1997-10-01

    In the pseudo binary systems, AlCl3-MSCN (where M = Li, Na, or K), low-melting solutions that are ionically- conducting and glass-forming occur over a wide composition range. The phase equilibria features are very similar to those of the analogous AlCl3-MCl binaries except for significantly lower liquidus temperatures, especially in more acidic compositions. The high conductivities of these liquids, which makes them of interest for rechargeable alkali battery systems, are attributed to a high degree of decoupling of cations from the complex anion matrix. A thorough Raman and FTIR characterization was made of the liquid structure. It appears that the anion complexes that make up the structure of AlCl3-MSCN liquids are formed by Lewis acid-base reactions very similar to those of the AlCl3-MCl binaries. Thus, in equimolar and acidic melts, the species Al(SCN)Cl3/sp- and Al2(SCN)Cl6/sp- are predominant. In contrast to the simpler AlCl3-MCl binaries, however, SCN-Cl ligand exchange reactions can also occur, forming complex anions with more than one SCN group. The low melting points, high cation conductivities, and the relative ease of supercooling and glass formation in the AlCl3- MSCN systems are believed to be related to the presence of these large and asymmetric complex anions.

  15. Anion effect on selectivity in solvent extraction of alkali metal salts by crown ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Hankins, M.G.; Bartsch, R.A.; Olsher, U.

    1995-11-01

    The influence of the co-extracted anion upon competitive solvent extraction of five alkali metal cations from aqueous solutions into organic diluents by the cis-syn-cis and cis-anti-cis isomers of dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 has been assessed. The anions are bromide, chloride, iodide, nitrate, perchlorate, and thiocyanate and the organic diluents are chloroform and 1-octanol. The extraction efficiency is markedly influenced by the identity of the anion and exhibits some correlation with the inverse of the hydration enthalpy of the anion. Although potassium is the best exctracted cation with all anions, the selectivities for potassium over lithium, sodium, rubidium, and cesium are strongly affected by anion variation in chloroform, but not in 1-octanol. The selectivity ordering in chloroform does not correlate with the hydration enthalpy or softness parameter for the anion. Instead it appears to result from variation of the dimensional structure and the availability of specific binding sites in the anion. 21 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  16. Cation affinity numbers of Lewis bases.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Christoph; Tandon, Raman; Maryasin, Boris; Larionov, Evgeny; Zipse, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Using selected theoretical methods the affinity of a large range of Lewis bases towards model cations has been quantified. The range of model cations includes the methyl cation as the smallest carbon-centered electrophile, the benzhydryl and trityl cations as models for electrophilic substrates encountered in Lewis base-catalyzed synthetic procedures, and the acetyl cation as a substrate model for acyl-transfer reactions. Affinities towards these cationic electrophiles are complemented by data for Lewis-base addition to Michael acceptors as prototypical neutral electrophiles.

  17. Development of cationic nanocrystals for ocular delivery.

    PubMed

    Romero, Gregori B; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H; Bou-Chacra, Nadia A

    2016-10-01

    A cationic nanocrystal formulation containing dexamethasone acetate nanocrystals (0.05%) and polymyxin B (0.10%) for ophthalmic application was produced using a self-developed small scale method for wet bead milling. The formulation developed offers the advantage of increased saturation solubility of the drug (due to the nano-size of the crystals) and increased residence time in the eye (due to small size and increased mucoadhesion by the cationic charge) resulting ultimately in potential increased bioavailability. Characterization of the nanosuspensions by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and transmission electron microscopy showed that the production method was successful in achieving dexamethasone crystals in the range of about 200-250nm. The physical stabilization of the nanocrystals and generation of the positive charge were realized by using cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and benzalkonium chloride (BAC) at the concentration of 0.01%. In contrast to other cationic excipients, they are regulatorily accepted due to their use as preservatives. The drug polymyxin B also contributed to the positive charge. Positive zeta potentials in the range +20 to +30mV were achieved. Isotonicity was adjusted using NaCl and non-ionic excipients (glycerol, sorbitol, dextrose). Physical and chemical stabilities were monitored for a period of 6months at room temperature, 5°C and 40°C. Particle size of the bulk population assessed by PCS remained practically unchanged over 6months of storage for the various formulations without isotonicity agents, and for the CPC-containing formulations with non-ionic isotonicity excipients. The chemical content also proved stable after 6months for all 3 temperatures evaluated. In vitro investigation of mucoadhesion was tested using mucin solutions at different concentrations, and the generated negative zeta potential was used as a measure of the interaction. The zeta potential reversed to about -15mV, indicating distinct interaction. The

  18. The 4843 Alkali Metal Storage Facility Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The 4843 AMSF has been used primarily to provide a centralized building to receive and store dangerous and mixed alkali metal waste, including sodium and lithium, which has been generated at the Fast Flux Test Facility and at various other Hanford Site operations that used alkali metals. Most of the dangerous and mixed alkali metal waste received consists of retired equipment from liquid sodium processes. The unit continues to store material. In general, only solid alkali metal waste that is water reactive is stored at the 4843 AMSF. The 4843 AMSF will be closed in a manner consistent with Ecology guidelines and regulations (WAC 173-303-610). The general closure procedure is detailed as follows.

  19. Effect of cavitation on removal of alkali elements from coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivalli, H.; Nirmal, L.; Nagarajan, R.

    2015-12-01

    The main impurities in coal are sulphur, ash and alkali. On combustion, the volatile forms of these impurities are either condensed on the boilers, or emitted in the form of potentially hazardous gases. The alkali elements present in coal help the fly ash particles adhere to boiler surfaces by providing a wet surface on which collection of these particles can take place. Use of ultrasonic techniques in cleaning of coal has stirred interest among researchers in recent times. Extraction of alkali elements by cavitation effect using low-frequency ultrasound, in the presence of reagents (HNO3 and H2O2) is reported in this paper. Powdered coal was dissolved with the reagent and exposed to ultrasonic fields of various frequencies at different time intervals. The treated solution is filtered and tested for alkali levels.

  20. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, M.M.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.

    1995-08-22

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  1. Electric field-induced softening of alkali silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, C.; Heffner, W.; Jain, H.; Tessarollo, R.; Raj, R.

    2015-11-02

    Motivated by the advantages of two-electrode flash sintering over normal sintering, we have investigated the effect of an external electric field on the viscosity of glass. The results show remarkable electric field-induced softening (EFIS), as application of DC field significantly lowers the softening temperature of glass. To establish the origin of EFIS, the effect is compared for single vs. mixed-alkali silicate glasses with fixed mole percentage of the alkali ions such that the mobility of alkali ions is greatly reduced while the basic network structure does not change much. The sodium silicate and lithium-sodium mixed alkali silicate glasses were tested mechanically in situ under compression in external electric field ranging from 0 to 250 V/cm in specially designed equipment. A comparison of data for different compositions indicates a complex mechanical response, which is observed as field-induced viscous flow due to a combination of Joule heating, electrolysis and dielectric breakdown.

  2. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, Marca M.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard

    1995-01-01

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  3. Hall Determination of Atomic Radii of Alkali Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    I will propose here an alternative method for determining atomic radii of alkali metals based on the Hall measurements of their free electron densities and the knowledge of their crystal structure. (Contains 2 figures.)

  4. Explosives remain preferred methods for platform abandonment

    SciTech Connect

    Pulsipher, A.; Daniel, W. IV; Kiesler, J.E.; Mackey, V. III

    1996-05-06

    Economics and safety concerns indicate that methods involving explosives remain the most practical and cost-effective means for abandoning oil and gas structures in the Gulf of Mexico. A decade has passed since 51 dead sea turtles, many endangered Kemp`s Ridleys, washed ashore on the Texas coast shortly after explosives helped remove several offshore platforms. Although no relationship between the explosions and the dead turtles was ever established, in response to widespread public concern, the US Minerals Management Service (MMS) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) implemented regulations limiting the size and timing of explosive charges. Also, more importantly, they required that operators pay for observers to survey waters surrounding platforms scheduled for removal for 48 hr before any detonations. If observers spot sea turtles or marine mammals within the danger zone, the platform abandonment is delayed until the turtles leave or are removed. However, concern about the effects of explosives on marine life remains.

  5. Becoming and remaining homeless: a qualitative investigation.

    PubMed

    Morrell-Bellai, T; Goering, P N; Boydell, K M

    2000-09-01

    This article reports the qualitative findings of a multimethod study of the homeless population in Toronto, Canada. The qualitative component sought to identify how people become homeless and why some individuals remain homeless for an extended period of time or cycle in and out of homelessness (the chronically homeless). In-depth, semistructured interviews were conducted with 29 homeless adults. The findings suggest that people both become and remain homeless due to a combination of macro level factors (poverty, lack of employment, low welfare wages, lack of affordable housing) and personal vulnerability (childhood abuse or neglect, mental health symptoms, impoverished support networks, substance abuse). Chronically homeless individuals often reported experiences of severe childhood trauma and tended to attribute their continued homelessness to a substance abuse problem. It is concluded that both macro and individual level factors must be considered in planning programs and services to address the issue of homelessness in Canada.

  6. Mill and the right to remain uninformed.

    PubMed

    Strasser, M

    1986-08-01

    In a recent article in the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, David Ost (1984) claims that patients do not have a right to waive their right to information. He argues that patients cannot make informed rational decisions without full information and thus, a right to waive information would involve a right to avoid one's responsibility to act as an autonomous moral agent. In support of his position, Ost cites a passage from Mill. Yet, a correct interpretation of the passage in question would support one's right to remain uninformed in certain situations. If the information would hurt one's chances for survival or hurt one's ability to make calm, rational decisions, then one not only does not have a duty to find out the information, but one's exercising one's right to remain uninformed may be the only rational course of action to take.

  7. [Professional confidentiality: speak out or remain silent? ].

    PubMed

    Daubigney, Jean-claude

    2014-01-01

    People who work with children, in their daily tasks, must choose whether to disclose information entrusted to them. However, they are subject to the law, which authorises or imposes speaking out or remaining silent. In terms of ethics, they can seek the best possible response while respecting professional secrecy when meeting an individual, in a situation, in a place or at a particular time. They must then take responsibility for that decision.

  8. 13 percent remain AIDS-free.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    Researchers predict that approximately thirteen percent of homosexual/bisexual men infected with HIV at an early age will be long-term survivors, remaining free of disease for more than twenty years. Researchers with the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study based their predictions on data from the ongoing study of 1,809 HIV-positive men. Stable immune markers and no use of antiretrovirals were the criteria used to define long-term.

  9. Direct Dating of Hominids Remains In Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Y.; Falguères, C.

    When archaeological sites are associated with human remains, it is relevant to be able to date those valuable remains for different reasons. The main one is that it avoids the stratigraphical problems which can be due to intrusive burials in the sequence. The other reason consists in the fact that human bones may be encountered out of established stratigraphical context. On the other hand, the majority of dating methods currently used are destructive and can not be applied on these precious samples particularly when they are older than 40,000 years and can not be dated by radiocarbon. Since several years, we have developped a completely non-destructive method which consists in the measurement of human remains using the gamma -ray spectrometry. This technique has been used recently by other laboratories. We present here two important cases for the knowledge of human evolution in Eurasia. The first example is Qafzeh site in Israel where many human skeletons have been unearthed from burials associated with fauna and lithic artefacts. This site has been dated by several independent radiometric methods. So, it was possible to compare our gamma results with the other results yielded by the different methods. The second case concerns the most evolved Homo erectus found in Java, Indonesia, at Ngandong site, close to the Solo river. A recent debate has been focused on the age of these fossils and their direct dating is of outmost importance for the knowledge of settlement of Modern Humans in South-East Asia.

  10. Electrochemical cell having an alkali-metal-nitrate electrode

    DOEpatents

    Roche, M.F.; Preto, S.K.

    1982-06-04

    A power-producing secondary electrochemical cell includes a molten alkali metal as the negative-electrode material and a molten-nitrate salt as the positive-electrode material. The molten material in the respective electrodes are separated by a solid barrier of alkali-metal-ion conducting material. A typical cell includes active materials of molten sodium separated from molten sodium nitrate and other nitrates in mixture by a layer of sodium ..beta..'' alumina.

  11. Rock Degradation by Alkali Metals: A Possible Lunar Erosion Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Naughton, J J; Barnes, I L; Hammond, D A

    1965-08-06

    When rocks melt under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions, their alkali components volatilize as metals. These metal vapors act to comminute polycrystalline rocks to their component minerals. The resultant powder is porous and loosely packed and its characteristics may be compatible with the lunar surface as revealed by the Ranger photographs. If meteorite impact or lunar volcanism has produced vaporization or areas of molten lava, alkali erosion may have given dust of this character in adjacent solid areas.

  12. Heavy metal cations permeate the TRPV6 epithelial cation channel.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Gergely; Danko, Tamas; Bergeron, Marc J; Balazs, Bernadett; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Zsembery, Akos; Hediger, Matthias A

    2011-01-01

    TRPV6 belongs to the vanilloid family of the transient receptor potential channel (TRP) superfamily. This calcium-selective channel is highly expressed in the duodenum and the placenta, being responsible for calcium absorption in the body and fetus. Previous observations have suggested that TRPV6 is not only permeable to calcium but also to other divalent cations in epithelial tissues. In this study, we tested whether TRPV6 is indeed also permeable to cations such as zinc and cadmium. We found that the basal intracellular calcium concentration was higher in HEK293 cells transfected with hTRPV6 than in non-transfected cells, and that this difference almost disappeared in nominally calcium-free solution. Live cell imaging experiments with Fura-2 and NewPort Green DCF showed that overexpression of human TRPV6 increased the permeability for Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and interestingly also for La(3+) and Gd(3+). These results were confirmed using the patch clamp technique. (45)Ca uptake experiments showed that cadmium, lanthanum and gadolinium were also highly efficient inhibitors of TRPV6-mediated calcium influx at higher micromolar concentrations. Our results suggest that TRPV6 is not only involved in calcium transport but also in the transport of other divalent cations, including heavy metal ions, which may have toxicological implications.

  13. Double layer effects in electrocatalysis: the oxygen reduction reaction and ethanol oxidation reaction on Au(111), Pt(111) and Ir(111) in alkaline media containing Na and Li cations.

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Pietro P.; Strmcnik, Dusan; Jirkovsky, Jakub S.; Connell, Justin G.; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad

    2016-03-15

    Oxygen reduction and ethanol oxidation reactions were studied on Au(111), Pt(111) and Ir(111) in alkaline solutions containing sodium and/or lithium cations. By keeping the same (111) surface orientation and exploring oxophilicity trends and non-covalent interactions between OHad and alkali metal cations (AMCn+), we were able to gain deep insights into the multiple roles that OHad plays in these important electrocatalytic reactions. Cyclic voltammetry experiments revealed that OHad formation initiates at distinct electrode potentials, governed by the oxophilicity of the specific metal surface, with further OHad adlayer stabilization by non-covalent alkali-cation interactions and affecting the formation of a “true oxide” layer at higher electrode potentials. Although OHad is a simple spectator for the ORR, it promotes the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) at lower potentials and act as spectator at high OHad coverages. By changing the alkali metal cation at the interface (Li+) on more oxophilic surfaces, it was possible to promote the EOR even more, relative to Na+, without changing the product distribution for the reaction. This cation effect suggests that OHad---Li+(H2O)x clusters can stabilize the ethoxide adlayer, thus improving the EOR activity. Our results indicate the importance of the entire electrochemical interface in determining the electrocatalytic activity during reaction.

  14. Preparation of poly(glycidylmethacrylate-divinylbenzene) weak acid cation exchange stationary phases with succinic anhydride, phthalic anhydride, and maleic anhydride for ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junwei; Wang, Yong; Wu, Shuchao; Zhang, Peimin; Zhu, Yan

    2016-08-01

    In this work, poly(glycidylmethacrylate-divinylbenzene) microspheres were prepared and applied for the preparation of weak acid cation exchange stationary phases. Succinic anhydride, phthalic anhydride, and maleic anhydride were selected as carboxylation reagents to prepare three weak acid cation exchangers by direct chemical derivatization reaction without solvent or catalyst. The diameters and dispersity of the microspheres were characterized by scanning electron microscopy; the amount of accessible epoxy groups and mechanical stability were also measured. The weak acid cation exchangers were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; the content of carboxyl groups was measured by traditional acid base titration method. The chromatographic properties were characterized and compared by separating alkali, alkaline earth metal ions and ammonium and polar amines. The separation properties enhanced in the order of succinic anhydride, phthalic anhydride, and maleic anhydride modified poly(glycidylmethacrylate-divinylbenzene) cation exchangers.

  15. Halogenated silanes, radicals, and cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liming; He, Yi-Liang

    2008-09-01

    Quantum chemistry study has been carried out on the structure and energetics of halogenated silanes, radicals, and cations (SiHxXy0,+1, X = F, Cl, Br; x + y = 1-4). The geometries are optimized at B3LYP/6-31+G(2df,p) level. The adiabatic ionization energiess (IEas), relative energetics of cations, proton affinities (PAs) of silanes, and the enthalpies of formation are predicted using G3(CC) model chemistry. Non-classical ion complex structures are found for hydrogenated cations and transition states connecting classical and non-classical structures are also located. The most stable cations for silylene and silyl radicals have their classical divalent and trivalent structures, and those for silanes have non-classical structures except for SiH3Br+ and SiH2Br2+. The non-classical structures for halosilane cations imply difficulty in experimentally measurement of the adiabatic ionization energies using photoionization or photoelectron studies. For SiH3X, SiH2X2, and SiHX3, the G3(CC) adiabatic IEas to classical ionic structures closest to their neutrals agree better with the photoelectron spectroscopic measurements. The transition states between classical and non-classical structures also hamper the photoionization determination of the appearance energies for silylene cations from silanes. The G3(CC) results for SiHx0,+1 agree excellently with the photoionization mass spectrometric study, and the results for fluorinated and chlorinated species also agree with the previous theoretical predictions at correlation levels from BAC-MP4 to CCSD(T)/CBS. The predicted enthalpy differences between SiH2Cl+, SiHCl2+, and SiCl3+ are also in accordance with previous kinetics study. The G3(CC) results show large discrepancies to the collision-induced charge transfer and/or dissociation reactions involving SiFx+ and SiClx+ ions, for which the G3(CC) enthalpies of formation are also significantly differed from the previous theoretical predictions, especially on SiFx+ (x = 2-4). The G3

  16. Distribution of albatross remains in the Far East regions during the Holocene, based on zooarchaeological remains.

    PubMed

    Eda, Masaki; Higuchi, Hiroyoshi

    2004-07-01

    Many albatross remains have been found in the Japanese Islands and the surrounding areas, such as Sakhalin and South Korea. These remains are interesting for two reasons: numerous sites from which albatross remains have been found are located in coastal regions of the Far East where no albatrosses have been distributed recently, and there are some sites in which albatross remains represent a large portion of avian remains, although albatrosses are not easily preyed upon by human beings. We collected data on albatross remains from archaeological sites in the Far East regions during the Holocene and arranged the remains geographically, temporally and in terms of quantity. Based on these results, we showed that coastal areas along the Seas of Okhotsk and Japan have rarely been used by albatrosses in Modern times, though formerly there were many albatrosses. We proposed two explanations for the shrinkage of their distributional range: excessive hunting in the breeding areas, and distributional changes of prey for albatrosses.

