Science.gov

Sample records for alkali corrosion kinetics

  1. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

    1992-05-27

    High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and high efficiency heat engines. The objective of this research is to systematically evaluate the alkali corrosion resistance of the most commonly used structural ceramics including silicon carbide, silicon nitride, cordierite, mullite, alumina, aluminum titanate, zirconia, and fireclay glass. The study consists of identification of the alkali reaction products (phase equilibria) and the kinetics of the alkali reactions as a function of temperature and time.

  2. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

    1991-11-30

    High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and high efficiency heat engines. The objective of this program is to systematically evaluate the alkali corrosion resistance of the most commonly used structural ceramics including silicon carbide, silicon nitride, cordierite, mullite, alumina, aluminum titanate, zirconia, and fireclay glass. The study consists of identification of the alkali reaction products (phase equilibria) and the kinetics of the alkali reactions as a function of temperature and time.

  3. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

    1992-08-29

    High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and high efficiency heat engines. The objective of this research is to systematically evaluate the alkali corrosion resistance of the most commonly used structural ceramics including silicon carbide, silicon nitride, cordierite, mullite, alumina, aluminum titanate, zirconia, and fireclay glass. The study consists of identification of the alkali reaction products (phase equilibria) and the kinetics of the alkali reactions as a function of temperature and time.

  4. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

    1992-02-24

    The high temperature alkali corrosion kinetics of SiC have been systematically investigated from 950 to 1100[degrees]C at 0.63 vol % alkali vapor concentration. The corrosion rate in the presence of alkaliis approximately 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 5] times faster than the oxidation rate of SiC in air. The activation energy associated with the alkali corrosion is 406 kJ/mol, indicating a highly temperature-dependent reaction rate. The rate-controlling step of the overall reaction is likely to be the dissolution of silica in the sodium silicate liquid, based on the oxygen diffusivity data.

  5. Theory of corrosion of alkali-borosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E.; Hench, L.L.

    1983-01-01

    The alkali-borosilicate (ABS) system provides the basis for a wide variety of commercially important products among which are the nuclear waste glasses. Although a large number of investigations have been undertaken in the last five years, the corrosion mechanisms of the ABS glasses have not been characterized nearly as well as for the soda-lime-silicate (NCS) glasses commonly used for containers. It is well known that the corrosion of the latter glasses involves ion exchange, network dissolution, and precipitation mechanisms resulting in the development of one of five types of surface films. In the present paper we compare the corrosion behavior to the ABS and NCS glasses and discuss our current understanding of ABS glass corrosion in terms of mechanisms, kinetics, surface film formation and thermodynamics.

  6. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas. Quarterly progress report No. 12, June 1--August 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Brown, J.J.

    1994-09-01

    High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and high efficiency heat engines. The objective of this research is to evaluate the alkali corrosion resistance of the most commonly used structural ceramics including silicon carbide, silicon nitride, cordierite, mullite, alumina, aluminum titanate, zirconia, and fireclay glass. The study consists of identification of the alkali reaction products (phase equilibria) and the kinetics of the alkali reactions.

  7. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas. Quarterly progress report No. 3, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

    1992-05-27

    High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and high efficiency heat engines. The objective of this research is to systematically evaluate the alkali corrosion resistance of the most commonly used structural ceramics including silicon carbide, silicon nitride, cordierite, mullite, alumina, aluminum titanate, zirconia, and fireclay glass. The study consists of identification of the alkali reaction products (phase equilibria) and the kinetics of the alkali reactions as a function of temperature and time.

  8. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas. Quarterly progress report No. 1, September 1, 1991--November 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

    1991-11-30

    High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and high efficiency heat engines. The objective of this program is to systematically evaluate the alkali corrosion resistance of the most commonly used structural ceramics including silicon carbide, silicon nitride, cordierite, mullite, alumina, aluminum titanate, zirconia, and fireclay glass. The study consists of identification of the alkali reaction products (phase equilibria) and the kinetics of the alkali reactions as a function of temperature and time.

  9. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas. Quarterly progress report No. 4, June 1, 1992--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

    1992-08-29

    High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and high efficiency heat engines. The objective of this research is to systematically evaluate the alkali corrosion resistance of the most commonly used structural ceramics including silicon carbide, silicon nitride, cordierite, mullite, alumina, aluminum titanate, zirconia, and fireclay glass. The study consists of identification of the alkali reaction products (phase equilibria) and the kinetics of the alkali reactions as a function of temperature and time.

  10. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas. Quarterly progress report No. 6, December 1, 1992--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

    1992-02-24

    The high temperature alkali corrosion kinetics of SiC have been systematically investigated from 950 to 1100{degrees}C at 0.63 vol % alkali vapor concentration. The corrosion rate in the presence of alkaliis approximately 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 5} times faster than the oxidation rate of SiC in air. The activation energy associated with the alkali corrosion is 406 kJ/mol, indicating a highly temperature-dependent reaction rate. The rate-controlling step of the overall reaction is likely to be the dissolution of silica in the sodium silicate liquid, based on the oxygen diffusivity data.

  11. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas. Quarterly progress report No. 7, March 1, 1993--June 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

    1993-05-25

    Corrosion kinetics of SiC were investigated from 950 to 1100C at 0.63 vol% alkali vapor concentration. Corrosion rate in alkali is 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 5} times faster than oxidation rate of SiC in air. Activation energy of the alkali corrosion is 406 kj/mol, indicating a high sensitivity to temperature changes. Overall reaction appears to be controlled by the oxidation of SiC. The alkali corrosion kinetics of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} from 950 to 1050{degrees}C were also examined in the same atmosphere (0.63 vol% alkali vapors). Reaction thickness of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} appears to vary linearly with reaction time from 950 to 1050C, suggesting that the alkali corrosion process is controlled by the oxidation of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. At 1050{degrees}C, the alkali-enhanced oxidation of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} is approximately 10{sup 7} times faster than the oxidation of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} in dry oxygen. Compared to SiC corroded in the same alkali atmosphere, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} seems to be less alkali-resistant than SiC. Phase relations of the Na{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} vertical section from 5--40 wt% Na{sub 2}O and 840-1100C were studied. Phase analysis indicates that this section is not a true binary system. A tentative phase diagram for the Na{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2} system was constructed.

  12. High temperature corrosion by deposits of alkali salts

    SciTech Connect

    Kloewer, J.

    1996-12-01

    In order to understand and predict how corrosion behavior of metallic high temperature materials is affected by deposits of alkali salts, eight commercial high temperature alloys (AISI 314, alloy 800H, alloy 31, AC66, alloy 45-TM, alloy 625, alloy 59 and alloy C-4) coated with alkali sulfates and chlorides (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/KCl) were investigated in both air and in HCl/SO{sub 2}-containing waste incineration environments. The corrosion rates were found to depend sensitively on the alloy composition, especially on the concentration of molybdenum and silicon. Both stainless steels and nickel base alloys without molybdenum were resistant to dissolution by sulfates in air. Molybdenum-containing steels and nickel base alloys, on the other hand, were extremely susceptible to acidic dissolution in sodium sulfate. These high corrosion rates can be attributed to an increase in salt acidity caused by dissolution of MoO{sub 3}. The effect of HCI in the gas atmosphere was contradictory. All alloys without molybdenum suffered severe internal oxidation, when chlorine was present in the gas atmosphere. The corrosion rates of the nickel-molybdenum alloys, however, were decreased when chlorine was added to the gas phase. The highest corrosion resistance to synthetic waste incineration gas in combination with deposits of alkali sulfates and chlorides was found in the nickel base alloys 45 TM and alloy 625.

  13. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas. Quarterly progress report {number_sign}9: September 1--December 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

    1993-12-01

    High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and high efficiency heat engines. The objective of this research is to systematically evaluate the alkali corrosion resistance of the most commonly used structural ceramics including silicon carbide, silicon nitride, cordierite, mullite, alumina, aluminum titanate, zirconia, and fireclay glass. The study consists of identification of the alkali reaction products (phase equilibria) and the kinetics of the alkali reactions.

  14. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    There are several ceramic materials which are currently being considered for use as structural elements in coal combustion and coal conversion systems because of their thermal and mechanical properties. These include alumina (refractories, membranes, heat engines); silicon carbide and silicon nitride (turbine engines, internal combustion engines, heat exchangers, particulate filters); zirconia (internal combustion engines, turbine engines, refractories); and mullite and cordierite (particulate filters, refractories, heat exchangers). High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and high efficiency heat engines. The objective of this research is to systematically evaluate the alkali corrosion resistance of the most commonly used structural ceramics including silicon carbide, silicon nitride, cordierite, mullite, alumina, aluminum titanate, and zirconia. The study consists of identification of the alkali reaction products and determination of the kinetics of the alkali reactions as a function of temperature and time. 145 refs., 29 figs., 12 tabs.

  15. Corrosion in alkali metal/molybdenum heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, L.B.; Feber, R.C. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Molybdenum/sodium (Mo/Na) and molybdenum/lithium (Mo/Li) heat pipes have been operated for long periods of time in a study of their resistance to failure by alkali metal corrosion. Some Mo/Na heat pipes have operated over 20,600 h at 1400 K without failure, while at least one similar heat pipe failed in less than 14 hours at 1435 K. Detailed post-mortem analyses which have been performed on three failed Mo/Na heat pipes all indicated impurity controlled corrosion of their evaporators. Impurities observed to be transported included carbon, oxygen, and silicon. A Mo/Li heat pipe that failed after 25,216 h of operation at 1700 K was also examined in detail. This failure was due to nickel impurities being transported to the evaporator resulting in perforation of the container tube by the formation of a low melting Mo-Ni alloy. Theoretical thermochemical calculations were conducted for these systems with the objective of corroborating the corrosion mechanisms in both types of heat pipes. The results of these calculations are in general agreement with the observed corrosion a phenomena.

  16. Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure and method of processing

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Jr., Jesse J.; Hirschfeld, Deidre A.; Li, Tingkai

    1993-12-07

    Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure are created using sol-gel processes. The processes have particular application in creating calcium magnesium zirconium phosphate, CMZP, coatings and foams.

  17. Method for inhibiting alkali metal corrosion of nickel-containing alloys

    DOEpatents

    DeVan, Jackson H.; Selle, James E.

    1983-01-01

    Structural components of nickel-containing alloys within molten alkali metal systems are protected against corrosion during the course of service by dissolving therein sufficient aluminum, silicon, or manganese to cause the formation and maintenance of a corrosion-resistant intermetallic reaction layer created by the interaction of the molten metal, selected metal, and alloy.

  18. Anaerobic corrosion reaction kinetics of nanosized iron.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Eric J; Fagan, Randal; Vogan, John L; Przepiora, Andrzej

    2008-04-01

    Nanosized Fe0 exhibits markedly different anaerobic corrosion rates in water compared to that disseminated in moist quartz sand. In water, hydrogen production from corrosion exhibits an autocatalytic style, attaining a maximum rate of 1.9 mol kg(-1) d(-1) within 2 d of reaction. The rate then drops sharply over the next 20 d and enters a period of uniformly decreasing rate, represented equally well by first-order or diffusion-controlled kinetic expressions. In quartz sand, hydrogen production exhibits a double maximum over the first 20 d, similar to the hydration reaction of Portland cement, and the highest rate attained is less than 0.5 mol kg(-1) d(-1). We ascribe this difference in early time corrosion behavior to the ability of the released hydrogen gas to convect both water and iron particles in an iron/water system and to its inability to do so when the iron particles are disseminated in sand. By 30 d, the hydrogen production rate of iron in quartz sand exhibits a uniform decrease as in the iron/water system, which also can be described by first-order or diffusion-controlled kinetic expressions. However, the corrosion resistance of the iron in moist sand is 4 times greater than in pure water (viz. t1/2 of 365 d vs 78 d, respectively). The lower rate for iron in sand is likely due to the effect of dissolved silica sorbing onto iron reaction sites and acting as an anodic inhibitor, which reduces the iron's susceptibility to oxidation by water. This study indicates that short-term laboratory corrosion tests of nanosized Fe0/water slurries will substantially underestimate both the material's longevity as an electron source and its potential as a long-term source of hydrogen gas in groundwater remediation applications.

  19. High temperature alkali corrosion in high velocity gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Sidik, S. M.; Deadmore, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of potential impurities in coal derived liquids such as Na, K, Mg, Ca and Cl on the accelerated corrosion of IN-100, U-700, IN-792 and Mar-M509 were investigated using a Mach 0.3 burner rig for times to 1000 hours in one hour cycles. These impurities were injected in combination as aqueous solutions into the combustor of the burner rig. The experimental matrix utilized was designed statistically. The extent of corrosion was determined by metal recession. The metal recession data were fitted by linear regression to a polynomial expression which allows both interpolation and extrapolation of the data. As anticipated, corrosion increased rapidly with Na and K, and a marked maximum in the temperature response was noted for many conditions. In contrast, corrosion decreased somewhat as the Ca, Mg and Cl contents increased. Extensive corrosion was observed at concentrations of Na and K as low as 0.1 PPM at long times.

  20. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels during thermal cycling in alkali nitrate molten salts.

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Goods, Steven Howard

    2001-09-01

    The corrosion behavior of three austenitic stainless steels was evaluated during thermal cycling in molten salt mixtures consisting of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3}. Corrosion tests were conducted with Types 316, 316L and 304 stainless steels for more than 4000 hours and 500 thermal cycles at a maximum temperature of 565 C. Corrosion rates were determined by chemically descaling coupons. Metal losses ranged from 5 to 16 microns and thermal cycling resulted in moderately higher corrosion rates compared to isothermal conditions. Type 316 SS was somewhat more corrosion resistant than Type 304 SS in these tests. The effect of carbon content on corrosion resistance was small, as 316L SS corroded only slightly slower than 316 SS. The corrosion rates increased as the dissolved chloride content of the molten salt mixtures increased. Chloride concentrations approximating 1 wt.%, coupled with thermal cycling, resulted in linear weight loss kinetics, rather than parabolic kinetics, which described corrosion rates for all other conditions. Optical microscopy and electron microprobe analysis revealed that the corrosion products consisted of iron-chromium spinel, magnetite, and sodium ferrite, organized as separate layers. Microanalysis of the elemental composition of the corrosion products further demonstrated that the chromium content of the iron-chromium spinel layer was relatively high for conditions in which parabolic kinetics were observed. However, linear kinetics were observed when the spinel layer contained relatively little chromium.

  1. High temperature corrosion behavior of commercial high temperature alloys under deposits of alkali salts

    SciTech Connect

    Kloewer, J.

    1995-12-31

    Corrosive deposits containing high amounts of alkali sulphates, chlorides and/or carbonates are encountered by heat exchanger tubes in a variety of industrial processes. Due to their low melting point the alkali salts can cause basic or acidic dissolution of the subjacent material, which results in rapid wastage of the tube. In order to select appropriate materials for application in heat recovery systems eight commercial high temperature materials (alloy 800H, Alloy 31, Alloy AC66, alloy 45-TM, Alloy 625, Alloy 59 and Alloy C-4) were investigated in sulphate, sulphate/chloride and sulphate/chloride/carbonate salt mixtures. The temperature range was between 550 and 750 C. In agreement with field tests the corrosion attack was high for most of the alloys tested with the corrosion rate depending sensitively on salt composition, test temperature and alloy composition. High molybdenum contents were found to be detrimental. Chromium did not effect the corrosion behavior significantly, whereas silicon had a beneficial effect on the corrosion resistance in molten alkali salts.

  2. (abstract) Fundamental Mechanisms of Electrode Kinetics and Alkali Metal Atom Transport at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kisor, A.; Kikkert, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of electrode kinetics and mass transport of alkali metal oxidation and alkali metal cation reduction at the solid electrolyte/porous electrode boundary as well as alkali metal transport through porous metal electrodes has important applications in optimizing device performance in alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) cells which are high temperature, high current density electrochemical cells. Basic studies of these processes also affords the opportunity to investigate a very basic electrochemical reaction over a wide range of conditions; and a variety of mass transport modes at high temperatures via electrochemical techniques. The temperature range of these investigations covers 700K to 1240K; the alkali metal vapor pressures range from about 10(sup -2) to 10(sup 2) Pa; and electrodes studied have included Mo, W, Mo/Na(sub 2)MoO(sub 4), W/Na(sub 2)WO(sub 4), WPt(sub x), and WRh(sub x) (1.0 < x < 6.0 ) with Na at Na-beta'-alumina, and Mo with K at K-beta'-alumina. Both liquid metal/solid electrolyte/alkali metal vapor and alkali metal vapor/solid electrolyte/vapor cells have been used to characterize the reaction and transport processes. We have previously reported evidence of ionic, free molecular flow, and surface transport of sodium in several types of AMTEC electrodes.

  3. Burner rig alkali salt corrosion of several high temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion of five alloys was studied in cyclic tests in a Mach 0.3 burner rig into whose combustion chamber various aqueous salt solutions were injected. Three nickel-based alloys, a cobalt-base alloy, and an iron-base alloy were studied at temperatures of 700, 800, 900, and 1000 C with various salt concentrations and compositions. The relative resistance of the alloys to hot corrosion attack was found to vary with temperature and both concentration and composition of the injected salt solution. Results indicate that the corrosion of these alloys is a function of both the presence of salt condensed as a liquid on the surface and of the composition of the gas phases present.

  4. Corrosion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  5. Classification of alkali-silica reaction and corrosion distress using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelrahman, Marwa; ElBatanouny, Mohamed; Serrato, Michael; Dixon, Kenneth; Larosche, Carl; Ziehl, Paul

    2016-02-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulates approximately 100 commercial nuclear power reactor facilities that contribute about 20% of the total electric energy produced in the United States. Half of these reactor facilities are over 30 years old and are approaching their original design service life. Due to economic and durability considerations, significant portions of many of the facilities were constructed with reinforced concrete, including the containment facilities, cooling towers, and foundations. While most of these concrete facilities have performed exceptionally well throughout their initial expected service life, some are beginning to exhibit different forms of concrete deterioration. In this study, acoustic emission (AE) is used to monitor two main concrete deterioration mechanisms; alkali-silica reaction (ASR) distress and corrosion of reinforcing steel. An accelerated ASR test was conducted where specimens were continuously monitored with AE. The results show that AE can detect and classify damage due to ASR distress in the specimens. AE was also used to remotely monitor active corrosion regions in a reactor facility. AE monitoring of accelerated corrosion testing was also conducted on a concrete block specimen cut from a similar reactor building. Electrochemical measurements were conducted to correlate AE activity to quantifiable corrosion measurements and to enhance capabilities for service life prediction.

  6. Theoretical analysis of the kinetics of low-temperature defect recombination in alkali halide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzovkov, V. N.; Popov, A. I.; Kotomin, E. A.; Moskina, A. M.; Vasilchenko, E.; Lushchik, A.

    2016-07-01

    We analyzed carefully the experimental kinetics of the low-temperature diffusion-controlled F, H center recombination in a series of irradiated alkali halides and extracted the migration energies and pre-exponential parameters for the hole H centers. The migration energy for the complementary electronic F centers in NaCl was obtained from the colloid formation kinetics observed above room temperature. The obtained parameters were compared with data available from the literature.

  7. Evaluation of alkali metal sulfate dew point measurement for detection of hot corrosion conditions in PFBC flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Helt, J.E.

    1980-11-01

    Hot corrosion in combustion systems is, in general, the accelerated oxidation of nickel, cobalt, and iron-base alloys which occurs in the presence of small amounts of impurities - notably, sodium, sulfur, chlorine, and vanadium. There is no real consensus on which mechanisms are primarily responsible for high-temperature corrosion. One point generally accepted, however, is that corrosion reactions take place at an appreciable rate only in the presence of a liquid phase. When coal is the fuel for combustion, hot corrosion may occur in the form of accelerated sulfidation. It is generally agreed by investigators that molten alkali metal sulfates (Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) are the principal agents responsible for the occurrence of sulfidation. Although molten sodium sulfate by itself appears to have little or no effect on the corrosion of metal alloys, its presence may increase the accessibility of the bare metal surface to the external atmosphere. If this atmosphere contains either a reductant and/or an oxide such as SiO/sub 2/, SO/sub 3/, or NaOH(Na/sub 2/O), corrosion is likely to occur. Alkali metal sulfate dew point measurement was evaluated as a means of anticipating hot corrosion in the gas turbine of a pressurized fluidized-bed combustion system. The hot corrosion mechanism and deposition rate theory were reviewed. Two methods of dew point measurement, electrical conductivity and remote optical techniques, were identified as having a potential for this application. Both techniques are outlined; practical measurement systems are suggested; and potential problem areas are identified.

  8. Crystallization kinetics of alkali feldspars in cooling and decompression-induced crystallization experiments in trachytic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, Fabio; Carroll, Michael R.

    2013-10-01

    Cooling and decompression experiments have been carried out on trachytic melts in order to investigate crystallization kinetics of alkali feldspar, the effect of the degree of undercooling ( ΔT = T liquidus - T experimental) and time on nucleation and crystal growth process. This experimental work gives us new data about crystallization kinetics of trachytic melts, and it that will be useful to better understand the natural system of Campi Flegrei volcanoes. Experiments have been conducted using cold seal pressure vessel apparatus, at pressure between 30 and 200 MPa, temperature between 750 and 855 °C, time between 7,200 and 57,600 s and redox condition close to the NNO +0.8 buffer. These conditions are ideal to reproducing pre- and syn-eruptive conditions of the Campi Flegrei volcanoes, where the "conditions" pertain to the complete range of pressures, temperatures and time at which the experiments were performed. Alkali feldspar is the main phase present in this trachyte, and its abundance can strongly vary with small changes in pressure, temperature and water content in the melt, implying appreciable variations in the textures and in the crystallization kinetics. The obtained results show that crystallization kinetics are strictly related to ΔT, time, final pressure, superheating (- ΔT) and water content in the melt. ΔT is the driving force of the crystallization, and it has a strong influence on nucleation and growth processes. In fact, the growth process dominates crystallization at small ΔT, whereas the nucleation dominates crystallization at large ΔT. Time also is an important variable during crystallization process, because long experiment durations involve more nucleation events of alkali feldspar than short experiment durations. This is an important aspect to understand magma evolution in the magma chamber and in the conduit, which in turn has strong effects on magma rheology.

  9. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Pyatina, T.

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  10. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Pyatina, T.

    2014-11-14

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  11. High Temperature Corrosion Problem of Boiler Components in presence of Sulfur and Alkali based Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debashis; Mitra, Swapan Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Material degradation and ageing is of particular concern for fossil fuel fired power plant components. New techniques/approaches have been explored in recent years for Residual Life assessment of aged components and material degradation due to different damage mechanism like creep, fatigue, corrosion and erosion etc. Apart from the creep, the high temperature corrosion problem in a fossil fuel fired boiler is a matter of great concern if the fuel contains sulfur, chlorine sodium, potassium and vanadium etc. This paper discusses the material degradation due to high temperature corrosion in different critical components of boiler like water wall, superheater and reheater tubes and also remedial measures to avoid the premature failure. This paper also high lights the Residual Life Assessment (RLA) methodology of the components based on high temperature fireside corrosion. of different critical components of boiler.

  12. Kinetic and fluid dynamic modeling, numerical approaches of flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Shen, Binglin; Pan, Bailiang; Jiao, Jian; Xia, Chunsheng

    2015-07-27

    Comprehensive analysis of kinetic and fluid dynamic processes in flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers is reported. Taking into account effects of the temperature, the amplified spontaneous emission, the saturation power, the excitation of the alkali atoms to high electronic levels and the ionization, a detailed physical model is established to simulate the output performance of flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers. Influences of the flow velocity and the pump power on the amplified power are calculated and analyzed. Comparisons between single and double amplifier, longitudinal and transverse flow are made. Results show that end-pumped cascaded amplifier can provide higher output power under the same total pump power and the cell length, while output powers achieved by single- and double-end pumped, double-side pumped amplifiers with longitudinal or transverse flow have a complicated but valuable relation. Thus the model is extremely helpful for designing high-power flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers.

  13. Oxidation kinetics of reaction products formed in uranium metal corrosion.

    SciTech Connect

    Totemeier, T. C.

    1998-04-22

    The oxidation behavior of uranium metal ZPPR fuel corrosion products in environments of Ar-4%O{sub 2} and Ar-20%O{sub 2} were studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). These tests were performed to extend earlier work in this area specifically, to assess plate-to-plate variations in corrosion product properties and the effect of oxygen concentration on oxidation behavior. The corrosion products from two relatively severely corroded plates were similar, while the products from a relatively intact plate were not reactive. Oxygen concentration strongly affected the burning rate of reactive products, but had little effect on low-temperature oxidation rates.

  14. Studies of Alkali Sorption Kinetics for Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion by High Pressure Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, K.J.; Willenborg, W.; Fricke, C.; Prikhodovsky, A.; Hilpert, K.; Singheiser, L.

    2002-09-20

    This work describes the first approach to use High Pressure Mass Spectrometry (HPMS) for the quantification and analysis of alkali species in a gas stream downstream a sorbent bed of different tested alumosilicates.

  15. Iron corrosion in Callovo Oxfordian argilite: From experiments to thermodynamic/kinetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Combarieu, G.; Barboux, P.; Minet, Y.

    Many designs for high-level nuclear waste deep geological disposal include steel waste canister and low-alloy steel overpacks. The container and overpack corrosion products may affect the alteration kinetics of nuclear waste glass and contaminant retention properties due to mineralogical transformation in the surrounding clay. To better quantify the effect of corrosion on the mineralogical alteration of the clay, the present study reports the corrosion of pure iron in raw Callovo-Oxfordian argilite. Batch experiments have been carried out at 90 °C, from one to six months, under oxygen-free atmosphere. Iron corrosion kinetics and secondary mineral formation have been studied with quantitative XRD measurements. Chemical analyses have been performed by ICP-AES, ICP-MS and ionic chromatography. Eh and pH have also been monitored along with the reaction progress. The phases formed from the Fe release in solution are magnetite and Fe-rich silicate from the serpentine group (greenalite or cronstedtite) or chlorite. These phases are associated to the dissolution of quartz, illite and interstratified illite/smectite mixed layers. Solution analyses show that the Si, Fe, Mg and Al concentrations are controlled at a very low level by the precipitation of newly formed phases, although a noticeable pH increase (from 7 to 10 at 90 °C) is associated to iron corrosion. In the conditions of the experiments, the iron corrosion rate has been measured ( Riron = 6 × 10 -9 mol/m 2/s equivalent to 1.4 μm/year) and is in good agreement with previous works. The use of the geochemical code CHESS based on (i) solution analysis, (ii) mineral quantification and (iii) determination of kinetic data for iron corrosion allows to reproduce accurately this reaction-path. Fractionation of dissolved iron between iron silicate and magnetite can be correctly predicted, as well as the pH, Eh and other minerals stability.

  16. Effect of Corrosion Film Composition and Structure on the Corrosion Kinetics of Ni-Cr-Fe Alloys in High Temperature Water

    SciTech Connect

    P.M. Rosecrans; N. Lewis; D.J. Duquette

    2002-02-27

    Nickel alloys such as Alloy 600 undergo Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) in pure water at temperatures between about 260 C and the critical point. Increasing the level of Cr in Ni-Fe-Cr alloys increases SCC resistance in aerated and deaerated water. The mechanism is not understood. The effect of Cr composition on oxide microstructure and corrosion kinetics of Ni-Fe-Cr alloys was determined experimentally, to evaluate whether the anodic dissolution model for SCC can account for the effect of Cr on SCC. The alloy corrosion rate and corrosion product oxide microstructure is strongly influenced by the Cr composition. Corrosion kinetics are parabolic and influenced by chromium concentration, with the parabolic constant first increasing then decreasing as Cr increases from 5 to 39%. Surface analyses using Analytical Electron microscopy (AEM) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) show that the corrosion product film that forms initially on all alloys exposed to high purity high temperature water is a nickel rich oxide. With time, the amount of chromium in the oxide film increases and corrosion proceeds toward the formation of the more thermodynamically stable spinel or hexagonal Cr-rich oxides, similar to high temperature gaseous oxidation. Due to the slower diffusion kinetics at the temperatures of water corrosion compared to those in high temperature gaseous oxidation, however, the films remain as a mixture of NiO, mixed Ni, Fe and Cr spinels, NiCrO{sub 3} and FeCrO{sub 3}. As the amount of Cr in the film increases and the nature of the film changes from NiO to spinel or hexagonal oxides, cation diffusion through the films slows, slowing the corrosion rate. These observations are qualitatively consistent with an anodic dissolution SCC mechanism. However, parametric modeling of the SCC growth process, applying available creep, oxide rupture strain and corrosion kinetics data, indicates that the anodic dissolution mechanism accounts for only a fraction of the effect of Cr

  17. Kinetics of Moisture Absorption for Alkali Extracted Steam-Exploded Fiber Filled High-Density Polyethylene Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Taib, R. M.; Ramarad, S.; Ishak, Z. A. M.; Rozman, H. D.

    2010-03-11

    Acacia mangium wood fiber derived from steam-explosion and fiber fractionation treatment was used as fillers for high-density polyethylene (HDPE). The alkali extracted steam-exploded fibers (AEF) obtained were acetylated to produce acetylated fibers (AAEF) having three different weight percent gain (WPG). Composites of AEF or AAEF and HDPE were prepared via 2-roll mill, compression molded and cut into dumbbell specimens. All samples were immersed in water at room temperature for 30 days. The process of absorption of water by all composites followed the kinetics and mechanisms described by the Fick's theory. Diffusion coefficient (D) values increased with filler loading but decreased with increasing WPG of the AAEF fiber. Further decrease was observed when maleated polyethylene (MAPE) was added to the composite system. This was due to improved fiber-matrix adhesion that restricts movement of water molecules from further penetrate inside the composite structures.

  18. A kinetic model for corrosion and precipitation in non-isothermal LBE flow loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, By Xiaoyi; Li, Ning; Mineev, Mark

    2001-08-01

    A kinetic model was developed to estimate the corrosion/precipitation rate in a non-isothermal liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) flow loop. The model was based on solving the mass transport equation with the assumptions that convective transport dominates in the longitudinal flow direction and diffusion dominates in the transverse direction. The species concentration at wall is assumed to be determined either by the solubility of species in LBE in the absence of oxygen or by the reduction reaction of the protective oxide film when active oxygen control is applied. Analyses show that the corrosion/precipitation rate depends on the flow velocity, the species diffusion rate, the oxygen concentration in LBE, as well as the temperature distribution along a loop. Active oxygen control can significantly reduce the corrosion/precipitation of the structural materials. It is shown that the highest corrosion/precipitation does not necessarily locate at places with the highest/lowest temperature. For a material testing loop being constructed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the highest corrosion occurs at the end of the heater zone, while the highest precipitation occurs in the return flow in the recuperator.

  19. High Temperature Alkali Corrosion of Dense SN4 Coated with CMZP and Mg-Doped A21TiO5 in Coal Gas

    SciTech Connect

    J. J. Brown; Nguyen Thierry

    1997-10-01

    Si3N4 heat exchangers used in industrial systems are usually operating in harsh environments. Not only is this structural material experiencing high temperatures, but it is also subjected to corrosive gases and condensed phases. Past studies have demonstrated that condensed phases severely attack Si3N4 and as a consequence, dramatically reduce its lifetime in industrial operating systems.1,2 Previous research conducted at Virginia Tech on low thermal expansion coefficient oxide ceramics,3,4,5 (Ca1-X,MgX)Zr4(PO4)6 (CMZP), and Mg-doped Al2TiO5, for structural application have shown that these two materials exhibited better resistance to alkaline corrosion than Si3N4. Thus, they were envisioned as good candidates for a protective coating on Si3N4 heat exchangers. As a result, the goal of the present work is to develop CMZP and Mg-doped Al2TiO5 protective thin films using the sol-gel process and the dip coating technique and to test their effectiveness in an alkali-containing atmosphere.

  20. Corrosion-electrochemical behavior of nickel in an alkali metal carbonate melt under a chlorine-containing atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitina, E. V.; Kudyakov, V. Ya.; Malkov, V. B.; Plaksin, S. V.

    2013-08-01

    The corrosion-electrochemical behavior of a nickel electrode is studied in the melt of lithium, sodium, and potassium (40: 30: 30 mol %) carbonates in the temperature range 500-600°C under an oxidizing atmosphere CO2 + 0.5O2 (2: 1), which is partly replaced by gaseous chlorine (30, 50, 70%) in some experiments. In other experiments, up to 5 wt % chloride of sodium peroxide is introduced in a salt melt. A change in the gas-phase composition is shown to affect the mechanism of nickel corrosion.

  1. Experimental investigations of the kinetic processes involved in a rubidium (Rb) Optically Pumped Alkali metal vapor Laser (OPAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zameroski, Nathan D.

    Diode or Optically Pumped Alkali metal vapor Lasers (DPALs or OPALs) are candidates for high power laser systems. These gas-phase three-level lasers are pumped on the alkali's D2 transition, 2S1/2 → 2P3/2, and support lasing on the D1 transition, 2P1/2 → 2S1/2. Collisional mixing using several hundred Torr of an additive gas such as methane or ethane transfers population from the 2P3/2 state to the 2P1/2 state. These gases are selected because of their large mixing rates (cross sections) and small quenching rates (cross sections) of the 2P states. Pressure broadening of the D1 and D2 transitions is a direct consequence of using several hundred Torr of buffer gas required for collisional mixing. The quenching kinetics (non radiative decay of excited states) of Rb 2P states by methane and ethane are reexamined with time resolved fluorescence techniques. A detailed analysis of the interplay between radiation trapping, the absorption and re-emission of resonant radiation in an atomic vapor, and quenching is carried out. Experimental results supported by theoretical simulations (calculations) bound the quenching cross sections (sigma) of methane and ethane at 40°C to sigma ≤ 0.02 A2 and sigma ≤ 0.03 A2, respectively. These values are about two orders of magnitude smaller than previously reported. The pressure broadening and collisional shift rates of the Rb D2 absorption line by methane, ethane, propane, butane, and helium are measured by using linear absorption spectroscopy at 40°C. The rates of ethane, propane, and butane are measured for the first time. The broadening rates in (MHz/Torr) for C2H6, C3H8, and n-C4H10, are 28.1 +/- 0.4, 30.5 +/- 0.6, and 31.3 +/- 0.6. The corresponding shift rates in (MHz/Torr) are -8.8 +/- 0.2, -9.7 +/- 0.2, and -10.0 +/- 0.2. A pulsed Rb-methane OPAL is demonstrated. Slope efficiencies of 72 to 76 % are obtained. A one dimensional (1D) rate equation model that includes the spectral overlap of the pump and the Rb D2

  2. Microstructure and kinetics of hot corrosion for a nickel alloy in molten salt

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D.W.; Brummond, W.A.; Grimmett, D.L.; Newcomb, J.C.; Chiang, K.T.; Gay, R.L.

    1996-12-01

    Metallography, analytical SEM, and XRD were used to measure kinetics and characterize the microstructure of hot corrosion of the Ni-Cr-Fe alloy INCONEL 600 after 500 h immersion in molten Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}- NaCl salt at 900-950 C in an oxidizing atmosphere. This was done to assess the alloy as a reaction vessel material for a waste treatment process known as Molten Salt Oxidation. The alloy was found to hot corrode by surface oxidation and intergranular attack. Combined rate for loss of load-bearing cross-section metal was comparable to corrosion rates for analogous salts. About 5% of the oxide scale was a continuous, dense, protective layer of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the metal/oxide interface. A middle portion comprised about 55% of the scale and was a porous, mixed oxide of NiO>Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}>Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The outer 40% was nearly all NiO with dense grains and cavitated grain boundaries. Overall, the NiO was dominant and the lesser amounts of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were roughly equivalent. No direct invasion of salt through the oxide to the metal was observed.

  3. Coupled alkali feldspar dissolution and secondary mineral precipitation in batch systems: 4. Numerical modeling of kinetic reaction paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chen; Lu, Peng; Zheng, Zuoping; Ganor, Jiwchar

    2010-07-01

    This paper explores how dissolution and precipitation reactions are coupled in batch reactor experimental systems at elevated temperatures. This is the fourth paper in our series of "Coupled Alkali Feldspar Dissolution and Secondary Mineral Precipitation in Batch Systems". In our third paper, we demonstrated via speciation-solubility modeling that partial equilibrium between secondary minerals and aqueous solutions was not attained in feldspar hydrolysis batch reactors at 90-300 °C and that a strong coupling between dissolution and precipitation reactions follows as a consequence of the slower precipitation of secondary minerals ( Zhu and Lu, 2009). Here, we develop this concept further by using numerical reaction path models to elucidate how the dissolution and precipitation reactions are coupled. Modeling results show that a quasi-steady state was reached. At the quasi-steady state, dissolution reactions proceeded at rates that are orders of magnitude slower than the rates measured at far from equilibrium. The quasi-steady state is determined by the relative rate constants, and strongly influenced by the function of Gibbs free energy of reaction ( ΔG) in the rate laws. To explore the potential effects of fluid flow rates on the coupling of reactions, we extrapolate a batch system ( Ganor et al., 2007) to open systems and simulated one-dimensional reactive mass transport for oligoclase dissolution and kaolinite precipitation in homogeneous porous media. Different steady states were achieved at different locations along the one-dimensional domain. The time-space distribution and saturation indices (SI) at the steady states were a function of flow rates for a given kinetic model. Regardless of the differences in SI, the ratio between oligoclase dissolution rates and kaolinite precipitation rates remained 1.626, as in the batch system case ( Ganor et al., 2007). Therefore, our simulation results demonstrated coupling among dissolution, precipitation, and flow rates

  4. Corrosion testing of zirconia, beryllia and magnesia ceramics in molten alkali metal carbonates at 900 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Valery; Bendikov, Tatyana; Feldman, Yishay; Gartsman, Konstantin; Wachtel, Ellen; Lubomirsky, Igor

    2016-01-01

    An electrochemical cell containing molten Li2CO3-Li2O at 900 °C has been proposed for the conversion of the greenhouse gas CO2 to CO for chemical energy storage. In the current work, we have examined the corrosion resistance of zirconia, beryllia and magnesia ceramics at 900 °C in the Li2CO3-Li2O and Li-Na-K carbonate eutectic mixtures to identify suitable electrically insulating materials. Conclusions regarding material stability were based on elemental analysis of the melt, primarily via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, a particularly sensitive technique. It was found that magnesia is completely stable for at least 33 h in a Li2CO3-Li2O melt, while a combined lithium titanate/lithium zirconate layer forms on the zirconia ceramic as detected by XRD. Under the same melt conditions, beryllia shows considerable leaching into solution. In a Li-Na-K carbonate eutectic mixture containing 10.2 mol% oxide at 900 °C under standard atmospheric conditions, magnesia showed no signs of degradation. Stabilization of the zirconia content of the eutectic mixture at 0.01-0.02 at% after 2 h is explained by the formation of a lithium zirconate coating on the ceramic. On the basis of these results, we conclude that only magnesia can be satisfactorily used as an insulating material in electrolysis cells containing Li2CO3-Li2O melts.

  5. Kinetics of atmospheric corrosion of mild steel in marine and rural environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palraj, S.; Selvaraj, M.; Maruthan, K.; Natesan, M.

    2015-03-01

    In continuation of the extensive studies carried out to update the corrosion map of India, in this study, the degradation of mild steel by air pollutants was studied at 16 different locations from Nagore to Ammanichatram along the east coast of Tamilnadu, India over a period of two years. The weight loss study showed that the mild steel corrosion was more at Nagapattinam site, when compared to Ammanichatram and Maravakadu sites. A linear regression analysis of the experimental data was attempted to predict the mechanism of the corrosion. The composition of the corrosion products formed on the mild steel surfaces was identified by XRD technique. The corrosion rate values obtained are discussed in the light of the weathering parameters, atmospheric pollutants such as salt content & SO2 levels in the atmosphere, corrosion products formed on the mild steel surfaces.

  6. Corrosion of high-density kinetic-energy penetrator materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zabielski, C.V.; Levy, M.

    1992-04-01

    The corrosion behavior of DU-3/4% Ti and DU-2% Mo alloys was assessed by electrochemical polarization techniques and exposure to both 5% salt fog at 35 deg C and a 95% relative humidity at 45 deg C. The efficacy of an ion vapor deposited aluminum coating in mitigating the corrosion of these alloys was also assessed.

  7. Structural Basis for Regioisomerization in the Alkali-Metal-Mediated Zincation (AMMZn) of Trifluoromethyl Benzene by Isolation of Kinetic and Thermodynamic Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Performed with a desire to advance knowledge of the structures and mechanisms governing alkali-metal-mediated zincation, this study monitors the reaction between the TMP-dialkylzincate reagent [(TMEDA)Na(TMP)(tBu)Zn(tBu)] 1 and trifluoromethyl benzene C6H5CF32. A complicated mixture of products is observed at room temperature. X-ray crystallography has identified two of these products as ortho- and meta-regioisomers of heterotrianionic [(TMEDA)Na(TMP)(C6H4-CF3)Zn(tBu)], 3-ortho and 3-meta, respectively. Multinuclear NMR data of the bulk crystalline product confirm the presence of these two regioisomers as well as a third isomer, 3-para, in a respective ratio of 20:11:1, and an additional product 4, which also exhibits ortho-zincation of the aryl substrate. Repeating the reaction at 0 °C gave exclusively 4, which was crystallographically characterized as [{(TMEDA)2Na}+{Zn(C6H4-CF3)(tBu)2}−]. Mimicking the original room-temperature reaction, this kinetic product was subsequently reacted with TMP(H) to afford a complicated mixture of products, including significantly the three regioisomers of 3. Surprisingly, 4 adopts a solvent-separated ion pair arrangement in contrast to the contacted ion variants of 3-ortho and 3-meta. Aided by DFT calculations on model systems, discussion focuses on the different basicities, amido or alkyl, and steps, exhibited in these reactions, and how the structures and bonding within these isolated key metallic intermediates (prior to any electrophilic interception step), specifically the interactions involving the alkali metal, influence the regioselectivity of the Zn−H exchange process. PMID:20568749

  8. Kinetics and structural studies of the atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels in Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaén, Juan A.; de Villalaz, Mariela Sánchez; de Araque, Lilibeth; de Bósquez, Agnes

    1997-09-01

    The corrosion of a carbon steel was studied in different atmospheres at sites in the Republic of Panama. The weight loss (corrosion penetration) suffered by the carbon steel is related to time by a bilogarithmic law. Mössbauer spectroscopy indicated the rust was composed of non-stoichiometric magnetite (Fe3-xO4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), goethite (α-FeOOH) of intermediate particle size, lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and superparamagnetic particles. Magnetite formation is related to the alternating dry--wet cycles. Goethite is related to corrosion penetration by a saturation type of behavior, following a Langmuir type of relationship. Goethite in rust protects steel against further atmospheric corrosion.

  9. Influence of ultrasound power and frequency upon corrosion kinetics of zinc in saline media.

    PubMed

    Doche, M-L; Hihn, J-Y; Mandroyan, A; Viennet, R; Touyeras, F

    2003-10-01

    This paper is devoted to zinc corrosion and oxidation mechanism in an ultrasonically stirred aerated sodium sulfate electrolyte. It follows a previous study devoted to the influence of 20 kHz ultrasound upon zinc corrosion in NaOH electrolytes [Ultrason. Sonochemis. 8 (2001) 291]. In the present work, various ultrasound regimes were applied by changing the transmitted power and the wave frequency (20 and 40 kHz). Unlike NaOH electrolyte which turns the zinc electrode into a passive state, Na2SO4 saline media induces soft corrosion conditions. This allows a study of the combined effects of ultrasonically modified hydrodynamic and mechanical damage (cavitation) upon the zinc corrosion process. A series of initial experiments were carried out so as to determine the transmitted power and to characterize mass transfer distribution in the electrochemical cell. Zinc corrosion and oxidation process were subsequently studied with respect to the vibrating parameters. When exposed to a 20 kHz ultrasonic field, and provided that the electrode is situated at a maximum mass transfer point, the corrosion rate reaches values six to eight times greater than in silent conditions. The zinc oxidation reaction, in the absence of competitive reduction reactions, is also activated by ultrasound (20 and 40 kHz) but probably through a different process of surface activation.

  10. The Fate Of Silicon During Glass Corrosion Under Alkaline Conditions: A Mechanistic And Kinetic Study With The International Simple Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Gin, Stephane; Jollivet, Patrick; Fournie, Maxime; Berthon, Claude; Wang, Zhaoying; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Zhu, Zihua; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2015-02-01

    International Simple Glass - a six oxide borosilicate glass selected by the international nuclear glass community to improve the understanding of glass corrosion mechanisms and kinetics - was altered at 90°C in a solution initially saturated with respect to amorphous 29-SiO2. The pH90°C, was fixed at 9 at the start of the experiment and raised to 11.5 after 209 d by the addition of KOH. Isotope sensitive analytical techniques were used to analyze the solution and altered glass samples, helping to understand the driving forces and rate limiting processes controlling long-term glass alteration. At pH 9, the corrosion rate continuously drops and the glass slowly transforms into a uniform, homogeneous and isovolumic amorphous alteration layer. The mechanisms responsible for this transformation are water diffusion through the growing alteration layer and ion exchange. We demonstrate that this amorphous alteration layer is not a precipitate resulting from the hydrolysis of the silicate network; it inherits from the glass structure from which the most weakly bonded cations (Na, Ca and B) have been released. At pH 11.5, the alteration process is very different: the high solubility of glass network formers (Si, Al, Zr) triggers the rapid and complete dissolution of the glass (dissolution becomes congruent) and precipitation of amorphous and crystalline phases. Unlike at pH 9 where glass corrosion rate decreased by 3 orders of magnitude likely due to transport-limiting phenomenon within the amorphous alteration layer, the rate at pH 11.5 is maintained at a value close to the forward rate due to both the hydrolysis of the silicate network and the precipitation of CSH and zeolites. This study provides key information for a unified model for glass dissolution.