  17. Alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide double alkoxide precursors to alkali metal yttrium oxide nanomaterials

    DOE PAGES

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Neville, Michael L.; Sears, Jeremiah Matthew; ...

    2016-03-15

    In this study, a series of alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide ([AY(ONep)4]) compounds were developed as precursors to alkali yttrium oxide (AYO2) nanomaterials. The reaction of yttrium amide ([Y(NR2)3] where R=Si(CH3)3) with four equivalents of H-ONep followed by addition of [A(NR2)] (A=Li, Na, K) or Ao (Ao=Rb, Cs) led to the formation of a complex series of AnY(ONep)3+n species, crystallographically identified as [Y2Li3(μ3-ONep)(μ3-HONep)(μ-ONep)5(ONep)3(HONep)2] (1), [YNa2(μ3-ONep)4(ONep)]2 (2), {[Y2K3(μ3-ONep)3(μ-ONep)4(ONep)2(ηξ-tol)2][Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4]•ηx-tol]} (3), [Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4] (3a), [Y2Rb3(μ4-ONep)3(μ-ONep)6] (4), and [Y2Cs4(μ6-O)(μ3-ONep)6(μ3-HONep)2(ONep)2(ηx-tol)4]•tol (5). Compounds 1–5 were investigated as single source precursors to AYOx nanomaterials following solvothermal routes (pyridine, 185 °C for 24h). The final products after thermal processing weremore » found by powder X-ray diffraction experiments to be Y2O3 with variable sized particles based on transmission electron diffraction. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy studies indicated that the heavier alkali metal species were present in the isolated nanomaterials.« less

  18. Cation deficiency in the atmosphere as a probable cause of acid rains in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, G. S.

    In North America, where almost every shower is acidic (pH < 5.65), the proper causes have been studied. It was observed that the main cause behind the acidic rains is the alkali deficient environment which fails to neutralize the acid traces formed in the atmosphere by anthropogenic, biogenic and agricultural activity and not the increase in anions in the atmosphere as was speculated earlier by many workers. The data of 12 BAPMoN stations of America from the period 1974-1980 have revealed that, at most of the stations, the trends of cations are declining and in most cases the concentration of anions have also decreased. Thus the environment in the U.S. is becoming cleaner day by day. The pH values have been correlated with both the 'cations' and 'anions' separately (Fig. 1) for all 12 the BAPMoN stations and strong positive correlations have been observed between pH and cations ( rc) while poor correlations were found for anions ( ra) which reveals that pH of rain is more influenced by cation's activity in the atmosphere which are decreasing rapidly as a result of which the rains in North America are found to be acidic. It is not due to an increase in anions caused by industrialization and automobile emissions.

  19. Relation between the electroforming voltage in alkali halide-polymer diodes and the bandgap of the alkali halide

    SciTech Connect

    Bory, Benjamin F.; Wang, Jingxin; Janssen, René A. J.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Gomes, Henrique L.; De Leeuw, Dago M.

    2014-12-08

    Electroforming of indium-tin-oxide/alkali halide/poly(spirofluorene)/Ba/Al diodes has been investigated by bias dependent reflectivity measurements. The threshold voltages for electrocoloration and electroforming are independent of layer thickness and correlate with the bandgap of the alkali halide. We argue that the origin is voltage induced defect formation. Frenkel defect pairs are formed by electron–hole recombination in the alkali halide. This self-accelerating process mitigates injection barriers. The dynamic junction formation is compared to that of a light emitting electrochemical cell. A critical defect density for electroforming is 10{sup 25}/m{sup 3}. The electroformed alkali halide layer can be considered as a highly doped semiconductor with metallic transport characteristics.

  20. Interaction of Cu(+) with cytosine and formation of i-motif-like C-M(+)-C complexes: alkali versus coinage metals.

    PubMed

    Gao, Juehan; Berden, Giel; Rodgers, M T; Oomens, Jos

    2016-03-14

    The Watson-Crick structure of DNA is among the most well-known molecular structures of our time. However, alternative base-pairing motifs are also known to occur, often depending on base sequence, pH, or the presence of cations. Pairing of cytosine (C) bases induced by the sharing of a single proton (C-H(+)-C) may give rise to the so-called i-motif, which occurs primarily in expanded trinucleotide repeats and the telomeric region of DNA, particularly at low pH. At physiological pH, silver cations were recently found to stabilize C dimers in a C-Ag(+)-C structure analogous to the hemiprotonated C-dimer. Here we use infrared ion spectroscopy in combination with density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G+(2df,2p) level to show that copper in the 1+ oxidation state induces an analogous formation of C-Cu(+)-C structures. In contrast to protons and these transition metal ions, alkali metal ions induce a different dimer structure, where each ligand coordinates the alkali metal ion in a bidentate fashion in which the N3 and O2 atoms of both cytosine ligands coordinate to the metal ion, sacrificing hydrogen-bonding interactions between the ligands for improved chelation of the metal cation.

  1. Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin

    DOEpatents

    Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

    2013-07-30

    A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

  2. Superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerene nanowhiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeya, Hiroyuki; Konno, Toshio; Hirata, Chika; Wakahara, Takatsugu; Miyazawa, Kun'ichi; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Tanaka, Masashi; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2016-09-01

    Superconductivity in alkali metal-doped fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs) was observed in K3.3C60NWs, Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs with transition temperatures at 17, 25 and 26 K, respectively. Almost full shielding volume fraction (~80%) was observed in K3.3C60NWs when subjected to thermal treatment at 200 °C for a duration of 24 h. In contrast, the shielding fraction of Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs were calculated to be 8% and 6%, respectively. Here we report on an extensive investigation of the superconducting properties of these AC60NWs (A  =  K3.3, Rb3.0 and Cs2.0Rb1.0). These properties are compared to the ones reported on the corresponding conventional (single-crystal or powder) K-doped fullerene. We also evaluated the critical current densities of these C60NWs using the Bean model under an applied magnetic field up to 50 kOe.

  3. Bioinorganic Chemistry of the Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsam; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien T; Churchill, David G

    2016-01-01

    The common Group 1 alkali metals are indeed ubiquitous on earth, in the oceans and in biological systems. In this introductory chapter, concepts involving aqueous chemistry and aspects of general coordination chemistry and oxygen atom donor chemistry are introduced. Also, there are nuclear isotopes of importance. A general discussion of Group 1 begins from the prevalence of the ions, and from a comparison of their ionic radii and ionization energies. While oxygen and water molecule binding have the most relevance to biology and in forming a detailed understanding between the elements, there is a wide range of basic chemistry that is potentially important, especially with respect to biological chelation and synthetic multi-dentate ligand design. The elements are widely distributed in life forms, in the terrestrial environment and in the oceans. The details about the workings in animal, as well as plant life are presented in this volume. Important biometallic aspects of human health and medicine are introduced as well. Seeing as the elements are widely present in biology, various particular endogenous molecules and enzymatic systems can be studied. Sodium and potassium are by far the most important and central elements for consideration. Aspects of lithium, rubidium, cesium and francium chemistry are also included; they help in making important comparisons related to the coordination chemistry of Na(+) and K(+). Physical methods are also introduced.

  4. Superconductivity in alkali-metal-doped picene.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Ryoji; Suzuki, Yuta; Yamanari, Yusuke; Mitamura, Hiroki; Kambe, Takashi; Ikeda, Naoshi; Okamoto, Hideki; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Yamaji, Minoru; Kawasaki, Naoko; Maniwa, Yutaka; Kubozono, Yoshihiro

    2010-03-04

    Efforts to identify and develop new superconducting materials continue apace, motivated by both fundamental science and the prospects for application. For example, several new superconducting material systems have been developed in the recent past, including calcium-intercalated graphite compounds, boron-doped diamond and-most prominently-iron arsenides such as LaO(1-x)F(x)FeAs (ref. 3). In the case of organic superconductors, however, no new material system with a high superconducting transition temperature (T(c)) has been discovered in the past decade. Here we report that intercalating an alkali metal into picene, a wide-bandgap semiconducting solid hydrocarbon, produces metallic behaviour and superconductivity. Solid potassium-intercalated picene (K(x)picene) shows T(c) values of 7 K and 18 K, depending on the metal content. The drop of magnetization in K(x)picene solids at the transition temperature is sharp (<2 K), similar to the behaviour of Ca-intercalated graphite. The T(c) of 18 K is comparable to that of K-intercalated C(60) (ref. 4). This discovery of superconductivity in K(x)picene shows that organic hydrocarbons are promising candidates for improved T(c) values.

  5. The timing of alkali metasomatism in paleosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacFarlane, A. W.; Holland, H. D.

    1991-01-01

    We have measured the concentrations of rubidium and strontium and 87Sr/86Sr values of whole-rock samples from three paleosols of different ages. The oldest of the three weathering horizons, the 2,760 Ma Mt. Roe #1 paleosol in the Fortescue Group of Western Australia, experienced addition of Rb, and probably Sr, at 2,168 +/- 10 Ma. The intermediate paleosol, developed on the Hekpoort Basalt in South Africa, is estimated to have formed at 2,200 Ma, and yields a Rb-Sr isochron age of 1,925 +/- 32 Ma. The youngest of the three paleosols, developed on the Ongeluk basalt in Griqualand West, South Africa ca. 1,900 Ma, yielded a Rb-Sr age of 1,257 +/- 11 Ma. The Rb-Sr systematics of all three paleosols were reset during post-weathering metasomatism related to local or regional thermal disturbances. The Rb-Sr systematics of the paleosols were not subsequently disturbed. The near-complete removal of the alkali and alkaline earth elements from these paleosols during weathering made them particularly susceptible to resetting of their Rb-Sr systematics. Paleosols of this type are therefore sensitive indicators of the timing of thermal disturbances.

  6. Why Do Some Cores Remain Starless?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anathpindika, S.

    2016-08-01

    Prestellar cores, by definition, are gravitationally bound but starless pockets of dense gas. Physical conditions that could render a core starless (in the local Universe) is the subject of investigation in this work. To this end, we studied the evolution of four starless cores, B68, L694-2, L1517B, L1689, and L1521F, a VeLLO. We demonstrate: (i) cores contracted in quasistatic manner over a timescale on the order of ~ 105 yr. Those that remained starless briefly acquired a centrally concentrated density configuration that mimicked the profile of a unstable BonnorEbert sphere before rebounding, (ii) three cores viz. L694-2, L1689-SMM16, and L1521F remained starless despite becoming thermally super-critical. By contrast, B68 and L1517B remained sub-critical; L1521F collapsed to become a VeLLO only when gas-cooling was enhanced by increasing the size of dust-grains. This result is robust, for other starless cores viz. B68, L694-2, L1517B, and L1689 could also be similarly induced to collapse. The temperature-profile of starless cores and those that collapsed was found to be radically different. While in the former type, only very close to the centre of a core was there any evidence of decline in gas temperature, by contrast, a core of the latter type developed a more uniformly cold interior. Our principle conclusions are: (a) thermal super-criticality of a core is insufficient to ensure it will become protostellar, (b) potential star-forming cores (the VeLLO L1521F here), could be experiencing dust-coagulation that must enhance gasdust coupling and in turn lower gas temperature, thereby assisting collapse. This also suggests, mere gravitational/virial boundedness of a core is insufficient to ensure it will form stars.

  7. 51-L Challenger Crew Remains Transferred

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Challenger crewmember remains are being transferred from 7 hearse vehicles to a MAC C-141 transport plane at the Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility for transport to Dover Air Force Base, Delaware. The STS-51L crew consisted of: Mission Specialist, Ellison S. Onizuka, Teacher in Space Participant Sharon Christa McAuliffe, Payload Specialist, Greg Jarvis and Mission Specialist, Judy Resnik. In the front row from left to right: Pilot Mike Smith, Commander, Dick Scobee and Mission Specialist, Ron McNair.

  8. So close: remaining challenges to eradicating polio.

    PubMed

    Toole, Michael J

    2016-03-14

    The Global Polio Eradication Initiative, launched in 1988, is close to achieving its goal. In 2015, reported cases of wild poliovirus were limited to just two countries - Afghanistan and Pakistan. Africa has been polio-free for more than 18 months. Remaining barriers to global eradication include insecurity in areas such as Northwest Pakistan and Eastern and Southern Afghanistan, where polio cases continue to be reported. Hostility to vaccination is either based on extreme ideologies, such as in Pakistan, vaccination fatigue by parents whose children have received more than 15 doses, and misunderstandings about the vaccine's safety and effectiveness such as in Ukraine. A further challenge is continued circulation of vaccine-derived poliovirus in populations with low immunity, with 28 cases reported in 2015 in countries as diverse as Madagascar, Ukraine, Laos, and Myanmar. This paper summarizes the current epidemiology of wild and vaccine-derived poliovirus, and describes the remaining challenges to eradication and innovative approaches being taken to overcome them.

  9. Decomposition Technique for Remaining Useful Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Bhaskar (Inventor); Goebel, Kai F. (Inventor); Saxena, Abhinav (Inventor); Celaya, Jose R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic tool disclosed here decomposes the problem of estimating the remaining useful life (RUL) of a component or sub-system into two separate regression problems: the feature-to-damage mapping and the operational conditions-to-damage-rate mapping. These maps are initially generated in off-line mode. One or more regression algorithms are used to generate each of these maps from measurements (and features derived from these), operational conditions, and ground truth information. This decomposition technique allows for the explicit quantification and management of different sources of uncertainty present in the process. Next, the maps are used in an on-line mode where run-time data (sensor measurements and operational conditions) are used in conjunction with the maps generated in off-line mode to estimate both current damage state as well as future damage accumulation. Remaining life is computed by subtracting the instance when the extrapolated damage reaches the failure threshold from the instance when the prediction is made.

  10. Shotgun microbial profiling of fossil remains.

    PubMed

    Der Sarkissian, C; Ermini, L; Jónsson, H; Alekseev, A N; Crubezy, E; Shapiro, B; Orlando, L

    2014-04-01

    Millions to billions of DNA sequences can now be generated from ancient skeletal remains thanks to the massive throughput of next-generation sequencing platforms. Except in cases of exceptional endogenous DNA preservation, most of the sequences isolated from fossil material do not originate from the specimen of interest, but instead reflect environmental organisms that colonized the specimen after death. Here, we characterize the microbial diversity recovered from seven c. 200- to 13 000-year-old horse bones collected from northern Siberia. We use a robust, taxonomy-based assignment approach to identify the microorganisms present in ancient DNA extracts and quantify their relative abundance. Our results suggest that molecular preservation niches exist within ancient samples that can potentially be used to characterize the environments from which the remains are recovered. In addition, microbial community profiling of the seven specimens revealed site-specific environmental signatures. These microbial communities appear to comprise mainly organisms that colonized the fossils recently. Our approach significantly extends the amount of useful data that can be recovered from ancient specimens using a shotgun sequencing approach. In future, it may be possible to correlate, for example, the accumulation of postmortem DNA damage with the presence and/or abundance of particular microbes.

  11. On-chip fabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, K.; Ban, K.; Hirai, Y.; Sugano, K.; Tsuchiya, T.; Mizutani, N.; Tabata, O.

    2013-11-01

    We describe a novel on-chip microfabrication technique for the alkali-metal vapor cell of an optically pumped atomic magnetometer (OPAM), utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet (AMST). The newly proposed AMST is a millimeter-sized piece of porous alumina whose considerable surface area holds deposited alkali-metal chloride (KCl) and barium azide (BaN6), source materials that effectively produce alkali-metal vapor at less than 400 °C. Our experiments indicated that the most effective pore size of the AMST is between 60 and 170 µm. The thickness of an insulating glass spacer holding the AMST was designed to confine generated alkali metal to the interior of the vapor cell during its production, and an integrated silicon heater was designed to seal the device using a glass frit, melted at an optimum temperature range of 460-490 °C that was determined by finite element method thermal simulation. The proposed design and AMST were used to successfully fabricate a K cell that was then operated as an OPAM with a measured sensitivity of 50 pT. These results demonstrate that the proposed concept for on-chip microfabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells may lead to effective replacement of conventional glassworking approaches.

  12. Alkali-aggregate reactivity of typical siliceious glass and carbonate rocks in alkali-activated fly ash based geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Duyou; Liu, Yongdao; Zheng, Yanzeng; Xu, Zhongzi; Shen, Xiaodong

    2013-08-01

    For exploring the behaviour of alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR) in alkali-activated geopolymeric materials and assessing the procedures for testing AAR in geopolymers, the expansion behaviour of fly ash based geopolymer mortars with pure silica glass and typical carbonate rocks were studied respectively by curing at various conditions, i.e. 23°C and 38°C with relative humidity over 95%, immersed in 1M NaOH solution at 80°C. Results show that, at various curing conditions, neither harmful ASR nor harmful ACR was observed in geopolymers with the criteria specified for OPC system. However, with the change of curing conditions, the geopolymer binder and reactive aggregates may experience different reaction processes leading to quite different dimensional changes, especially with additional alkalis and elevated temperatures. It suggests that high temperature with additional alkali for accelerating AAR in traditional OPC system may not appropriate for assessing the alkali-aggregate reactivity behaviour in geopolymers designed for normal conditions. On the other hand, it is hopeful to control the dimensional change of geopolymer mortar or concrete by selecting the type of aggregates and the appropriate curing conditions, thus changing the harmful AAR in OPC into beneficial AAR in geopolymers and other alkali-activated cementitious systems.

  13. Cationic Zinc-Cadmium Alloy Clusters in Zeolite A

    SciTech Connect

    Readman,J.; Gameson, I.; Hriljac, J.; Anderson, P.

    2007-01-01

    Rietveld analysis of synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data obtained from the product of the reaction of cadmium vapor with dehydrated zinc-exchanged zeolite A (LTA structure type) indicates the formation of cationic zinc-cadmium alloy clusters. The clusters are located in approximately 40% of the sodalite cages; the remaining 60% of the cages contain divalent zinc ions coordinated both to the oxygen atoms of the zeolite framework and to residual extra framework oxygen.

  14. The reaction dynamics of alkali dimer molecules and electronically excited alkali atoms with simple molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Hongtao

    1995-12-01

    This dissertation presents the results from the crossed molecular beam studies on the dynamics of bimolecular collisions in the gas phase. The primary subjects include the interactions of alkali dimer molecules with simple molecules, and the inelastic scattering of electronically excited alkali atoms with O2. The reaction of the sodium dimers with oxygen molecules is described in Chapter 2. Two reaction pathways were observed for this four-center molecule-molecule reaction, i.e. the formations of NaO2 + Na and NaO + NaO. NaO2 products exhibit a very anisotropic angular distribution, indicating a direct spectator stripping mechanism for this reaction channel. The NaO formation follows the bond breaking of O2, which is likely a result of a charge transfer from Na2 to the excited state orbital of O2-. The scattering of sodium dimers from ammonium and methanol produced novel molecules, NaNH3 and Na(CH3OH), respectively. These experimental observations, as well as the discussions on the reaction dynamics and the chemical bonding within these molecules, will be presented in Chapter 3. The lower limits for the bond dissociation energies of these molecules are also obtained. Finally, Chapter 4 describes the energy transfer between oxygen molecules and electronically excited sodium atoms.

  15. Mixed alkali effect on the spectroscopic properties of alkali-alkaline earth oxide borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, G.; Ramesh, B.; Shareefuddin, Md.; Chary, M. N.; Sayanna, R.

    2016-05-01

    The mixed alkali and alkaline earth oxide borate glass with the composition xK2O - (25-x) Li2O-12.5BaO-12.5MgO-50B2O3 (x = 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25mol %) and doped with 1mol% CuO were prepared by the melt quenching technique. From the optical absorption spectra the optical band gap, electronic polarizability(α02-), interaction parameter (A), theoretical and experimental optical basicity (Λ) values were evaluated. From the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectral data the number of spins (N) and susceptibility (χ) were evaluated. The values of (α02-), and (Λ) increases with increasing of K2O content and electronic polarizability and interaction parameter show opposite behaviuor which may be due to the creation of non-bridging oxygens and expansion of borate network. The reciprocal of susceptibility (1/χ) and spin concentration (N) as a function of K2O content, varied nonlinearly which may be due to creation of non-bridging oxygens in the present glass system. This may be attributed to mixed alkali effect (MAE).

  16. Environmental quality assessment of reservoirs impacted by Hg from chlor-alkali technologies: case study of a recovery.

    PubMed

    Le Faucheur, Séverine; Vasiliu, Dan; Catianis, Irina; Zazu, Mariana; Dranguet, Perrine; Beauvais-Flück, Rebecca; Loizeau, Jean-Luc; Cosio, Claudia; Ungureanu, Costin; Ungureanu, Viorel Gheorghe; Slaveykova, Vera I

    2016-11-01

    Mercury (Hg) pollution legacy of chlor-alkali plants will be an important issue in the next decades with the planned phase out of Hg-based electrodes by 2025 within the Minamata convention. In such a context, the present study aimed to examine the extent of Hg contamination in the reservoirs surrounding the Oltchim plant and to evaluate the possible improvement of the environmental quality since the closure of its chlor-alkali unit. This plant is the largest chlor-alkali plant in Romania, which partly switched to Hg-free technology in 1999 and definitely stopped the use of Hg electrolysis in May 2012. Total Hg (THg) and methylmercury (CH3Hg) concentrations were found to decrease in the surface waters and sediments of the reservoirs receiving the effluents of the chlor-alkali platform since the closure of Hg units. Hence, calculated risk quotients (RQ) indicated no adverse effect of Hg for aquatic organisms from the ambient water exposure. RQ of Hg in sediments were mostly all higher than 1, showing important risks for benthic organisms. However, ecotoxicity testing of water and sediments suggest possible impact of other contaminants and their mixtures. Hg hotspots were found in soils around the platform with RQ values much higher than 1. Finally, THg and CH3Hg concentrations in fish were below the food safety limit set by the WHO, which contrasts with previous measurements made in 2007 revealing that 92 % of the studied fish were of high risk of consumption. Discontinuing the use of Hg electrodes greatly improved the surrounding environment of chlor-alkali plants within the following years and led to the decrease environmental exposure to Hg through fish consumption. However, sediment and soil still remained highly contaminated and problematic for the river reservoir management. The results of this ecological risk assessment study have important implications for the evaluation of the benefits as well as limits of the Minamata Convention implementation.

  17. Some remaining problems in HCDA analysis. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.W.

    1981-01-01

    The safety assessment and licensing of liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) requires an analysis on the capability of the reactor primary system to sustain the consequences of a hypothetical core-disruptive accident (HCDA). Although computational methods and computer programs developed for HCDA analyses can predict reasonably well the response of the primary containment system, and follow up the phenomena of HCDA from the start of excursion to the time of dynamic equilibrium in the system, there remain areas in the HCDA analysis that merit further analytical and experimental studies. These are the analysis of fluid impact on reactor cover, three-dimensional analysis, the treatment of the perforated plates, material properties under high strain rates and under high temperatures, the treatment of multifield flows, and the treatment of prestressed concrete reactor vessels. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the structural mechanics of HCDA analysis in these areas where improvements are needed.

  18. Does hypertension remain after kidney transplantation?

    PubMed

    Pourmand, Gholamreza; Dehghani, Sanaz; Rahmati, Mohamad Reza; Mehrsai, Abdolrasoul; Gooran, Shahram; Alizadeh, Farimah; Khaki, Siavash; Mortazavi, Seyede Hamideh; Pourmand, Naghmeh

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a common complication of kidney transplantation with the prevalence of 80%. Studies in adults have shown a high prevalence of hypertension (HTN) in the first three months of transplantation while this rate is reduced to 50- 60% at the end of the first year. HTN remains as a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, lower graft survival rates and poor function of transplanted kidney in adults and children. In this retrospective study, medical records of 400 kidney transplantation patients of Sina Hospital were evaluated. Patients were followed monthly for the 1st year, every two months in the 2nd year and every three months after that. In this study 244 (61%) patients were male. Mean ± SD age of recipients was 39.3 ± 13.8 years. In most patients (40.8%) the cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) was unknown followed by HTN (26.3%). A total of 166 (41.5%) patients had been hypertensive before transplantation and 234 (58.5%) had normal blood pressure. Among these 234 individuals, 94 (40.2%) developed post-transplantation HTN. On the other hand, among 166 pre-transplant hypertensive patients, 86 patients (56.8%) remained hypertensive after transplantation. Totally 180 (45%) patients had post-transplantation HTN and 220 patients (55%) didn't develop HTN. Based on the findings, the incidence of post-transplantation hypertension is high, and kidney transplantation does not lead to remission of hypertension. On the other hand, hypertension is one of the main causes of ESRD. Thus, early screening of hypertension can prevent kidney damage and reduce further problems in renal transplant recipients.

  19. Water Content of Lunar Alkali Fedlspar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, R. D.; Simon, J. I.; Wang, J.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Hauri, E. H.

    2016-01-01

    Detection of indigenous hydrogen in a diversity of lunar materials, including volcanic glass, melt inclusions, apatite, and plagioclase suggests water may have played a role in the chemical differentiation of the Moon. Spectroscopic data from the Moon indicate a positive correlation between water and Th. Modeling of lunar magma ocean crystallization predicts a similar chemical differentiation with the highest levels of water in the K- and Th-rich melt residuum of the magma ocean (i.e. urKREEP). Until now, the only sample-based estimates of water content of KREEP-rich magmas come from measurements of OH, F, and Cl in lunar apatites, which suggest a water concentration of < 1 ppm in urKREEP. Using these data, predict that the bulk water content of the magma ocean would have <10 ppm. In contrast, estimate water contents of 320 ppm for the bulk Moon and 1.4 wt % for urKREEP from plagioclase in ferroan anorthosites. Results and interpretation: NanoSIMS data from granitic clasts from Apollo sample 15405,78 show that alkali feldspar, a common mineral in K-enriched rocks, can have approx. 20 ppm of water, which implies magmatic water contents of approx. 1 wt % in the high-silica magmas. This estimate is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that estimated from apatite in similar rocks. However, the Cl and F contents of apatite in chemically similar rocks suggest that these melts also had high Cl/F ratios, which leads to spuriously low water estimates from the apatite. We can only estimate the minimum water content of urKREEP (+ bulk Moon) from our alkali feldspar data because of the unknown amount of degassing that led to the formation of the granites. Assuming a reasonable 10 to 100 times enrichment of water from urKREEP into the granites produces an estimate of 100-1000 ppm of water for the urKREEP reservoir. Using the modeling of and the 100-1000 ppm of water in urKREEP suggests a minimum bulk silicate Moon water content between 2 and 20 ppm. However, hydrogen loss was

  20. Rice proteins, extracted by alkali and α-amylase, differently affect in vitro antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengxuan; Liu, Ye; Li, Hui; Yang, Lin

    2016-09-01

    Alkali treatment and α-amylase degradation are different processes for rice protein (RP) isolation. The major aim of this study was to determine the influence of two different extraction methods on the antioxidant capacities of RPA, extracted by alkaline (0.2% NaOH), and RPE, extracted by α-amylase, during in vitro digestion for 2h with pepsin and for 3h with pancreatin. Upon pepsin-pancreatin digestion, the protein hydrolysates (RPA-S, RPE-S), which were the supernatants in the absence of undigested residue, and the whole protein digests (RPA, RPE), in which undigested residue remained, were measured. RPE exhibited the stronger antioxidant responses to free radical scavenging activity, metal chelating activity, and reducing power, whereas the weakest antioxidant capacities were produced by RPE-S. In contrast, no significant differences in antioxidant activity were observed between RPA and RPA-S. The present study demonstrated that the in vitro antioxidant responses induced by the hydrolysates and the protein digests of RPs could be affected differently by alkali treatment and α-amylase degradation, suggesting that the extraction is a vital processing step to modify the antioxidant capacities of RPs. The results of the current study indicated that the protein digests, in which undigested residues remained, could exhibit more efficacious antioxidant activity compared to the hydrolysates.

  1. Alkali content of alpine ultramafic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, W.; Mountjoy, W.

    1965-01-01

    The lower limit of abundance of sodium and potassium in ultramafic rocks is less than the threshold amount detectable by conventional analytical methods. By a dilutionaddition modification of the flame-spectrophotometric method, sodium and potassium have been determined in 40 specimens of alpine ultramafic rocks. Samples represent six regions in the United States and one in Australia, and include dunite, peridotite, pyroxenite, and their variably serpentinized and metamorphosed derivatives. The median value found for Na2O is 0.004 per cent, and the range of Na2O is 0.001-0.19. The median value for K2O is 0.0034 per cent and the range is 0.001-0.031 per cent. Alkali concentrations are below 0.01 per cent Na2O in 28 samples and below 0.01 per cent K2O in 35. Derivation of basalt magma from upper-mantle material similar to such ultramafic rocks, as has been postulated, is precluded by the relative amounts of sodium and potassium, which are from 200 to 600 times more abundant in basalt than in the ultramafic rocks. Similar factors apply to a number of other elements. No reasonable process could produce such concentrations in, for example, tens of thousands of cubic miles of uniform tholeiitic basalt. The ultramafic rocks might have originated either as magmatic crystal precipitates or as mantle residues left after fusion and removal of basaltic magma. Injection of ultramafic rocks to exposed positions is tectonic rather than magmatic. ?? 1965.

  2. The Production of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Anions in Inert Gas Matrices Doped with Alkali Metals. Electronic Absorption Spectra of the Pentacene Anion (C22H14(-))

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halasinski, Thomas M.; Hudgins, Douglas M.; Salama, Farid; Allamandola, Louis J.; Mead, Susan (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The absorption spectra of pentacene (C22H14) and its radical cation (C22H14(+)) and anion (C22H14(-)) isolated in inert-gas matrices of Ne, Ar, and Kr are reported from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared. The associated vibronic band systems and their spectroscopic assignments are discussed together with the physical and chemical conditions governing ion (and counterion) production in the solid matrix. In particular, the formation of isolated pentacene anions is found to be optimized in matrices doped with alkali metal (Na and K).

  3. Smart Point Cloud: Definition and Remaining Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poux, F.; Hallot, P.; Neuville, R.; Billen, R.

    2016-10-01

    Dealing with coloured point cloud acquired from terrestrial laser scanner, this paper identifies remaining challenges for a new data structure: the smart point cloud. This concept arises with the statement that massive and discretized spatial information from active remote sensing technology is often underused due to data mining limitations. The generalisation of point cloud data associated with the heterogeneity and temporality of such datasets is the main issue regarding structure, segmentation, classification, and interaction for an immediate understanding. We propose to use both point cloud properties and human knowledge through machine learning to rapidly extract pertinent information, using user-centered information (smart data) rather than raw data. A review of feature detection, machine learning frameworks and database systems indexed both for mining queries and data visualisation is studied. Based on existing approaches, we propose a new 3-block flexible framework around device expertise, analytic expertise and domain base reflexion. This contribution serves as the first step for the realisation of a comprehensive smart point cloud data structure.

  4. Organic Remains in Finnish Subglacial Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punkari, Mikko; Forsström, Lars

    1995-05-01

    Many sites in Fennoscandia contain pre-Late Weichselian beds of organic matter, located mostly in the flanks of eskers. It is a matter of debate whether these fragmentary beds were deposited in situ, or whether they were deposited elsewhere and then picked up and moved by glacial ice. The till-mantled esker of Harrinkangas includes a shallow depression filled with sand and silt containing, for example, several tightly packed laminar sheets of brown moss ( Bryales) remains. It is argued that these thin peat sheets were transported at the base of the ice sheet, or englacially, and were deposited together with the silt and sand on the side of a subglacial meltwater tunnel. Subglacial meltout till subsequently covered the flanks of the esker near the receding ice margin. Information about the depositional and climatic environments was obtained from biostratigraphic analysis of the organic matter. Pollen spectra for the peat represent an open birch forest close to the tundra zone. A thin diamicton beneath the peat contains charred pine wood, recording the former presence of pine forests in western Finland. The unhumified, extremely well-preserved peat evidently originated during the final phase of an ice-free period, most probably the end of the Eemian Interglaciation. It was redeposited in the esker by the last ice sheet. Reconstructions of the Pleistocene chronology and stratigraphy of central Fennoscandia that rely on such redeposited organic matter should be viewed with caution.

  5. Spatial patterning of vulture scavenged human remains.

    PubMed

    Spradley, M Katherine; Hamilton, Michelle D; Giordano, Alberto

    2012-06-10

    This article presents the results of a pilot study on the effects of vulture modification to human remains. A donated body from the Willed Body Donation Program was placed at the Forensic Anthropology Research Facility (FARF), an outdoor human decomposition laboratory located at Texas State University-San Marcos. The effects of vulture scavenging on the timing and sequence, and the rate of skeletonization, disarticulation, and dispersal were observed via a motion sensing camera and direct observation. Using GIS (Geographic Information Systems) and GPS (Global Positioning System) technologies and spatial analytical methods, the transport of skeletal elements was mapped in order to analyze dispersal and terrain-influenced patterns of active vulture scavenging. Results showed that the initial scavenging took place 37 days after placement at FARF. This delay in scavenging differs from previous research. After the initial appearance of the vultures, the body was reduced from a fully-fleshed individual to a skeleton within only 5h. This underscores the potential for errors in postmortem interval estimations made at vulture scavenged scenes. Additionally, spatial analysis showed that skeletal elements were dispersed by vultures to lower elevations, and that the disarticulation and dispersal of the skeletal elements occurs early in the scavenging sequence.

  6. Superconductivity in an Alkali Doped Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon, Picene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokumoto, Madoka; Shimizu, Fumihiko; Hata, Yoshiaki; Sawai, Shinya; Han, Jing; Inoue, Katsuya

    2010-03-01

    The effect of carrier doping into polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, including perylene and pentacene, has been extensively studied.[1] As a result of halogen or alkali metal doping, a drastic increase in electrical conductivity was observed. However, superconductivity has not been reported except the one by Sch"on et al.[2] Recently, Kubozono reported that one of them, i.e. picene (C22H14) showed superconductivity at 20 K by doping with potassium.[3] We anticipate that it will lead to surprising findings of hidden organic molecular superconductors. In this presentation, we will report on the characterization of superconducting properties of alkali doped picene. Instead of ordinary vapor phase alkali metal doping, we employ thermal decomposition of alkali azides, i.e. AN3 where A = K, Rb. We followed the doping procedure of thermal decomposition applied to fullerene C60.[4] A systematic variation of the superconducting transition temperature and fraction are studied as a function of alkali metal composition. [1] H. Akamatu, H. Inokuchi, and Y. Matsunaga, Nature 173 (1954) 168. [2] J. H. Sch"on, Ch. Kloc & B. Batlogg, Nature 406 (2000) 702; retraction, Nature 422 (2003) 93. [3] R. Mitsuhashi, Y. Kubozono et al.: private communication. [4] M. Tokumoto, et al. , J. Phys. Chem. Solids, 54 (1993) 1667.

  7. Lithium and Sodium Resistance of Alkali Metal Vapor Resistant Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishinevski, Anatoly; Hall, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    A common challenge in atomic physics is that of containing an alkali metal vapor at an elevated temperature and concurrently being able to excite and probe atomic transitions within. Typically glass is used as the material to construct the container, as it is easy to manipulate into any geometry and offers thermal, mechanical, and optical properties that no other material is capable. Unfortunately it has been well established that alkali metal gasses/vapors react readily with silica containing glass and results in a progressive darkening of the material. As the darkening reaction progresses, the optical transmission properties of the glass progressively degrade to an eventual point of uselessness. Alkali metals have been used extensively in frequency standards and magnetometers. The finite life of these alkali metal vapor-containing devices has been accepted despite varying attempts by different teams to solve this problem. As a viable solution, it has been identified there exist a family of glass compositions that contain a marginal amount of silica, may be lampworked using traditional glassblowing techniques, and that offer substantially better alkali vapor resistance. The evaluation of these glasses and their resistance to sodium and lithium vapor at varying pressures and temperatures are discussed.

  8. Nonbonded interactions in membrane active cyclic biopolymers. IV - Cation dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, R.; Srinivasan, S.; Prasad, C. V.; Brinda, S. R.; Macelroy, R. D.; Sundaram, K.

    1980-01-01

    Interactions of valinomycin and form of its analogs in several conformations with the central ions Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+) and Cs(+) are investigated as part of a study of the specific preference of valinomycin for potassium and the mechanisms of carrier-mediated ion transport across membranes. Ion binding energies and conformational potential energies are calculated taking into account polarization energy formulas and repulsive energy between the central ion and the ligand atoms for conformations representing various stages in ion capture and release for each of the two ring chiralities of valinomycin and its analogs. Results allow the prediction of the chirality and conformation most likely to be observed for a given analog, and may be used to synthesize analogs with a desired rigidity or flexibility. The binding energies with the alkali metal cations are found to decrease with increasing ion size, and to be smaller than the corresponding ion hydration energies. It is pointed out that the observed potassium preference may be explainable in terms of differences between binding and hydration energies. Binding energies are also noted to depend on ligand conformation.