  11. The fate of silicon during glass corrosion under alkaline conditions: A mechanistic and kinetic study with the International Simple Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gin, Stéphane; Jollivet, Patrick; Fournier, Maxime; Berthon, Claude; Wang, Zhaoying; Mitroshkov, Alexandre; Zhu, Zihua; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2015-02-01

    International Simple Glass - a six oxide borosilicate glass selected by the international nuclear glass community to improve the understanding of glass corrosion mechanisms and kinetics - was altered at 90 °C in a solution initially saturated with respect to amorphous 29SiO2. The pH90°C, was fixed at 9 at the start of the experiment and raised to 11.5 after 209 d by the addition of KOH. Isotope sensitive analytical techniques were used to analyze the solution and altered glass samples, helping to understand the driving forces and rate limiting processes controlling long-term glass alteration. At pH 9, the corrosion rate continuously drops and the glass slowly transforms into a uniform, homogeneous amorphous alteration layer. The mechanisms responsible for this transformation are water penetration through the growing alteration layer and ion exchange. We demonstrate that this amorphous alteration layer is not a precipitate resulting from the hydrolysis of the silicate network; it is mostly inherited from the glass structure from which the most weakly bonded cations (Na, Ca and B) have been released. At pH 11.5, the alteration process is very different: the high solubility of glass network formers (Si, Al, Zr) triggers the rapid and complete dissolution of the glass (dissolution becomes congruent) and precipitation of amorphous and crystalline phases. Unlike at pH 9 where glass corrosion rate decreased by 3 orders of magnitude likely due to the retroaction of the alteration layer on water dynamics/reactivity at the reaction front, the rate at pH 11.5 is maintained at a value close to the forward rate due to both the hydrolysis of the silicate network promoted by OH- and the precipitation of CSH and zeolites. This study provides key information for a unified model for glass dissolution.

  12. Kinetics and mechanism of corrosion of SiC by molten salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.

    1986-01-01

    Corrosion of sintered alpha-SiC under thin films of Na2CO3/CO2, Na2SO4/O2, and Na2SO4/SO3 was investigated at 1000 C. Chemical analysis was used to follow silicate and silica evolution as a function of time. This information coupled with morphology observations leads to a detailed corrosion mechanism. In all cases the corrosion reactions occur primarily in the first few hours. In the Na2CO3/CO2 case, rapid oxidation and dissolution lead to a thick layer of silicate melt in about 0.25 h. After this, silica forms a protective layer on the carbide. In the Na2SO4/O2 case, a similar mechanism occurs. In the Na2SO4/SO3 case, a porous nonprotective layer of SiO2 grows directly on the carbide, and a silicate melt forms above this. In addition, SiO2 and regenerated Na2SO4 form at the melt/gas interface due to reaction of silicate with SO3 and SO2 + O2. The reaction slows when the lower silica layer becomes nonporous.

  13. Kinetic studies of the stress corrosion cracking of D6AC steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noronha, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of load interactions on the crack growth velocity of D6AC steel under stress corrosion cracking conditions was determined. The environment was a 3.5 percent salt solution. The modified-wedge opening load specimens were fatigue precracked and subjected to a deadweight loading in creep machines. The effects of load shedding on incubation times and crack growth rates were measured using high-sensitivity compliance measurement techniques. Load shedding results in an incubation time, the length of which depends on the amount of load shed and the baseline stress intensity. The sequence of unloading the specimen also controls the subsequent incubation period. The incubation period is shorter when load shedding passes through zero load than when it does not if the specimen initially had the same baseline stress intensity. The crack growth rates following the incubation period are also different from the steady-state crack growth rate at the operating stress intensity. These data show that the susceptibility of this alloy system to stress corrosion cracking depends on the plane-strain fracture toughness and on the yield strength of the material.

  14. The Additive Coloration of Alkali Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jirgal, G. H.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an inexpensive, vacuum furnace designed to produce F-centers in alkali halide crystals by additive coloration. The method described avoids corrosion or contamination during the coloration process. Examination of the resultant crystals is discussed and several experiments using additively colored crystals are…

  15. Uranyl peroxide enhanced nuclear fuel corrosion in seawater

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Christopher R.; Nyman, May; Shvareva, Tatiana; Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    The Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident brought together compromised irradiated fuel and large amounts of seawater in a high radiation field. Based on newly acquired thermochemical data for a series of uranyl peroxide compounds containing charge-balancing alkali cations, here we show that nanoscale cage clusters containing as many as 60 uranyl ions, bonded through peroxide and hydroxide bridges, are likely to form in solution or as precipitates under such conditions. These species will enhance the corrosion of the damaged fuel and, being thermodynamically stable and kinetically persistent in the absence of peroxide, they can potentially transport uranium over long distances. PMID:22308442

  16. A Microstructural and Kinetic Investigation of the KCl-Induced Corrosion of an FeCrAl Alloy at 600 °C

    DOE PAGES

    Israelsson, Niklas; Unocic, Kinga A.; Hellström, K.; Jonsson, T.; Norell, M.; Svensson, J. -E.; Johansson, L. -G.

    2015-03-18

    In this paper, the corrosion behaviour of a FeCrAl alloy was investigated at 600 °C in O2 + H2O with solid KCl applied. A kinetics and microstructural investigation showed that KCl accelerates corrosion and that potassium chromate formation depletes the protective scale in Cr, thus triggering the formation of a fast-growing iron-rich scale. Iron oxide was found to grow both inward and outward, on either side of the initial oxide. A chromia layer is formed with time underneath the iron oxide. Finally, it was found that although the alloy does not form a continuous pure alumina scale at the investigatedmore » temperature, aluminium is, however, always enriched at the oxide/alloy interface.« less

  17. A Microstructural and Kinetic Investigation of the KCl-Induced Corrosion of an FeCrAl Alloy at 600 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Israelsson, Niklas; Unocic, Kinga A.; Hellström, K.; Jonsson, T.; Norell, M.; Svensson, J. -E.; Johansson, L. -G.

    2015-03-18

    In this paper, the corrosion behaviour of a FeCrAl alloy was investigated at 600 °C in O2 + H2O with solid KCl applied. A kinetics and microstructural investigation showed that KCl accelerates corrosion and that potassium chromate formation depletes the protective scale in Cr, thus triggering the formation of a fast-growing iron-rich scale. Iron oxide was found to grow both inward and outward, on either side of the initial oxide. A chromia layer is formed with time underneath the iron oxide. Finally, it was found that although the alloy does not form a continuous pure alumina scale at the investigated temperature, aluminium is, however, always enriched at the oxide/alloy interface.

  18. High temperature alkali corrosion of dense SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} coated with CMZP and Mg-doped Al{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} in coal gas. Quarterly progress report No. 10, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Thierry, N.; Brown, J.J.

    1997-01-15

    In high temperature engineering applications, commercially available silicon nitride non-oxide ceramics have retained special attention because of their superior thermal, mechanical, and chemical properties. These properties mainly include a high fracture strength and toughness, a low coefficient of thermal expansion relative to other ceramics, good thermal shock resistance, and good chemical stability. With silicon carbide, silicon nitride was the second material selected for heat exchangers in the High Temperature Advanced Furnace being developed under the DOE Combustion 2000 program. Their potential use in heat exchangers is, however, limited in time since both materials corrode severely in high temperature coal combustion atmospheres containing alkali compounds. Thus, this research will first focus on enhancing the performance of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics by coating them with alkali corrosion resistant materials such as CMZP and Mg-doped Al{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} oxide ceramics.

  19. Removal of mercury(II) from aqueous solutions and chlor-alkali industry effluent by steam activated and sulphurised activated carbons prepared from bagasse pith: kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Anoop Krishnan, K; Anirudhan, T S

    2002-05-27

    The adsorption of mercury from aqueous solutions and chlor-alkali industry effluent on steam activated and sulphurised steam activated carbons prepared from bagasse pith have been studied comparatively. The uptake of mercury(II) (Hg(II)) was maximum by steam activated carbon in presence of SO(2) and H(2)S (SA-SO(2)-H(2)S-C) followed by steam activated carbon in presence of SO(2) (SA-SO(2)-C), steam activated carbon in presence of H(2)S (SA-H(2)S-C) and steam activated carbon (SA-C) at the same concentration, pH and temperature of the solution. Adsorption experiments demonstrate that the adsorption process corresponds to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and equilibrium results correspond to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Kinetic parameters as a function of initial concentration, for all adsorbents were calculated. Batch studies indicated that the optimum pH range for the adsorption of Hg(II) on sulphurised carbons was between 4 and 9 and for sulphur free carbon was between 6 and 9 at 30 degrees C. The adsorptive behaviour of the activated carbons is explained on the basis of their chemical nature and porous texture. Decrease in ionic strength and increase in temperature of the solution has been found to improve the uptake of Hg(II). Synthetic and chlor-alkali industrial wastewaters were also treated by sulphurised activated carbons to demonstrate their efficiencies in removing Hg(II) from wastewaters. Some feasibility experiments have been carried out with a view to recover the adsorbed Hg(II) and regenerate the spent activated carbons using 0.2M HCl solution. The data obtained point towards viable adsorbents, which are both effective as well as economically attractive for Hg(II) removal from wastewaters.

  20. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  1. High temperature alkali corrosion of dense SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} coated with CMZP and Mg-doped Al{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} in coal gas. Quarterly report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shaokai; Brown, J.J.

    1995-10-02

    SiC samples coated with CMZP and Mg-Al{sub 2}TiO{sub 5}, respectively, were tested in a 100-hour slagging combustion test at the Energy and Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota. Results of measurements and analysis indicate that CMZP and Mg-Al{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} coatings improved the high temperature alkali corrosion resistance under coal combustion atmospheres. It is clearly shown that it is important to obtain a homogeneous and crack-free coating and good adhesion of the coating to the surface of the substrate for the best corrosion resistance. Some measures to improve the coating procedure are presented.

  2. High temperature alkali corrosion of dense SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} coated with CMZP and Mg-DOPED Al{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} in coal gas. Quarterly progress report No. 6, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.; Brown, J.J.

    1995-12-31

    High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and high efficiency heat engines. Non-oxide ceramics, such as SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, are applied in HITAF systems for their well-known and desirable high temperature thermal and mechanical properties. However, these materials are prone to rapid corrosion under some types of high temperature coal combustion conditions. The objective of this research is to apply CMZP and Mg- Al{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} as coatings to SiC to improve corrosion resistance under coal combustion atmospheres as well as to improve high temperature mechanical properties. The research will not only develop and characterize CMZP and Mg-Al{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} coatings but will also strive to expand the existing knowledge of the mechanism of coal combustion corrosion of SiC in the temperature range of 1000- 4000{degrees}C.

  3. Experiment and simulation study on alkalis transfer characteristic during direct combustion utilization of bagasse.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yanfen; Cao, Yawen; Chen, Tuo; Ma, Xiaoqian

    2015-10-01

    Bagasse is utilized as fuel in the biggest biomass power plant of China, however, alkalis in the fuel created severe agglomeration and slagging problems. Alkalis transfer characteristic, agglomeration causes in engineering practice, additive improvement effects and mechanism during bagasse combustion were investigated via experiments and simulations. Only slight agglomeration occurs in ash higher than 800°C. Serious agglomeration in practical operation should be attributed to the gaseous alkalis evaporating at high temperature and condensing on the cooler grain surfaces in CFB. It can be speculated that ash caking can be avoided with temperature lower than 750°C and heating surface corrosion caused by alkali metal vapor can be alleviated with temperature lower than 850°C. Kaolin added into the bagasse has an apparent advantage over CaO additive both in enhancing ash fusion point and relieving alkali-chloride corrosion by locking alkalis in dystectic solid compounds over the whole temperature range.

  4. Kinetics of soluble chromium removal from contaminated water by zerovalent iron media: corrosion inhibition and passive oxide effects.

    PubMed

    Melitas, N; Chuffe-Moscoso, O; Farrell, J

    2001-10-01

    Permeable reactive barriers containing zerovalent iron are being increasingly employed for in situ remediation of groundwater contaminated with redox active metals and chlorinated organic compounds. This research investigated the effect of chromate concentration on its removal from solution by zerovalent iron. Removal rates of aqueous Cr(VI) by iron wires were measured in batch experiments for initial chromium concentrations ranging from 100 to 10 000 microg/L. Chromate removal was also measured in columns packed with zerovalent iron filings over this same concentration range. Electrochemical measurements were made to determine the free corrosion potential and corrosion rate of the iron reactants. In both the batch and column reactors, absolute rates of chromium removal declined with increasing chromate concentration. Corrosion current measurements indicated that the rate of iron corrosion decreased with increasing Cr(VI) concentrations between 0 and 5000 microg/L. At a Cr(VI) concentration of 10 000 microg/L, Tafel polarization diagrams showed that chromium removal was affected by its diffusion rate through a passivating oxide film and by the ability of iron to release Fe2+ at anodic sites. In contrast, water reduction was not mass transfer limited, but chromium did decrease the exchange current for the hydrogen evolution reaction. Even at the most passivating concentration of 10 000 microng/L, effluent Cr(VI) concentrations in the column reactors reached a steady state, indicating that passivation had also reached a steady state. Although chromate contributes to iron surface passivation, the removal rates are still sufficiently fast for in situ iron barriers to be effective for Cr(VI) removal at most environmentally relevant concentrations.

  5. Practical aspects of corrosion fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, H.S.

    1994-08-01

    Aspects important in corrosion have been introduced. They are: (a) ``Pourbaix Diagrams`` which consider thermodynamic stability of metals as a function of electrical potential and water pH; (b) the anodic interfacial reaction rates which depend on potential and accumulation of reaction products; (c) the prediction of polarization curves based on the kinetics and thermodynamics; and (d) localized corrosion models, as this form of corrosion is a major cause of corrosion failures.

  6. Heat pipes containing alkali metal working fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A technique for improving high temperature evaporation-condensation heat-transfer devices which have important and unique advantage in terrestrial and space energy processing is described. The device is in the form of a heat pipe comprising a sealed container or envelope which contains a capillary wick. The temperature of one end of the heat pipe is raised by the input of heat from an external heat source which is extremely hot and corrosive. A working fluid of a corrosive alkali metal, such as lithium, sodium, or potassium transfers this heat to a heat receiver remote from the heat source. The container and wick are fabricated from a superalloy containing a small percentage of a corrosion inhibiting or gettering element. Lanthanum, scandium, yttrium, thorium, and hafnium are utilized as the alloying metal.

  7. Forward and reverse ion-exchange kinetics for some alkali and alkaline earth metal ions on amorphous zirconium(IV) aluminophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Pandith, A.H.

    1999-10-26

    The Nernst-Planck equations are applied to study the ion-exchange kinetics on the surface of zirconium(IV) aluminophosphate for Li{sup +}/H{sup +}, Na{sup +}/H{sup +}, K{sup +}/H{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}/H{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}/H{sup +}, and Sr{sup 2+}/H{sup +} exchanges in the forward and reverse directions under the conditions favoring particle diffusion. On the basis of these studies, various physical parameters such as the self-diffusion coefficient (D{sub 0}), the energy of activation (E{sub a}), and the entropy of activation ({Delta}S*) have been determined and a correlation has been made of these parameters with the ion-exchange characteristics of the material. The study gives an insight into the ion-exchange processes going on in the exchanger phase and its potential use in metal ion separations.

  8. Bench-scale evaluation of ferrous iron oxidation kinetics in drinking water: effect of corrosion control and dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Safiur; Gagnon, Graham A

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion control strategies are important for many utilities in maintaining water quality from the water treatment plant to the customers' tap. In drinking water with low alkalinity, water quality can become significantly degraded in iron-based pipes if water utilities are not diligent in maintaining proper corrosion control. This article reports on experiments conducted in bicarbonate buffered (5 mg-C/L) synthetic water to determine the effects of corrosion control (pH and phosphate) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the rate constants of the Fe(II) oxidation process. A factorial design approach elucidated that pH (P = 0.007, contribution: 42.5%) and phosphate (P = 0.025, contribution: 22.7%) were the statistically significant factors in the Fe(II) oxidation process at a 95% confidence level. The comprehensive study revealed a significant dependency relationship between the Fe(II) oxidation rate constants (k) and phosphate-to- Fe(II) mole ratio. At pH 6.5, the optimum mole ratio was found to be 0.3 to reduce the k values. Conversely, the k values were observed to increase for the phosphate-to- Fe(II) mole ratio > 1. The factorial design approach revealed that chlorine and DOM for the designated dosages did not cause a statistically significant (α = 0.05, P > 0.05)change in rate constants. However, an increment of the chlorine to ferrous iron mole ratio by a factor of ∼ 2.5 resulted in an increase k values by a factor of ∼ 10. This study conclusively demonstrated that the lowest Fe(II) oxidation rate constant was obtained under low pH conditions (pH ≤ 6.5), with chlorine doses less than 2.2 mg/L and with a phosphate-to-Fe(II) mole ratio ≈ 0.3 in the iron water systems.

  9. Corrosion-resistant coating development

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Kupp, D.M.; Martin, R.L.

    1997-12-01

    SiC-based heat exchangers have been identified as the prime candidate material for use as heat exchangers in advanced combined cycle power plants. Unfortunately, hot corrosion of the SiC-based materials created by alkali metal salts present in the combustion gases dictates the need for corrosion-resistant coatings. The well-documented corrosion resistance of CS-50 combined with its low (and tailorable) coefficient of thermal expansion and low modulus makes CS-50 an ideal candidate for this application. Coatings produced by gelcasting and traditional particulate processing have been evaluated.

  10. Oxidation of delta-phase plutonium alloy: Corrosion kinetics in dry and humid air at 35 {degree}C

    SciTech Connect

    Haschke, J.M.

    1997-06-01

    Kinetic data for oxidation of delta-phase plutonium alloy are evaluated to provide a technical basis for assessing the merit of an existing time limitation on air exposure of components during process operations. Data describing the effects of humidity and oxygen pressure on the oxidation rate of the Pu-1.0 wt% Ga alloy at elevated temperatures are obtained from literature sources and used to predict the oxidation behavior of the alloy in air at 35 C and 0 to 100% relative humidity. A mandated six-hour limit on air exposure is inconsistent with a predicted thirty-day period required for formation of a 1-{micro}m-thick oxide layer in moisture-saturated air at 35 C. Relationships are defined for predicting kinetic behavior of the alloy at other conditions, and recommendations for addressing oxidation-related concerns in production are presented.

  11. Kinetic study for phenol degradation by ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and related iron corrosion investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, In-Ho; Yoo, Gursong; Hong, Hye-Jin; Kim, Jungmin; Kim, Min Gyu; Choi, Wang-Kyu; Yang, Ji-Won

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigated phenol degradation via zero-valent iron (ZVI)-assisted Fenton reaction through kinetic and spectroscopic analysis. In batch experiments, 100 mg/L of phenol was completely degraded, and 75% of TOC was removed within 3 min under an optimal hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration (50 mM) via the Fenton reaction. In the absence of H2O2, oxygen (O2) was dissolved into the solution and produced H2O2, which resulted in phenol degradation. However, phenol removal efficiency was not very high compared to external H2O2 input. The Fenton reaction rapidly occurred at the surface of ZVI, and then phenol mobility from the solution to the ZVI surface was the rate determining step of the whole reaction. The pseudo-second order adsorption kinetic model well describes phenol removal, and its rate increased according to the H2O2 concentration. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis revealed that iron oxide (Fe-O bonding) was formed on ZVI with [H2O2] > 50 mM. A high concentration of H2O2 led to rapid degradation of phenol and caused corrosion on the ZVI surface, indicating that Fe(2+) ions were rapidly oxidized to Fe(3+) ions due to the Fenton reaction and that Fe(3+) was precipitated as iron oxide on the ZVI surface. However, ZVI did not show corroded characteristics in the absence of H2O2 due to the insufficient ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and oxidation of Fe(2+) to Fe(3+).

  12. Kinetic study for phenol degradation by ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and related iron corrosion investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, In-Ho; Yoo, Gursong; Hong, Hye-Jin; Kim, Jungmin; Kim, Min Gyu; Choi, Wang-Kyu; Yang, Ji-Won

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigated phenol degradation via zero-valent iron (ZVI)-assisted Fenton reaction through kinetic and spectroscopic analysis. In batch experiments, 100 mg/L of phenol was completely degraded, and 75% of TOC was removed within 3 min under an optimal hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration (50 mM) via the Fenton reaction. In the absence of H2O2, oxygen (O2) was dissolved into the solution and produced H2O2, which resulted in phenol degradation. However, phenol removal efficiency was not very high compared to external H2O2 input. The Fenton reaction rapidly occurred at the surface of ZVI, and then phenol mobility from the solution to the ZVI surface was the rate determining step of the whole reaction. The pseudo-second order adsorption kinetic model well describes phenol removal, and its rate increased according to the H2O2 concentration. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis revealed that iron oxide (Fe-O bonding) was formed on ZVI with [H2O2] > 50 mM. A high concentration of H2O2 led to rapid degradation of phenol and caused corrosion on the ZVI surface, indicating that Fe(2+) ions were rapidly oxidized to Fe(3+) ions due to the Fenton reaction and that Fe(3+) was precipitated as iron oxide on the ZVI surface. However, ZVI did not show corroded characteristics in the absence of H2O2 due to the insufficient ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and oxidation of Fe(2+) to Fe(3+). PMID:26692518

  13. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  14. Corrosion in methylphosphonic difluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Zabielski, C.V.; Levy, M. )

    1994-12-01

    Electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization studies were conducted for a variety of ferrous and nonferrous metals in methylphosphonic difluoride. Studies were also made of the effects of organic inhibitors on the corrosion rates of 1,020 steel, type 316L, and type 304 stainless steel, and magnesium in methylphosphonic difluoride. Chemical weapons in the US include binary munitions in which two components are kept in separate compartments until activation. These munitions must be stockpiled for long periods of time (up to 30 years) and then must operate reliably when the need arises. The principal cause of failure will be corrosion of the storage container by the highly corrosive methylphosphonic difluoride (DF). The objectives of this study were to: investigate the kinetics and mechanisms of corrosion of Al 6061-T6 and candidate metal alloys in DF; establish effective corrosion inhibitors; and ultimately incorporate or immobilize inhibitors into coatings that provide protection above the liquid line.

  15. Corrosion behavior of carbon steel in the monoethanolamine-H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-SO{sub 2} System: products, reaction pathways, and kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kladkaew, N.; Idem, R.; Tontiwachwuthikul, P.; Saiwan, C.

    2009-12-15

    This work investigates the effect of operating parameters on corrosion products, reaction pathways, and kinetics For the corrosion of carbon steel in the monoethanolamine-H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-SO{sub 2} system. Corrosion experiments were conducted using a 273A potentiostat unit under conditions in which monoethanolamine (MEA), O{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2} concentrations and CO{sub 2} loading were in the range of 1-7 kmol/m{sup 3}, 0-100%, 0-204 ppm, and 0-0.5 mol CO{sub 2}/mol MEA, respectively, at corrosion temperatures of 303-353 K to mimic the absorption-regeneration sections. Analysis, performed for this system for the first time, shows that corrosion products generated from the effect of SO{sub 2} include FeSO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O. Also, a higher concentration of SO{sub 2} in simulated flue gas stream induces a higher corrosion rate because of the increase in the hydrogen ion concentration generated by reactions of SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O as well as SO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O. A power-law model developed to correlate corrosion rate with the parameters in the MEA-H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-SO{sub 2} system shows that corrosion rate of carbon steel increases with an increase in O{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} concentrations in simulated flue gas stream, as well as MEA concentration, CO{sub 2} loading, and operating temperature. It was observed that CO{sub 2} loading had the highest impact on the corrosion rate, while SO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} show only slight effects on the corrosion rate.

  16. Superheater Corrosion Produced By Biomass Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, William; Singbeil, Douglas; Keiser, James R

    2012-01-01

    About 90% of the world's bioenergy is produced by burning renewable biomass fuels. Low-cost biomass fuels such as agricultural wastes typically contain more alkali metals and chlorine than conventional fuels. Although the efficiency of a boiler's steam cycle can be increased by raising its maximum steam temperature, alkali metals and chlorine released in biofuel boilers cause accelerated corrosion and fouling at high superheater steam temperatures. Most alloys that resist high temperature corrosion protect themselves with a surface layer of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. However, this Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be fluxed away by reactions that form alkali chromates or volatilized as chromic acid. This paper reviews recent research on superheater corrosion mechanisms and superheater alloy performance in biomass boilers firing black liquor, biomass fuels, blends of biomass with fossil fuels and municipal waste.

  17. Apparatus enables accurate determination of alkali oxides in alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupraw, W. A.; Gahn, R. F.; Graab, J. W.; Maple, W. E.; Rosenblum, L.

    1966-01-01

    Evacuated apparatus determines the alkali oxide content of an alkali metal by separating the metal from the oxide by amalgamation with mercury. The apparatus prevents oxygen and moisture from inadvertently entering the system during the sampling and analytical procedure.

  18. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  19. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04

    Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

  20. Method for inhibiting corrosion of nickel-containing alloys

    DOEpatents

    DeVan, J.H.; Selle, J.E.

    Nickel-containing alloys are protected against corrosion by contacting the alloy with a molten alkali metal having dissolved therein aluminum, silicon or manganese to cause the formation of a corrosion-resistant intermetallic layer. Components can be protected by applying the coating after an apparatus is assembled.

  1. Vapor deposition and condensate flow on combustion turbine blades - Theoretical model to predict/understand some corrosion rate consequences of molten alkali sulfate deposition in the field or laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Daniel E.; Nagarajan, R.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis is undertaken of aerodynamically- and centrifugally-driven liquid condensate layers on nonisothermal combustion turbines' stator vanes and rotor blades. Attention is given to the quantitative consequences of one possible mechanism for the initiation of 'hot corrosion' in the underlying blade material through a 'fluxing' of the protective oxide coating by the molten salt of the Newtonian condensate film. Illustrative calculations are presented for the condensate streamline pattern and the distributions of the steady-state condensate layer thickness, together with the corresponding oxide dissolution rate, for a test turbine blade.

  2. Chlor-Alkali Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venkatesh, S.; Tilak, B. V.

    1983-01-01

    Chlor-alkali technology is one of the largest electrochemical industries in the world, the main products being chlorine and caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) generated simultaneously by the electrolysis of sodium chloride. This technology is reviewed in terms of electrochemical principles and manufacturing processes involved. (Author/JN)

  3. Difficulties in Interpreting Alkali Metal Trends at the Senior Chemistry Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Berg, Kevin

    2001-01-01

    Explores the reasons for the differences in alkali metal reactivity in water in terms of thermodynamics rather than ionization trends. Shows that differences in alkali metal reactivity with water are more appropriately explained in terms of the kinetics of the reactions. (MM)

  4. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Wolfs, Denise Y.; Clavenna, Le Roy R.; Eakman, James M.; Kalina, Theodore

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  5. Alkali-vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.; Krupke, W. F.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the results from several of our alkali laser systems. We show highly efficient performance from an alexandrite-pumped rubidium laser. Using a laser diode stack as a pump source, we demonstrate up to 145 W of average power from a CW system. We present a design for a transversely pumped demonstration system that will show all of the required laser physics for a high power system.

  6. Titanium corrosion in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Been, Jantje

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion of Grade 2 titanium in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments has been studied by weight loss corrosion tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements and potentiodynamic polarography. Calcium ions and wood pulp were investigated as corrosion inhibitors. In alkaline peroxide, the titanium corrosion rate increased with increasing pH, temperature, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The corrosion controlling mechanism is thought to be the reaction of the oxide with the perhydroxyl ion. No evidence of thermodynamically stable calcium titanate was found in the surface film of test coupons exposed to calcium-inhibited alkaline peroxide solutions. Calcium inhibition is probably the result of low local alkali and peroxide concentrations at the metal surface produced by reaction of adsorbed calcium with hydrogen peroxide. It has been shown that the inhibiting effect of calcium is temporary, possibly through an effect of calcium on the chemical and/or physical stability of the surface oxide. Pulp is an effective and stable corrosion inhibitor. Raising the pulp concentration decreased the corrosion rate. The inhibiting effect of pulp may be related to the adsorption and interaction of the pulp fibers with H 2O2, thereby decreasing the peroxide concentration and rendering the solution less corrosive. The presence of both pulp and calcium led to higher corrosion rates than obtained by either one inhibitor alone. Replacement of hydrofluoric acid with alkaline peroxide for pickling of titanium was investigated. Titanium corrosion rates in alkaline peroxide exceeded those obtained in the conventional hydrofluoric acid bath. General corrosion was observed with extensive roughening of the surface giving a dull gray appearance. Preferred dissolution of certain crystallographic planes was investigated through the corrosion of a titanium single crystal. Whereas the overall effect on the corrosion rate was small

  7. Fiber optic approach for detecting corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostecki, Roman; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Davis, Claire; McAdam, Grant; Wang, Tianyu; Monro, Tanya M.

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion is a multi-billion dollar problem faced by industry. The ability to monitor the hidden metallic structure of an aircraft for corrosion could result in greater availability of existing aircraft fleets. Silica exposed-core microstructured optical fiber sensors are inherently suited towards this application, as they are extremely lightweight, robust, and suitable both for distributed measurements and for embedding in otherwise inaccessible corrosion-prone areas. By functionalizing the fiber with chemosensors sensitive to corrosion by-products, we demonstrate in-situ kinetic measurements of accelerated corrosion in simulated aluminum aircraft joints.

  8. PROCESS OF RECOVERING ALKALI METALS

    DOEpatents

    Wolkoff, J.

    1961-08-15

    A process is described of recovering alkali metal vapor by sorption on activated alumina, activated carbon, dehydrated zeolite, activated magnesia, or Fuller's earth preheated above the vaporization temperature of the alkali metal and subsequent desorption by heating the solvent under vacuum. (AEC)

  9. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  10. Endoscopic pyloroplasty for severe gastric outlet obstruction due to alkali ingestion in a child.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Aldaghi, Mitra; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir

    2016-01-01

    A common belief is that alkali ingestion causes severe esophageal damage and limited gastric injury due to the buffering action of acid. Gastric injury has been observed in patients who ingested alkali. Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) secondary to caustic ingestion occurs due to fibrosis after resolution of the acute injury and inflammation, most commonly 6 to 12 weeks after initial ingestion. The traditional treatment for GOO related to ingestion of corrosive agents is surgery. Experience with endoscopic balloon dilation of corrosive-induced GOO is limited in children. This is the first report of endoscopic pyloroplasty in a child with GOO due to caustic alkalis ingestion that was treated with balloon dilation (using TTS balloon ranging from 6-15 mm) in Iran. Four dilation sessions were required for symptomatic relief of dysphagia. After one year of follow up, weight gain was normal. PMID:26744617

  11. Endoscopic pyloroplasty for severe gastric outlet obstruction due to alkali ingestion in a child

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Aldaghi, Mitra; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir

    2016-01-01

    A common belief is that alkali ingestion causes severe esophageal damage and limited gastric injury due to the buffering action of acid. Gastric injury has been observed in patients who ingested alkali. Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) secondary to caustic ingestion occurs due to fibrosis after resolution of the acute injury and inflammation, most commonly 6 to 12 weeks after initial ingestion. The traditional treatment for GOO related to ingestion of corrosive agents is surgery. Experience with endoscopic balloon dilation of corrosive-induced GOO is limited in children. This is the first report of endoscopic pyloroplasty in a child with GOO due to caustic alkalis ingestion that was treated with balloon dilation (using TTS balloon ranging from 6-15 mm) in Iran. Four dilation sessions were required for symptomatic relief of dysphagia. After one year of follow up, weight gain was normal. PMID:26744617

  12. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  13. Alkali hydrolysis of trinitrotoluene.

    PubMed

    Karasch, Christian; Popovic, Milan; Qasim, Mohamed; Bajpai, Rakesh K

    2002-01-01

    Data for alkali hydrolysis of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in aqueous solution at pH 12.0 under static (pH-controlled) as well as dynamic (pH-uncontrolled) conditions are reported. The experiments were conducted at two different molar ratios of TNT to hydroxyl ions at room temperature. The TNT disappeared rapidly from the solution as a first-order reaction. The complete disappearance of aromatic structure from the aqueous solution within 24 h was confirmed by the ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectra of the samples. Cuvet experiments in a UV-VIS spectrophotometer demonstrated the formation of Meisenheimer complex, which slowly disappeared via formation of aromatic compounds with fewer nitro groups. The known metabolites of TNT were found to accumulate only in very small quantities in the liquid phase.

  14. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  15. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  16. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1995-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  17. Corrosion protection

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2003-05-27

    There has been invented a chemically bonded phosphate corrosion protection material and process for application of the corrosion protection material for corrosion prevention. A slurry of iron oxide and phosphoric acid is used to contact a warm surface of iron, steel or other metal to be treated. In the presence of ferrous ions from the iron, steel or other metal, the slurry reacts to form iron phosphates which form grains chemically bonded onto the surface of the steel.

  18. Mixed alkali effect in nonconventional alkali gallotitanate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Miyaji, Fumiaki; Hasegawa, Shinya; Yoko, Toshinobu; Sakka, Sumio . Inst. for Chemical Research)

    1993-02-01

    The mixed alkali effect on electrical conductivity, that is, the reduction of conductivity due to alkali mixing, was observed in Na[sub 2]O-K[sub 2]O-Ga[sub 2]O[sub 3]-TiO[sub 2] glasses, which are nonconventional in the sense that glass-forming oxides defined by Zachariasen are not involved. The magnitude of the reduction in conductivity of the present glasses due to alkali mixing was similar to that of corresponding mixed alkali silicate and phosphate glasses. The activation energy for electrical conduction showed a maximum around the composition Na/(Na + K) = 0.5, where the conductivity was at a minimum.

  19. Recovery of Ga(III) by Raw and Alkali Treated Citrus limetta Peels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Alkali treated Citrus limetta peels were used for recovery of Ga(III) from its aqueous solution. The raw and alkali treated peels were characterized for functional groups. The efficiency of adsorption increased from 47.62 mg/g for raw peels to 83.33 mg/g for alkali treated peels. Between pH 1 and 3, the adsorption increased and thereafter decreased drastically. The adsorption followed pseudosecond order kinetics and Langmuir isotherm gave the best fit for the experimental data. Desorption studies showed 95.28% desorption after 3 cycles for raw peels while it was 89.51% for alkali treated peels. Simulated Bayer liquor showed 39.57% adsorption for gallium ions on raw peels which was enhanced to 41.13% for alkali treated peels. PMID:27382624

  20. Stabilization/solidification of hazardous and radioactive wastes with alkali-activated cements.

    PubMed

    Shi, Caijun; Fernández-Jiménez, A

    2006-10-11

    This paper reviews progresses on the use of alkali-activated cements for stabilization/solidification of hazardous and radioactive wastes. Alkali-activated cements consist of an alkaline activator and cementing components, such as blast furnace slag, coal fly ash, phosphorus slag, steel slag, metakaolin, etc., or a combination of two or more of them. Properly designed alkali-activated cements can exhibit both higher early and later strengths than conventional portland cement. The main hydration product of alkali-activated cements is calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) with low Ca/Si ratios or aluminosilicate gel at room temperature; CSH, tobmorite, xonotlite and/or zeolites under hydrothermal condition, no metastable crystalline compounds such as Ca(OH)(2) and calcium sulphoaluminates exist. Alkali-activated cements also exhibit excellent resistance to corrosive environments. The leachability of contaminants from alkali-activated cement stabilized hazardous and radioactive wastes is lower than that from hardened portland cement stabilized wastes. From all these aspects, it is concluded that alkali-activated cements are better matrix for solidification/stabilization of hazardous and radioactive wastes than Portland cement.

  1. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  2. Corrosion Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  3. Fireside Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon

    2011-07-14

    Oxy-fuel fireside research goals are: (1) determine the effect of oxyfuel combustion on fireside corrosion - flue gas recycle choice, staged combustion ramifications; and (2) develop methods to use chromia solubility in ash as an ash corrosivity measurement - synthetic ashes at first, then boiler and burner rig ashes.

  4. Corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wisotsky, M.J.; Metro, S.J.

    1989-10-31

    A corrosion inhibitor for use in synthetic ester lubricating oils is disclosed. It comprises an effective amount of: at least one aromatic amide; and at least one hydroxy substituted aromatic compound. The corrosion inhibitor thus formed is particularly useful in synthetic ester turbo lubricating oils.

  5. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  6. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1994-04-26

    A corrosion sensor array is described incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis. 7 figures.

  7. Degradation of SS316L bipolar plates in simulated fuel cell environment: Corrosion rate, barrier film formation kinetics and contact resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadias, Dionissios D.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Thomson, Jeffery K.; Meyer, Harry M.; Brady, Michael P.; Wang, Heli; Turner, John A.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rod

    2015-01-01

    A potentiostatic polarization method is used to evaluate the corrosion behavior of SS316L in simulated anode and cathode environments of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. A passive barrier oxide film is observed to form and reach steady state within ∼10 h of polarization, after which time the total ion release rates are low and nearly constant at ∼0.4 μg cm-2 h-1 for all potentials investigated. The equilibrium film thickness, however, is a function of the applied potential. The main ionic species dissolved in the liquid are predominately Fe followed by Ni, that account for >90% of the steady-state corrosion current. The dissolution rate of Cr is low but increases systematically at potentials higher than 0.8 V. The experimental ion release rates can be correlated with a point defect model using a single set of parameters over a broad range of potentials (0.2-1 V) on the cathode side. The interfacial contact resistance measured after 48 h of polarization is observed to increase with increase in applied potential and can be empirically correlated with applied load and oxide film thickness. The oxide film is substantially thicker at 1.5 V possibly because of alteration in film composition to Fe-rich as indicated by XPS data.

  8. Subtask 6.6 - SiAION Coatings for Alkali-Resistant Silicon Nitride. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-25

    The efficiency of a gas turbine can be improved by increasing operating temperature. Construction materials should both meet high strength requirements and exhibit hot alkali corrosion resistance. Structural ceramics based on silicon nitride are promising candidates for high temperature engineering applications because of their high strength and good resistance to corrosion. Their performance varies significantly with the mechanical properties of boundary phases which, in turn, depend on their chemical composition, thickness of the amorphous phase, and the deformation process. To make silicon nitride ceramics tough, SiAlON ceramics were developed with controlled crystallization of the amorphous grain boundary phase. Crystallization of the grain boundary glass improves the high temperature mechanical properties of silicon nitride ceramics. Thus, the knowledge of silicon oxynitride ceramics corrosion behavior in Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} becomes important for engineers in designing appropriate part for turbines working at high temperatures. So far there has been no report concerning alkali attack on SiAlON ceramics in the presence of SO{sub 2} and chlorine in flue gas. The goal of this project was to investigate alkali corrosion of SiAlON-Y structural ceramics under combustion conditions in the presence of sodium derived components.

  9. Pitting corrosion of aluminized seals in molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpelt, M.; Roche, M.F.; Bloom, I.

    1994-08-01

    The objective of this research is to gain a better understanding of the corrosion of the aluminized type 316 stainless steel employed in the seal areas of the molten carbonate fuel cell. The seals are formed between the aluminized Type 316 SS surface and the electrolyte (generally a mixture of molten alkali carbonates and lithium aluminate).

  10. Fighting Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structures such as bridges, parking decks, and balconies are designed to have a service life of over 50 years. All too often, however, many structures fall short of this goal, requiring expensive repairs and protection work earlier than anticipated. The corrosion of reinforced steel within the concrete infrastructure is a major cause for this premature deterioration. Such corrosion is a particularly dangerous problem for the facilities at NASA s Kennedy Space Center. Located near the Atlantic Ocean in Florida, Kennedy is based in one of the most corrosive-prone areas in the world. In order to protect its launch support structures, highways, pipelines, and other steel-reinforced concrete structures, Kennedy engineers developed the Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System. The system utilizes an inorganic coating material that slows or stops the corrosion of reinforced steel members inside concrete structures. Early tests determined that the coating meets the criteria of the National Association of Corrosion Engineers for complete protection of steel rebar embedded in concrete. Testing is being continued at the Kennedy's Materials Science Beach Corrosion Test Site.

  11. Hydrothermal alkali metal catalyst recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Eakman, James M.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.

    1979-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles primarily in the form of water soluble alkali metal formates by treating the particles with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of added carbon monoxide. During the treating process the water insoluble alkali metal compounds comprising the insoluble alkali metal residues are converted into water soluble alkali metal formates. The resultant aqueous solution containing water soluble alkali metal formates is then separated from the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment process, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal formates serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. This process permits increased recovery of alkali metal constituents, thereby decreasing the overall cost of the gasification process by reducing the amount of makeup alkali metal compounds necessary.

  12. Hot corrosion and high temperature corrosion behavior of a new gas turbine material -- alloy 603GT

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.C.; Brill, U.; Klower, J.

    1998-12-31

    Salt deposits encountered in a variety of high temperature processes have caused premature failures in heat exchangers and superheater tubes in pulp and paper recovery boilers, waste incinerators and coal gasifiers. Molten salt corrosion studies in both land based and air craft turbines have been the subject of intense study by many researchers. This phenomenon referred to as ``hot corrosion`` has primarily been attributed to corrosion by alkali sulfates, and there is somewhat general agreement in the literature that this is caused by either basic or acidic dissolution (fluxing) of the protective metal oxide layers by complex salt deposits containing both sulfates and chlorides. This paper describes experimental studies conducted on the hot corrosion behavior of a new Ni-Cr-Al alloy 603GT (UNS N06603) in comparison to some commercially established alloys used in gas turbine components.

  13. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    SciTech Connect

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  14. Photocatalytic decomposition of 4-t-octylphenol over NaBiO3 driven by visible light: catalytic kinetics and corrosion products characterization.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaofeng; Huang, Jun; Cheng, Cheng; Sha, Wei; Li, Xue; Ji, Guangbin; Deng, Shubo; Yu, Gang

    2010-01-15

    The photocatalytic decomposition of 4-t-octylphenol (4-t-OP) by NaBiO(3) photocatalyst and the catalyst stability in aqueous solution were investigated systematically for the first time. The results showed that some parameters such as catalyst dosage, initial 4-t-OP concentration and pH value of the solution had great effects on the photocatalytic activity. The NaBiO(3) photocatalyst maintained considerable catalytic performance under visible light (lambda>400 nm) irradiation and exhibited a higher photocatalytic activity compared to the commercialized photocatalyst P25. In addition, the corrosion products of NaBiO(3) catalyst under acid condition (HCl aqueous solution contained) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmittance electronic microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-vis transmittance spectrum analysis. The results showed that NaBiO(3) was unstable under the acidic condition and the catalyst could convert into Bi(3+)-containing compounds such as Bi(2)O(3), etc. The experiment demonstrates that NaBiO(3) can be corroded to nano-sized BiOCl crystal in the presence of hydrogen chloride, the band gap of which was estimated to be 3.28 eV by Tauc's approach. PMID:19800168

  15. Electrolytic method to make alkali alcoholates using ion conducting alkali electrolyte/separator

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Ashok V.; Balagopal, Shekar; Pendelton, Justin

    2011-12-13

    Alkali alcoholates, also called alkali alkoxides, are produced from alkali metal salt solutions and alcohol using a three-compartment electrolytic cell. The electrolytic cell includes an anolyte compartment configured with an anode, a buffer compartment, and a catholyte compartment configured with a cathode. An alkali ion conducting solid electrolyte configured to selectively transport alkali ions is positioned between the anolyte compartment and the buffer compartment. An alkali ion permeable separator is positioned between the buffer compartment and the catholyte compartment. The catholyte solution may include an alkali alcoholate and alcohol. The anolyte solution may include at least one alkali salt. The buffer compartment solution may include a soluble alkali salt and an alkali alcoholate in alcohol.

  16. Process for recovering alkali metals and sulfur from alkali metal sulfides and polysulfides

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard; Alvare, Javier

    2016-10-25

    Alkali metals and sulfur may be recovered from alkali monosulfide and polysulfides in an electrolytic process that utilizes an electrolytic cell having an alkali ion conductive membrane. An anolyte solution includes an alkali monosulfide, an alkali polysulfide, or a mixture thereof and a solvent that dissolves elemental sulfur. A catholyte includes molten alkali metal. Applying an electric current oxidizes sulfide and polysulfide in the anolyte compartment, causes alkali metal ions to pass through the alkali ion conductive membrane to the catholyte compartment, and reduces the alkali metal ions in the catholyte compartment. Liquid sulfur separates from the anolyte solution and may be recovered. The electrolytic cell is operated at a temperature where the formed alkali metal and sulfur are molten.

  17. High temperature alkali corrosion of dense SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} coated with CMZP and Mg-doped Al{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} in coal gas. Quarterly progress report No. 7, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shaokai; Brown, J.J.

    1996-03-31

    Objective is to apply CMZP and Mg-Al{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} as coatings to SiC to improve corrosion resistance under coal combustion atmospheres as well as to improve high temperature mechanical properties. The research will also study the mechanism of coal combustion corrosion of SiC at 1000-1400 C. 16 figs, 8 tabs.

  18. Alkali and transition metal phospholides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezkishko, I. A.; Zagidullin, A. A.; Milyukov, V. A.; Sinyashin, O. G.

    2014-06-01

    Major tendencies in modern chemistry of alkali and transition metal phospholides (phosphacyclopentadienides) are systematized, analyzed and generalized. Basic methods of synthesis of these compounds are presented. Their chemical properties are considered with a special focus on their complexing ability. Potential applications of phospholides and their derivatives are discussed. The bibliography includes 184 references.