  9. Ghost Remains After Black Hole Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has found a cosmic "ghost" lurking around a distant supermassive black hole. This is the first detection of such a high-energy apparition, and scientists think it is evidence of a huge eruption produced by the black hole. This discovery presents astronomers with a valuable opportunity to observe phenomena that occurred when the Universe was very young. The X-ray ghost, so-called because a diffuse X-ray source has remained after other radiation from the outburst has died away, is in the Chandra Deep Field-North, one of the deepest X-ray images ever taken. The source, a.k.a. HDF 130, is over 10 billion light years away and existed at a time 3 billion years after the Big Bang, when galaxies and black holes were forming at a high rate. "We'd seen this fuzzy object a few years ago, but didn't realize until now that we were seeing a ghost", said Andy Fabian of the Cambridge University in the United Kingdom. "It's not out there to haunt us, rather it's telling us something - in this case what was happening in this galaxy billions of year ago." Fabian and colleagues think the X-ray glow from HDF 130 is evidence for a powerful outburst from its central black hole in the form of jets of energetic particles traveling at almost the speed of light. When the eruption was ongoing, it produced prodigious amounts of radio and X-radiation, but after several million years, the radio signal faded from view as the electrons radiated away their energy. HDF 130 Chandra X-ray Image of HDF 130 However, less energetic electrons can still produce X-rays by interacting with the pervasive sea of photons remaining from the Big Bang - the cosmic background radiation. Collisions between these electrons and the background photons can impart enough energy to the photons to boost them into the X-ray energy band. This process produces an extended X-ray source that lasts for another 30 million years or so. "This ghost tells us about the black hole's eruption long after

  10. Alkali aluminosilicate melts and glasses: structuring at the middle range order of amorphous matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Losq, C.; neuville, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Rheological properties of silicate melts govern both magma ascension from the mantle to the surface of the earth and volcanological eruptions styles and behaviours. It is well known that several parameters impact strongly these properties, such as for instance the temperature, pressure, chemical composition and volatiles concentration, finally influencing eruptive behaviour of volcanoes. In this work, we will focus on the Na2O-K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 system, which is of a prime importance because it deals with a non-negligible part of natural melts, like for instance the Vesuvius (Italy) or Erebus (Antartica) magmas. In an oncoming paper in Chemical Geology (Le Losq and Neuville, 2012), we have communicated results of the study of mixing Na-K in tectosilicate melts containing a high concentration of silica (≥75mol%). In the present communication, we will enlarge this first point of view to tectosilicate melts presenting a lower silica concentration. We will first present our viscosity data, and then the Adam and Gibbs theory that allows theoretically modelling Na-K mixing in aluminosilicate melts by using the so-called "mixed alkali effect". On the basis of the rheological results, the Na-K mixing cannot be explained with the ideal "mixed alkali effect", which involves random exchange of Na-K cationic pairs. To go further and as rheological properties are directly linked with structural properties, we will present our first results obtained by Raman and NMR spectroscopy. These last ones provide important structural pieces of information on the polymerization state of glasses and melts, and also on the environment of tetrahedrally coordinated cations. Rheological and structural results all highlight that Na and K are not randomly distributed in aluminosilicate glasses and melts networks. Na melts present a network with some channels and a non-random distribution of Al and Si. K networks are different. They also present a non-random distribution of Al and Si, but in two sub

  11. Maternal exposure to alkali, alkali earth, transition and other metals: Concentrations and predictors of exposure.

    PubMed

    Hinwood, A L; Stasinska, A; Callan, A C; Heyworth, J; Ramalingam, M; Boyce, M; McCafferty, P; Odland, J Ø

    2015-09-01

    Most studies of metals exposure focus on the heavy metals. There are many other metals (the transition, alkali and alkaline earth metals in particular) in common use in electronics, defense industries, emitted via combustion and which are naturally present in the environment, that have received limited attention in terms of human exposure. We analysed samples of whole blood (172), urine (173) and drinking water (172) for antimony, beryllium, bismuth, cesium, gallium, rubidium, silver, strontium, thallium, thorium and vanadium using ICPMS. In general most metals concentrations were low and below the analytical limit of detection with some high concentrations observed. Few factors examined in regression models were shown to influence biological metals concentrations and explained little of the variation. Further study is required to establish the source of metals exposures at the high end of the ranges of concentrations measured and the potential for any adverse health impacts in children.

  12. Ciguatera: recent advances but the risk remains.

    PubMed

    Lehane, L; Lewis, R J

    2000-11-01

    Ciguatera is an important form of human poisoning caused by the consumption of seafood. The disease is characterised by gastrointestinal, neurological and cardiovascular disturbances. In cases of severe toxicity, paralysis, coma and death may occur. There is no immunity, and the toxins are cumulative. Symptoms may persist for months or years, or recur periodically. The epidemiology of ciguatera is complex and of central importance to the management and future use of marine resources. Ciguatera is an important medical entity in tropical and subtropical Pacific and Indian Ocean regions, and in the tropical Caribbean. As reef fish are increasingly exported to other areas, it has become a world health problem. The disease is under-reported and often misdiagnosed. Lipid-soluble, polyether toxins known as ciguatoxins accumulated in the muscles of certain subtropical and tropical marine finfish cause ciguatera. Ciguatoxins arise from biotransformation in the fish of less polar ciguatoxins (gambiertoxins) produced by Gambierdiscus toxicus, a marine dinoflagellate that lives on macroalgae, usually attached to dead coral. The toxins and their metabolites are concentrated in the food chain when carnivorous fish prey on smaller herbivorous fish. Humans are exposed at the end of the food chain. More than 400 species of fish can be vectors of ciguatoxins, but generally only a relatively small number of species are regularly incriminated in ciguatera. Ciguateric fish look, taste and smell normal, and detection of toxins in fish remains a problem. More than 20 precursor gambiertoxins and ciguatoxins have been identified in G. toxicus and in herbivorous and carnivorous fish. The toxins become more polar as they undergo oxidative metabolism and pass up the food chain. The main Pacific ciguatoxin (P-CTX-1) causes ciguatera at levels=0.1 microg/kg in the flesh of carnivorous fish. The main Caribbean ciguatoxin (C-CTX-1) is less polar and 10-fold less toxic than P-CTX-1. Ciguatoxins

  13. Metal cation dependence of interactions with amino acids: bond dissociation energies of Rb(+) and Cs(+) to the acidic amino acids and their amide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Armentrout, P B; Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M T

    2014-04-24

    Metal cation-amino acid interactions are key components controlling the secondary structure and biological function of proteins, enzymes, and macromolecular complexes comprising these species. Determination of pairwise interactions of alkali metal cations with amino acids provides a thermodynamic vocabulary that begins to quantify these fundamental processes. In the present work, we expand a systematic study of such interactions by examining rubidium and cesium cations binding with the acidic amino acids (AA), aspartic acid (Asp) and glutamic acid (Glu), and their amide derivatives, asparagine (Asn) and glutamine (Gln). These eight complexes are formed using electrospray ionization and their bond dissociation energies (BDEs) are determined experimentally using threshold collision-induced dissociation with xenon in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. Analyses of the energy-dependent cross sections include consideration of unimolecular decay rates, internal energy of the reactant ions, and multiple ion-neutral collisions. Quantum chemical calculations are conducted at the B3LYP, MP2(full), and M06 levels of theory using def2-TZVPPD basis sets, with results showing reasonable agreement with experiment. At 0 and 298 K, most levels of theory predict that the ground-state conformers for M(+)(Asp) and M(+)(Asn) involve tridentate binding of the metal cation to the backbone carbonyl, amino, and side-chain carbonyl groups, although tridentate binding to the carboxylic acid group and side-chain carbonyl is competitive for M(+)(Asn). For the two longer side-chain amino acids, Glu and Gln, multiple structures are competitive. A comparison of these results to those for the smaller alkali cations, Na(+) and K(+), provides insight into the trends in binding energies associated with the molecular polarizability and dipole moment of the side chain. For all four metal cations, the BDEs are inversely correlated with the size of the metal cation and follow the order Asp < Glu

  14. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of alkali metal deficiency and excess.

    PubMed

    Yung, C Y

    1984-01-01

    The alkali metals from the Group IA of the periodic table (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium and francium) are reviewed. The neuropsychiatric aspects of alkali metal deficiencies and excesses (intoxications) are described. Emphasis was placed on lithium due to its clinical uses. The signs and symptoms of these conditions are characterized by features of an organic brain syndrome with delirium and encephalopathy prevailing. There are no clinically distinctive features that could be reliably used for diagnoses. Sodium and potassium are two essential alkali metals in man. Lithium is used as therapeutic agent in bipolar affective disorders. Rubidium has been investigated for its antidepressant effect in a group of psychiatric disorders. Cesium is under laboratory investigation for its role in carcinogenesis and in depressive illness. Very little is known of francium due to its great instability for experimental study.

  15. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of alkali metal deficiency and excess

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, C.Y.

    1984-01-01

    The alkali metals from the Group IA of the periodic table (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium and francium) are reviewed. The neuropsychiatric aspects of alkali metal deficiencies and excesses (intoxications) are described. Emphasis was placed on lithium due to its clinical uses. The signs and symptoms of these conditions are characterized by features of an organic brain syndrome with delirium and encephalopathy prevailing. There are no clinically distinctive features that could be reliably used for diagnoses. Sodium and potassium are two essential alkali metals in man. Lithium is used as therapeutic agent in bipolar affective disorders. Rubidium has been investigated for its antidepressant effect in a group of psychiatric disorders. Cesium is under laboratory investigation for its role in carcinogenesis and in depressive illness. Very little is known of francium due to its great instability for experimental study.

  16. Superconductivity at 5 K in alkali-metal-doped phenanthrene.

    PubMed

    Wang, X F; Liu, R H; Gui, Z; Xie, Y L; Yan, Y J; Ying, J J; Luo, X G; Chen, X H

    2011-10-18

    Organic superconductors have π-molecular orbitals, from which electrons can become delocalized, giving rise to metallic conductivity due to orbital overlap between adjacent molecules. Here we report the discovery of superconductivity at a transition temperature (T(c)) of ~5 K in alkali-metal-doped phenanthrene. A 1-GPa pressure leads to a 20% increase of T(c), suggesting that alkali-metal-doped phenanthrene shows unconventional superconductivity. Raman spectra indicate that alkali-metal doping injects charge into the system to realize the superconductivity. The discovery of superconductivity in A(3)phenanthrene (where A can be either K or Rb) produces a novel broad class of superconductors consisting of fused hydrocarbon benzene rings with π-electron networks. An increase of T(c) with increasing number of benzene rings from three to five suggests that organic hydrocarbons with long chains of benzene rings are potential superconductors with high T(c).

  17. Alkali-vapor emission from PFBC of Illinois coals.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. H. D.; Teats, F. G.; Swift, W. M.; Banerjee, D. D.; Chemical Engineering; Center for Research on Sulfur in Coal

    1992-01-01

    Two Illinois Herrin No. 6 coals and one Illinois Springfield No. 5 coal were combusted in a laboratory-scale PFBC/alkali sorber facility with a bed of Tymochtee dolomite at temperatures ranging from 910 to 950oC and a system pressure of 9.2 atm absolute. Alkali vapor emission (Na and K) from combustion was determined by analytical activated-bauxite sorber bed technique. The test results showed that sodium is the major alkali-vapor species present in the PFBC flue gas of these coals and that there is a positive linear relationship between the level of sodium-vapor emission with both Na and Cl contents in the coals.

  18. Formation and stability of high-spin alkali clusters.

    PubMed

    Schulz, C P; Claas, P; Schumacher, D; Stienkemeier, F

    2004-01-09

    Helium nanodroplet isolation has been applied to agglomerate alkali clusters at temperatures of 380 mK. The very weak binding to the surface of the droplets allows a selection of only weakly bound, high-spin states. Here we show that larger clusters of alkali atoms in high-spin states can be formed. The lack of strong bonds from pairing electrons makes these systems nonmetallic, van der Waals-like complexes of metal atoms. We find that sodium and potassium readily form such clusters containing up to 25 atoms. In contrast, this process is suppressed for rubidium and cesium. Apparently, for these heavy alkalis, larger high-spin aggregates are not stable and depolarize spontaneously upon cluster formation.

  19. Formation and Stability of High-Spin Alkali Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, C. P.; Claas, P.; Schumacher, D.; Stienkemeier, F.

    2004-01-01

    Helium nanodroplet isolation has been applied to agglomerate alkali clusters at temperatures of 380mK. The very weak binding to the surface of the droplets allows a selection of only weakly bound, high-spin states. Here we show that larger clusters of alkali atoms in high-spin states can be formed. The lack of strong bonds from pairing electrons makes these systems nonmetallic, vanderWaals like complexes of metal atoms. We find that sodium and potassium readily form such clusters containing up to 25atoms. In contrast, this process is suppressed for rubidium and cesium. Apparently, for these heavy alkalis, larger high-spin aggregates are not stable and depolarize spontaneously upon cluster formation.

  20. A case of severe airbag related ocular alkali injury.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Shawn S; Wong, William; Affeldt, John C

    2012-08-01

    While airbags have saved many lives and are clearly beneficial overall, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) powder produced by the inflation reaction can cause significant alkali ocular injury if not irrigated promptly. Here we report a case of severe airbag related ocular alkali injury as a way to bring attention to the need for prompt ocular irrigation following motor vehicle accidents (MVA) with airbag deployment. A 47-year-old man was involved in a MVA with airbag deployment in a rural setting. Attention was paid to several other life-threatening traumatic injuries, however, ocular irrigation was not performed until some 6-7 hours after the MVA. Over the course of 6 months, airbag related alkali injury caused severe limbal ischemia, conjunctivalization of the cornea, corneal epithelial defects, cicatricial scarring, haze, and corneal/limbal vascularization despite amniotic membrane graft. Awareness of the importance of ocular irrigation following airbag deployment must be raised both in the ophthalmology and emergency medicine communities.

  1. Theoretical study of the alkali and alkaline-earth monosulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Ab initio calculations have been used to obtain accurate spectroscopic constants for the X2Pi and A2Sigma(+) states of the alkali sulfides and the X1Sigma(+), a3Pi, and A1Pi states of the alkaline-earth sulfides. In contrast to the alkali oxides, the alkali sulfides are found to have X2Pi ground states, due to the larger electrostatic interaction. Dissociation energies of 3.27 eV for BeS, 2.32 eV for MgS, 3.29 eV for CaS, and 3.41 eV for SrS have been obtained for the X1Sigma(+) states of the alkaline-earth sulfides, in good agreement with experimental results. Core correlation is shown to increase the Te values for the a3Pi and A1Pi states of MgS, CaS, and SrS.

  2. Spill-Resistant Alkali-Metal-Vapor Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, William

    2005-01-01

    A spill-resistant vessel has been developed for dispensing an alkali-metal vapor. Vapors of alkali metals (most commonly, cesium or rubidium, both of which melt at temperatures slightly above room temperature) are needed for atomic frequency standards, experiments in spectroscopy, and experiments in laser cooling. Although the present spill-resistant alkali-metal dispenser was originally intended for use in the low-gravity environment of outer space, it can also be used in normal Earth gravitation: indeed, its utility as a vapor source was confirmed by use of cesium in a ground apparatus. The vessel is made of copper. It consists of an assembly of cylinders and flanges, shown in the figure. The uppermost cylinder is a fill tube. Initially, the vessel is evacuated, the alkali metal charge is distilled into the bottom of the vessel, and then the fill tube is pinched closed to form a vacuum seal. The innermost cylinder serves as the outlet for the vapor, yet prevents spilling by protruding above the surface of the alkali metal, no matter which way or how far the vessel is tilted. In the event (unlikely in normal Earth gravitation) that any drops of molten alkali metal have been shaken loose by vibration and are floating freely, a mesh cap on top of the inner cylinder prevents the drops from drifting out with the vapor. Liquid containment of the equivalent of 1.2 grams of cesium was confirmed for all orientations with rubbing alcohol in one of the prototypes later used with cesium.

  3. Thermal effects in Cs DPAL and alkali cell window damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, B. V.; Rotondaro, M. D.; Shaffer, M. K.; Knize, R. J.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments on power scaling of Diode Pumped Alkali Lasers (DPALs) revealed some limiting parasitic effects such as alkali cell windows and gain medium contamination and damage, output power degradation in time and others causing lasing efficiency decrease or even stop lasing1 . These problems can be connected with thermal effects, ionization, chemical interactions between the gain medium components and alkali cells materials. Study of all these and, possibly, other limiting effects and ways to mitigate them is very important for high power DPAL development. In this talk we present results of our experiments on temperature measurements in the gain medium of operating Cs DPAL at different pump power levels in the range from lasing threshold to the levels causing damage of the alkali cell windows. For precise contactless in situ temperature measurements, we used an interferometric technique, developed in our lab2 . In these experiments we demonstrated that damage of the lasing alkali cell starts in the bulk with thermal breakdown of the hydrocarbon buffer gas. The degradation processes start at definite critical temperatures of the gain medium, different for each mixture of buffer gas. At this critical temperature, the hydrocarbon and the excited alkali metal begin to react producing the characteristic black soot and, possibly, some other chemical compounds, which both harm the laser performance and significantly increase the harmful heat deposition within the laser medium. This soot, being highly absorptive, is catastrophically heated to very high temperatures that visually observed as bulk burning. This process quickly spreads to the cell windows and causes their damage. As a result, the whole cell is also contaminated with products of chemical reactions.

  4. Crown-Ether Derived Graphene Hybrid Composite for Membrane-Free Potentiometric Sensing of Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Gunnar; Ulstrup, Jens; Chi, Qijin

    2016-01-13

    We report the design and synthesis of newly functionalized graphene hybrid material that can be used for selective membrane-free potentiometric detection of alkali metal ions, represented by potassium ions. Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) functionalized covalently by 18-crown[6] ether with a dense surface coverage is achieved by the introduction of a flexible linking molecule. The resulting hybrid composite is highly stable and is capable of detecting potassium ions down to micromolar ranges with a selectivity over other cations (including Ca(2+), Li(+), Na(+), NH4(+)) at concentrations up to 25 mM. This material can be combined further with disposable chips, demonstrating its promise as an effective ion-selective sensing component for practical applications.

  5. Cohesive Energy-Lattice Constant and Bulk Modulus-Lattice Constant Relationships: Alkali Halides, Ag Halides, Tl Halides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert

    1992-01-01

    In this note we present two expressions relating the cohesive energy, E(sub coh), and the zero pressure isothermal bulk modulus, B(sub 0), of the alkali halides. Ag halides and TI halides, with the nearest neighbor distances, d(sub nn). First, we show that the product E(sub coh)d(sub 0) within families of halide crystals with common crystal structure is to a good approximation constant, with maximum rms deviation of plus or minus 2%. Secondly, we demonstrate that within families of halide crystals with a common cation and common crystal structure the product B(sub 0)d(sup 3.5)(sub nn) is a good approximation constant, with maximum rms deviation of plus or minus 1.36%.

  6. Feasibility of supersonic diode pumped alkali lasers: Model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2013-04-08

    The feasibility of supersonic operation of diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) is studied for Cs and K atoms applying model calculations, based on a semi-analytical model previously used for studying static and subsonic flow DPALs. The operation of supersonic lasers is compared with that measured and modeled in subsonic lasers. The maximum power of supersonic Cs and K lasers is found to be higher than that of subsonic lasers with the same resonator and alkali density at the laser inlet by 25% and 70%, respectively. These results indicate that for scaling-up the power of DPALs, supersonic expansion should be considered.

  7. Alkali Metal/Salt Thermal-Energy-Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Wayne W.; Stearns, John W.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed thermal-energy-storage system based on mixture of alkali metal and one of its halide salts; metal and salt form slurry of two immiscible melts. Use of slurry expected to prevent incrustations of solidified salts on heat-transfer surfaces that occur where salts alone used. Since incrustations impede heat transfer, system performance improved. In system, charging heat-exchanger surface immersed in lower liquid, rich in halide-salt, phase-charge material. Discharging heat exchanger surface immersed in upper liquid, rich in alkali metal.

  8. Upgrading of petroleum oil feedstocks using alkali metals and hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A method of upgrading an oil feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the oil feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase separable from the organic oil feedstock material. The upgradant hydrocarbon bonds to the oil feedstock material and increases the number of carbon atoms in the product. This increase in the number of carbon atoms of the product increases the energy value of the resulting oil feedstock.

  9. ADSORPTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING METAL CATIONS

    DOEpatents

    Khym, J.X.

    1959-03-10

    The chromatographic separation of fission product cations is discussed. By use of this method a mixture of metal cations containing Zr, Cb, Ce, Y, Ba, and Sr may be separated from one another. Mentioned as preferred exchange adsorbents are resins containing free sulfonic acid groups. Various eluants, such as tartaric acid, HCl, and citric acid, used at various acidities, are employed to effect the selective elution and separation of the various fission product cations.