  19. Principle, calibration, and application of the in situ alkali chloride monitor.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Christer; Broström, Markus; Backman, Rainer; Edvardsson, Elin; Badiei, Shahriar; Berg, Magnus; Kassman, Håkan

    2009-02-01

    The extended use of biomass for heat and power production has caused increased operational problems with fouling and high-temperature corrosion in boilers. These problems are mainly related to the presence of alkali chlorides (KCl and NaCl) at high concentrations in the flue gas. The in situ alkali chloride monitor (IACM) was developed by Vattenfall Research and Development AB for measuring the alkali chloride concentration in hot flue gases (less than or approximately 650 degrees C). The measurement technique is based on molecular differential absorption spectroscopy in the UV range. Simultaneous measurement of SO(2) concentration is also possible. The measuring range is 1-50 ppm for the sum of KCl and NaCl concentrations and 4-750 ppm for SO(2). This paper describes the principle of the IACM as well as its calibration. Furthermore, an example of its application in an industrial boiler is given.

  20. Ionic alkali halide XUV laser feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.T.; Gylys, V.T.; Bower, R.D.; Harris, D.G.; Blauer, J.A.; Turner, C.E.; Hindy, R.N.

    1989-11-10

    The objective of this work is to assess the feasibility of a select set of ionic alkali halide XUV laser concepts by obtaining the relevant kinetic and spectroscopic parameters required for a proof-of-principle and conceptual design. The proposed lasers operate in the 80--200 nm spectral region and do not require input from outside radiation sources for their operation. Frequency up-conversion and frequency mixing techniques and therefore not considered in the work to be described. An experimental and theoretical study of a new type of laser operating in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength region has been conducted. The lasing species are singly ionized alkali halide molecules such as Rb{sup 2+}F{sub {minus}}, Rb{sup 2+}Br{sup {minus}} and Cs{sup 2+}F{sup {minus}}. These species are similar in electronic structure to the rare gas halide excimers, such as XeF and Krf, except that the ionic molecules emit at wavelengths of 80--200 nm, much shorter than the conventional rare-gas halide excimer laser. The radiative lifetime of these molecules are typically near 1 ns, which is about an order of magnitude shorter than that for rare-gas halide systems. The values of the cross section for stimulated emission are on the order of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}16}cm{sup 2}. Because of the fundamental similarity to existing UV lasers, these systems show promise as a high power, efficient XUV lasers. 55 refs., 50 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. CORROSION INHIBITION

    DOEpatents

    Cartledge, G.H.

    1958-06-01

    The protection of ferrous metsls from the corrosive action of aqueous solutions is accomplished by the incorporation of small amounts of certain additive agents into the aqueous solutions. The method comprises providing a small concentration of technetium, in the form of pertechnetate ion, dissolved in the solution.

  2. Modeling of marine corrosion of steel specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Melchers, R.E.

    1997-12-31

    Phenomenological modeling of the long term general corrosion of mild and low alloy steel specimens under marine conditions is considered, using weight loss as a function of time. A conceptual model for immersion corrosion, tidal corrosion and atmospheric corrosion under marine conditions is proposed. The model uses accepted theories for short term surface corrosion and employs modern understanding of the action of bacterial colonization of the surfaces of specimens, including the development of anaerobic conditions. Kinetic, diffusion, nutrient and anaerobic components of the model are identified and mathematical descriptions given. The model is compared to some data available in the literature. Some observations are made about data requirements for further development of models of the type proposed.

  3. Corrosion 99: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    This conference includes the following; Corrosion in Gas Treating; Advances in Scale and Deposit Control; Uses of Computers for Improved Corrosion Control; Erosion-Corrosion in Steam Generating Systems; Electrochemical Noise Measurements for Corrosion Evaluations; Materials Performance in Fossil Fuel Combustion and Conversion Systems; Corrosion in Super Critical Processes; Cathodic Protection of External Surfaces for Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Materials for Oilfield Applications; Refining Industry Corrosion; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibition Technologies; Managing Corrosion With Plastics; Corrosion Measurement Technology; Marine Corrosion; Improved Understanding and Mitigation of CO{sub 2} Corrosion; Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection; Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion Testing in Concrete; Stress Corrosion Cracking: Field Laboratory Correlations; Materials Performance in Incineration and Waste Fuel Combustion Environments; Water Reuse in Industry; Corrosion Control and Prevention of Military and Aerospace Equipment; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; Latest Developments in Aboveground Storage Tanks Corrosion Control, Monitoring and Evaluation Technology; Internal In-line Inspection of Pipelines and Evaluation of Results; New Developments in Cathodic Protection of Reinforcing Steels in Concrete; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in the Pulp and Paper Industry; Advanced Materials for High Temperature Service in Chemical Process Industry; Advances in Cooling Water Treatment; Materials, Fabrication, and Inspection Guidelines for Wet H{sub 2}S Service; Environmental Wear of Nonmetallics in Oilfield Service; and Corrosion and Scale Control in Low Pressure Boiler and Steam Systems in Buildings. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers.

  4. Corrosion 99: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-01-01

    This conference includes the following; Corrosion in Gas Treating; Advances in Scale and Deposit Control; Uses of Computers for Improved Corrosion Control; Erosion-Corrosion in Steam Generating Systems; Electrochemical Noise Measurements for Corrosion Evaluations; Materials Performance in Fossil Fuel Combustion and Conversion Systems; Corrosion in Super Critical Processes; Cathodic Protection of External Surfaces for Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Materials for Oilfield Applications; Refining Industry Corrosion; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibition Technologies; Managing Corrosion With Plastics; Corrosion Measurement Technology; Marine Corrosion; Improved Understanding and Mitigation of CO[sub 2] Corrosion; Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection; Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion Testing in Concrete; Stress Corrosion Cracking: Field Laboratory Correlations; Materials Performance in Incineration and Waste Fuel Combustion Environments; Water Reuse in Industry; Corrosion Control and Prevention of Military and Aerospace Equipment; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; Latest Developments in Aboveground Storage Tanks Corrosion Control, Monitoring and Evaluation Technology; Internal In-line Inspection of Pipelines and Evaluation of Results; New Developments in Cathodic Protection of Reinforcing Steels in Concrete; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in the Pulp and Paper Industry; Advanced Materials for High Temperature Service in Chemical Process Industry; Advances in Cooling Water Treatment; Materials, Fabrication, and Inspection Guidelines for Wet H[sub 2]S Service; Environmental Wear of Nonmetallics in Oilfield Service; and Corrosion and Scale Control in Low Pressure Boiler and Steam Systems in Buildings. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers.

  5. Alkali metal/sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Joginder N.

    1978-01-01

    Alkali metal/sulfur batteries in which the electrolyte-separator is a relatively fragile membrane are improved by providing means for separating the molten sulfur/sulfide catholyte from contact with the membrane prior to cooling the cell to temperatures at which the catholyte will solidify. If the catholyte is permitted to solidify while in contact with the membrane, the latter may be damaged. The improvement permits such batteries to be prefilled with catholyte and shipped, at ordinary temperatures.

  6. Corrosion and corrosion prevention in gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mom, A. J. A.; Kolkman, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    The conditions governing the corrosion behavior in gas turbines are surveyed. Factors such as temperature, relative humidity, the presence of sulfur and nitrogen dioxide, and fuel quality are discussed. Electromechanical corrosion at relatively low temperature in compressors; oxidation; and hot corrosion (sulfidation) at high temperature in turbines are considered. Corrosion prevention by washing and rinsing, fueld additives, and corrosion resistant materials and coatings are reviewed.

  7. Chemiluminescence from excited c 2- -alkali cation complexes formed in alkali atom-halocarbon flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, K. K.; Balling, L. C.; Wright, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Vapor phase reactions between alkali atoms and several halocarbon molecules containing C-C bonds have been observed to produce chemiluminescence which appears to originate from C 2-- (alkali) + complexes.

  8. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  9. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  10. Acid and alkali doped PBI electrolyte in electrochemical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Baozhong

    In this work the conductivity of blank PBI membrane, acid doped PBI and alkaline doped PBI was systematically studied. A new methodology for sorption kinetics study in electrolyte solution has been established by monitoring the conductivity change during the sorption process. The model of the doping process and mechanism of conductivity are proposed. The performance of PBI (doped under optimum conditions) in fuel cell as PEM was evaluated. The experimental results show that the blank PBI in acid solution is an ionic insulator. It clarified the long time confusion in this area. The acid doped PBI membrane is an ionic conductor. The conductivity increases with the concentration of the acid solution. In high concentration acid solution, the conductivity increases with the type of acid in the order: H2SO 4 > H3PO4 > HClO4 > HNO3 > HCl. The kinetics of the doping process was studied, by a continuous method. The ionic conductivity mechanism was established. The PBI membranes doped with H2SO4 and H3PO4 exhibit better performance than NafionRTM. The doped FBI has more resistance to CO poison. 3% CO in H2 has little effect on the H3PO 4 doped PBI membrane at 185°C. The conductivity of the alkali doped PBI membrane changes with the concentration of the alkaline solution and the type of the alkalis. The conductivity has a maximum in KOH and NaOH solution. The maximum conductivity in KOH is higher than in NaOH and LiOH. It is about 5 times of that of NafionRTM in alkaline solution. The two-step sorption process in alkaline solution was observed. The first step is the permeation process of the alkalis in the PBI membrane. The permeation is the results of diffusion and interaction. It is concluded that the permeation process is controlled by the rate of interaction between the alkali and PBI molecule. The second step is the relaxation process in the membrane. This step contributes more to the conductivity for the membrane than the first step. The ionic conductivity mechanism

  11. Coupon Surveillance For Corrosion Monitoring In Nuclear Fuel Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J. I.; Murphy, T. R.; Deible, R.

    2012-10-01

    Aluminum and stainless steel coupons were put into a nuclear fuel basin to monitor the effect of water chemistry on the corrosion of fuel cladding. These coupons have been monitored for over ten years. The corrosion and pitting data is being used to model the kinetics and estimate the damage that is occurring to the fuel cladding.

  12. Fabrication of alkali halide UV photocathodes by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Brendel', V M; Bukin, V V; Garnov, Sergei V; Bagdasarov, V Kh; Denisov, N N; Garanin, Sergey G; Terekhin, V A; Trutnev, Yurii A

    2012-12-31

    A technique has been proposed for the fabrication of atmospheric corrosion resistant alkali halide UV photocathodes by pulsed laser deposition. We produced photocathodes with a highly homogeneous photoemissive layer well-adherent to the substrate. The photocathodes were mounted in a vacuum photodiode, and a tungsten grid was used as an anode. Using pulsed UV lasers, we carried out experiments aimed at evaluating the quantum efficiency of the photocathodes. With a dc voltage applied between the photocathode and anode grid, we measured a shunt signal proportional to the total charge emitted by the cathode exposed to UV laser light. The proposed deposition technique enables one to produce photocathodes with photoemissive layers highly uniform in quantum efficiency, which is its main advantage over thin film growth by resistive evaporation. (laser technologies)

  13. Initial Atmospheric Corrosion of Carbon Steel in Industrial Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei; Pan, Chen; Wang, Zhenyao; Yu, Guocai

    2015-02-01

    The initial corrosion behavior of carbon steel subjected to Shenyang industrial atmosphere has been investigated by weight-loss measurement, scanning electron microscopy observation, x-ray diffraction, auger electron spectroscopy, and electron probe microanalysis. The experimental results reveal that the corrosion kinetics of the initial corrosion of carbon steel in industrial atmosphere follows empirical equation D = At n , and there is a corrosion rate transition from corrosion acceleration to deceleration; the corrosion products are composed of γ-FeOOH, α-FeOOH, Fe3O4, as well as FeS which is related to the existence of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the rust layers. The effect of dust particles on the corrosion evolution of carbon steel has also been discussed.

  14. Alkali-Metal Spin Maser.

    PubMed

    Chalupczak, W; Josephs-Franks, P

    2015-07-17

    Quantum measurement is a combination of a read-out and a perturbation of the quantum system. We explore the nonlinear spin dynamics generated by a linearly polarized probe beam in a continuous measurement of the collective spin state in a thermal alkali-metal atomic sample. We demonstrate that the probe-beam-driven perturbation leads, in the presence of indirect pumping, to complete polarization of the sample and macroscopic coherent spin oscillations. As a consequence of the former we report observation of spectral profiles free from collisional broadening. Nonlinear dynamics is studied through exploring its effect on radio frequency as well as spin noise spectra. PMID:26230788

  15. Alkali-Metal Spin Maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalupczak, W.; Josephs-Franks, P.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum measurement is a combination of a read-out and a perturbation of the quantum system. We explore the nonlinear spin dynamics generated by a linearly polarized probe beam in a continuous measurement of the collective spin state in a thermal alkali-metal atomic sample. We demonstrate that the probe-beam-driven perturbation leads, in the presence of indirect pumping, to complete polarization of the sample and macroscopic coherent spin oscillations. As a consequence of the former we report observation of spectral profiles free from collisional broadening. Nonlinear dynamics is studied through exploring its effect on radio frequency as well as spin noise spectra.

  16. Chemical Industry Corrosion Management

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Improved Corrosion Management Could Provide Significant Cost and Energy Savings for the Chemical Industry. In the chemical industry, corrosion is often responsible for significant shutdown and maintenance costs.

  17. Influence of energy pooling and ionization on physical features of a diode-pumped alkali laser.

    PubMed

    An, Guofei; Wang, You; Han, Juhong; Cai, He; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Wei; Xue, Liangping; Wang, Hongyuan; Gao, Ming; Jiang, Zhigang

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, a diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL) has become one of the most hopeful candidates to achieve the high power performance. A series of models have been established to analyze the DPAL's kinetic process and most of them were based on the algorithms in which only the ideal 3-level system was considered. In this paper, we developed a systematic model by taking into account the influence of excitation of neutral alkali atoms to even-higher levels and their ionization on the physical features of a static DPAL. The procedures of heat transfer and laser kinetics were combined together in our theoretical model. By using such a theme, the continuous temperature and number density distribution have been evaluated in the transverse section of a cesium vapor cell. The calculated results indicate that both energy pooling and ionization play important roles during the lasing process. The conclusions might deepen the understanding of the kinetic mechanism of a DPAL.

  18. Classical trajectories studies of diet from alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrzejek, C.; Ciepliński, L.

    1994-03-01

    Desorption of positive ions in alkali halides resulting from the repulsive environment created by core-hole Auger decay has been previously found not likely due to lattice rearrangement and trapping of the ion. We revisit the problem by studying ion trajectories using classical molecular dynamics in the crystalline (rather than cluster) geometry with careful account of the Madelung energy. We find that the previous findings remain unchanged. In contrast to previous works, we also assume that the positive ion gained substantial amount of kinetic energy at the onset of simulations, crudely mimicking ion-stimulated desorption. Then the ejection of the formed positive halogen ion occurs for initial kinetic energies of the order 2 eV for NaF and 0.65 eV for LiF. Implications for viability of the Knotek-Feibelman mechanism are discussed.

  19. Solvent effects and alkali metal ion catalysis in phosphodiester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Tagle, Paola; Vargas-Zúñiga, Idania; Taran, Olga; Yatsimirsky, Anatoly K

    2006-12-22

    The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP) have been studied in aqueous DMSO, dioxane, and MeCN. In all solvent mixtures the reaction rate steadily decreases to half of its value in pure water in the range of 0-70 vol % of organic cosolvent and sharply increases in mixtures with lower water content. Correlations based on different scales of solvent empirical parameters failed to describe the solvent effect in this system, but it can be satisfactorily treated in terms of a simplified stepwise solvent-exchange model. Alkali metal ions catalyze the BNPP hydrolysis but do not affect the rate of hydrolysis of neutral phosphotriester p-nitrophenyl diphenyl phosphate in DMSO-rich mixtures. The catalytic activity decreases in the order Li+ > Na+ > K+ > Rb+ > Cs+. For all cations except Na+, the reaction rate is first-order in metal ion. With Na+, both first- and second-order kinetics in metal ions are observed. Binding constants of cations to the dianionic transition state of BNPP alkaline hydrolysis are of the same order of magnitude and show a similar trend as their binding constants to p-nitrophenyl phosphate dianion employed as a transition-state model. The appearance of alkali metal ion catalysis in a medium, which solvates metal ions stronger than water, is attributed to the increased affinity of cations to dianions, which undergo a strong destabilization in the presence of an aprotic dipolar cosolvent.

  20. Corrosion performance of structural alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1999-07-15

    Component reliability and long-term trouble-free performance of structural materials are essential in power-generating and gasification processes that utilize coal as a feedstock. During combustion and conversion of coal, the environments encompass a wide range of oxygen partial pressures, from excess-air conditions in conventional boilers to air-deficient conditions in 10W-NO{sub x} and gasification systems. Apart from the environmental aspects of the effluent from coal combustion and conversion, one concern from the systems standpoint is the aggressiveness of the gaseous/deposit environment toward structural components such as waterwall tubes, steam superheaters, syngas coolers, and hot-gas filters. The corrosion tests in the program described in this paper address the individual and combined effects of oxygen, sulfur, and chlorine on the corrosion response of several ASME-coded and noncoded structural alloys that were exposed to air-deficient and excess-air environments typical of coal-combustion and gasification processes. Data in this paper address the effects of preoxidation on the subsequent corrosion performance of structural materials such as 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel, Type 347 austenitic stainless steel, Alloys 800, 825, 625, 214, Hastelloy X, and iron aluminide when exposed at 650 C to various mixed-gas environments with and without HCI. Results are presented for scaling kinetics, microstructural characteristics of corrosion products, detailed evaluations of near-surface regions of the exposed specimens, gains in our mechanistic understanding of the roles of S and Cl in the corrosion process, and the effect of preoxidation on subsequent corrosion.

  1. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties evaluation for the LBB concept in VVERs

    SciTech Connect

    Ruscak, M.; Chvatal, P.; Karnik, D.

    1997-04-01

    One of the conditions required for Leak Before Break application is the verification that the influence of corrosion environment on the material of the component can be neglected. Both the general corrosion and/or the initiation and, growth of corrosion-mechanical cracks must not cause the degradation. The primary piping in the VVER nuclear power plant is made from austenitic steels (VVER 440) and low alloy steels protected with the austenitic cladding (VVER 1000). Inspection of the base metal and heterogeneous weldments from the VVER 440 showed that the crack growth rates are below 10 m/s if a low oxygen level is kept in the primary environment. No intergranular cracking was observed in low and high oxygen water after any type of testing, with constant or periodic loading. In the framework of the LBB assessment of the VVER 1000, the corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties were also evaluated. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical testing was oriented predominantly to three types of tests: stress corrosion cracking tests corrosion fatigue tests evaluation of the resistance against corrosion damage. In this paper, the methods used for these tests are described and the materials are compared from the point of view of response on static and periodic mechanical stress on the low alloyed steel 10GN2WA and weld metal exposed in the primary circuit environment. The slow strain rate tests and static loading of both C-rings and CT specimens were performed in order to assess the stress corrosion cracking characteristics. Cyclic loading of CT specimens was done to evaluate the kinetics of the crack growth under periodical loading. Results are shown to illustrate the approaches used. The data obtained were evaluated also from the point of view of comparison of the influence of different structure on the stress corrosion cracking appearance. The results obtained for the base metal and weld metal of the piping are presented here.

  2. The alkali metals: 200 years of surprises.

    PubMed

    Dye, James L

    2015-03-13

    Alkali metal compounds have been known since antiquity. In 1807, Sir Humphry Davy surprised everyone by electrolytically preparing (and naming) potassium and sodium metals. In 1808, he noted their interaction with ammonia, which, 100 years later, was attributed to solvated electrons. After 1960, pulse radiolysis of nearly any solvent produced solvated electrons, which became one of the most studied species in chemistry. In 1968, alkali metal solutions in amines and ethers were shown to contain alkali metal anions in addition to solvated electrons. The advent of crown ethers and cryptands as complexants for alkali cations greatly enhanced alkali metal solubilities. This permitted us to prepare a crystalline salt of Na(-) in 1974, followed by 30 other alkalides with Na(-), K(-), Rb(-) and Cs(-) anions. This firmly established the -1 oxidation state of alkali metals. The synthesis of alkalides led to the crystallization of electrides, with trapped electrons as the anions. Electrides have a variety of electronic and magnetic properties, depending on the geometries and connectivities of the trapping sites. In 2009, the final surprise was the experimental demonstration that alkali metals under high pressure lose their metallic character as the electrons are localized in voids between the alkali cations to become high-pressure electrides!

  3. The alkali metals: 200 years of surprises.

    PubMed

    Dye, James L

    2015-03-13

    Alkali metal compounds have been known since antiquity. In 1807, Sir Humphry Davy surprised everyone by electrolytically preparing (and naming) potassium and sodium metals. In 1808, he noted their interaction with ammonia, which, 100 years later, was attributed to solvated electrons. After 1960, pulse radiolysis of nearly any solvent produced solvated electrons, which became one of the most studied species in chemistry. In 1968, alkali metal solutions in amines and ethers were shown to contain alkali metal anions in addition to solvated electrons. The advent of crown ethers and cryptands as complexants for alkali cations greatly enhanced alkali metal solubilities. This permitted us to prepare a crystalline salt of Na(-) in 1974, followed by 30 other alkalides with Na(-), K(-), Rb(-) and Cs(-) anions. This firmly established the -1 oxidation state of alkali metals. The synthesis of alkalides led to the crystallization of electrides, with trapped electrons as the anions. Electrides have a variety of electronic and magnetic properties, depending on the geometries and connectivities of the trapping sites. In 2009, the final surprise was the experimental demonstration that alkali metals under high pressure lose their metallic character as the electrons are localized in voids between the alkali cations to become high-pressure electrides! PMID:25666067

  4. Process for the disposal of alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Leroy C.

    1977-01-01

    Large quantities of alkali metals may be safely reacted for ultimate disposal by contact with a hot concentrated caustic solution. The alkali metals react with water in the caustic solution in a controlled reaction while steam dilutes the hydrogen formed by the reaction to a safe level.

  5. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C.

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  6. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, Raymond D.; McPheeters, Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  7. Corrosion of stainless and carbon steels in molten mixtures of industrial nitrates

    SciTech Connect

    Goods, S.H.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Prairie, M.R.; Chavez, J.M.

    1994-03-01

    Corrosion behavior of two stainless steels and carbon steel in mixtures of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} was evaluated to determine if impurities found in commodity grades of alkali nitrates aggravate corrosivity as applicable to an advanced solar thermal energy system. Corrosion tests were conducted for 7000 hours with Types 304 and 316 stainless steels at 570C and A36 carbon steel at 316C in seven mixtures of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} containing variations in impurity concentrations. Corrosion tests were also conducted in a ternary mixture of NaNO{sub 3}, KNO{sub 3}, and Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. Corrosion rates were determined by descaled weight losses while oxidation products were examined by scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, and X-ray diffraction. The nitrate mixtures were periodically analyzed for changes in impurity concentrations and for soluble corrosion products.

  8. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-11-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of PFBC technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an altemative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. As shown in Fig. 1, the RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no HTHP sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-leaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6M-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite [8]. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed.

  9. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of PFBC technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an altemative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. As shown in Fig. 1, the RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no HTHP sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-leaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6M-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite [8]. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed.

  10. Corrosion resistance of ceramic materials in pyrochemical reprocessing condition by using molten salt for spent nuclear oxide fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, M.; Kato, T.; Hanada, K.; Koizumi, T.; Aose, S.

    2005-02-01

    The corrosion resistance of ceramic materials in pyrochemical reprocessing using molten salts was discussed through the thermodynamic calculation and corrosion test. The corrosion test was basically carried out in alkali molten salt under chlorine gas. In addition, the effects of oxygen, carbon and main fission product's chlorides on ceramics corrosion were evaluated in that condition. Most of ceramic oxides showed good chemical stability on chlorine, oxygen and uranyl chloride from thermodynamic calculation results. On the other hand, from corrosion test result, silicon nitride, mullite (Al6Si2O13) and cordierite (Mg2Al3(AlSi5O18)) have a good corrosion resistance which is corresponding to 0.1 mm/y or less. No cracks on the materials were observed and flexural strength did not drop remarkably after 480 h corrosion testing in molten salt under Cl2 O2 atmosphere.

  11. Coal-ash Corrosion of Alloys for Combustion Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Purohit, A.; Rink, D.L.

    2003-04-22

    A program on coal-ash corrosion is being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate the performance of several structural alloys in the presence of mixtures of synthetic coal ash, alkali sulfates, and alkali chlorides. Candidate alloys are also exposed in a small-scale coal-fired combustor at the National Energy Technology Laboratory in Pittsburgh. Experiments in the present program, which addresses the effects of deposit chemistry, temperature, and alloy chemistry on the corrosion response of alloys, were conducted at temperatures in the range of 575-800 C for time periods up to {approx}1850 h. Fe-base alloys selected for the study included HR3C, 310TaN, HR120, SAVE 25, NF709, modified 800, 347HFG, and HCM12A. In addition, 800H clad with Alloy 671 was included in several of the exposures. Ni-base alloys selected for the study included 600, 601, 617, 690, 625, 602CA, 214, 230, 45TM, HR 160, and 693. Data were obtained on weight change, scale thickness, internal penetration, microstructural characteristics of corrosion products, mechanical integrity of the scales, and cracking of scales. Results showed that the relationship of corrosion rates to temperature followed a bell-shaped curve for Fe-base alloys, with peak rates at {approx}725 C, but the rate itself was dependent on the alloy chemistry. Several Fe-base alloys showed acceptable rates in the sulfate-containing coal-ash environment; but NaCl in the deposit led to catastrophic corrosion at 650 and 800 C. Ni-base alloys generally exhibited less corrosion than the Fe-base alloys under similar exposure conditions; however, they were susceptible to localized corrosion in the form of pits.

  12. Post-Harvest Processing Methods for Reduction of Silica and Alkali Metals in Wheat Straw

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David Neal; Lacey, Jeffrey Alan; Shaw, Peter Gordon

    2002-04-01

    Silica and alkali metals in wheat straw limit its use for bioenergy and gasification. Slag deposits occur via the eutectic melting of SiO2 with K2O, trapping chlorides at surfaces and causing corrosion. A minimum melting point of 950°C is desirable, corresponding to SiO2:K2O of about 3:1. Mild chemical treatments were used to reduce Si, K, and Cl, while varying temperature, concentration, %-solids, and time. Dilute acid was more effective at removing K and Cl, while dilute alkali was more effective for Si. Reduction of minerals in this manner may prove economical for increasing utilization of the straw for combustion or gasification.

  13. An Aqueous Redox Flow Battery Based on Neutral Alkali Metal Ferri/ferrocyanide and Polysulfide Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Xia, Gordon; Kirby, Brent W.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Graff, Gordon L.; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

    2015-11-13

    Aiming to explore low-cost redox flow battery systems, a novel iron-polysulfide (Fe/S) flow battery has been demonstrated in a laboratory cell. This system employs alkali metal ferri/ferrocyanide and alkali metal polysulfides as the redox electrolytes. When proper electrodes, such as pretreated graphite felts, are used, 78% energy efficiency and 99% columbic efficiency are achieved. The remarkable advantages of this system over current state-of-the-art redox flow batteries include: 1) less corrosive and relatively environmentally benign redox solutions used; 2) excellent energy and utilization efficiencies; 3) low cost for redox electrolytes and cell components. These attributes can lead to significantly reduced capital cost and make the Fe/S flow battery system a promising low-cost energy storage technology. The major drawbacks of the present cell design are relatively low power density and possible sulfur species crossover. Further work is underway to address these concerns.

  14. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  15. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  16. Alkali Silicate Vehicle Forms Durable, Fireproof Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, John B.; Seindenberg, Benjamin

    1964-01-01

    The problem: To develop a paint for use on satellites or space vehicles that exhibits high resistance to cracking, peeling, or flaking when subjected to a wide range of temperatures. Organic coatings will partially meet the required specifications but have the inherent disadvantage of combustibility. Alkali-silicate binders, used in some industrial coatings and adhesives, show evidence of forming a fireproof paint, but the problem of high surface-tension, a characteristic of alkali silicates, has not been resolved. The solution: Use of a suitable non-ionic wetting agent combined with a paint incorporating alkali silicate as the binder.

  17. Advancements in flowing diode pumped alkali lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Stalnaker, Donald M.; Guild, Eric M.; Oliker, Benjamin Q.; Moran, Paul J.; Townsend, Steven W.; Hostutler, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple variants of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) have recently been demonstrated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Highlights of this ongoing research effort include: a) a 571W rubidium (Rb) based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with a gain (2α) of 0.48 cm-1, b) a rubidium-cesium (Cs) Multi-Alkali Multi-Line (MAML) laser that simultaneously lases at both 795 nm and 895 nm, and c) a 1.5 kW resonantly pumped potassium (K) DPAL with a slope efficiency of 50%. The common factor among these experiments is the use of a flowing alkali test bed.

  18. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO{sub 2} corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  19. Superheater Corrosion In Biomass Boilers: Today's Science and Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, William

    2011-12-01

    This report broadens a previous review of published literature on corrosion of recovery boiler superheater tube materials to consider the performance of candidate materials at temperatures near the deposit melting temperature in advanced boilers firing coal, wood-based fuels, and waste materials as well as in gas turbine environments. Discussions of corrosion mechanisms focus on the reactions in fly ash deposits and combustion gases that can give corrosive materials access to the surface of a superheater tube. Setting the steam temperature of a biomass boiler is a compromise between wasting fuel energy, risking pluggage that will shut the unit down, and creating conditions that will cause rapid corrosion on the superheater tubes and replacement expenses. The most important corrosive species in biomass superheater corrosion are chlorine compounds and the most corrosion resistant alloys are typically FeCrNi alloys containing 20-28% Cr. Although most of these materials contain many other additional additions, there is no coherent theory of the alloying required to resist the combination of high temperature salt deposits and flue gases that are found in biomass boiler superheaters that may cause degradation of superheater tubes. After depletion of chromium by chromate formation or chromic acid volatilization exceeds a critical amount, the protective scale gives way to a thick layer of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} over an unprotective (FeCrNi){sub 3}O{sub 4} spinel. This oxide is not protective and can be penetrated by chlorine species that cause further acceleration of the corrosion rate by a mechanism called active oxidation. Active oxidation, cited as the cause of most biomass superheater corrosion under chloride ash deposits, does not occur in the absence of these alkali salts when the chloride is present as HCl gas. Although a deposit is more corrosive at temperatures where it is molten than at temperatures where it is frozen, increasing superheater tube temperatures through

  20. Corrosion resistant positive electrode for high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Otto, N.C.; Warner, B.T.; Smaga, J.A.; Battles, J.E.

    1982-07-07

    The corrosion rate of low carbon steel within a positive electrode of a high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell that includes FeS as active material is substantially reduced by incorporating therein finely divided iron powder in stoichiometric excess to the amount required to form FeS in the fully charged electrode. The cell typically includes an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal as negative electrode active material and a molten metal halide salt as electrolyte. The excess iron permits use of inexpensive carbon steel alloys that are substantially free of the costly corrosion resistant elements chromium, nickel and molybdenum while avoiding shorten cell life resulting from high corrosion rates.

  1. Corrosion resistant positive electrode for high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Otto, Neil C.; Warner, Barry T.; Smaga, John A.; Battles, James E.

    1983-01-01

    The corrosion rate of low carbon steel within a positive electrode of a high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell that includes FeS as active material is substantially reduced by incorporating therein finely divided iron powder in stoichiometric excess to the amount required to form FeS in the fully charged electrode. The cell typically includes an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal as negative electrode active material and a molten metal halide salt as electrolyte. The excess iron permits use of inexpensive carbon steel alloys that are substantially free of the costly corrosion resistant elements chromium, nickel and molybdenum while avoiding shorten cell life resulting from high corrosion rates.

  2. Alkali metal for ultraviolet band-pass filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, Nick (Inventor); Fraschetti, George A. (Inventor); Mccann, Timothy A. (Inventor); Mayall, Sherwood D. (Inventor); Dunn, Donald E. (Inventor); Trauger, John T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An alkali metal filter having a layer of metallic bismuth deposited onto the alkali metal is provided. The metallic bismuth acts to stabilize the surface of the alkali metal to prevent substantial surface migration from occurring on the alkali metal, which may degrade optical characteristics of the filter. To this end, a layer of metallic bismuth is deposited by vapor deposition over the alkali metal to a depth of approximately 5 to 10 A. A complete alkali metal filter is described along with a method for fabricating the alkali metal filter.

  3. Exotic s-wave superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerides.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yusuke; Sakai, Shiro; Capone, Massimo; Arita, Ryotaro

    2016-04-20

    Alkali-doped fullerides (A3C60 with A = K, Rb, Cs) show a surprising phase diagram, in which a high transition-temperature (Tc) s-wave superconducting state emerges next to a Mott insulating phase as a function of the lattice spacing. This is in contrast with the common belief that Mott physics and phonon-driven s-wave superconductivity are incompatible, raising a fundamental question on the mechanism of the high-Tc superconductivity. This article reviews recent ab initio calculations, which have succeeded in reproducing comprehensively the experimental phase diagram with high accuracy and elucidated an unusual cooperation between the electron-phonon coupling and the electron-electron interactions leading to Mott localization to realize an unconventional s-wave superconductivity in the alkali-doped fullerides. A driving force behind the exotic physics is unusual intramolecular interactions, characterized by the coexistence of a strongly repulsive Coulomb interaction and a small effectively negative exchange interaction. This is realized by a subtle energy balance between the coupling with the Jahn-Teller phonons and Hund's coupling within the C60 molecule. The unusual form of the interaction leads to a formation of pairs of up- and down-spin electrons on the molecules, which enables the s-wave pairing. The emergent superconductivity crucially relies on the presence of the Jahn-Teller phonons, but surprisingly benefits from the strong correlations because the correlations suppress the kinetic energy of the electrons and help the formation of the electron pairs, in agreement with previous model calculations. This confirms that the alkali-doped fullerides are a new type of unconventional superconductors, where the unusual synergy between the phonons and Coulomb interactions drives the high-Tc superconductivity.

  4. Exotic s-wave superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yusuke; Sakai, Shiro; Capone, Massimo; Arita, Ryotaro

    2016-04-01

    Alkali-doped fullerides ({{A}3}{{\\text{C}}60} with A  =  K, Rb, Cs) show a surprising phase diagram, in which a high transition-temperature ({{T}\\text{c}} ) s-wave superconducting state emerges next to a Mott insulating phase as a function of the lattice spacing. This is in contrast with the common belief that Mott physics and phonon-driven s-wave superconductivity are incompatible, raising a fundamental question on the mechanism of the high-{{T}\\text{c}} superconductivity. This article reviews recent ab initio calculations, which have succeeded in reproducing comprehensively the experimental phase diagram with high accuracy and elucidated an unusual cooperation between the electron-phonon coupling and the electron-electron interactions leading to Mott localization to realize an unconventional s-wave superconductivity in the alkali-doped fullerides. A driving force behind the exotic physics is unusual intramolecular interactions, characterized by the coexistence of a strongly repulsive Coulomb interaction and a small effectively negative exchange interaction. This is realized by a subtle energy balance between the coupling with the Jahn-Teller phonons and Hund’s coupling within the {{\\text{C}}60} molecule. The unusual form of the interaction leads to a formation of pairs of up- and down-spin electrons on the molecules, which enables the s-wave pairing. The emergent superconductivity crucially relies on the presence of the Jahn-Teller phonons, but surprisingly benefits from the strong correlations because the correlations suppress the kinetic energy of the electrons and help the formation of the electron pairs, in agreement with previous model calculations. This confirms that the alkali-doped fullerides are a new type of unconventional superconductors, where the unusual synergy between the phonons and Coulomb interactions drives the high-{{T}\\text{c}} superconductivity.

  5. Alkali Metal Salts with Designable Aryltrifluoroborate Anions.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kazuki; Yoshii, Kazuki; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Matsumoto, Hajime; Tsuda, Tetsuya; Kuwabata, Susumu

    2016-09-01

    Aryltrifluoroborate ([ArBF3](-)) has a designable basic anion structure. Various [ArBF3](-)-based anions were synthesized to create novel alkali metal salts using a simple and safe process. Nearly 40 novel alkali metal salts were successfully obtained, and their physicochemical characteristics, particularly their thermal properties, were elucidated. These salts have lower melting points than those of simple inorganic alkali halide salts, such as KCl and LiCl, because of the weaker interactions between the alkali metal cations and the [ArBF3](-) anions and the anions' larger entropy. Moreover, interestingly, potassium cations were electrochemically reduced in the potassium (meta-ethoxyphenyl)trifluoroborate (K[m-OEtC6H4BF3]) molten salt at 433 K. These findings contribute substantially to furthering molten salt chemistry, ionic liquid chemistry, and electrochemistry. PMID:27510799

  6. Alkali Metal Handling Practices at NASA MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvail, Patrick G.; Carter, Robert R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is NASA s principle propulsion development center. Research and development is coordinated and carried out on not only the existing transportation systems, but also those that may be flown in the near future. Heat pipe cooled fast fission cores are among several concepts being considered for the Nuclear Systems Initiative. Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a capability to handle high-purity alkali metals for use in heat pipes or liquid metal heat transfer loops. This capability is a low budget prototype of an alkali metal handling system that would allow the production of flight qualified heat pipe modules or alkali metal loops. The processing approach used to introduce pure alkali metal into heat pipe modules and other test articles are described in this paper.

  7. Internal Corrosion and Deposition Control

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter reviews the current knowledge of the science of corrosion control and control of scaling in drinking water systems. Topics covered include: types of corrosion; physical, microbial and chemical factors influencing corrosion; corrosion of specific materials; direct ...

  8. Desulfurizing Coal With an Alkali Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravindram, M.; Kalvinskas, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental coal-desulfurization process uses alkalies and steam in fluidized-bed reactor. With highly volatile, high-sulfur bituminous coal, process removed 98 percent of pyritic sulfur and 47 percent of organic sulfur. Used in coal liquefaction and in production of clean solid fuels and synthetic liquid fuels. Nitrogen or steam flows through bed of coal in reactor. Alkalies react with sulfur, removing it from coal. Nitrogen flow fluidizes bed while heating or cooling; steam is fluidizing medium during reaction.

  9. The corrosion behavior of hafnium in high-temperature-water environments

    SciTech Connect

    Rishel, D.M.; Smee, J.D.; Kammenzind, B.F.

    1999-10-01

    The high-temperature-water corrosion performance of hafnium is evaluated. Corrosion kinetic data are used to develop correlations that are a function of time and temperature. The evaluation is based on corrosion tests conducted in out-of-pile autoclaves and in out-of-flux locations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at temperatures ranging from 288 to 360 C. Similar to the corrosion behavior of unalloyed zirconium, the high-temperature-water corrosion response of hafnium exhibits three corrosion regimes: pretransition, posttransition, and spalling. In the pretransition regime, cubic corrosion kinetics are exhibited, whereas in the posttransition regime, linear corrosion kinetics are exhibited. Because of the scatter in the spalling regime data, it is not reasonable to use a best fit of the data to describe spalling regime corrosion. Data also show that neutron irradiation does not alter the corrosion performance of hafnium. Finally, the data illustrate that the corrosion rate of hafnium is significantly less than that of Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4.

  10. Selection of stainless steel tubes to minimize hot corrosion in utility boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Fujikawa, H.; Makiura, H.

    1982-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steel tubes of AISI 304, 316, 321, and 347 types are sometimes exposed to severe hot corrosion environments in superheaters and reheaters of utility boilers. Hot corrosion depends on the existence of V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ in the oil-fired boilers, and of Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ in the coal-fired boilers. Among various kinds of ash corrosions, the alkali sulphate-side corrosion has been mainly studied. Type 347 steel better resistance to alkali sulphate-side corrosion than 304, 316, and 321 steels. Alloying with Nb was more effective than Mo or Ti. A (Cr, Fe, Ni)-spinel oxide layer with little ash content formed at the scale-metal interface in 347 steel. In field tests, 347 tubes have maintained good resistance to both fire-side and steam-side corrosion for five years. However, 321 tubes were removed after three years of service, because of severe fire-side corrosion.

  11. Chemical Corrosion of Liquid-Phase Sintered SiC in Acidic/Alkaline Solutions Part 1. Corrosion in HNO3 Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ming; He, Xinnong; Tang, Wenming

    2016-03-01

    The corrosion behavior of the liquid-phase sintered SiC (LPS-SiC) was studied by dipping in 3.53 mol/L HNO3 aqueous solution at room temperature and 70 °C, respectively. The weight loss, strength reduction and morphology evolution of the SiC specimens during corroding were revealed and also the chemical corrosion process and mechanism of the SiC specimens in the acidic solution were clarified. The results show that the corrosion of the LPS-SiC specimens in the HNO3 solution is selective. The SiC particles are almost free from corrosion, but the secondary phases of BaAl2Si2O8 (BAS) and Y2Si2O7 are corroded via an acid-alkali neutralization reaction. BAS has a higher corrosion rate than Y2Si2O7, resulting in the formation of the bamboo-leaf-like corrosion pits. As the SiC specimens etched in the HNO3 solution at room temperature for 75 days, about 80 μm thickness corrosion layer forms. The weight loss and bending strength reduction of the etched SiC specimens are 2.6 mg/cm2 and 52%, respectively. The corrosion of the SiC specimens is accelerated in the 70 °C HNO3 solution with a rate about five times bigger than that in the same corrosion medium at room temperature.

  12. Corrosion inhibiting organic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sasson, E.

    1984-10-16

    A corrosion inhibiting coating comprises a mixture of waxes, petroleum jelly, a hardener and a solvent. In particular, a corrosion inhibiting coating comprises candelilla wax, carnauba wax, microcrystalline waxes, white petrolatum, an oleoresin, lanolin and a solvent.

  13. Duralumin and Its Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, WM

    1927-01-01

    The types of corrosion and factors of corrosion of duralumin are investigated. Salt water is the most common of the corroding media with which designers have to contend in using duralumin in aircraft and ships.

  14. Corrosion chemistry closing comments: opportunities in corrosion science facilitated by operando experimental characterization combined with multi-scale computational modelling.

    PubMed

    Scully, John R

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in characterization tools, computational capabilities, and theories have created opportunities for advancement in understanding of solid-fluid interfaces at the nanoscale in corroding metallic systems. The Faraday Discussion on Corrosion Chemistry in 2015 highlighted some of the current needs, gaps and opportunities in corrosion science. Themes were organized into several hierarchical categories that provide an organizational framework for corrosion. Opportunities to develop fundamental physical and chemical data which will enable further progress in thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of corrosion were discussed. These will enable new and better understanding of unit processes that govern corrosion at the nanoscale. Additional topics discussed included scales, films and oxides, fluid-surface and molecular-surface interactions, selected topics in corrosion science and engineering as well as corrosion control. Corrosion science and engineering topics included complex alloy dissolution, local corrosion, and modelling of specific corrosion processes that are made up of collections of temporally and spatially varying unit processes such as oxidation, ion transport, and competitive adsorption. Corrosion control and mitigation topics covered some new insights on coatings and inhibitors. Further advances in operando or in situ experimental characterization strategies at the nanoscale combined with computational modelling will enhance progress in the field, especially if coupling across length and time scales can be achieved incorporating the various phenomena encountered in corrosion. Readers are encouraged to not only to use this ad hoc organizational scheme to guide their immersion into the current opportunities in corrosion chemistry, but also to find value in the information presented in their own ways.

  15. DIET of alkali atoms from mineral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakshinskiy, B. V.; Madey, T. E.

    2003-03-01

    To investigate mechanisms for the origin of alkalis in the atmosphere of the Moon, we are studying the electron- and photon-stimulated desorption (ESD and PSD) of K atoms from model mineral surfaces (SiO 2 films), and ESD and PSD of Na atoms from a lunar basalt sample. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates the existence of traces of Na in the lunar sample. To obtain an increased signal for detailed measurements of desorption parameters (appearance thresholds, yields), a fractional monolayer of Na is deposited onto the lunar sample surface. An alkali atom detector based on surface ionization and a time-of-flight technique are used for DIET measurements, together with a pulsed electron gun, and a mechanically chopped and filtered mercury arc light source. We find that bombardment of the alkali covered surfaces by UV photons or by electrons with energies E>4 eV causes desorption of "hot" alkali atoms. The results are consistent with the model based on charge transfer from the substrate to adsorbate which was developed to explain our previous measurements of sodium desorption from a silica surface and desorption of K atoms from water ice. The data support the suggestion that PSD by UV solar photons is a dominant source process for alkalis in the tenuous lunar atmosphere.

  16. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Parkins, R.N. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  17. Refractories for high-alkali environments

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, A.W.; Cloer, F.

    1996-01-01

    There are two reliable and cost-effective tests for evaluating refractory materials. They are used to determine which refractory products allow greater variance in fuel type with respect to alkali environment for coal-fired applications. Preselection of a particular refractory is important because of down-time cost for premature failure. One test is a variation of the standard alkali cup test. The second involves reacting test specimens with the contaminant, followed by physical properties testing to determine degree of degradation and properties affected. The alkali cup test rates products using a relative numerical scale based upon visual appearance. This test indicates the presence and relative degree of chemical attack to the refractory. The physical properties test determines the specific properties affected by the given contaminant.

  18. Advances in high temperature components for AMTEC (Alkali Metal Thermal-To-Electric Converter)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Underwood, M. L.; Ryan, M. A.; Oconnor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1991-07-01

    Long lifetimes are required for AMTEC (or sodium heat engine) components for aerospace and terrestrial applications, and the high heat input temperature as well as the alkali metal liquid and vapor environment places unusual demands on the materials used to construct AMTEC devices. In addition, it is important to maximize device efficiency and power density, while maintaining a long life capability. In addition to the electrode, which must provide both efficient electrode kinetics, transport of the alkali metal, and low electrical resistance, other high temperature components of the cell face equally demanding requirements. The beta(double prime) alumina solid electrolyte (BASE), the seal between the BASE ceramic and its metallic transition to the hot alkali metal (liquid or vapor) source, and metallic components of the device are exposed to hot liquid alkali metal. Modification of AMTEC components may also be useful in optimizing the device for particular operating conditions. In particular, a potassium AMTEC may be expected to operate more efficiently at lower temperatures.

  19. Electrochemical corrosion testing: An effective tool for corrosion inhibitor evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, L.S.; Van de Ven, P.; Mowlem, J.K.

    1996-10-01

    Corrosivity of an Antifreeze/Coolant can lead to localized attacks which are a major cause for metal failure. To prevent this phenomenon, specific corrosion inhibitors are used to protect the different metals in service. This paper will discuss the electrochemical principles behind corrosion, Realized corrosion and corrosion inhibition. It will also discuss electrochemical techniques which allow for the evaluation of these inhibitors.

  20. Alkali metal vapors - Laser spectroscopy and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stwalley, W. C.; Koch, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the rapidly expanding use of lasers for spectroscopic studies of alkali metal vapors. Since the alkali metals (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium) are theoretically simple ('visible hydrogen'), readily ionized, and strongly interacting with laser light, they represent ideal systems for quantitative understanding of microscopic interconversion mechanisms between photon (e.g., solar or laser), chemical, electrical and thermal energy. The possible implications of such understanding for a wide variety of practical applications (sodium lamps, thermionic converters, magnetohydrodynamic devices, new lasers, 'lithium waterfall' inertial confinement fusion reactors, etc.) are also discussed.

  1. Dissolution kinetics of a sintered molybdenum coating applied on ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Kuz`ko, V.S.

    1994-11-01

    Using weighing and corrosion diagrams, the etching parameters are determined for a sintered M-21 molybdenum coating applied to VK 94-1 vacuum-tight ceramics. Dissolution of M-21 in an alkaline solution of potassium hexacyanoferrate(III) can be treated as a corrosion process proceeding with kinetic control.

  2. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, W.Y.

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased, preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  3. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2003-08-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a reasonably high alkali content, thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was well within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that the aggressive alkali-iron-trisulfate constituent was present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section C, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. The analysis of Test Section C followed much the same protocol that was employed in the assessment of Test Section A. Again, the focus was on determining and documenting the relative corrosion rates of the candidate materials. The detailed results of the investigation are included in this report as a series of twelve appendices. Each appendix is devoted to the performance of one of the candidate alloys. The table below summarizes metal loss rate for the worst case sample of each of the candidate materials for both Test Sections A and C

  4. Salts of alkali metal anions and process of preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Dye, James L.; Ceraso, Joseph M.; Tehan, Frederick J.; Lok, Mei Tak

    1978-01-01

    Compounds of alkali metal anion salts of alkali metal cations in bicyclic polyoxadiamines are disclosed. The salts are prepared by contacting an excess of alkali metal with an alkali metal dissolving solution consisting of a bicyclic polyoxadiamine in a suitable solvent, and recovered by precipitation. The salts have a gold-color crystalline appearance and are stable in a vacuum at -10.degree. C. and below.

  5. Modeling of the static and flowing-gas ring-LD side-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Binglin; Xu, Xingqi; Xia, Chunsheng; Pan, Bailiang

    2016-07-01

    A new method of pump-coupling in diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifier is reported, which uses ring-LD to tightly surround the alkali vapor cell for directly coupled side-pumping. The kinetic and fluid dynamic modeling, numerical approaches of the ring-LD side-pumped configuration are proposed and applied to the static and the flowing-gas Cs vapor amplifiers. Pump intensity and temperature distribution in the cell are simulated. Influences of some important factors on laser power are calculated and analyzed. Comparisons of different pumped configurations are made, demonstrating the highest utilizing efficiency of pump power of the ring-LD side-pumped configuration. Thus the model is very helpful for designing high-power side-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers.

  6. Corrosion of V and V-base alloys in high-temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Purdy, I.M.; Toben, P.T.; Kassner, T.F.

    1996-04-01

    Corrosion of nonalloyed V, V-5Cr-5Ti, and V-15Cr-5Ti were conducted in high-purity deoxygenated water at 230{degrees}C for up to {approx}4500h. The effects of Cr concentration in the alloy and temperature on the corrosion behavior were determined from weight-change measurements and microstructural observations. An expression was obtained for the kinetics of corrosion as a function of Cr content of the alloy and temperature.

  7. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  8. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  9. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  11. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  12. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  13. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  14. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  15. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  17. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  18. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  19. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  20. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  1. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  2. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  3. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  4. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  5. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  6. SRB seawater corrosion project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozack, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of 2219 aluminum when exposed to seawater was characterized. Controlled corrosion experiments at three different temperatures (30, 60 and 100 C) and two different environments (seawater and 3.5 percent salt solution) were designed to elucidate the initial stages in the corrosion process. It was found that 2219 aluminum is an active catalytic surface for growth of Al2O3, NaCl, and MgO. Formation of Al2O3 is favored at lower temperatures, while MgO is favored at higher temperatures. Visible corrosion products are formed within 30 minutes after seawater exposure. Corrosion characteristics in 3.5 percent salt solution are different than corrosion in seawater. Techniques utilized were: (1) scanning electron microscopy, (2) energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and (3) Auger electron spectroscopy.

  7. Novel corrosion inhibitor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, P.; Fritz, P.; Pellet, R.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, patented corrosion inhibitor technology has been identified for use in heat transfer applications such as automotive and heavy-duty coolant. The new technology is based on a low-toxic, virtually depletion-free carboxylic acid corrosion inhibitor package that performs equally well in mono ethylene glycol and in less toxic propylene glycol coolants. An aqueous inhibitor concentrate is available to provide corrosion protection where freezing protection is not an issue. In the present paper, this inhibitor package is evaluated in the different base fluids: mono ethylene glycol, mono propylene glycol and water. Results are obtained in both standardized and specific corrosion tests as well as in selected field trials. These results indicate that the inhibitor package remains effective and retains the benefits previously identified in automotive engine coolant applications: excellent corrosion protection under localized conditions, general corrosion conditions as well as at high temperature.

  8. Stress corrosion resistant fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    A family of high performance aerospace fasteners made from corrosion resistant alloys for use in applications where corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking are of major concern are discussed. The materials discussed are mainly A-286, Inconel 718, MP35N and MP159. Most of the fasteners utilize cold worked and aged materials to achieve the desired properties. The fasteners are unique in that they provide a combination of high strength and immunity to stress corrosion cracking not previously attainable. A discussion of fastener stress corrosion failures is presented including a review of the history and a description of the mechanism. Case histories are presented to illustrate the problems which can arise when material selection is made without proper regard for the environmental conditions. Mechanical properties and chemical compositions are included for the fasteners discussed. Several aspects of the application of high performance corrosion resistant fasteners are discussed including galvanic compatibility and torque-tension relationships.

  9. Method of preparing corrosion resistant composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1993-01-01

    Method of manufacture of ceramic materials which require stability in severely-corrosive environment having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These surfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  10. Alkali resistant optical coatings for alkali lasers and methods of production thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Soules, Thomas F; Beach, Raymond J; Mitchell, Scott C

    2014-11-18

    In one embodiment, a multilayer dielectric coating for use in an alkali laser includes two or more alternating layers of high and low refractive index materials, wherein an innermost layer includes a thicker, >500 nm, and dense, >97% of theoretical, layer of at least one of: alumina, zirconia, and hafnia for protecting subsequent layers of the two or more alternating layers of high and low index dielectric materials from alkali attack. In another embodiment, a method for forming an alkali resistant coating includes forming a first oxide material above a substrate and forming a second oxide material above the first oxide material to form a multilayer dielectric coating, wherein the second oxide material is on a side of the multilayer dielectric coating for contacting an alkali.

  11. Computational studies of solid-state alkali conduction in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, Zhi; Mo, Yifei; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-03-25

    The facile conduction of alkali ions in a crystal host is of crucial importance in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries, the dominant form of energy storage today. In this review, we provide a comprehensive survey of computational approaches to study solid-state alkali diffusion. We demonstrate how these methods have provided useful insights into the design of materials that form the main components of a rechargeable alkali-ion battery, namely the electrodes, superionic conductor solid electrolytes and interfaces. We will also provide a perspective on future challenges and directions. Here, the scope of this review includes the monovalent lithium- and sodium-ion chemistries that aremore » currently of the most commercial interest.« less

  12. Ingestion of caustic alkali farm products.

    PubMed

    Neidich, G

    1993-01-01

    Since the Poison Prevention Packaging Act took effect, the number of ingestions of caustic alkali from household products has been significantly reduced. Commercial caustic alkalis used on farms, however, were not included in this legislation. Fourteen children over a 5 year period were seen after ingestion of commercial caustic alkalis used on farms. Seven of the children had ingested liquid pipeline cleaners and seven had ingested solid agents used for a variety of reasons. Six of seven children ingesting liquid agents did so from nonoriginal containers into which the caustic had been transferred for convenience. All seven children ingesting solid agents did so from the original container. Eight of the 14 children were found to have second-degree or worse esophageal involvement. Both solid and liquid caustic agents used commercially on farms can cause significant morbidity. Development of a child-resistant container for daily transfer of liquid pipeline agents could be helpful in preventing injuries from liquid pipeline cleaners. Pediatric gastroenterologists as well as primary care physicians in rural areas should be familiar with this type of injury and should take an active role in instructing parents of children living on farms to prevent such injuries. Extension of the Poison Prevention Packaging Act to caustic alkalis used on farms needs to be considered. PMID:8433244

  13. Terahertz radiation in alkali vapor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, X.-C.

    2014-05-12

    By taking advantage of low ionization potentials of alkali atoms, we demonstrate terahertz wave generation from cesium and rubidium vapor plasmas with an amplitude nearly one order of magnitude larger than that from nitrogen gas at low pressure (0.02–0.5 Torr). The observed phenomena are explained by the numerical modeling based upon electron tunneling ionization.

  14. Ingestion of caustic alkali farm products.

    PubMed

    Neidich, G

    1993-01-01

    Since the Poison Prevention Packaging Act took effect, the number of ingestions of caustic alkali from household products has been significantly reduced. Commercial caustic alkalis used on farms, however, were not included in this legislation. Fourteen children over a 5 year period were seen after ingestion of commercial caustic alkalis used on farms. Seven of the children had ingested liquid pipeline cleaners and seven had ingested solid agents used for a variety of reasons. Six of seven children ingesting liquid agents did so from nonoriginal containers into which the caustic had been transferred for convenience. All seven children ingesting solid agents did so from the original container. Eight of the 14 children were found to have second-degree or worse esophageal involvement. Both solid and liquid caustic agents used commercially on farms can cause significant morbidity. Development of a child-resistant container for daily transfer of liquid pipeline agents could be helpful in preventing injuries from liquid pipeline cleaners. Pediatric gastroenterologists as well as primary care physicians in rural areas should be familiar with this type of injury and should take an active role in instructing parents of children living on farms to prevent such injuries. Extension of the Poison Prevention Packaging Act to caustic alkalis used on farms needs to be considered.

  15. Cohesive Energy of the Alkali Metals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a method, considered appropriate for presentation to undergraduate students in materials science and related courses, for the calculation of cohesive energies of the alkali metals. Uses a description based on the free electron model and gives results to within 0.1 eV of the experimental values. (Author/GS)

  16. Electrochemical corrosion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knockemus, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    The objective was to gain familiarity with the Model 350 Corrosion Measurement Console, to determine if metal protection by grease coatings can be measured by the polarization-resistance method, and to compare corrosion rates of 4130 steel coated with various greases. Results show that grease protection of steel may be determined electrochemically. Studies were also conducted to determine the effectiveness of certain corrosion inhibitors on aluminum and steel.

  17. Effective corrosion monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, C.F.; Tofield, B.C.

    1988-04-01

    The results of two surveys (conducted in 1981 and 1984) of users of corrosion monitoring equipment are described. The benefits to be obtained from a well-designed corrosion monitoring system, especially if a corrosion control program is used, are outlined together with the difficulties and barriers that can obstruct successful application. Developing methods such as AC impedance, electrochemical noise, and thin layer activation are discussed in view of the comments received from the surveys.

  18. Corrosion Detection Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, B.

    2003-12-01

    Nondestructive Examination Systems' (NDE) specialists at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site have unique, remotely controllable, corrosion detection capabilities. The corrosion detection devices most frequently used are automated ultrasonic mapping systems, digital radiography imaging devices, infrared imaging, and eddy current mapping systems. These devices have been successfully used in a variety of applications, some of which involve high levels of background radiation. Not only is corrosion located and mapped but other types of anomalies such as cracks have been detected and characterized. Examples of actual corrosion that has been detected will be discussed along with the NDE systems that were used.

  19. Computation of three-dimensional temperature distribution in diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Binglin; Xu, Xingqi; Xia, Chunsheng; Pan, Bailiang

    2016-06-01

    Combining the kinetic and fluid dynamic processes in static and flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers, a comprehensive physical model with a cyclic iterative approach for calculating the three-dimensional temperature distribution of the vapor cell is established. Taking into account heat generation, thermal conductivity and convection, the excitation of the alkali atoms to high electronic levels, and their losses due to ionization in the gain medium, the thermal features and output characteristics have been simultaneously obtained. The results are in good agreement with those of the measurement in a static rubidium vapor amplifier. Influences of gas velocity on radial and axial temperature profiles are simulated and analyzed. The results have demonstrated that thermal problems in gaseous gain medium can be significantly reduced by flowing the gain medium with sufficiently high velocity.

  20. Alteration of physical, chemical, and biological properties of endotoxin by treatment with mild alkali.

    PubMed

    Niwa, M; Milner, K C; Ribi, E; Rudbach, J A

    1969-03-01

    Treatment with alkali is one of several methods for removing fatty acids from bacterial endotoxins and, in the process, detoxifying the material. Saponification of fatty acid esters is the major detectable chemical change produced by alkali; however, kinetic studies of mild alkaline hydrolysis of endotoxin failed to correlate rates of detoxification with rates of loss of ketodeoxyoctonates, heptose, O-acetyl groups, or fatty acid esters. The alterations occurring during the critical stages of hydrolysis apparently changed the essential chemical conformation of endotoxic particles before cleavage of a significant amount of material took place. The rates of both saponification and detoxification were markedly increased by carrying out the reaction in media of ethyl alcohol or dimethylsulfoxide instead of water.

  1. Normal Auger spectra of iodine in gas phase alkali iodide molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhengfa; Caló, Antonio; Kukk, Edwin; Aksela, Helena; Aksela, Seppo

    2005-06-01

    Molecular normal Auger electron spectra following the iodine 4d ionization in gas-phase alkali iodides were investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The Auger electron spectra for LiI, NaI and KI were recorded using electron impact, and for RbI by using photo-excitation. These Auger spectra were analyzed in detail and compared to the referenced normal Auger spectra of HI [L. Karlsson, S. Svensson, P. Baltzer, M. Carlsson-Göthe, M.P. Keane, A. Naves de Brito, N. Correia, B. Wannberg, J. Phys. B 22 (1989) 3001]. An energy shift toward higher kinetic energy and a narrowing in linewidth are observed in the Auger spectra series revealing the effect of the changing environment from covalently bonded HI to ionic alkali iodide compounds. The experimental results are also compared with the theoretical ab initio calculations and with the Auger spectra of I -, computed with the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) method.

  2. Evaluation of the adsorption capacity of alkali-treated waste materials for the adsorption of sulphamethoxazole.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Lisha

    2012-01-01

    The present work is to develop potential adsorbents from waste material and employ them for the removal of a hazardous antibacterial, sulphamethoxazole, from the wastewater by the Adsorption technique. The Adsorption technique was used to impound the dangerous antibiotics from wastewater using Deoiled Soya (DOS), an agricultural waste, and Water Hyacinth (WH), a prolific colonizer. The adsorption capacity of these adsorbents was further enhanced by treating them with sodium hydroxide solution and it was seen that the adsorption capacity increases by 10 to 25%. Hence a comparative account of the adsorption studies of all the four adsorbents, i.e. DOS, Alkali-treated DOS, WH and Alkali-treated Water Hyacinth has been discussed in this paper. Different isotherms like Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich were also deduced from the adsorption data. Isotherm studies were in turn used in estimating the thermodynamic parameters. DOS showed sorption capacity of 0.0007 mol g(-1) while Alkali-treated Deoiled Soya exhibited 0.0011 mol g(-1) of sorption capacity, which reveals that the adsorption is higher in case of alkali-treated adsorbent. The mean sorption energy (E) was obtained between 9 and 12 kJ mol, which shows that the reaction proceeds by ion exchange reaction. Kinetic study reveals that the reaction follows pseudo-second-order rate equation. Moreover, mass transfer studies performed for the ongoing processes show that the mass transfer coefficient obtained for alkali-treated moieties was higher than the parent moieties. The breakthrough curves plotted from the column studies show percentage saturation of 90-98%. About 87-97% of sulphamethoxazole was recovered from column by desorption. PMID:22508113

  3. Plasma Formation During Operation of a Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) in Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu.; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-10-01

    Diode pumped Alkali Lasers (DPALs) produce laser action on the resonant lines of alkali atoms. Diode lasers resonantly pump the 2P3/2 state of the alkali atom which is collisionally relaxed to the 2P3/2 state which then lases to the ground state 2S1/2. The low optical quality of high power semiconductor diode lasers is converted into high optical quality laser radiation from the alkali vapor. The Cs DPAL system using Ar/Cs/C2H6 mixtures has shown promising results. (C2H6 is the collisional relaxant.) In other studies, resonant excitation of alkali vapor by low power lasers has been used to produce highly ionized channels, initiated through associative ionization and superelastic electron heating. The issue then arises if plasma formation occurs during DPAL by similar mechanisms which would be detrimental to laser performance. In this paper, we report on results from a computational study of a DPAL using Cs vapor. The global model addresses quasi-cw pumping of the Cs(2P3/2) state by laser diodes, and includes a full accounting of the resulting electron kinetics. To enable this study, the B-spline R-matrix (BSR) with pseudostates method was employed to calculate electron impact cross sections for Cs. We found that for pump rates of many to 10 kW/cm2, plasma densities approaching 1013 cm-3 occur during laser oscillation with higher values in the absence of laser oscillation. Supported by DoD High Energy Laser Mult. Res. Initiative and NSF.

  4. Corrosion inhibitive admixtures for concrete (A review of the current state of the art)

    SciTech Connect

    Incorvia, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    Corrosion inhibitive admixtures, chemicals added to the concrete mixture to decrease the corrosion activity of the steel reinforcement, are an easy, cost-effective method for corrosion protection. This paper will review some of the issues related to the corrosion process and to the use of corrosion inhibitive admixtures to extend the service life of steel reinforced structures. The principle cause of corrosion damage to steel reinforced concrete, even high quality concrete, is chloride ion attack. To perform properly an inhibitive admixture must provide protection against chloride induced corrosion. Corrosion inhibitive admixtures provide protection by two mechanisms: (1) a chloride screening mechanism which prolongs the time it takes for chloride to reach the surface of the metal, and (2) an interfacial process where protection is provided by decreasing the corrosion activity at the reinforcing steel surface. The classes of admixtures which prolong the time it takes for chlorides to reach the surface of the reinforcing bars are: hydrophobic materials, pozzolanic materials (e.g. silica fume, fly ash, etc.), and superplasticizers. Interfacial corrosion inhibitive admixtures provide protection by decreasing the corrosion activity by a thermodynamic or a kinetic process or both. The science and technology of corrosion inhibitive admixtures is a developing area, and as such, universally accepted testing procedures have not been established. For the more recently developed admixtures, long duration field exposure test data are not yet available.

  5. Alkali metal vapor removal from pressurized fluidized-bed combustor flue gas. Annual report, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, I.; Swift, W.M.; Lee, S.H.D.

    1980-10-01

    In the application of pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) to the generation of electricity, hot corrosion of the gas turbine (downstream from the combustor) by alkali metal compounds is a potential problem. The objective of this investigation is to develop a method for the removal of gaseous alkali metal compounds from the high-pressure high-temperature gas from a PFBC before the gas enters the gas turbine. The use of a granular bed filter, with either diatomaceous earth or activated bauxite as the bed material, is under study. Breakthrough data are reported on the sorption of gaseous NaCl by activated bauxite. Results are reported for the regeneration of activated bauxite using water leaching and a thermal swing method.

  6. Alkali metal recovery from carbonaceous material conversion process

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, David W.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.; Gorbaty, Martin L.; Tsou, Joe M.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced in the gasifier or similar reaction zone, alkali metal constitutents are recovered from the particles by withdrawing and passing the particles from the reaction zone to an alkali metal recovery zone in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen and treating the particles in the recovery zone with water or an aqueous solution in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen. The solution formed by treating the particles in the recovery zone will contain water-soluble alkali metal constituents and is recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preventing contact of the particles with oxygen as they are withdrawn from the reaction zone and during treatment in the recovery zone avoids the formation of undesirable alkali metal constituents in the aqueous solution produced in the recovery zone and insures maximum recovery of water-soluble alkali metal constituents from the alkali metal residues.

  7. METHOD OF CONTROLLING CORROSION IN A NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Kidder, C.P.; Sloan, C.K.

    1959-10-01

    A method is described for reducing or removing corrosion and iron deposits on aluminum surfaces from coolant water comprising adding to the coolant alkali metal dichromate in a concentration of between 1.8 and 2.2 ppm, adjusting the pH to between 7.3 and 7.8 by adding CaCO/sub 3/ or other similar material, and adding a silicious material such as diatomaceous earth of a particle size of 5 to 15 microns to effect a suspension of between 2 and 300 ppm and circulating it through the reactor.

  8. Potentiodynamic Corrosion Testing.

    PubMed

    Munir, Selin; Pelletier, Matthew H; Walsh, William R

    2016-01-01

    Different metallic materials have different polarization characteristics as dictated by the open circuit potential, breakdown potential, and passivation potential of the material. The detection of these electrochemical parameters identifies the corrosion factors of a material. A reliable and well-functioning corrosion system is required to achieve this. Corrosion of the samples was achieved via a potentiodynamic polarization technique employing a three-electrode configuration, consisting of reference, counter, and working electrodes. Prior to commencement a baseline potential is obtained. Following the stabilization of the corrosion potential (Ecorr), the applied potential is ramped at a slow rate in the positive direction relative to the reference electrode. The working electrode was a stainless steel screw. The reference electrode was a standard Ag/AgCl. The counter electrode used was a platinum mesh. Having a reliable and well-functioning in vitro corrosion system to test biomaterials provides an in-expensive technique that allows for the systematic characterization of the material by determining the breakdown potential, to further understand the material's response to corrosion. The goal of the protocol is to set up and run an in vitro potentiodynamic corrosion system to analyze pitting corrosion for small metallic medical devices. PMID:27683978

  9. Aluminum Corrosion and Turbidity

    SciTech Connect

    Longtin, F.B.

    2003-03-10

    Aluminum corrosion and turbidity formation in reactors correlate with fuel sheath temperature. To further substantiate this correlation, discharged fuel elements from R-3, P-2 and K-2 cycles were examined for extent of corrosion and evidence of breaking off of the oxide film. This report discusses this study.

  10. Potentiodynamic Corrosion Testing.

    PubMed

    Munir, Selin; Pelletier, Matthew H; Walsh, William R

    2016-09-04

    Different metallic materials have different polarization characteristics as dictated by the open circuit potential, breakdown potential, and passivation potential of the material. The detection of these electrochemical parameters identifies the corrosion factors of a material. A reliable and well-functioning corrosion system is required to achieve this. Corrosion of the samples was achieved via a potentiodynamic polarization technique employing a three-electrode configuration, consisting of reference, counter, and working electrodes. Prior to commencement a baseline potential is obtained. Following the stabilization of the corrosion potential (Ecorr), the applied potential is ramped at a slow rate in the positive direction relative to the reference electrode. The working electrode was a stainless steel screw. The reference electrode was a standard Ag/AgCl. The counter electrode used was a platinum mesh. Having a reliable and well-functioning in vitro corrosion system to test biomaterials provides an in-expensive technique that allows for the systematic characterization of the material by determining the breakdown potential, to further understand the material's response to corrosion. The goal of the protocol is to set up and run an in vitro potentiodynamic corrosion system to analyze pitting corrosion for small metallic medical devices.

  11. Fireside Corrosion USC Steering

    SciTech Connect

    G. R. Holcomb; J. Tylczak

    2011-09-07

    Oxy-Fuel Fireside Research goals are: (1) Determine the effect of oxy-fuel combustion on fireside corrosion - (a) Flue gas recycle choice, Staged combustion ramifications, (c) JCOAL Collaboration; and (2) Develop methods to use chromia solubility in ash as an 'ash corrosivity' measurement - (a) Synthetic ashes at first, then boiler and burner rig ashes, (b) Applicable to SH/RH conditions.

  12. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  13. Infrared and Raman spectroscopic studies on alkali borate glasses: evidence of mixed alkali effect.

    PubMed

    Padmaja, G; Kistaiah, P

    2009-03-19

    A lithium-potassium-borate glass system containing manganese and iron cations has been thoroughly investigated in order to obtain information about the mixed alkali effect and the structural role of both the manganese and iron in such glass hosts. Mixed alkali borate glasses of the (30 - x)Li(2)O - xK(2)O - 10CdO/ZnO - 59B(2)O(3) (x = 0, 10, 15, 20, and 30) doped with 1MnO(2)/1Fe(2)O(3) system were prepared by a melt quench technique. The amorphous phase of the prepared glass samples was confirmed from their X-ray diffraction. The spectroscopic properties of glass samples were studied using infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopic techniques. The density of all the prepared glasses was measured using Archimedes principle. Molar volumes were estimated from the density data. IR spectra of these glasses revealed a dramatic variation of three- and four-coordinated boron structures as a function of mixed alkali concentration. The vibrations due to Li-O, K-O, and MnO(4)/FeO(4) arrangements are consistent in all the compositions and show a nonlinear variation in the intensity with alkali content. Raman spectra of different alkali combinations with CdO and ZnO present drastic changes in the intensity of various Raman bands. The observation of disappearance and reappearance of IR and Raman bands as a function of various alkali concentrations is an important result pertaining to the mixed alkali effect in borate glasses. Acting as complementary spectroscopic techniques, both types of measurements, IR and Raman, revealed that the network structure of the studied glasses is mainly based on BO(3) and BO(4) units placed in different structural groups, the BO(3) units being dominant. The measured IR and Raman spectra of different glasses are used to clarify the optical properties of the present glasses correlating them with their structure and composition. PMID:19235995

  14. Crude unit corrosion and corrosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Bagdasarian, A.; Feather, J.; Hull, B.; Stephenson, R.; Strong, R.

    1996-08-01

    In the petroleum refining process, the Crude Unit is the initial stage of distillation of the crude oil into useable fractions, either as end products or feed to downstream units. The major pieces of equipment found on units will vary depending on factors such as the assay of the design crude, the age of the refinery, and other downstream units. The unit discussed in this paper has all of the major pieces of equipment found on crude units including double desalting, a preflash section, an atmospheric section, a vacuum section, and a stabilization section. This paper reviews fundamental corrosion issues concerning the Crude Unit process. It is, in concise form, a description of the process and major equipment found in the Crude Unit; types of corrosion and where they occur; corrosion monitoring and inspection advice; and a list of related references for further reading. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Fireside Corrosion in Oxy-Fuel Combustion of Coal

    SciTech Connect

    G. R. Holcomb; J. Tylczak; G. H. Meier; K. Jung; N. Mu; N. M. Yanar; F. S. Pettit

    2011-10-09

    The goal is to develop technologies for pulverized coal boilers with >90% CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration and <35% increase in the cost of electricity. Air-fired power plant experience shows a corrosion loss max at 680-700 C. Low melting point alkali metal trisulfates, such as (K,Na){sub 3}Fe(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}, become thermally unstable above this temperature range. Some overall conclusions are: (1) CO{sub 2} + 30% H{sub 2}O more corrosive than Ar + 30% H{sub 2}O; (2) Excess O{sub 2} in H{sub 2}O can, in some cases, greatly increase oxidation; (3) Coal ash is generally innocuous without SO{sub 3}3 in gas phase; and (4) Long-term exposures are starting to establish differences between air-firing and oxy-firing conditions.

  16. Infrared spectra of FHF - in alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunnilall, C. J.; Sherman, W. F.

    1982-03-01

    The bifluoride ion, FHF -, has been substitutionally isolated within single crystal samples of several different alkali halides. Infrared spectra of these crystals have been studied for sample temperatures down to 8K when half-bandwidths of less than 1 cm -1 have been observed. (Note that at room temperature ν 3 is observed to have a half-bandwidth of about 40 cm -1). The frequency shifts and half-bandwidth changes caused by cooling are considered together with the frequency shifts caused by pressures up to 10 k bar. The low temperature spectra clearly indicate that FHF - is a linear symmetrical ion when substitutionally isolated within alkali halides of either the NaCl or CsCl structure.

  17. Geopolymers and Related Alkali-Activated Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provis, John L.; Bernal, Susan A.

    2014-07-01

    The development of new, sustainable, low-CO2 construction materials is essential if the global construction industry is to reduce the environmental footprint of its activities, which is incurred particularly through the production of Portland cement. One type of non-Portland cement that is attracting particular attention is based on alkali-aluminosilicate chemistry, including the class of binders that have become known as geopolymers. These materials offer technical properties comparable to those of Portland cement, but with a much lower CO2 footprint and with the potential for performance advantages over traditional cements in certain niche applications. This review discusses the synthesis of alkali-activated binders from blast furnace slag, calcined clay (metakaolin), and fly ash, including analysis of the chemical reaction mechanisms and binder phase assemblages that control the early-age and hardened properties of these materials, in particular initial setting and long-term durability. Perspectives for future research developments are also explored.

  18. Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

    2003-02-26

    This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

  19. Kinetic Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  20. Study of corrosion of super martensitic stainless steel under alternating current in artificial seawater with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, T.; Bhola, S.; Olson, D. L.; Mishra, B.

    2011-06-23

    The assessment of corrosion requires the use of tools able to quantify the corrosion but often times also qualify it. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is a laboratory tool that can provide both qualification and quantification of corrosion. EIS was successfully used to compare the thickness of the corrosion products formed during the application of different alternating current (AC) densities as well as to characterize pitting. When EIS is applied at the open circuit potential, the technique is nondestructive and predicts the corrosion behavior of the electrode. It can also be used at cathodic potentials while still being nondestructive, providing information about the electrode reaction kinetics, diffusion and electrical double layer.

  1. Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Life Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    One approach to space fission power system design is predicated on the use of alkali metal heat pipes, either as radiator elements, thermal management components, or as part of the core primary heat-transfer system. This synopsis characterizes long-life core heat pipes. References are included where more detailed information can be found. Specifics shown here are for demonstrational purposes and do not necessarily reflect current Project Prometheus point designs.

  2. Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Life Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Robert S.

    2004-07-01

    One approach to fission power system design uses alkali metal heat pipes for the core primary heat-transfer system. Heat pipes may also be used as radiator elements or auxiliary thermal control elements. This synopsis characterizes long-life core heat pipes. References are included where information that is more detailed can be found. Specifics shown here are for demonstration purposes and do not necessarily reflect current Nasa Project Prometheus point designs. (author)

  3. Corrosion of silicon nitride in high temperature alkaline solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Liyan; Guzonas, Dave A.; Qian, Jing

    2016-08-01

    The corrosion of silicon nitride (Si3N4) in alkaline solutions was studied at temperatures from 60 to 300 °C. Si3N4 experienced significant corrosion above 100 °C. The release rates of silicon and nitrogen follow zero order reaction kinetics and increase with increasing temperature. The molar ratio of dissolved silicon and nitrogen species in the high temperature solutions is the same as that in the solid phase (congruent dissolution). The activation energy for silicon and nitrogen release rates is 75 kJ/mol which agrees well with that of silica dissolution. At 300 °C, the release of aluminum is observed and follows first order reaction kinetics while other minor constituents including Ti and Y are highly enriched on the corrosion films due to the low solubility of their oxides.

  4. Furniture Rack Corrosion Coupon Surveillance - 2012 Update

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J. I.; Murphy, T. R.; Berry, C. J.

    2012-10-01

    Under the L Basin corrosion surveillance program furniture rack coupons immersed for 14 years (FY2009 coupons) and 16 years (FY2011 coupons) were analyzed and the results trended with coupons exposed for shorter times. In addition, a section harvested from an actual furniture rack that was immersed for 14 years was analyzed for pitting in the weld and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) regions. The L Basin operations maintained very good water quality over the entire immersion period for these samples. These results for FY2009 and FY2011 coupons showed that the average pit depths for the 6061 and 6063 base metal are 1 and 2 mils, respectively, while those for the weld and HAZ are 3 and 4 mils, respectively. The results for the weld and HAZ regions are similar to coupons removed during the period of FY2003 to FY2007. These similarities indicate that the pit development occurred quickly followed by slow kinetics of increase in pit depth. For the actual furniture rack sample average pits of 5 and 2 mils were measured for the HAZ and weld, respectively. These results demonstrate that pitting corrosion of the aluminum furniture racks used to support the spent fuel occurs in waters of good quality. The corrosion kinetics or pit depth growth rate is much less that 1 mil/year, and would not impact long-term use of this material system for fuel storage racks in L Basin if good water quality is maintained.

  5. Ion Pairing in Alkali Nitrate Electrolyte Solutions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen Jun; Zhang, Zhen; Gao, Yi Qin

    2016-03-10

    In this study, we investigate the thermodynamics of alkali nitrate salt solutions, especially the formation of contact ion pairs between alkali cation and nitrate anion. The ion-pairing propensity shows an order of LiNO3 < NaNO3 < KNO3. Such results explain the salt activity coefficients and suggest that the empirical "law of matching water affinity" is followed by these alkali nitrate salt solutions. The spatial patterns of contact ion pairs are different in the three salt solutions studied here: Li(+) forms the contact ion pair with only one oxygen of the nitrate while Na(+) and K(+) can also be shared by two oxygens of the nitrate. In reproducing the salt activity coefficient using Kirkwood-Buff theory, we find that it is essential to include electronic polarization for Li(+) which has a high charge density. The electronic continuum correction for nonpolarizable force field significantly improves the agreement between the calculated activity coefficients and their experimental values. This approach also improves the performance of the force field on salt solubility. From these two aspects, this study suggests that electronic continuum correction can be a promising approach to force-field development for ions with high charge densities. PMID:26901167

  6. Ion Pairing in Alkali Nitrate Electrolyte Solutions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen Jun; Zhang, Zhen; Gao, Yi Qin

    2016-03-10

    In this study, we investigate the thermodynamics of alkali nitrate salt solutions, especially the formation of contact ion pairs between alkali cation and nitrate anion. The ion-pairing propensity shows an order of LiNO3 < NaNO3 < KNO3. Such results explain the salt activity coefficients and suggest that the empirical "law of matching water affinity" is followed by these alkali nitrate salt solutions. The spatial patterns of contact ion pairs are different in the three salt solutions studied here: Li(+) forms the contact ion pair with only one oxygen of the nitrate while Na(+) and K(+) can also be shared by two oxygens of the nitrate. In reproducing the salt activity coefficient using Kirkwood-Buff theory, we find that it is essential to include electronic polarization for Li(+) which has a high charge density. The electronic continuum correction for nonpolarizable force field significantly improves the agreement between the calculated activity coefficients and their experimental values. This approach also improves the performance of the force field on salt solubility. From these two aspects, this study suggests that electronic continuum correction can be a promising approach to force-field development for ions with high charge densities.

  7. Transport properties of alkali metal doped fullerides

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Daluram Yadav, Nishchhal

    2015-07-31

    We have studied the intercage interactions between the adjacent C{sub 60} cages and expansion of lattice due to the intercalation of alkali atoms based on the spring model to estimate phonon frequencies from the dynamical matrix for the intermolecular alkali-C{sub 60} phonons. We considered a two-peak model for the phonon density of states to investigate the nature of electron pairing mechanism for superconducting state in fullerides. Coulomb repulsive parameter and the electron phonon coupling strength are obtained within the random phase approximation. Transition temperature, T{sub c}, is obtained in a situation when the free electrons in lowest molecular orbital are coupled with alkali-C{sub 60} phonons as 5 K, which is much lower as compared to reported T{sub c} (20 K). The superconducting pairing is mainly driven by the high frequency intramolecular phonons and their effects enhance it to 22 K. The importance of the present study, the pressure effect and normal state transport properties are calculated within the same model leading superconductivity.

  8. Kinetics of carbothermal reduction of quartz under vacuum.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalafalla, S. E.; Haas, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the kinetics of carbothermal reduction of quartz in a batch reactor between 0.25 torr and 1 microtorr. The effects of temperature, CO partial pressure, SiO2 phase transformation, and alkali and alkaline-earth oxide additives on the rate of reaction are reported. The results are consistent with a model based on a transitory phase intermediate.

  9. Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Owen; Cornelius, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Conveys an appreciation of enzyme kinetic analysis by using a practical and intuitive approach. Discusses enzyme assays, kinetic models and rate laws, the kinetic constants (V, velocity, and Km, Michaels constant), evaluation of V and Km from experimental data, and enzyme inhibition. (CW)

  10. Mechanisms for the atmospheric corrosion of carbonate stone

    SciTech Connect

    Graedel, T.E.

    2000-03-01

    The physical and chemical phenomena responsible for the atmospheric corrosion of carbonate stone are presented. Corrosion product formation, morphology, and chemical makeup are discussed in the context of calcium-containing minerals and other crystalline structures that thermodynamics and kinetics suggest are likely to be present. Formation pathways for the minerals most often reported to occur in carbonate corrosion layers are shown in schematic diagrams. The dominant corrosion products are sulfates and oxalates, the former resulting from interactions with atmospheric sulfur dioxide or sulfate ions, the latter from oxalate secretions from the biological organisms. present (and perhaps to some extent from oxalate deposited from the atmosphere). The degradation processes are enhanced by the catalytic action of transition metal ions present in the stone and of soot deposited from the atmosphere.

  11. Corrosion Issues in Solder Joint Design and Service

    SciTech Connect

    VIANCO,PAUL T.

    1999-11-24

    Corrosion is an important consideration in the design of a solder joint. It must be addressed with respect to the service environment or, as in the case of soldered conduit, as the nature of the medium being transported within piping or tubing. Galvanic-assisted corrosion is of particular concern, given the fact that solder joints are comprised of different metals or alloy compositions that are in contact with one-another. The (thermodynamic) potential for corrosion to take place in a particular environment requires the availability of the galvanic series for those conditions and which includes the metals or alloys in question. However, the corrosion kinetics, which actually determine the rate of material loss under the specified service conditions, are only available through laboratory evaluations or field data that are found in the existing literature or must be obtained by in-house testing.

  12. The Corrosion and Preservation of Iron Antiques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Discusses general corrosion reactions (iron to rust), including corrosion of iron, sulfur dioxide, chlorides, immersed corrosion, and underground corrosion. Also discusses corrosion inhibition, including corrosion inhibitors (anodic, cathodic, mixed, organic); safe/dangerous inhibitors; and corrosion/inhibition in concrete/marble, showcases/boxes,…

  13. Alteration of alkali reactive aggregates autoclaved in different alkali solutions and application to alkali-aggregate reaction in concrete (II) expansion and microstructure of concrete microbar

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Duyou . E-mail: duyoulu@njut.edu.cn; Mei Laibao; Xu Zhongzi; Tang Mingshu; Mo Xiangyin; Fournier, Benoit

    2006-06-15

    The effect of the type of alkalis on the expansion behavior of concrete microbars containing typical aggregate with alkali-silica reactivity and alkali-carbonate reactivity was studied. The results verified that: (1) at the same molar concentration, sodium has the strongest contribution to expansion due to both ASR and ACR, followed by potassium and lithium; (2) sufficient LiOH can completely suppress expansion due to ASR whereas it can induce expansion due to ACR. It is possible to use the duplex effect of LiOH on ASR and ACR to clarify the ACR contribution when ASR and ACR may coexist. It has been shown that a small amount of dolomite in the fine-grained siliceous Spratt limestone, which has always been used as a reference aggregate for high alkali-silica reactivity, might dedolomitize in alkaline environment and contribute to the expansion. That is to say, Spratt limestone may exhibit both alkali-silica and alkali-carbonate reactivity, although alkali-silica reactivity is predominant. Microstructural study suggested that the mechanism in which lithium controls ASR expansion is mainly due to the favorable formation of lithium-containing less-expansive product around aggregate particles and the protection of the reactive aggregate from further attack by alkalis by the lithium-containing product layer.

  14. Assessment of alkali metal coolants for the ITER blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Reed, C.B.; Mattas, R.F.

    1994-06-01

    The blanket system is one of the most important components of a fusion reactor because it has a major impact on both the economics and safety of fusion energy. The primary functions of the blanket in a deuterium/tritium-fueled fusion reactor are to convert the fusion energy into sensible heat and to breed tritium for the fuel cycle. The Blanket Comparison and Selection Study, conducted earlier, described the overall comparative performance of different blanket concepts, including liquid metal, molten salt, water and helium. This paper will discuss the ITER requirements for a self-cooled blanket concept with liquid lithium and for indirectly cooled concepts that use other alkali metals such as NaK. The paper addresses the thermodynamics of interactions between the liquid metals (e.g., lithium and NaK) and structural materials (e.g., V-base alloys), together with associated corrosion/compatibility issues. Available experimental data are used to assess the long-term performance of the first wall in a liquid metal environment. Other key issues include development of electrical insulator coatings on the first-wall structural material to MHD pressure drop, and tritium permeation/inventory in self-cooled and indirectly cooled concepts. Acceptable types of coatings (based on their chemical compatibility and physical properties) are identified, and surface-modification avenues to achieve these coatings on the first wall are discussed. The assessment examines the extent of our knowledge on structural materials performance in liquid metals and identifies needed research and development in several of the areas in order to establish performance envelopes for the first wall in a liquid-metal environment.

  15. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Pullen, W.C.; Kollie, T.G.; Bell, R.T.

    1981-10-21

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  16. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Pullen, William C.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Bell, Richard T.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  17. Liquid-metal corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; DeVan, J.H.; Smith, D.L.; Sze, D.K.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1985-09-01

    A review of corrosion and environmental effects on the mechanical properties of candidate structural alloys for use with liquid metals in fusion reactors is presented. The corrosion/mass transfer behavior of austenitic and ferritic steels and vanadium-base alloys is evaluated to determine the preliminary operating temperature limits for circulating and static liquid-lithium and Pb-17Li systems. The influence of liquid-metal environment on the mechanical properties of structural materials is discussed. Corrosion effects of nitrate and fluoride salts are presented. Requirements for additional data are identified.

  18. Method for the safe disposal of alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Terry R.

    1977-01-01

    Alkali metals such as those employed in liquid metal coolant systems can be safely reacted to form hydroxides by first dissolving the alkali metal in relatively inert metals such as lead or bismuth. The alloy thus formed is contacted with a molten salt including the alkali metal hydroxide and possibly the alkali metal carbonate in the presence of oxygen. This oxidizes the alkali metal to an oxide which is soluble within the molten salt. The salt is separated and contacted with steam or steam-CO.sub.2 mixture to convert the alkali metal oxide to the hydroxide. These reactions can be conducted with minimal hydrogen evolution and with the heat of reaction distributed between the several reaction steps.

  19. Stress-corrosion cracking of titanium alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, M. J.; Feeney, J. A.; Beck, T. R.

    1973-01-01

    In the light of research material published up to May 1970, the current understanding of the experimental variables involved in the stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of titanium and its alloys is reviewed. Following a brief summary of the metallurgy and electrochemistry of titanium alloys, the mechanical, electrochemical, and metallurgical parameters influencing SCC behavior are explored with emphasis on crack growth kinetics. Macro- and microfeatures of fractures are examined, and it is shown that many transgranular SCC failures exhibit morphological and crystallographic features similar to mechanical cleavage failures. Current SCC models are reviewed with respect to their ability to explain the observed SCC behavior of titanium and its alloys. Possible methods for eliminating or minimizing stress corrosion hazards in titanium or titanium alloy components are described.

  20. Corrosion behavior and fatigue of alloy 625, alloy 33 and alloy 31 under conditions of decouplers in automotive exhaust systems

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.C.; Kloewer, J.; Koehler, M.; Kolb-Telieps, A.

    1998-12-31

    The alloys 625, 31, 33 and in some tests the newly developed alloy 626Si have been investigated with respect to their mechanical properties and their corrosion resistance against alkali salts containing chlorides at temperatures of 550 C, 65O C, 7OO C and 750 C. Concerning strength in the sensitized condition, all alloys are suitable as decoupler materials. The mechanical properties of alloys 625, 626Si and probably 31 indicate adequate manufacturing possibilities of bellows. All alloys investigated suffer accelerated corrosion in the presence of alkali salt containing chlorides at temperatures ranging from 550 C to 750 C. At 750 C alloy 626Si shows the lowest corrosion rate. At 75O C, 7OO C and 650 C no difference between the solution annealed and the sensitized specimens was found. At 55O C, however, the corrosion rate of the alloys 625 and 33 increased significantly, when the material was sensitized prior to corrosion testing. Alloy 31 does not suffer significant corrosion attack at 55O C both in the solution annealed and in the sensitized condition, thus making it a potential cost effective alternative to the more expensive alloy 625 for decoupler applications.