  10. Liquid Crystalline Polymers by Cationic Polymerization,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    cation mechanism of Scholl reaction the Lewis acid and by the benzylic carbocations . Hydride transfer to benzylic carbenium ions leads to methyl groups...reviewed. Examples from ring-opening, carbocationic , and radical-cation poly- merizations and oligomerizations are discussed. Accesion For DrIC TAB3...Examples from ring- opening, carbocationic , and radical-cation polymeri- zations and oligomerizations are discussed. INTRODUCTION This paper will

  11. Ternary alkali-metal and transition metal or metalloid acetylides as alkali-metal intercalation electrodes for batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeth, Karoly; Srajer, George; Harkay, Katherine C; Terdik, Joseph Z

    2015-02-10

    Novel intercalation electrode materials including ternary acetylides of chemical formula: A.sub.nMC.sub.2 where A is alkali or alkaline-earth element; M is transition metal or metalloid element; C.sub.2 is reference to the acetylide ion; n is an integer that is 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4 when A is alkali element and 0, 1, or 2 when A is alkaline-earth element. The alkali elements are Lithium (Li), Sodium (Na), Potassium (K), Rubidium (Rb), Cesium (Cs) and Francium (Fr). The alkaline-earth elements are Berilium (Be), Magnesium (Mg), Calcium (Ca), Strontium (Sr), Barium (Ba), and Radium (Ra). M is a transition metal that is any element in groups 3 through 12 inclusive on the Periodic Table of Elements (elements 21 (Sc) to element 30 (Zn)). In another exemplary embodiment, M is a metalloid element.

  12. Use of Complementary Cation And Anion Heavy Atom-Atom Salt Derivatives to Solve the Structure of Cytochrome P450 46a1

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.A.; Mast, N.; Bjorkhem, I.; Johnson, E.F.; Stout, C.D.; Pikuleva, I.A.

    2009-05-26

    Human cytochrome P450 46A1 (CYP46A1) is one of the key enzymes in cholesterol homeostasis in the brain. The crystallization and heavy-atom structure solution of an active truncated CYP46A1 in complex with the high-affinity substrate analogue cholesterol-3-sulfate (CH-3S) is reported. The 2.6 {angstrom} structure of CYP46A1-CH-3S was solved using both anion and cation heavy-atom salts. In addition to the native anomalous signal from the haem iron, an NaI anion halide salt derivative and a complementary CsCl alkali-metal cation salt derivative were used. The general implications of the use of halide and alkali-metal quick soaks are discussed. The importance of using isoionic strength buffers, the titration of heavy-atom salts into different ionic species and the role of concentration are considered. It was observed that cation/anion-binding sites will occasionally overlap, which could negatively impact upon mixed RbBr soaks used for multiple anomalous scatterer MAD (MMAD). The use of complementary cation and anion heavy-atom salt derivatives is a convenient and powerful tool for MIR(AS) structure solution.

  13. Use of complementary cation and anion heavy-atom salt derivatives to solve the structure of cytochrome P450 46A1

    SciTech Connect

    White, Mark Andrew; Mast, Natalia; Bjorkhem, Ingemar; Johnson, Eric F.; Stout, C. David; Pikuleva, Irina A.

    2008-05-01

    Crystallization and analysis of the MIRAS heavy-atom structure solution of human cytochrome P450 46A1 using NaI and CsCl quick soaks. Human cytochrome P450 46A1 (CYP46A1) is one of the key enzymes in cholesterol homeostasis in the brain. The crystallization and heavy-atom structure solution of an active truncated CYP46A1 in complex with the high-affinity substrate analogue cholesterol-3-sulfate (CH-3S) is reported. The 2.6 Å structure of CYP46A1–CH-3S was solved using both anion and cation heavy-atom salts. In addition to the native anomalous signal from the haem iron, an NaI anion halide salt derivative and a complementary CsCl alkali-metal cation salt derivative were used. The general implications of the use of halide and alkali-metal quick soaks are discussed. The importance of using isoionic strength buffers, the titration of heavy-atom salts into different ionic species and the role of concentration are considered. It was observed that cation/anion-binding sites will occasionally overlap, which could negatively impact upon mixed RbBr soaks used for multiple anomalous scatterer MAD (MMAD). The use of complementary cation and anion heavy-atom salt derivatives is a convenient and powerful tool for MIR(AS) structure solution.

  14. Structural, energetic, spectroscopic and QTAIM analyses of cation-π interactions involving mono- and bi-cyclic ring fused benzene systems.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ayorinde; Dinadayalane, Tandabany C; Grabowski, Sławomir J; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2013-12-28

    The effect of increasing the number of monocyclic six-membered rings or bicyclic rings of bicyclo[2.1.1]hexenyl fused to benzene on cation-π interactions involving alkali metal ions (Li(+), Na(+), and K(+)) has been investigated. The binding energy data at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p) level clearly indicate that the binding affinity of the metal ion with benzene is enhanced by increasing the number of rings fused irrespective of a monocyclic or a bicyclic ring. Calculated binding energies are in good agreement with the available experimental results. The binding strength of cations with ligands decreases in the order Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+). Our study establishes that trisannelation of bicyclo[2.1.1]hexene to benzene facilitates a very strong interaction between benzene and cations. Infrared (IR) frequencies and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts are shown to be valuable in characterizing cation-π interactions. The C-C bonds of the central six-membered rings are weakened due to metal ion binding. Based on the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM), we have observed the presence of stabilizing H∙∙∙H interactions in two of the considered systems as opposed to the frequent description of these interactions as non-bonded repulsive interactions. Alkali metal ion binding with those two ligands slightly reduces the strength of such H∙∙∙H interactions.

  15. Competitive interaction of monovalent cations with DNA from 3D-RISM

    PubMed Central

    Giambaşu, George M.; Gebala, Magdalena K.; Panteva, Maria T.; Luchko, Tyler; Case, David A.; York, Darrin M.

    2015-01-01

    The composition of the ion atmosphere surrounding nucleic acids affects their folding, condensation and binding to other molecules. It is thus of fundamental importance to gain predictive insight into the formation of the ion atmosphere and thermodynamic consequences when varying ionic conditions. An early step toward this goal is to benchmark computational models against quantitative experimental measurements. Herein, we test the ability of the three dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) to reproduce preferential interaction parameters determined from ion counting (IC) experiments for mixed alkali chlorides and dsDNA. Calculations agree well with experiment with slight deviations for salt concentrations >200 mM and capture the observed trend where the extent of cation accumulation around the DNA varies inversely with its ionic size. Ion distributions indicate that the smaller, more competitive cations accumulate to a greater extent near the phosphoryl groups, penetrating deeper into the grooves. In accord with experiment, calculated IC profiles do not vary with sequence, although the predicted ion distributions in the grooves are sequence and ion size dependent. Calculations on other nucleic acid conformations predict that the variation in linear charge density has a minor effect on the extent of cation competition. PMID:26304542

  16. Cation Exchange in Dynamic 3D Porous Magnets: Improvement of the Physical Properties.

    PubMed

    Grancha, Thais; Acosta, Alvaro; Cano, Joan; Ferrando-Soria, Jesús; Seoane, Beatriz; Gascon, Jorge; Pasán, Jorge; Armentano, Donatella; Pardo, Emilio

    2015-11-16

    We report two novel three-dimensional porous coordination polymers (PCPs) of formulas Li4{Mn4[Cu2(Me3mpba)2]3}·68H2O (2) and K4{Mn4[Cu2(Me3mpba)2]3}·69H2O (3) obtained-via alkali cation exchange in a single-crystal to single-crystal process-from the earlier reported anionic manganese(II)-copper(II) PCP of formula Na4{Mn4[Cu2(Me3mpba)2]3}·60H2O (1) [Me3mpba(4-) = N,N'-2,4,6-trimethyl-1,3-phenylenebis(oxamate)]. This postsynthetic process succeeds where the direct synthesis in solution from the corresponding building blocks fails and affords significantly more robust PCPs with enhanced magnetic properties [long-range 3D magnetic ordering temperatures for the dehydrated phases (1'-3') of 2.0 (1'), 12.0 (2'), and 20.0 K (3')]. Changes in the adsorptive properties upon postsynthetic exchange suggest that the nature, electrostatic properties, mobility, and location of the cations within the framework are crucial for the enhanced structural stability. Overall, these results further confirm the potential of postsynthetic methods (including cation exchange) to obtain PCPs with novel or enhanced physical properties while maintaining unaltered their open-framework structures.

  17. Chiroptical properties of cation complexes of chiral phenazino-18-crown-6 ether-type hosts.

    PubMed

    Szarvas, Szilvia; Szalay, Luca; Vass, Elemér; Hollósi, Miklós; Samu, Erika; Huszthy, Péter

    2005-06-01

    Herein we report CD spectroscopic studies on complexes of (R,R)-dimethyl-, (R,R)-diisobutyl-, and (S,S)-di-sec-butyl-phenazino-18-crown-6 ligands (Scheme 1) with selected alkali (Na+, K+), alkaline earth (Mg2+, Ca2+), and transition-metal (Ag+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Cd2+, Pb2+) cations. The complexation was monitored in the 300- to 240-nm region of the CD spectra comprising mainly the 1Bb band of the heteroaromatic subunit. The CD spectra of the complexes showed an unexpected diversity. In the most characteristic 1Bb spectral region, the number, position, and intensity of band(s) depend not only on the heteroaromatic subunit and the size of the substituents but also on the diameter, ion strength, and coordination geometry of the cation. The appearance of two weak 1Bb CD bands (type-I spectra) with the sign pattern of the host is an indication of two complexes of comparable stability. The "type-II" spectra differ from that of the host in the number, sign pattern, and intensity of the bands. Complexes of transition-metal cations generally show CD spectra with more intense bands. The CD spectra of complexes of (S,S)-di-sec-butyl-phenazino-18-crown-6 ligand with Na+, K+, and Pb2+ (type III) strongly suggest exciton coupling caused by the closeness of the heteroaromatic rings of two 1:1 complex molecules.

  18. Alternative mechanisms of action of cationic antimicrobial peptides on bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hale, John D F; Hancock, Robert E W

    2007-12-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides are a novel type of antibiotic offering much potential in the treatment of microbial-related diseases. They offer many advantages for commercial development, including a broad spectrum of action and modest size. However, despite the identification or synthetic production of thousands of such peptides, the mode of action remains elusive, except for a few examples. While the dogma for the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides against bacteria is believed to be through pore formation or membrane barrier disruption, some peptides clearly act differently and other intracellular target sites have been identified. This article presents an updated review of how cationic antimicrobial peptides are able to affect bacterial killing, with a focus on internal targets.

  19. Milk alkali syndrome—an unusual syndrome causing an unusual complication

    PubMed Central

    George, S; Clark, J

    2000-01-01

    Milk alkali syndrome is rare and although pancreatitis secondary to hypercalcaemia is well recognised, there has only been one other reported case of pancreatitis secondary to the milk alkali syndrome. Such a case, caused by self medication of over the counter medication, is reported.


Keywords: milk alkali syndrome; pancreatitis; over the counter medication PMID:10878206

  20. 40 CFR 721.2565 - Alkylated sulfonated diphenyl oxide, alkali and amine salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali and amine salts. 721.2565 Section 721.2565 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2565 Alkylated sulfonated diphenyl oxide, alkali and... substances identified as alkylated sulfonated diphenyl oxide, alkali salt (PMN P-93-352) and...

  1. 40 CFR 721.2565 - Alkylated sulfonated diphenyl oxide, alkali and amine salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali and amine salts. 721.2565 Section 721.2565 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2565 Alkylated sulfonated diphenyl oxide, alkali and... substances identified as alkylated sulfonated diphenyl oxide, alkali salt (PMN P-93-352) and...

  2. 40 CFR 721.2565 - Alkylated sulfonated diphenyl oxide, alkali and amine salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkali and amine salts. 721.2565 Section 721.2565 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2565 Alkylated sulfonated diphenyl oxide, alkali and... substances identified as alkylated sulfonated diphenyl oxide, alkali salt (PMN P-93-352) and...

  3. Non-Adiabatic Atomic Transitions: Computational Cross Section Calculations of Alkali Metal-Noble Gas Collisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    collisions were computationally simulated. The alkali metals were potassium, rubidium, and cesium and the noble gas partners were helium, neon, and argon...195 20. Spin-Orbit split energies of Potassium, Rubidium, and Cesium ...composed of an alkali metal typically Rubidium[26, 37] or Cesium [5, 18]. The unique character of the alkali atoms, having a single valence electron in

  4. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  5. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  6. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  7. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  8. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  9. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  10. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  11. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  12. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  13. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  14. Formation of alkali-metal nanoparticles in alkali-silicate glasses under electron irradiation and thermal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkareva, E. S.; Sidorov, A. I.; Ignat'ev, A. I.; Nikonorov, N. V.; Podsvirov, O. A.

    2017-02-01

    Experiments and numerical simulation show that the irradiation of alkali-containing glasses using electrons at an energy of 35 keV and the subsequent thermal processing at a temperature above the vitrification point lead to the formation of spherical metal (lithium, sodium, and potassium) nanoparticles with oxide sheaths that exhibit plasmon resonances in the visible spectral range. Glasses containing two alkali metals exhibit mutual effect of metals on the formation of nanoparticles with two compositions due to the difference of ion radii and mobilities of metal ions.

  15. Annihilation of positrons trapped at the alkali-metal-covered transition-metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Fazleev, N.G.; Fry, J.L.; Kuttler, K.H.; Koymen, A.R.; Weiss, A.H.

    1995-08-15

    Recent studies of the Cu(100) surface covered with submonolayers of Cs revealed that the normalized intensity of the positron-annihilation-induced Cu {ital M}{sub 2,3}{ital VV} Auger signal remains nearly constant at the clean Cu(100) surface value until the Cs coverage reaches approximately 0.7 physical monolayer, at which coverage the signal intensity drops precipitously. We present a microscopic analysis of this unusual behavior of the Cu {ital M}{sub 2,3}{ital VV} Auger signal based on a treatment of a positron as a single charged particle trapped in a ``correlation well`` in the proximity of the surface atoms. The image-potential-induced positron surface states are calculated using the corrugated-mirror model in a full three-dimensional geometry. These states are studied for the clean Cu(100) surface and for various ordered structures of the Cs adsorbate on the Cu(100) surface below and above the critical alkali-metal coverage of approximately 0.7 physical monolayer. Calculations show that whereas the positron surface state is localized in the region of the Cs/Cu(100) interface for Cs coverages below the critical alkali-metal coverage, at a Cs coverage corresponding to one physical monolayer the positron surface state is localized on the vacuum side of the Cs overlayer. The probabilities for a positron trapped in a surface state to annihilate with relevant Cu and Cs core-level electrons as well as the positron surface-state lifetimes are computed for various alkali-metal structures on the Cu(100) surface and compared with experimental positron-annihilation-induced Auger-electron-spectroscopy data. It is shown that a shift in localization of the positron surface state from the Cs/Cu(100) interface to the vacuum side of the alkali-metal overlayer results in a sharp decrease in the positron-annihilation probabilities with Cu 3{ital s} and 3{ital p} core-level electrons, in agreement with experiment.

  16. Cathodoluminescence characterization of experimentally shocked alkali feldspar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayama, M.; Nishido, H.; Sekine, T.; Ninagawa, K.

    2009-12-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy and microscopy provide important information to know the existence and distribution of defects and trace elements in materials. CL features of materials depend on varieties of luminescence centers, host chemical compositions and crystal fields, all of which are closely related to the genetic processes. Advanced investigations on CL of shock-induced silica minerals have been attempted to estimate their shock pressures, although very few studies have been reported for feldspars. In this study, CL and Raman spectra of experimentally shocked alkali feldspar were measured to evaluate the shock metamorphic effect. A single crystal of sanidine (Or81Ab19) from Eifel, Germany was selected as a starting material for shock recovery experiments at peak pressures of about 10, 20, 32 and 40 GPa by a propellant gun. Polished thin sections of recovered samples were used for CL and Raman measurements. CL was collected in the range from 300 to 800 nm by a secondary electron microscopy-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) system. CL spectra of unshocked sample consist of two emission bands at around 420 nm in blue region and 720 nm in red-IR region assigned to Al-O--Al defect and Fe3+ impurity center, respectively. There are three features between unshocked and shocked sanidine. (1) The blue emission is absent in the shocked samples. (2) The peak wavelength of the red-IR emission shifts to a short wavelength side with an increase in shock pressure up to 20 GPa, suggesting the alteration of the crystal field related to Fe3+ activator by shock metamorphic effect. The Raman spectrum of the unshocked sample exhibits pronounced peaks at around 180, 205, 290, 490 and 520 cm-1. The intensities of these peaks decrease with an increase in shock pressure. The shocked samples above 32 GPa show only two weak peaks at around 490 and 580 cm-1 which were also observed in maskelynite in Martian meteorites. Shock pressure causes partly breaking of the framework structure

  17. Cation-Coupled Bicarbonate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Ebbe; Choi, Inyeong; Lee, Soojung

    2016-01-01

    Cation-coupled HCO3− transport was initially identified in the mid-1970s when pioneering studies showed that acid extrusion from cells is stimulated by CO2/HCO3− and associated with Na+ and Cl− movement. The first Na+-coupled bicarbonate transporter (NCBT) was expression-cloned in the late 1990s. There are currently five mammalian NCBTs in the SLC4-family: the electrogenic Na,HCO3-cotransporters NBCe1 and NBCe2 (SLC4A4 and SLC4A5 gene products); the electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7 gene product); the Na+-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger NDCBE (SLC4A8 gene product); and NBCn2/NCBE (SLC4A10 gene product), which has been characterized as an electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter or a Na+-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger. Despite the similarity in amino acid sequence and predicted structure among the NCBTs of the SLC4-family, they exhibit distinct differences in ion dependency, transport function, pharmacological properties, and interactions with other proteins. In epithelia, NCBTs are involved in transcellular movement of acid-base equivalents and intracellular pH control. In nonepithelial tissues, NCBTs contribute to intracellular pH regulation; and hence, they are crucial for diverse tissue functions including neuronal discharge, sensory neuron development, performance of the heart, and vascular tone regulation. The function and expression levels of the NCBTs are generally sensitive to intracellular and systemic pH. Animal models have revealed pathophysiological roles of the transporters in disease states including metabolic acidosis, hypertension, visual defects, and epileptic seizures. Studies are being conducted to understand the physiological consequences of genetic polymorphisms in the SLC4-members, which are associated with cancer, hypertension, and drug addiction. Here, we describe the current knowledge regarding the function, structure, and regulation of the mammalian cation-coupled HCO3− transporters of the SLC4-family. PMID:25428855

  18. Cation-coupled bicarbonate transporters.

    PubMed

    Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Ebbe; Choi, Inyeong; Lee, Soojung

    2014-10-01

    Cation-coupled HCO3(-) transport was initially identified in the mid-1970s when pioneering studies showed that acid extrusion from cells is stimulated by CO2/HCO3(-) and associated with Na(+) and Cl(-) movement. The first Na(+)-coupled bicarbonate transporter (NCBT) was expression-cloned in the late 1990s. There are currently five mammalian NCBTs in the SLC4-family: the electrogenic Na,HCO3-cotransporters NBCe1 and NBCe2 (SLC4A4 and SLC4A5 gene products); the electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7 gene product); the Na(+)-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger NDCBE (SLC4A8 gene product); and NBCn2/NCBE (SLC4A10 gene product), which has been characterized as an electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter or a Na(+)-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger. Despite the similarity in amino acid sequence and predicted structure among the NCBTs of the SLC4-family, they exhibit distinct differences in ion dependency, transport function, pharmacological properties, and interactions with other proteins. In epithelia, NCBTs are involved in transcellular movement of acid-base equivalents and intracellular pH control. In nonepithelial tissues, NCBTs contribute to intracellular pH regulation; and hence, they are crucial for diverse tissue functions including neuronal discharge, sensory neuron development, performance of the heart, and vascular tone regulation. The function and expression levels of the NCBTs are generally sensitive to intracellular and systemic pH. Animal models have revealed pathophysiological roles of the transporters in disease states including metabolic acidosis, hypertension, visual defects, and epileptic seizures. Studies are being conducted to understand the physiological consequences of genetic polymorphisms in the SLC4-members, which are associated with cancer, hypertension, and drug addiction. Here, we describe the current knowledge regarding the function, structure, and regulation of the mammalian cation-coupled HCO3(-) transporters of the SLC4-family.