  1. Structures and thermodynamics of the mixed alkali alanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graetz, J.; Lee, Y.; Reilly, J. J.; Park, S.; Vogt, T.

    2005-05-01

    The thermodynamics and structural properties of the hexahydride alanates (M2M'AlH6) with the elpasolite structure have been investigated. A series of mixed alkali alanates ( Na2LiAlH6, K2LiAlH6 , and K2NaAlH6 ) were synthesized and found to reversibly absorb and desorb hydrogen without the need for a catalyst. Pressure-composition isotherms were measured to investigate the thermodynamics of the absorption and desorption reactions with hydrogen. Isotherms for catalyzed (4 mol% TiCl3 ) and uncatalyzed Na2LiAlH6 exhibited an increase in kinetics, but no change in the bulk thermodynamics with the addition of a dopant. A structural analysis using synchrotron x-ray diffraction showed that these compounds favor the Fm3¯m space group with the smaller ion (M') occupying an octahedral site. These results demonstrate that appropriate cation substitutions can be used to stabilize or destabilize the material and may provide an avenue to improving the unfavorable thermodynamics of a number of materials with promising gravimetric hydrogen densities.

  2. Current and potential distributions in corrosion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Smyrl, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    Current and potential distribution calculations in corrosion are reviewed. The mathematical methods used, and the specific results for galvanic corrosion, cathodic protection, and localized corrosion are described.

  3. Determination of the common and rare alkalies in mineral analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.C.; Stevens, R.E.

    1934-01-01

    Methods are described which afford a determination of each member of the alkali group and are successful in dealing with the quantities of the rare alkalies found in rocks and minerals. The procedures are relatively rapid and based chiefly on the use of chloroplatinic acid, absolute alcohol and ether, and ammonium sulfate. The percentages of all the alkalies found in a number of minerals are given.

  4. Environmental mercury contamination around a chlor-alkali plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lodenius, M.; Tulisalo, E.

    1984-04-01

    The chlor-alkali industry is one of the most important emitters of mercury. This metal is effectively spread from chlor-alkali plants into the atmosphere and it has been reported that only a few percent of the mercury emissions are deposited locally the major part spreading over very large areas. The purpose of this investigation was to study the spreading of mercury up to 100 km from a chlor-alkali plant using three different biological indicators.

  5. Solvation at nanoscale: Alkali-halides in water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Partanen, Leena; Mikkelae, Mikko-Heikki; Huttula, Marko; Tchaplyguine, Maxim; Zhang Chaofan; Andersson, Tomas; Bjoerneholm, Olle

    2013-01-28

    The solvation of alkali-halides in water clusters at nanoscale is studied by photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The Na 2p, K 3p, Cl 2p, Br 3d, and I 4d core level binding energies have been measured for salt-containing water clusters. The results have been compared to those of alkali halide clusters and the dilute aqueous salt solutions. It is found that the alkali halides dissolve in small water clusters as ions.

  6. BWR steel containment corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.P.; Bagchi, G.

    1996-04-01

    The report describes regulatory actions taken after corrosion was discovered in the drywell at the Oyster Creek Plant and in the torus at the Nine Mile Point 1 Plant. The report describes the causes of corrosion, requirements for monitoring corrosion, and measures to mitigate the corrosive environment for the two plants. The report describes the issuances of generic letters and information notices either to collect information to determine whether the problem is generic or to alert the licensees of similar plants about the existence of such a problem. Implementation of measures to enhance the containment performance under severe accident conditions is discussed. A study by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the performance of a degraded containment under severe accident conditions is summarized. The details of the BNL study are in the appendix to the report.

  7. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  8. Alkali metal compatibility testing of candidate heater head materials for a Stirling engine heat transport system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Jack E.; Hickman, Gary L.; Grobstein, Toni

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe work performed as part of the 25-kWe advanced Stirling conversion system project. Liquid alkali metal compatibility is being assessed in an ongoing test program to evaluate candidate heater head materials and fabrication processes at the temperatures and operating conditions required for Stirling engines. Specific materials under evaluation are alloy 713LC, alloy 713LC coated with nickel aluminide, and Udimet 720, each in combination with Waspaloy. The tests were run at a constant 700 C. A eutectic alloy of sodium and potassium (NaK) was the working fluid. Titanium sheet in the system was shown to be an effective oxygen getter. Metallographic and microchemical examination of material surfaces, joints, and their interfaces revealed little or no corrosion after 1000 h. Tests are in progress, with up to 10,000 h exposure.

  9. Development of laser optogalvanic spectroscopy as a probe of alkali atoms in an MHD environment

    SciTech Connect

    Monts, D.L.; Qian, S.; Cook, R.L.; Shepard, W.S.

    1995-02-01

    Application of Laser Optogalvanic Spectroscopy (LOGS) to MHD combustion systems requires selection of an appropriate alkali atom electronic transition to monitor. These studies suggest that in MHD combustion systems, it is desirable to use cesium, which occurs as an impurity in potassium compounds, as a surrogate for potassium rather than to directly monitor potassium in order to obtain reliable determinations of seed concentration. Studies were also performed to investigate the effect of electrode corrosion on the normalized LOGS signal intensity at a fixed wavelength (578.238 nm). During six-hour experiments in a near-stoichiometric flame, the normalized LOGS signal intensity decreased by 40-50% for a -960 V rod electrode and by 10-20% for a -500 V rod electrode. These changes are attributed to buildup of an oxide coating on the electrode, reducing the collection efficiency of the electrode.

  10. Voltammetric studies of porous molybdenum electrodes for the alkali metal thermoelectric converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Bankston, C. P.; Khanna, S. K.; Cole, T.

    1986-01-01

    Voltammetry of partially oxidized porous molybdenum alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) electrodes from about 600 to 1000 K revealed a series of redox processes within the AMTEC operational voltage range which can be used to establish the electronic and ionic conductivities of these electrodes. Improved estimates of the free energies of formation of Na2Mo3O6, NaMoO2, and Na3MoO4 are obtained. Evidence is provided for the slow corrosive attack by Na2MoO4 on molybdenum. The ionic conductivity of Na2MoO4 is found to be sufficiently large at temperatures of greater than 700 K to explain the observed electrochemical phenomena in addition to the enhanced sodium transport in AMTEC electrodes below the freezing point of Na2MoO4.

  11. Alkali cation specific adsorption onto fcc(111) transition metal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Mills, J N; McCrum, I T; Janik, M J

    2014-07-21

    The presence of alkali cations in electrolyte solutions is known to impact the rate of electrocatalytic reactions, though the mechanism of such impact is not conclusively determined. We use density functional theory (DFT) to examine the specific adsorption of alkali cations to fcc(111) electrode surfaces, as specific adsorption may block catalyst sites or otherwise impact surface catalytic chemistry. Solvation of the cation-metal surface structure was investigated using explicit water models. Computed equilibrium potentials for alkali cation adsorption suggest that alkali and alkaline earth cations will specifically adsorb onto Pt(111) and Pd(111) surfaces in the potential range of hydrogen oxidation and hydrogen evolution catalysis in alkaline solutions.

  12. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Hitchcock, D.C.; Mailhe, C.C.; De Jonghe, L.C.

    1985-07-10

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  13. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Hitchcock, David C.; Mailhe, Catherine C.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    1986-01-01

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  14. In-situ monitoring of undercoating corrosion damage by Direct Optical Interrogation (DOI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Garrity, Meng

    An approach referred to as "Direct Optical Interrogation" (DOI) has been developed as an extension of the thin film pitting approach developed and used by Frankel and others. Samples were prepared by depositing Al and Al-Cu alloy metallizations about 800 nm thick on glass substrates. These metallizations were then coated with various coatings and coating systems. Samples were introduced to aggressive environments and the progression of corrosion of the metallization under the coating was monitored in situ using low power videography. Because metallizations were thin, corrosion quickly penetrated through the metal layer to the glass substrate and then spread laterally. Measurement of the lateral spread of corrosion enabled non-electrochemical assessment of the corrosion kinetics. In Al-Cu thin films, both aged and as-deposited, corrosion sites are irregularly shaped because there is not enough cathodic current to propagate the entire corrosion site margin at equal rates. In a number of cases, corrosion propagates with a filamentary morphology resembling filiform corrosion. Cu played a strong role in determining under coating corrosion morphology and growth kinetics in experiments with Al-Cu thin films substrates. As-deposited Al-Cu metallizations were more corrosion resistant than aged metallization and both were more corrosion resistant than pure Al. Cu-rich dendrites were formed on the corrosion front. Corrosion rate (current density) was calculated using Faraday's law by collecting corrosion site perimeter and bottom area. Systematic exploration of the effects of a chromate and chromate-free conversion coatings, chromate and chromate-free primer coatings and the presence or absence of a polyurethane topcoat confirmed the extraordinary corrosion protection by chromates. A commercial praseodymium-pigmented primer coating was not particularly effective in retarding undercoating corrosion site growth unless paired with a chromate conversion coating. The presence of a

  15. Corrosivity Of Pyrolysis Oils

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, James R; Bestor, Michael A; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Storey, John Morse

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis oils from several sources have been analyzed and used in corrosion studies which have consisted of exposing corrosion coupons and stress corrosion cracking U-bend samples. The chemical analyses have identified the carboxylic acid compounds as well as the other organic components which are primarily aromatic hydrocarbons. The corrosion studies have shown that raw pyrolysis oil is very corrosive to carbon steel and other alloys with relatively low chromium content. Stress corrosion cracking samples of carbon steel and several low alloy steels developed through-wall cracks after a few hundred hours of exposure at 50 C. Thermochemical processing of biomass can produce solid, liquid and/or gaseous products depending on the temperature and exposure time used for processing. The liquid product, known as pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, as produced contains a significant amount of oxygen, primarily as components of water, carboxylic acids, phenols, ketones and aldehydes. As a result of these constituents, these oils are generally quite acidic with a Total Acid Number (TAN) that can be around 100. Because of this acidity, bio-oil is reported to be corrosive to many common structural materials. Despite this corrosive nature, these oils have the potential to replace some imported petroleum. If the more acidic components can be removed from this bio-oil, it is expected that the oil could be blended with crude oil and then processed in existing petroleum refineries. The refinery products could be transported using customary routes - pipelines, barges, tanker trucks and rail cars - without a need for modification of existing hardware or construction of new infrastructure components - a feature not shared by ethanol.

  16. Method for inhibiting corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Stapp, P. R.

    1985-12-03

    A composition comprising the reaction adduct or neutralized product resulting from the reaction of a maleic anhydride and an oil containing a polynuclear aromatic compound is provided which, when applied to a metal surface, forms a corrosion-inhibiting film thereon. The composition is particularly useful in the treatment of down-hole metal surfaces in oil and gas wells to inhibit the corrosion of the metal.

  17. Assessing the effect of cement-steel interface on well casing corrosion in aqueous CO2 environments

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jiabin; Carey, James W; Zhang, Jinsuo

    2010-01-01

    CO{sub 2} leakage is a critical safety concern for geologic storage. In wellbore environments, important leakage paths include the rock-cement and cement-casing interfaces. If the cement-casing interface is filled with escaping CO{sub 2}, the well casing directly contacts the CO{sub 2}. This can cause severe corrosion in the presence of water. This paper studies the effect of steel-cement interface gaps, ranging from 1 mm to 0 um, on casing corrosion. Corrosion kinetics were measured employing electrochemical techniques including linear polarization resistance, open circuit potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that the corrosion of steel is not significant where the gap between steel and cement is small ({le} 100 {micro}m). Corrosion rates are controlled by the diffusion of corrosive species (H{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and H{sup +}) along the interface. In contrast, steel corrosion is severe in a broad gap where the corrosion process is limited only by the reaction kinetics of steel and corrosive species. The threshold leading to severe corrosion in terms of the cement-steel interface size (100 {micro}m) was determined. Our research clarifies a corrosion scenario at the cement-steel interface. Casing steel corrosion is initiated when attacked by corrosive species at the cement-steel interface. For relatively tight interfaces, this results in a slow thinning of the casing and expansion of the interface width. If the gap increases beyond the critical threshold size, the corrosion rate increases significantly, and a potentially damaging cycle of corrosion and interface expansion is developed.

  18. Subtask 12E1: Compatibility of structural materials in liquid alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Rink, D.L.; Haglund, R.; Clark, R.W.

    1995-03-01

    The objectives of this task are to (a) evaluate the chemical compatibility of structural alloys such as V-5 wt.%Cr-5 wt.%Ti alloy and Type 316 stainless steel for application in liquid alkali metals such as lithium and sodium-78 wt.% potassium (NaK) at temperatures that are in the range of interest for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER); (b) evaluate the transfer of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen between structural materials and liquid metals; and (c) evaluate the effects of such transfers on the mechanical and microstructural characteristics of the materials for long-term service in liquid-metal environments. Candidate structural materials are being evaluated for their compatibility, interstitial-element transfer, and corrosion in liquid alkali-metal systems such as lithium and NaK. Type 316 stainless steel and V-5Cr-5Ti coupon specimens with and without prealuminizing treatment have been exposed to NaK and lithium environments of commercial purity for times up to 3768 h at temperatures between 300 and 400{degrees}C. 13 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Cathode architectures for alkali metal / oxygen batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Steven J; Nimon, Vitaliy; De Jonghe, Lutgard C; Volfkovich, Yury; Bograchev, Daniil

    2015-01-13

    Electrochemical energy storage devices, such as alkali metal-oxygen battery cells (e.g., non-aqueous lithium-air cells), have a cathode architecture with a porous structure and pore composition that is tailored to improve cell performance, especially as it pertains to one or more of the discharge/charge rate, cycle life, and delivered ampere-hour capacity. A porous cathode architecture having a pore volume that is derived from pores of varying radii wherein the pore size distribution is tailored as a function of the architecture thickness is one way to achieve one or more of the aforementioned cell performance improvements.

  20. Electrodes For Alkali-Metal Thermoelectric Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Wheeler, Bob L.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Lamb, James L.; Bankston, C. Perry; Cole, Terry

    1989-01-01

    Combination of thin, porous electrode and overlying collector grid reduces internal resistance of alkali-metal thermoelectric converter cell. Low resistance of new electrode and grid boosts power density nearly to 1 W/cm2 of electrode area at typical operating temperatures of 1,000 to 1,300 K. Conductive grid encircles electrode film on alumina tube. Bus wire runs along tube to collect electrical current from grid. Such converters used to transform solar, nuclear, and waste heat into electric power.

  1. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  2. Elucidation of transport mechanism and enhanced alkali ion transference numbers in mixed alkali metal-organic ionic molten salts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangfang; Forsyth, Maria

    2016-07-28

    Mixed salts of Ionic Liquids (ILs) and alkali metal salts, developed as electrolytes for lithium and sodium batteries, have shown a remarkable ability to facilitate high rate capability for lithium and sodium electrochemical cycling. It has been suggested that this may be due to a high alkali metal ion transference number at concentrations approaching 50 mol% Li(+) or Na(+), relative to lower concentrations. Computational investigations for two IL systems illustrate the formation of extended alkali-anion aggregates as the alkali metal ion concentration increases. This tends to favor the diffusion of alkali metal ions compared with other ionic species in electrolyte solutions; behavior that has recently been reported for Li(+) in a phosphonium ionic liquid, thus an increasing alkali transference number. The mechanism of alkali metal ion diffusion via this extended coordination environment present at high concentrations is explained and compared to the dynamics at lower concentrations. Heterogeneous alkali metal ion dynamics are also evident and, somewhat counter-intuitively, it appears that the faster ions are those that are generally found clustered with the anions. Furthermore these fast alkali metal ions appear to correlate with fastest ionic liquid solvent ions. PMID:27375042

  3. Guanidine hydrochloride-induced alkali molten globule model of horse ferrocytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rishu; Kaur, Sandeep; Kumar, Rajesh

    2013-02-01

    This article compares structural, kinetic and thermodynamic properties of previously unknown guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl)-induced alkali molten globule (MG) state of horse 'ferrocytochrome c' (ferrocyt c) with the known NaCl-induced alkali-MG state of ferrocyt c. It is well known that Cl(-) arising from GdnHCl refolds and stabilizes the acid-denatured protein to MG state. We demonstrate that the GdnH(+) arising from GdnHCl (≤0.2 M) also transforms the base-denatured CO-liganded ferrocyt c (carbonmonoxycyt c) to MG state by making the electrostatic interactions to the negative charges of the protein. Structural and molecular properties extracted from the basic spectroscopic (circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence, FTIR and NMR) experiments suggest that the GdnH(+)- and Na(+)-induced MG states of base-denatured carbonmonoxycyt c are molecular compact states containing native-like secondary structures and disordered tertiary structures. Kinetic experiments involving the measurement of the CO association to the alkaline ferrocyt c in the presence of different GdnHCl and NaCl concentrations indicate that the Na(+)-induced MG state is more constrained relative to that of GdnH(+)-induced MG state. Analyses of thermal (near UV-CD) denaturation curves of the base-denatured protein in the presence of different GdnHCl and NaCl concentration also indicate that the Na(+)-induced MG state is thermally more stable than the GdnH(+)-induced MG state.

  4. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides.

    PubMed

    Krzton-Maziopa, A; Svitlyk, V; Pomjakushina, E; Puzniak, R; Conder, K

    2016-07-27

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2-y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations. PMID:27248118

  5. Durability of Alkali Activated Blast Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, K.; Alharbi, N.; Matheu, P. S.; Varela, B.; Hailstone, R.

    2015-11-01

    The alkali activation of blast furnace slag has the potential to reduce the environmental impact of cementitious materials and to be applied in geographic zones where weather is a factor that negatively affects performance of materials based on Ordinary Portland Cement. The scientific literature provides many examples of alkali activated slag with high compressive strengths; however research into the durability and resistance to aggressive environments is still necessary for applications in harsh weather conditions. In this study two design mixes of blast furnace slag with mine tailings were activated with a potassium based solution. The design mixes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, BET analysis and compressive strength testing. Freeze-thaw testing up to 100 freeze-thaw cycles was performed in 10% road salt solution. Our findings included compressive strength of up to 100 MPa after 28 days of curing and 120 MPa after freeze-thaw testing. The relationship between pore size, compressive strength, and compressive strength after freeze-thaw was explored.

  6. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides.

    PubMed

    Krzton-Maziopa, A; Svitlyk, V; Pomjakushina, E; Puzniak, R; Conder, K

    2016-07-27

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2-y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations.

  7. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzton-Maziopa, A.; Svitlyk, V.; Pomjakushina, E.; Puzniak, R.; Conder, K.

    2016-07-01

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2-y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations.

  8. Packing transition in alkali metallic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, R.; Sung, Ming Wen; Weare, John H.

    1996-03-01

    Small metallic clusters form a local geometric configuration quite different from the bulk crystals. As the cluster size increases, several transitions in the local coordination take place before the bulk structure appears. These transitions involve change in the nature of chemical bonds. We have systematically investigated the structural transition of various alkali metal clusters including binary compounds using an ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. Among them, Li clusters exhibit unusual transition in their packing pattern. Small lithium clusters (N <= 21) form open structures based on a ``solvation shell''.(M. Sung, R. Kawai, and J. Weare, Phys. Rev. Lett. 73) (1994) 3552., which is quite different from other alkali metal clusters. The bonding of these small clusters is partially ionic. Above N=25, a close-packed structure is established. However, the local configuration still differ from that of the bulk crystal. As the size further increases, the ionic nature decreases and the system reaches another close-packed structure based on the Mackay icosahedron, which is similar to the bulk crystal structure.

  9. Decalcification resistance of alkali-activated slag.

    PubMed

    Komljenović, Miroslav M; Baščarević, Zvezdana; Marjanović, Nataša; Nikolić, Violeta

    2012-09-30

    This paper analyses the effects of decalcification in concentrated 6M NH(4)NO(3) solution on mechanical and microstructural properties of alkali-activated slag (AAS). Portland-slag cement (CEM II/A-S 42.5 N) was used as a benchmark material. Decalcification process led to a decrease in strength, both in AAS and in CEM II, and this effect was more pronounced in CEM II. The decrease in strength was explicitly related to the decrease in Ca/Si atomic ratio of C-S-H gel. A very low ratio of Ca/Si ~0.3 in AAS was the consequence of coexistence of C-S-H(I) gel and silica gel. During decalcification of AAS almost complete leaching of sodium and tetrahedral aluminum from C-S-H(I) gel also took place. AAS showed significantly higher resistance to decalcification in relation to the benchmark CEM II due to the absence of portlandite, high level of polymerization of silicate chains, low level of aluminum for silicon substitution in the structure of C-S-H(I), and the formation of protective layer of polymerized silica gel during decalcification process. In stabilization/solidification processes alkali-activated slag represents a more promising solution than Portland-slag cement due to significantly higher resistance to decalcification. PMID:22818592

  10. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzton-Maziopa, A.; Svitlyk, V.; Pomjakushina, E.; Puzniak, R.; Conder, K.

    2016-07-01

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2‑y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations.

  11. Formation of lysinoalanine in egg white under alkali treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Luo, Xuying; Li, Jianke; Xu, Mingsheng; Tu, Yonggang

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the formation mechanism of lysinoalanine (LAL) in eggs during the alkali treatment process, NaOH was used for the direct alkali treatment of egg white, ovalbumin, and amino acids; in addition, the amount of LAL formed during the alkali treatment process was measured. The results showed that the alkali treatment resulted in the formation of LAL in the egg white. The LAL content increased with increasing pH and temperature, with the LAL content first increasing and then leveling off with increasing time. The amount of LAL formed in the ovalbumin under the alkali treatment condition accounted for approximately 50.51% to 58.68% of the amount of LAL formed in the egg white. Thus, the LAL formed in the ovalbumin was the main source for the LAL in the egg white during the alkali treatment process. Under the alkali treatment condition, free L-serine, L-cysteine, and L-cystine reacted with L-lysine to form LAL; therefore, they are the precursor amino acids of LAL formed in eggs during the alkali treatment process. PMID:26772660

  12. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  13. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  14. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  15. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  16. Self-discharge in bimetallic cells containing alkali metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, M. S.; Hesson, J. C.; Shimotake, H.

    1969-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of thermally regenerative bimetallic cells with alkali metal anodes shows a relation between the current drawn and the rate of discharge under open-circuit conditions. The self-discharge rate of the cell is due to the dissolution and ionization of alkali metal atoms in the fused-salt electrolyte

  17. COMPLEX FLUORIDES OF PLUTONIUM AND AN ALKALI METAL

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1960-08-01

    A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides. such as KPuF/sub 5/, KPu/sub 2/F/sub 9/, NaPuF/sub 5/, and RbPuF/sub 5/, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal- fluoride.

  18. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, Wen Y.

    1984-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them (46, 53, 61, 69) with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide (63) to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased (81), preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated (84) to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process (86, 18, 17) where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  19. Corrosion and mechanical behavior of materials for coal gasification applications

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1980-05-01

    A state-of-the-art review is presented on the corrosion and mechanical behavior of materials at elevated temperatures in coal-gasification environments. The gas atmosphere in coal-conversion processes are, in general, complex mixtures which contain sulfur-bearing components (H/sub 2/S, SO/sub 2/, and COS) as well as oxidants (CO/sub 2//CO and H/sub 2/O/H/sub 2/). The information developed over the last five years clearly shows sulfidation to be the major mode of material degradation in these environments. The corrosion behavior of structural materials in complex gas environments is examined to evaluate the interrelationships between gas chemistry, alloy chemistry, temperature, and pressure. Thermodynamic aspects of high-temperature corrosion processes that pertain to coal conversion are discussed, and kinetic data are used to compare the behavior of different commercial materials of interest. The influence of complex gas environments on the mechanical properties such as tensile, stress-rupture, and impact on selected alloys is presented. The data have been analyzed, wherever possible, to examine the role of environment on the property variation. The results from ongoing programs on char effects on corrosion and on alloy protection via coatings, cladding, and weld overlay are presented. Areas of additional research with particular emphasis on the development of a better understanding of corrosion processes in complex environments and on alloy design for improved corrosion resistance are discussed. 54 references, 65 figures, 24 tables.

  20. Impact of Soil Composition and Electrochemistry on Corrosion of Rock-cut Slope Nets along Railway Lines in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiao; Chen, Zhaoqiong; Ai, Yingwei; Xiao, Jingyao; Pan, Dandan; Li, Wei; Huang, Zhiyu; Wang, Yumei

    2015-10-01

    Taking the slope of Suiyu Railway to study, the research separately studied soil resistivity, soil electrochemistry (corrosion potential, oxidization reduction potential, electric potential gradient and pH), soil anions (total soluble salt, Cl-, SO42- and ), and soil nutrition (moisture content, organic matter, total nitrogen, alkali-hydrolysable nitrogen, available phosphorus, and available potassium) at different slope levels, and conducted corrosion grade evaluation on artificial soil according to its single index and comprehensive indexes. Compared with other factors, water has the biggest impact on the corrosion of slope protection net, followed by anion content. Total soluble salt has the moderate impact on the corrosion of slope protection net, and stray current has the moderate impact on the corrosion of mid-slope protection net. Comprehensive evaluation on the corrosive degree of soil samples indicates that the corrosion of upper slope is moderate, and the corrosion of mid-slope and lower slope is strong. Organic matter in soil is remarkably relevant to electric potential gradient. Available nitrogen, available potassium and available phosphorus are remarkably relevant to anions. The distribution of soil nutrient is indirectly relevant to slope type.

  1. Impact of Soil Composition and Electrochemistry on Corrosion of Rock-cut Slope Nets along Railway Lines in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiao; Chen, Zhaoqiong; Ai, Yingwei; Xiao, Jingyao; Pan, Dandan; Li, Wei; Huang, Zhiyu; Wang, Yumei

    2015-01-01

    Taking the slope of Suiyu Railway to study, the research separately studied soil resistivity, soil electrochemistry (corrosion potential, oxidization reduction potential, electric potential gradient and pH), soil anions (total soluble salt, Cl−, SO42− and ), and soil nutrition (moisture content, organic matter, total nitrogen, alkali-hydrolysable nitrogen, available phosphorus, and available potassium) at different slope levels, and conducted corrosion grade evaluation on artificial soil according to its single index and comprehensive indexes. Compared with other factors, water has the biggest impact on the corrosion of slope protection net, followed by anion content. Total soluble salt has the moderate impact on the corrosion of slope protection net, and stray current has the moderate impact on the corrosion of mid-slope protection net. Comprehensive evaluation on the corrosive degree of soil samples indicates that the corrosion of upper slope is moderate, and the corrosion of mid-slope and lower slope is strong. Organic matter in soil is remarkably relevant to electric potential gradient. Available nitrogen, available potassium and available phosphorus are remarkably relevant to anions. The distribution of soil nutrient is indirectly relevant to slope type. PMID:26450811

  2. Impact of Soil Composition and Electrochemistry on Corrosion of Rock-cut Slope Nets along Railway Lines in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiao; Chen, Zhaoqiong; Ai, Yingwei; Xiao, Jingyao; Pan, Dandan; Li, Wei; Huang, Zhiyu; Wang, Yumei

    2015-10-09

    Taking the slope of Suiyu Railway to study, the research separately studied soil resistivity, soil electrochemistry (corrosion potential, oxidization reduction potential, electric potential gradient and pH), soil anions (total soluble salt, Cl(-), SO4(2-) and ), and soil nutrition (moisture content, organic matter, total nitrogen, alkali-hydrolysable nitrogen, available phosphorus, and available potassium) at different slope levels, and conducted corrosion grade evaluation on artificial soil according to its single index and comprehensive indexes. Compared with other factors, water has the biggest impact on the corrosion of slope protection net, followed by anion content. Total soluble salt has the moderate impact on the corrosion of slope protection net, and stray current has the moderate impact on the corrosion of mid-slope protection net. Comprehensive evaluation on the corrosive degree of soil samples indicates that the corrosion of upper slope is moderate, and the corrosion of mid-slope and lower slope is strong. Organic matter in soil is remarkably relevant to electric potential gradient. Available nitrogen, available potassium and available phosphorus are remarkably relevant to anions. The distribution of soil nutrient is indirectly relevant to slope type.

  3. Corrosion testing using isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Hohorst, Frederick A.

    1995-12-05

    A method for determining the corrosion behavior of a material with respect to a medium in contact with the material by: implanting a substantially chemically inert gas in a matrix so that corrosion experienced by the material causes the inert gas to enter the medium; placing the medium in contact with the material; and measuring the amount of inert gas which enters the medium. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested, composed of: a body of the material, which body has a surface to be contacted by the medium; and a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the body to a depth below the surface. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested, composed of: a substrate of material which is easily corroded by the medium, the substrate having a surface; a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the substrate; and a sheet of the material whose resistance to corrosion is to be tested, the sheet being disposed against the surface of the substrate and having a defined thickness.

  4. Corrosion testing using isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Hohorst, F.A.

    1995-12-05

    A method is described for determining the corrosion behavior of a material with respect to a medium in contact with the material by: implanting a substantially chemically inert gas in a matrix so that corrosion experienced by the material causes the inert gas to enter the medium; placing the medium in contact with the material; and measuring the amount of inert gas which enters the medium. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested is described composed of: a body of the material, which body has a surface to be contacted by the medium; and a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the body to a depth below the surface. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested is described composed of: a substrate of material which is easily corroded by the medium, the substrate having a surface; a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the substrate; and a sheet of the material whose resistance to corrosion is to be tested, the sheet being disposed against the surface of the substrate and having a defined thickness. 3 figs.

  5. Effect of Nano-crystalline Ceramic Coats Produced by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation on Corrosion Behavior of AA5083 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayananth, T.; Muthupandi, V.; Rao, S. R. Koteswara

    2010-10-01

    High specific strength offered by aluminum and magnesium alloys makes them desirable in modern transportation industries. Often the restrictions imposed on the usage of these alloys are due to their poor tribological and corrosion properties. However, their corrosion properties can be further enhanced by synthesizing ceramic coating on the substrate through Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) process. In this study, nano-crystalline alumina coatings were formed on the surface of AA5083 aluminum alloy test coupons using PEO process in aqueous alkali-silicate electrolyte with and without addition of sodium aluminate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies showed that the crystallite size varied between 38 and 46 nm and α- and γ- alumina were the dominant phases present in the coatings. Corrosion studies by potentiodynamic polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl revealed that the electrolyte composition has an influence on the corrosion resistance of nano-crystalline oxide layer formed.

  6. Performance of Straight Steel Fibres Reinforced Alkali Activated Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faris, Meor Ahmad; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Nizar Ismail, Khairul; Muniandy, Ratnasamy; Putra Jaya, Ramadhansyah

    2016-06-01

    This paper focus on the performance of alkali activated concrete produced by using fly ash activated by sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. These alkali activated concrete were reinforced with straight steel fibres with different weight percentage starting from 0 % up to 5 %. Chemical composition of raw material in the production alkali activated concrete which is fly ash was first identified by using X-ray fluorescence. Results reveal there have an effect of straight steel fibres inclusion to the alkali activated concrete. Highest compressive strength of alkali activated concrete which is 67.72 MPa was obtained when 3 % of straight fibres were added. As well as flexural strength, highest flexural strength which is 6.78 MPa was obtained at 3 % of straight steel fibres inclusions.

  7. Effects of alkali treatments on Ag nanowire transparent conductive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunho; Kang, Jun-gu; Eom, Tae-yil; Moon, Bongjin; Lee, Hoo-Jeong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we employ various alkali materials (alkali metals with different base strengths, and ammonia gas and solution) to improve the conductivity of silver nanowire (Ag NW)-networked films. The alkali treatment appears to remove the surface oxide and improve the conductivity. When applied with TiO2 nanoparticles, the treatment appears more effective as the alkalis gather around wire junctions and help them weld to each other via heat emitted from the reduction reaction. The ammonia solution treatment is found to be quick and aggressive, damaging the wires severely in the case of excessive treatment. On the other hand, the ammonia gas treatment seems much less aggressive and does not damage the wires even after a long exposure. The results of this study highlight the effectiveness of the alkali treatment in improving of the conductivity of Ag NW-networked transparent conductive films.

  8. Prediction of Corrosion of Alloys in Mixed-Solvent Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Anderko, Andrzej; Wang, Peiming; Young, Robert D.; Riemer, Douglas P.; McKenzie, Patrice; Lencka, Malgorzata M.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Angelini, Peter

    2003-06-05

    systems; (6) Development of fundamentals of a detailed kinetic model of general corrosion, which includes a detailed treatment of local chemistry changes near the metal/solution interface coupled with transport through a liquid layer and solid phases at the interface; (7) Development of parameters for OLI's kinetic model of general corrosion of common engineering alloys in aqueous systems with a variety of solutes. With this model, the users will be able to predict the effect of various process conditions (such as environment composition, temperature, pressure) on the general corrosion of alloys; (8)Comprehensive review of the fundamentals of the models by an Academic Review Panel, which was performed in conjunction with three annual review meetings; (9)Development and commercial release of the Corrosion Analyzer, a Windows software product that encompasses the thermodynamic model, a facility for generating stability diagrams and the model for predicting the rates of general corrosion of selected alloys in aqueous systems.

  9. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  10. Solving A Corrosion Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The corrosion problem, it turned out, stemmed from the process called electrolysis. When two different metals are in contact, an electrical potential is set up between them; when the metals are surrounded by an electrolyte, or a conducting medium, the resulting reaction causes corrosion, often very rapid corrosion. In this case the different metals were the copper grounding system and the ferry's aluminum hull; the dockside salt water in which the hull was resting served as the electrolyte. After identifying the source of the trouble, the Ames engineer provided a solution: a new wire-and-rod grounding system made of aluminum like the ferry's hull so there would no longer be dissimilar metals in contact. Ames research on the matter disclosed that the problem was not unique to the Golden Gate ferries. It is being experienced by many pleasure boat operators who are probably as puzzled about it as was the Golden Gate Transit Authority.

  11. Corrosion Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Russ Braunling

    2004-10-31

    The Corrosion Monitoring System (CMS) program developed and demonstrated a continuously on-line system that provides real-time corrosion information. The program focused on detecting pitting corrosion in its early stages. A new invention called the Intelligent Ultrasonic Probe (IUP) was patented on the program. The IUP uses ultrasonic guided waves to detect small defects and a Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) algorithm to provide an image of the pits. Testing of the CMS demonstrated the capability to detect pits with dimensionality in the sub-millimeter range. The CMS was tested in both the laboratory and in a pulp and paper industrial plant. The system is capable of monitoring the plant from a remote location using the internet.

  12. The mechanism of borosilicate glass corrosion revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Thorsten; Nagel, Thorsten; Kilburn, Matt R.; Janssen, Arne; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Fonseca, Raúl O. C.; Grange, Marion; Nemchin, Alexander A.

    2015-06-01

    Currently accepted mechanistic models describing aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses are based on diffusion-controlled hydrolysis, hydration, ion exchange reactions, and subsequent re-condensation of the hydrolyzed glass network, leaving behind a residual hydrated glass or gel layer. Here, we report results of novel oxygen and silicon isotope tracer experiments with ternary Na borosilicate glasses that can be better explained by a process that involves the congruent dissolution of the glass, which is spatially and temporally coupled to the precipitation and growth of an amorphous silica layer at an inwardly moving reaction interface. Such a process is thermodynamically driven by the solubility difference between the glass and amorphous silica, and kinetically controlled by glass dissolution reactions at the reaction front, which, in turn, are controlled by the transport of water and solute elements through the growing corrosion zone. Understanding the coupling of these reactions is the key to understand the formation of laminar or more complex structural and chemical patterns observed in natural corrosion zones of ancient glasses. We suggest that these coupled processes also have to be considered to realistically model the long-term performance of silicate glasses in aqueous environments.

  13. Elastic properties of alkali-feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waeselmann, N.; Brown, J.; Angel, R. J.; Ross, N.; Kaminsky, W.

    2013-12-01

    New measurements of single crystal elastic moduli for a suite of the alkali feldspars are reported. In order to interpret Earth's seismic structure, knowledge of the elastic properties of constituent minerals is essential. The elasticity of feldspar minerals, despite being the most abundant phase in Earth's crust (estimated to be more than 60%), were previously poorly characterized. All prior seismic and petrologic studies have utilized 50-year-old results, of questionable quality, based on 1-bar measurements on pseudo-single crystals. Alkali-feldspars present a large experimental challenge associated with their structural complexity. In the K-end member (KAlSi3O8) the symmetry is governed by Al/Si ordering, in the Na-end member (NaAlSi3O8) the symmetry is governed by whether or not there is a displacive collapse of the framework independent of the Al/Si ordering. K-feldspars exhibit monoclinic (C2/m) symmetry (necessitating determination of 13 elastic moduli) if disordered and triclinic (C-1) symmetry (21 elastic moduli) if ordered. Exsolution of Na-rich and K-rich phases is ubiquitous in natural samples, making it difficult to find suitable single phase and untwinned samples for study. The small single domain samples selected for this study were previously characterized by x-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis to ensure adequate sample quality. Surface wave velocities were measured on oriented surfaces of natural and synthetic single crystals using impulsively stimulated light scattering. A surface corrugation with a spacing of about 2 microns was impulsively created by the overlap of 100 ps infrared light pulses. The time evolution of the stimulated standing elastic waves was detected by measuring the intensity of diffraction from the surface corrugation of a variably delayed probe pulse. This method allows accurate (better than 0.2%) determination of velocities on samples smaller than 100 microns. The combination of measured surface wave velocities and

  14. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Fronk, Matthew Howard; Borup, Rodney Lynn; Hulett, Jay S.; Brady, Brian K. NY); Cunningham, Kevin M.

    2011-06-07

    A PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements comprising a corrosion-susceptible substrate metal coated with an electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant polymer containing a plurality of electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant filler particles. The substrate may have an oxidizable metal first layer (e.g., stainless steel) underlying the polymer coating.

  15. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Fronk, Matthew Howard; Borup, Rodney Lynn; Hulett, Jay S.; Brady, Brian K.; Cunningham, Kevin M.

    2002-01-01

    A PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements comprising a corrosion-susceptible substrate metal coated with an electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant polymer containing a plurality of electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant filler particles. The substrate may have an oxidizable metal first layer (e.g., stainless steel) underlying the polymer coating.

  16. Alkali oxide-tantalum oxide and alkali oxide-niobium oxide ionic conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, R. S.; Parker, H. S.; Brower, W. S.; Minor, D.

    1974-01-01

    A search was made for new cationic conducting phases in alkali-tantalate and niobate systems. The phase equilibrium diagrams were constructed for the six binary systems Nb2O5-LiNbO3, Nb2O5-NaNbO3, Nb2O5-KNbO3, Ta2O5-NaTaO3, Ta2O5-LiTaO3, and Ta2O5-KTaO3. Various other binary and ternary systems were also examined. Pellets of nineteen phases were evaluated (by the sponsoring agency) by dielectric loss measurements. Attempts were made to grow large crystals of eight different phases. The system Ta2O5-KTaO3 contains at least three phases which showed peaks in dielectric loss vs. temperature. All three contain structures related to the tungsten bronzes with alkali ions in non-stoichiometric crystallographic positions.

  17. Monitoring and Control of Alkali Volatilization and Batch Carryover for Minimization of Particulates and Crown Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    2001-01-01

    New Technology will Allow Glass Manufacturers to Optimize Furnace Conditions. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a continuous monitoring technique that glass manufacturers can use to reduce particulate matter emissions and extend furnace life.

  18. Volcanic Origin of Alkali Halides on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, L.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The recent observation of NaCl (gas) on Io confirms our earlier prediction that NaCl is produced volcanically. Here we extend our calculations by modeling thermochemical equilibrium of O, S, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, F, Cl, Br, and I as a function of temperature and pressure in a Pele-like volcanic gas with O/S/Na/Cl/K = 1.518/1/0.05/0.04/0.005 and CI chondritic ratios of the other (as yet unobserved) alkalis and halogens. For reference, the nominal temperature and pressure for Pele is 1760 plus or minus 210 K and 0.01 bars based on Galileo data and modeling.

  19. Algorithm for evaluation of temperature distribution of a vapor cell in a diode-pumped alkali laser system (part II).

    PubMed

    Han, Juhong; Wang, You; Cai, He; An, Guofei; Zhang, Wei; Xue, Liangping; Wang, Hongyuan; Zhou, Jie; Jiang, Zhigang; Gao, Ming

    2015-04-01

    With high efficiency and small thermally-induced effects in the near-infrared wavelength region, a diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL) is regarded as combining the major advantages of solid-state lasers and gas-state lasers and obviating their main disadvantages at the same time. Studying the temperature distribution in the cross-section of an alkali-vapor cell is critical to realize high-powered DPAL systems for both static and flowing states. In this report, a theoretical algorithm has been built to investigate the features of a flowing-gas DPAL system by uniting procedures in kinetics, heat transfer, and fluid dynamic together. The thermal features and output characteristics have been simultaneously obtained for different gas velocities. The results have demonstrated the great potential of DPALs in the extremely high-powered laser operation.

  20. Cerium-doped mixed-alkali rare-earth double-phosphate scintillators for thermal neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, John S.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Spurrier, Merry; Szupryczynski, Piotr; Melcher, Charles L.

    2007-08-01

    Previous measurements of the scintillation properties of members of the single-alkali, rare-earth double-phosphate family have demonstrated high light output and fast decay times when exposed to ionizing radiation. Because of the ease with which the alkali constituents (Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) of the crystal matrix may be interchanged (e.g. K 2CsLu(PO 4) 2 and CsLi 2Lu(PO 4) 2), the rare-earth double-phosphate family of scintillators provides an ideal system for the study of matrix effects on scintillation efficiency and kinetics. New members of the rare-earth double-phosphate family have been synthesized by high-temperature flux growth. These new samples, represented by the general formula (A,B) 3Lu(PO 4) 2:Ce where A and B are alkali elements, incorporate lithium as one of the components and varying levels of Ce doping. Characteristics important to gamma-ray and thermal neutron excitation are calculated for three model systems which incorporate total lithium-ion substitution. Light output, scintillation decay times, and photoluminescence measurements for the most promising of the samples to date are reported. Future work includes (1) synthesis of mixed-alkali scandium and yttrium double-phosphates in which Li ions are substitutional in the structure with varying lithium-ion content up to and including total lithium-ion substitution on the alkali ion site and (2) measurements of light output and pulse shape using thermal neutron excitation.

  1. Cerium-doped mixed-alkali rare-earth double-phosphate scintillators for x- and gamma-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, John S.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Spurrier, Merry; Szupryczynski, Piotr; Melcher, Charles L.

    2006-08-01

    Previous measurements of the scintillation properties of members of the single-alkali, rare-earth double-phosphate family have demonstrated high light output and fast decay times when exposed to ionizing radiation. Cerium-doped K 3Lu(PO 4) II and Rb 3Lu(PO 4) II scintillators have exhibited light outputs of 32,500 and 28,200 photons/MeV respectively and decay times of 37 and 34 nanoseconds respectively. Because of the ease with which the alkali constituents (Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) of the crystal matrix may be interchanged (e.g. K IICsLu(PO 4) II and CsLi IILu(PO 4) II), the rare-earth double-phosphate family of scintillators provides an ideal system for the study of matrix effects on scintillation efficiency and kinetics. In order to better understand and to ultimately optimize the scintillation properties of these scintillators, new members of the rare-earth double-phosphate family have been synthesized by high temperature flux growth. These new samples, represented by the general formula (A,B) 3Lu(PO 4) II:Ce where A and B are alkali elements, incorporate mixed alkali rather than single alkali components and varying levels of Ce doping. Light output, scintillation decay times, and photoluminescence measurements for the most promising of the samples to date are reported. In this paper, we identify promising samples and results that clearly demonstrate outstanding light output, up to 270% of BGO, fast decay times, 29-39 nanoseconds, and peak emission wavelengths of ~ 400 nm for many of the samples.

  2. Corrosion and erosion in PFBC environments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McCarron, R.L.

    1984-07-01

    This report summarizes work on the EPRI RP 979-14 Program, PFB Materials Parameter Tests. Two nominally 200-hour tests were conducted in the General Electric Company's Pressurized Fluidized Bed (PFB) Coal Combustion Facility located in Malta, NY. The purpose of the tests was to evaluate the influence of bed operating temperature and dolomite composition on the degradation of gas turbine vane and blade base alloys and protective coating/cladding systems in the effluent from a PFB. Operating conditions were as follows: (1) 1710 to 1770/sup 0/F bed temperature and Pfizer dolomite (0.1 wt % sodium plus potassium); and (2) 1630 to 1690/sup 0/F bed temperature and Tymochtee dolomite (0.9 wt % sodium plus potassium). Brookville seam coal with 4.5 wt % sulfur, 0.3 wt % alkali, and 0.17 wt % chlorine was used in both tests. Bare nickel and cobalt-base vane and blade alloys were susceptible to hot corrosion over the entire temperature range investigated, 1100 to 1600/sup 0/F. CoCrAlY and FeCrAlY overlay coatings showed good corrosion resistance at temperatures above 1450/sup 0/F, but were susceptible to pitting attack at lower temperatures, while a CoNiCrAlY cladding experienced hot corrosion attack at all temperatures. A platinum-aluminide diffusion coating showed excellent corosion resistance at all temperatures. 8 references, 31 figures, 15 tables.

  3. Fabrication of Test Tubes for Coal Ash Corrosion Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.; Judkins, R.R.; Sikka, V.K.; Swindeman, R.W.; Wright, I.G.

    1999-05-11

    This paper deals with the fabrication of tube sections of four alloys for incorporating into test sections to be assembled by Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) for installation at Ohio Edison Power, Niles Plant. The primary purpose of the installation was to determine the corrosion behavior of ten different alloys for flue gas corrosion. Ohio Edison Power, Niles Plant is burning an Ohio coal containing approximately 3.4% S (dry basis) and approximately 0.4% alkali which causes chronic coal ash corrosion of the unit�s superheater tubing. The 2.5-in.-OD x 0.4in.-wall x 6-in-long sections of four alloys {type 304H coated with Fe3Al alloy FAS [developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)], 310 + Ta, modified 800H, and Thermie alloy} were fabricated at ORNL. Each alloy tubing was characterized in terms of chemical analysis and microstructure. The machined tubes of each of the alloys were inspected and shipped on time for incorporation into the test loop fabricated at B&W. Among the alloys fabricated, Thermie was the hardest to extrude and machine.

  4. Inverse Kinetics

    2000-03-20

    Given the space-independent, one energy group reactor kinetics equations and the initial conditions, this prgram determines the time variation of reactivity required to produce the given input of flux-time data.

  5. Reactions of plutonium dioxide with water and oxygen-hydrogen mixtures: Mechanisms for corrosion of uranium and plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Haschke, John M.; Allen, Thomas H.; Morales, Luis A.

    1999-06-18

    Investigation of the interactions of plutonium dioxide with water vapor and with an oxygen-hydrogen mixture show that the oxide is both chemically reactive and catalytically active. Correspondence of the chemical behavior with that for oxidation of uranium in moist air suggests that similar catalytic processes participate in the mechanism of moisture-enhanced corrosion of uranium and plutonium. Evaluation of chemical and kinetic data for corrosion of the metals leads to a comprehensive mechanism for corrosion in dry air, water vapor, and moist air. Results are applied in confirming that the corrosion rate of Pu in water vapor decreases sharply between 100 and 200 degrees C.

  6. Copper corrosion in coastal Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S. Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is studying the atmospheric corrosion performance of copper and other metals along the Oregon coast. Only the copper results will be presented in this paper. Atmospheric corrosion measurements of copper samples were made at seven bridges, eight coastal communities, and three inland reference sites to quantify and understand the effect of high chloride environments on the corrosion performance of copper. The materials were atmospherically exposed for 1, 2, and 3 years to examine the effects of sheltering, orientation, distance from the ocean, and coastal microclimates on the rate of corrosion and the composition of the corrosion film.

  7. Ultrasonic coal washing to leach alkali elements from coals.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, S; Reddy, V Midhun; Nagarajan, R

    2015-11-01

    Deposition of fly ash particles onto heat-transfer surfaces is often one of the reasons for unscheduled shut-downs of coal-fired boilers. Fouling deposits encountered in convective sections of a boiler are characterized by arrival of ash particles in solidified (solid) state. Fouling is most frequently caused by condensation and chemical reaction of alkali vapors with the deposited ash particles creating a wet surface conducive to collect impacting ash particles. Hence, the amount of alkali elements present in coals, which, in turn, is available in the flue gas as condensable vapors, determines the formation and growth of fouling deposits. In this context, removal of alkali elements becomes vital when inferior coals having high-ash content are utilized for power generation. With the concept of reducing alkali elements present in a coal entering the combustor, whereby the fouling deposits can either be minimized or be weakened due to absence of alkali gluing effect, the ultrasonic leaching of alkali elements from coals is investigated in this study. Ultrasonic water-washing and chemical-washing, in comparison with agitation, are studied in order to estimate the intensification of the alkali removal process by sonication. PMID:26186840

  8. Alkali-activated cementitious materials: Mechanisms, microstructure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weimin

    The goal of this study was to examine the activation reaction, microstructure, properties, identify the mechanisms of activation, and achieve an enhanced understanding of activation processes occurring during the synthesis of alkali activated cementitious materials (AAC). The discussions classify the following categories. (1) alkali activated slag cement; (2) alkali activated portland-slag cement; (3) alkali activated fly ash-slag cement; (4) alkali activated pozzolana-lime cement; (5) alkali activated pozzolana cement. The activators involved are NaOH, KOH; Nasb2SOsb4;\\ Nasb2COsb3;\\ CaSOsb4, and soluble silicate of sodium and potassium. The effect of alkali activation on the microstructure of these materials were analyzed at the micro-nanometer scale by SEM, EDS, ESEM, and TEM. Also sp{29}Si and sp{27}Al MAS-NMR, IR, Raman, TGA, and DTA were performed to characterize the phase in these systems. Slag, fly ash, silica fume, as well as blended cements containing mixtures of these and other components were characterized. A set of ordinary portland cement paste samples served as a control. This study confirmed that AAC materials have great potential because they could generate very early high strength, greater durability and high performance. Among the benefits to be derived from this research is a better understanding of the factors that control concrete properties when using AAC materials, and by controlling the chemistry and processing to produce desired microstructures and properties, as well as their durability.

  9. Controlled in-situ dissolution of an alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jeffrey Donald; Dooley, Kirk John; Tolman, David Donald

    2012-09-11

    A method for the controllable dissolution of one or more alkali metals from a vessel containing a one or more alkali metals and/or one or more partially passivated alkali metals. The vessel preferably comprising a sodium, NaK or other alkali metal-cooled nuclear reactor that has been used. The alkali metal, preferably sodium, potassium or a combination thereof, in the vessel is exposed to a treatment liquid, preferably an acidic liquid, more preferably citric acid. Preferably, the treatment liquid is maintained in continuous motion relative to any surface of unreacted alkali metal with which the treatment liquid is in contact. The treatment liquid is preferably pumped into the vessel containing the one or more alkali metals and the resulting fluid is extracted and optionally further processed. Preferably, the resulting off-gases are processed by an off-gas treatment system and the resulting liquids are processed by a liquid disposal system. In one preferred embodiment, an inert gas is pumped into the vessel along with the treatment liquid.

  10. Alkali elemental and potassium isotopic compositions of Semarkona chondrules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, C.M. O'D.; Grossman, J.N.

    2005-01-01

    We report measurements of K isotope ratios in 28 Semarkona chondrules with a wide range of petrologic types and bulk compositions as well as the compositions of CPX-mesostasis pairs in 17 type I Semarkona chondrules, including two chondrules with radial alkali zonation and 19 type II chondrules. Despite the wide range in K/Al ratios, no systematic variations in K isotopic compositions were found. Semarkona chondrules do not record a simple history of Rayleigh-type loss of K. Experimentally determined evaporation rates suggest that considerable alkali evaporation would have occurred during chondrule formation. Nevertheless, based on Na CPX-mesostasis distribution coefficients, the alkali contents of the cores of most chondrules in Semarkona were probably established at the time of final crystallization. However, Na CPX-mesostasis distribution coefficients also show that alkali zonation in type I Semarkona chondrules was produced by entry of alkalis after solidification, probably during parent body alteration. This alkali metasomatism may have gone to completion in some chondrules. Our preferred explanation for the lack of systematic isotopic enrichments, even in alkali depleted type I chondrule cores, is that they exchanged with the ambient gas as they cooled. ?? The Meteoritical Society, 2005.

  11. Mullite coatings for corrosion protection of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Mulpuri, R.; Sarin, V.K.

    1995-08-01

    SiC based ceramics have been identified as the leading candidate materials for elevated temperature applications in harsh oxidation/corrosion environments. It has been established that a protective coating can be effectively used to avoid problems with excessive oxidation and hot corrosion. However, to date, no coating configuration has been developed that can satisfy the stringent requirements imposed by such applications. Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) mullite coatings due to their desirable properties of toughness, corrosion resistance, and a good coefficient of thermal expansion match with SiC are being investigated as a potential candidate. Since mullite has never been successfully grown via CVD, the thermodynamics and kinetics of its formation were initially established and used as a guideline in determining the initial process conditions. Process optimization was carried out using an iterative process of theoretical analysis and experimental work coupled with characterization and testing. The results of theoretical analysis and the CVD formation characteristics of mullite are presented.

  12. Corrosion protection by anaerobiosis.

    PubMed

    Volkland, H P; Harms, H; Wanner; Zehnder, A J

    2001-01-01

    Biofilm-forming bacteria can protect mild (unalloyed) steel from corrosion. Mild steel coupons incubated with Rhodoccocus sp. strain C125 and Pseudomonas putida mt2 in an aerobic phosphate-buffered medium containing benzoate as carbon and energy source, underwent a surface reaction leading to the formation of a corrosion-inhibiting vivianite layer [Fe3(PO4)2]. Electrochemical potential (E) measurements allowed us to follow the buildup of the vivianite cover. The presence of sufficient metabolically active bacteria at the steel surface resulted in an E decrease to -510 mV, the potential of free iron, and a continuous release of ferrous iron. Part of the dissolved iron precipitated as vivianite in a compact layer of two to three microns in thickness. This layer prevented corrosion of mild steel for over two weeks, even in a highly corrosive medium. A concentration of 20 mM phosphate in the medium was found to be a prerequisite for the formation of the vivianite layer.

  13. Corrosion protection of SiC-based ceramics with CVD mullite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, M.L.; Sarin, V.K.

    1997-12-01

    For the first time, crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited on SiC substrates to enhance its corrosion and oxidation resistance. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations have been utilized to produce mullite coatings with a variety of growth rates, compositions, and morphologies. The flexibility of processing can be exploited to produce coated ceramics with properties tailored to specific applications and varied corrosive environments.

  14. Electrochemical cell utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Virkar, Anil V.; Miller, Gerald R.

    1983-11-04

    An improved electrochemical cell comprising an additive-modified molten alkali metal electrode-reactant and/or electrolyte is disclosed. Various electrochemical cells employing a molten alkali metal, e.g., sodium, electrode in contact with a cationically conductive ceramic membrane experience a lower resistance and a lower temperature coefficient of resistance whenever small amounts of selenium are present at the interface of the electrolyte and the molten alkali metal. Further, cells having small amounts of selenium present at the electrolyte-molten metal interface exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte under long term cycling conditions.

  15. Bilayer resist system utilizing alkali-developable organosilicon positive photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nate, Kazuo; Mizushima, Akiko; Sugiyama, Hisashi

    1991-06-01

    A bi-layer resist system utilizing an alkali-developable organosilicon positive photoresist (OSPR) has been developed. The composite prepared from an alkali-soluble organosilicon polymer, poly(p- hydroxybenzylsilsesquioxane) and naphthoquinone diazide becomes a alkali-developable positive photoresist which is sensitive to UV (i line - g line) region, and exhibited high oxygen reactive ion etching (O2 RIE) resistance. The sensitivity and the resolution of OSPR are almost the same as those of conventional novolac-based positive photoresists. The bi-layer resist system utilizing OSPR as the top imaging layer gave fine patterns of underlayers with high aspect ratio easily.

  16. Increasing Class C fly ash reduces alkali silica reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, J.K.

    2007-07-01

    Contrary to earlier studies, it has been found that incremental additions of Class C fly ash do reduce alkali silica reactivity (ASR), in highly reactive, high alkali concrete mixes. AST can be further reduced by substituting 5% metakaolin or silica fume for the aggregate in concrete mixes with high (more than 30%) Class C fly ash substitution. The paper reports results of studies using Class C fly ash from the Labadie Station plant in Missouri which typically has between 1.3 and 1.45% available alkalis by ASTM C311. 7 figs.

  17. Controlling the corrosion and cathodic activation of magnesium via microalloying additions of Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R. L.; Hurley, M. F.; Kvryan, A.; Williams, G.; Scully, J. R.; Birbilis, N.

    2016-06-01

    The evolution of corrosion morphology and kinetics for magnesium (Mg) have been demonstrated to be influenced by cathodic activation, which implies that the rate of the cathodic partial reaction is enhanced as a result of anodic dissolution. This phenomenon was recently demonstrated to be moderated by the use of arsenic (As) alloying as a poison for the cathodic reaction, leading to significantly improved corrosion resistance. The pursuit of alternatives to toxic As is important as a means to imparting a technologically safe and effective corrosion control method for Mg (and its alloys). In this work, Mg was microalloyed with germanium (Ge), with the aim of improving corrosion resistance by retarding cathodic activation. Based on a combined analysis herein, we report that Ge is potent in supressing the cathodic hydrogen evolution reaction (reduction of water) upon Mg, improving corrosion resistance. With the addition of Ge, cathodic activation of Mg subject to cyclic polarisation was also hindered, with beneficial implications for future Mg electrodes.

  18. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    SciTech Connect

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80{degrees}C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either {open_quotes}satisfactory{close_quotes} (2-20 mpy) or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment.

  19. Electric field-induced softening of alkali silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, C.; Heffner, W.; Jain, H.; Tessarollo, R.; Raj, R.

    2015-11-02

    Motivated by the advantages of two-electrode flash sintering over normal sintering, we have investigated the effect of an external electric field on the viscosity of glass. The results show remarkable electric field-induced softening (EFIS), as application of DC field significantly lowers the softening temperature of glass. To establish the origin of EFIS, the effect is compared for single vs. mixed-alkali silicate glasses with fixed mole percentage of the alkali ions such that the mobility of alkali ions is greatly reduced while the basic network structure does not change much. The sodium silicate and lithium-sodium mixed alkali silicate glasses were tested mechanically in situ under compression in external electric field ranging from 0 to 250 V/cm in specially designed equipment. A comparison of data for different compositions indicates a complex mechanical response, which is observed as field-induced viscous flow due to a combination of Joule heating, electrolysis and dielectric breakdown.

  20. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, M.M.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.

    1995-08-22

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  1. Alkali activation of halloysite for adsorption and release of ofloxacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Junping; Wang, Aiqin

    2013-12-01

    Halloysite nanotubes are promising vehicles for the controlled release of drug molecules. Here, we systematically investigated the effects of alkali activation on the physicochemical properties, structure and morphology of halloysite nanotubes by XRD, FTIR, SEM and TEM, etc. Afterwards, the adsorption and in vitro release properties of halloysite for cationic ofloxacin (OFL) were evaluated. The results indicate that alkali activation dissolves amorphous aluminosilicate, free silica and alumina, which results in the increase in pore volume and pore size. OFL is adsorbed onto halloysite via electrostatic interaction and complexation. Alkali activation could increase the adsorption capacity of halloysite for OFL and prolong release of the adsorbed OFL compared with the natural halloysite. Thus, alkali activation of halloysite is an effective protocol to improve the adsorption and prolong release for cationic drug molecules.

  2. Hall Determination of Atomic Radii of Alkali Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    I will propose here an alternative method for determining atomic radii of alkali metals based on the Hall measurements of their free electron densities and the knowledge of their crystal structure. (Contains 2 figures.)

  3. Effect of cavitation on removal of alkali elements from coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivalli, H.; Nirmal, L.; Nagarajan, R.

    2015-12-01

    The main impurities in coal are sulphur, ash and alkali. On combustion, the volatile forms of these impurities are either condensed on the boilers, or emitted in the form of potentially hazardous gases. The alkali elements present in coal help the fly ash particles adhere to boiler surfaces by providing a wet surface on which collection of these particles can take place. Use of ultrasonic techniques in cleaning of coal has stirred interest among researchers in recent times. Extraction of alkali elements by cavitation effect using low-frequency ultrasound, in the presence of reagents (HNO3 and H2O2) is reported in this paper. Powdered coal was dissolved with the reagent and exposed to ultrasonic fields of various frequencies at different time intervals. The treated solution is filtered and tested for alkali levels.

  4. The 4843 Alkali Metal Storage Facility Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The 4843 AMSF has been used primarily to provide a centralized building to receive and store dangerous and mixed alkali metal waste, including sodium and lithium, which has been generated at the Fast Flux Test Facility and at various other Hanford Site operations that used alkali metals. Most of the dangerous and mixed alkali metal waste received consists of retired equipment from liquid sodium processes. The unit continues to store material. In general, only solid alkali metal waste that is water reactive is stored at the 4843 AMSF. The 4843 AMSF will be closed in a manner consistent with Ecology guidelines and regulations (WAC 173-303-610). The general closure procedure is detailed as follows.

  5. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, Marca M.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard

    1995-01-01

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  6. Corrosion in a temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; White, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    High temperature corrosion limits the operation of equipment used in the Power Generation Industry. Some of the more destructive corrosive attack occurs on the surfaces of heat exchangers, boilers, and turbines where the alloys are subjected to large temperature gradients that cause a high heat flux through the accumulated ash, the corrosion product, and the alloy. Most current and past corrosion research has, however, been conducted under isothermal conditions. Research on the thermal-gradient-affected corrosion of various metals and alloys is currently being studied at the Albany Research Center’s SECERF (Severe Environment Corrosion and Erosion Research Facility) laboratory. The purpose of this research is to verify theoretical models of heat flux effects on corrosion and to quantify the differences between isothermal and thermal gradient corrosion effects. The effect of a temperature gradient and the resulting heat flux on corrosion of alloys with protective oxide scales is being examined by studying point defect diffusion and corrosion rates. Fick’s first law of diffusion was expanded, using irreversible thermodynamics, to include a heat flux term – a Soret effect. Oxide growth rates are being measured for the high temperature corrosion of cobalt at a metal surface temperature of 900ºC. Corrosion rates are also being determined for the high temperature corrosion of carbon steel boiler tubes in a simulated waste combustion environment consisting of O2, CO2, N2, and water vapor. Tests are being conducted both isothermally and in the presence of a temperature gradient to verify the effects of a heat flux and to compare to isothermal oxidation.

  7. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2007-12-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that

  8. Alkali absorption and citrate excretion in calcium nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakhaee, K.; Williams, R. H.; Oh, M. S.; Padalino, P.; Adams-Huet, B.; Whitson, P.; Pak, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The role of net gastrointestinal (GI) alkali absorption in the development of hypocitraturia was investigated. The net GI absorption of alkali was estimated from the difference between simple urinary cations (Ca, Mg, Na, and K) and anions (Cl and P). In 131 normal subjects, the 24 h urinary citrate was positively correlated with the net GI absorption of alkali (r = 0.49, p < 0.001). In 11 patients with distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA), urinary citrate excretion was subnormal relative to net GI alkali absorption, with data from most patients residing outside the 95% confidence ellipse described for normal subjects. However, the normal relationship between urinary citrate and net absorbed alkali was maintained in 11 patients with chronic diarrheal syndrome (CDS) and in 124 stone-forming patients devoid of RTA or CDS, half of whom had "idiopathic" hypocitraturia. The 18 stone-forming patients without RTA or CDS received potassium citrate (30-60 mEq/day). Both urinary citrate and net GI alkali absorption increased, yielding a significantly positive correlation (r = 0.62, p < 0.0001), with the slope indistinguishable from that of normal subjects. Thus, urinary citrate was normally dependent on the net GI absorption of alkali. This dependence was less marked in RTA, confirming the renal origin of hypocitraturia. However, the normal dependence was maintained in CDS and in idiopathic hypocitraturia, suggesting that reduced citrate excretion was largely dietary in origin as a result of low net alkali absorption (from a probable relative deficiency of vegetables and fruits or a relative excess of animal proteins).

  9. Electrochemical cell having an alkali-metal-nitrate electrode

    DOEpatents

    Roche, M.F.; Preto, S.K.

    1982-06-04

    A power-producing secondary electrochemical cell includes a molten alkali metal as the negative-electrode material and a molten-nitrate salt as the positive-electrode material. The molten material in the respective electrodes are separated by a solid barrier of alkali-metal-ion conducting material. A typical cell includes active materials of molten sodium separated from molten sodium nitrate and other nitrates in mixture by a layer of sodium ..beta..'' alumina.

  10. Alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide double alkoxide precursors to alkali metal yttrium oxide nanomaterials

    DOE PAGES

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Neville, Michael L.; Sears, Jeremiah Matthew; Cramer, Roger

    2016-03-15

    In this study, a series of alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide ([AY(ONep)4]) compounds were developed as precursors to alkali yttrium oxide (AYO2) nanomaterials. The reaction of yttrium amide ([Y(NR2)3] where R=Si(CH3)3) with four equivalents of H-ONep followed by addition of [A(NR2)] (A=Li, Na, K) or Ao (Ao=Rb, Cs) led to the formation of a complex series of AnY(ONep)3+n species, crystallographically identified as [Y2Li3(μ3-ONep)(μ3-HONep)(μ-ONep)5(ONep)3(HONep)2] (1), [YNa2(μ3-ONep)4(ONep)]2 (2), {[Y2K3(μ3-ONep)3(μ-ONep)4(ONep)2(ηξ-tol)2][Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4]•ηx-tol]} (3), [Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4] (3a), [Y2Rb3(μ4-ONep)3(μ-ONep)6] (4), and [Y2Cs4(μ6-O)(μ3-ONep)6(μ3-HONep)2(ONep)2(ηx-tol)4]•tol (5). Compounds 1–5 were investigated as single source precursors to AYOx nanomaterials following solvothermal routes (pyridine, 185 °C for 24h). The final products after thermal processing weremore » found by powder X-ray diffraction experiments to be Y2O3 with variable sized particles based on transmission electron diffraction. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy studies indicated that the heavier alkali metal species were present in the isolated nanomaterials.« less

  11. Reduction of phosphorus and alkali levels in coking coals

    SciTech Connect

    Hoare, I.C.; Waugh, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    A number of coals, though exhibiting desirable coking properties, can have undesirable levels of alkalis and phosphorus. All the phosphorus in the coal will report to the coke, eventually to the iron and thence to the steel, with adverse effects on its metallurgical properties. Alkalis have damaging effects on the blast furnace operation and can be responsible for loss of heat, loss of production, efficiency loss and reduced furnace life. Buyers of coking coal commonly specify such parameters as phosphorus in coal and alkalis in ash, with penalties and rejection over certain limits. With the introduction of new direct reduction technologies such as COREX and HISMELT, and others such as PCI, it is anticipated that coal producers will have even tighter phosphorus and alkali specifications imposed on their products. Phosphorus is predominantly inorganic in origin occurring in a wide variety of minerals in coal, but its main source is apatite. It can be found mainly in the lower density fractions of the coal and intimately bound, so that conventional physical beneficiation techniques are relatively ineffective. CSIRO has developed a cost effective, selective chemical demineralization treatment, which can be applied to the problem of high alkali, high phosphorus coals. This particular technique makes use of unrefined organic acid, which also has the advantage of being low in cost and environmentally benign. In this paper, the effectiveness of acid demineralization of a number of coals is discussed, within the context of their phosphorus and alkali distributions throughout various size/density fractions.

  12. Two-phase alkali-metal experiments in reduced gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1986-06-01

    Future space missions envision the use of large nuclear reactors utilizing either a single or a two-phase alkali-metal working fluid. The design and analysis of such reactors require state-of-the-art computer codes that can properly treat alkali-metal flow and heat transfer in a reduced-gravity environment. A literature search of relevant experiments in reduced gravity is reported on here, and reveals a paucity of data for such correlations. The few ongoing experiments in reduced gravity are noted. General plans are put forth for the reduced-gravity experiments which will have to be performed, at NASA facilities, with benign fluids. A similar situation exists regarding two-phase alkali-metal flow and heat transfer, even in normal gravity. Existing data are conflicting and indequate for the task of modeling a space reactor using a two-phase alkali-metal coolant. The major features of past experiments are described here. Data from the reduced-gravity experiments with innocuous fluids are to be combined with normal gravity data from the two-phase alkali-metal experiments. Analyses undertaken here give every expectation that the correlations developed from this data base will provide a valid representation of alkali-metal heat transfer and pressure drop in reduced gravity.

  13. Bioinorganic Chemistry of the Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsam; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien T; Churchill, David G

    2016-01-01

    The common Group 1 alkali metals are indeed ubiquitous on earth, in the oceans and in biological systems. In this introductory chapter, concepts involving aqueous chemistry and aspects of general coordination chemistry and oxygen atom donor chemistry are introduced. Also, there are nuclear isotopes of importance. A general discussion of Group 1 begins from the prevalence of the ions, and from a comparison of their ionic radii and ionization energies. While oxygen and water molecule binding have the most relevance to biology and in forming a detailed understanding between the elements, there is a wide range of basic chemistry that is potentially important, especially with respect to biological chelation and synthetic multi-dentate ligand design. The elements are widely distributed in life forms, in the terrestrial environment and in the oceans. The details about the workings in animal, as well as plant life are presented in this volume. Important biometallic aspects of human health and medicine are introduced as well. Seeing as the elements are widely present in biology, various particular endogenous molecules and enzymatic systems can be studied. Sodium and potassium are by far the most important and central elements for consideration. Aspects of lithium, rubidium, cesium and francium chemistry are also included; they help in making important comparisons related to the coordination chemistry of Na(+) and K(+). Physical methods are also introduced. PMID:26860297

  14. Superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerene nanowhiskers.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Hiroyuki; Konno, Toshio; Hirata, Chika; Wakahara, Takatsugu; Miyazawa, Kun'ichi; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Tanaka, Masashi; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2016-09-01

    Superconductivity in alkali metal-doped fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs) was observed in K3.3C60NWs, Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs with transition temperatures at 17, 25 and 26 K, respectively. Almost full shielding volume fraction (~80%) was observed in K3.3C60NWs when subjected to thermal treatment at 200 °C for a duration of 24 h. In contrast, the shielding fraction of Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs were calculated to be 8% and 6%, respectively. Here we report on an extensive investigation of the superconducting properties of these AC60NWs (A  =  K3.3, Rb3.0 and Cs2.0Rb1.0). These properties are compared to the ones reported on the corresponding conventional (single-crystal or powder) K-doped fullerene. We also evaluated the critical current densities of these C60NWs using the Bean model under an applied magnetic field up to 50 kOe. PMID:27385220

  15. Superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerene nanowhiskers.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Hiroyuki; Konno, Toshio; Hirata, Chika; Wakahara, Takatsugu; Miyazawa, Kun'ichi; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Tanaka, Masashi; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2016-09-01

    Superconductivity in alkali metal-doped fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs) was observed in K3.3C60NWs, Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs with transition temperatures at 17, 25 and 26 K, respectively. Almost full shielding volume fraction (~80%) was observed in K3.3C60NWs when subjected to thermal treatment at 200 °C for a duration of 24 h. In contrast, the shielding fraction of Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs were calculated to be 8% and 6%, respectively. Here we report on an extensive investigation of the superconducting properties of these AC60NWs (A  =  K3.3, Rb3.0 and Cs2.0Rb1.0). These properties are compared to the ones reported on the corresponding conventional (single-crystal or powder) K-doped fullerene. We also evaluated the critical current densities of these C60NWs using the Bean model under an applied magnetic field up to 50 kOe.

  16. Bioinorganic Chemistry of the Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsam; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien T; Churchill, David G

    2016-01-01

    The common Group 1 alkali metals are indeed ubiquitous on earth, in the oceans and in biological systems. In this introductory chapter, concepts involving aqueous chemistry and aspects of general coordination chemistry and oxygen atom donor chemistry are introduced. Also, there are nuclear isotopes of importance. A general discussion of Group 1 begins from the prevalence of the ions, and from a comparison of their ionic radii and ionization energies. While oxygen and water molecule binding have the most relevance to biology and in forming a detailed understanding between the elements, there is a wide range of basic chemistry that is potentially important, especially with respect to biological chelation and synthetic multi-dentate ligand design. The elements are widely distributed in life forms, in the terrestrial environment and in the oceans. The details about the workings in animal, as well as plant life are presented in this volume. Important biometallic aspects of human health and medicine are introduced as well. Seeing as the elements are widely present in biology, various particular endogenous molecules and enzymatic systems can be studied. Sodium and potassium are by far the most important and central elements for consideration. Aspects of lithium, rubidium, cesium and francium chemistry are also included; they help in making important comparisons related to the coordination chemistry of Na(+) and K(+). Physical methods are also introduced.

  17. Superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerene nanowhiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeya, Hiroyuki; Konno, Toshio; Hirata, Chika; Wakahara, Takatsugu; Miyazawa, Kun'ichi; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Tanaka, Masashi; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2016-09-01

    Superconductivity in alkali metal-doped fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs) was observed in K3.3C60NWs, Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs with transition temperatures at 17, 25 and 26 K, respectively. Almost full shielding volume fraction (~80%) was observed in K3.3C60NWs when subjected to thermal treatment at 200 °C for a duration of 24 h. In contrast, the shielding fraction of Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs were calculated to be 8% and 6%, respectively. Here we report on an extensive investigation of the superconducting properties of these AC60NWs (A  =  K3.3, Rb3.0 and Cs2.0Rb1.0). These properties are compared to the ones reported on the corresponding conventional (single-crystal or powder) K-doped fullerene. We also evaluated the critical current densities of these C60NWs using the Bean model under an applied magnetic field up to 50 kOe.

  18. Corrosion Protection of Aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R. S.; Nelson, W. B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred.

  19. CORROSION PROTECTION OF ALUMINUM

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R.S.; Nelson, W.B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred. (D.C.W.)

  20. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

    1997-08-19

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  1. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, Debra A.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Thompson, Karen G.; Bryan, Coleman J.

    1997-01-01

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  2. Papering Over Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center's battle against corrosion led to a new coating that was licensed to GeoTech and is commercially sold as Catize. The coating uses ligno sulfonic acid doped polyaniline (Ligno-Pani), also known as synthetic metal. Ligno-Pani can be used to extend the operating lives of steel bridges as one example of its applications. future applications include computers, televisions, cellular phones, conductive inks, and stealth technology.

  3. Stress Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Advanced testing of structural materials was developed by Lewis Research Center and Langley Research Center working with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Under contract, Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa) conducted a study for evaluating stress corrosion cracking, and recommended the "breaking load" method which determines fracture strengths as well as measuring environmental degradation. Alcoa and Langley plan to submit the procedure to ASTM as a new testing method.

  4. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, Scott L.

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  5. Relation between the electroforming voltage in alkali halide-polymer diodes and the bandgap of the alkali halide

    SciTech Connect

    Bory, Benjamin F.; Wang, Jingxin; Janssen, René A. J.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Gomes, Henrique L.; De Leeuw, Dago M.

    2014-12-08

    Electroforming of indium-tin-oxide/alkali halide/poly(spirofluorene)/Ba/Al diodes has been investigated by bias dependent reflectivity measurements. The threshold voltages for electrocoloration and electroforming are independent of layer thickness and correlate with the bandgap of the alkali halide. We argue that the origin is voltage induced defect formation. Frenkel defect pairs are formed by electron–hole recombination in the alkali halide. This self-accelerating process mitigates injection barriers. The dynamic junction formation is compared to that of a light emitting electrochemical cell. A critical defect density for electroforming is 10{sup 25}/m{sup 3}. The electroformed alkali halide layer can be considered as a highly doped semiconductor with metallic transport characteristics.

  6. Corrosion in supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Propp, W.A.; Carleson, T.E.; Wai, Chen M.; Taylor, P.R.; Daehling, K.W.; Huang, Shaoping; Abdel-Latif, M.

    1996-05-01

    Integrated studies were carried out in the areas of corrosion, thermodynamic modeling, and electrochemistry under pressure and temperature conditions appropriate for potential applications of supercritical fluid (SCF) extractive metallurgy. Carbon dioxide and water were the primary fluids studied. Modifiers were used in some tests; these consisted of 1 wt% water and 10 wt% methanol for carbon dioxide and of sulfuric acid, sodium sulfate, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium nitrate at concentrations ranging from 0.00517 to 0.010 M for the aqueous fluids. The materials studied were Types 304 and 316 (UNS S30400 and S31600) stainless steel, iron, and AISI-SAE 1080 (UNS G10800) carbon steel. The thermodynamic modeling consisted of development of a personal computer-based program for generating Pourbaix diagrams at supercritical conditions in aqueous systems. As part of the model, a general method for extrapolating entropies and related thermodynamic properties from ambient to SCF conditions was developed. The experimental work was used as a tool to evaluate the predictions of the model for these systems. The model predicted a general loss of passivation in iron-based alloys at SCF conditions that was consistent with experimentally measured corrosion rates and open circuit potentials. For carbon-dioxide-based SCFs, measured corrosion rates were low, indicating that carbon steel would be suitable for use with unmodified carbon dioxide, while Type 304 stainless steel would be suitable for use with water or methanol as modifiers.

  7. Corrosion detection by induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roddenberry, Joshua L.

    Bridges in Florida are exposed to high amounts of humidity due to the state's geography. This excess moisture results in a high incidence of corrosion on the bridge's steel support cables. Also, the inclusion of ineffective waterproofing has resulted in additional corrosion. As this corrosion increases, the steel cables, responsible for maintaining bridge integrity, deteriorate and eventually break. If enough of these cables break, the bridge will experience a catastrophic failure resulting in collapse. Repairing and replacing these cables is very expensive and only increases with further damage. As each of the cables is steel, they have strong conductive properties. By inducing a current along each group of cables and measuring its dissipation over distance, a picture of structural integrity can be determined. The purpose of this thesis is to prove the effectiveness of using electromagnetic techniques to determine cable integrity. By comparing known conductive values (determined in a lab setting) to actual bridge values, the tester will be able to determine the location and severity of any damage, if present.

  8. Corrosive wear principles

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, W.J.

    1993-12-31

    The dual effects of corrosion and wear operate together in such industries as paper and pulp, coal handling, mining, and sugar beet extraction. There is a synergistic effect that causes far greater wastage to carbon steels, alloy steels, and even much more abrasion resistant cast irons. Several laboratory and in situ studies have been conducted to better understand the contributions of corrosion and wear to the wastage process. The environmental conditions are usually set by the process. However, there are a few instances where inhibitors as sodium nitrite, sodium chromate, and sodium metasilicate have been successfully used to reduce metal wastage of carbon steels. Hardness has been found to be an unreliable guide to performance under wet sliding conditions. Heat treated alloy steels and cast irons are inferior to stainless steels. Even distilled water is too severe a corrodent for steels. While the austenitic stainlesses perform the best, cold rolling to increase hardness does not further improve their performance. The surface roughness of stainless steels gets smoother during corrosive wear testing while it gets rougher for the alloy steels. This observation substantiated the reputation of improved slideability for stainless alloys over alloy steels.

  9. Corrosion inhibitors from expired drugs.

    PubMed

    Vaszilcsin, Nicolae; Ordodi, Valentin; Borza, Alexandra

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents a method of expired or unused drugs valorization as corrosion inhibitors for metals in various media. Cyclic voltammograms were drawn on platinum in order to assess the stability of pharmaceutically active substances from drugs at the metal-corrosive environment interface. Tafel slope method was used to determine corrosion rates of steel in the absence and presence of inhibitors. Expired Carbamazepine and Paracetamol tablets were used to obtain corrosion inhibitors. For the former, the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in 0.1 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid solution was about 90%, whereas for the latter, the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the same material in the 0.25 mol L(-1) acetic acid-0.25 mol L(-1) sodium acetate buffer solution was about 85%.

  10. Thermal Spray Coatings for High-Temperature Corrosion Protection in Biomass Co-Fired Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksa, M.; Metsäjoki, J.; Kärki, J.

    2015-01-01

    There are over 1000 biomass boilers and about 500 plants using waste as fuel in Europe, and the numbers are increasing. Many of them encounter serious problems with high-temperature corrosion due to detrimental elements such as chlorides, alkali metals, and heavy metals. By HVOF spraying, it is possible to produce very dense and well-adhered coatings, which can be applied for corrosion protection of heat exchanger surfaces in biomass and waste-to-energy power plant boilers. Four HVOF coatings and one arc sprayed coating were exposed to actual biomass co-fired boiler conditions in superheater area with a probe measurement installation for 5900 h at 550 and 750 °C. The coating materials were Ni-Cr, IN625, Fe-Cr-W-Nb-Mo, and Ni-Cr-Ti. CJS and DJ Hybrid spray guns were used for HVOF spraying to compare the corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr coating structures. Reference materials were ferritic steel T92 and nickel super alloy A263. The circulating fluidized bed boiler burnt a mixture of wood, peat and coal. The coatings showed excellent corrosion resistance at 550 °C compared to the ferritic steel. At higher temperature, NiCr sprayed with CJS had the best corrosion resistance. IN625 was consumed almost completely during the exposure at 750 °C.

  11. Gas-deposit-alloy corrosion interactions in simulated combustion environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luer, Kevin Raymond

    High temperature corrosion in aggressive coal combustion environments involves simultaneous corrosion reactions between combustion gases, ash deposits, and alloys. This research investigated the behavior of a ferritic steel (SA387-Gr11) and three weld claddings (309L SS, Alloy 72, and Alloy 622) in five combustion environments beneath solid deposits at 500°C for up to 1000 hours. The synthetic gases consisted of N2-CO-CO-H2-H2O-H 2S-SO2 mixtures that simulated a range of fuel-rich or fuel-lean combustion environments with a constant sulfur content. The synthetic deposits contained FeS2, FeS, Fe3O4 and/or carbon. Reaction kinetics was studied in individual gas-metal, gas deposit, and deposit-alloy systems. A test method was developed to investigate simultaneous gas-deposit-metal corrosion reactions. The results showed reaction kinetics varied widely, depending on the gas-alloy system and followed linear, parabolic, and logarithmic rate laws. Under reducing conditions, the alloys exhibited a range of corrosion mechanisms including carburization-sulfidation, sulfidation, and sulfidation-oxidation. Most alloys were not resistant to the highly reducing gases but offered moderate resistance to mixed oxidation-sulfidation by demonstrating parabolic or logarithmic behavior. Under oxidizing conditions, all of the alloys were resistant. Under oxidizing-sulfating conditions, alloys with high Fe or Cr contents sulfated whereas an alloy containing Mo and W was resistant. In the gas-deposit-metal tests, FeS2-bearing deposits were extremely corrosive to low alloy steel under both reducing and oxidizing conditions but they had little influence on the weld claddings. Accelerated corrosion was attributed to rapid decomposition or oxidation of FeS2 particles that generated sulfur-rich gases above the alloy surface. In contrast, FeS-type deposits had no influence under reducing conditions but they were aggressive to low alloy steel under oxidizing conditions. The extent of damage

  12. Efficient destruction of CF4 through in situ generation of alkali metals from heated alkali halide reducing mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Churl; Choi, Wonyong

    2002-03-15

    Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are the most potent green house gases that are very recalcitrant at destruction. An effective way of converting PFCs using hot solid reagents into safe products has been recently introduced. By investigating the thermal reductive destruction of tetrafluoromethane (CF4) we provided new insight and more physicochemical consideration on this novel process. The complete destruction of CF4was successfully achieved by flowing the gas through a heated reagent bed (400-950 degrees C) that contained powder mixtures of alkali halides, CaO, and Si. The silicon acted as a reducing agent of alkali halides for the in-situ production of alkali metals, and the calcium oxide played the role of a halide ion acceptor. The absence of any single component in this ternary mixture drastically reduced the destruction efficiency of CF4. The CF4 destruction efficiencies with the solid reagent containing the alkali halide, MX, increased in the order of Li approximately Na < K < Cs for alkali cations and I < Br < Cl < F for halide anions. This trend agreed with the endothermicity of the alkali metal generation reaction: the higher the endothermicity, the lower the destruction efficiency. Alkali metal generation was indirectly detected by monitoring H2 production from its reaction with water. The production of alkali metals increased with NaF, KF, and CsF in this order. The CsF/CaO/Si system exhibited the complete destruction of CF4 at as low as 600 degrees C. The solid product analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the formation of CaF2 and the depletion of Si with black carbon particles formed in the solid reagent residue. No CO/CO2 and toxic HF and SiF4 formation were detected in the exhaust gas.

  13. Tuning the Internet for corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Cottis, R.A.; Bogaerts, W.; Diamantidis, Z.

    1999-11-01

    The Internet provides a powerful, content-neutral mechanism for the presentation and delivery of information, but it has limitations for corrosion applications. These include the difficulty of defining corrosion specific information and the inability to accommodate commercial information. The Thematic Network described here is an open group project that aims to establish mechanisms for the indexing and exchange of corrosion information over the Internet.

  14. TREATMENT TANK CORROSION STUDIES FOR THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.

    2011-08-24

    in the PUREX/oxalic acid environment. (3) The corrosion rates for PUREX/8 wt.% oxalic acid were greater than or equal to those observed for the PUREX/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid. No localized corrosion was observed in the tests with the 8 wt.% oxalic acid. Testing with HM/8 wt.% oxalic acid simulant was not performed. Thus, a comparison with the results with 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid, where the corrosion rate was 88 mpy and localized corrosion was observed at 75 C, cannot be made. (4) The corrosion rates in 1 and 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid solutions were temperature dependent: (a) At 50 C, the corrosion rates ranged between 90 to 140 mpy over the 30 day test period. The corrosion rates were higher under stagnant conditions. (b) At 75 C, the initial corrosion rates were as high as 300 mpy during the first day of exposure. The corrosion rates increased with agitation. However, once the passive ferrous oxalate film formed, the corrosion rate decreased dramatically to less than 20 mpy over the 30 day test period. This rate was independent of agitation. (5) Electrochemical testing indicated that for oxalic acid/sludge simulant mixtures the cathodic reaction has transport controlled reaction kinetics. The literature suggests that the dissolution of the sludge produces a di-oxalatoferrate ion that is reduced at the cathodic sites. The cathodic reaction does not appear to involve hydrogen evolution. On the other hand, electrochemical tests demonstrated that the cathodic reaction for corrosion of carbon steel in pure oxalic acid involves hydrogen evolution. (6) Agitation of the oxalic acid/sludge simulant mixtures typically resulted in a higher corrosion rates for both acid concentrations. The transport of the ferrous ion away from the metal surface results in a less protective ferrous oxalate film. (7) A mercury containing species along with aluminum, silicon and iron oxides was observed on the interior of the pits formed in the HM/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant at 75 C. The pitting rates in

  15. Alkali-aggregate reactivity of typical siliceious glass and carbonate rocks in alkali-activated fly ash based geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Duyou; Liu, Yongdao; Zheng, Yanzeng; Xu, Zhongzi; Shen, Xiaodong

    2013-08-01

    For exploring the behaviour of alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR) in alkali-activated geopolymeric materials and assessing the procedures for testing AAR in geopolymers, the expansion behaviour of fly ash based geopolymer mortars with pure silica glass and typical carbonate rocks were studied respectively by curing at various conditions, i.e. 23°C and 38°C with relative humidity over 95%, immersed in 1M NaOH solution at 80°C. Results show that, at various curing conditions, neither harmful ASR nor harmful ACR was observed in geopolymers with the criteria specified for OPC system. However, with the change of curing conditions, the geopolymer binder and reactive aggregates may experience different reaction processes leading to quite different dimensional changes, especially with additional alkalis and elevated temperatures. It suggests that high temperature with additional alkali for accelerating AAR in traditional OPC system may not appropriate for assessing the alkali-aggregate reactivity behaviour in geopolymers designed for normal conditions. On the other hand, it is hopeful to control the dimensional change of geopolymer mortar or concrete by selecting the type of aggregates and the appropriate curing conditions, thus changing the harmful AAR in OPC into beneficial AAR in geopolymers and other alkali-activated cementitious systems.

  16. EVALUATION OF THE CORROSIVITY OF DUST DEPOSITED ON WASTE PACKAGES AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    C. Bryan; R. Jack; T, Wolery; D. Shields; M. Sutton; E. Hardin; D. Barr

    2005-08-03

    Potentially corrosive brines can form during post-closure by deliquescence of salt minerals in dust deposited on the surface of waste packages at Yucca Mountain during operations and the pre-closure ventilation period. Although thermodynamic modeling and experimental studies of brine deliquescence indicates that brines are likely to form, they will be nitrate-rich and non-corrosive. Processes that modify the brines following deliquescence are beneficial with respect to inhibition of corrosion. For example, acid degassing (HCl, HNO{sub 3}) could dry out brines, but kinetic limitations are likely to limit the effect to increasing their passivity by raising the pH and increasing the NO{sub 3}/Cl ratio. Predicted dust quantities and maximum brine volumes on the waste package surface are small, and physical isolation of salt minerals in the dust may inhibit formation of eutectic brines and decrease brine volumes. If brines do contact the WP surface, small droplet volumes and layer thicknesses do not support development of diffusive gradients necessary for formation on separate anodic-cathodic zones required for localized corrosion. Finally, should localized corrosion initiate, corrosion product buildup will stifle corrosion, by limiting oxygen access to the metal surface, by capillary retention of brine in corrosion product porosity, or by consumption of brine components (Cl{sup -}).

  17. Corrosion Performance of Fe-Based Alloys in Simulated Oxy-Fuel Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zuotao; Natesan, Ken; Cai, Zhonghou; Rink, David L.

    2016-09-01

    The long-term corrosion of Fe-based alloys in simulated oxy-fuel environment at 1023 K (750 °C) was studied. Detailed results are presented on weight change, scale thickness, internal penetration, microstructural characteristics of the corrosion products, and the cracking of scales for the alloys after exposure at 1023 K (750 °C) for up to 3600 hours. An incubation period during which the corrosion rate was low was observed for the alloys. After the incubation period, the corrosion accelerated, and the corrosion process followed linear kinetics. Effects of alloy, CaO-containing ash, and gas composition on the corrosion rate were also studied. In addition, synchrotron nanobeam X-ray analysis was employed to determine the phase and chemical composition of the oxide layers on the alloy surface. Results from these studies are being used to address the long-term corrosion performance of Fe-based alloys in various coal-ash combustion environments and to develop methods to mitigate high-temperature ash corrosion.

  18. Embeddable sensor for corrosion measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Robert G.; Yuan, J.; Jones, Stephen H.; Wang, W.; Hudson, K.; Sime, A.; Schneider, O.; Clemena, Gerardo G.

    1999-02-01

    The design of a microinstrument for corrosion monitoring in reinforced concrete is presented and the performance of the prototype device discussed. Sensors for the measurement of corrosion rate, corrosion potential, chloride concentration, and concrete conductivity have been developed and tested inside of model concrete slabs. The tests include electrochemical chloride driving as a method for test acceleration and wet/dry cycling. The corrosion rate and conductivity sensors perform very well, as do all aspects of the electronics. Work continues on the chloride sensor and reference electrode.