  19. Origin of low sodium capacity in graphite and generally weak substrate binding of Na and Mg among alkali and alkaline earth metals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyue; Merinov, Boris V; Goddard, William A

    2016-04-05

    It is well known that graphite has a low capacity for Na but a high capacity for other alkali metals. The growing interest in alternative cation batteries beyond Li makes it particularly important to elucidate the origin of this behavior, which is not well understood. In examining this question, we find a quite general phenomenon: among the alkali and alkaline earth metals, Na and Mg generally have the weakest chemical binding to a given substrate, compared with the other elements in the same column of the periodic table. We demonstrate this with quantum mechanics calculations for a wide range of substrate materials (not limited to C) covering a variety of structures and chemical compositions. The phenomenon arises from the competition between trends in the ionization energy and the ion-substrate coupling, down the columns of the periodic table. Consequently, the cathodic voltage for Na and Mg is expected to be lower than those for other metals in the same column. This generality provides a basis for analyzing the binding of alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms over a broad range of systems.

  20. Origin of low sodium capacity in graphite and generally weak substrate binding of Na and Mg among alkali and alkaline earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanyue; Merinov, Boris V.; Goddard, William A., III

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that graphite has a low capacity for Na but a high capacity for other alkali metals. The growing interest in alternative cation batteries beyond Li makes it particularly important to elucidate the origin of this behavior, which is not well understood. In examining this question, we find a quite general phenomenon: among the alkali and alkaline earth metals, Na and Mg generally have the weakest chemical binding to a given substrate, compared with the other elements in the same column of the periodic table. We demonstrate this with quantum mechanics calculations for a wide range of substrate materials (not limited to C) covering a variety of structures and chemical compositions. The phenomenon arises from the competition between trends in the ionization energy and the ion-substrate coupling, down the columns of the periodic table. Consequently, the cathodic voltage for Na and Mg is expected to be lower than those for other metals in the same column. This generality provides a basis for analyzing the binding of alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms over a broad range of systems.

  1. Investigation of anti-Relaxation coatings for alkali-metal vapor cells using surface science techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Seltzer, S. J.; Michalak, D. J.; Donaldson, M. H.; Balabas, M. V.; Barber, S. K.; Bernasek, S. L.; Bouchiat, M.-A.; Hexemer, A.; Hibberd, A. M.; Jackson Kimball, D. F.; Jaye, C.; Karaulanov, T.; Narducci, F. A.; Rangwala, S. A.; Robinson, H. G.; Shmakov, A. K.; Voronov, D. L.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Pines, A.; Budker, D.

    2010-10-11

    Many technologies based on cells containing alkali-metal atomic vapor benefit from the use of antirelaxation surface coatings in order to preserve atomic spin polarization. In particular, paraffin has been used for this purpose for several decades and has been demonstrated to allow an atom to experience up to 10?000 collisions with the walls of its container without depolarizing, but the details of its operation remain poorly understood. We apply modern surface and bulk techniques to the study of paraffin coatings in order to characterize the properties that enable the effective preservation of alkali spin polarization. These methods include Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, atomic force microscopy, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We also compare the light-induced atomic desorption yields of several different paraffin materials. Experimental results include the determination that crystallinity of the coating material is unnecessary, and the detection of C=C double bonds present within a particular class of effective paraffin coatings. Further study should lead to the development of more robust paraffin antirelaxation coatings, as well as the design and synthesis of new classes of coating materials.

  2. Use of ancient copper slags in Portland cement and alkali activated cement matrices.

    PubMed

    Nazer, Amin; Payá, Jordi; Borrachero, María Victoria; Monzó, José

    2016-02-01

    Some Chilean copper slag dumps from the nineteenth century still remain, without a proposed use that encourages recycling and reduces environmental impact. In this paper, the copper slag abandoned in landfills is proposed as a new building material. The slags studied were taken from Playa Negra and Púquios dumps, both located in the region of Atacama in northern Chile. Pozzolanic activity in lime and Portland cement systems, as well as the alkali activation in pastes with copper slag cured at different temperatures, was studied. The reactivity of the slag was measured using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), electrical conductivity and pH in aqueous suspension and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Furthermore, copper slag-Portland cement mortars with the substitution of 25% (by weight) of cement by copper slag and alkali-activated slag mortars cured at 20 and 65 °C were made, to determine the compressive strength. The results indicate that the ancient copper slags studied have interesting binding properties for the construction sector.

  3. Capillary electrochromatography with contactless conductivity detection for the determination of some inorganic and organic cations using monolithic octadecylsilica columns.

    PubMed

    Mai, Thanh Duc; Pham, Hung Viet; Hauser, Peter C

    2009-10-27

    A fast separation of alkali and alkaline earth metal cations and ammonium was carried out by capillary electrochromatography on monolithic octadecylsilica columns of 15 cm length and 100 microm inner diameter using water/methanol mixtures containing acetic acid as mobile phase. On-column contactless conductivity detection was used for quantification of these non-UV-absorbing species. The method was also extended successfully to the determination of small amines as well as of amino acids, and the separation selectivity was optimized by varying the composition of the mobile phase. Detection limits of about 1 microM were possible for the inorganic cations as well as for the small amines, while the amino acids could be quantified down to about 10 microM. The separation of 12 amino acids was achieved in the relatively short time of 10 min.

  4. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    DOEpatents

    Wasserman, Stephen R.; Anderson, Kenneth B.; Song, Kang; Yuchs, Steven E.; Marshall, Christopher L.

    1998-01-01

    A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate.

  5. Assesment of Alkali Resistance of Basalt Used as Concrete Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    al-Swaidani, Aref M.; Baddoura, Mohammad K.; Aliyan, Samira D.; Choeb, Walid

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to report a part of an ongoing research on the influence of using crushed basalt as aggregates on one of durability-related properties of concrete (i.e. alkali-silica reaction which is the most common form of Alkali-Aggregate Reaction). Alkali resistance has been assessed through several methods specified in the American Standards. Results of petrographic examination, chemical test (ASTM C289) and accelerated mortar bar test (ASTM C1260) have particularly been reported. In addition, the weight change and compressive strength of 28 days cured concrete containing basaltic aggregates were also reported after 90 days of exposure to 10% NaOH solution. Dolomite aggregate were used in the latter test for comparison. The experimental results revealed that basaltic rocks quarried from As-Swaida'a region were suitable for production of aggregates for concrete. According to the test results, the studied basalt aggregates can be classified as innocuous with regard to alkali-silica reaction. Further, the 10% sodium hydroxide attack did not affect the compressive strength of concrete.

  6. Method of assembling and sealing an alkali metal battery

    DOEpatents

    Elkins, Perry E.; Bell, Jerry E.; Harlow, Richard A.; Chase, Gordon G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of initially assembling and then subsequently hermetically sealing a container portion of an alkali metal battery to a ceramic portion of such a battery is disclosed. Sealing surfaces are formed respectively on a container portion and a ceramic portion of an alkali metal battery. These sealing surfaces are brought into juxtaposition and a material is interposed therebetween. This interposed material is one which will diffuse into sealing relationship with both the container portion and the ceramic portion of the alkali metal battery at operational temperatures of such a battery. A pressure is applied between these sealing surfaces to cause the interposed material to be brought into intimate physical contact with such juxtaposed surfaces. A temporary sealing material which will provide a seal against a flow of alkali metal battery reactants therethrough at room temperatures and is applied over the juxtaposed sealing surfaces and material interposed therebetween. The entire assembly is heated to an operational temperature so that the interposed material diffuses into the container portion and the ceramic portion to form a hermetic seal therebetween. The pressure applied to the juxtaposed sealing surfaces is maintained in order to ensure the continuation of the hermetic seal.

  7. An analytical equation of state for molten alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatee, M.H.; Boushehri, A.

    1995-11-01

    The paper brings the molten alkali metals into the scope of a new statistical mechanical equation of state that is known to satisfy normal fluids over the whole range. As for normal fluids, the latent heat of vaporization and density at freezing temperature are the only inputs (scaling factors). The corresponding-states correlation of normal fluids is used to calculate the second virial coefficient, B{sub 2}(T), of alkali metals, which is scarce experimentally and its calculation is complicated by dimer formation. Calculations of the other two temperature-dependent constants, {alpha}(T) and b (T), follow by scaling. The virial coefficients of alkali metals cannot be expected to obey a law of corresponding states for normal fluids. The fact that two potentials are involved may be the reason for this. Thus, alkali metals have the characteristics of interacting through singlet and triple potentials so that the treatment by a single potential here is fortuitous. The adjustable parameter of the equation of state, {Gamma}, compensates for the uncertainties in B{sub 2}(T). The procedure used to calculate the density of liquids Li through Cs from the freezing line up to several hundred degrees above the boiling temperatures. The results are within 5%.

  8. Influence of temperature on alkali stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes cells may induce alkali stress adaptation when exposed to sublethal concentrations of alkaline cleaners and sanitizers that may be frequently used in the food processing environment. In the present study, the effect of temperature on the induction and the stability of such alk...

  9. Outer-core emission spectra of heavy alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, R. L.; First, P. N.; Flynn, C. P.

    1988-09-01

    We report np5(n+1)s2-->np6(n+1)s emission spectra of K (n=3), Rb (n=4), and Cs (n=5), and compare emission-band characteristics through the series Na-Cs using earlier data for Na. The normalized band profiles of the different alkali metals are remarkably similar when scaled by the Fermi energy EF. However, the spin-orbit partner intensity ratios are far from the ideal value 2, reaching approximately 60 for Rb and above 65 for Cs, mainly owing to Coster-Kronig decays from higher levels. We confirm that the Mahan-Nozières-De Dominicis ``anomaly'' at EF is generally weaker in emission than in absorption. It decreases through the series to become undetectable for emission from Cs. A systematic increase of the core-hole-lifetime width occurs through the column of alkali metals from a reported estimate of 10 meV for Na to a value of 50 meV for Cs. A study of the Fermi-edge shape between 20 and 300 K reveals temperature-dependent phonon broadening in generally good agreement with theoretical predictions. Incomplete relaxation plays only a minor role in the edge processes of the heavy alkali metals. Additional Fermi-edge broadening and the shifted emission edges of surface atoms are observed for alkali-metal films 10-100 Å thick.

  10. Wellness Circles: The Alkali Lake Model in Community Recovery Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben, Leon W.; And Others

    The case study described here was conducted as a doctoral research project at Northern Arizona University. The study documents the success of the Shuswop Indian Band of Alkali Lake, British Columbia (Canada), in their 15-year battle with alcoholism, once the people themselves decided on recovery. The study looks back at the 95 percent recovery…

  11. Aqueous alkali metal hydroxide insoluble cellulose ether membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. E.; Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor)

    1969-01-01

    A membrane that is insoluble in an aqueous alkali metal hydroxide medium is described. The membrane is a resin which is a water-soluble C2-C4 hydroxyalkyl cellulose ether polymer and an insolubilizing agent for controlled water sorption, a dialytic and electrodialytic membrane. It is particularly useful as a separator between electrodes or plates in an alkaline storage battery.

  12. Method of assembling and sealing an alkali metal battery

    DOEpatents

    Elkins, P.E.; Bell, J.E.; Harlow, R.A.; Chase, G.G.

    1983-03-01

    A method of initially assembling and then subsequently hermetically sealing a container portion of an alkali metal battery to a ceramic portion of such a battery is disclosed. Sealing surfaces are formed respectively on a container portion and a ceramic portion of an alkali metal battery. These sealing surfaces are brought into juxtaposition and a material is interposed there between. This interposed material is one which will diffuse into sealing relationship with both the container portion and the ceramic portion of the alkali metal battery at operational temperatures of such a battery. A pressure is applied between these sealing surfaces to cause the interposed material to be brought into intimate physical contact with such juxtaposed surfaces. A temporary sealing material which will provide a seal against a flow of alkali metal battery reactants there through at room temperatures and is applied over the juxtaposed sealing surfaces and material interposed there between. The entire assembly is heated to an operational temperature so that the interposed material diffuses into the container portion and the ceramic portion to form a hermetic seal there between. The pressure applied to the juxtaposed sealing surfaces is maintained in order to ensure the continuation of the hermetic seal. 4 figs.

  13. Chlor-Alkali Industry: A Laboratory Scale Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez-Sanchez, C. M.; Exposito, E.; Frias-Ferrer, A.; Gonzalez-Garaia, J.; Monthiel, V.; Aldaz, A.

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory experiment for students in the last year of degree program in chemical engineering, chemistry, or industrial chemistry is presented. It models the chlor-alkali process, one of the most important industrial applications of electrochemical technology and the second largest industrial consumer of electricity after aluminium industry.

  14. Stabilized Alkali-Metal Ultraviolet-Band-Pass Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, Nick; Fraschetti, George A.; Mccann, Timothy; Mayall, Sherwood D.; Dunn, Donald E.; Trauger, John T.

    1995-01-01

    Layers of bismuth 5 to 10 angstrom thick incorporated into alkali-metal ultraviolet-band-pass optical filters by use of advanced fabrication techniques. In new filters layer of bismuth helps to reduce surface migration of sodium. Sodium layer made more stable and decreased tendency to form pinholes by migration.

  15. A revised study of the Li2+ alkali-dimer using a model potential approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabli, Djamal; McCarroll, Ronald

    2017-04-01

    The model potential approach is well adapted to study atomic and molecular systems involving a single active electron. Such is the case of the alkali-dimer lithium cation Li2+ . However, a comparison of the model potential results of Magnier et al. (1999) and those based on ab initio techniques (Bouzouita et al., 2006; Jasik et al., 2007, Musial et al., 2015) raises a number of questions related to the existence of an important disagreement regarding several excited states,which are found to be repulsive by Magnier et al. (1999) but attractive when ab initio techniques are employed. In this paper, we propose to re-investigate the Li2+ system, using a model potential technique to compute the adiabatic energy curves and the molecular spectroscopic constants. Our aim is to clarify whether this disagreement between the ab initio and model potential methods originates from some conceptual defect of the model potential technique or whether there is some source of error in the calculations of Magnier et al. (1999).

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of the dynamic and energetic properties of alkali and halide ions using water-model-specific ion parameters.

    PubMed

    Joung, In Suk; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2009-10-08

    The dynamic and energetic properties of the alkali and halide ions were calculated using molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy simulations with various different water and ion force fields including our recently developed water-model-specific ion parameters. The properties calculated were activity coefficients, diffusion coefficients, residence times of atomic pairs, association constants, and solubility. Through calculation of these properties, we can assess the validity and range of applicability of the simple pair potential models and better understand their limitations. Due to extreme computational demands, the activity coefficients were only calculated for a subset of the models. The results qualitatively agree with experiment. Calculated diffusion coefficients and residence times between cation-anion, water-cation, and water-anion showed differences depending on the choice of water and ion force field used. The calculated solubilities of the alkali-halide salts were generally lower than the true solubility of the salts. However, for both the TIP4P(EW) and SPC/E water-model-specific ion parameters, solubility was reasonably well-reproduced. Finally, the correlations among the various properties led to the following conclusions: (1) The reliability of the ion force fields is significantly affected by the specific choice of water model. (2) Ion-ion interactions are very important to accurately simulate the properties, especially solubility. (3) The SPC/E and TIP4P(EW) water-model-specific ion force fields are preferred for simulation in high salt environments compared to the other ion force fields.

  17. Cation exchange capacity of pine bark substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cation exchange capacity (CEC) is an important soil and substrate chemical property. It describes a substrate's ability to retain cation nutrients. Higher CEC values for a substrate generally result in greater amounts of nutrients retained in the substrate and available for plant uptake, and great...

  18. Tripodal Receptors for Cation and Anion Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kuswandi, Bambang; Nuriman; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2006-01-01

    This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selective recognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure and selectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometric ion sensing are emphasised, along with their potential applications in optical sensors or optodes.

  19. Design and Implementation of Alkali Activated Cement For Sustainable Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseson, Alexander James

    Herein, progress is presented on the design and implementation of technology for sustainable development in general and international development in particular. Necessarily interdisciplinary, the work draws upon the tools and techniques of Mechanical, Materials, and Civil Engineering; and History & Politics. The work was conducted along two paths, the first being the theory and methodology of sustainable development. A flexible design and dissemination framework was developed, Technology Seeding, defined as: development by the transfer and participatory adaptation of appropriate proven conceptual designs. The methodology was developed in part through two case studies which implemented, respectively, wood-turning lathes in Tanzania and upland rice planters in Thailand. The second path is the design and investigation of alkali-activated cements (AACs) for practical use. Those developed herein, for US markets, comprise ground granulated blast furnace slag, soda ash (sodium carbonate), and up to 68 wt.% granular limestone. Mixture Design of Experiment (DOE) was utilized to guide empirical and theoretical analysis of performance (e.g. compressive strength), economic & ecological aspects (e.g. cost, CO2 production, energy consumption), and chemistry (e.g. Rietveld analysis of x-ray diffractograms). Models were derived to understand the impact of mix design on performance and for optimization. Successful formulations are hydraulic and cure at room temperature, with strengths as high as 41 MPa at 3 days and 65 MPa at 28 days. Some of these formulations, compared to OPC, are competitive in performance, reduce cost by up to 40%, and reduce both CO2 production and energy consumption by up to 97%. Major chemical products include calcium silicate hydrates / calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (C-(A)-S-H), gaylussite, and calcite (both newly formed and remaining from limestone). Calcite/dolomite and C-(A)-S-H both contribute to strength. A fraction of the limestone is consumed

  20. Studies on the reduction of aortic calcification by alkali citrates in an ex vivo tissue preparation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Schick, C H; Schwille, P O

    1993-08-01

    The effect of orally administered alkali citrates on the calcification of arterial vessel was studied in the rat. Freshly dissected aortic segments were placed in Millipore diffusion chambers and grafted intraperitoneally. Within 21 days calcification of the media had developed. Under treatment with 2.1 mmol citrate per animal and day a significant decrease in histologically detectable calcification areas occurred, as assessed by greatest thickness and longitudinal expansion. This effect was more pronounced with potassium citrate and potassium sodium citrate, and less marked with sodium citrate. The calcium and phosphorus content of aortic tissue remained unchanged, but magnesium increased significantly. The spheroid particles deposited in the media were characterized in more detail by electron microscopy and elemental microanalysis, X-ray diffraction, and determination of the molar calcium-phosphorus ratio. The combined data suggest that in the model selected for studying biocalcification not mature hydroxyapatite but some precursor of this substance is deposited, and that in animals receiving alkali citrate treatment deposition of amorphous calcium phosphate is likely. It is concluded that in the ex vivo aortic wall preparation oral alkali citrates a) bring about a reduction in calcification areas in the media layer, b) impair the maturation of hydroxyapatite and its deposition in the arterial tissue; c) promote the accumulation of magnesium. Whether these results are of significance for the calcification of arteries in situ and treatment regimens is unknown.