  19. Electrochemical Apparatus Simulates Corrosion In Crevices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khoshbin, S. Rachel; Jeanjaquet, S. L.; Lumsden, Jesse B.

    1996-01-01

    Method of testing metal specimens for susceptibility to galvanic corrosion in crevices involves use of relatively simple electrochemical apparatus. By following method, one quantifies rates of corrosion of dissimilar-metal couples exposed to various etchants or other corrosive solutions.

  20. Mixed alkali effect on the spectroscopic properties of alkali-alkaline earth oxide borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, G.; Ramesh, B.; Shareefuddin, Md.; Chary, M. N.; Sayanna, R.

    2016-05-01

    The mixed alkali and alkaline earth oxide borate glass with the composition xK2O - (25-x) Li2O-12.5BaO-12.5MgO-50B2O3 (x = 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25mol %) and doped with 1mol% CuO were prepared by the melt quenching technique. From the optical absorption spectra the optical band gap, electronic polarizability(α02-), interaction parameter (A), theoretical and experimental optical basicity (Λ) values were evaluated. From the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectral data the number of spins (N) and susceptibility (χ) were evaluated. The values of (α02-), and (Λ) increases with increasing of K2O content and electronic polarizability and interaction parameter show opposite behaviuor which may be due to the creation of non-bridging oxygens and expansion of borate network. The reciprocal of susceptibility (1/χ) and spin concentration (N) as a function of K2O content, varied nonlinearly which may be due to creation of non-bridging oxygens in the present glass system. This may be attributed to mixed alkali effect (MAE).

  1. Highly Effective Pt-Based Water–Gas Shift Catalysts by Surface Modification with Alkali Hydroxide Salts

    PubMed Central

    Kusche, Matthias; Bustillo, Karen; Agel, Friederike; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we describe an economical and convenient method to improve the performance of Pt/alumina catalysts for the water–gas shift reaction through surface modification of the catalysts with alkali hydroxides according to the solid catalyst with ionic liquid layer approach. The results are in agreement with our findings reported earlier for methanol steam reforming. This report indicates that alkali doping of the catalyst plays an important role in the observed catalyst activation. In addition, the basic and hygroscopic nature of the salt coating contributes to a significant improvement in the performance of the catalyst. During the reaction, a partly liquid film of alkali hydroxide forms on the alumina surface, which increases the availability of H2O at the catalytically active sites. Kinetic studies reveal a negligible effect of the KOH coating on the rate dependence of CO and H2O partial pressures. TEM studies indicate an agglomeration of the active Pt clusters during catalyst preparation; restructuring of Pt nanoparticles occurs under reaction conditions, which leads to a highly active and stable system over 240 h time on stream. Excessive pore fillings with KOH introduce a mass transfer barrier as indicated in a volcano-shaped curve of activity versus salt loading. The optimum KOH loading was found to be 7.5 wt %. PMID:26413174

  2. Highly Effective Pt-Based Water-Gas Shift Catalysts by Surface Modification with Alkali Hydroxide Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Kusche, Matthias; Bustillo, Karen; Agel, Friederike; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2015-01-29

    Here, we describe an economical and convenient method to improve the performance of Pt/alumina catalysts for the water–gas shift reaction through surface modification of the catalysts with alkali hydroxides according to the solid catalyst with ionic liquid layer approach. The results are in agreement with our findings reported earlier for methanol steam reforming. This report indicates that alkali doping of the catalyst plays an important role in the observed catalyst activation. In addition, the basic and hygroscopic nature of the salt coating contributes to a significant improvement in the performance of the catalyst. During the reaction, a partly liquid film of alkali hydroxide forms on the alumina surface, which increases the availability of H2O at the catalytically active sites. Kinetic studies reveal a negligible effect of the KOH coating on the rate dependence of CO and H2O partial pressures. In conclusion, TEM studies indicate an agglomeration of the active Pt clusters during catalyst preparation; restructuring of Pt nanoparticles occurs under reaction conditions, which leads to a highly active and stable system over 240h time on stream. Excessive pore fillings with KOH introduce a mass transfer barrier as indicated in a volcano-shaped curve of activity versus salt loading. The optimum KOH loading was found to be 7.5wt%.

  3. Highly Effective Pt-Based Water-Gas Shift Catalysts by Surface Modification with Alkali Hydroxide Salts

    DOE PAGES

    Kusche, Matthias; Bustillo, Karen; Agel, Friederike; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2015-01-29

    Here, we describe an economical and convenient method to improve the performance of Pt/alumina catalysts for the water–gas shift reaction through surface modification of the catalysts with alkali hydroxides according to the solid catalyst with ionic liquid layer approach. The results are in agreement with our findings reported earlier for methanol steam reforming. This report indicates that alkali doping of the catalyst plays an important role in the observed catalyst activation. In addition, the basic and hygroscopic nature of the salt coating contributes to a significant improvement in the performance of the catalyst. During the reaction, a partly liquid filmmore » of alkali hydroxide forms on the alumina surface, which increases the availability of H2O at the catalytically active sites. Kinetic studies reveal a negligible effect of the KOH coating on the rate dependence of CO and H2O partial pressures. In conclusion, TEM studies indicate an agglomeration of the active Pt clusters during catalyst preparation; restructuring of Pt nanoparticles occurs under reaction conditions, which leads to a highly active and stable system over 240h time on stream. Excessive pore fillings with KOH introduce a mass transfer barrier as indicated in a volcano-shaped curve of activity versus salt loading. The optimum KOH loading was found to be 7.5wt%.« less

  4. Materials Characterization Center state-of-the-art report on corrosion data pertaining to metallic barriers for nuclear-waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, M.D.

    1982-10-01

    A compilation of published corrosion data on metals that have been suggested as canisters and overpack materials is presented. The data were categorized according to the solutions used in testing and divided into two parts: high-ionic strength solutions (such as seawater and brine) and low-ionic-strength waters (such as basalt and tuff waters). This distinction was made primarily because of the general difference in aggressiveness of these solutions with respect to general corrosion. A considerable amount of data indicated that titanium alloys have acceptably low uniform corrosion rates in anticipated repository sites; the other possible corrosion failure modes for titanium alloys, such as stress corrosion cracking and delayed failure due to hydrogen, have not been sufficiently studied to make any similar conclusions about lifetime with respect to these particular degradation processes. Other data suggested that iron-base alloys are sufficiently resistant to corrosion in basalt and tuff waters, although the effects of radiation and radiation combined with elevated temperature have not been reported in enough detail to conclusively qualify iron-base alloys for any particular barrier thickness in regard to uniform corrosion rate. The effect of overpack size on corrosion rate has been given little attention. A review of long-term underground data indicated that temperature and accessibility to oxygen were too different for deep geologic repositories to make the underground corrosion data directly applicable. However, the characteristics of corrosion attack, statistical treatment of data, and kinetics of corrosion showed that corrosion proceeds in a systematic and predictable way.

  5. Water Content of Lunar Alkali Fedlspar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, R. D.; Simon, J. I.; Wang, J.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Hauri, E. H.

    2016-01-01

    Detection of indigenous hydrogen in a diversity of lunar materials, including volcanic glass, melt inclusions, apatite, and plagioclase suggests water may have played a role in the chemical differentiation of the Moon. Spectroscopic data from the Moon indicate a positive correlation between water and Th. Modeling of lunar magma ocean crystallization predicts a similar chemical differentiation with the highest levels of water in the K- and Th-rich melt residuum of the magma ocean (i.e. urKREEP). Until now, the only sample-based estimates of water content of KREEP-rich magmas come from measurements of OH, F, and Cl in lunar apatites, which suggest a water concentration of < 1 ppm in urKREEP. Using these data, predict that the bulk water content of the magma ocean would have <10 ppm. In contrast, estimate water contents of 320 ppm for the bulk Moon and 1.4 wt % for urKREEP from plagioclase in ferroan anorthosites. Results and interpretation: NanoSIMS data from granitic clasts from Apollo sample 15405,78 show that alkali feldspar, a common mineral in K-enriched rocks, can have approx. 20 ppm of water, which implies magmatic water contents of approx. 1 wt % in the high-silica magmas. This estimate is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that estimated from apatite in similar rocks. However, the Cl and F contents of apatite in chemically similar rocks suggest that these melts also had high Cl/F ratios, which leads to spuriously low water estimates from the apatite. We can only estimate the minimum water content of urKREEP (+ bulk Moon) from our alkali feldspar data because of the unknown amount of degassing that led to the formation of the granites. Assuming a reasonable 10 to 100 times enrichment of water from urKREEP into the granites produces an estimate of 100-1000 ppm of water for the urKREEP reservoir. Using the modeling of and the 100-1000 ppm of water in urKREEP suggests a minimum bulk silicate Moon water content between 2 and 20 ppm. However, hydrogen loss was

  6. Alkali content of alpine ultramafic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, W.; Mountjoy, W.

    1965-01-01

    The lower limit of abundance of sodium and potassium in ultramafic rocks is less than the threshold amount detectable by conventional analytical methods. By a dilutionaddition modification of the flame-spectrophotometric method, sodium and potassium have been determined in 40 specimens of alpine ultramafic rocks. Samples represent six regions in the United States and one in Australia, and include dunite, peridotite, pyroxenite, and their variably serpentinized and metamorphosed derivatives. The median value found for Na2O is 0.004 per cent, and the range of Na2O is 0.001-0.19. The median value for K2O is 0.0034 per cent and the range is 0.001-0.031 per cent. Alkali concentrations are below 0.01 per cent Na2O in 28 samples and below 0.01 per cent K2O in 35. Derivation of basalt magma from upper-mantle material similar to such ultramafic rocks, as has been postulated, is precluded by the relative amounts of sodium and potassium, which are from 200 to 600 times more abundant in basalt than in the ultramafic rocks. Similar factors apply to a number of other elements. No reasonable process could produce such concentrations in, for example, tens of thousands of cubic miles of uniform tholeiitic basalt. The ultramafic rocks might have originated either as magmatic crystal precipitates or as mantle residues left after fusion and removal of basaltic magma. Injection of ultramafic rocks to exposed positions is tectonic rather than magmatic. ?? 1965.

  7. Corrosion control in alkanolamine gas treating: Absorber corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Helle, H.P.E.

    1995-12-01

    Even in 1980, when corrosion in alkanolamine units was rampant, over 50% of all acid gas purification systems was based on alkanolamine absorbents. Over the years the control of corrosion has gradually become firmer. This paper examines the reasons for corrosion and provides insight in one particular aspect of corrosion in alkanolamine units, absorber corrosion. Three factors are identified, solvent degradation, local stagnancy and exceeding the units capacity. Solvent degradation increases the corrosivity of the solvent proper by the formation of complexing compounds such as diamines. Local stagnancy allows the solvent loading level to approach equilibrium which creates a corrosive environment. Exceeding the unit`s capacity will achieve essentially the same but on a larger scale. The corrosion enhancement by interaction of a total of 12 factors is made visual and clarified. The paper examines step by step the means to prevent a number of the factors arising. Guidelines are given for design of the absorber and absorber internals, the molarity of the solvent, inhibition and the benefits and handicaps of filming inhibitors.

  8. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-11-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys.

  9. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K

    2015-11-30

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys.

  10. Monitoring power plant fireside corrosion using corrosion probes

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to monitor the corrosion degradation of key components in fossil fuel power plants is of utmost importance for Futuregen and ultra-supercritical power plants. Fireside corrosion occurs in the high temperature sections of energy production facilities due to a number of factors: ash deposition, coal composition, thermal gradients, and low NOx conditions, among others. Problems occur when equipment designed for either oxidizing or reducing conditions is exposed to alternating oxidizing and reducing conditions. This can happen especially near the burners. The use of low NOx burners is becoming more commonplace and can produce reducing environments that accelerate corrosion. One method of addressing corrosion of these surfaces is the use of corrosion probes to monitor when process changes cause corrosive conditions. In such a case, corrosion rate could become a process control variable that directs the operation of a coal combustion or coal gasification system. Alternatively, corrosion probes could be used to provide an indication of total metal damage and thus a tool to schedule planned maintenance outages.

  11. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys. PMID:26615896

  12. Corrosion and stress corrosion problems associated with the Space Shuttle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, J. G.

    1971-01-01

    The problems encountered and the methods used to prevent corrosion and stress corrosion cracking on current space vehicles and aircraft are discussed. Preventing these problems on the Space Shuttle, in particular, by properly using materials that are highly resistant to this phenomenon, is examined in detail.

  13. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K

    2015-01-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys. PMID:26615896

  14. Materials corrosion and protection from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Donald F.

    Materials erode under environmental stresses such as high temperature, high pressure, and mechanical shock/stress, but erosion is often exacerbated by chemical corrosion. In this dissertation, periodic density functional theory (DFT) is employed to simulate interfacial adhesion, absorption kinetics, bulk diffusion, and other material phenomena (e.g., hydrogen-enhanced decohesion and shock-induced phase changes) with the intention of understanding corrosion and subsequent failure processes and guiding the design of new protective coatings. This work examines corrosion and/or protection of materials ( i.e., Fe, Ni, W) with important applications: structural steel, gun tubes, high-pressure oil recovery vessels, jet engine turbine blades, and fusion reactor walls. We use DFT to model the pressure-induced, bcc-to-hcp phase transformation in Fe, in which a new low energy pathway is predicted exhibiting nonadiabatic behavior coupling magnetic and structural changes. Protection of steel is addressed in two aspects: interfacial adhesion of protective coatings and assessment of corrosion resistance provided by a surface alloy. First, the current chrome-coated steel system is examined where extremely strong adhesion is predicted at the Cr/Fe interface originating in strong spin correlations. A ceramic coating, SiC, is considered as a possible replacement for Cr. Strong adhesion is predicted, especially for C-Fe interfacial bonds. To assess corrosion resistance, we model ingress of two common corrosive elements, H and C, into two Fe alloys, FeAl and Fe3Si. Adsorption and absorption thermodynamics and kinetics, as well as bulk dissolution and diffusion are calculated in order to determine whether these two alloys can inhibit uptake of H and C. Relative to pure Fe, dissolved H and C are less stable in the alloys, as the dissolution enthalpy is predicted to be more endothermic. Overall, the energy barriers and rate constants for adsorbed H/C diffusing into Fe3Si subsurface layers

  15. Environmental and alloying effects on corrosion of metals and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Dong

    2009-12-01

    species could be missed in standard laboratory exposures such as ASTM B117. Initial efforts focused on the effects UV radiation, O3, relative humidity on the atmospheric corrosion of bare silver. Later work addressed the corrosion of silver samples deposited with NaCl particles. An exposure chamber that can simulate various environmental effects was built. The effects of UV radiation, O3, and relative humidity were varied separately while keeping the other factors the same level. The corrosion products were analyzed by the galvanostatic reduction method and characterization techniques such as SEM and EDS. It was found that both UV and O3 are necessary for fast corrosion on bare silver and this fast corrosion reaction results from atomic oxygen generated photodegradation of O3. In the presence of UV and O3, relative humidity has little effect on the atmospheric corrosion of bare silver in contrast to conventional atmospheric corrosion. The degree of corrosion is found to increase with O3 concentration. Moreover, a kinetic study of atmospheric corrosion of bare silver found that an incubation time for the atmospheric corrosion attack is needed. This incubation time is related to the chemisorption process of atomic oxygen. Though UV radiation can form reactive atomic oxygen which is more reactive than O3 alone as shown in the last chapter, the enhancement of corrosion by UV is limited for Ag with NaCl particles at low ozone concentration and high RH. The corrosion rate of silver with NaCl particles is found to increase with relative humidity, which is different than the case of bare silver. This indicates that different mechanisms control the atmospheric corrosion of silver. The incubation time for corrosion of silver with NaCl particles is shorter than for bare silver. This result from chemisorption of Cl 2 is favored over that of atomic oxygen. Interestingly, the total corrosion product of silver with NaCl particles is less than that of bare silver. This could be due to

  16. A Stopped-Flow Kinetics Experiment for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory Using Noncorrosive Reagents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prigodich, Richard V.

    2014-01-01

    Stopped-flow kinetics techniques are important to the study of rapid chemical and biochemical reactions. Incorporation of a stopped-flow kinetics experiment into the physical chemistry laboratory curriculum would therefore be an instructive addition. However, the usual reactions studied in such exercises employ a corrosive reagent that can over…

  17. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    K.G. Mon

    2004-10-01

    The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

  18. Unified mechanism of alkali and alkaline earth catalyzed gasification reactions of carbon by CO2 and H2O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, S.G.; Yang, R.T.

    1997-01-01

    From molecular orbital calculations, a unified mechanism is proposed for the gasification reactions of graphite by CO2 and H2O, both uncatalyzed and catalyzed by alkali and alkaline earth catalysts. In this mechanism, there are two types of oxygen intermediates that are bonded to the active edge carbon atoms: an in-plane semiquinone type, Cf(O), and an off-plane oxygen bonded to two saturated carbon atoms that are adjacent to the semiquinone species, C(O)Cf(O). The rate-limiting step is the decomposition of these intermediates by breaking the C-C bonds that are connected to Cf(O). A new rate equation is derived for the uncatalyzed reactions, and that for the catalyzed reactions is readily available from the proposed mechanism. The proposed mechanism can account for several unresolved experimental observations: TPD and TK (transient kinetics) desorption results of the catalyzed systems, the similar activation energies for the uncatalyzed and catalyzed reactions, and the relative activities of the alkali and alkaline earth elements. The net charge of the edge carbon active site is substantially changed by gaining electron density from the alkali or alkaline earth element (by forming C-O-M, where M stands for metal). The relative catalytic activities of these elements can be correlated with their abilities of donating electrons and changing the net charge of the edge carbon atom. As shown previously (Chen, S. G.; Yang, R. T. J. Catal. 1993, 141, 102), only clusters of the alkali compounds are active. This derives from the ability of the clusters to dissociate CO2 and H2O to form O atoms and the mobility of the dissociated O atoms facilitated by the clusters.

  19. Corrosion fatigue crack propagation in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    This review assesses fracture mechanics data and mechanistic models for corrosion fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys exposed to ambient temperature gases and electrolytes. Extensive stress intensity-crack growth rate data exist for ferrous, aluminum and nickel based alloys in a variety of environments. Interactive variables (viz., stress intensity range, mean stress, alloy composition and microstructure, loading frequency, temperature, gas pressure and electrode potential) strongly affect crack growth kinetics and complicate fatigue control. Mechanistic models to predict crack growth rates were formulated by coupling crack tip mechanics with occluded crack chemistry, and from both the hydrogen embrittlement and anodic dissolution/film rupture perspectives. Research is required to better define: (1) environmental effects near threshold and on crack closure; (2) damage tolerant life prediction codes and the validity of similitude; (3) the behavior of microcrack; (4) probes and improved models of crack tip damage; and (5) the cracking performance of advanced alloys and composites.

  20. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  1. INHIBITION OF CORROSION

    DOEpatents

    Atherton, J.E. Jr.; Gurinsky, D.H.

    1958-06-24

    A method is described for preventing corrosion of metallic container materials by a high-temperature liquid bismuth flowing therein. The method comprises fabricating the containment means from a steel which contains between 2 and 12% chromium, between 0.5 and 1.5% of either molybdenum and silicon, and a minimum of nickel and manganese, and maintaining zirconium dissolved in the liquid bismuth at a concentration between 50 parts per million and its saturation value at the lowest temperature in the system.

  2. Corrosion beneath disbonded pipeline coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Thompson, N.G.

    1997-04-01

    The relationship between coatings, cathodic protection (CP), and external corrosion of underground pipelines is described. Historically, this problem has been addressed by focusing on the corrosion and CP processes associated with holidays, e.g., coating disbondment and CP current flow within the disbonded region. These issues and those associated with disbonded areas distant from holidays are also discussed.

  3. DPC materials and corrosion environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Bryan, Charles R.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest; Clarity, J.

    2014-10-01

    After an exposition of the materials used in DPCs and the factors controlling material corrosion in disposal environments, a survey is given of the corrosion rates, mechanisms, and products for commonly used stainless steels. Research needs are then identified for predicting stability of DPC materials in disposal environments. Stainless steel corrosion rates may be low enough to sustain DPC basket structural integrity for performance periods of as long as 10,000 years, especially in reducing conditions. Uncertainties include basket component design, disposal environment conditions, and the in-package chemical environment including any localized effects from radiolysis. Prospective disposal overpack materials exist for most disposal environments, including both corrosion allowance and corrosion resistant materials. Whereas the behavior of corrosion allowance materials is understood for a wide range of corrosion environments, demonstrating corrosion resistance could be more technically challenging and require environment-specific testing. A preliminary screening of the existing inventory of DPCs and other types of canisters is described, according to the type of closure, whether they can be readily transported, and what types of materials are used in basket construction.

  4. Atlas 5013 tank corrosion test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, W. M.; Girton, L. D.; Treadway, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    The type and cause of corrosion in spot welded joints were determined by X-ray and chemical analysis. Fatigue and static tests showed the degree of degradation of mechanical properties. The corrosion inhibiting effectiveness of WD-40 compound and required renewal period by exposing typical joint specimens were examined.

  5. INTERNAL CORROSION AND DEPOSITION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Corrosion is one of the most important problems in the drinking water industry. It can affect public health, public acceptance of a water supply, and the cost of providing safe water. Deterioration of materials resulting from corrosion can necessitate huge yearly expenditures o...

  6. Agricultural Polymers as Corrosion Inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural polymers were composed of extra-cellular polysaccharides secreted by Leuconostoc mesenteroides have been shown to inhibit corrosion on corrosion-sensitive metals. The substantially pure exopolysaccharide has a general structure consisting of alpha(1-6)-linked D-glucose backbone and appr...

  7. Infrared Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Alkali Metal Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ei; Hommerich, Uwe; Yang, Clayton; Trivedi, Sudhir; Samuels, Alan; Snyder, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a powerful diagnostic tool for detection of trace elements by monitoring the atomic and ionic emission from laser-induced plasmas. LIBS is a relatively simple technique and has been successfully employed in applications such as environmental monitoring, materials analysis, medical diagnostics, industrial process control, and homeland security. Most LIBS applications are limited to emission features in the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-VIS-NIR) region arising from atoms and simple molecular fragments. In the present work, we report on the observation of mid- infrared emission lines from alkali metal halides due to laser-induced breakdown processes. The studied alkali metal halides included LiCl, NaCl, NaBr, KCl, KBr, KF, RbCl, and RbBr. The laser-induced plasma was produced by focusing a 16 mJ pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) on the target. The LIBS infrared emission from alkali halides showed intense and narrow bands located in the region from 2-8 μm. The observed emission features were assigned to atomic transitions between higher-lying Rydberg states of neutral alkali atoms. More detailed results of the performed IR LIBS studies on alkali metal halides will be discussed at the conference.

  8. Multi-photon processes in alkali metal vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Baodong; Hu, Shu; Li, Hui; Shi, Zhe; Cai, Xianglong; Guo, Jingwei; Tan, Yannan; Liu, Wanfa; Jin, Yuqi; Sang, Fengting

    2015-02-01

    Achieving population inversion through multi-photon cascade pumping is almost always difficult, and most laser medium work under 1-photon excitation mechanism. But for alkali atoms such as cesium, relatively large absorption cross sections of several low, cascading energy levels enable them properties such as up conversion. Here we carried out research on two-photon excitation alkali fluorescence. Two photons of near infrared region are used to excite alkali atoms to n 2 D5/2, n 2 D3/2 or higher energy levels, then the blue fluorescence of (n+1) 2 P3/2,(n+1) 2 P1/2-->n 2 S1/2 are observed. Different pumping paths are tried and by the recorded spectra, transition routes of cesium are deducted and concluded. Finally the possibility of two-photon style DPALs (diode pumped alkali laser) are discussed, such alkali lasers can give output wavelengths in the shorter end of visual spectroscopy (400-460 nm) and are expected to get application in underwater communication and material laser processing.

  9. Gas-side corrosion performance of superheater/ITAH tube alloys in MHD tests with high sulfur coal

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.

    1993-01-01

    Corrosion data have been obtained for tubes exposed for 600, 1500, and 2000 hours in a proof-of-concept magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) power generation test facility (the CFFF) to conditions representative of superheater and intermediate temperature air heater components. The tubes, coated with K[sub 2]SO[sub 4]-rich deposits, developed predominantly oxide surface scales. Stainless steel alloy scales were not sufficiently protective to prevent internal oxidation/sulfidation of the subsurface metal. Corrosion resistance increased with chromium content. Low chromium alloys had thick scaling but no internal penetration. Although no liquid phases were present corrosion rates and scale morphologies were similar to those typical of conventional coal ash corrosion in the presence of molten alkali sulfates. Corrosion rates derived from scale thickness and penetration depth measurements are reported, along with scale morphologies and compositions. The implications of the results on commercial MHD utilization of the alloys are discussed, as well as the indicated need for more corrosion resistant alloys or coatings under the most severe exposure conditions.

  10. Electrochemical studies of corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of single salts, as well as multicomponent mixtures, on corrosion inhibition was studied for type 1010 steel; for 5052, 1100, and 2219-T87 aluminum alloys; and for copper. Molybdate-containing inhibitors exhibit an immediate, positive effect for steel corrosion, but an incubation period may be required for aluminum before the effect of a given inhibitor can be determined. The absence of oxygen was found to provide a positive effect (smaller corrosion rate) for steel and copper, but a negative effect for aluminum. This is attributed to the two possible mechanisms by which aluminum can oxidize. Corrosion inhibition is generally similar for oxygen-rich and oxygen-free environments. The results show that the electrochemical method is an effective means of screening inhibitors for the corrosion of single metals, with caution to be exercised in the case of aluminum.

  11. Corrosion of Titanium Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Alman, D.E.

    2002-09-22

    The corrosion behavior of unalloyed Ti and titanium matrix composites containing up to 20 vol% of TiC or TiB{sub 2} was determined in deaerated 2 wt% HCl at 50, 70, and 90 degrees C. Corrosion rates were calculated from corrosion currents determined by extrapolation of the tafel slopes. All curves exhibited active-passive behavior but no transpassive region. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiC composites were similar to those for unalloyed Ti except at 90 degrees C where the composites were slightly higher. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiB{sub 2} composites were generally higher than those for unalloyed Ti and increased with higher concentrations of TiB{sub 2}. XRD and SEM-EDS analyses showed that the TiC reinforcement did not react with the Ti matrix during fabrication while the TiB{sub 2} reacted to form a TiB phase.

  12. Kinetics and thermodynamics of chemical reactions in Li/SOCl2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Lee D.; Frank, Harvey

    1987-01-01

    Work is described that was designed to determine the kinetic constants necessary to extrapolate kinetic data on Li/SOCl2 cells over the temperature range from 25 to 75 C. A second objective was to characterize as far as possible the chemical reactions that occur in the cells since these reactions may be important in understanding the potential hazards of these cells. The kinetics of the corrosion processes in undischarged Li/SOCl2 cells were determined and separated according to their occurrence at the anode and cathode; the effects that switching the current on and off has on the corrosion reactions was determined; and the effects of discharge state on the kinetics of the corrosion process were found. A thermodynamic analysis of the current-producing reactions in the cell was done and is included.

  13. Maternal exposure to alkali, alkali earth, transition and other metals: Concentrations and predictors of exposure.

    PubMed

    Hinwood, A L; Stasinska, A; Callan, A C; Heyworth, J; Ramalingam, M; Boyce, M; McCafferty, P; Odland, J Ø

    2015-09-01

    Most studies of metals exposure focus on the heavy metals. There are many other metals (the transition, alkali and alkaline earth metals in particular) in common use in electronics, defense industries, emitted via combustion and which are naturally present in the environment, that have received limited attention in terms of human exposure. We analysed samples of whole blood (172), urine (173) and drinking water (172) for antimony, beryllium, bismuth, cesium, gallium, rubidium, silver, strontium, thallium, thorium and vanadium using ICPMS. In general most metals concentrations were low and below the analytical limit of detection with some high concentrations observed. Few factors examined in regression models were shown to influence biological metals concentrations and explained little of the variation. Further study is required to establish the source of metals exposures at the high end of the ranges of concentrations measured and the potential for any adverse health impacts in children. PMID:25984984

  14. Maternal exposure to alkali, alkali earth, transition and other metals: Concentrations and predictors of exposure.

    PubMed

    Hinwood, A L; Stasinska, A; Callan, A C; Heyworth, J; Ramalingam, M; Boyce, M; McCafferty, P; Odland, J Ø

    2015-09-01

    Most studies of metals exposure focus on the heavy metals. There are many other metals (the transition, alkali and alkaline earth metals in particular) in common use in electronics, defense industries, emitted via combustion and which are naturally present in the environment, that have received limited attention in terms of human exposure. We analysed samples of whole blood (172), urine (173) and drinking water (172) for antimony, beryllium, bismuth, cesium, gallium, rubidium, silver, strontium, thallium, thorium and vanadium using ICPMS. In general most metals concentrations were low and below the analytical limit of detection with some high concentrations observed. Few factors examined in regression models were shown to influence biological metals concentrations and explained little of the variation. Further study is required to establish the source of metals exposures at the high end of the ranges of concentrations measured and the potential for any adverse health impacts in children.

  15. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  16. Naval electrochemical corrosion reducer

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Howard L.

    1991-10-01

    A corrosion reducer for use with ships having a hull, a propeller mounted a propeller shaft and extending through the hull, bearings supporting the shaft, at least one thrust bearing and one seal. The improvement includes a current collector and a current reduction assembly for reducing the voltage between the hull and shaft in order to reduce corrosion due to electrolytic action. The current reduction assembly includes an electrical contact, the current collector, and the hull. The current reduction assembly further includes a device for sensing and measuring the voltage between the hull and the shaft and a device for applying a reverse voltage between the hull and the shaft so that the resulting voltage differential is from 0 to 0.05 volts. The current reduction assembly further includes a differential amplifier having a voltage differential between the hull and the shaft. The current reduction assembly further includes an amplifier and a power output circuit receiving signals from the differential amplifier and being supplied by at least one current supply. The current selector includes a brush assembly in contact with a slip ring over the shaft so that its potential may be applied to the differential amplifier.

  17. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of alkali metal deficiency and excess.

    PubMed

    Yung, C Y

    1984-01-01

    The alkali metals from the Group IA of the periodic table (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium and francium) are reviewed. The neuropsychiatric aspects of alkali metal deficiencies and excesses (intoxications) are described. Emphasis was placed on lithium due to its clinical uses. The signs and symptoms of these conditions are characterized by features of an organic brain syndrome with delirium and encephalopathy prevailing. There are no clinically distinctive features that could be reliably used for diagnoses. Sodium and potassium are two essential alkali metals in man. Lithium is used as therapeutic agent in bipolar affective disorders. Rubidium has been investigated for its antidepressant effect in a group of psychiatric disorders. Cesium is under laboratory investigation for its role in carcinogenesis and in depressive illness. Very little is known of francium due to its great instability for experimental study. PMID:6395136

  18. C-CAMP, A closed cycle alkali metal power system

    SciTech Connect

    Wichner, R.P.; Hoffman, H.W.

    1988-01-01

    A concept is presented for a Closed-Cycle Alkali Metal (C-CAMP) power systems which utilizes the heat of reaction of an alkali metal and halogen compound to vaporize an alkali metal turbine fluid for a Rankine cycle. Unique features of the concept are (1) direct contact (heat exchange) between the reaction products and turbine fluid, and (2) a flow-through chemical reactor/boiler. The principal feasibility issues of the concept relate to the degree of cross-mixing of product and turbine fluid streams within the reactor-boiler. If proven feasible, the concept may be adapted to a range of fuel and turbine fluids and ultimately lead to thermal efficiencies in excess of 35%.

  19. Alkali-induced enhancement of surface electronic polarizibility.

    PubMed

    Stolbov, Sergey; Rahman, Talat S

    2006-05-12

    From results of ab initio electronic structure calculations based on density functional theory for a set of prototype systems, we find alkali adsorbates to cause a dramatic enhancement of the electronic polarizability of the metal surface extending it several angstroms into the vacuum. This phenomenon is traceable to an unusual feature induced in the surface potential on alkali adsorption. The effect appears to be general, as we find it to be present on metals as varied as Pd and Cu, and helps explain the observed substantial decrease in the vibrational frequency of molecules when coadsorbed with alkalis on metal surfaces. Specifically, for two dissimilar molecules CO and O(2), we trace the softening of the frequencies of their stretching mode when coadsorbed with K on Pd(111) to the enhanced electronic polarizability.

  20. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of alkali metal deficiency and excess

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, C.Y.

    1984-01-01

    The alkali metals from the Group IA of the periodic table (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium and francium) are reviewed. The neuropsychiatric aspects of alkali metal deficiencies and excesses (intoxications) are described. Emphasis was placed on lithium due to its clinical uses. The signs and symptoms of these conditions are characterized by features of an organic brain syndrome with delirium and encephalopathy prevailing. There are no clinically distinctive features that could be reliably used for diagnoses. Sodium and potassium are two essential alkali metals in man. Lithium is used as therapeutic agent in bipolar affective disorders. Rubidium has been investigated for its antidepressant effect in a group of psychiatric disorders. Cesium is under laboratory investigation for its role in carcinogenesis and in depressive illness. Very little is known of francium due to its great instability for experimental study.

  1. Theoretical study of the alkali and alkaline-earth monosulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Ab initio calculations have been used to obtain accurate spectroscopic constants for the X2Pi and A2Sigma(+) states of the alkali sulfides and the X1Sigma(+), a3Pi, and A1Pi states of the alkaline-earth sulfides. In contrast to the alkali oxides, the alkali sulfides are found to have X2Pi ground states, due to the larger electrostatic interaction. Dissociation energies of 3.27 eV for BeS, 2.32 eV for MgS, 3.29 eV for CaS, and 3.41 eV for SrS have been obtained for the X1Sigma(+) states of the alkaline-earth sulfides, in good agreement with experimental results. Core correlation is shown to increase the Te values for the a3Pi and A1Pi states of MgS, CaS, and SrS.

  2. Effect of debonded interfaces on corrosion of mild steel composites in supercritical CO2-saturated brines

    SciTech Connect

    John, Han; Carey, James W; Zhang, Jinsuo

    2010-10-07

    The geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2} is a proposed method to limit greenhouse gas emissions and has been the subject of many studies in the last decade. Wellbore systems achieve isolation of the storage reservoir through a combination of steel (generally carbon steel) and Portland cement. CO{sub 2} leakage along the steel-cement interface has the potential to accelerate corrosion. We conduct experiments to assess the corrosion risk at cement-steel interface under in situ wellbore conditions. Wellbore interfaces were simulated by assemblies constructed of J55 mild steel and Portland class G (Epoxy was used in this study to separate) cement and corrosion was investigated in supercritical CO{sub 2} saturated brines, (NaCl = 1 wt%) at T = 50 C, pCO{sub 2} = 1200 psi with interface gap size = 100 {micro}m and {infinity} (open surface). The experiments were carried out in a high-pressure, 1.8 L autoclave. The corrosion kinetics were measured employing electrochemical techniques including linear polarization resistance and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. The corrosion scales were analyzed using secondary electron microscopy, back scattering electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. Corrosion rates decreased as time with or without interface gap. In this case corrosion rates are controlled by scale protectivity through the interface gap. Scaled steel corrosion rates were two orders of magnitude less compared with fresh steel. The corrosion scale is pseudo crystalline at the open interface. Well-crystallized scale was observed at interface gap sizes 100 {micro}m. All corrosion scales were composed of iron carbonates.

  3. Field testing results for the strategic petroleum reserve pipeline corrosion control program

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.; Maestas, L.M.; Hinkebein, T.E.

    1998-02-01

    Results of two studies conducted as part of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Pipeline Corrosion Control Program are reported. These studies focused on evaluation of rotary-applied concrete materials for internal pipeline protection against the erosive and corrosive effects of flowing brine. The study also included evaluation of liners applied by hand on pipe pieces that cannot be lined by rotary methods. Such pipe pieces include tees, elbows and flanged pipe sections. Results are reported from a corrosion survey of 17 different liner formulations tested at the-Big-Rill SPR Site. Testing consisted of electrochemical corrosion rate measurements made on lined pipe sections exposed, in a test manifold, to flowing SPR generated fluids. Testing also involved cumulative immersion exposure where samples were exposed to static site-generated brine for increasing periods of time. Samples were returned to the laboratory for various diagnostic analyses. Results of this study showed that standard calcium silicate concrete (API RP10E) and a rotary calcium aluminate concrete formulation were excellent performers. Hand-lined pipe pieces did not provide as much corrosion protection. The focus of the second part of the study was on further evaluation of the calcium silicate, calcium aluminate and hand-applied liners in actual SPR equipment and service. It was a further objective to assess the practicality of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for field corrosion monitoring of concrete lined pipe compared to the more well-known linear polarization technique. This study showed that concrete linings reduced the corrosion rate for bare steel from 10 to 15 mils per year to 1 mil per year or less. Again, the hand-applied liners did not provide as much corrosion protection as the rotary-applied liners. The EIS technique was found to be robust for field corrosion measurements. Mechanistic and kinetic corrosion rate data were reliably obtained.

  4. Electron emission in slow collisions of inert gas and reactive ions with W(110) partially covered by alkali atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, H.; Hausmann, R.; Brenten, H.; Kempter, V.

    1993-05-01

    Electron energy spectra from slow (50 to 1000 eV) collisions of inert gas (He +, He 2+ and Ar +) and reactive (H +, N +) ions colliding under grazing incidence with W(110) surfaces are reported. The surface work function is varied by the exposure of the W(110) surface to alkali atoms. For clean W(110) the sequence of electronic transitions during a slow (50 eV, typically) collision is similar as reported for other clean metals: Auger capture processes involving two electrons from the surface dominate for all projectiles. For sufficiently large coverages by alkali atoms resonant capture of one or two surface electrons by the projectiles leads to the formation of excited states of the projectiles with one or two electrons occupying valence orbitals. These states decay by Auger deexcitation (Penning ionization) and intra-atomic Auger processes (autoionization and autodetachment), respectively. For the case of Ar + ions colliding with W(110) partially covered by potassium it is demonstrated that core vacancies (Ar3p -1) are created during the collision provided the kinetic energy of the projectile surmounts about 300 eV. Contributions from both potential and kinetic emission can then be seen in the spectra of the emitted electrons.

  5. Hydrothermal chemistry, structures, and luminescence studies of alkali hafnium fluorides.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Christopher C; McMillen, Colin D; Chen, Hongyu; Anker, Jeffery N; Kolis, Joseph W

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the hydrothermal chemistry of alkali hafnium fluorides, including the synthesis and structural characterization of five new alkali hafnium fluorides. Two ternary alkali hafnium fluorides are described: Li(2)HfF(6) in space group P31m with a = 4.9748(7) Å and c = 4.6449(9) Å and Na(5)Hf(2)F(13) in space group C2/m with a = 11.627(2) Å, b = 5.5159(11) Å, and c = 8.4317(17) Å. Three new alkali hafnium oxyfluorides are also described: two fluoroelpasolites, K(3)HfOF(5) and (NH(4))(3)HfOF(5), in space group Fm3m with a = 8.9766(10) and 9.4144(11) Å, respectively, and K(2)Hf(3)OF(12) in space group R3m with a = 7.6486(11) Å and c = 28.802(6) Å. Infrared (IR) spectra were obtained for the title solids to confirm the structure solutions. Comparison of these materials was made based on their structures and synthesis conditions. The formation of these species in hydrothermal fluids appears to be dependent upon both the concentration of the alkali fluoride mineralizer solution and the reaction temperature. Both X-ray and visible fluorescence studies were conducted on compounds synthesized in this study and showed that fluorescence was affected by a variety of factors, such as alkali metal size, the presence/absence of oxygen in the compound, and the coordination environment of Hf(4+).

  6. Spill-Resistant Alkali-Metal-Vapor Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, William

    2005-01-01

    A spill-resistant vessel has been developed for dispensing an alkali-metal vapor. Vapors of alkali metals (most commonly, cesium or rubidium, both of which melt at temperatures slightly above room temperature) are needed for atomic frequency standards, experiments in spectroscopy, and experiments in laser cooling. Although the present spill-resistant alkali-metal dispenser was originally intended for use in the low-gravity environment of outer space, it can also be used in normal Earth gravitation: indeed, its utility as a vapor source was confirmed by use of cesium in a ground apparatus. The vessel is made of copper. It consists of an assembly of cylinders and flanges, shown in the figure. The uppermost cylinder is a fill tube. Initially, the vessel is evacuated, the alkali metal charge is distilled into the bottom of the vessel, and then the fill tube is pinched closed to form a vacuum seal. The innermost cylinder serves as the outlet for the vapor, yet prevents spilling by protruding above the surface of the alkali metal, no matter which way or how far the vessel is tilted. In the event (unlikely in normal Earth gravitation) that any drops of molten alkali metal have been shaken loose by vibration and are floating freely, a mesh cap on top of the inner cylinder prevents the drops from drifting out with the vapor. Liquid containment of the equivalent of 1.2 grams of cesium was confirmed for all orientations with rubbing alcohol in one of the prototypes later used with cesium.

  7. Mechanism of Na2SO4-induced corrosion of molybdenum containing nickel-base superalloys at high temperatures. I - Corrosion in atmospheres containing O2 only. II - Corrosion in O2 + SO2 atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Kinetics of the Na2SO4-induced corrosion of the molybdenum-containing nickel-base superalloys, B-1900 and Udimet 700, coated with Na2MoO4, has been studied in oxygen atmosphere at temperatures ranging from 750 to 950 C. Because the gas turbine atmosphere always contains some SO2 and SO3, the effect of atmospheric SO2 content on corrosion of Udimet-700 has also been studied. It was found that in the O2 atmosphere the melt in the catastrophic corrosion phase consists of Na2MoO4 plus MoO3, with the onset of the catastrophic corrosion coinciding with the appearance of MoO3. In the presence of low levels of atmospheric SO2 (below 0.24 percent), the melt during catastrophic corrosion contains, in addition to Na2MoO4 and MoO3, some quantities of Na2SO4. At the levels of SO2 above 1 percent, no catastrophic corrosion was observed. At these SO2 levels, internal sulfidation appears to be the primary mode of degradation.

  8. Significance of coplanar macrocells to corrosion in concrete-embedded steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, P.; Ramirez, E.; Feliu, S.; Gonzalez, J.A.; Lopez, W.

    1999-03-01

    The influence of microcells and galvanic macrocells on the corrosion kinetics of concrete-embedded steel was investigated experimentally. Nine stainless steel/carbon steel coplanar macrocouples in cathodic-to-anodic ratios of 0.02 to 50 were cast in concrete slabs made from cement, sand, and water in a 1:3:0:5 proportion plus 2% calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) per cement weight. Corrosion potential (E{sub corr}), galvanic current (i{sub g}), polarization resistance (R{sub p}), and impedance measurements from 100 kHz to 0.01 Hz were made for the two metals, coupled and uncoupled. i{sub g} data provided by a zero resistance ammeter led to potentially underestimated corrosion rates for anodic areas, whereas R{sub p} measurements provided fairly reliable corrosion rates. Macrocells polarized anodic areas very slightly at points where an anodic and a cathodic process took place simultaneously.

  9. Corrosion and tribocorrosion behavior of Ti-B4C composite intended for orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Toptan, F; Rego, A; Alves, A C; Guedes, A

    2016-08-01

    Poor wear resistance of titanium is a major concern since relative movements due to the cyclic loads in body environment cause wear between the bone and the implant material leading to detachment of the wear debris and release of metal ions due to the simultaneous action of corrosion and wear, defined as tribocorrosion. In order to increase the tribocorrosion resistance, Grade 2 Ti matrix 24vol% B4C particle reinforced composites were processed by hot pressing. Corrosion behaviour was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization in 9g/L NaCl solution at body temperature. Tribocorrosion tests were performed under open circuit potential, as well as under potentiodynamic polarization using a reciprocating ball-on-plate tribometer. Results suggested that the addition of B4C particles provided lower tendency to corrosion and lower corrosion kinetics under sliding, along with significantly reduced wear loss, mainly due to the load carrying effect given by the reinforcement particles.

  10. Corrosion and tribocorrosion behavior of Ti-B4C composite intended for orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Toptan, F; Rego, A; Alves, A C; Guedes, A

    2016-08-01

    Poor wear resistance of titanium is a major concern since relative movements due to the cyclic loads in body environment cause wear between the bone and the implant material leading to detachment of the wear debris and release of metal ions due to the simultaneous action of corrosion and wear, defined as tribocorrosion. In order to increase the tribocorrosion resistance, Grade 2 Ti matrix 24vol% B4C particle reinforced composites were processed by hot pressing. Corrosion behaviour was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization in 9g/L NaCl solution at body temperature. Tribocorrosion tests were performed under open circuit potential, as well as under potentiodynamic polarization using a reciprocating ball-on-plate tribometer. Results suggested that the addition of B4C particles provided lower tendency to corrosion and lower corrosion kinetics under sliding, along with significantly reduced wear loss, mainly due to the load carrying effect given by the reinforcement particles. PMID:26866451

  11. Review of corrosion causes and corrosion control in a technical facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charng, T.; Lansing, F.

    1982-01-01

    Causes of corrosion of metals and their alloys are reviewed. The corrosion mechanism is explained by electrochemical reaction theory. The causes and methods of controlling of both physiochemical corrosion and biological corrosion are presented. Factors which influence the rate of corrosion are also discussed.

  12. Upgrading of petroleum oil feedstocks using alkali metals and hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A method of upgrading an oil feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the oil feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase separable from the organic oil feedstock material. The upgradant hydrocarbon bonds to the oil feedstock material and increases the number of carbon atoms in the product. This increase in the number of carbon atoms of the product increases the energy value of the resulting oil feedstock.

  13. Alkali Metal/Salt Thermal-Energy-Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Wayne W.; Stearns, John W.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed thermal-energy-storage system based on mixture of alkali metal and one of its halide salts; metal and salt form slurry of two immiscible melts. Use of slurry expected to prevent incrustations of solidified salts on heat-transfer surfaces that occur where salts alone used. Since incrustations impede heat transfer, system performance improved. In system, charging heat-exchanger surface immersed in lower liquid, rich in halide-salt, phase-charge material. Discharging heat exchanger surface immersed in upper liquid, rich in alkali metal.

  14. Metal induced gap states at alkali halide/metal interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiguchi, Manabu; Yoshikawa, Genki; Ikeda, Susumu; Saiki, Koichiro

    2004-10-01

    The electronic state of a KCl/Cu(0 0 1) interface was investigated using the Cl K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). A pre-peak observed on the bulk edge onset of thin KCl films has a similar feature to the peak at a LiCl/Cu(0 0 1) interface, which originates from the metal induced gap state (MIGS). The present result indicates that the MIGS is formed universally at alkali halide/metal interfaces. The decay length of MIGS to an insulator differs from each other, mainly due to the difference in the band gap energy of alkali halide.

  15. Feasibility of supersonic diode pumped alkali lasers: Model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2013-04-08

    The feasibility of supersonic operation of diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) is studied for Cs and K atoms applying model calculations, based on a semi-analytical model previously used for studying static and subsonic flow DPALs. The operation of supersonic lasers is compared with that measured and modeled in subsonic lasers. The maximum power of supersonic Cs and K lasers is found to be higher than that of subsonic lasers with the same resonator and alkali density at the laser inlet by 25% and 70%, respectively. These results indicate that for scaling-up the power of DPALs, supersonic expansion should be considered.

  16. Interfacial tension in immiscible mixtures of alkali halides.

    PubMed

    Lockett, Vera; Rukavishnikova, Irina V; Stepanov, Victor P; Tkachev, Nikolai K

    2010-02-01

    The interfacial tension of the liquid-phase interface in seven immiscible reciprocal ternary mixtures of lithium fluoride with the following alkali halides: CsCl, KBr, RbBr, CsBr, KI, RbI, and CsI was measured using the cylinder weighing method over a wide temperature range. It was shown that for all mixtures the interfacial tension gradually decreases with growing temperature. The interfacial tension of the reciprocal ternary mixtures at a given temperature increases both with the alkali cation radius (K(+) < Rb(+) < Cs(+)) and with the radius of the halogen anion (Cl(-) < Br(-) < I(-)). PMID:20094678

  17. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott t.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of existing microcapsulation designs, the corrosion controlled release function that triggers the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand, only when and where needed. Microencapsulation of self-healing agents for autonomous repair of mechanical damage to the coating is also being pursued. Corrosion indicators, corrosion inhibitors, as well as self-healing agents, have been encapsulated and dispersed into several paint systems to test the corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing properties of the coating. Key words: Corrosion, coating, autonomous corrosion control, corrosion indication, corrosion inhibition, self-healing coating, smart coating, multifunctional coating, microencapsulation.

  18. Ternary alkali-metal and transition metal or metalloid acetylides as alkali-metal intercalation electrodes for batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeth, Karoly; Srajer, George; Harkay, Katherine C; Terdik, Joseph Z

    2015-02-10

    Novel intercalation electrode materials including ternary acetylides of chemical formula: A.sub.nMC.sub.2 where A is alkali or alkaline-earth element; M is transition metal or metalloid element; C.sub.2 is reference to the acetylide ion; n is an integer that is 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4 when A is alkali element and 0, 1, or 2 when A is alkaline-earth element. The alkali elements are Lithium (Li), Sodium (Na), Potassium (K), Rubidium (Rb), Cesium (Cs) and Francium (Fr). The alkaline-earth elements are Berilium (Be), Magnesium (Mg), Calcium (Ca), Strontium (Sr), Barium (Ba), and Radium (Ra). M is a transition metal that is any element in groups 3 through 12 inclusive on the Periodic Table of Elements (elements 21 (Sc) to element 30 (Zn)). In another exemplary embodiment, M is a metalloid element.

  19. Surface- and microanalysis as a tool for studying the corrosion of aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van craen, M. J. A.; Adams, F. C.; Van Beek, L. J. A.; Vanden Berghe, R. A. L.

    Corrosion phenomena of Al-1 % Si bond wires, observed after life testing of certain transistors, are studied. The following information is derived from laboratory simulation tests: the kinetics of the corrosion process, information about the corrosion mechanism and critical parameters, especially the influence of the environmental gas and Si content and finally the identification of the corrosion products and their comparison with those found for the transistor. It is demonstrated, using a combination of several surface analytical techniques, that the A1 pitting corrosion is induced and enhanced by the presence of water as a transport medium and surface electrolyte in an oxygen-rich atmosphere, with chloride ions as a stimulating and activating species. The effect of 1 % Si in the wire consists in acceleration of the corrosion rate, and is probably due to grain boundary effects. All critical corrosion parameters could be traced in the transistor system by electron microscopy, laser microprobe mass analysis and residual gas (and moisture) analysis by mass spectrometry.

  20. Protection of bronze artefacts through polymeric coatings based on nanocarriers filled with corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Luna, Martina Salzano; Buonocore, Giovanna; Di Carlo, Gabriella; Giuliani, Chiara; Ingo, Gabriel M.; Lavorgna, Marino

    2016-05-01

    Protective coatings based on polymers synthesized from renewable sources (chitosan or an amorphous vinyl alcohol based polymer) have been prepared for the protection of bronze artifacts from corrosion. Besides acting as an effective barrier against corrosive species present in the environment, the efficiency of the coatings has been improved by adding corrosion inhibitor compounds (benzotriazole or mercaptobenzothiazole) to the formulations. The liquid medium of the formulations has been carefully selected looking at maximizing the wettability on the bronze substrate and optimizing the solvent evaporation rate. The minimum amount of inhibitor compounds has been optimized by performing accelerated corrosion tests on coated bronze substrates. The inhibitors have been directly dissolved in the coating-forming solutions and/or introduced by means of nanocarriers, which allow to control the release kinetics. The free dissolved inhibitor molecules immediately provide a sufficient protection against corrosion. On the other hand, the inhibitor molecules contained in the nanocarriers serve as long-term reservoir, which can be activated by external corrosion-related stimuli in case of particularly severe conditions. Particular attention has been paid to other features which affect the coating performances. Specifically, the adhesion of the protective polymer layer to the bronze substrate has been assessed, as well as its permeability properties and transparency, the latter being a fundamental feature of protective coating for cultural heritages. Finally, the protective efficiency of the produced smart coatings has been assessed through accelerated corrosion tests.

  1. Corrosion-resistant sulfur concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBee, W. C.; Sullivan, T. A.; Jong, B. W.

    1983-04-01

    Sulfur concretes have been developed by the Bureau of Mines as construction materials with physical and mechanical properties that suit them for use in acid and salt corrosive environments where conventional concretes fail. Mixture design methods were established for preparing sulfur concretes using different types of aggregates and recently developed mixed-modified sulfur cements. Bench-scale testing of the sulfur concretes has shown their potential value. Corrosion resistance, strength, and durability of sulfur concrete are superior to those of conventional materials. Field in situ evaluation tests of the sulfur concretes as replacement for conventional concrete materials are in progress in corrosive areas of 24 commercial chemical, fertilizer, and metallurgical plants.

  2. Corrosion and corrosion fatigue of airframe aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G. S.; Gao, M.; Harlow, D. G.; Wei, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    Localized corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and growth are recognized as degradation mechanisms that effect the durability and integrity of commercial transport aircraft. Mechanically based understanding is needed to aid the development of effective methodologies for assessing durability and integrity of airframe components. As a part of the methodology development, experiments on pitting corrosion, and on corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and early growth from these pits were conducted. Pitting was found to be associated with constituent particles in the alloys and pit growth often involved coalescence of individual particle-nucleated pits, both laterally and in depth. Fatigue cracks typically nucleated from one of the larger pits that formed by a cluster of particles. The size of pit at which fatigue crack nucleates is a function of stress level and fatigue loading frequency. The experimental results are summarized, and their implications on service performance and life prediction are discussed.

  3. Corrosion manual for internal corrosion of water distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Singley, J.E.; Beaudet, B.A.; Markey, P.H.

    1984-04-01

    Corrosion of distribution piping and of home plumbing and fixtures has been estimated to cost the public water supply industry more than $700 million per year. Two toxic metals that occur in tap water, almost entirely because of corrosion, are lead and cadmium. Three other metals, usually present because of corrosion, cause staining of fixtures, or metallic taste, or both. These are copper (blue stains and metallic taste), iron (red-brown stains and metallic taste), and zinc (metallic taste). Since the Safe Drinking Water Act (P.L. 93-523) makes the supplying utility responsible for the water quality at the customer's tap, it is necessary to prevent these metals from getting into the water on the way to the tap. This manual was written to give the operators of potable water treatment plants and distribution systems an understanding of the causes and control of corrosion.

  4. Alloying of metals for corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    McCafferty, E.; Hubler, G.K.; Natishan, P.M.

    1989-09-29

    The corrosion resistance of bulk metals is improved by implanting a corrosion-resistant species into the surface of the bulk metal in a layer beginning at the surface and extending to a depth of at least about 50 angstroms. An amount of corrosion-resistant species is deposited so that the oxide layer that forms on the corrosion-resistant species implanted bulk metal is composed of at least about three percent of the oxide of the corrosion-resistant species.

  5. Review on stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue failure of centrifugal compressor impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiao; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng; Li, Jianfeng

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion failure, especially stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue, is the main cause of centrifugal compressor impeller failure. And it is concealed and destructive. This paper summarizes the main theories of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue and its latest developments, and it also points out that existing stress corrosion cracking theories can be reduced to the anodic dissolution (AD), the hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC), and the combined AD and HIC mechanisms. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of corrosion fatigue in the crack propagation stage are similar to stress corrosion cracking. The effects of stress ratio, loading frequency, and corrosive medium on the corrosion fatigue crack propagation rate are analyzed and summarized. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in corrosive environments, which contain sulfide, chlorides, and carbonate, are analyzed. The working environments of the centrifugal compressor impeller show the behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in different corrosive environments. The current research methods for centrifugal compressor impeller corrosion failure are analyzed. Physical analysis, numerical simulation, and the fluid-structure interaction method play an increasingly important role in the research on impeller deformation and stress distribution caused by the joint action of aerodynamic load and centrifugal load.

  6. Alkali, thermo and halo tolerant fungal isolate for the removal of textile dyes.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Prachi; Malik, Anushree

    2010-11-01

    In the present study potential of a fungal isolate Aspergillus lentulusFJ172995, was investigated for the removal of textile dyes. The removal percentages of dyes such as Acid Navy Blue, Orange-HF, Fast Red A, Acid Sulphone Blue and Acid Magenta were determined as 99.43, 98.82, 98.75, 97.67 and 69.98, respectively. None of the dyes inhibited the growth of A. lentulus. Detailed studies on growth kinetics, mechanism of dye removal and effect of different parameters on dye removal were conducted using Acid Navy Blue dye. It was observed that A. lentulus could completely remove Acid Navy Blue even at high initial dye concentrations, up to 900 mg/L. Highest uptake capacity of 212.92 mg/g was observed at an initial dye concentration of 900 mg/L. Dye removing efficiency was not altered with the variation of pH; and biomass production as well as dye removal was favored at higher temperatures. Dye removal was also efficient even at high salt concentration. Through growth kinetics studies it was observed that the initial exponential growth phase coincided with the phase of maximal dye removal. Microscopic studies suggest that bioaccumulation along with biosorption is the principle mechanism involved in dye removal by A. lentulus. Thus, it is concluded that being alkali, thermo and halo tolerant, A. lentulus isolate has a great potential to be utilized for the treatment of dye bearing effluents which are usually alkaline, hot and saline.

  7. Ultraviolet-blue ionic luminescence of alkali feldspars from bulk and interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Guinea, J.; Townsend, P. D.; Sanchez-Muñoz, L.; Rojo, J. M.

    Laboratory driven ionic thermal exchange of alkali feldspars from K to Na produces samples which are strongly luminescent in the ultraviolet region near 320nm. The sites providing this luminescence are suggested as being correlated with the motion of Na atoms along interface-interphases of the material (i.e. with Na-O bond fracture). The thermoluminescence peaks show multi-order kinetics. Thermal preheatings of low albite sensitize the feldspar lattice with respect to thermoluminescence generated by exposure to UV irradiation and heating produces a strong blue luminescence spread over the range 350nm to 500nm band in feldspars. The upper temperature for thermoluminescence in feldspars is 300°C, which is also the point where ionic conductivity of albite (010) begins, but the 300°C region is also the starting point of a large second glow peak in adularia. Whilst it seems appropriate to link the Na motion to the 350-500nm emission, it is unclear whether these changes are the result of the large anisotropic thermal vibration of Na atoms or the massive Na jumps that occur when the lattice reaches 300°C. A speculative model is considered in which the UV TL emissions of natural minerals are linked to different interface-interphases (grain boundaries, exsolution limits, twinning planes, antiphase domains). Increased interface coherency energies are related to the kinetic order and the spectral position of luminescence emission peaks.

  8. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  9. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  10. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  11. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  12. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  13. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  14. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  15. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  16. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  17. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  18. Development of models and online diagnostic monitors of the high-temperature corrosion of refractories in oxy/fuel glass furnaces : final project report.

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Gupta, Amul; Walsh, Peter M.; Rice, Steven F.; Velez, Mariano; Allendorf, Mark D.; Pecoraro, George A.; Nilson, Robert H.; Wolfe, H. Edward; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Bugeat, Benjamin American Air Liquide, Countryside, IL); Spear, Karl E.; Marin, Ovidiu American Air Liquide, Countryside, IL); Ghani, M. Usman

    2005-02-01

    This report summarizes the results of a five-year effort to understand the mechanisms and develop models that predict the corrosion of refractories in oxygen-fuel glass-melting furnaces. Thermodynamic data for the Si-O-(Na or K) and Al-O-(Na or K) systems are reported, allowing equilibrium calculations to be performed to evaluate corrosion of silica- and alumina-based refractories under typical furnace operating conditions. A detailed analysis of processes contributing to corrosion is also presented. Using this analysis, a model of the corrosion process was developed and used to predict corrosion rates in an actual industrial glass furnace. The rate-limiting process is most likely the transport of NaOH(gas) through the mass-transport boundary layer from the furnace atmosphere to the crown surface. Corrosion rates predicted on this basis are in better agreement with observation than those produced by any other mechanism, although the absolute values are highly sensitive to the crown temperature and the NaOH(gas) concentration at equilibrium and at the edge of the boundary layer. Finally, the project explored the development of excimer laser induced fragmentation (ELIF) fluorescence spectroscopy for the detection of gas-phase alkali hydroxides (e.g., NaOH) that are predicted to be the key species causing accelerated corrosion in these furnaces. The development of ELIF and the construction of field-portable instrumentation for glass furnace applications are reported and the method is shown to be effective in industrial settings.

  19. Kinetic buffers.

    PubMed

    Alibrandi, Giuseppe; Fabbrizzi, Luigi; Licchelli, Maurizio; Puglisi, Antonio

    2015-01-12

    This paper proposes a new type of molecular device that is able to act as an inverse proton sponge to slowly decrease the pH inside a reaction vessel. This makes the automatic monitoring of the concentration of pH-sensitive systems possible. The device is a composite formed of an alkyl chloride, which kinetically produces acidity, and a buffer that thermodynamically modulates the variation in pH value. Profiles of pH versus time (pH-t plots) have been generated under various experimental conditions by computer simulation, and the device has been tested by carrying out automatic spectrophotometric titrations, without using an autoburette. To underline the wide variety of possible applications, this new system has been used to realize and monitor HCl uptake by a di-copper(II) bistren complex in a single run, in a completely automatic experiment.

  20. Assesment of Alkali Resistance of Basalt Used as Concrete Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    al-Swaidani, Aref M.; Baddoura, Mohammad K.; Aliyan, Samira D.; Choeb, Walid

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to report a part of an ongoing research on the influence of using crushed basalt as aggregates on one of durability-related properties of concrete (i.e. alkali-silica reaction which is the most common form of Alkali-Aggregate Reaction). Alkali resistance has been assessed through several methods specified in the American Standards. Results of petrographic examination, chemical test (ASTM C289) and accelerated mortar bar test (ASTM C1260) have particularly been reported. In addition, the weight change and compressive strength of 28 days cured concrete containing basaltic aggregates were also reported after 90 days of exposure to 10% NaOH solution. Dolomite aggregate were used in the latter test for comparison. The experimental results revealed that basaltic rocks quarried from As-Swaida'a region were suitable for production of aggregates for concrete. According to the test results, the studied basalt aggregates can be classified as innocuous with regard to alkali-silica reaction. Further, the 10% sodium hydroxide attack did not affect the compressive strength of concrete.

  1. Chlor-Alkali Industry: A Laboratory Scale Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez-Sanchez, C. M.; Exposito, E.; Frias-Ferrer, A.; Gonzalez-Garaia, J.; Monthiel, V.; Aldaz, A.

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory experiment for students in the last year of degree program in chemical engineering, chemistry, or industrial chemistry is presented. It models the chlor-alkali process, one of the most important industrial applications of electrochemical technology and the second largest industrial consumer of electricity after aluminium industry.

  2. Influence of temperature on alkali stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes cells may induce alkali stress adaptation when exposed to sublethal concentrations of alkaline cleaners and sanitizers that may be frequently used in the food processing environment. In the present study, the effect of temperature on the induction and the stability of such alk...

  3. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified...

  4. Stabilized Alkali-Metal Ultraviolet-Band-Pass Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, Nick; Fraschetti, George A.; Mccann, Timothy; Mayall, Sherwood D.; Dunn, Donald E.; Trauger, John T.

    1995-01-01

    Layers of bismuth 5 to 10 angstrom thick incorporated into alkali-metal ultraviolet-band-pass optical filters by use of advanced fabrication techniques. In new filters layer of bismuth helps to reduce surface migration of sodium. Sodium layer made more stable and decreased tendency to form pinholes by migration.

  5. Factors associated with alkali production from arginine in dental biofilms.

    PubMed

    Huang, X; Exterkate, R A M; ten Cate, J M

    2012-12-01

    Alkali production by oral bacteria in the oral cavity has been linked to protection against dental caries. The current study assessed various parameters associated with ammonium produced during arginine catabolism in dental biofilms. Polymicrobial biofilms were formed with saliva as the inoculum. The NH(3) level and the pH of the spent medium were used to monitor and quantitate the bacterial reactions. The presence of sucrose, a low buffer capacity, and a low pH (≤ pH 4.5) were found to hamper alkali production from arginine. The rate of alkali production exhibited an optimum around pH 5.5. Biofilms were found to produce NH(3) also from polypeptides and proteins in the medium. The biofilm age affected these processes. The experimental model proved valuable for the assessment of the collective bacterial reactions determining the overall pH outcome. This experimental approach could bridge the gap in our knowledge between pH-rise phenomena and caries susceptibility from clinical observations and studies performed on alkali-producing bacteria in well- controlled, though simplified, in vitro models. Analysis of our data supports the hypothesis that the initiation and progression of dental caries may be influenced by the relative rates of acid and base formation, which critically depend on the aforementioned parameters. PMID:23010718

  6. Aqueous alkali metal hydroxide insoluble cellulose ether membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. E.; Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor)

    1969-01-01

    A membrane that is insoluble in an aqueous alkali metal hydroxide medium is described. The membrane is a resin which is a water-soluble C2-C4 hydroxyalkyl cellulose ether polymer and an insolubilizing agent for controlled water sorption, a dialytic and electrodialytic membrane. It is particularly useful as a separator between electrodes or plates in an alkaline storage battery.

  7. High capacity nickel battery material doped with alkali metal cations

    DOEpatents

    Jackovitz, John F.; Pantier, Earl A.

    1982-05-18

    A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

  8. Method of assembling and sealing an alkali metal battery

    DOEpatents

    Elkins, Perry E.; Bell, Jerry E.; Harlow, Richard A.; Chase, Gordon G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of initially assembling and then subsequently hermetically sealing a container portion of an alkali metal battery to a ceramic portion of such a battery is disclosed. Sealing surfaces are formed respectively on a container portion and a ceramic portion of an alkali metal battery. These sealing surfaces are brought into juxtaposition and a material is interposed therebetween. This interposed material is one which will diffuse into sealing relationship with both the container portion and the ceramic portion of the alkali metal battery at operational temperatures of such a battery. A pressure is applied between these sealing surfaces to cause the interposed material to be brought into intimate physical contact with such juxtaposed surfaces. A temporary sealing material which will provide a seal against a flow of alkali metal battery reactants therethrough at room temperatures and is applied over the juxtaposed sealing surfaces and material interposed therebetween. The entire assembly is heated to an operational temperature so that the interposed material diffuses into the container portion and the ceramic portion to form a hermetic seal therebetween. The pressure applied to the juxtaposed sealing surfaces is maintained in order to ensure the continuation of the hermetic seal.

  9. Method of assembling and sealing an alkali metal battery

    DOEpatents

    Elkins, P.E.; Bell, J.E.; Harlow, R.A.; Chase, G.G.

    1983-03-01

    A method of initially assembling and then subsequently hermetically sealing a container portion of an alkali metal battery to a ceramic portion of such a battery is disclosed. Sealing surfaces are formed respectively on a container portion and a ceramic portion of an alkali metal battery. These sealing surfaces are brought into juxtaposition and a material is interposed there between. This interposed material is one which will diffuse into sealing relationship with both the container portion and the ceramic portion of the alkali metal battery at operational temperatures of such a battery. A pressure is applied between these sealing surfaces to cause the interposed material to be brought into intimate physical contact with such juxtaposed surfaces. A temporary sealing material which will provide a seal against a flow of alkali metal battery reactants there through at room temperatures and is applied over the juxtaposed sealing surfaces and material interposed there between. The entire assembly is heated to an operational temperature so that the interposed material diffuses into the container portion and the ceramic portion to form a hermetic seal there between. The pressure applied to the juxtaposed sealing surfaces is maintained in order to ensure the continuation of the hermetic seal. 4 figs.

  10. Corrosion Problems in Absorption Chillers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Absorption chillers use a lithium bromide solution as the medium of absorption and water as the refrigerant. Discussed are corrosion and related problems, tests and remedies, and cleaning procedures. (Author/MLF)

  11. Argentinean map of atmospheric corrosivities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosales, B.M.; Ayllon, E.S.; Leiro, M.C.; Fernandez, A.; Moriena, G.; Varela, F.; Codaro, E.N.; Vilche, J.R.

    1995-10-01

    In the present paper the results obtained by the Argentinean research groups integrated in the MICAT (Iberoamerican Map of Atmospheric Corrosion) Project are given. Outdoor exposure in 6 test situations of different environmental conditions were performed by quadruplicate, on plain carbon steel and pure zinc, copper and aluminium, during yearly periods from 1 to 4 years. Three samples were used for the weight loss determinations while the fourth one was used to characterize the corrosion products formed through electrochemical d.c. and a.c. techniques and SEM-EDAX surface analysis. Good correlations were observed among the corrosion rates, the environmental conditions, both electrochemical techniques and the morphology of the rusts in plant and in polished cross sections. The techniques applied allowed to evidence the different protectiveness of the rusts formed on the metals, according to the solubility, morphology, hygroscopic power and pollutants content of the corrosion products` components.

  12. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  13. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C.; Lee, Chuck K.; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  14. Alkali element constraints on Earth-Moon relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, M. D.; Drake, M. J.; Jones, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    Given their range of volatilities, alkali elements are potential tracers of temperature-dependent processes during planetary accretion and formation of the Earth-Moon system. Under the giant impact hypothesis, no direct connection between the composition of the Moon and the Earth is required, and proto-lunar material does not necessarily experience high temperatures. Models calling for multiple collisions with smaller planetesimals derive proto-lunar materials mainly from the Earth's mantle and explicitly invoke vaporization, shock melting and volatility-related fractionation. Na/K, K/Rb, and Rb/Cs should all increase in response to thermal volatization, so theories which derive the Moon substantially from Earth's mantle predict these ratios will be higher in the Moon than in the primitive mantle of the Earth. Despite the overall depletion of volatile elements in the Moon, its Na/K and K/Rb are equal to or less than those of Earth. A new model presented here for the composition of Earth's continental crust, a major repository of the alkali elements, suggests the Rb/Cs of the Moon is also less than that of Earth. Fractionation of the alkali elements between Earth and Moon are in the opposite sense to predictions based on the relative volatilities of these elements, if the Moon formed by high-T processing of Earth's mantle. Earth, rather than the Moon, appears to carry a signature of volatility-related fractionation in the alkali elements. This may reflect an early episode of intense heating on Earth with the Moon's alkali budget accreting from cooler material.

  15. Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Preventative Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Montgomery, Eliza; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry; Back, Teddy; Balles, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Protective Coatings and Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) project is to identify, test, and develop qualification criteria for the use of environmentally friendly corrosion protective coatings and CPCs for flight hardware and ground support equipment. This document is the Final Report for Phase I evaluations, which included physical property, corrosion resistance, and NASA spaceport environment compatibility testing and analysis of fifteen CPC types. The CPCs consisted of ten different oily film CPCs and five different wax or grease CPC types. Physical property testing encompassed measuring various properties of the bulk CPCs, while corrosion resistance testing directly measured the ability of each CPC material to protect various metals against corrosion. The NASA spaceport environment compatibility testing included common tests required by NASA-STD-6001, "Flammability, Odor, Offgassing, and Compatibility Requirements and Test Procedures for Materials in Environments that Support Combustion". At the end of Phase I, CPC materials were down-selected for inclusion in the next test phases. This final report includes all data and analysis of results obtained by following the experimental test plan that was developed as part of the project. Highlights of the results are summarized by test criteria type.

  16. Atmospheric Corrosion of Ag and Cu with Ozone, UV and NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huang

    . With the addition of NaCl, corrosion rate of Cu increases dramatically because of the breakdown of the naturally formed cuprous oxide by NaCl. To mimic corrosion behavior of metals in real field, a new environment chamber that generated constant deposition of NaCl was invented. With this novel environment chamber, the kinetics of Cu corrosion with constant deposition of NaCl in synthetic air with high and low CO2 and UV was studied. Cu2O and Cu2(OH)3Cl were both dominant corrosion products after exposure. 0.1 M Na2CO3 instead of 0.1M KCl was used as supporting electrolyte for reduction of Cu2O and Cu2(OH)3Cl, because it can clearly differentiate reduction of Cu2O and Cu2(OH)3Cl. With quantification of Cu2O and Cu2(OH)3Cl respectively, it is found UV has strong effect on formation of Cu2O but little on Cu2(OH)3Cl. It is also determined that localized corrosion of Cu dominates at the beginning of Cu corrosion and then uniform corrosion takes over.

  17. Alkali Activated Systems: Understanding the Influence of Curing Conditions and Activator Type/Chemistry on the Mechanical Strength and Chemical Structure of Fly Ash/Slag Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Ussala

    The alkali activation of aluminosilicate materials as binder systems derived from industrial byproducts have been extensively studied due to the advantages they offer in terms enhanced material properties, while increasing sustainability by the reuse of industrial waste and byproducts and reducing the adverse impacts of OPC production. Fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag are commonly used for their content of soluble silica and aluminate species that can undergo dissolution, polymerization with the alkali, condensation on particle surfaces and solidification. The following topics are the focus of this thesis: (i) the use of microwave assisted thermal processing, in addition to heat-curing as a means of alkali activation and (ii) the relative effects of alkali cations (K or Na) in the activator (powder activators) on the mechanical properties and chemical structure of these systems. Unsuitable curing conditions instigate carbonation, which in turn lowers the pH of the system causing significant reductions in the rate of fly ash activation and mechanical strength development. This study explores the effects of sealing the samples during the curing process, which effectively traps the free water in the system, and allows for increased aluminosilicate activation. The use of microwave-curing in lieu of thermal-curing is also studied in order to reduce energy consumption and for its ability to provide fast volumetric heating. Potassium-based powder activators dry blended into the slag binder system is shown to be effective in obtaining very high compressive strengths under moist curing conditions (greater than 70 MPa), whereas sodium-based powder activation is much weaker (around 25 MPa). Compressive strength decreases when fly ash is introduced into the system. Isothermal calorimetry is used to evaluate the early hydration process, and to understand the reaction kinetics of the alkali powder activated systems. A qualitative evidence of the alkali

  18. Corrosion testing in natural waters: Second volume

    SciTech Connect

    Kain, R.M.; Young, W.T.

    1997-12-31

    This is the second STP of the same title. The first volume, STP 1086, was published in 1990 and contained papers on seawater corrosivity, crevice corrosion resistance of stainless steels, corrosion fatigue testing, and corrosion in potable water. Since then, final results have become available from the worldwide study on corrosion behavior of metals in seawater, and additional studies have been performed that should be brought to the attention of the corrosion engineering community. The second volume contains these studies. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  19. Hot corrosion resistance of high-velocity oxyfuel sprayed coatings on a nickel-base superalloy in molten salt environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, T. S.; Prakash, S.; Agrawal, R. D.

    2006-09-01

    No alloy is immune to hot corrosion attack indefinitely. Coatings can extend the lives of substrate materials used at higher temperatures in corrosive environments by forming protective oxides layers that are reasonably effective for long-term applications. This article is concerned with studying the performance of high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) sprayed NiCrBSi, Cr3C2-NiCr, Ni-20Cr, and Stellite-6 coatings on a nickel-base superalloy at 900 °C in the molten salt (Na2SO4-60% V2O5) environment under cyclic oxidation conditions. The thermogravimetric technique was used to establish kinetics of corrosion. Optical microscope, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy/electron dispersive analysis by x-ray (SEM/EDAX), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) techniques were used to characterize the as-sprayed coatings and corrosion products. The bare superalloy suffered somewhat accelerated corrosion in the given environmental conditions. whereas hot corrosion resistance of all the coated superalloys was found to be better. Among the coating studied, Ni-20Cr coated superalloy imparted maximum hot corrosion resistance, whereas Stellite-6 coated indicated minimum resistance. The hot corrosion resistance of all the coatings may be attributed to the formation of oxides and spinels of nickel, chromium, or cobalt.

  20. High-Pressure Cold-Sprayed Ni and Ni-Cu Coatings: Improved Structures and Corrosion Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivuluoto, Heli; Milanti, Andrea; Bolelli, Giovanni; Lusvarghi, Luca; Vuoristo, Petri

    2014-01-01

    Cold spraying is a promising technique for the production of dense metallic coatings. In cold spraying, coating formation is through high velocity impacts of solid particles with high kinetic energy. During impact, particles deform plastically and adhere to the substrate, gradually building-up the coating. This makes it possible to form pure and dense coating structures. These impermeable coatings are advantageous in many applications such as those where corrosion protection is required. Nickel and nickel-copper alloys have good corrosion resistance and therefore, as dense coatings, have high potential for employment as corrosion barrier layers. In this study, the structural and corrosion properties of high-pressure cold-sprayed (HPCS) Ni and NiCu coatings are characterized. NiCu alloys are known to have good corrosion resistance in sulphuric and hydrochloric acids, whereas Ni is resistant to caustic soda and alkaline salt solutions. This study also shows the effect of heat treatments on coating properties. FESEM studies of cross-sectional samples reveal structural details of the HPCS coatings while corrosion properties are evaluated with polarization measurements. The corrosion behavior of both the bulk and substrate material is determined in order to assess the real corrosion protection potential of the coatings.

  1. Chem I Supplement: Corrosion: A Waste of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This article, intended for secondary school chemistry students, discusses the corrosion of metals. The discussion includes: (1) thermodynamic aspects of corrosion; (2) electrochemical aspects of corrosion; and (3) inhibition of corrosion processes. (HM)

  2. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua

    2004-09-16

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

  3. Report on accelerated corrosion studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Mowry, Curtis Dale; Glass, Sarah Jill; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2011-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted accelerated atmospheric corrosion testing for the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to help further the understanding of the development of corrosion products on conductor materials in household electrical components exposed to environmental conditions representative of homes constructed with problem drywall. The conditions of the accelerated testing were chosen to produce corrosion product growth that would be consistent with long-term exposure to environments containing humidity and parts per billion (ppb) levels of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) that are thought to have been the source of corrosion in electrical components from affected homes. This report documents the test set-up, monitoring of electrical performance of powered electrical components during the exposure, and the materials characterization conducted on wires, screws, and contact plates from selected electrical components. No degradation in electrical performance (measured via voltage drop) was measured during the course of the 8-week exposure, which was approximately equivalent to 40 years of exposure in a light industrial environment. Analyses show that corrosion products consisting of various phases of copper sulfide, copper sulfate, and copper oxide are found on exposed surfaces of the conductor materials including wires, screws, and contact plates. The morphology and the thickness of the corrosion products showed a range of character. In some of the copper wires that were observed, corrosion product had flaked or spalled off the surface, exposing fresh metal to the reaction with the contaminant gasses; however, there was no significant change in the wire cross-sectional area.

  4. [Enhancement of anaerobic digestion of excess sludge by acid-alkali pretreatment].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Guang-Huan; Zhou, Xing-Qiu; Wu, Jian-Dong

    2012-06-01

    In order to enhance the efficiency of anaerobic digestion of excess sludge, acid-alkali pretreatment method was studied. Three different pretreatment methods (alkali alone,acid-alkali, alkali-acid) were compared to investigate their impacts on hydrolysis and acidification of activated sludge. In addition, their influences on methane-producing in subsequent anaerobic digestion process were also studied. The results showed that the soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) of alkaline treatment alone was about 16% higher than the combining of acid and alkali treatment, SCOD concentration increased to 5406.1 mg x L(-1) after 8 d pretreatment. After treated by acid (pH 4.0, 4 d) and alkali (pH 10.0, 4 d), the acetic acid production and its content in short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were higher than other pretreatment methods. And the acetic acid production (as COD/VSS) could reach 74.4 mg x g(-1), accounting for 60.5% of SCFAs. After acid-alkali pretreatment, the C: N ratio of the sludge mixed liquor was about 25, and the C: P ratio was between 35-40, which was more favorable than C: N and C: P ratio of alkali alone and alkali-acid to subsequent anaerobic digestion. The control experiments showed that, after acid-alkali pretreatment, anaerobic digestion cumulative methane yield (CH4/VSS(in)) reached to 136.1 mL x g(-1) at 15 d, which was about 2.5-, 1.6-, and 1.7-fold of the blank (unpretreated), alkali alone pretreatment and alkali-acid pretreatment, respectively. After acid-alkali pretreatment for 8 d and anaerobic digestion for 15 d, the removal efficiency of VSS was about 60.9%, and the sludge reduction effect was better than other pretreatments. It is obvious that the acid-alkali pretreatment method was more favorable to anaerobic digestion and sludge reduction.

  5. Silica mesoporous thin films as containers for benzotriazole for corrosion protection of 2024 aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recloux, Isaline; Mouanga, Maixent; Druart, Marie-Eve; Paint, Yoann; Olivier, Marie-Georges

    2015-08-01

    This work contributes to the development of a new environmentally friendly alternative pretreatment for 2024 aluminium alloys to replace hexavalent chromium based conversion layers in the aeronautical field. A silica mesoporous thin film, synthesized through the evaporation induced self-assembly process, was doped with benzotriazole to obtain active corrosion protection. Inhibitor loading contents were correlated with pore characteristics. The release kinetics was studied as function of pH. The application of the doped mesoporous film on 2024 aluminium alloy revealed a slowing down of corrosion processes, demonstrating its potential as an active inhibitor storage layer.

  6. Corrosion behavior of alloy 800H (Fe-21Cr-32Ni) in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Allen, Todd R.; Yang, Ying

    2011-01-01

    The effect of testing conditions (temperature, time, and oxygen content) and material's microstructure (the as-received and the grain boundary engineered conditions) on the corrosion behavior of alloy 800H in high-temperature pressurized water was studied using a variety of characterization techniques. Oxidation was observed as the primary corrosion behavior on the samples. Oxide exfoliation was significantly mitigated on the grain boundary engineered samples compared to the as-received ones. The oxide formation, including some 'mushroom-shaped oxidation', is predicted via a combination of thermodynamics and kinetics influenced by the preferential diffusion of specific species using short-cut diffusion paths.

  7. Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, David W.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  8. Hanford transuranic storage corrosion review

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, J.L.; Divine, J.R.

    1980-12-01

    The rate of atmospheric corrosion of the transuranic (TRU) waste drums at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Project, near Richland, Washington, was evaluated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The rate of corrosion is principally contingent upon the effects of humidity, airborne pollutants, and temperature. Results of the study indicate that actual penetration of barrels due to atmospheric corrosion will probably not occur within the 20-year specified recovery period. Several other US burial sites were surveyed, and it appears that there is sufficient uncertainty in the available data to prevent a clearcut statement of the corrosion rate at a specific site. Laboratory and site tests are recommended before any definite conclusions can be made. The corrosion potential at the Hanford TRU waste site could be reduced by a combination of changes in drum materials (for example, using galvanized barrels instead of the currently used mild steel barrels), environmental exposure conditions (for example, covering the barrels in one of numerous possible ways), and storage conditions (for example, separating the layers of barrels with slats of wood instead of sheets of plywood).

  9. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    SciTech Connect

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly.

  10. Polymerization reactivity of sulfomethylated alkali lignin modified with horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongjie; Wu, Xiaolei; Qiu, Xueqing; Chang, Yaqi; Lou, Hongming

    2014-03-01

    Alkali lignin (AL) was employed as raw materials in the present study. Sulfomethylation was conducted to improve the solubility of AL, while sulfomethylated alkali lignin (SAL) was further polymerized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). HRP modification caused a significant increase in molecular weight of SAL which was over 20 times. It was also found to increase the amount of sulfonic and carboxyl groups while decrease the amount of phenolic and methoxyl groups in SAL. The adsorption quantity of self-assembled SAL film was improved after HRP modification. Sulfonation and HRP modification were mutually promoted. The polymerization reactivity of SAL in HRP modification was increased with its sulfonation degree. Meanwhile, HRP modification facilitated SAL's radical-sulfonation reaction. PMID:24534439

  11. Polymerization reactivity of sulfomethylated alkali lignin modified with horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongjie; Wu, Xiaolei; Qiu, Xueqing; Chang, Yaqi; Lou, Hongming

    2014-03-01

    Alkali lignin (AL) was employed as raw materials in the present study. Sulfomethylation was conducted to improve the solubility of AL, while sulfomethylated alkali lignin (SAL) was further polymerized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). HRP modification caused a significant increase in molecular weight of SAL which was over 20 times. It was also found to increase the amount of sulfonic and carboxyl groups while decrease the amount of phenolic and methoxyl groups in SAL. The adsorption quantity of self-assembled SAL film was improved after HRP modification. Sulfonation and HRP modification were mutually promoted. The polymerization reactivity of SAL in HRP modification was increased with its sulfonation degree. Meanwhile, HRP modification facilitated SAL's radical-sulfonation reaction.

  12. Alkali dimers on the surface of liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Peter B.; Cole, Milton W.; Cheng, E.

    1995-09-01

    A recent paper by Ancilotto et al. (Zeitschrift für Physik B, in press), presented calculations of adsorption energies and the geometry of a surface dimple for alkali atoms bound to the surfaces of quantum liquids (4He,3He, H2). Here we present a study of the adsorption of two alkali dimers (Li2, Na2) on the surface of liquid helium. The calculations employ a model of an abrupt interface formulated by Ancilotto et al. as well as one using a diffuse interface. Our conclusion its that the dimers are bound to the surface more strongly than their respective monomers. In the case of dimers there is an additional degree of freedom-the orientation of the molecular axis relative to the surface. We study the influence of molecular anisotropy on adsorption by comparing the cases of “erect” and “spinning flat” orientations and conclude that the latter is energetically favored.

  13. Wetting Transitions of Inert Gases on Alkali Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojan, M. J.; McDonald, I. A.; Cole, M. W.; Steele, W. A.

    1996-03-01

    Theoretical and experimental discoveries have been made recently of wetting and prewetting transitions of helium and hydrogen films on alkali metal surfaces [1,2]. New experiments show anomalous nonwetting behavior of Ne on Rb and Cs [3]. Building on earlier work [4], we have done and will describe results from the first Monte Carlo simulations showing wetting transitions for classical gases on alkali metal surfaces. * Research supported by an NSF Materials Research Group grant. 1. R. B.Hallock, J. Low Temp. Phys. 101, 31, 1995 2. M. W. Cole, J. Low Temp. Phys. 101, 25, 1995. 3. G. B. Hess, M. Sabatini, and M. H. W. Chan, unpublished 4. J. E. Finn and P. A. Monson, Phys. Rev. A 39, 6402, 1989.

  14. Valence bond cluster studies of alkali metal/semiconductor bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatar, Robert C.; Messmer, Richard P.

    1986-12-01

    We present results of cluster studies of alkali metal/semiconductor bonding. Using the Generalized Valence Bond (GVB) method, we find a remarkable consistency in the behavoir of bonding orbitals for a variety of systems, including: LiH, CLi4, LiH4 and several hypervalent systems, such as SiH3Li2, SiH4Li2. Our results show that the metal-semiconductor bonding in these systems can be understood in terms of a pairing between McAdon-Goddard type metallic bonding orbitals and a set of equivalent orbitals of the non-metallic species. We propose that the results are relevant to the initial stages of alkali overlayer growth on semiconductor surfaces and lead to a simple picture of the bonding including the transition from a non-conducting to a conducting layer. We have considered numerous proposed hypervalent structures in light of the above results and find that they can be understood.

  15. Fireside corrosion probes--an update

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Holcomb, G.R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Matthes, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to monitor the corrosion degradation of key metallic components in fossil fuel power plants will become increasingly important for FutureGen and ultra-supercritical power plants. A number of factors (ash deposition, coal composition changes, thermal gradients, and low NOx conditions, among others) which occur in the high temperature sections of energy production facilities, will contribute to fireside corrosion. Several years of research have shown that high temperature corrosion rate probes need to be better understood before corrosion rate can be used as a process variable by power plant operators. Our recent research has shown that electrochemical corrosion probes typically measure lower corrosion rates than those measured by standard mass loss techniques. While still useful for monitoring changes in corrosion rates, absolute probe corrosion rates will need a calibration factor to be useful. Continuing research is targeted to help resolve these issues.

  16. Corrosion and Preservation of Bronze Artifacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Robert

    1980-01-01

    Reviews chemical information relating to the corrosion of bronze artifacts. Properties of copper alloys are reviewed, with a thorough discussion of the specialized properties of bronze. Techniques to reduce or eliminate corrosion are listed. (CS)

  17. Microencapsulation of Corrosion Indicators for Smart Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.; Calle, Luz M.; Hanna,Joshua S.; Rawlins, James W.

    2011-01-01

    A multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous detection, indication, and control of corrosion is been developed based on microencapsulation technology. This paper summarizes the development, optimization, and testing of microcapsules specifically designed for early detection and indication of corrosion when incorporated into a smart coating. Results from experiments designed to test the ability of the microcapsules to detect and indicate corrosion, when blended into several paint systems, show that these experimental coatings generate a color change, indicative of spot specific corrosion events, that can be observed with the naked eye within hours rather than the hundreds of hours or months typical of the standard accelerated corrosion test protocols.. Key words: smart coating, corrosion detection, microencapsulation, microcapsule, pH-sensitive microcapsule, corrosion indicator, corrosion sensing paint

  18. Corrosion of nickel-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Scarberry, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The volume consists of three tutorial lectures and 18 contributed papers. The three tutorial lectures provide state-of-the-art background on the physical metallurgy of nickel-base alloys as it relates to corrosion. Also featured are the mechanisms and applications of these alloys and an insight into the corrosion testing techniques. The three tutorial lecture papers will help acquaint newcomers to this family of alloys with a thorough overview. The contributed papers are categorized into four major topics: general corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, fatigue and localized corrosion. Each topic is key-noted by one invited lecture followed by several contributed papers. The papers in the general corrosion section are wide ranging and cover the aspects of material selection, development of galvanic series in corrosive environments, corrosion resistance characteristics, hydrogen permeation and hydrogen embrittlement of nickel and some nickel-base alloys.

  19. Na+ and Rb+ tracer diffusion in alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniere, F.; Sen, S. K.

    1991-11-01

    We have undertaken a fundamental study of heterodiffusion of foreign ions in pure single crystals. The present work describes the measurements of the diffusion coefficient of monovalent cations in some alkali halides, namely Na+ and Rb+ into KCl, KBr, NaI and KI. The priority is given to the super-accuracy of the experimental data. The target is to test the validity of the existing theories for calculating the enthalpy and entropy of migration.

  20. Optical Properties of Tm(3+) Ions in Alkali Germanate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.; Barnes, Norman P.; Reichle, Donald J.; Jiang, Shibin

    2006-01-01

    Tm-doped alkali germanate glass is investigated for use as a laser material. Spectroscopic investigations of bulk Tm-doped germanate glass are reported for the absorption, emission and luminescence decay. Tm:germanate shows promise as a fiber laser when pumped with 0.792 m diodes because of low phonon energies. Spectroscopic analysis indicates low nonradiative quenching and pulsed laser performance studies confirm this prediction by showing a quantum efficiency of 1.69.