  1. Structural and energetic study of cation-π-cation interactions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Silvana; Soteras, Ignacio; Gelpí, Josep Lluis; Dehez, François; Chipot, Christophe; Luque, F Javier; Curutchet, Carles

    2017-04-12

    Cation-π interactions of aromatic rings and positively charged groups are among the most important interactions in structural biology. The role and energetic characteristics of these interactions are well established. However, the occurrence of cation-π-cation interactions is an unexpected motif, which raises intriguing questions about its functional role in proteins. We present a statistical analysis of the occurrence, composition and geometrical preferences of cation-π-cation interactions identified in a set of non-redundant protein structures taken from the Protein Data Bank. Our results demonstrate that this structural motif is observed at a small, albeit non-negligible frequency in proteins, and suggest a preference to establish cation-π-cation motifs with Trp, followed by Tyr and Phe. Furthermore, we have found that cation-π-cation interactions tend to be highly conserved, which supports their structural or functional role. Finally, we have performed an energetic analysis of a representative subset of cation-π-cation complexes combining quantum-chemical and continuum solvation calculations. Our results point out that the protein environment can strongly screen the cation-cation repulsion, leading to an attractive interaction in 64% of the complexes analyzed. Together with the high degree of conservation observed, these results suggest a potential stabilizing role in the protein fold, as demonstrated recently for a miniature protein (Craven et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138, 1543). From a computational point of view, the significant contribution of non-additive three-body terms challenges the suitability of standard additive force fields for describing cation-π-cation motifs in molecular simulations.

  2. Alkali element constraints on Earth-Moon relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, M. D.; Drake, M. J.; Jones, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    Given their range of volatilities, alkali elements are potential tracers of temperature-dependent processes during planetary accretion and formation of the Earth-Moon system. Under the giant impact hypothesis, no direct connection between the composition of the Moon and the Earth is required, and proto-lunar material does not necessarily experience high temperatures. Models calling for multiple collisions with smaller planetesimals derive proto-lunar materials mainly from the Earth's mantle and explicitly invoke vaporization, shock melting and volatility-related fractionation. Na/K, K/Rb, and Rb/Cs should all increase in response to thermal volatization, so theories which derive the Moon substantially from Earth's mantle predict these ratios will be higher in the Moon than in the primitive mantle of the Earth. Despite the overall depletion of volatile elements in the Moon, its Na/K and K/Rb are equal to or less than those of Earth. A new model presented here for the composition of Earth's continental crust, a major repository of the alkali elements, suggests the Rb/Cs of the Moon is also less than that of Earth. Fractionation of the alkali elements between Earth and Moon are in the opposite sense to predictions based on the relative volatilities of these elements, if the Moon formed by high-T processing of Earth's mantle. Earth, rather than the Moon, appears to carry a signature of volatility-related fractionation in the alkali elements. This may reflect an early episode of intense heating on Earth with the Moon's alkali budget accreting from cooler material.

  3. A reactor system for studying the interactions between alkali vapors and ceramic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Shadman, F.; Punjak, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of interaction between alkali vapors and several ceramic compounds are studied. A unique micro-gravimetric reactor is designed and utilized for this study. Bauxite and kaolin are very good adsorbents for alkali chlorides and are potentially good additives for control of alkali during coal combustion and gasification. The experimental data shows that the alkali capturing process is a combination of physisorption, chemisorption and chemical reaction. An analytical model is developed assuming a multi-layer adsorption of alkali on substrate followed by a rate-controlling rection on the surface. The experimental results and model predictions are in good agreement.

  4. Alkali solution extraction of rice residue protein isolates: Influence of alkali concentration on protein functional, structural properties and lysinoalanine formation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Furong; Ding, Wenhui; Qu, Wenjuan; Oladejo, Ayobami Olayemi; Xiong, Feng; Zhang, Weiwei; He, Ronghai; Ma, Haile

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluated the nutrient property and safety of the rice residue protein isolates (RRPI) product (extracted by different alkali concentrations) by exploring the protein functional, structural properties and lysinoalanine (LAL) formation. The results showed that with the rising of alkali concentration from 0.03M to 0.15M, the solubility, emulsifying and foaming properties of RRPI increased at first and then descended. When the alkali concentration was greater than 0.03M, the RRPI surface hydrophobicity decreased and the content of thiol and disulfide bond, Lys and Cys significantly reduced. By the analysis of HPLC, the content of LAL rose up from 276.08 to 15,198.07mg/kg and decreased to 1340.98mg/kg crude protein when the alkali concentration increased from 0.03 to 0.09M and until to 0.15M. These results indicated that RRPI alkaline extraction concentration above 0.03M may cause severe nutrient or safety problems of protein.

  5. Interactions and low-energy collisions between an alkali ion and an alkali atom of a different nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, Arpita; Ghanmi, Chedli; Berriche, Hamid; Deb, Bimalendu

    2016-05-01

    We study theoretically interaction potentials and low-energy collisions between different alkali atoms and alkali ions. Specifically, we consider systems such as X + {{{Y}}}+, where X({{{Y}}}+) is either Li(Cs+) or Cs(Li+), Na(Cs+) or Cs(Na+) and Li(Rb+) or Rb(Li+). We calculate the molecular potentials of the ground and first two excited states of these three systems using a pseudopotential method and compare our results with those obtained by others. We derive ground-state scattering wave functions and analyze the cold collisional properties of these systems for a wide range of energies. We find that, in order to get convergent results for the total scattering cross sections for energies of the order 1 K, one needs to take into account at least 60 partial waves. The low-energy scattering properties calculated in this paper may serve as a precursor for experimental exploration of quantum collisions between an alkali atom and an alkali ion of a different nucleus.

  6. Chromium liquid waste inertization in an inorganic alkali activated matrix: leaching and NMR multinuclear approach.

    PubMed

    Ponzoni, Chiara; Lancellotti, Isabella; Barbieri, Luisa; Spinella, Alberto; Saladino, Maria Luisa; Martino, Delia Chillura; Caponetti, Eugenio; Armetta, Francesco; Leonelli, Cristina

    2015-04-09

    A class of inorganic binders, also known as geopolymers, can be obtained by alkali activation of aluminosilicate powders at room temperature. The process is affected by many parameters (curing time, curing temperature, relative humidity etc.) and leads to a resistant matrix usable for inertization of hazardous waste. In this study an industrial liquid waste containing a high amount of chromium (≈ 2.3 wt%) in the form of metalorganic salts is inertized into a metakaolin based geopolymer matrix. One of the innovative aspects is the exploitation of the water contained in the waste for the geopolymerization process. This avoided any drying treatment, a common step in the management of liquid hazardous waste. The evolution of the process--from the precursor dissolution to the final geopolymer matrix hardening--of different geopolymers containing a waste amount ranging from 3 to 20%wt and their capability to inertize chromium cations were studied by: i) the leaching tests, according to the EN 12,457 regulation, at different curing times (15, 28, 90 and 540 days) monitoring releases of chromium ions (Cr(III) and Cr(VI)) and the cations constituting the aluminosilicate matrix (Na, Si, Al); ii) the humidity variation for different curing times (15 and 540 days); iii) SEM characterization at different curing times (28 and 540 days); iv) the trend of the solution conductivity and pH during the leaching test; v) the characterization of the short-range ordering in terms of TOT bonds (where T is Al or Si) by (29)Si and (27)Al solid state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (ss MAS NMR) for geopolymers containing high amounts of waste (10-20%wt). The results show the formation of a stable matrix after only 15 days independently on the waste amount introduced; the longer curing times increase the matrices stabilities and their ability to immobilize chromium cations. The maximum amount of waste that can be inertized is around 10 wt% after a curing time of 28 days.

  7. [Effects of saline-alkali stress on electrical impedance spectroscopy parameters and ion contents in shoots of Ping'ou hybrid hazelnut].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Jia, Zhi-Guo; Ma, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Gang; Wang, Gui-Xi

    2014-11-01

    To study the adaptability to salt-alkaline stress of Ping'ou hybrid hazelnut, 'Liaozhen 3' shoots which were treated with three types of stress neutral NaCl, alkaline Na2CO3, and mixed salt-alkali, and the changes in electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) parameters and mineral ion contents were subsequently determined. The correlations between the EIS parameters and mineral ion contents were analyzed. The results showed that with the increasing level of NaCl, specific high- frequency resistance (r), specific low-frequency resistance ( r(l)), specific intracellular resistance (r(i)) and specific extracellular resistance (r(e)) of shoots decreased firstly, then increased, and finally decreased again. However, these parameters increased gradually with the increasing level of Na2CO3, while r(l) and r(e) decreased slowly in the mixed salt-alkali treatments. The Na+ contents of shoots increased significantly under the three salt-alkali stresses with the order of NaCl stress > mixed salt-alkali stress > Na2CO3 stress. Furthermore, Na2CO3 stress resulted in the decreases in the contents of three elements Zn, B and Ca. The significant negative correlation was found between the sum of five cations and four EIS parameters r(l), r(e), relaxation time (τ) , and distribution coefficient of relaxation time (ψ). The shoots of 'Liaozhen 3' might be tolerant of Na2CO3 stress of 200 mmol · L(-1), while they could be resistant to NaCl stress of 100-150 mmol · L(-1).

  8. High-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal synthesis, characterization, and structural relationships of mixed-alkali metals uranyl silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yi-Hsin; Liu, Hsin-Kuan; Chang, Wen-Jung; Tzou, Der-Lii; Lii, Kwang-Hwa

    2016-04-15

    Three mixed-alkali metals uranyl silicates, Na{sub 3}K{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sub 2}]·2H{sub 2}O (1), Na{sub 3}Rb{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sub 2}] (2), and Na{sub 6}Rb{sub 4}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}Si{sub 12}O{sub 33}] (3), have been synthesized by high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal reactions at 550 °C and 1440 bar, and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and thermogravimetric analysis. Compound 1 and 2 are isostructural and contain layers of uranyl disilicate. The smaller cation, Na{sup +}, is located in the intralayer channels, whereas the larger cations, K{sup +} and Rb{sup +}, and water molecule are located in the interlayer region. The absence of lattice water in 2 can be understood according to the valence-matching principle. The structure is related to that of a previously reported mixed-valence uranium(V,VI) silicate. Compound 3 adopts a 3D framework structure and contains a unique unbranched dreier fourfold silicate chain with the structural formula {uB,4"1_∞}[{sup 3}Si{sub 12}O{sub 33}] formed of Q{sup 2}, Q{sup 3}, and Q{sup 4} Si. The connectivity of the Si atoms in the Si{sub 12}O{sub 33}{sup 18−} anion can be interpreted on the basis of Zintl–Klemm concept. Crystal data for compound 1: triclinic, P-1, a=5.7981(2) Å, b=7.5875(3) Å, c=12.8068(5) Å, α=103.593(2)°, β=102.879(2)°, γ=90.064(2)°, V=533.00(3) Å{sup 3}, Z=1, R1=0.0278; compound 2: triclinic, P-1, a=5.7993(3) Å, b=7.5745(3) Å, c=12.9369(6) Å, α=78.265(2)°, β=79.137(2)°, γ=89.936(2)°, V=546.02(4) Å{sup 3}, Z=1, R1=0.0287; compound 3: monoclinic, C2/m, a=23.748(1) Å, b=7.3301(3) Å, c=15.2556(7) Å, β=129.116(2)°, V=2060.4(2) Å{sup 3}, Z=2, R1=0.0304. - Graphical abstract: Three mixed-alkali metals uranyl silicates were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions at 550 °C and 1400 bar and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Two of them have a layer structure

  9. A Study of Complexation-ability of Neutral Schiff Bases to Some Metal Cations

    PubMed Central

    Topal, Giray; Tümerdem, Recep; Basaran, Ismet; Gümüş, Arzu; Cakir, Umit

    2007-01-01

    The constants of the extraction equilibrium and the distribution for dichloromethane as an organic solvent having low dielectric constant of metal cations with chiral Schiff bases, benzaldehydene-(S)-2-amino-3-phenylpropanol (I), ohydroxybenzaldehydene-( S)-2-amino-3-phenyl-propanol (II), benzaldehydene-(S)-2- amino-3-methylbutanol (III) with anionic dyes [4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol mono sodium monohydrate (NaPar), sodium picrat (NaPic) and potassium picrat (KPic)] and some heavy metal chlorides were determined at 25 ºC. All the ligands have given strongest complexation for NaPar. In contrast, similar behaviour for both alkali metal picrates is not apparent in the complexation of corresponding ligands.

  10. Macroscopic and bulk-controlled elastic modes in an interaction of interstitial alcali metal cations within a face-centered cubic crystalline fullerine

    SciTech Connect

    Tatarenko, V.A.; Tsysman, C.L.; Oltarzhevskaya, Y.T.

    1994-12-31

    The calculations in a majority of previous works for the fulleride (AqC{sub 60}) crystals were performed within the framework of the rigid-lattice model, neglecting the distoration relaxation of the host fullerene (C{sub 60}) crystal caused by the interstitial alkali-metal (A) cations. However, an each cation is a source of a static distoration field, and the resulting field is a superposition of such fields generated by all cations. This is a reason why the host-crystal distortions depend on the A-cations configurations, i.e. on a type of a spatial bulk distribution of interstitial cations. This paper seeks to find a functional relation between the amplitudes of the doping-induced structure-distortion waves and of statistic concentration ones. A semiphenomenological model is constructed here within the scope of statistical-thermodynamic treatment and using the lattice-statistics simulation method. In this model the effects due to the presence of q solute A cations over available interstices (per unit cell) on the statistic inherent reorientation and/or displacements of the solvent molecules from the average-lattice sites as well as on the lattice parameter a of the elastically-anysotropic cubic C{sub 60} crystal are taken into account.

  11. Macroscopic and bulk-controlled elastic modes in an interaction of interstitial alcali metal cations within a face-centered cubic crystalline fullerine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatarenko, Valentine A.; Tsysman, Constantin L.; Oltarzhevskaya, Yelena T.

    1995-01-01

    The calculations in a majority of previous works for the fulleride (AqC-60) crystals were performed within the framework of the rigid-lattice model, neglecting the distortion relaxation of the host fullerene (C-60) crystal caused by the interstitial alkali-metal (A) cations. However, an each cation is a source of a static distortion field, and the resulting field is a superposition of such fields generated by all cations. This is a reason why the host-crystal distortions depend on the A-cations configurations, i.e. on a type of a spatial bulk distribution of interstitial cations. The given paper seeks to find a functional relation between the amplitudes of the doping-induced structure-distortion waves and of static concentration ones. A semiphenomenological model is constructed here within the scope of statistical-thermodynamic treatment and using the lattice-statistics simulation method(*). In this model the effects due to the presence of q solute A cations over available interstices (per unit cell) on the static inherent reorientation and/or displacements of the solvent molecules from the 'average-lattice' sites' as well as on the lattice parameter a of a elastically-anysotropic 'cubic' C-60 crystal are taken into account.

  12. INORGANIC CATIONS IN RAT KIDNEY

    PubMed Central

    Tandler, C. J.; Kierszenbaum, A. L.

    1971-01-01

    For localization of pyroantimonate-precipitable cations, rat kidney was fixed by perfusion with a saturated aqueous solution of potassium pyroantimonate (pH about 9.2, without addition of any conventional fixative). A remarkably good preservation of the tissue and cell morphology was obtained as well as a consistent and reproducible localization of the insoluble antimonate salts of magnesium, calcium, and sodium. All proximal and distal tubules and glomeruli were delimited by massive electron-opaque precipitates localized in the basement membrane and, to a lesser extent, in adjacent connective tissue. In the intraglomerular capillaries the antimonate precipitate was encountered in the basement membranes and also between the foot processes. In addition to a more or less uniform distribution in the cytoplasm and between the microvilli of the brush border, antimonate precipitates were found in all cell nuclei, mainly between the masses of condensed chromatin. The mitochondria usually contained a few large antimonate deposits which probably correspond to the so-called "dense granules" observed after conventional fixations. PMID:4106544

  13. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  14. [Enhancement of anaerobic digestion of excess sludge by acid-alkali pretreatment].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Guang-Huan; Zhou, Xing-Qiu; Wu, Jian-Dong

    2012-06-01

    In order to enhance the efficiency of anaerobic digestion of excess sludge, acid-alkali pretreatment method was studied. Three different pretreatment methods (alkali alone,acid-alkali, alkali-acid) were compared to investigate their impacts on hydrolysis and acidification of activated sludge. In addition, their influences on methane-producing in subsequent anaerobic digestion process were also studied. The results showed that the soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) of alkaline treatment alone was about 16% higher than the combining of acid and alkali treatment, SCOD concentration increased to 5406.1 mg x L(-1) after 8 d pretreatment. After treated by acid (pH 4.0, 4 d) and alkali (pH 10.0, 4 d), the acetic acid production and its content in short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were higher than other pretreatment methods. And the acetic acid production (as COD/VSS) could reach 74.4 mg x g(-1), accounting for 60.5% of SCFAs. After acid-alkali pretreatment, the C: N ratio of the sludge mixed liquor was about 25, and the C: P ratio was between 35-40, which was more favorable than C: N and C: P ratio of alkali alone and alkali-acid to subsequent anaerobic digestion. The control experiments showed that, after acid-alkali pretreatment, anaerobic digestion cumulative methane yield (CH4/VSS(in)) reached to 136.1 mL x g(-1) at 15 d, which was about 2.5-, 1.6-, and 1.7-fold of the blank (unpretreated), alkali alone pretreatment and alkali-acid pretreatment, respectively. After acid-alkali pretreatment for 8 d and anaerobic digestion for 15 d, the removal efficiency of VSS was about 60.9%, and the sludge reduction effect was better than other pretreatments. It is obvious that the acid-alkali pretreatment method was more favorable to anaerobic digestion and sludge reduction.

  15. Model for fast, nonadiabatic collisions between alkali atoms and diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, A. P.

    1980-11-01

    Equations for collisions involving two potential surfaces are presented in the impact parameter approximation. In this approximation, a rectilinear classical trajectory is assumed for the translational motion, leading to a time-dependent Schroedinger's equation for the remaining degrees of freedom. Model potentials are considered for collisions of alkali atoms with diatomic molecules that lead to a particularly simple form of the final equations. Using the Magnus approximation, these equations are solved for parameters chosen to model the process Cs+O2→Cs++O2-, and total cross sections for ion-pair formation are obtained as a function of energy. The results exhibit oscillations that correspond qualitatively to those seen in recent measurements. In addition, the model predicts that the oscillations will become less pronounced as the initial vibrational level of O2 is increased.

  16. Infrared Spectroscopy of Cationized Arginine in the Gas Phase: Direct Evidence for the Transition from Nonzwitterionic to Zwitterionic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Matthew F.; O'Brien, Jeremy T.; Prell, James S.; Saykally, Richard J.; Williams, Evan R.

    2009-01-01

    The gas-phase structures of protonated and alkali metal cationized arginine (Arg) and arginine methyl ester (ArgOMe) are investigated with infrared spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. Infrared spectra, measured in the hydrogen-stretch region, provide compelling evidence that arginine changes from its nonzwitterionic to zwitterionic form with increasing metal ion size, with the transition in structure occurring between lithium and sodium. For sodiated arginine, evidence for both forms is obtained from spectral deconvolution, although the zwitterionic form is predominant. Comparisons of the photodissociation spectra with spectra calculated for low-energy candidate structures provide additional insights into the detailed structures of these ions. Arg•Li+, ArgOMe•Li+, and ArgOMe•Na+ exist in nonzwitterionic forms in which the metal ion is tricoordinated with the amino acid, whereas Arg•Na+ and Arg•K+ predominately exist in a zwitterionic form where the protonated side chain donates one hydrogen bond to the N terminus of the amino acid and the metal ion is bicoordinated with the carboxylate group. Arg•H+ and ArgOMe•H+ have protonated side chains that form the same interaction with the N terminus as zwitterionic, alkali metal cationized arginine, yet both are unambiguously determined to be nonzwitterionic. Calculations indicate that for clusters with protonated side chains, structures with two strong hydrogen bonds are lowest in energy, in disagreement with these experimental results. This study provides new detailed structural assignments and interpretations of previously observed fragmentation patterns for these ions. PMID:17249666

  17. Molecular simulation study on Hofmeister cations and the aqueous solubility of benzene.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Pritam; Hajari, Timir; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2014-05-22

    We study the ion-specific salting-out process of benzene in aqueous alkali chloride solutions using Kirkwood-Buff (KB) theory of solutions and molecular dynamics simulations with different empirical force field models for the ions and benzene. Despite inaccuracies in the force fields, the simulations indicate that the decrease of the Setchenow salting-out coefficient for the series NaCl > KCl > RbCl > CsCl is determined by direct benzene-cation correlations, with the larger cations showing weak interactions with benzene. Although ion-specific aqueous solubilities of benzene may be affected by indirect ion-ion, ion-water, and water-water correlations, too, these correlations are found to be unimportant, with little to no effect on the Setchenow salting-out coefficients of the various salts. We further considered LiCl, which is experimentally known to be a weaker salting-out agent than NaCl and KCl and, therefore, ranks at an unusual position within the Hofmeister cation series. The simulations indicate that hydrated Li(+) ions can take part of the benzene hydration shell while the other cations are repelled by it. This causes weaker Li(+) exclusion around the solute and a resulting, weaker salting-out propensity of LiCl compared to that of the other salts. Removing benzene-water and benzene-salt electrostatic interactions in the simulations does not affect this mechanism, which may therefore also explain the smaller effect of LiCl, as compared to that of NaCl or KCl, on aqueous solvation and hydrophobic interaction of nonpolar molecules.

  18. Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, David W.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  19. Structures of alkali metals in silica gel nanopores: new materials for chemical reductions and hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Shatnawi, Mouath; Paglia, Gianluca; Dye, James L; Cram, Kevin C; Lefenfeld, Michael; Billinge, Simon J L

    2007-02-07

    Alkali metals and their alloys can be protected from spontaneous reaction with dry air by intercalation (with subsequent heating) into the pores of silica gel (SG) at loadings up to 40 wt %. The resulting loose, black powders are convenient materials for chemical reduction of organic compounds and the production of clean hydrogen. The problem addressed in this paper is the nature of the reducing species present in these amorphous materials. The atomic pair distribution function (PDF), which considers both Bragg and diffuse scattering components, was used to examine their structures. Liquid Na-K alloys added to silica gel at room temperature (stage 0) or heated to 150 degrees C (stage I) as well as stage I Na-SG, retain the overall pattern of pure silica gel. Broad oscillations in the PDF show that added alkali metals remain in the pores as nanoscale metal clusters. 23Na MAS NMR studies confirm the presence of Na(0) and demonstrate that Na+ ions are formed as well. The relative amounts of Na(0) and Na(+) depend on both the overall metal loading and the average pore size. The results suggest that ionization occurs near or in the SiO2 walls, with neutral metal present in the larger cavities. The fate of the electrons released by ionization is uncertain, but they may add to the silica gel lattice, or form an "electride-like plasma" near the silica gel walls. A remaining mystery is why the stage I material does not show a melting endotherm of the encapsulated metal and does not react with dry oxygen. Na-SG when heated to 400 degrees C (stage II) yields a dual-phase reaction product that consists of Na(4)Si(4) and Na(2)SiO(3).

  20. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  1. Activation of DNA strand exchange by cationic comb-type copolymers: effect of cationic moieties of the copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung Won; Kano, Arihiro; Maruyama, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    We have previously reported that poly(l-lysine)-graft-dextran cationic comb-type copolymers accelerate strand exchange reaction between duplex DNA and its complementary single strand by >4 orders of magnitude, while stabilizing duplex. However, the stabilization of the duplex is considered principally unfavourable for the accelerating activity since the strand exchange reaction requires, at least, partial melting of the initial duplex. Here we report the effects of different cationic moieties of cationic comb-type copolymers on the accelerating activity. The copolymer having guanidino groups exhibited markedly higher accelerating effect on strand exchange reactions than that having primary amino groups. The high accelerating effect of the former is considered to be due to its lower stabilizing effect on duplex DNA, resulting from its increased affinity to single-stranded DNA. The difference in affinity was clearly demonstrated by a fluorescence correlation spectroscopy study; the interaction of the former with single-stranded DNA still remained high even at 1 M NaCl, while that of the latter completely disappeared. These results suggest that some modes of interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, other than electrostatic interactions between the copolymers having guanidino groups and DNAs may be involved in strand exchange activation. PMID:18033803

  2. 43 CFR 4730.2 - Disposal of remains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.2 Disposal of remains. Remains of wild horses or burros that die after capture shall be disposed of in accordance...

  3. 43 CFR 4730.2 - Disposal of remains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.2 Disposal of remains. Remains of wild horses or burros that die after capture shall be disposed of in accordance...

  4. 43 CFR 4730.2 - Disposal of remains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.2 Disposal of remains. Remains of wild horses or burros that die after capture shall be disposed of in accordance...

  5. 43 CFR 4730.2 - Disposal of remains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.2 Disposal of remains. Remains of wild horses or burros that die after capture shall be disposed of in accordance...

  6. Alkali Halide Microstructured Optical Fiber for X-Ray Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeHaven, S. L.; Wincheski, R. A.; Albin, S.

    2014-01-01

    Microstructured optical fibers containing alkali halide scintillation materials of CsI(Na), CsI(Tl), and NaI(Tl) are presented. The scintillation materials are grown inside the microstructured fibers using a modified Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers, with and without an aluminum film coating are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The photon count results show significant variations in the fiber output based on the materials. The alkali halide fiber output can exceed that of the CdTe detector, dependent upon photon counter efficiency and fiber configuration. The results and associated materials difference are discussed.

  7. The optical properties of alkali nitrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anan'ev, Vladimir; Miklin, Mikhail

    2000-08-01

    Absorption of non-polarized light by a uniaxial crystal has been studied. The degree of absorption polarization has been calculated as a function of the ratio of optical densities in the region of low and high absorbances. This function is proposed for analysis of the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of uniaxial crystal absorption spectra. Non-polarized light spectra of alkali nitrate single crystals, both pure and doped with thallium, have been studied. It is shown that the absorption band at 300 nm is due to two transitions, whose intensities depend on temperature in various ways. There is a weak band in a short wavelength range of the absorption spectrum of potassium nitrate crystal, whose intensity increases with thallium doping. The band parameters of alkali nitrate single crystals have been calculated. Low-energy transitions in the nitrate ion have been located.

  8. Control of alkali vapors by a granular-bed filter

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Myles, K.M.; Jonke, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    Control of alkali vapors in the pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) of coal is being studied in a laboratory-scale fixed granular-bed filter. The potential sorbents identified earlier were tested for their alkali vapor sorption in a gas stream with temperature (greater than or equal to 850/sup 0/C), pressure (10 atm absolute), and composition closely simulating actual PFBC flue gas. The NaCl-vapor sorption efficiency of activated bauxite is > 99.8% and was found not to be diminished by HCl in flue gas. Diatomaceous earth has lower sorption efficiencies than activated bauxite. Emathlite, a fuller's earth, has a capability for NaCl-vapor capture. Its sorption behavior and preliminary sorption efficiencies are presented and discussed.

  9. Petrology and geochemistry of alkali gabbronorites from lunar breccia 67975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Odette B.; Flohr, Marta K.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed results of petrologic and compositional studies of three clasts found in thin sections of the Apollo 16 lunar breccia 67975 and of four clasts extracted from the breccia (for instrumental neutron activation analysis) prior to thin sectioning are reported. The alkali gabbronorites of the breccia form two distinct subgroups, magnesian and ferroan. The magnesian gabbronorites are composed of bytownitic plagioclase, hypersthene, augite, a silica mineral, and trace Ba-rich K-feldspar. The ferroan gabbronorites are composed of ternary plagioclase, pigeonite, augite, Ba-rich K-feldspar, and a silica mineral. Trace minerals in both subgroups are apatite, REE-rich whitlockite, and zircon. The magnesian and ferroan alkali gabbronorites appear to have formed by progressive differentiation of the same, or closely related, parent REE-rich magmas.

  10. Polymerization reactivity of sulfomethylated alkali lignin modified with horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongjie; Wu, Xiaolei; Qiu, Xueqing; Chang, Yaqi; Lou, Hongming

    2014-03-01

    Alkali lignin (AL) was employed as raw materials in the present study. Sulfomethylation was conducted to improve the solubility of AL, while sulfomethylated alkali lignin (SAL) was further polymerized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). HRP modification caused a significant increase in molecular weight of SAL which was over 20 times. It was also found to increase the amount of sulfonic and carboxyl groups while decrease the amount of phenolic and methoxyl groups in SAL. The adsorption quantity of self-assembled SAL film was improved after HRP modification. Sulfonation and HRP modification were mutually promoted. The polymerization reactivity of SAL in HRP modification was increased with its sulfonation degree. Meanwhile, HRP modification facilitated SAL's radical-sulfonation reaction.

  11. Alkali elements in the Earth's core: Evidence from enstatite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lodders, K.

    1995-01-01

    The abundances of alkali elements in the Earth's core are predicted by assuming that accretion of the Earth started from material similar in composition to enstatite chondrites and that enstatite achondrites (aubrites) provide a natural laboratory to study core-mantle differentiation under extremely reducing conditions. If core formation on the aubrite parent body is comparable with core formation on the early Earth, it is found that 2600 (+/- 1000) ppm Na, 550 (+/- 260) ppm K, 3.4 (+/- 2.1) ppm Rb, and 0.31 (+/- 0.24) ppm Cs can reside in the Earth's core. The alkali-element abundances are consistent with those predicted by independent estimates based on nebula condensation calculations and heat flow data.

  12. Alkali halide microstructured optical fiber for X-ray detection

    SciTech Connect

    DeHaven, S. L. E-mail: russel.a.wincheski@nasa.gov; Wincheski, R. A. E-mail: russel.a.wincheski@nasa.gov; Albin, S.

    2015-03-31

    Microstructured optical fibers containing alkali halide scintillation materials of CsI(Na), CsI(Tl), and NaI(Tl) are presented. The scintillation materials are grown inside the microstructured fibers using a modified Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers, with and without an aluminum film coating are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The photon count results show significant variations in the fiber output based on the materials. The alkali halide fiber output can exceed that of the CdTe detector, dependent upon photon counter efficiency and fiber configuration. The results and associated materials difference are discussed.

  13. Alkali metal ion catalysis and inhibition in nucleophilic displacement reactions at phosphorus centers: ethyl and methyl paraoxon and ethyl and methyl parathion.

    PubMed

    Um, Ik-Hwan; Shin, Young-Hee; Lee, Seung-Eun; Yang, Kiyull; Buncel, Erwin

    2008-02-01

    We report on the ethanolysis of the P=O and P=S compounds ethyl and methyl paraoxon (1a and 1b) and ethyl and methyl parathion (2a and 2b). Plots of spectrophotometrically measured rate constants, kobsd versus [MOEt], the alkali ethoxide concentration, show distinct upward and downward curvatures, pointing to the importance of ion-pairing phenomena and a differential reactivity of free ions and ion pairs. Three types of reactivity and selectivity patterns have been discerned: (1) For the P=O compounds 1a and 1b, LiOEt > NaOEt > KOEt > EtO-; (2) for the P=S compound 2a, KOEt > EtO- > NaOEt > LiOEt; (3) for P=S, 2b, 18C6-crown-complexed KOEt > KOEt = EtO(-) > NaOEt > LiOEt. These selectivity patterns are characteristic of both catalysis and inhibition by alkali-metal cations depending on the nature of the electrophilic center, P=O vs P=S, and the metal cation. Ground-state (GS) vs transition-state (TS) stabilization energies shed light on the catalytic and inhibitory tendencies. The unprecedented catalytic behavior of crowned-K(+) for the reaction of 2b is noteworthy. Modeling reveals an extreme steric interaction for the reaction of 2a with crowned-K(+), which is responsible for the absence of catalysis in this system. Overall, P=O exhibits greater reactivity than P=S, increasing from 50- to 60-fold with free EtO(-) and up to 2000-fold with LiOEt, reflecting an intrinsic P=O vs P=S reactivity difference (thio effect). The origin of reactivity and selectivity differences in these systems is discussed on the basis of competing electrostatic effects and solvational requirements as function of anionic electric field strength and cation size (Eisenman's theory).

  14. The borosulfate story goes on--from alkali and oxonium salts to polyacids.

    PubMed

    Daub, Michael; Kazmierczak, Karolina; Höppe, Henning A; Hillebrecht, Harald

    2013-12-09

    The structural principles of borosulfates derived from the B/S ratio are confirmed and extended to new representatives of this class showing novel motifs. According to the composition, Na[B(S2O7)2] (P2(1)/c; a=10.949(6), b=8.491(14), c=12.701(8) Å; β=110.227(1)°; Z=4) and K[B(S2O7)2] (Cc; a=11.3368(6), b=14.662(14), c=13.6650(8) Å; β=94.235(1)°; Z=8) contain isolated [B(S2O7)2](-) ions, in which the central BO4 tetrahedron is coordinated by two disulfate units. The alkali cations have coordination numbers of 7 (Na) and 8 (K), respectively. The structure of Cs[B(S2O7)(SO4)] (P2(1)/c; a=10.4525(6), b=11.3191(14), c=8.2760(8) Å; β=103.206(1); Z=4) combines, for the first time, sulfate and disulfate units into a chain structure. Cs has a coordination number of 12. The same structural units were found in H[B(S2O7)(SO4)] (P2(1)/c; a=15.6974(6), b=11.4362(14), c=8.5557(8) Å; β=90.334(3)°; Z=8). This compound represents the first example of a polyacid. The hydrogen atoms were located and connect the chains to form layers through hydrogen-bonding bridges. H3O[B(SO4)2] (P4/ncc; a=9.1377(6), c=7.3423(8) Å; Z=4) is the first oxonium compound of this type to be found. The BO4 tetrahedra are linked by SO4 tetrahedra to form linear chains similar to those in SiS2. The chains form a tetragonal rod packing structure with H3O(+) between the rods. The structures of borosulfates can be classified following the concept described by Liebau for silicates, which was extended to borophosphates by Kniep et al. In contrast to these structures, borosulfates do not comprise B-O-B bonds but instead contain S-O-S connections. All compounds were obtained as colourless, moisture-sensitive single crystals by reaction of B2O3 and the appropriate alkali salt in oleum.

  15. Molecular Modeling and Monte Carlo Simulation of Concentrated Aqueous Alkali Halide Solutions at 25 C.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llano-Restrepo, Mario Andres

    A study of concentrated aqueous alkali halide solutions is made at the molecular level, through modeling and computer simulation of their structural and thermodynamic properties. It is found that the HNC approximation is the best integral equation theory to predict such properties within the framework of the primitive model (PM). The intrinsic limitations of the PM in describing ionic association and hydration effects are addressed and discussed in order to emphasize the need for explicitly including the water molecules in the treatment of aqueous electrolyte solutions by means of a civilized model (CM). As a step toward developing a CM as simple as possible, it is shown that a modified version of the SPC model of liquid water in which the Lennard-Jones interaction between intermolecular oxygen sites is replaced by a hard core interaction, is still successful enough to predict the degree of hydrogen bonding of real water. A simple civilized model (SCM) (in which the ions are treated as hard spheres interacting through Coulombic potentials and the water molecules are simulated using the simplified SPC model) is introduced in order to study the changes in the structural features of various aqueous alkali halide solutions upon varying both the concentration and the size of the ions. Both cations and anions are found to be solvated by the water molecules at expense of a breakdown in the hydrogen-bonded water network. Hydration numbers are reported for the first time for NaBr and KBr, and the first simulation -based estimates for LiBr, NaI and KI are also obtained. In several cases, values of the hydration numbers based on the SCM are found to be in excellent agreement with available experimental results obtained from x-ray diffraction measurements. Finally, it is shown that a neoprimitive model (NPM) can be developed by incorporating some of the structural features seen in the SCM into the short-range part of the PM interionic potential via a shielded square well whose

  16. Solid Electrolytes: Alkali-Ion Transport in Skeleton Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-30

    side if necessary and identify by block number) solid electrolytes alkali -ion transport sodium -sulfur batteries fast -ion transport O ABSTRACT...molten Na 2 S4 for 10 days at 400’C indicated chemical stability, similar testing i-1 molten sodium was initiated, and it has been established that...tests under dynamic conditions are necessary before long-term stability of tile material can be established. Tests for stability in molten sodium have

  17. Optical Properties of Tm(3+) Ions in Alkali Germanate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.; Barnes, Norman P.; Reichle, Donald J.; Jiang, Shibin

    2006-01-01

    Tm-doped alkali germanate glass is investigated for use as a laser material. Spectroscopic investigations of bulk Tm-doped germanate glass are reported for the absorption, emission and luminescence decay. Tm:germanate shows promise as a fiber laser when pumped with 0.792 m diodes because of low phonon energies. Spectroscopic analysis indicates low nonradiative quenching and pulsed laser performance studies confirm this prediction by showing a quantum efficiency of 1.69.

  18. Transversely diode-pumped alkali metal vapour laser

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomenko, A I; Shalagin, A M

    2015-09-30

    We have studied theoretically the operation of a transversely diode-pumped alkali metal vapour laser. For the case of high-intensity laser radiation, we have obtained an analytical solution to a complex system of differential equations describing the laser. This solution allows one to exhaustively determine all the energy characteristics of the laser and to find optimal parameters of the working medium and pump radiation (temperature, buffer gas pressure, and intensity and width of the pump spectrum). (lasers)

  19. High-energy transversely pumped alkali vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.

    2011-03-01

    We report on the results from our transversely pumped alkali laser. This system uses an Alexandrite laser to pump a stainless steel laser head. The system uses methane and helium as buffer gasses. Using rubidium, the system produced up to 40 mJ of output energy when pumped with 63 mJ. Slope efficiency was 75%. Using potassium as the lasing species the system produced 32 mJ and a 53% slope efficiency.

  20. Diode pumped alkali vapor lasers for high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.; Komashko, A.

    2008-02-01

    General Atomics has been engaged in the development of diode pumped alkali vapor lasers. We have been examining the design space looking for designs that are both efficient and easily scalable to high powers. Computationally, we have looked at the effect of pump bandwidth on laser performance. We have also looked at different lasing species. We have used an alexandrite laser to study the relative merits of different designs. We report on the results of our experimental and computational studies.